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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terminal surface area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Terminal area flight path generation using parallel constraint propagation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Flight Path Generator is defined as the module of an automated Air Traffic Control system which plans aircraft trajectories in the terminal area with respect to operational constraints. The flight path plans have to be ...

Sadoune, Michel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

High-Resolution Weather Database for the Terminal Area of Frankfurt Airport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 1-yr meteorological dataset for the terminal area of Frankfurt Airport in Germany has been generated with a numerical weather prediction system to provide a synthetic though realistic database for the evaluation of new operational aircraft ...

Michael Frech; Frank Holzäpfel; Arnold Tafferner; Thomas Gerz

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Use of Mass- and Area-Dimensional Power Laws for Determining Precipitation Particle Terminal Velocities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on boundary layer theory and a comparison of empirical power laws relating the Reynolds and Best numbers, it was apparent that the primary variables governing a hydrometeor's terminal velocity were its mass, its area projected to the flow, ...

David L. Mitchell

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Improvement of terminal area capacity in the New York airspace  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The New York airspace is the most congested in the U.S. air transportation network. Increasing capacity in this area is critical to ensure the balanced growth of traffic across the U.S. This study compares the total measured ...

Donaldson, Alexander David

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Surface Water Management Areas (Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Surface Water Management Areas (Virginia) Surface Water Management Areas (Virginia) Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General...

6

Nanometer-scale striped surface terminations on fractured SrTiO{sub 3} surfaces.  

SciTech Connect

Using cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy on in situ fractured SrTiO{sub 3}, one of the most commonly used substrates for the growth of complex oxide thin films and superlattices, atomically smooth terraces have been observed on (001) surfaces. Furthermore, it was discovered that fracturing this material at room temperature results in the formation of stripe patterned domains having characteristic widths ({approx}10 to {approx}20 nm) of alternating surface terminations that extend over a long range. Spatial characterization utilizing spectroscopy techniques revealed a strong contrast in the electronic structure of the two domains. Combining these results with topographic data, we are able to assign both TiO{sub 2} and SrO terminations to their respective domains. The results of this experiment reveal that fracturing this material leads to reproducibly flat surfaces that can be characterized at the atomic-scale and suggest that this technique can be utilized for the study of technologically relevant complex oxide interfaces.

Guisinger, N. P.; Santos, T. S.; Guest, J. R.; Chien, T.-Y; Bhattacharya, A.; Freeland, J. W.; Bode, M.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Surface Termination and Roughness of Ge(100) Cleaned by HF and HCl Solutions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Oxide removal from Ge(100) surfaces treated by HCl and HF solutions with different concentrations are systematically studied by synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy (SR-PES). SR-PES results show that clean surfaces without any oxide can be obtained after wet chemical cleaning followed by vacuum annealing with a residual carbon contamination of less than 0.02 monolayer. HF etching leads to a hydrogen terminated Ge surface whose hydrogen coverage is a function of the HF concentration. In contrast, HCl etching yields a chlorine terminated surface. Possible etching mechanisms are discussed. Surface roughness after HF and HCl treatments is also investigated by AFM, which shows that HF treatment leaves a rougher surface than HCl. Germanium (Ge) is increasingly being studied for MOSFET applications to take advantage of its high intrinsic electron and hole mobility. To fabricate high performance devices on Ge, it is essential to understand Ge surface chemistry and find an effective way to clean and passivate its surface. Although Si surface cleaning and passivation have been extensively studied, only recently has some research been done on Ge surfaces. Conventional XPS results show that HF etching removes Ge oxide and carbon contamination significantly, and HCl etching leads to a chlorine terminated Ge(111) surface, which only forms Ge monochloride. However, it is difficult to probe the details of the chemical nature of treated surfaces and quantify the surface termination and cleanness with conventional XPS, because of its limited surface sensitivity and resolution. In addition, little attention has been paid to the HF concentration, which turns out to be an important factor in the surface hydrogen passivation. In this work, we study the Ge(100) surfaces treated by aqueous HCl and HF solutions with three different concentrations by synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy (SR-PES) at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL). Using SR-PES, we can tune the photon energy to achieve very high surface sensitivity and good resolution, so the chemical states of treated surfaces can be resolved unambiguously, and the surface termination and cleanness can be quantified. We find that HF treatment results in a hydrogen terminated surface, and the hydrogen coverage depends on the HF concentration. In contrast, a Cl terminated Ge(100) surface is achieved after HCl treatment. Both monochloride and dichloride are formed on the surface. The termination difference between HF etching and HCl etching can be explained by the etching mechanism. In both cases, the residual carbon and oxygen after chemical etching can be removed by vacuum annealing.

Sun, Shiyu; /SLAC, SSRL

2005-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

8

Electrical passivation and chemical functionalization of SiC surfaces by chlorine termination  

SciTech Connect

We have developed a straightforward plasma-based method which yields chlorine-terminated n-type 6H-SiC surfaces. Atomic force microscopy shows that the surface roughness is not affected by the plasma processing. Additionally, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals a significant reduction in oxygen, and a corresponding rise of chlorine core level intensities, following halogen termination. Contact potential difference and surface photovoltage measurements show formation of negative surface dipoles and approximately flat band surface potentials after chlorine termination of (0001) n-type 6H-SiC (built-in voltage V{sub bi}<20 meV). Starting from halogenated surfaces, we demonstrate both ultraviolet light-induced and thermally-induced functionalization with alkene-derived self-assembled organic monolayers.

Schoell, S. J.; Howgate, J.; Hoeb, M.; Auernhammer, M.; Garrido, J. A.; Stutzmann, M.; Brandt, M. S.; Sharp, I. D. [Walter Schottky Institut and Physik Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Coulombwall 4, 85748 Garching (Germany)

2011-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

9

Tennessee Valley Authority Smart Modal Area Recharge Terminal (SMART) Station Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) collaborated to design and build solar-assisted electric vehicle (EV) charging stations, referred to as a TVA Smart Modal Area Recharge Terminal, or TVA SMART Station. These stations—which combine photovoltaic generation, EV charging, and stationary battery storage—have been deployed across the State of Tennessee. In specific, the five deployed stations provide a total of 72 kW of solar generation capacity, 36 parking spaces equipped for ...

2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

10

Packing efficiency and accessible surface area of crumpled graphene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Graphene holds promise as an ultracapacitor due to its high specific surface area and intrinsic capacitance. To exploit both, a maximum surface area must be accessible while the two-dimensional (2D) graphene is deformed ...

Cranford, Steven Wayne

11

Tennessee Valley Authority Smart Modal Area Recharge Terminal (SMART) Station Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the base design for a Smart Modal Area Recharge Terminal (SMART) station. The base design is for a 10-space public vehicle charging facility, incorporating a solar photo-voltaic array/canopy with battery storage. Many of the design recommendations are based on the system design experience of Eaton Corporation in related energy applications and cover safety compliance and field integration. The design effort was conducted not only to develop a base design that can be used by other en...

2010-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

12

Mechanism of the Initial Oxidation of Hydrogen andHalogen Terminated Ge(111) Surfaces in Air  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The initial stage of the oxidation of Ge(111) surfaces etched by HF, HCl and HBr solutions is systematically studied using synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy (SR-PES). We perform controlled experiments to differentiate the effects of different oxidation factors. SR-PES results show that both moisture and oxygen contribute to the oxidation of the surfaces; however, they play different roles in the oxidation process. Moisture effectively replaces the hydrogen and halogen termination layers with hydroxyl (OH), but hardly oxidizes the surfaces further. On the other hand, dry oxygen does not replace the termination layers, but breaks the Ge-Ge back bonds and oxidizes the substrates with the aid of moisture. In addition, room light enhances the oxidation rate significantly.

Sun, Shiyu; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Sun, Yun; Liu, Zhi; Lee, Dong-Ick; Pianetta, Piero; /SLAC, SSRL

2006-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

13

Historic Surface Faulting and Paleoseismicity in the Area of...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Historic Surface Faulting and Paleoseismicity in the Area of the 1954 Rainbow Mountain-Stillwater Earthquake Sequence, Central Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

14

Synthesis of High Surface Area Foams for Functional and ...  

A substantially higher surface area is very desirable in porous metallic bulk materials for functional applications such as catalysts, hydrogen storag ...

15

Surface Gas Sampling At International Geothermal Area Mexico...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Facebook icon Twitter icon Surface Gas Sampling At International Geothermal Area Mexico (Norman, Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home...

16

A variational level set approach for surface area minimization of triply-periodic surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we study triply-periodic surfaces with minimal surface area under a constraint in the volume fraction of the regions (phases) that the surface separates. Using a variational level set method formulation, we present a theoretical characterization ...

Y. Jung; K. T. Chu; S. Torquato

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

MOISTURE AND SURFACE AREA MEASUREMENTS OF PLUTONIUM-BEARING OXIDES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To ensure safe storage, plutonium-bearing oxides are stabilized at 950 C for at least two hours in an oxidizing atmosphere. Stabilization conditions are expected to decompose organic impurities, convert metals to oxides, and result in moisture content below 0.5 wt%. During stabilization, the specific surface area is reduced, which minimizes readsorption of water onto the oxide surface. Plutonium oxides stabilized according to these criteria were sampled and analyzed to determine moisture content and surface area. In addition, samples were leached in water to identify water-soluble chloride impurity content. Results of these analyses for seven samples showed that the stabilization process produced low moisture materials (< 0.2 wt %) with low surface area ({le} 1 m{sup 2}/g). For relatively pure materials, the amount of water per unit surface area corresponded to 1.5 to 3.5 molecular layers of water. For materials with chloride content > 360 ppm, the calculated amount of water per unit surface area increased with chloride content, indicating hydration of hygroscopic salts present in the impure PuO{sub 2}-containing materials. The low moisture, low surface area materials in this study did not generate detectable hydrogen during storage of four or more years.

Crowder, M.; Duffey, J.; Livingston, R.; Scogin, J.; Kessinger, G.; Almond, P.

2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

18

SAW determination of surface area of thin films  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

N.sub.2 adsorption isotherms are measured from thin films on SAW devices. The isotherms may be used to determine the surface area and pore size distribution of thin films.

Frye, Gregory C. (Albuquerque, NM); Martin, Stephen J. (Albuquerque, NM); Ricco, Antonio J. (Albuquerque, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Cube and Sphere Surface Area and Relative Size  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cube and Sphere Surface Area and Relative Size Cube and Sphere Surface Area and Relative Size Name: Andrea Status: student Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Will a sphere that has the identical surface area as a cube fit inside the cube? Replies: The surface area of a cube is 6L^2 where L is the length of a side. The surface area of a sphere is 4 pi r^2 where r is the radius of the sphere Setting these two terms equal (which we do because the surface areas are equal, [we do not need and exact number, mind you. We just have to know they are equal.]) and doing some algebra we find that the cube has a side 1.414 times as long as the radius of the sphere. BUT WAIT. The radius of the sphere is only half its size (diameter)! To hold the sphere, the cube needs a side of 2r or twice the sphere's radius!! It is only 1.414 times as long so, the sphere will not fit.

20

Surface Gas Sampling At International Geothermal Area Mexico (Norman, Et  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At International Geothermal Area Mexico (Norman, Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At International Geothermal Area Mexico (Norman, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location International Geothermal Area Mexico Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Norman (2002) shows that the Cerro Prieto gas analyses collected by Cathy Janik and Alfred Truesdell from1977 to 1998 plot on a C02/N2 condensation

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terminal surface area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Structure of the -Al2O3,,0001... surface from low-energy electron diffraction: Al termination and evidence for anomalously large thermal vibrations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Structure of the -Al2O3,,0001... surface from low-energy electron diffraction: Al termination structure of -Al2O3(0001). Sapphire surfaces are prepared in three different ways, and the diffraction, the clearly favored structure has a single Al layer termination and a large first interlayer contraction

Soares, Edmar Avellar

22

High Surface Area Molybdenum Nitride Support for Fuel Cell Electrodes  

SciTech Connect

Alternative supports for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells were synthesized and catalytic activity was explored using electrochemical analysis. High surface area, molybdenum nitride supports were synthesized by rapidly heating a gel of polyethyleneimine bound molybdenum in a tube furnace under a forming gas atmosphere. Subsequent disposition of platinum through an incipient wetness approach lead to dispersed crystallites of platinum on the conductive support. All the ceramic materials were characterized with XRD, SEM, TEM and electrochemical analysis. The supports without platinum are highly stable to acidic aqueous conditions and show no signs of oxygen reduction reactivity (ORR). However, once the 20 wt % platinum is added to the material, ORR activity comparable to XC72 based materials is observed.

Blackmore, Karen [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Elbaz, L [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Bauer, E D [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Brosha, Eric [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); More, Karren Leslie [ORNL; Mccleskey, T [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Burrell, A [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Method for producing high surface area chromia materials for catalysis  

SciTech Connect

Nanostructured chromium(III)-oxide-based materials using sol-gel processing and a synthetic route for producing such materials are disclosed herein. Monolithic aerogels and xerogels having surface areas between 150 m.sup.2/g and 520 m.sup.2/g have been produced. The synthetic method employs the use of stable and inexpensive hydrated-chromium(III) inorganic salts and common solvents such as water, ethanol, methanol, 1-propanol, t-butanol, 2-ethoxy ethanol, and ethylene glycol, DMSO, and dimethyl formamide. The synthesis involves the dissolution of the metal salt in a solvent followed by an addition of a proton scavenger, such as an epoxide, which induces gel formation in a timely manner. Both critical point (supercritical extraction) and atmospheric (low temperature evaporation) drying may be employed to produce monolithic aerogels and xerogels, respectively.

Gash, Alexander E. (Brentwood, CA); Satcher, Joe (Patterson, CA); Tillotson, Thomas (Tracy, CA); Hrubesh, Lawrence (Pleasanton, CA); Simpson, Randall (Livermore, CA)

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Observations of Nuclear Explosive Melt Glass Textures and Surface Areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This memo report summarizes our current knowledge of the appearance of melt glass formed and subsequently deposited in the subsurface after an underground nuclear test. We have collected archived pictures and melt glass samples from a variety of underground nuclear tests that were conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) during the U.S. nuclear testing program. The purpose of our work is to better determine the actual variation in texture and surface area of the melt glass material. This study is motivated by our need to better determine the rate at which the radionuclides incorporated in the melt glass are released into the subsurface under saturated and partially saturated conditions. The rate at which radionuclides are released from the glass is controlled by the dissolution rate of the glass. Glass dissolution, in turn, is a strong function of surface area, glass composition, water temperature and water chemistry (Bourcier, 1994). This work feeds into an ongoing experimental effort to measure the change in surface area of analog glasses as a function of dissolution rate. The conclusions drawn from this study help bound the variation in the textures of analog glass samples needed for the experimental studies. The experimental work is a collaboration between Desert Research Institute (DRI) and Earth and Environmental Sciences-Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (EES-LLNL). On March 4, 1999 we hosted a meeting at LLNL to present and discuss our findings. The names of the attendees appear at the end of this memo. This memo report further serves to outline and summarize the conclusions drawn from our meeting. The United States detonated over 800 underground nuclear tests at the NTS between 1951 and 1992. In an effort to evaluate the performance of the nuclear tests, drill-back operations were carried out to retrieve samples of rock in the vicinity of the nuclear test. Drill-back samples were sent to Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and analyzed for diagnostic purposes. As a result of these activities, a body of knowledge consisting of personal accounts, photos, reports and archived solid samples was gained regarding the physical nature of the melt glass that formed during an underground nuclear test. In this memo report, we summarize previously published reports, compile archived photos, document and describe melt glass samples and summarized discussions from former field engineers and radiochemists who had direct knowledge of drill-back samples. All the information presented in the report was gathered from unclassified sources. We have included as wide a variation of samples as we could document. Unfortunately, as part of the drill-back and diagnostic efforts, it was not common practice to photograph or physically describe the material returned to the surface.

Kersting, A B; Smith, D K

2006-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

25

Theoretical study of syngas hydrogenation to methanol on the polar Zn-terminated ZnO(0001) surface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methanol synthesis from syngas (CO/CO2/H2) hydrogenation on the perfect Zn–terminated polar ZnO(0001) surface have been investigated using periodic density functional theory calculations. Our results show that direct CO2 hydrogenation to methanol on the perfect ZnO(0001) surface is unlikely because in the presence of surface atomic H and O the highly stable formate (HCOO) and carbonate (CO3) readily produced from CO2 with low barriers 0.11 and 0.09 eV will eventually accumulate and block the active sites of the ZnO(0001) surface. In contrast, methanol synthesis from CO hydrogenation is thermodynamically and kinetically feasible on the perfect ZnO(0001) surface. CO can be consecutively hydrogenated into formyl (HCO), formaldehyde (H2CO), methoxy (H3CO) intermediates, leading to the final formation of methanol (H3COH). The reaction route via hydroxymethyl (H2COH) intermediate, a previously proposed species on the defected O–terminated ZnO( ) surface, is kinetically inhibited on the perfect ZnO(0001) surface. The rate-determining step in the consecutive CO hydrogenation route is the hydrogenation of H3CO to H3COH. We also note that this last hydrogenation step is pronouncedly facilitated in the presence of water by lowering the activation barrier from 1.02 to 0.55 eV. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Biosciences and Geosciences, and performed at EMSL, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Computational resources were provided at EMSL and the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. J. Li and Y.-F. Zhao were also financially supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 20933003 and 91026003) and the National Basic Research Program of China (No. 2011CB932400). Y.-F. Zhao acknowledges the fellowship from PNNL.

Zhao, Ya-Fan; Rousseau, Roger J.; Li, Jun; Mei, Donghai

2012-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

26

GUIDELINES MANUAL FOR SURFACE MONITORING OF GEOTHERMAL AREAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I Guidelines Manual for Surface Monitoring of GeothermalA07 Final Report GUIDELINES MANUAL FOR SURFACE MONITORING OFi t a t i o n s o f t h e Manual PRELIMINARY INVESTIGATION I

Til, C. J. Van

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

GUIDELINES MANUAL FOR SURFACE MONITORING OF GEOTHERMAL AREAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1976, "Blowout o f a Geothermal Well", California Geology,in Rocks from Two Geothermal Areas'' , -- P1 anetary ScienceMonitoring Ground Movement in Geothermal Areas", Hydraul ic

Til, C. J. Van

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Does the Surface Pressure Equal the Weight per Unit Area of a Hydrostatic Atmosphere?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The common statement that the surface pressure in a hydrostatic atmosphere is equal to the weight per unit area of the air aloft is shown to be true only for a Cartesian world. Here the unit area is the surface area of the base of the atmospheric ...

Peter R. Bannon; Craig H. Bishop; James B. Kerr

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Boundary Layer Characteristics over Areas of Inhomogeneous Surface Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes results from a June 1992 field program to study the response of the boundary layer over a site with well-defined extreme differences in sensible and latent heat fluxes over clearly separated areas, each with characteristic ...

J. C. Doran; W. J. Shaw; J. M. Hubbe

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Correlating Humidity-Dependent Ionically Conductive Surface Area with Transport Phenomena in Proton-Exchange Membranes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conductive Surface Area with Transport Phenomena in Proton-its bulk and interfacial transport properties as a functioninterfacial mass-transport resistance was established.

He, Qinggang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Impervious Areas: Examining the Undermining Effects on Surface Water Quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study explored the relationship between increased proportions of imperviousness in a watershed on surface water quality and examined the effectiveness of using remote sensing to systematically and accurately determine impervious surfaces. A supervised maximum likelihood algorithm was used to classify the 2008 high resolution National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP) imagery into six classifications. A stratified random sampling scheme was conducted to complete an accuracy assessment of the classification. The overall accuracy was 85%, and the kappa coefficient was 0.80. Additionally, field sampling and chemical analysis techniques were used to examine the relationship between impervious surfaces and water quality in a rainfall simulation parking lot study. Results indicated that day since last rain event had the most significant effect on surface water quality. Furthermore, concrete produced higher dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), potassium and calcium in runoff concentrations than did asphalt. Finally, a pollutant loading application model was used to estimate pollutant loadings for three watersheds using two scenarios. Results indicated that national data may overestimate annual pollutant loads by approximately 700%. This study employed original techniques and methodology to combine the extraction of impervious surfaces, utilization of local rainfall runoff data and hydrological modeling to increase planners' and scientists' awareness of using local data and remote sensing data to employ predictive hydrological modeling.

Young, De'Etra Jenra

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

LANL Virtual Center for Chemical Hydrogen Storage: Chemical Hydrogen Storage Using Ultra-high Surface Area Main Group Materials  

SciTech Connect

The focus of the project was to design and synthesize light element compounds and nanomaterials that will reversibly store molecular hydrogen for hydrogen storage materials. The primary targets investigated during the last year were amine and hydrogen terminated silicon (Si) nanoparticles, Si alloyed with lighter elements (carbon (C) and boron (B)) and boron nanoparticles. The large surface area of nanoparticles should facilitate a favorable weight to volume ratio, while the low molecular weight elements such as B, nitrogen (N), and Si exist in a variety of inexpensive and readily available precursors. Furthermore, small NPs of Si are nontoxic and non-corrosive. Insights gained from these studies will be applied toward the design and synthesis of hydrogen storage materials that meet the DOE 2010 hydrogen storage targets: cost, hydrogen capacity and reversibility. Two primary routes were explored for the production of nanoparticles smaller than 10 nm in diameter. The first was the reduction of the elemental halides to achieve nanomaterials with chloride surface termination that could subsequently be replaced with amine or hydrogen. The second was the reaction of alkali metal Si or Si alloys with ammonium halides to produce hydrogen capped nanomaterials. These materials were characterized via X-ray powder diffraction, TEM, FTIR, TG/DSC, and NMR spectroscopy.

Susan M. Kauzlarich; Phillip P. Power; Doinita Neiner; Alex Pickering; Eric Rivard; Bobby Ellis, T. M.; Atkins, A. Merrill; R. Wolf; Julia Wang

2010-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

33

Areas of the Event Horizon and Stationary Limit Surface for a Kerr Black Hole  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an elementary evaluation of the surface areas of the event horizon and stationary limit surface for an uncharged Kerr black hole. The latter appears not to have been previously given in the literature, and permits us to suggest new geometrical / physical interpretations of these areas.

Pickett, C A

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Surface Gas Sampling At Lightning Dock Area (Norman, Et Al., 2002) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Gas Sampling At Lightning Dock Area (Norman, Et Al., 2002) Surface Gas Sampling At Lightning Dock Area (Norman, Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Lightning Dock Area (Norman, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Lightning Dock Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The Lightning Dock, Animas Valley, New Mexico geothermal area was discovered when a rancher found boiling water while drilling a shallow stock tank welt (Elston, Deal, et. al, 1983). There are no surface manifestations of present or past geothermal activity in the Animas Valley. Norman and Bernhart (1982) analyzed the gases in the discovery well and 15 stock tank wells nearby (Figure 1).

35

Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References C. O. Grigsby, J. W. Tester, P. E. Trujillo, D. A. Counce, J. Abbott, C. E. Holley, L. A. Blatz (1983) Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Surface_Gas_Sampling_At_Fenton_Hill_Hdr_Geothermal_Area_(Grigsby,_Et_Al.,_1983)&oldid=689258

36

Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff & Janik,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff & Janik, Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from HDR well References Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Janik (2002) Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico And Comparisons With Gases At Yellowstone, Long Valley And Other Geothermal Systems Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Surface_Gas_Sampling_At_Fenton_Hill_Hdr_Geothermal_Area_(Goff_%26_Janik,_2002)&oldid=689255"

37

Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Goff &  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Goff & Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from fumaroles, springs, and/or wells. References Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Janik (2002) Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico And Comparisons With Gases At Yellowstone, Long Valley And Other Geothermal Systems Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Surface_Gas_Sampling_At_Valles_Caldera_-_Sulphur_Springs_Area_(Goff_%26_Janik,_2002)&oldid=689392

38

Historic Surface Faulting and Paleoseismicity in the Area of the 1954  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Historic Surface Faulting and Paleoseismicity in the Area of the 1954 Historic Surface Faulting and Paleoseismicity in the Area of the 1954 Rainbow Mountain-Stillwater Earthquake Sequence, Central Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Historic Surface Faulting and Paleoseismicity in the Area of the 1954 Rainbow Mountain-Stillwater Earthquake Sequence, Central Nevada Abstract The Rainbow Mountain area was the site of three surface-rupturing earthquakes on 6 July and 23 August 1954. More than 50 field measurements of surface offsets constrain the distribution of slip along the discontinuous and distributed rupture zone that formed during the earthquake sequence. Vertical offsets reach a maximum of ~0.8 m with the average vertical offset being ~0.2 m. In contrast to original reports, we

39

Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik &  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Lassen Volcanic National Park Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Cathy J. Janik, Marcia K. McLaren (2010) Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National Park, California- Evidence For Two

40

Surface Water Sampling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1973) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Water Sampling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1973) Surface Water Sampling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1973) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Water Sampling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1973) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Surface Water Sampling Activity Date 1973 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis At least 380 hot springs and wells are known to occur throughout the central and southern parts of Idaho. Notes One hundred twenty-four of 380 hot springs and wells in the central and southern parts of Idaho were inventoried as a part of the study reported on herein. At the spring vents and wells visited, the thermal waters flow from rocks ranging in age from Precambrian to Holocene and from a wide range of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terminal surface area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Surface Gas Sampling At Lightning Dock Area (Norman & Moore, 2004) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Lightning Dock Area (Norman & Moore, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Lightning Dock Area (Norman & Moore, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Lightning Dock Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References David I. Norman, Joseph Moore (2004) Gas Analysis Of Geothermal Fluid Inclusions- A New Technology For Geothermal Exploration Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Surface_Gas_Sampling_At_Lightning_Dock_Area_(Norman_%26_Moore,_2004)&oldid=689367"

42

The Relationship Between the Surface Wind Field and Convective Precipitation over the St. Louis Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rainfall, wind and temperature data at the surface for a mesoscale area surrounding St. Louis, Missouri for seven summer days in 1975 were used to determine qualitative and quantitative relationships between divergence, and the location, timing ...

Gary L. Achtemeier

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Derivation of Effective Aerodynamic Surface Roughness in Urban Areas from Airborne Lidar Terrain Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An automated technique was developed that uses only airborne lidar terrain data to derive the necessary parameters for calculation of effective aerodynamic surface roughness in urban areas. The technique provides parameters for geometric models ...

Donald E. Holland; Judith A. Berglund; Joseph P. Spruce; Rodney D. McKellip

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Toward New Candidates for Hydrogen Storage: High Surface Area Carbon Aerogels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report the hydrogen surface excess sorption saturation value of 5.3 wt% at 30 bar pressure at 77 K, from an activated carbon aerogel with a surface area of 3200 m{sup 2}/g as measured by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analysis. This sorption value is one of the highest we have measured in a material of this type, comparable to values obtained in high surface area activated carbons. We also report, for the first time, the surface area dependence of hydrogen surface excess sorption isotherms of carbon aerogels at 77 K. Activated carbon aerogels with surface areas ranging from 1460 to 3200 m{sup 2}/g are evaluated and we find a linear dependence of the saturation of the gravimetric density with BET surface area for carbon aerogels up to 2550 m{sup 2}/g, in agreement with data from other types of carbons reported in the literature. Our measurements show these materials to have a differential enthalpy of adsorption at zero coverage of {approx}5 to 7 kJ/mole. We also show that the introduction of metal nanoparticles of nickel improves the sorption capacity while cobalt additions have no effect.

Kabbour, H; Baumann, T F; Satcher, J H; Saulnier, A; Ahn, C C

2007-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

45

Modeling Surface Sensible Heat Flux Using Surface Radiative Temperatures in a Simple Urban Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sensible heat fluxes over a light industrial area in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, are analyzed from observed tower fluxes and modeled using a bulk heat transfer approach. The bulk transfer models are initialized using remotely sensed ...

J. A. Voogt; C. S. B. Grimmond

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff & Janik,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff & Janik, 2002)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from HDR well References Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Janik (2002) Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles

47

Surface Gas Sampling At Jemez Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Jemez Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples At Jemez Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Jemez Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Jemez Springs Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from fumaroles, springs, and/or wells. References Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Janik (2002) Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles

48

Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik &  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Lassen Volcanic National Park Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Cathy J. Janik, Marcia K. McLaren (2010) Seismicity And Fluid

49

Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Goff & Janik, 2002)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Goff & Janik, 2002)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Redondo Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from fumaroles, springs, and/or wells. References Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Janik (2002) Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles

50

Surface Gas Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples At Long Valley Caldera Area (Goff & Janik, 2002)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from fumaroles, springs, and/or wells. At shallow depths in the caldera

51

Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References C. O. Grigsby, J. W. Tester, P. E. Trujillo, D. A. Counce, J.

52

Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Goff &  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from fumaroles, springs, and/or wells.

53

Surface Gas Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from fumaroles, springs, and/or wells. At shallow depths in the caldera References Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Janik (2002) Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico And Comparisons With Gases At Yellowstone, Long

54

Surface Gas Sampling At Jemez Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Jemez Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Jemez Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Jemez Springs Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from fumaroles, springs, and/or wells. References Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Janik (2002) Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico And Comparisons With Gases At Yellowstone, Long

55

Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Goff & Janik, 2002)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Redondo Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from fumaroles, springs, and/or wells. References Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Janik (2002) Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico And Comparisons With Gases At Yellowstone, Long

56

Self assembled molecular monolayers on high surface area materials as molecular getters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a gettering material that may be used as a filtration medium to remove pollutants from the environment. The gettering material comprises a high surface area material having a metal surface that chemically bonds n-alkanethiols in an organized manner thereby forming a molecular monolayer over the metal surface. The n-alkanethiols have a free functional group that interacts with the environment thereby binding specific pollutants that may be present. The gettering material may be exposed to streams of air in heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems or streams of water to remove specific pollutants from either medium.

King, David E. (Lakewood, CO); Herdt, Gregory C. (Denver, CO); Czanderna, Alvin W. (Denver, CO)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Self assembled molecular monolayers on high surface area materials as molecular getters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a gettering material that may be used as a filtration medium to remove pollutants from the environment. The gettering material comprises a high surface area material having a metal surface that chemically bonds n-alkanethiols in an organized manner thereby forming a molecular monolayer over the metal surface. The n-alkanethiols have a free functional group that interacts with the environment thereby binding specific pollutants that may be present. The gettering material may be exposed to streams of air in heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems or streams of water to remove specific pollutants from either medium. 9 figs.

King, D.E.; Herdt, G.C.; Czanderna, A.W.

1997-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

58

Continental insulation, mantle cooling, and the surface area of oceans and continents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Continental insulation, mantle cooling, and the surface area of oceans and continents A. Lenardica, Rice University, Houston, TX 77251-1892, United States b School of Mathematical Sciences, Building 28 May 2005 Abstract It is generally assumed that continents, acting as thermal insulation above

Manga, Michael

59

Geology and surface geochemistry of the Roosevelt Springs Known Geothermal Resource Area, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Available data on the Roosevelt area were synthesized to determine the spatial arrangement of the rocks, and the patterns of mass and energy flow within them. The resulting model lead to a new interpretation of the geothermal system, and provided ground truth for evaluating the application of soil geochemistry to exploration for concealed geothermal fields. Preliminary geochemical studies comparing the surface microlayer to conventional soil sampling methods indicated both practical and chemical advantages for the surface microlayer technique, which was particularly evident in the case of As, Sb and Cs. Subsequent multi-element analyses of surface microlayer samples collected over an area of 100 square miles were processed to produce single element contour maps for 41 chemical parameters. Computer manipulation of the multi-element data using R-mode factor analysis provided the optimum method of interpretation of the surface microlayer data. A trace element association of As, Sb and Cs in the surface microlayer provided the best indication of the leakage of geothermal solutions to the surface, while regional mercury trends may reflect the presence of a mercury vapour anomaly above a concealed heat source.

Lovell, J.S.; Meyer, W.T.; Atkinson, D.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Uncertainty Studies of Real Anode Surface Area in Computational Analysis for Molten Salt Electrorefining  

SciTech Connect

This study examines how much cell potential changes with five differently assumed real anode surface area cases. Determining real anode surface area is a significant issue to be resolved for precisely modeling molten salt electrorefining. Based on a three-dimensional electrorefining model, calculated cell potentials compare with an experimental cell potential variation over 80 hours of operation of the Mark-IV electrorefiner with driver fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor II. We succeeded to achieve a good agreement with an overall trend of the experimental data with appropriate selection of a mode for real anode surface area, but there are still local inconsistencies between theoretical calculation and experimental observation. In addition, the results were validated and compared with two-dimensional results to identify possible uncertainty factors that had to be further considered in a computational electrorefining analysis. These uncertainty factors include material properties, heterogeneous material distribution, surface roughness, and current efficiency. Zirconium's abundance and complex behavior have more impact on uncertainty towards the latter period of electrorefining at given batch of fuel. The benchmark results found that anode materials would be dissolved from both axial and radial directions at least for low burn-up metallic fuels after active liquid sodium bonding was dissolved.

Sungyeol Choi; Jaeyeong Park; Robert O. Hoover; Supathorn Phongikaroon; Michael F. Simpson; Kwang-Rag Kim; Il Soon Hwang

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terminal surface area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

The Electrode as Organolithium Reagent: Catalyst-Free Covalent Attachment of Electrochemically Active Species to an Azide-Terminated Glassy Carbon Electrode Surface  

SciTech Connect

Glassy carbon electrodes have been activated for modification with azide groups and subsequent coupling with ferrocenyl reagents by a catalyst-free route using lithium acetylide-ethylenediamine complex, and also by the more common Cu(I)-catalyzed alkyne-azide coupling (CuAAC) route, both affording high surface coverages. Electrodes were preconditioned at ambient temperature under nitrogen, and ferrocenyl surface coverages obtained by CuAAC were comparable to those reported with preconditioning at 1000 °C under hydrogen/nitrogen. The reaction of lithium acetylide-ethylenediamine with the azide-terminated electrode affords a 1,2,3-triazolyllithium-terminated surface that is active toward covalent C-C coupling reactions including displacement at an aliphatic halide and nucleophilic addition at an aldehyde. For example, surface ferrocenyl groups were introduced by reaction with (6-iodohexyl)ferrocene; the voltammetry shows narrow, symmetric peaks indicating uniform attachment. Coverages are competitive with those obtained by the CuAAC route. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic data, presented for each synthetic step, are consistent with the proposed reactions. This research was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy. A portion of the research was performed using EMSL, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

Das, Atanu K.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Liu, Fei; Bullock, R. Morris; Roberts, John A.

2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

62

Microsoft Word - Poster Abstract_2010_CMU_High Surface Area Materials.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1th Annual SECA Workshop Poster Abstract 1th Annual SECA Workshop Poster Abstract Topic: High Surface Area, Mesoporous (La, Sr)MnO 3 For Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cathodes Robin Chao, Graduate Student in Carnegie Mellon University 5700 Bunkerhill St. Apt 705, Pittsburgh, PA 15206 USA, hchao@andrew.cmu.edu, 412-260-5687 Dr. John Kitchin, Professor of Chemical Engineering in Carnegie Mellon University 5000 Forbes Ave, Pittsburgh PA, 15213, jkitchin@andrew.cmu.edu, 412-268-7803 Dr. Paul Salvador, Professor of Material Science and Engineering in Carnegie Mellon University 149 Roberts Eng Hall, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, paul7@andrew.cmu.edu, 412-268-2702 Abstract: The efficiency of the solid oxide fuel cell is limited by the cathode polarizations. One essential approach is to include high-surface-area cathode materials into the fabrication. However, conventional synthesis methods to

63

Surface area generation and droplet size control in solvent extraction systems utilizing high intensity electric fields  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and system for solvent extraction where droplets are shattered by a high intensity electric field. These shattered droplets form a plurality of smaller droplets which have a greater combined surface area than the original droplet. Dispersion, coalescence and phase separation are accomplished in one vessel through the use of the single pulsing high intensity electric field. Electric field conditions are chosen so that simultaneous dispersion and coalescence are taking place in the emulsion formed in the electric field. The electric field creates a large amount of interfacial surface area for solvent extraction when the droplet is disintegrated and is capable of controlling droplet size and thus droplet stability. These operations take place in the presence of a counter current flow of the continuous phase.

Scott, Timothy C. (Knoxville, TN); Wham, Robert M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Specific Effects of Fiber Size and Fiber Swelling on Biomass Substrate Surface Area and Enzymatic Digestibility  

SciTech Connect

To clarify the specific effect of biomass substrate surface area on its enzymatic digestibility, factors of fiber size reduction and swelling changes were investigated by using poplar substrates with controlled morphological and chemical properties after modified chemical pulping. Results showed that fiber size changes had insignificant influence on enzymatic hydrolysis, although the external surface area increased up to 41% with the reduction of fiber size. Swelling changes caused by increased biomass fiber porosities after PFI refining showed a significant influence on the efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis. It is also found that chemical properties such as xylan and lignin content can influence the swelling effect. Xylan is confirmed to facilitate substrate hydrolysability by swelling, while lignin restricts swelling effect and thus minimizes the enzyme accessibility to substrates.

Ju, Xiaohui; Grego, Courtnee; Zhang, Xiao

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

SURFACE AREA, VOLUME, MASS, AND DENSITY DISTRIBUTIONS FOR SIZED BIOMASS PARTICLES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This semi-annual technical progress report describes work performed at Morehouse College under DOE Grant No. DE-FC26-04NT42130 during the period July 01, 2005 to December 31, 2005 which covers the third six months of the project. Presently work is in progress to characterize surface area, volume, mass, and density distributions for sized biomass particles. During this reporting period, Morehouse continued to obtain additional mean mass measurements for biomass particles employing the gravimetric technique measurement system that was set up in the last reporting period. Simultaneously, REM, our subcontractor, has obtained raw data for surface area, volume, and drag coefficient to mass ratio (C{sub d}/m) information for several biomass particles employing the electrodynamic balance (EDB) measurement system that was calibrated in the last reporting period. Preliminary results of the mean mass and the shape data obtained are reported here, and more data collection is in progress.

Ramanathan Sampath

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

SURFACE AREA, VOLUME, MASS, AND DENSITY DISTRIBUTIONS FOR SIZED BIOMASS PARTICLES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This semi-annual technical progress report describes work performed at Morehouse College under DOE Grant No. DE-FC26-04NT42130 during the period January 01, 2006 to June 30, 2006 which covers the fourth six months of the project. Presently work is in progress to characterize surface area, volume, mass, and density distributions for sized biomass particles. During this reporting period, Morehouse completed obtaining additional mean mass measurements for biomass particles employing the gravimetric technique measurement system that was set up in a previous reporting period. Simultaneously, REM, our subcontractor, has completed obtaining raw data for surface area, volume, and drag coefficient to mass ratio (Cd/m) information for 9 more biomass particles employing the electrodynamic balance (EDB) measurement system that was calibrated before in this project. Results of the mean mass data obtained to date are reported here, and analysis of the raw data collected by REM is in progress.

Ramanathan Sampath

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

67

Relationships between gas-liquid interfacial surface area, liquid saturation, and light transmission in variably saturated porous media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Relationships between gas-liquid interfacial surface area, liquid saturation, and light transmission in variably saturated porous media Abstract Liquid saturation and gas-liquid interfacial area the specific gas-liquid interfacial area from the area under the primarydrainage branch of the Seff -h

Weisbrod, Noam

68

Synthetic process for preparation of high surface area electroactive compounds for battery applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for the preparation of electroactive cathode compounds useful in lithium-ion batteries, comprising exothermic mixing of low-cost precursors and calcination under appropriate conditions. The exothermic step may be a spontaneous flameless combustion reaction. The disclosed process can be used to prepare any lithium metal phosphate or lithium mixed metal phosphate as a high surface area single phase compound.

Evenson, Carl; Mackay, Richard

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

69

Effect of geometric configuration and surface area on the thermal transmittance of edge-sealed draperies  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory studies were carried out to investigate the influence of fabric structure and geometric configuration of multilayer window draperies on the thermal insulation characteristics of drapery models. Drapery assemblies representing various configurations of drapery fullness, lining fullness, and spatial separation between lining and drapery fabrics were sealed at sides, top, and bottom to a full-scale window built into an insulated wall between a cold chamber, which simulated outdoor winter conditions, and the inside of a test room, which was maintained at indoor winter conditions. Thermal transmittance of the window/fabric systems was measured by transducers mounted on the surface of the window glass. The temperature of the cold chamber, the temperature and relative humidity of the test room, and the heat transfer were monitored by a desk-top computer system. The influence of fabric structure, drapery and lining, fabric surface area, and volume of air space within the drapery assembly on thermal transmittance are discussed.

Epps, H.H.; Goswami, B.C.; Hassenboehler, C.B.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Porosity and surface area evolution during weathering of two igneous rocks  

SciTech Connect

During weathering, rocks release nutrients and storewater vital for growth ofmicrobial and plant life. Thus, the growth of porosity as weathering advances into bedrock is a life-sustaining process for terrestrial ecosystems. Here, we use small-angle and ultra small-angle neutron scattering to show how porosity develops during initial weathering under tropical conditions of two igneous rock compositions, basaltic andesite and quartz diorite. The quartz diorite weathers spheroidally while the basaltic andesite does not. The weathering advance rates of the two systems also differ, perhaps due to this difference in mechanism, from 0.24 to 100 mm kyr1, respectively. The scattering data document how surfaces inside the feldspar-dominated rocks change as weathering advances into the protolith. In the unaltered rocks, neutrons scatter fromtwo types of featureswhose dimensions vary from6 nmto 40 lm: pores and bumps on pore grain surfaces. These features result in scattering data for both unaltered rocks that document multi-fractal behavior: scattering is best described by amass fractal dimension (Dm) and a surface fractal dimension (Ds) for features of length scales greater than and less than 1 lm, respectively. In the basaltic andesite, Dm is approximately 2.9 and Ds is approximately 2.7. The mechanism of solute transport during weathering of this rock is diffusion. Porosity and surface area increase from 1.5%to 8.5%and 3 to 23 m2 g1 respectively in a relatively consistent trend across themm-thick plagioclase reaction front. Across this front, both fractal dimensions decrease, consistentwith development of amoremonodisperse pore networkwith smoother pore surfaces. Both changes are consistent largely with increasing connectivity of pores without significant surface roughening, as expected for transport-limited weathering. In contrast, porosity and surface area increase from 1.3% to 9.5% and 1.5 to 13 m2 g1 respectively across a many cm-thick reaction front in the spheroidally weathering quartz diorite. In that rock, Dm is approximately 2.8 andDs is approximately 2.5 prior to weathering. These two fractals transform during weathering to multiple surface fractals as micro-cracking reduces the size of diffusion-limited subzones of thematrix.Across the reaction front of plagioclase in the quartz diorite, the specific surface area and porosity change very little until the pointwhere the rock disaggregates into saprolite. The different patterns in porosity development of the two rocks are attributed to advective infiltration plus diffusion in the rock that spheroidally fractures versus diffusion-only in the rock that does not. Fracturing apparently diminishes the size of the diffusion-limited parts of the spheroidally weathering rock system to promote infiltration of meteoric fluids, thereforeexplaining the faster weathering advance rate into that rock.

Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis [Colorado School of Mines, Golden; Cole, David [Ohio State University; Rother, Gernot [ORNL; Jin, Lixin [University of Texas, El Paso; Buss, Heather [University of Bristol, UK; Brantley, S. L. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

High-Pressure Studies on CeO2 Nano-Octahedrons with a (111)-Terminated Surface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In-situ high-pressure X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopies have been performed on well-shaped CeO{sub 2} nano-octahedrons enclosed by eight (111) planes. The CeO{sub 2} nano-octahedrons are shown to be more stable than their bulk counterparts and some other reported CeO{sub 2} nanocrystals of smaller size. The transition pressure from cubic to orthorhombic phase is approximately 10 GPa higher than that of 12 nm CeO{sub 2} nanocrystals even though they have similar volume expansion at ambient conditions. Additionally, the phase transition to {alpha}-PbCl2 phase is very sluggish and uncompleted even up to 55 GPa. The TEM image of the sample after decompression from 55 GPa clearly shows that the nano-octahedrons preserve the starting shape. Such distinct high-pressure behaviors in CeO{sub 2} nano-octahedrons have been discussed in terms of their special exposure surface. Further analysis shows that the lower compressibility of the exposed (111) planes in the nano-octahedrons is believed to be the major factor to the elevation of the phase transition pressure and the sluggishness of the transition.

B Liu

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

72

The Effects of Remotely Sensed Plant Functional Type and Leaf Area Index on Simulations of Boreal Forest Surface Fluxes by the NCAR Land Surface Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The land surface models used with atmospheric models typically characterize landscapes in terms of generalized biome types. However, the advent of high–spatial resolution satellite-derived data products such as land cover and leaf area index (LAI)...

Keith W. Oleson; Gordon B. Bonan

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

AREA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AREA AREA FAQ # Question Response 316 vs DCAA FAQ 1 An inquiry from CH about an SBIR recipient asking if a DCAA audit is sufficient to comply with the regulation or if they need to add this to their audit they have performed yearly by a public accounting firm. 316 audits are essentially A-133 audits for for-profit entities. They DO NOT replace DCAA or other audits requested by DOE to look at indirect rates or incurred costs or closeouts. DCAA would never agree to perform A-133 or our 316 audits. They don't do A-133 audits for DOD awardees. The purpose of the audits are different, look at different things and in the few instances of overlap, from different perspectives. 316

74

Area G Perimeter Surface-Soil Sampling Environmental Surveillance for Fiscal Year 1998 Hazardous and Solid Waste Group (ESH-19)  

SciTech Connect

Material Disposal Area G (Area G) is at Technical Area 54 at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Area G has been the principal facility for the disposal of low-level, solid-mixed, and transuranic waste since 1957. It is currently LANL's primary facility for radioactive solid waste burial and storage. As part of the annual environmental surveillance effort at Area G, surface soil samples are collected around the facility's perimeter to characterize possible radionuclide movement off the site through surface water runoff During 1998, 39 soil samples were collected and analyzed for percent moisture, tritium, plutonium-238 and 239, cesium-137 and americium-241. To assess radionuclide concentrations, the results from these samples are compared with baseline or background soil samples collected in an undisturbed area west of the active portion Area G. The 1998 results are also compared to the results from analogous samples collected during 1996 and 1997 to assess changes over this time in radionuclide activity concentrations in surface soils around the perimeter of Area G. The results indicate elevated levels of all the radionuclides assessed (except cesium-137) exist in Area G perimeter surface soils vs the baseline soils. The comparison of 1998 soil data to previous years (1996 and 1997) indicates no significant increase or decrease in radionuclide concentrations; an upward or downward trend in concentrations is not detectable at this time. These results are consistent with data comparisons done in previous years. Continued annual soil sampling will be necessary to realize a trend if one exists. The radionuclide levels found in the perimeter surface soils are above background but still considered relatively low. This perimeter surface soil data will be used for planning purposes at Area G, techniques to prevent sediment tm.nsport off-site are implemented in the areas where the highest radionuclide concentrations are indicated.

Marquis Childs

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Forward-Looking Assimilation of MODIS-Derived Snow-Covered Area into a Land Surface Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Snow cover over land has a significant impact on the surface radiation budget, turbulent energy fluxes to the atmosphere, and local hydrological fluxes. For this reason, inaccuracies in the representation of snow-covered area (SCA) within a land ...

Benjamin F. Zaitchik; Matthew Rodell

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Relationships between Cloud Type and Amount, Precipitation, and Surface Temperature in the Mackenzie River Valley-Beaufort Sea Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hourly data from climatological stations in the Mackenzie River valley-Beaufort Sea area of northern Canada have been examined to determine the relationships between cloud type and amount, precipitation, and surface temperatures. During all ...

G. A. Isaac; R. A. Stuart

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Area-Averaged Surface Fluxes in a Semiarid Region with Partly Irrigated Land: Lessons Learned from EFEDA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The European Field Experiment in a Desertification-Threatened Area (EFEDA) provides a comprehensive land surface dataset for a semiarid Mediterranean environment with natural vegetation and cultivated dry and irrigated land. This paper discusses ...

M. Anna Osann Jochum; Hendrik A. R. de Bruin; Albert A. M. Holtslag; Alfonso Calera Belmonte

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Method for the preparation of high surface area high permeability carbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for preparing carbon materials having high surface area and high macropore volume to provide high permeability. These carbon materials are prepared by dissolving a carbonizable polymer precursor, in a solvent. The solution is cooled to form a gel. The solvent is extracted from the gel by employing a non-solvent for the polymer. The non-solvent is removed by critical point drying in CO{sub 2} at an elevated pressure and temperature or evaporation in a vacuum oven. The dried product is heated in an inert atmosphere in a first heating step to a first temperature and maintained there for a time sufficient to substantially cross-link the polymer material. The cross-linked polymer material is then carbonized in an inert atmosphere. 3 figs.

Lagasse, R.R.; Schroeder, J.L.

1999-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

79

Method for the preparation of high surface area high permeability carbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for preparing carbon materials having high surface area and high macropore volume to provide high permeability. These carbon materials are prepared by dissolving a carbonizable polymer precursor, in a solvent. The solution is cooled to form a gel. The solvent is extracted from the gel by employing a non-solvent for the polymer. The non-solvent is removed by critical point drying in CO.sub.2 at an elevated pressure and temperature or evaporation in a vacuum oven. The dried product is heated in an inert atmosphere in a first heating step to a first temperature and maintained there for a time sufficient to substantially cross-link the polymer material. The cross-linked polymer material is then carbonized in an inert atmosphere.

Lagasse, Robert R. (Albuquerque, NM); Schroeder, John L. (Albuquerque, NM)

1999-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

80

Fracture Surface Area Effects on Fluid Extraction and the Electrical Resistivity of Geothermal Reservoir Rocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Laboratory measurements of the electrical resistivity of fractured analogue geothermal reservoir rocks were performed to investigate the resistivity contrast caused by active boiling and to determine the effects of variable fracture dimensions and surface area on water extraction. Experiments were performed at confining pressures up to 10 h4Pa (100 bars) and temperatures to 170 C. Fractured samples show a larger resistivity change at the onset of boiling than intact samples. Monitoring the resistivity of fractured samples as they equilibrate to imposed pressure and temperature conditions provides an estimate of fluid migration into and out of the matrix. Measurements presented are an important step toward using field electrical methods to quantitatively search for fractures, infer saturation, and track fluid migration in geothermal reservoirs.

Roberts, J J; Detwiler, R L; Ralph, W; Bonner, B

2002-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terminal surface area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Synthesis of High Surface Area Alumina Aerogels without the Use of Alkoxide Precursors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Alumina aerogels were prepared through the addition of propylene oxide to aqueous or ethanolic solutions of hydrated aluminum salts, AlCl{sub 3} {center_dot} 6H{sub 2}O or Al(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} {center_dot} 9H{sub 2}O, followed by drying with supercritical CO{sub 2}. This technique affords low-density (60-130 kg/m{sup 3}), high surface area (600-700 m{sup 2}/g) alumina aerogel monoliths without the use of alkoxide precursors. The dried alumina aerogels were characterized using elemental analysis, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, solid state NMR, acoustic measurements and nitrogen adsorption/desorption analysis. Powder X-ray diffraction and TEM analysis indicated that the aerogel prepared from hydrated AlCl{sub 3} in water or ethanol possessed microstructures containing highly reticulated networks of pseudoboehmite fibers, 2-5 nm in diameter and of varying lengths, while the aerogels prepared from hydrated Al(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} in ethanol were amorphous with microstructures comprised of interconnected spherical particles with diameters in the 5-15 nm range. The difference in microstructure resulted in each type of aerogel displaying distinct physical and mechanical properties. In particular, the alumina aerogels with the weblike microstructure were far more mechanically robust than those with the colloidal network, based on acoustic measurements. Both types of alumina aerogels can be transformed to {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} through calcination at 800 C without a significant loss in surface area or monolithicity.

Baumann, T F; Gash, A E; Chinn, S C; Sawvel, A M; Maxwell, R S; Satcher Jr., J H

2004-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

82

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 300: Surface Release Areas Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 300 is located in Areas 23, 25, and 26 of the Nevada Test Site, which is located approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 300 is listed in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996 as Surface Release Areas and is comprised of the following seven Corrective Action Sites (CASs), which are associated with the identified Building (Bldg): {sm_bullet} CAS 23-21-03, Bldg 750 Surface Discharge {sm_bullet} CAS 23-25-02, Bldg 750 Outfall {sm_bullet} CAS 23-25-03, Bldg 751 Outfall {sm_bullet} CAS 25-60-01, Bldg 3113A Outfall {sm_bullet} CAS 25-60-02, Bldg 3901 Outfall {sm_bullet} CAS 25-62-01, Bldg 3124 Contaminated Soil {sm_bullet} CAS 26-60-01, Bldg 2105 Outfall and Decon Pad The Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP)-approved corrective action alternative for CASs 23-21-03, 23-25-02, and 23-25-03 is no further action. As a best management practice, approximately 48 feet of metal piping was removed from CAS 23-25-02 and disposed of as sanitary waste. The NDEP-approved corrective action alternative for CASs 25-60-01, 25-60-02, 25-62-01, and 26-60-01, is clean closure. Closure activities for these CASs included removing and disposing of soil impacted with total petroleum hydrocarbons-diesel range organics (TPH-DRO), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs), and cesium (Cs)-137, concrete impacted with TPH-DRO, and associated piping impacted with TPH-DRO. CAU 300 was closed in accordance with the NDEP-approved CAU 300 Corrective Action Plan (CAP) (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2006). The closure activities specified in the CAP were based on the recommendations presented in the CAU 300 Corrective Action Decision Document (NNSA/NSO, 2005). This Closure Report documents CAU 300 closure activities. During closure activities, approximately 40 cubic yards (yd3) of low-level waste consisting of TPH-DRO-, PCB-, and Cs-137-impacted soil and debris, approximately 7 yd3 of hydrocarbon waste consisting of TPH-DRO-impacted soil, and approximately 66 yd3 of sanitary debris consisting of soil and concrete debris were generated, managed, and disposed of appropriately. Waste minimization techniques, such as the utilization of field screening and laboratory analysis to determine the extent of excavation required, were employed during the performance of closure work.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Relationships among Remotely Sensed Data, Surface Energy Balance, and Area-Averaged Fluxes over Partially Vegetated Land Surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerous recent field experiments have examined the use of remote sensing to estimate land surface fluxes of latent and sensible heat using combinations of thermal, visible, and near-infrared data. While substantial progress has been made, ...

M. A. Friedl

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

SURFACE AREA, VOLUME, MASS, AND DENSITY DISTRIBUTIONS FOR SIZED BOMASS PARTICLES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This semi-annual technical progress report describes work performed at Morehouse College under DOE Grant No. DE-FC26-04NT42130 during the period July 01, 2004 to December 31, 2004 which covers the first six months of the project. Presently work is in progress to characterize surface area, volume, mass, and density distributions for sized biomass particles. During this reporting period, supply requests were processed and supplies including biomass test particles (hardwood sawdust AI14546) in the size range of 100-200 microns were obtained from a cofiring pilot plant research facility owned by Southern Company, Birmingham, AL. Morehouse has completed setting up of the gravimetric technique measurement system in the heat transfer laboratory, department of physics and dual degree engineering, Morehouse College. Simultaneously, REM, our subcontractor, has completed setting up of the electrodynamic balance (EDB) measurement system to characterize shape and mass for individual biomass particles. Testing of the gravimetric system, and calibration of the cameras and imaging systems using known sizes of polystyrene particles are in progress.

Ramanathan Sampath

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Surface Area, Volume, Mass, and Density Distributions for Sized Biomass Particles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This final technical report describes work performed at Morehouse College under DOE Grant No. DE-FC26-04NT42130 during the period July 01, 2004 to June 30, 2007 which covers the entire performance period of the project. 25 individual biomass particles (hardwood sawdust AI14546 in the size range of 100-200 microns) were levitated in an electrodynamic balance (EDB) and their external surface area, volume, and drag coefficient/mass (C{sub d}/m) ratios were characterized applying highly specialized video based and high-speed diode array imaging systems. Analysis methods were employed using shape and drag information to calculate mass and density distributions for these particles. Results of these measurements and analyses were validated by independent mass measurements using a particle weighing and counting technique. Similar information for 28 PSOC 1451D bituminous coal particles was retrieved from a previously published work. Using these two information, density correlations for coal/biomass blends were developed. These correlations can be used to estimate the density of the blend knowing either the volume fraction or the mass fraction of coal in the blend. The density correlations presented here will be useful in predicting the burning rate of coal/biomass blends in cofiring combustors. Finally, a discussion on technological impacts and economic projections of burning biomass with coal in US power plants is presented.

Ramanathan Sampath

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

86

Towards Development of a Synthesized Database of Spatial and Temporal Surface Spectral Reflectivity Over the ARM SGP CART Area  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Towards Development of a Synthesized Database of Towards Development of a Synthesized Database of Spatial and Temporal Surface Spectral Reflectivity Over the ARM SGP CART Area A. P. Trishchenko, Y. Luo, R. Latifovic, W. Park, J. Cihlar, and B. Hwang Canada Centre for Remote Sensing Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Z. Li and M. C. Cribb University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland Introduction Surface albedo is a key variable determining the disposition of solar radiation between the surface and the atmosphere. Reliable mapping of surface albedo and improved understanding of radiation interactions at the surface are required for advancing weather forecasting and climate studies. The ground-based observations are limited to a handful of locations sparsely distributed in the South Great Plains (SGP). Frequently, they represent only small-scale features of surface reflective properties and

87

The Influence of Variations in Surface Treatment on 24-Hour Forecasts with a Limited Area Model, Including a Comparison of Modeled and Satellite-Measured Surface Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of variations in surface parameters on 24-hour limited area forecasts has been examined on a day in July 1981. The vehicle for the study is a ten-level primitive equation model covering most of the continental United States. Variations ...

George Diak; Stacey Heikkinen; John Rates

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Limited-Area Model Sensitivity to the Complexity of Representation of the Land Surface Energy Balance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By coupling a multimode land surface scheme with a regional climate model, three scientific issues are addressed in this paper: (i) the regional model's sensitivity to the different levels of complexity presented by the land surface ...

H. Zhang; A. Henderson-Sellers; A. J. Pitman; C. E. Desborough; J. L. McGregor; J. J. Katzfey

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Area G perimeter surface-soil and single-stage water sampling: Environmental surveillance for fiscal year 95. Progress report  

SciTech Connect

ESH-19 personnel collected soil and single-stage water samples around the perimeter of Area G at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) during FY 95 to characterize possible radionuclide movement out of Area G through surface water and entrained sediment runoff. Soil samples were analyzed for tritium, total uranium, isotopic plutonium, americium-241, and cesium-137. The single-stage water samples were analyzed for tritium and plutonium isotopes. All radiochemical data was compared with analogous samples collected during FY 93 and 94 and reported in LA-12986 and LA-13165-PR. Six surface soils were also submitted for metal analyses. These data were included with similar data generated for soil samples collected during FY 94 and compared with metals in background samples collected at the Area G expansion area.

Childs, M.; Conrad, R.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 417: Central Nevada Test Area Surface, Nevada Appendix D - Corrective Action Investigation Report, Central Nevada Test Area, CAU 417  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's selection of a recommended corrective action alternative (CAA) appropriate to facilitate the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417: Central Nevada Test Area Surface, Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in Hot Creek Valley in Nye County, Nevada, and consisting of three separate land withdrawal areas (UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4), CAU 417 is comprised of 34 corrective action sites (CASs) including 2 underground storage tanks, 5 septic systems, 8 shaker pad/cuttings disposal areas, 1 decontamination facility pit, 1 burn area, 1 scrap/trash dump, 1 outlier area, 8 housekeeping sites, and 16 mud pits. Four field events were conducted between September 1996 and June 1998 to complete a corrective action investigation indicating that the only contaminant of concern was total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) which was found in 18 of the CASs. A total of 1,028 samples were analyzed. During this investigation, a statistical approach was used to determine which depth intervals or layers inside individual mud pits and shaker pad areas were above the State action levels for the TPH. Other related field sampling activities (i.e., expedited site characterization methods, surface geophysical surveys, direct-push geophysical surveys, direct-push soil sampling, and rotosonic drilling located septic leachfields) were conducted in this four-phase investigation; however, no further contaminants of concern (COCs) were identified. During and after the investigation activities, several of the sites which had surface debris but no COCs were cleaned up as housekeeping sites, two septic tanks were closed in place, and two underground storage tanks were removed. The focus of this CADD was to identify CAAs which would promote the prevention or mitigation of human exposure to surface and subsurface soils with contaminant concentrations above preliminary action levels. Based on the potential exposure pathways, several risk-based CAAs were developed and evaluated against the individual CAS requirements. It was determined that a combination of the CAAs would be recommended to meet all applicable state and federal regulations for closure of these sites and to eliminate potential future exposure pathways to the TPH-contaminated soils.

U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations office

1999-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

91

LITERATURE REVIEW OF PUO2 CALCINATION TIME AND TEMPERATURE DATA FOR SPECIFIC SURFACE AREA  

SciTech Connect

The literature has been reviewed in December 2011 for calcination data of plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) from plutonium oxalate Pu(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2} precipitation with respect to the PuO{sub 2} specific surface area (SSA). A summary of the literature is presented for what are believed to be the dominant factors influencing SSA, the calcination temperature and time. The PuO{sub 2} from Pu(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2} calcination data from this review has been regressed to better understand the influence of calcination temperature and time on SSA. Based on this literature review data set, calcination temperature has a bigger impact on SSA versus time. However, there is still some variance in this data set that may be reflecting differences in the plutonium oxalate preparation or different calcination techniques. It is evident from this review that additional calcination temperature and time data for PuO{sub 2} from Pu(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2} needs to be collected and evaluated to better define the relationship. The existing data set has a lot of calcination times that are about 2 hours and therefore may be underestimating the impact of heating time on SSA. SRNL recommends that more calcination temperature and time data for PuO{sub 2} from Pu(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2} be collected and this literature review data set be augmented to better refine the relationship between PuO{sub 2} SSA and its calcination parameters.

Daniel, G.

2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

92

HYDROLASING OF CONTAMINATED UNDERWATER BASIN SURFACES AT THE HANFORD K-AREA  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses selecting and Implementing hydrolasing technology to reduce radioactive contamination in preparing to dispose of the K Basins; two highly contaminated concrete basins at the Hanford Site. A large collection of spent nuclear fuel stored for many years underwater at the K Basins has been removed to stable, dry, safe storage. Remediation activities have begun for the remaining highly contaminated water, sludge, and concrete basin structures. Hydrolasing will be used to decontaminate and prepare the basin structures for disposal. The U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site is considered the world's largest environmental cleanup project. The site covers 1,517 Km{sup 2} (586 square miles) along the Columbia River in an arid region of the northwest United States (U.S.). Hanford is the largest of the US former nuclear defense production sites. From the World War II era of the mid-1940s until the late-1980s when production stopped, Hanford produced 60 percent of the plutonium for nuclear defense and, as a consequence, produced a significant amount of environmental pollution now being addressed. Spent nuclear fuel was among the major challenges for DOE's environmental cleanup mission at Hanford. The end of production left Hanford with about 105,000 irradiated, solid uranium metal fuel assemblies--representing approximately 2,100 metric tons (80 percent of DOE's spent nuclear fuel). The fuel was ultimately stored in the K Basins water-filled, concrete basins attached to Hanford's K East (KE) and K West (KW) reactors. K Basin's fuel accounted for 95 percent of the total radioactivity in Hanford's former reactor production areas. Located about 457 meters (500 yards) from the Columbia River, the K Basins are two indoor, rectangular structures of reinforced concrete; each filled with more than 3.8 million liters (one million gallons) of water that has become highly contaminated with long-lived radionuclides. At the KW Basin, fuel was packaged and sealed in canisters. At the KE Basin, fuel was stored in open canisters that were exposed to water in the basin. The irradiated spent nuclear fuel corroded during long-term, wet storage; resulting in thousands of fuel assemblies becoming severely corroded and/or damaged. Corrosion, especially in the KE Basin, contributed to the formation of a layer of radioactive sludge in the basins. Sludge removal is now progressing and will be followed by dewatering and dispositioning the concrete structures. The DOE Richland Operations Office (RL) has given Fluor Hanford Inc./Fluor Government Group (Fluor) the task of preparing Hanford's K Basins for decontamination and disposal. Prior to dewatering, hydrolasing will be used to decontaminate the basin surfaces to prepare them for disposal. By removing highly contaminated surface layers of concrete, hydrolasing will be used to meet the dose objectives for protecting workers and complying with regulations for transporting demolition debris. Fluor has innovated, tested, and planned the application of the hydrolasing technology to meet the challenge of decontaminating highly radioactive concrete surfaces underwater. Newly existing technology is being adapted to this unique challenge.

CHRONISTER, G.B.

2005-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

93

On the Nonpolar Hydration Free Energy of Proteins: Surface Area and Continuum Solvent Models for the Solute-Solvent  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On the Nonpolar Hydration Free Energy of Proteins: Surface Area and Continuum Solvent Models solvent hydration free energy models are an important component of most modern computational methods aimed. The nonpolar component of the hydration free energy, consisting of a repulsive cavity term and an attractive

94

1Satellite Surface Areas The NASA Imager for Magnetosphere-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) satellite was  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that cover the satellite's surface actually face the sun at any given moment? #12;Answer Key 1 Question 1) satellite was launched on March 25, 2000. The instruments and other electrical systems inside the satellite area of the satellite, and how much electrical power can be collected by the satellite. (Hints - http

95

Water bathing synthesis of high-surface-area nanocrystal-assembled SnO{sub 2} particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nanocrystal assembled SnO{sub 2} particles were synthesized in aqueous solutions. The particles showed high BET surface area of 276 m{sup 2}/g. It was much higher than that of our previous studies. BJH analyses indicated that the particles had pores of about 2-5 nm. The particles included two kinds of morphologies. The first particles were about 300-1000 nm in diameter, which were assemblies of acicular crystals of 5-10 nm in width and 100-200 nm in length. They contributed high BET surface area. The second particles were about 10,000-3000 nm in diameter, which were assemblies of ellipse crystals of 100-200 in width and 200-400 nm in length. The ellipse crystals consisted of sheet crystals. They connected with a certain angle and arranged their long direction parallel. - Graphical abstract: Acicular crystal assembled SnO{sub 2} particles and ellipse crystal assembled SnO{sub 2} particles were synthesized in the aqueous solutions. They showed high BET surface area of 276 m{sup 2}/g. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unique SnO{sub 2} nanocrystals were synthesized in an aqueous solution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer They were acicular crystals and ellipse crystals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer They had high BET surface area of 276 m{sup 2}/g.

Masuda, Yoshitake, E-mail: masuda-y@aist.go.jp [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 2266-98 Anagahora, Shimoshidami, Moriyama-ku, Nagoya 463-8560 (Japan); Ohji, Tatsuki; Kato, Kazumi [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 2266-98 Anagahora, Shimoshidami, Moriyama-ku, Nagoya 463-8560 (Japan)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

96

Aerodynamic Properties of Urban Areas Derived from Analysis of Surface Form  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several methods to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of a site through analysis of its surface form (morphometry) are considered in relation to cities. The measures discussed include zero-plane displacement length (zd), roughness length (...

C. S. B. Grimmond; T. R. Oke

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Sensible Heat Flux-Radiometric Surface Temperature Relationship for Eight Semiarid Areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of sensible heat flux, radiometric surface temperature, air temperature, and wind speed made at eight semiarid rangeland sites were used to investigate the sensible heat flux-aerodynamic resistance relationship. The individual sites ...

J. B. Stewart; W. P. Kustas; K. S. Humes; W. D. Nichols; M. S. Moran; H. A. R. de Bruin

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

A Cooperative Atmosphere–Surface Exchange Study (CASES) Dataset for Analyzing and Parameterizing the Effects of Land Surface Heterogeneity on Area-Averaged Surface Heat Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multiscale dataset that includes atmospheric, surface, and subsurface observations obtained from an observation network covering a region that has a scale order comparable to mesoscale and general circulation models is described and analyzed. ...

David N. Yates; Fei Chen; Margaret A. LeMone; Russell Qualls; Steven P. Oncley; Robert L. Grossman; Edward A. Brandes

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Surface Di-directional Reflectance Properties Over the ARM SGP Area from Satellite Multi-Platform Observations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bi-Directional Reflectance Properties Bi-Directional Reflectance Properties Over the ARM SGP Area from Satellite Multi-Platform Observations Y. Luo, A. P. Trishchenko, and R. Latifovic Canada Centre for Remote Sensing Natural Resources Canada Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Z. Li Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center University of Maryland College Park, Maryland Introduction Surface albedo is an important parameter in atmospheric radiation research. Good knowledge of surface bi-directional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) is essential in order to obtain the hemispheric reflectance (albedo) using data from satellite systems, which only view the ground at particular angles. Linear kernel-driven BRDF models have been commonly used for simple operational implementation of

100

Planar fuel cell utilizing nail current collectors for increased active surface area  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A plurality of nail current collector members are useful in the gas flow passages of an electrochemical device to optimize the active surfaces of the device and to provide structural support. In addition, the thicknesses of cathode and anode layers within the electrochemical device are varied according to current flow through the device to reduce resistance and increase operating efficiency.

George, Thomas J. (Star City, WV); Meacham, G. B. Kirby (Shaker Heights, OH)

2002-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terminal surface area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Planar fuel cell utilizing nail current collectors for increased active surface area  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A plurality of nail current collector members are useful in the gas flow passages of an electrochemical device to optimize the active surfaces of the device and to provide structural support. In addition, the thicknesses of cathode and anode layers within the electrochemical device are varied according to current flow through the device to reduce resistance and increase operating efficiency.

George, Thomas J.; Meacham, G.B. Kirby

1999-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

102

Surface Melt Area and Water Balance Modeling on the Greenland Ice Sheet 1995–2005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SnowModel, a physically based snow-evolution modeling system that includes four submodels—MicroMet, EnBal, SnowPack, and SnowTran-3D—was used to simulate variations in Greenland [including the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS)] surface snow and ice melt,...

Sebastian H. Mernild; Glen E. Liston; Christopher A. Hiemstra; Konrad Steffen

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Universal battery terminal connector  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a universal battery terminal connector for connecting either a top post battery terminal or a side post battery terminal to a battery cable. The connector comprises an elongated electrically conductive body having: (a) first means for connection to a top post battery terminal; (b) second means for connection to a side post battery terminal, and (c) third means for receiving one end of a battery cable and providing an electrical connection therewith.

Norris, R.W.

1987-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

104

Completion of decommissioning: Monitoring for site release and license termination  

SciTech Connect

To request termination of a license upon completion of dismantling or decommissioning activities, documenting any residual radioactivity to show that the levels are environmentally acceptable will be necessary. When the regulators approve the decommissioning plan, they establish what the release criteria for the decommissioned site will be at the time of the site release and license termination. The criteria are numeric guidelines for direct radiation in soils and on surfaces. If the regulatory body finds that the measured on-site values are below the guidelines, the site will be acceptable for unrestricted release (no radiological controls or future use). If areas are found above those values, more decontamination or cleanup of these areas may be required unless the regulatory body grants an exemption.

Boing, L.E.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Structure of a Fab Complex with the C-terminal fragment of merozoite surface protein-1 of Plasmodium vivax determined by Computational Docking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One current vaccine candidate against Plasmodium vivax, targeting asexual blood stages, is the major merozoite surface protein-1 of P. vivax (PvMSP-1). Vaccine trials with PvMSP-1$_{19}$ and PvMSP-1$_{33}$ have succeeded in protecting monkeys and it ... Keywords: Merozoite surface protein 1, Plasmodium vivax, antibody-antigen complex, docking, malaria vaccine candidate

M. L. Serrano; A. Gauna; H. A. Pérez; E. Squitieri; J. D. Medina

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Literature and data review for the surface-water pathway: Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project, Pacific Northwest Laboratory reviewed literature and data on radionuclide concentrations and distribution in the water, sediment, and biota of the Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Over 600 documents were reviewed including Hanford reports, reports by offsite agencies, journal articles, and graduate theses. Certain radionuclide concentration data were used in preliminary estimates of individual dose for the 1964--1966 time period. This report summarizes the literature and database review and the results of the preliminary dose estimates.

Walters, W.H.; Dirkes, R.L.; Napier, B.A.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Literature and data review for the surface-water pathway: Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project, Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories reviewed literature and data on radionuclide concentrations and distribution in the water, sediment, and biota of the Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Over 600 documents were reviewed including Hanford reports, reports by offsite agencies, journal articles, and graduate theses. Radionuclide concentration data were used in preliminary estimates of individual dose for the period 1964 through 1966. This report summarizes the literature and database reviews and the results of the preliminary dose estimates.

Walters, W.H.; Dirkes, R.L.; Napier, B.A.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 417: Central Nevada Test Area Surface, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Plan provides methods for implementing the approved corrective action alternative as provided in the Corrective Action Decision Document for the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA), Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417 (DOE/NV, 1999). The CNTA is located in the Hot Creek Valley in Nye County, Nevada, approximately 137 kilometers (85 miles) northeast of Tonopah, Nevada. The CNTA consists of three separate land withdrawal areas commonly referred to as UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4, all of which are accessible to the public. CAU 417 consists of 34 Corrective Action Sites (CASs). Results of the investigation activities completed in 1998 are presented in Appendix D of the Corrective Action Decision Document (DOE/NV, 1999). According to the results, the only Constituent of Concern at the CNTA is total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH). Of the 34 CASs, corrective action was proposed for 16 sites in 13 CASs. In fiscal year 1999, a Phase I Work Plan was prepared for the construction of a cover on the UC-4 Mud Pit C to gather information on cover constructibility and to perform site management activities. With Nevada Division of Environmental Protection concurrence, the Phase I field activities began in August 1999. A multi-layered cover using a Geosynthetic Clay Liner as an infiltration barrier was constructed over the UC-4 Mud Pit. Some TPH impacted material was relocated, concrete monuments were installed at nine sites, signs warning of site conditions were posted at seven sites, and subsidence markers were installed on the UC-4 Mud Pit C cover. Results from the field activities indicated that the UC-4 Mud Pit C cover design was constructable and could be used at the UC-1 Central Mud Pit (CMP). However, because of the size of the UC-1 CMP this design would be extremely costly. An alternative cover design, a vegetated cover, is proposed for the UC-1 CMP.

K. Campbell

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

SIZE AND SURFACE AREA OF ICY DUST AGGREGATES AFTER A HEATING EVENT AT A PROTOPLANETARY NEBULA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The activity of a young star rises abruptly during an FU Orionis outburst. This event causes a temporary temperature increase in the protoplanetary nebula. H{sub 2}O icy grains are sublimated by this event, and silicate cores embedded inside the ice are ejected. During the high-temperature phase, the silicate grains coagulate to form silicate core aggregates. After the heating event, the temperature drops, and the ice recondenses onto the aggregates. I determined numerically the size distribution of the ice-covered aggregates. The size of the aggregates exceeds 10 {mu}m around the snow line. Because of the migration of the ice to large aggregates, only a small fraction of the silicate core aggregate is covered with H{sub 2}O ice. After the heating event, the surface of an ice-covered aggregate is totally covered by silicate core aggregates. This might reduce the fragmentation velocity of aggregates when they collide. It is possible that the covering silicate cores shield the UV radiation field which induces photodissociation of H{sub 2}O ice. This effect may cause the shortage of cold H{sub 2}O vapor observed by Herschel.

Sirono, Sin-iti [Earth and Environmental Sciences, Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan)] [Earth and Environmental Sciences, Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan)

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Comparison of equilibria and kinetics of high surface area activated carbon produced from different precursors and by different chemical treatments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Activated carbons prepared by chemical activation of coal and macadamia nutshell precursors with KOH and ZnCl{sub 2} have been studied in terms of their equilibrium and dynamic characteristics. These characteristics were then related to the micropore properties: surface area, volume, and half-width. Volumetric techniques were used for equilibria characterization and an FT-IR batch adsorber for dynamics. Carbons activated by KOH resulted in a more microporous structure, while those activated by zinc chloride were more mesoporous. High surface area samples were further studied in terms of their methane adsorption uptake. It was found that nutshell-derived activated carbons have a higher adsorption capacity per unit mass than those derived from coal; however, this was offset by lower particle density (mass/volume). High-pressure (2 GPa) pelletization of the carbons used for dynamic testing had a detrimental effect on capacity, presumably from pore collapse. Dynamic characteristics were found to be rather similar between the samples, with those treated with KOH displaying slower adsorption time scales.

Ahmadpour, A.; King, B.A.; Do, D.D. [Univ. of Queensland, St. Lucia, Queensland (Australia)

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Electro-catalytically Active, High Surface Area Cathodes for Low Temperature SOFCs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This research focused on developing low polarization (area specific resistance, ASR) cathodes for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells (IT-SOFCs). In order to accomplish this we focused on two aspects of cathode development: (1) development of novel materials; and (2) developing the relationships between microstructure and electrochemical performance. The materials investigated ranged from Ag-bismuth oxide composites (which had the lowest reported ASR at the beginning of this contract) to a series of pyrochlore structured ruthenates (Bi{sub 2-x}M{sub x}Ru{sub 2}O{sub 7}, where M = Sr, Ca, Ag; Pb{sub 2}Ru{sub 2}O{sub 6.5}; and Y{sub 2-2x}Pr{sub 2x}Ru{sub 2}O{sub 7}), to composites of the pyrochlore ruthenates with bismuth oxide. To understand the role of microstructure on electrochemical performance, we optimized the Ag-bismuth oxide and the ruthenate-bismuth oxide composites in terms of both two-phase composition and particle size/microstructure. We further investigated the role of thickness and current collector on ASR. Finally, we investigated issues of stability and found the materials investigated did not form deleterious phases at the cathode/electrolyte interface. Further, we established the ability through particle size modification to limit microstructural decay, thus, enhancing stability. The resulting Ag-Bi{sub 0.8}Er{sub 0.2}O{sub 1.5} and Bi{sub 2}Ru{sub 2}O{sub 7{sup -}}Bi{sub 0.8}Er{sub 0.2}O{sub 1.5} composite cathodes had ASRs of 1.0 {Omega} cm{sup 2} and 0.73 {Omega}cm{sup 2} at 500 C and 0.048 {Omega}cm{sup 2} and 0.053 {Omega}cm{sup 2} at 650 C, respectively. These ASRs are truly impressive and makes them among the lowest IT-SOFC ASRs reported to date.

Eric D. Wachsman

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

112

A simulation tool for combined rail/road transport in intermodal terminals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simulation model of the flow of intermodal terminal units (ITUs) among and within inland intermodal terminals is presented. The intermodal terminals are interconnected by rail corridors. Each terminal serves a user catchment area via a road network. ... Keywords: intermodal terminal simulation, intermodal transport

Andrea E. Rizzoli; Nicoletta Fornara; Luca Maria Gambardella

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

An Innovative Approach for the Calculation of Exposure Point Concentrations for Large Areas of Surface Radionuclide Contamination  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy Rocky Flats site was designated as a wildlife refuge by the Rocky Flats National Wildlife Refuge Act of 2001. Rocky Flats was considered to be one of the most highly contaminated radiological sites in the country. Some portions of the site have low-level radionuclide contamination in surface soils. A site-wide risk and dose assessment to evaluate threats to human health and the environment were performed, so that the site could be released for this land use. The aggressive accelerated action program combined with defensible and innovative risk assessment methods resulted in there being no radionuclides of concern in the final comprehensive risk assessment (DOE 2006). An innovative approach for delineating functional exposure areas and area-weighted exposure point concentration-activities (EPCs) was negotiated with the regulatory agencies in Colorado. This procedure leads to realistic estimates of risk and dose to workers and visitors. This innovative approach to the calculation of EPCs was negotiated with both State and Federal regulators. The value of developing and maintaining good working relationships with regulators responsible for a site can not be overestimated. The building of trust and confidence among responsible parties and regulators is essential for the development and implementation of innovative methods and technologies.

Winchester Chromec, F.; Myers, Jeffrey C. [7800 E. Union Avenue, Denver, Colorado, 801237 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

114

The Resonance of the Surface Waves. The H/V Ratio in the Metropolitan Area of Bucharest  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this work is to evaluate the natural period of oscillation T{sub 0} for soils in Bucharest city area. We will start by examine the elastic waves excited at the surface of an isotropic body by an oscillatory, localized force (Rayleigh waves). We define the 'H/V'-ratio as the ratio of the intensity of the in-plane waves (horizontal waves) to the intensity of the perpendicular-to-the-plane waves (vertical waves). It is shown that this ratio exhibits a resonance at a frequency which is close to the frequency of the transverse waves. It may serve to determine Poison's ratio of the body. We consider the ratio H/V of the horizontal to the vertical component of the Fourier spectrum for the seismic events recorded at 34 locations during the period October 2003 to August 2004. The method gives reliable data regarding the fundamental frequencies for soil deposits and the results of this experiment allows us to improve the known distribution of T{sub 0}--regularly calculated with the approximate formula T = 4h/v{sub s}. The earthquakes with M{sub w}>4 that occurred on 21.01.2004, 07.02.2004, 17.03.2004 and 04.04.2004 will be used as input to compute H/V ratios for each site of a URS stations in the area of Bucharest city. The H/V ratio is also calculated from noise recordings in the same areas. Computation of H/V spectral ratios are performed by means of the SeismicHandler and J-SESAME software showing the reliability of the method used for the sites located in Bucharest. The fundamental period obtained for the majority of sites is in accordance with already known results. By obtaining the fundamental period for much more and different spots situated in the Bucharest area we covered the zones where these data did not exist before. This study is significant in seismic risk mitigation for the Bucharest city area, for a safer seismic design and for the improvement of microzonation efforts.

Balan, Stefan F.; Cioflan, Carmen O.; Apostol, Bogdan F.; Tataru, Dragos; Grecu, Bogdan [National Institute for Earth Physics, Calugareni 12, PO Box MG2, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

115

Terminal automation system maintenance  

SciTech Connect

Nothing has improved petroleum product loading in recent years more than terminal automation systems. The presence of terminal automation systems (TAS) at loading racks has increased operational efficiency and safety and enhanced their accounting and management capabilities. However, like all finite systems, they occasionally malfunction or fail. Proper servicing and maintenance can minimize this. And in the unlikely event a TAS breakdown does occur, prompt and effective troubleshooting can reduce its impact on terminal productivity. To accommodate around-the-clock loading at racks, increasingly unattended by terminal personnel, TAS maintenance, servicing and troubleshooting has become increasingly demanding. It has also become increasingly important. After 15 years of trial and error at petroleum and petrochemical storage and transfer terminals, a number of successful troubleshooting programs have been developed. These include 24-hour {open_quotes}help hotlines,{close_quotes} internal (terminal company) and external (supplier) support staff, and {open_quotes}layered{close_quotes} support. These programs are described.

Coffelt, D.; Hewitt, J. [Engineered Systems Inc., Tempe, AZ (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

The Heliospheric Termination Shock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The heliospheric Termination Shock is the largest (by dimension) shock in the heliosphere. It is believed that it is also the strongest shock and is responsible for the generation of the Anomalous Cosmic Ray component in the heliosphere. This chapter review the gross properties and observations of the Termination Shock. It is structured as follows: 1. The heliosphere, providing the heliospheric stage for Termination Shock formation, 2. The argument for a heliospheric Termination Shock, 3. The global heliospheric system, 4. Termination Shock properties, 5. Observations: the Voyager passages, radio observations, plasma waves and electron beams, traces of plasma and magnetic field, energetic particles, galactic cosmic rays, Termination Shock particles, the anomalous cosmic ray component, 6. Conclusions.

R. A. Treumann; C. H. Jaroschek

2008-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

117

Effects of Li[sup +}, K{sup +} and Ba{sup 2 sup +} cations on the ORR at model and high surface area Pt and Au surfaces in alkaline solutions.  

SciTech Connect

This Letter reveals new findings on the influence of noncovalent interactions on the electrochemical interface. Using surface X-ray scattering, we demonstrate that the barium cations are located at 3.4 {angstrom} away from the surface, suggesting that they are partially hydrated, though not adsorbed at the surface. The effect of the cation on the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) ranges from significant (Pt) to little (Au), depending on the nature of the metal and cation. Finally, we show that these results, as obtained on well-defined single-crystal surfaces, correlate well with observations on high surface area nanoparticle catalysts.

Strmcnik, D.; van der Vliet, D. F.; Chang, K-C.; Komanicky, V.; Kodama, K.; You, H.; Stamenkovic, V. R.; Markovic, N. M. (Materials Science Division); (Safarik Univ.); (Toyota Central R& D Labs.)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Status Company Terminal Term  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Status of Short-Term Applications to Export Previously Imported LNG (as of March 5, 2013) Status Company Terminal Term (Years) Authorized Volume (Equivalent Bcf in natural gas)...

119

Superconducting Cable Termination  

SciTech Connect

Disclosed is a termination that connects high temperature superconducting (HTS) cable immersed in pressurized liquid nitrogen to high voltage and neutral (shield) external bushings at ambient temperature and pressure. The termination consists of a splice between the HTS power (inner) and shield (outer) conductors and concentric copper pipes which are the conductors in the termination. There is also a transition from the dielectric tape insulator used in the HTS cable to the insulators used between and around the copper pipe conductors in the termination. At the warm end of the termination the copper pipes are connected via copper braided straps to the conventional warm external bushings which have low thermal stresses. This termination allows for a natural temperature gradient in the copper pipe conductors inside the termination which enables the controlled flashing of the pressurized liquid coolant (nitrogen) to the gaseous state. Thus the entire termination is near the coolant supply pressure and the high voltage and shield cold bushings, a highly stressed component used in most HTS cables, are eliminated. A sliding seal allows for cable contraction as it is cooled from room temperature to ˜72-82 K. Seals, static vacuum, and multi-layer superinsulation minimize radial heat leak to the environment.

Sinha, Uday K. (Carrollton, GA); Tolbert, Jerry (Newnan, GA)

2005-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

120

Sintering Effects on Morphology, Thermal Stability and Surface Area of Sol-Gel Derived Nano-Hydroxyapatite Powder  

SciTech Connect

Hydroxyapatite (HAP) ceramics have been recognized as substitute materials for bone and teeth in orthopedic and dentistry field due to their chemical and biological similarity to human hard tissue. The nanosized and nanocrystalline forms of HAP have great potential to revolutionize the hard tissue-engineering field, starting from bone repair and augmentation to controlled drug delivery systems. This paper reports the synthesis of biomimetic nano-hydroxyapatite (HAP) by sol-gel method using calcium nitrate tetrahydrate (CNT) and potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) as calcium and phosphorus precursors, respectively to obtain a desired Ca/P ratio of 1.67. Deionized water was used as a diluting media for HAP sol preparation and ammonia was used to adjust the pH to 11. After aging, the HAP gel was dried at 55 deg. C and sintered to different temperatures (200 deg. C, 400 deg. C, 600 deg. C, 800 deg. C, 1000 deg. C and 1200 deg. C). The dried and sintered powders were characterized for phase composition using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The particle size and morphology was studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The thermal behavior of the dried HAP nanopowder was studied in the temperature range of 55 deg. C to 1000 deg. C using thermal gravimetric analyser (TGA). The BET surface area of absorbance was determined by Nitrogen adsorption using Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) method. The presence of characteristic peaks of the phosphate and OH groups in FTIR spectrums confirmed the formation of pure HAP in dried as well as sintered powders. XRD results also confirmed the formation of stoichiometric nano-HAP. Sintering revealed that with increase in temperature, both the crystallinity and crystallite size of nano-HAP particles increased. The synthesized nano-HAP powder was found to be stable upto 1000 deg. C without any additional phase other than HAP, whereas peak of {beta}-TCP (tricalcium phosphate) was observed at 1200 deg. C. Photomicrograph of TEM showed that the nanopowder sintered at 600 deg. C is composed of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (26.0-45.6 nm), which is well in agreement with the crystallite size calculated using XRD data. TGA study showed the thermal stability of the synthesized nano-HAP powder. The BET surface area decreased with increase in sintering temperature.

Kapoor, Seema [University Institute of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Panjab University, Chandigarh (India); Batra, Uma [Department of Materials and Metallurgical Engineering, PEC University of Technology, Chandigarh (India); Kohli, Suchita [University Institute of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Panjab University, Chd. (India)

2011-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terminal surface area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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121

Cirrus Crystal Terminal Velocities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cirrus crystal terminal velocities are of primary importance in determining the rate of transport of condensate from upper- to middle-tropospheric levels and profoundly influence the earth’s radiation balance through their effect on the rate of ...

Andrew J. Heymsfield; Jean Iaquinta

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Auxiliary battery charging terminal  

SciTech Connect

In accordance with the present invention there is provided an auxiliary battery charging terminal that may selectively engage battery charging circuitry inside a portable radio pager. There is provided a current conducting cap having a downwardly and outwardly flared rim that deforms to lock under the crimped edge an insulating seal ring of a standard rechargeable cell by application of a compressive axial force. The auxiliary battery charging terminal is further provided with a central tip axially projecting upwardly from the cap. The auxiliary terminal may be further provided with a cap of reduced diameter to circumferentially engage the raised battery cathode terminal on the battery cell. A mating recess in a remote battery charging receptacle may receive the tip to captivate the battery cell against lateral displacement. The tip may be further provided with a rounded apex to relieve localized frictional forces upon insertion and removal of the battery cell from the remote battery charging receptacle.

Field, H.; Richter, R. E.

1985-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

123

Contribution of Land Use Changes to Near-Surface Air Temperatures during Recent Summer Extreme Heat Events in the Phoenix Metropolitan Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of 1973–2005 land use–land cover (LULC) changes on near-surface air temperatures during four recent summer extreme heat events (EHEs) are investigated for the arid Phoenix, Arizona, metropolitan area using the Weather Research and ...

Susanne Grossman-Clarke; Joseph A. Zehnder; Thomas Loridan; C. Sue B. Grimmond

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

SECURITY TERMINATION STATEMENT | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SECURITY TERMINATION STATEMENT SECURITY TERMINATION STATEMENT Form provides an individual's statement in connection with the termination of access authorization (security...

125

Cerebral extraction of N-13 ammonia: its dependence on cerebral blood flow and capillary permeability, surface area product. [Dogs; monkeys  

SciTech Connect

/sup 13/N-labeled ammonia was used to investigate: (1) the cerebral extraction and clearance of ammonia; (2) the mechanicsm by which capillaries accommodate changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF); and (3) its use for the measure of CBF. This was investigated by measuring the single pass extraction of /sup 13/NH/sub 3/ in rhesus monkeys during P/sub a/CO/sub 2/ induced changes in CBF, and with dog studies using in vitro tissue counting techniques to examine /sup 13/NH/sub 3/ extraction in gray and white matter, mixed tissue, and cerebellum during variations in CBF produced by combinations of embolization, local brain compression, and changes in P/sub a/CO/sub 2/. The single pass extraction fraction of /sup 13/NH/sub 3/ varied from about 70 to 20% over a CBF range of 12 to 140cc/min/100gms. Capillary permeability-surface area product (PS) estimates from this data and the dog experiments show PS increasing with CBF. The magnitude and rate of increase in PS with CBF was highest in gray matter > mixed tissue > white matter. Tissue extraction of /sup 13/NH/sub 3/ vs CBF relationship was best described by a unidirectional transport model in which CBF increases by both recruitment of capillaries and by increases of blood velocity in open capillaries. Glutamine synthetase, which incorporates /sup 13/NH/sub 3/ into glutamine, appears to be anatomically located in astrocytes in general and specifically in the astrocytic pericapillary end-feet that are in direct contact with gray and white matter capillaries. The net /sup 13/NH/sub 3/ extraction subsequent to an i.v. injection increases nonlinearly with CBF. Doubling or halving basal CBF produced from 40 to 50% changes in the /sup 13/N tissue concentrations with further increases in CBF associated with progressively smaller changes in /sup 13/N concentrations. /sup 13/NH/sub 3/ appears to be a good tracer for the detection of cerebral ischemia with positron tomography but exhibits a poor response at high values of CBF.

Phelps, M.E.; Huang, S.C.; Kuhl, D.E.; Hoffman, E.J.; Slin, C.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Seasonal and Interannual Variations of Evapotranspiration and Energy Exchange over Different Land Surfaces in a Semiarid Area of China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seasonal and interannual variations of evapotranspiration (ET) and energy exchange were estimated over degraded grassland and cropland land surfaces in a semiarid region of northeastern China using the eddy covariance technique from 2003 to 2008. ...

Liu Huizhi; Feng Jianwu

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

High Horizontal and Vertical Resolution Limited-Area Model: Near-Surface and Wind Energy Forecast Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As harvesting of wind energy grows, so does the need for improved forecasts from the surface to the top of wind turbines. To improve mesoscale forecasts of wind, temperature, and dewpoint temperature in this layer, two different approaches are ...

Natacha B. Bernier; Stéphane Bélair

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

AVHRR-Derived Land Surface Conditions for Flux Simulations with a Mesoscale Model over the HAPEX-Sahel Study Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The description of land surface conditions at a spatial scale adapted to climate and meteorological models is at the core of major problems in environment studies. In this regard, the information routinely provided by remote sensing observations ...

Roselyne Lacaze; Sylvie Donier; Pierre Lacarrère; Jean-Louis Roujean

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Welding electric terminals ultrasonically  

SciTech Connect

Ultrasonic welding has been investigated for use on foil conductor terminations. Equipment and tooling have been improved; material considerations and combinations have been evaluated to determine their effects on the process; and special configurations and techniques have been studied to extend the applicability of the ultrasonic welding process.

Darner, G.S.

1976-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

A Simple Parcel Method for Prediction of Cumulus Onset and Area-Averaged Cloud Amount over Heterogeneous Land Surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this note is to compare several methods for predicting the onset and quantitative amount of cloud cover over heterogeneous land surfaces. Among the methods tested are that of Wilde et al. (1985) and a new, simple parcel approach. ...

Peter J. Wetzel

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-B-23, 100-B/C Area Surface Debris, Waste Site, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2008-027  

SciTech Connect

The 100-B-23, 100-B/C Surface Debris, waste consisted of multiple locations of surface debris and chemical stains that were identified during an Orphan Site Evaluation of the 100-B/C Area. Evaluation of the collected information for the surface debris features yielded four generic waste groupings: asbestos-containing material, lead debris, oil and oil filters, and treated wood. Focused verification sampling was performed concurrently with remediation. Site remediation was accomplished by selective removal of the suspect hazardous items and potentially impacted soils. In accordance with this evaluation, the verification sampling results support a reclassification of this site to Interim Closed Out. The results of verification sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

J. M. Capron

2008-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

132

Prediction and visualization of GPS multipath signals in urban areas using LiDAR Digital Surface Models and building footprints  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explains a ray tracing method which is applied to prediction and visualization of diffracted and reflected GPS signals in dense urban areas. Reflected and diffracted signals can have a detrimental effect on GPS positioning accuracy especially ... Keywords: 3D visualization, GPS multipath, LiDAR

Jing Li; George Taylor; David Kidner; Mark Ware

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Investigation of surface inhomogeneity and estimation of the GOES skin temperature assimilation errors of the MM5 implied by the inhomogeneity over Houston metropolitan area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study developed a parameterization method to investigate the impacts of inhomogeneous land surfaces on mesoscale model simulations using a high-resolution 1-d PBL model. Then, the 1-d PBL model was used to investigate the inhomogeneity-caused model errors in applying the GOES satellite skin temperature assimilation technique into the MM5 over the Houston metropolitan area (HOU). In order to investigate the surface inhomogeneity impacts on the surface fluxes and PBL variables over HOU, homo- and inhomogeneous 1-d PBL model simulations were performed over HOU and compared to each other. The 1-d PBL model was constructed so that the surface inhomogeneities were able to be represented within model grid elements using a methodology similar to Avissar and Pielke (1989). The surface inhomogeneities over HOU were defined using 30-m resolution land cover data produced by Global Environment Management (GEM), Inc. The inhomogeneity parameterization method developed in the 1-d model was applied to a standard MM5 simulation to test the applicability of the parameterization to 3-d mesoscale model simulations. From the 1-d simulations it was inferred that the surface inhomogeneities would enhance the sensible heat flux by about 36 % and reduce the latent heat flux by about 25 %, thereby inducing the warmer (0.7 %) and drier (-1.0 %) PBL and the colder and moister PBL top induced by greater turbulent diffusivities. The 3-d application of the inhomogeneity parameterization indicated consistent results with the 1-d in general, with additional effects of advection and differential local circulation. The original GOES simulation was warmer compared to observations over HOU than over surrounding areas. The satellite data assimilation itself would lead to a warm bias due to erroneous estimation of gridpoint-mean skin temperature by the satellite, but 1-d simulations indicate that the impact of this error should be much weaker than what was observed. It seems that, unless the already existing warm and dry bias of the MM5 is corrected, the inhomogeneity parameterization in the MM5 would adversely affect the MM5 performance. Therefore, consideration of the surface inhomogeneities in the urban area needs to be confined to the GOES skin temperature retrieval errors at the moment.

Han, Sang-Ok

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Theory Of Alkyl Terminated Silicon Quantum Dots  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have carried out a series of ab-initio calculations to investigate changes in the optical properties of Si quantum dots as a function of surface passivation. In particular, we have compared hydrogen passivated dots with those having alkyl groups at the surface. We find that, while on clusters with reconstructed surfaces a complete alkyl passivation is possible, steric repulsion prevents full passivation of Si dots with unreconstructed surfaces. In addition, our calculations show that steric repulsion may have a dominant effect in determining the surface structure, and eventually the stability of alkyl passivated clusters, with results dependent on the length of the carbon chain. Alkyl passivation weakly affects optical gaps of silicon quantum dots, while it substantially decreases ionization potentials and electron affinities and affect their excited state properties. On the basis of our results we propose that alkyl terminated quantum dots may be size selected taking advantage of the change in ionization potential as a function of the cluster size.

Reboredo, F; Galli, G

2004-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

135

Mesoporous TiO{sub 2} aggregate photoanode with high specific surface area and strong light scattering for dye-sensitized solar cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Phase-pure anatase TiO{sub 2} nanocrystallite aggregates synthesized by a continuous supercritical fluid process have been first used for fabricating mesoporous photoanodes of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). Due to the small size (11 nm) of the TiO{sub 2} nanocrystallites in the aggregates, the mesoporous photoanode provides a high specific surface area, 80 m{sup 2}/g, which ensures high dye loading. At the same time, the submicrometer-sized aggregates endow the mesoporous photoanode with strong light scattering effect. Therefore, the light harvesting efficiency of the photoanode is increased. With an improved short-circuit current density, a high overall power conversion efficiency of 8.65% (100 mW/cm{sup 2}, AM 1.5) is achieved without additional scattering layers, 12% enhanced compared with the DSCs fabricated from commercial Degussa P25 with exactly the same procedures. In addition, this supercritical fluid process is scalable and rapid (less than one minute) for TiO{sub 2} aggregates synthesis, which will push the commercialization of DSCs in the future. - Graphical abstract: Due to the special morphology and structure, the photoanode of DSCs provides high specific surface area and strong light scattering at the same time, which results in high conversion efficiencies of the DSCs. Table of contents: Thanks to the synchronous realization of high specific surface area and strong light scattering, a high efficiency of 8.65% was achieved based on a novel mesoporous TiO{sub 2} aggregates photoanode for DSCs. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The TiO{sub 2} aggregate photoanode provides a possible route for highly efficient DSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Photoanode with high dye loading and light scattering is successfully fabricated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TiO{sub 2} synthesized by a supercritical fluid process is first applied to DSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The synthesis method and high efficiency will push the commercialization of DSCs.

Li, Chunhui; Luo, Yanhong; Guo, Xiaozhi; Li, Dongmei [Key Laboratory for Renewable Energy, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing Key Laboratory for New Energy Materials and Devices, Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)] [Key Laboratory for Renewable Energy, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing Key Laboratory for New Energy Materials and Devices, Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Mi, Jianli; So, Lasse; Hald, Peter [Center for Materials Crystallography, Department of Chemistry and Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus (Denmark)] [Center for Materials Crystallography, Department of Chemistry and Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus (Denmark); Meng, Qingbo, E-mail: qbmeng@iphy.ac.cn [Key Laboratory for Renewable Energy, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing Key Laboratory for New Energy Materials and Devices, Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)] [Key Laboratory for Renewable Energy, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing Key Laboratory for New Energy Materials and Devices, Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Iversen, Bo B., E-mail: bo@chem.au.dk [Center for Materials Crystallography, Department of Chemistry and Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus (Denmark)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

136

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 484: Surface Debris, Waste Sites, and Burn Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration plan details the activities necessary to close Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 484: Surface Debris, Waste Sites, and Burn Area (Tonopah Test Range). CAU 484 consists of sites located at the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, and is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. CAU 484 consists of the following six Corrective Action Sites: (1) CAS RG-52-007-TAML, Davis Gun Penetrator Test; (2) CAS TA-52-001-TANL, NEDS Detonation Area; (3) CAS TA-52-004-TAAL, Metal Particle Dispersion Test; (4) CAS TA-52-005-TAAL, Joint Test Assembly DU Sites; (5) CAS TA-52-006-TAPL, Depleted Uranium Site; and (6) CAS TA-54-001-TANL, Containment Tank and Steel Structure

Bechel Nevada

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Novel strategies for the synthesis of methane adsorbents with controlled porosity and high surface area. Final report, October 1991-October 1992  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas is an attractive alternative to gasoline as fuel for cars because of its desirable emission characteristics, good cold starting characteristics, and high octane number. A major factor that limits widespread use of NGVs is the low energy density of natural gas. The energy density can be increased by adsorption of the natural gas on high surface area sorbents. Present carbon adsorbents do not adsorb enough methane on a volume per volume basis to be commercially attractive for storage of methane on natural gas fueled vehicles. The report has begun exploring the use of organic gels for the adsorption of methane. Preliminary results are promising enough to warrant further research.

Ventura, S.C.; Hum, G.P.; Narang, S.C.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Surface Area and Microporosity of Carbon Aerogels from Gas Adsorption and Small- and Wide-Angle X-ray Scattering Measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A carbon aerogel was obtained by carbonization of an organic aerogel prepared by sol-gel polymerization of resorcinol and formaldehyde in water. The carbon aerogel was then CO2 activated at 800 °C to increase its surface area and widen its microporosity. Evolution of these parameters was followed by gas adsorption and small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS and WAXS, respectively) with contrast variation by using dry and wet (immersion in benzene and m-xylene) samples. For the original carbon aerogel, the surface area, SSAXS, obtained by SAXS, is larger than that obtained by gas adsorption (Sads). The values become nearly the same as the degree of activation of the carbon aerogel increases. This feature is due to the widening of the narrow microporosity in the carbon aerogel as the degree of activation is increased. In addition, WAXS results show that the short-range spatial correlations into the assemblies of hydrocarbon molecules confined inside the micropores are different from those existing in the liquid phase. 1.

David Fairén-jiménez; Francisco Carrasco-marín; David Djurado; Françoise Bley; Françoise Ehrburger-dolle; Carlos Moreno-castilla

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Surface water sampling and analysis plan for environmental monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses surface water monitoring, sampling, and analysis activities that will be conducted in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-burial land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a research facility owned by the US Department of Energy and managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. Surface water monitoring will be conducted at nine sites within WAG 6. Activities to be conducted will include the installation, inspection, and maintenance of automatic flow-monitoring and sampling equipment and manual collection of various water and sediment samples. The samples will be analyzed for various organic, inorganic, and radiological parameters. The information derived from the surface water monitoring, sampling, and analysis will aid in evaluating risk associated with contaminants migrating off-WAG, and will be used in calculations to establish relationships between contaminant concentration (C) and flow (Q). The C-Q relationship will be used in calculating the cumulative risk associated with the off-WAG migration of contaminants.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Research Areas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Areas Areas Research Areas Print Scientists from a wide variety of fields come to the ALS to perform experiements. Listed below are some of the most common research areas covered by ALS beamlines. Below each heading are a few examples of the specific types of topics included in that category. Click on a heading to learn more about that research area at the ALS. Energy Science Photovoltaics, photosynthesis, biofuels, energy storage, combustion, catalysis, carbon capture/sequestration. Bioscience General biology, structural biology. Materials/Condensed Matter Correlated materials, nanomaterials, magnetism, polymers, semiconductors, water, advanced materials. Physics Atomic, molecular, and optical (AMO) physics; accelerator physics. Chemistry Surfaces/interfaces, catalysts, chemical dynamics (gas-phase chemistry), crystallography, physical chemistry.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terminal surface area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Post-Closure Inspection and Monitoring Report for Corrective Action Unit 417: Central Nevada Test Area Surface, Hot Creek Valley, Nevada For Calendar Year 2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417, Central Nevada Test Area - Surface, is located in Hot Creek Valley in northern Nye County, Nevada, and consists of three areas commonly referred to as UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4. CAU 417 consists of 34 Corrective Action Sites (CASs) which were closed in 2000 (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, 2001). Three CASs at UC-1 were closed in place with administrative controls. At CAS 58-09-01, Central Mud Pit (CMP), a vegetated soil cover was constructed over the mud pit. At the remaining two sites, CAS 58-09-02, Mud Pit, and CAS 58-09-05, Mud Pits (3), aboveground monuments and warning signs were installed to mark the CAS boundaries. Three CASs at UC-3 were closed in place with administrative controls. Aboveground monuments and warning signs were installed to mark the site boundaries at CAS 58-09-06, Mud Pits (5), CAS 58-25-01, Spill, and CAS 58-10-01, Shaker Pad Area. Two CASs that consist of five sites at UC-4 were closed in place with administrative controls. At CAS 58-09-03, Mud Pits (5), an engineered soil cover was constructed over Mud Pit C. At the remaining three sites in CAS 58-09-03 and at CAS 58-10-05, Shaker Pad Area, aboveground monuments and warning signs were installed to mark the site boundaries. The remaining 26 CASs at CAU 417 were either clean-closed or closed by taking no further action.

None

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Intensive archaeological survey of the F/H Surface Enhancement Project Area, Savannah River Site, Aiken and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Twelve archaeological sites and four artifact occurrences were located by intensive survey of two tracts of land for the F and H Surface Enhancement Project on the Savannah River Site, Aiken and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina. Fieldwork in the 480-acre project area included surface reconnaissance of 3.6 linear kilometers of transects, 140 shovel tests along 4.2 linear kilometers of transects, an additional 162 shovel tests at sites and occurrences, and the excavation of six l {times} 2 m test units. All but one of the sites contained artifacts of the prehistoric era; the twelfth site consists of the remains of a twentieth-century home place. The historic site and six of the prehistoric sites consist of limited and/or disturbed contexts of archaeological deposits that have little research potential and are therefore considered ineligible for nomination to the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP). The remaining five sites have sufficient content and integrity to yield information important to ongoing investigations into upland site use. These sites (38AK146, 38AK535, 38AK539, 38AK541, and 38AK543) are thus deemed eligible for nomination to the NRHP and the Savannah River Archaeological Research Program (SRARP) recommends that they be preserved through avoidance or data recovery.

Sassaman, K.E.; Gillam, J.C.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Hydrogen sulfide, trace element and sulfur hexafluoride tracer treatment from the Geysers-Calistoga Geothermal Resource Area based on aircraft and surface sampling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This four-day study has provided initial data regarding the short-range transport of pollutants from The Geysers geothermal operations. The initial analysis of the data has shown that a measureable plume of gaseous sulfur (H{sub 2}S) is emitted from the Geysers and transported by surface and upper-level winds to distances beyond 20 km. Only one day had concentrations above 30 ppB and on this day H{sub 2}S was detected as a distinct odor at 1500 m (m.s.1.) at 4 km or more from the Geysers. The initial data analysis of the H{sub 2}S and SF{sub 6} plume data have revealed the important role that vertical wind shear plays in changing plume trajectories with height and enhancing diffusion of pollutants. Surface and aircraft sampling of aerosols indicate that small quantities of trace elements such as As, Cd, Hg, Pb, Cr and Br may be transported from the area.

Orgill, M.M.; Lee, R.N.; Nickola, P.W.; Schreck, R.C.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Research Areas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Areas Print Research Areas Print Scientists from a wide variety of fields come to the ALS to perform experiements. Listed below are some of the most common research areas covered by ALS beamlines. Below each heading are a few examples of the specific types of topics included in that category. Click on a heading to learn more about that research area at the ALS. Energy Science Photovoltaics, photosynthesis, biofuels, energy storage, combustion, catalysis, carbon capture/sequestration. Bioscience General biology, structural biology. Materials/Condensed Matter Correlated materials, nanomaterials, magnetism, polymers, semiconductors, water, advanced materials. Physics Atomic, molecular, and optical (AMO) physics; accelerator physics. Chemistry Surfaces/interfaces, catalysts, chemical dynamics (gas-phase chemistry), crystallography, physical chemistry.

145

POST CLOSURE INSPECTION AND MONITORING REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 417: CENTRAL NEVADA TEST AREA - SURFACE, HOT CREEK VALLEY, NEVADA, FOR CALENDAR YEAR 2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This post-closure inspection and monitoring report has been prepared according to the stipulations laid out in the Closure Report (CR) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417, Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA)--Surface (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office [NNSA/NV], 2001), and the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996). This report provides an analysis and summary of site inspections, subsidence surveys, meteorological information, and soil moisture monitoring data for CAU 417, which is located in Hot Creek Valley, Nye County, Nevada. This report covers Calendar Year 2004. Inspections at CAU 417 are conducted quarterly to document the physical condition of the UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4 soil covers, monuments, signs, fencing, and use restricted areas. The physical condition of fencing, monuments, and signs is noted, and any unusual conditions that could impact the integrity of the covers are reported. The objective of the soil moisture monitoring program is to monitor the stability of soil moisture conditions within the upper 1.2 meters (m) (4 feet [ft]) of the UC-1 Central Mud Pit (CMP) cover and detect changes that may be indicative of moisture movement exceeding the cover design performance expectations.

BECHTEL NEVADA; NNSA NEVADA SITE OFFICE

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Complete Urban Surface Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An observation program using ground and airborne thermal infrared radiometers is used to estimate the surface temperature of urban areas, taking into account the total active surface area. The authors call this the complete urban surface ...

J. A. Voogt; T. R. Oke

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Monitoring peak power and cooling energy savings of shade trees and white surfaces in the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) service area: Project design and preliminary results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Urban areas in warm climates create summer heat islands of daily average intensity of 3--5{degrees}C, adding to discomfort and increasing air-conditioning loads. Two important factors contributing to urban heat islands are reductions in albedo (lower overall city reflectance) and loss of vegetation (less evapotranspiration). Reducing summer heat islands by planting vegetation (shade trees) and increasing surface albedos, saves cooling energy, allows down-sizing of air conditioners, lowers air-conditioning peak demand, and reduces the emission of CO{sub 2} and other pollutants from electric power plants. The focus of this multi-year project, jointly sponsored by SMUD and the California Institute for Energy Efficiency (CIEE), was to measure the direct cooling effects of trees and white surfaces (mainly roofs) in a few buildings in Sacramento. The first-year project was to design the experiment and obtain base case data. We also obtained limited post retrofit data for some sites. This report provides an overview of the project activities during the first year at six sites. The measurement period for some of the sites was limited to September and October, which are transitional cooling months in Sacramento and hence the interpretation of results only apply to this period. In one house, recoating the dark roof with a high-albedo coating rendered air conditioning unnecessary for the month of September (possible savings of up to 10 kWh per day and 2 kW of non-coincidental peak power). Savings of 50% relative to an identical base case bungalow were achieved when a school bungalow`s roof and southeast wall were coated with a high-albedo coating during the same period. Our measured data for the vegetation sites do not indicate conclusive results because shade trees were small and the cooling period was almost over. We need to collect more data over a longer cooling season in order to demonstrate savings conclusively.

Akbari, H.; Bretz, S.; Hanford, J.; Rosenfeld, A.; Sailor, D.; Taha, H. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Bos, W. [Sacramento Municipal Utility District, CA (United States)

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Three-dimensional terminal toric flips  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe three-dimensional terminal toric flips. We obtain the complete local description of three-dimensional terminal toric flips.

Fujino, Osamu; Takano, Yukishige; Uehara, Hokuto

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Evaluation of Land Surface Models in Reproducing Satellite Derived Leaf Area Index over the High-Latitude Northern Hemisphere. Part II: Earth System Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Leaf Area Index (LAI) is a key parameter in the Earth System Models (ESMs) since it strongly affects land-surface boundary conditions and the exchange of matter and energy with the atmosphere. Observations and data products derived from satellite remote sensing are important for the validation and evaluation of ESMs from regional to global scales. Several decades ’ worth of satellite data products are now available at global scale which represents a unique opportunity to contrast observations against model results. The objective of this study is to assess whether ESMs correctly reproduce the spatial variability of LAI when compared with satellite data and to compare the length of the growing season in the different models with the satellite data. To achieve this goal we analyse outputs from 11 coupled carbon-climate models that are based on the set of new global model simulations planned in support of the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report. We focus on the average LAI and the length of the growing season on Northern Hemisphere over the period 1986–2005. Additionally we compare the results with previous analyses (Part I) of

Ro Anav; Guillermo Murray-tortarolo; Pierre Friedlingstein; Stephen Sitch; Shilong Piao; Zaichun Zhu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Two terminal line voltage thermostat  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A two terminal line voltage thermostat includes a switch which effectively connects line voltage to a heater load. The entire process is controlled by an integrated circuit microcontroller which is powered by a rectified voltage from a transformer secondary connected to a primary which is in series with the heater load. Backup battery power is provided to maintain limited functions of the microcontroller in the event of overall power loss. The microcontroller is programmed to meet the temperature sensing and control requirements specific to a two terminal electric baseboard heating installation. 7 figs.

Stalsberg, K.J.; Ingalls, J.E.; Hoglund, S.R.

1995-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

151

In-kernel passive measurement of the performance impact of hidden terminals in 802.11 wireless networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The negative performance impact of the presence of hidden terminals in wireless networks has been well know for decades. Despite much research in the area, many deployed networks continue to suffer a performance penalty because of hidden terminals. Ad ... Keywords: 802.11, hidden terminal collisions, passive measurement, wireless networks

Scott M. Raynel; Tony J. McGregor

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Consequence analysis for Safety of LNG-Receiving Terminal: Use of a Dispersion Model to Study Natural Gas Leakage and Motor Vehicle Movement in the Terminal.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The natural gas plant terminal considered in this study was built in 1996 for commercialoperation. It has an area of about 1.4 km2, and there… (more)

Leathers, Pauletta

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

POST CLOSURE INSPECTION AND MONITORING REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 417: CENTRAL NEVADA TEST AREA - SURFACE, HOT CREEK VALLEY, NEVADA; FOR CALENDAR YEAR 2005  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417, Central Nevada Test Area - Surface, is located in Hot Creek Valley in northern Nye County, Nevada, and consists of three areas commonly referred to as UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4. CAU 417 consists of 34 Corrective Action Sites (CASs) which were closed in 2000 (U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, 2001). Three CASs at UC-1 were closed in place with administrative controls. At CAS 58-09-01, Central Mud Pit (CMP), a vegetated soil cover was constructed over the mud pit. At the remaining two sites CAS 58-09-02, Mud Pit and 58-09-05, Mud Pits (3), aboveground monuments and warning signs were installed to mark the CAS boundaries. Three CASs at UC-3 were closed in place with administrative controls. Aboveground monuments and warning signs were installed to mark the site boundaries at CAS 58-09-06, Mud Pits (5), CAS 58-25-01, Spill and CAS 58-10-01, Shaker Pad Area. Two CASs that consist of five sites at UC-4 were closed in place with administrative controls. At CAS 58-09-03, Mud Pits 9, an engineered soil cover was constructed over Mud Pit C. At the remaining three sites in CAS 58-09-03 and at CAS 58-10-05, Shaker Pad Area, aboveground monuments and warning signs were installed to mark the site boundaries. The remaining 26 CASs at CAU 417 were either clean-closed or closed by taking no further action. Quarterly post-closure inspections are performed at the CASs that were closed in place at UC-I, UC-3, and UC-4. During calendar year 2005, site inspections were performed on March 15, June 16, September 22, and December 7. The inspections conducted at the UC-1 CMP documented that the site was in good condition and continued to show integrity of the cover unit. No new cracks or fractures were observed until the December inspection. A crack on the west portion of the cover showed evidence of lateral expansion; however, it is not at an actionable level. The crack will be sealed by filling with bentonite during the first quarter of 2006 and monitored during subsequent inspections. The cover vegetation was healthy and well established. No issues were identified with the CMP fence, gate, or subsidence monuments. No issues were identified with the warning signs and monuments at the other two UC-1 locations. The inspections at UC-3 indicated that the sites are in excellent condition. All monuments and signs showed no displacement, damage, or removal. A small erosion gully from spring rain runoff was observed during the June inspection, but it did not grow to an actionable level during 2005. No other issues or concerns were identified. Inspections performed at UC-4 Mud Pit C cover revealed that erosion rills were formed during March and September exposing the geosynthetic clay liner. Both erosion rills were repaired within 90 days of reporting. Sparse vegetation is present on the cover. The overall condition of the monuments, fence, and gate are in good condition. No issues were identified with the warning signs and monuments at the other four UC-4 locations. Subsidence surveys were conducted at UC-1 CMP and UC-4 Mud Pit C in March and September of 2005. The results of the subsidence surveys indicate that the covers are performing as expected, and no unusual subsidence was observed. The June vegetation survey of the UC-1 CMP cover and adjacent areas indicated that the revegetation has been very successful. The vegetation should continue to be monitored to document any changes in the plant community and identify conditions that could potentially require remedial action in order to maintain a viable vegetative cover on the site. Vegetation surveys should be conducted only as required. Precipitation during 2005 was above average, with an annual rainfall total of 21.79 centimeters (8.58 inches). Soil moisture content data show that the UC-1 CMP cover is performing as designed, with evapotranspiration effectively removing water from the cover. It is recommended to continue quarterly site inspections and the collection of soil moisture data for the UC-1 CMP cove

NONE

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

AFM CHARACTERIZATION OF LASER INDUCED DAMAGE ON CDZNTE CRYSTAL SURFACES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Semi-conducting CdZnTe (or CZT) crystals can be used in a variety of detector-type applications. CZT shows great promise for use as a gamma radiation spectrometer. However, its performance is adversely affected by point defects, structural and compositional heterogeneities within the crystals, such as twinning, pipes, grain boundaries (polycrystallinity), secondary phases and in some cases, damage caused by external forces. One example is damage that occurs during characterization of the surface by a laser during Raman spectroscopy. Even minimal laser power can cause Te enriched areas on the surface to appear. The Raman spectra resulting from measurements at moderate intensity laser power show large increases in peak intensity that is attributed to Te. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was used to characterize the extent of damage to the CZT crystal surface following exposure to the Raman laser. AFM data reveal localized surface damage in the areas exposed to the Raman laser beam. The degree of surface damage to the crystal is dependent on the laser power, with the most observable damage occurring at high laser power. Moreover, intensity increases in the Te peaks of the Raman spectra are observed even at low laser power with little to no visible damage observed by AFM. AFM results also suggest that exposure to the same amount of laser power yields different amounts of surface damage depending on whether the exposed surface is the Te terminating face or the Cd terminating face of CZT.

Hawkins, S; Lucile Teague, L; Martine Duff, M; Eliel Villa-Aleman, E

2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

155

DOE Terminated Federal Advisory Committees  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TERMINATED FEDERAL ADVISORY COMMITTEES Date Committee Name/Web Site Terminated Federal Energy Management Advisory Committee 06/08/07 Web Site: (Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board) Fernald 09/30/06 Web Site: (Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board) Rocky Flats 09/30/06 Web Site: Secretary of Energy Advisory Board 05/20/06 Web Site: http://www.seab.energy.gov/ Electricity Advisory Board 02/10/06 Web Site: http://www.eab.doe.gov/ American Statistical Association Advisory Committee on Energy Statistics 03/24/05 Web Site: Workers' Compensation Assistance Advisory Committee 06/29/04 Web Site: National Nuclear Security Administration Advisory Committee 06/25/03 Web Site: Commission on Fire Safety and Preparedness 01/09/03

156

The control of size and areal density of InAs self-assembled quantum dots in selective area molecular beam epitaxy on GaAs (001) surface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The growth of InAs quantum dots (QDs) on GaAs (001) substrates by selective area molecular beam epitaxy (SA-MBE) with dielectric mask is investigated. The GaAs polycrystals on the mask, which is formed during growth due to low GaAs selectivity between ... Keywords: InAs quantum dots, Molecular beam epitaxy, Selective area epitaxy

J. C. Lin; P. W. Fry; R. A. Hogg; M. Hopkinson; I. M. Ross; A. G. Cullis; R. S. Kolodka; A. I. Tartakovskii; M. S. Skolnick

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Surface Passivation of Germanium Nanowires  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The surface of single crystal, cold-wall CVD-grown germanium nanowires was studied by synchrotron radiation photoemission spectroscopy (SR-PES) and also by conventional XPS. The as-grown germanium nanowires seem to be hydrogen terminated. Exposure to laboratory atmosphere leads to germanium oxide growth with oxidation states of Ge{sup 1+}, Ge{sup 2+}, Ge{sup 3+}, while exposure to UV light leads to a predominance of the Ge{sup 4+} oxidation state. Most of the surface oxide could be removed readily by aqueous HF treatment which putatively leaves the nanowire surface hydrogen terminated with limited stability in air. Alternatively, chlorine termination could be achieved by aq. HCl treatment of the native oxide-coated nanowires. Chlorine termination was found to be relatively more stable than the HF-last hydrogen termination.

Adhikari, Hemant; Sun, Shiyu; Pianetta, Piero; Chidsey, Chirstopher E.D.; McIntyre, Paul C.; /SLAC, SSRL

2005-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

158

Simulation analysis of marine terminal investments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A common problem in the oil industry is the optimization of terminal facilities to minimize delays in servicing incoming tankers. In Exxon Corporation, simulation has been successfully applied to marine terminal studies since the early nineteen sixties. ...

David W. Graff

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Formation Mechanisms of the Extreme High Surface Air Temperature of 40.9°C Observed in the Tokyo Metropolitan Area: Considerations of Dynamic Foehn and Foehnlike Wind  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A record-breaking high surface air temperature in Japan of 40.9°C was observed on 16 August 2007 in Kumagaya, located 60 km northwest of central Tokyo. In this study, the formation mechanisms of this extreme high temperature event are ...

Yuya Takane; Hiroyuki Kusaka

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Photovoltaic module electrical termination design requirement study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Motorola Inc., in conjunction with ITT Cannon, has conducted a study to develop information to facilitate the selection of existing, commercial, electrical termination hardware for photovoltaic modules and arrays. This volume of the report contains the executive summary. Module and array design parameters were investigated and recommendations were developed for use in surveying, evaluating, and comparing electrical termination hardware. Electrical termination selection criteria factors were developed and applied to nine generic termination types in each of the four application sectors: remote, residential, intermediate and industrial. Existing terminations best suited for photovoltaic modules and arrays were identified. Cost information was developed to identify cost drivers and/or requirements which might lead to cost reductions. The general conclusion is that there is no single generic termination that is best suited for photovoltaic application, but that the appropriate termination is strongly dependent upon the module construction and its support structure as well as the specific application sector.

Mosna, F.J. Jr.; Donlinger, J.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terminal surface area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Complete LNG Terminal Status Maps | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LNG Terminal Status Maps Complete LNG Terminal Status Maps A series of slides showing the status of various LNG terminals (existing, under construction, proposed, etc.) in North...

162

Effects of urban land cover modifications in a mesoscale meteorological model on surface temperature and heat fluxes in the Phoenix metropolitan area.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and latent heat fluxes and therefore the ground temperature, Tg. Evaporation, E, for each grid cell temperature and heat fluxes in the Phoenix metropolitan area. S. Grossman-Clarke1, J.A. Zehnder2, and W) satellite images [2]. The data were upscaled to a 30-second grid and used to augment and correct

Hall, Sharon J.

163

Two terminal micropower radar sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A simple, low power ultra-wideband radar motion sensor/switch configuration connects a power source and load to ground. The switch is connected to and controlled by the signal output of a radar motion sensor. The power input of the motion sensor is connected to the load through a diode which conducts power to the motion sensor when the switch is open. A storage capacitor or rechargeable battery is connected to the power input of the motion sensor. The storage capacitor or battery is charged when the switch is open and powers the motion sensor when the switch is closed. The motion sensor and switch are connected between the same two terminals between the source/load and ground. 3 figs.

McEwan, T.E.

1995-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

164

Two terminal micropower radar sensor  

SciTech Connect

A simple, low power ultra-wideband radar motion sensor/switch configuration connects a power source and load to ground. The switch is connected to and controlled by the signal output of a radar motion sensor. The power input of the motion sensor is connected to the load through a diode which conducts power to the motion sensor when the switch is open. A storage capacitor or rechargeable battery is connected to the power input of the motion sensor. The storage capacitor or battery is charged when the switch is open and powers the motion sensor when the switch is closed. The motion sensor and switch are connected between the same two terminals between the source/load and ground.

McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 484: Surface Debris, Waste Sites, and Burn Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (Revision 0)  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 484 Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) activities called for the identification and remediation of surface hot spot depleted uranium (DU) with some excavation to determine the vertical extent of contamination (NNSA/NSO, 2004). During the CAU 484 SAFER investigation (conducted November 2003 through August 2007), approximately 50 locations containing DU were identified on Antelope Lake. All but four locations (CA-1, SA-5-9, SA-12-15, and SA-4) were remediated. Figure 1-1 shows locations of the four use restriction (UR) sites. The four locations were determined to have failed the SAFER conceptual site model assumption of a small volume hot spot. Two of the locations (CA-1 and SA-5-9) were excavated to depths of 3.5 to 7 feet (ft) below ground surface (bgs), and a third location (SA-12-15) with a footprint of 30 by 60 ft was excavated to a depth of 0.5 ft. At the fourth site (SA-4), the discovery of unexploded ordnance (UXO) halted the excavation due to potential safety concerns. Remediation activities on Antelope Lake resulted in the removal of approximately 246 cubic yards (yd3) of DU-impacted soil from the four UR sites; however, Kiwi surveys confirmed that residual DU contamination remained at each of the four sites. (The Kiwi was a Remote Sensing Laboratory [RSL] vehicle equipped with a data-acquisition system and four sodium iodide gamma detectors. Surveys were conducted with the vehicle moving at a rate of approximately 10 miles per hour with the gamma detectors positioned 14 to 28 inches [in.] above the ground surface [NNSA/NSO, 2004]).

Mark Burmeister

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Literature and data review for the surface-water pathway: Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project, Pacific Northwest Laboratory reviewed literature and data on radionuclide concentrations and distribution in the water, sediment, and biota of the Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Over 600 documents were reviewed including Hanford reports, reports by offsite agencies, journal articles, and graduate theses. Certain radionuclide concentration data were used in preliminary estimates of individual dose for the 1964--1966 time period. This report summarizes the literature and database review and the results of the preliminary dose estimates.

Walters, W.H.; Dirkes, R.L.; Napier, B.A.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Literature and data review for the surface-water pathway: Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project, Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories reviewed literature and data on radionuclide concentrations and distribution in the water, sediment, and biota of the Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Over 600 documents were reviewed including Hanford reports, reports by offsite agencies, journal articles, and graduate theses. Radionuclide concentration data were used in preliminary estimates of individual dose for the period 1964 through 1966. This report summarizes the literature and database reviews and the results of the preliminary dose estimates.

Walters, W.H.; Dirkes, R.L.; Napier, B.A.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

EIA-811 MONTHLY BULK TERMINAL REPORT INSTRUCTIONS  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

EIA-811, Monthly Bulk Terminal Report Page 1 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY IN FORMATION ADMINISTRATION Washington, D.C. 20585 OMB No. 1905-0165

169

Termination in language-based systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Language run-time systems are increasingly being embedded in systems to support run-time extensibility via mobile code. Such systems raise a number of concerns when the code running in such systems is potentially buggy or untrusted. Although sophisticated access ... Keywords: Applets, Internet, Java, resource control, soft termination, termination

Algis Rudys; Dan S. Wallach

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Columbia River: Terminal fisheries research project. 1994 Annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Columbia River terminal fisheries have been conducted in Youngs Bay, Oregon, since the early 1960`s targeting coho salmon produced at the state facility on the North Fork Klaskanine River. In 1977 the Clatsop County Economic Development Council`s (CEDC) Fisheries Project began augmenting the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife production efforts. Together ODFW and CEDC smolt releases totaled 5,060,000 coho and 411,300 spring chinook in 1993 with most of the releases from the net pen acclimation program. During 1980-82 fall commercial terminal fisheries were conducted adjacent to the mouth of Big Creek in Oregon. All past terminal fisheries were successful in harvesting surplus hatchery fish with minimal impact on nonlocal weak stocks. In 1993 the Northwest Power Planning Council recommended in its` Strategy for Salmon that terminal fishing sites be identified and developed. The Council called on the Bonneville Power Administration to fund a 10-year study to investigate the feasibility of creating and expanding terminal known stock fisheries in the Columbia River Basin. The findings of the initial year of the study are included in this report. The geographic area considered for study extends from Bonneville Dam to the river mouth. The initial year`s work is the beginning of a 2-year research stage to investigate potential sites, salmon stocks, and methodologies; a second 3-year stage will focus on expansion in Youngs Bay and experimental releases into sites with greatest potential; and a final 5-year phase establishing programs at full capacity at all acceptable sites. After ranking all possible sites using five harvest and five rearing criteria, four sites in Oregon (Tongue Point, Blind Slough, Clifton Channel and Wallace Slough) and three in Washington (Deep River, Steamboat Slough and Cathlamet Channel) were chosen for study.

Hirose, P.; Miller, M.; Hill, J.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Cooperative frequency control with a multi-terminal high-voltage DC network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider frequency control in power systems made of several non-synchronous AC areas connected by a multi-terminal high-voltage direct current (HVDC) grid. We propose two HVDC control schemes to make the areas collectively react to power imbalances, ... Keywords: Decentralized control, Frequency control, HVDC systems, Power system control

Alain Sarlette; Jing Dai; Yannick Phulpin; Damien Ernst

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Material Disposal Areas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Material Disposal Areas Material Disposal Areas Material Disposal Areas Material Disposal Areas, also known as MDAs, are sites where material was disposed of below the ground surface in excavated pits, trenches, or shafts. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Material Disposal Areas at LANL The following are descriptions and status updates of each MDA at LANL. To view a current fact sheet on the MDAs, click on LA-UR-13-25837 (pdf). MDA A MDA A is a Hazard Category 2 nuclear facility comprised of a 1.25-acre, fenced, and radiologically controlled area situated on the eastern end of Delta Prime Mesa. Delta Prime Mesa is bounded by Delta Prime Canyon to the north and Los Alamos Canyon to the south.

173

Provision of multimedia services over Europe by means of geostationary satellites with multispot coverage using small terminals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The possibility to provide multimedia services over a wide area using small mobile terminals represents a challenging task. This task is even more challenging especially if high frequency bands are used and high service availability is required, considering ...

Michele Luglio; Mauro Marinelli; Aldo Paraboni

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Large area bulk superconductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A bulk superconductor having a thickness of not less than about 100 microns is carried by a polycrystalline textured substrate having misorientation angles at the surface thereof not greater than about 15.degree.; the bulk superconductor may have a thickness of not less than about 100 microns and a surface area of not less than about 50 cm.sup.2. The textured substrate may have a thickness not less than about 10 microns and misorientation angles at the surface thereof not greater than about 15.degree.. Also disclosed is a process of manufacturing the bulk superconductor and the polycrystalline biaxially textured substrate material.

Miller, Dean J. (Darien, IL); Field, Michael B. (Jersey City, NJ)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Analysis of LNG import terminal release prevention systems  

SciTech Connect

The release prevention systems of liquefied natural gas (LNG) import terminal were analyzed. A series of potential release scenarios were analyzed to determine the frequency of the release events, the probability these releases are not stopped or isolated by emergency shutdown systems, the estimated release quantities, and the critical components of the system. The two plant areas identified as being most significant with respect to safety are the unloading system and the storage system. Rupture of the main transfer line and gross failure of the storage tanks are the two release scenarios of primary safety interest. Reducing the rate of failure by improved design, better maintenance and testing, or adding redundancy of the critical system components for these plant areas and release scenarios will result in improved safety. Several design alternatives which have the potential to significantly reduce the probability of a large release of LNG occurring at an import terminal are identified. These design alternatives would reduce the probability of a large release of LNG by reducing the expected number of failures which could cause a release or by reducing the magnitude of releases that do occur. All of these alternatives are technically feasible and have been used or considered for use in at least one LNG facility. A more rigorous analysis of the absolute risk of LNG import terminal operation is necessary before the benefits of these design alternatives can be determined. In addition, an economic evaluation of these alternatives must be made so the costs and benefits can be compared. It is concludd that for remotely located facilities many of these alternatives are probably not justified; however, for facilities located in highly populated areas, these alternatives deserve serious consideration.

Baker, E G

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Design of a Graphic Generator for Remote Terminal Application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The design of a graphic display system for remote terminal application is presented. Control data requirements are reduced by generating a useful set of graphic primitives locally at the remote terminals. Keywords: Computer graphics, digital differential analyzers, peripherals, remote terminals.

J. R. Armstrong

1973-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Examination of Terminal Land Requirements for Hydrogen Delivery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

May 8, 2007 Jerry Gillette Examination of Terminal Land Requirements for Hydrogen Hydrogen Delivery Analysis Meeting Argonne National Laboratory A Variety of Terminal...

178

PCs and Computer Terminals in Commercial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Special Topics and Data Reports > PC's and Computer Terminals Special Topics and Data Reports > PC's and Computer Terminals Picture of a personal computer Personal Computers and Computer Terminals in Commercial Buildings PCs and Computer Terminals in 1995 Changes Between 1992 and 1995 How the Number of PCs and Computer Terminals Were Estimated References and Additional Links Over the past 10 to 15 years, the use of personal computers (PCs) has risen dramatically. The energy consumed by PCs and other types of office equipment has become a significant component of electricity consumption in commercial buildings -- 13 percent (98 billion kWh) of all electricity consumed in 1995. That amount was nearly as much as the amount used to air condition these buildings. The Energy Information Administration's 1999 Annual Energy Outlook[1] forecasts that, for the next two decades, electricity consumption for office equipment (3.2 percent annually) will grow over twice as fast as electricity use as a whole (1.4 percent annually).

179

Process for producing radiation-induced self-terminating protective coatings on a substrate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas and radiation are used to produce a protective coating that is substantially void-free on the molecular scale, self-terminating, and degradation resistant. The process can be used to deposit very thin (.apprxeq.5-20 .ANG.) coatings on critical surfaces needing protection from degradative processes including, corrosion and contamination.

Klebanoff, Leonard E. (Dublin, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

The Termination of the 1997–98 El Niño. Part I: Mechanisms of Oceanic Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1997–98 El Niño was both unusually strong and terminated unusually. Warm eastern equatorial Pacific (EEqP) sea surface temperature anomalies (SSTAs) exceeded 4°C at the event peak and lasted well into boreal spring of 1998, even though ...

Gabriel A. Vecchi; D. E. Harrison

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terminal surface area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Optimization Control Strategies for HVAC Terminal Boxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The HVAC terminal boxes are one of the major building HVAC components. They directly impact the building room comfort conditions and the energy costs. How to operate the box in a highly energy efficient way and maintain the room comfort level is an important topic in today's building energy management and HVAC control field. The authors developed novel optimized control strategies and operation schedules for the terminal boxes for both occupied and non-occupied hours. The optimized control schedules were implemented in a medical complex during the commissioning. This not only improved the building comfort conditions but also reduced the energy costs.

Zhu, Y.; Batten, T.; Noboa, H.; Claridge, D. E.; Turner, W. D.; Liu, M.; Zhou, J.; Cameron, C.; Keeble, D.; Hirchak, R.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Ohio Distillate Fuel Oil Stocks at Refineries, Bulk Terminals, and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Ohio Distillate Fuel Oil Stocks at Refineries, Bulk Terminals, and Natural Gas Plants (Thousand Barrels)

183

Variable area fuel cell cooling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell arrangement having cooling fluid flow passages which vary in surface area from the inlet to the outlet of the passages. A smaller surface area is provided at the passage inlet, which increases toward the passage outlet, so as to provide more uniform cooling of the entire fuel cell. The cooling passages can also be spaced from one another in an uneven fashion.

Kothmann, Richard E. (Churchill Borough, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

PCN-based measured rate termination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Overload in a packet-based network can be prevented by admitting or blocking new flows depending on its load conditions. However, overload can occur in spite of admission control due to unforseen events, e.g., when admitted traffic is rerouted in the ... Keywords: Admission control, Differentiated services, Flow termination, QoS, Resilience

Michael Menth; Frank Lehrieder

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Termination for superconducting power transmission systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to a cold, electrical gradient, terminal section for a superconducting cable for alternating current power transmission. A cold electrical gradient section filled with a gaseous coolant acting as an insulator is provided in series with a separate thermal gradient section. (auth)

Forsyth, E.B.; Jensen, J.E.

1975-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

186

Aggregate Terminal Velocity/Temperature Relations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Terminal velocities of snow aggregates in storms along the Front Range in eastern Colorado are examined with a ground-based two-dimensional video disdrometer. Power-law relationships for particles having equivalent volume diameters of 0.5–20 mm ...

Edward A. Brandes; Kyoko Ikeda; Gregory Thompson; Michael Schönhuber

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

RADIOLOGICAL CRITERIA FOR LICENSE TERMINATION OF URANIUM RECOVERY FACILITIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

radiological criteria for building surfaces and radionuclides other than radium in soil, for termination of uranium recovery licenses. SUMMARY: In a Staff Requirements Memorandum (SRM) on SECY-98-084, dated August 11, 1998 (Attachment 1), the Commission indicated that it did not object to the staff's recommendation to use the radium benchmark dose in developing a final rule applicable to uranium recovery licensees. The final rule addresses radiological criteria for decommissioning land and buildings required for license termination for uranium recovery facilities, e.g., uranium mills and in situ leach facilities (ISLs). The final rule will provide a clear and consistent regulatory basis for determining the extent to which lands and structures can be considered to be decommissioned. BACKGROUND: On August 22, 1994 (59 FR 43200), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published a proposed rule for comment in the Federal Register, to amend 10 CFR Part 20, "Standards for Protection Against Radiation, " to include radiological criteria for decommissioning as subpart E. The proposed rule applied to uranium mill facilities and other NRC licensees, but did not apply to mill tailings disposal or to soil radium cleanup at mills because the radiological criteria for these activities are regulated under 10 CFR Part 40, Appendix A. Some commenters recommended that the rule exempt conventional thorium and uranium mill facilities and ISLs. In SECY-97-046A, dated March 28, 1997, entitled "Final Rule on Radiological Criteria for License Termination, " the staff recommended that the final rule indicate that for uranium and thorium mill facilities the cleanup of radionuclides other than radium from soil and buildings must result in a dose no greater than the dose resulting from the cleanup of radium-contaminated soil (benchmark

William D. Travers /s

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Radiological Areas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Revision to Clearance Policy Associated with Recycle of Scrap Metals Originating from Revision to Clearance Policy Associated with Recycle of Scrap Metals Originating from Radiological Areas On July 13, 2000, the Secretary of Energy imposed an agency-wide suspension on the unrestricted release of scrap metal originating from radiological areas at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities for the purpose of recycling. The suspension was imposed in response to concerns from the general public and industry groups about the potential effects of radioactivity in or on material released in accordance with requirements established in DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment. The suspension was to remain in force until DOE developed and implemented improvements in, and better informed the public about, its release process. In addition, in 2001 the DOE announced its intention to prepare a

189

INTERNATIONAL CONSULTANTS REQUIRED FOR DEVELOPMENT OF COAL PORT/TERMINAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PIDC intends to develop complete infrastructure facilities (Coal Port/Terminal) for the handling & transportation of imported coal at a greenfield site in the coastal area of Pakistan to facilitate setting up coal based industries in an adjoining industrial zone and supply to other users. International consultants, having experience and expertise of developing coal handling facilities of international standard for off-loading, storage and transportation of imported coal in bulk volume are invited to apply preferably in association with reputed local consultants for preparation of Feasibility Study of the project covering all relevant aspects including: 1. Market study to ascertain potential local demand for imported coal by power, cement and steel plants and other major users for the next 15 years. 2. Develop master plan and design of the infrastructure facilities (Coal Port/Terminal) for handling imported coal in bulk quantity at the location to be identified in the study. 3. Development of industrial zone for coal based industry. 4. Financial and technical aspects / viability of the project. 5. Implementation plan and strategy to develop and operate the project. Interested parties may collect the TOR for the feasibility study from the under mentioned office during working hours or download it from Ministry of Industries, Production & Special Initiatives, Government of Pakistan’s web site www.moip.gov.pk. Detailed proposal for carrying out the feasibility study alongwith financial bid and the background information of the consultants, should be submitted latest by May 17, 2007 at the address given below. PIDC

For Imported; Coal In Pakistan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Transmission of sound through suspended ceilings from HVAC terminal units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An ASHRAE project to investigate factors determining the sound pressure levels in rooms below ceilings concealing air?terminal units has been completed. Four terminal units installed close to the six ceiling types used were the major noise sources. They were supplemented by two simulators powered by loudspeakers.Sound power was measured for each device in the 156 cubic meter test room in its reverberant condition. The levels in the room were measured for each combination of source and ceiling tile. Sound pressure level was measured as a function of distance from two sources in the room below. The main intent of the project was to validate ARI Standard 885 which provides a calculation method for such situations. Differences among ceiling types were less than expected; leakage around the edges of each panel is a dominant transmission path. Ceiling attenuations at low frequencies were found to depend on the area of the lower face of the units. Sound levels in the room were essentially uniform when the source was above the ceiling. The decay of sound with distance from the sources below the ceiling was found to depend on the inverse of the room reverberation time.

Alf Warnock

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Declaration of Termination of Domestic Partnership Form  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DPT (01-2012) DPT (01-2012) SANDIA PROPRIETARY INFORMATION PERSONALLY IDENTIFIABLE INFORMATION (PII) (WHEN COMPLETE) Declaration of Termination of Domestic Partnership Form To be completed by the employee and submitted to the Sandia Benefits Customer Service Center at the address above. Please keep a copy for your records. Sworn Affidavit We, __________________________________________ and _____________________________________________ Employee Domestic Partner __________________________________________ _____________________________________________ Employee Social Security Number Domestic Partner Social Security Number __________________________________________ _____________________________________________ Employee Date of Birth Domestic Partner Date of Birth

192

Environmental Assessment for the Terminal Expansion Project.  

SciTech Connect

The Terminal Expansion Project is proposed by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Southern California Edison (SCE), and the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP) to increase the operating capacity of the existing bipole direct current (dc) Intertie line between the Celilo Converter Station at The Dalles, Oregon, and the Sylmar converter Station at Sylmar, California. The proposal will allow a greater exchange of electric power between the Pacific Northwest (PNW) and Southern California without constructing new interregional transmission lines. By adding more alternating ac/dc converter equipment at the terminals, the conductors on the existing 845-mile dc intertie transmission line can be operated at full design capacity. The dc Intertie plus two other ac lines which terminate near San Francisco comprise the ''Intertie.'' Though the project is interregional, relatively little construction will be needed. This Environmental Assessment addresses the environmental impacts of the proposed actions and makes a determination as to their significance. Though LADWP is complying with the State environmental process, as required by the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), the impacts of their construction are being considered as part of the impacts of the overall proposal and are considered in the determination of significance.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

ZigZag Decoding: Combating Hidden Terminals in Wireless Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents ZigZag, an 802.11 receiver that combats hidden terminals. ZigZag exploits 802.11 retransmissions which, in the case of hidden terminals, cause successive collisions. Due to asynchrony, these collisions ...

Katabi, Dina

2008-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

194

Stabilization mechanisms of LaFeO3 (010) surfaces determined with first principles calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Density functional theory is used to determine the stabilization mechanisms of LaFeO3 (010) surfaces over a range of surface oxygen stoichiometries. For the stoichiometric LaO surface, and for reduced surface terminations, an electron-rich surface is needed for stabilization. By contrast, in the case of the stoichiometric FeO2 surface and oxidized surface terminations with low-coordinated oxygen atoms, a hole-rich surface is needed for stabilization. The calculations further predict that low coordinated oxygen atoms are more stable on LaO-type surface terminations than on FeO2-type surface terminations due to relatively strong electron transfer. In addition to these electronic effects, atomic relaxation is found to be an important contributor to charge compensation, with LaO-type surface terminations exhibiting larger atomic relaxations than FeO2-type surface terminations. As a result, there is a significant contribution from the sub-layers to charge compensation in LaO-type surface terminations.

Lee, Chan-Woo [University of Florida; Behera, Rakesh K [University of Florida; Okamoto, Satoshi [ORNL; Devanathan, Ram [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Wachsman, Eric D [University of Maryland; Phillpot, Simon R [University of Florida; Sinnott, Susan B [University of Florida

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Stabilization mechanisms of LaFeO3 (010) surfaces determined with first principles calculations  

SciTech Connect

Density functional theory is used to determine the stabilization mechanisms of LaFeO3 (010) surfaces over a range of surface oxygen stoichiometries. For the stoichiometric LaO surface, and for reduced surface terminations, charge redistribution is needed for stabilization that results in an electron-rich surface. In contrast, in the case of the stoichiometric FeO2 surface and oxidized surface terminations with low-coordinated oxygen atoms, a hole-rich surface is needed for stabilization. The calculations further predict that low coordinated oxygen atoms are more stable on LaO-type surface terminations than on FeO2-type surface terminations due to relatively strong electron transfer. In addition to these electronic effects, atomic relaxation is found to be an important contributor to charge compensation, with LaO-type surface terminations exhibiting larger atomic relaxations than FeO2-type surface terminations. As a result, there is a significant contribution from the sub-layers to charge compensation in LaO-type surface terminations.

Lee, Chan-Woo; Behera, Rakesh K.; Okamoto, Satoshi; Devanathan, Ramaswami; Wachsman, E. D.; Phillpot, Simon R.; Sinnott, Susan B.

2011-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

196

Termination of Safeguards on ULWBR Material  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management, has approved the disposition of 31 metric tons of Unirradiated Light Water Breeder Reactor (ULWBR) material in canisters stored within dry wells of the Underground Fuel Storage Facility at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC). This unirradiated material consists primarily of ceramic pellets of thorium oxide in stainless steel cladding, but it also contains 300 kilograms of uranium that is 98 wt% U-233. The ULWBR material was not processed at the INTEC because it was incompatible with prior chemical separation schemes. Other economical recovery options have not been identified, and expressions of interest for consolidating the material with existing projects at other DOE sites have not been received. The U-233 could be used for producing the medical isotope Actinium-225, but the proof-of-principle demonstration and follow-on pilot program have not been developed to the point of requiring production quantities of U-233. Consequently, the selected disposition of the ULWBR material was burial as Low Level Waste at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), which required terminating safeguards controls for the contained Category II quantity of Attractiveness Level D special nuclear material (SNM). The requested termination followed the twelve point evaluation criteria of the Historical Defense Program Discard Guidance and included a security analysis for evaluating the risks of theft, diversion, and radiological sabotage associated with the material. Continuity of knowledge in the book inventory was assured by documenting that the original shipper’s measurements accurately reflected the quantities of materials received and that the ULWBR materials had remained under adequate physical protection and had been subject to periodic physical inventories. The method selected for substantiating the book values as the basis for terminating safeguards was the nondestructive assay used during physical inventories. Shipping arrangements included refurbishing a licensed cask to be reused over the duration of the termination process. An accompanying batching plan and shipping schedule were developed to accommodate multiple commercial shipments of Category III quantities of SNM in the selected cask, such that all canisters would be received at NTS prior to the expiration of the nonrenewable cask license.

Ivan R. Thomas; Ernest L. Laible

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Photovoltaic module electrical termination design requirement study. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Motorola Inc., in conjunction with ITT Cannon, has conducted a study to develop information to facilitate the selection of existing, commercial, electrical termination hardware for photovoltaic modules and arrays. Details of the study are presented in this volume. Module and array design parameters were investigated and recommendations were developed for use in surveying, evaluating, and comparing electrical termination hardware. Electrical termination selection criteria factors were developed and applied to nine generic termination types in each of the four application sectors. Remote, residential, intermediate and industrial. Existing terminations best suited for photovoltaic modules and arrays were identified. Cost information was developed to identify cost drivers and/or requirements which might lead to cost reductions. The general conclusion is that there is no single generic termination that is best suited for photovoltaic application, but that the appropriate termination is strongly dependent upon the module construction and its support structure as well as the specific application sector.

Mosna, F.J. Jr.; Donlinger, J.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Accelerating Observers, Area and Entropy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider an explicit example of a process, where the entropy carried by radiation through an accelerating two-plane is proportional to the decrease in the area of that two-plane even when the two-plane is not a part of any horizon of spacetime. Our results seem to support the view that entropy proportional to area is possessed not only by horizons but by all spacelike two-surfaces of spacetime.

Makela, J

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Accelerating Observers, Area and Entropy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider an explicit example of a process, where the entropy carried by radiation through an accelerating two-plane is proportional to the decrease in the area of that two-plane even when the two-plane is not a part of any horizon of spacetime. Our results seem to support the view that entropy proportional to area is possessed not only by horizons but by all spacelike two-surfaces of spacetime.

Jarmo Makela

2005-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

200

Automatic Commissioning of Multiple VAV Terminals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A site survey on a modern operating commercial building screened 261 ineffective VAV (Variable Air Volume) boxes (20.9% of the total boxes in the building) and summarized ten typical faults for VAV air-conditioning system(s) resulting in energy waste, performance degradation or totally out of control. A strategy is developed to automatically check the health condition of VAV terminals and diagnose the faults. Hybrid approach is employed to establish a commissioning and re-commissioning tool of VAV air-conditioning system. Performance indices with expert rules based on system physical characteristics are adopted to detect and diagnose the nine of the ten faults. PCA (Principal Component Analysis) method is developed to detect and diagnose the VAV box flow sensor bias (Fault 10) and to reconstruct the faulty sensors. A multiple VAV fault FDD strategy for a VAV entire system is developed, which is validated in simulation and filed tests.

Qin, J.; Wang, S.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terminal surface area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Human-centered automation of air traffic control operations in the terminal area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction: Air Traffic Control operations are described extensively in the ATC manuals such as the Airman's Information Manual [1] and the ATC Controller's Handbook [2]. Mathematical analysis has also been conducted for ...

Idris, Husni Rifat

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Controller and computer display interface in an advanced terminal area ATC system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Controller and display interactions and information requirements in an advanced Air Traffic Control (ATC) system are investigated. A description of the present ATC system and of some proposed developments for the future ...

Dopart, Kevin Peter

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

A simulation study for designing a rail terminal in a container port  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rail terminals in port container terminals play an important role for transshipping containers between rail wagons and port container terminals. This paper addresses a case study for designing a new rail terminal which is planned to be constructed in ...

Byung Kwon Lee; Bong Joo Jung; Kap Hwan Kim; Soon Oh Park; Jeong Hoon Seo

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Optical control system for high-voltage terminals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optical control system for the control of devices in the terminal of an electrostatic accelerator includes a laser that is modulated by a series of preselected codes produced by an encoder. A photodiode receiver is placed in the laser beam at the high-voltage terminal of an electrostatic accelerator. A decoder connected to the photodiode decodes the signals to provide control impulses for a plurality of devices at the high voltage of the terminal.

Bicek, John J. (Tinley Park, IL)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Rechargeable battery with separate charging terminal contact ring  

SciTech Connect

A generally cylindrical rechargeable battery is provided leaving a pair of power terminals for delivering energy to an energy-using device. The battery further includes a charging terminal contact spaced apart from the power terminals and extending substantially around the circumference of the battery whereby charging contact on the battery may engage a corresponding charging contact in the energy-using device to charge the battery in all rotational positions of the battery.

Beachy, R. W.

1984-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

206

Offshore refrigerated LPG loading/unloading terminal using a CALM buoy  

SciTech Connect

In existing Liquefied Petroleum Gases terminals, the transfer of liquefied gases to the tanker is performed via articulated loading arms or flexible hoses, working under quasistatic conditions. The tanker has to be firmly moored alongside a jetty or a process barge in a protected area (such as a harbour in most cases). This paper gives the main results of the development of an offshore refrigerated LPG (-48/sup 0/C) loading/unloading system, using a CALM buoy and LPG floating hoses working under dynamic conditions. The aim of this new concept is to replace the standard harbour structure for loading/unloading refrigerated LPG and to provide a considerable reduction in investments and a greater flexibility regarding the terminal location. The main components of that terminal have been designed so as to enable the loading of a 75 000 cubic meter LPG carrier in 15 hours. The results of static and dynamic low temperature tests on a LPG swivel joint for CALM buoy and LPG floating hoses show that such a SPM terminal is now a realistic solution.

Bonjour, E.L.; Simon, J.M.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Energy, Shading and Daylighting Analysis for the Austin Bergstrom International Airport Terminal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Our firm was under contract with the City of Austin, Texas to perform energy analysis and analysis of the daylighting potential within the New Austin Bergstrom International Airport Terminal. Design of the Passenger Terminal Facility for the New Austin Airport included large glass areas for viewing arriving and departing planes, the sky, and the surrounding terrain. The glass was envisioned to provide quality natural lighting for the terminal during daylight hours in order to improve the quality of the space and save energy throughout the usable life of the terminal. For the glass to achieve the design goals, adverse qualities were minimized and beneficial qualities must be enhanced. Using computer simulation, we studied the shading devices on the south clearstories to maximize the daylight and minimize problems of direct gain in a large commercial space. The study also included analysis of skylights above the baggage claim, indirect lighting of major spaces within the airport, and the controls of the artificial lights for integrating the efficient use of the available daylight. The energy, shading, and daylighting analysis includes analysis of a mix of low and high volume spaces. The daylight sources include glass walls, clearstories, and skylights.

Holder, L. M. III; Holder, L. M. IV

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

The impact on transmission line terminations on radiated emissions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Terminating transmission lines at either the source or the load end with a damping resistor is frequently used to improve the signal integrity of clock… (more)

Wong, Wei-Juet

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Analysis of Multi-terminal HVDC Systems Harold Kirkham Pacific...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Analysis of Multi-terminal HVDC Systems Harold Kirkham Pacific Northwest National Laboratory harold.kirkham@pnnl.gov 2728 June 2013 Washington, DC DOEOE Transmission Reliability...

210

Site investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 4 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Volume 2, Appendixes: Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the UltraSonic Ranging and Data Systems (USRADS) survey conducted for radiological characterization of approximately 5 acres located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 4. The survey was conducted by Chemrad Tennessee Corporation under subcontract No. 7908-RS-00902 to CDM Federal Programs Corporation. The field survey began June 23, 1994 (Chemrad survey team was unable to actually enter field until June 24 awaiting sign-off of CDM plans by MMES) and was terminated on June 29, 1994. The designated survey area is located on the DOE X-10 facility and South of the main X-10 building complex. The entire north boundary of the site is adjacent to SWSA 4, with the Bath Tubbing Trench Seep Area (BTT) actually being a part of that SWSA (See Figure 1). Approximately one-third of the designated area was actually surveyed. The BTT area slopes moderately eastward toward a small stream in the WAG 4 area. The area is open and had recently been trimmed for the survey. The balance of the designated survey area lies along the small stream within WAG 4 and is densely wooded with heavy underbrush. The area had not been cleared or brushed. Survey reference points for the BTT area mere directly tied into the X-10 coordinate system while the t bale,ice of the designated survey area mere tied into an existing relative metric grid system. The designated area was surveyed for radiological characterization using near-surface gamma and beta detectors as well as an energy independent dosimeter. This report describes the survey method and presents the survey findings.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Columbia River : Terminal Fisheries Research Report : Annual Report 1994.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1993 the Northwest Power Planning Council recommended in its Strategy for Salmon that terminal fishing sites be identified and developed. The Council called on the Bonneville Power Administration to fund a 10-year study to investigate the feasibility of creating and expanding terminal known stock fisheries in the Columbia River Basin.

Hirose, Paul; Miller, Marc; Hill, Jim

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Stacker-reclaimer scheduling in a dry bulk terminal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A dry bulk terminal acts as a multi-modal interface for transhipping iron ores. Stacker-reclaimers are the dedicated equipments in storage yard for iron ore handling. Both unloading and loading processes are supported by stacker-reclaimers in most cases. ... Keywords: dry bulk terminal, genetic algorithm, lower bound, stacker-reclaimer scheduling

Dayong Hu; Zhenqiang Yao

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Terminal models for switching overvoltage studies in electrical machines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, terminal models for high voltage machine windings are developed. The models are useful for simulating transient overvoltages due to switching operations on industrial installations. The models are based on network synthesis of the winding ... Keywords: electrical parameters, machine winding, network synthesis, switching transients, terminal impedance

J. L. Guardado; V. Venegas; E. Melgoza

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Handover strategy of smart mobile terminals among heterogeneous wireless networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to the variety of wireless networks, the handover among heterogeneous wireless networks has become a research hotspot in recent years. More attention have been paid to the radio access network and the core network than the terminal side. In the future ... Keywords: heterogeneous wireless network, network handover, network handover design, smart mobile terminal

Wei Lin; Weiqiang Wu; Qinyu Zhang

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Performance of ECM controlled VAV fan powered terminal units  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Empirical performance models of fan airflow, primary airflow and power consumption were developed for series and parallel variable air volume fan powered terminal units. An experimental setup and test procedure were created to test the terminal units at typical design pressures and airflows. Each terminal unit observed in this study used an 8 in (20.3 cm) primary air inlet. Two fan motor control methods were considered. The primary control of interest was the electronically commutated motor (ECM) controller. Data collected were compared with previous research regarding silicon rectified control (SCR) units. Generalized models were developed for both series and parallel terminal units. Coefficients for performance models were then compared with comparable SCR controlled units. Non-linear statistical modeling was performed using SPSS software (2008). In addition to airflow and power consumption modeling, power quality was also quantified. Relationships between real power (watts) and apparent power (VA) were presented as well as harmonic frequencies and total harmonic distortion. Power quality was recorded for each ECM controlled terminal unit tested. Additional tests were also made to SCR controlled terminal units used in previous research (Furr 2006). The airflow and power consumption performance models had an R2 equal to 0.990 or greater for every terminal unit tested. An air leakage model was employed to account for leakage in the parallel designed VAV terminal units when the internal fan was turned off. For the leakage model, both ECM and SCR controlled units achieved an R2 greater than or equal to 0.918.

Cramlet, Andrew Charles

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Visual Simulation of Offshore Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Terminals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Visual Simulation of Offshore Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Terminals in a Decision-Making Context1, Berkeley. 3/ Liquified Natural Gas Act Stats, 1977, Chap. 855, Page 2506 (effective Sept. 17, 1977 potential offshore Liquified Natural Gas (LNG) sites and the types of terminals that might occupy those

Standiford, Richard B.

217

Automated container transport system between inland port and terminals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article we propose a new concept called automated container transportation system between inland port and terminals (ACTIPOT) which involves the use of automated trucks to transfer containers between an inland port and container terminals. The ... Keywords: Automated container transportation system, Petri nets, automated truck, supervisory control, vehicle control

Jianlong Zhang; Petros A. Ioannou; Anastasios Chassiakos

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Energy Conservation in the Food Industry : Terminal Flour Mill.  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of an energy study that was conducted at Terminal Flour Mill in Portland, Oregon. Terminal Flour Mill is one of five food industry (SIC 20) plants that are being studied. Energy conservation measures (ECM's) are divided into two groups; operation and maintenance (O and M) measures, and equipment modification measures.

United Industries Corporation.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Conservation of Heat Energy at Hot Petroleum Products Terminals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exxon operates several terminals which store asphalt and heavy fuel oil. Due to the rising cost of fuels, Exxon initiated a study to identify economic investments which would reduce the fuel needed to heat these products. First, fuel usage at four terminals was compared. Large variations were noted, even after accounting for different heating requirements. Next, theoretical fuel requirements were calculated. Actual fuel usage was significantly greater than theoretical requirements at all four terminals. Onsite inspections were then conducted. At one terminal, tank insulation was only 40% effective. Replacement of this insulation would reduce fuel usage by 10,000 barrels per year. At a second terminal, an inefficient steam plant consumed 42% of the total fuel used while producing only 13% of the heat. Retirement of this steam plant would save 5,300 barrels of fuel each year. At a third terminal an underutilized steam plant and excess heated transfer lines probably cause 85,000 barrels per year of excess fuel use. To date, investments of $850,000 have been approved for this terminal, with substantially more investment likely.

Powell, J. C.; Graham, R. M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Room temperature study of a strain-induced electronic superstructure on a magnetite (111) surface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A magnetite (Fe3O4) single crystal (111) surface has been studied at various oxygen-iron surface stoichiometries. The stoichiometry was modified by controlling the in-situ sample anneal conditions. We have found the conditions that lead to the formation of an oxygen-rich surface that forms a quasi-hexagonal superstructure with a 42A periodicity. The superstructure is highly regular and was observed by both LEED and STM. The superstructure consists of three regions, two of which have identical atomic scale structures with a periodicity of 2.8A, and a third having a periodicity that is about 10% larger (3.1A). The subtle difference in the atomic periodicities between the three areas results from the modulation of intrinsic strain developed along the surface. The superstructure results from electronic effects rather than being a mosaic of different iron oxide terminations. The onset of the superstructure is sensitive to the surface stoichiometry. From our results we could estimate the critical density of defects leading to the disappearance of the superstructure. We have modelled the experimental results and calculated the electron density using a DFT algorithm. The model clearly shows the development of strain along the surface.

N. Berdunov; S. Murphy; G. Mariotto; I. V. Shvets

2004-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terminal surface area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Variable area light reflecting assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Device is described for tracking daylight and projecting it into a building. The device tracks the sun and automatically adjusts both the orientation and area of the reflecting surface. The device may be mounted in either a wall or roof of a building. Additionally, multiple devices may be employed in a light shaft in a building, providing daylight to several different floors. The preferred embodiment employs a thin reflective film as the reflecting device. One edge of the reflective film is fixed, and the opposite end is attached to a spring-loaded take-up roller. As the sun moves across the sky, the take-up roller automatically adjusts the angle and surface area of the film. Additionally, louvers may be mounted at the light entrance to the device to reflect incoming daylight in an angle perpendicular to the device to provide maximum reflective capability when daylight enters the device at non-perpendicular angles. 9 figs.

Howard, T.C.

1986-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

222

Variable area light reflecting assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Device for tracking daylight and projecting it into a building. The device tracks the sun and automatically adjusts both the orientation and area of the reflecting surface. The device may be mounted in either a wall or roof of a building. Additionally, multiple devices may be employed in a light shaft in a building, providing daylight to several different floors. The preferred embodiment employs a thin reflective film as the reflecting device. One edge of the reflective film is fixed, and the opposite end is attached to a spring-loaded take-up roller. As the sun moves across the sky, the take-up roller automatically adjusts the angle and surface area of the film. Additionally, louvers may be mounted at the light entrance to the device to reflect incoming daylight in an angle perpendicular to the device to provide maximum reflective capability when daylight enters the device at non-perpendicular angles.

Howard, Thomas C. (Raleigh, NC)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Environmental resources of selected areas of Hawaii: Geological hazards  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background scientific data and related information collected on geologic hazards during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The US Department of Energy (DOE) published a notice withdrawing its Notice of Intent to prepare the HGP-EIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. This report presents a review of current information on geologic hazards in the Hawaiian Islands. Interrelationships among these hazards are discussed. Probabilities of occurrence of given geologic hazards are provided in various regions where sufficient geologic or historical data are available. Most of the information contained herein is compiled from recent US Geological Survey (USGS) publications and USGS open-file reports related to this project. This report describes the natural geologic hazards present in the area and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts. Geologic hazards originate both onshore and offshore. Onshore geologic hazards such as volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, surface rupture, landslides, uplift and subsidence occur mainly on the southern third of the island of Hawaii (hereinafter referred to as Hawaii). Offshore geologic hazards are more widely distributed throughout the Hawaiian Islands. Examples of offshore geologic hazards are submarine landslides, turbidity currents, and seismic sea waves (tsunamis).

Staub, W.P.; Reed, R.M.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Grid-Averaged Surface Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the inadequacies of formulations for surface fluxes for use in numerical models of atmospheric flow. The difficulty is that numerical models imply spatial averaging over each grid area. Existing formulations am based on the ...

L. Mahrt

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Termination-Insensitive Noninterference Leaks More Than Just a Bit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current tools for analysing information flow in programs build upon ideas going back to Denning's work from the 70's. These systems enforce an imperfect notion of information flow which has become known as termination-insensitive noninterference. ...

Aslan Askarov; Sebastian Hunt; Andrei Sabelfeld; David Sands

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

California's LNG Terminals: The Promise of New Gas Supplies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation covers California's LNG terminals and is given at the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) Fall Meeting, held on November 28-29, 2007 in San Diego, California.

227

Baiu rainband termination in atmospheric and atmosphere-ocean models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Baiu rainband is a summer rainband stretching from eastern China through Japan towards the Northwest Pacific. The climatological termination of the Baiu rainband is investigated using Japanese 25-year ReAnalysis (JRA25), a stand-alone atmospheric ...

Akira Kuwano-Yoshida; Bunmei Taguchi; Shang-Ping Xie

228

Transfer passenger needs at airports : human factors in terminal design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis analyzes the needs of particular users of airport: transfer passengers. The object of this work has been to produce a set of design guidelines for terminals. these guidelines are framed upon a user-need survey ...

Brillembourg, Marie-Claire

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

FSME Procedure Approval Termination of Uranium Milling Licenses in Agreement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Any changes to the procedure will be the responsibility of the FSME Procedure Contact. Copies of the FSME procedures will be available through the NRC website. Procedure Title: Termination of Uranium Milling

Robert J. Lewis; A. Duncan White; William R. Rautzen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Tiny Terminators: New Micro-Robots Assemble, Repair Themselves...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Themselves and Are Surprisingly Strong August 8, 2011 - 2:14pm Addthis A video of Argonne National Laboratory's micro-robots - Tiny Terminators, if you will - moving glass...

231

Terminal control of a variable-stability slender reentry vehicle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Various terminal control schemes are applied to a proposed slender reentry vehicle, controlled by two separately-articulating flaps. The flap deflections are summarized as symmetric and asymmetric flap deflections; the ...

Karmondy, Matthew T

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Land Surface Heterogeneity in the Cooperative Atmosphere Surface Exchange Study (CASES-97). Part I: Comparing Modeled Surface Flux Maps with Surface-Flux Tower and Aircraft Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land surface heterogeneity over an area of 71 km × 74 km in the lower Walnut River watershed, Kansas, was investigated using models and measurements from the 1997 Cooperative Atmosphere Surface Exchange Study (CASES-97) field experiment. As an ...

Fei Chen; David N. Yates; Haruyasu Nagai; Margaret A. LeMone; Kyoko Ikeda; Robert L. Grossman

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

STLOAD 1.1 (Substation Terminal Equipment Loading Software)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI’s Substation Terminal Equipment Loading software (STLOAD 1.1) calculates temperatures and thermal ratings for substation equipment based on physical parameters of the equipment, electrical load, air temperature, and, where appropriate, solar heating and wind. This provides a convenient way for substation engineers to maximize the usage of existing substation terminal equipment under a wide variety of operating conditions. STLOAD can perform temperature and rating calculations for a daily load and am...

2009-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

234

Nonlinear optical spectroscopy of diamond surfaces  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Second harmonic generation (SHG) and infrared-visible sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopies have been shown to be powerful and versatile for studying surfaces with submonolayer sensitivity. They have been used in this work to study bare diamond surfaces and molecular adsorption on them. In particular, infrared-visible SFG as a surface vibrational spectroscopic technique has been employed to identify and monitor in-situ surface bonds and species on the diamond (111) surface. The CH stretch spectra allow us to investigate hydrogen adsorption, desorption, abstraction, and the nature of the hydrogen termination. The C(111) surface dosed with atomic hydrogen was found to be in a monohydride configuration with the hydrogen atoms situated at top-sites. The ratio of the abstraction rate to the adsorption rate was appreciable during atomic hydrogen dosing. Kinetic parameters for thermal desorption of H on C(111) were determined showing a near first-order kinetics. For the fully H-terminated (111) surface, a large (110 cm{sup {minus}1}) anharmonicity and {approximately}19 psec lifetime were measured for the first-excited CH stretch mode. The bare reconstructed C(111)-(2 {times} l) surface showed the presence of CC stretch modes which were consistent with the Pandey {pi}-bonded chain structure. When exposed to the methyl radical, the SFG spectra of the C(111) surface showed features suggesting the presence of adsorbed methyl species. After heating to sufficiently high temperatures, they were converted into the monohydride species. Preliminary results on the hydrogen-terminated diamond (100) surface are also presented.

Chin, R.P.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Table 1. Personal Computers and Computer Terminals in Commercial Buildings,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 PC's and Computer Terminals 1 PC's and Computer Terminals Table 1. Personal Computers and Computer Terminals in Commercial Buildings, 1995 Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million sq.ft.) Employees (thousand) PCs and Terminals (thousand) PCs and Terminals per Million Sq.Ft. PCs and Terminals per Thousand Employees All Buildings 4,579 58,772 75,262 43,003 732 571 Principal Building Activity Assembly 596 6,740 6,840 1,763 262 258 Education 309 7,740 9,495 8,046 1,039 847 Food Sales 137 642 652 206 321 316 Food Service 285 1,353 2,342 276 204 118 Health Care 105 2,333 4,483 2,549 1,092 569 Lodging 158 3,618 2,748 1,296 358 472 Mercantile and Service 1,289 12,728 13,049 4,021 316 308 Office 705 10,478 26,564 21,173 2,021 797

236

Strategic Focus Areas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Focus Areas Lockheed Martin on behalf of Sandia National Laboratories will consider grant requests that best support the Corporation's strategic focus areas and reflect effective...

237

REPORT OF THE SURFACE SCIENCE WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

surface-science-related problems of energy technology.the first day, various energy technology areas were reviewedon the various energy technologies? How would you optimize

Somorjai, G.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Summary of Utility License Termination Documents and Lessons Learned: Summary of License Termination Plan Submittals by Three Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) 1996 revised decommissioning regulations specify that the operator of a nuclear plant must submit a "License Termination Plan" (LTP) two years prior to termination of the plant license. The LTP explicitly defines the elements that the plant operator must address in the decommissioning plan. This report focuses on the approaches and experience gained by three of the leading plants in the preparation and submittal of their LTP submittals under the 1996 regul...

2002-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

239

Surface Soil  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Surface Soil Surface Soil Surface Soil We compare local soil samples with samples collected from northern New Mexico locations that are beyond the range of potential influence from normal Laboratory operations. April 12, 2012 Farm soil sampling Two LANL environmental field team members take soil samples from a farm. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Measurements are compared to samples from the regional sites and compared to averages over time to see if there are changes in concentrations. Monitoring surface soil LANL has monitored surface soils since the early 1970s. Institutional surface soil samples are collected from 17 on-site, 11 perimeter, and six regional (background) locations every three years.

240

Surface Soil  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

operations Why we sample surface soil Soil sampling is performed to: Determine radionuclide and chemical concentrations in soil and compare these results to regional...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terminal surface area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Highly uniform step and terrace structures on SiC(0001) surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highly uniform step and termination structures on 4H- and 6H-SiC(0001) surfaces have been prepared via moderate annealing in disilane. Atomic force microscopy and dark-field low-energy electron microscopy imaging indicate single-phase terminations separated ...

J. Sun; J. B. Hannon; R. M. Tromp; K. Pohl

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

New San Antonio Airport Terminal Generating Clean Power | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

San Antonio Airport Terminal Generating Clean Power San Antonio Airport Terminal Generating Clean Power New San Antonio Airport Terminal Generating Clean Power January 27, 2011 - 2:03pm Addthis The new photovoltaic system at the San Antonio International Airport. The new photovoltaic system at the San Antonio International Airport. Todd G. Allen Project Officer, Golden Field Office What are the key facts? The City of San Antonio's EECBG proram staff awarded a block grant for a solar photovoltaic (PV) system at the airport, designed and built the project, and complied with all local and federal regulations... all in seven months. In early 2010, the City of San Antonio's Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) program staff quickly realized a golden opportunity lay right at their fingertips. The opening of the new San

243

A valiant little terminal: A VLT user's manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

VLT came to be used at SLAC (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center), because SLAC wanted to assess the Amiga's usefulness as a color graphics terminal and T{sub E}X workstation. Before the project could really begin, the people at SLAC needed a terminal emulator which could successfully talk to the IBM 3081 (now the IBM ES9000-580) and all the VAXes on the site. Moreover, it had to compete in quality with the Ann Arbor Ambassador GXL terminals which were already in use at the laboratory. Unfortunately, at the time there was no commercial program which fit the bill. Luckily, Willy Langeveld had been independently hacking up a public domain VT100 emulator written by Dave Wecker et al. and the result, VLT, suited SLAC's purpose. Over the years, as the program was debugged and rewritten, the original code disappeared, so that now, in the present version of VLT, none of the original VT100 code remains.

Weinstein, A.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Division/ Interest Area Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Learn more about Divisions and Interest areas. Division/ Interest Area Information Membership Information achievement application award Awards distinguished division Divisions fats job Join lipid lipids Member member get a member Membership memori

245

Base drive circuit for a four-terminal power Darlington  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high power switching circuit which utilizes a four-terminal Darlington transistor block to improve switching speed, particularly in rapid turn-off. Two independent reverse drive currents are utilized during turn off in order to expel the minority carriers of the Darlington pair at their own charge sweep-out rate. The reverse drive current may be provided by a current transformer, the secondary of which is tapped to the base terminal of the power stage of the Darlington block. In one application, the switching circuit is used in each power switching element in a chopper-inverter drive of an electric vehicle propulsion system.

Lee, Fred C. (Blacksburg, VA); Carter, Roy A. (Salem, VA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Molecular dynamics studies of interfacial water at the alumina surface.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Interfacial water properties at the alumina surface were investigated via all-atom equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations at ambient temperature. Al-terminated and OH-terminated alumina surfaces were considered to assess the structural and dynamic behavior of the first few hydration layers in contact with the substrates. Density profiles suggest water layering up to {approx}10 {angstrom} from the solid substrate. Planar density distribution data indicate that water molecules in the first interfacial layer are organized in well-defined patterns dictated by the atomic terminations of the alumina surface. Interfacial water exhibits preferential orientation and delayed dynamics compared to bulk water. Water exhibits bulk-like behavior at distances greater than {approx}10 {angstrom} from the substrate. The formation of an extended hydrogen bond network within the first few hydration layers illustrates the significance of water?water interactions on the structural properties at the interface.

Argyris, Dr. Dimitrios [University of Oklahoma; Ho, Thomas [ORNL; Cole, David [Ohio State University

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Surface Integrity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...inclusions introduced Plastically deformed debris as a result of grinding Voids, pits, burrs, or foreign material inclusions in surface Metallurgical Transformation of phases Grain size and distribution Precipitate size and distribution Foreign inclusions in material Twinning Recrystallization...

248

Programmable surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Robotic vehicles walk on legs, roll on wheels, are pulled by tracks, pushed by propellers, lifted by wings, and steered by rudders. All of these systems share the common character of momentum transport across their surfaces. ...

Sun, Amy (Amy Teh-Yu)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

DOE Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National Interest Electric Transmission Corridors October 2, 2007 DOE Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National...

250

DOE Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National Interest Electric Transmission Corridors DOE Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National Interest Electric...

251

Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal br Resource br Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region MW K Coso Geothermal Area Coso Geothermal Area Walker Lane...

252

Surface Analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the Surface Analysis group, within the National Center for Photovoltaic's Measurements and Characterization Division, we use surface analytical techniques help to determine the chemical, elemental, and molecular composition, and electronic structure of material surfaces and interfaces. The properties of the surface and outer few micrometers of a material often control the electrical, chemical, or mechanical properties of that material--hence, this region is of extreme importance. Our techniques use ions, electrons, and X-ray or ultraviolet photons in high vacuum to probe surfaces and interfaces of a material. We map the elemental and chemical composition of specimens, study impurities and grain boundaries, gather bonding and chemical-state information, measure surface electronic properties, and perform depth profiles to determine doping and elemental distributions. We have analyzed a wide range of materials, including photovoltaics, microelectronics, polymers, and biological specimens. We work collaboratively with you to solve materials- and device-related R&D problems. This sheet describes our major technique capabilities.

Not Available

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

An approach for location area planning in a personal communication services network (PCSN)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper deals with an approach for planning location areas (LAs) in a personal communication services network (PCSN) to be overlaid on an existing wired network. Given the average speed of mobile terminals, the number of mobile switching centers (MSCs), ... Keywords: CMRs, Call-to-mobility ratios, LA, LU, PCSN, cost optimization, heuristic, location area, location update, paging, personal communication services network

P. S. Bhattacharjee; D. Saha; A. Mukherjee

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Influence of leaf area index prescriptions on simulations of heat, moisture, and carbon fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Leaf-area index (LAI), the total one-sided surface area of leaf per ground surface area, is a key component of land surface models. We investigate the influence of differing, plausible LAI prescriptions on heat, moisture, and carbon fluxes ...

Jatin Kala; Mark Decker; Jean-François Exbrayat; Andy J. Pitman; Claire Carouge; Jason P. Evans; Gab Abramowitz; David Mocko

255

Research Highlights Sorted by Research Area  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Area Research Area Radiation Processes | Cloud Distributions/Characterizations | Surface Properties | General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations | Aerosol Properties | Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures | Clouds with Low Optical [Water] Depths (CLOWD) | Vertical Velocity | Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) | Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions | Cloud Processes | Aerosol Processes Radiation Processes Alexandrov, M. D. Optical Depth Measurements by Shadowband Radiometers and Their Uncertainties ARM Berg, L. Surface Summertime Radiative Forcing by Shallow Cumuli at the ARM SGP ARM Bergmann, D. The Influence of Regional Anthropogenic Emission Reductions on Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing ASR Bhattacharya, A. Burning on the Prairies ARM

256

Technical communique: Minkowski terminal cost functions for MPC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical communique delivers a systematic procedure for obtaining a suitable terminal cost function for model predictive control based on Minkowski cost functions. It is shown that, for any given stabilizing linear state feedback control law and ... Keywords: Lyapunov methods, Minkowski functions, Model predictive control

SašA V. Rakovi?; Mircea Lazar

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Valuation of Storage at a Liquefied Natural Gas Terminal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The valuation of the real option to store liquefied natural gas (LNG) at the downstream terminal of an LNG value chain is an important problem in practice. Because the exact valuation of this real option is computationally intractable, we develop a novel ... Keywords: Markov, asset pricing, dynamic programming, finance, heuristics, industries, petroleum/natural gas, real options, storage valuation, upper bounds

Guoming Lai; Mulan X. Wang; Sunder Kekre; Alan Scheller-Wolf; Nicola Secomandi

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

A valiant little terminal: A VLT user's manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a manual for the valiant little terminal. Information covered in this report is as follow: an introduction to VLT; installation; starting up; text screen menus; graphics screen menus; introduction to VLT's scripting facility; quick reference section; and troubleshooting.

Weinstein, A.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Material Disposal Areas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

wastewater absorption beds that received effluent from the DP Site radioactive laundry facility from 1945 to 1963, two surface debris disposal sites, and a former septic...

260

Seismic facies and growth history of Miocene carbonate platforms, Wonocolo Formation, North Madura area, East Java Basin, Indonesia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Miocene Wonocolo Formation in the North Madura area, East Java Basin, contains numerous isolated carbonate platforms that are broadly distributed across a ~3000 sq km area of the Indonesian back-arc region. The Wonocolo platforms provide an interesting test for comparing the different growth histories of closely spaced individual platforms, where eustatic history was the same for all the platforms, but where subtle differences in other extrinsic factors influenced their growth. A grid of 2D seismic data and information from several wells across the region were used to map all Wonocolo platforms across the study area. Five growth phases are recognizable in the platforms, based on seismic facies analysis and internal seismic-stratigraphic relationships. Platforms from the western part of the study area are larger in plan view than age-equivalent platforms to the east and record a complex history of platform initiation, backstepping, progradation, coalescence into larger composite platforms, and termination. Although all five growth phases are also recognizable in some Wonocolo platforms from the eastern part of the study area, the eastern platforms are different in that they: 1) are much smaller in plan view, 2) are spaced farther apart, 3) tend to have steeper platform margins, 4) have largely aggradational stratal geometries, 5) are slightly thicker overall than the western platforms, and 6) the tops of the platforms are at greater burial depths than the tops of the western platforms. Most of these differences in platform morphology and growth history can be attributed to slightly faster subsidence rates in the eastern part of the study area. Faster subsidence rates in the eastern part of the study area from 12 - 6 Ma (the age range for the Wonocolo platforms) are probably related to differential surface loading by the Indonesian volcanic arc.

Adhyaksawan, Rahadian

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terminal surface area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Urban Bias in Area-averaged Surface Air Temperature Trends  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A data set derived from the United States Historical Climate Network has been compared to two global land-based temperature data sets that have been commonly cited in connection with the detection of the greenhouse effect and in other studies of ...

Thomas R. Karl; Philip D. Jones

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

High specific surface area aerogel cryoadsorber for vacuum pumping applications  

SciTech Connect

A cryogenic pumping system is provided, comprising a vacuum environment, an aerogel sorbent formed from a carbon aerogel disposed within the vacuum environment, and cooling means for cooling the aerogel sorbent sufficiently to adsorb molecules from the vacuum environment onto the aerogel sorbent. Embodiments of the invention include a liquid refrigerant cryosorption pump, a compressed helium cryogenic pump, a cryopanel and a Meissner coil, each of which uses carbon aerogel as a sorbent material.

Hill, Randal M. (Livermore, CA); Fought, Eric R. (Brentwood, CA); Biltoft, Peter J. (Livermore, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

High Specific Surface area Aerogel Cryoadsorber for Vacuum Pumping Applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cryogenic pumping system is provided, comprising a vacuum environment, an aerogel sorbent formed from a carbon aerogel disposed within the vacuum environment, and cooling means for cooling the aerogel sorbent sufficiently to adsorb molecules from the vacuum environment onto the aerogel sorbent. Embodiments of the invention include a liquid refrigerant cryosorption pump, a compressed helium cryogenic pump, a cryopanel and a Meissner coil, each of which uses carbon aerogel as a sorbent material.

Hill, Randal M.; Fought, Eric R.; Biltoft, Peter J.

1998-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

264

HIGH SURFACE AREA SILICON CARBIDE-COATED CARBON AEROGEL ...  

Carbon aerogels can be coated with sol-gel silica and the silica can be converted to silicon carbide, improving the thermal stability of the carbon ae ...

265

Guidelines manual for surface monitoring of geothermal areas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following are covered: preliminary investigation, design of monitoring system, and monitoring operations. Included in appendices are: characteristics of geothermal subsidence, guidelines for specifications for monitoring subsidence, instruments for monitoring, formats for data presentation, and statistical analyses. (MHR)

Van Til, C.J.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Synthesis of High Surface Area Foams for Functional and ...  

Electricity Transmission; Energy Analysis; Energy Storage; Geothermal; Hydrogen and Fuel Cell; Hydropower, Wave and Tidal; Industrial Technologies; ...

267

GUIDELINES MANUAL FOR SURFACE MONITORING OF GEOTHERMAL AREAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the United States", Land Subsidence, Proceedings, IAHS-AIHS-1973, "Collapsing Soil and Subsidence", Geolo Seismicit -Factors Controlling Mine Subsidence in Utah and Colorado",

Til, C. J. Van

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Correlating Humidity-Dependent Ionically Conductive Surface Area...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buildings Cool Roofs and Heat Islands Demand Response Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends High Technology and Industrial Buildings Lighting Systems Residential Buildings...

269

Anti-Stain Surface Treatment for Housing Wet Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The chemical state of Ag in the glaze was investigated by using XAFS. Proceedings ... Preparation of Biomass Char for Ironmaking and Its Reactivity · Production ...

270

Naval applications study areas  

SciTech Connect

This memorandum discusses study areas and items that will require attention for the naval studies of the utilization of nuclear propulsion in a submarine-based missile system.

Hadley, J. W.

1962-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

271

Boulder Area Transportation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NIST does not endorse or guarantee the quality or services provided by these businesses. All Denver/Boulder area transportation companies. ...

2011-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

272

NIST Aperture area measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... particularly critical, for example, in climate and weather applications on ... of aperture areas used in exo-atmospheric solar irradiance measurements; ...

2011-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

273

Method for producing functionally graded nanocrystalline layer on metal surface  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved process for the creation or formation of nanocrystalline layers on substrates' surfaces is provided. The process involves "prescuffing" the surface of a substrate such as a metal by allowing friction to occur on the surface by a load-bearing entity making rubbing contact and moving along and on the substrate's surface. The "prescuffing" action is terminated when the coefficient of friction between the surface and the noise is rising significantly. Often, the significant rise in the coefficient of friction is signaled by a change in pitch of the scuffing action sound emanating from the buffeted surface. The "prescuffing" gives rise to a harder and smoother surface which withstands better any inadequate lubrication that may take place when the "prescuffed" surface is contacted by other surfaces.

Ajayi, Oyelayo O. (Oswego, IL); Hershberger, Jeffrey G. (Berwyn, IL)

2010-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

274

California's LNG Terminals: The Promise of New Gas Supplies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LNG Terminals: The LNG Terminals: The Promise of New Gas Supplies November 28, 2007 © 2005 San Diego Gas and Electric and Southern California Gas Company. All copyright and trademark rights reserved What is LNG? LNG is natural gas that has been liquefied, by cooling it to a temperature of -260°F, so it can be shipped across oceans. The gas is then re-vaporized and delivered to customers. 2 Why Do We Need LNG? California Energy Commission * 2007 Integrated Energy Policy Report -North American gas demand to increase at annual rate of 2.1% over next decade -Domestic production expected to remain flat -LNG imports to US expected to increase 14% annually by 2017 3 4 Benefits of LNG * Reduced energy costs for customers * Increased competition between gas suppliers * Improved reliability for customers

275

U.S. LPG pipeline begins deliveries to Pemex terminal  

SciTech Connect

LPG deliveries began this spring to the new Mendez LPG receiving terminal near Juarez, State of Chihuahua, Mexico. Supplying the terminal is the 265-mile, 8-in. Rio Grande Pipeline that includes a reconditioned 217-mile, 8-in. former refined-products pipeline from near Odessa, Texas, and a new 48-mile, 8-in. line beginning in Hudspeth County and crossing the US-Mexico border near San Elizario, Texas. Capacity of the pipeline is 24,000 b/d. The LPG supplied to Mexico is a blend of approximately 85% propane and 15% butane. Before construction and operation of the pipeline, PGPB blended the propane-butane mix at a truck dock during loading. Demand for LPG in northern Mexico is strong. Less than 5% of the homes in Juarez have natural gas, making LPG the predominant energy source for cooking and heating in a city of more than 1 million. LPG also is widely used as a motor fuel.

Bodenhamer, K.C. [Mid-America Pipeline Co., Tulsa, OK (United States)

1997-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

276

The Fermi Bubbles as Starburst Wind Termination Shocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The enhanced star formation in the inner 100 pc of the Galaxy launches a superwind, reaching ~1600 km/s for M82-like parameters. The ram pressure of the wind is very low compared to more powerful starburst winds. I show that halo gas stops the wind a few kpc from the Galactic Center. I argue that the termination shock accelerates cosmic rays, and that the resulting Inverse Compton gamma-rays are visible as the Fermi Bubbles. The Bubbles are thus wind bubbles, which the starburst can inflate within 10 Myr. They remain in steady state as long as the starburst lasts. The shock may accelerate PeV electrons and ultra-high energy protons. The Bubbles may be analogs of galactic wind termination shocks in the intergalactic medium. I discuss the advantages and problems of this model.

Lacki, Brian C

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Focus Area 5 Deliverables  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 - Line Management Understanding of QA 5 - Line Management Understanding of QA and Oversight Top Right Quadrant: Quality Assurance Point of Contact: Sandra Waisley * Issues: Users will provide current or on-going QA issues of concern that impact work being done correctly, timely, and safely. Input could be from recent assessments, trends, Performance Metrics, number of open action items, recurring issues, etc. Example: Issue #1: Training database was not updated for a 60 day period following termination of training coordinator * Risks: Users will identify risks that impact the project (can be related to "issues" [above] or any other FPD identified risk) being done correctly, timely, and safely. Example: Risk #1: Unqualified personnel may have performed hazardous work

278

Fractured rock modeling in the National Waste Terminal Storage Program: a review of requirements and status  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Generalized computer codes capable of forming the basis for numerical models of fractured rock masses are being used within the NWTS program. Little additional development of these codes is considered justifiable, except in the area of representation of discrete fractures. On the other hand, model preparation requires definition of medium-specific constitutive descriptions and site characteristics and is therefore legitimately conducted by each of the media-oriented projects within the National Waste Terminal Storage program. However, it is essential that a uniform approach to the role of numerical modeling be adopted, including agreement upon the contribution of modeling to the design and licensing process and the need for, and means of, model qualification for particular purposes. This report discusses the role of numerical modeling, reviews the capabilities of several computer codes that are being used to support design or performance assessment, and proposes a framework for future numerical modeling activities within the NWTS program.

St. John, C.; Krug, A.; Key, S.; Monsees, J.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

LANSCE | Lujan Center | Science Thrust Areas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Thrust Areas Science Thrust Areas User research at the Lujan Center is focused in four science thrust areas. Each has a contact person who is available to discuss proposed experiments and to provide advice on the appropriate instrument and instrument scientist, available sample environments, and other details for planned experiments. Lujan Center instrument scientists welcome questions and discussions about new experiments and are happy to provide guidance for proposal development. New users are encouraged to contact the appropriate instrument scientist before submitting a proposal. Primary Instruments and Contacts: Surfaces and Interfaces Rex Hjelm - Principal Contact Neutron reflectivity and small angle scattering probe interfaces, surfaces, defects, and their influence on material properties and functionality.

280

Geology of the Soda Lake geothermal area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Soda Lake geothermal area is located in the Carson Desert, west-central Nevada. Hot springs activity has occurred in the Soda Lake area in the past, resulting in surface deposits which have motivated present geothermal exploration. The geothermal anomaly is in Quaternary clastic sediments which are as much as 4600 feet thick. The sediments consist of interbedded deltaic, lacustrine, and alluvial sediments. Quaternary basaltic igneous activity has produced cinder cones, phreatic explosions that formed the maar occupied by Soda Lake, and possible dikes. Opal deposition and soil alteration are restricted to a small area two miles north of Soda Lake. The location of hot springs activity and the surface thermal anomaly may be partially controlled by north-northeast-trending faults.

Sibbett, B.S.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terminal surface area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Fueling area site assessment  

SciTech Connect

This report provides results of a Site Assessment performed at the Fuel Storage Area at Buckley ANG Base in Aurora, Colorado. Buckley ANG Base occupies 3,328 acres of land within the City of Aurora in Arapahoe County, Colorado. The Fuel Storage Area (also known as the Fueling Area) is located on the west side of the Base at the intersection of South Powderhorn Street and East Breckenridge Avenue. The Fueling Area consists of above ground storage tanks in a bermed area, pumps, piping, valves, an unloading stand and a fill stand. Jet fuel from the Fueling Area is used to support aircraft operations at the Base. Jet fuel is stored in two 200,000 gallon above ground storage tanks. Fuel is received in tanker trucks at the unloading stand located south and east of the storage tanks. Fuel required for aircraft fueling and other use is transferred into tanker trucks at the fill stand and transported to various points on the Base. The Fuel Storage Area has been in operation for over 20 years and handles approximately 7 million gallons of jet fuel annually.

1996-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

282

Surface Water Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Water Sampling Surface Water Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Surface Water Sampling Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Water Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Water composition and source of fluids Thermal: Water temperature Dictionary.png Surface Water Sampling: Water sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface aqueous system. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Introduction Surface water sampling of hot and cold spring discharges has traditionally

283

NSTB Summarizes Vulnerable Areas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NSTB Summarizes Vulnerable Areas NSTB Summarizes Vulnerable Areas Commonly Found in Energy Control Systems Experts at the National SCADA Test Bed (NSTB) discovered some common areas of vulnerability in the energy control systems assessed between late 2004 and early 2006. These vulnerabilities ranged from conventional IT security issues to specific weaknesses in control system protocols. The paper "Lessons Learned from Cyber Security Assessments of SCADA and Energy Management Systems" describes the vulnerabilities and recommended strategies for mitigating them. It should be of use to asset owners and operators, control system vendors, system integrators, and third-party vendors interested in enhancing the security characteristics of current and future products.

284

area | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

area area Dataset Summary Description These estimates are derived from a composite of high resolution wind resource datasets modeled for specific countries with low resolution data originating from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (United States) and the National Center for Atmospheric Research (United States) as processed for use in the IMAGE model. The high resolution datasets were produced by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (United States), Risø DTU National Laboratory (Denmark), the National Institute for Space Research (Brazil), and the Canadian Wind Energy Association. The data repr Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords area capacity clean energy international National Renewable Energy Laboratory

285

Country 8+1+Area Code 8+011+Country  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.2700 Austria (Mobile Termination) * 43 $0.2700 Azerbaijan * 994 $0.4600 Azerbaijan (Mobile Termination) * 994

Peterson, Blake R.

286

Geographic Area Month  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fuels by PAD District and State (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) - Continued Geographic Area Month No. 1 Distillate No. 2 Distillate a No. 4 Fuel b Sales to End Users Sales for...

287

3. Producing Areas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The OCS area provides surplus capacity to meet major seasonal swings in the lower 48 States gas requirements. The ... Jun-86 9,878 17,706 1,460 19,166 9,288 51.5

288

Western Area Power Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Loveland Area Projects November 29-30, 2011 2 Agenda * Overview of Western Area Power Administration * Post-1989 Loveland Area Projects (LAP) Marketing Plan * Energy Planning and Management Program * Development of the 2025 PMI Proposal * 2025 PMI Proposal * 2025 PMI Comment Period & Proposal Information * Questions 3 Overview of Western Area Power Administration (Western) * One of four power marketing administrations within the Department of Energy * Mission: Market and deliver reliable, renewable, cost-based Federal hydroelectric power and related services within a 15-state region of the central and western U.S. * Vision: Provide premier power marketing and transmission services Rocky Mountain Region (RMR) is one of five regional offices 4 Rocky Mountain Region

289

300 AREA URANIUM CONTAMINATION  

SciTech Connect

{sm_bullet} Uranium fuel production {sm_bullet} Test reactor and separations experiments {sm_bullet} Animal and radiobiology experiments conducted at the. 331 Laboratory Complex {sm_bullet} .Deactivation, decontamination, decommissioning,. and demolition of 300 Area facilities

BORGHESE JV

2009-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

290

Decontamination & decommissioning focus area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In January 1994, the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE EM) formally introduced its new approach to managing DOE`s environmental research and technology development activities. The goal of the new approach is to conduct research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE, utilizing the best talent in the Department and in the national science community. To facilitate this solutions-oriented approach, the Office of Science and Technology (EM-50, formerly the Office of Technology Development) formed five Focus AReas to stimulate the required basic research, development, and demonstration efforts to seek new, innovative cleanup methods. In February 1995, EM-50 selected the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) to lead implementation of one of these Focus Areas: the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D & D) Focus Area.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

APS Area Emergency Supervisors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Area Emergency Supervisors BUILDING AES AAES 400-EAA Raul Mascote Debra Eriksen-Bubulka 400-A (SPX) Tim Jonasson 400-Sectors 25-30 Reggie Gilmore 401-CLO Steve Downey Ed Russell...

292

B&W Y-12 to terminate WSI contract | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to terminate ... B&W Y-12 to terminate WSI contract Posted: September 28, 2012 - 8:01pm Following the recommendation from the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) that...

293

Adoption protocols for fanout-optimal fault-tolerant termination detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Termination detection is relevant for signaling completion (all processors are idle and no messages are in flight) of many operations in distributed systems, including work stealing algorithms, dynamic data exchange, and dynamically structured computations. ... Keywords: high performance computing, termination detection

Jonathan Lifflander; Phil Miller; Laxmikant Kale

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Geothermometry At Coso Geothermal Area (1978) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermometry At Coso Geothermal Area (1978) Geothermometry At Coso Geothermal Area (1978) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Coso Geothermal Area (1978) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date 1978 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine fluid origin in two exploratory wells Notes Collected water from original coso hot springs well (1967) and CGEH No. 1. and completed chemical analysis to determine fluid origin. The surface expression of fumarole and acid sulfate pools and shallow steam wells gives a false indication of an extensive vapor dominated system because upward convecting, boiling alkaline-chloride waters do not reach the surface.

295

Study on Damage Assessment of Terminal-Sensitive Projectile Firing at Armored Targets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Terminal-sensitive projectile is one kind of sensing instrument initiation cluster ammunition. According to the performance characteristics of terminal-sensitive projectile, the target vulnerability of mechanized gun was analyzed in this paper. On that ... Keywords: efficiency assessment, terminal-sensitive projectile, mechanized gun, damage probability, Monte-Carlo method

Rui Guo; Rong-zhong Liu; Jun Zhang; Gang Li

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Bi-objective optimization of the intermodal terminal location problem as a policy-support tool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Determining the optimal layout of an intermodal terminal network, more specifically the optimal locations of the terminals, is a complicated matter that requires adequate decision support tools. In this paper, a bi-objective model is developed, minimizing ... Keywords: Bi-objective optimization, GRASP, Intermodal terminal location, Metaheuristics

Kenneth SöRensen; Christine Vanovermeire

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

The Research of Distribution Transformer Remote Terminal Units Based on DSP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Based on the importance analysis of the distribution transformer remote terminal units ,Introduced the main performance and the hardware design of the distribution transformer intelligent monitoring terminal units which take the TMS320C5410 high ... Keywords: distribution monitoring terminal, DSP (Digital Signal Processor), Data acquisition

Li Yan; Lu Wenmei; Li Wencai

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Procedural guide for the design of transit stations and terminals  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

State-of-the-art concepts regarding the planning, design, and evaluation of passenger transportation stations are discussed. The material directs transportation planning teams to search for efficient station designs. The important stages and considerations in a comprehensive terminal analysis methodology are described. The transit station design process requires contributions from many disciplines and skills. The report given will help coordinate station development programs in accommodating inputs from the disciplines, and it highlights the elements of different stations to assure valid comparisons relative to performance and cost criteria.

Demetsky, M.J.; Hoel, L.A.; Virkler, M.R.

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Regulatory Reform and License Termination Planning in Decommissioning  

SciTech Connect

Decommissioning of commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) must be safe and cost-effective and consider the needs of a wide range of stakeholders. The creative tension among these objectives has provided opportunities to reform the way these plants are regulated and managed in decommissioning. Enlightened and visionary leaders from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and industry are seizing these opportunities to create new paradigms for risk-informed regulation; creative stakeholder involvement; and effective, end-state focused, license termination planning.

Michael J. Meisner

2000-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

300

Planning for a Sustainable Future of the Cincinnati Union Terminal  

SciTech Connect

The Cincinnati Museum Center invited a number of local stakeholders, political leaders, nationally and internationally recognized design professionals and the Design Team, that has been engaged to help shape the future of this remarkable resource, to work together in a Workshop that would begin to shape a truly sustainable future for both the Museum and its home, the Union Terminal, one of the most significant buildings in America. This report summarizes and highlights the discussions that took place during the Workshop and presents recommendations for shaping a direction and a framework for the future.

None

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terminal surface area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Three-terminal semiconductor laser for wave mixing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We suggest and analyze the concept of a semiconductor laser device that incorporates two basic ideas: (i) dual-wavelength generation of two optical fields on the interband transitions with independent control of each field in a three-terminal "transistor" scheme, and (ii) generation of infrared radiation in the 3-300 mum range due to nonlinear wave mixing of the above optical fields in the same laser cavity. Due to inversionless nature of the difference frequency generation and inherently low threshold current, the laser can be capable of continuous room-temperature operation in the mid/far-infrared and THz range.

Belyanin, Alexey; Kocharovsky, V.; Kocharovsky, V.; Scully, Marlan O.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

600 a Current Leads with Dry and Compact Warm Terminals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For the LHC magnet test benches 26 pairs of conventional helium vapour-cooled 600 A current leads are required. The first pair of 600 A current leads has been designed and built by industry and tested at CERN. The main component of the lead is the heat exchanger, which consists of two concentric copper pipes. Special attention was also given to the design of the warm terminal in order to avoid any condensation and to resist at an electrical test of 2 kV. The paper describes construction details and compares calculated and measured values of the main parameters.

Andersen, T P; Vullierme, B

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Operational Area Monitoring Plan  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

' ' SECTION 11.7B Operational Area Monitoring Plan for the Long -Term H yd rol og ical M o n i to ri ng - Program Off The Nevada Test Site S . C. Black Reynolds Electrical & Engineering, Co. and W. G. Phillips, G. G. Martin, D. J. Chaloud, C. A. Fontana, and 0. G. Easterly Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory U. S. Environmental Protection Agency October 23, 1991 FOREWORD This is one of a series of Operational Area Monitoring Plans that comprise the overall Environmental Monitoring Plan for the DOE Field Office, Nevada (DOEINV) nuclear and non- nuclear testing activities associated with the Nevada Test Site (NTS). These Operational Area Monitoring Plans are prepared by various DOE support contractors, NTS user organizations, and federal or state agencies supporting DOE NTS operations. These plans and the parent

304

Vertical Mode Initialization in a Limited Area Data Assimilation Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A previously reported 9-day limited area data assimilation experiment has been reported, incorporating a recently developed nonlinear vertical mode initialization scheme. It is shown that the initialization scheme significantly reduces surfaces ...

G. A. Mills; J. L. McGregor

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Neutral Solar Wind Generated by Lunar Exospheric Dust at the Terminator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate the flux of neutral solar wind observed on the lunar surface at the terminator due to solar wind protons penetrating exospheric dust grains with (1) radii greater than 0.1 microns and (2) radii greater than 0.01 microns. For grains with radii larger than 0.1 microns, the ratio of the neutral solar wind flux produced by exospheric dust to the incident ionized solar wind flux is estimated to be about 10^-4-10^-3 for solar wind speeds in excess of 800 km/s, but much lower (less than 10^-5) at average to slow solar wind speeds. However, when the smaller grain sizes are considered, this ratio is estimated to be greater than 10^-5 at all speeds, and at speeds in excess of 700 km/s reaches about 10^-3. These neutral solar wind fluxes are easily measurable with current low energy neutral atom instrumentation. Observations of neutral solar wind from the surface of the Moon would provide independent information on the distribution of very small dust grains in the lunar exosphere that would complement and c...

Collier, Michael R

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

NMR structure of the N-terminal domain of the replication initiator protein DnaA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

DnaA is an essential component in the initiation of bacterial chromosomal replication. DnaA binds to a series of 9 base pair repeats leading to oligomerization, recruitment of the DnaBC helicase, and the assembly of the replication fork machinery. The structure of the N-terminal domain (residues 1-100) of DnaA from Mycoplasma genitalium was determined by NMR spectroscopy. The backbone r.m.s.d. for the first 86 residues was 0.6 +/- 0.2 Angstrom based on 742 NOE, 50 hydrogen bond, 46 backbone angle, and 88 residual dipolar coupling restraints. Ultracentrifugation studies revealed that the domain is monomeric in solution. Features on the protein surface include a hydrophobic cleft flanked by several negative residues on one side, and positive residues on the other. A negatively charged ridge is present on the opposite face of the protein. These surfaces may be important sites of interaction with other proteins involved in the replication process. Together, the structure and NMR assignments should facilitate the design of new experiments to probe the protein-protein interactions essential for the initiation of DNA replication.

Wemmer, David E.; Lowery, Thomas J.; Pelton, Jeffrey G.; Chandonia, John-Marc; Kim, Rosalind; Yokota, Hisao; Wemmer, David E.

2007-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

307

Surface-to-Atmosphere Exchange in a River Valley Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of the turbulent exchange between a river surface and the atmosphere in a mountainous area in southern Brazil are presented and discussed. A micrometeorological tower was installed directly above the surface of a 60-m-wide river. ...

Otávio C. Acevedo; Osvaldo L. L. Moraes; Rodrigo da Silva; Vagner Anabor; Daniel P. Bittencourt; Hans R. Zimmermann; Roberto O. Magnago; Gervásio A. Degrazia

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

An experimental study of nanobubbles on hydrophobic surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the recent development of microfluidic systems, miniaturization of flow devices has become a real challenge. Microchannels, however, are characterized by a large surface area-to-volume ratio so that surface properties ...

Agarwal, Abhinandan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

The Analysis of Sea Surface Imagery for Whitecap Kinematics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Visible sea surface images are analyzed to determine the distribution of the average length of breaking crests per unit sea surface area per unit speed increment ?(c). The ?(c) distribution offers a scale-dependent description of wave breaking ...

Jessica M. Kleiss; W. Kendall Melville

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

On Computing the Surface Horizontal Pressure Gradient over Elevated Terrain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methods are proposed for calculating the surface horizontal pressure gradient or geostrophic wind in a local area over elevated terrain from randomly spaced surface observations. These procedures avoid many of the problems associated with sea-...

Maurice Danard

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Rockies Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rockies Area Rockies Area Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Clean Energy Clusters in the Rockies Area 1.1 Products and Services in the Rockies Area 1.2 Research and Development Institutions in the Rockies Area 1.3 Networking Organizations in the Rockies Area 1.4 Investors and Financial Organizations in the Rockies Area 1.5 Policy Organizations in the Rockies Area Clean Energy Clusters in the Rockies Area Products and Services in the Rockies Area Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":500,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026

312

Bay Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bay Area Bay Area Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Clean Energy Clusters in the Bay Area 1.1 Products and Services in the Bay Area 1.2 Research and Development Institutions in the Bay Area 1.3 Networking Organizations in the Bay Area 1.4 Investors and Financial Organizations in the Bay Area 1.5 Policy Organizations in the Bay Area Clean Energy Clusters in the Bay Area Products and Services in the Bay Area Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":500,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026

313

Texas Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Area Area Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Clean Energy Clusters in the Texas Area 1.1 Products and Services in the Texas Area 1.2 Research and Development Institutions in the Texas Area 1.3 Networking Organizations in the Texas Area 1.4 Investors and Financial Organizations in the Texas Area 1.5 Policy Organizations in the Texas Area Clean Energy Clusters in the Texas Area Products and Services in the Texas Area Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":500,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026

314

HQFMSP Chapter 2, Limited Areas, Valut-Type Rooms and Temporary Limited  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2, Limited Areas, Valut-Type Rooms and Temporary 2, Limited Areas, Valut-Type Rooms and Temporary Limited Areas HQFMSP Chapter 2, Limited Areas, Valut-Type Rooms and Temporary Limited Areas October 2013 2013 Headquarters Facilities Master Security Plan - Chapter 2, Limited Areas, Valut-Type Rooms and Temporary Limited Areas This chapter covers the establishment, maintenance, and termination of areas within HQ buildings where classified activities take place. It covers the requirements applicable to each type of security area, including physical protection measures, controls on the use of electronic devices, restrictions on what security activities can take place, and what security equipment must be present. The procedures in this chapter were developed and are maintained jointly by HS-91 and the Office of Information Security

315

Surface Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Gas Sampling Surface Gas Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Surface Gas Sampling Details Activities (12) Areas (10) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Gas Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Gas composition and source of fluids. Thermal: Distinguish magmatic/mantle heat inputs. Can be used to estimate reservoir fluid temperatures. Dictionary.png Surface Gas Sampling: Gas sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface hydrothermal system. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Introduction

316

MOLTEN CARBONATE FUEL CELL POWER PLANT LOCATED AT TERMINAL ISLAND WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP) has developed one of the most recognized fuel cell demonstration programs in the United States. In addition to their high efficiencies and superior environmental performance, fuel cells and other generating technologies that can be located at or near the load, offers several electric utility benefits. Fuel cells can help further reduce costs by reducing peak electricity demand, thereby deferring or avoiding expenses for additional electric utility infrastructure. By locating generators near the load, higher reliability of service is possible and the losses that occur during delivery of electricity from remote generators are avoided. The potential to use renewable and locally available fuels, such as landfill or sewage treatment waste gases, provides another attractive outlook. In Los Angeles, there are also many oil producing areas where the gas by-product can be utilized. In June 2000, the LADWP contracted with FCE to install and commission the precommercial 250kW MCFC power plant. The plant was delivered, installed, and began power production at the JFB in August 2001. The plant underwent manufacturer's field trials up for 18 months and was replace with a commercial plant in January 2003. In January 2001, the LADWP contracted with FCE to provide two additional 250kW MCFC power plants. These commercial plants began operations during mid-2003. The locations of these plants are at the Terminal Island Sewage Treatment Plant at the Los Angeles Harbor (for eventual operation on digester gas) and at the LADWP Main Street Service Center east of downtown Los Angeles. All three carbonate fuel cell plants received partial funding through the Department of Defense's Climate Change Fuel Cell Buydown Program. This report covers the technical evaluation and benefit-cost evaluation of the Terminal Island 250kW MCFC power plant during its first year of operation from June 2003 to July 2004.

William W. Glauz

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Characterization of the Chemical Changes and Surface Properties ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The specific surface area and the CEC of waste cement increased with an ... Dissolution of Mixed Zinc-Carbon and Alkaline Battery Powders in Sulphuric Acid

318

borrow_area.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

information information at Weldon Spring, Missouri. This site is managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. developed by the former WSSRAP Community Relations Department to provide comprehensive descriptions of key activities that took place throughout the cleanup process The Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) approved a plan on June 9, 1995, allowing the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP) to excavate nearly 2 million cubic yards of clay material from land in the Weldon Spring Conservation Area. Clay soil from a borrow area was used to construct the permanent disposal facility at the Weldon Spring site. Clay soil was chosen to construct the disposal facility because it has low permeability when

319

Focus Area Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

information provided was consolidated from the original five focus areas for the EM information provided was consolidated from the original five focus areas for the EM Corporate QA Board. The status of QAP/QIP approvals etc. was accurate at the time of posting; however, additional approvals may have been achieved since that time. If you have any questions about the information provided, please contact Bob Murray at robert.murray@em.doe.gov Task # Task Description Status 1.1 Develop a brief questionnaire to send out to both commercial and EM contractors to describe their current approach for identifying the applicable QA requirements for subcontractors, tailoring the requirements based upon risk, process for working with procurement to ensure QA requirements are incorporated into subcontracts, and implementing verification of requirement flow-down by their

320

Focus Area 3 Deliverables  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 - Commercial Grade item and Services 3 - Commercial Grade item and Services Dedication Implementation and Nuclear Services Office of Environmental Management And Energy Facility Contractors Group Quality Assurance Improvement Project Plan Project Focus Area Task # and Description Deliverable Project Area 3-Commercial Grade Item and Services Dedication 3.1-Complete a survey of selected EM contractors to identify the process and basis for their CGI dedication program including safety classification of items being dedicated for nuclear applications within their facilities Completed Survey Approvals: Yes/No/NA Project Managers: S. Waisley, D. Tuttel Yes Executive Committee: D. Chung, J. Yanek, N. Barker, D. Amerine No EM QA Corporate Board: No Energy Facility Contractors Group

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terminal surface area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Argonne area restaurants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

area restaurants area restaurants Amber Cafe 13 N. Cass Ave. Westmont, IL 60559 630-515-8080 www.ambercafe.net Argonne Guest House Building 460 Argonne, IL 60439 630-739-6000 www.anlgh.org Ballydoyle Irish Pub & Restaurant 5157 Main Street Downers Grove, IL 60515 630-969-0600 www.ballydoylepub.com Bd's Mongolian Grill The Promenade Shopping Center Boughton Rd. & I-355 Bolingbrook, IL 60440 630-972-0450 www.gomongo.com Branmor's American Grill 300 Veterans Parkway Bolingbrook, IL 60440 630-226-9926 www.branmors.com Buca di Beppo 90 Yorktown Convenience Center Lombard, IL 60148 630-932-7673 www.bucadibeppo.com California Pizza Kitchen 551 Oakbrook Center Oak Brook, IL 60523 630-571-7800 www.cpk.com Capri Ristorante 5101 Main Street Downers Grove, IL 60516 630-241-0695 www.capriristorante.com Carrabba's Italian Grill

322

EA-1177: Salvage/Demolition of 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Salvage/Demolition of 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 7: Salvage/Demolition of 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area Steam Plants, Richland, Washington EA-1177: Salvage/Demolition of 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area Steam Plants, Richland, Washington SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to salvage and demolish the 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area steam plants and their associated steam distribution piping equipment, and ancillary facilities at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD October 21, 1996 EA-1177: Finding of No Significant Impact Salvage/Demolition of 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area Steam Plants October 21, 1996 EA-1177: Final Environmental Assessment

323

Hyperreal Waves on Transfinte, Terminated, Distortionless and Lossless, Transmission Lines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A prior work (see Chapter 8 of the book, ``Graphs and Networks: Transfinite and Nonstandard,'' Birkhauser-Boston, Cambridge, Mass., USA, 2004) examined the propagation of an electromagnetic wave on a transfinite transmission line, transfinite in the sense that infinitely many one-way infinite transmission lines are connected in cascade. That there are infinitely many such one-way infinite lines results in the wave propagating without ever reflecting at some discontinuity. The present work examines the cascade where the cascade terminates after only finitely many one-way infinite transmission lines, with the result that reflected waves are now produced at both the far end as well as at the initial end of the transfinite transmission line. The question of whether the reflected waves are infini tesimal or appreciable and whether they sum to an infinitesimal or appreciable amount are resolved for both distortionless and lossless lines. Finally, the generalizations to higher ranks of transfiniteness is briefly summarized.

A. H. Zemanian

2004-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

324

NGL (natural gas liquids) shipping and terminals. [Japan, Europe, USA  

SciTech Connect

An analysis of the world LPG market covers the need for a world-wide planning organization to develop that market; the shortage of ships between 1000 and 20,000 cu m capacity and the excess of large ships (> 50,000 cu m capacity); the status of the Japanese and European LPG markets; the failure of the U.S. LPG market to develop as expected; and the need for the U.S. to keep its gas for the future by putting a very high price at the well head, to build terminals and ships so as to minimize the effect of LPG and LNG imports on the balance-of-payment deficit; and the availability of LPG from nearby sources (Venezuela, Mexico, the North Sea, and Algeria).

Boudet, R.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

TL5002 Provides DDR Bus Termination Power Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Double data rate (DDR) bus termination power requirements bring new challenges to the power supply by requiring voltage tracking of a reference supply, requiring both sourcing and sinking current, and maintaining a high efficiency over a wide current range. This paper address these issues while presenting an example DDR design of 12 A of output current with voltage outputs between 0.9 V and 1.25 V. Issues and their solutions are provided for the power supply operating as a tradition buck power stage in the sourcing mode as well as for operating as a synchronous boost regulator in the sinking mode. Regulation and control loop characteristics of the examples are presented for both current sinking and sourcing modes of operation. Transient load response is also presented showing output voltage variation, as the current is transitioned from sourcing to sinking.

Robert Kollman; John Betten; Bang S. Lee

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Aquifer Testing Recommendations for Supporting Phase II of the T Area Technetium-99 Data Objectives Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aquifer characterization needs are currently being assessed to optimize pump-and-treat remedial strategies within the 200-ZP-1 operable unit, specifically for the immediate area of the 241-T Tank Farm. This report provides a general discussion of the six identified hydrologic test methods for possible subsequent characterization within the 241-T Tank Farm area and details for implementing the large-scale recovery test after terminating pumping at the 241-Tank Farm extraction well locations.

Spane, Frank A.

2008-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

327

PNNL: Biological Sciences - A Subsurface Science Scientific Focus Area -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Role of Microenvironments and Transition Zones in Subsurface Reactive Role of Microenvironments and Transition Zones in Subsurface Reactive Contaminant Transport Subsurface Science Scientific Focus Area (SFA) The Subsurface Science Scientific Focus Area (SFA) is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research. The SFA team is performing integrated, multidisciplinary, science-theme-focused research on the role of microenvironments and transition zones in the reactive transport of technetium (Tc), uranium (U), and plutonium (Pu). The primary environmental system being studied is the groundwater-river interaction zone in the 300 area of the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Ringold Sediments Redox boundary in Ringold sediments about 2.5 m below the Hanford-Ringold contact. The boundary is the point where oxygen and other terminal electron

328

Interpolation Uncertainties Across the ARM SGP Area  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interpolation Uncertainties Across the ARM SGP Area Interpolation Uncertainties Across the ARM SGP Area J. E. Christy, C. N. Long, and T. R. Shippert Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Interpolation Grids Across the SGP Network Area The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program operates a network of surface radiation measurement sites across north central Oklahoma and south central Kansas. This Southern Great Plains (SGP) network consists of 21 sites unevenly spaced from 95.5 to 99.5 degrees west longitude, and from 34.5 to 38.5 degrees north latitude. We use the technique outlined by Long and Ackerman (2000) and Long et al. (1999) to infer continuous estimates of clear-sky downwelling shortwave (SW) irradiance, SW cloud effect, and daylight fractional sky cover for each

329

On the Proper Use of Satellite-Derived Leaf Area Index in Climate Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Satellite-observed leaf area index (LAI) is increasingly being used in climate modeling. In common land surface models, LAI is specified for the vegetated part only. In contrast, satellite LAI is defined for the total area including both ...

Jianjun Ge

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Estimation of Regional Surface Resistance to Evapotranspiration from NDVI and Thermal-IR AVHRR Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Infrared surface temperatures from satellite sensors have been used to infer evaporation and soil moisture distribution over large areas. However, surface energy partitioning to latent versus sensible heat changes with surface vegetation cover ...

Ramakrishna R. Nemani; Steven W. Running

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Impacts of Land Surface Model Complexity on a Regional Simulation of a Tropical Synoptic Event  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multimode Chameleon Surface Model (CHASM) with different levels of complexity in parameterizing surface energy balance is coupled to a limited-area model (DARLAM) to investigate the impacts of complexity in land surface representations on the ...

H. Zhang; J. L. McGregor; A. Henderson-Sellers; J. J. Katzfey

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Enhanced heat transfer surface for cast-in-bump-covered cooling surfaces and methods of enhancing heat transfer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An annular turbine shroud separates a hot gas path from a cooling plenum containing a cooling medium. Bumps are cast in the surface on the cooling side of the shroud. A surface coating overlies the cooling side surface of the shroud, including the bumps, and contains cooling enhancement material. The surface area ratio of the cooling side of the shroud with the bumps and coating is in excess of a surface area ratio of the cooling side surface with bumps without the coating to afford increased heat transfer across the element relative to the heat transfer across the element without the coating.

Chiu, Rong-Shi Paul (Glenmont, NY); Hasz, Wayne Charles (Pownal, VT); Johnson, Robert Alan (Simpsonville, SC); Lee, Ching-Pang (Cincinnati, OH); Abuaf, Nesim (Lincoln City, OR)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Table 2. Change in the Number of Personal Computers and Computer Terminals  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 PC's and Computer Terminals 2 PC's and Computer Terminals Table 2. Change in the Number of Personal Computers and Computer Terminals in Commercial Buildings, 1992 to 1995 PCs and Terminals (thousand) PCs and Terminals per Thousand Employees PCs and Terminals per Million Sq. Ft. 1992 1995 Change (percent) 1992 1995 Change (percent) 1992 1995 Change (percent) All Buildings 29,752 43,003 45 431 571 32 463 732 58 Principal Building Activity Assembly 845 1,763 109 167 258 54 102 262 157 Education 6,004 8,046 34 877 847 -3 710 1,039 46 Food Sales 85 206 142 101 316 213 113 321 184 Food Service 146 276 89 65 118 82 98 204 108 Health Care 1,128 2,549 126 334 569 70 641 1,092 70 Lodging 651 1,296 99 322 472 47 225 358 59

334

U-027: RSA Key Manager Appliance Session Logout Bug Fails to Terminate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: RSA Key Manager Appliance Session Logout Bug Fails to 7: RSA Key Manager Appliance Session Logout Bug Fails to Terminate Sessions U-027: RSA Key Manager Appliance Session Logout Bug Fails to Terminate Sessions November 4, 2011 - 8:00am Addthis PROBLEM: RSA Key Manager Appliance Session Logout Bug Fails to Terminate Sessions. PLATFORM: RSA Key Manager Appliance 2.7 Service Pack 1 ABSTRACT: A remote authenticated user session may not terminate properly. reference LINKS: SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1026276 SecurityFocus Bug Traq Seclists: ESA-2011-035 CVE-2011-2740 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: A vulnerability was reported in RSA Key Manager Appliance. A remote authenticated user session may not terminate properly. When using Firefox 4 and 5, an authenticated user session is not terminated properly when logging out.

335

Residual Fuel Oil Bulk Terminal Stocks by Type  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Stock Type: Download Series History: Definitions, Sources & Notes: Show Data By: Product: Stock Type: Area: Jan-13 Feb-13 Mar-13 Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 View History; U ...

336

Western Area Power Administration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

v*Zy- i , . v*Zy- i , . r ,v * -i S # Af [, (e- . - o -A tl }r- 0 v-" l^~4~S J l ^-)^ I^U^ck iM clti ^ Area Power Administration Follow-up to Nov. 25, 2008 Transition Meeting Undeveloped Transmission Right-of-Way Western has very little undeveloped transmission right-of-way. There is a 7-mile right- of-way between Folsom, CA and Roseville, CA where Western acquired a 250' wide right-of-way but is only using half of it. Another line could be built parallel to Western's line to relieve congestion in the Sacramento area. In addition, Western has rights-of- way for many transmission lines that could be rebuilt to increase transmission capacity. For example, Western's Tracy-Livermore 230-kV line is a single circuit line but the existing towers could support a double circuit line. These rights-of-way would have to

337

Geothermal Areas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Areas Geothermal Areas Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Areas Geothermal Areas are specific locations of geothermal potential (e.g., Coso Geothermal Area). The base set of geothermal areas used in this database came from the 253 geothermal areas identified by the USGS in their 2008 Resource Assessment.[1] Additional geothermal areas were added, as needed, based on a literature search and on projects listed in the GTP's 2011 database of funded projects. Add.png Add a new Geothermal Resource Area Map of Areas List of Areas Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":2500,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026

338

Proceedings: 2004 EPRI Topical Workshop - License Termination Plans/Final Site Release  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the final challenges in plant decommissioning is that of license termination and final site release. The EPRI Decommissioning - License Termination and Final Site Release Workshop was the tenth in a series designed to aid utility personnel in decommissioning nuclear power plants. This workshop focused on specific aspects of license termination activities and final site release as they relate to decommissioning. The information presented will update utilities on developments and experience related ...

2005-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

339

Modeling Land Surface Processes and Heavy Rainfall in Urban Environments: Sensitivity to Urban Surface Representations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-resolution simulations with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model are used in conjunction with observational analyses to investigate land surface processes and heavy rainfall over the Baltimore-Washington metropolitan area. ...

Dan Li; Elie Bou-Zeid; Mary Lynn Baeck; Stephen Jessup; James A. Smith

340

Sliding contact at plastically graded surfaces and applications to surface design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tailored gradation in elastic-plastic properties is known to offer avenues for suppressing surface damage during normal indentation and sliding contact. These graded materials have potential applications in diverse areas ...

Prasad, Anamika, 1979-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terminal surface area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Floating LNG terminal and LNG carrier interaction analysis for side-by-side offloading operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Floating LNG terminals are a relatively new concept with the first such terminal in the world installed this year. The hydrodynamic interaction effects between the terminal and a LNG carrier in a side-by-side offloading arrangement is investigated. The side-byside arrangement is compared with each body floating alone to identify the interaction effects. The hydrodynamic coefficients are obtained using the Constant Panel Method and the analysis of body motions, mooring line tensions are done in time domain. The relative motion between the two bodies is analyzed using WAMIT in frequency domain and WINPOST in time domain to ascertain the offloading operability of the terminal under 1 year storm condition.

Kuriakose, Vinu P.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Oil well diagnosis by sensing terminal characteristics of the induction motor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract—Oil well diagnosis usually requires dedicated sensors placed on the surface and the bottom of the well. There is significant interest in identifying the characteristics of an oil well by using data from these sensors and neural networks for data processing. The purpose of this paper is to identify oil well parameters by measuring the terminal characteristics of the induction motor driving the pumpjack. Information about oil well properties is hidden in instantaneous power waveforms. The extraction of this information was done using neural networks. For the purpose of training neural networks, a complex model of the system, which included 25 differential equations, was developed. Successful application of neural networks was possible due to the proposed signal preprocessing which reduces thousands of measured data points into 20 scalar variables. The special input pattern transformation was used to enhance the power of the neural networks. Two training algorithms, originally developed by authors, were used in the learning process. The presented approach does not require special instrumentation and can be used on any oil well with a pump driven by an induction motor. The quality of the oil well could be monitored continuously and proper adjustments could be made. The approach may lead to significant savings in electrical energy, which is required to pump the oil. Index Terms—Induction motor, neural networks, oil well.

Bogdan M. Wilamowski; Okyay Kaynak; Senior Member

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Western Area Power Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Western Area Power Administration Customer Meeting The meeting will begin at 12:30 pm MST We have logged on early for connectivity purposes Please stand-by until the meeting begins Please be sure to call into the conference bridge at: 888-989-6414 Conf. Code 60223 If you have connectivity issues, please contact: 866-900-1011 1 Introduction ï‚— Welcome ï‚— Introductions ï‚— Purpose of Meeting â—¦ Status of the SLCA/IP Rate â—¦ SLCA/IP Marketing Plan â—¦ Credit Worthiness Policy â—¦ LTEMP EIS update â—¦ Access to Capital ï‚— Handout Materials http://www.wapa.gov/crsp/ratescrsp/default.htm 2 SLCA/IP Rate 3 1. Status of Repayment 2. Current SLCA/IP Firm Power Rate (SLIP-F9) 3. Revenue Requirements Comparison Table 4.SLCA/IP Rate 5. Next Steps

344

Attenuation structure of Coso geothermal area, California, from wave pulse  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

structure of Coso geothermal area, California, from wave pulse structure of Coso geothermal area, California, from wave pulse widths Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Attenuation structure of Coso geothermal area, California, from wave pulse widths Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Pulse width data are used to invert for attenuation structure in the Coso geothermal area, California. The dataset consists of pulse width measurements of 838 microseismic events recorded on a seismic array of 16 downhole stations between August 1993 and March 1994. The quality factor Q correlates well with surface geology and surface heat flow observations. A broad region of low Q (≈ 30 to 37) is located at 0.5 to 1.2 km in depth below Devil's Kitchen, Nicol Prospects, and Coso Hot Springs. A vertical,

345

Heat Flow, Heat Transfer And Lithosphere Rheology In Geothermal Areas-  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flow, Heat Transfer And Lithosphere Rheology In Geothermal Areas- Flow, Heat Transfer And Lithosphere Rheology In Geothermal Areas- Features And Examples Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Heat Flow, Heat Transfer And Lithosphere Rheology In Geothermal Areas- Features And Examples Details Activities (5) Areas (5) Regions (0) Abstract: Surface heat flow measurements over active geothermal systems indicate strongly positive thermal anomalies. Whereas in "normal" geothermal settings, the surface heat flow is usually below 100-120 mW m- 2, in active geothermal areas heat flow values as high as several watts per meter squared can be found. Systematic interpretation of heat flow patterns sheds light on heat transfer mechanisms at depth on different lateral, depth and time scales. Borehole temperature profiles in active geothermal

346

Conceptual Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) terminal design for Kuwait  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research study investigated a new conceptual design for a modular structural configuration incorporating storage for Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) within the base of the platform structure. The structure, referred to as a modified gravity base concrete structure (MGBCS), was envisioned specifically to be constructed at a suitable site off the coast of Kuwait. Coastal offshore bathometric information, environmental data and existing data on onshore facilities were examined in the site selection portion of the study. A finite element model of the MGBCS was developed using an industry standard finite element code that allows preliminary sizes of structural models to meet appropriate design codes. A variety of parametric and design load scenarios were investigated. This research tackles some preliminary issues that are adequate for an initial evaluation of the proposed design concept. The proposed design concept needs a lot more scrutiny in order to be sufficiently developed as a concept where it can be confirmed as a truly viable concept and investment. It was confirmed that quartering sea conditions, waves approaching at a 45 degree angle, are the most critical scenarios for the terminal based on maximum values and ranges of shears and moments. In addition, there are several interesting issues in this concept that should be further looked at for this design to be further developed. The limitations of our study must be mitigated in future designs if the proposed design concept is to be carried to the implementation stage.

Aljeeran, Fares

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Plaquemines parish Deep Draft top-off terminal  

SciTech Connect

The recently completed ''Deep River Study, Lower Mississippi River'' sponsored by the ''Governor's Task Force on Deep-Draft Vessel Access to the Lower Mississippi River'' contained the following recommended program: Dredge the present 40 foot deep channel to 45 feet initially from the Gulf via Southwest Pass to Mile 172 AHP to provide for two-way navigation of the deep draft vessels that would serve the forecasted most likely level of waterborne commerce (Alternative 9). Plan and seek authorization to further deepen the channel in stages to 55 feet in the future should actual increases in commerce equal the high level level of commerce (Alternative 11). Put into operation, as soon as possible, facilities for loading and topping-off grain ships midstream and topping-off coal carriers in the Gulf in order to attract and establish patterns of trade in large ships. The South Pass Bulk Terminal is a project that responds to the last section of this three-part recommendation. It was conceived as a means of providing the Gulf Coast region with low cost and efficient access to the economics of scale offered by using deep-draft vessels for ocean transport of dry bulk commodities. The proposed facility seeks to combine the advantages of a deep-draft port with those typical of a topping-off operation. It is intended as an interim measure that will serve to maintain and attract trade until such time as the river is dredged.

Nelson, C.; Morehiser, M.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Surface rheology and interface stability.  

SciTech Connect

We have developed a mature laboratory at Sandia to measure interfacial rheology, using a combination of home-built, commercially available, and customized commercial tools. An Interfacial Shear Rheometer (KSV ISR-400) was modified and the software improved to increase sensitivity and reliability. Another shear rheometer, a TA Instruments AR-G2, was equipped with a du Nouey ring, bicone geometry, and a double wall ring. These interfacial attachments were compared to each other and to the ISR. The best results with the AR-G2 were obtained with the du Nouey ring. A Micro-Interfacial Rheometer (MIR) was developed in house to obtain the much higher sensitivity given by a smaller probe. However, it was found to be difficult to apply this technique for highly elastic surfaces. Interfaces also exhibit dilatational rheology when the interface changes area, such as occurs when bubbles grow or shrink. To measure this rheological response we developed a Surface Dilatational Rheometer (SDR), in which changes in surface tension with surface area are measured during the oscillation of the volume of a pendant drop or bubble. All instruments were tested with various surfactant solutions to determine the limitations of each. In addition, foaming capability and foam stability were tested and compared with the rheology data. It was found that there was no clear correlation of surface rheology with foaming/defoaming with different types of surfactants, but, within a family of surfactants, rheology could predict the foam stability. Diffusion of surfactants to the interface and the behavior of polyelectrolytes were two subjects studied with the new equipment. Finally, surface rheological terms were added to a finite element Navier-Stokes solver and preliminary testing of the code completed. Recommendations for improved implementation were given. When completed we plan to use the computations to better interpret the experimental data and account for the effects of the underlying bulk fluid.

Yaklin, Melissa A.; Cote, Raymond O.; Moffat, Harry K.; Grillet, Anne Mary; Walker, Lynn; Koehler, Timothy P.; Reichert, Matthew D. (Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA); Castaneda, Jaime N.; Mondy, Lisa Ann; Brooks, Carlton, F.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Environmental resources of selected areas of Hawaii: Ecological resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background scientific data and related information collected on ecological resources during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. The background scientific data and related information presented in this report focus on several areas of Hawaii County. In this report, reference is made to these areas as study areas rather than as areas where proposed or alternative facilities of the HGP would be located. The resource areas addressed herein include terrestrial ecology, aquatic ecology, and marine ecology. The scientific background data and related information that were obtained from review of the (1) scientific literature, (2) government and private sector reports, (3) studies done under DOE interagency agreements with the US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) and with the US Army Corps of Engineers (COE), and (4) observations made during site visits are being made available for future research in these areas.

Trettin, C.C.; Tolbert, V.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Jones, A.T. [Jones (Anthony T.), Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Smith, C.R. [Smith (Craig R.), Kailna, HI (United States); Kalmijn, A.J. [Kalmijn (Adrianus J.), Encinitas, CA (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

AREA RADIATION MONITOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

S>An improved area radiation dose monitor is designed which is adapted to compensate continuously for background radiation below a threshold dose rate and to give warning when the dose integral of the dose rate of an above-threshold radiation excursion exceeds a selected value. This is accomplished by providing means for continuously charging an ionization chamber. The chamber provides a first current proportional to the incident radiation dose rate. Means are provided for generating a second current including means for nulling out the first current with the second current at all values of the first current corresponding to dose rates below a selected threshold dose rate value. The second current has a maximum value corresponding to that of the first current at the threshold dose rate. The excess of the first current over the second current, which occurs above the threshold, is integrated and an alarm is given at a selected integrated value of the excess corresponding to a selected radiation dose. (AEC)

Manning, F.W.; Groothuis, S.E.; Lykins, J.H.; Papke, D.M.

1962-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

351

Optimal Design of Remote Terminal Unit (RTU) for Wireless SCADA System for Energy Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For energy deficit countries, the design of Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) based energy management systems for optimal distribution is of high interest. Such design involves development of Remote Terminal Unit (RTU) which is considered ... Keywords: Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), Programmable Logic Controller (PLC), Remote Terminal Unit (RTU), Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA), Tele-Control Interface (TCI), Wireless Communication

Muhammad Aamir; Javier Poncela; Muhammad Aslam Uqaili; B. S. Chowdhry; Nishat Ahmad Khan

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

A Simulation Tool for Combined Rail-Road Transport in Intermodal Terminals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Simulation Tool for Combined Rail-Road Transport in Intermodal Terminals Andrea E. Rizzoli the current flows of freight. On the other side, the growth of freight transport shows a rapidly increasing by road and rail gates and by a set of platforms. Intermodal terminals are inter-connected by rail

Gambardella, Luca Maria

353

A dual-processor solution for the MAC layer of a software defined radio terminal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Considerable work has been devoted to studying flexible computation structures for the physical layer of a software defined radio (SDR) terminal. However there has been almost no research on protocol processors for the upper layer protocols such as the ... Keywords: SDR terminal, protocol processing, wireless platform

Hyunseok Lee; Trevor Mudge

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Illustrating surfaces in volume  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a novel framework for illustrating surfaces in a volume. Surfaces are illustrated by drawing only feature lines, such as silhouettes, valleys, ridges, and surface hatching strokes, and are embedded in volume renderings. This framework ...

Xiaoru Yuan; Baoquan Chen

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Entropy of Spacelike Two-Surfaces of Spacetime  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We argue that every finite piecewise smooth spacelike two-surface of spacetime possesses an entropy which is, in natural units, one quarter of its area. However, the thermodynamical properties of a two-surface become apparent only to the observers having that two-surface as a horizon. Consequences of this result are discussed.

J. Makela; A. Peltola

2004-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

356

Entropy of Spacelike Two-Surfaces of Spacetime  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We argue that every finite piecewise smooth spacelike two-surface of spacetime possesses an entropy which is, in natural units, one quarter of its area. However, the thermodynamical properties of a two-surface become apparent only to the observers having that two-surface as a horizon. Consequences of this result are discussed.

Makela, J

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Repository surface design site layout analysis  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this analysis is to establish the arrangement of the Yucca Mountain Repository surface facilities and features near the North Portal. The analysis updates and expands the North Portal area site layout concept presented in the ACD, including changes to reflect the resizing of the Waste Handling Building (WHB), Waste Treatment Building (WTB), Carrier Preparation Building (CPB), and site parking areas; the addition of the Carrier Washdown Buildings (CWBs); the elimination of the Cask Maintenance Facility (CMF); and the development of a concept for site grading and flood control. The analysis also establishes the layout of the surface features (e.g., roads and utilities) that connect all the repository surface areas (North Portal Operations Area, South Portal Development Operations Area, Emplacement Shaft Surface Operations Area, and Development Shaft Surface Operations Area) and locates an area for a potential lag storage facility. Details of South Portal and shaft layouts will be covered in separate design analyses. The objective of this analysis is to provide a suitable level of design for the Viability Assessment (VA). The analysis was revised to incorporate additional material developed since the issuance of Revision 01. This material includes safeguards and security input, utility system input (size and location of fire water tanks and pump houses, potable water and sanitary sewage rates, size of wastewater evaporation pond, size and location of the utility building, size of the bulk fuel storage tank, and size and location of other exterior process equipment), main electrical substation information, redundancy of water supply and storage for the fire support system, and additional information on the storm water retention pond.

Montalvo, H.R.

1998-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

358

EIS-0493: Corpus Christi LNG Terminal and Pipeline Project, Nueces and San  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: Corpus Christi LNG Terminal and Pipeline Project, Nueces 3: Corpus Christi LNG Terminal and Pipeline Project, Nueces and San Patricio Counties, Texas EIS-0493: Corpus Christi LNG Terminal and Pipeline Project, Nueces and San Patricio Counties, Texas SUMMARY The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is preparing, with DOE as a cooperating agency, an EIS to analyze the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to construct and operate a liquefied natural gas export and import terminal on the north shore of Corpus Christi Bay in Nueces and San Patricio Counties, Texas; a marine berth connecting the terminal to the adjacent La Quinta Channel; and an approximately 23-mile-long natural gas transmission pipeline and associated facilities. In June 2012, FERC issued a notice of intent to prepare an EA; in October 2012, FERC announced that

359

V-204: A specially crafted query can cause BIND to terminate abnormally |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

V-204: A specially crafted query can cause BIND to terminate V-204: A specially crafted query can cause BIND to terminate abnormally V-204: A specially crafted query can cause BIND to terminate abnormally July 27, 2013 - 4:35am Addthis PROBLEM: A specially crafted query that includes malformed rdata can cause named to terminate with an assertion failure while rejecting the malformed query. PLATFORM: BIND 9.7 ABSTRACT: A specially crafted query sent to a BIND nameserver can cause it to crash (terminate abnormally). REFERENCE LINKS: ISC Knowledge Base CVE-2013-4854 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High DISCUSSION: BIND is an implementation of the Domain Name System (DNS) protocols. Authoritative and recursive servers are equally vulnerable. Intentional exploitation of this condition can cause a denial of service in all nameservers running affected versions of BIND 9. Access Control Lists do

360

L AREA WASTEWATER STORAGE DRUM EVALUATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the determination of the cause of pressurization that led to bulging deformation of a 55 gallon wastewater drum stored in L-Area. Drum samples were sent to SRNL for evaluation. The interior surface of these samples revealed blistering and holes in the epoxy phenolic drum liner and corrosion of the carbon steel drum. It is suspected that osmotic pressure drove permeation of the water through the epoxy phenolic coating which was weakened from exposure to low pH water. The coating failed at locations throughout the drum interior. Subsequent corrosion of the carbon steel released hydrogen which pressurized the drum causing deformation of the drum lid. Additional samples from other wastewater drums on the same pallet were also evaluated and limited corrosion was visible on the interior surfaces. It is suspected that, with time, the corrosion would have advanced to cause pressurization of these sealed drums.

Vormelker, P; Cynthia Foreman, C; Zane Nelson, Z; David Hathcock, D; Dennis Vinson, D

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terminal surface area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Surface Properties of Biomaterials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 29, 2011 ... Surface charge and surface energy measurements ... The Multiple Uses of Carbon Nanotubes in Regenerative Medicine · The Role of Bacterial ...

362

User's guide to the Geothermal Resource Areas Database  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Geothermal Information Resource project at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is developing a Geothermal Resource Areas Database, called GRAD, designed to answer questions about the progress of geothermal energy development. This database will contain extensive information on geothermal energy resources for selected areas, covering development from initial exploratory surveys to plant construction and operation. The database is available for on-lie interactive query by anyone with an account number on the computer, a computer terminal with an acoustic coupler, and a telephone. This report will help in making use of the database. Some information is provided on obtaining access to the computer system being used, instructions on obtaining standard reports, and some aids to using the query language.

Lawrence, J.D.; Leung, K.; Yen, W.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Program Areas | National Security | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Programs Initiatives Facilities Events and Conferences Supporting Organizations National Security Home | Science & Discovery | National Security | Program Areas SHARE Program...

364

Body Area Networks: A Survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advances in wireless communication technologies, such as wearable and implantable biosensors, along with recent developments in the embedded computing area are enabling the design, development, and implementation of body area networks. This class of ... Keywords: body area networks, survey, wireless sensor networks

Min Chen; Sergio Gonzalez; Athanasios Vasilakos; Huasong Cao; Victor C. Leung

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Mercury Vapor At Kawaihae Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mercury Vapor At Kawaihae Area (Thomas, 1986) Mercury Vapor At Kawaihae Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Mercury Vapor At Kawaihae Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Kawaihae Area Exploration Technique Mercury Vapor Activity Date Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The soil geochemistry yielded quite complex patterns of mercury concentrations and radonemanation rates within the survey area (Cox and Cuff, 1981c). Mercury concentrations (Fig. 38) showed a general minimum along the Kawaihae-Waimea roads and a broad trend of increasing mercury concentrations toward both the north and south. There is no correlation apparent between the mercury patterns and either the resistivity sounding data or the surface geology in the area. The radon emanometry data (Fig.

366

Mercury Vapor At Lualualei Valley Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mercury Vapor At Lualualei Valley Area (Thomas, 1986) Mercury Vapor At Lualualei Valley Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Mercury Vapor At Lualualei Valley Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Lualualei Valley Area Exploration Technique Mercury Vapor Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Soil mercury and radon emanation surveys were performed over much of the accessible surface of Lualualei Valley (Cox and Thomas, 1979). The results of these surveys (Figs 7 and 8) delineated several areas in which soil mercury concentrations or radon emanation rates were substantially above normal background values. Some of these areas were apparently coincident with the mapped fracture systems associated with the caldera boundaries.

367

Microearthquake moment tensors from the Coso Geothermal area | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Microearthquake moment tensors from the Coso Geothermal area Microearthquake moment tensors from the Coso Geothermal area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Microearthquake moment tensors from the Coso Geothermal area Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Coso geothermal area, California, has produced hot water and steam for electricity generation for more than 20 years, during which time there has been a substantial amount of microearthquake activity in the area. Seismicity is monitored by a high-quality permanent network of 16 three-component digital borehole seismometers operated by the US Navy and supplemented by a ~ 14-station portable array of surface three-component digital instruments. The portable stations improve focal sphere coverage, providing seismic-wave polarity and amplitude data sets sufficient for

368

Pool boiling on nano-finned surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effect of nano-structured surfaces on pool boiling heat transfer is explored in this study. Experiments are conducted in a cubical test chamber containing fluoroinert coolant (PF5060, Manufacturer: 3M Co.) as the working fluid. Pool boiling experiments are conducted for saturation and subcooled conditions. Three different types of ordered nano-structured surfaces are fabricated using Step and flash imprint lithography on silicon substrates followed by Reactive Ion Etching (RIE) or Deep Reactive Ion Etching (DRIE). These nano-structures consist of a square array of cylindrical nanofins with a longitudinal pitch of 1 mm, transverse pitch of 0.9 mm and fixed (uniform) heights ranging from 15 nm - 650 nm for each substrate. The contact angle of de-ionized water on the substrates is measured before and after the boiling experiments. The contact-angle is observed to increase with the height of the nano-fins. Contact angle variation is also observed before and after the pool boiling experiments. The pool boiling curves for the nano-structured silicon surfaces are compared with that of atomically smooth single-crystal silicon (bare) surfaces. Data processing is performed to estimate the heat flux through the projected area (plan area) for the nano-patterned zone as well as the heat flux through the total nano-patterned area, which includes the surface area of the fins. Maximum heat flux (MHF) is enhanced by ~120 % for the nanofin surfaces compared to bare (smooth) surfaces, under saturation condition. The pool boiling heat flux data for the three nano-structured surfaces progressively overlap with each other in the vicinity of the MHF condition. Based on the experimental data several micro/nano-scale transport mechanisms responsible for heat flux enhancements are identified, which include: "microlayer" disruption or enhancement, enhancement of active nucleation site density, enlargement of cold spots and enhancement of contact angle which affects the vapor bubble departure frequency.

Sriraman, Sharan Ram

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Pool boiling on nano-finned surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effect of nano-structured surfaces on pool boiling heat transfer is explored in this study. Experiments are conducted in a cubical test chamber containing fluoroinert coolant (PF5060, Manufacturer: 3M Co.) as the working fluid. Pool boiling experiments are conducted for saturation and subcooled conditions. Three different types of ordered nano-structured surfaces are fabricated using Step and flash imprint lithography on silicon substrates followed by Reactive Ion Etching (RIE) or Deep Reactive Ion Etching (DRIE). These nano-structures consist of a square array of cylindrical nanofins with a longitudinal pitch of 1 mm, transverse pitch of 0.9 mm and fixed (uniform) heights ranging from 15 nm – 650 nm for each substrate. The contact angle of de-ionized water on the substrates is measured before and after the boiling experiments. The contact-angle is observed to increase with the height of the nano-fins. Contact angle variation is also observed before and after the pool boiling experiments. The pool boiling curves for the nano-structured silicon surfaces are compared with that of atomically smooth single-crystal silicon (bare) surfaces. Data processing is performed to estimate the heat flux through the projected area (plan area) for the nano-patterned zone as well as the heat flux through the total nano-patterned area, which includes the surface area of the fins. Maximum heat flux (MHF) is enhanced by ~120 % for the nanofin surfaces compared to bare (smooth) surfaces, under saturation condition. The pool boiling heat flux data for the three nano-structured surfaces progressively overlap with each other in the vicinity of the MHF condition. Based on the experimental data several micro/nano-scale transport mechanisms responsible for heat flux enhancements are identified, which include: “microlayer” disruption or enhancement, enhancement of active nucleation site density, enlargement of cold spots and enhancement of contact angle which affects the vapor bubble departure frequency.

Sriraman, Sharan Ram

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Geothermal resource area 9: Nye County. Area development plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal Resource area 9 encompasses all of Nye County, Nevada. Within this area there are many different known geothermal sites ranging in temperature from 70/sup 0/ to over 265/sup 0/ F. Fifteen of the more major sites have been selected for evaluation in this Area Development Plan. Various potential uses of the energy found at each of the resource sites discussed in this Area Development Plan were determined after evaluating the area's physical characteristics, land ownership and land use patterns, existing population and projected growth rates, and transportation facilities, and comparing those with the site specific resource characteristics. The uses considered were divided into five main categories: electrical generation, space heating, recreation, industrial process heat, and agriculture. Within two of these categories certain subdivisions were considered separately. The findings about each of the 15 geothermal sites considered in this Area Development Plan are summarized.

Pugsley, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Computer aided surface representation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The central research problem of this project is the effective representation, computation, and display of surfaces interpolating to information in three or more dimensions. If the given information is located on another surface, then the problem is to construct a surface defined on a surface''. Sometimes properties of an already defined surface are desired, which is geometry processing''. Visualization of multivariate surfaces is possible by means of contouring higher dimensional surfaces. These problems and more are discussed below. The broad sweep from constructive mathematics through computational algorithms to computer graphics illustrations is utilized in this research. The breadth and depth of this research activity makes this research project unique.

Barnhill, R.E.

1990-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

372

Monitoring Environmental Recovery at Terminated Produced Water Discharge Sites in Coastal Louisiana Waters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a study of terminated produced water discharge sites in the coastal waters of Louisiana. Environmental recovery at the sites is documented by comparing pre-termination and post-termination (six months and one year) data. Produced water, sediments, and sediment interstitial water samples were analyzed for radionuclides, metals, and hydrocarbons. Benthic infauna were identified from samples collected in the vicinity of the discharge and reference sites. Radium isotope activities were determined in fish and crustacean samples. In addition, an environmental risk assessment is made on the basis of the concentrations of metals and hydrocarbons determined in the samples.

Continental Shelf Associates, Inc.

1999-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

373

Property:AreaGeology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AreaGeology AreaGeology Jump to: navigation, search Property Name AreaGeology Property Type String Description A description of the area geology This is a property of type String. Subproperties This property has the following 22 subproperties: A Amedee Geothermal Area B Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area C Chena Geothermal Area Coso Geothermal Area D Desert Peak Geothermal Area D cont. Dixie Valley Geothermal Area E East Mesa Geothermal Area G Geysers Geothermal Area K Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area L Lightning Dock Geothermal Area Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area R Raft River Geothermal Area Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area S Salt Wells Geothermal Area Salton Sea Geothermal Area San Emidio Desert Geothermal Area

374

The Size Distribution and Mass-Weighted Terminal Velocity of Low-Latitude Tropopause Cirrus Crystal Populations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ice crystal terminal velocities govern the lifetime of radiatively complex, climatologically important, low-latitude tropopause cirrus clouds. To better understand cloud lifetimes, the terminal velocities of low-latitude tropopause cirrus cloud ...

C. G. Schmitt; A. J. Heymsfield

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Comparison of 10-m Wind Forecasts from a Regional Area Model and QuikSCAT Scatterometer Wind Observations over the Mediterranean Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface wind forecasts from a limited-area model [the Quadrics Bologna Limited-Area Model (QBOLAM)] covering the entire Mediterranean area at 0.1° grid spacing are verified against Quick Scatterometer (QuikSCAT) wind observations. Only forecasts ...

Christophe Accadia; Stefano Zecchetto; Alfredo Lavagnini; Antonio Speranza

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Computational Investigation of FeS2 Surfaces and Prediction of Effects of Sulfur Environment on Stabilities  

SciTech Connect

Density functional theory calculations were employed to investigate the (001), (210), (III), and (110) surfaces of, F~S2' The surface free ene:gies were calculated in equilibrium with a sulfur environment using firstpnnclples based thermodynamics approach. Surfaces that feature metal atoms in their outermost layer are predicted to be higher m energy. Wlthm the studied subset of (I x I) terminations, the stoichiometric (001) surface termmated by a layer of sulfur atoms is the most stable for sulfur-lean condition. For increasingly sulfur-nch enVIronment, two structures were found to have notably lower surface energies compared to others. They have (210) and (Ill) orientation, both terminated by layers of sulfur. Interestingly, these surfaces are nonstoichiometric exhibiting an excess of sulfur atoms.

Alfonso, D.R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Surface modification of tribological components in transportation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper reviews a number of programs funded through the Engineered Tribological Interfaces (ETI) Task area of the Tribology Program that utilize energetic beams of atoms to enhance the mechanical and microstructural properties of near-surface regions to improve the tribological performance of critical components. The processes used in these programs include techniques based on chemical vapor deposition, physical vapor deposition, and ion implantation. A common feature of these techniques is their ability to produce dense and adherent modified surfaces without need for subsequent grinding/polishing treatments. Another feature of these techniques is their ability to introduce a wide range of elements into near-surface regions.

Fenske, G.R.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Surface Geometric and Electronic Structures of BaFe2As2(001)  

SciTech Connect

BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} exhibits properties that are characteristic of the parent compounds of the newly discovered iron (Fe)-based high-T{sub c} superconductors. By combining real-space imaging of scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM+STS) with momentum-space quantitative low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), we have identified the surface plane of cleaved BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} crystals as the As terminated Fe-As layer - the plane where superconductivity occurs. LEED and STM+STS data on the BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}(001) surface indicate an ordered arsenic (As) terminated metallic surface without reconstruction or lattice distortion. It is surprising that STM images the different Fe-As orbitals associated with the orthorhombic structure, but not the As atoms in the surface plane.

Nascimento, V. B. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Li, Ang [University of Houston, Houston; Jayasundara, Dilushan [University of Houston, Houston; Xuan, Yi [University of Houston, Houston; O'Neal, Jared [University of Houston, Houston; Pan, Shuheng [University of Houston, Houston; Chien, T. Y. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Hu, Biao [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); He, X. B. [Louisiana State University; Li, Guorong [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Sefat, A. S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); McGuire, Michael A [ORNL; Sales, Brian C [ORNL; Mandrus, David [ORNL; Pan, Minghu [ORNL; Zhang, Jiandi [Louisiana State University; Jin, R. [Louisiana State University; Plummer, E. Ward [Louisiana State University

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Mercury Vapor At Medicine Lake Area (Kooten, 1987) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kooten, 1987) Kooten, 1987) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Mercury Vapor At Medicine Lake Area (Kooten, 1987) Exploration Activity Details Location Medicine Lake Area Exploration Technique Mercury Vapor Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown References Gerald K. Van Kooten (1987) Geothermal Exploration Using Surface Mercury Geochemistry Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Mercury_Vapor_At_Medicine_Lake_Area_(Kooten,_1987)&oldid=386431" Category: Exploration Activities What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation:

380

Terminal Doppler Weather Radar Observation of Atmospheric Flow over Complex Terrain during Tropical Cyclone Passages  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) started operation in Hong Kong, China, in 1997 for monitoring wind shear associated with thunderstorms affecting the Hong Kong International Airport. The airport was built on land reclaimed from the sea and ...

C. M. Shun; S. Y. Lau; O. S. M. Lee

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terminal surface area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Predictions of flexible C-terminal tethers of bacterial proteins with the FLEXTAIL bioinformatics pipeline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proteins use conserved binding motifs associated with relatively unconserved flexible amino acid sequences as mobile tethers for interacting molecules, as exemplified by C-terminal sequences of bacterial chemotaxis receptors. The FLEXTAIL bioinformatics ...

Yi Lu; Jeffrey L. Ram

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

,"U.S. Refinery, Bulk Terminal, and Natural Gas Plant Stocks...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

S1","MDGSXUS1","MRESXUS1","MPRSXUS1" "Date","U.S. Finished Motor Gasoline Stocks at Refineries, Bulk Terminals, and Natural Gas Plants (Thousand Barrels)","U.S. Reformulated Motor...

383

U.S. Refinery Grade Butane Stocks at Bulk Terminals (Thousand ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Refinery Grade Butane Stocks at Bulk Terminals (Thousand Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; ...

384

U.S. Refinery Grade Butane Stocks at Bulk Terminals (Thousand ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Refinery Grade Butane Stocks at Bulk Terminals (Thousand Barrels) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 2005: 1,077: 999: 1,362: ...

385

Electronic structure analyses and activation studies of a dinitrogen-derived terminal nitride of molybdenum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 1: Complexes obtained by electrophilic attack on a dinitrogen-derived terminal molybdenum nitride: Electronic structure analysis by solid state CP/MAS ¹?N NMR in combination ... Chapter 2. Carbene chemistry in the ...

Sceats, Emma Louise, 1978-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

"Multi-use" airport design : a new terminal for Malpensa International Airport, Milan, Italy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The design of an airport terminal building can be viewed as a specialized case of the design of a large building. One of the major planning and design issues of typical large buildings is that of accommodating multiple ...

Seremetis, Constantine M

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Utilizing Smart Feeder Terminal Units and Fault Indicators to Realize Distributed Fault Locations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Feeder Terminal Unit (FTU) is one of the most important equipment in Distribution Automation System (DAS). In order to achieve self-management and auto-healing functions for… (more)

Ting, Kuo-chun

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

EIS-0493: Corpus Christi LNG Terminal and Pipeline Project, Nueces and San Patricio Counties, Texas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is preparing, with DOE as a cooperating agency, an EIS to analyze the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to construct and operate a liquefied natural gas export and import terminal on the north shore of Corpus Christi Bay in Nueces and San Patricio Counties, Texas; a marine berth connecting the terminal to the adjacent La Quinta Channel; and an approximately 23-mile-long natural gas transmission pipeline and associated facilities.

389

Proceedings: Decommissioning--License Termination Plans and Final Site Release Workshop  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the proceedings of an EPRI workshop dealing with the subject of decommissioning license termination and final site release. The workshop was the ninth in a series designed to aid utility personnel in assessing technologies for decommissioning nuclear power plants. It focused on specific aspects of license termination activities and final site release as they relate to nuclear plant decommissioning. The information presented will help utilities control decommissioning costs by selecting the best practices and technologies

None

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Termination for a superconducting power transmission line including a horizontal cryogenic bushing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A termination for a superconducting power transmission line is disclosed which is comprised of a standard air entrance insulated vertical bushing with an elbow, a horizontal cryogenic bushing linking the pressurized cryogenic cable environment to the ambient temperature bushing and a stress cone which terminates the cable outer shield and transforms the large radial voltage gradient in the cable dielectric into a much lower radial voltage gradient in the high density helium coolant at the cold end of the cryogenic bushing.

Minati, Kurt F. (Northport, NY); Morgan, Gerry H. (Patchogue, NY); McNerney, Andrew J. (Shoreham, NY); Schauer, Felix (Upton, NY)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

A Dynamic Thermal Circuit Rating (DTCR) Thermal Parameter Database for Substation Terminal Equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI's DTCR (Dynamic Thermal Circuit Rating) software uses real-time or historical weather and electrical load data to calculate power equipment ratings for overhead lines, underground cables, power transformers, and substation terminal equipment. This technical update concerns the organization of a thermal parameter database for substation terminal equipment intended to simplify the documentation and access to the data required for rating calculations. This update contains an organized and partly popula...

2008-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

392

Horizontal cryogenic bushing for the termination of a superconducting power-transmission line  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A termination for a superconducting power transmission line is disclosed which is comprised of a standard air entrance insulated vertical bushing with an elbow, a horizontal cryogenic bushing linking the pressurized cryogenic cable environment to the ambient temperature bushing and a stress cone which terminated the cable outer shield and transforms the large radial voltage gradient in the cable dielectric into a much lower radial voltage gradient in the high density helium coolant at the cold end of the cryogenic bushing.

Minati, K.F.; Morgan, G.H.; McNerney, A.J.; Schauer, F.

1982-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

393

Guide to Assessing Radiological Elements for License Termination of Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides guidance in the preparation of a License Termination Plan (LTP) to utilities engaged in nuclear plant decommissioning. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requires utilities to submit the LTP document years prior to the site license termination. This report focuses on the radiological components of the LTP. It identifies and addresses the regulatory requirements of each element in a way useful to the utility end user.

2002-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

394

Proceedings: Decommissioning--License Termination Plans and Final Site Release Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the proceedings of an EPRI workshop dealing with the subject of decommissioning license termination and final site release. The workshop was the ninth in a series designed to aid utility personnel in assessing technologies for decommissioning nuclear power plants. It focused on specific aspects of license termination activities and final site release as they relate to nuclear plant decommissioning. The information presented will help utilities control decommissioning costs by selecti...

2004-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

395

Decommissioning: License Termination and Final Site Release: Proceedings of EPRI Technical Workshop, October 2001  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the proceedings of an EPRI workshop on decommissioning license termination and final site release. The workshop was the eighth in a series designed to aid utility personnel in assessing technologies for decommissioning nuclear power plants. This workshop focused on specific aspects of license termination and final site release as they relate to nuclear plant decommissioning. The information presented will help utilities control decommissioning costs by selecting the best practices an...

2002-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

396

Transforming Parks and Protected Areas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

areas Lisa M. Campbell, Noella J. Gray; and Zoe A. Meletis In many countries, parks and protected areas construction of nature, conservation and development narratives, and alternative consumption - and what World' or 'developing' countries. One feature of political ecology has been an overriding emphasis

Bolch, Tobias

397

Data Administration Area: Date Issued  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Policy Data Administration Policy Area: Date Issued: April, 1994 Title: Data Administration Last. INTRODUCTION The President established the Committee on Data Administration (CODA) in May, 1992, to advise him on policies in the area of data administration (attached as references Policy ADC 011 and TOR for CODA

Brownstone, Rob

398

Area 410 status and capabilities  

SciTech Connect

This memo is distributed to acquaint personnel with (a) the status of the various 410 areas, (b) time and personnel required to do optic experiments in the ``Dog`` area, and (c) status of the timing and firing system and conditions of cables from Able to Dog.

Bennett, W. P.

1962-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Numerical Modeling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1983) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Raft River Geothermal Area (1983) Raft River Geothermal Area (1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Numerical Modeling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Numerical Modeling Activity Date 1983 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The numerical modeling of the resistivity data is marginal for changes as small as those observed but the results suggest that changes of a few percent could be expected from a fracture zone extending from depth to within 100 m of the surface. References Sill, W. R. (1 September 1983) Resistivity measurements before and after injection Test 5 at Raft River KGRA, Idaho. Final report Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Numerical_Modeling_At_Raft_River_Geothermal_Area_(1983)&oldid=47387

400

Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1997) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1997) Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1997) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1997) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Rock Activity Date 1997 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine a major lithospheric boundary Notes Sr and Nd isotope ratios of Miocene-Recent basalts in eastern California, when screened for crustal contamination, vary dramatically and indicate the presence of a major lithospheric boundary that is not obvious from surface geology. Isotope ratios from the Coso field form a bull's-eye pattern with very low 87Sr/86Sr (0.7033) centered just south of the geothermal area. The

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terminal surface area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Heat flow studies, Coso Geothermal Area, China Lake, California. Technical  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

studies, Coso Geothermal Area, China Lake, California. Technical studies, Coso Geothermal Area, China Lake, California. Technical report Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Heat flow studies, Coso Geothermal Area, China Lake, California. Technical report Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Heat flow studies in the Coso Geothermal Area were conducted at China Lake, California. Temperature measurements were completed in nine of the heat flow boreholes. Temperatures were measured at five meter intervals from the ground surface to the deepest five meter interval. Subsequently, temperatures were remeasured two or three times in each borehole in order to demonstrate that equilibrium thermal conditions existed. The maximum difference in temperature, at any of the five meter intervals, was 0.03 deg

402

Report Wildland Fire Area Hazard  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Report Wildland Fire Area Hazard Report Wildland Fire Area Hazard Report Wildland Fire Area Hazard Report wildland fire area hazards or incidents that are non-life threatening only. Call 911 for all emergencies that require immediate assistance. How to report wildland fire hazard Use the following form to report any wildland fire area hazards or incidents that are non-life threatening only. Call 911 for all emergencies that require immediate assistance. Fill out this form as completely as possible so we can better assess the hazard. All submissions will be assessed as promptly as possible. For assistance with a non-emergency situation, contact the Operations Support Center at 667-6211. Name (optional): Hazard Type (check one): Wildlife Sighting (check box if animal poses serious threat) Trails (access/egress)

403

Tech Area II: A History  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report documents the history of the major buildings in Sandia National Laboratories' Technical Area II. It was prepared in support of the Department of Energy's compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act. Technical Area II was designed and constructed in 1948 specifically for the final assembly of the non-nuclear components of nuclear weapons, and was the primary site conducting such assembly until 1952. Both the architecture and location of the oldest buildings in the area reflect their original purpose. Assembly activities continued in Area II from 1952 to 1957, but the major responsibility for this work shifted to other sites in the Atomic Energy Commission's integrated contractor complex. Gradually, additional buildings were constructed and the original buildings were modified. After 1960, the Area's primary purpose was the research and testing of high-explosive components for nuclear weapons. In 1994, Sandia constructed new facilities for work on hi...

Rebecca Ullrich; Rebecca Ullrich

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Surface Chemical Dynamics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Surface Chemical Dynamics Surface Chemical Dynamics The goal of the Surface Chemical Dynamics Program is to elucidate the underlying physical processes that determine the products (selectivity) and yield (efficiency) of chemical transformations relevant to energy-related chemistry on catalytic and nanostructured surfaces. Achieving this end requires understanding the evolution of the reactant-molecule/surface complex as molecules adsorb, bonds dissociate, surface species diffuse, new bonds form and products desorb. The pathways and time scales of these processes are ultimately determined by a multidimensional potential energy surface that is a function of the geometric and electronic structures of the surface and the reactant, product, intermediate and transition-state molecular and atomic species.

405

Biomaterial Surfaces II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biofilm produced by microbes is a structure formed on material surface containing water ... In this work, both dense and porous silica and niobium oxide coatings were ... environments and their surface and interfacial breakdown was examined.

406

Nanoscale Surface Modifications I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... with a microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition technique utilizing methane/hydrogen/nitrogen chemistry. The surface modifications are characterized by ...

407

Surface Processing & Mechanics Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contact Directory Staff Ceramic Machining Composites Coatings Powder Metallurgy Thermodynamics Tribology Related Links HTML Comments Welcome to the Surface Processing &...

408

Surface Ozone Pattern in Hong Kong  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface ozone (O3) and its precursors in rural and urban areas of Hong Kong are analyzed through the seasonal, temporal, and spatial variation patterns. The seasonal O3 shows a unique pattern with a major peak in autumn and a trough in summer. ...

L. Y. Chan; C. Y. Chan; Y. Qin

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Recovering the Elemental Composition of Comet Wild 2 Dust in Five Stardust Impact Tracks and Terminal Particles in Aerogel  

SciTech Connect

The elemental (non-volatile) composition of five Stardust impact tracks and terminal particles left from capture of Comet 81P/Wild 2 dust were mapped in a synchrotron x-ray scanning microprobe with full fluorescence spectra at each pixel. Because aerogel includes background levels of several elements of interest, we employ a novel 'dual threshold' approach to discriminate against background contaminants: an upper threshold, above which a spectrum contains cometary material plus aerogel and a lower threshold below which it contains only aerogel. The difference between normalized cometary-plus-background and background-only spectra is attributable to cometary material. The few spectra in between are discarded since misallocation is detrimental: cometary material incorrectly placed in the background spectrum is later subtracted from the cometary spectrum, doubling the loss of reportable cometary material. This approach improves precision of composition quantification. We present the refined whole impact track and terminal particle elemental abundances for the five impact tracks. One track shows mass increases in Cr and Mn (1.4x), Cu, As and K (2x), Zn (4x) and total mass (13%) by dual thresholds compared to a single threshold. Major elements Fe and Ni are not significantly affected. The additional Cr arises from cometary material containing little Fe. We exclude Au intermixed with cometary material because it is found to be a localized surface contaminant carried by comet dust into an impact track. The dual threshold technique can be used in other situations where elements of interest in a small sample embedded in a matrix are also present in the matrix itself.

Ishii, H A; Brennan, S; Bradley, J P; Luening, K; Ignatyev, K; Pianetta, P

2007-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

410

Surface structures from low energy electron diffraction: Atoms, small molecules and an ordered ice film on metal surfaces  

SciTech Connect

We investigated the surface bonding of various adsorbates (0, S, C{sub 2}H{sub 3} and NO) along with the resulting relaxation of the Pt(111) surface using low energy electron diffiraction (LEED). LEED experiments have been performed on these ordered overlayers along with theoretical structural analysis using automated tensor LEED (ATLEED). The resulting surface structures of these ordered overlayers exhibit similar adsorbate-induced relaxations. In all cases the adsorbate occupies the fcc hollow site and induces an approximately 0.1 A buckling of the metal surface. The three metal atoms directly bonded to the adsorbate are ``pulled`` out of the surface and the metal atom that is not bound to the adsorbate is `pushed`` inward. In order to understand the reliability of such details, we have carried out a comprehensive study of various non-structural parameters used in a LEED computation. We also studied the adsorption of water on the Pt(lll) surface. We ordered an ultra thin ice film on this surface. The film`s surface is found to be the (0001) face of hexagonal ice. This surface is apparently terminated by a full-bilayer, in which the uppermost water molecules have large vibrational amplitudes even at temperatures as low as 90 K. We examined two other metal surfaces besides Pt(111): Ni(111) and Fe(lll). On Ni(111), we have studied the surface under a high coverage of NO. On both Ni(111) and Pt(111) NO molecules occupy the hollow sites and the N-0 bond distances are practically identical. The challenging sample preparation of an Fe(111) surface has been investigated and a successful procedure has been obtained. The small interlayer spacing found on Fe(111) required special treatment in the LEED calculations. A new ATLEED program has been developed to handle this surface.

Materer, N.F.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Surface Temperature of IGUs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

117 117 Surface Temperatures of Insulated Glazing Units: Infrared Thermography Laboratory Measurements Brent T. Griffith, Daniel Türler, and Dariush Arasteh Building Technologies Program Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory University of California Berkeley, CA 94720 USA Fax: 510-486-6046, email: D_Arasteh@lbl.gov Abstract Data are presented for the distribution of surface temperatures on the warm-side surface of seven different insulated glazing units. Surface temperatures are measured using infrared thermography and an external referencing technique. This technique allows detailed mapping of surface temperatures that is non-intrusive. The glazings were placed between warm and cold environmental chambers that were operated at conditions

412

The Use of Limited Surface Networks to Measure Mesoscale Phenomena  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large mesonetworks have successfully demonstrated coupling of surface meteorological phenomena to convective activity. It is unrealistic however, to assume that such networks will be available for wide-area operational applications. This paper ...

James A. Heimbach Jr.; Thomas M. Engel

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

A Bayesian Cloud Mask for Sea Surface Temperature Retrieval  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bayesian methods are used to develop a cloud mask classification algorithm for use in an operational sea surface temperature (SST) retrieval processing system for Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) local area coverage (LAC) ...

Michael J. Uddstrom; Warren R. Gray; Richard Murphy; Niles A. Oien; Talbot Murray

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Optimized Cleaning Method for Producing Device Quality InP(100) Surfaces  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A very effective, two-step chemical etching method to produce clean InP(100) surfaces when combined with thermal annealing has been developed. The hydrogen peroxide/sulfuric acid based solutions, which are successfully used to clean GaAs(100) surfaces, leave a significant amount of residual oxide on the InP surface which can not be removed by thermal annealing. Therefore, a second chemical etching step is needed to remove the oxide. We found that strong acid solutions with HCl or H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} are able to remove the surface oxide and leave the InP surface passivated with elemental P which is, in turn, terminated with H. This yields a hydrophobic surface and allows for lower temperatures to be used during annealing. We also determined that the effectiveness of oxide removal is strongly dependent on the concentration of the acid. Surfaces cleaned by HF solutions were also studied and result in a hydrophilic surface with F terminated surface In atoms. The chemical reactions leading to the differences in behavior between InP and GaAs are analyzed and the optimum cleaning method for InP is discussed.

Sun, Y.

2005-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

415

Intraurban Differences of Surface Energy Fluxes in a Central European City  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface properties, such as roughness and vegetation, which vary both within and between urban areas, play a dominant role in determining surface–atmosphere energy exchanges. The turbulent heat flux partitioning is examined within a single urban ...

B. Offerle; C. S. B. Grimmond; K. Fortuniak; W. Pawlak

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Thermal energy storage application areas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of thermal energy storage in the areas of building heating and cooling, recovery of industrial process and waste heat, solar power generation, and off-peak energy storage and load management in electric utilities is reviewed. (TFD)

Not Available

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Western Area Power Administration, Desert Southwest Region  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Western Area Power Administration, Desert Southwest Region Liberty-Parker #2 230-kV Transmission Line Optical Power Ground Wire Repairs - Continuation Sheet Project Description The scope of work includes digging a trenching and burying a 1.25-inch OPGW conduit. The conduit trench will be about 4 feet deep and 10 inches wide, with warning tape placed above the conduit in the trench. Once the conduit has been placed, the trench will be backfilled with the original surface material. About 5.3 linear miles of trenching will be required, mostly within the existing dirt access road associated with the LIB-PAD #2 transmission line. Four pullboxes will be installed along the route. The pullboxes measure 2 feet by 3 feet by 2 feet and will be installed at least 24 inches below grade. An

418

Western Area Power Administration, Desert Southwest Region  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Western Area Power Administration, Desert Southwest Region Liberty-Parker #2 230-kV Transmission Line Optical Power Ground Wire Repairs - Continuation Sheet Project Description The scope of work includes digging a trenching and burying a 1.25-inch OPGW conduit. The conduit trench will be about 4 feet deep and 10 inches wide, with warning tape placed above the conduit in the trench. Once the conduit has been placed, the trench will be backfilled with the original surface material. About 5.3 linear miles of trenching will be required, mostly within the existing dirt access road associated with the LIB-PAD #2 transmission line. Four pullboxes will be installed along the route. The pullboxes measure 2 feet by 3 feet by 2 feet and will be installed at least 24 inches below grade. An

419

Geothermal resource area 3: Elko County. Area development plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal Resource Area 3 includes all of the land in Elko County, Nevada. There are in excess of 50 known thermal anomalies in this area. Several of the more major resources have been selected for detailed description and evaluation in this Area Development Plan. The other resources are considered too small, too low in temperature, or too remote to be considered for development in the near future. Various potential uses of the energy found at each of the studied resource sites in Elko County were determined after evaluating the area's physical characteristics; the land ownership and land use patterns; existing population and projected growth rates; transportation facilities and energy requirements. These factors were then compared with resource site specific data to determine the most likely uses of the resource. The uses considered in this evaluation were divided into five main categories: electrical generation, space heating, recreation, industrial process heat, and agriculture. Within two of these categories several subdivisions were considered separately. It was determined that several of the geothermal resources evaluated in the Area Development Plan could be commercially developed. The potential for development for the seven sites considered in this study is summarized.

Pugsley, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Research on stable, high-efficiency, large-area amorphous silicon based modules -- Task B  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents progress in developing a stable, high- efficiency, four-terminal hybrid tandem module. The module consists of a semi-transparent, thin-film silicon:hydrogen alloy (TFS) top circuit and a copper indium diselenide (CuInSe{sub 2}) bottom circuit. Film deposition and patterning processes were successfully extended to 0.4-m{sup 2} substrates. A 33.2-W (8.4% efficient) module with a 3970-cm{sup 2} aperture area and a white back reflector was demonstrated; without the back reflector, the module produced 30.2 W (7.6% efficient). Placing a laminated, 31.6-W, 8.1%-efficient CuInSe{sub 2} module underneath this TFS module, with an air gap between the two, produces 11.2 W (2.9% efficient) over a 3883-cm{sup 2} aperture area. Therefore, the four-terminal tandem power output is 41.4 W, translating to a 10.5% aperture-area efficiency. Subsequently, a 37.8-W (9.7% aperture-area efficiency) CuInSe{sub 2} module was demonstrated with a 3905-cm{sup 2} aperture area. Future performances of single-junction and tandem modules of this size were modeled, and predicted power outputs exceed 50 W (13% efficient) for CuInSe{sub 2} and 65 W (17% efficient) for TFS/CuInSe{sub 2} tandem modules.

Mitchell, K.W.; Willet, D.R. (Siemens Solar Industries, Camarillo, CA (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terminal surface area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Surfacing of the parts of Christmas tree valves  

SciTech Connect

The authors discuss the strengthening of Christmas trees for service conditions, in particular, the method of plasma spraying of the sealing surfaces of the gates of the valves with hard corrosion resistant alloys. Most frequently, cobalt- (stellite), nickel- (colmonoy), and iron-base alloys are used for surfacing. A plan is shown of the area for plasma surfacing in one of the petroleum machinery plants. It is found that the hardening of the sealing surface of gate valve parts by plasma powder surfacing with self-fluxing nickel alloys increases the reliability and life of well-head equipment.

Mordynskii, V.B.; Barsukov, V.P.; Iskakhov, A.R.; Komarcheva, E.S.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Aquatic Natural Areas Analysis and Evaluation: Oak Ridge Reservation  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an assessment of the natural area value of eight Aquatic Natural Areas (ANAs) and seven Aquatic Reference Areas (ARAs) on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Anderson and Roane Counties in east Tennessee. It follows a previous study in 2009 that analyzed and evaluated terrestrial natural areas on the Reservation. The purpose of both studies was to evaluate and rank those specially designated areas on the Reservation that contain sensitive species, special habitats, and natural area value. Natural areas receive special protections through established statutes, regulations, and policies. The ORR contains 33,542 acres (13,574 ha) administered by the Department of Energy. The surface waters of the Reservation range from 1st-order to 5th-order streams, but the majority of the streams recognized as ANAs and ARAs are 1st- and 2nd-order streams. East Fork Poplar Creek is a 4th-order stream and the largest watershed that drains Reservation lands. All the waters of the Reservation eventually reach the Clinch River on the southern and western boundaries of the ORR. All available information was collected, synthesized, and evaluated. Field observations were made to support and supplement the available information. Geographic information system mapping techniques were used to develop several quantitative attributes about the study areas. Narrative descriptions of each ANA and ARA and tables of numerical data were prepared. Criteria for assessment and evaluation were developed, and eight categories of factors were devised to produce a ranking system. The evaluation factors used in the ranking system were: (A) size of area, (B) percentage of watershed protected, (C) taxa present with protected status, (D) overall biotic diversity, (E) stream features, (F) water quality and use support ratings, (G) disturbance regime, and (H) other factors. Each factor was evaluated on a 5-point ranking scale (0-4), and each area received a composite score, where 32 was the maximum score possible. A highly ranked ANA or ARA is one that is large in size compared to other areas, includes a greater proportion of the watershed within Reservation boundaries, contains a number of status taxa at high densities, exhibits a high overall biodiversity, has very good or excellent habitat and water quality, is well protected and isolated from disturbances, and shows several other characteristics that contribute to natural area value. In this report, the term 'natural area' is loosely defined as a terrestrial or aquatic system that exhibits, or is thought to exhibit, high natural integrity and other significant natural values. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate and rank the currently recognized Aquatic Natural Areas (ANAs) and Aquatic Reference Areas (ARAs) on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) for their natural area value. A previous study (Baranski 2009) analyzed, evaluated, and ranked terrestrial areas (Natural Areas [NAs], Reference Areas [RAs], and Cooperative Management Areas [CMAs]) on the ORR for natural area value, and a precise methodology for natural area evaluation was developed. The present study is intended to be a complement and companion to the terrestrial area study and attempts to employ a similar methodology for aquatic areas so that aquatic and terrestrial areas can be compared on a similar scale. This study specifically develops criteria for assessing the ecological, biodiversity, and natural area importance and significance of aquatic systems on the Reservation in a relevant and consistent manner. The information can be integrated into the Tennessee Natural Heritage Program (http://tn.gov/environment/na/nhp.shtml) system and applied to potential new aquatic areas. Further, the information will be useful in planning, management, and protection efforts on the ORR.

Baranski, Dr. Michael J. [Catawba College

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Geothermal resource area 11, Clark County area development plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal Resource Area 11 includes all of the land in Clark County, Nevada. Within this area are nine geothermal anomalies: Moapa Area, Las Vegas Valley, Black Canyon, Virgin River Narrows, Roger's Springs, Indian Springs, White Rock Springs, Brown's Spring, and Ash Creek Spring. All of the geothermal resources in Clark County have relatively low temperatures. The highest recorded temperature is 145{sup 0}F at Black Canyon. The temperatures of the other resources range from 70 to 90{sup 0}F. Because of the low temperature of the resources and, for the most part, the distance of the resources from any population base, the potential for the development of the resources are considered to be somewhat limited.

Pugsley, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Termination of Safeguards for Accountable Nuclear Materials at the Idaho National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Termination of safeguards ends requirements of Nuclear Material Control and Accountability (MC&A) and thereby removes the safeguards basis for applying physical protection requirements for theft and diversion of nuclear material, providing termination requirements are met as described. Department of Energy (DOE) M 470.4 6 (Nuclear Material Control and Accountability [8/26/05]) stipulates: 1. Section A, Chapter I (1)( q) (1): Safeguards can be terminated on nuclear materials provided the following conditions are met: (a) 'If the material is special nuclear material (SNM) or protected as SNM, it must be attractiveness level E and have a measured value.' (b) 'The material has been determined by DOE line management to be of no programmatic value to DOE.' (c) 'The material is transferred to the control of a waste management organization where the material is accounted for and protected in accordance with waste management regulations. The material must not be collocated with other accountable nuclear materials.' Requirements for safeguards termination depend on the safeguards attractiveness levels of the material. For attractiveness level E, approval has been granted from the DOE Idaho Operations Office (DOE ID) to Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC (BEA) Safeguards and Security (S&S). In some cases, it may be necessary to dispose of nuclear materials of attractiveness level D or higher. Termination of safeguards for such materials must be approved by the Departmental Element (this is the DOE Headquarters Office of Nuclear Energy) after consultation with the Office of Security.

Michael Holzemer; Alan Carvo

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Surface decontamination utilizing mechanical vacuum blasting methods  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project (SSDP) surface decontamination effort, vacuum blasting techniques were utilized to remove fixed radioactive contamination entrained in steel and concrete painted surfaces to meet on-site and off-site release limits. Removal of contaminated paint by vacuum blasting was restricted to selected areas of the project. Specifically, this technique was applied only when it was determined to be cost-effective compared to other methods of paint removal or direct disposal of the bulk material as contaminated waste. As the lower portions of the reactor plant container painted steel surface was eligible for this surface decontamination technique. A performance summary of the results obtained using vacuum blasting is included. Based on these results, it is concluded that application of vacuum blasting techniques was effective in terms of removal rate, person-hours expended, and waste generated.

McKernan, M.L.; Schulmeister, A.R.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Surface decontamination utilizing mechanical vacuum blasting methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the Shippingport Decommissioning Project surface decontamination effort vacuum blasting techniques were utilized to remove fixed radioactive contamination entrained in steel and concrete painted surfaces to meet on-site and off-site release limits. Removal of contaminated paint by vacuum blasting was restricted to select areas of the project. Specifically, this technique was applied only when it was determined to be cost effective compared to other methods of paint removal or direct disposal of the bulk material as contaminated waste. As a result of pre-decontamination surveys it was determined that the lower portions of the Reactor Plant Container painted steel surface was eligible for this surface decontamination technique. 3 refs., 1 tab.

McKernan, M.L.; Schulmeister, A.R.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Surface chemistry driven actuation in nanoporous gold  

SciTech Connect

Although actuation in biological systems is exclusively powered by chemical energy, this concept has not been realized in man-made actuator technologies, as these rely on generating heat or electricity first. Here, we demonstrate that surface-chemistry driven actuation can be realized in high surface area materials such as nanoporous gold. For example, we achieve reversible strain amplitudes in the order of a few tenths of a percent by alternating exposure of nanoporous Au to ozone and carbon monoxide. The effect can be explained by adsorbate-induced changes of the surface stress, and can be used to convert chemical energy directly into a mechanical response thus opening the door to surface-chemistry driven actuator and sensor technologies.

Biener, J; Wittstock, A; Zepeda-Ruiz, L; Biener, M M; Zielasek, V; Kramer, D; Viswanath, R N; Weissmuller, J; Baumer, M; Hamza, A V

2008-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

428

ARM - Measurement - Surface condition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

condition condition ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Surface condition State of the surface, including vegetation, land use, surface type, roughness, and such; often provided in model output. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments NAV : Navigational Location and Attitude SURFLOG : SGP Surface Conditions Observations by Site Technicians S-TABLE : Stabilized Platform MET : Surface Meteorological Instrumentation

429

Mobile robotic surveying performance for planetary surface site characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Robotic systems will perform mobile surveys for scientific and engineering purposes as part of future missions on lunar and planetary surfaces. With site characterization as a task objective various system configurations and surveying techniques are ... Keywords: area coverage performance, in-situ remote sensing, planetary surface exploration, robotic surveying, site characterization

Edward Tunstel

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Oxide modified air electrode surface for high temperature electrochemical cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical cell is made having a porous cermet electrode (16) and a porous lanthanum manganite electrode (14), with solid oxide electrolyte (15) between them, where the lanthanum manganite surface next to the electrolyte contains a thin discontinuous layer of high surface area cerium oxide and/or praseodymium oxide, preferably as discrete particles (30) in contact with the air electrode and electrolyte.

Singh, Prabhakar (Export, PA); Ruka, Roswell J. (Churchill Boro, Allegheny County, PA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Mesoscale Surface Pressure and Temperature Features Associated with Bow Echoes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines observed mesoscale surface pressure, temperature, and wind features of bow echoes. Bow-echo events in the area of the Oklahoma Mesonet are selected for study to take advantage of high-resolution surface data. Thirty-six cases ...

Rebecca D. Adams-Selin; Richard H. Johnson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Surface modification to waveguides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of treating the interior surfaces of a waveguide to improve power transmission comprising the steps of mechanically polishing to remove surface protrusions; electropolishing to remove embedded particles; ultrasonically cleaning to remove any residue; coating the interior waveguide surfaces with an alkyd resin solution or electrophoretically depositing carbon lamp black suspended in an alkyd resin solution to form a 1.mu. to 5.mu. thick film; vacuum pyrolyzing the film to form a uniform adherent carbon coating.

Timberlake, John R. (Allentown, NJ); Ruzic, David N. (Kendall Park, NJ); Moore, Richard L. (Princeton, NJ); Cohen, Samuel A. (Pennington, NJ); Manos, Dennis M. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Surface modification to waveguides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for treating the interior surfaces of a waveguide to improve power transmission comprising the steps of mechanically polishing to remove surface protrusions; electropolishing to remove embedded particles; ultrasonically cleaning to remove any residue; coating the interior waveguide surfaces with an alkyd resin solution or electrophoretically depositing carbon lamp black suspended in an alkyd resin solution to form a 1..mu.. to 5..mu.. thick film; vacuum pyrolyzing the film to form a uniform adherent carbon coating.

Timberlake, J.R.; Ruzic, D.N.; Moore, R.L.; Cohen, S.A.; Manos, D.M.

1982-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

434

Beneath the Surface.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Beneath the Surface is a collection of seven individual literary nonfiction essays. Five of the essays are personal essays, and three come from the author's… (more)

Dienes, Susanna

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Well Log Techniques At Coso Geothermal Area (1985) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coso Geothermal Area (1985) Coso Geothermal Area (1985) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Well Log Techniques Activity Date 1985 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Impact of long term testing on the well pressure Notes The downhole pressure monitoring equipment for each well included a stainless steel pressure chamber attached to a 0.25 inch stainless steel capillary tubing. The surface end of the capillary tubing was connected to a Paroscientific quartz pressure trandsducer. References Sanyal, S.; Menzies, A.; Granados, E.; Sugine, S.; Gentner, R. (20 January 1987) Long-Term Testing of Geothermal Wells in the Coso Hot Springs KGRA Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Well_Log_Techniques_At_Coso_Geothermal_Area_(1985)&oldid=600462

436

Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (1978) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (1978) Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (1978) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (1978) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date 1978 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geology and alteration mapping analyzed exposed rocks in geothermal region. Neither geologic mapping nor deep drilling have revealed potential deep primary aquifers. Surface alteration at Coso is of three main types: (1) clay-opal-alunite alteration, (2) weak argillic alteration, and (3) stockwork calcite veins and veinlets, which are locally associated with calcareous sinter. References Hulen, J. B. (1 May 1978) Geology and alteration of the Coso

437

Water Sampling At Mokapu Penninsula Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling At Mokapu Penninsula Area (Thomas, Water Sampling At Mokapu Penninsula Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Mokapu Penninsula Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Chemical analysis of groundwater from Mokapu was severely restricted by the absence of drilled wells; the only groundwater sources present were five shallow, brackish ponds, Chemical data indicated that all of the ponds consisted of seawater diluted by varying amounts of fresh surface water; no thermal alteration was revealed by the water chemistry (Table 2). Available temperature and water chemistry data on the Koolau caldera area were also assessed as part of the Mokapu study. The results of this analysis (Table

438

Structural investigations at the Coso geothermal area using remote sensing  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

investigations at the Coso geothermal area using remote sensing investigations at the Coso geothermal area using remote sensing information, Inyo County, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Structural investigations at the Coso geothermal area using remote sensing information, Inyo County, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Remote sensing studies have been made in and adjacent to the Coso geothermal field using TM FCC satellite imagery, 1:100,000 scale, US Geological Survey orthophotos, 1:24,OOO scale, and proprietary black-and-white photography by California Energy Company, Inc., at various scales including black-and-white positive film transparencies at a scale of 1:6,000. These studies have been made in an attempt to understand the complex geology seen on the surface and to try to improve the method of

439

Acoustic Logs At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Acoustic Logs Activity Date 1979 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To permit the lateral and vertical extrapolation of core and test data and bridged the gap between surface geophysical data and core analyses. Notes Televiewer logs permitted the location and orientation of numerous fractures and several features that may be faults. References Keys, W. S.; Sullivan, J. K. (1 June 1979) Role of borehole geophysics in defining the physical characteristics of the Raft River geothermal reservoir, Idaho Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Acoustic_Logs_At_Raft_River_Geothermal_Area_(1979)&oldid=473816"

440

Optimal Terminal Box Control for Single Duct Air-Handling Units  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Terminal boxes maintain room temperature by modulating supply air temperature and airflow in building HVAC systems. Terminal boxes with conventional control sequences often supply inadequate airflow to a conditioned space, resulting in occupant discomfort, or provide excessive airflow that wastes significant reheat energy. In this study, an optimal terminal box airflow control sequence was developed to improve indoor ventilation and reduce energy consumption. The developed control sequence was applied in an office building air conditioning system. Improvements in indoor thermal comfort and energy reduction were verified through measurement. The results show that the optimal control sequence can stably maintain thermal environment, satisfy comfort standards and reduce energy consumption compared to the conventional control sequence.

Cho, Y.; Vondal, J.; Wang, G.; Liu, M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terminal surface area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Focus Areas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mission » Focus Areas Mission » Focus Areas Focus Areas Safety With this focus on cleanup completion and risk reducing results, safety still remains the utmost priority. EM will continue to maintain and demand the highest safety performance. All workers deserve to go home as healthy as they were when they came to the job in the morning. There is no schedule or milestone worth any injury to the work force. Project Management EM is increasing its concentration on project management to improve its overall performance toward cost-effective risk reduction. This will involve review of validated project baselines, schedules, and assumptions about effective identification and management of risks. Instrumental in refining the technical and business approaches to project management are the senior

442

100 Areas CERCLA ecological investigations  

SciTech Connect

This document reports the results of the field terrestrial ecological investigations conducted by Westinghouse Hanford Company during fiscal years 1991 and 1992 at operable units 100-FR-3, 100-HR-3, 100-NR-2, 100-KR-4, and 100-BC-5. The tasks reported here are part of the Remedial Investigations conducted in support of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 studies for the 100 Areas. These ecological investigations provide (1) a description of the flora and fauna associated with the 100 Areas operable units, emphasizing potential pathways for contaminants and species that have been given special status under existing state and/or federal laws, and (2) an evaluation of existing concentrations of heavy metals and radionuclides in biota associated with the 100 Areas operable units.

Landeen, D.S.; Sackschewsky, M.R.; Weiss, S.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

A Data Assimilation Case Study Using a Limited-Area Ensemble Kalman Filter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) data assimilation experiments are conducted on a limited-area domain over the Pacific Northwest region of the United States, using the Weather Research and Forecasting model. Idealized surface pressure, ...

Sébastien Dirren; Ryan D. Torn; Gregory J. Hakim

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Soil Initialization Strategy for Use in Limited-Area Weather Prediction Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three diverse methods of initializing soil moisture and temperature in limited-area numerical weather prediction models are compared and assessed through the use of nonstandard surface observations to identify the approach that best combines ease ...

Francesca Di Giuseppe; Davide Cesari; Giovanni Bonafé

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Convective Evolution and Merger in the FACE Experimental Area: Mesoscale Convection and Boundary Layer Interactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates the interactions between the various scales of motion and, specifically, the inter-actions between convection and the surface boundary layer in the development of a mesoscale convective system within the Florida Area ...

John B. Cunning; Ronald L. Holle; Patrick T. Gannon; Andrew I. Watson

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

A direct thin-film path towards low-cost large-area III-V ...  

A direct thin-film path towards low-cost large-area III-V ... depending on the surface energy constraints of the nucleation ... scaling all times in ...

447

Diurnal Variation of Precipitable Water over a Mountainous Area of Sumatra Island  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Diurnal variations in atmospheric water vapor at Koto Tabang, a mountainous area of Sumatra Island, Indonesia, are studied by analyzing the GPS-derived precipitable water, radiosonde data, and surface meteorological observation data. A permanent ...

Peiming Wu; Jun-Ichi Hamada; Shuichi Mori; Yudi I. Tauhid; Manabu D. Yamanaka; Fujio Kimura

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

The Impact of Crop Areas in Northeast Colorado on Midsummer Mesoscale Thermal Circulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present study provides a preliminary evaluation of mesoscale circulations forced by surface gradients of heating arising from irrigated areas adjacent to dry land, utilizing a combination of satellite, observational, and modeling approaches. ...

M. Segal; J. R. Garratt; R. A. Pielke; W. E. Schreiber; A. Rodi; G. Kallos; J. Weaver

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Inspection Report Follow-up Inspection on Security Clearance Terminations and Badge  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Inspection Report Inspection Report Follow-up Inspection on Security Clearance Terminations and Badge Retrieval at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory INS-L-12-02 March 2012 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audits and Inspections Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 March 6, 2012 MEMORANDUM FOR THE ASSOCIATE ADMINISTRATOR FOR DEFENSE NUCLEAR SECURITY MANAGER, LIVERMORE SITE OFFICE FROM: Sandra D. Bruce Assistant Inspector General for Inspections Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Inspection Report on "Follow-up Inspection on Security Clearance Terminations and Badge Retrieval at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory" BACKGROUND The Department of Energy's Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Livermore) is managed

450

Phase-coherence and symmetry in four-terminal magnetotransport measurements on InN nanowires  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Universal conductance fluctuations in n-type doped InN nanowires are investigated at temperatures down to 0.35 K. The nanowires were grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The effect of the contact resistance is eliminated by performing the measurements in a four-terminal configuration. We find that the decrease in the conductance fluctuation amplitude with temperature is due to small energy transfer phase-breaking processes and thermal broadening. In contrast to measurements in a two-terminal configuration, the symmetry of the conductance under magnetic field reversal is lost.

Frielinghaus, R.; Estevez Hernandez, S.; Calarco, R.; Schaepers, Th. [Institute of Bio- and Nanosystems (IBN-1) and JARA-Fundamentals of Future Information Technology, Research Centre Juelich GmbH, 52425 Juelich (Germany)

2009-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

451

DISCONNECTION FROM THE TERMINATION SHOCK: THE END OF THE VOYAGER PARADOX  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The most recent Voyager 1 observations show rapidly increasing galactic cosmic ray fluxes with simultaneously decreasing anomalous cosmic ray fluxes. While this has been suggested to somehow herald the imminent crossing of the heliopause, which bounds the heliosphere, we show that such observations should naturally arise from the heliosphere's global magnetic topology. For a blunt termination shock, there must be a region of magnetic flux, still inside the heliopause, but beyond the last magnetic connection point to the termination shock, with poorer access for the shock-accelerated anomalous cosmic rays and better access for the galactic cosmic rays entering the heliosphere.

McComas, D. J.; Schwadron, N. A., E-mail: dmccomas@swri.edu [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX (United States)

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

452

Gas field ion source current stability for trimer and single atom terminated W(111) tips  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tungsten W(111) oriented trimer-terminated tips as well as single atom tips, fabricated by a gas and field assisted etching and evaporation process, were investigated with a view to scanning ion microscopy and ion beam writing applications. In particular, ion current stability was studied for helium and neon imaging gases. Large ion current fluctuations from individual atomic sites were observed when a trimer-terminated tip was used for the creation of neon ion beam. However, neon ion current was stable when a single atom tip was employed. No such current oscillations were observed for either a trimer or a single atom tip when imaged with helium.

Urban, Radovan; Wolkow, Robert A. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G7 (Canada); National Institute for Nanotechnology, National Research Council of Canada, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2M9 (Canada); Pitters, Jason L. [National Institute for Nanotechnology, National Research Council of Canada, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2M9 (Canada)

2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

453

Precision surface machining  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Precision finishing apparatus utilizing line contact polishing to produce optical quality parts. A rotatable cylinder is horizontally disposed above a workpiece which is mounted on a rotatable, and horizontally and vertically adjustable chuck. Predetermined surfaces can be cut into the surface of the cylinder to produce figures of revolution, such as aspheres,, when the workpiece is being rotated.

Lazazzera, V.J.; Schmell, R.A.

1991-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

454

Tritium Surface Contamination  

SciTech Connect

Glovebox wipe surveys were conducted to correlate surface tritium contamination with atmospheric tritium levels. Surface contamination was examined as a function of tritium concentration and of tritium form, HT/T2 and HTO. The relationship between atmospheric HTO concentration and cleanup time was also investigated.

Sienkiewicz, Charles J.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Solar absorption surface panel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composite metal of aluminum and nickel is used to form an economical solar absorption surface for a collector plate wherein an intermetallic compound of the aluminum and nickel provides a surface morphology with high absorptance and relatively low infrared emittance along with good durability.

Santala, Teuvo J. (Attleboro, MA)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Morphable Surface Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a novel automatic technique for finding a dense correspondence between a pair of n-dimensional surfaces with arbitrary topologies. This method employs a different formulation than previous correspondence algorithms (such as optical ... Keywords: computer vision, correspondence, learning, morphable models, surface matching

Christian R. Shelton

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

New surface equipment for underbalanced drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Perhaps the single most exciting development in the area of new drilling technology in this decade is underbalanced drilling (UBD). This category includes both jointed pipe and coiled tubing applications. Each has advantages and disadvantages in UBD operations. Regardless of the method selected for a particular UBD application, equipment similarities exist. The surface control and production equipment must be correctly sized and designed for the overall total UBD engineering solution. This article describes the various types, applications and purposes of special surface equipment needed in underbalanced operations. This is the second in a series of articles on UBD technology and its rapid development is this field.

Cuthbertson, R.L.; Vozniak, J.; Kinder, J.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Marginally outer trapped surfaces in higher dimensions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review the basic setup of Kaluza-Klein theory, namely a 5-dimensional vacuum with a cyclic isometry, which corresponds to Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory in 4-dimensional spacetime. We first recall the behaviour of Killing horizons and its generators under bundle lift and projection. We then show that the property of compact surfaces of being (stably) marginally trapped is preserved under lift and projection provided the appropriate ("Pauli-") conformal scaling is used for the spacetime metric. We also discuss and compare recently proven area inequalities for stable axially symmetric 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional marginally outer trapped surfaces.

Tim-Torben Paetz; Walter Simon

2013-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

459

Pierre Auger Observatory Surface Detector Cabling Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ELECTRONICS METAL BOX Motherboard (PCC/CdF) MBB1 2 push-in terminals (tech name?) - 24V power in MBJ8 HE10 a comprehensive list of connectors on boards, terminals, feedthroughs, etc; that is, anything which constitutes used here. Pinouts for the sockets and terminals must also be collected. Connector part numbers, hole

460

Geothermal Exploration Using Surface Mercury Geochemistry | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Mercury Geochemistry Surface Mercury Geochemistry Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Geothermal Exploration Using Surface Mercury Geochemistry Details Activities (5) Areas (3) Regions (0) Abstract: Shallow, soil-mercury surveys can be used effectively in exploration for geothermal resources. Soil-mercury data from six areas in Nevada, California and New Mexico are analyzed using contour maps, histogram and probability graphs. Plotting on probability graphs allows background and anomalous populations to be resolved even when considerable overlap between populations is present. As is shown in several examples, separate soil-mercury populations can be plausibly interpreted. Mercury data can significantly enhance the structural understanding of a prospect

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terminal surface area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Manhattan Project: Tech Area Gallery  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

TECH AREA GALLERY (LARGE) TECH AREA GALLERY (LARGE) Los Alamos: The Laboratory Resources > Photo Gallery All of the photographs below are of the "Tech Area" at Los Alamos during or shortly after the wartime years. If this page is taking a long time to load, click here for a photo gallery with smaller versions of the same images. There is a map of the Tech Area at the top and again at the bottom. The first image below is courtesy the Los Alamos National Laboratory. All of the other photographs are reproduced from Edith C. Truslow, with Kasha V. Thayer, ed., Manhattan Engineer District: Nonscientific Aspects of Los Alamos Project Y, 1942 through 1946 (Los Alamos, NM: Manhattan Engineer District, ca. 1946; first printed by Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory as LA-5200, March 1973; reprinted in 1997 by the Los Alamos Historical Society). This is a reprint of an unpublished volume originally written in 1946 by 2nd Lieutenant Edith C. Truslow, a member of the Women's Army Corps, as a contribution to the Manhattan Engineer District History.

462

Detection of Surface Temperature Anomalies in the Coso Geothermal Field  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Detection of Surface Temperature Anomalies in the Coso Geothermal Field Detection of Surface Temperature Anomalies in the Coso Geothermal Field Using Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Detection of Surface Temperature Anomalies in the Coso Geothermal Field Using Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: We use thermal infrared (TIR) data from the spaceborne ASTER instrument to detect surface temperature anomalies in the Coso geothermal field in eastern California. The identification of such anomalies in a known geothermal area serves as an incentive to apply similar markers and techniques to areas of unknown geothermal potential. We carried out field measurements concurrently with the collection of ASTER images. The field

463

Econometric Modelling of World Oil Supplies: Terminal Price and the Time to Depletion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper develops a novel approach by which to identify the price of oil at the time of depletion; the so-called "terminal price " of oil. It is shown that while the terminal price is independent of both GDP growth and the price elasticity of energy demand, it is dependent on the world real interest rate and the total life-time stock of oil resources, as well as on the marginal extraction and scarcity cost parameters. The theoretical predictions of this model are evaluated using data on the cost of extraction, cumulative production, and proven reserves. The predicted terminal prices seem sensible for a range of parameters and variables, as illustrated by the sensitivity analysis. Using the terminal price of oil, we calculate the time to depletion, and determine the extraction and price pro…les over the life-time of the resource. The extraction pro…les generated seem to be in line with the actual production and the predicted prices are generally in line with those currently observed.

Kamiar Mohaddes

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Handling Triple Hidden Terminal Problems for Multi-Channel MAC in Long-Delay Underwater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Handling Triple Hidden Terminal Problems for Multi-Channel MAC in Long-Delay Underwater Sensor-channel MAC problem in underwater acoustic sensor networks. To reduce hardware cost, only one acoustic transceiver is often preferred on every node. In a single-transceiver multi- channel long-delay underwater

Cui, Jun-Hong

465

Dynamics of initiation, termination and reinitiation of DNA translocation by the motor protein  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dynamics of initiation, termination and reinitiation of DNA translocation by the motor protein Eco two motors to translocate DNA before carrying out DNA cleavage. The motor func- tion is accomplished unit of the enzyme loads the motor subunits onto adjacent DNA by allowing them to bind and initiate

Seidel, Ralf

466

A novel terminal-controlled handover scheme in heterogeneous wireless networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the next generation heterogeneous wireless networks, a mobile terminal (MT) with a multi-interface may have network access from different service providers using various technologies. In spite of this heterogeneity, seamless intersystem mobility is ... Keywords: Fuzzy logic, Handover, Heterogeneous networks

Xu Haibo; Tian Hui; Zhang Ping

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Modelling and simulation of high capacity waterside container handling systems at deep-sea terminals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current handling systems at deep-sea container terminals run into their physical limits and new methods of handling containers are needed to deal with the ever-growing container shipping volumes. We present a domain specific simulation model of high ... Keywords: adjustable simulation model, container handling system, container workflow, productivity improvement, quay crane concepts

F. Geldof; B. C. van Haarlem; W. Lock; E. E. Roubtsova

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

An Improved Approach to Calculating Terminal Velocities of Plate-like Crystals and Graupel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of 461 planar crows and 312 graupel reported by Kajikawa have been used to develop equations for calculating the terminal velocity and mass of lump and conical graupel and of planar crystals of a variety of shapes and degrees of ...

Andrew J. Heymsfield; Masahiro Kajikawa

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Modeling of Electronically Commutated Motor Controlled Fan-powered Terminal Units  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Empirical models of airflow and power consumption were developed for series and parallel variable air volume fan powered terminal units (FPTUs). An experimental setup and test procedure were developed to test the terminal units over typical operating ranges. The terminal units in this study used either an 8 in. (20.32 cm) or a 12 in. (30.48 cm) primary air inlet. All terminal units utilized electronically commutated motor (ECM) controllers. Data collected were compared against previous data collected for silicon controlled rectifier (SCR) units. Generalized models were developed for both series and parallel units, and compared against models developed for SCR units. In addition to the performance modeling, power factor and power quality data were also collected for each terminal unit. The power quality analysis included recording and analyzing harmonic distortion for current, voltage, and power up to the 25th harmonic. The total harmonic distortion (THD) was also recorded and presented. For the series terminal units, models were developed for fan airflow, fan power, and primary airflow. The models for fan airflow all had R2 values above 0.987. The models for fan power all had R2 values above 0.968. The models for primary airflow all had R2 value