National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for terminal surface area

  1. Decision support systems for automated terminal area air traffic control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pararas, John Demetrios

    1982-01-01

    This work studies the automation of the terminal area Air Traffic Management and Control (ATM/C) system. The ATM/C decision-making process is analyzed and broken down into a number of "automation functions". Each of these ...

  2. The dynamic scheduling of aircraft in the near terminal area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dear, Roger George

    1976-01-01

    Aircraft arrive in a random fashion into a terminal area seeking to land at a given runway. The aircraft are differentiated by their landing velocities. All aircraft are required to maintain a prespecified minimum horizontal ...

  3. Enhanced surface diffusion through termination conversion during epitaxial SrRuO3 growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eom, Chang Beom

    Enhanced surface diffusion through termination conversion during epitaxial SrRuO3 growth Guus of the ferromagnetic oxide SrRuO3 on TiO2-terminated SrTiO3 , we observe a self-organized conversion of the terminating to surface termination and growth mode.6 Because their application is mostly in mirror-symmetric trilayer

  4. Electronic structure of the Si(111):GaSe van der Waals-like surface termination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olmstead, Marjorie

    Electronic structure of the Si(111):GaSe van der Waals-like surface termination Reiner Rudolph-like surface termination has been determined by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy using photons. This explains both the absence of a surface core-level shift in Si 2p photoelectron spectra of the terminated

  5. TERMINATION FORM Send complete, signed form to your Human Resources Services Area Office

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haykin, Simon

    TERMINATION FORM Send complete, signed form to your Human Resources Services Area Office HR/ REV1.8/2007/12/11 A EMPLOYEE INFORMATION Employee ID First Name & Initial(s) Surname Effective Date of Termination (dd for Current Benefit Year Reason for Termination Comments B AUTHORIZATION Department Ext. Name Signature Date

  6. Chlorination of hydrogen-terminated silicon ,,111... surfaces Sandrine Rivillon and Yves J. Chabala

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webb, Lauren J.

    Chlorination of hydrogen-terminated silicon ,,111... surfaces Sandrine Rivillon and Yves J. Chabala the chlorination of hydrogen-terminated Si 111 surfaces by three different methods: a exposure to a saturated introduced onto clean silicon surfaces using either vapor deposition under ultrahigh vacuum or by use

  7. Roles of Oxygen and Water Vapor in the Oxidation of Halogen Terminated Ge(111) Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Shiyu; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Sun, Yun; Liu, Zhi; Lee, Dong-Ick; Pianette, Piero; /SLAC, SSRL

    2006-12-18

    The initial stage of the oxidation of Cl and Br terminated Ge(111) surfaces is studied using photoelectron spectroscopy. The authors perform controlled experiments to differentiate the effects of different factors in oxidation, and find that water vapor and oxygen play different roles. Water vapor effectively replaces the halogen termination layers with the hydroxyl group, but does not oxidize the surfaces further. In contrast, little oxidation is observed for Cl and Br terminated surfaces with dry oxygen alone. However, with the help of water vapor, oxygen oxidizes the surface by breaking the Ge-Ge back bonds instead of changing the termination layer.

  8. Terminal 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    and angular positions of the cylinders as a function of time. The experimental error encountered due to video resolution was studied and minimized through the use of a proper data sampling rate The terminal velocities of the cylinders are found to increase...

  9. Prediction of Terminal-Area Weather Penetration Based on Operational Factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Yi-Hsin

    Convective weather is known to reduce airspace capacity, but the extent of the impact is not well understood. Understanding how weather affects terminal area capacity is essential for quantification of the uncertainty in ...

  10. Surface Science Letters Initial oxidation stages of hydrogen-and styrene-terminated Si(100) surfaces: A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ciobanu, Cristian

    Surface Science Letters Initial oxidation stages of hydrogen- and styrene-terminated Si(100- and styrene-terminated Si(100)-2×1 films in O2 atmosphere at 500 K using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of these reactions leads to increased amorphization of the surface as the oxidation proceeds. In the case of styrene

  11. Effects of surface termination on the band gap of ultrabright Si29 nanoparticles: Experiments and computational models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braun, Paul

    Effects of surface termination on the band gap of ultrabright Si29 nanoparticles: Experiments constituting a H-terminated reconstructed Si surface was recently proposed as a structural prototype termination with a N linkage in butylamine and O linkage in pentane . The emission band for N-termination

  12. Policy Related to Creating, Changing, and Terminating Degree Programs, Majors, Minors, Areas of Emphasis, Certificate Programs,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    Policy Related to Creating, Changing, and Terminating Degree Programs, Majors, Minors, Areas academic units to describe the areas of study within the unit. Note: The Higher Education Policy Commission as such by the institution and BOG and listed on the official HEPC inventory of degree programs. Policy: #12; A degree

  13. Policy Related to Creating, Changing, and Terminating Degree Programs, Majors, Minors, Areas of Emphasis, Certificate Programs,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    Policy Related to Creating, Changing, and Terminating Degree Programs, Majors, Minors, Areas of study within the unit. Note: The Higher Education Policy Commission (HEPC) has the authority to review on the official HEPC inventory of degree programs. Policy: #12; A degree program is specified by a degree

  14. Effect of Surface Termination on the Electonic Properties of LaNiO? Films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumah, Divine P.; Malashevich, Andrei; Disa, Ankit S.; Arena, Dario A.; Walker, Fred J.; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab; Ahn, Charles H.

    2014-11-06

    The electronic and structural properties of thin LaNiO? films grown by using molecular beam epitaxy are studied as a function of the net ionic charge of the surface terminating layer. We demonstrate that electronic transport in nickelate heterostructures can be manipulated through changes in the surface termination due to a strong coupling of the surface electrostatic properties to the structural properties of the Ni—O bonds that govern electronic conduction. We observe experimentally and from first-principles theory an asymmetric response of the structural properties of the films to the sign of the surface charge, which results from a strong interplay between electrostatic and mechanical boundary conditions governing the system. The structural response results in ionic buckling in the near-surface NiO? planes for films terminated with negatively charged NiO? and bulklike NiO? planes for films terminated with positively charged LaO planes. The ability to modify transport properties by the deposition of a single atomic layer can be used as a guiding principle for nanoscale device fabrication.

  15. Effect of Surface Termination on the Electonic Properties of LaNiO? Films

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kumah, Divine P.; Malashevich, Andrei; Disa, Ankit S.; Arena, Dario A.; Walker, Fred J.; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab; Ahn, Charles H.

    2014-11-06

    The electronic and structural properties of thin LaNiO? films grown by using molecular beam epitaxy are studied as a function of the net ionic charge of the surface terminating layer. We demonstrate that electronic transport in nickelate heterostructures can be manipulated through changes in the surface termination due to a strong coupling of the surface electrostatic properties to the structural properties of the Ni—O bonds that govern electronic conduction. We observe experimentally and from first-principles theory an asymmetric response of the structural properties of the films to the sign of the surface charge, which results from a strong interplay betweenmore »electrostatic and mechanical boundary conditions governing the system. The structural response results in ionic buckling in the near-surface NiO? planes for films terminated with negatively charged NiO? and bulklike NiO? planes for films terminated with positively charged LaO planes. The ability to modify transport properties by the deposition of a single atomic layer can be used as a guiding principle for nanoscale device fabrication.« less

  16. Casimir effect in dielectrics: Surface area contribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carmen Molina-Paris; Matt Visser

    1997-07-08

    In this paper we take a deeper look at the technically elementary but physically robust viewpoint in which the Casimir energy in dielectric media is interpreted as the change in the total zero point energy of the electromagnetic vacuum summed over all states. Extending results presented in previous papers [hep-th/9609195; hep-th/9702007] we approximate the sum over states by an integral over the density of states including finite volume corrections. For an arbitrarily-shaped finite dielectric, the first finite-volume correction to the density of states is shown to be proportional to the surface area of the dielectric interface and is explicitly evaluated as a function of the permeability and permitivity. Since these calculations are founded in an elementary and straightforward way on the underlying physics of the Casimir effect they serve as an important consistency check on field-theoretic calculations. As a concrete example we discuss Schwinger's suggestion that the Casimir effect might be the underlying physical basis behind sonoluminescence}. The recent controversy concerning the relative importance of volume and surface contributions is discussed. For sufficiently large bubbles the volume effect is always dominant. Furthermore we can explicitly calculate the surface area contribution as a function of refractive index.

  17. Influence of the surface termination to the point imaging by a photonic crystal slab with negative refraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanshui Xiao; Min Qiu; Zhichao Ruan; Sailing He

    2005-09-01

    Point imaging by a photonic crystal slab due to the negative refraction is studied theoretically. By investigating the transfer function of the imaging system, the influence of the surface termination to the imaging quality is analyzed. It is shown that an appropriate surface termination is important for obtaining an image of good quality.

  18. Loss of solar wind plasma neutrality and affect on surface potentials near the lunar terminator and shadowed polar regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Loss of solar wind plasma neutrality and affect on surface potentials near the lunar terminator (2008), Loss of solar wind plasma neutrality and affect on surface potentials near the lunar terminator observations confirm a consistent solar wind-to-wake potential difference of many hundreds of volts (negative

  19. Mechanism of the Initial Oxidation of Hydrogen andHalogen Terminated Ge(111) Surfaces in Air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Shiyu; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Sun, Yun; Liu, Zhi; Lee, Dong-Ick; Pianetta, Piero; /SLAC, SSRL

    2006-08-23

    The initial stage of the oxidation of Ge(111) surfaces etched by HF, HCl and HBr solutions is systematically studied using synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy (SR-PES). We perform controlled experiments to differentiate the effects of different oxidation factors. SR-PES results show that both moisture and oxygen contribute to the oxidation of the surfaces; however, they play different roles in the oxidation process. Moisture effectively replaces the hydrogen and halogen termination layers with hydroxyl (OH), but hardly oxidizes the surfaces further. On the other hand, dry oxygen does not replace the termination layers, but breaks the Ge-Ge back bonds and oxidizes the substrates with the aid of moisture. In addition, room light enhances the oxidation rate significantly.

  20. High surface area, high permeability carbon monoliths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lagasse, R.R.; Schroeder, J.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Organic Materials Processing Dept.

    1994-12-31

    The goal of this work is to prepare carbon monoliths having precisely tailored pore size distribution. Prior studies have demonstrated that poly(acrylonitrile) can be processed into a precursor having tailored macropore structure. Since the macropores were preserved during pyrolysis, this synthetic process provided a route to porous carbon having macropores with size =0.1 to 10{mu}m. No micropores of size <2 nm could be detected in the carbon, however, by nitrogen adsorption. In the present work, the authors have processed a different polymer, poly(vinylidene chloride) into a macroporous precursor, Pyrolysis produced carbon monoliths having macropores derived from the polymer precursor as well as extensive microporosity produced during the pyrolysis of the polymer. One of these carbons had BET surface area of 1,050 m{sup 2}/g and about 1.2 cc/g total pore volume, with about 1/3 of the total pore volume in micropores and the remainder in 1{mu}m macropores. No mesopores in the intermediate size range could be detected by nitrogen adsorption. Carbon materials having high surface area as well as micron size pores have potential applications as electrodes for double layer supercapacitors containing liquid electrolyte, or as efficient media for performing chemical separations.

  1. Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Grigsby...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas...

  2. Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Goff...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling...

  3. Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas...

  4. Surface Gas Sampling At International Geothermal Area Mexico...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Surface Gas Sampling At International Geothermal Area Mexico (Norman, Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas...

  5. Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas...

  6. Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Goff ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling...

  7. Packing efficiency and accessible surface area of crumpled graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cranford, Steven Wayne

    Graphene holds promise as an ultracapacitor due to its high specific surface area and intrinsic capacitance. To exploit both, a maximum surface area must be accessible while the two-dimensional (2D) graphene is deformed ...

  8. Morphology and chemical termination of HF-etched Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Li-Hong; Debenedetti, William J. I.; Peixoto, Tatiana; Gokalp, Sumeyra; Shafiq, Natis; Veyan, Jean-François; Chabal, Yves J.; Michalak, David J.; Hourani, Rami

    2014-12-29

    Several reports on the chemical termination of silicon nitride films after HF etching, an important process in the microelectronics industry, are inconsistent claiming N-H{sub x}, Si-H, or fluorine termination. An investigation combining infrared and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopies with atomic force and scanning electron microscopy imaging reveals that under some processing conditions, salt microcrystals are formed and stabilized on the surface, resulting from products of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} etching. Rinsing in deionized water immediately after HF etching for at least 30?s avoids such deposition and yields a smooth surface without evidence of Si-H termination. Instead, fluorine and oxygen are found to terminate a sizeable fraction of the surface in the form of Si-F and possibly Si-OH bonds. The relatively unique fluorine termination is remarkably stable in both air and water and could lead to further chemical functionalization pathways.

  9. High Surface Area Stainless Steel Brushes as Cathodes in Microbial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High Surface Area Stainless Steel Brushes as Cathodes in Microbial Electrolysis Cells D O U G L show here that high surface area stainless steel brush cathodes produce hydrogen at rates. Using a stainless steel brush cathode with a specific surface area of 810 m2 /m3 , hydrogen was produced

  10. Casimir effect in dielectrics Surface area contribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Molina-Paris, C; Molina-Paris, Carmen; Visser, Matt

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we take a deeper look at the technically elementary but physically robust viewpoint in which the Casimir energy in dielectric media is interpreted as the change in the total zero point energy of the electromagnetic vacuum summed over all states. Extending results presented in previous papers [hep-th/9609195; hep-th/9702007] we approximate the sum over states by an integral over the density of states including finite volume corrections. For an arbitrarily-shaped finite dielectric, the first finite-volume correction to the density of states is shown to be proportional to the surface area of the dielectric interface and is explicitly evaluated as a function of the permeability and permitivity. Since these calculations are founded in an elementary and straightforward way on the underlying physics of the Casimir effect they serve as an important consistency check on field-theoretic calculations. As a concrete example we discuss Schwinger's suggestion that the Casimir effect might be the underlying ph...

  11. Activation of Surface Hydroxyl Groups by Modification of H-Terminated Si(111) Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Wolf Gero

    important processes, such as surface phosphonation requiring a lengthy postprocessing annealing step at 140, and more specific alloys such as stainless steel, AZ31, SS316L, and Nitinol.5,8-13 The possibility on TiO2 require thermal annealing after deposition of a thin phosphonic acid film. Without

  12. Automated identification of terminal area air traffic flows and weather related deviations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Tony M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2008-01-01

    Air traffic in terminal air space is very complex, making it very difficult to identify air traffic flows. Finding air traffic flows and flow boundaries are very helpful in analyzing how air traffic would react to weather. ...

  13. Surface Termination of M1 Phase and Rational Design of Propane Ammoxidation Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guliants, Vadim

    2015-02-16

    This final report describes major accomplishments in this research project which has demonstrated that the M1 phase is the only crystalline phase required for propane ammoxidation to acrylonitrile and that a surface monolayer terminating the ab planes of the M1 phase is responsible for their activity and selectivity in this reaction. Fundamental studies of the topmost surface chemistry and mechanism of propane ammoxidation over the Mo-V-(Te,Sb)-(Nb,Ta)-O M1 and M2 phases resulted in the development of quantitative understanding of the surface molecular structure – reactivity relationships for this unique catalytic system. These oxides possess unique catalytic properties among mixed metal oxides, because they selectively catalyze three alkane transformation reactions, namely propane ammoxidation to acrylonitrile, propane oxidation to acrylic acid and ethane oxidative dehydrogenation, all of considerable economic significance. Therefore, the larger goal of this research was to expand this catalysis to other alkanes of commercial interest, and more broadly, demonstrate successful approaches to rational design of improved catalysts that can be applied to other selective (amm)oxidation processes.

  14. Evolution of the surface area of a snow layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanot, L.; Domine, F.

    1999-12-01

    Atmospheric trace gases can partition between the atmosphere and the snow surface. Because snow has a large surface-to-volume ratio, an important interaction potential between ice and atmospheric trace gases exists. Quantifying this partitioning requires the knowledge of the surface area (SA) of snow. Eleven samples were taken from a 50 cm thick snow fall at Col de Porte, near Grenoble (French Alps) between January 20 and February 4, 1998. Fresh snow and 3, 8, and 15-day-old snow were sampled at three different depths. Surface hoar, formed after the fall, was also sampled. Air and surface snow temperature, snow density, and snow fall rate were measured. Snow temperature always remained below freezing. Snow SA was measured using methane adsorption at 77.15 K. Values ranged from 2.25 m{sup 2}/g for fresh snow to 0.25 m{sup 2}/g for surface hoar and surface snow after 15 days. These values are much too high to be explained by the macroscopic aspect of snow crystals, and microstructures such as small rime droplets must have been present. Large decrease in SA with time were observed. The first meter of snowpack had a total surface area of about 50,000 m{sup 2} per m{sup 2} of ground. Reduction in SA will lead to the emission of adsorbed species by the snowpack, with possible considerable increase in atmospheric concentrations.

  15. Large area, surface discharge pumped, vacuum ultraviolet light source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sze, Robert C. (Santa Fe, NM); Quigley, Gerard P. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1996-01-01

    Large area, surface discharge pumped, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light source. A contamination-free VUV light source having a 225 cm.sup.2 emission area in the 240-340 nm region of the electromagnetic spectrum with an average output power in this band of about 2 J/cm.sup.2 at a wall-plug efficiency of approximately 5% is described. Only ceramics and metal parts are employed in this surface discharge source. Because of the contamination-free, high photon energy and flux, and short pulse characteristics of the source, it is suitable for semiconductor and flat panel display material processing.

  16. Large area, surface discharge pumped, vacuum ultraviolet light source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sze, R.C.; Quigley, G.P.

    1996-12-17

    Large area, surface discharge pumped, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light source is disclosed. A contamination-free VUV light source having a 225 cm{sup 2} emission area in the 240-340 nm region of the electromagnetic spectrum with an average output power in this band of about 2 J/cm{sup 2} at a wall-plug efficiency of approximately 5% is described. Only ceramics and metal parts are employed in this surface discharge source. Because of the contamination-free, high photon energy and flux, and short pulse characteristics of the source, it is suitable for semiconductor and flat panel display material processing. 3 figs.

  17. Transmission Infrared Spectroscopy of Methyl-and Ethyl-Terminated Silicon(111) Surfaces Lauren J. Webb, Sandrine Rivillon, David J. Michalak, Yves J. Chabal,*, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webb, Lauren J.

    in ambient air, forming a large number of surface electronic trap states.2 In contrast, alkylated Si surfaces tunneling micros- copy8 and low-energy electron diffraction studies9 have revealed both short-range and long-terminated Si(111) surfaces have a very low surface electron-hole recombination velocity,6 but oxidize rapidly

  18. Realization of single-termination SrTiO{sub 3} (100) surfaces by a microwave-induced hydrothermal process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Velasco-Davalos, Ivan; Thomas, Reji; Ruediger, Andreas, E-mail: ruediger@emt.inrs.ca [Centre Énergie, Matériaux et Télécommunications, INRS, 1650 Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, Québec J3X1S2 (Canada)] [Centre Énergie, Matériaux et Télécommunications, INRS, 1650 Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, Québec J3X1S2 (Canada)

    2013-11-11

    A microwave-induced hydrothermal etching of SrTiO{sub 3} (100) single crystal surfaces in deionized water and subsequent annealing in oxygen atmosphere results in single-terminated and atomically flat terraces for pure and niobium-doped substrates as confirmed through one unit-cell step height and uniform phase by atomic force microscopy. This process that requires 3?min of moderate microwave radiation completely avoids the use of hydrofluoric acid (HF) and related point defects due to fluorine in the crystal surface. The advantages of a safe, inexpensive, and environmentally neutral process hold promise to replace the existing standard protocol for substrate preparation based on buffered HF.

  19. High-surface-area hydrated lime for SO2 control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rostam-Abadi, M.; Moran, D.L. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States). Minerals Engineering Section)

    1993-03-01

    Since 1986, the Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS), has been developing a process to produce high-surface-area hydrated lime (HSAHL) with more activity for adsorbing SO2 than commercially available hydrated lime. HSAHL prepared by the ISGS method as considerably higher surface area and porosity, and smaller mean particle diameter and crystallite size than commercial hydrated lime. The process has been optimized in a batch, bench-scale reactor and has been scaled-up to a 20--100 lb/hr process optimization unit (POU). Experiments have been conducted to optimize the ISGS hydration process and identify key parameters influencing hydrate properties for SO2 capture (surface area, porosity, particle size, and crystallite size). The known how is available to tailor properties of hydrated limes for specific SO2 removal applications. Pilot-scale tests conducted with the HSAHL under conditions typical of burning high-sulfur coals have achieved up to 90% SO2 capture in various DSI systems. The removal results are enough to bring most high-sulfur coals into compliance with acid rain legislation goals for the year 2000. The focus of the POU program is to generate critical engineering data necessary for the private sector to scale-up the process to a commercial level and provide estimates of the optimal cost of construction and operation of a commercial plant. ISGS is currently participating in a clean coal technology program (CCT-1) by providing 50 tons of HSAHL for a demonstration test at Illinois Power's Hennepin station in January 1993.

  20. Hydroetching of high surface area ceramics using moist supercritical fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fryxell, Glen; Zemanian, Thomas S.

    2004-11-02

    Aerogels having a high density of hydroxyl groups and a more uniform pore size with fewer bottlenecks are described. The aerogel is exposed to a mixture of a supercritical fluid and water, whereupon the aerogel forms a high density of hydroxyl groups. The process also relaxes the aerogel into a more open uniform internal structure, in a process referred to as hydroetching. The hydroetching process removes bottlenecks from the aerogels, and forms the hydrogels into more standard pore sizes while preserving their high surface area.

  1. Metal-organic framework materials with ultrahigh surface areas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.; Wilmer, Christopher E.; Eryazici, Ibrahim; Snurr, Randall Q.; Gomez-Gualdron, Diego A.; Borah, Bhaskarjyoti

    2015-12-22

    A metal organic framework (MOF) material including a Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area greater than 7,010 m.sup.2/g. Also a metal organic framework (MOF) material including hexa-carboxylated linkers including alkyne bond. Also a metal organic framework (MOF) material including three types of cuboctahedron cages fused to provide continuous channels. Also a method of making a metal organic framework (MOF) material including saponifying hexaester precursors having alkyne bonds to form a plurality of hexa-carboxylated linkers including alkyne bonds and performing a solvothermal reaction with the plurality of hexa-carboxylated linkers and one or more metal containing compounds to form the MOF material.

  2. Nitridation under ammonia of high surface area vanadium aerogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merdrignac-Conanec, Odile [Laboratoire Verres et Ceramiques, UMR CNRS 6512, Institut de Chimie de Rennes, Universite de Rennes 1, Campus de Beaulieu, F-35042 Rennes Cedex (France)]. E-mail: odile.merdrignac@univ-rennes1.fr; El Badraoui, Khadija [Laboratoire Verres et Ceramiques, UMR CNRS 6512, Institut de Chimie de Rennes, Universite de Rennes 1, Campus de Beaulieu, F-35042 Rennes Cedex (France); L'Haridon, Paul [Laboratoire Verres et Ceramiques, UMR CNRS 6512, Institut de Chimie de Rennes, Universite de Rennes 1, Campus de Beaulieu, F-35042 Rennes Cedex (France)

    2005-01-15

    Vanadium pentoxide gels have been obtained from decavanadic acid prepared by ion exchange on a resin from ammonium metavanadate solution. The progressive removal of water by solvent exchange in supercritical conditions led to the formation of high surface area V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, 1.6H{sub 2}O aerogels. Heat treatment under ammonia has been performed on these aerogels in the 450-900 deg. C temperature range. The oxide precursors and oxynitrides have been characterized by XRD, SEM, TGA, BET. Nitridation leads to divided oxynitride powders in which the fibrous structure of the aerogel is maintained. The use of both very low heating rates and high surface area aerogel precursors allows a higher rate and a lower threshold of nitridation than those reported in previous works. By adjusting the nitridation temperature, it has been possible to prepare oxynitrides with various nitrogen enrichment and vanadium valency states. Whatever the V(O,N) composition, the oxidation of the oxynitrides in air starts between 250 and 300 deg. C. This determines their potential use as chemical gas sensors at a maximum working temperature of 250 deg. C.

  3. Theoretical study of syngas hydrogenation to methanol on the polar Zn-terminated ZnO(0001) surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Ya-Fan; Rousseau, Roger J.; Li, Jun; Mei, Donghai

    2012-08-02

    Methanol synthesis from syngas (CO/CO2/H2) hydrogenation on the perfect Zn–terminated polar ZnO(0001) surface have been investigated using periodic density functional theory calculations. Our results show that direct CO2 hydrogenation to methanol on the perfect ZnO(0001) surface is unlikely because in the presence of surface atomic H and O the highly stable formate (HCOO) and carbonate (CO3) readily produced from CO2 with low barriers 0.11 and 0.09 eV will eventually accumulate and block the active sites of the ZnO(0001) surface. In contrast, methanol synthesis from CO hydrogenation is thermodynamically and kinetically feasible on the perfect ZnO(0001) surface. CO can be consecutively hydrogenated into formyl (HCO), formaldehyde (H2CO), methoxy (H3CO) intermediates, leading to the final formation of methanol (H3COH). The reaction route via hydroxymethyl (H2COH) intermediate, a previously proposed species on the defected O–terminated ZnO( ) surface, is kinetically inhibited on the perfect ZnO(0001) surface. The rate-determining step in the consecutive CO hydrogenation route is the hydrogenation of H3CO to H3COH. We also note that this last hydrogenation step is pronouncedly facilitated in the presence of water by lowering the activation barrier from 1.02 to 0.55 eV. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Biosciences and Geosciences, and performed at EMSL, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Computational resources were provided at EMSL and the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. J. Li and Y.-F. Zhao were also financially supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 20933003 and 91026003) and the National Basic Research Program of China (No. 2011CB932400). Y.-F. Zhao acknowledges the fellowship from PNNL.

  4. High surface area ThO/sub 2/ catalyst

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Colmenares, C.A.; Somorjai, G.A.; Maj, J.J.

    1983-06-21

    A ThO/sub 2/ catalyst having a high surface area of about 80 to 125m/sup 2//g is synthesized. The compound is synthesized by simultaneously mixing an aqueous solution of ThNO/sub 3/(NO/sub 3/)/sub 4/.4H/sub 2/O with an aqueous solution of Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/.H/sub 2/O, to produce a solution and solid ThOCO/sub 3/. The solid ThOCO/sub 3/ is separated from the solution, and then calcined at a temperature of about 225 to 300/sup 0/C for about 40 to 55 hours to produce ThO/sub 2/. The ThO/sub 2/ catalyst produced includes Na present as a substitutional cation in an amount equal to about 5 to 10 at. %.

  5. Method for producing high surface area chromia materials for catalysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gash, Alexander E. (Brentwood, CA); Satcher, Joe (Patterson, CA); Tillotson, Thomas (Tracy, CA); Hrubesh, Lawrence (Pleasanton, CA); Simpson, Randall (Livermore, CA)

    2007-05-01

    Nanostructured chromium(III)-oxide-based materials using sol-gel processing and a synthetic route for producing such materials are disclosed herein. Monolithic aerogels and xerogels having surface areas between 150 m.sup.2/g and 520 m.sup.2/g have been produced. The synthetic method employs the use of stable and inexpensive hydrated-chromium(III) inorganic salts and common solvents such as water, ethanol, methanol, 1-propanol, t-butanol, 2-ethoxy ethanol, and ethylene glycol, DMSO, and dimethyl formamide. The synthesis involves the dissolution of the metal salt in a solvent followed by an addition of a proton scavenger, such as an epoxide, which induces gel formation in a timely manner. Both critical point (supercritical extraction) and atmospheric (low temperature evaporation) drying may be employed to produce monolithic aerogels and xerogels, respectively.

  6. Hydrogen intercalation of single and multiple layer graphene synthesized on Si-terminated SiC(0001) surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    So?tys, Jakub; Piechota, Jacek; Ptasinska, Maria; Krukowski, Stanis?aw

    2014-08-28

    Ab initio density functional theory simulations were used to investigate the influence of hydrogen intercalation on the electronic properties of single and multiple graphene layers deposited on the SiC(0001) surface (Si-face). It is shown that single carbon layer, known as a buffer layer, covalently bound to the SiC substrate, is liberated after hydrogen intercalation, showing characteristic Dirac cones in the band structure. This is in agreement with the results of angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy measurements of hydrogen intercalation of SiC-graphene samples. In contrast to that hydrogen intercalation has limited impact on the multiple sheet graphene, deposited on Si-terminated SiC surface. The covalently bound buffer layer is liberated attaining its graphene like structure and dispersion relation typical for multilayer graphene. Nevertheless, before and after intercalation, the four layer graphene preserved the following dispersion relations in the vicinity of K point: linear for (AAAA) stacking, direct parabolic for Bernal (ABAB) stacking and “wizard hat” parabolic for rhombohedral (ABCA) stacking.

  7. Structure of the -Al2O3,,0001... surface from low-energy electron diffraction: Al termination and evidence for anomalously large thermal vibrations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soares, Edmar Avellar

    ; published 22 April 2002 We use dynamical low-energy electron diffraction LEED to determine the surface layer s as labeled in Fig. 1. First- principles calculations predict an Al1 termination with the first cannot be accurately modeled in low-energy electron diffraction LEED calculations using an isotropic

  8. INVESTIGATING THE SURFACE ENERGY BALANCE IN URBAN AREAS RECENT ADVANCES AND FUTURE NEEDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INVESTIGATING THE SURFACE ENERGY BALANCE IN URBAN AREAS ­ RECENT ADVANCES AND FUTURE NEEDS M of the surface energy balance of urban areas, based on both experimental investigations and numerical models effects in meso-scale mod- els are reviewed. Given that neither the surface energy balance, nor its

  9. GUIDELINES MANUAL FOR SURFACE MONITORING OF GEOTHERMAL AREAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Til, C. J. Van

    2012-01-01

    1976, "Blowout o f a Geothermal Well", California Geology,in Rocks from Two Geothermal Areas'' , -- P1 anetary ScienceMonitoring Ground Movement in Geothermal Areas", Hydraul ic

  10. LANL Virtual Center for Chemical Hydrogen Storage: Chemical Hydrogen Storage Using Ultra-high Surface Area Main Group Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan M. Kauzlarich; Phillip P. Power; Doinita Neiner; Alex Pickering; Eric Rivard; Bobby Ellis, T. M.; Atkins, A. Merrill; R. Wolf; Julia Wang

    2010-09-05

    The focus of the project was to design and synthesize light element compounds and nanomaterials that will reversibly store molecular hydrogen for hydrogen storage materials. The primary targets investigated during the last year were amine and hydrogen terminated silicon (Si) nanoparticles, Si alloyed with lighter elements (carbon (C) and boron (B)) and boron nanoparticles. The large surface area of nanoparticles should facilitate a favorable weight to volume ratio, while the low molecular weight elements such as B, nitrogen (N), and Si exist in a variety of inexpensive and readily available precursors. Furthermore, small NPs of Si are nontoxic and non-corrosive. Insights gained from these studies will be applied toward the design and synthesis of hydrogen storage materials that meet the DOE 2010 hydrogen storage targets: cost, hydrogen capacity and reversibility. Two primary routes were explored for the production of nanoparticles smaller than 10 nm in diameter. The first was the reduction of the elemental halides to achieve nanomaterials with chloride surface termination that could subsequently be replaced with amine or hydrogen. The second was the reaction of alkali metal Si or Si alloys with ammonium halides to produce hydrogen capped nanomaterials. These materials were characterized via X-ray powder diffraction, TEM, FTIR, TG/DSC, and NMR spectroscopy.

  11. The relationship of the distribution coefficient to surface area for microcline and albite feldspars 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, John Reed

    1968-01-01

    for nicrocline and one equilibration, ~ . ~ 55 12 Rquilibriun-cation adsorption for strontiun and nicrocline per cn surface area nnd oae ~ quilibration . viii LIST OF TAELES Table Distribution-coefficient values for Sr++ and microcline and albite... feldspar with varying surface area 40 Equilibrium-cation adsorption values for Sr~ and Sr and microcline feldspar with varying surface area and four equilibrations Equilibrium-cation adsorption values for Sr~ and Sr and albite feldspar with varying...

  12. Impervious Areas: Examining the Undermining Effects on Surface Water Quality 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, De'Etra Jenra

    2012-02-14

    lot study. Results indicated that day since last rain event had the most significant effect on surface water quality. Furthermore, concrete produced higher dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), potassium and calcium...

  13. High Surface Area Iron Oxide Microspheres via Ultrasonic Spray Pyrolysis of Ferritin Core Analogues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suslick, Kenneth S.

    High Surface Area Iron Oxide Microspheres via Ultrasonic Spray Pyrolysis of Ferritin Core Analogues) and are difficult to scale-up. Spray pyrolysis and similar aerosol techniques are well- known as scalable synthetic particles with relatively high surface areas have been obtained with spray pyrolysis for carbon,33-40 silica

  14. De novo synthesis of a metalorganic framework material featuring ultrahigh surface area and gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Among the many potential applications that can be extrapolated from these properties are gas storage4 high gas storage capacities and one of the highest reported surface areas to date. ResultsDe novo synthesis of a metal­organic framework material featuring ultrahigh surface area and gas

  15. ULTRA-HIGH SURFACE AREA SINGLE AND MULTI-WALLED CARBON NANOTUBE 3-DIMENSIONAL HYBRID STRUCTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mellor-Crummey, John

    flexible electronic devices, membranes, sensors, and energy storage devices, the primary reason being surface area 3-dimensional hybrid nanostructure by combining carbon nanotube growth on two templates. This novel hybrid carbon nanostructure demonstrates an enhanced conductive surface area that paves the way

  16. Termination unit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Traeholt, Chresten [Frederiksberg, DK; Willen, Dag [Klagshamn, SE; Roden, Mark [Newnan, GA; Tolbert, Jerry C [Carrollton, GA; Lindsay, David [Carrollton, GA; Fisher, Paul W [Heiskell, TN; Nielsen, Carsten Thidemann [Jaegerspris, DK

    2014-01-07

    This invention relates to a termination unit comprising an end-section of a cable. The end section of the cable defines a central longitudinal axis and comprising end-parts of N electrical phases, an end-part of a neutral conductor and a surrounding thermally insulation envelope adapted to comprising a cooling fluid. The end-parts of the N electrical phases and the end-part of the neutral conductor each comprising at least one electrical conductor and being arranged in the cable concentrically around a core former with a phase 1 located relatively innermost, and phase N relatively outermost in the cable, phase N being surrounded by the neutral conductor, electrical insulation being arrange between neighboring electrical phases and between phase N and the neutral conductor, and wherein the end-parts of the neutral conductor and the electrical phases each comprise a contacting surface electrically connected to at least one branch current lead to provide an electrical connection: The contacting surfaces each having a longitudinal extension, and being located sequentially along the longitudinal extension of the end-section of the cable. The branch current leads being individually insulated from said thermally insulation envelope by individual electrical insulators.

  17. Surface Meteorology, Barrow, Alaska, Area A, B, C and D, Ongoing from 2012

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Bob Busey; Larry Hinzman; William Cable; Vladimir Romanovsky

    Meteorological data are being collected at several points within four intensive study areas in Barrow. These data assist in the calculation of the energy balance at the land surface and are also useful as inputs into modeling activities.

  18. Surface Meteorology, Barrow, Alaska, Area A, B, C and D, Ongoing from 2012

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Bob Busey; Larry Hinzman; William Cable; Vladimir Romanovsky

    2014-12-04

    Meteorological data are being collected at several points within four intensive study areas in Barrow. These data assist in the calculation of the energy balance at the land surface and are also useful as inputs into modeling activities.

  19. Porous silicon structures with high surface area/specific pore size

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Northrup, M.A.; Yu, C.M.; Raley, N.F.

    1999-03-16

    Fabrication and use of porous silicon structures to increase surface area of heated reaction chambers, electrophoresis devices, and thermopneumatic sensor-actuators, chemical preconcentrates, and filtering or control flow devices. In particular, such high surface area or specific pore size porous silicon structures will be useful in significantly augmenting the adsorption, vaporization, desorption, condensation and flow of liquids and gases in applications that use such processes on a miniature scale. Examples that will benefit from a high surface area, porous silicon structure include sample preconcentrators that are designed to adsorb and subsequently desorb specific chemical species from a sample background; chemical reaction chambers with enhanced surface reaction rates; and sensor-actuator chamber devices with increased pressure for thermopneumatic actuation of integrated membranes. Examples that benefit from specific pore sized porous silicon are chemical/biological filters and thermally-activated flow devices with active or adjacent surfaces such as electrodes or heaters. 9 figs.

  20. Porous silicon structures with high surface area/specific pore size

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Northrup, M. Allen (Berkeley, CA); Yu, Conrad M. (Antioch, CA); Raley, Norman F. (Danville, CA)

    1999-01-01

    Fabrication and use of porous silicon structures to increase surface area of heated reaction chambers, electrophoresis devices, and thermopneumatic sensor-actuators, chemical preconcentrates, and filtering or control flow devices. In particular, such high surface area or specific pore size porous silicon structures will be useful in significantly augmenting the adsorption, vaporization, desorption, condensation and flow of liquids and gasses in applications that use such processes on a miniature scale. Examples that will benefit from a high surface area, porous silicon structure include sample preconcentrators that are designed to adsorb and subsequently desorb specific chemical species from a sample background; chemical reaction chambers with enhanced surface reaction rates; and sensor-actuator chamber devices with increased pressure for thermopneumatic actuation of integrated membranes. Examples that benefit from specific pore sized porous silicon are chemical/biological filters and thermally-activated flow devices with active or adjacent surfaces such as electrodes or heaters.

  1. Toward New Candidates for Hydrogen Storage: High Surface Area Carbon Aerogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kabbour, H; Baumann, T F; Satcher, J H; Saulnier, A; Ahn, C C

    2007-02-05

    We report the hydrogen surface excess sorption saturation value of 5.3 wt% at 30 bar pressure at 77 K, from an activated carbon aerogel with a surface area of 3200 m{sup 2}/g as measured by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analysis. This sorption value is one of the highest we have measured in a material of this type, comparable to values obtained in high surface area activated carbons. We also report, for the first time, the surface area dependence of hydrogen surface excess sorption isotherms of carbon aerogels at 77 K. Activated carbon aerogels with surface areas ranging from 1460 to 3200 m{sup 2}/g are evaluated and we find a linear dependence of the saturation of the gravimetric density with BET surface area for carbon aerogels up to 2550 m{sup 2}/g, in agreement with data from other types of carbons reported in the literature. Our measurements show these materials to have a differential enthalpy of adsorption at zero coverage of {approx}5 to 7 kJ/mole. We also show that the introduction of metal nanoparticles of nickel improves the sorption capacity while cobalt additions have no effect.

  2. Inversion of surface NOx anthropogenic emission fluxes in the Paris area during the ESQUIF campaign.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menut, Laurent

    1 Inversion of surface NOx anthropogenic emission fluxes in the Paris area during the ESQUIF OF SURFACE EMISSIONS #12;2 Abstract. An inverse modeling approach has been developed to optimize urban NOx emission fluxes. Based on the chemistry-transport model CHIMERE and its adjoint, the new methodology

  3. Spherical Torus Plasma Interactions with Large-Area Liquid Lithium Surfaces in CDX-U

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    Outside of Plasma" (DOLLOP) lithium wall conditioning experiments,[3] for example, in the Tokamak Fusion, introduction of large area lithium limiter targets and walls into existing tokamak facilities has not yet taken- 1 - Spherical Torus Plasma Interactions with Large-Area Liquid Lithium Surfaces in CDX-U R. KAITA

  4. Self assembled molecular monolayers on high surface area materials as molecular getters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    King, D.E.; Herdt, G.C.; Czanderna, A.W.

    1997-01-07

    The present invention relates to a gettering material that may be used as a filtration medium to remove pollutants from the environment. The gettering material comprises a high surface area material having a metal surface that chemically bonds n-alkanethiols in an organized manner thereby forming a molecular monolayer over the metal surface. The n-alkanethiols have a free functional group that interacts with the environment thereby binding specific pollutants that may be present. The gettering material may be exposed to streams of air in heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems or streams of water to remove specific pollutants from either medium. 9 figs.

  5. Self assembled molecular monolayers on high surface area materials as molecular getters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    King, David E. (Lakewood, CO); Herdt, Gregory C. (Denver, CO); Czanderna, Alvin W. (Denver, CO)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to a gettering material that may be used as a filtration medium to remove pollutants from the environment. The gettering material comprises a high surface area material having a metal surface that chemically bonds n-alkanethiols in an organized manner thereby forming a molecular monolayer over the metal surface. The n-alkanethiols have a free functional group that interacts with the environment thereby binding specific pollutants that may be present. The gettering material may be exposed to streams of air in heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems or streams of water to remove specific pollutants from either medium.

  6. Self-Assembly of Virus-Structured High Surface Area Nanomaterials and Their Application as Battery Electrodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    Self-Assembly of Virus-Structured High Surface Area Nanomaterials and Their Application as Battery mosaic Virus (TMV) templates. Rod-shaped TMV templates (300 × 18 nm) engineered to encode unique cysteine-fold increase in surface area. Electroless deposition of ionic metals onto surface-assembled virus

  7. High surface area crystalline titanium dioxide: potential and limits in electrochemical energy storage and catalysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Holger

    and it is widely applied, for example in photocatalysis, electrochemical energy storage, in white pigmentsHigh surface area crystalline titanium dioxide: potential and limits in electrochemical energy storage and catalysis T. Fröschl1 , U. Hörmann2 , P. Kubiak3 , G. Kucerova2 , M. Pfanzelt3 , C.K. Weiss4

  8. High surface area diamond-like carbon electrodes grown on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bristol, University of

    High surface area diamond-like carbon electrodes grown on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes H packed forests of vertically aligned multiwall carbon nanotubes (VACNTs). The DLC:VACNT composite film and high corrosion resistance [13,14]. Other type of dopants, including nickel and boron, also result

  9. Terminal electrode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zagrodnik, J.P.; Bowen, G.K.

    1990-08-14

    This paper discusses a bipolar flow battery. It comprises a series of half cells in electrical communication with one another, the cells being defined by partitions comprising alternating electrodes and separators, each partition being secured to each adjacent partition about a common perimeter therewith, the series of half cells having a terminal electrode at an end thereof; an endblock, disposed at an end of the series of half cells, the endblock being secured to the terminal electrode; an electrolyte manifold in hydraulic communication with the half cells; and an electrolyte pump for urging electrolyte through the manifold and into the half cells.

  10. Uncertainty Studies of Real Anode Surface Area in Computational Analysis for Molten Salt Electrorefining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sungyeol Choi; Jaeyeong Park; Robert O. Hoover; Supathorn Phongikaroon; Michael F. Simpson; Kwang-Rag Kim; Il Soon Hwang

    2011-09-01

    This study examines how much cell potential changes with five differently assumed real anode surface area cases. Determining real anode surface area is a significant issue to be resolved for precisely modeling molten salt electrorefining. Based on a three-dimensional electrorefining model, calculated cell potentials compare with an experimental cell potential variation over 80 hours of operation of the Mark-IV electrorefiner with driver fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor II. We succeeded to achieve a good agreement with an overall trend of the experimental data with appropriate selection of a mode for real anode surface area, but there are still local inconsistencies between theoretical calculation and experimental observation. In addition, the results were validated and compared with two-dimensional results to identify possible uncertainty factors that had to be further considered in a computational electrorefining analysis. These uncertainty factors include material properties, heterogeneous material distribution, surface roughness, and current efficiency. Zirconium's abundance and complex behavior have more impact on uncertainty towards the latter period of electrorefining at given batch of fuel. The benchmark results found that anode materials would be dissolved from both axial and radial directions at least for low burn-up metallic fuels after active liquid sodium bonding was dissolved.

  11. Impact of a Mixed Oxide’s Surface Composition and Structure on Its Adsorptive Properties: Case of the (Fe,Cr)3O4(111) Termination of the ?-(Fe,Cr)2O3(0001) Surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, Michael A.; Engelhard, Mark H.

    2014-12-18

    Characterization of an ?-(Fe0.75,Cr0.25)2O3(0001) mixed oxide single crystal surface was conducted using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD). After sputter/anneal cleaning in ultra-high vacuum (UHV), the mixed oxide surface became terminated with a magnetite-(111) structure based on the presence of (2x2) spots in LEED and Fe2+ in XPS. The composition of the surface was close to that of M3O4 based on XPS, with the metal (M) content of Fe2+/3+ and Cr3+ being close to 1.4:1, despite the fact that the film’s bulk was 3:1 with respect to the metal cations. The enrichment of the surface with Cr was not altered by high temperature oxidation in UHV, but could be returned to that of the bulk film composition by exposure to the ambient. Adsorption of various probe molecules (NO, O2, CO2 and H2O) was used to identify the active cation sites present in the (Fe,Cr)3O4(111) terminated surface. Although XPS and SIMS both indicated that the near-surface region was enriched in Cr3+, no adsorption states typically associated with Cr3+ sites on ?-Cr2O3 single crystal surfaces were detected. Instead, the TPD behaviors of O2 and CO2 pointed toward the main active sites being Fe2+ and Fe3+, with O2 preferentially adsorbing at the former and CO2 at the latter. NO was observed to bind at both Fe2+ and Fe3+ sites, and H2O TPD looked nearly identical to that for H2O on the Fe3O4(111) surface. Competition for adsorption sites between coadsorbed combinations of CO2, O2, H2O and NO corroborated these assignments. These results indicate that the surface composition of a mixed oxide can vary significantly from its bulk composition depending on the treatment conditions. Even then, the surface composition does not necessarily provide direct insight into the active adsorption sites. In the case of the (Fe,Cr)3O4(111) termination of the ?-(Fe0.75,Cr0.25)2O3(0001) surface, Cr3+ cations in the near-surface region appear to be fully coordinated and unavailable for adsorbing molecules. The authors thank Drs. Sara Chamberlin and Scott Chambers for supplying the film used in this work. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle. The research was performed using EMSL, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  12. Synthetic process for preparation of high surface area electroactive compounds for battery applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evenson, Carl; Mackay, Richard

    2013-07-23

    A process is disclosed for the preparation of electroactive cathode compounds useful in lithium-ion batteries, comprising exothermic mixing of low-cost precursors and calcination under appropriate conditions. The exothermic step may be a spontaneous flameless combustion reaction. The disclosed process can be used to prepare any lithium metal phosphate or lithium mixed metal phosphate as a high surface area single phase compound.

  13. Measurement of surface emission flux rates for volatile organic compounds at Technical Area 54

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trujillo, V.; Morgenstern, M.; Krier, D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Gilkeson, R. [Weirich and Associates, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1998-06-01

    The survey described in this report was conducted to estimate the mass of volatile organic compounds venting to the atmosphere from active and inactive waste disposal sites at Technical Area 54. A large number of nonintrusive passive sample collection devices were placed on the ground surface for 72 hours to characterize an area of approximately 150 acres. Results provided an indication of the boundary location of the known volatile organic plume, plume constituents, and isolated high concentration areas. The data from this survey enhanced existing data from a limited number of monitor wells currently used for plume surveillance. Results indicate that the estimated mass emission to the atmosphere is orders of magnitude lower than what is considered a small flux rate at a spill site or a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act landfill and is far below the threshold limit established by the State of New Mexico as an air quality concern.

  14. Terminal structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Frank (Langenhagen, DE); Allais, Arnaud (Hannover, DE); Mirebeau, Pierre (Villebon sur Yvette, FR); Ganhungu, Francois (Vieux-Reng, FR); Lallouet, Nicolas (Saint Martin Boulogne, FR)

    2009-10-20

    A terminal structure (2) for a superconducting cable (1) is described. It consists of a conductor (2a) and an insulator (2b) that surrounds the conductor (2a), wherein the superconducting cable (1) has a core with a superconducting conductor (5) and a layer of insulation that surrounds the conductor (5), and wherein the core is arranged in such a way that it can move longitudinally in a cryostat. The conductor (2a) of the terminal structure (2) is electrically connected with the superconducting conductor (5) or with a normal conductor (6) that is connected with the superconducting conductor (5) by means of a tubular part (7) made of an electrically conductive material, wherein the superconducting conductor (5) or the normal conductor (6) can slide in the part (7) in the direction of the superconductor.

  15. Probing hot-electron effects in wide area plasmonic surfaces using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ayas, Sencer; Cupallari, Andi; Dana, Aykutlu

    2014-12-01

    Plasmon enhanced hot carrier formation in metallic nanostructures increasingly attracts attention due to potential applications in photodetection, photocatalysis, and solar energy conversion. Here, hot-electron effects in nanoscale metal-insulator-metal (MIM) structures are investigated using a non-contact X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy based technique using continuous wave X-ray and laser excitations. The effects are observed through shifts of the binding energy of the top metal layer upon excitation with lasers of 445, 532, and 650?nm wavelength. The shifts are polarization dependent for plasmonic MIM grating structures fabricated by electron beam lithography. Wide area plasmonic MIM surfaces fabricated using a lithography free route by the dewetting of evaporated Ag on HfO{sub 2} exhibit polarization independent optical absorption and surface photovoltage. Using a simple model and making several assumptions about the magnitude of the photoemission current, the responsivity and external quantum efficiency of wide area plasmonic MIM surfaces are estimated as 500?nA/W and 11 × 10{sup ?6} for 445?nm illumination.

  16. Size-Dependent Specific Surface Area of Nanoporous Film Assembled by Core-Shell Iron Nanoclusters

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Antony, Jiji; Nutting, Joseph; Baer, Donald R.; Meyer, Daniel; Sharma, Amit; Qiang, You

    2006-01-01

    Nanoporous films of core-shell iron nanoclusters have improved possibilities for remediation, chemical reactivity rate, and environmentally favorable reaction pathways. Conventional methods often have difficulties to yield stable monodispersed core-shell nanoparticles. We produced core-shell nanoclusters by a cluster source that utilizes combination of Fe target sputtering along with gas aggregations in an inert atmosphere at 7 ? C . Sizes of core-shell iron-iron oxide nanoclusters are observed with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The specific surface areas of the porous films obtained from Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) process are size-dependent and compared with the calculated data.more »« less

  17. High surface area neodymium phosphate nano particles by modified aqueous sol-gel method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sankar, Sasidharan [Materials Division, National Institute for Interdisciplinary Science and Technology, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Thiruvananthapuram 695 019, Kerala (India)] [Materials Division, National Institute for Interdisciplinary Science and Technology, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Thiruvananthapuram 695 019, Kerala (India); Warrier, Krishna Gopakumar, E-mail: wwarrierkgk@yahoo.co.in [Materials Division, National Institute for Interdisciplinary Science and Technology, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Thiruvananthapuram 695 019, Kerala (India); Komban, Rajesh [Institut fuer Chemie, Anorganische Chemie 1, Universitaet Osnabrueck, Barbarastrasse 7, 49069 Osnabrueck (Germany)] [Institut fuer Chemie, Anorganische Chemie 1, Universitaet Osnabrueck, Barbarastrasse 7, 49069 Osnabrueck (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Synthesis of nano rod shaped neodymium phosphate particles with specific surface area as high as 107 m{sup 2} g{sup -1} and particles could be compacted and sintered at as low as 1300 Degree-Sign C to a density of 98.5% (theoretical) with an average grain size of {approx}1 {mu}m. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nano size neodymium phosphate is synthesized and characterized using a novel modified aqueous sol gel process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Specific surface area above 100 m{sup 2} g{sup -1} achieved without the addition of any complexing agents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High sintered density reported than the density obtained for powder synthesized through conventional solid state reaction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The particles are nano sized and have rod shape morphology and are retained at higher temperatures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An average grain size of {approx}1 {mu}m obtained for sintered NdPO{sub 4} after thermal etching at 1400 Degree-Sign C. -- Abstract: Synthesis of nano rod shaped neodymium phosphate (NdPO{sub 4}) particles with specific surface area as high as 107 m{sup 2}g{sup -1} and an average length of 50 nm with aspect ratio 5 was achieved using modified sol gel method. Crystallite size calculated from the X-ray diffraction data by applying Scherer equation was 5 nm for the precursor gel after calcination at 400 Degree-Sign C. NdPO{sub 4} was first precipitated from neodymium nitrate solution using phosphoric acid followed by peptization using dilute nitric acid and further gelation in ammonia atmosphere. The calcined gel powders were further characterized by surface area (Brunauer-Emmet-Teller nitrogen adsorption analysis), Transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, UV-vis and FT-IR analysis. Transmission electron microscopy confirms the formation of rod like morphology from the sol, gel and the calcined particles in nano size range. These particles could be compacted and sintered at as low as 1300 Degree-Sign C to a density of 98.5% (theoretical) with an average grain size of {approx}1 {mu}m.

  18. Interactive Termination Proofs using Termination Cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manolios, Panagiotis "Pete"

    Interactive Termination Proofs using Termination Cores Panagiotis Manolios and Daron Vroon College@ccs.neu.edu, daron.vroon@gmail.com Abstract. Recent advances in termination analysis have yielded new methods and determining how to proceed. In this paper, we address the issue of building termination analysis engines

  19. From outermost termination to innermost termination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Middeldorp, Aart

    From outermost termination to innermost termination Ren´e Thiemann Institute of Computer Science mechanism of func- tional programming languages. Therefore, termination analysis of term rewrite systems transformation such that a TRS is outermost terminating iff the transformed TRS is innermost terminat- ing

  20. High-surface-area nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide for electric double-layer capacitors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Youn, Hee-Chang; Bak, Seong-Min; Kim, Myeong-Seong; Jaye, Cherno; Fischer, Daniel A.; Lee, Chang-Wook; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Roh, Kwang Chul; Kim, Kwang-Bum

    2015-06-08

    A two-step method consisting of solid-state microwave irradiation and heat treatment under NH? gas was used to prepare nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide (N-RGO) with a high specific surface area (1007m²g?¹), high electrical conductivity (1532S m?¹), and low oxygen content (1.5 wt%) for electric double-layer capacitor applications. The specific capacitance of N-RGO was 291 Fg?¹ at a current density of 1 A g?¹, and a capacitance of 261 F g?¹ was retained at 50 A g?¹, indicating a very good rate capability. N-RGO also showed excellent cycling stability, preserving 96% of the initial specific capacitance after 100,000 cycles. Near-edge X-ray absorptionmore »fine-structure spectroscopy evidenced the recover of ?-conjugation in the carbon networks with the removal of oxygenated groups and revealed the chemical bonding of the nitrogen atoms in N-RGO. The good electrochemical performance of N-RGO is attributed to its high surface area, high electrical conductivity, and low oxygen content.« less

  1. High-surface-area nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide for electric double-layer capacitors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Youn, Hee-Chang [Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Republic of Korea); Bak, Seong-Min [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Kim, Myeong-Seong [Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Republic of Korea); Jaye, Cherno [National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Fischer, Daniel A. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Lee, Chang-Wook [Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Republic of Korea); Yang, Xiao-Qing [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Roh, Kwang Chul [Korea Inst. of Ceramic Engineering and Technology, Seoul (Republic of Korea); Kim, Kwang-Bum [Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Republic of Korea)

    2015-06-08

    A two-step method consisting of solid-state microwave irradiation and heat treatment under NH? gas was used to prepare nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide (N-RGO) with a high specific surface area (1007m²g?¹), high electrical conductivity (1532S m?¹), and low oxygen content (1.5 wt%) for electric double-layer capacitor applications. The specific capacitance of N-RGO was 291 Fg?¹ at a current density of 1 A g?¹, and a capacitance of 261 F g?¹ was retained at 50 A g?¹, indicating a very good rate capability. N-RGO also showed excellent cycling stability, preserving 96% of the initial specific capacitance after 100,000 cycles. Near-edge X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy evidenced the recover of ?-conjugation in the carbon networks with the removal of oxygenated groups and revealed the chemical bonding of the nitrogen atoms in N-RGO. The good electrochemical performance of N-RGO is attributed to its high surface area, high electrical conductivity, and low oxygen content.

  2. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Chaffee County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Chaffee Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Chaffee County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4333432.368072 m Left: 366907.700763 m Right: 452457.816015 m Bottom: 4208271.566715 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  3. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Garfield County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Garfield Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Garfield County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4441550.552290 m Left: 271445.053363 m Right: 359825.053363 m Bottom: 4312490.552290 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  4. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Dolored County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Dolores Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Dolores County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4186234.213315 m Left: 212558.673056 m Right: 232922.811862 m Bottom: 4176781.467043 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  5. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Archuleta County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Archuleta Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Archuleta County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4144691.792023 m Left: 285531.662851 m Right: 348694.182686 m Bottom: 4097005.210304 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  6. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Routt County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Routt Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Routt County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4501071.574000 m Left: 311351.975000 m Right: 359681.975000 m Bottom: 4447251.574000 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  7. Integrated Approach to Use Natural Chemical and Isotopic Tracers to Estimate Fracture Spacing and Surface Area in EGS Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. This objective of this project is to develop an innovative approach to estimate fracture surface area and spacing through interpretation of signals of natural chemical and isotopic tracers.

  8. Method for preparing ultraflat, atomically perfect areas on large regions of a crystal surface by heteroepitaxy deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    El Gabaly, Farid; Schmid, Andreas K.

    2013-03-19

    A novel method of forming large atomically flat areas is described in which a crystalline substrate having a stepped surface is exposed to a vapor of another material to deposit a material onto the substrate, which material under appropriate conditions self arranges to form 3D islands across the substrate surface. These islands are atomically flat at their top surface, and conform to the stepped surface of the substrate below at the island-substrate interface. Thereafter, the deposited materials are etched away, in the etch process the atomically flat surface areas of the islands transferred to the underlying substrate. Thereafter the substrate may be cleaned and annealed to remove any remaining unwanted contaminants, and eliminate any residual defects that may have remained in the substrate surface as a result of pre-existing imperfections of the substrate.

  9. Global estimation of evapotranspiration using a leaf area index-based surface energy and water balance model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Timothy

    -relative-humidity-based two-source (ARTS) E model that simulates the surface energy balance, soil water balanceGlobal estimation of evapotranspiration using a leaf area index-based surface energy and water balance model H. Yan a, , S.Q. Wang b , D. Billesbach c , W. Oechel d , J.H. Zhang e , T. Meyers f , T

  10. Surface Water Transport for the F/H Area Seepage Basins Groundwater Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Kuo-Fu

    1995-08-29

    The contribution of the F- and H-Area Seepage Basins (FHSBs) tritium releases to the tritium concentration in the Savannah River are presented in this report. WASP5 was used to simulate surface water transport for tritium releases from the FHSBs. The WASP5 model was qualified with the 1993 tritium measurements at US Highway 301. The tritium concentrations in Fourmile Branch and the Savannah River were calculated for tritium releases from FHSBs. The calculated tritium concentrations above normal environmental background in the Savannah River, resulting from FHSBs releases, drop from 1.25 pCi/ml (<10% of EPA Drinking Water Guide) in 1995 to 0.0056 pCi/ml in 2045.

  11. High surface area ThO.sub.2 catalyst and method of preparing it

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Colmenares, Carlos A. (Alamo, CA); Somorjai, Gabor A. (Berkeley, CA); Maj, Joseph J. (Walnut Creek, CA)

    1985-01-01

    A ThO.sub.2 catalyst having a high surface area of about 80-125 m.sup.2 /g is synthesized. The compound is synthesized by simultaneously mixing an aqueous solution of ThNO.sub.3 (NO.sub.3).sub.4.4H.sub.2 O with an aqueous solution of Na.sub.2 CO.sub.3.H.sub.2 O, to produce a solution and solid ThOCO.sub.3. The solid ThOCO.sub.3 is separated from the solution, and then calcined at a temperature of about 225.degree.-300.degree. C. for about 40-55 hours to produce ThO.sub.2. The ThO.sub.2 catalyst produced includes Na present as a substitutional cation in an amount equal to about 5-10 atom percent.

  12. Method for the preparation of high surface area high permeability carbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lagasse, R.R.; Schroeder, J.L.

    1999-05-11

    A method for preparing carbon materials having high surface area and high macropore volume to provide high permeability. These carbon materials are prepared by dissolving a carbonizable polymer precursor, in a solvent. The solution is cooled to form a gel. The solvent is extracted from the gel by employing a non-solvent for the polymer. The non-solvent is removed by critical point drying in CO{sub 2} at an elevated pressure and temperature or evaporation in a vacuum oven. The dried product is heated in an inert atmosphere in a first heating step to a first temperature and maintained there for a time sufficient to substantially cross-link the polymer material. The cross-linked polymer material is then carbonized in an inert atmosphere. 3 figs.

  13. Method for the preparation of high surface area high permeability carbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lagasse, Robert R. (Albuquerque, NM); Schroeder, John L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1999-05-11

    A method for preparing carbon materials having high surface area and high macropore volume to provide high permeability. These carbon materials are prepared by dissolving a carbonizable polymer precursor, in a solvent. The solution is cooled to form a gel. The solvent is extracted from the gel by employing a non-solvent for the polymer. The non-solvent is removed by critical point drying in CO.sub.2 at an elevated pressure and temperature or evaporation in a vacuum oven. The dried product is heated in an inert atmosphere in a first heating step to a first temperature and maintained there for a time sufficient to substantially cross-link the polymer material. The cross-linked polymer material is then carbonized in an inert atmosphere.

  14. Macrostructure-dependent photocatalytic property of high-surface-area porous titania films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimura, T.

    2014-11-01

    Porous titania films with different macrostructures were prepared with precise control of condensation degree and density of the oxide frameworks in the presence of spherical aggregates of polystyrene-block-poly(oxyethylene) (PS-b-PEO) diblock copolymer. Following detailed explanation of the formation mechanisms of three (reticular, spherical, and large spherical) macrostructures by the colloidal PS-b-PEO templating, structural variation of the titania frameworks during calcination were investigated by X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Then, photocatalytic performance of the macroporous titania films was evaluated through simple degradation experiments of methylene blue under an UV irradiation. Consequently, absolute surface area of the film and crystallinity of the titania frameworks were important for understanding the photocatalytic performance, but the catalytic performance can be improved further by the macrostructural design that controls diffusivity of the targeted molecules inside the film and their accessibility to active sites.

  15. Lithium inclusion in indium metal-organic frameworks showing increased surface area and hydrogen adsorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bosch, Mathieu; Zhang, Muwei; Feng, Dawei; Yuan, Shuai; Wang, Xuan [Department of Chemistry, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77842 (United States); Chen, Ying-Pin [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77842 (United States); Zhou, Hong-Cai, E-mail: zhou@mail.chem.tamu.edu [Department of Chemistry, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77842 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77842 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Investigation of counterion exchange in two anionic In-Metal-Organic Frameworks (In-MOFs) showed that partial replacement of disordered ammonium cations was achieved through the pre-synthetic addition of LiOH to the reaction mixture. This resulted in a surface area increase of over 1600% in (Li [In(1,3 ? BDC){sub 2}]){sub n} and enhancement of the H{sub 2} uptake of approximately 275% at 80?000 Pa at 77 K. This method resulted in frameworks with permanent lithium content after repeated solvent exchange as confirmed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Lithium counterion replacement appears to increase porosity after activation through replacement of bulkier, softer counterions and demonstrates tuning of pore size and properties in MOFs.

  16. Synthesis of High Surface Area Alumina Aerogels without the Use of Alkoxide Precursors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baumann, T F; Gash, A E; Chinn, S C; Sawvel, A M; Maxwell, R S; Satcher Jr., J H

    2004-06-25

    Alumina aerogels were prepared through the addition of propylene oxide to aqueous or ethanolic solutions of hydrated aluminum salts, AlCl{sub 3} {center_dot} 6H{sub 2}O or Al(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} {center_dot} 9H{sub 2}O, followed by drying with supercritical CO{sub 2}. This technique affords low-density (60-130 kg/m{sup 3}), high surface area (600-700 m{sup 2}/g) alumina aerogel monoliths without the use of alkoxide precursors. The dried alumina aerogels were characterized using elemental analysis, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, solid state NMR, acoustic measurements and nitrogen adsorption/desorption analysis. Powder X-ray diffraction and TEM analysis indicated that the aerogel prepared from hydrated AlCl{sub 3} in water or ethanol possessed microstructures containing highly reticulated networks of pseudoboehmite fibers, 2-5 nm in diameter and of varying lengths, while the aerogels prepared from hydrated Al(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} in ethanol were amorphous with microstructures comprised of interconnected spherical particles with diameters in the 5-15 nm range. The difference in microstructure resulted in each type of aerogel displaying distinct physical and mechanical properties. In particular, the alumina aerogels with the weblike microstructure were far more mechanically robust than those with the colloidal network, based on acoustic measurements. Both types of alumina aerogels can be transformed to {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} through calcination at 800 C without a significant loss in surface area or monolithicity.

  17. Hydrophobic force field as molecular alternative to surface-area models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hummer, G.

    1999-07-07

    An effective force field for hydrophobic interactions is developed based on a modified potential-of-mean-force (PMF) expansion of the effective many-body interactions between nonpolar molecules in water. For the simplest nonpolar solutes in water, hard particles, the modified PMF expansion is exact in both limiting cases of infinite separation and perfect overlap. The hydrophobic interactions are parametrized by using the information-theory model of hydrophobic hydration. The interactions between nonpolar solutes are short-ranged and can be evaluated efficiently on a computer. The force field is compared with simulation data for alkane conformational equilibria in water as well as a model for the formation of a hydrophobic core of a protein. The modified PMF expansion can be extended to solutes with attractive interactions. The observed accuracy, computational efficiency, and atomic detail of the model suggest that this simple hydrophobic force field can lead to a molecular alternative for phenomenological surface-area models with applications in ligand-binding and protein-folding studies.

  18. LITERATURE REVIEW OF PUO2 CALCINATION TIME AND TEMPERATURE DATA FOR SPECIFIC SURFACE AREA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel, G.

    2012-03-06

    The literature has been reviewed in December 2011 for calcination data of plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) from plutonium oxalate Pu(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2} precipitation with respect to the PuO{sub 2} specific surface area (SSA). A summary of the literature is presented for what are believed to be the dominant factors influencing SSA, the calcination temperature and time. The PuO{sub 2} from Pu(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2} calcination data from this review has been regressed to better understand the influence of calcination temperature and time on SSA. Based on this literature review data set, calcination temperature has a bigger impact on SSA versus time. However, there is still some variance in this data set that may be reflecting differences in the plutonium oxalate preparation or different calcination techniques. It is evident from this review that additional calcination temperature and time data for PuO{sub 2} from Pu(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2} needs to be collected and evaluated to better define the relationship. The existing data set has a lot of calcination times that are about 2 hours and therefore may be underestimating the impact of heating time on SSA. SRNL recommends that more calcination temperature and time data for PuO{sub 2} from Pu(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2} be collected and this literature review data set be augmented to better refine the relationship between PuO{sub 2} SSA and its calcination parameters.

  19. EVIDENCE OF INTERACTION BETWEEN SYNOPTIC AND LOCAL SCALES IN THE SURFACE LAYER OVER THE PARIS AREA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menut, Laurent

    -hydrostatic mesoscale model MERCURE restricted to a small domain. This `column' model uses existing state-of-the-art surface-layer parameterizations (the addition of the convective velocity scale to the mean wind speed meteorological factors affecting urban air quality. Keywords: Surface layer, Roughness length, Sonic anemometer

  20. Do surfaces with mixed hydrophilic and hydrophobic areas enhance pool boiling?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Betz, Amy; Qiu, Huihe; Attinger, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate that smooth and flat surfaces combining hydrophilic and hydrophobic patterns improve pool boiling performance. Compared to a hydrophilic surface with 7^\\circ wetting angle, the measured critical heat flux and heat transfer coefficients of the enhanced surfaces are up to respectively 65 and 100% higher. Different networks combining hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions are characterized. While all tested networks enhance the heat transfer coefficient, large enhancements of critical heat flux are typically found for hydrophilic networks featuring hydrophobic islands. Hydrophilic networks indeed are shown to prevent the formation of an insulating vapor layer.

  1. Large area substrate for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) using glass-drawing technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ivanov, Ilia N.; Simpson, John T.

    2012-06-26

    A method of making a large area substrate comprises drawing a plurality of tubes to form a plurality of drawn tubes, and cutting the plurality of drawn tubes into cut drawn tubes. Each cut drawn tube has a first end and a second end along the longitudinal direction of the respective cut drawn tube. The cut drawn tubes collectively have a predetermined periodicity. The method of making a large area substrate also comprises forming a metal layer on the first ends of the cut drawn tubes to provide a large area substrate.

  2. Low-surface-area hard carbon anode for Na-ion batteries via graphene oxide as a dehydration agent

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Luo, Wei; Bommier, Clement; Jian, Zelang; Li, Xin; Carter, Rich; Vail, Sean; Lu, Yuhao; Lee, Jong -Jan; Ji, Xiulei

    2015-02-04

    Na-ion batteries are emerging as one of the most promising energy storage technologies, particularly for grid-level applications. Among anode candidate materials, hard carbon is very attractive due to its high capacity and low cost. However, hard carbon anodes often suffer a low first-cycle Coulombic efficiency and fast capacity fading. In this study, we discover that doping graphene oxide into sucrose, the precursor for hard carbon, can effectively reduce the specific surface area of hard carbon to as low as 5.4 m²/g. We further reveal that such doping can effectively prevent foaming during caramelization of sucrose and extend the pyrolysis burn-offmore »of sucrose caramel over a wider temperature range. Thus, the obtained low-surface-area hard carbon greatly improves the first-cycle Coulombic efficiency from 74% to 83% and delivers a very stable cyclic life with 95% of capacity retention after 200 cycles.« less

  3. Lagrangian study of surface transport in the Kuroshio Extension area based on simulation of propagation of Fukushima-derived radionuclides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prants, S V; Uleysky, M Yu

    2013-01-01

    Lagrangian approach is applied to study near-surface large-scale transport in the Kuroshio Extension area using a simulation with synthetic particles advected by AVISO altimetric velocity field. A material line technique is applied to find the origin of water masses in cold-core cyclonic rings pinched off from the jet in summer 2011. Tracking and Lagrangian maps provide the evidence of cross-jet transport. Fukushima derived caesium isotopes are used as Lagrangian tracers to study transport and mixing in the area a few months after the March of 2011 tsunami that caused a heavy damage of the Fukushima nuclear power plant (FNPP). Tracking maps are computed to trace the origin of water parcels with measured levels of Cs-134 and Cs-137 concentrations collected in two R/V cruises in June and July 2011 in the large area of the Northwest Pacific. It is shown that Lagrangian simulation is useful to finding the surface areas that are potentially dangerous due to the risk of radioactive contamination. The results of sim...

  4. 140 P. L. WALKER,JR.,J. I?. RAICSZAWSKIAND G. R. IMPERIAL Vol. 63 surface area (0.8 m."g.) as compared to that of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    surface areas of the carbons show tl maxiinurn in the teni- perature range of ea. 500 to 576'. The atomic C-H ratio of the cnrboiis is found to increase monoton- ically with increasing formation- linity, surface area and C-H ratio. The properties of the carbon are found to be affected by the amount

  5. Do surfaces with mixed hydrophilic and hydrophobic areas enhance pool boiling?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Attinger, Daniel

    performance. Compared to a hydrophilic surface with 7° wetting angle, the measured critical heat flux and heat the heat transfer coefficient, large enhancements of critical heat flux are typically found for hydrophilic networks featuring hydrophobic islands. Hydrophilic networks indeed are shown to prevent the formation

  6. Predicted impacts of climate and land use change on surface ozone in the Houston, Texas, area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    sensitivity experiments show that the effect of future anthropogenic emissions change is on the same order detrimental effects on human health and plants. The conditions conducive to high O3 concentrations near the surface generally include warm weather, high solar radiation and high-pressure sys- tems. Future

  7. The Heliospheric Termination Shock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. A. Treumann; C. H. Jaroschek

    2008-07-25

    The heliospheric Termination Shock is the largest (by dimension) shock in the heliosphere. It is believed that it is also the strongest shock and is responsible for the generation of the Anomalous Cosmic Ray component in the heliosphere. This chapter review the gross properties and observations of the Termination Shock. It is structured as follows: 1. The heliosphere, providing the heliospheric stage for Termination Shock formation, 2. The argument for a heliospheric Termination Shock, 3. The global heliospheric system, 4. Termination Shock properties, 5. Observations: the Voyager passages, radio observations, plasma waves and electron beams, traces of plasma and magnetic field, energetic particles, galactic cosmic rays, Termination Shock particles, the anomalous cosmic ray component, 6. Conclusions.

  8. Surface--micromachined rotatable member having a low-contact-area hub

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rodgers, M. Steven (Albuquerque, NM); Sniegowski, Jeffry J. (Edgewood, NM)

    2002-01-01

    A surface-micromachined rotatable member formed on a substrate and a method for manufacturing thereof are disclosed. The surface-micromachined rotatable member, which can be a gear or a rotary stage, has a central hub, and an annulus connected to the central hub by an overarching bridge. The hub includes a stationary axle support attached to the substrate and surrounding an axle. The axle is retained within the axle support with an air-gap spacing therebetween of generally 0.3 .mu.m or less. The rotatable member can be formed by alternately depositing and patterning layers of a semiconductor (e.g. polysilicon or a silicon-germanium alloy) and a sacrificial material and then removing the sacrificial material, at least in part. The present invention has applications for forming micromechanical or microelectromechanical devices requiring lower actuation forces, and providing improved reliability.

  9. Surface-micromachined rotatable member having a low-contact-area hub

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rodgers, M. Steven; Sniegowski, Jeffry J.; Krygowski, Thomas W.

    2003-11-18

    A surface-micromachined rotatable member formed on a substrate and a method for manufacturing thereof are disclosed. The surface-micromachined rotatable member, which can be a gear or a rotary stage, has a central hub, and an annulus connected to the central hub by an overarching bridge. The hub includes a stationary axle support attached to the substrate and surrounding an axle. The axle is retained within the axle support with an air-gap spacing therebetween of generally 0.3 .mu.m or less. The rotatable member can be formed by alternately depositing and patterning layers of a semiconductor (e.g. polysilicon or a silicon-germanium alloy) and a sacrificial material and then removing the sacrificial material, at least in part. The present invention has applications for forming micromechanical or microelectromechanical devices requiring lower actuation forces, and providing improved reliability.

  10. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Garfield County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Warm Modeled Temperature Garfield Edition: First Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Garfield County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature between 1? and 2? were considered ASTER modeled warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4442180.552290 m Left: 268655.053363 m Right: 359915.053363 m Bottom: 4312490.552290 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  11. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Alamosa and Saguache Counties, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Alamosa Saguache Edition: First Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Alamosa and Saguache Counties identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4217727.601630 m Left: 394390.400264 m Right: 460179.841813 m Bottom: 4156258.036086 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  12. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Archuleta County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Warm Modeled Temperature Archuleta Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Archuleta County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature between 1? and 2? were considered ASTER modeled warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies). Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4144825.235807 m Left: 285446.256851 m Right: 350577.338852 m Bottom: 4096962.250137 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  13. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Dolores County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Dolores Edition: First Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Dolores County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4186234.213315 m Left: 212558.673056 m Right: 232922.811862 m Bottom: 4176781.467043 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  14. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Routt County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Warm Modeled Temperature Routt Edition: First Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Routt County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature between 1? and 2? were considered ASTER modeled warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4501071.574000 m Left: 311351.975000 m Right: 359411.975000 m Bottom: 4447521.574000 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  15. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Chaffee County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Chaffee Edition: First Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Chaffee County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4333432.368072 m Left: 366907.700763 m Right: 452457.816015 m Bottom: 4208271.566715 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  16. Structural and electrochemical properties of nanostructured nickel silicides by reduction and silicification of high-surface-area nickel oxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Xiao [Laboratory of Advanced Materials and Catalytic Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)] [Laboratory of Advanced Materials and Catalytic Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zhang, Bingsen [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society (Germany)] [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society (Germany); Li, Chuang; Shao, Zhengfeng [Laboratory of Advanced Materials and Catalytic Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)] [Laboratory of Advanced Materials and Catalytic Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Su, Dangsheng [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society (Germany)] [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society (Germany); Williams, Christopher T. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Swearingen Engineering Center, University of South Carolina (United States)] [Department of Chemical Engineering, Swearingen Engineering Center, University of South Carolina (United States); Liang, Changhai, E-mail: changhai@dlut.edu.cn [Laboratory of Advanced Materials and Catalytic Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)] [Laboratory of Advanced Materials and Catalytic Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2012-03-15

    Graphical abstract: Nanostructured nickel silicides have been synthesized by reduction and silification of high-surface-area nickel oxide, and exhibited remarkably like-noble metal property, lower electric resistivity, and ferromagnetism at room temperature. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NiSi{sub x} have been prepared by reduction and silification of high-surface-area NiO. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structure of nickel silicides changed with increasing reaction temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Si doping into nickel changed the magnetic properties of metallic nickel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NiSi{sub x} have remarkably lower electric resistivity and like-noble metal property. -- Abstract: Nanostructured nickel silicides have been prepared by reduction and silicification of high-surface-area nickel oxide (145 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}) produced via precipitation. The prepared materials were characterized by nitrogen adsorption, X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis, FT-IR spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, magnetic and electrochemical measurements. The nickel silicide formation involves the following sequence: NiO (cubic) {yields} Ni (cubic) {yields} Ni{sub 2}Si (orthorhombic) {yields} NiSi (orthorhombic) {yields} NiSi{sub 2} (cubic), with particles growing from 13.7 to 21.3 nm. The nickel silicides are ferromagnetic at room temperature, and their saturation magnetization values change drastically with the increase of Si content. Nickel silicides have remarkably low electrical resistivity and noble metal-like properties because of a constriction of the Ni d band and an increase of the electronic density of states. The results suggest that such silicides are promising candidates as inexpensive yet functional materials for applications in electrochemistry as well as catalysis.

  17. Low temperature synthesis of nanocrystalline magnesium aluminate with high surface area by surfactant assisted precipitation method: Effect of preparation conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mosayebi, Zeinab; Rezaei, Mehran; Catalyst and Advanced Materials Research Laboratory, Chemical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, University of Kashan, Kashan ; Hadian, Narges; Kordshuli, Fazlollah Zareie; Meshkani, Fereshteh

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: ? MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} showed a high surface area and nanocrystalline structure. ? Addition of polymeric surfactant affected the structural properties of MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}. ? MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} prepared with surfactant showed a hollow cylindrical shape. -- Abstract: A surfactant assisted co-precipitation method was employed for the low temperature synthesis of magnesium aluminate spinel with nanocrystalline size and high specific surface area. Pluronic P123 triblock copolymer and ammonia solution were used as surfactant and precipitation agent, respectively. The prepared samples were characterized by thermal gravimetric and differential thermal gravimetric analyses (TG/DTG), X-ray diffraction (XRD), N{sub 2} adsorption (BET) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. The effects of several process parameters such as refluxing temperature, refluxing time, pH, P123 to metals mole ratio (P123/metals) and calcination temperature on the structural properties of the samples were investigated. The obtained results showed that, among the process parameters pH and refluxing temperature have a significant effect on the structural properties of samples. The results revealed that increase in pH from 9.5 to 11 and refluxing temperature from 40 °C to 80 °C increased the specific surface area of prepared samples in the range of 157–188 m{sup 2} g{sup ?1} and 162–184 m{sup 2} g{sup ?1}, respectively. The XRD analysis showed the single-phase MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} was formed at 700 °C.

  18. Literature and data review for the surface-water pathway: Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walters, W.H.; Dirkes, R.L.; Napier, B.A.

    1992-04-01

    As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project, Pacific Northwest Laboratory reviewed literature and data on radionuclide concentrations and distribution in the water, sediment, and biota of the Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Over 600 documents were reviewed including Hanford reports, reports by offsite agencies, journal articles, and graduate theses. Certain radionuclide concentration data were used in preliminary estimates of individual dose for the 1964--1966 time period. This report summarizes the literature and database review and the results of the preliminary dose estimates.

  19. A highly stable zirconium-based metal-organic framework material with high surface area and gas storage capacities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gutov, Oleksii V.; Bury, Wojciech; Gomez-Gualdron, Diego A.; Krungleviciute, Vaiva; Fairen-Jimenez, David; Sarjeant, Amy A.; Snurr, Randall Q.; Hupp, Joseph T.; Yildirim, Taner; Farha, Omar K.

    2014-08-14

    : 10.1002/chem.201xxxxxx ? Metal-organic frameworks A highly stable zirconium-based metal-organic framework material with high surface area and gas storage capacities Oleksii V. Gutov,†[a] Wojciech Bury,†[a,b] Diego A. Gomez-Gualdron,[c] Vaiva... these parameters is crucial for constructing materials with high-capacity gas uptake, as well as stability. However, most known MOFs are not sufficiently stable to allow their application for gas storage in the presence of water or acid.10 To overcome...

  20. Termination Casts: A Flexible Approach to Termination with General Recursion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weirich, Stephanie

    distinguishes terminating terms and total functions from possibly diverging terms and partial functionsTermination Casts: A Flexible Approach to Termination with General Recursion Aaron Stump Computer type-form "Terminates t", expressing that term t is terminating; and then allow terms t to be coerced

  1. Environmental geochemistry for surface and subsurface waters in the Pajarito Plateau and outlying areas, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blake, W.D.; Goff, F.; Adams, A.I.; Counce, D.

    1995-05-01

    This report provides background information on waters in the Los Alamos and Santa Fe regions of northern New Mexico. Specifically, the presented data include major element, trace element, and isotope analyses of 130 water samples from 94 different springs, wells, and water bodies in the area. The region considered in this study extends from the western edge of the Valles Caldera to as far east as Santa Fe Lake. For each sample, the presented analysis includes fourteen different major elements, twenty-six trace elements, up to five stable isotopes, and tritium. In addition, this data base contains certain characteristics of the water that are calculated from the aforementioned raw data, including the water`s maximum and minimum residence times, as found from tritium levels assuming no contamination, the water`s recharge elevation, as found from stable isotopes, and the charge balance of the water. The data in this report are meant to provide background information for investigations in groundwater hydrology and geochemistry, and for environmental projects. For the latter projects, the presented information would be useful for determining the presence of contamination it any one location by enabling one to compare potential contaminant levels to the background levels presented here. Likely locations of interest are those possibly effected by anthropogenic activities, including locations in and around Los Alamos National Laboratory, White Rock Canyon, and developed areas in the Rio Grande Valley.

  2. Quasi-Termination Analysis of Logic Programs Using Size-Change Graphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vidal, Germán

    is a relevant problem in several areas, like tabled evaluation or partial evaluation, where quasi-termination analysis Keywords Quasi-Termination, Partial Deduction 1. INTRODUCTION While the termination of logic notion in the context of of- fline partial evaluation of functional programs [25], where quasi-termination

  3. Superconducting Cable Termination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sinha, Uday K. (Carrollton, GA); Tolbert, Jerry (Newnan, GA)

    2005-08-30

    Disclosed is a termination that connects high temperature superconducting (HTS) cable immersed in pressurized liquid nitrogen to high voltage and neutral (shield) external bushings at ambient temperature and pressure. The termination consists of a splice between the HTS power (inner) and shield (outer) conductors and concentric copper pipes which are the conductors in the termination. There is also a transition from the dielectric tape insulator used in the HTS cable to the insulators used between and around the copper pipe conductors in the termination. At the warm end of the termination the copper pipes are connected via copper braided straps to the conventional warm external bushings which have low thermal stresses. This termination allows for a natural temperature gradient in the copper pipe conductors inside the termination which enables the controlled flashing of the pressurized liquid coolant (nitrogen) to the gaseous state. Thus the entire termination is near the coolant supply pressure and the high voltage and shield cold bushings, a highly stressed component used in most HTS cables, are eliminated. A sliding seal allows for cable contraction as it is cooled from room temperature to ˜72-82 K. Seals, static vacuum, and multi-layer superinsulation minimize radial heat leak to the environment.

  4. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 417: Central Nevada Test Area Surface, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. Campbell

    2000-04-01

    This Corrective Action Plan provides methods for implementing the approved corrective action alternative as provided in the Corrective Action Decision Document for the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA), Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417 (DOE/NV, 1999). The CNTA is located in the Hot Creek Valley in Nye County, Nevada, approximately 137 kilometers (85 miles) northeast of Tonopah, Nevada. The CNTA consists of three separate land withdrawal areas commonly referred to as UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4, all of which are accessible to the public. CAU 417 consists of 34 Corrective Action Sites (CASs). Results of the investigation activities completed in 1998 are presented in Appendix D of the Corrective Action Decision Document (DOE/NV, 1999). According to the results, the only Constituent of Concern at the CNTA is total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH). Of the 34 CASs, corrective action was proposed for 16 sites in 13 CASs. In fiscal year 1999, a Phase I Work Plan was prepared for the construction of a cover on the UC-4 Mud Pit C to gather information on cover constructibility and to perform site management activities. With Nevada Division of Environmental Protection concurrence, the Phase I field activities began in August 1999. A multi-layered cover using a Geosynthetic Clay Liner as an infiltration barrier was constructed over the UC-4 Mud Pit. Some TPH impacted material was relocated, concrete monuments were installed at nine sites, signs warning of site conditions were posted at seven sites, and subsidence markers were installed on the UC-4 Mud Pit C cover. Results from the field activities indicated that the UC-4 Mud Pit C cover design was constructable and could be used at the UC-1 Central Mud Pit (CMP). However, because of the size of the UC-1 CMP this design would be extremely costly. An alternative cover design, a vegetated cover, is proposed for the UC-1 CMP.

  5. SIZE AND SURFACE AREA OF ICY DUST AGGREGATES AFTER A HEATING EVENT AT A PROTOPLANETARY NEBULA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sirono, Sin-iti

    2013-03-01

    The activity of a young star rises abruptly during an FU Orionis outburst. This event causes a temporary temperature increase in the protoplanetary nebula. H{sub 2}O icy grains are sublimated by this event, and silicate cores embedded inside the ice are ejected. During the high-temperature phase, the silicate grains coagulate to form silicate core aggregates. After the heating event, the temperature drops, and the ice recondenses onto the aggregates. I determined numerically the size distribution of the ice-covered aggregates. The size of the aggregates exceeds 10 {mu}m around the snow line. Because of the migration of the ice to large aggregates, only a small fraction of the silicate core aggregate is covered with H{sub 2}O ice. After the heating event, the surface of an ice-covered aggregate is totally covered by silicate core aggregates. This might reduce the fragmentation velocity of aggregates when they collide. It is possible that the covering silicate cores shield the UV radiation field which induces photodissociation of H{sub 2}O ice. This effect may cause the shortage of cold H{sub 2}O vapor observed by Herschel.

  6. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Alamosa and Saguache Counties, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Alamosa Saguache Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Alamosa and Saguache Counties identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4217727.601630 m Left: 394390.400264 m Right: 460179.841813 m Bottom: 4156258.036086 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  7. Using Thermally-Degrading, Partitioning, and Nonreactive Tracers to Determine Temperature Distribution and Fracture/Heat Transfer Surface Area in Geothermal Reservoirs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Project Summary. The goal of this project is to provide integrated tracer and tracer interpretation tools to facilitate quantitative characterization of temperature distributions and surface area available for heat transfer in EGS.

  8. Termination-Insensitive Computational Indistinguishability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Termination-Insensitive Computational Indistinguishability (and applications to computational indistinguishability: termination-insensitive computational indistinguishability (tic-indistinguishability). Tic-indistinguishability models indistinguishability with respect to distinguishers that cannot distinguish be- tween termination

  9. Termination and Recovery

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-08-21

    This volume defines event Termination and determination of when it is appropriate to cease emergency response activities and of associated notifications. Canceled by DOE G 151.1-4.

  10. Local Termination: theory and practice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Endrullis, Joerg; Waldmann, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    The characterisation of termination using well-founded monotone algebras has been a milestone on the way to automated termination techniques, of which we have seen an extensive development over the past years. Both the semantic characterisation and most known termination methods are concerned with global termination, uniformly of all the terms of a term rewriting system (TRS). In this paper we consider local termination, of specific sets of terms within a given TRS. The principal goal of this paper is generalising the semantic characterisation of global termination to local termination. This is made possible by admitting the well-founded monotone algebras to be partial. We also extend our approach to local relative termination. The interest in local termination naturally arises in program verification, where one is probably interested only in sensible inputs, or just wants to characterise the set of inputs for which a program terminates. Local termination will be also be of interest when dealing with a specif...

  11. Termination of Isabelle Functions via Termination of Rewriting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ábrahám, Erika

    Termination of Isabelle Functions via Termination of Rewriting Alexander Krauss,1 ChristianFG Informatik 2, RWTH Aachen University, Germany Abstract. We show how to automate termination proofs and invoking an external termination prover. Our link to the external prover includes full proof reconstruction

  12. An Innovative Approach for the Calculation of Exposure Point Concentrations for Large Areas of Surface Radionuclide Contamination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winchester Chromec, F.; Myers, Jeffrey C.

    2008-01-15

    The Department of Energy Rocky Flats site was designated as a wildlife refuge by the Rocky Flats National Wildlife Refuge Act of 2001. Rocky Flats was considered to be one of the most highly contaminated radiological sites in the country. Some portions of the site have low-level radionuclide contamination in surface soils. A site-wide risk and dose assessment to evaluate threats to human health and the environment were performed, so that the site could be released for this land use. The aggressive accelerated action program combined with defensible and innovative risk assessment methods resulted in there being no radionuclides of concern in the final comprehensive risk assessment (DOE 2006). An innovative approach for delineating functional exposure areas and area-weighted exposure point concentration-activities (EPCs) was negotiated with the regulatory agencies in Colorado. This procedure leads to realistic estimates of risk and dose to workers and visitors. This innovative approach to the calculation of EPCs was negotiated with both State and Federal regulators. The value of developing and maintaining good working relationships with regulators responsible for a site can not be overestimated. The building of trust and confidence among responsible parties and regulators is essential for the development and implementation of innovative methods and technologies.

  13. Influence of perovskite termination on oxide heteroepitaxy D. A. Schmidta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olmstead, Marjorie

    Influence of perovskite termination on oxide heteroepitaxy D. A. Schmidta Department of Physics, regardless of termination, indicating that the substrate cations and perovskite surface polarity play little- monly used substrate for growth of high Tc super- conductors1­4 and other perovskite-based materials,5

  14. Synthesis and characterization of high-surface-area millimeter-sized silica beads with hierarchical multi-modal pore structure by the addition of agar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Yosep; Choi, Junhyun [Department of Mineral Resources and Energy Engineering, Chonbuk National University, 567 Baekje-daero, Deokjin-gu, Jeonju-si, Jeollabuk-do 561–756 (Korea, Republic of); Tong, Meiping, E-mail: tongmeiping@iee.pku.edu.cn [The Key Laboratory of Water and Sediment Sciences, Ministry of Education, College of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Kim, Hyunjung, E-mail: kshjkim@jbnu.ac.kr [Department of Mineral Resources and Energy Engineering, Chonbuk National University, 567 Baekje-daero, Deokjin-gu, Jeonju-si, Jeollabuk-do 561–756 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-01

    Millimeter-sized spherical silica foams (SSFs) with hierarchical multi-modal pore structure featuring high specific surface area and ordered mesoporous frameworks were successfully prepared using aqueous agar addition, foaming and drop-in-oil processes. The pore-related properties of the prepared spherical silica (SSs) and SSFs were systematically characterized by field emission-scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), small-angle X-ray diffraction (SAXRD), Hg intrusion porosimetry, and N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption isotherm measurements. Improvements in the BET surface area and total pore volume were observed at 504 m{sup 2} g{sup ?1} and 5.45 cm{sup 3} g{sup ?1}, respectively, after an agar addition and foaming process. Despite the increase in the BET surface area, the mesopore wall thickness and the pore size of the mesopores generated from the block copolymer with agar addition were unchanged based on the SAXRD, TEM, and BJH methods. The SSFs prepared in the present study were confirmed to have improved BET surface area and micropore volume through the agar loading, and to exhibit interconnected 3-dimensional network macropore structure leading to the enhancement of total porosity and BET surface area via the foaming process. - Highlights: • Millimeter-sized spherical silica foams (SSFs) are successfully prepared. • SSFs exhibit high BET surface area and ordered hierarchical pore structure. • Agar addition improves BET surface area and micropore volume of SSFs. • Foaming process generates interconnected 3-D network macropore structure of SSFs.

  15. Report Form for Program Termination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    Report Form for Program Termination Program(s) to be deleted: Effective date of termination: 1. List reasons for termination and describe the background leading to this decision. 2. Technical the last five years. #12;3. Impact of the termination. Internal 3.1 What if any impact

  16. Sweet Surface Area

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired Solar Fuel Production 1:Physics Lab AprilSustainabilityS ISweet

  17. Mapping Impervious Surfaces with High ResolutionMapping Impervious Surfaces with High Resolution QuickBirdQuickBird Satellite DataSatellite Data Accurate mapping of impervious surface areas is critical to stormwater management because impervious surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrissey, Leslie A.

    to stormwater management because impervious surfaces reduce infiltration of surface water into the soil, thereby's stormwater utility. To this end, the combination of high spatial resolution (0.6m panchromatic and 2.44m of these results, VT DEC and CSB adopted this approach to meet their stormwater objectives. The use of advanced

  18. The effects of gaps between bridge foils and PETN as a function of PETN density and specific surface area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, D; Roeske, F; Burnham, A

    2007-06-26

    X-ray computer tomography scans of artificially aged PETN seem to indicate shrinkage of material and, by extension, an increased high explosive density, resulting in potential separation of the HE from the header/bridge foil. We have investigated these phenomena by mimicking this shrinkage of material (load density). Thus, we have evaluated various induced gaps between the exploding bridge foil and the PETN in our custom detonators by changing both specific surface area - recognizing crystal morphology changes - and load density. Analyses for these data include absolute function time relative to bridge burst and careful evaluation of the detonation wave breakout curvature, using an electronic streak camera for wave capture, in cases where the bridge foil (exploding bridge wire - EBW style) initiation successfully traverses the gap (a 'go' condition). In addition, a fireset with subnanosecond trigger jitter was used for these tests allowing easy comparison of relative 'go' function times. Using the same test matrix and fine-tuning the induced gap, a second, smaller subset of these experiments were performed to provide additional insight as to what conditions we might expect detonator anomalies/failure.

  19. Shipboard regasification terminal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, G.; Zednik, J.

    1999-07-01

    Mobil Technology Company and Mobil Shipping and Transportation Company have jointly developed a new combination of existing proven equipment to regasify LNG. Advantages of this Shipboard Regasification Terminal (SRT) include accelerated initial gas delivery schedule, low capital cost, delivery of smaller quantities of LNG at a competitive price and shorter term of LNG purchase and improved financing options. These advantages benefit both the supplier of LNG and the purchaser. SRT can be used as an interim supply to developing markets allowing the demand to grow while developing downstream infrastructure. This concept does not involve offshore transfer of cryogenic fluids while delivering near-ambient temperature pipeline quality gas at typical pipeline pressures. During times when gas is not required, the SRT ship can easily be returned to the trade of transporting and delivering LNG to conventional land based terminals. This paper will discuss the merits of Shipboard Regasification Terminals in general, cover the development of this concept and review the factors guiding the use of SRT vs. an onshore terminal.

  20. Termination Casts: A Flexible Approach to Termination with General Recursion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stump, Aaron; Weirich, Stephanie; 10.4204/EPTCS.43.6

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes a type-and-effect system called Teqt, which distinguishes terminating terms and total functions from possibly diverging terms and partial functions, for a lambda calculus with general recursion and equality types. The central idea is to include a primitive type-form "Terminates t", expressing that term t is terminating; and then allow terms t to be coerced from possibly diverging to total, using a proof of Terminates t. We call such coercions termination casts, and show how to implement terminating recursion using them. For the meta-theory of the system, we describe a translation from Teqt to a logical theory of termination for general recursive, simply typed functions. Every typing judgment of Teqt is translated to a theorem expressing the appropriate termination property of the computational part of the Teqt term.

  1. An Improved MUSIC Model for Gibbsite Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, Scott C.; Bickmore, Barry R.; Tadanier, Christopher J.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2004-06-01

    Here we use gibbsite as a model system with which to test a recently published, bond-valence method for predicting intrinsic pKa values for surface functional groups on oxides. At issue is whether the method is adequate when valence parameters for the functional groups are derived from ab initio structure optimization of surfaces terminated by vacuum. If not, ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations of solvated surfaces (which are much more computationally expensive) will have to be used. To do this, we had to evaluate extant gibbsite potentiometric titration data that where some estimate of edge and basal surface area was available. Applying BET and recently developed atomic force microscopy methods, we found that most of these data sets were flawed, in that their surface area estimates were probably wrong. Similarly, there may have been problems with many of the titration procedures. However, one data set was adequate on both counts, and we applied our method of surface pKa int prediction to fitting a MUSIC model to this data with considerable success—several features of the titration data were predicted well. However, the model fit was certainly not perfect, and we experienced some difficulties optimizing highly charged, vacuum-terminated surfaces. Therefore, we conclude that we probably need to do AIMD simulations of solvated surfaces to adequately predict intrinsic pKa values for surface functional groups.

  2. Eternal Inflation with Arrival Terminals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henry Stoltenberg; Andreas Albrecht

    2015-01-18

    We analyze the cosmological role of terminal vacua in the string theory landscape, and point out that existing work on this topic makes very strong assumptions about the properties of the terminal vacua. We explore the implications of relaxing these assumptions (by including "arrival" as well as "departure" terminals) and demonstrate that the results in earlier work are highly sensitive to their assumption of no arrival terminals. We use our discussion to make some general points about tuning and initial conditions in cosmology.

  3. Effects of urban land cover modifications in a mesoscale meteorological model on surface temperature and heat fluxes in the Phoenix metropolitan area.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    Effects of urban land cover modifications in a mesoscale meteorological model on surface between the two simulations. Mesoscale atmospheric models such as the Pennsylvania State University for the Phoenix metropolitan area was implemented in the fifth- generation PSU/NCAR mesoscale meteorological model

  4. Substrate Atomic-Termination-Induced Anisotropic Growth of ZnO Nanowires/Nanorods by the VLS Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    Substrate Atomic-Termination-Induced Anisotropic Growth of ZnO Nanowires/Nanorods by the VLSO substrate, we demonstrate the effect of substrate surface termination on nanowire growth. Symmetric) substrates have asymmetrically grown nanostructures. For the Zn-terminated (0001) substrate surface, uniform

  5. High ethanol sensitivity of Palladium/TiO2 nanobelt surface heterostructures dominated by enlarged surface area and nano-Schottky junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Guozhong

    High ethanol sensitivity of Palladium/TiO2 nanobelt surface heterostructures dominated by enlarged [1­3], lithium-ion batteries [4,5], chemical and bio-sensors [6,7], hydrogen production and storage

  6. Termination Detection of Local Computations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Godard, Emmanuel; Tel, Gerard

    2010-01-01

    Contrary to the sequential world, the processes involved in a distributed system do not necessarily know when a computation is globally finished. This paper investigates the problem of the detection of the termination of local computations. We define four types of termination detection: no detection, detection of the local termination, detection by a distributed observer, detection of the global termination. We give a complete characterisation (except in the local termination detection case where a partial one is given) for each of this termination detection and show that they define a strict hierarchy. These results emphasise the difference between computability of a distributed task and termination detection. Furthermore, these characterisations encompass all standard criteria that are usually formulated : topological restriction (tree, rings, or triangu- lated networks ...), topological knowledge (size, diameter ...), and local knowledge to distinguish nodes (identities, sense of direction). These re- sult...

  7. The effect of weaving maneuvers on operation of a free right-turn lane at ramp terminals 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Minchul

    2006-04-12

    Service interchange ramp terminals provide access from the local highway or urban street system to the freeway. In urban areas, the ramp terminals at the arterial road are usually signalized for separation of all high-volume conflicting movements...

  8. Synthesis of murdochite-type Ni{sub 6}MnO{sub 8} with variable specific surface areas and the application in methane oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taguchi, Hideki; Tahara, Shohei; Okumura, Mikoto; Hirota, Ken

    2014-07-01

    To synthesize a murdochite-type Ni{sub 6}MnO{sub 8} with variable specific surface areas, an oxalate precursor was calcined at 350–500 °C in flowing argon, and the calcined sample was heated to 600 °C in air. The lattice constant of the Ni{sub 6}MnO{sub 8} did not depend on the calcination temperature of the precursor, while the specific surface area decreased from 8.4 m{sup 2}/g to 2.6 m{sup 2}/g when increasing the calcination temperature of the precursor. The methane (CH{sub 4}) oxidation data indicated that the temperature corresponding to the 50% conversion (T{sub 50%}) of Ni{sub 6}MnO{sub 8} calcined at 350 °C or 400 °C was lower than that of all other Ni{sub 6}MnO{sub 8} specimens. However, the intrinsic conversion of Ni{sub 6}MnO{sub 8} calcined at 350 °C, which is defined as conversion per specific surface area, was half of that of all other Ni{sub 6}MnO{sub 8} specimens. The degree of crystallinity and catalytic performance of the Ni{sub 6}MnO{sub 8} calcined at 400 °C were high. - Graphical abstract: The conversion of CH{sub 4} into CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O on Ni{sub 6}MnO{sub 8}, which was heated at 600 °C in air after the calcination of the precursor at 350 °C, 400 °C, 450 °C, or 500 °C in flowing argon, was measured. Since the specific surface area was strongly affected by the calcination temperature of the precursor, intrinsic conversion (IC) was defined as conversion per the specific surface area. For comparison, the IC value on Ni{sub 6}MnO{sub 8} synthesized by the direct calcination of the precursor at 600 °C in air is plotted. - Highlights: • The oxalate precursor was calcined at 350–500 °C in flowing argon. • Murdochite-type Ni{sub 6}MnO{sub 8} was obtained by heating the calcined sample in air. • The specific surface area of Ni{sub 6}MnO{sub 8} varied with the calcination temperature. • The degree of crystallinity and catalysis of Ni{sub 6}MnO{sub 8} calcined at 400 °C were high.

  9. The role of CO2 as a soft oxidant for dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene to styrene over a high-surface-area ceria catalyst

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Li; Wu, Zili; Nelson, Nicholas; Sadow, Aaron D.; Slowing, Igor I.; Overbury, Steven H.

    2015-09-22

    Catalytic performance and the nature of surface adsorbates were investigated for high-surface-area ceria during ethylbenzene oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) reaction using CO2 as a soft oxidant. A template assisted method was used to synthesize the high-surface-area ceria. The interactions between ethylbenzene, styrene and CO2 on the surface of ceria and the role of CO2 for the ethylbenzene ODH reaction have been investigated in detail by using activity test, in situ Diffuse Reflectance Infrared and Raman spectroscopy. Not only did CO2 as an oxidant favor the higher yield of styrene, but it also inhibited the deposition of coke during the ethylbenzene ODHmore »reaction. Ethylbenzene ODH reaction over ceria followed a two-step pathway: Ethylbenzene is first dehydrogenated to styrene with H2 formed simultaneously, and then CO2 reacts with H2 via the reverse water gas shift. The styrene produced can easily polymerize to form polystyrene, a key intermediate for coke formation. In the absence of CO2, the polystyrene transforms into graphite-like coke at temperatures above 500 °C, which leads to catalyst deactivation. While in the presence of CO2, the coke deposition can be effectively removed via oxidation with CO2.« less

  10. Co-Terminal Handbook I. What is a co-terminal degree?.................................................................3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    Co-Terminal Handbook 2014-2015 #12;Contents I. What is a co-terminal degree................................................................................10 VIII. Transferring to a Different Co-Terminal Program............................111 IX. Withdrawing from the Co-Terminal Program....................................122 X. Resources

  11. TERMINATION OF IDEAL COS m phi WINDING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laslett, L.J.

    2010-01-01

    6 III . Termination of the cos A. B. Analysis ExamplesTERMINATION OF IDEAL COS m~ WINDING L.J. Laslett, S. Caspi,MAG-77 TERMINATION OF IDEAL COS WINDING L. J . Las1ett, S.

  12. TERMINATION OF IDEAL COS m phi WINDING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laslett, L.J.

    2010-01-01

    6 III . Termination of the cos A. B.of Dipole Magnets 1. The Lambertson-Coupland TerminationTerminations Employing the Function f(y) = k(y/a)P

  13. Unrestricted Termination and Non-termination Arguments for Bit-Vector Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kröning, Daniel

    Unrestricted Termination and Non-termination Arguments for Bit-Vector Programs Cristina David, Daniel Kroening, and Matt Lewis University of Oxford Abstract. Proving program termination is typically for proving termination of many terminating programs, and furthermore a termination argument for a program

  14. Terminality implies non-signalling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bob Coecke

    2014-12-30

    A 'process theory' is any theory of systems and processes which admits sequential and parallel composition. `Terminality' unifies normalisation of pure states, trace-preservation of CP-maps, and adding up to identity of positive operators in quantum theory, and generalises this to arbitrary process theories. We show that terminality and non-signalling coincide in any process theory, provided one makes causal structure explicit. In fact, making causal structure explicit is necessary to even make sense of non-signalling in process theories. We conclude that because of its much simpler mathematical form, terminality should be taken to be a more fundamental notion than non-signalling.

  15. McKenize Terminal - 3 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2009-01-01

    ©2008 ASHRAE 83 ABSTRACT Empirical models of airflow output, power consumption, and primary airflow were developed for parallel fan powered variable air volume terminal units at typical operating pres- sures. Both 8 in. (203 mm) and 12 in. (304 mm...) primary air inlet terminal units from three manufacturers were evaluated. Generalized models were developed from the experimental data with coefficients varying by size and manufacturer. Fan power and airflow data were collected at down- stream static...

  16. Distributed Termination Detection for Dynamic Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dhamdhere, Dhananjay Madhav

    systems, Termination detection. \\Lambda Address all correspondence to this author. 1 #12; Distributed

  17. Program termination discussed by BOT AA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almor, Amit

    Program termination discussed by BOT AA and BOT Full (termination of concentrations does Education (CHE) Approval Process Timeline Program Terminations 2014-2015 NOTE: These dates reflect the shortest amount of time it takes to process a program termination through the approval cycle

  18. Division of Human Resources Termination Of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Steven D.

    Division of Human Resources Termination Of Domestic Partnership Health Stipend Questions (813) 974 Insurance Stipend will terminate as of the Effective Date on this Termination of Domestic Partnership Health. ______ The Domestic Partnership Declaration attested to and filed by me with USF shall be and is terminated

  19. Termination of Nondeterministic Quantum Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yangjia Li; Nengkun Yu; Mingsheng Ying

    2012-01-04

    We define a language-independent model of nondeterministic quantum programs in which a quantum program consists of a finite set of quantum processes. These processes are represented by quantum Markov chains over the common state space. An execution of a nondeterministic quantum program is modeled by a sequence of actions of individual processes. These actions are described by super-operators on the state Hilbert space. At each step of an execution, a process is chosen nondeterministically to perform the next action. A characterization of reachable space and a characterization of diverging states of a nondeterministic quantum program are presented. We establish a zero-one law for termination probability of the states in the reachable space of a nondeterministic quantum program. A combination of these results leads to a necessary and sufficient condition for termination of nondeterministic quantum programs. Based on this condition, an algorithm is found for checking termination of nondeterministic quantum programs within a fixed finite-dimensional state space. A striking difference between nondeterministic classical and quantum programs is shown by example: it is possible that each of several quantum programs simulates the same classical program which terminates with probability 1, but the nondeterministic program consisting of them terminates with probability 0 due to the interference carried in the execution of them.

  20. Termination or Transfer Checklist for Managers Employees can terminate from their positions for many reasons including

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fletcher, Robin

    HR-FRM-050 Termination or Transfer Checklist for Managers Employees can terminate from etc. This checklist is to be used by managers when an employee is going to terminate from as part of the termination process. Type of Termination Resignation: If your employee is resigning, review

  1. Novel strategies for the synthesis of methane adsorbents with controlled porosity and high surface area. Annual report, January 1, 1994-December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ventura, S.C.; Kumar, S.K.; Yokoi, S.I.

    1995-04-01

    Natural gas is an attractive alternative to gasoline as fuel for cars because of its desirable emission characteristics, good cold starting characteristics, and high octane number. A major factor that limits widespread use of NGV`s is the low energy density of natural gas. The authors have developed low-cost gel precursors that are excellent binders of high surface area carbon and produce monoliths with piece density of 0.64 g/mL, carbon packing density of 0.62 g/mL and methane volumetric storage capacity of 140 V/V (based on volume of gas delivered) at 500 psia. The authors` preliminary experiments show that piece density may be further increased under suitable processing conditions and that even higher methane volumetric capacities will be attainable.

  2. Flower-like nanostructure MNb{sub 2}O{sub 6} (M = Mn, Zn) with high surface area: Hydrothermal synthesis and enhanced photocatalytic performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Xue; Jing, Yan; Yang, Jia [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Ju, Jing [College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Cong, Rihong [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Gao, Wenliang, E-mail: gaowl@cqu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Yang, Tao, E-mail: taoyang@cqu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • MNb{sub 2}O{sub 6} was prepared by a mild two-step hydrothermal method. • Their flower-like nanostructure morphology was studied by SEM and TEM. • High BET surface areas for MnNb{sub 2}O{sub 6} (?50 m{sup 2}/g) and ZnNb{sub 2}O{sub 6} (?100 m{sup 2}/g). • Band gap energies were estimated by UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectra. • Photocatalytic activities were evaluated under UV-light irradiation. - Abstract: Nano-scaled MNb{sub 2}O{sub 6} (M = Mn, Zn) was successfully synthesized via a two-step hydrothermal method. It is important to control the exact pH of the reaction solution in order to obtain pure products. The as-prepared samples both crystallize in the columbite structure. Interestingly, the products possess a flower-like morphology in a pseudo-six-fold symmetry, which is in fact arrayed by two-dimensional nanosheets. Their surface areas (51 m{sup 2}/g for MnNb{sub 2}O{sub 6} and 103 m{sup 2}/g for ZnNb{sub 2}O{sub 6}) are about 25–50 times of those prepared by solid state reaction. UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectra show the nano-scaled sample has a stronger absorption and a narrower band gap than its bulk form. The estimated band gap energies are 2.70 eV (MnNb{sub 2}O{sub 6}) and 3.77 eV (ZnNb{sub 2}O{sub 6}), respectively. The nano-scaled ZnNb{sub 2}O{sub 6} exhibits a double enhancement of photocatalytic activity in the decolorization of methylene blue than bulk ZnNb{sub 2}O{sub 6}.

  3. Site characterization summary report for dry weather surface water sampling upper East Fork Poplar Creek characterization area Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    This report describes activities associated with conducting dry weather surface water sampling of Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This activity is a portion of the work to be performed at UEFPC Operable Unit (OU) 1 [now known as the UEFPC Characterization Area (CA)], as described in the RCRA Facility Investigation Plan for Group 4 at the Oak- Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee and in the Response to Comments and Recommendations on RCRA Facility Investigation Plan for Group 4 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, Volume 1, Operable Unit 1. Because these documents contained sensitive information, they were labeled as unclassified controlled nuclear information and as such are not readily available for public review. To address this issue the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) published an unclassified, nonsensitive version of the initial plan, text and appendixes, of this Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) Plan in early 1994. These documents describe a program for collecting four rounds of wet weather and dry weather surface water samples and one round of sediment samples from UEFPC. They provide the strategy for the overall sample collection program including dry weather sampling, wet weather sampling, and sediment sampling. Figure 1.1 is a schematic flowchart of the overall sampling strategy and other associated activities. A Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPJP) was prepared to specifically address four rounds of dry weather surface water sampling and one round of sediment sampling. For a variety of reasons, sediment sampling has not been conducted and has been deferred to the UEFPC CA Remedial Investigation (RI), as has wet weather sampling.

  4. Post-Closure Inspection and Monitoring Report for Corrective Action Unit 417: Central Nevada Test Area Surface, Hot Creek Valley, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-01-01

    This report presents data collected during the annual post-closure site inspection conducted at the Central Nevada Test Area Surface Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417 in May of 2008. The annual post-closure site inspection included inspections of the UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4 sites in accordance with the Post-Closure Monitoring Plan provided in the CAU 417 Closure Report (NNSA/NV 2001). The annual inspection conducted at the UC-1 Central Mud Pit (CMP) indicated that the site and soil cover were in good condition. Three new cracks or fractures were observed in the soil cover during the annual inspection and were immediately filled with bentonite chips. The vegetation on the soil cover was adequate, but showed signs of the area's ongoing drought. No issues were identified with the CMP fence, gate, or subsidence monuments. No issues were identified with the warning signs and monuments at the other two UC-1 locations. The annual subsidence survey was conducted at UC-1 CMP and UC-4 Mud Pit C in August 2008. The results of the subsidence surveys indicate that the covers are performing as expected, and no unusual subsidence was observed.

  5. Testing Surface Area Pravesh Kothari

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Donnell, Ryan

    Program of China Grant 2011CBA00300, 2011CBA00301, the National Natural Science Foundation of China Grant

  6. Post-Closure Inspection and Monitoring Report for Corrective Action Unit 417: Central Nevada Test Area Surface, Hot Creek Valley, Nevada, for Calendar Year 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-09-01

    This report presents data collected during the annual post-closure site inspection conducted at the Central Nevada Test Area Surface Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417 in May 2007. The annual post-closure site inspection included inspections of the UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4 sites in accordance with the Post-Closure Monitoring Plan provided in the CAU 417 Closure Report (NNSA/NV 2001). The annual inspection conducted at the UC-1 Central Mud Pit (CMP) indicated the site and soil cover were in good condition. No new cracks or fractures were observed in the soil cover during the annual inspection. A crack on the west portion of the cover was observed during the last quarterly inspection in December 2006. This crack was filled with bentonite as part of the maintenance activities conducted in February 2007 and will be monitored during subsequent annual inspections. The vegetation on the soil cover was adequate but showing signs of the area's ongoing drought. No issues were identified with the CMP fence, gate, or subsidence monuments. New DOE Office of Legacy Management signs with updated emergency phone numbers were installed as part of this annual inspection, no issues were identified with the warning signs and monuments at the other two UC-1 locations. The annual subsidence survey was conducted at UC-1 CMP and UC-4 Mud Pit C as part of the maintenance activities conducted in February 2007. The results of the subsidence surveys indicate that the covers are performing as expected, and no unusual subsidence was observed. A vegetation survey of the UC-1 CMP cover and adjacent areas was conducted as part of the annual inspection in May 2007. The vegetation survey indicated that revegetation continues to be successful, although stressed due to the area's prevailing drought conditions. The vegetation should continue to be monitored to document any changes in the plant community and to identify conditions that could potentially require remedial action to maintain a viable vegetation cover on the site. It is suggested that future vegetation surveys be conducted once every 2 years or as needed to help monitor the health of the vegetation.

  7. Dynamic prediction of terminal-area severe convective weather penetration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schonfeld, Daniel (Daniel Ryan)

    2015-01-01

    Despite groundbreaking technology and revised operating procedures designed to improve the safety of air travel, numerous aviation accidents still occur every year. According to a recent report by the FAA's Aviation Weather ...

  8. Identification of Robust Terminal-Area Routes in Convective Weather

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balakrishnan, Hamsa

    Convective weather is responsible for large delays and widespread disruptions in the U.S. National Airspace System, especially during summer. Traffic flow management algorithms require reliable forecasts of route blockage ...

  9. Monitoring peak power and cooling energy savings of shade trees and white surfaces in the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) service area: Project design and preliminary results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, H.; Bretz, S.; Hanford, J.; Rosenfeld, A.; Sailor, D.; Taha, H. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Bos, W. [Sacramento Municipal Utility District, CA (United States)

    1992-12-01

    Urban areas in warm climates create summer heat islands of daily average intensity of 3--5{degrees}C, adding to discomfort and increasing air-conditioning loads. Two important factors contributing to urban heat islands are reductions in albedo (lower overall city reflectance) and loss of vegetation (less evapotranspiration). Reducing summer heat islands by planting vegetation (shade trees) and increasing surface albedos, saves cooling energy, allows down-sizing of air conditioners, lowers air-conditioning peak demand, and reduces the emission of CO{sub 2} and other pollutants from electric power plants. The focus of this multi-year project, jointly sponsored by SMUD and the California Institute for Energy Efficiency (CIEE), was to measure the direct cooling effects of trees and white surfaces (mainly roofs) in a few buildings in Sacramento. The first-year project was to design the experiment and obtain base case data. We also obtained limited post retrofit data for some sites. This report provides an overview of the project activities during the first year at six sites. The measurement period for some of the sites was limited to September and October, which are transitional cooling months in Sacramento and hence the interpretation of results only apply to this period. In one house, recoating the dark roof with a high-albedo coating rendered air conditioning unnecessary for the month of September (possible savings of up to 10 kWh per day and 2 kW of non-coincidental peak power). Savings of 50% relative to an identical base case bungalow were achieved when a school bungalow`s roof and southeast wall were coated with a high-albedo coating during the same period. Our measured data for the vegetation sites do not indicate conclusive results because shade trees were small and the cooling period was almost over. We need to collect more data over a longer cooling season in order to demonstrate savings conclusively.

  10. Termination Checking with Types Strong Normalization for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abel, Andreas

    Termination Checking with Types Strong Normalization a program can be separated into two parts: As the first step, partial correctness is established by verifying that a program matches its specification; then, termination is shown to obtain full correctness

  11. Using indicators in finite termination procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. J. Williams; A. S. El-Bakry; R. W. Tapia

    1999-10-01

    The presence of bounded variables complicates finite termination procedures in interior-point methods for linear programming.

  12. Complete LNG Terminal Status Maps | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Complete LNG Terminal Status Maps Complete LNG Terminal Status Maps A series of slides showing the status of various LNG terminals (existing, under construction, proposed, etc.) in...

  13. Termination by Aphasia & Carotid Artery Disease: History and Definition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tkachuk, Emma

    2014-01-01

    nonfiction. Her paper on Termination by Aphasia and CarotidVol. 6 Issue 1 2014 Termination by Aphasia & Carotid Arterywith Leonid Krukov in Termination by Aphasia. People like

  14. Pooh-Poohing Copyright Law’s “Inalienable” Termination Rights

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menell, Peter; Nimmer, David

    2010-01-01

    Accordingly, the relevant termination window under § 304(d)between them, to use termination rights to enhance theirand clarity of the termination of transfer provisions. ©

  15. Clothes Dryer Automatic Termination Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.

    2014-10-01

    Volume 2: Improved Sensor and Control Designs Many residential clothes dryers on the market today provide automatic cycles that are intended to stop when the clothes are dry, as determined by the final remaining moisture content (RMC). However, testing of automatic termination cycles has shown that many dryers are susceptible to over-drying of loads, leading to excess energy consumption. In particular, tests performed using the DOE Test Procedure in Appendix D2 of 10 CFR 430 subpart B have shown that as much as 62% of the energy used in a cycle may be from over-drying. Volume 1 of this report shows an average of 20% excess energy from over-drying when running automatic cycles with various load compositions and dryer settings. Consequently, improving automatic termination sensors and algorithms has the potential for substantial energy savings in the U.S.

  16. Modularity of Termination Using Dependency Pairs ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ábrahám, Erika

    Modularity of Termination Using Dependency Pairs ? Thomas Arts 1 and J¨urgen Giesl 2 1 Computer@informatik.tu­darmstadt.de Abstract. The framework of dependency pairs allows automated ter­ mination and innermost termination proofs of this framework in order to prove termination in a modular way. Our mod­ ularity results significantly increase

  17. Termination of Linear Programs Ashish Tiwari

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tiwari, Ashish

    Termination of Linear Programs Ashish Tiwari SRI International, 333 Ravenswood Ave, Menlo Park, CA, U.S.A tiwari@csl.sri.com Abstract. We show that termination of a class of linear loop programs is decidable. Linear loop programs are discrete-time linear systems with a loop condition governing termination

  18. Improved Modular Termination Proofs Using Dependency Pairs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Middeldorp, Aart

    Improved Modular Termination Proofs Using Dependency Pairs Ren´e Thiemann, J¨urgen Giesl, Peter) termination proofs of term rewrite systems (TRSs). For any TRS, it generates inequality constraints that have to be satisfied by well-founded orders. However, proving innermost termination is considerably easier than

  19. Revised December, 2014 DOSIMETRY TERMINATION REQUEST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Revised December, 2014 DOSIMETRY TERMINATION REQUEST In order to ensure that dosimetry records are accurately maintained we require that persons wishing to terminate personal dosimetry fill out this form attention. Your badge(s) will be terminated upon receipt of this form. PIs may be charged

  20. Fourth International Workshop on Termination Dagstuhl, Germany

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giesl, Juergen

    Fourth International Workshop on Termination WST '99 Dagstuhl, Germany May 10­12, 1999 Abstracts #12; Fourth International Workshop on Termination WST '99 Dagstuhl, Germany May 10­12, 1999 Abstracts, The Netherlands) #12; Contents Hans Zantema The Termination Hierarchy for Term Rewriting

  1. Total termination of term rewriting is undecidable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Total termination of term rewriting is undecidable Hans Zantema Utrecht University, Department Usually termination of term rewriting systems (TRS's) is proved by means of a monotonic well­founded order. If this order is total on ground terms, the TRS is called totally terminating. In this paper we prove that total

  2. Termination Analysis with Compositional Transition Invariants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kröning, Daniel

    Termination Analysis with Compositional Transition Invariants Daniel Kroening1 , Natasha Sharygina2 termination provers rely on a safety checker to con- struct disjunctively well-founded transition invariants that uses a light-weight check based on transitivity of ranking relations to prove program termination. We

  3. Improved Modular Termination Proofs Using Dependency Pairs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ábrahám, Erika

    Improved Modular Termination Proofs Using Dependency Pairs Renâ??e Thiemann, JË?urgen Giesl, Peter) termination proofs of term rewrite systems (TRSs). For any TRS, it generates inequality constraints that have to be satisfied by well­founded orders. However, proving innermost termination is considerably easier than

  4. Termination of Linear Programs Ashish Tiwari #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tiwari, Ashish

    Termination of Linear Programs Ashish Tiwari # SRI International, 333 Ravenswood Ave, Menlo Park, CA, U.S.A tiwari@csl.sri.com Abstract. We show that termination of a class of linear loop programs is decidable. Linear loop programs are discrete­time linear systems with a loop condition governing termination

  5. Terminals and Ports Jan C. Willems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terminals and Ports Jan C. Willems ESAT, K.U. Leuven, B-3001 Leuven, Belgium Email: Jan. An electrical circuit is a device that interacts with its environment through wires, called terminals. On each terminal, there are two interaction variables, a potential and a current. Interconnection of circuits

  6. Semicontinuous Sized Types and Termination Andreas Abel #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abel, Andreas

    , and classical applications are total correctness and termination of partial evaluation. In languagesSemi­continuous Sized Types and Termination Andreas Abel # Institut für Informatik Ludwig to termination uses sized types: an ordinal bound for the size of a data structure is stored in its type

  7. TERMINATION OF SIMPLY MODED WELLTYPED LOGIC PROGRAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giesl, Juergen

    is borrowed from [9], defining a similar notion in the context of termination of off­line partial evaluation only partially corresponds to our intuitive notion of a ``terminating computation''. This is becauseTERMINATION OF SIMPLY MODED WELL­TYPED LOGIC PROGRAMS UNDER TABLED EXECUTION MECHANISM Sofie

  8. SANS and Contrast Variation Measurement of the Different Contributions to the Total Surface Area in PBX 9501 as a Function of Pressing Intensity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mang, Joseph T.; Hjelm, Rex P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2006-07-28

    We have used small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) in conjunction with the method of contrast variation to measure the surface area (SHB, SHV, and SBV) associated with the three interfaces (HMX-binder (HB), HMX-voids (HV) and binder-voids (BV)) in pressed pellets of PBX 9501 (95% HMX and 5% binder, by weight). These interfaces are of interest as they may influence the transmission of microstresses and hot spot formation under shock conditions. Because of the difficulty in making measurements, little is known about the microstructure of pressed PBX 9501 parts and thus how it is affected by processing. Here, we explore the effect of varying the pressing intensity on the PBX 9501 microstructure and in particular, how the three interfaces (HB, HV and BV) are affected. Disk-shaped samples of PBX 9501 were die-pressed with applied pressures ranging between 5,000 and 29,000 psi. SANS measurements were performed on 4-5 pellets at each pressure. Analysis of the SANS data indicates systematic changes in SHB, SHV, and SBV with applied pressure.

  9. Post-Closure Inspection and Monitoring Report for Corrective Action Unit 417: Central Nevada Test Area Surface, Hot Creek Valley, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-03-01

    This report presents results of data collected during the annual post-closure site inspections conducted at the Central Nevada Test Area surface Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417 in May 2011 and July 2012. The annual post-closure site inspections included inspections of the UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4 sites in accordance with the Post-Closure Monitoring Plan provided in the CAU 417 Closure Report (NNSA/NV 2001). The annual inspections conducted at the UC-1 Central Mud Pit (CMP) indicated that the site and soil cover were in good condition. No new fractures or extension of existing fractures were observed and no issues with the fence or gate were identified. The vegetation on the cover continues to look healthy, but the biennial vegetation survey conducted during the 2012 inspection indicated that the total foliar cover was slightly higher in 2009 than in 2012. This may be indicative of a decrease in precipitation observed during the 2-year monitoring period. The precipitation totaled 9.9 inches from July 1, 2010, through June 30, 2011, and 5 inches from July 1, 2011, through June 30, 2012. This decrease in precipitation is also evident in the soil moisture data obtained from the time domain reflectometry sensors. Soil moisture content data show that the UC-1 cover is performing as designed, and evapotranspiration is effectively removing water from the cover.

  10. Termination or Transfer Checklist for Employees Employees can terminate from their positions for many reasons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fletcher, Robin

    HR-FRM-051 Termination or Transfer Checklist for Employees Employees can terminate from etc. This checklist is to be used by employees who are terminating from the University or transferring the University, review the voluntary termination policy for the minimum notice guidelines required

  11. Quasi-Terminating Logic Programs for Ensuring the Termination of Partial Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vidal, Germán

    Quasi-Terminating Logic Programs for Ensuring the Termination of Partial Evaluation Germ´an Vidal challenges in partial evaluation is the design of automatic methods for ensuring the termination of spe- cialisation. It is well known that the termination of partial evalua- tion can be ensured when the considered

  12. Quasi-Terminating Logic Programs for Ensuring the Termination of Partial Evaluation ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vidal, Germán

    Quasi-Terminating Logic Programs for Ensuring the Termination of Partial Evaluation ? Germ#19;an approach by designing a simple partial evaluator in which global termination is always ensured o#15;ine (i but only provides partial termination guarantees. Holst [18] was the #12;rst to relate (within

  13. Quasi-Terminating Logic Programs for Ensuring the Termination of Partial Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vidal, Germán

    Quasi-Terminating Logic Programs for Ensuring the Termination of Partial Evaluation Germ´an Vidal approach by designing a simple partial evaluator in which global termination is always ensured offline (i for ensuring the termination of offline partial eval- uation yet. Recent progress include [9], which presents

  14. United States National Waste Terminal Storage argillaceous rock studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brunton, G.D.

    1981-01-01

    The past and present argillaceous rock studies for the US National Waste Terminal Storage Program consist of: (1) evaluation of the geological characteristics of several widespread argillaceous formations in the United States; (2) laboratory studies of the physical and chemical properties of selected argillaceous rock samples; and (3) two full-scale in situ surface heater experiments that simulate the emplacement of heat-generating radioactive waste in argillaceous rock.

  15. Synthesis of MOF having hydroxyl functional side groups and optimization of activation process for the maximization of its BET surface area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jongsik; Kim, Dong Ok; Kim, Dong Wook; Sagong, Kil

    2013-01-15

    To accomplish the postsynthetic modification of MOF with organic-metal precursors (OMPs) described in our previous researches more efficiently, synthesis of MOF (HCC-2) possessing relatively larger pore size as well as higher number of hydroxyl functional side groups per its base unit than those of HCC-1 has been successfully conducted via adopting 1,4-di-(4-carboxy-2,6-dihydroxyphenyl)benzene as an organic ligand and Zn(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O as a metal source, respectively. Also, optimization about the Activation process of HCC-2 was performed to maximize its BET (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller) surface area which was proved to be proportional to the number of exposed active sites on which its postsynthetic modification occurred. However, Activation process having been validated to be so effective with the acquirement of highly-purified HCC-1 (CO{sub 2} supercritical drying step followed by vacuum drying step) was less satisfactory with the case of HCC-2. This might be attributed to relatively higher hydrophilicity and bulkier molecular structure of organic ligand of HCC-2. However, it was readily settled by simple modification of above Activation process. Moreover, indispensable residues composed of both DMF and its thermally degraded derivatives which were chemically attached via coordination bond with hydroxyl functionalities even after Activation process III might enable their H{sub 2} adsorption properties to be seriously debased compared to that of IRMOF-16 having no hydroxyl functionalities. - Graphical abstract: Synthesis of new-structured MOF (HCC-2) simultaneously possessing relatively larger pore size as well as higher number of hydroxyl functional side groups per its base unit at the same time than those of HCC-1 has been performed via adopting 1,4-di-(4-carboxy-2,6-dihydroxyphenyl)benzene as an organic ligand and Zn(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O as a metal source, respectively. Also, the optimization of activation process for HCC-2 was conducted to maximize its BET surface area while the suitability of this activation process was proved via SEM, TGA, EA, XRF, and PSD. Being compared with the crystal structures of IRMOF-16 and HCC-1 via XRD and FT-IR analysis, the crystal structure of HCC-2 having an identical chemical structure except the introduction of four hydroxyl functional side groups on the backbone of its organic ligand showed no noticeable change. Specifically, HCC-2 was established as a cubic structure with each axis of about 21.5 A. Moreover, H{sub 2} adsorption isotherms for these HCCs were attained to ultimately examine that hydroxyl functionalities inside their pores have any influence on their H{sub 2} adsorption properties. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HCC-2 having higher number of hydroxyl groups than that of HCC-1 was prepared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The optimization of activation process for HCC-2 was studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The crystal structure of HCC-2 was a cubic-shaped structure with each axis of 21.5 A. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer -OH functionalities on HCCs had negative influence on their H{sub 2} adsorption abilities. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This might be due to impurities rigidly attached to their functional side groups.

  16. A remote image analysis terminal 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daigle, Lucien Don

    1976-01-01

    A APPENDIX B APPENDIX C APPENDIX D VITA 140 142 157 157 162 163 164 170 179 190 234 Vrzt I, I S'I' III' I: I OIIRI:. 8 The Remote Image Analysis Terminal System Block Diagram The Digital Interface The Analog Interface Digitizer...- flow Chart Loading and Transmission of Position Coordinates Page 59 61 63 65 66 II-22 II-23 Keyboard Block Diagram Generation and Transmission cE a Hex Digit 69 70 II- 24 I I-25 Opcode Table 73 Partial Block Diagram...

  17. Effects of the seasonal cycle on the development and termination of the Indian Ocean Zonal Dipole Mode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Weiqing

    Effects of the seasonal cycle on the development and termination of the Indian Ocean Zonal Dipole of atmospheric surface forcings on the development and termination of the Indian Ocean Zonal Dipole Mode (IOZDM) are studied using a nonlinear, 4-1/2 layer ocean model partially coupled to an advective atmospheric mixed

  18. Sequestration of Sr-90 Subsurface Contamination in the Hanford 100-N Area by Surface Infiltration of a Ca-Citrate-Phosphate Solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szecsody, James E.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Oostrom, Martinus; Moore, R. C.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Williams, Mark D.; Zhong, Lirong; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; McKinley, James P.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Covert, Matthew A.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Breshears, Andrew T.; Garcia, Ben J.

    2009-03-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a method to emplace apatite precipitate in the 100N vadose zone, which results in sorption and ultimately incorporation of Sr-90 into the apatite structure. The Ca-citrate-PO4 solution can be infiltrated into unsaturated sediments to result in apatite precipitate to provide effective treatment of Sr-90 contamination. Microbial redistribution during solution infiltration and a high rate of citrate biodegradation for river water microbes (water used for solution infiltration) results in a relatively even spatial distribution of the citrate biodegradation rate and ultimately apatite precipitate in the sediment. Manipulation of the Ca-citrate-PO4 solution infiltration strategy can be used to result in apatite precipitate in the lower half of the vadose zone (where most of the Sr-90 is located) and within low-K layers (which are hypothesized to have higher Sr-90 concentrations). The most effective infiltration strategy to precipitate apatite at depth (and with sufficient lateral spread) was to infiltrate a high concentration solution (6 mM Ca, 15 mM citrate, 60 mM PO4) at a rapid rate (near ponded conditions), followed by rapid, then slow water infiltration. Repeated infiltration events, with sufficient time between events to allow water drainage in the sediment profile can be used to buildup the mass of apatite precipitate at greater depth. Low-K heterogeneities were effectively treated, as the higher residual water content maintained in these zones resulted in higher apatite precipitate concentration. High-K zones did not receive sufficient treatment by infiltration, although an alternative strategy of air/surfactant (foam) was demonstrated effective for targeting high-K zones. The flow rate manipulation used in this study to treat specific depths and heterogeneities are not as easy to implement at field scale due to the lack of characterization of heterogeneities and difficulty tracking the wetting front over a large subsurface area. However, the use of real-time surface and cross-borehole geophysics can be used to track the infiltrating Ca-citrate-PO4 front so some adjustments can be made in the infiltration rate to precipitate apatite in desired zones. In addition, the reactive transport code used in this study with field scale physical parameters for sediments can be used to evaluate infiltration strategies along with preliminary water infiltration tests at field scale.

  19. Two terminal micropower radar sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1995-01-01

    A simple, low power ultra-wideband radar motion sensor/switch configuration connects a power source and load to ground. The switch is connected to and controlled by the signal output of a radar motion sensor. The power input of the motion sensor is connected to the load through a diode which conducts power to the motion sensor when the switch is open. A storage capacitor or rechargeable battery is connected to the power input of the motion sensor. The storage capacitor or battery is charged when the switch is open and powers the motion sensor when the switch is closed. The motion sensor and switch are connected between the same two terminals between the source/load and ground.

  20. Two terminal micropower radar sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1995-11-07

    A simple, low power ultra-wideband radar motion sensor/switch configuration connects a power source and load to ground. The switch is connected to and controlled by the signal output of a radar motion sensor. The power input of the motion sensor is connected to the load through a diode which conducts power to the motion sensor when the switch is open. A storage capacitor or rechargeable battery is connected to the power input of the motion sensor. The storage capacitor or battery is charged when the switch is open and powers the motion sensor when the switch is closed. The motion sensor and switch are connected between the same two terminals between the source/load and ground. 3 figs.

  1. Columbia River: Terminal fisheries research project. 1994 Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirose, P.; Miller, M.; Hill, J.

    1996-12-01

    Columbia River terminal fisheries have been conducted in Youngs Bay, Oregon, since the early 1960`s targeting coho salmon produced at the state facility on the North Fork Klaskanine River. In 1977 the Clatsop County Economic Development Council`s (CEDC) Fisheries Project began augmenting the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife production efforts. Together ODFW and CEDC smolt releases totaled 5,060,000 coho and 411,300 spring chinook in 1993 with most of the releases from the net pen acclimation program. During 1980-82 fall commercial terminal fisheries were conducted adjacent to the mouth of Big Creek in Oregon. All past terminal fisheries were successful in harvesting surplus hatchery fish with minimal impact on nonlocal weak stocks. In 1993 the Northwest Power Planning Council recommended in its` Strategy for Salmon that terminal fishing sites be identified and developed. The Council called on the Bonneville Power Administration to fund a 10-year study to investigate the feasibility of creating and expanding terminal known stock fisheries in the Columbia River Basin. The findings of the initial year of the study are included in this report. The geographic area considered for study extends from Bonneville Dam to the river mouth. The initial year`s work is the beginning of a 2-year research stage to investigate potential sites, salmon stocks, and methodologies; a second 3-year stage will focus on expansion in Youngs Bay and experimental releases into sites with greatest potential; and a final 5-year phase establishing programs at full capacity at all acceptable sites. After ranking all possible sites using five harvest and five rearing criteria, four sites in Oregon (Tongue Point, Blind Slough, Clifton Channel and Wallace Slough) and three in Washington (Deep River, Steamboat Slough and Cathlamet Channel) were chosen for study.

  2. Terminating Surface Electromigration at the Source (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Word Cloud More Like This Free Publicly Accessible Full Text Publisher's Accepted Manuscript at...

  3. Automation of Termination: Abstracting CCG through MWG Automation of Termination: Abstracting Calling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ayala-Rincón, Mauricio

    Automation of Termination: Abstracting CCG through MWG Automation of Termination: Abstracting.Ayala-Rinc´on & C.A.Munoz IX Semin´ario Informal(, mas Formal!) November 29, 2013 1 / 32 #12;Automation science. While classical results state the undecidability of various termination problems, automated

  4. Termination Checking with Types Strong Normalization for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abel, Andreas

    Termination Checking with Types Strong Normalization for Mendler­Style Course­Of­Value Recursion can be separated into two parts: As the first step, partial correctness is established by verifying that a program matches its specification; then, termination is shown to obtain full correctness. For practical

  5. Termination Checking with Types Strong Normalization for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abel, Andreas

    Termination Checking with Types Strong Normalization for Mendler-Style Course-Of-Value Recursion can be separated into two parts: As the first step, partial correctness is established by verifying that a program matches its specification; then, termination is shown to obtain full correctness. For practical

  6. Termination Analysis of Term Rewriting by Polynomial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Middeldorp, Aart

    Termination Analysis of Term Rewriting by Polynomial Interpretations and Matrix Interpretations of the University of Innsbruck in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of "Doktor der technischen Wissenschaften" advisor: Univ.-Prof. Dr. Aart Middeldorp Innsbruck, March 2012 #12;#12;dissertation Termination

  7. Program Termination and Well Partial Orderings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blass, Andreas R.

    Program Termination and Well Partial Orderings Andreas Blass Yuri Gurevich Abstract The following observation may be useful in establishing program termination: if a transitive relation R is covered of the stature P of a well partial ordering P and show that |R| 1 × · · · × n and that this bound is tight

  8. Roles of Fe2+, Fe3+, and Cr3+ Surface Sites in the Oxidation of NO on the (Fe,Cr)3O4(1 1 1) Surface Termination of an ?-(Fe,Cr)2O3(0 0 0 1) Mixed Oxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, Michael A.

    2014-10-01

    The oxidation and photooxidation reactions of nitric oxide were explored on a mixed Fe and Cr mixed oxide surface using temperature programmed desorption (TPD). The mixed oxide surface examined initially had a corundum (0001) structure with a nominal cation composition of 75% Fe and 25% Cr, but after sputter/anneal cleaning was transformed into a magnetite-like (111) surface structure enriched with Cr (~40%). TPD studies of nitric oxide on the (Fe,Cr)3O4(111) surface revealed two main desorption states at 220 and 370 K, along with a third minor desorption state at ~310 K. Similarly, O2 TPD occurred in two main TPD states (100 and 230 K) and a minor state (155 K). The more strongly and weakly bound NO and O2 molecules were assigned to adsorption at Fe2+ and Fe3+ sites, respectively, with the minor desorption states assigned to Cr3+ sites. No thermal decomposition or surface chemistry was detected in TPD for adsorbed NO (e.g., no N2 or N2O formation), whereas ~10% of the adsorbed O2 irreversibly dissociated at Fe2+ sites. These dissociated oxygen species did not react with coadsorbed NO, but instead blocked NO adsorption at the Fe2+ sites, but had no effect on NO adsorption at Fe3+ sites. In contrast, NO reacted with preadsorbed O2 molecules to generate an adsorbed nitrate/nitrite species that decomposed in TPD to liberate NO at 425 K, leaving an O atom on the surface. Coadsorption of 15N18O with 16O2 suggests the oxidized species was a nitrate based on the detected level of oxygen scrambling. Preadsorption of O2 was required for nitrate formation as preadsorbed NO blocked both O2 adsorption and the oxidation reaction. Irradiation of adsorbed NO with 460 nm light at 40 K resulted in rapid photodesorption of NO without generation of any new surface species. Irradiation of the coadsorbed NO+O2 system did not promote additional NO oxidation, but limited the extent of thermal NO oxidation (in subsequent TPD) by photodepleting the surface of adsorbed NO. Preheating the NO+O2 adlayer to 250 K prior to 460 nm light irradiation restored the level of thermal NO oxidation, revealing both that thermal activation is required for NO oxidation on the (Fe,Cr)3O4(111) surface and that the nitrate product was insensitive to 460 nm light. The author thanks Drs. Sara Chamberlin and Scott Chambers for supplying the film used in this work. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle. The research was performed using EMSL, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  9. Distributed Approaches for Determination of Reconfiguration Algorithm Termination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lai, Hong-jian

    Distributed Approaches for Determination of Reconfiguration Algorithm Termination Pinak Tulpule architecture was used as globally shared memory structure for detection of algorithm termination. This paper of algorithm termination. Keywords--autonomous agent-based reconfiguration, dis- tributed algorithms, shipboard

  10. Increasing Creel Interview Efficiency Through Early Survey Termination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Increasing Creel Interview Efficiency Through Early Survey Termination HAL R. OSBURN and MIKE G were terminated early when no angler interviews were con ducted by a specified time. Using this method, terminating

  11. Termination Analysis of Java Bytecode Elvira Albert1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arenas, Puri

    program properties is often split into separately proving partial correctness and termination. ObjectTermination Analysis of Java Bytecode Elvira Albert1 , Puri Arenas1 , Michael Codish2 , Samir Abstract. Termination analysis has received considerable attention, traditionally in the context

  12. Analysis of LNG import terminal release prevention systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, E G

    1982-04-01

    The release prevention systems of liquefied natural gas (LNG) import terminal were analyzed. A series of potential release scenarios were analyzed to determine the frequency of the release events, the probability these releases are not stopped or isolated by emergency shutdown systems, the estimated release quantities, and the critical components of the system. The two plant areas identified as being most significant with respect to safety are the unloading system and the storage system. Rupture of the main transfer line and gross failure of the storage tanks are the two release scenarios of primary safety interest. Reducing the rate of failure by improved design, better maintenance and testing, or adding redundancy of the critical system components for these plant areas and release scenarios will result in improved safety. Several design alternatives which have the potential to significantly reduce the probability of a large release of LNG occurring at an import terminal are identified. These design alternatives would reduce the probability of a large release of LNG by reducing the expected number of failures which could cause a release or by reducing the magnitude of releases that do occur. All of these alternatives are technically feasible and have been used or considered for use in at least one LNG facility. A more rigorous analysis of the absolute risk of LNG import terminal operation is necessary before the benefits of these design alternatives can be determined. In addition, an economic evaluation of these alternatives must be made so the costs and benefits can be compared. It is concludd that for remotely located facilities many of these alternatives are probably not justified; however, for facilities located in highly populated areas, these alternatives deserve serious consideration.

  13. Surface activity of the red imported fire ant Solenopsis invicta Buren (Hymenoptera:Formicidae), in polygyne infested areas of Brazos Co., Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, James Benjamin

    1996-01-01

    the sticks are noted. Four habitat types that are common throughout the landscape matrix of Texas and other regions of the southern U.S. were examined for surface scouting activity: cattle pasture, fallow field, forested edge (post oak forest), and pond edge...

  14. High-Resolution Synchrotron Photoemission Studies of the Electronic Structure and Thermal Stability of CH3-and C2H5-Functionalized Si(111) Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webb, Lauren J.

    can yield only partial termination of the Si(111) surface by Si-C bonds (Figure 1b). X photoemission spectroscopy. Whereas the CH3-terminated Si(111) surface showed only one C 2s peak for the occupied orbitals, the C 2s spectra of C2H5-terminated Si(111) surfaces showed a symmetric splitting

  15. Notice of Termination for Authorization under TPDES General Permit...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Termination for Authorization under TPDES General Permit (TXR150000) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Reference: Notice of Termination for...

  16. Process for producing radiation-induced self-terminating protective coatings on a substrate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klebanoff, Leonard E. (Dublin, CA)

    2001-01-01

    A gas and radiation are used to produce a protective coating that is substantially void-free on the molecular scale, self-terminating, and degradation resistant. The process can be used to deposit very thin (.apprxeq.5-20 .ANG.) coatings on critical surfaces needing protection from degradative processes including, corrosion and contamination.

  17. Literature and data review for the surface-water pathway: Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walters, W.H.; Dirkes, R.L.; Napier, B.A.

    1992-04-01

    As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project, Pacific Northwest Laboratory reviewed literature and data on radionuclide concentrations and distribution in the water, sediment, and biota of the Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Over 600 documents were reviewed including Hanford reports, reports by offsite agencies, journal articles, and graduate theses. Certain radionuclide concentration data were used in preliminary estimates of individual dose for the 1964--1966 time period. This report summarizes the literature and database review and the results of the preliminary dose estimates.

  18. Geologic and hydrologic records of observation wells, test holes, test wells, supply wells, springs, and surface water stations in the Los Alamos area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Purtymun, W.D.

    1995-01-01

    Hundreds of holes have been drilled into the Pajarito Plateau and surrounding test areas of the Los Alamos National Laboratory since the end of World War II. They range in depth from a few feet to more than 14,000 ft. The holes were drilled to provide geologic, hydrologic, and engineering information related to development of a water supply, to provide data on the likelihood or presence of subsurface contamination from hazardous and nuclear materials, and for engineering design for construction. The data contained in this report provide a basis for further investigations into the consequences of our past, present, and future interactions with the environment.

  19. Detecting Termination of Active Database Rules Using Symbolic Model Checking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Indrakshi

    Detecting Termination of Active Database Rules Using Symbolic Model Checking Indrakshi Ray is the non-termination of rules. Although algorithms have been proposed to detect non-termination, al- most all provide a conservative estimate; that is, the algorithms detect all the potential cases of non-termination

  20. Financial Policy Manual 2411 NOTIFICATION OF EMPLOYEE TERMINATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Edward I.

    Financial Policy Manual Page 1 2411 NOTIFICATION OF EMPLOYEE TERMINATION Effective: December 1986 To establish policy regarding the timely processing of the termination notice to the Payroll Department is required for effecting an employee's termination. Terminating the current pay distribution does

  1. Termination of algebraic type systems: the syntactic approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Raamsdonk, Femke

    Termination of algebraic type systems: the syntactic approach Gilles Barthe and Femke van Raamsdonk applications in proof­checking. A natural question in this field concerns the termination or strong normalisation of such systems and is as follows: given a terminating type system T and a terminating rewriting

  2. DISCIPLINE AND TERMINATION POLICY Employees covered by this policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DISCIPLINE AND TERMINATION POLICY Employees covered by this policy This policy applies to all non to discipline, suspend with or without pay, or terminate employees for just cause. Just cause includes to discipline or termination for just cause, the University reserves the right to demote, suspend or terminate

  3. Termination Semantics of Logic Programs with Cut and Related Features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giesl, Juergen

    Termination Semantics of Logic Programs with Cut and Related Features Jamie Andrews Dept of termination for logic programs. I am particularly interested in the termination of logic programs which use practical features such as the Prolog ``cut''. In order to prove termination of such programs

  4. Tyrolean Termination Tool Nao Hirokawa and Aart Middeldorp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hirokawa, Nao

    Tyrolean Termination Tool Nao Hirokawa and Aart Middeldorp Institute of Computer Science University describes the Tyrolean Termination Tool (TTT in the sequel), the successor of the Tsukuba Termination Tool are not (yet) avail- able in any other termination tool, in some detail. TTT is a tool for automatically

  5. TERMINATION OF THE POROUS WALL CONCEPT To: APEX GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    TERMINATION OF THE POROUS WALL CONCEPT To: APEX GROUP From: Anter El-Azab (anter@seas.ucla.edu) Re with Lithium will can not work and this concept should be terminated. For the case of vanadium alloy on this concept should be terminated. #12;TERMINATION OF THE POROUS WALL CONCEPT Best Regards, Anter #12;

  6. Formation of Tetra(ethylene oxide) Terminated Si-C Linked Monolayers and Their Derivatization with Glycine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kilian, Kristopher A.

    for attachment of biomolecules but which can selectively form monolayers onto hydrogen terminated silicon have surface. Monolayer formation was carried out using solutions of the alkene in the high for the immobilization of amines on tetra(ethylene oxide) modified surfaces. Introduction The rapid advances

  7. Surface-induced charge at the Ge (001) surface and its interaction with self-interstitials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamiyama, Eiji; Sueoka, Koji [Department of Communication Engineering, Okayama Prefectural University, 111 Kuboki, Soja-shi, Okayama-ken 719-1197 (Japan); Vanhellemont, Jan [Department of Solid State Sciences, Ghent University, B-9000 Gent (Belgium)

    2014-02-21

    The Ge (001) surface with dimer structure, is negatively charged while into the bulk, positive charges are observed even deeper than the fifteenth layer from the surface. This is different from the Si case. This charge distribution can lead to the repulsion of positively charged self-interstitials by the positively charged near surface layer in an implantation or irradiation process. Self-interstitial reflection by Ge surfaces had been proposed to explain the results of diffusion experiments during irradiation whereby positively charged self-interstitials are generated by collisions of highly energetic particles with Ge atoms. We investigated different Ge (001) surface comparing an as-cleaved surface with dangling bonds to a surface with dimer structure, and to a surface terminated by hydrogen atoms. The effect of these different surface terminations on the surface-induced charges in the near surface bulk were calculated by ab initio techniques.

  8. Investigations into Protein-Surface Interactions via Atomic Force Microscopy and Surface Plasmon Resonance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Settle, Jenifer Kaye

    2012-08-31

    performed via surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to investigate the dynamics of this adsorption process on gold, and an amine-, carboxyl-, methyl- and hydroxyl-terminated SAM films. Chapter 4 provides background and investigation into F1-Adenosine triphosphate...

  9. SSC termination will be lengthy and expensive

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, D.

    1994-03-14

    Closing down the huge Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) is going to take a lot of time and money. Congress gave the Department of Energy $640 million to begin the shutdown in fiscal 1994, and DOE is asking for another $180 million next year. In the meantime, Energy Secretary Hazel R. O'Leary has come up with a termination plan for the project that will guide the department's activities. Much of the expense associated with terminating the SSC project involves closing out the many contracts the department has for building and supplying the site. Other major parts of the termination will be the environmental restoration and asset closeout, and the benefits provided for the SSC's employees. Two things still unresolved are the settlement DOE must make with Texas for the state's investment in the project and deciding what will be done with the facilities already there.

  10. Cost reduction ideas for LNG terminals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habibullah, A.; Weldin, F.

    1999-07-01

    LNG projects are highly capital intensive and this has long been regarded as being inevitable. However, recent developments are forcing the LNG industry to aggressively seek cost reductions. For example, the gas-to-liquids (GTL) process is increasingly seen as a potential rival technology and is often being touted as an economically superior alternative fuel source. Another strong driving force behind needed cost reductions is the low crude oil price which seems to have settled in the $10--13/bb. range. LNG is well positioned as the fuel of choice for environmentally friendly new power projects. As a result of the projected demand for power especially in the Pacific Rim countries several LNG terminal projects are under consideration. Such projects will require a new generation of LNG terminal designs emphasizing low cost, small scale and safe and fully integrated designs from LNG supply to power generation. The integration of the LNG terminal with the combined cycle gas turbine (CCGT) power plant offers substantial cost savings opportunities for both plants. Various cost reduction strategies and their impact on the terminal design are discussed including cost reduction due to integration.

  11. eRA Training Team1 Terminations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Chris I.

    eRA Training Team1 xTrain Terminations Electronic Research Administration Sponsored by: The National Institutions of Health, Office of Extramural Research April 2010 #12;eRA Training Team2 xTrain General Information xTrain Overview The following section provides general information on the xTrain

  12. eRA Training Team1 Terminations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Chris I.

    eRA Training Team1 xTrain Terminations Electronic Research Administration Sponsored by: The National Institutes of Health, Office of Extramural Research March 2012 #12;eRA Training Team2 xTrain General Information xTrain Overview The following section provides general information on the xTrain

  13. ISSUANCE 2015-06-08: Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for Packaged Terminal Air Conditioners and Packaged Terminal Heat Pumps, Final Rule

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for Packaged Terminal Air Conditioners and Packaged Terminal Heat Pumps, Final Rule

  14. High pressure, high current, low inductance, high reliability sealed terminals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, John S. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; McKeever, John W. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-03-23

    The invention is a terminal assembly having a casing with at least one delivery tapered-cone conductor and at least one return tapered-cone conductor routed there-through. The delivery and return tapered-cone conductors are electrically isolated from each other and positioned in the annuluses of ordered concentric cones at an off-normal angle. The tapered cone conductor service can be AC phase conductors and DC link conductors. The center core has at least one service conduit of gate signal leads, diagnostic signal wires, and refrigerant tubing routed there-through. A seal material is in direct contact with the casing inner surface, the tapered-cone conductors, and the service conduits thereby hermetically filling the interstitial space in the casing interior core and center core. The assembly provides simultaneous high-current, high-pressure, low-inductance, and high-reliability service.

  15. N-Terminal T4 Lysozyme Fusion Facilitates Crystallization of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    N-Terminal T4 Lysozyme Fusion Facilitates Crystallization of a G Protein Coupled Receptor Citation Details In-Document Search Title: N-Terminal T4 Lysozyme Fusion Facilitates...

  16. Stochastic partial differential equations with singular terminal condition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popier, Alexandre

    Stochastic partial differential equations with singular terminal condition A Matoussi, Lambert Piozin, A Popier To cite this version: A Matoussi, Lambert Piozin, A Popier. Stochastic partial differential equations with singular terminal condition. 2015. HAL Id: hal-01152687 https

  17. General Properties and Termination Conditions for Soft Constraint Propagation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossi, Francesca

    General Properties and Termination Conditions for Soft Constraint Propagation S. Bistarelli (bista for its termination. 1. Introduction Soft constraints allow to model faithfully many real­life problems [14], probabilistic [10] and partial [11] constraints. The constraint propagation techniques usually

  18. Performance of ECM controlled VAV fan powered terminal units 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cramlet, Andrew Charles

    2009-05-15

    Empirical performance models of fan airflow, primary airflow and power consumption were developed for series and parallel variable air volume fan powered terminal units. An experimental setup and test procedure were created to test the terminal...

  19. RPM-1 suppressors Act in synapse formation and axon termination in Caenorhabditis elegans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trujillo, Gloriana Victoria

    2010-01-01

    Variant Protein in Axon Termination and Synaptogenesis. St.Protein Acts in Axon Termination and Synaptogenesis in C.RPM-1 Regulates Axon Termination and Synaptogenesis through

  20. Rotor Termination in a Patient-Specific Model of Atrial Fibrillation /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzales, Matthew James

    2013-01-01

    of atrial fibrillation termination by rapidly unbinding Na+of atrial fibrillation termination by pure sodium channelfor spontaneous termination of reentrant tachycardias.

  1. Roles for Wnts and their receptors in topographic mapping and laminar termination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richman, Alisha

    2011-01-01

    tectum may be assigned termination sites on a "first come,Mapping and Laminar Termination A dissertation submitted inTermination ..

  2. Unraveling the Molecular Mechanism of Poly(A)-Dependent Transcription Termination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Huimin

    2014-01-01

    dependent transcription termination. Nature 463, 245–249.of transcription termination factors with the RNA polymerasecomplexes in vitro by the termination factor Rat1. J. Biol.

  3. Creating Clarity for the Process of Managing Residents through Remediation, Probation and Termination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    Remediation, Probation and Termination Murano T, Lypson M,remediation, probation and termination (RPT), as well as theobservation period. 4. Termination: when a resident is

  4. Vehicle drive module having improved terminal design

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beihoff, Bruce C.; Radosevich, Lawrence D.; Phillips, Mark G.; Kehl, Dennis L.; Kaishian, Steven C.; Kannenberg, Daniel G.

    2006-04-25

    A terminal structure for vehicle drive power electronics circuits reduces the need for a DC bus and thereby the incidence of parasitic inductance. The structure is secured to a support that may receive one or more power electronic circuits. The support may aid in removing heat from the circuits through fluid circulating through the support. The support may form a shield from both external EMI/RFI and from interference generated by operation of the power electronic circuits. Features may be provided to permit and enhance connection of the circuitry to external circuitry, such as by direct contact between the terminal assembly and AC and DC circuit components. Modular units may be assembled that may be coupled to electronic circuitry via plug-in arrangements or through interface with a backplane or similar mounting and interconnecting structures.

  5. Power converter having improved terminal structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Radosevich, Lawrence D.; Kannenberg, Daniel G.; Phillips, Mark G.; Kaishian, Steven C.

    2007-03-06

    A terminal structure for power electronics circuits reduces the need for a DC bus and thereby the incidence of parasitic inductance. The structure is secured to a support that may receive one or more power electronic circuits. The support may aid in removing heat from the circuits through fluid circulating through the support. The support may form a shield from both external EMI/RFI and from interference generated by operation of the power electronic circuits. Features may be provided to permit and enhance connection of the circuitry to external circuitry, such as by direct contact between the terminal assembly and AC and DC circuit components. Modular units may be assembled that may be coupled to electronic circuitry via plug-in arrangements or through interface with a backplane or similar mounting and interconnecting structures.

  6. Visual Simulation of Offshore Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Terminals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Visual Simulation of Offshore Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Terminals in a Decision-Making Context1 potential offshore Liquified Natural Gas (LNG) sites and the types of terminals that might occupy those sites. The study had to evaluate the engineering feasibility of siting an LNG receiving terminal

  7. Proof-Theoretic Analysis of Termination Proofs Wilfried Buchholz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buchholz, Wilfried

    Proof-Theoretic Analysis of Termination Proofs Wilfried Buchholz Mathematisches Institut der the order type of a termination ordering #30; places a bound on the lengths of reduction sequences; is the order type of a termination ordering #30; for a #12;nite rewrite system R then the function G#3; from

  8. SAT Instances for Termination Analysis with Carsten Fuhs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ábrahám, Erika

    SAT Instances for Termination Analysis with AProVE Carsten Fuhs LuFG Informatik 2, RWTH Aachen for tackling the search problems in automated termination analysis for term rewrite systems and for programming languages. Indeed, even since the last SAT competition in 2007, many new termination techniques have been

  9. Type-Based Termination of Functional Programs Andreas Abel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abel, Andreas

    Type-Based Termination of Functional Programs Andreas Abel Department of Computer Science Ludwig Timmendorfer Strand, Germany Andreas Abel (LMU Munich) Type-Based Termination KPS'07 1 / 21 #12;Introduction Termination Question: Will the run of a program eventually halt? Undecidable for Turing-complete programming

  10. DETECTING TERMINATION OF DISTRIBUTED COMPUTATIONS USING MARKERS Jayadev Misra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tropper, Carl

    DETECTING TERMINATION OF DISTRIBUTED COMPUTATIONS USING MARKERS Jayadev Misra Department in designing computations by process networks, is detection of termination. We propose a very simple algorithm for termination detection in an arbitrary network using a single marker We show an application of this scheme

  11. Abstraction and Implementation of a Lightweight Distributed Termination Protocol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobson, Simon

    Abstraction and Implementation of a Lightweight Distributed Termination Protocol D.M. Goodeve , C, University of Leeds, UK Department of Computer Science, Trinity College Dublin, Eire Abstract Termination synchronisation on this state costly. Many parallel applica- tions are structured such that termination occurs

  12. 9-1 (03/25/15) TERMINATION OF EMPLOYMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    9-1 (03/25/15) SECTION 9 TERMINATION OF EMPLOYMENT 9.1 NON-RENEWAL OF APPOINTMENT Non employees, except tenured and tenure-track faculty, are employees at-will, who may be terminated at any time unenforceable and is subject to termination without advance notice if, during the term of the faculty member

  13. Loop summarization and termination analysis Aliaksei Tsitovich1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kröning, Daniel

    Loop summarization and termination analysis Aliaksei Tsitovich1 , Natasha Sharygina1 , Christoph M termination analysis based on loop summarization. The algorithm relies on a library of ab- stract domains Introduction The program termination problem has received increased interest in the recent past. In practice

  14. Plasma waves associated with the termination W. S. Kurth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gurnett, Donald A.

    Plasma waves associated with the termination shock W. S. Kurth , D. A. Gurnett and R. B. Decker, Johns Hopkins University, Laurel, MD Abstract. Voyager 1 crossed the termination shock for nearly a year prior to the termination shock crossing. The Langmuir waves are thought to be produced

  15. Termination Checking: Comparing Structural Recursion and Sized Types by Examples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abel, Andreas

    Termination Checking: Comparing Structural Recursion and Sized Types by Examples David Thibodeau Decemer 3, 2011 Abstract Termination is an important property for programs and is necessary for formal proofs to make sense. In order to make sure that a program using recursion is terminating, one can use

  16. Semi-continuous Sized Types and Termination Andreas Abel?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abel, Andreas

    Semi-continuous Sized Types and Termination Andreas Abel-based approach to termination uses sized types: an ordinal bound for the size of a data structure is stored criterion, * *a calculus for semi-continuous function is developed. 1 Introduction Termination

  17. THE SIZE-CHANGE TERMINATION PRINCIPLE FOR CONSTRUCTOR BASED LANGUAGES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hyvernat, Pierre

    THE SIZE-CHANGE TERMINATION PRINCIPLE FOR CONSTRUCTOR BASED LANGUAGES PIERRE HYVERNAT Laboratoire describes an automatic termination checker for a generic first- order call-by-value language in ML style. We arguments of recursive calls evolve during evaluation. The result is a criterion for termination extending

  18. Type-Based Termination, Inflationary Fixed-Points, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abel, Andreas

    Type-Based Termination, Inflationary Fixed-Points, and Mixed Inductive-Coinductive Types Andreas Science (FICS 2012) ETAPS 2012, Tallinn, Estonia 24 March 2012 Andreas Abel (LMU) Type-Based Termination AIM XV 1 / 1 #12;Introduction Aspects of Termination What the talk is about: foundational approach

  19. Termination and Reduction Checking for Higher-Order Logic Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pientka, Brigitte

    Termination and Reduction Checking for Higher-Order Logic Programs Brigitte Pientka Department, we present a syntax-directed termination and reduction checker for higher-order logic programs and output of well-moded predicates. These reduction con- straints are exploited during termination checking

  20. On Termination and Derivation Lengths for Ground Rewrite Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giesl, Juergen

    On Termination and Derivation Lengths for Ground Rewrite Systems Dieter Hofbauer 1 Universit¨at GH@theory.informatik.uni­kassel.de Abstract. It is shown that for terminating ground term rewrite systems the length of derivations a suitable interpretation into the natural numbers. Terminating ground systems are not necessarily

  1. Computer Science at Kent On Modular Termination Proofs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kent, University of

    Computer Science at Kent On Modular Termination Proofs Jonathan C. Martin and Andy King Technical by the Computing Laboratory, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NF, UK. Abstract Reasoning about termination is a key issue in logic program development. One classic technique for proving termination is to construct

  2. On Automating Inductive and Non-Inductive Termination Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamareddine, Fairouz

    On Automating Inductive and Non-Inductive Termination Methods Fairouz Kamareddine and Francois of the function which satis es a notion of terminal prop- erty and then verifying that this construction processPre can only deal with the termination proofs that are inductive. There are however many functions

  3. The Dependency Pair Framework: Combining Techniques for Automated Termination Proofs #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ábrahám, Erika

    The Dependency Pair Framework: Combining Techniques for Automated Termination Proofs # J of the most powerful techniques for automated termination proofs of term rewrite systems. Up to now of new methods for termination analy­ sis. To demonstrate this, we present several new techniques within

  4. On Termination of Integer Linear Loops Joel Ouaknine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    On Termination of Integer Linear Loops Jo¨el Ouaknine Department of Computer Science Oxford con- cerns the termination of simple linear loops of the form: x u ; while Bx c do x Ax + a , where initial integer vectors u, such a loop terminates. The correctness of our algorithm relies

  5. The termination hierarchy for term rewriting Hans Zantema

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giesl, Juergen

    The termination hierarchy for term rewriting Hans Zantema Utrecht University, The Netherlands e-mail: hansz@cs.uu.nl (Tutorial talk) A natural way to prove termination of a term rewriting system is to #12. If the operations are strictly monotone in all arguments then indeed termination of the TRS can be concluded

  6. Termination and Reduction Checking for HigherOrder Logic Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pientka, Brigitte

    Termination and Reduction Checking for Higher­Order Logic Programs Brigitte Pientka Department, we present a syntax­directed termination and reduction checker for higher­order logic programs and output of well­moded predicates. These reduction con­ straints are exploited during termination checking

  7. Termination of Narrowing in Left-Linear Constructor Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vidal, Germán

    [24], partial evaluation [1, 48], refining methods for proving the termination of rewriting [8, 9Termination of Narrowing in Left-Linear Constructor Systems Germ´an Vidal Technical University.g., it forms the basis of functional logic languages). Surprisingly, the termination of narrowing has been

  8. Termination of Narrowing in Left-Linear Constructor Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vidal, Germán

    ], model checking [17], partial evaluation [1, 32], refining methods for proving the terminationTermination of Narrowing in Left-Linear Constructor Systems Germ´an Vidal Technical University in different contexts, ranging from the- orem proving to language design. Surprisingly, the termination of nar

  9. Modular Termination of Basic Narrowing and Equational Unification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escobar, Santiago

    constraint solving [4, 5], partial evaluation [6], and model checking [17], among others. TerminationModular Termination of Basic Narrowing and Equational Unification Mar´ia Alpuente Santiago Escobar steps to a set of unblocked (or basic) positions. In this work, we study the modularity of termination

  10. Semi-continuous Sized Types and Termination Andreas Abel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abel, Andreas

    , and classical applications are total correctness and termination of partial evaluation. In languagesSemi-continuous Sized Types and Termination Andreas Abel Institut für Informatik Ludwig to termination uses sized types: an ordinal bound for the size of a data structure is stored in its type

  11. Growth and Surface Reconstructions of AlN(0001) Films C. D. Lee1*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feenstra, Randall

    ) surface, these structures are determined to contain 2-3 monolayers of excess Al terminating the surface spirals (associated with threading dislocations having full or partial screw character) is found termination, and if not, it can be obtained by performing a post-growth anneal at 800°C for about 10 min

  12. Photovoltaic module electrical termination design requirement study. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mosna, F.J. Jr.; Donlinger, J.

    1980-07-01

    Motorola Inc., in conjunction with ITT Cannon, has conducted a study to develop information to facilitate the selection of existing, commercial, electrical termination hardware for photovoltaic modules and arrays. Details of the study are presented in this volume. Module and array design parameters were investigated and recommendations were developed for use in surveying, evaluating, and comparing electrical termination hardware. Electrical termination selection criteria factors were developed and applied to nine generic termination types in each of the four application sectors. Remote, residential, intermediate and industrial. Existing terminations best suited for photovoltaic modules and arrays were identified. Cost information was developed to identify cost drivers and/or requirements which might lead to cost reductions. The general conclusion is that there is no single generic termination that is best suited for photovoltaic application, but that the appropriate termination is strongly dependent upon the module construction and its support structure as well as the specific application sector.

  13. Method of making hermetic seals for hermetic terminal assemblies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, John S.; Marlino, Laura D.; Ayers, Curtis W.

    2010-04-13

    This invention teaches methods of making a hermetic terminal assembly comprising the steps of: inserting temporary stops, shims and jigs on the bottom face of a terminal assembly thereby blocking assembly core open passageways; mounting the terminal assembly inside a vacuum chamber using a temporary assembly perimeter seal and flange or threaded assembly interfaces; mixing a seal admixture and hardener in a mixer conveyor to form a polymer seal material; conveying the polymer seal material into a polymer reservoir; feeding the polymer seal material from the reservoir through a polymer outlet valve and at least one polymer outlet tube into the terminal assembly core thereby filling interstitial spaces in the core adjacent to service conduits, temporary stop, and the terminal assembly casing; drying the polymer seal material at room temperature thereby hermetically sealing the core of the terminal assembly; removing the terminal assembly from the vacuum chamber, and; removing the temporary stops, shims.

  14. Reproductive Termination in Female Japanese Monkeys: A Comparative Life History Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fedigan, Linda M.

    Reproductive Termination in Female Japanese Monkeys: A Comparative Life History Perspective MARY S; reproductive termination ABSTRACT This study explores the question of reproductive termination (loss used a large sample of completed lives to identify reproductively terminated female Japanese macaques

  15. Variable area fuel cell cooling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kothmann, Richard E. (Churchill Borough, PA)

    1982-01-01

    A fuel cell arrangement having cooling fluid flow passages which vary in surface area from the inlet to the outlet of the passages. A smaller surface area is provided at the passage inlet, which increases toward the passage outlet, so as to provide more uniform cooling of the entire fuel cell. The cooling passages can also be spaced from one another in an uneven fashion.

  16. Reversible Protection and Reactive Patterning of Amine-and Hydroxyl-Terminated Self-Assembled Monolayers on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reversible Protection and Reactive Patterning of Amine- and Hydroxyl-Terminated Self, Wisconsin 53706-1396 Received June 7, 1999 The reversible protection of amine- and hydroxyl MUAM surface. Fmoc is also utilized as a hydroxyl protecting group, as demonstrated by the reaction

  17. Offshore refrigerated LPG loading/unloading terminal using a CALM buoy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonjour, E.L.; Simon, J.M.

    1985-03-01

    In existing Liquefied Petroleum Gases terminals, the transfer of liquefied gases to the tanker is performed via articulated loading arms or flexible hoses, working under quasistatic conditions. The tanker has to be firmly moored alongside a jetty or a process barge in a protected area (such as a harbour in most cases). This paper gives the main results of the development of an offshore refrigerated LPG (-48/sup 0/C) loading/unloading system, using a CALM buoy and LPG floating hoses working under dynamic conditions. The aim of this new concept is to replace the standard harbour structure for loading/unloading refrigerated LPG and to provide a considerable reduction in investments and a greater flexibility regarding the terminal location. The main components of that terminal have been designed so as to enable the loading of a 75 000 cubic meter LPG carrier in 15 hours. The results of static and dynamic low temperature tests on a LPG swivel joint for CALM buoy and LPG floating hoses show that such a SPM terminal is now a realistic solution.

  18. Coordinating Tectons: Bipyridyl Terminated Allenylidene Complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cifuentes, Marie P.; Humphrey, Mark G.; Koutsantonis, George A.; Lengkeek, Nigel A.; Petrie, Simon; Sanford, Vanessa; Schauer, Phil A.; Skelton, Brian W.; Stranger, Robert; White, Allan H.

    2009-01-15

    A series of complexes with {pi}-conjugated carbon chains terminated by bipyridyl moieties has been prepared. These allenylidene complexes were derived from 9-hydroxy-9-ethynyl-4,5-diazafluorene, the preparation of which is reported; the new allenylidene complexes are highly colored with the cumulated carbon chain terminating in a bipyridyl unit providing a site for further coordination. The synthesis, characterization, and X-ray structure determination of trans-[MCl(P{intersection}P){sub 2}{sub {double_bond}}C{sub {double_bond}}C{sub {double_bond}}(4,5-diazafluoren-9-yl)]PF{sub 6} (M = Ru, P{intersection}P = bis(diphenylphosphino)methane (dppm), 1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)ethane (dppe), 1,2-bis(dimethylphosphino)ethane (dmpe); M = Os, P{intersection}P = dppm) are described. The effect of the variation in metal and ligand on electronic and electrochemical characteristics of these complexes has been investigated by using UV-vis, solution electrochemistry, and a combination of these techniques in spectroelectrochemical experiments. DFT calculations have been performed on trans-[RuCl(P{intersection}P){sub 2}{sub {double_bond}}C{sub {double_bond}}C{sub {double_bond}}(4,5-diazafluoren-9-yl)]{sup q} (P{intersection}P = dppm, bis(dimethylphosphino)methane (dmpm); q = -1, 0, +1, +2) and subsequently solvent-corrected calculations with use of COSMO were also undertaken to examine the nature of electronic transitions in various oxidation states.

  19. Surface cleanliness measurement procedure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schroder, Mark Stewart (Hendersonville, NC); Woodmansee, Donald Ernest (Simpsonville, SC); Beadie, Douglas Frank (Greenville, SC)

    2002-01-01

    A procedure and tools for quantifying surface cleanliness are described. Cleanliness of a target surface is quantified by wiping a prescribed area of the surface with a flexible, bright white cloth swatch, preferably mounted on a special tool. The cloth picks up a substantial amount of any particulate surface contamination. The amount of contamination is determined by measuring the reflectivity loss of the cloth before and after wiping on the contaminated system and comparing that loss to a previous calibration with similar contamination. In the alternative, a visual comparison of the contaminated cloth to a contamination key provides an indication of the surface cleanliness.

  20. Research Areas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid youOxygen Generation |Publications TheGashome /Areas Research Areas

  1. A complete characterization of termination of Hans ZANTEMA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    A complete characterization of termination of 0 p 1 q ! 1 r 0 s Hans ZANTEMA Universiteit Utrecht@fmi.uni­passau.de Abstract We completely characterize termination of one­rule string rewriting systems of the form 0 p 1 q ! 1 r 0 s for every choice of positive integers p, q, r, and s. For the simply terminating cases, we

  2. Small Scale LNG Terminals Market Installed Capacity is anticipated...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Although large scale LNG terminals have been preferably constructed across the world till date, the emergence of small demand centers for natural gas within small...

  3. NIOSH publications on video display terminals (revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-06-01

    Materials developed by NIOSH concerning video display terminals (VDTs) comprise the publication. The first section listed citations of reports developed by NIOSH concerning VDTs and possible hazards associated with their use, and contained ordering information for these publications. Types of publications included NIOSH numbered publications, hazard evaluation and technical assistance reports, contract reports, journal articles, book chapters, presentations, and miscellaneous reports. The second section of the report contained full text copies of selected references from the bibliography. These references included testimony before congressional committees, presentations and articles dealing with radiation issues, reproductive outcomes of workers using VDTs the risk of spontaneous abortion, an epidemiologic investigation of electric and magnetic fields and operator exposure, controlling glare problems in the VDT work environment, and the design of rest breaks for VDT operators.

  4. A simulation of the transport and fate of radon-222 derived from thorium-230 low-level waste in the near-surface zone of the Radioactive Waste Management Site in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindstrom, F.T.; Cawlfield, D.E.; Donahue, M.E.; Emer, D.F.; Shott, G.J.

    1993-12-01

    US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A (DOE, 1988) requires performance assessments on all new and existing low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal sites. An integral part of performance assessment is estimating the fluxes of radioactive gases such as radon-220 and radon-222. Data needs pointed out by mathematical models drive site characterization. They provide a logical means of performing the required flux estimations. Thorium-230 waste, consisting largely of thorium hydroxide and thorium oxides, has been approved for disposal in shallow trenches and pits at the LLW Radioactive Waste Management Site in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site. A sophisticated gas transport model, CASCADR8 (Lindstrom et al., 1992b), was used to simulate the transport and fate of radon-222 from its source of origin, nine feet below a closure cap of native soil, through the dry alluvial earth, to its point of release into the atmosphere. CASCADR8 is an M-chain gas-phase radionuclide transport and fate model. It has been tailored to the site-specific needs of the dry desert environment of southern Nevada. It is based on the mass balance principle for each radionuclide and uses gas-phase diffusion as well as barometric pressure-induced advection as its main modes of transport. CASCADR8 uses both reversible and irreversible sorption kinetic rules as well as the usual classical Bateman (1910) M-chain decay rules for its kinetic processes. Worst case radon-222 gas-phase concentrations, as well as surface fluxes, were estimated over 40 days. The maximum flux was then used in an exposure assessment model to estimate the total annual dose equivalent received by a person residing in a standard 2500-square-foot house with 10-foot walls. Results are described.

  5. Battery system including batteries that have a plurality of positive terminals and a plurality of negative terminals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dougherty, Thomas J; Symanski, James S; Kuempers, Joerg A; Miles, Ronald C; Hansen, Scott A; Smith, Nels R; Taghikhani, Majid; Mrotek, Edward N; Andrew, Michael G

    2014-01-21

    A lithium battery for use in a vehicle includes a container, a plurality of positive terminals extending from a first end of the lithium battery, and a plurality of negative terminals extending from a second end of the lithium battery. The plurality of positive terminals are provided in a first configuration and the plurality of negative terminals are provided in a second configuration, the first configuration differing from the second configuration. A battery system for use in a vehicle may include a plurality of electrically connected lithium cells or batteries.

  6. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2007. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company, Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Area IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Ning [Santa Susana Field Laboratory, CA (United States). The Boeing Company; Rutherford, Phil [Santa Susana Field Laboratory, CA (United States). The Boeing Company; Lenox, Art [Santa Susana Field Laboratory, CA (United States). The Boeing Company; Blair, Lori [Santa Susana Field Laboratory, CA (United States). The Boeing Company; Amar, Ravnesh [Santa Susana Field Laboratory, CA (United States). The Boeing Company; Costa, Paul [Santa Susana Field Laboratory, CA (United States). The Boeing Company; Galvez, Lydia [Santa Susana Field Laboratory, CA (United States). The Boeing Company; Jameson, Blythe [Santa Susana Field Laboratory, CA (United States). The Boeing Company; Galvez, Lydia [Santa Susana Field Laboratory, CA (United States). The Boeing Company

    2008-09-30

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2007 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeing’s Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). The Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations in Area IV included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities in the area involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing non-nuclear liquid metal fast breeder components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988; all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. In May 2007, the D&D operations in Area IV were suspended until DOE completes the SSFL Area IV Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). The environmental monitoring programs were continued throughout the year. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2007 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling. All radioactive wastes are processed for disposal at DOE disposal sites and/or other licensed sites approved by DOE for radioactive waste disposal. No liquid radioactive wastes were released into the environment in 2007.

  7. y:\\academic staff relations\\career processes\\terminations\\forms\\termination of employment -vacation payout 2014-2015.doc 14-12-22 hiTERMINATION OF EMPLOYMENT VACATION PAYOUT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calgary, University of

    y:\\academic staff relations\\career processes\\terminations\\forms\\termination of employment - vacation payout 2014-2015.doc 14-12-22 hiTERMINATION OF EMPLOYMENT ­ VACATION PAYOUT DURING 2014 - 2015/FACULTY: _________________________________________________ TERMINATION DATE: _________________________________________________ A. A staff member is expected to take his

  8. Bacterial Diversity in Livestock Manure Composts as Characterized by Terminal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tiquia-Arashiro, Sonia M.

    Bacterial Diversity in Livestock Manure Composts as Characterized by Terminal Restriction Fragment in the decomposition of organic matter during the composting process. However, microbial communities active in composts of bacterial communities in livestock manure compost was determined based on terminal restriction fragment

  9. TERMINATION OF NONSIMPLE REWRITE SYSTEMS CHARLES GLEN HOOT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dershowitz, Nachum

    TERMINATION OF NON­SIMPLE REWRITE SYSTEMS BY CHARLES GLEN HOOT B.A., University of California, San Diego, 1982 M.A., Princeton University, 1985 THESIS Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements at Urbana­Champaign, 1996 Urbana, Illinois #12; TERMINATION OF NON­SIMPLE REWRITE SYSTEMS Charles Glen Hoot

  10. TERMINATION OF NON-SIMPLE REWRITE SYSTEMS CHARLES GLEN HOOT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dershowitz, Nachum

    TERMINATION OF NON-SIMPLE REWRITE SYSTEMS BY CHARLES GLEN HOOT B.A., University of California, San Diego, 1982 M.A., Princeton University, 1985 THESIS Submitted in partial ful llment of the requirements at Urbana-Champaign, 1996 Urbana, Illinois #12;TERMINATION OF NON-SIMPLE REWRITE SYSTEMS Charles Glen Hoot

  11. Columbia River : Terminal Fisheries Research Report : Annual Report 1994.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirose, Paul; Miller, Marc; Hill, Jim

    1996-12-01

    In 1993 the Northwest Power Planning Council recommended in its Strategy for Salmon that terminal fishing sites be identified and developed. The Council called on the Bonneville Power Administration to fund a 10-year study to investigate the feasibility of creating and expanding terminal known stock fisheries in the Columbia River Basin.

  12. Supporting on-line material for: Topologically protected conduction state at carbon foam surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tománek, David

    views of the structure that better illustrate the type of termination and illustrate partial hydrogen of sp3 - and sp2 -terminated n-honeycomb thick slabs with n = 3, 5, 7 is shown in Fig. S1. The slab are both at the surface and in the bulk of these thick slabs. sp3sp2 sp3 sp2 sp3 sp2 sp3 sp2 sp3 terminated

  13. Initiate Job Termination Request Salaried Job This job aid provides the steps for initiating a Job Termination Request form from the Manager Self

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calgary, University of

    Page 1 Initiate Job Termination Request ­ Salaried Job Purpose This job aid provides the steps for initiating a Job Termination Request form from the Manager Self Service menu. This process is for Voluntary Terminations only. Please see your HR Services team for support with involuntary terminations. Complete

  14. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2009. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Area IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Ning; Rutherford, Phil; Amar, Ravnesh

    2010-09-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2009 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeing’s Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). The Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations in Area IV included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities in the area involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing non-nuclear liquid metal fast breeder reactor components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. Liquid metal research and development ended in 2002. Since May 2007, the D&D operations in Area IV have been suspended by the DOE, but the environmental monitoring and characterization programs have continued. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2009 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling.

  15. Annual Site Environmental Report, Department of Energy Operations at the Energy Technology Engineering Center – Area IV, Santa Susana Field Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frazee, Brad; Hay, Scott; Wondolleck, John; Sorrels, Earl; Rutherford, Phil; Dassler, David; Jones, John

    2015-05-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2014 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the DOE at Area IV of the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). The ETEC, a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations in Area IV included development, fabrication, operation and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities in the area involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing non-nuclear liquid metal fast breeder reactor components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward environmental restoration and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. Liquid metal research and development ended in 2002. Since May 2007, the D&D operations in Area IV have been suspended by the DOE, but the environmental monitoring and characterization programs have continued. Results of the radiological monitoring program continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling.

  16. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2010. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Area IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Ning; Rutherford, Phil; Amar, Ravnesh

    2011-09-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2010 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeing’s Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). The Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations in Area IV included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities in the area involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing non-nuclear liquid metal fast breeder reactor components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. Liquid metal research and development ended in 2002. Since May 2007, the D&D operations in Area IV have been suspended by the DOE, but the environmental monitoring and characterization programs have continued. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2010 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling.

  17. Site Environmental Report For Calendar Year 2012. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Area IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Ning; Rutherford, Phil; Dassler, David

    2013-09-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2012 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeing’s Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). The Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations in Area IV included development, fabrication, operation and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities in the area involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing non-nuclear liquid metal fast breeder reactor components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward environmental restoration and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. Liquid metal research and development ended in 2002. Since May 2007, the D&D operations in Area IV have been suspended by the DOE, but the environmental monitoring and characterization programs have continued. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2012 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling.

  18. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2011. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Area IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Ning; Rutherford, Phil; Dassler, David

    2012-09-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2011 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeing’s Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). The Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations in Area IV included development, fabrication, operation and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities in the area involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing non-nuclear liquid metal fast breeder reactor components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward environmental restoration and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. Liquid metal research and development ended in 2002. Since May 2007, the D&D operations in Area IV have been suspended by the DOE, but the environmental monitoring and characterization programs have continued. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2011 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling.

  19. Chemical treatment for silica-containing glass surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grabbe, A.; Michalske, T.A.; Smith, W.L.

    1998-04-07

    Dehydroxylated, silica-containing, glass surfaces are known to be at least partially terminated by strained siloxane rings. According to the invention, a surface of this kind is exposed to a selected silane compound or mixture of silane compounds under reaction-promoting conditions. The ensuing reaction results in opening of the strained siloxane rings, and termination of surface atoms by chemical species, such as organic or organosilicon species, having desirable properties. These species can be chosen to provide qualities such as hydrophobicity, or improved coupling to a polymeric coating. 11 figs.

  20. Chemical treatment for silica-containing glass surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grabbe, Alexis (Albuquerque, NM); Michalske, Terry Arthur (Cedar Crest, NM); Smith, William Larry (Albuquerque, NM)

    1999-01-01

    Dehydroxylated, silica-containing, glass surfaces are known to be at least partially terminated by strained siloxane rings. According to the invention, a surface of this kind is exposed to a selected silane compound or mixture of silane compounds under reaction-promoting conditons. The ensuing reaction results in opening of the strained siloxane rings, and termination of surface atoms by chemical species, such as organic or organosilicon species, having desirable properties. These species can be chosen to provide qualities such as hydrophobicity, or improved coupling to a polymeric coating.

  1. Chemical treatment for silica-containing glass surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grabbe, Alexis (Albuquerque, NM); Michalske, Terry Arthur (Bernalillo, NM); Smith, William Larry (Albuquerque, NM)

    1999-01-01

    Dehydroxylated, silica-containing, glass surfaces are known to be at least partially terminated by strained siloxane rings. According to the invention, a surface of this kind is exposed to a selected silane compound or mixture of silane compounds under reaction-promoting conditions. The ensuing reaction results in opening of the strained siloxane rings, and termination of surface atoms by chemical species, such as organic or organosilicon species, having desirable properties. These species can be chosen to provide qualities such as hydrophobicity, or improved coupling to a polymeric coating.

  2. Chemical treatment for silica-containing glass surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grabbe, Alexis (Albuquerque, NM); Michalske, Terry Arthur (Cedar Crest, NM); Smith, William Larry (Albuquerque, NM)

    1998-01-01

    Dehydroxylated, silica-containing, glass surfaces are known to be at least partially terminated by strained siloxane rings. According to the invention, a surface of this kind is exposed to a selected silane compound or mixture of silane compounds under reaction-promoting conditions. The ensuing reaction results in opening of the strained siloxane rings, and termination of surface atoms by chemical species, such as organic or organosilicon species, having desirable properties. These species can be chosen to provide qualities such as hydrophobicity, or improved coupling to a polymeric coating.

  3. Method for chemical surface modification of fumed silica particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grabbe, Alexis (Albuquerque, NM); Michalske, Terry Arthur (Cedar Crest, NM); Smith, William Larry (Albuquerque, NM)

    1999-01-01

    Dehydroxylated, silica-containing, glass surfaces are known to be at least partially terminated by strained siloxane rings. According to the invention, a surface of this kind is exposed to a selected silane compound or mixture of silane compounds under reaction-promoting conditions. The ensuing reaction results in opening of the strained siloxane rings, and termination of surface atoms by chemical species, such as organic or organosilicon species, having desirable properties. These species can be chosen to provide qualities such as hydrophobicity, or improved coupling to a polymeric coating.

  4. Method for chemical surface modification of fumed silica particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grabbe, A.; Michalske, T.A.; Smith, W.L.

    1999-05-11

    Dehydroxylated, silica-containing, glass surfaces are known to be at least partially terminated by strained siloxane rings. According to the invention, a surface of this kind is exposed to a selected silane compound or mixture of silane compounds under reaction-promoting conditions. The ensuing reaction results in opening of the strained siloxane rings, and termination of surface atoms by chemical species, such as organic or organosilicon species, having desirable properties. These species can be chosen to provide qualities such as hydrophobicity, or improved coupling to a polymeric coating. 11 figs.

  5. Time-resolved energy transfer from single chloride-terminated nanocrystals to graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ajayi, O. A. E-mail: cww2104@columbia.edu; Wong, C. W. E-mail: cww2104@columbia.edu; Anderson, N. C.; Wolcott, A.; Owen, J. S.; Cotlet, M.; Petrone, N.; Hone, J.; Gu, T.; Gesuele, F.

    2014-04-28

    We examine the time-resolved resonance energy transfer of excitons from single n-butyl amine-bound, chloride-terminated nanocrystals to two-dimensional graphene through time-correlated single photon counting. The radiative biexponential lifetime kinetics and blinking statistics of the individual surface-modified nanocrystal elucidate the non-radiative decay channels. Blinking modification as well as a 4× reduction in spontaneous emission were observed with the short chloride and n-butylamine ligands, probing the energy transfer pathways for the development of graphene-nanocrystal nanophotonic devices.

  6. A study of carbon-14 of paleoatmospheric methane for the last glacial termination from ancient glacial ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petrenko, Vasilii Victorovich

    2008-01-01

    for the last glacial termination." xii VITA Education Ph.D.the Last Glacial Termination: a horizontal ice core.the Last Glacial Termination: a horizontal ice core.

  7. Physical properties of naked DNA influence nucleosome positioning and correlate with transcription start and termination sites in yeast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deniz, Özgen; Flores, Oscar; Battistini, Federica; Pérez, Alberto; Soler-López, Montserrat; Orozco, Modesto

    2011-01-01

    with transcription start and termination sites in yeast. BMCtranscription start and termination sites in yeast Özgenand TTS (Transcription Termination Site) (at least in yeast)

  8. Floating LNG terminal and LNG carrier interaction analysis for side-by-side offloading operation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuriakose, Vinu P.

    2005-11-01

    Floating LNG terminals are a relatively new concept with the first such terminal in the world installed this year. The hydrodynamic interaction effects between the terminal and a LNG carrier in a side-by-side offloading arrangement is investigated...

  9. Initiation propagation and termination of elastodynamic ruptures associated with segmentation of faults and shaking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Bruce E.

    Initiation propagation and termination of elastodynamic ruptures associated with segmentation the initiation, propagation, and termination of ruptures and their relationship to fault geometry and shaking of terminations near fault ends; and persistent propagation directivity effects. Taking advantage of long

  10. Surface Soil

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Surface Soil Surface Soil We compare local soil samples with samples collected from northern New Mexico locations that are beyond the range of potential influence from normal...

  11. Solution of the p(2 2) NiO(111) surface structure using direct methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marks, Laurence D.

    -packed layers of oxygen and nickel atoms: the top surface layer is nickel terminated with 3/4 of the nickel/4 of the nickel atoms missing. The structure is consistent with theo- retical predictions of octopolar termination and electronic structure of the proposed reconstruction. Calculated partial atomic charges and magnetic moments

  12. Potential impacts on advanced technologies on the ATC capacity of high-density terminal areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simpson, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    Advanced technologies for airborne systems (automatic flight control, flight displays, navigation) and for ground ATC systems (digital communications, improved surveillance and tracking, automated decision-making) create ...

  13. Control of Aircraft in the Terminal Manoeuvring Area using Parallelised Sequential Monte Carlo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eele, Alison; Maciejowski, Jan; Chau, Thomas; Luk, Wayne

    and vertical angle P? where ?i is described later in Equation 12. Constraint 2d ensures that the aircraft is pointing towards the runway assuming an East to West landing without significant crosswind. Finally constraint 2e limits the airspeed (Pvs)at which...

  14. An expert system for generating terminal area flight paths for arriving aircraft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadoune, Michel

    Air-traffic congestion and frequent saturation of major airports require improved Air Traffic Control procedures to make the flow of traffic more uniform and increase system capacity. Advanced technologies allow an increased ...

  15. Prediction of terminal-area weather penetration based on operational factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Yi-Hsin, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01

    As demand for air transportation grows, the existing air traffic control system is being pushed to capacity. This is especially true during weather events. However, the degree to which weather impacts airspace capacity, ...

  16. Optimization of airport terminal-area air traffic operations under uncertain weather conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfeil, Diana Michalek

    2011-01-01

    Convective weather is responsible for large delays and widespread disruptions in the U.S. National Airspace System, especially during summer. Although Air Traffic Flow Management algorithms exist to schedule and route ...

  17. Evaluation of research and development for terminal isolation of nuclear wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burton, B.W.

    1982-08-01

    The National Waste Terminal Storage program is responsible for identifying and constructing a geologic repository for spent reactor fuel, high-level waste, and transuranic waste. Extensive research and development work is in progress in the areas of site selection, waste treatment and waste form development, model development and validation, and long-term repository performance assessment. Many potential technologies are under investigation, but specific technologies cannot be identified until a repository site is selected. It is too early in the program to assess the adequacy of environmental control technologies for deep geologic disposal.

  18. Transfer passenger needs at airports : human factors in terminal design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brillembourg, Marie-Claire

    1982-01-01

    This thesis analyzes the needs of particular users of airport: transfer passengers. The object of this work has been to produce a set of design guidelines for terminals. these guidelines are framed upon a user-need survey ...

  19. Terminal control of a variable-stability slender reentry vehicle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karmondy, Matthew T

    2008-01-01

    Various terminal control schemes are applied to a proposed slender reentry vehicle, controlled by two separately-articulating flaps. The flap deflections are summarized as symmetric and asymmetric flap deflections; the ...

  20. A Terminal Molybdenum Arsenide Complex Synthesized from Yellow Arsenic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curley, John J.

    A terminal molybdenum arsenide complex is synthesized in one step from the reactive As4 molecule. The properties of this complex with its arsenic atom ligand are discussed in relation to the analogous nitride and phosphide ...

  1. Reachability and Termination Analysis of Concurrent Quantum Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nengkun Yu; Mingsheng Ying

    2012-06-09

    We introduce a Markov chain model of concurrent quantum programs. This model is a quantum generalization of Hart, Sharir and Pnueli's probabilistic concurrent programs. Some characterizations of the reachable space, uniformly repeatedly reachable space and termination of a concurrent quantum program are derived by the analysis of their mathematical structures. Based on these characterizations, algorithms for computing the reachable space and uniformly repeatedly reachable space and for deciding the termination are given.

  2. Environmental resources of selected areas of Hawaii: Geological hazards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staub, W.P.; Reed, R.M.

    1995-03-01

    This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background scientific data and related information collected on geologic hazards during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The US Department of Energy (DOE) published a notice withdrawing its Notice of Intent to prepare the HGP-EIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. This report presents a review of current information on geologic hazards in the Hawaiian Islands. Interrelationships among these hazards are discussed. Probabilities of occurrence of given geologic hazards are provided in various regions where sufficient geologic or historical data are available. Most of the information contained herein is compiled from recent US Geological Survey (USGS) publications and USGS open-file reports related to this project. This report describes the natural geologic hazards present in the area and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts. Geologic hazards originate both onshore and offshore. Onshore geologic hazards such as volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, surface rupture, landslides, uplift and subsidence occur mainly on the southern third of the island of Hawaii (hereinafter referred to as Hawaii). Offshore geologic hazards are more widely distributed throughout the Hawaiian Islands. Examples of offshore geologic hazards are submarine landslides, turbidity currents, and seismic sea waves (tsunamis).

  3. GAP-independent termination of photoreceptor light response by excess gamma subunit of the cGMP-phosphodiesterase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    of photoreceptor signal termination. Invest Oph- thalmol VisMolecular GAP-Independent Termination of Photoreceptor Light

  4. Electronic Structure of Diamond Surfaces Functionalized by Ru(tpy)2 Ioannis Zegkinoglou,,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Himpsel, Franz J.

    in photocatalysis and photovoltaics, is compared to a hydrogen- terminated diamond surface as a reference. Bulk. The implications of using diamond films as inert electron donors in photocatalysis and dye-sensitized solar cells

  5. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2006. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Area IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Ning; Rutherford, Phil

    2007-09-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2006 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeing’s Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). In the past, the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations in Area IV included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities in the area involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing non-nuclear liquid metal fast breeder components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988; all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. Closure of the liquid metal test facilities began in 1996. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2006 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling.

  6. Molecular dynamics studies of interfacial water at the alumina surface.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Argyris, Dr. Dimitrios [University of Oklahoma; Ho, Thomas [ORNL; Cole, David [Ohio State University

    2011-01-01

    Interfacial water properties at the alumina surface were investigated via all-atom equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations at ambient temperature. Al-terminated and OH-terminated alumina surfaces were considered to assess the structural and dynamic behavior of the first few hydration layers in contact with the substrates. Density profiles suggest water layering up to {approx}10 {angstrom} from the solid substrate. Planar density distribution data indicate that water molecules in the first interfacial layer are organized in well-defined patterns dictated by the atomic terminations of the alumina surface. Interfacial water exhibits preferential orientation and delayed dynamics compared to bulk water. Water exhibits bulk-like behavior at distances greater than {approx}10 {angstrom} from the substrate. The formation of an extended hydrogen bond network within the first few hydration layers illustrates the significance of water?water interactions on the structural properties at the interface.

  7. CAH TERMINATION POLICY All Exit Checklist activities must be conducted in accordance with all university policies and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    CAH TERMINATION POLICY All Exit Checklist activities must be conducted in accordance with all://hr.ucf.edu/files/EmployeeExitQuestionnaire.pdf · Termination Checklist at: https://hr.ucf.edu/files/TerminationChecklist.pdf CAH TERMINATION PROCEDURES assigned to him/her. Specific PeopleSoft access should be terminated as well. Terminating employees must

  8. VCU Human Resources November 14, 2011 Instructions for Termination ePAF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammack, Richard

    VCU Human Resources November 14, 2011 Instructions for Termination ePAF TERME and TERMJ Overview We have revised the termination process and related ePAFs to help improve the efficiency and tracking of termination information. Effective July 26, 2010, Personnel Administrators (PAs) must submit termination e

  9. Distributed Termination Detection for Dynamic D.M. Dhamdhere Sridhar Iyer E.K.K.Reddy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iyer, Sridhar

    Distributed Termination Detection for Dynamic Systems D.M. Dhamdhere Sridhar Iyer E.K.K.Reddy Dept of Computer Science IIT Bombay Mumbai, INDIA Abstract A symmetric algorithm for detecting the termination Distributed algorithms, Distributed computation, Distributed termination, Dynamic systems, Termination

  10. Termination of Domestic Partnership Signature of faculty/staff/student domestic partner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    Termination of Domestic Partnership Signature of faculty/staff/student domestic partner Printed as of ________________________. I certify I have mailed a copy of this Termination to my above named former domestic partner. We the domestic partnership is terminated. In the event more than one such Termination of Domestic Partnership

  11. Properties of the termination shock observed by Voyager 2 and J. D. Richardson3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, John

    Properties of the termination shock observed by Voyager 2 H. Li,1,2 C. Wang,1 and J. D. Richardson3] In August 2007, Voyager 2 reached the termination shock and entered the heliosheath at a distance of about, the termination shock moved back and forth, and Voyager 2 crossed the termination shock multiple times. We use

  12. Dropwise Condensation on Micro- and Nanostructured Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miljkovic, Nenad

    In this review we cover recent developments in the area of surface- enhanced dropwise condensation against the background of earlier work. The development of fabrication techniques to create surface structures at the micro- ...

  13. 2014-03-06 Issuance: Test Procedures for Packaged Terminal Air Conditioners and Packaged Terminal Heat Pumps; Notice of Proposed Rulemaking

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a pre-publication Federal Register notice of proposed rulemaking regarding test procedures for packaged terminal air conditioners and packaged terminal heat pumps, as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary on March 6, 2014.

  14. Tools for measuring surface cleanliness

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schroder, Mark Stewart (Hendersonville, NC); Woodmansee, Donald Ernest (Simpsonville, SC); Beadie, Douglas Frank (Greenville, SC)

    2002-01-01

    A procedure and tools for quantifying surface cleanliness are described. Cleanliness of a target surface is quantified by wiping a prescribed area of the surface with a flexible, bright white cloth swatch, preferably mounted on a special tool. The cloth picks up a substantial amount of any particulate surface contamination. The amount of contamination is determined by measuring the reflectivity loss of the cloth before and after wiping on the contaminated system and comparing that loss to a previous calibration with similar contamination. In the alternative, a visual comparison of the contaminated cloth to a contamination key provides an indication of the surface cleanliness.

  15. Cooled electrical terminal assembly and device incorporating same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beihoff, Bruce C.; Radosevich, Lawrence D.; Phillips, Mark G.; Kehl, Dennis L.; Kaishian, Steven C.; Kannenberg, Daniel G.

    2005-05-24

    A terminal structure provides interfacing with power electronics circuitry and external circuitry. The thermal support may receive one or more power electronic circuits. The support may aid in removing heat from the terminal structure and the circuits through fluid circulating through the support. The support may form a shield from both external EMI/RFI and from interference generated by operation of the power electronic circuits. Features may be provided to permit and enhance connection of the circuitry to external circuitry, such as improved terminal configurations. Modular units may be assembled that may be coupled to electronic circuitry via plug-in arrangements or through interface with a backplane or similar mounting and interconnecting structures.

  16. Cooled electrical terminal assembly and device incorporating same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beihoff, Bruce C.; Radosevich, Lawrence D.; Phillips, Mark G.; Kehl, Dennis L.; Kaishian, Steven C.; Kannenberg, Daniel G.

    2006-08-22

    A terminal structure provides interfacing with power electronics circuitry and external circuitry. The thermal support may receive one or more power electronic circuits. The support may aid in removing heat from the terminal structure and the circuits through fluid circulating through the support. The support may form a shield from both external EMI/RFI and from interference generated by operation of the power electronic circuits. Features may be provided to permit and enhance connection of the circuitry to external circuitry, such as improved terminal configurations. Modular units may be assembled that may be coupled to electronic circuitry via plug-in arrangements or through interface with a backplane or similar mounting and interconnecting structures.

  17. Impurity stabilized near-surface phase on ion bombarded a-Fe2O3(0001)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marks, Laurence D.

    broader range of oxygen partial pressures than has been previously observed in the literature. Conversely) diffraction patterns indicative of a bulk hematite termination. � 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved or oxygen terminated (1 · 1), Fe3O4, and so-called bi-phase selvedges on the (0001) surface of hematite

  18. Role of chemical termination in edge contact to graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Qun; Guo, Jing, E-mail: guoj@ufl.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Edge contacts to graphene can offer excellent contact properties. Role of different chemical terminations is examined by using ab initio density functional theory and quantum transport simulations. It is found that edge termination by group VI elements O and S offers considerably lower contact resistance compared to H and group VII element F. The results can be understood by significantly larger binding energy and shorter binding distance between the metal contact and these group VI elements, which results in considerably lower interface potential barrier and larger transmission. The qualitative conclusion applies to a variety of contact metal materials.

  19. Static power reduction for midpoint-terminated busses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coteus, Paul W. (Yorktown Heights, NY); Takken, Todd (Brewster, NY)

    2011-01-18

    A memory system is disclosed which is comprised of a memory controller and addressable memory devices such as DRAMs. The invention provides a programmable register to control the high vs. low drive state of each bit of a memory system address and control bus during periods of bus inactivity. In this way, termination voltage supply current can be minimized, while permitting selected bus bits to be driven to a required state. This minimizes termination power dissipation while not affecting memory system performance. The technique can be extended to work for other high-speed busses as well.

  20. Base drive circuit for a four-terminal power Darlington

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Fred C. (Blacksburg, VA); Carter, Roy A. (Salem, VA)

    1983-01-01

    A high power switching circuit which utilizes a four-terminal Darlington transistor block to improve switching speed, particularly in rapid turn-off. Two independent reverse drive currents are utilized during turn off in order to expel the minority carriers of the Darlington pair at their own charge sweep-out rate. The reverse drive current may be provided by a current transformer, the secondary of which is tapped to the base terminal of the power stage of the Darlington block. In one application, the switching circuit is used in each power switching element in a chopper-inverter drive of an electric vehicle propulsion system.

  1. Wildlife Management Areas (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Certain sites in Florida are designated as wildlife management areas, and construction and development is heavily restricted in these areas.

  2. Designing liquid repellent surfaces for fabrics, feathers and fog

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chhatre, Shreerang S. (Shreerang Sharad)

    2013-01-01

    Omniphobicity refers to a property of surfaces which are not wetted by water, oils, alcohols and other low surface tension liquids. Robust omniphobic surfaces can be applied in many areas including fabrics with chemical / ...

  3. Finding Large Aperture Fractures in Geothermal Resource Areas...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fractures in Geothermal Resource Areas Using a Three-Component Long-Offset Surface Seismic Survey Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011....

  4. Level set methods to compute minimal surfaces in a medium with ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-06-06

    terms of area among all surfaces with periodic boundary conditions. Even though it ... Do the numerical results produce minimal surfaces that enter the exclusions orthogonally? ... We search for the surface with least area measured in this way.

  5. Variable area light reflecting assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Howard, T.C.

    1986-12-23

    Device is described for tracking daylight and projecting it into a building. The device tracks the sun and automatically adjusts both the orientation and area of the reflecting surface. The device may be mounted in either a wall or roof of a building. Additionally, multiple devices may be employed in a light shaft in a building, providing daylight to several different floors. The preferred embodiment employs a thin reflective film as the reflecting device. One edge of the reflective film is fixed, and the opposite end is attached to a spring-loaded take-up roller. As the sun moves across the sky, the take-up roller automatically adjusts the angle and surface area of the film. Additionally, louvers may be mounted at the light entrance to the device to reflect incoming daylight in an angle perpendicular to the device to provide maximum reflective capability when daylight enters the device at non-perpendicular angles. 9 figs.

  6. Variable area light reflecting assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Howard, Thomas C. (Raleigh, NC)

    1986-01-01

    Device for tracking daylight and projecting it into a building. The device tracks the sun and automatically adjusts both the orientation and area of the reflecting surface. The device may be mounted in either a wall or roof of a building. Additionally, multiple devices may be employed in a light shaft in a building, providing daylight to several different floors. The preferred embodiment employs a thin reflective film as the reflecting device. One edge of the reflective film is fixed, and the opposite end is attached to a spring-loaded take-up roller. As the sun moves across the sky, the take-up roller automatically adjusts the angle and surface area of the film. Additionally, louvers may be mounted at the light entrance to the device to reflect incoming daylight in an angle perpendicular to the device to provide maximum reflective capability when daylight enters the device at non-perpendicular angles.

  7. Mixed Nash Equilibria in Concurrent Terminal-Reward Games

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doyen, Laurent

    Mixed Nash Equilibria in Concurrent Terminal-Reward Games Patricia Bouyer, Nicolas Markey, and Daniel Stan LSV ­ CNRS & ENS Cachan ­ France Abstract We study mixed-strategy Nash equilibria states with a value for each player). We show undecidability of the existence of a constrained Nash

  8. Snowball Earth termination by destabilization of equatorial permafrost methane clathrate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kennedy, Martin J.

    LETTERS Snowball Earth termination by destabilization of equatorial permafrost methane clathrate-gassing during post-glacial oceanic overturn7 or methane hydrate destabilization8­10 . Here we report the broadest range of oxygen isotope values yet measured in mar- ine sediments (225% to 112%) in methane seeps

  9. Prfungen 1. Termin FS 2015 Bachelor / Master Chemie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mühlemann, Oliver

    Prüfungen 1. Termin FS 2015 Bachelor / Master Chemie Bachelor Biochemie Grundstudium Pharmazie to be handed in. Achtung: Die Wiederholungsprüfungstermine aus dem Bereich Chemie, Biochemie und Biologie make sure you always sign-up for the first exam date. Departement für Chemie und Biochemie

  10. Conservation of Heat Energy at Hot Petroleum Products Terminals 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, J. C.; Graham, R. M.

    1981-01-01

    Exxon operates several terminals which store asphalt and heavy fuel oil. Due to the rising cost of fuels, Exxon initiated a study to identify economic investments which would reduce the fuel needed to heat these products. First, fuel usage at four...

  11. TECHNICAL POLLUTION PREVENTION GUIDE FOR DRY BULK TERMINALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;TECHNICAL POLLUTION PREVENTION GUIDE FOR DRY BULK TERMINALS IN THE LOWER FRASER BASIN DOE FRAP 1996-19 Prepared for: Enviromnent Canada Environmental Protection Fraser Pollution Abatement North's report was fùnded by Environment Canada under the Fraser River Action Plan through its Fraser Pollution

  12. Despite its chaotic and disrupted opening, Heathrow's Terminal 5 is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are famous for late completion and huge budget overruns. BAA, the company responsible for T5, avoided into the planning and construction of Terminal 5 at London's Heathrow airport shows how organisations can learn from major infrastructure programmes to improve their management of future projects. #12;Between June 2005

  13. BARNARD COLLEGE Termination of a Research Protocol Involving Human Subjects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BARNARD COLLEGE Termination of a Research Protocol Involving Human Subjects Title: Principal) Study subjects: A total of _____ subjects were enrolled since the last report to the IRB. Since initial study approval on _____________ a total of _____ subjects have been enrolled in this study and ____ have

  14. QER- Comment of Lake Charles Harbor & Terminal District

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Good Afternoon, Please find the Lake Charles Harbor and Terminal District’s comments on Infrastructure Constraints in re: the QER Investigation hearing scheduled for Bismarck, ND on August 8, 2014. Please include these comments in the public record of the hearing. Thank you.

  15. Area Activation 1 Running Head: AREA ACTIVATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomplun, Marc

    Area Activation 1 Running Head: AREA ACTIVATION Advancing Area Activation towards a General Model at Boston 100 Morrissey Boulevard Boston, MA 02125-3393 USA Phone: 617-287-6485 Fax: 617-287-6433 e. Without great effort, human observers clearly outperform every current artificial vision system in tasks

  16. Reducing the In2O3(111) Surface Results in Ordered Indium Adatoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, Margareta; Seiler, Steffen; Meyer, Bernd; Boatner, Lynn A; Schmid, M.; Diebold, U.

    2014-01-01

    The In2O3(111) surface can be transformed from an oxidized bulk termination to one that is covered by single In adatoms. As each adatom sits at one specific site within the surface unit cell they form a well-ordered (1 1) superstructure. Annealing at 500 C in O2 or in ultrahigh vacuum results in a fully reversible conversion between these two surface terminations; this transformation and intermediate stages were followed with Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM). Formation of this novel surface structure under reducing conditions is corroborated by Density Functional Theory (DFT). The reduced adatom-covered and the oxidized In2O3(111) surfaces are expected to exhibit different chemical and electronic properties, which can easily be exploited by the facile and reversible switching between the two terminations.

  17. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2013. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company, Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Area IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-06-30

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2013 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). The Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations in Area IV included development, fabrication, operation and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities in the area involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing non-nuclear liquid metal fast breeder reactor components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward environmental restoration and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. Liquid metal research and development ended in 2002. Since May 2007, the D&D operations in Area IV have been suspended by the DOE, but the environmental monitoring and characterization programs have continued. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2013 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling. Due to the suspension of D&D activities in Area IV, no effluents were released into the atmosphere during 2013. Therefore, the potential radiation dose to the general public through airborne release was zero. Similarly, the radiation dose to an offsite member of the public (maximally exposed individual) due to direct radiation from SSFL is indistinguishable from background. All radioactive wastes are processed for disposal at DOE disposal sites and/or other licensed sites approved by DOE for radioactive waste disposal. No liquid radioactive wastes were released into the environment in 2013.

  18. Method for producing functionally graded nanocrystalline layer on metal surface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ajayi, Oyelayo O. (Oswego, IL); Hershberger, Jeffrey G. (Berwyn, IL)

    2010-03-23

    An improved process for the creation or formation of nanocrystalline layers on substrates' surfaces is provided. The process involves "prescuffing" the surface of a substrate such as a metal by allowing friction to occur on the surface by a load-bearing entity making rubbing contact and moving along and on the substrate's surface. The "prescuffing" action is terminated when the coefficient of friction between the surface and the noise is rising significantly. Often, the significant rise in the coefficient of friction is signaled by a change in pitch of the scuffing action sound emanating from the buffeted surface. The "prescuffing" gives rise to a harder and smoother surface which withstands better any inadequate lubrication that may take place when the "prescuffed" surface is contacted by other surfaces.

  19. Restoration of areas disturbed by site studies for a mined commercial radioactive waste repository: The Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandt, C.A.; Rickard, W.H. Jr.; Biehert, R.W.; Newell, R.L.; Page, T.L.

    1989-01-01

    The Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) was undertaken to environmentally characterize a portion of the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site in Washington State as a potential host for the nation's first mined commercial nuclear waste repository. Studies were terminated by Congress in 1987. Between 1976 and 1987, 72 areas located across the Hanford Site were disturbed by the BWIP. These areas include borehole pads, a large Exploratory Shaft Facility, and the Near Surface Test Facility. Most boreholes were cleared of vegetation, leveled, and stabilized with a thick layer of compacted pit-run gravel and sand. The Near Surface Test Facility consists of three mined adits, a rock-spoils bench, and numerous support facilities. Restoration began in 1988 with the objective of returning sites to pre-existing conditions using native species. The Hanford Site retains some of the last remnants of the shrub-steppe ecosystem in Washington. The primary constraints to restoring native vegetation at Hanford are low precipitation and the presence of cheatgrass, an extremely capable alien competitor. 5 figs.

  20. Fractured rock modeling in the National Waste Terminal Storage Program: a review of requirements and status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    St. John, C.; Krug, A.; Key, S.; Monsees, J.

    1983-05-01

    Generalized computer codes capable of forming the basis for numerical models of fractured rock masses are being used within the NWTS program. Little additional development of these codes is considered justifiable, except in the area of representation of discrete fractures. On the other hand, model preparation requires definition of medium-specific constitutive descriptions and site characteristics and is therefore legitimately conducted by each of the media-oriented projects within the National Waste Terminal Storage program. However, it is essential that a uniform approach to the role of numerical modeling be adopted, including agreement upon the contribution of modeling to the design and licensing process and the need for, and means of, model qualification for particular purposes. This report discusses the role of numerical modeling, reviews the capabilities of several computer codes that are being used to support design or performance assessment, and proposes a framework for future numerical modeling activities within the NWTS program.

  1. Three-terminal magnetic tunneling junction device with perpendicular anisotropy CoFeB sensing layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Honjo, H. Nebashi, R.; Tokutome, K.; Miura, S.; Sakimura, N.; Sugibayashi, T.; Fukami, S.; Kinoshita, K.; Murahata, M.; Kasai, N.; Ishihara, K.; Ohno, H.

    2014-05-07

    We demonstrated read and write characteristics of a three terminal memory device with a perpendicular anisotropy-free layer of a strip of [Co/Ni] and a low-switching perpendicular-anisotropy CoFeB/MgO sensing layer. This new design of the cell results in a small cell area. The switching magnetic field of the sensing layer can be decreased by changing sputtering gas for the Ta-cap from Ar to Kr. An electron energy-loss spectroscopy analysis of the cross-section of the magnetic tunneling junction (MTJ) revealed that the boron content in CoFeB with a Kr-sputtered Ta-cap was smaller than that with an Ar-sputtered one. A change in resistance for the MTJ was observed that corresponded to the magnetic switching of the Co/Ni wire and its magnetoresistance ratio and critical current were 90% and 0.8?mA, respectively.

  2. Graphene flakes with defective edge terminations: Universal and topological aspects, and one-dimensional quantum behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yannouleas, Constantine

    Graphene flakes with defective edge terminations: Universal and topological aspects, and one graphene nanoflakes with reconstructed zigzag edges, where a succes- sion of pentagons and heptagons these spectra. The electronic spectra of trigonal graphene nanoflakes with reczag edge terminations exhibit

  3. Optimal Terminal Box Control for Single Duct Air-Handling Units 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, Y.; Vondal, J.; Wang, G.; Liu, M.

    2006-01-01

    Terminal boxes maintain room temperature by modulating supply air temperature and airflow in building HVAC systems. Terminal boxes with conventional control sequences often supply inadequate airflow to a conditioned space, resulting in occupant...

  4. Alpha Emission Near 100Sn and the Termination of the rp Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alpha Emission Near 100 Sn and the Termination of the rp Process The astrophysical rp-process is thought to reach a termination point in the region of 100 Sn, via the...

  5. Energy, Shading and Daylighting Analysis for the Austin Bergstrom International Airport Terminal 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holder, L. M. III; Holder, L. M. IV

    2002-01-01

    Our firm was under contract with the City of Austin, Texas to perform energy analysis and analysis of the daylighting potential within the New Austin Bergstrom International Airport Terminal. Design of the Passenger Terminal Facility for the New...

  6. Programmable surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Amy (Amy Teh-Yu)

    2012-01-01

    Robotic vehicles walk on legs, roll on wheels, are pulled by tracks, pushed by propellers, lifted by wings, and steered by rudders. All of these systems share the common character of momentum transport across their surfaces. ...

  7. Why the case for clean surfaces does not hold water: Structure and morphology of hydroxylated nickel oxide (1 1 1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marks, Laurence D.

    Why the case for clean surfaces does not hold water: Structure and morphology of hydroxylated diffraction Density functional calculations Surface structure kinetics Hydroxylation a b s t r a c t We report that the surfaces contain significant coverage of hydroxyl terminations, and the sur- face structures

  8. U.S. LPG pipeline begins deliveries to Pemex terminal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bodenhamer, K.C.

    1997-08-11

    LPG deliveries began this spring to the new Mendez LPG receiving terminal near Juarez, State of Chihuahua, Mexico. Supplying the terminal is the 265-mile, 8-in. Rio Grande Pipeline that includes a reconditioned 217-mile, 8-in. former refined-products pipeline from near Odessa, Texas, and a new 48-mile, 8-in. line beginning in Hudspeth County and crossing the US-Mexico border near San Elizario, Texas. Capacity of the pipeline is 24,000 b/d. The LPG supplied to Mexico is a blend of approximately 85% propane and 15% butane. Before construction and operation of the pipeline, PGPB blended the propane-butane mix at a truck dock during loading. Demand for LPG in northern Mexico is strong. Less than 5% of the homes in Juarez have natural gas, making LPG the predominant energy source for cooking and heating in a city of more than 1 million. LPG also is widely used as a motor fuel.

  9. The Fermi Bubbles as Starburst Wind Termination Shocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lacki, Brian C

    2013-01-01

    The enhanced star formation in the inner 100 pc of the Galaxy launches a superwind, reaching ~1600 km/s for M82-like parameters. The ram pressure of the wind is very low compared to more powerful starburst winds. I show that halo gas stops the wind a few kpc from the Galactic Center. I argue that the termination shock accelerates cosmic rays, and that the resulting Inverse Compton gamma-rays are visible as the Fermi Bubbles. The Bubbles are thus wind bubbles, which the starburst can inflate within 10 Myr. They remain in steady state as long as the starburst lasts. The shock may accelerate PeV electrons and ultra-high energy protons. The Bubbles may be analogs of galactic wind termination shocks in the intergalactic medium. I discuss the advantages and problems of this model.

  10. Neutral atom transport from the termination shock to 1 AU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maciej Bzowski; Slawomir Tarnopolski

    2006-04-27

    Dynamics of H, D, and heavy Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENA) between the termination shock and 1 AU is discussed in the context of the forthcoming NASA SMEX mission IBEX. In particular, effects of the velocity-dependent radiation pressure on atomic trajectories are considered and ionization losses between TS and 1 AU are studied. It is shown, among others, that most of the dynamical effects and ionization losses are induced within a few AU from the Sun, which translates to the time domain into $\\sim 1 - 3$ solar rotations before detection. This loosens considerably time requirements for tracking the ionization and radiation pressure history to just prior 3 months. ENA seem excellent tracers of the processes within the heliospheric interface, with the transport effects between the termination shock and detector relatively mild and easy to account for.

  11. Probing effective nucleon-nucleon interaction at band termination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wojciech Satula

    2006-10-27

    Low-energy nuclear structure is not sensitive enough to resolve fine details of nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction. Insensitivity of infrared physics to the details of short-range strong interaction allows for consistent, free of ultraviolet divergences, formulation of local theory at the level of local energy density functional (LEDF) including, on the same footing, both particle-hole as well as particle-particle channels. Major difficulty is related to parameterization of the nuclear LEDF and its density dependence. It is argued that structural simplicity of terminating or isomeric states offers invaluable source of informations that can be used for fine-tuning of the NN interaction in general and the nuclear LEDF parameters in particular. Practical applications of terminating states at the level of LEDF and nuclear shell-model are discussed.

  12. On Detecting Termination in the Crash-Recovery Model Felix C. Freiling1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mittal, Neeraj

    Graduiertenkolleg "Software for Mobile Communicaton Systems" at RWTH Aachen University. A.-M. Kermarrec, L. Boug-passing system where processes may crash and recover. We show that it is impossible to solve the termination termination detection problem under these conditions. Keywords: asynchronous distributed system, termination

  13. Termination Graphs for Java Bytecode M. Brockschmidt, C. Otto, C. von Essen, and J. Giesl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ábrahám, Erika

    Termination Graphs for Java Bytecode M. Brockschmidt, C. Otto, C. von Essen, and J. Giesl LuFG Informatik 2, RWTH Aachen University, Germany Abstract. To prove termination of Java Bytecode (JBC) automatically, we transform JBC to finite termination graphs which represent all pos- sible runs of the program

  14. Transforming Termination by SelfLabelling Aart Middeldorp, 1 Hitoshi Ohsaki, 1 Hans Zantema 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Transforming Termination by Self­Labelling Aart Middeldorp, 1 Hitoshi Ohsaki, 1 Hans Zantema 2 1 introduce a new technique for proving termination of term rewriting systems. The technique, a specialization of transformation methods that attempt to prove termination by transforming term rewriting systems into systems

  15. Detecting the Termination Shock and Beyond Chi Wang and John W. Belcher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, John

    Detecting the Termination Shock and Beyond Chi Wang and John W. Belcher Center for Space Research of the termination shock by the Voyager spacecraft. The multiple crossings caused by large-scale solar wind, including the termination shock and the heliopause. As the Voyager spacecraft reach distances where crossing

  16. Growth Termination of Carbon Nanotubes at Millimeter Thickness Due to Structural Change in Catalyst

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    Growth Termination of Carbon Nanotubes at Millimeter Thickness Due to Structural Change in Catalyst, it is reported that "supergrowth" rate decreases with reaction time and finally the growth terminates [2]. Our group recently reproduced "supergrowth" [3] and observed similar "supergrowth" termination within a few

  17. On Termination of Constraint Logic Programs Livio Colussi 1, Elena Marchiori 2, Massimo Marchiori 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchiori, Elena

    On Termination of Constraint Logic Programs Livio Colussi 1, Elena Marchiori 2, Massimo Marchiori 1 introduces a necessary and sufficient condition for termination of constraint logic programs. The method programs. Then termination is proven using a technique inspired by the seminal approach of Floyd

  18. To appear in the Journal of Symbolic Computation Modular Termination Proofs for Rewriting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ábrahám, Erika

    To appear in the Journal of Symbolic Computation Modular Termination Proofs for Rewriting Using Recently, Arts and Giesl developed the dependency pair approach which allows automated termination and innermost termination proofs for many term rewriting systems for which such proofs were not possible before

  19. SAT-based Termination Analysis for Java Bytecode with AProVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ábrahám, Erika

    SAT-based Termination Analysis for Java Bytecode with AProVE Carsten Fuhs LuFG Informatik 2, RWTH solving engines for the search problems in automated termination analysis. Consequently, the performance of current termination tools heavily relies on the speed of modern SAT solvers on the corresponding SAT

  20. Endoplasmic Reticulum-bound Ribosomes Reside in Stable Association with the Translocon following Termination of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicchitta, Chris

    Termination of Protein Synthesis* Received for publication, March 15, 2002, and in revised form, April 18 pathway and dissociation occurring upon the termination of protein synthesis. Recent stud- ies indicate, however, that ribosomal subunits remain membrane-bound following the termination of protein synthesis

  1. Holocene climate instability during the termination of the African Humid Period

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renssen, Hans

    Holocene climate instability during the termination of the African Humid Period H. Renssen January 2003; published 25 February 2003. [1] The termination of the Holocene African Humid Period ($9. Goosse, Holocene climate instability during the termination of the African Humid Period, Geophys. Res

  2. Fundamenta Informaticae 33(2), 1998, 201{209 1 Termination of graph rewriting is undecidable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plump, Detlef

    Fundamenta Informaticae 33(2), 1998, 201{209 1 IOS Press Termination of graph rewriting pushout approach") is terminating. The proof is by a reduction of the Post Correspondence Problem or of the termination problem for string rewriting systems to the present problem. Keywords: graph rewriting

  3. PROGRAM TERMINATION FORM Board of Governors, State University System of Florida

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sin, Peter

    PROGRAM TERMINATION FORM Board of Governors, State University System of Florida UNIVERSITY TERMINATION DATE: _____________________________________ (Last date that students will be accepted into program for this program) 1. Provide a narrative rationale for the request to terminate the program. 3. Indicate on which

  4. Meridional movement of wind anomalies during ENSO events and their role in event termination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santoso, Agus

    Meridional movement of wind anomalies during ENSO events and their role in event termination Shayne), Meridional movement of wind anomalies during ENSO events and their role in event termination, Geophys. Res, setting up conditions favorable for the termination of ENSO warm events. The basic principles of the RDO

  5. Magnetic fields at the solar wind termination shock L. F. Burlaga1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, John

    LETTERS Magnetic fields at the solar wind termination shock L. F. Burlaga1 , N. F. Ness2 , M. H and dynamics of the termination shock, made by Voyager 2 on 31 August­1 September 2007 at a distance of 83.7 AU') at the shock. This Letter discusses three termination shock crossings (TS-2, TS- 3 and TS-4) that were observed

  6. APPEAL TO STUDENT PROGRESS APPEALS COMMITTEE TERMINATION FROM COURSE NOT ACHIEVING SATISFACTORY COURSE PROGRESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mucina, Ladislav

    APPEAL TO STUDENT PROGRESS APPEALS COMMITTEE TERMINATION FROM COURSE NOT ACHIEVING SATISFACTORY COURSE PROGRESS This form is to be used to lodge an appeal against the decision to terminate you from ID Student Name Course Code and Name Faculty Year and Study Period of Termination Citizenship status

  7. College Policy and Procedure for the Termination of a Student's Registration Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, Ian

    College Policy and Procedure for the Termination of a Student's Registration Introduction 1. The College reserves the right to terminate the registration of any student on academic grounds, disciplinary be followed in order for a student's registration to be terminated for academic reasons, or where the student

  8. Modular Termination of Basic Narrowing Maria Alpuente, Santiago Escobar, and Jose Iborra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpuente, María

    Modular Termination of Basic Narrowing Mar´ia Alpuente, Santiago Escobar, and Jos´e Iborra theories. Another application is analyzing ter- mination of narrowing by checking the termination of basic narrowing, as done in pioneering work by Hullot. In this work, we study the modu- larity of termination

  9. Early Termination in Ben-Or/Tiwari Sparse Interpolation and a Hybrid of Zippel's Algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaltofen, Erich

    Early Termination in Ben-Or/Tiwari Sparse Interpolation and a Hybrid of Zippel's Algorithm Wen, ei = deg fxi. #12;Idea # 1 Early termination degree? number of terms? What if an upper bound. And double the guess if fails. Early termination. Interpolate the polynomial at a random point, when

  10. Supervisors and Termination A presentation to FGSR Council, 16 November 2011 (updated June 2014)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Hao "Howard"

    Supervisors and Termination A presentation to FGSR Council, 16 November 2011 (updated June 2014) Dr that their supervisor has terminated their program of studies. In some cases, the supervisor sent a letter to the student stating that the student's program of studies had come to an end. Supervisors cannot terminate

  11. Automated Termination Analysis for Haskell: From Term Rewriting to Programming Languages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Middeldorp, Aart

    Automated Termination Analysis for Haskell: From Term Rewriting to Programming Languages J the application of existing techniques from term rewriting in order to prove termination of programs in the functional language Has- kell. In particular, we show how termination techniques for ordinary re- writing can

  12. Automated Termination Analysis for Haskell: From Term Rewriting to Programming Languages #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ábrahám, Erika

    Automated Termination Analysis for Haskell: From Term Rewriting to Programming Languages # J the application of existing techniques from term rewriting in order to prove termination of programs in the functional language Has­ kell. In particular, we show how termination techniques for ordinary re­ writing can

  13. REQUEST FOR REVIEW OF DECISION / REQUEST FOR READMISSION TERMINATION FROM COURSE NOT ACHIEVING SATISFACTORY COURSE PROGRESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mucina, Ladislav

    REQUEST FOR REVIEW OF DECISION / REQUEST FOR READMISSION TERMINATION FROM COURSE NOT ACHIEVING is obliged to report student visa holders who have been Terminated for not achieving satisfactory course of the appeals process. COURSE DETAILS COURSE FROM WHICH I HAVE BEEN TERMINATED Course code Course name STUDY

  14. Transforming Termination by Self-Labelling Aart Middeldorp,1 Hitoshi Ohsaki,1 Hans Zantema2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Transforming Termination by Self-Labelling Aart Middeldorp,1 Hitoshi Ohsaki,1 Hans Zantema2 1 introduce a new technique for proving termination of term rewriting systems. The technique, a specialization of transformation methods that attempt to prove termination by transforming term rewriting systems into systems

  15. RESEARCH Open Access Cell type-specific termination of transcription by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jordan, King

    RESEARCH Open Access Cell type-specific termination of transcription by transposable element sequences necessary for their own transposition, including signals required for the termination to terminate the transcription of host gene transcripts. While there is evidence in support of this model

  16. Abrupt change of Antarctic moisture origin at the end of Termination II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chappellaz, Jérôme

    Abrupt change of Antarctic moisture origin at the end of Termination II V. Masson-Delmottea,1 , B of events involved in Termination II, the transition between the penultimate glacial and interglacial periods. This termination is marked by a north­south seesaw behavior, with first a slow methane concen

  17. Improvements on the "Size Change Termination Principle" in a functional language

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Improvements on the "Size Change Termination Principle" in a functional language Pierre Hyvernat improvements of Lee, Jones and Ben-Amram size change termination principle specialised to functional-graphs and yields a more precise test for termination. 1 Introduction Lee, Jones and Ben-Amram size change

  18. Message-Optimal and Latency-Optimal Termination Detection Algorithms for Arbitrary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mittal, Neeraj

    Message-Optimal and Latency-Optimal Termination Detection Algorithms for Arbitrary Topologies. Detecting termination of a distributed computation is a fun- damental problem in distributed systems. We present two optimal algo- rithms for detecting termination of a non-diffusing distributed computa- tion

  19. Intense plasma waves at and near the solar wind termination shock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gurnett, Donald A.

    LETTERS Intense plasma waves at and near the solar wind termination shock D. A. Gurnett1 & W. S wind termination shock. The observations were obtained from the plasma-wave instrument on the Voyager 2 a series of crossings of the termination shock at a heliocentric radial distance of 83.7 AU. The spectrum

  20. Termination Detection in an Asynchronous Distributed System with Crash-Recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mittal, Neeraj

    Termination Detection in an Asynchronous Distributed System with Crash-Recovery Failures Felix C 75083, USA 1 Termination Detection In practice, it cannot easily be detected whether a computation running in a distributed system has terminated or not. Thus, suitable observing algorithms are required

  1. Fast and Accurate Strong Termination Analysis with an Application to Partial Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vidal, Germán

    Fast and Accurate Strong Termination Analysis with an Application to Partial Evaluation Michael-46022, Valencia, Spain {stamarit,gvidal}@dsic.upv.es Abstract. A logic program strongly terminates if it terminates for any selection rule. Clearly, considering a particular selection rule--like Pro- log's leftmost

  2. Pick-up ion energization at the termination shock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary, S Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Winske, Dan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wu, Pin [BOSTON UNIV.; Schwadron, N A [BOSTON UNIV.

    2009-01-01

    One-dimensional hybrid simulations are used to investigate how pickup ions are energized at the perpendicular termination shock. Contrary to previous models based on pickup ion energy gain by repeated crossings of the shock front (shock surfing) or due to a reforming shock front, the present simulations show that pickup ion energy gain involves a gyro-phasedependent interaction with the inhomogeneous motional electric field at the shock. The process operates at all relative concentrations of pickup ion density.

  3. Country 8+1+Area Code 8+011+Country

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .1683 Colombia (Mobile Termination - 3) * 57 $0.3000 Comoros * 269 $0.5400 Comoros (Mobile Termination - 3, 9

  4. Lower Columbia River Terminal Fisheries Research Project : Final Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1995-04-01

    This notice announces BPA`S`s decision to fund the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), and the Clatsop Economic Development Committee for the Lower Columbia River Terminal Fisheries Research Project (Project). The Project will continue the testing of various species/stocks, rearing regimes, and harvest options for terminal fisheries, as a means to increase lower river sport and commercial harvest of hatchery fish, while providing both greater protection of weaker wild stocks and increasing the return of upriver salmon runs to potential Zone 6 Treaty fisheries. The Project involves relocating hatchery smolts to new, additional pen locations in three bays/sloughs in the lower Columbia River along both the Oregon and Washington sides. The sites are Blind Slough and Tongue Point in Clatsop County, Oregon, and Grays Bay/Deep River, Wahkiakum County, Washington. The smolts will be acclimated for various lengths of time in the net pens and released from these sites. The Project will expand upon an existing terminal fisheries project in Youngs Bay, Oregon. The Project may be expanded to other sites in the future, depending on the results of this initial expansion. BPA`S has determined the project is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required, and BPA`S is issuing this FONSI.

  5. The influence of surface functionalisation on the electrical properties and thermal stability of nanodiamonds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welch, Joseph O; Li, Pei; Chaudhary, Aysha; Edgington, Robert; Jackman, Richard B.

    2014-10-07

    Detonation nanodiamond (ND) has recently emerged as a useful new class of diamond material. However, to date there has been little investigation of the electrical properties of this material. Due to the nanoscale dimensions, the surface functionalisation of the individual ND is of particular importance to the characteristics of ND films. Here, hydrogen and oxygen termination of ND, verified using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, are shown to strongly influence the electronic properties of NDs. Hydrogen terminated ND exhibiting a far greater resilience to thermal decomposition when compared to the oxygen terminated NDs. Moreover, H-NDs also displayed so-called “surface conductivity,” a property displayed by hydrogen-terminated bulk diamond films, whilst O-NDs display properties high resistivity. These results indicate that under the correct conditions ND layers can display similar electrical properties to “bulk” diamond thin films.

  6. Environmental Resources of Selected Areas of Hawaii: Geological Hazards (DRAFT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staub, W.P.

    1994-06-01

    This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background scientific data and related information collected on geologic hazards during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) published a notice in the Federal Register on May 17, 1994 (Fed Regis. 5925638) withdrawing its Notice of Intent (Fed Regis. 575433) of February 14, 1992, to prepare the HGP-EIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated This report presents a review of current information on geologic hazards in the Hawaiian Islands. Interrelationships among these hazards are discussed. Probabilities of occurrence of given geologic hazards are provided in various regions where sufficient geologic or historical data are available. Most of the information contained herein is compiled from recent U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) publications and open-file reports. This report describes the natural geologic hazards present in the area and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts. Geologic hazards originate both onshore and offshore. Onshore geologic hazards such as volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, surface rupture, landslides, uplift, and subsidence occur mainly on the southern third of the island of Hawaii (hereinafter referred to as Hawaii). Offshore geologic hazards are more widely distributed throughout the Hawaiian Islands. Examples of offshore geologic hazards are submarine landslides, turbidity currents, and seismic sea waves (tsunamis). First, overviews of volcanic and earthquake activity, and details of offshore geologic hazards is provided for the Hawaiian Islands. Then, a more detailed discussion of onshore geologic hazards is presented with special emphasis on the southern third of Hawaii and the east rift zone of Kilauea.

  7. Molecularly Resolved Images of Peptide-Functionalized Gold Surfaces by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webb, Lauren J.

    propargylglycine unnatural functional groups 20 Å apart and an alkanethiol self-assembled monolayer (SAM) on a gold-terminated surfaces in which a structured -helical peptide is chemically bonded to an alkanethiol self-assembledMolecularly Resolved Images of Peptide-Functionalized Gold Surfaces by Scanning Tunneling

  8. Quantitative estimates of velocity sensitivity to surface melt variations at a large Greenland outlet glacier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, M. L.; Nettles, M.; Larsen, T. B.; Hamilton, Gordon S.; Stearns, Leigh

    2011-09-01

    , marine-terminating outlet glaciers that drain the ice sheet. We use a validated model of meltwater input and GPS-derived surface velocities to quantify the sensitivity of glacier flow speed to changes in surface melt at Helheim Glacier during two summer...

  9. Crystal Structure of a Complex between Amino and Carboxy Terminal Fragments of mDia1: Insights into Autoinhibition of Diaphanous-Related Formins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nezami, A.; Poy, F; Toms, A; Zheng, W; Eck, M

    2010-01-01

    Formin proteins direct the nucleation and assembly of linear actin filaments in a variety of cellular processes using their conserved formin homology 2 (FH2) domain. Diaphanous-related formins (DRFs) are effectors of Rho-family GTPases, and in the absence of Rho activation they are maintained in an inactive state by intramolecular interactions between their regulatory N-terminal region and a C-terminal segment referred to as the DAD domain. Although structures are available for the isolated DAD segment in complex with the interacting region in the N-terminus, it remains unclear how this leads to inhibition of actin assembly by the FH2 domain. Here we describe the crystal structure of the N-terminal regulatory region of formin mDia1 in complex with a C-terminal fragment containing both the FH2 and DAD domains. In the crystal structure and in solution, these fragments form a tetrameric complex composed of two interlocking N+C dimers. Formation of the tetramer is likely a consequence of the particular N-terminal construct employed, as we show that a nearly full-length mDia1 protein is dimeric, as are other autoinhibited N+C complexes containing longer N-terminal fragments. The structure provides the first view of the intact C-terminus of a DRF, revealing the relationship of the DAD to the FH2 domain. Delineation of alternative dimeric N+C interactions within the tetramer provides two general models for autoinhibition in intact formins. In both models, engagement of the DAD by the N-terminus is incompatible with actin filament formation on the FH2, and in one model the actin binding surfaces of the FH2 domain are directly blocked by the N-terminus.

  10. Surface Soil

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired Solar Fuel Production 1: TotalofSupplySurface Soil Surface Soil We

  11. On Surface Approximation using Developable Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, In-Kwon

    manufacturing, e.g. in shipbuilding. Keywords: computer aided design, computer aided manufacturing, surface ap- proximation, reverse engineering, surface of revolution, developable surface, shipbuilding. 2 #12

  12. Date Created: 4/24/2012 6:29:00 AM Page 1 Initiating a Termination Checklist from the online Termination form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calgary, University of

    your Workforce Administration menu, when a termination form is not required (e.g. Term Jobs with end #12;Date Created: 4/24/2012 6:29:00 AM Page 3 Complete the following steps: Step Action 4. Enter terminating employee's EmplID and select Search #12;Page 4 Date Created: 4/24/2012 6:29:00 AM Complete

  13. Surface modification of polyethylene by functionalized plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuan, S.; Marchant, R.E.

    1993-12-31

    The surface of low density polyethylene(PE) has been modified by functionalized plasma-polymerized N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone (PPNVP) and allyl alcohol(PPAA) thin films, PPNVP and PPAA(approx. 100 nm). The surface structure and functional groups of modified surfaces were characterized by water contact angle, ATR/FTIR and ESCA techniques. Plasma polymer modified PE surfaces exhibited significant water contact angle hysteresis and a much lower value of advancing water contact angle than that of unmodified polyethylene. Reduction of PPNVP and PPAA modified surfaces by sodium borohydride coverted into hydroxyl groups. The determined concentrations of hydroxyl groups on the reduced PPNVP and PPAA modified surfaces by ESCA after gas-phase derivatization with trifluoroacetic anhydride (TFAA) were about 25% and 30% of total oxygen content, respectively. Finally, the amine containing molecules such as amine-terminated polyethylene oxide (PEO) and 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTS) were coupled to the hydroxylated surfaces. These novel modified PE surfaces are suitable for immobilization of biomolecules.

  14. Planning for a Sustainable Future of the Cincinnati Union Terminal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-04-30

    The Cincinnati Museum Center invited a number of local stakeholders, political leaders, nationally and internationally recognized design professionals and the Design Team, that has been engaged to help shape the future of this remarkable resource, to work together in a Workshop that would begin to shape a truly sustainable future for both the Museum and its home, the Union Terminal, one of the most significant buildings in America. This report summarizes and highlights the discussions that took place during the Workshop and presents recommendations for shaping a direction and a framework for the future.

  15. Self-terminating diffraction gates femtosecond X-ray nanocrystallography

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque| StanfordOfficeImplementationmeasurements Self-terminating

  16. Unit 51 - GIS Application Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unit 51, CC in GIS; Cowen, David; Ferguson, Warren

    1990-01-01

    51 - GIS APPLICATION AREAS UNIT 51 - GIS APPLICATION AREAS1990 Page 1 Unit 51 - GIS Application Areas Computers inyour students. UNIT 51 - GIS APPLICATION AREAS Compiled with

  17. Metadata of the chapter that will be visualized online ChapterTitle Observations of the Termination Shock and Heliosheath

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, John

    Metadata of the chapter that will be visualized online ChapterTitle Observations of the Termination termination shock and are now in the heliosheath, the region of shocked solar wind plasma before the heliopause. This paper reviews observations of the termination foreshock, the termination shock (TS

  18. Termination of Rewriting with Right-Flat Rules Guillem Godoy 1 , Eduard Huntingford 2 , and Ashish Tiwari 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tiwari, Ashish

    Termination of Rewriting with Right-Flat Rules Guillem Godoy 1 , Eduard Huntingford 2 , and Ashish, Menlo Park, CA 94025 tiwari@csl.sri.com Abstract. Termination and innermost termination are shown occur at depth at most one) and linear. Innermost termination is also shown to be decidable for shallow

  19. CAH TERMINATION POLICY All Exit Checklist activities must be conducted in accordance with all university policies and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    CAH TERMINATION POLICY All Exit Checklist activities must be conducted in accordance with all Questionnaire at: http://www.hr.ucf.edu/web/forms/employeerelations/exitinterview.pdf CAH TERMINATION PROCEDURES assigned to him/her. Specific PeopleSoft access should be terminated as well. Terminating employees must

  20. High-Speed Non-Directional Infrared Communication for Wireless Local-Area Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carruthers, Jeffrey

    terminals and a base station, allowing construction of in-building wireless local-area networks. We discuss.0 Introduction Non-directional infrared radiation [1-4] is an attrac- tive transmission medium for wireless characterized free-space infrared channels in a variety of indoor environments [6] using a swept

  1. High specific surface area aerogel cryoadsorber for vacuum pumping applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hill, Randal M. (Livermore, CA); Fought, Eric R. (Brentwood, CA); Biltoft, Peter J. (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A cryogenic pumping system is provided, comprising a vacuum environment, an aerogel sorbent formed from a carbon aerogel disposed within the vacuum environment, and cooling means for cooling the aerogel sorbent sufficiently to adsorb molecules from the vacuum environment onto the aerogel sorbent. Embodiments of the invention include a liquid refrigerant cryosorption pump, a compressed helium cryogenic pump, a cryopanel and a Meissner coil, each of which uses carbon aerogel as a sorbent material.

  2. GUIDELINES MANUAL FOR SURFACE MONITORING OF GEOTHERMAL AREAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Til, C. J. Van

    2012-01-01

    the United States", Land Subsidence, Proceedings, IAHS-AIHS-1973, "Collapsing Soil and Subsidence", Geolo Seismicit -Factors Controlling Mine Subsidence in Utah and Colorado",

  3. GUIDELINES MANUAL FOR SURFACE MONITORING OF GEOTHERMAL AREAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Til, C. J. Van

    2012-01-01

    Q i PRELIMINARY INVESTIGATION The design and operation of aInvestigation, Designing the Monitoring System, and Monitoring Operations.operation of the monitoring system; and for analysis of the monitoring data. Ideally, the preliminary investigation

  4. High Specific Surface area Aerogel Cryoadsorber for Vacuum Pumping Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, Randal M.; Fought, Eric R.; Biltoft, Peter J.

    1998-12-22

    A cryogenic pumping system is provided, comprising a vacuum environment, an aerogel sorbent formed from a carbon aerogel disposed within the vacuum environment, and cooling means for cooling the aerogel sorbent sufficiently to adsorb molecules from the vacuum environment onto the aerogel sorbent. Embodiments of the invention include a liquid refrigerant cryosorption pump, a compressed helium cryogenic pump, a cryopanel and a Meissner coil, each of which uses carbon aerogel as a sorbent material.

  5. High surface area silicon carbide-coated carbon aerogel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worsley, Marcus A; Kuntz, Joshua D; Baumann, Theodore F; Satcher, Jr, Joe H

    2014-01-14

    A metal oxide-carbon composite includes a carbon aerogel with an oxide overcoat. The metal oxide-carbon composite is made by providing a carbon aerogel, immersing the carbon aerogel in a metal oxide sol under a vacuum, raising the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol to atmospheric pressure, curing the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol at room temperature, and drying the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol to produce the metal oxide-carbon composite. The step of providing a carbon aerogel can provide an activated carbon aerogel or provide a carbon aerogel with carbon nanotubes that make the carbon aerogel mechanically robust. Carbon aerogels can be coated with sol-gel silica and the silica can be converted to silicone carbide, improved the thermal stability of the carbon aerogel.

  6. High surface area, electrically conductive nanocarbon-supported metal oxide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Worsley, Marcus A; Han, Thomas Yong-Jin; Kuntz, Joshua D; Cervanted, Octavio; Gash, Alexander E; Baumann, Theodore F; Satcher, Jr., Joe H

    2014-03-04

    A metal oxide-carbon composite includes a carbon aerogel with an oxide overcoat. The metal oxide-carbon composite is made by providing a carbon aerogel, immersing the carbon aerogel in a metal oxide sol under a vacuum, raising the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol to atmospheric pressure, curing the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol at room temperature, and drying the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol to produce the metal oxide-carbon composite. The step of providing a carbon aerogel can provide an activated carbon aerogel or provide a carbon aerogel with carbon nanotubes that make the carbon aerogel mechanically robust.

  7. Surface Gas Sampling At International Geothermal Area Mexico (Norman, Et

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing CapacityVectren)Model for theSunLanSuperDrive IncCity, New Jersey:2002)Al.,

  8. High-spin structure and Band Termination in $^{103}$Cd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Chakraborty; Krishichayan; S. Mukhopadhyay; S. Ray; S. N. Chintalapudi; S. S. Ghugre; N. S. Pattabiraman; A. K. Sinha; S. Sarkar; U. Garg; S. Zhu; M. Saha Sarkar

    2007-09-11

    Excited states of the neutron deficient $^{103}$Cd nucleus have been investigated via the $^{72}$Ge($^{35}$Cl, p3n) reaction at beam energy of 135 MeV by use of in-beam spectroscopic methods. Gamma rays depopulating the excited states were detected using the Gammasphere spectrometer with high-fold $\\gamma$-ray coincidences. A quadrupole $\\gamma$-ray coincidence analysis ($\\gamma^{4}$) has been used to extend the known level scheme. The positive parity levels have been established up to $J = 35/2\\hbar$ and $E_{x} = 7.071$ MeV. In addition to the observation of highly-fragmented level scheme belonging to the positive-parity sequences at E$_{x}\\sim$ 5 MeV, the termination of a negative-parity sequence connected by $E2$ transitions has been established at $J = 47/2 \\hbar$ and $E_{x} = 11.877$ MeV. The experimental results corresponding to both the positive- and negative-parity sequences have been theoretically interpreted in the framework of the core particle coupling model. Evidence is presented for a shape change from collective prolate to non-collective oblate above the $J^{\\pi} = 39/2^{-}$ (8011 keV) level and for a smooth termination of the negative-parity band.

  9. The termination shock in a striped pulsar wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. E. Lyubarsky

    2003-06-22

    The origin of radio emission from plerions is considered. Recent observations suggest that radio emitting electrons are presently accelerated rather than having been injected at early stages of the plerion evolution. The observed flat spectra without a low frequency cutoff imply an acceleration mechanism that raises the average particle energy by few orders of magnitude but leaves most of the particles at the energy less than about few hundred MeV. It is suggested that annihilation of the alternating magnetic field at the pulsar wind termination shock provides the necessary mechanism. Toroidal stripes of opposite magnetic polarity are formed in the wind emanated from an obliquely rotating pulsar magnetosphere (the striped wind). At the termination shock, the flow is compressed and the magnetic field annihilates by driven reconnection. Jump conditions are obtained for the shock in a striped wind. It is shown that postshock MHD parameters of the flow are the same as if the energy of alternating field has already been converted into the plasma energy upstream the shock. Therefore the available estimates of the ratio of the Poynting flux to the matter energy flux, $\\sigma$, should be attributed not to the total upstream Poynting flux but only to that associated with the average magnetic field. A simple model for the particle acceleration in the shocked striped wind is presented.

  10. Hawaii Application for Surface Water Use Permit for Proposed...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hawaii Application for Surface Water Use Permit for Proposed New Use in a Designated Surface Water Management Area (DLNR Form SWUPA-N) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

  11. Performance of VAV Parallel Fan Powered Terminal Units: Experimental Results and Models 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furr, J.; O'Neal, D.; Davis, M.; Bryant, J.; Cramlet, A.

    2008-01-01

    to develop empirical models of airflow, power, and leakage of both parallel and series fan power terminal units. These models are suitable for use in annual energy use models of variable air volume systems in commer- cial buildings. This paper provides a... was the development of empirical models of power and airflow output for parallel and series fan powered terminal units at typical operating pres- sures. An experimental setup was developed and used to test fan powered terminal units from three manufacturers...

  12. Physisorption and Chemisorption Methods for Evaluating the Total Surface Area and Active Surface Area of Two Types of Carbon Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    TSA is a gross indicator of soot reactivity and does not always correlate well with the real reactivity. This research shows that a more relevant reactivity index is soot ASA.

  13. Surface water drainage system. Environmental assessment and finding of no significant impact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-05-01

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) is written pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The document identifies and evaluates the action proposed to correct deficiencies in, and then to maintain, the surface water drainage system serving the Department of Energy`s Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site), located north of Golden, Colorado. Many of the activities proposed would not normally be subject to this level of NEPA documentation. However, in many cases, maintenance of the system has been deferred to the point that wetlands vegetation has become established in some ditches and culverts, creating wetlands. The proposed activities would damage or remove some of these wetlands in order to return the drainage system to the point that it would be able to fully serve its intended function - stormwater control. The Department of Energy (DOE) regulations require that activities affecting environmentally sensitive areas like wetlands be the subject of an EA. Most portions of the surface water drainage system are presently inadequate to convey the runoff from a 100-year storm event. As a result, such an event would cause flooding across much of the Site and possibly threaten the integrity of the dams at the terminal ponds. Severe flooding would not only cause damage to facilities and equipment, but could also facilitate the transport of contaminants from individual hazardous substance sites (IHSSs). Uncontrolled flow through the A- and B-series ponds could cause contaminated sediments to become suspended and carried downstream. Additionally, high velocity flood flows significantly increase erosion losses.

  14. Calibration of charge state conversion surfaces for neutral particle detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wahlstroem, P.; Scheer, J. A.; Wurz, P.; Hertzberg, E.; Fuselier, S. A.

    2008-08-01

    Molecular oxygen and hydrogen ions were scattered off hydrogen terminated diamondlike carbon (DLC) charge state conversion surfaces at incident grazing angles. The energy range of the scattered particles was 390-1000 eV, and the surface roughness of the DLC surface was of the order of 1 A rms. For all surfaces almost equal angular scattering and negative ion fractions were found within the uncertainties of the measurement. This result supports the fact that charge state conversion with DLC surfaces is a reliable technology for neutral particle sensing instruments. Furthermore, these instruments can work in the laboratory as well as in the harsh environment on board a satellite.The surfaces measured here are used in the IBEX-lo sensor, a neutral particle sensing instrument on the NASA IBEX mission, which is scheduled for launch into orbit around Earth in July 2008.

  15. A Catalytic Mechanism for Cysteine N-Terminal Nucleophile Hydrolases, as Revealed by Free Energy Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    2 | e32397 A Catalytic Mechanism for Cysteine Ntn-Hydrolaseson the catalytic mechanism of aspartylglucosaminidase (AGA):serine protease- like mechanism with an N-terminal threonine

  16. Sulfur-mediated palladium catalyst immobilized on a GaAs surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shimoda, M. [Surface Physics and Structure Unit, Surface Physics Group, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1, Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Konishi, T. [Anan National College of Technology, 265 Aoki, Minobayashi-cho, Anan, Tokushima 774-0017 (Japan); Nishiwaki, N. [School of Environmental and Engineering, Kochi University of Technology, Tosayamada, Kami, Kochi 782-8502 (Japan); Yamashita, Y.; Yoshikawa, H. [Synchrotron X-ray Station at SPring-8, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)

    2012-06-15

    We present a hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study on the preparation process of palladium catalyst immobilized on an S-terminated GaAs(100) surface. It is revealed that Pd(II) species are reduced on the GaAs surface and yield Pd nanoparticles during the process of Pd immobilization and the subsequent heat treatment. A comparison with the results on GaAs without S-termination suggests that the reduction of Pd is promoted by hydroxy groups during the Pd immobilization and by S during the heat treatment.

  17. Chance-Constrained Multi-Terminal Network Design Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-04-15

    products to customers in local areas. The deterministic version of our problem ...... an approach to stochastic programming of heating oil. Management Science ...

  18. Site Monitoring Area Maps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and roads The spatial location and boundaries for each Site shown on the Site Monitoring Area maps originate from activities conducted under the Compliance Order on Consent with...

  19. Multi-terminal Subsystem Model Validation for Pacific DC Intertie

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Bo; Huang, Zhenyu; Kosterev, Dmitry

    2008-07-20

    this paper proposes to validate dynamic model of Pacific DC Intertie with the concept of hybrid simulation by combing simulation with PMU measurements. The Playback function available in GE PSLF is adopted for hybrid simulation. It is demonstrated for the first time the feasibility of using Playback function on multi-terminal subsystem. Sensitivity studies are also presented as a result of common PMU measurement quality problem, ie, offset noise and time synchronization. Results indicate a good tolerance of PDCI model generally. It is recommended that requirements should apply to phasor measurements in model validation work to ensure better analysis. Key parameters are identified based on impact of value change to model behavior. Two events are employed for preliminary model validation with PMU measurements. Suggestions are made for PDCI model validation work in the future.

  20. Power line carrier interference from HVDC converter terminals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tatro, P.J.; Adamson, K.A. (New England Power Service Co., Westborough, MA (United States)); Eitzmann, M.A.; Smead, M. (GE Industrial and Power Systems, Schenectady, NY (United States). Power Systems Engineering Dept.)

    1993-07-01

    Power line carrier (PLC) equipment typically operates in the frequency range from 25 kHz to 300 kHz. Interference studies for HVDC converters usually concentrate on interference from noise sources within this frequency range. However, operating experience at the Sandy Pond converter terminal has indicated that PLC equipment is also susceptible to interference from sources of power system harmonics below the PLC frequency range. Extensive field testing and analytical studies have shown that each PLC circuit has a resonant frequency below the operating frequency. If excited at this resonant frequency, high voltages may exist within the PLC circuit. The resulting saturation of PLC components leads to local generation of radio frequency (RF) noise that interferes with proper operation of PLC circuits. Sources of power system harmonics in the 3-10 kHz range, such as line commutated dc converters, are potential sources of this type of interference.

  1. Direct first-principles simulation of a high-performance electron emitter: Lithium-oxide-coated diamond surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyamoto, Yoshiyuki, E-mail: yoshi-miyamoto@aist.go.jp; Miyazaki, Takehide [Nanosystem Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Central 2, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Takeuchi, Daisuke; Yamasaki, Satoshi [Energy Technology Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Central 2, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); JST, ALCA, 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan)

    2014-09-28

    We examined the field emission properties of lithium(Li)/oxygen(O)-co-terminated diamond (001) surface [C(001)-LiO] through real-time electron dynamics simulation under an applied field. The current emitted from this surface was found to be more than four-fold that emitted by an H-terminated (001) surface, the latter being a typical negative electron affinity system. This high performance is attributed to the Li layer, which bends the potential wall of O-induced electron pockets down in the direction of vacuum, thus facilitating electron emission. Detailed analysis of the emitted electrons and the profile of the self-consistent potential elucidated that the role of O atoms changes from an electron barrier on OH-terminated diamond surfaces to an outlet for electron emission on C(001)-LiO.

  2. Leaf Area Distribution of Tomato Plants as Influenced by Polyethylene Mulch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Decoteau, Dennis R.

    Leaf Area Distribution of Tomato Plants as Influenced by Polyethylene Mulch Surface Color Dennis R of polyethylene (plastic) mulch surface color (white versus black) on leaf area distribution of tomato and soil temperatures. These results suggest that the polyethylene mulch surface color can induce changes

  3. Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal br Resource br Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area Central Nevada Seismic Zone Pull Apart in Strike Slip Fault Zone Ordovician shale quartzite MW K Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Northwest...

  4. Oil spreading in surface waters with an ice cover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yapa, P.D.; Weerasuriya, S.A.; Belaskas, D.P.; Chowdhury, T.

    1993-02-01

    A study of oil spreading in surface waters in the presence of a floating ice cover is presented. The ice can be solid or fragmented. Both axi-symmetrical and uni-directional spreading are studied. The report describes the analytical and numerical model development, the experimental set-up, results from the laboratory experiments, and their comparison with the derived theory and the numerical simulation. To analyze the spreading of oil under solid ice, new equations are derived. These equations consider gravity (buoyancy) - inertia phase, gravity (buoyancy) - viscous phase, and the termination of spreading during the buoyancy - surface tension phase. The derivation considers both the constant discharge mode and the constant volume mode. Therefore, a complete description of the spreading phenomena from the time of initial spill to termination of spreading is presented. The emphasis of the study is on the dominant spreading mechanism for oil under ice, which is the buoyancy-viscous phase.

  5. Finding Large Aperture Fractures in Geothermal Resource Areas...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Three-Component Long-Offset Surface Seismic Survey, PSInSAR, and Kinematic Analysis Finding Large Aperture Fractures in Geothermal Resource Areas Using A Three-Component...

  6. Organic molecules colliding with and desorbing from solid surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrison, B.J.; Sundararam, V.; Taylor, R.S.

    1996-12-31

    The reactions induced by both 500 eV Ar bombardment of organic overlayers on Pt(111) and 20-60 eV benzene and phenyl radical scattering from a H-terminated diamond surface have been modeled with molecular dynamics simulations. We have used many-body potential developed by Brenner that allows for reactions among the particles. Examples of reactions observed in the simulations will be discussed.

  7. Neutron Science Research Areas | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Home | Science & Discovery | Neutron Science | Research Areas SHARE Research Areas Neutron scattering research at ORNL covers four broad research areas: biology and soft...

  8. Hydrology of a land-terminating Greenlandic outlet glacier 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cowton, Thomas Ralph

    2013-11-28

    Hydrology is recognised as an important component of the glacial system in alpine environments. In particular, the subglacial drainage of surface meltwaters is known to exert a strong influence on the motion of glaciers ...

  9. Mobile Terminal Energy Management for Sustainable Multi-homing Video Transmission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhuang, Weihua

    ]. In addition to develop- ing new battery technology with improved capacity, the MT operational period between1 Mobile Terminal Energy Management for Sustainable Multi-homing Video Transmission Muhammad Ismail-system is proposed for mobile terminals (MTs) to support a sustainable multi-homing video transmission, over the call

  10. Ballistic transport and electrical spin signal enhancement in a nanoscale three-terminal spintronic device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Edward T.

    Ballistic transport and electrical spin signal enhancement in a nanoscale three-terminal spintronic dimensions is investigated and exploited in a nanoscale three-terminal, all-electrical spintronic-electrical spintronic switching device in which ballistic electron transport at nanoscale dimensions combined

  11. Chemical passivity of III-VI bilayer terminated Si,,111... Jonathan A. Adamsa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olmstead, Marjorie

    Chemical passivity of III-VI bilayer terminated Si,,111... Jonathan A. Adamsa and Aaron A online 17 October 2005 The chemical stability of Si 111 , terminated with bilayer AlSe and GaSe, upon electronic and atomic structure do not imply similar chemical passivity. While Si 111 :GaSe is largely

  12. MANAGEMENT OF DANGEROUS GOODS IN CONTAINER TERMINAL WITH MAS Mansoriya Hamidou*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    MANAGEMENT OF DANGEROUS GOODS IN CONTAINER TERMINAL WITH MAS MODEL Mansoriya Hamidou* , Dominique the dangerous container storage problem. It is an optimization problem since the aim is to improve the container. Keywords: container terminal, dangerous container, multi-agents system, security 1. INTRODUCTION This paper

  13. Three-dimensional terminally attached self-avoiding walks and bridges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nathan Clisby; Andrew R. Conway; Anthony J. Guttmann

    2015-07-24

    We study terminally attached self-avoiding walks and bridges on the simple cubic lattice, both by series analysis and Monte Carlo methods. We provide strong numerical evidence supporting a scaling relation between self-avoiding walks, bridges, and terminally attached self-avoiding walks, and posit that a corresponding amplitude ratio is a universal quantity.

  14. Vehicle Dispatching Problem at the Container Terminal with Tandem Lift Quay Cranes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xing, Yao

    2013-07-09

    , the tandem lift operations bring new challenges to the vehicle dispatching at terminals and this has become a big issue in the application of tandem lift QCs. The vehicle dispatching at terminals is to enhance the QCs’ productivities by coordinating the QCs...

  15. Signal Processing Algorithms for the Terminal Doppler Weather Radar: Build 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, John Y. N.

    Signal Processing Algorithms for the Terminal Doppler Weather Radar: Build 2 February 21, 2010 John to the public through the National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161 Signal Processing) was developed for the Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR), enhanced signal processing algorithms taking

  16. Termination for a Class of Algorithms for Constructing Algebras Given by Generators and Relations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Leeuwen, Marc

    Termination for a Class of Algorithms for Constructing Algebras Given by Generators" of the algebra is used. The algorithm itself is only partially specified: it proceed* *s by repeatedly taking* * for selecting steps is assumed. We study the question whether termination of the algorithm is guaranteed

  17. An Effective Termination Criterion for the Rudin-Osher-Fatemi Algorithm for Image Restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Wu-Sheng

    An Effective Termination Criterion for the Rudin-Osher-Fatemi Algorithm for Image Restoration results from the algorithm only when one terminates the algorithm at the "right time" which turns out to be way before the corresponding parabolic partial differential equation converges to its steady

  18. Cyanobacterial bloom termination: the disappearance of Planktothrix rubescens from Lake Bourget (France) after

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacquet, Stéphan

    Cyanobacterial bloom termination: the disappearance of Planktothrix rubescens from Lake Bourget and since the 1980s has been partially restored by reductions in nutrient loadings. 2. Here, we analyse termination, although a number of other factors could also be important, such as temperature-dependent water

  19. Equational Termination by Semantic Labelling Hitoshi Ohsaki \\Lambda Aart Middeldorp y Jurgen Giesl z

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giesl, Juergen

    Equational Termination by Semantic Labelling Hitoshi Ohsaki \\Lambda Aart Middeldorp y J¨urgen Giesl z Semantic labelling (Zantema [5]) is a powerful tool for proving termination of term rewrite, parameterized by three choices: (1) the well­founded order on the underlying algebra (partial order vs. quasi

  20. Termination Problem of the APO Algorithm Tal Grinshpoun, Moshe Zazon, Maxim Binshtok, and Amnon Meisels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meisels, Amnon

    Termination Problem of the APO Algorithm Tal Grinshpoun, Moshe Zazon, Maxim Binshtok, and Amnon. Asynchronous Partial Overlay (APO) is a search algorithm that uses cooperative mediation to solve Distributed contradict the termination and consequently the completeness of the APO algo- rithm. A correction

  1. Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Studies of Charged Carboxyl-Terminated Dendrimers in Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dubin, Paul D.

    Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Studies of Charged Carboxyl-Terminated Dendrimers in Solutions Q. R-angle neutron scattering was used to characterize the solution behavior of charged carboxylic acid terminated- copy,16 small-angle X-ray scattering,17 and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS),18-25 have been used

  2. COSTA: Design and Implementation of a Cost and Termination Analyzer for Java Bytecode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zanardini, Damiano

    COSTA: Design and Implementation of a Cost and Termination Analyzer for Java Bytecode E. Albert1 and termination together is interesting, as both analyses share most of the machinery to, respectively, infer cost analysis share most of the system machinery, as they need to consider and infer roughly the same

  3. Enhanced heat transfer surface for cast-in-bump-covered cooling surfaces and methods of enhancing heat transfer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chiu, Rong-Shi Paul (Glenmont, NY); Hasz, Wayne Charles (Pownal, VT); Johnson, Robert Alan (Simpsonville, SC); Lee, Ching-Pang (Cincinnati, OH); Abuaf, Nesim (Lincoln City, OR)

    2002-01-01

    An annular turbine shroud separates a hot gas path from a cooling plenum containing a cooling medium. Bumps are cast in the surface on the cooling side of the shroud. A surface coating overlies the cooling side surface of the shroud, including the bumps, and contains cooling enhancement material. The surface area ratio of the cooling side of the shroud with the bumps and coating is in excess of a surface area ratio of the cooling side surface with bumps without the coating to afford increased heat transfer across the element relative to the heat transfer across the element without the coating.

  4. Central Facilities Area Sewage Lagoon Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark R. Cole

    2013-12-01

    The Central Facilities Area (CFA), located in Butte County, Idaho, at the Idaho National Laboratory has an existing wastewater system to collect and treat sanitary wastewater and non-contact cooling water from the facility. The existing treatment facility consists of three cells: Cell #1 has a surface area of 1.7 acres, Cell #2 has a surface area of 10.3 acres, and Cell #3 has a surface area of 0.5 acres. If flows exceed the evaporative capacity of the cells, wastewater is discharged to a 73.5-acre land application site that uses a center-pivot irrigation sprinkler system. As flows at CFA have decreased in recent years, the amount of wastewater discharged to the land application site has decreased from 13.64 million gallons in 2004 to no discharge in 2012 and 2013. In addition to the decreasing need for land application, approximately 7.7 MG of supplemental water was added to the system in 2013 to maintain a water level and prevent the clay soil liners in the cells from drying out and “cracking.” The Idaho National Laboratory is concerned that the sewage lagoons and land application site may be oversized for current and future flows. A further concern is the sustainability of the large volumes of supplemental water that are added to the system according to current operational practices. Therefore, this study was initiated to evaluate the system capacity, operational practices, and potential improvement alternatives, as warranted.

  5. Urban Surfaces and Heat Island Mitigation Potentials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, Hashem; Akbari, Hashem; Shea Rose, Leanna

    2007-06-14

    Data on materials and surface types that comprise a city, i.e. urban fabric, are needed in order to estimate the effects of light-colored surfaces (roofs and pavements) and urban vegetation (trees, grass, shrubs) on the meteorology and air quality of a city. We discuss the results of a semi-automatic statistical approach used to develop data on surface-type distribution and urban-fabric makeup using aerial color orthophotography, for four metropolitan areas of Chicago, IL, Houston, TX, Sacramento, CA, and Salt Lake City, UT. The digital high resolution (0.3 to 0.5-m) aerial photographs for each of these metropolitan areas covers representative urban areas ranging from 30 km{sup 2} to 52 km{sup 2}. Major land-use types examined included: commercial, residential, industrial, educational, and transportation. On average, for the metropolitan areas studied, vegetation covers about 29-41% of the area, roofs 19-25%, and paved surfaces 29-39%. For the most part, trees shade streets, parking lots, grass, and sidewalks. At ground level, i.e., view from below the tree canopies, vegetation covers about 20-37% of the area, roofs 20-25%, and paved surfaces 29-36%.

  6. LM340/LM78MXX Series 3-Terminal Positive Regulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravikumar, B.

    limit n Output transistor safe area protection n P+ Product Enhancement tested Device Output Voltages Limited Maximum Junction Temperature 150°C Storage Temperature Range -65°C to +150°C Lead Temperature

  7. Geographic Area Month

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Fuels by PAD District and State (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) - Continued Geographic Area Month No. 1 Distillate No. 2 Distillate a No. 4 Fuel b Sales to End Users Sales for...

  8. Decontamination & decommissioning focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-08-01

    In January 1994, the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE EM) formally introduced its new approach to managing DOE`s environmental research and technology development activities. The goal of the new approach is to conduct research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE, utilizing the best talent in the Department and in the national science community. To facilitate this solutions-oriented approach, the Office of Science and Technology (EM-50, formerly the Office of Technology Development) formed five Focus AReas to stimulate the required basic research, development, and demonstration efforts to seek new, innovative cleanup methods. In February 1995, EM-50 selected the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) to lead implementation of one of these Focus Areas: the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D & D) Focus Area.

  9. Environmental Resources of Selected Areas of Hawaii: Ecological Resources (DRAFT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trettin, C.C.; Tolbert, V.R.; Jones, A.T.; Smith, C.R.; Kalmijn, A.J.

    1994-06-01

    This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background scientific data and related information collected on ecological resources during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The U.S. Department of Energy (COE) published a notice in the Federal Register on May 17, 1994 (Fed. Regist. 5925638) withdrawing its Notice of Intent (Fed. Regst. 575433) of February 14, 1992, to prepare the HGP-EIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. The background scientific data and related information presented in this report focus on several areas of Hawaii County, including the southeastern coast, a potential development corridor along the Saddle Road between Hilo and the North Kohala District on the northwestern coast, and on the southeastern coast of Maui. In this report, reference is made to these areas as study areas rather than as areas where proposed or alternative facilities of the HGP would be located. The resource areas addressed herein include terrestrial ecology, aquatic ecology, and marine ecology. The scientific background data and related information is being made available for future research in these areas. This report describes the environmental resources present in the areas studied (i.e., the affected environment) and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts.

  10. Appendix C: Transmission, Ancillary and Control Area Service...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Intertie, by BPA on account of any reduction in Transmission Demand, termination, or partial termination of any such agreement or otherwise to compensate BPA for the...

  11. Sliding contact at plastically graded surfaces and applications to surface design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prasad, Anamika, 1979-

    2007-01-01

    Tailored gradation in elastic-plastic properties is known to offer avenues for suppressing surface damage during normal indentation and sliding contact. These graded materials have potential applications in diverse areas ...

  12. 300 Area Disturbance Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LL Hale; MK Wright; NA Cadoret

    1999-01-07

    The objective of this study was to define areas of previous disturbance in the 300 Area of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site to eliminate these areas from the cultural resource review process, reduce cultural resource monitoring costs, and allow cultural resource specialists to focus on areas where subsurface disturbance is minimal or nonexistent. Research into available sources suggests that impacts from excavations have been significant wherever the following construction activities have occurred: building basements and pits, waste ponds, burial grounds, trenches, installation of subsurface pipelines, power poles, water hydrants, and well construction. Beyond the areas just mentioned, substrates in the' 300 Area consist of a complex, multidimen- sional mosaic composed of undisturbed stratigraphy, backfill, and disturbed sediments; Four Geographic Information System (GIS) maps were created to display known areas of disturbance in the 300 Area. These maps contain information gleaned from a variety of sources, but the primary sources include the Hanford GIS database system, engineer drawings, and historic maps. In addition to these maps, several assumptions can be made about areas of disturbance in the 300 Area as a result of this study: o o Buried pipelines are not always located where they are mapped. As a result, cultural resource monitors or specialists should not depend on maps depicting subsurface pipelines for accurate locations of previous disturbance. Temporary roads built in the early 1940s were placed on layers of sand and gravel 8 to 12 in. thick. Given this information, it is likely that substrates beneath these early roads are only minimally disturbed. Building foundations ranged from concrete slabs no more than 6 to 8 in. thick to deeply excavated pits and basements. Buildings constructed with slab foundations are more numerous than may be expected, and minimally disturbed substrates may be expected in these locations. Historic black and white photographs provide a partial record of some excavations, including trenches, building basements, and material lay-down yards. Estimates of excavation depth and width can be made, but these estimates are not accurate enough to pinpoint the exact location where the disturbedhmdisturbed interface is located (e.g., camera angles were such that depths and/or widths of excavations could not be accurately determined or estimated). In spite of these limitations, these photographs provide essential information. Aerial and historic low-level photographs have captured what appears to be backfill throughout much of the eastern portion of the 300 Area-near the Columbia River shoreline. This layer of fill has likely afforded some protection for the natural landscape buried beneath the fill. This assumption fits nicely with the intermittent and inadvertent discoveries of hearths and stone tools documented through the years in this part of the 300 Area. Conversely, leveling of sand dunes appears to be substantial in the northwestern portion of the 300 Area during the early stages of development. o Project files and engineer drawings do not contain information on any impromptu but necessary adjustments made on the ground during project implementation-after the design phase. Further, many projects are planned and mapped but never implemented-this information is also not often placed in project files. Specific recommendations for a 300 Area cultural resource monitoring strategy are contained in the final section of this document. In general, it is recommended that monitoring continue for all projects located within 400 m of the Columbia River. The 400-m zone is culturally sensitive and likely retains some of the most intact buried substrates in the 300 Area.

  13. Economic Effects of Land Subsidence Due to Excessive Groundwater Withdrawal in the Texas Gulf Coast Area 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, L. L.; Larson, J.

    1975-01-01

    Land surface subsidence continues to be a destructive force in the Texas Gulf Coast area. The sinking of the surface has been linked by engineers to the withdrawal of groundwater. Subsidence causes damages and property value losses as saltwater...

  14. Imaging the early material response associated with exit surface damage in fused silica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demos, S G; Raman, R N; Negres, R A

    2010-11-05

    The processes involved at the onset of damage initiation on the surface of fused silica have been a topic of extensive discussion and thought for more than four decades. Limited experimental results have helped develop models covering specific aspects of the process. In this work we present the results of an experimental study aiming at imaging the material response from the onset of the observation of material modification during exposure to the laser pulse through the time point at which material ejection begins. The system involves damage initiation using a 355 nm pulse, 7.8 ns FWHM in duration and imaging of the affected material volume with spatial resolution on the order of 1 {micro}m using as strobe light a 150 ps laser pulse that is appropriately timed with respect to the pump pulse. The observations reveal that the onset of material modification is associated with regions of increased absorption, i.e., formation of an electronic excitation, leading to a reduction in the probe transmission to only a few percent within a time interval of about 1 ns. This area is subsequently rapidly expanding with a speed of about 1.2 {micro}m/ns and is accompanied by the formation and propagation of radial cracks. These cracks appear to initiate about 2 ns after the start of the expansion of the modified region. The damage sites continue to grow for about 25 ns but the mechanism of expansion after the termination of the laser pulse is via formation and propagation of lateral cracks. During this time, the affected area of the surface appears to expand forming a bulge of about 40 {micro}m in height. The first clear observation of material cluster ejection is noted at about 50 ns delay.

  15. High-spin structure and Band Termination in $^{103}$Cd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakraborty, A; Mukhopadhyay, S; Ray, S; Chintalapudi, S N; Ghugre, S S; Pattabiraman, N S; Sinha, A K; Sarkar, S; Garg, U; Zhu, S; Sarkar, M Saha

    2007-01-01

    Excited states of the neutron deficient $^{103}$Cd nucleus have been investigated via the $^{72}$Ge($^{35}$Cl, p3n) reaction at beam energy of 135 MeV by use of in-beam spectroscopic methods. Gamma rays depopulating the excited states were detected using the Gammasphere spectrometer with high-fold $\\gamma$-ray coincidences. A quadrupole $\\gamma$-ray coincidence analysis ($\\gamma^{4}$) has been used to extend the known level scheme. The positive parity levels have been established up to $J = 35/2\\hbar$ and $E_{x} = 7.071$ MeV. In addition to the observation of highly-fragmented level scheme belonging to the positive-parity sequences at E$_{x}\\sim$ 5 MeV, the termination of a negative-parity sequence connected by $E2$ transitions has been established at $J = 47/2 \\hbar$ and $E_{x} = 11.877$ MeV. The experimental results corresponding to both the positive- and negative-parity sequences have been theoretically interpreted in the framework of the core particle coupling model. Evidence is presented for a shape chan...

  16. N-terminal protein processing: A comparative proteogenomic analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonissone, Stefano; Gupta, Nitin; Romine, Margaret F.; Bradshaw, Ralph A.; Pevzner, Pavel A.

    2013-01-01

    N-Terminal Methionine Excision (NME) is a universally conserved mechanism with the same specificity across all life forms that removes the first Methionine in proteins when the second residue is Gly, Ala, Ser, Cys, Thr, Pro, or Val. In spite of its necessity for proper cell functioning, the functional role of NME remains unclear. In 1988, Arfin and Bradshaw connected NME with the N-end protein degradation rule and postulated that the role of NME is to expose the stabilizing residues with the goal to resist protein degradation. While this explanation (that treats 7 stabilizing residues in the same manner) has become the de facto dogma of NME, comparative proteogenomics analysis of NME tells a different story. We suggest that the primary role of NME is to expose only two (rather than seven) amino acids Ala and Ser for post-translational modifications (e.g., acetylation) rather than to regulate protein degradation. We argue that, contrary to the existing view, NME is not crucially important for proteins with 5 other stabilizing residue at the 2nd positions that are merely bystanders (their function is not affected by NME) that become exposed to NME because their sizes are comparable or smaller than the size of Ala and Ser.

  17. Defining the Termination of the Asymptotic Giant Branch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noam Soker

    2007-12-22

    I suggest a theoretical quantitative definition for the termination of the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase and the beginning of the post-AGB phase. I suggest that the transition will be taken to occur when the ratio of the dynamical time scale to the the envelope thermal time scale, Q, reaches its maximum value. Time average values are used for the different quantities, as the criterion does not refer to the short time-scale variations occurring on the AGB and post-AGB, e.g., thermal pulses (helium shell flashes) and magnetic activity. Along the entire AGB the value of Q increases, even when the star starts to contract. Only when a rapid contraction starts does the value of Q start to decrease. This criterion captures the essence of the transition from the AGB to the post AGB phase, because Q is connected to the stellar effective temperature, reaching its maximum value at T~4000-6000 K, it is related to the mass loss properties, and it reaches its maximum value when rapid contraction starts and envelope mass is very low.

  18. Evolution of Plasma Parameters in the Termination Phase of High Confinement H-modes at JET and Implications for ITER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evolution of Plasma Parameters in the Termination Phase of High Confinement H-modes at JET and Implications for ITER

  19. Surface morphology and electronic structure of bulk single crystal -Ga2O3,,100...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olmstead, Marjorie

    termination contains both gallium and oxygen, and this surface does not exhibit a reconstruction. The valence of main group elements other than Al2O3 exist,4 they are scarce. This is at least partially due-temperature gas sensors whose conductivity varies with the partial pressure of oxidizing or reducing gases

  20. Structure and Reactivity of Surface Oxides on Pt(110) during Catalytic CO Oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ackermann, M.D.; Pedersen, T.M.; Hammer, B.; Hendriksen, B.L.M.; Bobaru, S.C.; Frenken, J.W.M.; Robach, O.; Quiros, C.

    2005-12-16

    We present the first structure determination by surface x-ray diffraction during the restructuring of a model catalyst under reaction conditions, i.e., at high pressure and high temperature, and correlate the restructuring with a change in catalytic activity. We have analyzed the Pt(110) surface during CO oxidation at pressures up to 0.5 bar and temperatures up to 625 K. Depending on the O{sub 2}/CO pressure ratio, we find three well-defined structures: namely, (i) the bulk-terminated Pt(110) surface, (ii) a thin, commensurate oxide, and (iii) a thin, incommensurate oxide. The commensurate oxide only appears under reaction conditions, i.e., when both O{sub 2} and CO are present and at sufficiently high temperatures. Density functional theory calculations indicate that the commensurate oxide is stabilized by carbonate ions (CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}). Both oxides have a substantially higher catalytic activity than the bulk-terminated Pt surface.

  1. 17-Hydroxyprogesterone caproate to prolong pregnancy after preterm rupture of the membranes: early termination of a double-blind, randomized clinical trial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    of the membranes: early termination of a double-blind,of the membranes: early termination of a double-blind,Because of premature termination, the trial does not have

  2. OLED area illumination source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foust, Donald Franklin (Scotia, NY); Duggal, Anil Raj (Niskayuna, NY); Shiang, Joseph John (Niskayuna, NY); Nealon, William Francis (Gloversville, NY); Bortscheller, Jacob Charles (Clifton Park, NY)

    2008-03-25

    The present invention relates to an area illumination light source comprising a plurality of individual OLED panels. The individual OLED panels are configured in a physically modular fashion. Each OLED panel comprising a plurality of OLED devices. Each OLED panel comprises a first electrode and a second electrode such that the power being supplied to each individual OLED panel may be varied independently. A power supply unit capable of delivering varying levels of voltage simultaneously to the first and second electrodes of each of the individual OLED panels is also provided. The area illumination light source also comprises a mount within which the OLED panels are arrayed.

  3. To examine how the dynamics of recall processes are affected by the control processes involved with search termination, to study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dougherty, Michael

    involved with search termination, to study the implications of these control processes for the development at understanding the metacognitive control processes involved with the decision to terminate memory search. Specifically, research examines the impact of search termination decisions on the natural retrieval dynamics

  4. UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 6C1-7.048 Academic Affairs; Suspension, Termination, and Other Disciplinary Action for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sin, Peter

    1 RULES OF UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 6C1-7.048 Academic Affairs; Suspension, Termination, and Other Disciplinary Action for Faculty: Definition of Just Cause, Termination, Suspension, and Other Disciplinary for termination, suspension, and/or other disciplinary action imposed on a faculty member shall be defined

  5. PUBLISHED ONLINE: 26 JANUARY 2015 | DOI: 10.1038/NGEO2329 The time-transgressive termination of the African

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    -transgressive termination of the African Humid Period Timothy M. Shanahan1 *, Nicholas P. McKay2 , Konrad A. Hughen3 of the African monsoon. Hydrologic reconstructions from arid North Africa show an abrupt onset and termination of hydrologic reconstructions from across Africa shows that the termination of the African Humid Period

  6. Output Harmonic Termination Techniques for AlGaN/GaN HEMT Power Amplifiers Using Active Integrated Antenna Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Itoh, Tatsuo

    Output Harmonic Termination Techniques for AlGaN/GaN HEMT Power Amplifiers Using Active Integrated 1200, Los Angeles, CA 90045 Abstract -- In this paper, effects of output harmonic terminations on PAE termination, we observe a substantial increase in PAE and output power. Further, we demonstrate the high

  7. Enhanced self-termination of re-entrant arrhythmias as a pharmacological strategy for anti-arrhythmic action.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biktashev, Vadim N.

    1 Enhanced self-termination of re-entrant arrhythmias as a pharmacological strategy for anti-diffusion equations. A spiral wave in a bounded medium can be terminated if its core reaches a boundary. Ventricular tachyarrhythmias in patients are sometimes observed to spontaneously self-terminate. One possible mechanism

  8. UCF-3.0124 Discipline and Termination for Cause of Non-unit Faculty and A&P Staff Members.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    UCF-3.0124 Discipline and Termination for Cause of Non-unit Faculty and A&P Staff Members. (1) Just cause shall be defined as: (a) Incompetence; or (b) Misconduct. (2) Termination and Suspension. (a) The appointment of a non-unit faculty or an A&P staff member may be terminated or suspended during its term

  9. JOURNAL OF INFORMATION SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING 24, 159-174 (2008) Improving the Efficacy of a Termination Detection Algorithm*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mittal, Neeraj

    2008-01-01

    of a Termination Detection Algorithm* SATHYA PERI AND NEERAJ MITTAL Department of Computer Science The University@utdallas.edu} An important problem in distributed systems is to detect termination of a distributed computation. A distributed computation is said to have terminated when all processes have become passive and all channels

  10. Recent results at ultrahigh spin: Terminating states and beyond in mass 160 rare-earth nuclei

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Paul, E. S.; Rees, J. M.; Hampson, P.; Riley, M. A.; Simpson, J.; Ayangeakaa, A. D.; Baron, J. S.; Carpenter, M. P.; Chiara, C. J.; Garg, U.; et al

    2015-01-01

    A classic region of band termination at high spin occurs in rare-earth nuclei with around ten valence nucleons above the 146Gd closed core. The results are presented here for such non-collective oblate (? = 60°) terminating states in odd-Z 155Ho, odd–odd 156Ho, and even–even 156Er, where they are compared with neighboring nuclei. In addition to these particularly favoured states, the occurrence of collective triaxial strongly deformed (TSD) bands, bypassing the terminating states and extending to over 65?, is reviewed.

  11. Modeling of Electronically Commutated Motor Controlled Fan-powered Terminal Units 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edmondson, Jacob Lee

    2011-02-22

    : Dr. Dennis O?Neal Empirical models of airflow and power consumption were developed for series and parallel variable air volume fan powered terminal units (FPTUs). An experimental setup and test procedure were developed to test the terminal... (THD) was also recorded and presented. For the series terminal units, models were developed for fan airflow, fan power, and primary airflow. The models for fan airflow all had R2 values above 0.987. The iv models for fan power all had R2 values...

  12. Termination of Reentry in an Inhomogeneous Ring of Model Cardiac Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sitabhra Sinha; David J. Christini

    2003-04-21

    Reentrant waves propagating in a ring or annulus of excitable media model is the basic mechanism underlying a major class of irregular cardiac rhythms known as anatomical reentry. Such reentrant waves are terminated by rapid electrical stimulation (pacing) from an implantable device. Because the mechanisms of such termination are poorly understood, we study pacing of anatomical reentry in a one-dimensional ring of model cardiac cells. For realistic off-circuit pacing, our model-independent results suggest that circuit inhomogeneities, and the electrophysiological dynamical changes they introduce, may be essential for terminating reentry in some cases.

  13. Monitoring Environmental Recovery at Terminated Produced Water Discharge Sites in Coastal Louisiana Waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Continental Shelf Associates, Inc.

    1999-08-16

    This report presents the results of a study of terminated produced water discharge sites in the coastal waters of Louisiana. Environmental recovery at the sites is documented by comparing pre-termination and post-termination (six months and one year) data. Produced water, sediments, and sediment interstitial water samples were analyzed for radionuclides, metals, and hydrocarbons. Benthic infauna were identified from samples collected in the vicinity of the discharge and reference sites. Radium isotope activities were determined in fish and crustacean samples. In addition, an environmental risk assessment is made on the basis of the concentrations of metals and hydrocarbons determined in the samples.

  14. Surface rheology and interface stability.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaklin, Melissa A.; Cote, Raymond O.; Moffat, Harry K.; Grillet, Anne Mary; Walker, Lynn; Koehler, Timothy P.; Reichert, Matthew D.; Castaneda, Jaime N.; Mondy, Lisa Ann; Brooks, Carlton, F.

    2010-11-01

    We have developed a mature laboratory at Sandia to measure interfacial rheology, using a combination of home-built, commercially available, and customized commercial tools. An Interfacial Shear Rheometer (KSV ISR-400) was modified and the software improved to increase sensitivity and reliability. Another shear rheometer, a TA Instruments AR-G2, was equipped with a du Nouey ring, bicone geometry, and a double wall ring. These interfacial attachments were compared to each other and to the ISR. The best results with the AR-G2 were obtained with the du Nouey ring. A Micro-Interfacial Rheometer (MIR) was developed in house to obtain the much higher sensitivity given by a smaller probe. However, it was found to be difficult to apply this technique for highly elastic surfaces. Interfaces also exhibit dilatational rheology when the interface changes area, such as occurs when bubbles grow or shrink. To measure this rheological response we developed a Surface Dilatational Rheometer (SDR), in which changes in surface tension with surface area are measured during the oscillation of the volume of a pendant drop or bubble. All instruments were tested with various surfactant solutions to determine the limitations of each. In addition, foaming capability and foam stability were tested and compared with the rheology data. It was found that there was no clear correlation of surface rheology with foaming/defoaming with different types of surfactants, but, within a family of surfactants, rheology could predict the foam stability. Diffusion of surfactants to the interface and the behavior of polyelectrolytes were two subjects studied with the new equipment. Finally, surface rheological terms were added to a finite element Navier-Stokes solver and preliminary testing of the code completed. Recommendations for improved implementation were given. When completed we plan to use the computations to better interpret the experimental data and account for the effects of the underlying bulk fluid.

  15. A superconducting-nanowire 3-terminal electronic device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adam N. McCaughan; Karl K. Berggren

    2014-03-25

    In existing superconducting electronic systems, Josephson junctions play a central role in processing and transmitting small-amplitude electrical signals. However, Josephson-junction-based devices have a number of limitations including: (1) sensitivity to magnetic fields, (2) limited gain, (3) inability to drive large impedances, and (4) difficulty in controlling the junction critical current (which depends sensitively on sub-Angstrom-scale thickness variation of the tunneling barrier). Here we present a nanowire-based superconducting electronic device, which we call the nanocryotron (nTron), that does not rely on Josephson junctions and can be patterned from a single thin film of superconducting material with conventional electron-beam lithography. The nTron is a 3-terminal, T-shaped planar device with a gain of ~20 that is capable of driving impedances of more than 100 k{\\Omega}, and operates in typical ambient magnetic fields at temperatures of 4.2K. The device uses a localized, Joule-heated hotspot formed in the gate to modulate current flow in a perpendicular superconducting channel. We have characterized the nTron, matched it to a theoretical framework, and applied it both as a digital logic element in a half-adder circuit, and as a digital amplifier for superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors pulses. The nTron has immediate applications in classical and quantum communications, photon sensing and astronomy, and its performance characteristics make it compatible with existing superconducting technologies. Furthermore, because the hotspot effect occurs in all known superconductors, we expect the design to be extensible to other materials, providing a path to digital logic, switching, and amplification in high-temperature superconductors.

  16. Search for the Heliospheric Termination Shock (TS) and Heliosheath (HS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ness, Norman F. [Bartol Research Institute, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Burlaga, Leonard F.; Acuna, Mario H. [NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Stone, Edward C. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); McDonald, Frank B. [Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2005-08-01

    Voyager 1 continues to measure the very distant Heliospheric Magnetic Field (HMF) beyond 95 AU at {approx}35 North latitude. The MAG instrument data covers more than a full 22 years solar magnetic cycle. The magnitude of the observed HMF is well described, on average, by Parker's Archimedean spiral structure if due account is made for time variations of the source field strength and solar wind velocity. The V1 magnetic field observations do not provide any evidence for a field increase associated with entry into a subsonic solar wind region, such as the heliosheath is expected to be, nor an exit from this regime. We see no evidence for crossing of the Termination Shock (TS) as has been reported at {approx}85 AU by the LECP instrument. Merged Interaction Regions are identified by an increased HMF and associated decreases in the flux of >70 MeV/nuc cosmic rays which are then followed by a flux recovery. This CR-B relationship has been identified in V1 data and studied since 1982 when V1 was at 11 AU. The variance of HMF, a direct measure of the energy**1/2 in the HMF fluctuations, shows no significant changes associated with the alleged TS crossings in 2002-2003. Thus, the absence of any HMF increase at the entry into the heliosheath appears not to be due to the onset of mesoscale turbulence as proposed by Fisk. The TS has yet to be directly observed in-situ by the V1 MAG experiment in data through 2003.

  17. Environmental resources of selected areas of Hawaii: Ecological resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trettin, C.C.; Tolbert, V.R.; Jones, A.T.; Smith, C.R.; Kalmijn, A.J.

    1995-03-01

    This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background scientific data and related information collected on ecological resources during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. The background scientific data and related information presented in this report focus on several areas of Hawaii County. In this report, reference is made to these areas as study areas rather than as areas where proposed or alternative facilities of the HGP would be located. The resource areas addressed herein include terrestrial ecology, aquatic ecology, and marine ecology. The scientific background data and related information that were obtained from review of the (1) scientific literature, (2) government and private sector reports, (3) studies done under DOE interagency agreements with the US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) and with the US Army Corps of Engineers (COE), and (4) observations made during site visits are being made available for future research in these areas.

  18. Fluorocarbons: Surface Free Energies and van der Waals Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Derek Y C

    Letters Fluorocarbons: Surface Free Energies and van der Waals Interaction Calum J. Drummond surface free energies based on contact angle measurements with dispersive organic liquids depend of dispersive materials, the surface free energy per unit area of a solid organic material can be used

  19. Plutonium focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    To ensure research and development programs focus on the most pressing environmental restoration and waste management problems at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) established a working group in August 1993 to implement a new approach to research and technology development. As part of this new approach, EM developed a management structure and principles that led to the creation of specific Focus Areas. These organizations were designed to focus the scientific and technical talent throughout DOE and the national scientific community on the major environmental restoration and waste management problems facing DOE. The Focus Area approach provides the framework for intersite cooperation and leveraging of resources on common problems. After the original establishment of five major Focus Areas within the Office of Technology Development (EM-50, now called the Office of Science and Technology), the Nuclear Materials Stabilization Task Group (EM-66) followed the structure already in place in EM-50 and chartered the Plutonium Focus Area (PFA). The following information outlines the scope and mission of the EM, EM-60, and EM-66 organizations as related to the PFA organizational structure.

  20. Subsurface contaminants focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-08-01

    The US Department of Enregy (DOE) Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is developing technologies to address environmental problems associated with hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil and groundwater that exist throughout the DOE complex, including radionuclides, heavy metals; and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). More than 5,700 known DOE groundwater plumes have contaminated over 600 billion gallons of water and 200 million cubic meters of soil. Migration of these plumes threatens local and regional water sources, and in some cases has already adversely impacted off-site rsources. In addition, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is responsible for supplying technologies for the remediation of numerous landfills at DOE facilities. These landfills are estimated to contain over 3 million cubic meters of radioactive and hazardous buried Technology developed within this specialty area will provide efective methods to contain contaminant plumes and new or alternative technologies for development of in situ technologies to minimize waste disposal costs and potential worker exposure by treating plumes in place. While addressing contaminant plumes emanating from DOE landfills, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is also working to develop new or alternative technologies for the in situ stabilization, and nonintrusive characterization of these disposal sites.