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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "term mitigation scenarios" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

South Africa Long Term Mitigation Scenarios | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South Africa Long Term Mitigation Scenarios South Africa Long Term Mitigation Scenarios Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: South Africa Long Term Mitigation Scenarios Agency/Company /Organization: South Africa Department of Environment Affairs and Tourism Sector: Energy, Land Topics: Background analysis, Low emission development planning Resource Type: Case studies/examples Website: www.erc.uct.ac.za/Research/publications/07Scenario_team-LTMS_Scenarios Country: South Africa Southern Africa Coordinates: -30.559482°, 22.937506° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-30.559482,"lon":22.937506,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

2

Electrification and Mitigation: Long-Term GHG Deep-Cut Scenario Compatible  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrification and Mitigation: Long-Term GHG Deep-Cut Scenario Compatible Electrification and Mitigation: Long-Term GHG Deep-Cut Scenario Compatible with Economic Development Speaker(s): Taishi Sugiyama Date: August 6, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Lynn Price We have analyzed scenarios of Japanese energy systems in the 21st century with special focus on the electrification and climate change mitigation. We have described the causality pathway as to how the major drivers will have impacts on the structure of energy systems and found the followings: (1) Steady electrification in the building sector is expected driven by technological progresses and social change in the absence of climate change policy; (2) With strong greenhouse gas emission constraints, the combination of accelerated electrification across all sectors and

3

Electrification and Mitigation: Long-Term GHG Deep-Cut Scenario...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and de-carbonization of power generation is most likely to evolve in the future. The scenario analysis demonstrates the unique and important contribution of the Japanese...

4

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

SciTech Connect

In this analysis, the authors projected Japan's energy demand/supply and energy-related CO{sub 2} emissions to 2050. Their analysis of various scenarios indicated that Japan's CO{sub 2} emissions in 2050 could be potentially reduced by 26-58% from the current level (FY 2005). These results suggest that Japan could set a CO{sub 2} emission reduction target for 2050 at between 30% and 60%. In order to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions by 60% in 2050 from the present level, Japan will have to strongly promote energy conservation at the same pace as an annual rate of 1.9% after the oil crises (to cut primary energy demand per GDP (TPES/GDP) in 2050 by 60% from 2005) and expand the share of non-fossil energy sources in total primary energy supply in 2050 to 50% (to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions per primary energy demand (CO{sub 2}/TPES) in 2050 by 40% from 2005). Concerning power generation mix in 2050, nuclear power will account for 60%, solar and other renewable energy sources for 20%, hydro power for 10% and fossil-fired generation for 10%, indicating substantial shift away from fossil fuel in electric power supply. Among the mitigation measures in the case of reducing CO{sub 2} emissions by 60% in 2050, energy conservation will make the greatest contribution to the emission reduction, being followed by solar power, nuclear power and other renewable energy sources. In order to realize this massive CO{sub 2} abatement, however, Japan will have to overcome technological and economic challenges including the large-scale deployment of nuclear power and renewable technologies.

Komiyama, Ryoichi; Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael; Lai, Judy; Borgeson, Sam; Coffey, Brian; Azevedo, Ines Lima

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the share of non-fossil energy sources in total primaryF Y 2050. As a result, non-fossil energy sources (nuclear,the reference scenario, non-fossil energy sources' share of

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cool Earth - Innovative Energy Technology Plan," (14) AgencySuper-Long-Term Energy Technology Roadmap (Super-Long-TermTechnology Strategy Map (Energy Technology Strategy 2007),"

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Argentina-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Argentina-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Argentina-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Argentina-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Name Argentina-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Agency/Company /Organization The Children's Investment Fund Foundation, SouthSouthNorth, University of Cape Town-Energy Research Centre, Danish Government Sector Climate, Energy Topics Baseline projection, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Pathways analysis Website http://www.mapsprogramme.org Program Start 2010 Program End 2013 Country Argentina South America References Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 MAPS Processes and Outcomes 2.1 Chile 2.2 Colombia 2.3 Peru 2.4 Brazil 2.5 Resources 2.5.1 Mitigation Action Country Studies

8

Colombia-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Colombia-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Colombia-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Colombia-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Name Colombia-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Agency/Company /Organization The Children's Investment Fund Foundation, SouthSouthNorth, University of Cape Town-Energy Research Centre, Danish Government Sector Climate, Energy Topics Baseline projection, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Pathways analysis Website http://www.mapsprogramme.org Program Start 2010 Program End 2013 Country Colombia South America References Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 MAPS Processes and Outcomes 2.1 Chile 2.2 Colombia 2.3 Peru 2.4 Brazil 2.5 Resources 2.5.1 Mitigation Action Country Studies

9

Brazil-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brazil-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Brazil-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Brazil-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Name Brazil-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Agency/Company /Organization The Children's Investment Fund Foundation, SouthSouthNorth, University of Cape Town-Energy Research Centre, Danish Government Sector Climate, Energy Topics Baseline projection, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Pathways analysis Website http://www.mapsprogramme.org Program Start 2010 Program End 2013 Country Brazil South America References Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 MAPS Processes and Outcomes 2.1 Chile 2.2 Colombia 2.3 Peru 2.4 Brazil 2.5 Resources 2.5.1 Mitigation Action Country Studies

10

Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Redirected from CIFF-Chile-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS)) (Redirected from CIFF-Chile-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS)) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Name Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Agency/Company /Organization The Children's Investment Fund Foundation, SouthSouthNorth, University of Cape Town-Energy Research Centre, Danish Government Sector Climate, Energy Topics Baseline projection, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Pathways analysis Website http://www.mapsprogramme.org Program Start 2010 Program End 2013 Country Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Peru, South Africa South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, Southern Africa References Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS)[1]

11

Chile-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Chile-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Chile-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Name Chile-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Agency/Company /Organization The Children's Investment Fund Foundation, SouthSouthNorth, University of Cape Town-Energy Research Centre, Danish Government Sector Climate, Energy Topics Baseline projection, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Pathways analysis Website http://www.mapsprogramme.org Program Start 2010 Program End 2013 Country Chile South America References Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 MAPS Processes and Outcomes 2.1 Chile 2.2 Colombia 2.3 Peru

12

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

SciTech Connect

In this analysis, the authors projected Japan's energy demand/supply and energy-related CO{sub 2} emissions to 2050. Their analysis of various scenarios indicated that Japan's CO{sub 2} emissions in 2050 could be potentially reduced by 26-58% from the current level (FY 2005). These results suggest that Japan could set a CO{sub 2} emission reduction target for 2050 at between 30% and 60%. In order to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions by 60% in 2050 from the present level, Japan will have to strongly promote energy conservation at the same pace as an annual rate of 1.9% after the oil crises (to cut primary energy demand per GDP (TPES/GDP) in 2050 by 60% from 2005) and expand the share of non-fossil energy sources in total primary energy supply in 2050 to 50% (to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions per primary energy demand (CO{sub 2}/TPES) in 2050 by 40% from 2005). Concerning power generation mix in 2050, nuclear power will account for 60%, solar and other renewable energy sources for 20%, hydro power for 10% and fossil-fired generation for 10%, indicating substantial shift away from fossil fuel in electric power supply. Among the mitigation measures in the case of reducing CO{sub 2} emissions by 60% in 2050, energy conservation will make the greatest contribution to the emission reduction, being followed by solar power, nuclear power and other renewable energy sources. In order to realize this massive CO{sub 2} abatement, however, Japan will have to overcome technological and economic challenges including the large-scale deployment of nuclear power and renewable technologies.

Komiyama, Ryoichi; Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael; Lai, Judy; Borgeson, Sam; Coffey, Brian; Azevedo, Ines Lima

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation Title Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 -...

14

Enduse Global Emissions Mitigation Scenarios (EGEMS): A New Generation of Energy Efficiency Policy Planning Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Carbon Dioxide Emissions on GNP Growth: Interpretation ofMcNeil et al Enduse Global Emissions Mitigation Scenarios (Keywords Greenhouse gas emissions, emissions scenarios,

McNeil, Michael A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Peru-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Peru-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Peru-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Peru-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Name Peru-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Agency/Company /Organization The Children's Investment Fund Foundation, SouthSouthNorth, University of Cape Town-Energy Research Centre, Danish Government Sector Climate, Energy Topics Baseline projection, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Pathways analysis Website http://www.mapsprogramme.org Program Start 2010 Program End 2013 Country Peru South America References Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 MAPS Processes and Outcomes 2.1 Chile 2.2 Colombia 2.3 Peru 2.4 Brazil 2.5 Resources 2.5.1 Mitigation Action Country Studies

16

South Africa-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » South Africa-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Argentina-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Name Argentina-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Agency/Company /Organization The Children's Investment Fund Foundation, SouthSouthNorth, University of Cape Town-Energy Research Centre, Danish Government Sector Climate, Energy Topics Baseline projection, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Pathways analysis Website http://www.mapsprogramme.org Program Start 2010 Program End 2013 Country South Africa Southern Africa References Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 MAPS Processes and Outcomes 2.1 Chile

17

Climate Change Mitigation: An Analysis of Advanced Technology Scenarios  

SciTech Connect

This report documents a scenario analysis that explores three advanced technology pathways toward climate stabilization using the MiniCAM model.

Clarke, Leon E.; Wise, Marshall A.; Placet, Marylynn; Izaurralde, R Cesar; Lurz, Joshua P.; Kim, Son H.; Smith, Steven J.; Thomson, Allison M.

2006-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

18

Enduse Global Emissions Mitigation Scenarios (EGEMS): A New Generation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Appliance Efficiency, bottom-up, china, emissions scenarios, end use, energy demand, forecasting, greenhouse gas emissions, india, modelling, Multi-Country, refrigerators URL...

19

Failure Scenarios and Mitigations and for the BaBar Superconducting Solenoid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The cryogenic department at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center is responsible for the operation, troubleshooting, and upgrade of the 1.5 Tesla superconducting solenoid detector for the BABAR B-factory experiment. Events that disable the detector are rare but significantly impact the availability of the detector for physics research. As a result, a number of systems and procedures have been developed over time to minimize the downtime of the detector, for example improved control systems, improved and automatic backup systems, and spares for all major components. Together they can prevent or mitigate many of the failures experienced by the utilities, mechanical systems, controls and instrumentation. In this paper we describe various failure scenarios, their effect on the detector, and the modifications made to mitigate the effects of the failure. As a result of these modifications the reliability of the detector has increased significantly with only 3 shutdowns of the detector due to cryogenics systems over the last 2 years.

Thompson, EunJoo; Candia, A.; Craddock, W.W.; Racine, M.; Weisend, J.G., II; /SLAC

2005-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

20

Enduse Global Emissions Mitigation Scenarios (EGEMS): A New Generation of Energy Efficiency Policy Planning Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents efforts to date and prospective goals towards development of a modelling and analysis framework which is comprehensive enough to address the global climate crisis, and detailed enough to provide policymakers with concrete targets and achievable outcomes. In terms of energy efficiency policy, this requires coverage of the entire world, with emphasis on countries and regions with large and/or rapidly growing energy-related emissions, and analysis at the 'technology' level-building end use, transport mode or industrial process. These elements have not been fully addressed by existing modelling efforts, which usually take either a top-down approach, or concentrate on a few fully industrialized countries where energy demand is well-understood. Inclusion of details such as appliance ownership rates, use patterns and efficiency levels throughout the world allows for a deeper understanding of the demand for energy today and, more importantly, over the coming decades. This is a necessary next step for energy analysts and policy makers in assessment of mitigation potentials. The modelling system developed at LBNL over the past 3 years takes advantage of experience in end use demand and in forecasting markets for energy-consuming equipment, in combination with known technology-based efficiency opportunities and policy types. A particular emphasis has been placed on modelling energy growth in developing countries. Experiences to date include analyses covering individual countries (China and India), end uses (refrigerators and air conditioners) and policy types (standards and labelling). Each of these studies required a particular effort in data collection and model refinement--they share, however, a consistent approach and framework which allows comparison, and forms the foundation of a comprehensive analysis system leading to a roadmap to address the greenhouse gas mitigation targetslikely to be set in the coming years.

McNeil, Michael A.; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; McMahon, James E.

2009-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "term mitigation scenarios" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Green Roof Mitigation Potential for a Proxy Future Climate Scenario in Chicago, Illinois  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Research version of the Weather Research and Forecasting Model (ARW) coupled with an urban canopy model is used to investigate the potential of vegetative (green) roof technology to mitigate against ongoing climate warming and ...

Kathryn R. Smith; Paul J. Roebber

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Economically consistent long-term scenarios for air pollutant emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pollutant emissions such as aerosols and tropospheric ozone precursors substantially influence climate. While future century-scale scenarios for these emissions have become more realistic through the inclusion of emission controls, they still potentially lack consistency between surface pollutant concentrations and regional levels of affluence. We demonstrate a methodology combining use of an integrated assessment model and a three-dimensional atmospheric chemical transport model, whereby a reference scenario is constructed by requiring consistent surface pollutant levels as a function of regional income over the 21st century. By adjusting air pollutant emission control parameters, we improve agreement between modeled PM2.5 and economic income among world regions through time; agreement for ozone is also improved but is more difficult to achieve because of the strong influence of upwind world regions. The scenario examined here was used as the basis for one of the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios. This analysis methodology could also be used to examine the consistency of other pollutant emission scenarios.

Smith, Steven J.; West, Jason; Kyle, G. Page

2011-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

23

Scenario  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scenario Scenario HELP Index Summary Scenario References Student Pages A United States Regional Study The 4th and 5th grade gifted and talented students in the Project Idea Plus classes at Highlands School and Mill Street School apparently have just received e-mail from Moscow, Russia! Actually, these two classes are involved in a humanities simulation. Check out these hints for facilitating the unit. Most school district curricula include the traditional United States regional study. This project is an innovative way to cover the same material emphasizing engaged learning with the Internet. It is a unit that integrates social studies and language arts as well as thinking skills. The teachers have planned this project so that their classes will be able to interact using telecommunications. This offers an opportunity for students

24

scenario  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scenario Scenario Summary Student Page Internet Links Index These are the first few days of the 96 - 97 course and a new list of students has been given to the teacher. Twenty-seven new students will form his class, some with familiar surnames. Most of the students in the bilingual 4th & 5th grade need extra help in some of the subject areas of instruction. Some students just came from another country and have very little educational experiences. Most of them lack the Basic English skills to succeed and compete in a regular classroom. The challenge is there! How being so close to the XXI Century, "The Information Era," will the teacher be able to provide his students with, the necessary skills to succeed in the job market of the future? Fortunately, a few months ago the teacher was

25

Scenario  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Project RELATIVITY Scenario HELP Index Summary Scenario Reference Student Pages Introduction: Mr. Brian Wegley is part of a talented science staff at Glenbrook South High School. Glenbrook South High School is set in an educationally supportive and affluent community. The physics staff work in teams teaching physics to over 80% of the student population and are constantly looking for ways to use technology to empower students with the ability to apply learned concepts of physics to their lives. With this goal in mind, the physics staff has instituted a second-semester project which is an engaging, student directed project. It currently runs parallel with a traditionally-formatted, highly-structured physics course and is preceded by many smaller, developmental projects during the first semester. The

26

scenario  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SPACE SPACE Scenario HELP Index Summary Scenario Internet Links Student Pages September The students from 7-2 team at Grissom Junior High have started the school year by sending e-mail messages about themselves to sixth graders at a Chicago public school and high school students in Nashville. They have sent a message about how they are looking forward to sharing ideas on astronomy and short biography about Grissom and themselves. They hope to set up a project with the two schools. Other students want to know if other schools around the world could be contacted. The math teacher says she will try to make arrangements but to see if they could come up with some ideas on ways they could contact other schools themselves. Astronomy is part of the seventh grade science curriculum. This year, the

27

The implications of future building scenarios for long-term building energy research and development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a discussion of alternative future scenarios of the building environment to the year 2010 and assesses the implications these scenarios present for long-term building energy R and D. The scenarios and energy R and D implications derived from them are intended to serve as the basis from which a strategic plan can be developed for the management of R and D programs conducted by the Office of Buildings and Community Systems, US Department of Energy. The scenarios and analysis presented here have relevance not only for government R and D programs; on the contrary, it is hoped that the results of this effort will be of interest and useful to researchers in both private and public sector organizations that deal with building energy R and D. Making R and D decisions today based on an analysis that attempts to delineate the nexus of events 25 years in the future are clearly decisions made in the face of uncertainty. Yet, the effective management of R and D programs requires a future-directed understanding of markets, technological developments, and environmental factors, as well as their interactions. The analysis presented in this report is designed to serve that need. Although the probability of any particular scenario actually occurring is uncertain, the scenarios to be presented are sufficiently robust to set bounds within which to examine the interaction of forces that will shape the future building environment.

Flynn, W.T.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) Agency/Company /Organization: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: GHG inventory, Pathways analysis Website: ies.lbl.gov/taxonomy/term/34 References: GCOMAP Project [1] Logo: Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) "The GCOMAP project reported on the global potential for carbon sequestration in forest plantations, and the reduction of carbon emissions from deforestation, in response to six carbon price scenarios from 2000 to 2100. These carbon price scenarios cover a range typically seen in global

29

Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) (Redirected from GCOMAP) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) Agency/Company /Organization: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: GHG inventory, Pathways analysis Website: ies.lbl.gov/taxonomy/term/34 References: GCOMAP Project [1] Logo: Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) "The GCOMAP project reported on the global potential for carbon sequestration in forest plantations, and the reduction of carbon emissions from deforestation, in response to six carbon price scenarios from 2000 to 2100. These carbon price scenarios cover a range typically seen in global

30

The short and long term role of the ocean in Greenhouse Gas mitigation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

JY01ax.doc 19 May 2001 JY01ax.doc 19 May 2001 The short and long term role of the ocean in Greenhouse Gas mitigation Ian S F Jones, Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University, New York i.jones@ldeo.columbia.edu Helen E Young Earth Ocean and Space, Australian Technology Park, Sydney, HelenYoung@ozemail.com.au Introduction The carbon dioxide concentration in the atmosphere is rising rapidly, mostly as a result of fossil fuel burning. This is leading to more trapping of solar radiation in the atmosphere with the expectation that the world's climate will change. Rapid climate change has a downside risk of endangering the food security of the poor and raising the spectra of large scale transmigration. The UNFCCC was an agreement amongst most of the sovereign nations of the world

31

An Analysis of Near-Term Hydrogen Vehicle Rollout Scenarios for Southern California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electricity from grid or solar PV. We developed scenarios tovia grid) Onsite electrolysis (Solar PV at station) Table 10ONSITE ELECTROLYSIS: 100% Solar PV $20/kg Electricity for

Nicholas, Michael A; Ogden, J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Long-term land use future scenarios for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

In order to facilitate decision regarding environmental restoration activities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), the United States Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) conducted analyses to project reasonable future land use scenarios at the INEL for the next 100 years. The methodology for generating these scenarios included: review of existing DOE plans, policy statements, and mission statements pertaining to the INEL; review of surrounding land use characteristics and county developments policies; solicitation of input from local, county, state and federal planners, policy specialists, environmental professionals, and elected officials; and review of environmental and development constraints at the INEL site that could influence future land use.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Topical report on release scenario analysis of long-term management of high-level defense waste at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

Potential release scenarios for the defense high-level waste (HLW) on the Hanford Site are presented. Presented in this report are the three components necessary for evaluating the various alternatives under consideration for long-term management of Hanford defense HLW: identification of scenarios and events which might directly or indirectly disrupt radionuclide containment barriers; geotransport calculations of waste migration through the site media; and consequence (dose) analyses based on groundwater and air pathways calculations. The scenarios described in this report provide the necessary parameters for radionuclide transport and consequence analysis. Scenarios are categorized as either bounding or nonbounding. Bounding scenarios consider worst case or what if situations where an actual and significant release of waste material to the environment would happen if the scenario were to occur. Bounding scenarios include both near-term and long-term scenarios. Near-term scenarios are events which occur at 100 years from 1990. Long term scenarios are potential events considered to occur at 1000 and 10,000 years from 1990. Nonbounding scenarios consider events which result in insignificant releases or no release at all to the environment. Three release mechanisms are described in this report: (1) direct exposure of waste to the biosphere by a defined sequence of events (scenario) such as human intrusion by drilling; (2) radionuclides contacting an unconfined aquifer through downward percolation of groundwater or a rising water table; and (3) cataclysmic or explosive release of radionuclides by such mechanisms as meteorite impact, fire and explosion, criticality, or seismic events. Scenarios in this report present ways in which these release mechanisms could occur at a waste management facility. The scenarios are applied to the two in-tank waste management alternatives: in-situ disposal and continued present action.

Wallace, R.W.; Landstrom, D.K.; Blair, S.C.; Howes, B.W.; Robkin, M.A.; Benson, G.L.; Reisenauer, A.E.; Walters, W.H.; Zimmerman, M.G.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

higlily efficient electricity distribution equipments (in electricity transmission and distribution equipments by

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

equivalent and its electricity demand at 19 Mtoe. If wastemeet water heating and electricity demand in the residentialJournal Vol.4, No.4 electricity demand, fuel requirements

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

feasibility of new nuclear power plant construction may growadditional expansion of nuclear power plant, and CCS (carbonconstruct 13 nuclear power plants (with a total capacity of

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

higlily efficient natural gas power generation) Developing Ccoal natural gas thermal power generation Sources : Preparednatural gas demand will fall slowly because of improvements in L N G thermal power generation

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy sources for 20%, hydro power for 10% and fossil-firedetc. Wind power Solar Geothermal ^ Hydro O LO CO CT> Chydro and geothermal) are assumed to expand their share of electric utilities' power

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gasoline (with a 3% bioethanol content) under the referencefrom Brazil and other bioethanol producing countries. We2050. Biofuels (including bioethanol) have been globally

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Generation Roadmap toward 2030 (PV2030)," 2004 (16) NEDO, "new nuclear plants by 2030, as assumed for the referencegradually in or after 2030. These systems are estimated to

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "term mitigation scenarios" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be expected to reduce energy consumption by about 15% (=(69-sectors expanded energy consumption on a lull in Fig. 4-1factors behind energy consumption, we have paid attention to

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

industrial furnaces/processes (SCOPE 2 I next-generation coke ovens,industrial sector will repair and improve existing production processes and introduce next-generation coke ovens

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of tons oil equivalent (Mtoe) 700 i Sources : Estimates byas nuclear, oil will be the most important energy sourcenuclear energy, oil will be the most important energy source

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2004 (16) NEDO, "Wind Power Generation Roadmap," 2005 (17)from 2005). Concerning power generation mix in 2050, nuclearintroduction of nuclear power generation is assumed from the

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vol.4, No.4 followed by solar power, nuclear Fig. 2 powersources including solar power will expand substantially.P V and concentrated solar power generation. As a result,

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of 1,500-degree-Celsius combined cycle plants. Oil thermalintegrated gasification combined cycle) and other highlyof 1,700-degree-Celsius combined cycle generation systems.

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the present level. Natural gas demand is expected to avoid2030 to 2050, however, natural gas demand will fall slowly

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

o f tedinologies Ibi nuclear, solar PV aid other new energj'cell vehicles In 2050: Solar PV generation at 100 millionvehicles) in 2050 In 2050: Solar PV generation at 40 million

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

renewable energy sources (excluding hydro and geothermal)C O ; Hydro and 4 Po geothermal energies I Nuclear Gas I OilNuclear Hydro/geothermal Renewables Primary energy supply

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

efficiency and in the coke manufacturing efficiency in thesystems and next-generation coke ovens. Demand for steamingsystems and next-generation coke ovens. Steaming coal

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Risk Mitigation Strategies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical update builds upon the development of attack/failure and cyber-physical attack scenarios focused on combined cyber-physical attacks. These scenarios include threats and vulnerabilities that may be exploited by well-financed and motivated entities. It also leverages risk assessment processes developed to address combined cyber-physical attack scenarios. The framework in this update supports the further development of risk mitigation strategies focused on combined cyber-physical ...

2012-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

52

The Role of China in Mitigating Climate Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore short- and long-term implications of several energy scenarios of Chinas role in efforts to mitigate global climate risk. The focus is on the impacts on Chinas energy system and GDP growth, and on global climate ...

Paltsev, S.

53

Kootenai River Wildlife Habitat Enhancement Project : Long-term Bighorn Sheep/Mule Deer Winter and Spring Habitat Improvement Project : Wildlife Mitigation Project, Libby Dam, Montana : Management Plan.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Libby hydroelectric project, located on the Kootenai River in northwestern Montana, resulted in several impacts to the wildlife communities which occupied the habitats inundated by Lake Koocanusa. Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, in cooperation with the other management agencies, developed an impact assessment and a wildlife and wildlife habitat mitigation plan for the Libby hydroelectric facility. In response to the mitigation plan, Bonneville Power Administration funded a cooperative project between the Kootenai National Forest and Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks to develop a long-term habitat enhancement plan for the bighorn sheep and mule deer winter and spring ranges adjacent to Lake Koocanusa. The project goal is to rehabilitate 3372 acres of bighorn sheep and 16,321 acres of mule deer winter and spring ranges on Kootenai National Forest lands adjacent to Lake Koocanusa and to monitor and evaluate the effects of implementing this habitat enhancement work. 2 refs.

Yde, Chis

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

PERSPECTIVES Scenarios &  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Buildings Transport Industry Transformation Power Generation ACT Scenarios 2050 +137% #12;INTERNATIONAL Buildings Transport Industry Transformation Power Generation ACT Scenarios 2050 +137% +6% #12;INTERNATIONAL Baseline 2030 Baseline 2050 Map No CCS Other Buildings Transport Industry Transformation Power Generation

55

Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems. Perspectives on the geological and hydrological aspects of long-term release scenario analyses  

SciTech Connect

Information that may be relevant to individuals involved with analyzing long-term release scenarios of specific repositories for nuclear waste is presented. The bulk of the information is derived from recent studies in West Germany and the United States. Emphasis is on the specific geological and hydrological phenomena that, alone or in concert, could potentially perturb the area around specific repository sites. Research is continuing on most of the topics discussed within this report. Because research is ongoing, statements and conclusions described in this document are subject to change. The main topics of this report are: (1) fracturing, (2) geohydrology, (3) magmatic activity, and (4) geomorphology. Therefore, the site-specific nature of the problem cannot be overemphasized. As an example of how one might combine the many synergistic and time-dependent parameters into a concise format the reader is referred to A Conceputal Simulation Model for Release Scenario Analysis of a Hypothetical Site in Columbia Plateau Basalts, PNL-2892. For additional details on the topics in this report, the reader is referred to the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) consultant report listed in the bibliography.

Stottlemyre, J.A.; Wallace, R.W.; Benson, G.L.; Zellmer, J.T.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

How should indicators be found for scenario monitoring ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scenario planning is a widely used approach for developing long-term strategies. The typical scenario process involves developing scenarios, identifying strategies whose success is contingent on the scenario, and monitoring ...

He, Zheng, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Unconventional Nuclear Warfare Defense (UNWD) containment and mitigation subtask.  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this subtask of the Unconventional Nuclear Warfare Design project was to demonstrate mitigation technologies for radiological material dispersal and to assist planners with incorporation of the technologies into a concept of operations. The High Consequence Assessment and Technology department at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has studied aqueous foam's ability to mitigate the effects of an explosively disseminated radiological dispersal device (RDD). These benefits include particle capture of respirable radiological particles, attenuation of blast overpressure, and reduction of plume buoyancy. To better convey the aqueous foam attributes, SNL conducted a study using the Explosive Release Atmospheric Dispersion model, comparing the effects of a mitigated and unmitigated explosive RDD release. Results from this study compared health effects and land contamination between the two scenarios in terms of distances of effect, population exposure, and remediation costs. Incorporating aqueous foam technology, SNL created a conceptual design for a stationary containment area to be located at a facility entrance with equipment that could minimize the effects from the detonation of a vehicle transported RDD. The containment design was evaluated against several criteria, including mitigation ability (both respirable and large fragment particle capture as well as blast overpressure suppression), speed of implementation, cost, simplicity, and required space. A mock-up of the conceptual idea was constructed at SNL's 9920 explosive test site to demonstrate the containment design.

Wente, William Baker

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

IPCC Special Report on Emissions Scenarios  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

IPCC Special Report on Emissions Scenarios IPCC Special Report on Emissions Scenarios Get Javascript Other reports in this collection Special Report on Emissions Scenarios Foreword Preface Summary for policymakers Technical Summary Chapters Chapter 1: Background and Overview Chapter 2: An Overview of the Scenario Literature Chapter 3: Scenario Driving Forces Chapter 4: An Overview of Scenarios Chapter 5: Emission Scenarios Chapter 6: Summary Discussions and Recommendations Appendices index I: SRES Terms of Reference: New IPCC Emission Scenarios II: SRES Writing Team and SRES Reviewers III: Definition of SRES World Region IV: Six Modeling Approaches V: Database Description VI: Open Process VII Data tables VIII Acronyms and Abbreviations IX Chemical Symbols X Units XI Glossary of Terms XII List of Major IPCC Reports

59

Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

linking sectoral and economy-wide models, is progressing well and set for completion by August 2013. The MAPS Proposal, institutional framework and objectives are under...

60

RenewableElectricityGenerationinGermany: AMetaAnalysisofMitigationScenarios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-IFU), Forschungszentrum, Karlsruhe, Germany; (7) Institut für Energiewirtschaft und Rationelle Energieanwendung (IER

Stock, Manfred

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "term mitigation scenarios" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

The role of nuclear energy in mitigating greenhouse warming  

SciTech Connect

A behavioral, top-down, forced-equilibrium market model of long-term ({approximately} 2,100) global energy-economics interactions has been modified with a bottom-up nuclear energy model and used to construct consistent scenarios describing future impacts of civil nuclear materials flows in an expanding, multi-regional (13) world economy. The relative measures and tradeoffs between economic (GNP, tax impacts, productivity, etc.), environmental (greenhouse gas accumulations, waste accumulation, proliferation risk), and energy (resources, energy mixes, supply-side versus demand-side attributes) interactions that emerge from these analyses are focused herein on advancing understanding of the role that nuclear energy (and other non-carbon energy sources) might play in mitigating greenhouse warming. Two ostensibly opposing scenario drivers are investigated: (a) demand-side improvements in (non-price-induced) autonomous energy efficiency improvements; and (b) supply-side carbon-tax inducements to shift energy mixes towards reduced- or non-carbon forms. In terms of stemming greenhouse warming for minimal cost of greenhouse-gas abatement, and with the limitations of the simplified taxing schedule used, a symbiotic combination of these two approaches may offer advantages not found if each is applied separately.

Krakowski, R.A.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

62

ULCOS scenarios and economic modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling activities and scenario building are at the heart of the economic analysis delivered by the ULCOS program. Two main objectives were followed in the framework of SP9. First the modeling team had to provide a set of coherent energy economic scenarios using POLES model. Second, the economic conditions for the emergence of the ULCOS technologies were analyzed. ULCOS contributes to the elaboration of contrasted scenarios that the steel industry could face in the long term. To aim at these objectives specific tools have been used: POLES model for the global energy system modeling and ISIM model for the steel sector based prospective ([1] Hidalgo, 2003). The most promising steel production technologies identified in ULCOS Phase 1 have been introduced into ISIM as generic technologies. ISIM was then integrated as a module into POLES modeling system. The main model outputs are the energy prices and mixes and the steel sector balances with a focus on the technology mix. Actually the climate policy scenarios developped in project allow making recommendations to the steel industry in terms of sustainable development but also in terms of business strategy.

Elie Bellevrat

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Mitigation Efforts Calculator (MEC)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Mitigation Efforts Calculator (MEC) has been developed by the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) as an online tool to compare greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation proposals by various countries for the year 2020. In this paper, ... Keywords: Business intelligence, Cost curves, Decision model, Interactive system, Optimisation

Thanh Binh Nguyen; Lena Hoeglund-Isaksson; Fabian Wagner; Wolfgang Schoepp

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

MITIGATION ACTION PLAN  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MITIGATION ACTION PLAN MITIGATION ACTION PLAN KEMPER COUNTY IGCC PROJECT KEMPER COUNTY, MISSISSIPPI U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory September 2010 2 INTRODUCTION The Department of Energy (DOE) issued a Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Kemper County IGCC Project (Project) (DOE/EIS-0409) in May 2010 and a Record of Decision (ROD) in August 2010 (75 FR 51248). The ROD identified commitments to mitigate potential adverse impacts associated with the project. This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) describes the monitoring and mitigation actions the recipient must implement during the design, construction, and demonstration of the Project. DOE prepared this MAP in accordance with 10 CFR § 1021.331. PURPOSE Section 1021.331 of the DOE regulations implementing NEPA (10 CFR Part 1021) provides

65

Mitigation Action Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) focuses on mitigation commitments stated in the Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS) and the Record of Decision (ROD) for the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1). Specific commitments and mitigation implementation actions are listed in Appendix A-Mitigation Actions, and form the central focus of this MAP. They will be updated as needed to allow for organizational, regulatory, or policy changes. It is the intent of DOE to comply with all applicable federal, state, and local environmental, safety, and health laws and regulations. Eighty-six specific commitments were identified in the SEIS and associated ROD which pertain to continued operation of NPR-1 with petroleum production at the Maximum Efficient Rate (MER). The mitigation measures proposed are expected to reduce impacts as much as feasible, however, as experience is gained in actual implementation of these measures, some changes may be warranted.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Long term performance of radon mitigation systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Renewable Energy, Office of Building Technology, State andand Renewable Energy, Office of Building Technology, State and

Prill, R.; Fisk, W.J.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Long term performance of radon mitigation systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wood stove in house ESP116 required adding additional combustionwood stove located on the main level. Providing additional combustion

Prill, R.; Fisk, W.J.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Long term performance of radon mitigation systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in homes with active sub-slab ventilation House ID ESPESP108 ESP 111 ESP 113 ESP 119 ESP 120 ECD026 Location B, M B,

Prill, R.; Fisk, W.J.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Air Pollution Project: Scenario  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Summary HELP Index Summary Scenario Internet Links Student Pages SubjectContent Area: ScienceChemistry, Environment - Air Pollution Target Audience: High school chemistry...

70

COMMISSION SCENARIO ANALYSES OF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

high penetrations of energy efficiency measures and renewable energy generation (both rooftop solar efficiency, renewable generation, solar photo voltaic, greenhouse gases, power generation, scenario analysis

71

Battery Standard Scenario  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scenario: Fast Tracking a Battery Standard. ... with developing a new standard specifying quality controls for the development of batteries used in ...

72

EPR Severe Accident Threats and Mitigation  

SciTech Connect

Despite the extremely low EPR core melt frequency, an improved defence-in-depth approach is applied in order to comply with the EPR safety target: no stringent countermeasures should be necessary outside the immediate plant vicinity like evacuation, relocation or food control other than the first harvest in case of a severe accident. Design provisions eliminate energetic events and maintain the containment integrity and leak-tightness during the entire course of the accident. Based on scenarios that cover a broad range of physical phenomena and which provide a sound envelope of boundary conditions associated with each containment challenge, a selection of representative loads has been done, for which mitigation measures have to cope with. This paper presents the main critical threats and the approach used to mitigate those threats. (authors)

Azarian, G. [Framatome ANP SAS, Tour Areva, Place de la Coupole 92084 Paris la Defense (France); Kursawe, H.M.; Nie, M.; Fischer, M.; Eyink, J. [Framatome ANP GmbH, Freyeslebenstrasse, 1, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany); Stoudt, R.H. [Framatome ANP Inc. - 3315 Old Forest Rd, Lynchburgh, VA 24501 (United States)

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Monitoring and Mitigation of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mitigation of Mitigation of Sustained Localized Pitting Corrosion FINAL REPORT DOE FEW 49297 YuPo J. Lin, Edward J. St.Martin, and James R. Frank Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL 60439 January 2003 Argonne National Laboratory 9700 S. Cass Avenue Argonne, IL 60439 Monitoring and Mitigation of Sustained Localized Pitting Corrosion Submitted to: Nancy C. Comstock U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Petroleum Technology Office By: YuPo J. Lin, Edward J. St.Martin, and James R. Frank Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL 60439 January 2003 The submitted manuscript has been created by the University of Chicago as Operator of Argonne National Laboratory ("Argonne") under Contract No. W-31-109-Eng-38 with the U.S. Department of Energy. The U.S. Government retains for itself, and others acting on

74

Paving materials for heat island mitigation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Paving materials for heat island mitigation Paving materials for heat island mitigation Title Paving materials for heat island mitigation Publication Type Report Year of Publication 1997 Authors Pomerantz, Melvin, Hashem Akbari, Allan Chen, Haider Taha, and Arthur H. Rosenfeld Keywords Cool Pavements, Heat Island Abstract This report summarizes paving materials suitable for urban streets, driveways, parking lots and walkways. The authors evaluate materials for their abilities to reflect sunlight, which will reduce their temperatures. This in turn reduces the excess air temperature of cities (the heat island effect). The report presents the compositions of the materials, their suitability for particular applications, and their approximate costs (in 1996). Both new and resurfacing are described. They conclude that, although light-colored materials may be more expensive than conventional black materials, a thin layer of light-colored pavement may produce energy savings and smog reductions whose long-term worth is greater than the extra cost.

75

SO3 Mitigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a summary of current utility operating experience in control of gas phase sulfuric acid emissions. It provides guidance for those contemplating the installation of an SO3 mitigation technology based on experience and lessons learned from utilities that have retrofitted different technologies.

2006-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

76

Climate change 2007 - mitigation of climate change  

SciTech Connect

This volume of the Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) provides a comprehensive, state-of-the-art and worldwide overview of scientific knowledge related to the mitigation of climate change. It includes a detailed assessment of costs and potentials of mitigation technologies and practices, implementation barriers, and policy options for the sectors: energy supply, transport, buildings, industry, agriculture, forestry and waste management. It links sustainable development policies with climate change practices. This volume will again be the standard reference for all those concerned with climate change. Contents: Foreword; Preface; Summary for policymakers; Technical Summary; 1. Introduction; 2. Framing issues; 3. Issues related to mitigation in the long term context; 4. Energy supply; 5. Transport and its infrastructure; 6. Residential and commercial buildings; 7. Industry; 8. Agriculture; 9. Forestry; 10. Waste management; 11. Mitigation from a cross sectoral perspective; 12. Sustainable development and mitigation; 13. Policies, instruments and co-operative agreements. 300 figs., 50 tabs., 3 annexes.

Metz, B.; Davidson, O.; Bosch, P.; Dave, R.; Meyer, L. (eds.)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

wind engineering & natural disaster mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wind engineering & natural disaster mitigation #12;wind engineering & natural disaster mitigation Investment WindEEE Dome at Advanced Manufacturing Park $31million Insurance Research Lab for Better Homes $8million Advanced Facility for Avian Research $9million #12;wind engineering & natural disaster mitigation

Sinnamon, Gordon J.

78

Air Pollution Project: Scenario  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scenario Scenario HELP Index Summary Scenario Internet Links Student Pages Oak Park and River Forest High School in Oak Park, IL, is a four-year (9-12) comprehensive high school with an enrollment of approximately 2800 students. The communities of Oak Park and River Forest are located just west of Chicago. Student backgrounds vary greatly socio-economically, ethnically (63% Caucasian, 28% African-American, 4% Hispanic, 4% Asian) and culturally. Average student standardized test scores are above the state and national averages. The chemistry class is a cross section of the lower 70% of the school community. Students in Ms. Bardeen's regular chemistry class, grades 10, 11 & 12 enter the computer lab, access the Internet on their computers, and begin to work with their teams on their current project. Students are busy talking with

79

Salt Creek Scenario  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scenario Scenario HELP Index Summary Scenario References Student Pages Two branches of Salt Creek run through the city of Rolling Meadows, Illinois, not far from our school. Five members of our team of eighth grade teachers from different subject areas (science, language arts, bilingual education and special education), decided to develop an interdisciplinary study of Salt Creek as a way of giving our students authentic experiences in environmental studies. The unit begins when students enter school in August, running through the third week of September, and resuming for three weeks in October. Extension activities based on using the data gathered at the creek continue throughout the school year, culminating in a presentation at a city council meeting in the spring.

80

Mitigation Action Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

212 212 Mitigation Action Plan for the Lease of Land for the Development of a Research Park at Los Alamos National Laboratory Departme~t of Energy Albuquerque Operations Office Los Alamos Area Office Los Alamos, New Mexico MITIGATION ACTION PLAN for the LEASE OF LAND FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF A RESEARCH PARK AT LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY Background on the Lease of Land at Los Alamos National Laboratory: The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) has approved an Environmental Assessment (EA) on the Lease of Land for the Development of a Research Park at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)(DOE/EA-1212), Los Alamos, New Mexico. The DOE released a Predecisional Draft of this EA for State and Tribal review and made the draft document available to the public on July 24, 1997 for

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "term mitigation scenarios" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Peaking of world oil production: Impacts, mitigation, & risk management  

SciTech Connect

The peaking of world oil production presents the U.S. and the world with an unprecedented risk management problem. As peaking is approached, liquid fuel prices and price volatility will increase dramatically, and, without timely mitigation, the economic, social, and political costs will be unprecedented. Viable mitigation options exist on both the supply and demand sides, but to have substantial impact, they must be initiated more than a decade in advance of peaking.... The purpose of this analysis was to identify the critical issues surrounding the occurrence and mitigation of world oil production peaking. We simplified many of the complexities in an effort to provide a transparent analysis. Nevertheless, our study is neither simple nor brief. We recognize that when oil prices escalate dramatically, there will be demand and economic impacts that will alter our simplified assumptions. Consideration of those feedbacks will be a daunting task but one that should be undertaken. Our aim in this study is to-- Summarize the difficulties of oil production forecasting; Identify the fundamentals that show why world oil production peaking is such a unique challenge; Show why mitigation will take a decade or more of intense effort; Examine the potential economic effects of oil peaking; Describe what might be accomplished under three example mitigation scenarios. Stimulate serious discussion of the problem, suggest more definitive studies, and engender interest in timely action to mitigate its impacts.

Hirsch, R.L. (SAIC); Bezdek, Roger (MISI); Wendling, Robert (MISI)

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 1/2/2003 through 4/01/2003. As indicated in the list of accomplishments below we are progressing with long-term model scale bioreactor tests and are completing final preparations for pilot scale bioreactor testing. Specific results and accomplishments for the first quarter of 2003 are included.

Dr. Gregory Kremer; Dr. David J. Bayless; Dr. Morgan Vis; Dr. Michael Prudich; Dr. Keith Cooksey; Dr. Jeff Muhs

2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

83

Mitigation Options in Forestry, Land-Use, Change and Biomass Burning in Africa  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Mitigation options to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and sequester carbon in land use sectors are describe in some detail. The paper highlights those options in the forestry sector, which are more relevant to different parts of Africa. It briefly outlines a bottom-up methodological framework for comprehensively assessing mitigation options in land use sectors. This method emphasizes the application of end-use demand projections to construct a baseline and mitigation scenarios and explicitly addresses the carbon storage potential on land and in wood products, as well as use of wood to substitute for fossil fuels. Cost-effectiveness indicators for ranking mitigation options are proposed, including those, which account for non-carbon monetary benefits such as those derived from forest products, as well as opportunity cost of pursuing specific mitigation option. The paper finally surveys the likely policies, barriers and incentives to implement such mitigation options in African countries .

Makundi, Willy R.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Eco-efficiency for greenhouse gas emissions mitigation of municipal solid waste management: A case study of Tianjin, China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The issue of municipal solid waste (MSW) management has been highlighted in China due to the continually increasing MSW volumes being generated and the limited capacity of waste treatment facilities. This article presents a quantitative eco-efficiency (E/E) analysis on MSW management in terms of greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation. A methodology for E/E analysis has been proposed, with an emphasis on the consistent integration of life cycle assessment (LCA) and life cycle costing (LCC). The environmental and economic impacts derived from LCA and LCC have been normalized and defined as a quantitative E/E indicator. The proposed method was applied in a case study of Tianjin, China. The study assessed the current MSW management system, as well as a set of alternative scenarios, to investigate trade-offs between economy and GHG emissions mitigation. Additionally, contribution analysis was conducted on both LCA and LCC to identify key issues driving environmental and economic impacts. The results show that the current Tianjin's MSW management system emits the highest GHG and costs the least, whereas the situation reverses in the integrated scenario. The key issues identified by the contribution analysis show no linear relationship between the global warming impact and the cost impact in MSW management system. The landfill gas utilization scenario is indicated as a potential optimum scenario by the proposed E/E analysis, given the characteristics of MSW, technology levels, and chosen methodologies. The E/E analysis provides an attractive direction towards sustainable waste management, though some questions with respect to uncertainty need to be discussed further.

Zhao Wei, E-mail: zhaowei.tju@gmail.com [College of Civil Engineering and Architecture, Liaoning University of Technology, 121000 Jinzhou (China); Institute of Environmental Sciences (CML), Leiden University, P.O. Box 9518, 2300RA Leiden (Netherlands); Huppes, Gjalt, E-mail: huppes@cml.leidenuniv.nl [Institute of Environmental Sciences (CML), Leiden University, P.O. Box 9518, 2300RA Leiden (Netherlands); Voet, Ester van der, E-mail: Voet@cml.leidenuniv.nl [Institute of Environmental Sciences (CML), Leiden University, P.O. Box 9518, 2300RA Leiden (Netherlands)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

85

Enterprise mobile product strategy using scenario planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Mobile industry is changing at a rapid pace and so is the behavior of enterprise workforce which uses mobile technologies. When planning for a long-term product roadmap, one has to consider a myriad of evolution trends and forecasts to determine ... Keywords: Mobile enterprise, product strategy, scenario planning, strategic framework, wireless technology

Sami Muneer; Chetan Sharma

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Sight and Sound - Scenario  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scenario Scenario Summary Student Pages Internet Links Index Introduction Development/Rationale for the Year-End Project Teacher Preparation for the Year-End Project The Sight and Sound Project - an Anecdotal Account Introduction to and Selection of Year-End Projects Conducting the Literature Search Project Proposal Conducting the Experiments Wrapping up with the Reports and Presentations Introduction: Mr. Tom Henderson is part of a talented science staff at Glenbrook South High School. Glenbrook South High School (GBS) is set in an educationally supportive and affluent community. The physics staff work in teams teaching physics to over 80 percent of the student population and are constantly looking for ways to use technology to empower students with the ability to apply learned concepts of physics to their lives. With this goal in mind,

87

Relative outcomes of climate change mitigation related to global  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Relative outcomes of climate change mitigation related to global Relative outcomes of climate change mitigation related to global temperature versus sea-level rise Submitted by mkaczmar on February 8, 2013 - 15:19 Authors: Gerald A. Meehl, Aixue Hu, Claudia Tebaldi, Julie M. Arblaster, Warren M. Washington, Haiyan Teng, Benjamin M. Sanderson, Toby Ault, Warren G. Strand & James B. White III There is a common perception that, if human societies make the significant adjustments necessary to substantively cut emissions of greenhouse gases, global temperature increases could be stabilized, and the most dangerous consequences of climate change could be avoided. Here we show results from global coupled climate model simulations with the new representative concentration pathway mitigation scenarios to 2300 to illustrate that, with

88

Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary of transportation greenhouse gas mitigation optionsof alternative fuels. Low greenhouse gas fuels Mixing ofreplacement. Greenhouse gas budgets for households and

Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Igneous Event Scenario  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous risk analyses by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) indicate that a future igneous event at Yucca Mountain could lead to significant increases in calculated probability-weighted, mean-annual dose rates. A technical report is being prepared by EPRI that examines the various steps and sub-processes inherent in such a scenario for a repository at Yucca Mountain. Specific steps that are being evaluated include: determination of the probability...

2003-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

90

Wind Engineering & Natural Disaster Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind Engineering & Natural Disaster Mitigation For more than 45 years, Western University has been internationally recognized as the leading university for wind engineering and wind- related research. Its of environmental disaster mitigation, with specific strengths in wind and earthquake research. Boundary Layer Wind

Sinnamon, Gordon J.

91

Carbon Mitigation in Europe Through No-till Farming  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Mitigation in European Soils Carbon Mitigation in European Soils Preliminary Estimates of the Potential for Carbon Mitigation in European Soils Through No-Till Farming DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/tcm.003 Global Change Biology 4:679-685 (1998) P. Smith, D. Powlson, M. Glendining, J. Smith School of Biological Sciences University of Aberdeen Cruikshank Building, St Machar Drive Aberdeen, AB24 3UU, UK Sponsor: Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council of the United Kingdom Abstract In this paper we estimate the European potential for carbon mitigation of no-till farming using results from European tillage experiments. Our calculations suggest some potential in terms of (a) reduced agricultural fossil fuel emissions, and (b) increased soil carbon sequestration. We estimate that 100% conversion to no-till farming would be likely to

92

Physics and Cancer Scenario  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

from his home page that includes the situation as well as some initial searching terms and links where students can begin to find information. The second day of class,...

93

Mitigation analysis for Estonia  

SciTech Connect

The present report provides data on the mitigation analysis of Estonia. The results for energy, forest and agricultural sectors and macro-economic analysis are given. The Government of Estonia has identified the development of energy production as the main strategical means in the movement towards market economy. Now 99% of electricity generation and about 25% of heat production in Estonia is based on oil shale combustion. To increase the efficiency of oil shale-fired power plants and decrease CO{sub 2} emissions, the State Enterprise (SE) Eesti Energia (Estonian Energy) is planning to reconstruct these power plants and introduce the Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) combustion technology for oil shale burning to replace the Pulverized Combustion (PC). According to the Estonian Forest Policy, two general objectives are of importance: sustainability in forestry and efficiency in forest management. For the reduction of greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions from agriculture, it is necessary to increase the efficiency of production resource usage. The growth of the GDP in 1995 was 2.9% as a result of large-scale privatization activities in Estonia and re-introduction of the available, but unused production capacities with the help of foreign and domestic investments. It is assumed that the medium growth rate of GDP reaches 6% in 1998.

Martins, A.; Roos, J.; Pesur, A. [Inst. of Energy Research, Tallinn (Estonia)] [and others

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Ultrasonic mitigation investigation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The suggestion was made that the introduction of ultrasound into Tank 101-SY might serve to release the hydrogen bubbles trapped in the slurry. This would cause a continuous release of bubbles and thereby prevent the turnover phenomenon. Two major considerations were (1) the method for delivering the energy into the slurry and (2) the effective volume of action. In this study, we attached the former by designing and testing a liquid-filled waveguide and radiator, and the latter by making ultrasonic property measurements on synthetic waste. Our conclusion is that ultrasonic mitigation may not be feasible, primarily because of the very high attenuation (1000 to 50000 dB/m) factor to 10 to 30 kHz. Such a high attenuation would restrict the action volume to such a low value as to make the method impractical. Further investigations are recommended to identify the cause of this effect and determine if this same effect will be seen in real 101-SY waste.

Hildebrand, B.P.; Shepard, C.L.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gas Mitigation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mitigation Planning The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Mitigation Planning section of the FEMP website is designed to provide Federal agency personnel with guidance to achieve agency GHG...

96

Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gas Mitigation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mitigation Planning to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program:...

97

Hydrogen and FCV Implementation Scenarios, 2010 - 2025  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scenario 1 Vehicle Transition and Deployment Scenario 2 Vehicle Transition and Deployment Scenario 3 Vehicle Transition and Deployment SUMMARY In response to the National Research...

98

Agricultural Carbon Mitigation in Europe  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agricultural Carbon Mitigation in Europe Agricultural Carbon Mitigation in Europe Agricultural Carbon Mitigation in Europe Smith P, Powlson DS, Smith JU, Falloon P, and Coleman K. 2000. Meeting Europe's climate change commitments: Quantitative estimates of the potential for carbon mitigation by agriculture. Global Climate Change 6:525-539. Abstract Under the Kyoto Protocol, the European Union is committed to a reduction in CO2 emissions to 92% of baseline (1990) levels during the first commitment period (2008-2012). The Kyoto Protocol allows carbon emissions to be offset by demonstrable removal of carbon from the atmosphere. Thus, land-use / land-management change and forestry activities that are shown to reduce atmospheric CO2 levels can be included in the Kyoto targets. These activities include afforestation, reforestation and deforestation (article

99

Benchmark scenarios for the NMSSM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss constrained and semi--constrained versions of the next--to--minimal supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model (NMSSM) in which a singlet Higgs superfield is added to the two doublet superfields that are present in the minimal extension (MSSM). This leads to a richer Higgs and neutralino spectrum and allows for many interesting phenomena that are not present in the MSSM. In particular, light Higgs particles are still allowed by current constraints and could appear as decay products of the heavier Higgs states, rendering their search rather difficult at the LHC. We propose benchmark scenarios which address the new phenomenological features, consistent with present constraints from colliders and with the dark matter relic density, and with (semi--)universal soft terms at the GUT scale. We present the corresponding spectra for the Higgs particles, their couplings to gauge bosons and fermions and their most important decay branching ratios. A brief survey of the search strategies for these states at the LHC is given.

A. Djouadi; M. Drees; U. Ellwanger; R. Godbole; C. Hugonie; S. F. King; S. Lehti; S. Moretti; A. Nikitenko; I. Rottlaender; M. Schumacher; A. Teixeira

2008-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

100

Mitigating Flood Loss through Local Comprehensive Planning in Florida  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Planning researchers believe that property losses from natural hazards, such as floods can be reduced if governments address this issue and adopt appropriate policies in their plans. However, little empirical research has examined the relationship between plan quality and actual property loss from floods. My research addresses this critical gap in the planning and hazard research literature by evaluating the effectiveness of current plans and policies in mitigating property damage from floods. Specifically, this study: 1) assesses the extent to which local comprehensive plans integrate flood mitigation policies in Florida; and 2) it examines the impact of the quality of flood mitigation policies on actual insured flood damages. Study results show that fifty-three local plans in the sample received a mean score for total flood mitigation policy quality of 38.55, which represents 35.69% of the total possible points. These findings indicate that there is still considerable room for improvement by local governments on flooding issues. The scores of local plans varied widely, with coastal communities receiving significantly higher scores than non-coastal communities. While most communities adopted land use management tools, such as permitted land use and wetland permits as primary flood mitigation tools, incentive based tools/taxing tools and acquisition tools were rarely adopted. This study also finds that plan quality associated with flood mitigation policy had little discernible effect on reducing insured flood damage while controlling for biophysical, built environment and socio-economic variables. This result counters the assumption inherent in previous plan quality research that better plans mitigate the adverse effects associated with floods and other natural hazards. There are some possible explanations for this result in terms of plan implementation, land use management paradox and characteristics of insurance policies. The statistical analysis also suggests that insured flood loss is considerably affected by wetland alteration and a community's location on the coast. Another finding indicates that very strong leadership and dam construction are factors in mitigating flood loss.

Kang, Jung Eun

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "term mitigation scenarios" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Biofuel and Bioenergy implementation scenarios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biofuel and Bioenergy implementation scenarios Final report of VIEWLS WP5, modelling studies #12;Biofuel and Bioenergy implementation scenarios Final report of VIEWLS WP5, modelling studies By André of this project are to provide structured and clear data on the availability and performance of biofuels

102

Urban Policies and Earthquake Risk Mitigation  

SciTech Connect

The paper aims at proposing some considerations about some recent experiences of research carried out on the theme of earthquake risk mitigation and combining policies and actions of mitigation with urban development strategies. The objective was to go beyond the classical methodological approach aiming at defining a 'technical' evaluation of the earthquake risk through a procedure which can correlate the three 'components' of danger, exposure and vulnerability. These researches experiment, in terms of methodology and application, with a new category of interpretation and strategy: the so-called Struttura Urbana Minima (Minimum urban structure).Actually, the introduction of the Struttura Urbana Minima establishes a different approach towards the theme of safety in the field of earthquake risk, since it leads to a wider viewpoint, combining the building aspect of the issue with the purely urban one, involving not only town planning, but also social and managerial implications.In this sense the constituent logic of these researches is strengthened by two fundamental issues:- The social awareness of earthquake;- The inclusion of mitigation policies in the ordinary strategies for town and territory management. Three main aspects of the first point, that is of the 'social awareness of earthquake', characterize this issue and demand to be considered within a prevention policy:- The central role of the risk as a social production,- The central role of the local community consent,- The central role of the local community capability to planTherefore, consent, considered not only as acceptance, but above all as participation in the elaboration and implementation of choices, plays a crucial role in the wider issue of prevention policies.As far as the second point is concerned, the inclusion of preventive mitigation policies in ordinary strategies for the town and territory management demands the identification of criteria of choice and priorities of intervention and, as a consequence, the opportunity to promote an approach to the theme of mitigation policies realized through strategic principles and systemic logics able to shift the problem from the building to the town. The critical aspects of this theme are tied to three main issues:- The sharing of the way of interpreting town planning,- The integration of multiple objectives in one intervention tool,- The measures which can be adopted for an effective prevention policy.The above-mentioned elements have inspired these researches experimented on Calabrian towns.In particular, in this paper the experience carried out on Reggio Calabria is proposed. Its cultural roots derive from the principles and criteria experimented in small Calabrian towns, but it modifies them according to the complexity of the urban settlement, introducing also some experimental concepts and methodological approaches.

Sarlo, Antonella [Department of Architecture and Analysis of Mediterranean City Mediterranea University, via Melissari-Feo di Vito, 89124 Reggio Calabria (Italy)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

103

Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigation Mitigation Planning Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning October 7, 2013 - 10:08am Addthis The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Mitigation Planning section provides Federal agency personnel with guidance to achieve agency GHG reduction goals in the most cost-effective way. Using a portfolio-based management approach for GHG mitigation planning, agencies will be able to prioritize strategies for GHG mitigation. Agencies can also use this guidance to set appropriate GHG reduction targets for different programs and sites within an agency. Learn more about the benefits of portfolio-based planning for GHG mitigation. Also see information about greenhouse gas mitigation planning data and tools. Step-by-Step The GHG mitigation planning process follows six key steps. Click on a step

104

Rooftop Photovoltaics Market Penetration Scenarios  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this study was to model the market penetration of rooftop photovoltaics (PV) in the United States under a variety of scenarios, on a state-by-state basis, from 2007 to 2015.

Paidipati, J.; Frantzis, L.; Sawyer, H.; Kurrasch, A.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Human Error Mitigation in Future Operations Control Centers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report documents a human error mitigation study conducted at the William J. Hughes Technical Center Research Development & Human Factors Laboratory. The study examined potential causes of human errors in future Airway Facilities (AF) operations control centers (OCCs). The participants consisted of nine specialists having expertise in current AF operations and knowledge of human error tendencies. The participants explored four operational scenarios, identified potential sources of error, and recommended specific solutions. A research team extracted common themes from participant responses to each of the four scenarios and identified general sources of potential error. They made specific recommendations for mitigating error in future OCC facilities. 17. Key Words NIMS, operations control centers, fault management, errors, human factors, event ticketing 18. Distribution Statement This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service, Springfield, Virginia, 22161 19. Security Classif. (of this report) 20. Security Classif. (of this page) 21. No. of Pages 48 22. Price Form DOT F 1700.7 (8-72) Reproduction of completed page authorized iii Acknowledgments This research would not have been possible without the support and sponsorship of AAR-100, the Office of the Chief Scientific and Technical Advisor for Human Factors. The research team greatly appreciated the outstanding support provided by Jack Oxford, FDC, who headed the effort to develop futuristic scenarios and to recruit participants. Dan Wagner and Armida Rosiles, ACT-530, and Anton Koros, FDC, played important roles in the completion of this study. Subject matter experts who supported scenario development included Patrick Marable, Kermit Grayson, and William Bauerle...

Vicki Ahlstrom, Ph.D.; Yvette J Tenney; Richard W. Pew; Robert L. Cranston; Richard Mogford, Ph.D.; Author(s Vicki Ahlstrom (act; Jean MacMillen; Jean Macmillan; Yvette Tenney; Richard Pew

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Lube Oil System Leakage Mitigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lube Oil System Leakage Mitigation is the second in a series of training modules addressing leakage in nuclear power plants. The first planned modules in the leakage reduction series include leakage reduction program management, bolted joints with flat gaskets, valve packing, threaded joints, compression fittings, mechanical seals, and miscellaneous bolting issues.

1999-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

107

Appropriate Use of Mitigation and Monitoring and Clarifying the...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Appropriate Use of Mitigation and Monitoring and Clarifying the Appropriate Use of Mitigated Findings of No Significant Impact Appropriate Use of Mitigation and Monitoring and...

108

EIS-0397: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigation Action Plan EIS-0397: Mitigation Action Plan Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project This Mitigation Action Plan identifies measures that are intended to avoid, reduce, or...

109

Baseline scenario(s) for muon collider proton driver  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper gives an overview of the various muon collider scenarios and the requirements they put on the Proton Driver. The required proton power is about 4-6MW in all the scenarios, but the bunch repetition rate varies between 12 and 65Hz. Since none of the muon collider scenarios have been simulated end-to-end, it would be advisable to plan for an upgrade path to around 10MW. Although the proton driver energy is flexible, cost arguments seems to favor a relatively low energy. In particular, at Fermilab 8GeV seems most attractive, partly due to the possibility of reusing the three existing fixed energy storage rings for bunch manipulations.

Jansson, Andreas; /Fermilab

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

A proposal for a new scenario framework to support research and assessment in different climate research communities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose a scenario framework that could provide a scenario thread through the different climate research communities (climate change vulnerability, impact, and adaptation (VIA) and mitigation) in order to provide assessment of mitigation and adaptation strategies and other VIA challenges. The scenario framework is defined across two main axes. One is defined by the radiative forcing levels (climate signal) of the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs). The second axis is defined by socio-economic development and comprises elements that affect the capacity for adaptation and mitigation but also exposure to climate impacts. The proposed set of scenarios derived from this framework are limited in number, allow for comparison across various mitigation and adaptation levels, address a range of vulnerability characteristics, provide information across climate forcing and vulnerability states and spans a full century time scale. Scenario assessment based on the proposed framework would strengthen cooperation between integrated-assessment modelers, climate modelers and the VIA research community, and most importantly, facilitate the development of more consistent and comparable research within and across communities.

Van Vuuren, Detlef; Riahi, Keywan; Moss, Richard H.; Edmonds, James A.; Thomson, Allison M.; Nakicenovic, Nebojsa; Kram, Tom; Berkhout, Frans; Swart, Robert; Janetos, Anthony C.; Rose, Steven K.; Arnell, Nigel

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Complexity of event structure in IE scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents new Information Extraction scenarios which are linguistically and structurally more challenging than the traditional MUC scenarios. Traditional views on event structure and template design are not adequate for the more complex scenarios.The ...

Silja Huttunen; Roman Yangarber; Ralph Grishman

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Energy Technology Perspectives, 2010: Scenarios & Strategies to 2050 | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Energy Technology Perspectives, 2010: Scenarios & Strategies to 2050 Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy Technology Perspectives, 2010: Scenarios & Strategies to 2050 Focus Area: Carbon Capture and Storage Topics: Environmental Website: www.iea.org/Textbase/nppdf/free/2010/etp2010_part1.pdf Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/energy-technology-perspectives-2010-s Policies: "Regulations,Financial Incentives" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. Regulations: "Emissions Standards,Emissions Mitigation Scheme,Mandates/Targets" is not in the list of possible values (Agriculture Efficiency Requirements, Appliance & Equipment Standards and Required Labeling, Audit Requirements, Building Certification, Building Codes, Cost Recovery/Allocation, Emissions Mitigation Scheme, Emissions Standards, Enabling Legislation, Energy Standards, Feebates, Feed-in Tariffs, Fuel Efficiency Standards, Incandescent Phase-Out, Mandates/Targets, Net Metering & Interconnection, Resource Integration Planning, Safety Standards, Upgrade Requirements, Utility/Electricity Service Costs) for this property.

113

Aspen & Pitkin County - Renewable Energy Mitigation Program ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Colorado Name Aspen & Pitkin County - Renewable Energy Mitigation Program Incentive Type Building Energy Code Applicable Sector Commercial, Residential Eligible Technologies...

114

WIPPAnnualMitigationActionReport2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2-3322 2-3322 2012 ANNUAL MITIGATION REPORT FOR THE WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT JULY 10, 2012 DOE/CBFO-12-3322 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS ACRONYMS ................................................................................................................................. 3 INTRODUCTION......................................................................................................................... 4 THE 2012 ANNUAL MITIGATION REPORT ......................................................................... 5 REFERENCES ............................................................................................................................ 14 DOE/CBFO-12-3322 3 ACRONYMS AMR Annual Mitigation Report ASER Annual Site Environmental Report

115

EXTREME CYBER SCENARIO PLANNING & FAULT TREE ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Impact Analysis Threat Actor Analysis For each scenario Aim: Select scenarios that could have a catastrophic impact on the organisation Page 23. ...

2013-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

116

RESEARCH ARTICLE Optimal Scenario Tree Reduction for ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

scenarios) for streamflows of the jth hydroelectric plant. Our choice is based on the fact that when scenarios are discarded, variance tends to decrease.

117

Abrupt Climate Change Scenario Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Abrupt Climate Change Scenario Technologies Abrupt Climate Change Scenario Technologies Speaker(s): Tina Kaarsberg Date: April 27, 2006 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Jayant Sathaye This talk examines the potential for several types of technologies that hitherto have not been a focus of U.S. climate technology planning. It was inspired by the latest climate science data and modeling which suggest that an abrupt warming (+10oF in 10 years), is an increasingly plausible scenario. The technologies described in the session rapidly reduce the risk of climate change and increase our ability to respond quickly. All of the technologies also have other public benefits. (Summary follows): For more information about this seminar, please contact: JoAnne Lambert 510.486.4835, or send e-mail to JMLambert@lbl.gov

118

Economic Modeling of Mid-Term Electric Generation Scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The type and stringency of environmental mandates and carbon regulation in the next 10 years continue to be a topic of substantial uncertainty and debate. This study applies a model-based approach for exploring the potential magnitude of shifts in electric generation trends that could occur over a broad range of future environmental regulatory outcomes. Cases examined include a path of stringent environmental regulations, a high cost carbon policy, and their combination. This study is a follow-on modelin...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

119

Mapping Climate Change Vulnerability and Impact Scenarios - A Guidebook for  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mapping Climate Change Vulnerability and Impact Scenarios - A Guidebook for Mapping Climate Change Vulnerability and Impact Scenarios - A Guidebook for Sub-national Planners Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Mapping Climate Change Vulnerability and Impact Scenarios - A Guidebook for Sub-national Planners Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: www.beta.undp.org/content/dam/aplaws/publication/en/publications/envir Language: English Mapping Climate Change Vulnerability and Impact Scenarios - A Guidebook for Sub-national Planners Screenshot This guidebook assists planners working at the sub-national levels to identify and map the nature of current and future vulnerability to long-term climate change so that appropriate policies and intervention can

120

Scenario  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory, RMLevinson@LBL.gov 7 May 2012 Solar reflective "cool" roofs save energy, money, and CO 2 when applied to air-conditioned buildings; improve comfort when applied to...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "term mitigation scenarios" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

UNFCCC-Mitigation Assessments | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UNFCCC-Mitigation Assessments UNFCCC-Mitigation Assessments Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: UNFCCC-Mitigation Assessments Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change Sector: Energy, Land Topics: Pathways analysis Resource Type: Presentation, Training materials Website: unfccc.int/resource/cd_roms/na1/mitigation/index.htm UNFCCC-Mitigation Assessments Screenshot References: UNFCCC-Mitigation Assessments[1] "This training package (containing PowerPoint presentations and notes, a handbook and reference materials) is designed to facilitate the preparation of the mitigation component of the national communications by non-Annex I teams based on UNFCCC guidelines contained in the annex to decision 17/CP.8." References

122

Enduse Global Emissions Mitigation Scenarios (EGEMS): A New Generation of Energy Efficiency Policy Planning Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

drivers of demand for energy services to establish the mostmodels demand for energy services (activity) at the end usethe demand for energy services. Often, energy service

McNeil, Michael A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Enduse Global Emissions Mitigation Scenarios (EGEMS): A New Generation of Energy Efficiency Policy Planning Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2008). The Boom of Electricity Demand in the residentialwith Residential Electricity Demand in India's Future - Howlevels could reduce electricity demand in IEA member country

McNeil, Michael A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Enduse Global Emissions Mitigation Scenarios (EGEMS): A New Generation of Energy Efficiency Policy Planning Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

likely baseline through 2030, and arrived at a cumulative24% in 2010 and by 33% in 2030. The EGEMS project seeks topotential in 2020 and 2030. The figure indicates that by

McNeil, Michael A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Organisational scenarios and legacy systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A legacy system is made up of technical components and social factors (such as software, people, skills, business processes) which no longer meet the needs of the business environment. The study of legacy systems has tended to be biased towards a software ... Keywords: Business process, Legacy system, Scenario, Software

Carole Brooke; Magnus Ramage

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Emerging Energy-Efficiency and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Technologies for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emerging Energy-Efficiency and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Technologies for Emerging Energy-Efficiency and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Technologies for the Pulp and Paper Industry Title Emerging Energy-Efficiency and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Technologies for the Pulp and Paper Industry Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2012 Authors Kong, Lingbo, Ali Hasanbeigi, and Lynn K. Price Date Published 12/2012 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Keywords emerging technologies, energy efficiency, ghg, Low Emission & Efficient Industry, pulp and paper Abstract The pulp and paper industry ranks fourth in terms of energy consumption among industries worldwide. Globally, the pulp and paper industry accounted for approximately 5 percent of total world industrial final energy consumption in 2007, and contributed 2 percent of direct carbon dioxide (CO2)emissions from industry. Worldwide pulp and paper demand and production are projected to increase significantly by 2050, leading to an increase in this industry's absolute energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Development of new energy-efficiency and GHG mitigation technologies and their deployment in the market will be crucial for the pulp and paper industry's mid- and long-term climate change mitigation strategies. This report describes the industry's processes and compiles available information on the energy savings, environmental and other benefits, costs, commercialization status, and references for 36 emerging technologies to reduce the industry's energy use and GHG emissions. Although studies from around the world identify a variety of sector-specific and cross-cutting energy-efficiency technologies that have already been commercialized for the pulp and paper industry, information is scarce and/or scattered regarding emerging or advanced energy-efficiency and low-carbon technologies that are not yet commercialized. The purpose of this report is to provide engineers, researchers, investors, paper companies, policy makers, and other interested parties with easy access to a well-structured resource of information on these technologies.

127

Hungry Horse Mitigation; Flathead Lake, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) and Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks (MFWP) wrote ''Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam'' in March 1991 to define the fisheries losses, mitigation alternatives and recommendations to protect, mitigate and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by Hungry Horse Dam. On November 12, 1991, the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) approved the mitigation plan with minor modifications, called for a detailed implementation plan, and amended measures 903(h)(1) through (7). A long-term mitigation plan was submitted in August 1992, was approved by the Council in 1993, and the first contract for this project was signed on November 11, 1993. The problem this project addresses is the loss of habitat, both in quality and quantity, in the interconnected Flathead Lake and River basin resulting from the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. The purpose of the project is to both implement mitigation measures and monitor the biological responses to those measures including those implemented by Project Numbers 9101903 and 9101904. Goals and objectives of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (Section 10.1) addressed by this project are the rebuilding to sustainable levels weak, but recoverable, native populations injured by the hydropower system. The project mitigates the blockage of spawning runs by Hungry Horse Dam by restoring and even creating spawning habitats within direct drainages to Flathead Lake. The project also addresses the altered habitat within Flathead Lake resulting from species shifts and consequent dominance of new species that restricts the potential success of mitigation measures. Specific goals of this project are to create and restore habitat and quantitatively monitor changes in fish populations to verify the efficacy of our mitigation measures. The project consists of three components: monitoring, restoration and research. Monitoring, for example, includes a spring gillnetting series conducted annually in Flathead Lake and builds on an existing data set initiated in 1981. Monitoring of the experimental kokanee reintroduction was a primary activity of this project between 1992 and 1997. Lake trout, whose high densities have precluded successful mitigation of losses of other species in Flathead Lake, have been monitored since 1996 to measure several biological parameters. Results of this work have utility in determining the population status of this key predator in Flathead Lake. The project has also defined the baseline condition of the Flathead Lake fishery in 1992-1993 and has conducted annual lakewide surveys since 1998. The restoration component of the project has addressed several stream channel, riparian, and fish passage problems. The research component of the project began in FY 2000 and measured trophic linkages between M. relicta and other species to assist in predicting the results of potential mitigation strategies. Only Objective 1 in the workplan is funded entirely by Hungry Horse Mitigation funds. Additional funds are drawn from other sources to assist in completion of Objectives 2-6.

Hansen, Barry (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

2003-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

128

Planning Tools For Seismic Risk Mitigation. Rules And Applications  

SciTech Connect

Recently, Italian urban planning research in the field of seismic risk mitigation are renewing. In particular, it promotes strategies that integrate urban rehabilitation and aseismic objectives, and also politicizes that are directed to revitalizes urban systems, coupling physical renewal and socio-economic development.In Italy the first law concerning planning for seismic mitigation dates back 1974, the law n. 64 'Regulation for buildings with particular rules for the seismic areas' where the rules for buildings in seismic areas concerning also the local hazard. This law, in fact, forced the municipalities to acquire, during the formation of the plans, a preventive opinion of compatibility between planning conditions and geomorphology conditions of the territory. From this date the conviction that the seismic risk must be considered inside the territorial planning especially in terms of strategies of mitigation has been strengthened.The town planners have started to take an interest in seismic risk in the [80]s when the Irpinia's earthquake took place. The researches developed after this earthquake have established that the principal cause of the collapse of buildings are due to from the wrong location of urban settlements (on slopes or crowns) After Irpinia's earthquake the first researches on seismic risk mitigation, in particular on the aspects related to the hazards and to the urban vulnerability were made.

De Paoli, Rosa Grazia [Department of Landscape Planning, Mediterranean University of Reggio Calabria (Italy)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

129

Base case and perturbation scenarios  

SciTech Connect

This report describes fourteen energy factors that could affect electricity markets in the future (demand, process, source mix, etc.). These fourteen factors are believed to have the most influence on the State? s energy environment. A base case, or most probable, characterization is given for each of these fourteen factors over a twenty year time horizon. The base case characterization is derived from quantitative and qualitative information provided by State of California government agencies, where possible. Federal government databases are nsed where needed to supplement the California data. It is envisioned that a initial selection of issue areas will be based upon an evaluation of them under base case conditions. For most of the fourteen factors, the report identities possible perturbations from base case values or assumptions that may be used to construct additional scenarios. Only those perturbations that are plausible and would have a significant effect on energy markets are included in the table. The fourteen factors and potential perturbations of the factors are listed in Table 1.1. These perturbations can be combined to generate internally consist.ent. combinations of perturbations relative to the base case. For example, a low natural gas price perturbation should be combined with a high natural gas demand perturbation. The factor perturbations are based upon alternative quantitative forecasts provided by other institutions (the Department of Energy - Energy Information Administration in some cases), changes in assumptions that drive the quantitative forecasts, or changes in assumptions about the structure of the California energy markets. The perturbations are intended to be used for a qualitative reexamination of issue areas after an initial evaluation under the base case. The perturbation information would be used as a ?tiebreaker;? to make decisions regarding those issue areas that were marginally accepted or rejected under the base case. Hf a quantitative scoring system for issue areas were applied under the base case, a tractable quantitative decision model incorporating scenarios and their likelihoods could be developed and appli& in the decision process. LLNL has developed four perturbation scenarios that address the following issues: l} low economic growth, 2) high natural gas prices, 3) dysfunctional markets, and 4) a preference for green power. We have proposed a plausible scenario that addresses each issue for discussion and consideration by the CEC. In addition, we have provided an example application of the four perturbation scenarios in a qualitative framework for evaluation of issue areas developed for the PIEPC program. A description of each of the perturbation scenarios and a discussion of how they could effect decisions about today? s R&D funding is included. The scenarios attempt to cover a broad spectrum of plausible outcomes in a deregulated market environment. Nowever, Vhey are not a comprehensive and rigorously defined list of the most probable scenarios, but rather a qualitative inference based upon knowledge and expertise in the energy field.

Edmunds, T

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Hungry Horse Mitigation Plan; Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam, 1990-2003 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this document we present fisheries losses, mitigation alternatives, and recommendations to protect, mitigate, and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. This plan addresses six separate program measures in the 1987 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. We designed the plan to be closely coordinated in terms of dam operations, funding, and activities with the Kerr Mitigation Plan presently before the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. This document represents a mitigation plan for consideration by the Northwest Power Planning Council process; it is not an implementation plan. Flathead Lake is one of the cleanest lakes of its size in the world. The exceptional water quality and unique native fisheries make the Flathead Lake/River system extremely valuable to the economy and quality of life in the basin. The recreational fishery in Flathead Lake has an estimated value of nearly eight million dollars annually. This mitigation process represents our best opportunity to reduce the impacts of hydropower in this valuable aquatic system and increase angling opportunity. We based loss estimates and mitigation alternatives on an extensive data base, agency reports, nationally and internationally peer-reviewed scientific articles, and an innovative biological model for Hungry Horse Reservoir and the Flathead River. We conducted an extensive, 14-month scoping and consultation process with agency representatives, representatives of citizen groups, and the general public. This consultation process helped identify issues, areas of agreement, areas of conflict, and advantages and disadvantages of mitigation alternatives. The results of the scoping and consultation process helped shape our mitigation plan. Our recommended plan is based firmly on principles of adaptive management and recognition of biological uncertainty. After we receive direction from the NPPC, we will add more detailed hypotheses and other features necessary for a long-term implementation plan.

Fraley, John J.; Marotz, Brian L. (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Helena, MT); DosSantos, Joseph M. (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

EPRI Boiling Water Reactor Mitigation Performance Summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) mitigation performance of 44 BWRs with or without noble metal chemical addition or On-Line NobleChem. Results are categorized by chemistry regime and include data from the most recently completed and current operating cycles. BWRs continue to strive for high hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) availability for IGSCC mitigation, and most plants achieve an overall mitigation performance indicator in the green (excellent) or white (satisf...

2010-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

132

Comparison of risk-dominant scenario assumptions for several TRU waste facilities in the DOE complex  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to gain a risk management perspective, the DOE Rocky Flats Field Office (RFFO) initiated a survey of other DOE sites regarding risks from potential accidents associated with transuranic (TRU) storage and/or processing facilities. Recently-approved authorization basis documents at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) have been based on the DOE Standard 3011 risk assessment methodology with three qualitative estimates of frequency of occurrence and quantitative estimates of radiological consequences to the collocated worker and the public binned into three severity levels. Risk Class 1 and 2 events after application of controls to prevent or mitigate the accident are designated as risk-dominant scenarios. Accident Evaluation Guidelines for selection of Technical Safety Requirements (TSRs) are based on the frequency and consequence bin assignments to identify controls that can be credited to reduce risk to Risk Class 3 or 4, or that are credited for Risk Class 1 and 2 scenarios that cannot be further reduced. This methodology resulted in several risk-dominant scenarios for either the collocated worker or the public that warranted consideration on whether additional controls should be implemented. RFFO requested the survey because of these high estimates of risks that are primarily due to design characteristics of RFETS TRU waste facilities (i.e., Butler-type buildings without a ventilation and filtration system, and a relatively short distance to the Site boundary). Accident analysis methodologies and key assumptions are being compared for the DOE sites responding to the survey. This includes type of accidents that are risk dominant (e.g., drum explosion, material handling breach, fires, natural phenomena, external events, etc.), source term evaluation (e.g., radionuclide material-at-risk, chemical and physical form, damage ratio, airborne release fraction, respirable fraction, leakpath factors), dispersion analysis (e.g., meteorological assumptions, distance to receptors, plume meander, deposition, and other factors affecting the calculated {chi}/Q), dose assessments (specific activities, inhalation dose conversion factors, breathing rates), designated frequency of occurrence, and risk assignment per the DOE Standard 3011 methodology. Information from the sites is being recorded on a spreadsheet to facilitate comparisons. The first response from Westinghouse Safety Management Solutions for the Savannah River Site (SRS) also provided a detailed analysis of the major differences in methods and assumptions between RFETS and SRS, which forms much of the basis for this paper. Other sites responding to the survey include the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Hanford, and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

Foppe, T.L. [Foppe and Associates, Inc., Golden, CO (United States); Marx, D.R. [Westinghouse Safety Management Solutions, Inc., Aiken, SC (United States)

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gas Mitigation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GHG Mitigation Strategies Emissions & Generation Resource Integrated Database (eGRID) U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Environmental characteristics data on U.S....

134

Mitigating Climate Change through Energy Efficiency: Implications...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mitigating Climate Change through Energy Efficiency: Implications of China's 20 % Energy Intensity Reduction Target Speaker(s): Jiang Lin Date: March 13, 2007 - 12:00pm Location:...

135

Estimating Mitigation Potential of Agricultural Projects: an...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tool (EX-ACT) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Brazil-Estimating Mitigation Potential of Agricultural Projects: an Application of the...

136

Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gas Mitigation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Mobile Equipment to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning for Vehicles and Mobile Equipment on Facebook Tweet...

137

Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gas Mitigation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Business Travel to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning for Business Travel on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy...

138

Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gas Mitigation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Employee Commuting to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning for Employee Commuting on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy...

139

Industrial Energy Efficiency and Climate Change Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mitigate 21 MtCO 2 . Cogeneration (also called Combined Heatefficiencies. Industrial cogeneration is an important partpotential for industrial cogeneration is estimated at almost

Worrell, Ernst

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Hungry Horse Mitigation; Flathead Lake, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) and Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks (MFWP) wrote the ''Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam'' in March 1991 to define the fisheries losses, mitigation alternatives and recommendations to protect, mitigate and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by Hungry Horse Dam. On November 12, 1991, the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) approved the mitigation plan with minor modifications, called for a detailed implementation plan, and amended measures 903(h)(1) through (7). A long-term mitigation plan was submitted in August 1992, was approved by the Council in 1993, and the first contract for this project was signed on November 11, 1993. The problem this project addresses is the loss of habitat, both in quality and quantity, in the Flathead Lake and River basin resulting from the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. The purpose of the project is to both implement mitigation measures and monitor the biological responses to those measures including those implemented by Project Numbers 9101903 and 9101904. Goals and objectives of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (Section 10.1) addressed by this project are the rebuilding to sustainable levels weak, but recoverable, native populations injured by the hydropower system. The project mitigates the blockage of spawning runs by Hungry Horse Dam by restoring and even creating spawning habitats within direct drainages to Flathead Lake. The project also addresses the altered habitat within Flathead Lake resulting from species shifts and consequent dominance of new species that restricts the potential success of mitigation measures. Specific goals of this project are to create and restore habitat and quantitatively monitor changes in fish populations to verify the efficacy of our mitigation measures. The project consists of three components: monitoring, restoration and research. Monitoring, for example, includes a spring gillnetting series conducted annually in Flathead Lake and builds on an existing data set initiated in 1981. Monitoring of the experimental kokanee reintroduction was a primary activity of this project between 1992 and 1997. Lake trout, whose high densities have precluded successful mitigation of losses of other species in Flathead Lake, have been monitored since 1996 to measure several biological parameters. Results of this work have utility in determining the population status of this key predator in Flathead Lake. The project has also defined the baseline condition of the Flathead Lake fishery in 1992-1993 and has conducted annual lakewide surveys since 1998. The restoration component of the project has addressed several stream channel, riparian, and fish passage problems, and suppression of non-native fish. The research component of the project began in FY 2000 and measured trophic linkages between M. relicta and other species to assist in predicting the results of our efforts to suppress lake trout. Only Work Element A in the Statement of Work is funded entirely by Hungry Horse Mitigation funds. Additional funds are drawn from other sources to assist in completion of all remaining Work Elements.

Hansen, Barry; Evarts, Les (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

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141

Hungry Horse Mitigation : Flathead Lake : Annual Progress Report 2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) and Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks (MFWP) wrote the 'Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam' in March 1991 to define the fisheries losses, mitigation alternatives and recommendations to protect, mitigate and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by Hungry Horse Dam. On November 12, 1991, the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) approved the mitigation plan with minor modifications, called for a detailed implementation plan, and amended measures 903(h)(1) through (7). A long-term mitigation plan was submitted in August 1992, was approved by the Council in 1993, and the first contract for this project was signed on November 11, 1993. The problem this project addresses is the loss of habitat, both in quality and quantity, in the Flathead Lake and River basin resulting from the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. The purpose of the project is to both implement mitigation measures and monitor the biological responses to those measures including those implemented by Project Numbers 9101903 and 9101904. Goals and objectives of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (Section 10.1) addressed by this project are the rebuilding to sustainable levels weak, but recoverable, native populations injured by the hydropower system. The project mitigates the blockage of spawning runs by Hungry Horse Dam by restoring and even creating spawning habitats within direct drainages to Flathead Lake. The project also addresses the altered habitat within Flathead Lake resulting from species shifts and consequent dominance of new species that restricts the potential success of mitigation measures. Specific goals of this project are to create and restore habitat and quantitatively monitor changes in fish populations to verify the efficacy of our mitigation measures. The project consists of three components: monitoring, restoration and research. Monitoring, for example, includes a spring gillnetting series conducted annually in Flathead Lake and builds on an existing data set initiated in 1981. Monitoring of the experimental kokanee reintroduction was a primary activity of this project between 1992 and 1997. Lake trout, whose high densities have precluded successful mitigation of losses of other species in Flathead Lake, have been monitored since 1996 to measure several biological parameters. Results of this work have utility in determining the population status of this key predator in Flathead Lake. The project has also defined the baseline condition of the Flathead Lake fishery in 1992-1993 and has conducted annual lakewide surveys since 1998. The restoration component of the project has addressed several stream channel, riparian, and fish passage problems, and suppression of non-native fish. The research component of the project began in FY 2000 and measured trophic linkages between M. relicta and other species to assist in predicting the results of our efforts to suppress lake trout. Only Work Element A in the Statement of Work is funded entirely by Hungry Horse Mitigation funds. Additional funds are drawn from other sources to assist in completion of all remaining Work Elements.

Hansen, Barry; Evarts, Les [Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes

2009-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

142

Hungry Horse Mitigation : Flathead Lake : Annual Progress Report 2007.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) and Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks (MFWP) wrote the 'Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam' in March 1991 to define the fisheries losses, mitigation alternatives and recommendations to protect, mitigate and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by Hungry Horse Dam. On November 12, 1991, the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) approved the mitigation plan with minor modifications, called for a detailed implementation plan, and amended measures 903(h)(1) through (7). A long-term mitigation plan was submitted in August 1992, was approved by the Council in 1993, and the first contract for this project was signed on November 11, 1993. The problem this project addresses is the loss of habitat, both in quality and quantity, in the Flathead Lake and River basin resulting from the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. The purpose of the project is to both implement mitigation measures and monitor the biological responses to those measures including those implemented by Project Numbers 9101903 and 9101904. Goals and objectives of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (Section 10.1) addressed by this project are the rebuilding to sustainable levels weak, but recoverable, native populations injured by the hydropower system. The project mitigates the blockage of spawning runs by Hungry Horse Dam by restoring and even creating spawning habitats within direct drainages to Flathead Lake. The project also addresses the altered habitat within Flathead Lake resulting from species shifts and consequent dominance of new species that restricts the potential success of mitigation measures. Specific goals of this project are to create and restore habitat and quantitatively monitor changes in fish populations to verify the efficacy of our mitigation measures. The project consists of three components: monitoring, restoration and research. Monitoring, for example, includes a spring gillnetting series conducted annually in Flathead Lake and builds on an existing data set initiated in 1981. Monitoring of the experimental kokanee reintroduction was a primary activity of this project between 1992 and 1997. Lake trout, whose high densities have precluded successful mitigation of losses of other species in Flathead Lake, have been monitored since 1996 to measure several biological parameters. Results of this work have utility in determining the population status of this key predator in Flathead Lake. The project has also defined the baseline condition of the Flathead Lake fishery in 1992-1993 and has conducted annual lakewide surveys since 1998. The restoration component of the project has addressed several stream channel, riparian, and fish passage problems, and suppression of non-native fish. The research component of the project began in FY 2000 and measured trophic linkages between M. relicta and other species to assist in predicting the results of our efforts to suppress lake trout. Only Work Element A in the Statement of Work is funded entirely by Hungry Horse Mitigation funds. Additional funds are drawn from other sources to assist in completion of all remaining Work Elements.

Hansen, Barry; Evarts, Les [Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

143

Hungry Horse Mitigation; Flathead Lake, 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) and Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks (MFWP) wrote the ''Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam'' in March 1991 to define the fisheries losses, mitigation alternatives and recommendations to protect, mitigate and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by Hungry Horse Dam. On November 12, 1991, the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) approved the mitigation plan with minor modifications, called for a detailed implementation plan, and amended measures 903(h)(1) through (7). A long-term mitigation plan was submitted in August 1992, was approved by the Council in 1993, and the first contract for this project was signed on November 11, 1993. The problem this project addresses is the loss of habitat, both in quality and quantity, in the Flathead Lake and River basin resulting from the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. The purpose of the project is to both implement mitigation measures and monitor the biological responses to those measures including those implemented by Project Numbers 9101903 and 9101904. Goals and objectives of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (Section 10.1) addressed by this project are the rebuilding to sustainable levels weak, but recoverable, native populations injured by the hydropower system. The project mitigates the blockage of spawning runs by Hungry Horse Dam by restoring and even creating spawning habitats within direct drainages to Flathead Lake. The project also addresses the altered habitat within Flathead Lake resulting from species shifts and consequent dominance of new species that restricts the potential success of mitigation measures. Specific goals of this project are to create and restore habitat and quantitatively monitor changes in fish populations to verify the efficacy of our mitigation measures. The project consists of three components: monitoring, restoration and research. Monitoring, for example, includes a spring gillnetting series conducted annually in Flathead Lake and builds on an existing data set initiated in 1981. Monitoring of the experimental kokanee reintroduction was a primary activity of this project between 1992 and 1997. Lake trout, whose high densities have precluded successful mitigation of losses of other species in Flathead Lake, have been monitored since 1996 to measure several biological parameters. Results of this work have utility in determining the population status of this key predator in Flathead Lake. The project has also defined the baseline condition of the Flathead Lake fishery in 1992-1993 and has conducted annual lakewide surveys since 1998. The restoration component of the project has addressed several stream channel, riparian, and fish passage problems, and suppression of non-native fish. The research component of the project began in FY 2000 and measured trophic linkages between M. relicta and other species to assist in predicting the results of our efforts to suppress lake trout. Only Objective 1 in the workplan is funded entirely by Hungry Horse Mitigation funds. Additional funds are drawn from other sources to assist in completion of Objectives 2-8.

Hansen, Barry; Evarts, Les (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Low carbon and clean energy scenarios for India: Analysis of targets approach  

SciTech Connect

Low carbon energy technologies are gaining increasing importance in India for reducing emissions as well as diversifying its energy supply mix. The present paper presents and analyses a targeted approach for pushing solar, wind and nuclear technologies in the Indian energy market. Targets for these technologies have been constructed on the basis of Indian government documents, policy announcements and expert opinion. Different targets have been set for the reference scenario and the carbon price scenario. In the reference scenario it is found that in the long run all solar, wind and nuclear will achieve their targets without any subsidy push. In the short run however, nuclear and solar energy require significant subsidy push. Nuclear energy requires a much higher subsidy allocation as compared to solar because the targets assumed are also higher for nuclear energy. Under a carbon price scenario, the carbon price drives the penetration of these technologies significantly. Still subsidy is required especially in the short run when the carbon price is low. It is also found that pushing solar, wind and nuclear technologies might lead to decrease in share of CCS under the price scenario and biomass under both BAU and price scenario, which implies that one set of low carbon technologies is substituted by other set of low carbon technologies. Thus the objective of emission mitigation might not be achieved due to this substitution. Moreover sensitivity on nuclear energy cost was done to represent risk mitigation for this technology and it was found that higher cost can significantly decrease the share of this technology under both the BAU and carbon price scenario.

Shukla, Priyadarshi R.; Chaturvedi, Vaibhav

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Entanglement cost in practical scenarios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We quantify the one-shot entanglement cost of an arbitrary bipartite state, that is the minimum number of singlets needed by two distant parties to create a single copy of the state up to a finite accuracy, using local operations and classical communication only. This analysis, in contrast to the traditional one, pertains to scenarios of practical relevance, in which resources are finite and transformations can only be achieved approximately. Moreover, it unveils a fundamental relation between two well-known entanglement measures, namely, the Schmidt number and the entanglement of formation. Using this relation, we are able to recover the usual expression of the entanglement cost as a special case.

Francesco Buscemi; Nilanjana Datta

2009-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

146

Addressing an Uncertain Future Using Scenario Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a scenario may be an oil price hike in a future year, whichon the impact of high oil prices on the global economy (seethe scenario of a high oil price (of US$35/barrel, which is

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

A Dual-Pulse Repetition Frequency Scheme for Mitigating Velocity Ambiguities of the NOAA P-3 Airborne Doppler Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To mitigate some of the deleterious effects of the relatively small unambiguous Doppler velocity range (Nyquist interval) of airborne X-band Doppler radars, a technique has been developed to extend this interval. This technique, termed the batch-...

David P. Jorgensen; Tom R. Shepherd; Alan S. Goldstein

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Summary of Slagging and Fouling Mitigation Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a report on novel slagging and fouling mitigation methods in the coal-fired power generation industry. The project was identified by EPRI in response to member needs to compile a snapshot of approaches to mitigating slagging and fouling of coal-fired boilers as the industry migrates to burning off design coal.

2009-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

149

A review of scenario generation methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stochastic programming models provide a powerful paradigm for decision making under uncertainty. In these models the uncertainties are captured by scenario generation and so are crucial to the quality of solutions obtained. Presently there do not exist ... Keywords: decision making, scenario generation, scenarios, stochastic optimisation, stochastic programming, uncertainty

Sovan Mitra; Nico Di Domenica

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Property:EnvironmentalMitigation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EnvironmentalMitigation EnvironmentalMitigation Jump to: navigation, search Property Name EnvironmentalMitigation Property Type Text Description Description of measures that could be used to mitigate environmental impact. Subproperties This property has the following 1 subproperty: E Exploration Drilling Pages using the property "EnvironmentalMitigation" Showing 24 pages using this property. 2 2-M Probe Survey + The use of off road vehicles should avoid overland travel during periods when soils are moist or wet. Backfilling of excavated probe holes. A Active Seismic Techniques + The environmental impacts of a seismic survey vary drastically and are survey-specific. Factors to consider are: terrain, land access, land usage, survey extent, seismic crew size, source (dynamite, vibroseis, etc.), accomodation for the crew, remoteness of survey location, among others.

151

Safety evaluation of MHTGR licensing basis accident scenarios  

SciTech Connect

The safety potential of the Modular High-Temperature Gas Reactor (MHTGR) was evaluated, based on the Preliminary Safety Information Document (PSID), as submitted by the US Department of Energy to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The relevant reactor safety codes were extended for this purpose and applied to this new reactor concept, searching primarily for potential accident scenarios that might lead to fuel failures due to excessive core temperatures and/or to vessel damage, due to excessive vessel temperatures. The design basis accident scenario leading to the highest vessel temperatures is the depressurized core heatup scenario without any forced cooling and with decay heat rejection to the passive Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS). This scenario was evaluated, including numerous parametric variations of input parameters, like material properties and decay heat. It was found that significant safety margins exist, but that high confidence levels in the core effective thermal conductivity, the reactor vessel and RCCS thermal emissivities and the decay heat function are required to maintain this safety margin. Severe accident extensions of this depressurized core heatup scenario included the cases of complete RCCS failure, cases of massive air ingress, core heatup without scram and cases of degraded RCCS performance due to absorbing gases in the reactor cavity. Except for no-scram scenarios extending beyond 100 hr, the fuel never reached the limiting temperature of 1600/degree/C, below which measurable fuel failures are not expected. In some of the scenarios, excessive vessel and concrete temperatures could lead to investment losses but are not expected to lead to any source term beyond that from the circulating inventory. 19 refs., 56 figs., 11 tabs.

Kroeger, P.G.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Development of Burning Plasma and Advanced Scenarios in the DIII-D Tokamak  

SciTech Connect

Significant progress in the development of burning plasma scenarios, steady-state scenarios at high fusion performance, and basic tokamak physics has been made by the DIII-D Team. Discharges similar to the ITER baseline scenario have demonstrated normalized fusion performance nearly 50% higher than required for Q = 10 in ITER, under stationary conditions. Discharges that extrapolate to Q {approx} 10 for longer than one hour in ITER at reduced current have also been demonstrated in DIII-D under stationary conditions. Proof of high fusion performance with full noninductive operation has been obtained. Underlying this work are studies validating approaches to confinement extrapolation, disruption avoidance and mitigation, tritium retention, ELM avoidance, and operation above the no-wall pressure limit. In addition, the unique capabilities of the DIII-D facility have advanced studies of the sawtooth instability with unprecedented time and space resolution, threshold behavior in the electron heat transport, and rotation in plasmas in the absence of external torque.

Luce, T C

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Development of Burning Plasma and Advanced Scenarios in the DIII-D Tokamak  

SciTech Connect

Significant progress in the development of burning plasma scenarios, steady-state scenarios at high fusion performance, and basic tokamak physics has been made by the DIII-D Team. Discharges similar to the ITER baseline scenario have demonstrated normalized fusion performance nearly 50% higher than required for Q = 10 in ITER, under stationary conditions. Discharges that extrapolate to Q {approx} 10 for longer than one hour in ITER at reduced current have also been demonstrated in DIII-D under stationary conditions. Proof of high fusion performance with full noninductive operation has been obtained. Underlying this work are studies validating approaches to confinement extrapolation, disruption avoidance and mitigation, tritium retention, ELM avoidance, and operation above the no-wall pressure limit. In addition, the unique capabilities of the DIII-D facility have advanced studies of the sawtooth instability with unprecedented time and space resolution, threshold behavior in the electron heat transport, and rotation in plasmas in the absence of external torque.

Luce, T C

2004-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

154

ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 10/2/2003 through 1/1/2004. As indicated in the list of accomplishments below we have seen very encouraging results from the model scale tests in terms of organism growth rates and we have begun the final tests necessary to meet our project goals. Specific results and accomplishments for the fourth quarter of 2003 include: (1) Bioreactor support systems and test facilities--(A) The solar collector is working well and has survived the winter weather. (B) The improved high-flow CRF-2 test system has been used successfully to run several long-term growth tests with periodic harvesting events. The high flow harvesting system performed well. The mass measurement results after a 4-week test show 275% growth over the initial mass loading. This figure would have been higher had there been no leakage and handling losses. Carbon dating of biomass from this test is planned for carbon uptake estimation. The next test will include direct measurement of carbon uptake in addition to organism mass measurements. (C) Qualitative organism growth testing has begun in the pilot scale bioreactor. Some issues with uniformity of organism loading, fluid leakage and evaporation have surfaced and are currently being addressed, and quantitative testing will begin as soon as these problems are resolved. (2) Organisms and Growth Surfaces--(A) Montana State University (Subcontracted to do organism studies) submitted their final (3-year) project report. An abstract of the report in included in this quarterly report.

Gregory Kremer; David J. Bayless; Morgan Vis; Michael Prudich; Keith Cooksey; Jeff Muhs

2004-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

155

2009 River Corridor Closure Contractor Revegetation and Mitigation Monitoring Report  

SciTech Connect

This document details the results of revegetation and mitigation monitoring conducted in 2009, including 25 revegetation/restoration projects, one revegetation/mitigation project, and three bat mitigation projects.

C. T. Lindsey; K. A. Gano; R. D. Teel

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

156

Radiation Detection Computational Benchmark Scenarios  

SciTech Connect

Modeling forms an important component of radiation detection development, allowing for testing of new detector designs, evaluation of existing equipment against a wide variety of potential threat sources, and assessing operation performance of radiation detection systems. This can, however, result in large and complex scenarios which are time consuming to model. A variety of approaches to radiation transport modeling exist with complementary strengths and weaknesses for different problems. This variety of approaches, and the development of promising new tools (such as ORNLs ADVANTG) which combine benefits of multiple approaches, illustrates the need for a means of evaluating or comparing different techniques for radiation detection problems. This report presents a set of 9 benchmark problems for comparing different types of radiation transport calculations, identifying appropriate tools for classes of problems, and testing and guiding the development of new methods. The benchmarks were drawn primarily from existing or previous calculations with a preference for scenarios which include experimental data, or otherwise have results with a high level of confidence, are non-sensitive, and represent problem sets of interest to NA-22. From a technical perspective, the benchmarks were chosen to span a range of difficulty and to include gamma transport, neutron transport, or both and represent different important physical processes and a range of sensitivity to angular or energy fidelity. Following benchmark identification, existing information about geometry, measurements, and previous calculations were assembled. Monte Carlo results (MCNP decks) were reviewed or created and re-run in order to attain accurate computational times and to verify agreement with experimental data, when present. Benchmark information was then conveyed to ORNL in order to guide testing and development of hybrid calculations. The results of those ADVANTG calculations were then sent to PNNL for compilation. This is a report describing the details of the selected Benchmarks and results from various transport codes.

Shaver, Mark W.; Casella, Andrew M.; Wittman, Richard S.; McDonald, Ben S.

2013-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

157

EA-1456: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

456: Mitigation Action Plan EA-1456: Mitigation Action Plan Cheyenne-Miracle Mile and Ault-Cheyenne Transmission Line Rebuild Project Carbon, Albany and Laramie Counties, Wyoming...

158

Transmission/Resource Library/Enviromental Resources and Mitigation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resources and Mitigation < Transmission | Resource Library(Redirected from TransmissionResource LibraryMitigation) Redirect page Jump to: navigation, search REDIRECT...

159

EA-1611: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigation Action Plan EA-1611: Mitigation Action Plan Colorado Highlands Wind Project, Logan County, Colorado Colorado Highlands Wind LLC applied to Western Area Power...

160

Microgrid Dispatch for Macrogrid Peak-Demand Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dispatch for Macrogrid Peak- Demand Mitigation NicholasDispatch for Macrogrid Peak-Demand Mitigation Nicholasdetermine whether the peak demand on the substation feeder

DeForest, Nicholas

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "term mitigation scenarios" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation...

162

Procedures for Interagency Consultation to Avoid or Mitigate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Consultation to Avoid or Mitigate Adverse Effects on Rivers in the Nationwide Inventory Procedures for Interagency Consultation to Avoid or Mitigate Adverse Effects on...

163

EA-1934: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plan EA-1934: Mitigation Action Plan Expansion of Active Borrow Areas, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington This Mitigation Action Plan is an integral part of the Finding of No...

164

Microgrid Dispatch for Macrogrid Peak-Demand Mitigation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dispatch for Macrogrid Peak-Demand Mitigation Title Microgrid Dispatch for Macrogrid Peak-Demand Mitigation Publication Type Conference Proceedings Refereed Designation Refereed...

165

EA-1617: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mitigation Action Plan EA-1617: Mitigation Action Plan Lovell-Yellowtail and Basin-Lovell Transmission Line Rebuild Project, Big Horn County, Wyoming, Big Horn and Carbon Counties,...

166

EIS-0422: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Action Plan EIS-0422: Mitigation Action Plan Central Ferry-Lower Monumental 500-kilovolt Transmission Line Project Mitigation measures and estimated time of implementation within...

167

Progress toward mitigation of flammable gas Tank 241-SY-101  

SciTech Connect

The mixing pump installed in Hanford Site tank 241-SY-101 has been shown to be effective in releasing flammable gases in a controlled manner. This controlled release of gas prevents the accumulation and episodic release above flammable limits. More work needs to be done to optimize the pumping operation, and to evaluate the long-term effects of mixing so as to assure that no undesirable changes have occurred to the waste. Other alternative mitigation concepts are still being evaluated as a backup to mixing.

Lentsch, J.W.; Babad, H.; Hanson, C.E.; Kirch, N.W.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Integrating Efficiency Into Climate Change Mitigation Policy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrating Efficiency Into Climate Change Mitigation Policy Speaker(s): Steven R. Schiller Date: December 8, 2008 - 12:00pm Location: 90-4133 Seminar HostPoint of Contact:...

169

Economical solutions to blast mitigation on bridges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mitigating the energy created from a blast has been a topic of utmost importance in the terrorism-feared world of today. Main targets of concern are passageways that are significant to a specific area, such as bridges. ...

DeRogatis, Austin (Austin Patrick)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Choosing Carbon Mitigation Strategies Using Ethical Deliberation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions change earths climate by altering the planets radiative balance. An important first step in mitigation of climate change is to reduce annual increases in these emissions. However, the many suggested means ...

Rebecca Bendick; Kyla M. Dahlin; Brian V. Smoliak; Lori Kumler; Sierra J. Jones; Athena Aktipis; Ezekiel Fugate; Rachel Hertog; Claus Moberg; Dane Scott

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Recoverable Robust Knapsack: the Discrete Scenario Case  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Feb 24, 2011... different customers according to their demands maximizing the profit of ... In this paper, we show that for a fixed number of discrete scenarios...

172

energy scenarios | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

- 14:37 Four new publications help advance renewable energy development energy scenarios fossil fuels OECD OpenEI policy Renewable Energy Four publications giving guidance to...

173

Transport Test Problems for Radiation Detection Scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the final report and deliverable for the project. It is a list of the details of the test cases for radiation detection scenarios.

Shaver, Mark W.; Miller, Erin A.; Wittman, Richard S.; McDonald, Benjamin S.

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

174

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy scenarios to explore alternative energy pathways indo not include the alternative energy pathways (such asmodeling to investigate alternative energy supply strategies

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050 RyanResearch Program California Energy Commission November 7,Chris Kavalec. California Energy Commission. CEC (2003a)

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

2010 - 2025 Scenario Analysis and Transition Strategies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2025 Scenario Analysis Sig Gronich Technology Validation Manager Manager- Transition Strategies DOE Hydrogen Program DOE Hydrogen Program The President's Hydrogen Fuel Initiative...

177

Undulator Hall Air Temperature Fault Scenarios  

SciTech Connect

Recent experience indicates that the LCLS undulator segments must not, at any time following tuning, be allowed to change temperature by more than about {+-}2.5 C or the magnetic center will irreversibly shift outside of acceptable tolerances. This vulnerability raises a concern that under fault conditions the ambient temperature in the Undulator Hall might go outside of the safe range and potentially could require removal and retuning of all the segments. In this note we estimate changes that can be expected in the Undulator Hall air temperature for three fault scenarios: (1) System-wide power failure; (2) Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system shutdown; and (3) HVAC system temperature regulation fault. We find that for either a system-wide power failure or an HVAC system shutdown (with the technical equipment left on), the short-term temperature changes of the air would be modest due to the ability of the walls and floor to act as a heat ballast. No action would be needed to protect the undulator system in the event of a system-wide power failure. Some action to adjust the heat balance, in the case of the HVAC power failure with the equipment left on, might be desirable but is not required. On the other hand, a temperature regulation failure of the HVAC system can quickly cause large excursions in air temperature and prompt action would be required to avoid damage to the undulator system.

Sevilla, J.

2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

178

Advanced Mitigating Measures for the Cell Internal Short Risk (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation describes mitigation measures for internal short circuits in lithium-ion battery cells.

Darcy, E.; Smith, K.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

EA-1096: Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects (Programmatic), Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects (Programmatic), 6: Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects (Programmatic), Washington EA-1096: Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects (Programmatic), Washington SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal for the U.S. Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration to fund the portion of the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement pertaining to wildlife habitat mitigation projects to be undertaken in a cooperative effort with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD July 30, 1996 EA-1096: Finding of No Significant Impact Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects (Programmatic) July 30, 1996 EA-1096: Final Environmental Assessment Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects (Programmatic)

180

An integrated multi-criteria scenario evaluation web tool for participatory land-use planning in urbanized areas: The Ecosystem Portfolio Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land-use land-cover change is one of the most important and direct drivers of changes in ecosystem functions and services. Given the complexity of the decision-making, there is a need for Internet-based decision support systems with scenario evaluation ... Keywords: Decision support, Ecological value, Ecosystem restoration, Land-use planning, Quality of life, Sea level rise mitigation, Sustainability

W. B. Labiosa; W. M. Forney; A. -M. Esnard; D. Mitsova-Boneva; R. Bernknopf; P. Hearn; D. Hogan; L. Pearlstine; D. Strong; H. Gladwin; E. Swain

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "term mitigation scenarios" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Comments on climate change scenario development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A short review is presented of progress in climate change scenario development. Sources of uncertainty are discussed. Critical assessment of climate models for their veracity in describing the present climate is considered essential. Methods of deriving ... Keywords: Climate change, Global climate models, Greenhouse effect, Scenarios

A. B. Pittock

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Uncertainty in Integrated Assessment Scenarios  

SciTech Connect

The determination of climate policy is a decision under uncertainty. The uncertainty in future climate change impacts is large, as is the uncertainty in the costs of potential policies. Rational and economically efficient policy choices will therefore seek to balance the expected marginal costs with the expected marginal benefits. This approach requires that the risks of future climate change be assessed. The decision process need not be formal or quantitative for descriptions of the risks to be useful. Whatever the decision procedure, a useful starting point is to have as accurate a description of climate risks as possible. Given the goal of describing uncertainty in future climate change, we need to characterize the uncertainty in the main causes of uncertainty in climate impacts. One of the major drivers of uncertainty in future climate change is the uncertainty in future emissions, both of greenhouse gases and other radiatively important species such as sulfur dioxide. In turn, the drivers of uncertainty in emissions are uncertainties in the determinants of the rate of economic growth and in the technologies of production and how those technologies will change over time. This project uses historical experience and observations from a large number of countries to construct statistical descriptions of variability and correlation in labor productivity growth and in AEEI. The observed variability then provides a basis for constructing probability distributions for these drivers. The variance of uncertainty in growth rates can be further modified by expert judgment if it is believed that future variability will differ from the past. But often, expert judgment is more readily applied to projected median or expected paths through time. Analysis of past variance and covariance provides initial assumptions about future uncertainty for quantities that are less intuitive and difficult for experts to estimate, and these variances can be normalized and then applied to mean trends from a model for uncertainty projections. The probability distributions of these critical model drivers, and the resulting uncertainty in projections from a range of models, can provide the basis of future emission scenario set designs.

Mort Webster

2005-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

183

Blue Creek Winter Range : Wildlife Mitigation Project : Final Environmental Assessment.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund that portion of the Washington Wildlife Agreement pertaining to the Blue Creek Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Project) in a cooperative effort with the Spokane Tribe, Upper Columbia United Tribes, and the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). If fully implemented, the proposed action would allow the sponsors to protect and enhance 2,631 habitat units of big game winter range and riparian shrub habitat on 2,185 hectares (5,400 acres) of Spokane Tribal trust lands, and to conduct long term wildlife management activities within the Spokane Indian Reservation project area. This Final Environmental Assessment (EA) examines the potential environmental effects of securing land and conducting wildlife habitat enhancement and long term management activities within the boundaries of the Spokane Indian Reservation. Four proposed activities (habitat protection, habitat enhancement, operation and maintenance, and monitoring and evaluation) are analyzed. The proposed action is intended to meet the need for mitigation of wildlife and wildlife habitat adversely affected by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam and its reservoir.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; United States. Bureau of Indian Affairs; Spokane Tribe of the Spokane Reservation, Washington

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Illustrative Scenarios Tool | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Illustrative Scenarios Tool Illustrative Scenarios Tool Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Illustrative Scenarios Tool Agency/Company /Organization: European Commission Focus Area: GHG Inventory Development Topics: Analysis Tools Website: www.eutransportghg2050.eu/cms/illustrative-scenarios-tool/ The SULTAN (SUstainabLe TrANsport) Illustrative Scenarios Tool is a high-level calculator to help provide estimates of the possible impacts of policy on transport in the European Union. The tool allows quick scoping of a range of transport policy options to help understand what scale of action might be required and may also be used as part of the analysis for final technical outputs of a project. How to Use This Tool This tool is most helpful when using these strategies:

185

A discussion of certain safety issues associated with the Tank 241-SY-101 mitigation mixing test  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper addresses certain safety issues associated with the Hanford Tank 241-SY 101 hydrogen mitigation mixing test. Specifically, the study, is concerned with the effect of pump shearing, jet mixing, and piling-up on the following areas: Gas generation; gas retention; gas release (immediate); gas release (long-term); and saltcake. The findings for each issue area of concern are addressed.

Not Available

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Stephen Potter: Exploring rail futures using scenarios EXPLORING RAIL FUTURES USING SCENARIOS: EXPERIENCE AND POTENTIAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and other research outputs Exploring rail futures using scenarios: experience and potential Conference Item How to cite:

Stephen Potter

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 10/2/2001 through 10/01/2002. This report marks the end of year 2 of a three-year project as well as the milestone date for completion of Phase I activities. This report includes our current status and defines the steps being taken to ensure that we meet the project goals by the end of year 3. As indicated in the list of accomplishments below our current efforts are focused on evaluating candidate organisms and growth surfaces, preparing to conduct long-term tests in the bench-scale bioreactor test systems, and scaling-up the test facilities from bench scale to pilot scale. Specific results and accomplishments for the third quarter of 2002 include: Organisms and Growth Surfaces: (1) Test results continue to indicate that thermophilic cyanobacteria have significant advantages as agents for practical photosynthetic CO{sub 2} mitigation before mesophilic forms. (2) Additional thermal features with developed cyanobacterial mats, which might be calcium resistant, were found in YNP. (3) Back to back tests show that there is no detectable difference in the growth of isolate 1.2 s.c. (2) in standard and Ca-modified BG-11 medium. The doubling time for both cases was about 12 hours. (4) The cultivation of cyanobacteria in Ca-BG medium should proceed in the pH range between 7 and 7.4, but this suggestion requires additional experiments. (5) Cyanobacteria can be grown in media where sodium is present at trace levels. (6) Ca{sup 2+} enriched medium can be used as a sink for CO{sub 2} under alkaline conditions. (7) Cyanobacteria are able to generate cones of filaments on travertine surfaces. [Travertine is a mixture of CaCO{sub 3} and CaSO{sub 4}]. We hypothesize that SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} stimulates the generation of such cones, because they are not almost generated on CaCO3 surface. On the other hand, we know that plant gas contains elevated concentrations of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}. We may speculate that the introduction of 11.2 isolate in CRF might significantly increase the productivity of such facility. It is possible that a higher colonization potential for the screens may allow a higher surface productivity than some of the other isolates. (8) The colonization of Omnisil surface is an auto-inducible and time-requiring process. (9) Omnisil coupons should be treated under pH control, preferably using KOH. Bioreactor support systems and test facilities: (1) The pilot-scale bioreactor construction and debugging is continuing on schedule. Tests of the ''natural'' lighting system have shown acceptable levels of illumination for the bioreactor screens using only collected sunlight. (2) Flow control inserts have been designed for the CRF-2 screens, which require header pipes for flow distribution and control. A staggered drilled-hole design and a thick shim design have both shown acceptable performance results (little to no clogging, uniform flow, ability to load algae on to the screen). They will both be tested in the CRF-2 to see which performs the best over long durations, and the best performing design will be used for the pilot scale bioreactor screens.

Dr. Gregory Kremer; Dr. David J. Bayless; Dr. Morgan Vis; Dr. Michael Prudich; Dr. Keith Cooksey; Dr. Jeff Muhs

2002-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

188

Business Case for Energy Efficiency in Support of Climate Change Mitigation, Economic and Societal Benefits in China  

SciTech Connect

This study seeks to provide policymakers and other stakeholders with actionable information towards a road map for reducing energy consumption cost-effectively. We focus on individual end use equipment types (hereafter referred to as appliance groups) that might be the subject of policies - such as labels, energy performance standards, and incentives - to affect market transformation in the short term, and on high-efficiency technology options that are available today. As the study title suggests, the high efficiency or Business Case scenario is constructed around a model of cost-effective efficiency improvement. Our analysis demonstrates that a significant reduction in energy consumption and emissions is achievable at net negative cost, that is, as a profitable investment for consumers. Net savings are calculated assuming no additional costs to energy consumption such as carbon taxes. Savings relative to the base case as calculated in this way is often referred to as 'economic savings potential'. Chinese energy demand has grown dramatically over the last few decades. While heavy industry still plays a dominant role in greenhouse gas emissions, demand from residential and commercial buildings has also seen rapid growth in percentage terms. In the residential sector this growth is driven by internal migration from the countryside to cities. Meanwhile, income in both urban and rural subsectors allows ownership of major appliances. While residences are still relatively small by U.S. or European standards, nearly all households own a refrigerator, a television and an air conditioner. In the future, ownership rates are not expected to grow as much as in other developing countries, because they are already close to saturation. However, the gradual turnover of equipment in the world's largest consumer market provides a huge opportunity for greenhouse gas mitigation. In addition to residences, commercial floor space has expanded rapidly in recent years, and construction continues at a rapid pace. Growth in this sector means that commercial lighting and HVAC will play an increasingly important role in energy demand in China. The outlook for efficiency improvement in China is encouraging, since the Chinese national and local governments have implemented significant policies to contain energy intensity and announced their intention to continue and accelerate these. In particular, the Chinese appliance standards program, first established in 1989, was significantly strengthened and modernized after the passage of the Energy Conservation Law of 1997. Since then, the program has expanded to encompass over 30 equipment types (including motor vehicles). The current study suggests that, in spite of these efforts, there is significant savings to be captured through wide adoption of technologies already available on the Chinese market. The approach of the study is to assess the impact of short-term actions on long-term impacts. 'Short-term' market transformation is assumed to occur by 2015, while 'long-term' energy demand reduction impacts are assessed in 2030. In the intervening years, most but not all of the equipment studied will turn over completely. Early in 2011, the Chinese government announced a plan to reduce carbon dioxide emissions intensity (per unit GDP) by 16% by 2015 as part of the 12th five year plan. These targets are consistent with longer term goals to reduce emissions intensity 40-45% relative to 2005 levels by 2020. The efforts of the 12th FYP focus on short-term gains to meet the four-year targets, and concentrate mainly in industry. Implementation of cost-effective technologies for all new equipment in the buildings sector thus is largely complementary to the 12th FYP goals, and would provide a mechanism to sustain intensity reductions in the medium and long term. The 15-year time frame is significant for many products, in the sense that delay of implementation postpones economic benefits and mitigation of emissions of carbon dioxide. Such delays would result in putting in place energy-wasting technologies, postponin

McNeil, Michael A.; Bojda, Nicholas; Ke, Jing; Qin, Yining; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Fridley, David; Letschert, Virginie E.; McMahon, James E.

2011-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

189

Long-term tradeoffs between nuclear- and fossil-fuel burning  

SciTech Connect

A global energy/economics/environmental (E{sup 3}) model has been adapted with a nuclear energy/materials model to understand better {open_quotes}top-level{close_quotes}, long-term trade offs between civilian nuclear power, nuclear-weapons proliferation, fossil-fuel burning, and global economic welfare. Using a {open_quotes}business-as-usual{close_quotes} (BAU) point-of-departure case, economic, resource, proliferation-risk implications of plutonium recycle in LAIRs, greenhouse-gas-mitigating carbon taxes, and a range of nuclear energy costs (capital and fuel) considerations have been examined. After describing the essential elements of the analysis approach being developed to support the Los Alamos Nuclear Vision Project, preliminary examples of parametric variations about the BAU base-case scenario are presented. The results described herein represent a sampling from more extensive results collected in a separate report. The primary motivation here is: (a) to compare the BAU basecase with results from other studies; (b) to model on a regionally resolved global basis long-term (to year {approximately}2100) evolution of plutonium accumulation in a variety of forms under a limited range of fuel-cycle scenarios; and (c) to illustrate a preliminary connectivity between risks associated with nuclear proliferation and fossil-fuel burning (e.g., greenhouse-gas accumulations).

Krakowski, R.A.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

190

Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO2 Mitigation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 4/2/2003 through 7/01/2003. As indicated in the list of accomplishments below we have completed some long-term model scale bioreactor tests and are prepared to begin pilot scale bioreactor testing. Specific results and accomplishments for the second quarter of 2003 include: (1) Bioreactor support systems and test facilities: (a) Qualitative long-term survivability tests for S.C.1.2(2) on Omnisil have been successfully completed and results demonstrate a growth rate that appears to be acceptable. (b) Quantitative tests of long-term growth productivity for S.C.1.2(2) on Omnisil have been completed and initial results are promising. Initial results show that the mass of organisms doubled (from 54.9 grams to 109.8 grams) in about 5 weeks. Full results will be available as soon as all membranes and filters are completely dried. The growth rate should increase significantly with the initiation of weekly harvesting during the long term tests. (c) The phase 1 construction of the pilot scale bioreactor has been completed, including the solar collector and light distribution system. We are now in the phase of system improvement as we wait for CRF-2 results in order to be able to finalize the design and construction of the pilot scale system. (d) A mass transfer experimental setup was constructed in order to measure the mass transfer rate from the gas to the liquid film flowing over a membrane and to study the hydrodynamics of the liquid film flowing over a membrane in the bioreactor. Results were reported for mass transfer coefficient, film thickness, and fluid velocity over an Omnisil membrane with a ''drilled hole'' header pipe design. (2) Organisms and Growth Surfaces: (a) A selectivity approach was used to obtain a cyanobacterial culture with elevated resistance to acid pH. Microlonies of ''3.2.2 S.C.1 Positive'' migrated towards light along a light gradient, and against acid gradient, in whole. Nonetheless, some microcolonies were able to generate ''secondary'' microcolonies with increased ability to move towards acid area. These microcolonies with elevated resistance to acidity have been isolated and inoculated in BG-11 with pH 6. They are still under incubation. (b) We have continued our work on the genotyping of unialgal cyanobacterial cultures isolated in YNP. Because partial sequence of 16S rRNA gene of the isolate 5.2 S.C.1 did not appear to be more than 93% identical to published cyanobacterial sequences, we carried out entire sequence of this gene using the combination of different primers. It appears that we have found a representative of putative new genus. We expect to publish all sequences. (c) The new species (even probably new genus) of cyanobacteria, 5.2 s. c. 1 that was isolated from La Duke Spring in Great Yellowstone Basin demonstrate an elevated resistance to some compounds of iron. This might be very important for our project, because plant gases may have elevated amount of iron. Our study of the effect of different concentration of FeCl3 6H2O on the growth of 5.2 S.C.1 isolate showed that iron additions stimulated rather then inhibited the growth of 5.2. S.C.1 isolate. Because of this we would recommend this isolate for further experiments.

Gregory Kremer; David J. Bayless; Morgan Vis; Michael Prudich; Keith Cooksey; Jeff Muhs

2003-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

191

Integrating Efficiency Into Climate Change Mitigation Policy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrating Efficiency Into Climate Change Mitigation Policy Integrating Efficiency Into Climate Change Mitigation Policy Speaker(s): Steven R. Schiller Date: December 8, 2008 - 12:00pm Location: 90-4133 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Richard Diamond Steve will discuss policy options for deploying energy efficiency resources in electricity (non-transportation) end-use markets to meet needed GHG emission reduction levels. This discussion will include listing some barriers inherent to climate policy design, as well as energy markets, that inhibit efficiency investment as an emissions reduction strategy. However, the focus of the talk is on recommendations for effective mechanisms that incorporate end-use electricity energy efficiency into climate change mitigation efforts. In a recent ACEEE paper, Steve and his co-authors,

192

Level maintenance for Tank 101-SY mitigation-by-mixing test  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides the procedure to be followed to implement the requirements of the Mixer Pump Long-Term Operations Plan for Tank 241-SY-101 Mitigation, WHC-SD-WM-PLN-081. The test is divided into 2 distinct sequences, named Single Position Pump Run and Tank Sweep. Instructions for all sequences are defined within the procedure. All safety requirements as defined in LA-UR-92-3196, A Safety Assessment for Proposed Mixing Operations to Mitigate Episodic Gas Releases in Tank 241-101-SY have been implemented into this procedure.

Sobocinski, R.G.

1994-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

193

Mitigating PQ Problems in Legacy Data Centers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The conclusions of this presentation are: (1) Problems with PQ in legacy data centers still exist and need to be mitigated; (2) Harmonics generated by non-linear IT load can be lowered by passive, active and hybrid cancellation methods; (3) Harmonic study is necessary to find the best way to treat PQ problems; (4) AHF's and harmonic cancellation transformers proved to be very efficient in mitigating PQ problems; and (5) It is important that IT leaders partner with electrical engineering to appropriate ROI statements, justifying many of these expenditures.

Ilinets, Boris; /SLAC

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

EA-1508: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

508: Mitigation Action Plan 508: Mitigation Action Plan EA-1508: Mitigation Action Plan Beaver Creek-Hoyt-Erie Transmission Line Upgrade Project Morgan and Weld Counties, Colorado This is the mitigation action plan (MAP) for use during construction of the Beaver Creek-Hoyt-Erie transmission line upgrades, including right-of ways (ROWS), hydrology, vegetation, construction debris and dewatering, landscape engineering, borrow pits and recommended procedures for Raptors and powerline construction. Mitigation Action Plan to Implement Mitigation Requirements for Beaver Creek-Hoyt-Erie Transmission Line Upgrade Project Morgan and Weld Counties, Colorado November 2005 More Documents & Publications EA-1617: Mitigation Action Plan EA-1456: Mitigation Action Plan EA-1611: Mitigation Action Plan

195

The Programmer's Apprentice: A Program Design Scenario  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A scenario is used to illustrate the capabilities of a proposed Design Apprentice, focussing on the area of detailed, low-level design. Given a specification, the Design Apprentice will be able to make many of the ...

Rich, Charles

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Workforce management strategies in a disaster scenario.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model of the repair operations of the voice telecommunications network is used to study labor management strategies under a disaster scenario where the workforce is overwhelmed. The model incorporates overtime and fatigue functions and optimizes the deployment of the workforce based on the cost of the recovery and the time it takes to recover. The analysis shows that the current practices employed in workforce management in a disaster scenario are not optimal and more strategic deployment of that workforce is beneficial.

Kelic, Andjelka; Turk, Adam L.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Mitigation Methods for Tubular Structures -- Interim Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This interim report describes the first year of a two-year testing program for methods to prevent or mitigate corrosion in the interior surfaces of steel tubular poles. Two methods are under study: cathodic protection that uses zinc or magnesium sacrificial anodes and rust inhibitors that protect interior surfaces.BackgroundUtilities have become increasingly aware of the potential problems associated with underground ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

198

Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO2 Mitigation  

SciTech Connect

This report highlights significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation Project for the period ending 06/30/2004. The major accomplishment was the modification of the header and harvesting work, with a system designed to distribute algae at startup, sustain operations and harvest in one unit.

Gregory Kremer; David J. Bayless; Morgan Vis; Michael Prudich; Keith Cooksey; Jeff Muhs

2004-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

199

Wildlife Mitigation Program Record of Decision.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has decided to adopt a set of Descriptions (goals, strategies, and procedural requirements) that apply to future BPA-funded wildlife mitigation projects. Various. sources-including Indian tribes, state agencies, property owners, private conservation groups, or other Federal agencies-propose wildlife mitigation projects to the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) for BPA funding. Following independent scientific and public reviews, Council then selects projects to recommend for BPA funding. BPA adopts this set of prescriptions to standardize the planning and implementation of individual wildlife mitigation projects. This decision is based on consideration of potential environmental impacts evaluated in BPA`s Wildlife Mitigation Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0246) published March, 20, 1997, and filed with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) the week of March 24, 1997 (EPA Notice of Availability Published April 4, 1997, 62 FR 65, 16154). BPA will distribute this Record of Decision to all known interested and affected persons, groups, tribes, and agencies.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Passive versus active mitigation cost analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The scope of this task is to assess the impact of mitigation alternatives for Tanks 241-SY-101 and 241-SY-103 on the Project W-236A Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility. This assessment and other related tasks are part of an Action Plan Path Forward prepared by the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Life Extension and Transition Program. Task 3.7 of the Action Plan for Project W-236A MWTF analyzed the comparative cost/risk of two hydrogen gas mitigation alternatives (active versus passive) to recommend the most appropriate course of action to resolve the hydrogen gas safety issue. The qualitative success of active mitigation has been demonstrated through Tank 241-SY-101 testing. Passive mitigation has not been demonstrated but will be validated by laboratory test work performed under Task 3.1 of the Action Plan. It is assumed for this assessment that the uncertainties associated with the performance of either alternative is comparable. Determining alternative specific performance measures beyond those noted are not in the scope of this effort.

Parazin, R.J.; Galbraith, J.D.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "term mitigation scenarios" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Dust Mitigation Methods for Coal Combustion Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal-fired power plants generate coal combustion products (CCPs) requiring management for storage and disposal. These products are often stored in facilities such as landfills or placed in temporary storage pads for short or long durations. At these facilities, there is a need to address dust mitigation concerns in order to comply with environmental permits, ...

2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

202

Autonomic fault mitigation in embedded systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Autonomy, particularly from a maintenance and fault-management perspective, is an increasingly desirable feature in embedded (and non-embedded) computer systems. The driving factors are several-including increasing pervasiveness of computer systems, ... Keywords: Autonomic computing, Embedded systems, Fault mitigation, Fault tolerance, Hierarchical concurrent finite-state machines, Model-based design

Sandeep Neema; Ted Bapty; Shweta Shetty; Steven Nordstrom

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Mitigating Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Voluntary Reporting 1996  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presents information on voluntary actions to reduce greenhouse gases or remove such gases from the atmosphere in 1995. It provides an overview of participation in the Voluntary Reporting Program, a perspective on the composition of activities reported, and a review of some key issues in interpreting and evaluating achievements associated with reported emissions mitigation initiatives.

Information Center

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Wildlife Protection, Mitigation and Enhancement Planning for Grand Coulee Dam, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

The development and operation of Grand Coulee Dam inundated approximately 70,000 acres of wildlife habitat under the jurisdictions of the Colville Confederated Tribes, the Spokane Tribe, and the State of Washington. Under the provisions of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980, this study reviews losses to wildlife and habitat, and proposes mitigation for those losses. Wildlife loss estimates were developed from information available in the literature. Habitat losses and potential habitat gains through mitigation were estimated by a modified Habitat Evaluation Procedure. The mitigation plan proposes (1) acquisition of sufficient land or management rights to land to protect Habitat Units equivalent to those lost (approximately 73,000 acres of land would be required), (2) improvement and management of those lands to obtain and perpetuate target Habitat Units, and (3) protection and enhancement of suitable habitat for bald eagles. Mitigation is presented as four actions to be implemented over a 10-year period. A monitoring program is proposed to monitor mitigation success in terms of Habitat Units and wildlife population trends.

Creveling, Jennifer

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Environmental mitigation at hydroelectric projects. Volume 2, Benefits and costs of fish passage and protection  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study examines envirorunental mitigation practices that provide upstream and downstream fish passage and protection at hydroelectric projects. The study includes a survey of fish passage and protection mitigation practices at 1,825 hydroelectric plants regulated by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) to determine frequencies of occurrence, temporal trends, and regional practices based on FERC regions. The study also describes, in general terms, the fish passage/protection mitigation costs at 50 non-Federal hydroelectric projects. Sixteen case studies are used to examine in detail the benefits and costs of fish passage and protection. The 16 case studies include 15 FERC licensed or exempted hydroelectric projects and one Federally-owned and-operated hydroelectric project. The 16 hydroelectric projects are located in 12 states and range in capacity from 400 kilowatts to 840 megawatts. The fish passage and protection mitigation methods at the case studies include fish ladders and lifts, an Eicher screen, spill flows, airburst-cleaned inclined and cylindrical wedgewire screens, vertical barrier screens, and submerged traveling screens. The costs, benefits, monitoring methods, and operating characteristics of these and other mitigation methods used at the 16 case studies are examined.

Francfort, J.E.; Rinehart, B.N.; Sommers, G.L. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cada, G.F.; Jones, D.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Dauble, D.D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Hunt, R.T. [Hunt (Richard) Associates, Inc., Concord, NH (United States); Costello, R.J. [Northwest Water Resources Advisory Services (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Exploring the Future Role of Asia Utilizing A Scenario Matrix Architecture and Shared Socio-Ecosystem Pathways  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We explore the implications of alternative pathways for human population and economic development for the role of Asia in both reference, no-climate-policy, scenarios and scenarios in which climate forcing is limited. We consider three different reference scenarios, which we refer to as Shared Socio-ecosystem Pathways (SSPs) and four different levels of limitation on climate forcing, which we refer to as Shared Policy Assumptions (SPAs). SSPs are differentiated by population and economic growth assumptions, while SPAs are differentiated on the level of radiative forcing in the year 2100. Regardless of the scenarios we examined Asia plays a central role in shaping the worlds future with nearly half of the worlds people and more than half of the worlds economic activity and energy consumption. The future of Asian and world are dramatically different across the various combinations of SSPs and SPAs. High population worlds place significant stress on Asian resources and ecosystems. In high population SSPs the poorest members of the population face high energy and food prices and the more stringent the level of emissions mitigation, the more stress poor populations experience, though the more stringent the emissions mitigation, the larger the area of unmanaged ecosystems that are preserved.

Eom, Jiyong; Calvin, Katherine V.; Clarke, Leon E.; Edmonds, James A.; Kim, Son H.; Kopp, Roberrt; Kyle, G. Page; Luckow, Patrick; Moss, Richard H.; Patel, Pralit L.; Wise, Marshall A.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Modified GBIG Scenario as a Successful Alternative for Dark Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We construct a DGP-inspired braneworld model where induced gravity on the brane is modified in the spirit of $f(R)$ gravity and stringy effects are taken into account by incorporation of the Gauss-Bonnet term in the bulk action. We explore cosmological dynamics of this model and we show that this scenario is a successful alternative for dark energy proposal. Interestingly, it realizes the phantom-like behavior without introduction of any phantom field on the brane and the effective equation of state parameter crosses the cosmological constant line naturally in the same way as observational data suggest.

Nozari, Kourosh

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Modified GBIG Scenario as an Alternative for Dark Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We construct a DGP-inspired braneworld model where induced gravity on the brane is modified in the spirit of $f(R)$ gravity and stringy effects are taken into account by incorporation of the Gauss-Bonnet term in the bulk action. We explore cosmological dynamics of this model and we show that this scenario is a successful alternative for dark energy proposal. Interestingly, it realizes the phantom-like behavior without introduction of any phantom field on the brane and the effective equation of state parameter crosses the cosmological constant line naturally in the same way as observational data suggest.

Kourosh Nozari; Narges Rashidi

2009-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

209

Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry, Agriculture Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.fao.org/climatechange/67148/en/ RelatedTo: Mitigation of Climate Change in Agriculture (MICCA) Project Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database Screenshot References: AFOLU Mitigation Database[1] Global Survey of Agricultural Mitigation Projects Paper[2] "The AFOLU MP database endeavors to gather information on all mitigation activities currently ongoing within the agricultural and forestry sectors

210

Mitigation and Remediation of Mercury Contamination at the Y...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigation and Remediation of Mercury Contamination at the Y-12 Plant Oak Ridge Mitigation and Remediation of Mercury Contamination at the Y-12 Plant Oak Ridge Full Document and...

211

The Agricultural Sector and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Model (ASMGHG)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Agricultural Sector and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Model (ASMGHG) Uwe A. Schneider Bruce A. Mc Sector and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Model (ASMGHG Taxes and Sequestration Subsidies...............................66 3.8.2.4 Special Greenhouse Gas

McCarl, Bruce A.

212

The U.S. Country Studies Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Assessment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 The U.S. Country Studies Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Assessment Workshop: A Report Participants in the first GHG Mitigation Assessment Workshop. On June 13-24, the Center's Energy...

213

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Congestion Mitigation Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) Improvement Program to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) Improvement Program on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) Improvement Program on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) Improvement Program on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) Improvement Program on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) Improvement Program on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) Improvement Program on AddThis.com...

214

2007 River Corridor Closure Contractor Revegetation and Mitigation Monitoring Report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to document the status of revegetation projects and natural resources mitigation efforts that have been conducted for remediated waste sites and other activities associated with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) cleanup of National Priorities List waste sites at Hanford. This report documents the results of revegetation and mitigation monitoring conducted in 2007 and includes 11 revegetation/restoration projects, one revegetation/mitigation project, and 3 bat habitat mitigation projects.

K. A. Gano; C. T. Lindsey

2007-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

215

2008 River Corridor Closure Contractor Revegetation and Mitigation Monitoring Report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to document the status of revegetation projects and natural resources mitigation efforts that have been conducted for remediated waste sites and other activities associated with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act cleanup of National Priorities List waste sites at Hanford. This report documents the results of revegetation and mitigation monitoring conducted in 2008 and includes 22 revegetation/restoration projects, one revegetation/mitigation project, and two bat habitat mitigation projects.

C. T. Lindsey; K. A. Gano

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

216

Southern Idaho Wildlife Mitigation Implementation 2000 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers calendar year 2000 activities for the Southern Idaho Wildlife Mitigation Implementation project. This project, implemented by Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Shoshone Bannock Tribes wildlife mitigation staff, is designed to protect, enhance and maintain wildlife habitats to mitigate construction losses for Palisades, Anderson Ranch, Black Canyon and Minidoka hydroelectric projects. Additional project information is available in the quarterly reports.

Bottum, Edward; Mikkelsen, Anders

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Southern idaho Wildlife Mitigation Implementation 1999 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is for the Southern Idaho Wildlife Mitigation Implementation project. This project, implemented by IDFG and SBT wildlife mitigation staff, is designed to protect, enhance and maintain wildlife habitats to mitigate construction losses for Palisades, Anderson Ranch, Black Canyon and Minidoka hydroelectric projects. Additional project information is available in the quarterly reports.

Bottum, Edward; Mikkelsen, Anders

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Review of scenario selection approaches for performance assessment of high-level waste repositories and related issues.  

SciTech Connect

The selection of scenarios representing plausible realizations of the future conditions-with associated probabilities of occurrence-that can affect the long-term performance of a high-level radioactive waste (HLW) repository is the commonly used method for treating the uncertainty in the prediction of the future states of the system. This method, conventionally referred to as the ``scenario approach,`` while common is not the only method to deal with this uncertainty; other method ``ch as the environmental simulation approach (ESA), have also been proposed. Two of the difficulties with the scenario approach are the lack of uniqueness in the definition of the term ``scenario`` and the lack of uniqueness in the approach to formulate scenarios, which relies considerably on subjective judgments. Consequently, it is difficult to assure that a complete and unique set of scenarios can be defined for use in a performance assessment. Because scenarios are key to the determination of the long-term performance of the repository system, this lack of uniqueness can present a considerable challenge when attempting to reconcile the set of scenarios, and their level of detail, obtained using different approaches, particularly among proponents and regulators of a HLW repository.

Banano, E.J. [Beta Corporation International, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Baca, R.G. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States). Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Formulating Climate Change Scenarios to Inform Climate - Resilient...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Formulating Climate Change Scenarios to Inform Climate - Resilient Development Strategies Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Formulating Climate Change Scenarios to...

220

Analysis of Long-range Clean Energy Investment Scenarios for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Long-range Clean Energy Investment Scenarios for Eritrea, East Africa Title Analysis of Long-range Clean Energy Investment Scenarios for Eritrea, East Africa Publication Type...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "term mitigation scenarios" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: H2A Delivery Scenario Analysis...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scenario Analysis Model (HDSAM) Project Summary Full Title: H2A Delivery Scenario Analysis Model (HDSAM) Project ID: 218 Principal Investigator: Marianne Mintz Keywords: Models;...

222

Technical assessment of community solar future scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Kent Solar Project goal is to develop energy future scenarios for the community based upon the input of a cross-section of the population. It has been primarily a non-technical development in an attempt to gain community commitment. Social/political/economic issues have been identified as the key obstacles in fulfilling the future scenarios. To communicate the feasibility of solar energy in Kent, Ohio an analysis of the economic potential for solar energy was developed. The Solar Project calls for 25 per cent reduction of present fossil fuel quantities in 1990, achievable by conservation measures, and a 50 per cent reduction in 2000, which necessitates solar technology implementation. The technical analysis is demonstrating the future scenarios to be both feasible and economically wise. The technical assessment requires an in-depth data base of existing comsumption which is not easily identifiable.

Kremers, J.A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Global Warming Mitigation Investments Optimized under Uncertainty  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Warming Mitigation Investments Optimized under Uncertainty Global Warming Mitigation Investments Optimized under Uncertainty Speaker(s): Hermann Held Date: July 9, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Thomas McKone The Copenhagen Accord (2009) recognizes that 'the increase in global temperature should be below 2 degrees Celsius' (compared to pre-industrial levels, '2° target'). In recent years, energy economics have derived welfare-optimal investment streams into low-emission energy mixes and associated costs. According to our analyses, auxiliary targets that are in line with the 2° target could be achieved at relatively low costs if energy investments were triggered rather swiftly. While such analyses assume 'perfect foresight' of a benevolent 'social planner', an accompanying suite of experiments explicitly

224

Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change Sector: Energy, Land Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: GHG inventory, Low emission development planning Resource Type: Publications, Lessons learned/best practices, Case studies/examples Website: unfccc.int/home/items/5265.php Country: Afghanistan, Antigua and Barbuda, Armenia, Benin, Bhutan, Botswana, Brazil, Cameroon, Central African Republic, China, Democratic Republic of Congo, Costa Rica, Ivory Coast, Ethiopia, Eritrea, Gabon, Georgia (country), Ghana, India, Indonesia, Israel, Jordan, Madagascar, Maldives, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Papua New Guinea, Peru, South Korea, Moldova, San Marino, Sierra Leone, Singapore, South Africa, Republic of Macedonia, Togo, Tunisia

225

Decarbonization and Sequestration for Mitigating Global Warming  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DECARBONIZATION AND SEQUESTRATION FOR DECARBONIZATION AND SEQUESTRATION FOR MITIGATING GLOBAL WARMING M. Steinberg (msteinbe@bnl.gov); 631-344-3036 Brookhaven National Laboratory 12 South Upton Street Upton, NY 11973-5000, USA ABSTRACT Mitigating the global warming greenhouse effect while maintaining a fossil fuel economy, requires improving efficiency of utilization of fossil fuels, use of high hydrogen content fossil fuels, decarbonization of fossil fuels, and sequestering of carbon and CO 2 applied to all the sectors of the economy, electric power generation, transportation, and industrial, and domestic power and heat generation. Decarbonization means removal of carbon as C or CO 2 either before or after fossil fuel combustion and sequestration means disposal of the recovered C or CO 2 including its utilization. Removal and recovery of CO

226

Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO2 Mitigation  

SciTech Connect

This report highlights significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation Project during the ending 12/31/2004. Specific results and accomplishments for the program include review of pilot scale testing and design of a new bioreactor. Testing confirmed that algae can be grown in a sustainable fashion in the pilot bioreactor, even with intermittent availability of sunlight. The pilot-scale tests indicated that algal growth rate followed photon delivery during productivity testing.

Gregory Kremer; David J. Bayless; Morgan Vis; Michael Prudich; Keith Cooksey; Jeff Muhs

2005-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

227

Explosive parcel containment and blast mitigation container  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a containment structure for containing and mitigating explosions. The containment structure is installed in the wall of the building and has interior and exterior doors for placing suspicious packages into the containment structure and retrieving them from the exterior of the building. The containment structure has a blast deflection chute and a blowout panel to direct over pressure from explosions away from the building, surrounding structures and people.

Sparks, Michael H. (Frederick County, MD)

2001-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

228

ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 1/3/2001 through 4/02/2002. Most of the achievements are milestones in our efforts to complete the tasks and subtasks that constitute the project objectives, and we are currently on schedule to complete Phase I activities by 10/2002, the milestone date from the original project timeline. As indicated in the list of accomplishments below, we are continuing to evaluate candidate organisms and growth surfaces, and we are expanding the test facilities in preparation for scaled up system-level testing. Specific results and accomplishments for the first quarter of 2002 include: Organisms and Growth Surfaces: (1) Isolate 1.2 s.c. (2) has been selected for further investigations because of its favorable growth properties. (2) Research on optimal conditions for the growth of cyanobacterial isolates from YNP should be carried out using distilled water which has more stable chemical parameters, although tap water use may be permissible during full scale operations (at the cost of longer organism doubling times). (3) Tr. 9.4 WF is able to generate a biofilm on an Omnisil surface. Over the long term Omnisil does not inhibit the growth of TR 9.4 isolate, though it does elongate the lag phase of growth of this isolate. (4) Initial survivability tests for the TR 9.4 organism on Omnisil screens in the CRF2 modelscale bioreactor are underway. We have experienced problems keeping the organisms alive for more than three days, but we are currently investigating several possible causes for this unexpected result. (5) Accelerated materials testing have shown that Omnisil fabric has acceptable strength properties for use in a practical bioreactor system. Bioreactor support systems and test facilities: (1) Several CO{sub 2} scrubbing experiments have been completed in the translating slug flow test system, however the error introduced by the original process for measuring CO{sub 2} concentration in the solution was so big that the resulting data was unreasonable. A new sampling method to prevent degassing of the liquid sample is being implemented, and a new set of tests has been scheduled for the week of 4/15/2002. (2) Qualitative harvesting tests of TR 9.4 on Omnisil have been completed but the results are inconclusive. Very little harvesting effect was observed with the current harvesting system design, but the results were greatly impacted by the minimal amount of organism growth on the screens at the time of the harvesting tests. Measures are being taken to extend the colonization time to achieve a screen loading condition that represents a more realistic harvesting condition, and additional tests will be run in the near future with these screens. (3) Significant work has been completed in the design of a new up-flow bioreactor test facility, using a vertical flow as expected in practical applications as opposed to the horizontal flow used for convenience in our current CRF test systems. (4) A reasonably priced location has been selected for the pilot scale bioreactor system, and construction can now proceed in order to prepare for the installation of the solar collectors and the bioreactor.

Dr. Gregory Kremer; Dr. David J. Bayless; Dr. Morgan Vis; Dr. Michael Prudich; Dr. Keith Cooksey; Dr. Jeff Muhs

2002-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

229

ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 10/03/2000 through 10/02/2001. Most of the achievements are milestones in our efforts to complete the tasks and subtasks that constitute the project objectives. This is the fourth quarterly report for this project, so it also serves as a year-1 project review. We have made significant progress on our Phase I objectives, and our current efforts are focused on fulfilling these research objectives ''on time'' relative to the project timeline. Overall, we believe that we are on schedule to complete Phase I activities by 10/2002, which is the milestone date from the original project timeline. Our results to date concerning the individual factors which have the most significant effect on CO{sub 2} uptake are inconclusive, but we have gathered useful information about the effects of lighting, temperature and CO{sub 2} concentration on one particular organism (Nostoc) and significant progress has been made in identifying other organisms that are more suitable for use in the bioreactor due to their better tolerance for the high temperatures likely to be encountered in the flue gas stream. Our current tests are focused on one such thermophilic organism (Cyanidium), and an enlarged bioreactor system (CRF-2) has been prepared for testing this organism. Tests on the enhanced mass transfer CO{sub 2} absorption technique are underway and useful information is currently being collected concerning pressure drop. The solar collectors for the deep-penetration hybrid solar lighting system have been designed and a single solar collector tracking unit is being prepared for installation in the pilot scale bioreactor system currently under construction. Much progress has been made in designing the fiber optic light delivery system, but final selection of the ''optimum'' delivery system design depends on many factors, most significantly the configuration and orientation of the growth surfaces in the bioreactor. For the growth surface subsystem we have identified advantages and disadvantages for several candidate growth surface materials, we have built and tested various ''screen'' systems and fluid delivery systems, and we continue to test compatibility of the candidate materials with the organisms and with the moisture delivery and harvesting system designs. These tests will be ongoing until an ''optimum'' combination of growth surface material/organism type/harvesting system is identified. For the harvesting system, a nozzle-based water jet system has been shown to be effective, but it has disadvantages for the overall system design in terms of space utilization. A streamlined and integrated screen wetting/harvesting system design is currently under development and will be the focus of harvesting system tests in the foreseeable future. This report addresses each of the key project tasks as defined in the statement of work, giving both a summary of key accomplishments over the past year and a plan for future work.

Dr. Gregory Kremer; Dr. David J. Bayless; Dr. Morgan Vis; Dr. Michael Prudich; Dr. Keith Cooksey; Dr. Jeff Muhs

2001-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

230

Ethiopia-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ethiopia-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Ethiopia-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Ethiopia-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Name Ethiopia-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Partner Global Environment Facility (GEF), Government of Denmark Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Adaptation, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning Website http://www.unep.org/climatecha Program Start 2011 Program End 2013 Country Ethiopia UN Region Central America References Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM)[1]

231

EA-1592: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigation Action Plan Mitigation Action Plan EA-1592: Mitigation Action Plan Modernization of Facilities and Infrastructure for the Non-Nuclear Production Activities Conducted at the NNSA's Kansas City Plant Based on the analysis in the Environmental Assessment prepared for the proposal by the GSA and NNSA, neither the construction nor operation of the selected alternative wouldhave significant environmental impact. This MAP contains mitigation and monitoring commitments for the project, including commitments set in permits for the new facility. Mitigation Action Plan for the Modernization of Facilities and Infrastructure for the Non-Nuclear Production Activities Conducted at the NNSA's Kansas City Plant More Documents & Publications EA-1592: Finding of No Significant Impact

232

UNEP-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UNEP-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) UNEP-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: UNEP-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Name UNEP-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Partner Global Environment Facility (GEF), Government of Denmark Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Adaptation, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning Website http://www.unep.org/climatecha Program Start 2011 References Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM)[1] "The Government of Denmark will provide US$6 million to the new programme

233

Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation Modeling |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation Modeling Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation Modeling Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation Modeling Agency/Company /Organization: Future Perfect Sector: Climate Focus Area: GHG Inventory Development, Greenhouse Gas Topics: GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Resource Type: Case studies/examples, Training materials Website: www.gpstrategiesltd.com/divisions/future-perfect/ Country: South Korea Eastern Asia Language: English References: Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation Modeling[1] Logo: Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation Modeling Jointly sponsored by Greenhouse Gas Inventory & Research (GIR) Center of

234

Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: UNEP-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Name UNEP-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Partner Global Environment Facility (GEF), Government of Denmark Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Adaptation, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning Website http://www.unep.org/climatecha Program Start 2011 Program End 2013 Country Costa Rica, Ethiopia, Ghana, Indonesia, Mexico, Morocco, Senegal, South Africa, Vietnam UN Region Central America References Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM)[1]

235

Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation: Transport Sector | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation: Transport Sector Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation: Transport Sector Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation: Transport Sector Agency/Company /Organization: Global Environment Facility, United Nations Environment Programme Sector: Energy, Climate Focus Area: Transportation Topics: Low emission development planning Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: tech-action.org/Guidebooks/TNAhandbook_Transport.pdf Cost: Free Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation: Transport Sector Screenshot References: Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation: Transport Sector[1] "The options outlined in this guidebook are designed to assist you in the process of developing transport services and facilities in your countries

236

Costa Rica-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Costa Rica-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Costa Rica-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Costa Rica-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Name Costa Rica-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Partner Global Environment Facility (GEF), Government of Denmark Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Adaptation, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning Website http://www.unep.org/climatecha Program Start 2011 Program End 2013 Country Costa Rica UN Region Central America References Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM)[1]

237

Ecofys-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions: Insights from Example  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ecofys-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions: Insights from Example Ecofys-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions: Insights from Example Development Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: National Appropriate Mitigation Actions: Insights from Example Development Agency/Company /Organization: Ecofys Sector: Energy, Land Topics: Low emission development planning, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.ecofys.com/com/publications/brochures_newsletters/documents/Report National Appropriate Mitigation Actions: Insights from Example Development Screenshot References: National Appropriate Mitigation Actions: Insights from Example Development[1] "Ecofys elaborated in several projects, concrete examples of NAMAs to understand the issues arising from this concept. This report summarizes the

238

Wildlife Mitigation Program Record of Decision; 06April1997  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wildlife Mitigation Program Record of Decision Wildlife Mitigation Program Record of Decision SUMMARY Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has decided to adopt a set of prescriptions (goals, strategies, and procedural requirements) that apply to future BPA-funded wildlife mitigation projects. Various sourcesincluding Indian tribes, state agencies, property owners, private conservation groups, or other Federal agenciespropose wildlife mitigation projects to the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) for BPA funding. Following independent scientific and public reviews, Council then selects projects to recommend for BPA funding. BPA adopts this set of prescriptions to standardize the planning and implementation of individual wildlife mitigation projects. This decision is based on consideration of potential environmental

239

South Africa-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South Africa-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation South Africa-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: South Africa-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Name South Africa-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Partner Global Environment Facility (GEF), Government of Denmark Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Adaptation, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning Website http://www.unep.org/climatecha Program Start 2011 Program End 2013 Country South Africa UN Region Central America References Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM)[1]

240

MITIGATION ACTION PLAN FOR THE FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MITIGATION MITIGATION ACTION PLAN FOR THE FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT, NOTICE OF WETLAND INVOLVEMENT, AND FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FOR THE CONSTRUCTION AND OPERATION OF A LIGNOCELLULOSIC U.S. Department of Energy Golden Field Office 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 1.0 Introd uction 1 1.1 Purpose of the Mitigation Action Plan 1 1.2 Structure of the Mitigation Action Plan 2 2.0 Ambient Ai r Quality 3 2.1 Potential Impacts 3 2.2 Mitigation Measures 3 2.3 Metrics for Determining Success or Failure of the Mitigation Measures 4 2.4 Monitoring Techniques for Mitigation Measures 4 3.0 Truck Traffic 4 3.1 Potential Impacts 4 3.2 Mitigation Measures 4 3.3 Metrics for Determining Success or Failure of the Mitigation Measures 5 3.4 Monitoring Techniques for Mitigation Measures 5 4.0 Genetically Modified Yeasts 6 4.1 Potential Impacts 6 4.2 Mitigation Measures 6 4.3 Metrics for Determining

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241

National and Sectoral GHG Mitigation Potential: A Comparison Across Models  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

National and Sectoral GHG Mitigation Potential: A Comparison Across Models National and Sectoral GHG Mitigation Potential: A Comparison Across Models Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: National and Sectoral GHG Mitigation Potential: A Comparison Across Models Agency/Company /Organization: Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development Topics: GHG inventory, Policies/deployment programs, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Software/modeling tools, Publications, Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.iea.org/papers/2009/Mitigation_potentials.pdf References: National and Sectoral GHG Mitigation Potential: A Comparison Across Models[1] Summary "This paper focuses on mitigation potential to provide a comparative assessment across key economies. GHG mitigation potential is defined here to be the level of GHG emission reductions that could be realised, relative

242

EIS-0409: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigation Action Plan Mitigation Action Plan EIS-0409: Mitigation Action Plan Kemper County Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Project, Kemper County, Mississippi The Department of Energy (DOE) issued a Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Kemper County Integrated Gasification Combine Cycle Project (Project) (DOE/EIS-0409) in May 2010 and a Record of Decision (ROD) in August 2010 (75 FR 51248). The ROD identified commitments to mitigate potential adverse impacts associated with the project. This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) describes the monitoring and mitigation actions the recipient must implement during the design, construction, and demonstration of the Project. Mitigation Action Plan Kemper County Iintegrated Gasification Combined Cycle Project, Kemper County, Mississippi, DOE/EIS-0409 (September 2010)

243

Appropriate Use of Mitigation and Monitoring and Clarifying the Appropriate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Appropriate Use of Mitigation and Monitoring and Clarifying the Appropriate Use of Mitigation and Monitoring and Clarifying the Appropriate Use of Mitigated Findings of No Significant Impact Appropriate Use of Mitigation and Monitoring and Clarifying the Appropriate Use of Mitigated Findings of No Significant Impact The Council on Environmental Quality is issuing this guidance for Federal departments and agencies on establishing, implementing, and monitoring mitigation commitments identified and analyzed in Environmental Assessments, Environmental Impact Statements, and adopted in the final decision documents. This guidance also clarifies the appropriate use of mitigated "Findings of No Significant Impact" under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The guidance explains the requirements of NEPA and the CEQ Regulations, describes CEQ policies, and recommends

244

Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning Data and Tools | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning Data and Tools Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning Data and Tools Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning Data and Tools October 7, 2013 - 10:27am Addthis These data and tools from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and other organizations can help Federal agencies with greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation planning for: Buildings Vehicles and mobile equipment Business travel Employee commuting. Buildings Table 1 features data and tools to help with GHG mitigation planning for buildings. Table 1. GHG Mitigation Planning Data and Tools for Buildings Data or Tool Source Description Planning Use Buildings GHG Mitigation Worksheet Estimator Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) Estimates savings and costs from GHG reduction strategies Evaluate GHG Reduction Strategies Estimate Costs to Implement GHG Reduction Strategies

245

Assessment of alternative mitigation concepts for Hanford flammable gas tanks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a review and assessment of four selected mitigation concepts: pump jet mixing, sonic vibration, dilution, and heating. Though the relative levels of development of these concepts are quite different, some definite conclusions are made on their comparative feasibility. Key findings of this report are as follows. A mixer pump has proven to be a safe and effective active mitigation method in Tank 241-SY-101, and the authors are confident that mixer pumps will effectively mitigate other tanks with comparable waste configurations and properties. Low-frequency sonic vibration is also predicted to be effective for mitigation. Existing data cannot prove that dilution can mitigate gas release event (GRE) behavior. However, dilution is the only concept of the four that potentially offers passive mitigation. Like dilution, heating the waste cannot be proven with available information to mitigate GRE behavior. The designs, analyses, and data from which these conclusions are derived are presented along with recommendations.

Stewart, C.W.; Schienbein, L.A.; Hudson, J.D.; Eschbach, E.J.; Lessor, D.L.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Biomass Scenario Model | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Scenario Model Biomass Scenario Model Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Biomass Scenario Model (BSM) Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Partner: Department of Energy (DOE) Office of the Biomass Program Sector: Energy Focus Area: Biomass Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options Topics: Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs, Resource assessment Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: bsm.nrel.gov/ Country: United States Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): EERE tool, Biomass Scenario Model UN Region: Northern America Coordinates: 37.09024°, -95.712891° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.09024,"lon":-95.712891,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

247

Scenarios for a Clean Energy Future ACKNOWLEDGMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was provided by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE of Policy). Additional funding from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Office of AtmosphericScenarios for a Clean Energy Future xxiii ACKNOWLEDGMENTS Primary funding for this report

248

The Programmer's Apprentice: A Program Design Scenario  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A scenario is used to illustrate the capabilities of a proposed Design Apprentice, focussing on the area of detailed, low-level design. Given a specification, the Design Apprentice will be able to make many of the design decisions needed to synthesize the required program. The Design Apprentice will also be able to detect various kinds of contradictions and omissions in a specifica- tion.

Charles Rich; Richard C. Waters

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Scenarios for a Sustainable Transportation Future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· To present some snapshots for diverse suites of options that can meet the target #12;Efficient Biofuels · To determine the most important areas to target · To see the results and tradeoffs resulting from specific, biofuels, efficiency (no alt fuels), transport demand and VMT reduction · 80% Reduction (80in50) Scenarios

California at Davis, University of

250

Danish Greenhouse Gas Reduction Scenarios for 2020  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Danish Greenhouse Gas Reduction Scenarios for 2020 and 2050 February 2008 Prepared by Ea Energy 54 2.9 ENERGY RESOURCES 55 3 DANISH GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSION 58 3.1 GREENHOUSE GAS SOURCES 58 4 of 2007, Ea Energy Analyses and Risø DTU developed a number of greenhouse gas emissions reduction

251

Design Scenarios: Enabling transparent parametric design spaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a novel methodology called Design Scenarios (DSs) intended for use in conceptual design of buildings. DS enables multidisciplinary design teams to streamline the requirements definition, alternative generation, analysis, and decision-making ... Keywords: Conceptual design, Design spaces, Ontology, Parametric modeling, Process mapping, Requirements modeling

Victor Gane; John Haymaker

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Mitigation potential and cost in tropical forestry - relative role for agroforestry  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes studies of carbon mitigation potential (MP) and costs of forestry options in seven developing countries with a focus on the role of agroforestry. A common methodological approach known as comprehensive mitigation assessment process (COMAP) was used in each study to estimate the potential and costs between 2000 and 2030. The approach requires the projection of baseline and mitigation land-use scenarios derived from the demand for forest products and forestland for other uses such as agriculture and pasture. By using data on estimated carbon sequestration, emission avoidance, costs and benefits, the model enables one to estimate cost effectiveness indicators based on monetary benefit per t C, as well as estimates of total mitigation costs and potential when the activities are implemented at equilibrium level. The results show that about half the MP of 6.9 Gt C (an average of 223 Mt C per year) between 2000 and 2030 in the seven countries could be achieved at a negative cost, and the other half at costs not exceeding $100 per t C. Negative cost indicates that non-carbon revenue is sufficient to offset direct costs of about half of the options. The agroforestry options analyzed bear a significant proportion of the potential at medium to low cost per t C when compared to other options. The role of agroforestry in these countries varied between 6% and 21% of the MP, though the options are much more cost effective than most due to the low wage or opportunity cost of rural labor. Agroforestry options are attractive due to the large number of people and potential area currently engaged in agriculture, but they pose unique challenges for carbon and cost accounting due to the dispersed nature of agricultural activities in the tropics, as well as specific difficulties arising from requirements for monitoring, verification, leakage assessment and the establishment of credible baselines.

Makundi, Willy R.; Sathaye, Jayant A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Occult hepatitis B infection: an evolutionary scenario  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License

Formijn J Van Hemert; Hans L Zaaijer; Ben Berkhout; Vladimir V Lukashov

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Scenario Evaluation, Regionalization & Analysis (SERA) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Scenario Evaluation, Regionalization & Analysis (SERA) Scenario Evaluation, Regionalization & Analysis (SERA) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Scenario Evaluation, Regionalization & Analysis (SERA) Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Scenario Evaluation, Regionalization & Analysis (SERA) Screenshot Logo: Scenario Evaluation, Regionalization & Analysis (SERA) SERA (Scenario Evaluation, Regionalization & Analysis) is a geospatially and temporally oriented infrastructure analysis model that determines the optimal production and delivery scenarios for hydrogen, given resource availability and technology cost. Given annual H2 demands on a city-by-city basis, forecasts of feedstock costs, and a catalog of available hydrogen production and transportation technologies, the model generates

255

Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO2 Mitigation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This final report highlights significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation Project during the period from 10/1/2001 through 01/02/2006. As indicated in the list of accomplishments below, our efforts during this project were focused on the selection of candidate organisms and growth surfaces and initiating long-term tests in the bench-scale and pilot-scale bioreactor test systems. Specific results and accomplishments for the program include: (1) CRF-2 test system: (a) Sampling test results have shown that the initial mass of algae loaded into the Carbon Recycling Facility Version 2 (CRF-2) system can be estimated with about 3% uncertainty using a statistical sampling procedure. (b) The pressure shim header pipe insert design was shown to have better flow for harvesting than the drilled-hole design. (c) The CRF-2 test system has undergone major improvements to produce the high flow rates needed for harvesting (as determined by previous experiments). The main changes to the system are new stainless steel header/frame units, with increased flow capacity and a modified pipe-end-sealing method to improve flow uniformity, and installation and plumbing for a new high flow harvesting pump. Qualitative system tests showed that the harvesting system performed wonderfully, cleaning the growth surfaces within a matter of seconds. (d) Qualitative tests have shown that organisms can be repopulated on a harvested section of a bioreactor screen, demonstrating that continuous bioreactor operation is feasible, with continuous cycles of harvesting and repopulating screens. (e) Final preparations are underway for quantitative, long-term tests in the CRF-2 with weekly harvesting. (2) Pilot-scale test system: (a) The construction of the pilot-scale bioreactor was completed, including the solar collector and light distribution system. Over the course of the project, the solar collector used in the light delivery system showed some degradation, but performed well overall. (b) Testing confirmed that algae can be grown in a sustainable fashion in the pilot bioreactor, even with intermittent availability of sunlight. (c) The pilot-scale tests indicated that algal growth rate followed photon delivery during productivity testing. (3) Organisms and Growth Surfaces: (a) The aeration of growth media with 5% CO{sub 2} in air stimulates cyanobacterial growth 10-20 times over that with air alone. It is possible that the rate of the stimulation of cyanobacterial growth in the CRF will be higher because cyanobacteria will be grown as a biofilm. We plan to increase the concentration to 15% CO{sub 2} in air. (b) Tests have shown a doubling time of the cyanobacterial culture of about 7.5 hours with illumination of about 170 {micro}mol m{sup -2} sec{sup -1}. All lower levels of illumination led to a decrease in the cyanobacterial growth rate. (c) Macroscopical and microscopical observations suggest that the culture of this isolate undergoes significant morphological changes after 60-70 hours of incubation in the batch culture mode. First of all, the culture begins to clump. This clumping could lead to the decrease of effective illumination of culture and may reflect a medium alkalinization. (d) Organization of our collection of the thermophilic cyanobacteria isolated from Yellowstone National Park has resulted in 13 unialgal cultures of thermophilic cyanobacteria. (e) A new species (even probably a new genus) of cyanobacteria, 5.2 s. c. 1, isolated from LaDuke Spring in Great Yellowstone Basin, demonstrates an elevated resistance to some compounds of iron. This might be very important for our project, because plant gases may have elevated amount of iron. Our study of the effect of different concentration of FeCl{sub 3}* 6H{sub 2}O on the growth of the 5.2 s.c.1 isolate showed that iron additions stimulated rather then inhibited the growth of the isolate. Because of this we would recommend this isolate for further experiments. (f) The shape of the Chlorogloeopsis siderophila cells (cyanobacteria) was found to be affected b

Gregory Kremer; David J. Bayless; Morgan Vis; Michael Prudich; Keith Cooksey; Jeff Muhs

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

256

The Next Generation of Scenarios for Climate Change Research and Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advances in the science and observation of climate change are providing a clearer understanding of the inherent variability of Earths climate system and its likely response to human and natural influences. The implications of climate change for the environment and society will depend not only on the response of the Earth system to changes in radiative forcings, but also on how humankind responds through changes in technology, economies, lifestyle, and policy. Extensive uncertainties exist in future forcings of and responses to climate change, necessitating the use of scenarios of the future to explore the potential consequences of different response options. To date, these scenarios have not adequately examined crucial possibilities, such as climate mitigation and adaptation, and have relied on processes that limited the exchange of information among physical, biological, and social scientists. Now, an interdisciplinary research team has developed a new process for creating plausible scenarios to investigate some of the most challenging and important questions about climate change confronting the international community.

Moss, Richard H.; Edmonds, James A.; Hibbard, K.; Manning, Martin; Rose, Steven K.; Van Vuuren, Detlet; Carter, Tim; Emori, S.; Kainuma, M.; Kram, Tom; Meehl, G.; Mitchell, John; Nakicenovic, Nebojsa; Riahi, Keywan; Smith, Steven J.; Stouffer, Ron; Thomson, Allison M.; Weyant, John; Wilbanks, Thomas

2010-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

257

A lifestyle-based scenario, Energy Policy A lifestyle-based scenario for U.S. buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A lifestyle-based scenario, Energy Policy A lifestyle-based scenario for U.S. buildings the speculative nature of the #12;A lifestyle-based scenario, Energy Policy exercise, the rationale was to broaden implications of these changes, and how might we create energy policies to 2 #12;A lifestyle-based scenario

Diamond, Richard

258

Carbon mitigation potential and costs of forestry options in Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Mexico, the Philippines and Tanzania  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper summarizes studies of carbon (C) mitigation potential and costs of about 40 forestry options in seven developing countries. Each study uses the same methodological approach - Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (COMAP) - to estimate the above parameters between 2000 and 2030. The approach requires the projection of baseline and mitigation land-use scenarios. Coupled with data on a per ha basis on C sequestration or avoidance, and costs and benefits, it allows the estimation of monetary benefit per Mg C, and the total costs and carbon potential. The results show that about half (3.0 Pg C) the cumulative mitigation potential of 6.2 Petagram (Pg) C between 2000 and 2030 in the seven countries (about 200 x 106 Mg C yr-1) could be achieved at a negative cost and the remainder at costs ranging up to $100 Mg C-1. About 5 Pg C could be achieved, at a cost less than $20 per Mg C. Negative cost potential indicates that non-carbon revenue is sufficient to offset direct costs of these options. The achievable potential is likely to be smaller, however, due to market, institutional, and sociocultural barriers that can delay or prevent the implementation of the analyzed options.

Sathaye, J.; Makundi, W.; Andrasko, K.; Boer, R.; Ravindranath, N.; Sudha, P.; Rao, S.; Lasco, R.; Pulhin, F.; Masera, O.; Ceron, A.; Ordonez, J.; Deying, X.; Zhang, X.; Zuomin, S.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

CO2 MITIGATION VIA ACCELERATED LIMESTONE WEATHERING  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The climate and environmental impacts of our current, carbon-intensive energy usage demands that effective and practical energy alternatives and CO2 mitigation strategies be found. As part of this effort, various means of capturing and storing CO2 generated from fossil-fuel-based energy production are being investigated. One of the proposed methods involves a geochemistry-based capture and sequestration process that hydrates point-source, waste CO2 with water to produce a carbonic acid solution. This in turn is reacted and neutralized with limestone, thus converting the original CO2 gas to calcium bicarbonate in solution, the overall reaction being:

Rau, G H; Knauss, K G; Langer, W H; Caldeira, K G

2004-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

260

Industrial Energy Efficiency and Climate Change Mitigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industry contributes directly and indirectly (through consumed electricity) about 37% of the global greenhouse gas emissions, of which over 80% is from energy use. Total energy-related emissions, which were 9.9 GtCO2 in 2004, have grown by 65% since 1971. Even so, industry has almost continuously improved its energy efficiency over the past decades. In the near future, energy efficiency is potentially the most important and cost-effective means for mitigating greenhouse gas emissions from industry. This paper discusses the potential contribution of industrial energy efficiency technologies and policies to reduce energy use and greenhouse gas emissions to 2030.

Worrell, Ernst; Bernstein, Lenny; Roy, Joyashree; Price, Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Harnisch, Jochen

2009-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "term mitigation scenarios" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

A discussion of certain safety issues associated with the Tank 241-SY-101 mitigation mixing test. Letter report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper addresses certain safety issues associated with the Hanford Tank 241-SY 101 hydrogen mitigation mixing test. Specifically, the study, is concerned with the effect of pump shearing, jet mixing, and piling-up on the following areas: Gas generation; gas retention; gas release (immediate); gas release (long-term); and saltcake. The findings for each issue area of concern are addressed.

Not Available

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Mobile IPv6 bootstrapping in split scenario  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This document specifies an Internet standards track protocol for the Internet community, and requests discussion and suggestions for improvements. Please refer to the current edition of the "Internet Official Protocol Standards " (STD 1) for the standardization state and status of this protocol. Distribution of this memo is unlimited. A Mobile IPv6 node requires a Home Agent address, a home address, and IPsec security associations with its Home Agent before it can start utilizing Mobile IPv6 service. RFC 3775 requires that some or all of these are statically configured. This document defines how a Mobile IPv6 node can bootstrap this information from non-topological information and security credentials pre-configured on the Mobile Node. The solution defined in this document solves the split scenario described in the Mobile IPv6 bootstrapping problem statement in RFC 4640. The split scenario refers to the case where the Mobile

G. Giaretta; J. Kempf; V. Devarapalli

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Blackbody radiation in a nonextensive scenario  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An exact analysis of the N-dimensional blackbody radiation process in a nonextensive la Tsallis scenario is performed for values of the nonextensives index in the range (0 < q < 1). The recently advanced Optimal Lagrange Multipliers (OLM) technique has been employed. The results are consistent with those of the extensive, q = 1 case. The generalization of the celebrated laws of Planck, Stefan-Boltzmann, and Wien are investigated.

S. Martnez; F. Pennini; A. Plastino; C. Tessone

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

terms of Californias 16 climate zones (based upon the CECsis divided into 16 climate zones to account for variablelevel, in terms of climate zones for electricity, and in

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

EIS-0026: 2009 Annual Mitigation Report | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

026: 2009 Annual Mitigation Report 026: 2009 Annual Mitigation Report EIS-0026: 2009 Annual Mitigation Report Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Guidance for the development of a Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) is contained in Department of Energy (DOE) Order 451.1B, National Environmental Policy Act Compliance Program, and 10 CFR 1021, National Environmental Policy Act Implementing Procedures. These documents specify that a MAP be prepared to mitigate environmental impacts resulting from the implementation of commitments made in the Record of Decision (ROD) for an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). The Order further requires that an annual report be prepared to demonstrate the progress made in implementing the commitments and effectiveness of any mitigation activity until the activity has been

266

EIS-0128: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

28: Mitigation Action Plan 28: Mitigation Action Plan EIS-0128: Mitigation Action Plan Los Banos - Gates (Path 15) Transmission Project, Revision 2 Revision 2: This MAP addresses the construction, operation, and maintenance of the new 84-mile long 500-kV transmission line. Necessary work conducted by Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) at their substations will occur within the previously disturbed area inside the substation boundaries. Western or Trans Electric, Inc. will also not have a role in upgrading the various existing PG&E 230-kV system components. DOE-0128-MAP-02, Western Area Power Administration, Mitigation Action Plan for Los Banos - Gates (Path 15) Transmission Project, Revision 2 (December 2003) More Documents & Publications EIS-0128: Mitigation Action Plan EA-1456: Mitigation Action Plan

267

EIS-0026: 2009 Annual Mitigation Report | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

09 Annual Mitigation Report 09 Annual Mitigation Report EIS-0026: 2009 Annual Mitigation Report Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Guidance for the development of a Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) is contained in Department of Energy (DOE) Order 451.1B, National Environmental Policy Act Compliance Program, and 10 CFR 1021, National Environmental Policy Act Implementing Procedures. These documents specify that a MAP be prepared to mitigate environmental impacts resulting from the implementation of commitments made in the Record of Decision (ROD) for an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). The Order further requires that an annual report be prepared to demonstrate the progress made in implementing the commitments and effectiveness of any mitigation activity until the activity has been completed. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) MAP was prepared to

268

EIS-0350-S1: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigation Action Plan Mitigation Action Plan EIS-0350-S1: Mitigation Action Plan Nuclear Facility Portion of the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Building Replacement Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) describes mitigation and monitoring commitments for constructing and operating the Modified CMRR-NF. The commitments made in this MAP are designed to mitigate potentially adverse environmental consequences associated with the CMRR-NF Project as the CMRR-NF is constructed and operated, and as direct, indirect, and cumulative impacts from these actions occur over time. EIS-0350-S1-MAP-2011.pdf More Documents & Publications EIS-0350-S1: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0350-S1: Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement

269

Mitigation Action Plans (MAP) and Related Documents | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 1, 2010 December 1, 2010 EA-1782: Mitigation Action Plan University of Delaware Lewes Campus Onsite Wind Energy Project September 1, 2010 EIS-0409: Mitigation Action Plan Kemper County Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Project, Kemper County, Mississippi August 24, 2010 EA-1736: Mitigation Action Plan Expansion of the Sanitary Effluent Reclamation Facility and Environmental Restoration of Reach S-2 of Sandia Canyon at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, Los Alamos, New Mexico July 10, 2010 EIS-0026: 2010 Annual Mitigation Report Waste Isolation Pilot Plant June 4, 2010 EA-1704: Mitigation Action Plan Construction and Operation of a Proposed Cellulosic Biorefinery, BlueFire Fulton Renewable Energy, LLC, Fulton, Mississippi January 1, 2010 EA-1755: Mitigation Action Plan

270

EIS-0026: 2010 Annual Mitigation Report | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10 Annual Mitigation Report 10 Annual Mitigation Report EIS-0026: 2010 Annual Mitigation Report Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Guidance for the development of a Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) is contained in Department of Energy (DOE) Order 451.1B, National Environmental Policy Act Compliance Program, and 10 CFR 1021, National Environmental Policy Act Implementing Procedures. These documents specify that a MAP be prepared to mitigate environmental impacts resulting from the implementation of commitments made in the Record of Decision (ROD) for an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). The Order further requires that an annual report be prepared to demonstrate the progress made in implementing the commitments and effectiveness of any mitigation activity until the activity has been completed. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) MAP was prepared to

271

EA-1901: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Mitigation Action Plan 1: Mitigation Action Plan EA-1901: Mitigation Action Plan Kootenai River White Sturgeon and Burbot Hatcheries Project, Bonners Ferry, Boundary County, Idaho This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) is referenced in the Finding of No Significant Impact for the Kootenai River White Sturgeon and Burbot Hatcheries Project (Department of Energy Environmental Assessment-1901). This MAP includes all of the mitigation measures recommended in the Final Environmental Assessment to mitigate adverse environmental impacts. It includes some measures that are essential to render the impacts of the Proposed Action not significant and other measures that will decrease impacts that did not reach a level to be considered significant. EA-1901-MAP-2013.pdf More Documents & Publications

272

EIS-0128: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

: Mitigation Action Plan : Mitigation Action Plan EIS-0128: Mitigation Action Plan Los Banos - Gates (Path 15) Transmission Project, Revision 2 Revision 2: This MAP addresses the construction, operation, and maintenance of the new 84-mile long 500-kV transmission line. Necessary work conducted by Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) at their substations will occur within the previously disturbed area inside the substation boundaries. Western or Trans Electric, Inc. will also not have a role in upgrading the various existing PG&E 230-kV system components. DOE-0128-MAP-02, Western Area Power Administration, Mitigation Action Plan for Los Banos - Gates (Path 15) Transmission Project, Revision 2 (December 2003) More Documents & Publications EIS-0128: Mitigation Action Plan EA-1456: Mitigation Action Plan

273

EIS-0380: Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report EIS-0380: Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report Los Alamos National Laboratory Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement Fiscal Year 2012 Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report In Fiscal Year (FY) 2012, the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement (SWEIS) Project Office focused on tracking and managing mitigation action commitments and reporting. Highlights for FY 2012 include the following: completion and distribution of the FY 2011 SWEIS Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report (DOE 2012), which included a section for the Las Conchas Fire, completion and distribution of the calendar year (CY) 2010 SWEIS Yearbook in April 2012 (LANL 2012a), construction and operation of SERF-E, construction of an institutional

274

EA-1923: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigation Action Plan Mitigation Action Plan EA-1923: Mitigation Action Plan Green Energy School Wind Turbine Project on Saipan, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands This Mitgation Action Plan specifies the methods for implementing mitigation measures that address the potential environmental impacts identified in DOE/EA-1923 and by the USFWS Biological Opinion issued to DOE on February 1, 2012, in accordance with the Endangered Species Act (ESA) (16 U.S.C.1531 et seq.). The development of these measures and an implementation plan, are a necessary condition for the DOE FONSI, as described by 40 CFR 1021.331(b) Mitigation action plans. EA-1923-MAP-2013 More Documents & Publications EA-1923: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1923: Draft Environmental Assessment EA-1923: Mitigated Finding of No Significant Impact

275

EA-1591: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

91: Mitigation Action Plan 91: Mitigation Action Plan EA-1591: Mitigation Action Plan Palisades-Goshen Transmission Line Reconstruction Project This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) is part of the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the Palisades-Goshen Transmission Line Reconstruction Project. The project involves reconstruction of the existing Palisades-Goshen 115-kV transmission line, which extends from Palisades Dam in eastern Idaho approximately 52 miles west to the Goshen Substation south of Idaho Falls, Idaho. Mitigation Action Plan for the Palisades-Goshen Transmission Line Reconstruction Project More Documents & Publications EA-1591: Final Environmental Assessment, Finding of No Significant Impact, and Mitigation Action Plan EA-1591: Finding of No Significant Impact

276

Global climate change and the mitigation challenge  

SciTech Connect

Anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases, especially carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), have led to increasing atmospheric concentrations, very likely the primary cause of the 0.8{sup o}C warming the Earth has experienced since the Industrial Revolution. With industrial activity and population expected to increase for the rest of the century, large increases in greenhouse gas emissions are projected, with substantial global additional warming predicted. This paper examines forces driving CO{sub 2} emissions, a concise sector-by-sector summary of mitigation options, and research and development (R&D) priorities. To constrain warming to below approximately 2.5{sup o}C in 2100, the recent annual 3% CO{sub 2} emission growth rate needs to transform rapidly to an annual decrease rate of from 1 to 3% for decades. Furthermore, the current generation of energy generation and end-use technologies are capable of achieving less than half of the emission reduction needed for such a major mitigation program. New technologies will have to be developed and deployed at a rapid rate, especially for the key power generation and transportation sectors. Current energy technology research, development, demonstration, and deployment (RDD&D) programs fall far short of what is required. 20 refs., 18 figs., 4 tabs.

Frank Princiotta [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States). Air Pollution Prevention and Control Division

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

277

An Experiment on Graph Analysis Methodologies for Scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Visual graph representations are increasingly used to represent, display, and explore scenarios and the structure of organizations. The graph representations of scenarios are readily understood, and commercial software is available to create and manage these representations. The purpose of the research presented in this paper is to explore whether these graph representations support quantitative assessments of the underlying scenarios. The underlying structure of the scenarios is the information that is being targeted in the experiment and the extent to which the scenarios are similar in content. An experiment was designed that incorporated both the contents of the scenarios and analysts graph representations of the scenarios. The scenarios content was represented graphically by analysts, and both the structure and the semantics of the graph representation were attempted to be used to understand the content. The structure information was not found to be discriminating for the content of the scenarios in this experiment; but, the semantic information was discriminating.

Brothers, Alan J.; Whitney, Paul D.; Wolf, Katherine E.; Kuchar, Olga A.; Chin, George

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

278

Global projections for anthropogenic reactive nitrogen emissions to the atmosphere: an assessment of scenarios in the scientific literature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most long-term scenarios of global N emissions are produced by Integrated Assessment Models in the context of climate change assessment. The scenarios indicate that N emissions are likely to increase in the next decades, followed by a stabilization or decline. Critical factors for future N emissions are the development of the underlying drivers (especially fertilizer use, animal husbandry, transport and power generation), air pollution control policy and climate policy. The new scenarios made for climate change assessment, the Representative Concentration Pathways - RCPs, are not representative of the range of possible N-emission projections. A more focused development of scenarios for air pollution may improve the relevance and quality of the scenarios.

Van Vuuren, Detlef; Bouwman, Lex; Smith, Steven J.; Dentener, Frank

2011-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

279

Recent progress in scenario development for the WIPP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing to request the US Environmental Protection Agency to certify compliance with the radioactive waste disposal standards found in 40 CFR Part 191 for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The DOE will also need to demonstrate compliance with a number of other State and Federal standards and, in particular, the Land Disposal Restrictions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), 40 CFR Part 268. Demonstrating compliance with these regulations requires an assessment of the long-term performance of the WIPP disposal system. Re-evaluation and extension of past scenario development for the WIPP forms an integral part of the ongoing performance assessment (PA) process.

Galson, D.A. [Galson Sciences Limited, Oakham, Rutland (United Kingdom); Swift, P.N. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

280

Monitoring and Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation Potential in Agriculture Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Monitoring and Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation Potential in Agriculture (MAGHG) Name Monitoring and Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation Potential in Agriculture (MAGHG) Agency/Company /Organization Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Agriculture, Greenhouse Gas Topics GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Resource Type Dataset, Technical report Website http://www.fao.org/climatechan References MICCA Website[1] The overall objective of the MAGHG project is to support developing countries assess and report their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "term mitigation scenarios" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

International Partnership on Mitigation and Measuring, Reporting and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mitigation and Measuring, Reporting and Mitigation and Measuring, Reporting and Verification (MRV) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: International Partnership on Mitigation and Measuring, Reporting and Verification (MRV) Name International Partnership on Mitigation and Measuring, Reporting and Verification (MRV) Agency/Company /Organization German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservancy and Nuclear Safety (BMU), German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Sector Climate Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Buildings, Energy Efficiency, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, People and Policy, Transportation Topics Background analysis, Baseline projection, Finance, GHG inventory, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs, Technology characterizations

282

Mitigation of Rare Earth Supply Risk Posed by Permanent Magnets ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These include electric vehicles and wind generators. Volatility of the price of rare earth elements highlights the importance of a co-ordinated strategy to mitigate...

283

Costa Rica-Mitigation of Greenhouse Gas Emissions through Avoided...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Avoided Deforestation of Tropical Rainforests on Privately-owned Lands in High Conservation Value Areas Jump to: navigation, search Name Costa Rica-Mitigation of Greenhouse...

284

Poster: Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peak-demand Mitigation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Poster: Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peak-demand Mitigation: A Solution in Developing and Developed World Alike Title Poster: Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity...

285

IDB-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean Jump to: navigation, search Logo: IDB-Argentina-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean Name...

286

Speeding up Mother Nature's very own CO2 mitigation process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in the journal Environmental Science & Technology. More Information "CO2 Mitigation via Capture and Chemical Conversion in Seawater," Environmental Science & Technology...

287

China-Transportation Demand Management in Beijing: Mitigation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

China-Transportation Demand Management in Beijing: Mitigation of Emissions in Urban Transport Jump to: navigation, search Name Transportation Demand Management in Beijing -...

288

Mitigation Action Plans (MAP) and Related Documents | Department...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

University of Delaware Lewes Campus Onsite Wind Energy Project March 1, 2011 EIS-0422: Mitigation Action Plan Central Ferry-Lower Monumental 500-kilovolt Transmission...

289

EA-1858: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Action Plan EA-1858: Mitigation Action Plan Nippon Paper Industries USA Company Biomass Cogeneration Project The Department of Energy has prepared a final environmental...

290

title Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peakdemand Mitigation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

proceedings title Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peakdemand Mitigation A Solution in Developing and Developed World Alike journal ECEEE Summer Study textendash June...

291

2006 River Corridor Closure Contractor Revegetation and Mitigation Monitoring Report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to document the status of revegetation projects and natural resources mitigation efforts that have been conducted for remediated waste sites and other activities associated with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act cleanup of National Priorities List waste sites at Hanford. One of the objectives of restoration is the revegetation of remediated waste sites to stabilize the soil and restore the land to native vegetation. The report documents the results of revegetation and mitigation monitoring conducted in 2006 and includes 11 revegetation/restoration projects, one revegetation/mitigation project, and 2 bat habitat mitigation projects.

A. L. Johnson; K. A. Gano

2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

292

Oregon Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Policy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Oregon Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Policy Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material:...

293

Improving Department of Energy Capabilities for Mitigating Beyond...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DSA andor to disable important controls relied on to mitigate the release of radioactive material shall be evaluated. The types of BDB Es that should be evaluated include: *...

294

Characterizing Uncertainty for Regional Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation Decisions  

SciTech Connect

This white paper describes the results of new research to develop an uncertainty characterization process to help address the challenges of regional climate change mitigation and adaptation decisions.

Unwin, Stephen D.; Moss, Richard H.; Rice, Jennie S.; Scott, Michael J.

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

295

San Diego's carbon footprint : measuring and mitigating greenhouse gas emissions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Climate Change is one of the most pressing issues of our time. The best way to measure and mitigate the greenhouse gas emissions causing climate (more)

Bushman, Tara Rose

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Climate Change Mitigation in the Energy and Forestry Sectors...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

studies also suggest that this would increase significantly the worldwide demand for natural gas and renewable technologies. Country studies show that the aggregate mitigation...

297

EA-1923: Mitigated Finding of No Significant Impact | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Impact EA-1923: Mitigated Finding of No Significant Impact Green Energy School Wind Turbine Project on Saipan, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands Based on the...

298

Microsoft Word - MitigationsForVulnerabilitiesInCSNetworks.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Systems and Automation Society. Presented at 16th Annual Joint ISA POWIDEPRI Controls and Instrumentation Conference; http:www.isa.org Mitigations for Security...

299

Indonesia-Bringing a Range of Supported Mitigation Activities...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Indonesia-Bringing a Range of Supported Mitigation Activities in Selected Countries to the Next Level Jump to: navigation,...

300

Risk Assessment and Risk Management/Mitigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Emergency Management Agency FEMP Federal Energy ... defines key terms, designates guidelines, and ... the many software products developed by ...

2007-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "term mitigation scenarios" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Illustrative Scenarios Tool (European Union) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Illustrative Scenarios Tool (European Union) Illustrative Scenarios Tool (European Union) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Illustrative Scenarios Tool (European Union) Focus Area: Propane Topics: Opportunity Assessment & Screening Website: www.eutransportghg2050.eu/cms/illustrative-scenarios-tool/ Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/illustrative-scenarios-tool-european- Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Regulations" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance Regulations: Emissions Standards The SUstainabLe TrANsport (SULTAN) Illustrative Scenarios Tool is a high-level calculator to help provide estimates of the possible impacts of

302

The Effect of Transaction Costs on Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation for Agriculture and Forestry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate change and its mitigation is rapidly becoming an item of social concern. Climate change mitigation involves reduction of atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations through emissions reduction and or sequestration enhancement (collectively called offsets). Many have asked how agriculture and forestry can participate in mitigation efforts. Given that over 80 percent of greenhouse gas emissions arise from the energy sector, the role of agriculture and forestry depends critically on the costs of the offsets they can achieve in comparison with offset costs elsewhere in the economy. A number of researchers have examined the relative offset costs but have generally looked only at producer level costs. However there are also costs incurred when implementing, selling and conveying offset credits to a buyer. Also when commodities are involved like bioenergy feedstocks, the costs of readying these for use in implementing an offset strategy need to be reflected. This generally involves the broadly defined category of transaction costs. This dissertation examines the possible effects of transactions costs and storage costs for bioenergy commodities and how they affect the agriculture and forestry portfolio of mitigation strategies across a range of carbon dioxide equivalent prices. The model is used to simulate the effects with and without transactions and storage costs. Using an agriculture and forestry sector model called FASOMGHG, the dissertation finds that consideration of transactions and storage costs reduces the agricultural contribution total mitigation and changes the desirable portfolio of alternatives. In terms of the portfolio, transactions costs inclusion diminishes the desirability of soil sequestration and forest management while increasing the bioenergy and afforestation role. Storage costs diminish the bioenergy role and favor forest and sequestration items. The results of this study illustrate that transactions and storage costs are important considerations in policy and market design when addressing the reduction of greenhouse gas concentrations in climate change related decision making.

Kim, Seong Woo

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

International perspectives on mitigating laboratory biorisks.  

SciTech Connect

The International Perspectives on Mitigating Laboratory Biorisks workshop, held at the Renaissance Polat Istanbul Hotel in Istanbul, Republic of Turkey, from October 25 to 27, 2010, sought to promote discussion between experts and stakeholders from around the world on issues related to the management of biological risk in laboratories. The event was organized by Sandia National Laboratories International Biological Threat Reduction program, on behalf of the US Department of State Biosecurity Engagement Program and the US Department of Defense Cooperative Biological Engagement Program. The workshop came about as a response to US Under Secretary of State Ellen O. Tauscher's statements in Geneva on December 9, 2009, during the Annual Meeting of the States Parties to the Biological Weapons Convention (BWC). Pursuant to those remarks, the workshop was intended to provide a forum for interested countries to share information on biorisk management training, standards, and needs. Over the course of the meeting's three days, participants discussed diverse topics such as the role of risk assessment in laboratory biorisk management, strategies for mitigating risk, measurement of performance and upkeep, international standards, training and building workforce competence, and the important role of government and regulation. The meeting concluded with affirmations of the utility of international cooperation in this sphere and recognition of positive prospects for the future. The workshop was organized as a series of short presentations by international experts on the field of biorisk management, followed by breakout sessions in which participants were divided into four groups and urged to discuss a particular topic with the aid of a facilitator and a set of guiding questions. Rapporteurs were present during the plenary session as well as breakout sessions and in particular were tasked with taking notes during discussions and reporting back to the assembled participants a brief summary of points discussed. The presentations and breakout sessions were divided into five topic areas: 'Challenges in Biorisk Management,' 'Risk Assessment and Mitigation Measures,' 'Biorisk Management System Performance,' 'Training,' and 'National Oversight and Regulations.' The topics and questions were chosen by the organizers through consultation with US Government sponsors. The Chattham House Rule on non-attribution was in effect during question and answer periods and breakout session discussions.

Pinard, William J.; Salazar, Carlos A.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

International perspectives on mitigating laboratory biorisks.  

SciTech Connect

The International Perspectives on Mitigating Laboratory Biorisks workshop, held at the Renaissance Polat Istanbul Hotel in Istanbul, Republic of Turkey, from October 25 to 27, 2010, sought to promote discussion between experts and stakeholders from around the world on issues related to the management of biological risk in laboratories. The event was organized by Sandia National Laboratories International Biological Threat Reduction program, on behalf of the US Department of State Biosecurity Engagement Program and the US Department of Defense Cooperative Biological Engagement Program. The workshop came about as a response to US Under Secretary of State Ellen O. Tauscher's statements in Geneva on December 9, 2009, during the Annual Meeting of the States Parties to the Biological Weapons Convention (BWC). Pursuant to those remarks, the workshop was intended to provide a forum for interested countries to share information on biorisk management training, standards, and needs. Over the course of the meeting's three days, participants discussed diverse topics such as the role of risk assessment in laboratory biorisk management, strategies for mitigating risk, measurement of performance and upkeep, international standards, training and building workforce competence, and the important role of government and regulation. The meeting concluded with affirmations of the utility of international cooperation in this sphere and recognition of positive prospects for the future. The workshop was organized as a series of short presentations by international experts on the field of biorisk management, followed by breakout sessions in which participants were divided into four groups and urged to discuss a particular topic with the aid of a facilitator and a set of guiding questions. Rapporteurs were present during the plenary session as well as breakout sessions and in particular were tasked with taking notes during discussions and reporting back to the assembled participants a brief summary of points discussed. The presentations and breakout sessions were divided into five topic areas: 'Challenges in Biorisk Management,' 'Risk Assessment and Mitigation Measures,' 'Biorisk Management System Performance,' 'Training,' and 'National Oversight and Regulations.' The topics and questions were chosen by the organizers through consultation with US Government sponsors. The Chattham House Rule on non-attribution was in effect during question and answer periods and breakout session discussions.

Pinard, William J.; Salazar, Carlos A.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Sustainable biochar to mitigate global climate change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Production of biochar (the carbon-rich solid formed by pyrolysis of biomass), in combination with its storage in soils, has been suggested as a means to abate anthropogenic climate change, while simultaneously increasing crop yields. The climate mitigation potential stems primarily from the highly recalcitrant nature of biochar, which slows the rate at which photosynthetically fixed carbon is returned to the atmosphere. Significant uncertainties exist, however, regarding the impact, capacity, and sustainability of biochar for carbon capture and storage when scaled to the global level. Previous estimates, based on simple assumptions, vary widely. Here we show that, subject to strict environmental and modest economic constraints on biomass procurement and biochar production methods, annual net emissions of CO2, CH4 and N2O could be reduced by 1.1 - 1.9 Pg CO2-C equivalent (CO2-Ce)/yr (7 - 13% of current anthropogenic CO2-Ce emissions; 1Pg = 1 Gt). Over one century, cumulative net emissions of these gases could be reduced by 72-140 Pg CO2-Ce. The lower end of this range uses currently untapped residues and wastes; the upper end requires substantial alteration to global biomass management, but would not endanger food security, habitat or soil conservation. Half the avoided emissions are due to the net C sequestered as biochar, one-quarter to replacement of fossil-fuel energy by pyrolysis energy, and one-quarter to avoided emissions of CH4 and N2O. The total mitigation potential is 18-30% greater than if the same biomass were combusted to produce energy. Despite limited data for the decomposition rate of biochar in soils and the effects of biochar additions on soil greenhouse-gas fluxes, sensitivity within realistic ranges of these parameters is small, resulting in an uncertainty of 8% (1 s.d.) in our estimates. Achieving these mitigation results requires, however, that biochar production be performed using only low-emissions technologies and feedstocks obtained sustainably, with minimal carbon debt incurred from land-use change.

Woolf, Dominic; Amonette, James E.; Street-Perrott, F. A.; Lehmann, Johannes C.; Joseph, Stephen

2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

306

Global Climate Change and the Transportation Sector: An Update on Issues and Mitigation Options  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is clear from numerous energy/economic modeling exercises that addressing the challenges posed by global climate change will eventually require the active participation of all industrial sectors and all consumers on the planet. Yet, these and similar modeling exercises indicate that large stationary CO2 point sources (e.g., refineries and fossil-fired electric power plants) are often the first targets considered for serious CO2 emissions mitigation. Without participation of all sectors of the global economy, however, the challenges of climate change mitigation will not be met. Because of its operating characteristics, price structure, dependence on virtually one energy source (oil), enormous installed infrastructure, and limited technology alternatives, at least in the near-term, the transportation sector will likely represent a particularly difficult challenge for CO2 emissions mitigation. Our research shows that climate change induced price signals (i.e., putting a price on carbon that is emitted to the atmosphere) are in the near term insufficient to drive fundamental shifts in demand for energy services or to transform the way these services are provided in the transportation sector. We believe that a technological revolution will be necessary to accomplish the significant reduction of greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector. This paper presents an update of ongoing research into a variety of technological options that exist for decarbonizing the transportation sector and the various tradeoffs among them.

Geffen, CA; Dooley, JJ; Kim, SH

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

307

Idaho Habitat Evaluation for Off-Site Mitigation Record : Annual Report 1988.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) has been monitoring and evaluating existing and proposed habitat improvement projects for steelhead and chinook in the Clearwater and Salmon subbasins since 1984. Projects included in the monitoring are funded by, or proposed for funding by, the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the Northwest Power Planning Act as off-site mitigation for downstream hydropower development on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. This monitoring project is also funded under the same authority. A mitigation record is being developed to use actual and potential increases in smolt production as the best measures of benefit from a habitat improvement project. This project is divided into two subprojects: general and intensive monitoring. Primary objectives of the general monitoring subproject are to determine natural production increases due to habitat improvement projects in terms of parr production and to determine natural production status and trends in Idaho. The second objective is accomplished by combining parr density from monitoring and evaluation of BPA habitat projects and from other IDFG management and research activities. The primary objective of the intensive monitoring subproject is to determine the relationships between spawning escapement, parr production, and smolt production in two Idaho streams; the upper Salmon River and Crooked River. Results of the intensive monitoring will be used to estimate mitigation benefits in terms of smolt production and to interpret natural production monitoring in Idaho. 30 refs., 19 figs., 34 tabs.

Idaho. Dept. of Fish and Game.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Underground infrastructure damage for a Chicago scenario  

SciTech Connect

Estimating effects due to an urban IND (improvised nuclear device) on underground structures and underground utilities is a challenging task. Nuclear effects tests performed at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) during the era of nuclear weapons testing provides much information on how underground military structures respond. Transferring this knowledge to answer questions about the urban civilian environment is needed to help plan responses to IND scenarios. Explosions just above the ground surface can only couple a small fraction of the blast energy into an underground shock. The various forms of nuclear radiation have limited penetration into the ground. While the shock transmitted into the ground carries only a small fraction of the blast energy, peak stresses are generally higher and peak ground displacement is lower than in the air blast. While underground military structures are often designed to resist stresses substantially higher than due to the overlying rocks and soils (overburden), civilian structures such as subways and tunnels would generally only need to resist overburden conditions with a suitable safety factor. Just as we expect the buildings themselves to channel and shield air blast above ground, basements and other underground openings as well as changes of geology will channel and shield the underground shock wave. While a weaker shock is expected in an urban environment, small displacements on very close-by faults, and more likely, soils being displaced past building foundations where utility lines enter could readily damaged or disable these services. Immediately near an explosion, the blast can 'liquefy' a saturated soil creating a quicksand-like condition for a period of time. We extrapolate the nuclear effects experience to a Chicago-based scenario. We consider the TARP (Tunnel and Reservoir Project) and subway system and the underground lifeline (electric, gas, water, etc) system and provide guidance for planning this scenario.

Dey, Thomas N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bos, Rabdall J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

309

Mitigating Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Voluntary Reporting  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

08(96) 08(96) Distribution Category UC-950 Mitigating Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Voluntary Reporting October 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. For More Information Individuals or members of organizations wishing to report reductions in emissions of greenhouse gases under the auspices of the Voluntary Reporting Program can contact the Energy Information Administration (EIA) at: Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Energy Information Administration U.S. Department

310

Microsoft Word - Mitigation Action Plan.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

782 782 MITIGATION ACTION PLAN FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE LEWES CAMPUS ONSITE WIND ENERGY PROJECT DECEMBER 2010 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. 20585 1.0 INTRODUCTION The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) to aid its decision whether to provide funding for the University of Delaware's construction and operation of a 2-megawatt wind turbine adjacent to the University's College of Earth, Ocean, and Environment Campus in Lewes, Delaware. The EA (DOE/EA-1782) for the University's Wind Energy Project was completed in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and implementing regulations issued by the Council on Environmental Quality and

311

Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO2 Mitigation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report highlights significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation Project for the period ending 09/30/2004. The primary effort of this quarter was focused on mass transfer of carbon dioxide into the water film to study the potential effects on the photosynthetic organisms that depend on the carbon. Testing of the carbon dioxide scrubbing capability (mass transfer capability) of flowing water film appears to be relatively high and largely unaffected by transport of the gas through the bioreactor. The implications are that the transfer of carbon dioxide into the film is nearly at maximum and that it is sufficient to sustain photosynthesis at whatever rate the organisms can sustain. This finding is key to assuming that the process is an energy (photon) limited reaction and not a nutrient limited reaction.

Gregory Kremer; David J. Bayless; Morgan Vis; Michael Prudich; Keith Cooksey; Jeff Muhs

2004-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

312

Near Term Hydrogen and Electricity Infrastructure Integration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Denver, CO Denver, CO September 22, 2004 Abbas Akhil, DER and Energy Storage Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (505) 844-7308 aaakhil@sandia.gov Near-term Hydrogen and Electricity Infrastructure Integration Near-term Hydrogen and Electricity Infrastructure Integration Integration Scenarios and Issues Integration Scenarios and Issues ! How and where can electrolysis systems be integrated in the grid? " Siting/location " Operational issues " Investments " Benefits " Ownership ! Objectives are " Capture "grid" benefits " Seek to reduce emissions Siting and Location Siting and Location ! Electrolysis systems can be sited at " Existing generating stations " Transmission substations " Distribution substations ! Each locations has different

313

Special Issue On Estimation Of Baselines And Leakage In CarbonMitigation Forestry Projects  

SciTech Connect

There is a growing acceptance that the environmentalbenefits of forests extend beyond traditional ecological benefits andinclude the mitigation of climate change. Interest in forestry mitigationactivities has led to the inclusion of forestry practices at the projectlevel in international agreements. Climate change activities place newdemands on participating institutions to set baselines, establishadditionality, determine leakage, ensure permanence, and monitor andverify a project's greenhouse gas benefits. These issues are common toboth forestry and other types of mitigation projects. They demandempirical evidence to establish conditions under which such projects canprovide sustained long term global benefits. This Special Issue reportson papers that experiment with a range of approaches based on empiricalevidence for the setting of baselines and estimation of leakage inprojects in developing Asia and Latin America.

Sathaye, Jayant A.; Andrasko, Kenneth

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

NIES Low-Carbon Society Scenarios 2050 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NIES Low-Carbon Society Scenarios 2050 NIES Low-Carbon Society Scenarios 2050 Jump to: navigation, search Name NIES Low-Carbon Society Scenarios 2050 Agency/Company /Organization National Institute for Environmental Studies Topics Background analysis, Low emission development planning Website http://2050.nies.go.jp/LCS/ind Program Start 2009 Country Bangladesh, China, India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, Thailand, Vietnam UN Region Eastern Asia References 2050 Low-Carbon Society Scenarios (LCSs)[1] National and Local Scenarios National and local scenarios available from the activity webpage: http://2050.nies.go.jp/LCS/index.html References ↑ "2050 Low-Carbon Society Scenarios (LCSs)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=NIES_Low-Carbon_Society_Scenarios_2050&oldid=553682"

315

Empirically Downscaled Multimodel Ensemble Temperature and Precipitation Scenarios for Norway  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A number of different global climate model scenarios are used in order to infer local climate scenarios for various locations in Norway. Results from empirically downscaled multimodel ensembles of temperature and precipitation for the period 2000...

Rasmus E. Benestad

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Modeling Clean and Secure Energy Scenarios for the Indian Power...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clean and Secure Energy Scenarios for the Indian Power Sector in 2030 Title Modeling Clean and Secure Energy Scenarios for the Indian Power Sector in 2030 Publication Type Report...

317

The Development of Impact-Oriented Climate Scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Appropriate scenarios of future climate must be developed prior to any assessment of the impacts of climate change. Information needed was examined in consultation with those having experience in scenario use. Most assessors require regional ...

P. J. Robinson; P. L. Finkelstein

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Integrated Operation Scenarios ITPA Topical Group Meeting | Princeton...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

20, 2010, 9:00am to April 23, 2010, 5:00pm Conference Princeton, NJ Integrated Operation Scenarios ITPA Topical Group Meeting Integrated Operation Scenarios ITPA Topical Group...

319

Scenario-Driven Training | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scenario-Driven Training Scenario-Driven Training An initial entry team member assesses the overall hazards in a clandestine lab. Y-12's Nuclear and Radiological Field Training...

320

FCT Systems Analysis: 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and Infrastructure to someone by E-mail Share FCT Systems Analysis: 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "term mitigation scenarios" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

FCT Systems Analysis: DOE 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis Meeting...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to someone by E-mail Share FCT Systems Analysis: DOE 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis Meeting: January 31, 2007 on Facebook Tweet about FCT Systems Analysis: DOE 2010-2025 Scenario...

322

Optimization Online - Optimal Scenario Tree Reduction for ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nov 21, 2008 ... Abstract: The mid-term operation planning of hydro-thermal power ... Chain of Models for Setting the Energy Dispatch and Spot Price in the...

323

Libby Mitigation Program, 2007 Annual Progress Report: Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Libby Reservoir was created under an International Columbia River Treaty between the United States and Canada for cooperative water development of the Columbia River Basin (Columbia River Treaty 1964). Libby Reservoir inundated 109 stream miles of the mainstem Kootenai River in the United States and Canada, and 40 miles of tributary streams in the U.S. that provided habitat for spawning, juvenile rearing, and migratory passage (Figure 1). The authorized purpose of the dam is to provide power (91.5%), flood control (8.3%), and navigation and other benefits (0.2%; Storm et al. 1982). The Pacific Northwest Power Act of 1980 recognized possible conflicts stemming from hydroelectric projects in the northwest and directed Bonneville Power Administration to 'protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by the development and operation of any hydroelectric project of the Columbia River and its tributaries' (4(h)(10)(A)). Under the Act, the Northwest Power Planning Council was created and recommendations for a comprehensive fish and wildlife program were solicited from the region's federal, state, and tribal fish and wildlife agencies. Among Montana's recommendations was the proposal that research be initiated to quantify acceptable seasonal minimum pool elevations to maintain or enhance the existing fisheries (Graham et al. 1982). Research to determine how operations of Libby Dam affect the reservoir and river fishery and to suggest ways to lessen these effects began in May 1983. The framework for the Libby Reservoir Model (LRMOD) was completed in 1989. Development of Integrated Rule Curves (IRCs) for Libby Dam operation was completed in 1996 (Marotz et al. 1996). The Libby Reservoir Model and the IRCs continue to be refined (Marotz et al 1999). Initiation of mitigation projects such as lake rehabilitation and stream restoration began in 1996. The primary focus of the Libby Mitigation project now is to restore the fisheries and fish habitat in basin streams and lakes. 'Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam' is part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's (NPCC) resident fish and wildlife program. The program was mandated by the Northwest Planning Act of 1980, and is responsible for mitigating damages to fish and wildlife caused by hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. The objective of Phase I of the project (1983 through 1987) was to maintain or enhance the Libby Reservoir fishery by quantifying seasonal water levels and developing ecologically sound operational guidelines. The objective of Phase II of the project (1988 through 1996) was to determine the biological effects of reservoir operations combined with biotic changes associated with an aging reservoir. The objectives of Phase III of the project (1996 through present) are to implement habitat enhancement measures to mitigate for dam effects, to provide data for implementation of operational strategies that benefit resident fish, monitor reservoir and river conditions, and monitor mitigation projects for effectiveness. This project completes urgent and high priority mitigation actions as directed by the Kootenai Subbasin Plan.

Dunnigan, James; DeShazer, J.; Garrow, L.

2009-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

324

Calculation of SY tank annulus continuous air monitor readings after postulated leak scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this work was to determine whether or not a continuous air monitor (CAM) monitoring the annulus of one of the SY Tanks would be expected to alarm after three postulated leak scenarios. Using data and references provided by Lockheed Martin`s Tank Farm personnel, estimated CAM readings were calculated at specific times after the postulated scenarios might have occurred. Potential CAM readings above background at different times were calculated for the following leak scenarios: Leak rate of 0.01 gal/min; Leak rate of 0.03 gal/min (best estimate of the maximum probable leak rate from a single-shell tank); and Leak of 73 gal (equivalent to a {1/4}-in. leak on the floor of the annulus). The equation used to make the calculations along with descriptions and/or explanations of the terms are included, as is a list of the assumptions and/or values used for the calculations.

Kenoyer, J.L.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Methodology Formation Mitigation of Process Contaminants (3-MCPD)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

3-MCPD (3-Monochloropropane-1,2-diol )Methodology,Formation,and Mitigation reference papers. Methodology Formation Mitigation of Process Contaminants (3-MCPD) 3-MCPD 2-diol 3-MCPD 3-MCPD Esters 3-monochloropropane-1 acid analysis aocs april articles cert

326

U.S. Agriculture's Role Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation World  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. Agriculture's Role in a Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation World: An Economic Perspective the IMPAC project. #12;Abstract International agreements are likely to stimulate greenhouse gas mitigation Words Agricultural Sinks, Emissions Trading, Greenhouse Gas Emission Reductions, Kyoto Protocol #12

McCarl, Bruce A.

327

Mitigation for the Endangered Wood Stork on Savannah River Site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The wood stork is a recently classified federally endangered species. The species forages throughout the facility. The facility impact was mitigated by replacing the affected area with artificially created impoundment. Studies conducted in conjunction with the mitigation have assisted with the recovery effort for this species.

Bryan, A.L.; Coulter, M.C.; Brisbin, I.L.

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Cost Analysis and Reduction of Power Quality Mitigation Equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many power quality mitigation systems have been planned, designed, produced, and operated with very little concern for their cumulative life-cycle cost. This report describes how to conduct a life-cycle cost analysis to determine the financial implications of a chosen power quality mitigation technology versus other competing technologies.

2000-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

329

Underground Event Mitigation: State-of-Science Workshop Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes a workshop on underground event mitigation held in Phoenix, Arizona, in October 2002. EPRI sponsored the workshop to present a comprehensive review of the state of the science and knowledge of underground events and mitigation measures and to provide a forum for discussion of future needs of the utility industry and directions for further EPRI-sponsored work in this area.

2002-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

330

Southern Idaho Wildlife Mitigation Implementation 2000 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers calendar year 2001 activities for the Southern Idaho Wildlife Mitigation Implementation project. This project, implemented by Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Shoshone Bannock Tribes, is designed to protect, enhance and maintain wildlife habitats to mitigate for construction losses associated with Anderson Ranch, Black Canyon, Deadwood, Minidoka and Palisades hydroelectric projects. Additional project information is available in the quarterly reports.

Bottum, Edward; Mikkelsen, Anders

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Tillman Creek Mitigation Site As-Build Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This as-built report describes site conditions at the Tillman Creek mitigation site in South Cle Elum, Washington. This mitigation site was constructed in 2006-2007 to compensate for wetland impacts from the Yakama Nation hatchery. This as-built report provides information on the construction sequence, as-built survey, and establishment of baseline monitoring stations.

Gresham, Doug [Otak, Inc.

2009-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

332

A Potential Cost Effective Liquefaction Mitigation Countermeasure: Induced Partial Saturation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work is devoted to illustrate the potential liquefaction mitigation countermeasure: Induced Partial Saturation. Firstly the potential liquefaction mitigation method is briefly introduced. Then the numerical model for partially saturated sandy soil is presented. At last the dynamic responses of liquefiable free filed with different water saturation is given. It shows that the induced partial saturation is efficiency for preventing the liquefaction.

Bian Hanbing; Jia Yun; Shahrour, Isam [Laboratoire de Mecanique de Lille (UMR 8107), Universite des Sciences et Technologies de Lille 59655 Villeneuve d'Ascq (France)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

333

Biomass Scenario Model Documentation: Data and References  

SciTech Connect

The Biomass Scenario Model (BSM) is a system dynamics model that represents the entire biomass-to-biofuels supply chain, from feedstock to fuel use. The BSM is a complex model that has been used for extensive analyses; the model and its results can be better understood if input data used for initialization and calibration are well-characterized. It has been carefully validated and calibrated against the available data, with data gaps filled in using expert opinion and internally consistent assumed values. Most of the main data sources that feed into the model are recognized as baseline values by the industry. This report documents data sources and references in Version 2 of the BSM (BSM2), which only contains the ethanol pathway, although subsequent versions of the BSM contain multiple conversion pathways. The BSM2 contains over 12,000 total input values, with 506 distinct variables. Many of the variables are opportunities for the user to define scenarios, while others are simply used to initialize a stock, such as the initial number of biorefineries. However, around 35% of the distinct variables are defined by external sources, such as models or reports. The focus of this report is to provide insight into which sources are most influential in each area of the supply chain.

Lin, Y.; Newes, E.; Bush, B.; Peterson, S.; Stright, D.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Disrupting digital library development with scenario informed design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, there has been great interest in scenario-based design and other forms of user-centred design. However, there are many design processes that, often for good reason, remain technology-centred. We present a case study of introducing scenarios ... Keywords: Digital libraries, Scenario based design, Software development processes, Usability evaluation

Ann Blandford; Suzette Keith; Richard Butterworth; Bob Fields; Dominic Furniss

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Tools for designing and delivering multiple-perspective scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes two prototype tools developed as part of a design-based investigation into the use of multiple-perspective scenarios. A multiple-perspective scenario is one constructed as many different narratives about the same events, with the ... Keywords: XML, knowledge management, scenarios, training, video-conferencing

Wally Smith; Daghan Acay; Ramon Fano; Gideon Ratner

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Renewable Energy Scenarios for the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

demand, since manufacturing wind turbines is not as energy-intensive as the production of solar (silicon, etc. associated with the operation of wind turbines. Moreover, despite a number of previous 22 6.4 Other Issues 23 7. Scenarios Narratives 24 7.1 Blue Scenarios 24 7.2 Yellow Scenarios 25 7

Watson, Andrew

337

Synthesizing hierarchical state machines from expressive scenario descriptions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are many examples in the literature of algorithms for synthesizing state machines from scenario-based models. The motivation for these is to automate the transition from scenario-based requirements to early behavioral design models. To date, however, ... Keywords: State machine synthesis, interaction overview diagrams, scenario-based requirements, software modeling

Jon Whittle; Praveen K. Jayaraman

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Automated Prototyping of User Interfaces Based on UML Scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

User interface (UI) prototyping and scenario engineering have become popular techniques. Yet, the transition from scenario to formal specifications and the generation of UI code is still ill-defined and essentially a manual task, and the two techniques ... Keywords: Unified Modeling Language, scenario engineering, user interface prototyping

Mohammed Elkoutbi; Ismal Khriss; Rudolf K. Keller

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Morocco-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Morocco-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Morocco-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Morocco-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Name Morocco-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Partner Global Environment Facility (GEF), Government of Denmark Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Adaptation, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning Website http://www.unep.org/climatecha Program Start 2011 Program End 2013 Country Morocco UN Region Central America References Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM)[1] "The Government of Denmark will provide US$6 million to the new programme

340

FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing Countries Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture Topics: Resource assessment, Background analysis Website: www.fao.org/climatechange/micca/en/ References: FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing Countries[1] "The aim of the project is to help realise the substantial mitigation potential of agriculture, especially that of smallholders in developing countries. If the right changes are implemented in production systems, emissions can be reduced and sinks created in biomass and soils while

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "term mitigation scenarios" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Portfolio-Based Planning Process for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portfolio-Based Planning Process for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Portfolio-Based Planning Process for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Portfolio-Based Planning Process for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation October 7, 2013 - 10:10am Addthis The portfolio-based planning process for greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation offers an approach to: Evaluating the GHG reduction potential at the site, program, and agency level Identifying strategies for reducing those emissions Prioritizing activities to achieve both GHG reduction and cost objectives. Portfolio-based management for GHG mitigation helps agencies move from "peanut-butter-spreading" obligations for meeting GHG reduction targets evenly across all agency operating units to strategic planning of GHG reduction activities based on each operating unit's potential and cost to reduce emissions. The result of this prioritization will lay the foundation

342

Financing Climate Adaptation and Mitigation in Rural Areas of Developing  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Financing Climate Adaptation and Mitigation in Rural Areas of Developing Financing Climate Adaptation and Mitigation in Rural Areas of Developing Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Financing Climate Adaptation and Mitigation in Rural Areas of Developing Countries Agency/Company /Organization: U.S. Agency for International Development Topics: Adaptation, Co-benefits assessment, Finance Resource Type: Publications Website: pdf.usaid.gov/pdf_docs/PNADO826.pdf Financing Climate Adaptation and Mitigation in Rural Areas of Developing Countries Screenshot References: Financing Climate Adaptation and Mitigation in Rural Areas of Developing Countries[1] Summary "In order to determine how USAID assistance may help overcome barriers to financing these types of projects, this report addresses the following

343

EA-1456: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Mitigation Action Plan 6: Mitigation Action Plan EA-1456: Mitigation Action Plan Cheyenne-Miracle Mile and Ault-Cheyenne Transmission Line Rebuild Project Carbon, Albany and Laramie Counties, Wyoming and Weld County, Colorado Western proposes to upgrade the existing 146 miles of CH-MM 115kB transmission line which crosses Carbon, Albany and Larmie Counties in Wyoming and 35 miles of the AU-CH transmission line which corsses portions of Laramie Counties, Wyoming and Weld County, Colorado. The upgrade would remove the existing 115-kV H-frame structures and replace them with new 230-Kv H-frame structures and single pole steel structures. Western also proposes to widen the existing right-of-way (ROW), where necessary to allow adequate electrical clearances. Mitigation Action Plan to Implement Mitigation Requirements for

344

EA-1755: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigation Action Plan Mitigation Action Plan EA-1755: Mitigation Action Plan Reconstruction of the South Access Road (CR 802) in Support of the Department of Energy, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Eddy County, New Mexico EA prepared for the proposed reconstruction of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) South Access Road (County Road 802) located in Eddy County, New Mexico. Through the environmental review process, the Bureau of Land Management Carlsbad Field Office (BLM CFO) determined that there would be potential environmental impacts from the proposed project that would require mitigation to assure that the impacts would not become significant. Therefore, the Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) prepared this Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) to establish conditions for issuing its

345

Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation in the Tourism Sector | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation in the Tourism Sector Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation in the Tourism Sector Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation in the Tourism Sector Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Environment Programme Topics: Adaptation, Co-benefits assessment Resource Type: Publications Website: www.unep.fr/shared/publications/pdf/DTIx1047xPA-ClimateChange.pdf Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation in the Tourism Sector Screenshot References: Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation in the Tourism Sector[1] Summary "This document forms part of the " UNEP Manuals on Sustainable Tourism" and the UNWTO sustainable tourism policy guidebooks publication series, aiming to provide guidance to tourism stakeholders to integrate

346

EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

These documents specify that a MAP be prepared to mitigate environmental These documents specify that a MAP be prepared to mitigate environmental impacts resulting from the implementation of commitments made in the Record of Decision (ROD) for an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). The Order further requires that an annual report be prepared to demonstrate the progress made in implementing the commitments and effectiveness of any mitigation activity until the activity has been completed. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) MAP was prepared to address commitments made in the RODs for the WIPP Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS), and the WIPP Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement. This 2011 Annual Mitigation Report (2011 AMR) addresses those WIPP Project-related mitigation activities undertaken from the time of submittal of the 1994

347

Vietnam-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vietnam-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Vietnam-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Vietnam-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Name Vietnam-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Partner Global Environment Facility (GEF), Government of Denmark Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Adaptation, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning Website http://www.unep.org/climatecha Program Start 2011 Program End 2013 Country Vietnam UN Region Central America References Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM)[1] "The Government of Denmark will provide US$6 million to the new programme

348

Buildings GHG Mitigation Estimator Worksheet, Version 1 | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Buildings GHG Mitigation Estimator Worksheet, Version 1 Buildings GHG Mitigation Estimator Worksheet, Version 1 Buildings GHG Mitigation Estimator Worksheet, Version 1 Xcel document describes Version 1 of the the Buildings GHG Mitigation Estimator tool. This tool assists federal agencies in estimating the greenhouse gas mitigation reduction from implementing energy efficiency measures across a portfolio of buildings. It is designed to be applied to groups of office buildings, for example, at a program level (regional or site) that can be summarized at the agency level. While the default savings and cost estimates apply to office buildings, users can define their own efficiency measures, costs, and savings estimates for inclusion in the portfolio assessment. More information on user-defined measures can be

349

EA-1636: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigation Action Plan Mitigation Action Plan EA-1636: Mitigation Action Plan Albany-Burnt Woods and Santiam-Toledo Pole Replacement Project This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) is part of the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the Albany-Burnt Woods and Santiam-Toledo Pole Replacement Project. The project involves replacing wood pole structures on about 26 miles of the Albany-Burnt Woods single-circuit, 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission line and about 21 miles of the Santiam-Toledo single circuit, 230-kVtransmission line in Linn, Benton and Lincoln counties, Oregon. Mitigation Action Plan for the Albany-Burnt Woods and Santiam-Toledo Pole Replacement Project More Documents & Publications EA-1636: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1636: Finding of No Significant Impact

350

Ghana-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ghana-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Ghana-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Ghana-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Name Ghana-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Partner Global Environment Facility (GEF), Government of Denmark Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Adaptation, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning Website http://www.unep.org/climatecha Program Start 2011 Program End 2013 Country Ghana UN Region Central America References Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM)[1] "The Government of Denmark will provide US$6 million to the new programme

351

Policies and Measures to Realise Industrial Energy Efficiency and Mitigate  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Policies and Measures to Realise Industrial Energy Efficiency and Mitigate Policies and Measures to Realise Industrial Energy Efficiency and Mitigate Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Policies and Measures to Realise Industrial Energy Efficiency and Mitigate Climate Change Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Industrial Development Organization Sector: Energy Focus Area: Conventional Energy, Energy Efficiency, Industry Topics: GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Publications Website: www.unido.org/fileadmin/user_media/Publications/Pub_free/UNEnergy2009P Policies and Measures to Realise Industrial Energy Efficiency and Mitigate Climate Change Screenshot References: Policies and Measures to Realise Industrial Energy Efficiency and Mitigate Climate Change[1]

352

EIS-0128: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

128: Mitigation Action Plan 128: Mitigation Action Plan EIS-0128: Mitigation Action Plan Los Banos-Gates (Path 15) Transmission Project This MAP addresses the construction, operation, and maintenance of the new 84-mile long 500-kV transmission line. Necessary work conducted by Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) at their substations will occur within the previously disturbed area inside the substation boundaries. Western or Trans Elect, Inc. will also not have a role in upgrading the various existing PG&E 230-kV system components. DOE/EIS-0128, Western Area Power Administration, Mitigation Action Plan for the Los Banos-Gates (Path 15) Transmission Project (January 2003) More Documents & Publications EIS-0128: Mitigation Action Plan FAQS Gap Analysis Qualification Card - Mechanical Systems

353

Dominican Republic-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dominican Republic-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin Dominican Republic-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Dominican Republic-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean Name Dominican Republic-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean Agency/Company /Organization Inter-American Development Bank, The Regional Fund for Agricultural Technology, Government of New Zealand Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics Background analysis, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning Website http://www.iadb.org/en/news/ne Program Start 2011 Country Dominican Republic Caribbean References IDB, FONTAGRO, Government of New Zealand sign agreement on climate change mitigation and agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean[1]

354

Supporting International Mitigation and MRV activities | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

International Mitigation and MRV activities International Mitigation and MRV activities Jump to: navigation, search Name Supporting International Mitigation and MRV activities Agency/Company /Organization Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Energy Efficiency Topics Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type Lessons learned/best practices Website http://www.mitigationpartnersh Program End 2014 References International Partnership on Mitigation and MRV[1] Program Overview In the framework of the Petersberg Climate Dialogue in May 2010 in Bonn/Germany, South Africa, South Korea and Germany launched the International Partnership on Mitigation and MRV. The overall aim of the

355

Mexico-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mexico-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Mexico-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Mexico-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Name Mexico-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Partner Global Environment Facility (GEF), Government of Denmark Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Adaptation, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning Website http://www.unep.org/climatecha Program Start 2011 Program End 2013 Country Mexico UN Region Central America References Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM)[1] "The Government of Denmark will provide US$6 million to the new programme

356

Session: Avoiding, minimizing, and mitigating avian and bat impacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of two presentations followed by a discussion/question answer period. The session addressed a variety of questions related to avoiding, minimizing, and mitigating the avian and bat impacts of wind power development including: what has been learned from operating turbines and mitigating impacts where they are unavoidable, such as at Altamont Pass WRA, and should there be mitigation measures such as habitat creation or land conservation where impacts occur. Other impact minimization and mitigation approaches discussed included: location and siting evaluations; options for construction and operation of wind facilities; turbine lighting; and the physical alignment/orientation. Titles and authors of the presentations were: 'Bird Fatalities in the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area: A Case Study, Part II' by Carl Thelander and 'Prevention and Mitigation of Avian Impacts at Wind Power Facilities' by Paul Kerlinger.

Thelander, Carl; Kerlinger, Paul

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

EA-1440-S1: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigation Action Plan Mitigation Action Plan EA-1440-S1: Mitigation Action Plan National Renewable Energy Laboratory's South Table Mountain Complex, Golden, Colorado ThIs Mitigation Action Plan implements the mitigation measures associated with the potential environmental impact of a DOE proposal that consists of three site development projects at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) South Table Mountain (STM) site at Golden, Colorado: Construction of the Research Support Facilities (RSF), a new office building or multi-building office complex; Installation of Phase 1 of planned Site Infrastructure Improvements (Phase 1 of Full Site Development); Upgrades to the Thermochemical User Facility (TCUF), TCUF High Bay area, and addition of the Thermochemical Biorefinery Pilot Plant

358

Mitigation of direct containment heating and hydrogen combustion events in ice condenser plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Using Sequoyah as a representative plant, calculations have been performed with a developmental version of the CONTAIN computer code to assess the effectiveness of various possible improvements to ice condenser containments in mitigating severe accident scenarios involving direct containment heating (DCH) and/or hydrogen combustion. Mitigation strategies considered included backup power for igniters and/or air return fans, augmented igniter systems, containment venting, containment inerting, subatmospheric containment operation, reduced ice condenser bypass, and primary system depressurization. Various combinations of these improvements were also considered. Only inerting the containment or primary system depressurization combined with backup power supplies for the igniter systems resulted in large decreases in the peak pressures calculated to result from DCH events. Potential hydrogen detonation threats were also assessed; providing backup power for both the igniter systems and the air return fans would significantly reduce the potential for detonations but might not totally eliminate it. Sensitivity studies using the NUREG-1150 PRA methodology indicated that primary system depressurization combined with backup power for both igniters and fans could reduce the contribution to the mean risk potential of the class of events considered by about a factor of three. 7 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.

Williams, D.C.; Gregory, J.J. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Long Term World Oil Supply - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Long-Term World Oil Supply Scenarios. The Future Is Neither as Bleak or Rosy as Some Assert. By. John H. Wood, Gary R. Long, David F. Morehouse Conventionally ...

360

US National Climate Assessment (NCA) Scenarios for Assessing Our Climate Future: Issues and Methodological Perspectives Background Whitepaper for Participants  

SciTech Connect

This whitepaper is intended to provide a starting point for discussion at a workshop for the National Climate Assessment (NCA) that focuses on the use and development of scenarios. The paper will provide background needed by participants in the workshop in order to review options for developing and using scenarios in NCA. The paper briefly defines key terms and establishes a conceptual framework for developing consistent scenarios across different end uses and spatial scales. It reviews uses of scenarios in past U.S. national assessments and identifies potential users of and needs for scenarios for both the report scheduled for release in June 2013 and to support an ongoing distributed assessment process in sectors and regions around the country. Because scenarios prepared for the NCA will need to leverage existing research, the paper takes account of recent scientific advances and activities that could provide needed inputs. Finally, it considers potential approaches for providing methods, data, and other tools for assessment participants. We note that the term 'scenarios' has many meanings. An important goal of the whitepaper (and portions of the workshop agenda) is pedagogical (i.e., to compare different meanings and uses of the term and make assessment participants aware of the need to be explicit about types and uses of scenarios). In climate change research, scenarios have been used to establish bounds for future climate conditions and resulting effects on human and natural systems, given a defined level of greenhouse gas emissions. This quasi-predictive use contrasts with the way decision analysts typically use scenarios (i.e., to consider how robust alternative decisions or strategies may be to variation in key aspects of the future that are uncertain). As will be discussed, in climate change research and assessment, scenarios describe a range of aspects of the future, including major driving forces (both human activities and natural processes), changes in climate and related environmental conditions (e.g., sea level), and evolution of societal capability to respond to climate change. This wide range of scenarios is needed because the implications of climate change for the environment and society depend not only on changes in climate themselves, but also on human responses. This degree of breadth introduces and number of challenges for communication and research.

Moss, Richard H.; Engle, Nathan L.; Hall, John; Jacobs, Kathy; Lempert, Rob; Mearns, L. O.; Melillo, Jerry; Mote, Phil; O'Brien, Sheila; Rosenzweig, C.; Ruane, Alex; Sheppard, Stephen; Vallario, Robert W.; Wiek, Arnim; Wilbanks, Thomas

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "term mitigation scenarios" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

A lifestyle-based scenario, Energy Policy A lifestyle-based scenario for U.S. buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A lifestyle-based scenario, Energy Policy A lifestyle-based scenario for U.S. buildings, and how might we create energy policies to take these changes into account. The assumption here environment. #12;A lifestyle-based scenario, Energy Policy 2 2. Methodology Forecasts for energy use

362

Formulating Climate Change Scenarios to Inform Climate - Resilient  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Formulating Climate Change Scenarios to Inform Climate - Resilient Formulating Climate Change Scenarios to Inform Climate - Resilient Development Strategies Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Formulating Climate Change Scenarios to Inform Climate - Resilient Development Strategies Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Topics: Low emission development planning Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: www.climatefinanceoptions.org/cfo/node/256 Language: English Formulating Climate Change Scenarios to Inform Climate - Resilient Development Strategies Screenshot References: Formulating Climate Change Scenarios to Inform Climate - Resilient Development Strategies[1] Tool Overview "This guidebook is part of a series of manuals, guidebooks, and toolkits that draw upon the experience and information generated by UNDP's support

363

Toward a national plan for the commercialization of solar energy: price/demand scenarios and projections of solar utilization under the National Energy Act  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three macroeconomic scenarios were developed as an economic backdrop for projecting solar technology market acceptance under various government policies and commercialization programs. These scenarios assume three levels of future world oil prices - $18, $25 and $32 per barrel (1976 $) in the year 2000. This range is intended to encompass the most likely set of energy futures. The scenarios are discussed in terms of their underlying assumptions and changes in fuel and resource consumption by sector of the economy. Estimates of the future utilization of solar technologies for the mid-price scenarios are given. These estimates are based on the solar subsidies and incentive programs in the National Energy Act.

Rebibo, K. K.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Event:CCCCC and SPREP-Climate Change Mitigation | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Calendar.png CCCCC and SPREP-Climate Change Mitigation: 1:30pm- on 20111130 CCCCC and SPREP-Climate Change Mitigation Event Details Name CCCCC and SPREP-Climate Change Mitigation...

365

Analysis and Design of New Harmonic Mitigation Approaches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerous approaches have been proposed in order to resolve the problems of current harmonics in electrical distribution systems. The rapid development of power semiconductors along with the revolutionary advances on microprocessors consolidated the motor drives industry and with it a massive proliferation of non-linear loads. It was thought that these very same technological advances would trigger an explosive development of harmonic solutions based on power electronics. Moreover, the introduction of the instantaneous active and reactive power theory or the so-called p, q theory which simplifies and gives more robustness to the control strategies of active filters reinforced this idea. Three decades have passed since the first IGBT was introduced in early 1980s, and active harmonic solutions are not the first choice to solve harmonic pollution in electrical distribution systems, mainly due to the high cost and the perception of low reliability. Given this scenario, in this work two main approaches are explored. First, the combination of an asymmetric 18-pulse rectifier with a reduced KVA active harmonic filter to improve the performance under abnormal utility conditions. Second, an interleaved active harmonic filter using multiple inverters connected in parallel at the ac and dc size, which will allow for higher power ratings and power density increase. The performance issues of the asymmetric 18-pulse rectifier under unbalanced voltage and pre-existing harmonic components are analyzed, as well as the current distortion improvement, achieved when an active power filter is introduced. On the other hand, the high frequency harmonic cancellation when interleaved inverters are used, the circulation of zero-sequence current and the impact of interleaving on dc bus capacitor are analyzed. Finally, some methods to mitigate the low frequency circulating currents based on eliminating the zero-sequence component, and the introduction of common mode inductors to reduce the high frequency circulating current are studied. Without a doubt the search for new cost-effective topologies able to reach broader power levels and voltage ranges will continue emerging giving more alternatives to users. Moreover, extensive research on wide band gap devices such as Silicon Carbide (SiC) and Gallium Nitride (GaN), with which it is possible to reach higher voltage breakdown and at least an order-of-magnitude lower switching losses, makes the future more promising for active solutions.

Aeloiza Matus, Eddy 1972-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Addressing an Uncertain Future Using Scenario Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) has had a longstanding goal of introducing uncertainty into the analysis it routinely conducts in compliance with the Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA) and for strategic management purposes. The need to introduce some treatment of uncertainty arises both because it would be good general management practice, and because intuitively many of the technologies under development by EERE have a considerable advantage in an uncertain world. For example, an expected kWh output from a wind generator in a future year, which is not exposed to volatile and unpredictable fuel prices, should be truly worth more than an equivalent kWh from an alternative fossil fuel fired technology. Indeed, analysts have attempted to measure this value by comparing the prices observed in fixed-price natural gas contracts compared to ones in which buyers are exposed to market prices (see Bolinger, Wiser, and Golove and (2004)). In addition to the routine reasons for exploring uncertainty given above, the history of energy markets appears to have exhibited infrequent, but troubling, regime shifts, i.e., historic turning points at which the center of gravity or fundamental nature of the system appears to have abruptly shifted. Figure 1 below shows an estimate of how the history of natural gas fired generating costs has evolved over the last three decades. The costs shown incorporate both the well-head gas price and an estimate of how improving generation technology has gradually tended to lower costs. The purpose of this paper is to explore scenario analysis as a method for introducing uncertainty into EERE's forecasting in a manner consistent with the preceding observation. The two questions are how could it be done, and what is its academic basis, if any. Despite the interest in uncertainty methods, applying them poses some major hurdles because of the heavy reliance of EERE on forecasting tools that are deterministic in nature, such as the Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). NEMS is the source of the influential Annual Energy Outlook whose business-as-usual (BAU) case, the Reference Case, forms the baseline for most of the U.S. energy policy discussion. NEMS is an optimizing model because: 1. it iterates to an equilibrium among modules representing the supply, demand, and energy conversion subsectors; and 2. several subsectoral models are individually solved using linear programs (LP). Consequently, it is deeply rooted in the recent past and any effort to simulate the consequences of a major regime shift as depicted in Figure 1 must come by applying an exogenously specified scenario. And, more generally, simulating futures that lie outside of our recent historic experience, even if they do not include regime switches suggest some form of scenario approach. At the same time, the statistical validity of scenarios that deviate significantly outside the ranges of historic inputs should be questioned.

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

367

The jamming scenario - an introduction and outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The jamming scenario of disordered media, formulated about 10 years ago, has in recent years been advanced by analyzing model systems of granular media. This has led to various new concepts that are increasingly being explored in in a variety of systems. This chapter contains an introductory review of these recent developments and provides an outlook on their applicability to different physical systems and on future directions. The first part of the paper is devoted to an overview of the findings for model systems of frictionless spheres, focussing on the excess of low-frequency modes as the jamming point is approached. Particular attention is paid to a discussion of the cross-over frequency and length scales that govern this approach. We then discuss the effects of particle asphericity and static friction, the applicability to bubble models for wet foams in which the friction is dynamic, the dynamical arrest in colloids, and the implications for molecular glasses.

Andrea J. Liu; Sidney R. Nagel; Wim van Saarloos; Matthieu Wyart

2010-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

368

STUDY ON AIR INGRESS MITIGATION METHODS IN THE VERY HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS COOLED REACTOR (VHTR)  

SciTech Connect

An air-ingress accident followed by a pipe break is considered as a critical event for a very high temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR). Following helium depressurization, it is anticipated that unless countermeasures are taken, air will enter the core through the break leading to oxidation of the in-core graphite structure. Thus, without mitigation features, this accident might lead to severe exothermic chemical reactions of graphite and oxygen. Under extreme circumstances, a loss of core structural integrity may occur along with excessive release of radiological inventory. Idaho National Laboratory under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy is performing research and development (R&D) that focuses on key phenomena important during challenging scenarios that may occur in the VHTR. Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) studies to date have identified the air ingress event, following on the heels of a VHTR depressurization, as very important (Oh et al. 2006, Schultz et al. 2006). Consequently, the development of advanced air ingress-related models and verification and validation (V&V) requirements are part of the experimental validation plan. This paper discusses about various air-ingress mitigation concepts applicable for the VHTRs. The study begins with identifying important factors (or phenomena) associated with the air-ingress accident by using a root-cause analysis. By preventing main causes of the important events identified in the root-cause diagram, the basic air-ingress mitigation ideas can be conceptually derived. The main concepts include (1) preventing structural degradation of graphite supporters; (2) preventing local stress concentration in the supporter; (3) preventing graphite oxidation; (4) preventing air ingress; (5) preventing density gradient driven flow; (4) preventing fluid density gradient; (5) preventing fluid temperature gradient; (6) preventing high temperature. Based on the basic concepts listed above, various air-ingress mitigation methods are proposed in this study. Among them, the following two mitigation ideas are extensively investigated using computational fluid dynamic codes (CFD): (1) helium injection in the lower plenum, and (2) reactor enclosure opened at the bottom. The main idea of the helium injection method is to replace air in the core and the lower plenum upper part by buoyancy force. This method reduces graphite oxidation damage in the severe locations of the reactor inside. To validate this method, CFD simulations are addressed here. A simple 2-D CFD model is developed based on the GT-MHR 600MWt design. The simulation results showed that the helium replace the air flow into the core and significantly reduce the air concentration in the core and bottom reflector potentially protecting oxidation damage. According to the simulation results, even small helium flow was sufficient to remove air in the core, mitigating the air-ingress successfully. The idea of the reactor enclosure with an opening at the bottom changes overall air-ingress mechanism from natural convection to molecular diffusion. This method can be applied to the current system by some design modification of the reactor cavity. To validate this concept, this study also uses CFD simulations based on the simplified 2-D geometry. The simulation results showed that the enclosure open at the bottom can successfully mitigate air-ingress into the reactor even after on-set natural circulation occurs.

Chang H. Oh

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

PHYSICS AND CONTROL OF ELMING H-MODE NEGATIVE CENTRAL SHEAR ADVANCED TOKAMAK SCENARIO BASED ON EXPERIMENTAL PROFILES FOR ITER  

SciTech Connect

A271 PHYSICS AND CONTROL OF ELMING H-MODE NEGATIVE CENTRAL SHEAR ADVANCED TOKAMAK SCENARIO BASED ON EXPERIMENTAL PROFILES FOR ITER. Key DIII-D AT experimental and modeling results are applied to examine the physics and control issues for ITER to operate in a negative central shear (NCS) AT scenario. The effects of a finite edge pressure pedestal and current density are included based on the DIII-D experimental profiles. Ideal and resistive stability analyses indicate that feedback control of resistive wall modes by rotational drive or flux conserving intelligent coils is crucial for these AT configurations to operate at attractive {beta}{sub N} values in the range of 3.0-3.5. Vertical stability and halo current analyses show that reliable disruption mitigation is essential and mitigation control using an impurity gas can significantly reduce the local mechanical stress to an acceptable level. Core transport and turbulence analyses demonstrate that control of the rotational shear profile is essential to maintain the good confinement necessary for high {beta}. Consideration of edge stability and core transport suggests that a sufficiently wide pedestal is necessary for the projected fusion performance. Heat flux analyses indicate that with core-only radiation enhancement the outboard peak divertor heat load is near the design limit of 10 MW/m{sup 2}

LAO,LL; CHAN,VS; EVANS,TE; HUMPHREYS,DA; LEUER,JA; MAHDAVI,MA; PETRIE,TW; SNYDER,PB; STJOHN,HE; STAEBLER,GM; STAMBAUGH,RD; TAYLOR,TS; TURNBULL,AD; WEST,WP; BRENNAN,DP

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Evaluating Potential for Large Releases from CO2 StorageReservoirs: Analogs, Scenarios, and Modeling Needs  

SciTech Connect

While the purpose of geologic storage of CO{sub 2} in deep saline formations is to trap greenhouse gases underground, the potential exists for CO{sub 2} to escape from the target reservoir, migrate upward along permeable pathways, and discharge at the land surface. Such discharge is not necessarily a serious concern, as CO{sub 2} is a naturally abundant and relatively benign gas in low concentrations. However, there is a potential risk to health, safety and environment (HSE) in the event that large localized fluxes of CO{sub 2} were to occur at the land surface, especially where CO{sub 2} could accumulate. In this paper, we develop possible scenarios for large CO{sub 2} fluxes based on the analysis of natural analogues, where large releases of gas have been observed. We are particularly interested in scenarios which could generate sudden, possibly self-enhancing, or even eruptive release events. The probability for such events may be low, but the circumstances under which they might occur and potential consequences need to be evaluated in order to design appropriate site selection and risk management strategies. Numerical modeling of hypothetical test cases is needed to determine critical conditions for such events, to evaluate whether such conditions may be possible at designated storage sites, and, if applicable, to evaluate the potential HSE impacts of such events and design appropriate mitigation strategies.

Birkholzer, Jens; Pruess, Karsten; Lewicki, Jennifer; Tsang,Chin-Fu; Karimjee, Anhar

2005-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

371

Climate Change Scenarios for New Zealand Rainfall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In terms of the effects of future climate change upon society, some of the most important parameters to estimate are associated with changing risks of extreme rainfall events, both floods and droughts. However, such aspects of the climate system ...

John Sansom; James A. Renwick

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Plan for Libby Hydroelectric Project, Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the proposed mitigation plan for wildlife losses attributable to the construction of the Libby hydroelectric project. Mitigation objectives and alternatives, the recommended mitigation projects, and the crediting system for each project are described by each target species. The report describes mitigation that has already taken place and 8 recommended mitigation projects designed to complete total wildlife mitigation. 8 refs., 2 figs., 12 tabs.

Mundinger, John

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Heat Exchanger Fouling- Prediction, Measurement and Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Industrial Programs (OIP) sponsors the development of innovative heat exchange systems. Fouling is a major and persistent cost associated with most industrial heat exchangers and nationally wastes an estimated 2.9 Quads per year. To predict and control fouling, three OIP projects are currently exploring heat exchanger fouling in specific industrial applications. A fouling probe has been developed to determine empirically the fouling potential of an industrial gas stream and to derive the fouling thermal resistance. The probe is a hollow metal cylinder capable of measuring the average heat flux along the length of the tube. The local heat flux is also measured by a heat flux meter embedded in the probe wall. The fouling probe has been successfully tested in the laboratory at flue gas temperatures up to 2200F and a local heat flux up to 41,000 BTU/hr-ft2. The probe has been field tested at a coal-fired boiler plant. Future tests at a municipal waste incinerator are planned. Two other projects study enhanced heat exchanger tubes, specifically the effect of enhanced surface geometries on tube bundle performance. Both projects include fouling in a liquid heat transfer fluid. Identifying and quantifying the factors affecting fouling in these enhanced heat transfer tubes will lead to techniques to mitigate fouling.

Peterson, G. R.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

WHC natural phenomena hazards mitigation implementation plan  

SciTech Connect

Natural phenomena hazards (NPH) are unexpected acts of nature which pose a threat or danger to workers, the public or to the environment. Earthquakes, extreme winds (hurricane and tornado),snow, flooding, volcanic ashfall, and lightning strike are examples of NPH at Hanford. It is the policy of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to design, construct and operate DOE facilitiesso that workers, the public and the environment are protected from NPH and other hazards. During 1993 DOE, Richland Operations Office (RL) transmitted DOE Order 5480.28, ``Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation,`` to Westinghouse Hanford COmpany (WHC) for compliance. The Order includes rigorous new NPH criteria for the design of new DOE facilities as well as for the evaluation and upgrade of existing DOE facilities. In 1995 DOE issued Order 420.1, ``Facility Safety`` which contains the same NPH requirements and invokes the same applicable standards as Order 5480.28. It will supersede Order 5480.28 when an in-force date for Order 420.1 is established through contract revision. Activities will be planned and accomplished in four phases: Mobilization; Prioritization; Evaluation; and Upgrade. The basis for the graded approach is the designation of facilities/structures into one of five performance categories based upon safety function, mission and cost. This Implementation Plan develops the program for the Prioritization Phase, as well as an overall strategy for the implemention of DOE Order 5480.2B.

Conrads, T.J.

1996-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

375

ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 4/03/2001 through 7/02/2001. Most of the achievements are milestones in our efforts to complete the tasks and subtasks that constitute the project objectives. Note that this version of the quarterly technical report is a revision to add the reports from subcontractors Montana State and Oak Ridge National Laboratories The significant accomplishments for this quarter include: Development of an experimental plan and initiation of experiments to create a calibration curve that correlates algal chlorophyll levels with carbon levels (to simplify future experimental procedures); Completion of debugging of the slug flow reactor system, and development of a plan for testing the pressure drop of the slug flow reactor; Design and development of a new bioreactor screen design which integrates the nutrient delivery drip system and the harvesting system; Development of an experimental setup for testing the new integrated drip system/harvesting system; Completion of model-scale bioreactor tests examining the effects of CO{sub 2} concentration levels and lighting levels on Nostoc 86-3 growth rates; Completion of the construction of a larger model-scale bioreactor to improve and expand testing capabilities and initiation of tests; Substantial progress on construction of a pilot-scale bioreactor; and Preliminary economic analysis of photobioreactor deployment. Plans for next quarter's work are included in the conclusions. A preliminary economic analysis is included as an appendix.

Dr. Gregory Kremer; Dr. David J. Bayless; Dr. Morgan Vis; Dr. Michael Prudich; Dr. Keith Cooksey; Dr. Jeff Muhs

2001-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

376

ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the first quarterly report of the project Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation. The official project start date, 10/02/2000, was delayed until 10/31/2000 due to an intellectual property dispute that was resolved. However, the delay forced a subsequent delay in subcontracting with Montana State University, which then delayed obtaining a sampling permit from Yellowstone National Park. However, even with these delays, the project moved forward with some success. Accomplishments for this quarter include: Culturing of thermophilic organisms from Yellowstone; Testing of mesophilic organisms in extreme CO{sub 2} conditions; Construction of a second test bed for additional testing; Purchase of a total carbon analyzer dedicated to the project; Construction of a lighting container for Oak Ridge National Laboratory optical fiber testing; Modified lighting of existing test box to provide more uniform distribution; Testing of growth surface adhesion and properties; Experimentation on water-jet harvesting techniques; and Literature review underway regarding uses of biomass after harvesting. Plans for next quarter's work and an update on the project's web page are included in the conclusions.

Dr. David J. Bayless; Dr. Morgan Vis; Dr. Gregory Kremer; Dr. Michael Prudich; Dr. Keith Cooksey; Dr. Jeff Muhs

2001-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

377

Greenhouse gas mitigation options for Washington State  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

President Clinton, in 1993, established a goal for the United States to return emissions of greenhouse gases to 1990 levels by the year 2000. One effort established to help meet this goal was a three part Environmental Protection Agency state grant program. Washington State completed part one of this program with the release of the 1990 greenhouse gas emissions inventory and 2010 projected inventory. This document completes part two by detailing alternative greenhouse gas mitigation options. In part three of the program EPA, working in partnership with the States, may help fund innovative greenhouse gas reduction strategies. The greenhouse gas control options analyzed in this report have a wide range of greenhouse gas reductions, costs, and implementation requirements. In order to select and implement a prudent mix of control strategies, policy makers need to have some notion of the potential change in climate, the consequences of that change and the uncertainties contained therein. By understanding the risks of climate change, policy makers can better balance the use of scarce public resources for concerns that are immediate and present against those that affect future generations. Therefore, prior to analyzing alternative greenhouse gas control measures, this report briefly describes the phenomenon and uncertainties of global climate change, and then projects the likely consequences for Washington state.

Garcia, N.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation, 1992-1993 Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In February of 1900, over forty agency representatives and interested citizens began development of the 1991 Mitigation Plan. This effort culminated in the 1993 Implementation Plan for mitigation of fish losses attributable to the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. The primary purpose of this biennial report is to inform the public of the status of ongoing mitigation activities resulting from those planning efforts. A habitat improvement project is underway to benefit bull trout in Big Creek in the North Fork drainage of the Flathead River and work is planned in Hay Creek, another North Fork tributary. Bull trout redd counts have been expanded and experimental programs involving genetic evaluation, outmigrant monitoring, and hatchery studies have been initiated, Cutthroat mitigation efforts have focused on habitat improvements in Elliott Creek and Taylor`s Outflow and improvements have been followed by imprint plants of hatchery fish and/or eyed eggs in those streams. Rogers Lake west of Kalispell and Lion Lake, near Hungry Horse, were chemically rehabilitated. Cool and warm water fish habitat has been improved in Halfmoon Lake and Echo Lake. Public education and public interest is important to the future success of mitigation activities. As part of the mitigation team`s public awareness responsibility we have worked with numerous volunteer groups, public agencies, and private landowners to stimulate interest and awareness of mitigation activities and the aquatic ecosystem. The purpose of this biennial report is to foster public awareness of, and support for, mitigation activities as we move forward in implementing the Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation Implementation Plan.

DosSantos, Joe; Vashro, Jim; Lockard, Larry

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and Forestry Sectors Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Climate Change Mitigation Through...

380

JICA's Assistance for Mitigation to Climate Change - The Co-Benefits...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

JICA's Assistance for Mitigation to Climate Change - The Co-Benefits Approach to Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: JICA's Assistance for Mitigation to...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "term mitigation scenarios" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife Mitigation Project Management Plan for the "Dilling Addition".  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a recommendation from the Kalispel Tribe to the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA) for management of the Pend Oreille Wetland Wildlife Mitigation project II (Dilling Addition) for the extensive habitat losses caused by Albeni Falls Dam on Kalispel Ceded Lands. Albeni Falls Dam is located on the Pend Oreille River near the Washington-Idaho border, about 25 miles upstream of the Kalispel Indian Reservation. The dam controls the water level on Lake Pend Oreille. The lake was formerly the center of subsistence use by the Kalispel Tribe. Flooding of wetlands, and water fluctuations both on the lake and downstream on the river, has had adverse impacts to wildlife and wildlife habitat. An extensive process was followed to formulate and prioritize wildlife resource goals. The Kalispel Natural Resource Department provided guidance in terms of opportunities onsite. To prioritize specific goals, the Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority Wildlife Caucus were consulted. From this process, the top priority goal for the Kalispel Tribe is: Protect and develop riparian forest and shrub, and freshwater wetlands, to mitigate losses resulting from reservoir inundation and river level fluctuations due to Albeni Falls Dam. Indicator species used to determine the initial construction/inundation loses and mitigation project gains include Bald Eagle (breeding and wintering), Black-capped Chickadee, Canada Goose, Mallard, muskrat, white-tailed deer, and Yellow Warbler.

Entz, Ray D.

1999-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

382

Double Ended Guillotine Break in a Prismatic Block VHTR Lower Plenum Air Ingress Scenario  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The double ended guillotine break leading to density-driven air ingress has been identified as a low probability yet high consequence event for Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). The lower plenum of the VHTR contains the core support structure and is composed of graphite. During an air ingress event, oxidation of the graphite structure under high temperature conditions in an oxygen containing environment could degrade the integrity of the core support structure. Following this large break, air from the reactor containment will begin to enter the lower plenum via two mechanisms: diffusion or density driven stratified flow. The large difference in time scales between the mechanisms leads to the need to perform high fidelity experimental studies to investigate the dominant the air ingress mechanism. A scaled test facility has been designed and built that allows the acquisition of velocity measurements during stratification after a pipe break. A non-intrusive optical measurement technique provides full-field velocity measurements profiles of the two species Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The data allow a more developed understanding of the fundamental flow features, the development of improved models, and possible mitigation strategies in such a scenario.Two brine-water experiments were conducted with different break locations. Flow fronts were analyzed and findings concluded that the flow has a constant speed through the pipe after the initial lock exchange. The time in which the flow enters the lower plenum is an important factor because it provides the window of opportunity for mitigation strategies in an actual reactor scenario. For both cases the flow of the heavier density liquid (simulating air ingress from the reactor containment) from the pipe enters the reactor vessel in under 6 seconds. The diffusion velocity and heavy flow front of the stratified flow layer were compared for the SF6/He gas case. It is seen that the diffusion plays less of a role as the transport mechanism in comparison to the density-driven stratified flow since the velocity of the diffusion is two orders of magnitude smaller than the velocity of the stratified flow mechanism. This is the reason for the need for density-driven stratified flow investigations following a LOCA. These investigations provided high-quality data for CFD validation in order for these models to depict the basic phenomena occurring in an air ingress scenario.

Hartley, Jessica

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Summary - Mitigation and Remediation of Mercury Contamination...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and stakeholders. 2. "Quick Wins" were recommended for near term improvements as follows: Outfall 200- (a) use of stannous chloride in the NS Pipe to volatilize Hg, (b) addition of...

384

Standard Assessment of Mitigation Potential and Livelihoods in Smallholder  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mitigation Potential and Livelihoods in Smallholder Mitigation Potential and Livelihoods in Smallholder Systems (SAMPLES) Jump to: navigation, search Name Standard Assessment of Mitigation Potential and Livelihoods in Smallholder Systems (SAMPLES) Agency/Company /Organization CGIAR's Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS), Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA), the European Union, International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) Partner International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), International Council for Research in Agroforestry (ICRAF), International Rice Research Institute (IRRI), Ministry of Agriculture Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics Adaptation, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, - Macroeconomic, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -TNA

385

Kenya-Standard Assessment of Mitigation Potential and Livelihoods in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kenya-Standard Assessment of Mitigation Potential and Livelihoods in Kenya-Standard Assessment of Mitigation Potential and Livelihoods in Smallholder Systems (SAMPLES) Jump to: navigation, search Name Kenya-Standard Assessment of Mitigation Potential and Livelihoods in Smallholder Systems (SAMPLES) Agency/Company /Organization CGIAR's Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS), Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA), the European Union, International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) Partner International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), International Council for Research in Agroforestry (ICRAF), International Rice Research Institute (IRRI), Ministry of Agriculture Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics Adaptation, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, - Macroeconomic, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -TNA

386

Aspen and Pitkin County - Renewable Energy Mitigation Program | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Aspen and Pitkin County - Renewable Energy Mitigation Program Aspen and Pitkin County - Renewable Energy Mitigation Program Aspen and Pitkin County - Renewable Energy Mitigation Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Other Solar Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Wind Program Info State Colorado Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Community Office for Resource Efficiency (CORE) The City of Aspen and Pitkin County have adopted the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC), with some amendments, as their official energy code effective March 9, 2010. The [http://www.aspenpitkin.com/Portals/0/docs/county/countycode/Building%20C...

387

Philippines-Standard Assessment of Mitigation Potential and Livelihoods in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Philippines-Standard Assessment of Mitigation Potential and Livelihoods in Philippines-Standard Assessment of Mitigation Potential and Livelihoods in Smallholder Systems (SAMPLES) Jump to: navigation, search Name Philippines-Standard Assessment of Mitigation Potential and Livelihoods in Smallholder Systems (SAMPLES) Agency/Company /Organization CGIAR's Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS), Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA), the European Union, International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) Partner International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), International Council for Research in Agroforestry (ICRAF), International Rice Research Institute (IRRI), Ministry of Agriculture Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics Adaptation, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, - Macroeconomic, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -TNA

388

Mexico-Standard Assessment of Mitigation Potential and Livelihoods in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mexico-Standard Assessment of Mitigation Potential and Livelihoods in Mexico-Standard Assessment of Mitigation Potential and Livelihoods in Smallholder Systems (SAMPLES) Jump to: navigation, search Name Mexico-Standard Assessment of Mitigation Potential and Livelihoods in Smallholder Systems (SAMPLES) Agency/Company /Organization CGIAR's Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS), Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA), the European Union, International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) Partner International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), International Council for Research in Agroforestry (ICRAF), International Rice Research Institute (IRRI), Ministry of Agriculture Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics Adaptation, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, - Macroeconomic, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -TNA

389

Burundi-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Burundi-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Burundi-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Jump to: navigation, search Name Burundi-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Agency/Company /Organization Environment Canada, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector Climate, Energy, Land, Water Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Greenhouse Gas, Grid Assessment and Integration, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, Transportation Topics Adaptation, Background analysis, Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -NAMA, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs Program Start 2012 Program End 2013 Country Burundia

390

Democratic Republic of Congo-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Democratic Republic of Congo-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions Democratic Republic of Congo-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Jump to: navigation, search Name Democratic Republic of Congo-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Agency/Company /Organization Environment Canada, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector Climate, Energy, Land, Water Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Greenhouse Gas, Grid Assessment and Integration, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, Transportation Topics Adaptation, Background analysis, Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -NAMA, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs

391

An overview of alternative fossil fuel price and carbon regulation scenarios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laboratory. Natural Gas Price Scenarios Among activelys 2004 IRP includes three gas price scenarios. As shownwellhead price in the High gas price scenario is $1.43/Mcf

Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Fish passage mitigation of impacts from hydroelectric power projects in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Obstruction of fish movements by dams continues to be the major environmental issue facing the hydropower industry in the US. Dams block upstream migrations, which can cut off adult fish form their historical spawning grounds and severely curtail reproduction. Conversely, downstream-migrating fish may be entrained into the turbine intake flow and suffer turbine-passage injury or mortality. Hydroelectric projects can interfere with the migrations of a wide variety of fish. Maintenance, restoration or enhancement of populations of these species may require the construction of facilities to allow for upstream and downstream fish passage. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), by law, must give fish and wildlife resources equal consideration with power production in its licensing decisions, must be satisfied that a project is consistent with comprehensive plans for a waterway (including fisheries management plans), and must consider all federal and state resource agency terms and conditions for the protection of fish and wildlife. As a consequence, FERC often requires fish passage mitigation measures as a condition of the hydropower license when such measures are deemed necessary for the protection of fish. Much of the recent research and development efforts of the US Department of Energy`s Hydropower Program have focused on the mitigation of impacts to upstream and downstream fish passage. This paper descries three components of that effort: (1) a survey of environmental mitigation measures at hydropower sites across the country; (2) a critical review of the effectiveness of fish passage mitigation measures at 16 case study sites; and (3) ongoing efforts to develop new turbine designs that minimize turbine-passage mortality.

Cada, G.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Mitigation of tank 241-SY-101 by pump mixing: Results of full-scale testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Full-Scale Mixer Pump Test Program was performed in Hanford Tank 241-SY-101 from February 4 to April 13, 1994, to confirm the long-term operational strategy for flammable gas mitigation and to demonstrate that mixing can control the gas release and waste level. Since its installation on July 3, 1993, the current pump, operating only a few hours per week, has proved capable of mixing the waste sufficiently to release gas continuously instead of in large episodic events. The results of Full-Scale Testing demonstrated that the pump can control gas release and waste level for long-term mitigation, and the four test sequences formed the basis for the long-term operating schedule. The last test sequence, jet penetration tests, showed that the current pump jet creates flow near the tank wall and that it can excavate portions of the bottom sludge layer if run at maximum power. Pump mixing has altered the {open_quote}normal{close_quote} configuration of the waste; most of the original nonconvective sludge has been mixed with the supernatant liquid into a mobile convective slurry that has since been maintained by gentle pump operation and does not readily return to sludge.

Stewart, C.W.; Hudson, J.D.; Friley, J.R.; Panisko, F.E.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Irwin, J.J.; Fadeff, J.G.; Efferding, L.F.; Michener, T.E.; Kirch, N.W. [and others

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Forest inventory: Peter T. Johnson Wildlife Mitigation Unit, Craig Mountain, Idaho. Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary objective of this report is to determine the quantity and quality of existing forest habitat types on the 59,991-acre Peter T. Johnson Wildlife Mitigation Unit (WMU). Products from this effort include a description of the ecological condition, a map of habitat types, and an inventory of forest resources on the WMU lands. The purpose of this and other resource inventories (plant and wildlife) is to assess the current resources condition of the WMU and to provide necessary information to generate a long-term management for this area.

Narolski, Steven W.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Insider Threat - Material Control and Accountability Mitigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The technical objectives of nuclear safeguards are (1) the timely detection of diversion of significant quantities of nuclear material from peaceful uses to the manufacture of nuclear weapons or other nuclear explosive devices or for purposes unknown and (2) the deterrence of such diversion by the risk of early detection. The safeguards and security program must address both outsider threats and insider threats. Outsider threats are primarily addressed by the physical protection system. Insider threats can be any level of personnel at the site including passive or active insiders that could attempt protracted or abrupt diversion. This could occur by an individual acting alone or by collusion between an individual with material control and accountability (MC&A) responsibilities and another individual who has responsibility or control within both the physical protection and the MC&A systems. The insider threat is one that must be understood and incorporated into the safeguards posture. There have been more than 18 documented cases of theft or loss of plutonium or highly enriched uranium. The insider has access, authority, and knowledge, as well as a set of attributes, that make him/her difficult to detect. An integrated safeguards program is designed as a defense-in-depth system that seeks to prevent the unauthorized removal of nuclear material, to provide early detection of any unauthorized attempt to remove nuclear material, and to rapidly respond to any attempted removal of nuclear material. The program is also designed to support protection against sabotage, espionage, unauthorized access, compromise, and other hostile acts that may cause unacceptable adverse impacts on national security, program continuity, the health and safety of employees, the public, or the environment. Nuclear MC&A play an essential role in the capabilities of an integrated safeguards system to deter and detect theft or diversion of nuclear material. An integrated safeguards system with compensating mitigation can decrease the risk of an insider performing a malicious act without detection.

Powell, Danny H [ORNL; Elwood Jr, Robert H [ORNL; Roche, Charles T [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 1/03/2001 through 4/02/2001. Many of the activities and accomplishments are continuations of work initiated and reported in last quarter's status report. Major activities and accomplishments for this quarter include: Three sites in Yellowstone National Park have been identified that may contain suitable organisms for use in a bioreactor; Full-scale culturing of one thermophilic organism from Yellowstone has progressed to the point that there is a sufficient quantity to test this organism in the model-scale bioreactor; The effects of the additive monoethanolamine on the growth of one thermophilic organism from Yellowstone has been tested; Testing of growth surface adhesion and properties is continuing; Construction of a larger model-scale bioreactor to improve and expand testing capabilities is completed and the facility is undergoing proof tests; Model-scale bioreactor tests examining the effects of CO{sub 2} concentration levels and lighting levels on organism growth rates are continuing; Alternative fiber optic based deep-penetration light delivery systems for use in the pilot-scale bioreactor have been designed, constructed and tested; An existing slug flow reactor system has been modified for use in this project, and a proof-of-concept test plan has been developed for the slug flow reactor; Research and testing of water-jet harvesting techniques is continuing, and a harvesting system has been designed for use in the model-scale bioreactor; and The investigation of comparative digital image analysis as a means for determining the ''density'' of algae on a growth surface is continuing Plans for next quarter's work and an update on the project's web page are included in the conclusions.

Dr. David J. Bayless; Dr. Morgan Vis; Dr. Gregory Kremer; Dr. Michael Prudich; Dr. Keith Cooksey; Dr. Jeff Muhs

2001-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

397

Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO2 Mitigation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 7/2/2003 through 10/01/2003. As indicated in the list of accomplishments below we are preparing for the final tests necessary to meet our project goals. Specific results and accomplishments for the third quarter of 2003 include: (1) Bioreactor support systems and test facilities: (A) The solar collector used in the light delivery system showed signs of degradation and hence had to be replaced by ORNL. A set of light readings were taken after the new solar collector was installed. The readings showed an acceptable light profile. (B) The CRF-2 test system has undergone major improvements to produce the high flow rates needed for harvesting (as determined by previous experiments). The main changes to the system are new stainless steel header/frame units with increased flow capacity and a modified pipe end sealing method to improve flow uniformity, and installation and plumbing for a new high flow harvesting pump. The improvements have been completed and the system is ready for testing. (C) The pilot scale bioreactor is ready for testing pending some information from the CRF-2 tests. (2) Organisms and Growth Surfaces: (A) The shape of the Chlorogloeopsis sp. cells (cyanobacteria) was found to be affected by environmental pH, which may be useful in culture quality control. Besides, the further investigation of this phenomenon suggested that the rate of cell adhesion to glass surface decreases upon medium alkalinization. Thus, harvesting effectiveness may be improved by increasing medium pH up to 9 before harvesting of cyanobacteria from a substratum.

Gregory Kremer; David J. Bayless; Morgan Vis; Michael Prudich; Keith Cooksey; Jeff Muhs

2003-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

398

Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning for Buildings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning for Buildings Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning for Buildings Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning for Buildings October 7, 2013 - 10:29am Addthis Energy use in buildings represents the single largest source of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the Federal sector. Buildings can contribute to Scope 1 emissions from direct stationary combustion sources; Scope 2 from indirect electricity, heat, or steam purchases; and Scope 3 emissions from transmission and distribution losses. Also see Use Renewable Energy in Buildings for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation. Step 1: Assess Agency Size Changes Step 2: Evaluate Emissions Profile Step 3: Evaluate Reduction Strategies Step 4: Estimate Implementation Costs Step 5: Prioritize Strategies Helpful Data and Tools See GHG planning data and tools for buildings.

399

Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peakdemand Mitigation: A Solution in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peakdemand Mitigation: A Solution in Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peakdemand Mitigation: A Solution in Developing and Developed World Alike Title Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peakdemand Mitigation: A Solution in Developing and Developed World Alike Publication Type Conference Proceedings Refereed Designation Refereed LBNL Report Number LBNL-6308E Year of Publication 2013 Authors DeForest, Nicholas, Gonçalo Mendes, Michael Stadler, Wei Feng, Judy Lai, and Chris Marnay Conference Name ECEEE 2013 Summer Study 3-8 June 2013, Belambra Les Criques, France Date Published 06/2013 Conference Location Belambra Les Criques, France Keywords electricity, energy storage, Energy System Planning & Grid Integration, peakdemand mitigation, thermal Abstract In much of the developed world, air-conditioning in buildings is the dominant driver of summer peak electricity

400

Estimate and Analyze Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategy Implementation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Estimate and Analyze Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategy Estimate and Analyze Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategy Implementation Costs Estimate and Analyze Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategy Implementation Costs October 7, 2013 - 10:18am Addthis Analyzing the cost of implementing each greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation measure provides an important basis for prioritizing different emission reduction strategies. While actual costs should be used when available, this guidance provides cost estimates or considerations for the major emission reduction measures to help agencies estimate costs without perfect information. Cost criteria the agency may consider when prioritizing strategies include: Lifecycle cost Payback Cost effectiveness ($ invested per MTCO2e, metric tonne carbon dioxide equivalent avoided). Implementation costs should be analyzed for each emissions source:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "term mitigation scenarios" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

EA-1706: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

706: Mitigation Action Plan 706: Mitigation Action Plan EA-1706: Mitigation Action Plan West Tennessee Solar Farm Project Haywood County, Tennessee Based on the analyses in the Environmental Assessment, DOE determined that its proposed action - allowing the State of Tennessee to use some of its State Energy Program funds appropriated in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to construct and operate the West Tennessee Solar Farm Project - would not result in any significant environmental impacts. Mitigation Action Plan for the West Tennessee Solar farm Project Haywood County, Tennessee, DOE/EA-1706 More Documents & Publications EA-1706: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1706: Final Environmental Assessment 2012 Annual Planning Summary for Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology

402

Agricultural Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Agricultural Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation in Agricultural Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation in Developing Countries: Policy Options for Innovations and Technology Diffusion Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Agricultural Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation in Developing Countries: Policy Options for Innovations and Technology Diffusion Agency/Company /Organization: International Centre for Trade and Sustainable Development Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture, Biomass Topics: Adaptation, Implementation, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Guide/manual, Publications Website: ictsd.org/downloads/2010/06/agricultural-technologies-for-climate-chan Language: English Agricultural Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation in Developing Countries: Policy Options for Innovations and Technology Diffusion Screenshot

403

Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Jump to: navigation, search Name Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Year founded 2011 Website http://www.ccap.org/index.php? References MAIN[1] LinkedIn Connections "CCAP is working in collaboration with the World Bank Institute (WBI) and INCAE Business School to support the design and implementation of Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) and Low-Carbon Development (LCD) strategies in developing countries through regionally based dialogues, web-based exchanges, and practitioner networks. Recent UNFCCC negotiations have made it clear that climate protection will depend on actions on the ground in both developing and developed countries. In recent years, developing countries have shown a significant commitment to

404

EA-1440: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

440: Mitigation Action Plan 440: Mitigation Action Plan EA-1440: Mitigation Action Plan National Renewable Energy Laboratory's South Table Mountain Complex The Department of Energy has issued a Supplemental Environmental Assessment and has prepared a Finding of No Significant Impact for three site development projects at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's South Table Mountain site at Golden, Colorado. 1) Construction of the Research Support Facilities, a new office building or multi-building office complex; 2) Installation of phase 1 of planned Site Infrastructure Improvements (Phase 1 of Full Site Development); and 3) Upgrades to the Thermochemical User Facility (TCUF), TCUF High Bay area, and addition of the Thermochemical Biorefinery Pilot Plant. Mitigation Action Plan for the Supplement to the Final Site-Wide

405

EA-1736: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigation Action Plan Mitigation Action Plan EA-1736: Mitigation Action Plan Expansion of the Sanitary Effluent Reclamation Facility and Environmental Restoration of Reach S-2 of Sandia Canyon at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, Los Alamos, New Mexico Based on the analysis of potential environmental impacts presented in the environmental assessment, neither the construction or operation of the expanded Sanitary Effluent Reclamation Facility considered in the two action alternatives for that facility, nor the environmental restoration action measures considered in the two action alternatives for reach S-2 of Sandia Canyon would have significant environmental impacts. Mitigation Action Plan for the Expansion of the Sanitary Effluent Reclamation Facility and Environmental Restoration of Reach S-2 of Sandia

406

Use Renewable Energy in Buildings for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Use Renewable Energy in Buildings for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Use Renewable Energy in Buildings for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Use Renewable Energy in Buildings for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation October 7, 2013 - 11:13am Addthis After all cost-effective energy efficiency projects have been explored as part of a Federal agency's planning efforts for greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation in buildings, renewable energy may be considered as an option for meeting the agency's GHG reduction goals. Renewable energy can reduce emissions in all three GHG emission scopes by displacing conventional fossil fuel use. The focus of this guidance is prioritizing on-site renewable energy projects that will best support GHG reduction goals. It is intended to provide a high-level screening approach for on-site renewable energy projects to support agency- or program-level portfolio planning. General

407

Turkey - Analyzing Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Issues | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Turkey - Analyzing Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Issues Turkey - Analyzing Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Issues Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Turkey - Analyzing Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Issues Name Turkey - Analyzing Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Issues Agency/Company /Organization Argonne National Laboratory Partner Turkish Ministry of Energy and Natural Resources, Turkish Electricity Transmission-Generation Company Sector Energy Focus Area Energy Efficiency Topics Background analysis Website http://www.dis.anl.gov/pubs/39 Country Turkey Western Asia References http://www.dis.anl.gov/pubs/39156.pdf Abstract CEEESA trained a team of experts from Turkey's Ministry of Energy and Natural Resources (MENR) and the Turkish Electricity Transmission-Generation Company (TEAS) to use various ENPEP modules. CEEESA trained a team of experts from Turkey's Ministry of Energy and

408

EA-1870: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

70: Mitigation Action Plan 70: Mitigation Action Plan EA-1870: Mitigation Action Plan Utah Coal and Biomass Fueled Pilot Plant, Kanab, UT The Department of Energy (DOE) issues this Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) in conjunction with its Finding of No Significant Impact as to the department's proposed action of providing costshared funding for the Utah Coal and Biomass Fueled Pilot Plant Project. Based on the analyses in the Environmental Assessment (DOE/EA-1870), DOE determined that its proposed action allowing Viresco Energy, LLC (Viresco) to use federal funding to design, construct and operate a coal and biomass gasification pilot plant (pilot plant) - would not result in any significant environmental impacts. The pilot plant would evaluate the technical feasibility of using steam hydrogasification to convert coal and biomass (such as agricultural

409

Mitigation of Climate Change in Agriculture (MICCA) Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Change in Agriculture (MICCA) Project Climate Change in Agriculture (MICCA) Project Jump to: navigation, search Name Mitigation of Climate Change in Agriculture (MICCA) Project Agency/Company /Organization Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.fao.org/climatechan Program Start 2010 References Mitigation of Climate Change in Agriculture (MICCA) Project[1] "The main goal of this project is to support efforts to mitigate climate change through agriculture in developing countries and move towards carbon friendly agricultural practices. The aim of the project is to help realise the substantial mitigation potential of agriculture, especially that of smallholders in developing countries. If the right changes are implemented in production systems,

410

Mitigations for Security Vulnerabilities Found in Control System Networks |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigations for Security Vulnerabilities Found in Control System Mitigations for Security Vulnerabilities Found in Control System Networks Mitigations for Security Vulnerabilities Found in Control System Networks Industry is aware of the need for Control System (CS) security, but in on-site assessments, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has observed that security procedures and devices are not consistently and effectively implemented. The Department of Homeland Security (DHS), National Cyber Security Division (NCSD), established the Control Systems Security Center (CSSC) at INL to help industry and government improve the security of the CSs used in the nation's critical infrastructures. One of the main CSSC objectives is to identify control system vulnerabilities and develop effective mitigations for them. This paper discusses common problems and vulnerabilities seen in

411

Microsoft Word - Final Mitigated Action Plan - CNMI.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

| P a g e MITIGATION ACTION PLAN FOR THE FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE GREEN ENERGY SCHOOL WIND PROJECT SAIPAN, COMMONWEALTH OF THE NORTHERN MARIANA ISLANDS U.S....

412

EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Mitigation Action Plan was prepared to address commitments made in the RODs for the WIPP FEIS, and the WIPP Final...

413

EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Mitigation Action Plan was prepared to address commitments made in the RODs for the WIPP FEIS, and the WIPP Final SEIS. This 2012 Annual...

414

MITIGATION ACTION PLAN FOR THE OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY WAVE ENERGY...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 | P a g e MITIGATION ACTION PLAN FOR THE OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY WAVE ENERGY TEST PROJECT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT AUGUST 15, 2012 PREPARED TO ACCOMPANY DOEEA 1917 U.S....

415

UNDP-Peru GEF Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions in the...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in the Energy Generation and End-Use Sectors Jump to: navigation, search Name UNDP-Peru GEF Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions in the Energy Generation and End-Use...

416

Design of innovative dynamic systems for seismic response mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rocking wall systems consist of shear walls, laterally connected to a building, that are moment-released in their strong plane. Their purpose is to mitigate seismic structural response by constraining a building primarily ...

Seymour, Douglas (Douglas Benjamin)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Impacts of greenhouse gas mitigation policies on agricultural land  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are widely acknowledged to be responsible for much of the global warming in the past century. A number of approaches have been proposed to mitigate GHG emissions. Since the burning of ...

Wang, Xiaodong, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

EA-1731: Mitigation Acton Plan | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1: Mitigation Acton Plan 1: Mitigation Acton Plan EA-1731: Mitigation Acton Plan Walla Walla-Tucannon River Transmission Line Rebuild Project This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) is part of the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the Walla Walla-Tucannon River Transmission Line Rebuild Project (Proposed Action). The Proposed Action involves rebuilding the 47-mile-long 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission line from the existing Walla Walla Substation, located in the city of Walla Walla, Washington, to the existing Tucannon River Substation, located near the town of Dayton, Washington. Walla Walla-Tucannon River Transmission Line Rebuild Project, DOE/EA-1731, (May 2011) More Documents & Publications EA-1731: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1731: Final Environmental Assessment

419

Northwest Montana Wildlife Mitigation Habitat Protection : Advance Design : Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the habitat protection process developed to mitigate for certain wildlife and wildlife habitat losses due to construction of Hungry Horse and Libby dams in northwestern Montana.

Wood, Marilyn A.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Prioritize Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies for Buildings | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Buildings Buildings Prioritize Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies for Buildings October 7, 2013 - 11:10am Addthis YOU ARE HERE: Step 5 After evaluating the cost to implement energy-savings measures and the greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction potential for buildings, the program or site may prioritize implementation of those measures using criteria of importance to the Federal agency. The Buildings GHG Mitigation Estimator summarizes energy savings and costs by program, site, building type, and mitigation measure. This can help users at different levels of the organization understand where the largest GHG reduction potential lies, and which mitigation measures are most common across programs and sites and then plan investments accordingly. Criteria for prioritization will vary by agency but may include:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "term mitigation scenarios" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

H2A Delivery Scenario Model and Analyses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

H2A Delivery Scenario Model H2A Delivery Scenario Model and Analyses Marianne Mintz and Jerry Gillette DOE Hydrogen Delivery Analysis and High Pressure Tanks R&D Project Review Meeting February 8, 2005 2 Pioneering Science and Technology Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy Topics * Delivery Scenarios - Current status - Future scenarios * Delivery Scenarios model - Approach - Structure - Current status - Results * Pipeline modeling - Approach - Key assumptions - Results * Next Steps 3 Pioneering Science and Technology Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy Delivery Scenarios 4 Pioneering Science and Technology Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy Three-Quarters of the US Population Reside in Urbanized Areas East of the Mississippi there are many large, proximate urban areas. In the West

422

Greenhouse Gas Initiative Scenario Database | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gas Initiative Scenario Database Greenhouse Gas Initiative Scenario Database Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Greenhouse Gas Initiative Scenario Database Agency/Company /Organization: Science for Global Insight Sector: Climate, Energy, Land Topics: Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Dataset, Online calculator, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: www.iiasa.ac.at/web-apps/ggi/GgiDb/dsd?Action=htmlpage&page=about Cost: Free References: Greenhouse Gas Initiative Scenario Database[1] The GGI (Greenhouse Gas Initiative) scenario database documents the results of a set of greenhouse gas emission scenarios that were created using the IIASA Integrated Assessment Modeling Framework and previously documented in a special issue of the Technological Forecasting and Social Change.

423

Sagging Line Mitigator (SLiM) Full-Scale Demonstration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High conductor temperature operations cause excessive sag on transmission lines and thus limit ampacity. The Sagging Line Mitigator (SLiM) is a new class of transmission line hardware that fixes this problem in real time. In response to high conductor temperatures, SLiM decreases the effective length of conductor in the span. This mitigates the thermal expansion experienced by the conductor and reduces or eliminates excess sag. In this demonstration study, a preproduction SLiM device reliably reduced exc...

2005-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

424

2011 River Corridor Closure Contractor Revegetation and Mitigation Monitoring Report  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the status of revegetation projects and natural resources mitigation efforts conducted for remediated waste sites and other activities associated with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 cleanup of National Priorities List waste sites at Hanford. This report contains the vegetation monitoring data that was collected in the spring and summer of 2011 from the River Corridor Closure Contractors revegetation and mitigation areas on the Hanford Site.

West, W. J.; Lucas, J. G.; Gano, K. A.

2011-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

425

2010 River Corridor Closure Contractor Revegetation and Mitigation Monitoring Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents eh status of revegetation projects and natural resources mitigation efforts conducted for remediated waste sites and other activities associated with CERLA cleanup of National Priorities List waste sites at Hanford. This report contains vegetation monitoring data that were collected in the spring and summer of 2010 from the River Corridor Closure Contracts revegetation and mitigation areas on the Hanford Site.

C. T. Lindsey, A. L. Johnson

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

426

Hellsgate Winter Range : Wildlife Mitigation Project. Preliminary Environmental Assessment.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration proposes funding the Hellsgate Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project in cooperation with the Colville Convederated Tribes and Bureau of Indian Affairs. This Preliminary Environmental Assessment examines the potential environmental effects of acquiring and managing property for wildlife and wildlife habitat within a large project area. The Propose action is intended to meet the need for mitigation of wildlife and wild life habitat that was adversely affected by the construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams and their reservoirs.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Geo-magnetic Disturbances (GMD): Monitoring, Mitigation, and Next Steps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The North American power grid may be increasingly susceptible to the effects of geo-magnetic disturbances (GMDs) caused by solar storms. Without adequate steps to mitigate these effects, severe GMDs may pose a risk to power system reliability. This report summarizes information that industry experts and North American utilities presented at a recent NERC workshop on GMD mitigation and related GMD topics. It supplements this information with a review of the latest GMD literature to provide an up-to-date s...

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

428

Northeast Oregon Wildlife Mitigation Project : Final Environmental Assessment.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Development of the hydropower system in the Columbia River Basin has had far-reaching effects on many species of wildlife. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is responsible for mitigating the loss of wildlife habitat caused by the Federal portion of this system, as allocated to the purpose of power production. BPA needs to mitigate for loss of wildlife habitat in the Snake River Subbasin.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Nez Perce Tribe

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Release mitigation spray safety systems for chemical demilitarization applications.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories has conducted proof-of-concept experiments demonstrating effective knockdown and neutralization of aerosolized CBW simulants using charged DF-200 decontaminant sprays. DF-200 is an aqueous decontaminant, developed by Sandia National Laboratories, and procured and fielded by the US Military. Of significance is the potential application of this fundamental technology to numerous applications including mitigation and neutralization of releases arising during chemical demilitarization operations. A release mitigation spray safety system will remove airborne contaminants from an accidental release during operations, to protect personnel and limit contamination. Sandia National Laboratories recently (November, 2008) secured funding from the US Army's Program Manager for Non-Stockpile Chemical Materials Agency (PMNSCMA) to investigate use of mitigation spray systems for chemical demilitarization applications. For non-stockpile processes, mitigation spray systems co-located with the current Explosive Destruction System (EDS) will provide security both as an operational protective measure and in the event of an accidental release. Additionally, 'tented' mitigation spray systems for native or foreign remediation and recovery operations will contain accidental releases arising from removal of underground, unstable CBW munitions. A mitigation spray system for highly controlled stockpile operations will provide defense from accidental spills or leaks during routine procedures.

Leonard, Jonathan; Tezak, Matthew Stephen; Brockmann, John E.; Servantes, Brandon; Sanchez, Andres L.; Tucker, Mark David; Allen, Ashley N.; Wilson, Mollye C.; Lucero, Daniel A.; Betty, Rita G.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Release mitigation spray safety systems for chemical demilitarization applications.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories has conducted proof-of-concept experiments demonstrating effective knockdown and neutralization of aerosolized CBW simulants using charged DF-200 decontaminant sprays. DF-200 is an aqueous decontaminant, developed by Sandia National Laboratories, and procured and fielded by the US Military. Of significance is the potential application of this fundamental technology to numerous applications including mitigation and neutralization of releases arising during chemical demilitarization operations. A release mitigation spray safety system will remove airborne contaminants from an accidental release during operations, to protect personnel and limit contamination. Sandia National Laboratories recently (November, 2008) secured funding from the US Army's Program Manager for Non-Stockpile Chemical Materials Agency (PMNSCMA) to investigate use of mitigation spray systems for chemical demilitarization applications. For non-stockpile processes, mitigation spray systems co-located with the current Explosive Destruction System (EDS) will provide security both as an operational protective measure and in the event of an accidental release. Additionally, 'tented' mitigation spray systems for native or foreign remediation and recovery operations will contain accidental releases arising from removal of underground, unstable CBW munitions. A mitigation spray system for highly controlled stockpile operations will provide defense from accidental spills or leaks during routine procedures.

Leonard, Jonathan; Tezak, Matthew Stephen; Brockmann, John E.; Servantes, Brandon; Sanchez, Andres L.; Tucker, Mark David; Allen, Ashley N.; Wilson, Mollye C.; Lucero, Daniel A.; Betty, Rita G.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Solar and Wind Energy Utilization and Project Development Scenarios  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utilization and Project Development Scenarios

(Abstract):Solar and wind energy resources in Ethiopia have not been given due attention in the past. Some of...

432

Scenario Modelling: A Holistic Environmental and Energy Management...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development Contact Us Department Contacts Media Contacts Scenario Modelling: A Holistic Environmental and Energy Management Technique for Building Managers Speaker(s): James...

433

Mapping Climate Change Vulnerability and Impact Scenarios - A...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mapping Climate Change Vulnerability and Impact Scenarios - A Guidebook for Sub-national Planners Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Mapping Climate Change...

434

Development of Sea Level Rise Scenarios for Climate Change Assessments...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development of Sea Level Rise Scenarios for Climate Change Assessments of the Mekong Delta, Vietnam Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Development of Sea Level Rise...

435

A Method for Evaluating Fire After Earthquake Scenarios for Single...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

using statistical methods to determine some aspects of the bounding scenario. Historical weather data has been used in dispersion calculations to determine the 95 th percentile...

436

Geographically-Based Hydrogen Demand & Infrastructure Rollout Scenario Analysis (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation by Margo Melendez at the 2007 DOE Hydrogen Program Annual Merit Review Meeting provides information about NREL's Hydrogen Demand & Infrastructure Rollout Scenario Analysis.

Melendez, M.

2007-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

437

An Analysis of Near-Term Hydrogen Vehicle Rollout Scenarios for Southern California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

O&M cost. We use a land rent value of $5 per square foot perO&M cost. We use a land rent value of $5 per square foot per

Nicholas, Michael A; Ogden, J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

An Analysis of Near-Term Hydrogen Vehicle Rollout Scenarios for Southern California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

delivery or onsite steam methane reformers) were availabledelivery, onsite steam methane reformer, onsite electrolyzera small-scale Steam Methane reformer (SMR), which is located

Nicholas, Michael A; Ogden, J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Scenarios for a Clean Energy Future Longer Term and Global Context 8.1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; synthetic fuels; biofuels including biogas, biodiesels, and alcohols--even syngas derived from sources

440

An Analysis of Near-Term Hydrogen Vehicle Rollout Scenarios for Southern California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for compression ONSITE SMR: 33% Bioethanol + 33% $0.1-0.4/kgcompression ONSITE SMR: 100% Bioethanol + 100% $1.2-4.2/kg

Nicholas, Michael A; Ogden, J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "term mitigation scenarios" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

An Analysis of Near-Term Hydrogen Vehicle Rollout Scenarios for Southern California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of biomass-derived ethanol vary with the supply pathway, andor biomass-derived ethanol. Using these supply pathways, the

Nicholas, Michael A; Ogden, J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

An Analysis of Near-Term Hydrogen Vehicle Rollout Scenarios for Southern California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

costs for compressed gas stations include rent for land,Costs for Compressed Gas Stations. OPERATION AND MAINTENANCEPortable Refueler Stations (Compressed Gas Truck Delivery)

Nicholas, Michael A; Ogden, J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

An Analysis of Near-Term Hydrogen Vehicle Rollout Scenarios for Southern California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

early will help vehicle manufacturers integrate systems intobased on the locations vehicle manufacturers see potentialto manufacturer, the locations of vehicle placements were

Nicholas, Michael A; Ogden, J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Power Quality Mitigation Technology Demonstration at Industrial Customer Sites: Industrial and Utility Harmonic Mitigation Guideline s and Case Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

However the restructuring of the electric power industry shakes out, the commercial/industrial customer's need for quality power will increase; and customer service will remain a key to retaining current accounts and attracting new customers. The need for demonstrating new harmonics mitigation technologies will thus be an important factor for the wire side of the business as well as for energy service companies. This report provides guidelines for implementing harmonics mitigation demonstration projects ...

2000-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

445

Development based climate change adaptation and mitigation-conceptual...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

analytical tools have been used in the studies including quantitative and qualitative scenario work as well as detailed micro-based analysis. The methodological conclusion that...

446

Non-Standard Structure Formation Scenarios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Observations on galactic scales seem to be in contradiction with recent high resolution N-body simulations. This so-called cold dark matter (CDM) crisis has been addressed in several ways, ranging from a change in fundamental physics by introducing self-interacting cold dark matter particles to a tuning of complex astrophysical processes such as global and/or local feedback. All these efforts attempt to soften density profiles and reduce the abundance of satellites in simulated galaxy halos. In this contribution we are exploring the differences between a Warm Dark Matter model and a CDM model where the power on a certain scale is reduced by introducing a narrow negative feature (''dip''). This dip is placed in a way so as to mimic the loss of power in the WDM model: both models have the same integrated power out to the scale where the power of the Dip model rises to the level of the unperturbed CDM spectrum again. Using N-body simulations we show that that the new Dip model appears to be a viable alternative to WDM while being based on different physics: where WDM requires the introduction of a new particle species the Dip stems from a non-standard inflationary period. If we are looking for an alternative to the currently challenged standard LCDM structure formation scenario, neither the LWDM nor the new Dip model can be ruled out with respect to the analysis presented in this contribution. They both make very similar predictions and the degeneracy between them can only be broken with observations yet to come.

Alexander Knebe; Brett Little; Ranty Islam; Julien Devriendt; Asim Mahmood; Joe Silk

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

447

Low-Energy Supersymmetry Breaking from String Flux Compactifications: Benchmark Scenarios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soft supersymmetry breaking terms were recently derived for type IIB string flux compactifications with all moduli stabilised. Depending on the choice of the discrete input parameters of the compactification such as fluxes and ranks of hidden gauge groups, the string scale was found to have any value between the TeV and GUT scales. We study the phenomenological implications of these compactifications at low energy. Three realistic scenarios can be identified depending on whether the Standard Model lies on D3 or D7 branes and on the value of the string scale. For the MSSM on D7 branes and the string scale between 10^12 GeV and 10^17 GeV we find that the LSP is a neutralino, while for lower scales it is the stop. At the GUT scale the results of the fluxed MSSM are reproduced, but now with all moduli stabilised. For the MSSM on D3 branes we identify two realistic scenarios. The first one corresponds to an intermediate string scale version of split supersymmetry. The second is a stringy mSUGRA scenario. This requires tuning of the flux parameters to obtain the GUT scale. Phenomenological constraints from dark matter, (g-2)_mu and BR(b->s gamma) are considered for the three scenarios. We provide benchmark points with the MSSM spectrum, making the models suitable for a detailed phenomenological analysis.

Benjamin C. Allanach; Fernando Quevedo; Kerim Suruliz

2005-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

448

Energy access scenarios to 2030 for the power sector in sub-Saharan Africa Morgan Bazilian a,*, Patrick Nussbaumer a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from the data being modeled. Usually used for short- term load forecasting. 9 IRP has a long history electricity demand forecast to 2025 shows a projected annual growth of about 2% (SAPP, 2010); the annual Energy access Power system planning Electricity scenarios a b s t r a c t In order to reach a goal

Kammen, Daniel M.

449

Modular analysis and modelling of risk scenarios with dependencies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The risk analysis of critical infrastructures such as the electric power supply or telecommunications is complicated by the fact that such infrastructures are mutually dependent. We propose a modular approach to the modelling and analysis of risk scenarios ... Keywords: Critical infrastructure, Dependency, Modular risk analysis, Risk scenario, Threat modelling

Gyrd Brndeland; Atle Refsdal; Ketil Stlen

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Scenarios for a Clean Energy Future Industry 5.1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this chapter we present scenarios for future industrial energy use, based on different assumptions for U.S. energy policies. We start with a reference scenario which is derived from the AEO99 (U.S. DOE, EIA, 1998a of primary energy, accounting for 37% of the primary energy consumed in the U.S. that year. The industrial

451

Statistical Analysis of Traffic Measurements in a Disaster Area Scenario  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

challenges of information sharing in OOH [Out-of-Hospital] disaster response."([1]) Performance evaluationStatistical Analysis of Traffic Measurements in a Disaster Area Scenario Considering Heavy Load-- Catastrophes cause an area of destruction including destroyed infrastructure. These disaster area scenarios

Frank, Matthias

452

Future technology oriented scenarios on e-accessibility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a set of future scenarios as a part of our study which explores and analyzes the relationships between the emerging ICT landscape in the European societal and economic context, and the development and provision of e-Accessibility, ... Keywords: eaccessibility, future, scenario

Christos Kouroupetroglou; Adamantios Koumpis; Dimitris Papageorgiou

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Summary of student scenarios: 2020 Vision project, fiscal year 1997  

SciTech Connect

The Strategic Issues Thinking: 2020 Vision project introduces students and teaches to national security issues through the techniques of scenario building, and engages them in an interactive process of creating scenarios relevant to the Department of Energy, Defense Programs (DOE/DP). Starting with the world as it is today, teams of students develop a series of scenarios on international developments over the next 25 years under various circumstances. This report identifies recurrent themes in the student`s scenarios, lists creative ways the students presented their scenarios, compares and contrasts the program`s FY97 results with FY96 results, identifies the benefits of the program, and offers a glimpse of Sandia`s future plans for the 2020 Vision project.

Gordon, K.W.; Munoz, A.; Scott, K.P.; Rinne, R.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 10/3/2001 through 1/02/2002. Most of the achievements are milestones in our efforts to complete the tasks and subtasks that constitute the project objectives. Our research team has made significant progress towards completion of our Phase I objectives, and our current efforts remain focused on fulfilling these research objectives in accordance with the project timeline. Overall, we believe that we are on schedule to complete Phase I activities by 10/2002, which is the milestone date from the original project timeline. Specific results and accomplishments for the fourth quarter of 2001 include: (1) New procedures and protocols have been developed to increase the chances of successful implementation in the bioreactor of organisms that perform well in the lab. The new procedures include pre-screening of organisms for adhesion characteristics and a focus on identifying the organisms with maximum growth rate potential. (2) Preliminary results show an increase in adhesion to glass and a decrease in overall growth rates when using growth media prepared with tap water rather than distilled water. (3) Several of the organisms collected from Yellowstone National Park using the new procedures are currently being cultured in preparation for bioreactor tests. (4) One important result from a test of growth surface temperature distribution as a function of gas stream and drip-fluid temperatures showed a high dependence of membrane temperature on fluid temperature, with gas stream temperature having minimal effect. This result indicates that bioreactor growth surface temperatures can be controlled using fluid delivery temperature. The possible implications for implementation of the bioreactor concept are encouraging, since it may be possible to use the bioreactor with very high gas stream temperatures by controlling the temperature of the organisms with the fluid temperature. (5) Investigation of growth surface materials continues, with Omnisil and Scotch Brite emerging as the leading candidates. More investigation of these and other material types is still needed to determine the best material for particular combinations of organisms and harvesting methods. (6) Tests of harvesting methods and harvesting system designs have shown that desirable levels of ''percentage algae removal'' can be achieved for particular organisms and growth surface materials, for example Cyanidium on polyester felt. Additional testing continues to better characterize sensitivity of the ''percentage removal'' to various system design parameters, but these tests have been delayed due to the lack of suitable organisms for the tests. (7) The solar collectors and the pilot-scale bioreactor light distribution panels for the deep-penetration hybrid solar lighting system have been designed. One solar lighting system (solar collector tracking unit, fiber optic light transmission cables, light distribution panels) is almost completely prepared for installation during the next quarter in the pilot scale bioreactor system. (8) Pressure drop results from tests on the enhanced mass transfer CO{sub 2} absorption technique (the translating slug flow reactor) are encouraging, with reasonable values of 2.5 psi maximum over an 11.48 meter distance between pressure taps for test conditions of 0.6 m/sec slug velocity and approximately 10 m/sec gas velocity. Preparations are under way for CO{sub 2} scrubbing tests.

Dr. Gregory Kremer; Dr. David J. Bayless; Dr. Morgan Vis; Dr. Michael Prudich; Dr. Keith Cooksey; Dr. Jeff Muhs

2002-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

455

ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 4/2/2001 through 7/01/2002. Most of the achievements are milestones in our efforts to complete the tasks and subtasks that constitute the project objectives, and we are currently on schedule to complete Phase I activities by 10/2002, the milestone date from the original project timeline. As indicated in the list of accomplishments below, our efforts are focused on improving the design of the bioreactor test system, evaluating candidate organisms and growth surfaces, and scaling-up the test facilities from bench scale to pilot scale. Specific results and accomplishments for the second quarter of 2002 include: Organisms and Growth Surfaces: (1) Our collection of cyanobacteria, isolated in YNP was increased to 15 unialgal cultures. (2) Illumination rate about 50 {micro}E/m{sup 2}/sec is not saturated for the growth of 1.2 s.c. (2) isolate. The decrease of illumination rate led to the decrease of doubling time of this isolate. (3) The positive effect of Ca{sup 2+} on the growth of isolate 1.2 s.c. (2) without Omnisil was revealed, though Ca{sup 2+} addition was indifferent for the growth of this isolate at the presence of Omnisil. (4) Calcium addition had a positive effect on the generation of cyanobacterial biofilm on Omnisil surface. (5) The survivability problems with the Tr9.4 organism on Omnisil screens in the CRF2 model-scale bioreactor have been solved. The problems were related to the method used to populate the growth surfaces. When pre-populated screens were placed in the bioreactor the microalgae died within 72 hours, but when the microalgae were cultured while in place in the bioreactor using a continuous-population method they grew well inside of the CRF2 test system and survived for the full 7-day test duration. CRF2 tests will continue as soon as the new combined drip system/harvesting system header pipe design is refined. Bioreactor support systems and test facilities: (1) A solar collector, fiber optic light cables, and 8 light distribution panels have been installed at the pilot-scale bioreactor site. The ''natural'' lighting system is ready for the pilot-scale bioreactor system-level debugging tests scheduled for early to mid July. (2) CO{sub 2} scrubbing tests were carried out to understand the CO{sub 2} scrubbing capability of translating slug flow under various conditions. Within experimental error, for liquid velocities of 0.6 m/s and 1m/s it was shown that different gas velocities (including 4.8, 6.6 and 9m/s) cause no significant change in CO{sub 2} concentration. (3) The harvesting tests were put on hold while an alternative loading method was developed and to concentrate our resources on the design of the new combined drip system/harvesting system header pipe. A new header pipe design has been completed and proof-of-concept tests have shown good performance in the drip loading mode. Tests have also shown that we can create preferable conditions for harvesting with this design, and actual harvesting tests will be run as soon as screens are available that have achieved a sufficiently ''thick'' growth state such that harvesting is desired.

Dr. Gregory Kremer; Dr. David J. Bayless; Dr. Morgan Vis; Dr. Michael Prudich; Dr. Keith Cooksey; Dr. Jeff Muhs

2002-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

456

Experimental Validation of Stratified Flow Phenomena, Graphite Oxidation, and Mitigation Strategies of Air Ingress Accidents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy is performing research and development (R&D) that focuses on key phenomena that are important during challenging scenarios that may occur in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program / GEN-IV Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). Phenomena identification and ranking studies (PIRT) to date have identified the air ingress event, following on the heels of a VHTR depressurization, as very important (Schultz et al., 2006). Consequently, the development of advanced air ingress-related models and verification and validation (V&V) are very high priority for the NGNP program. Following a loss of coolant and system depressurization, air will enter the core through the break. Air ingress leads to oxidation of the in-core graphite structure and fuel. The oxidation will accelerate heat-up of the bottom reflector and the reactor core and will cause the release of fission products eventually. The potential collapse of the bottom reflector because of burn-off and the release of CO lead to serious safety problems. For estimation of the proper safety margin we need experimental data and tools, including accurate multi-dimensional thermal-hydraulic and reactor physics models, a burn-off model, and a fracture model. We also need to develop effective strategies to mitigate the effects of oxidation. The results from this research will provide crucial inputs to the INL NGNP/VHTR Methods R&D project. This project is focused on (a) analytical and experimental study of air ingress caused by density-driven, stratified, countercurrent flow, (b) advanced graphite oxidation experiments, (c) experimental study of burn-off in the bottom reflector, (d) structural tests of the burnt-off bottom reflector, (e) implementation of advanced models developed during the previous tasks into the GAMMA code, (f) full air ingress and oxidation mitigation analyses, (g) development of core neutronic models, (h) coupling of the core neutronic and thermal hydraulic models, and (i) verification and validation of the coupled models.

Chang Ho Oh; Eung Soo Kim; Hee Cheon No; Nam Zin Cho

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Property:NEPA Resource Applicant Mitigation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resource Applicant Mitigation Resource Applicant Mitigation Jump to: navigation, search Property Name NEPA Resource Applicant Mitigation Property Type Text Description Applicant proposed mitigation plan to minimize the risk of a potential negative impact to a NEPA resource with a geothermal development effort. Pages using the property "NEPA Resource Applicant Mitigation" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) B BLM-NV-WN-ES-08-01-1310, NV-020-08-01#NEPAImpact_with_Noise + Construction noise would be minimized through practices which avoid or minimize actions which may typically generate greater noise levels, or generate distinctive impact noise. BLM-NV-WN-ES-08-01-1310, NV-020-08-01#NEPAImpact_with_Air_Quality + Water would be applied to the ground during the construction and utilization of the drill pads, access roads, and other disturbed areas as necessary to control dust. NGP would comply with any requirements prescribed by the NDEP-BAPC. NGP also proposes to water the ground to control dust during construction.

458

Property:NEPA Resource Imposed Mitigation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Imposed Mitigation Imposed Mitigation Jump to: navigation, search Property Name NEPA Resource Imposed Mitigation Property Type Text Description Agency imposed mitigation plan to minimize the risk of a potential negative impact to a NEPA resource with a geothermal development effort. Pages using the property "NEPA Resource Imposed Mitigation" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) B BLM-NV-WN-ES-08-01-1310, NV-020-08-01#NEPAImpact_with_Migratory_Birds + Initial ground disturbing activities would not be conducted during the migratory bird nesting season (March through July) unless necessary, and then only after inventories for migratory birds and nests were conducted by a qualified biologist acceptable to the BLM. This survey would be conducted to identify either breeding adult birds or nest sites within the specific areas to be disturbed. If active nests are present within these areas to be disturbed, NGP would coordinate with the authorized officer to develop appropriate protection measures for these sites, which may include avoidance, construction constraints, and/or the establishment of buffers.

459

Bonneville Power Administration Wildlife Mitigation Program : Draft Environmental Impact Statement.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is responsible for mitigating the loss of wildlife habitat caused by the development of the Federal Columbia River Power System. BPA accomplishes this mitigation by funding projects consistent with those recommended by the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council). The projects are submitted to the Council from Indian Tribes, state agencies, property owners, private conservation groups, and other Federal agencies. Future wildlife mitigation actions with potential environmental impacts are expected to include land acquisition and management, water rights acquisition and management, habitat restoration and enhancement, installation of watering devices, riparian fencing, and similar wildlife conservation actions. BPA needs to ensure that individual wildlife mitigation projects are planned and managed with appropriate consistency across projects, jurisdictions, and ecosystems, as well as across time. BPA proposes to standardize the planning and implementation of individual wildlife mitigation projects funded by BPA. Alternative 1 is the No Action alternative. Five standardizing alternatives are identified to represent the range of possible strategies, goals, and procedural requirements reasonably applicable to BPA-funded projects under a standardized approach to project planning and implementation. All action alternatives are based on a single project planning process designed to resolve site-specific issues in an ecosystem context and to adapt to changing conditions and information.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Staff policy regarding mitigation of school enrollment impacts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Testimony in recent geothermal power plant siting cases in the Geysers-Calistoga KGRA has established that nine local school districts have reached or exceeded the design which induces immigration into these impacted districts will aggravate the situation. Several power plant applicants have agreed to provide annual mitigation payments to local school districts which can document adverse student enrollment impacts. The Lake County agreements with Occidental Geothermal, Inc. and the California Department of Water Resources require mitigation fees for students having at least one parent who either works directly with the power plant or works indirectly with the geothermal-service industry. An adjustment is made each year so that the applicant only pays a one-time fee for each student. An annual student survey is used to help identify students qualifying for mitigation payments. This paper presents an algorithms which CEC staff will propose to be used in the event that a power plant applicant and an impacted school district are unable to negotiate a mitigation agreement. The algorithm provides a basis for calculating an annual mitigation payment which would be used to help construct new permanent facilities and to purchase additional school buses.

Williams, D.S.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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