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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "term energy intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

OECD energy intensity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

to examine OECD countries' energy intensity levels (i.e., the ratio of energy ... steady-state or long-run distribution of energy intensity for the Organisation of...

2

Energy Intensity Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Our presentation will cover how we began the journey of conserving energy at our facility. Well discuss a basic layout of our energy intensity plan and the impact our team has had on the process, what tools were using, what goals have been identified, how we structured the plan to include our team in the process and so on.

Rappolee, D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Unlocking energy intensive habits  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

energy intensive habits energy intensive habits Presentation at LBL Oct 10, 2013 by Hal Wilhite Professor and Research Director University of Oslo Centre for Development and the Environment Source: WWF US EIA Outlook 2011 Conventional framing of the energy consumption and savings * Sovereign consumers * Economically rational and persistentely reflexive. * Uninfluenced by social and material conditions of everyday life * Focus on efficiency and not on size and volume which is for the most part treated as an indifferent variable Cognitive reductionism The change of frame * From individual to socio-material * From rational/reflexive experience-based (practical) knowledge * From efficiency to reduction A theory of habit * Acknowledges the role of lived experience (history, both cultural and personal) in forming

4

Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(83/3Q) (83/3Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook iuarterly Projections August 1983 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. 20585 t rt jrt- .ort- iort- iort- iort- nort- lort- '.ort- ort- Tt- .-m .erm -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term Term .-Term -Term xrm Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy -OJ.UUK Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term

5

ITP Energy Intensive Processes: Energy-Intensive Processes Portfolio...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

for energy-Intensive Processes (eIP) addresses the top technology opportunities to save energy and reduce carbon emissions across the industrial sector. the portfolio focuses the...

6

energy intensity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

intensity intensity Dataset Summary Description Energy intensity data and documentation published by the U.S. DOE's office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). Energy intensity is defined as: amount of energy used in producing a given level of output or activity; expressed as energy per unit of output. This is the energy intensity of the the electricity sector, which is an energy consuming sector that generates electricity. Data are organized to separate electricity-only generators from combined heat and power (CHP) generators. Data is available for the period 1949 - 2004. Source EERE Date Released May 31st, 2006 (8 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Electricity Energy Consumption energy intensity fossil fuels renewable energy Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon electricity_indicators.xls (xls, 2.1 MiB)

7

U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Efficiency > Commercial Buildings Energy Intensities > Table 6a. U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy

8

U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Glossary Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency > Commercial Buildings Energy Intensities > Table 5b

9

U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Glossary Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency > Commercial Buildings Energy Intensities > Table 5a

10

U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Glossary Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency > Commercial Buildings Energy Intensities > Table 7a

11

U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Glossary Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency > Commercial Buildings Energy Intensities > Table7c

12

U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Glossary Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency > Commercial Buildings Energy Intensities > Table 7b

13

Changes in Energy Intensity 1985-1991  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Information Administration Home Page. Home > Energy Users > Manufacturing > Changes in Energy Intensity Changes in Energy Intensity 1985-1991 Overview Full Report The focus is...

14

Intense low energy positron beams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intense positron beams are under development or being considered at several laboratories. Already today a few accelerator based high intensity, low brightness e{sup +} beams exist producing of the order of 10{sup 8} {minus} 10{sup 9} e{sup +}/sec. Several laboratories are aiming at high intensity, high brightness e{sup +} beams with intensities greater than 10{sup 9} e{sup +}/sec and current densities of the order of 10{sup 13} {minus} 10{sup 14} e{sup +} sec{sup {minus}} {sup 1}cm{sup {minus}2}. Intense e{sup +} beams can be realized in two ways (or in a combination thereof) either through a development of more efficient B{sup +} moderators or by increasing the available activity of B{sup +} particles. In this review we shall mainly concentrate on the latter approach. In atomic physics the main trust for these developments is to be able to measure differential and high energy cross-sections in e{sup +} collisions with atoms and molecules. Within solid state physics high intensity, high brightness e{sup +} beams are in demand in areas such as the re-emission e{sup +} microscope, two dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation, low energy e{sup +} diffraction and other fields. Intense e{sup +} beams are also important for the development of positronium beams, as well as exotic experiments such as Bose condensation and Ps liquid studies.

Lynn, K.G.; Jacobsen, F.M.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

15

ShortShort--Term Energy Outlook Term Energy Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration Independent Statistics & Analysis ShortShort--Term Energy Outlook Term Energy Outlook Chart Gallery for Chart Gallery for ...

16

Short-Term Energy Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Energy Information Administration Independent Statistics & Analysis Short Short- -Term Energy Outlook Term Energy Outlook Chart Gallery for Chart Gallery for November...

17

Energy-Efficiency Technologies and Benchmarking the Energy Intensity...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy-Efficiency Technologies and Benchmarking the Energy Intensity for the Textile Industry Title Energy-Efficiency Technologies and Benchmarking the Energy Intensity for the...

18

Iron and Steel Energy Intensities  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

If you are having trouble, call 202-586-8800 for help. Home > >Energy Users > Energy Efficiency Page > Iron and Steel Energy Intensities First Use of Energy Blue Bullet First Use/Value of Production Blue Bullet First Use/Ton of steel End Uses of Consumption Blue Bullet Total End Use/Value of Production Blue Bullet Total End Use/Ton of Steel Boiler Fuel as End Use Blue Bullet Boiler Fuel /Value of Production Blue Bullet Boiler Fuel /Ton of Steel Process Heating as End Use Blue Bullet Process Heating Fuel /Ton of Steel Blue Bullet Process Heating /Value of Production Machine Drive as End Use Blue Bullet Machine Drive Fuel/Ton of Steel Blue Bullet Machine Drive Fuel /Value of Production Expenditures Blue Bullet Purchased Fuel /Ton of Steel Blue Bullet Purchased Fuel /Value of Production

19

Short-Term Energy Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Short-Term Energy Outlook July 2013 1 July 2013 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) Highlights The U.S. Energy Information ...

20

U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 7c. U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity Using Primary Energy 1 by Census Region and Principal Building Activity, 1992-1999 (Million Btu per Worker)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "term energy intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Efficiency > Commercial Buildings Energy Intensities > Table 6b . ... Warehouse and Storage 42: 38 45: Other: 3. 154: 170 163: Vacant 28: 21 21: Total ...

22

Description of Energy Intensity Tables (12)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Description of Energy Intensity Data Tables 3. Description of Energy Intensity Data Tables There are 12 data tables used as references for this report. Specifically, these tables are categorized as tables 1 and 2 present unadjusted energy-intensity ratios for Offsite-Produced Energy and Total Inputs of Energy for 1985, 1988, 1991, and 1994; along with the percentage changes between 1985 and the three subsequent years (1988, 1991, and 1994) tables 3 and 4 present 1988, 1991, and 1994 energy-intensity ratios that have been adjusted to the mix of products shipped from manufacturing establishments in 1985 tables 5 and 6 present unadjusted energy-intensity ratios for Offsite-Produced Energy and Total Inputs of Energy for 1988, 1991, and 1994; along with the percentage changes between 1988 and the two subsequent

23

Short-Term Energy Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE/EIA-0202(98/3Q) Distribution Category UC-950 Short-Term Energy Outlook July 1998 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use

24

Energy intensity (Table E.1g)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

AC Argentina AR Aruba AA Bahamas, The BF Barbados BB Belize BH Bolivia BL ... E.1g World Energy Intensity--Total Primary Energy Consumption per Dollar of Gross Domestic

25

Short Term Energy Outlook - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy OutlookFebruary 2008 2 Global Petroleum OPEC left production targets unchanged at its February 1st ...

26

Short Term Energy Outlook - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy OutlookMarch 2008 2 Diesel prices are projected to show larger gains in 2008, averaging $3.45 per

27

Short Term Energy Outlook - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy OutlookJanuary 2009 2 Global Petroleum Overview. The downward trend in oil prices continued in ...

28

Short Term Energy Outlook - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy OutlookDecember 2008 2 Global Petroleum Overview The increasing likelihood of a prolonged global ...

29

ESMAP-China Energy Intensity Reduction Strategy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Intensity Reduction Strategy Intensity Reduction Strategy Jump to: navigation, search Name China-ESMAP Low Carbon Growth Country Studies Program Agency/Company /Organization Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank Sector Energy, Land Focus Area Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Forestry, Agriculture Topics Low emission development planning, Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Website http://www.esmap.org/filez/pub Country China Eastern Asia References China Energy Intensity Reduction Strategy[1] Overview "The study involves the development of pragmatic "implementation" focused policy notes to support the Government of China's goal of reducing energy intensity in China focusing on: Reevaluation of renewable energy targets, growth path, and related

30

Technical Change, Investment and Energy Intensity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper analyzes the role of different components of technical change on energy intensity by applying a Translog variable cost function setting to the new EU KLEMS dataset for 3 selected EU countries (Italy, Finland and ...

Kratena, Kurt

31

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings 1989  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Energy End-Use Intensities 1989 Energy End-Use Intensities Overview Full Report Tables National estimates and analysis of energy consumption by fuel (electricity, natural gas,...

32

U.S. energy intensity projected to continue its steady decline ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

In the United States, energy intensity has been declining steadily since the early 1970s and continues to decline in EIA's long-term projection.

33

EIA Energy Efficiency-Commercial Buildings Sector Energy Intensities,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Commercial Buildings Sector Energy Intensities Commercial Buildings Sector Energy Intensities Commercial Buildings Sector Energy Intensities: 1992- 2003 Released Date: December 2004 Page Last Revised: August 2009 These tables provide estimates of commercial sector energy consumption and energy intensities for 1992, 1995, 1999 and 2003 based on the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS). They also provide estimates of energy consumption and intensities adjusted for the effect of weather on heating, cooling, and ventilation energy use. Total Site Energy Consumption (U.S. and Census Region) Html Excel PDF bullet By Principal Building Activity (Table 1a) html Table 1a excel table 1a. pdf table 1a. Weather-Adjusted by Principal Building Activity (Table 1b) html table 1b excel table 1b pdf table 1b.

34

Determinants of energy intensity in industrialized countries : a comparison of China and India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The amount of final energy per unit of economic output (usually in terms of gross domestic product, or GDP), known as energy intensity, is often used to measure the effectiveness of energy use and the consumption patterns ...

Huang, Feiya

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

What is energy use intensity (EUI)? | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

buildings Use Portfolio Manager How Portfolio Manager calculates metrics What is energy use intensity (EUI)? Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio...

36

Analysis of the Energy Intensity of Industries in California  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the Energy Intensity of Industries in California Title Analysis of the Energy Intensity of Industries in California Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication...

37

Purchased Energy, Energy Intensity, and Policy Impacts in the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Purchased Energy, Energy Intensity, and Policy Impacts in the U.S. Manufacturing Sector: Tentative Findings Speaker(s): Marvin J. Horowitz Date: July 8, 2011 - 12:00pm Location:...

38

China energy issues : energy intensity, coal liquefaction, and carbon pricing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In my dissertation I explore three independent, but related, topics on China's energy issues. First, I examine the drivers for provincial energy-intensity trends in China, and finds that technology innovation is the key ...

Wu, Ning, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

2 Distribution Category UC-950 Energy Consumption Series Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings September 1994 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy...

40

Table 22. Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual" Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu / real GDP in billion 2005 chained dollars)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",11.24893441,11.08565002,10.98332766,10.82852279,10.67400621,10.54170176,10.39583203,10.27184573,10.14478673,10.02575883,9.910410202,9.810812106,9.69894802,9.599821783,9.486985399,9.394733753,9.303329725,9.221322623 "AEO 1995",,10.86137373,10.75116461,10.60467959,10.42268977,10.28668187,10.14461664,10.01081222,9.883759026,9.759022105,9.627404949,9.513643295,9.400418762,9.311729546,9.226142899,9.147374752,9.071102491,8.99599906 "AEO 1996",,,10.71047701,10.59846153,10.43655044,10.27812088,10.12746866,9.9694713,9.824165152,9.714832565,9.621874334,9.532324916,9.428169355,9.32931308,9.232716414,9.170931044,9.086870061,9.019963901,8.945602337

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "term energy intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings 1992 - Index...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Energy End-Use Intensities 1992 Energy End-Use Intensities Overview Tables National estimates of energy consumption by fuel (electricity and natural gas) and end use (heating,...

42

China's energy intensity and its determinants at the provincial level  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy intensity is defined as the amount of energy consumed per dollar of GDP (Gross Domestic Product). The People's Republic of China's (China's) energy intensity has been declining significantly since the late 1970s. ...

Zhang, Xin, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

High pressure study of changes in energy and intensity of excitations in crystalline metal glyoximes  

SciTech Connect

The effect of high pressure has been measured on the energy and integrated intensity of electronic excitations of several layered crystals of glyoximes containing Ni, Pd, or Pt. Large changes in both energy and intensity were observed, both of which were completely reversible. The shifts in energy with pressure, are explained in terms of the relative spatial extent of the outer d and p orbitals of Ni, Pd, and Pt. The effects of back donation from the ligands and intensity borrowing from the higher energy charge transfer excitations are considered as possible causes of the observed intensity changes. It was concluded that intensity borrowing was the major cause of the observed changes.

Tkacz, M.; Drickamer, H.G.

1986-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

44

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE/EIA-0555(94)/2 Distribution Category UC-950 Energy Consumption Series Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings September 1994 Energy Information ...

45

A model for Long-term Industrial Energy Forecasting (LIEF)  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to establish the content and structural validity of the Long-term Industrial Energy Forecasting (LIEF) model, and to provide estimates for the model's parameters. The model is intended to provide decision makers with a relatively simple, yet credible tool to forecast the impacts of policies which affect long-term energy demand in the manufacturing sector. Particular strengths of this model are its relative simplicity which facilitates both ease of use and understanding of results, and the inclusion of relevant causal relationships which provide useful policy handles. The modeling approach of LIEF is intermediate between top-down econometric modeling and bottom-up technology models. It relies on the following simple concept, that trends in aggregate energy demand are dependent upon the factors: (1) trends in total production; (2) sectoral or structural shift, that is, changes in the mix of industrial output from energy-intensive to energy non-intensive sectors; and (3) changes in real energy intensity due to technical change and energy-price effects as measured by the amount of energy used per unit of manufacturing output (KBtu per constant $ of output). The manufacturing sector is first disaggregated according to their historic output growth rates, energy intensities and recycling opportunities. Exogenous, macroeconomic forecasts of individual subsector growth rates and energy prices can then be combined with endogenous forecasts of real energy intensity trends to yield forecasts of overall energy demand. 75 refs.

Ross, M. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States) Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment and Information Sciences Div.); Hwang, R. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States))

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

A model for Long-term Industrial Energy Forecasting (LIEF)  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to establish the content and structural validity of the Long-term Industrial Energy Forecasting (LIEF) model, and to provide estimates for the model`s parameters. The model is intended to provide decision makers with a relatively simple, yet credible tool to forecast the impacts of policies which affect long-term energy demand in the manufacturing sector. Particular strengths of this model are its relative simplicity which facilitates both ease of use and understanding of results, and the inclusion of relevant causal relationships which provide useful policy handles. The modeling approach of LIEF is intermediate between top-down econometric modeling and bottom-up technology models. It relies on the following simple concept, that trends in aggregate energy demand are dependent upon the factors: (1) trends in total production; (2) sectoral or structural shift, that is, changes in the mix of industrial output from energy-intensive to energy non-intensive sectors; and (3) changes in real energy intensity due to technical change and energy-price effects as measured by the amount of energy used per unit of manufacturing output (KBtu per constant $ of output). The manufacturing sector is first disaggregated according to their historic output growth rates, energy intensities and recycling opportunities. Exogenous, macroeconomic forecasts of individual subsector growth rates and energy prices can then be combined with endogenous forecasts of real energy intensity trends to yield forecasts of overall energy demand. 75 refs.

Ross, M. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)]|[Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment and Information Sciences Div.; Hwang, R. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook April 2003 Overview World Oil Markets. Crude oil prices fell sharply at the onset of war in Iraq, but the initial declines probably overshot levels that we consider to be generally consistent with fundamental factors in the world oil market. Thus, while near-term price averages are likely to be below our previous projections, the baseline outlook for crude oil prices (while generally lower) is not drastically different and includes an average for spot West Texas Intermediate (WTI) that is close to $30 per barrel in 2003 (Figure 1). The mix of uncertainties related to key oil production areas has changed since last month, as Venezuelan production has accelerated beyond previous estimates while Nigerian output has been reduced due to internal conflict.

48

Lighting Principles and Terms | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Principles and Terms Lighting Principles and Terms July 29, 2012 - 5:20pm Addthis Light quantity, energy consumption, and light quality are the basic principles of lighting. |...

49

Energy Intensity Indicators in the U.S.: Electricity Sector ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Intensity Indicators in the U.S.: Electricity Sector (1949 - 2004) Energy intensity data and documentation published by the U.S. DOE's office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable...

50

Glossary of Energy Related Terms | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Glossary of Energy Related Terms Glossary of Energy Related Terms August 20, 2013 - 9:20am Addthis Here you'll find a glossary of energy-related terms. A | B | C | D | E | F | G |...

51

Energy use and energy intensity of the U.S. chemical industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Chlorine Making US energy statistics only report energya weighted-average US energy intensity. The intensity valuesProcess Stage The US Manufacturing Energy Consumption survey

Worrell, Ernst; Phylipsen, Dian; Einstein, Dan; Martin, Nathan

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

U.S. Commercial Buildings Weather Adjusted Site Energy Intensity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 6c. U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity Using. Weather-Adjusted Site Energy. 1. ... Laboratory buildings are included in the "Other" category.

53

Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Motor Gasoline Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement April 2008 1 ... Source: Oak Ridge National Laboratory, National Transportation Data Book.

54

Budgets of Divergent and Rotational Kinetic Energy during Two Periods of Intense Convection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Budgets of divergent and rotational components of kinetic energy (KD and KR) are investigated for two periods of intense convection. Derivations of the budget equations are presented for limited volumes in terms of VD and VR. The two periods ...

Dennis E. Buechler; Henry E. Fuelberg

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Target Allocation Methodology for China's Provinces: Energy Intensity in the 12th FIve-Year Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

economic energy intensity as an indicator for energy savingon industrial energy intensity as an indicator of savingsindustrial energy intensity as an indicator of savings

Ohshita, Stephanie

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Improving MapReduce energy efficiency for computation intensive workloads  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

MapReduce is a programming model for data intensive computing on large-scale distributed systems. With its wide acceptance and deployment, improving the energy efficiency of MapReduce will lead to significant energy savings for data centers and computational ... Keywords: intelligent DVFS scheduling, MapReduce energy efficiency, computation intensive workloads, data intensive computing, large-scale distributed systems, data centers, computational grids, energy savings, Hadoop, energy-proportional computing, resource allocation, dynamic voltage and frequency scaling, processor frequency

Thomas Wirtz; Rong Ge

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Table 23. Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu / $Billion Nominal GDP) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 20.1 18.5 16.9 15.5 14.4 13.2 AEO 1983 19.9 18.7 17.4 16.2 15.1 14.0 9.5 AEO 1984 20.1 19.0 17.7 16.5 15.5 14.5 10.2 AEO 1985 20.0 19.1 18.0 16.9 15.9 14.7 13.7 12.7 11.8 11.0 10.3 AEO 1986 18.3 17.8 16.8 16.1 15.2 14.3 13.4 12.6 11.7 10.9 10.2 9.5 8.9 8.3 7.8 AEO 1987 17.6 17.0 16.3 15.4 14.5 13.7 12.9 12.1 11.4 8.2 AEO 1989* 16.9 16.2 15.2 14.2 13.3 12.5 11.7 10.9 10.2 9.6 9.0 8.5 8.0 AEO 1990 16.1 15.4 11.7 8.6 6.4 AEO 1991 15.5 14.9 14.2 13.6 13.0 12.5 11.9 11.3 10.8 10.3 9.7 9.2 8.7 8.3 7.9 7.4 7.0 6.7 6.3 6.0 AEO 1992 15.0 14.5 13.9 13.3 12.7 12.1 11.6 11.0 10.5 10.0 9.5 9.0 8.6 8.1 7.7 7.3 6.9 6.6 6.2 AEO 1993 14.7 13.9 13.4 12.8 12.3 11.8 11.2 10.7 10.2 9.6 9.2 8.7 8.3 7.8 7.4 7.1 6.7 6.4

58

Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Energy-weighted industrial...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Energy-weighted industrial production indices December 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy...

59

User's Guide Short-Term Energy Model  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The personal computer version of the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) Short Term Energy Outlook, known simply as the Short-Term Energy Model, is a modeling system used to forecast future values for key energy variables. It replicates in a Windows environment most features of EIA's mainframe-based short-term modeling system, and adds capabilities that allow the user substitute assumptions to calculate alternative projections.

Information Center

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Energy use and carbon dioxide emissions in energy-intensive industries in key developing countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rotary) Brazil China India Mexico Energy and Carbon Dioxideenergy intensity values for Brazil, China, India, and Mexico,energy intensity values for Brazil, China, India and Mexico,

Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Phylipsen, Dian

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "term energy intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Term Appointments | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Term Appointments Term Appointments Term Appointments A term appointment is a non-permanent time limited appointment for a period of more than 1 year but not more than 4 years. The appointment allows eiligibility for benefits and retirement coverage. Reasons for making a term appointment include but are not limited to: project work, extraordinary workload, scheduled abolishment, reorganization, uncertainty of future funding, or the need to maintain permanent positions for placement of employees who would otherwise be displaced from other parts of the organization. OPM may authorize exceptions beyond the 4-year limit when the extension is appropriately justifiable. For example, if the deadline of a major project is extended and the employee's term appointment is at the end of its time

62

China-Medium and Long Term Energy Conservation Plan | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Medium and Long Term Energy Conservation Plan Medium and Long Term Energy Conservation Plan Jump to: navigation, search Name China-Medium and Long Term Energy Conservation Plan Agency/Company /Organization Government of China Sector Energy Focus Area Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy Topics Implementation, Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Resource Type Publications Website http://www.beconchina.org/ener Country China UN Region Eastern Asia References China EE[1] Overview "Energy conservation is a long-term strategic guideline in China's economic and social development, and an extremely urgent matter at present. The NDRC has therefore formulated the Plan of Energy Conservation, which aims to push the whole society towards energy conservation and energy intensity reduction, to remove energy bottlenecks, to build an energy

63

RENEWABLE ENERGY Medium-Term  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Please note that this PDF is subject to specific restrictions that limit its use and distribution. The terms and conditions are available online at

unknown authors

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Effect of pulse intensity distributions on fragment internal energy in the infrared multiphoton dissociation of vinyl  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effect of pulse intensity distributions on fragment internal energy in the infrared multiphoton the rovibra- tional energy distributions of fragmentsl formed in the infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD energies of the frag- ment can be well characterized in terms of a Boltzmann distribution with a single

Zare, Richard N.

65

Energy use and energy intensity of the U.S. chemical industry  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. chemical industry is the largest in the world, and responsible for about 11% of the U.S. industrial production measured as value added. It consumes approximately 20% of total industrial energy consumption in the U.S. (1994), and contributes in similar proportions to U.S. greenhouse gas emissions. Surprisingly, there is not much information on energy use and energy intensity in the chemical industry available in the public domain. This report provides detailed information on energy use and energy intensity for the major groups of energy-intensive chemical products. Ethylene production is the major product in terms of production volume of the petrochemical industry. The petrochemical industry (SIC 2869) produces a wide variety of products. However, most energy is used for a small number of intermediate compounds, of which ethylene is the most important one. Based on a detailed assessment we estimate fuel use for ethylene manufacture at 520 PJ (LHV), excluding feedstock use. Energy intensity is estimated at 26 GJ/tonne ethylene (LHV), excluding feedstocks.The nitrogenous fertilizer production is a very energy intensive industry, producing a variety of fertilizers and other nitrogen-compounds. Ammonia is the most important intermediate chemical compound, used as basis for almost all products. Fuel use is estimated at 268 PJ (excluding feedstocks) while 368 PJ natural gas is used as feedstock. Electricity consumption is estimated at 14 PJ. We estimate the energy intensity of ammonia manufacture at 39.3 GJ/tonne (including feedstocks, HHV) and 140 kWh/tonne, resulting in a specific primary energy consumption of 40.9 GJ/tonne (HHV), equivalent to 37.1 GJ/tonne (LHV). Excluding natural gas use for feedstocks the primary energy consumption is estimated at 16.7 GJ/tonne (LHV). The third most important product from an energy perspective is the production of chlorine and caustic soda. Chlorine is produced through electrolysis of a salt-solution. Chlorine production is the main electricity consuming process in the chemical industry, next to oxygen and nitrogen production. We estimate final electricity use at 173 PJ (48 TWh) and fuel use of 38 PJ. Total primary energy consumption is estimated at 526 PJ (including credits for hydrogen export). The energy intensity is estimated at an electricity consumption of 4380 kWh/tonne chlorine and fuel consumption of 3.45 GJ/tonne chlorine, where all energy use is allocated to chlorine production. Assuming an average power generation efficiency of 33% the primary energy consumption is estimated at 47.8 GJ/tonne chlorine (allocating all energy use to chlorine).

Worrell, E.; Phylipsen, D.; Einstein, D.; Martin, N.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Figure 60. Energy intensity of selected commercial end uses ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Refrigeration Lighting Heating, cooling, and ventilation Other 2040.00 2011.00 ... Energy intensity of selected commercial end uses, 2011 and 2040 ...

67

World Energy Intensity by Region, 1970-2020  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

If energy intensities in the developing world are assumed to increase by 136 percentthe most rapid annual rate of increase observed between 1990 and 1997 ...

68

Opportunities to Reduce Energy and Water Intensity of Mining ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Opportunities to Reduce Energy and Water Intensity of Mining ... bearing on the value of mining projects and the image of the mining industry;...

69

Figure 59. Commercial delivered energy intensity in four cases ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 59. Commercial delivered energy intensity in four cases, 2005-2040 (index, 2005 = 1) Reference case 2011 Technology case

70

Figure 55. Residential delivered energy intensity in four ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 55. Residential delivered energy intensity in four cases, 2005-2035 (index, 2005 = 1) Best Available Technology case High Technology case

71

CHANGES IN ENERGY INTENSITY IN THE MANUFACTURING SECTOR  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE/EIA-0552(85-91) Changes in Energy Intensity in the Manufacturing Sector 1985-1991 September 1995 ... All telephone orders should be directed to:

72

Methodology of Energy Intensities - Appendix A  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Glossary Appendix A Survey Design, Implementation, and Estimates Introduction The Energy Information Administration (EIA) designed the 1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption...

73

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings 1989 -- Executive  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Energy End-Use Intensities > Executive Summary 9 Energy End-Use Intensities > Executive Summary Executive Summary Energy End Uses Ranked by Energy Consumption, 1989 Energy End Uses Ranked by Energy Consumption, 1989 Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Forms EIA-871A through F of the 1989 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. divider line The demand for energy in U.S. stores, offices, schools, hospitals, and other commercial buildings has been increasing. This report examines energy intensities in commercial buildings for nine end uses: space heating, cooling, ventilation, lighting, water heating, cooking, refrigeration, office equipment, and "other." The objective of this analysis was to increase understanding of how energy is used in commercial buildings and to identify targets for greater energy efficiency which could moderate future growth in demand.

74

Short-Term Energy Outlook January 2014  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Chart Gallery for January 2014 Short-Term Energy Outlook U.S. Energy Information Administration Independent Statistics & Analysis 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 180 200 220 West Texas...

75

Higher order terms of radiative damping in extreme intense laser-matter interaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The higher order terms of the Lorentz-Abraham-Dirac equation have been derived, and their effects are studied via a relativistic collisional particle-in-cell simulation. The dominant group of terms up to the fourth order of the Lorentz-Abraham-Dirac equation is identified for ultra-intense laser-matter interactions. The second order terms are found to be the damping terms of the Lorentz force while the first order terms represent friction in the equation of motion. Because the second order terms restrict electron acceleration during the laser interaction, electrons/ions are prevented from over-accelerating. Radiative damping becomes highly significant when I{>=} 10{sup 22} W/cm{sup 2} while Bremsstrahlung will be saturated, thus radiative damping will be a dominant source of hard x-rays in regimes at extreme intensities.

Pandit, Rishi R.; Sentoku, Yasuhiko [Department of Physics, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

76

Short-Term Energy Outlook - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook October 2013 2 Projected Winter Fuel Expenditures by Fuel and Region

77

Short Term Energy Outlook Supplement - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement June 2007 4 Figure 2. Major Hurricanes in the Gulf of Mexico, 1995?2006

78

Analysis and Decomposition of the Energy Intensity of Industries in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Decomposition of the Energy Intensity of Industries in and Decomposition of the Energy Intensity of Industries in California Title Analysis and Decomposition of the Energy Intensity of Industries in California Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors de la du Can, Stephane Rue, Ali Hasanbeigi, and Jayant A. Sathaye Journal Energy Policy Volume 46 Pagination 234-245 Keywords california, co2 emissions, energy intensity, energy use Abstract In 2008, the gross domestic product (GDP) of California industry was larger than GDP of industry in any other U.S. states. This study analyses the energy use of and output from seventeen industry subsectors in California and performs decomposition analysis to assess the influence of different factors on California industry energy use. The logarithmic mean Divisia index method is used for the decomposition analysis. The decomposition analysis results show that the observed reduction of energy use in California industry since 2000 is the result of two main factors: the intensity effect and the structural effect. The intensity effect has started pushing final energy use downward in 2000 and has since amplified. The second large effect is the structural effect. The significant decrease of the energy-intensive "Oil and Gas Extraction" subsector's share of total industry value added, from 15% in 1997 to 5% in 2008, and the increase of the non-energy intensive "Electric and electronic equipment manufacturing" sector's share of value added, from 7% in 1997 to 30% in 2008, both contributed to a decrease in the energy intensity in the industry sector

79

EIA - AEO2010 - Energy intensity trends in AEO2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

intensity trends in AEO2010 intensity trends in AEO2010 Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Figure 17. Trends in U.S. oil prices, energy consumption, and economic output, 1950-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Energy intensity trends in AEO2010 Energy intensity—energy consumption per dollar of real GDP—indicates how much energy a country uses to produce its goods and services. From the early 1950s to the early 1970s, U.S. total primary energy consumption and real GDP increased at nearly the same annual rate (Figure 17). During that period, real oil prices remained virtually flat. In contrast, from the mid-1970s to 2008, the relationship between energy consumption and real GDP growth changed, with primary energy consumption growing at less than one-third the previous average rate and real GDP growth continuing to grow at its historical rate. The decoupling of real GDP growth from energy consumption growth led to a decline in energy intensity that averaged 2.8 percent per year from 1973 to 2008. In the AEO2010 Reference case, energy intensity continues to decline, at an average annual rate of 1.9 percent from 2008 to 2035.

80

Short Term Energy Outlook - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Projections: EIA, Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System database, and Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels (hydroelectric and nuclear).

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "term energy intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Renewable Energy Monitoring Evaluation Terms of Reference | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewable Energy Monitoring Evaluation Terms of Reference Renewable Energy Monitoring Evaluation Terms of Reference Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Renewable Energy Monitoring Evaluation Terms of Reference Agency/Company /Organization: World Bank Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Policies/deployment programs Website: web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/TOPICS/EXTENERGY2/EXTRENENERGYTK/0,, References: Renewable Energy Monitoring Evaluation Terms of Reference[1] Resources Design of a Monitoring and Evaluation Plan Audit of Solar Home Systems Project Mid-term Review Panel for Solar Home Systems Project Socio-Economic Survey of the Photovoltaic Pilot Project References ↑ "Renewable Energy Monitoring Evaluation Terms of Reference" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Renewable_Energy_Monitoring_Evaluation_Terms_of_Reference&oldid=329154"

82

Energy Intensities for the Iron and Steel Industry (1985-1994)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

national level data on energy intensity issues on household energy use in the residential sector, energy intensity issues on manufacturing energy use in the ...

83

Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

degree-days. ** thousand cubic feet 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 2012 2013 2014 Energy Supply Crude Oil Production (a) (million barrels per day)...

84

Energy Intensity Trends in AEO2010 (released in AEO2010)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Energy intensity (energy consumption per dollar of real GDP) indicates how much energy a country uses to produce its goods and services. From the early 1950s to the early 1970s, U.S. total primary energy consumption and real GDP increased at nearly the same annual rate (Figure 17). During that period, real oil prices remained virtually flat. In contrast, from the mid-1970s to 2008, the relationship between energy consumption and real GDP growth changed, with primary energy consumption growing at less than one-third the previous average rate and real GDP growth continuing to grow at its historical rate. The decoupling of real GDP growth from energy consumption growth led to a decline in energy intensity that averaged 2.8 percent per year from 1973 to 2008. In the AEO2010 Reference case, energy intensity continues to decline, at an average annual rate of 1.9 percent from 2008 to 2035.

Information Center

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

85

DRAFT DO NOT QUOTE Energy Prices and Energy Intensity in China: A Structural Decomposition Analysis and Econometrics Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the start of its economic reforms in 1978, China's energy prices relative to other prices have increased. At the same time, its energy intensity, i.e., energy consumption per unit of Gross Domestic Product (GDP), has declined dramatically, by about 70%, in spite of increases in energy consumption. Is this just a coincidence? Or does a systematic relationship exist between energy prices and energy intensity? In this study, we examine whether and how Chinas energy price changes affect its energy intensity trend during 1980-2002 at a macro level. We conduct the research by using two complementary economic models: the input-output-based structural decomposition analysis (SDA) and econometric regression models and by using a decomposition method of own-price elasticity of energy intensity. Findings include a negative own-price elasticity of energy intensity, a price-inducement effect on energyefficiency improvement, and a greater sensitivity (in terms of the reaction of energy intensity towards changes in energy prices) of the industry sector, compared to the overall economy. Analysts can use these results as a starting point for China's energy and carbon

Xiaoyu Shi; Karen R. Polenske; Xiaoyu Shi; Karen R. Polenske

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

DOE/EIA-0202(87/3Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3Q) 3Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections July 1987 aergy i . Energy ' Energy Energy Energy i Energy i . Energy . Energy Energy Energy . Energy . Energy Energy Energy Energy i Energy . Energy . Energy Energy Energy Energy . Energy "nergy ; Short-Term : Short-Term . Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term ; Short-Term : Short-Term ; Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term ; Short-Term ; Short-Term ; Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term ; Short-Term ; Short-Term ; Short-Term ; Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term ; Short-Term : Short-Term ; Short-Term ; Short-Term ; Short-T'- Ent. Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energv Ene1" F- Ou Out, Outlc Outloc.

87

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings 1992  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Overview > Tables Overview > Tables 1992 Energy End-Use Intensities Tables Energy Consumption by End Use, 1992 Figure on Energy Consumption By End Use, 1992 Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Forms EIA-871A through F of the 1992 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. divider line To View and/or Print Reports (requires Adobe Acrobat Reader) - Download Adobe Acrobat Reader If you experience any difficulties, visit our Technical Frequently Asked Questions. divider line Tables - (file size 31,655 bytes), pages 6. - requires Adobe Acrobat Reader Consumption of All Major Fuels by End Uses, 1992 Energy End-Use Intensities for All Major Fuels, 1992 Consumption of Electricity by End Uses, 1992 Energy End-Use Intensities for Electricity, 1992

88

Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(STEO) (STEO) Highlights * Crude oil prices increased during the first three weeks of July 2013 as world oil markets tightened in the face of seasonal increases in world consumption, unexpected supply disruptions, and heightened uncertainty over the security of supply with the renewed unrest in Egypt. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) expects that the Brent crude oil spot price, which averaged $108 per barrel over the first half of 2013, will average $104 per barrel over the second half of 2013, and $100 per barrel in 2014. * The discount of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil to Brent crude oil, which averaged $18 per barrel in 2012 and increased to a monthly average of $21 per barrel in February 2013, closed below $1.50 per barrel on July 19, 2013, and averaged $3 per barrel for the

89

High-Intensity Discharge Lighting Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

High-Intensity Discharge Lighting Basics High-Intensity Discharge Lighting Basics High-Intensity Discharge Lighting Basics August 15, 2013 - 5:59pm Addthis High-intensity discharge (HID) lighting provides the highest efficacy and longest service life of any lighting type. It can save 75%-90% of lighting energy when it replaces incandescent lighting. Illustration of a high-intensity discharge (HID) lIllustration amp. The lamp is a tall cylindrical shape, and a cutout of the outer tube shows the materials inside. A long, thin cylinder called the arc tube runs through the lamp between two electrodes. The space around the arc tube is labeled as a vacuum. In a high-intensity discharge lamp, electricity arcs between two electrodes, creating an intensely bright light. Mercury, sodium, or metal halide gas

90

Property:Incentive/Terms | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Terms Terms Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Incentive/Terms Property Type Text Description Terms. Pages using the property "Incentive/Terms" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A AEP Ohio - Renewable Energy Credit (REC) Purchase Program (Ohio) + RECs must be registered in the PJM-GATS Customer must have an interconnection agreement with AEP Ohio. APS - Solutions for Business Financing (Arizona) + 3.99% or higher (see website for details)Available for retrofit projects only through the comprehensive Solutions for Business program. Projects must qualify for a rebate under the Solutions for Business program. Work must be performed by Solutions for Business Trade Ally. Adams Electric Cooperative - Energy Efficiency Loan Program (Pennsylvania) + Rate: 4.5%-5% Repayment Terms: up to 7 years

91

Energy Basics: High-Intensity Discharge Lighting  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and longest service life of any lighting type. It can save 75%-90% of lighting energy when it replaces incandescent lighting. HID lamps use an electric arc to produce...

92

Short Term Energy Outlook - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The forecasts were generated by simulation of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System. 02-03 03-04 04-05 05-06 06-07 Avg.02-07 07-08 08-09 % Change Natural Gas

93

Energy Market Impacts of Alternative Greenhouse Gas Intensity Reduction Goals  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Energy Market Impacts of Alternative Greenhouse Gas Intensity Reduction Goals March 2006 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Service Reports are prepared by the Energy Information Administration upon special request and are based on assumptions specified by the requester. Energy Information Administration / Energy Market Impacts of Alternative Greenhouse Gas Intensity Reduction Goals

94

Some Intensive and Extensive Quantities in High-Energy Collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review the evolution of some statistical and thermodynamical quantities measured in difference sizes of high-energy collisions at different energies. We differentiate between intensive and extensive quantities and discuss the importance of their distinguishability in characterizing possible critical phenomena of nuclear collisions at various energies with different initial conditions.

Tawfik, A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Short-term energy outlook: Quarterly projections  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) quarterly forecasts of short-term energy supply, demand, and prices are revised in January, April, July, and October for publication in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes previous forecast errors, compares recent projections by other forecasters, and discusses current topics of the short-term energy markets (see Short- Term Energy Outlook: Annual Supplement, DOE/EIA-0202). The principal users of the Outlook are managers and energy analysts in private industry and government. The projections in this volume extend through the fourth quarter of 1990. The forecasts are produced using the Short-term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS). The STIFS model uses two principal driving variables: a macroeconomic forecast and world oil price assumptions. Macroeconomic forecasts produced by data Resources, Inc., (DRI), are adjusted by EIA to reflect EIA assumptions about the world price of crude oil, energy product prices, and other assumptions which may affect the macroeconomic forecast. EIA's Oil Market Simulation Model is used to project world oil prices. 20 refs., 17 figs., 16 tabs.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

DOE/EIA-0202(88/3Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3Q) 3Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections July 1988 Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy . oi Lor L- . ; Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term ; Short-Term . Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term . Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term ; Short-Term : Short-Term . Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term . Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term ; Short-Term . Short-Term Ent, Energ,, Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Ene r F- Ou Out, Outlc Outloc Outloo. Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlool Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlool

97

Climate Policy Design for Energy-Intensive Industries - And The...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate Policy Design for Energy-Intensive Industries - And The Rest of Us Speaker(s): Holmes Hummel Date: January 8, 2009 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar HostPoint of...

98

B. Appendix: Scaling of Cost with Energy and Intensity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

B. Appendix: Scaling of Cost with Energy and Intensity With the two ongoing studies, one for the physics program, 1 and one for the accelerator and facilities 2 on the...

99

Energy intensity in China's iron and steel sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this study, I examine the spatial and economic factors that influence energy intensity in China's iron and steel sector, namely industrial value added, renovation investment, coke consumption, and local coke supply. ...

Xu, Jingsi, M.C.P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Lighting Principles and Terms | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Principles and Terms Principles and Terms Lighting Principles and Terms July 29, 2012 - 5:20pm Addthis Light quantity, energy consumption, and light quality are the basic principles of lighting. | Photo courtesy of Tadson Bussey. Light quantity, energy consumption, and light quality are the basic principles of lighting. | Photo courtesy of Tadson Bussey. Learn More Find out how to shop for lights by lumens, not watts. To choose the best energy-efficient lighting options for your home, you should understand basic lighting principles and terms. Light Quantity Illumination The distribution of light on a horizontal surface. The purpose of all lighting is to produce illumination. Lumen A measurement of light emitted by a lamp. As reference, a 100-watt

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "term energy intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

BEDES Terms and Definitions | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Terms and Definitions Terms and Definitions BEDES Terms and Definitions On this page you'll find terms and definitions associated with the Building Energy Data Exchange Specification (BEDES). Data Specification, or spec A data spec establishes clear field names, definitions, formats (e.g. number, text) and enumerations (categorical lists) It serves as a guide to ensure that data is consistent among a range of sources and uses. For example, Green Button is a data specification that is used for utility customers' energy consumption information. Data Schema A data schema (or model) describes the structural relationships, hierarchies, and dependencies between data fields. For example, a schema might dictate that energy consumption data should be associated with a meter and a space in a building. A data specification could be used as the

102

Two Decades of U.S. Household Trends in Energy-Intensity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

This paper looks at two decades of energyintensity trends. Energy intensity measures are often used as a measure of energy efficiency and its change over time.

103

U.S. Residential Housing Weather-Adjusted Site Energy Intensity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Glossary Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency Page > Energy Intensities >Table 6b U.S. Residential Housing Weather-Adjusted Site Energy Intensity

104

Energy dispersive spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation: intensity considerations  

SciTech Connect

Detailed considerations are given to the reliability of energy dependent integrated intensity data collected from the pressure cavity of a diamond-anvil pressure cell illuminated with heterochromatic radiation from a synchrotron storage ring. It is demonstrated that at least in one run, the electron beam current cannot be used to correct for energy-intensity variations of the incident beam. Rather there appears to be an additional linear relationship between the decay of the synchrotron beam and the magnitude of the background intensity. 13 refs., 7 figs.

Skelton, E.F.; Elam, W.T.; Qadri, S.B.; Webb, A.W.; Schiferl, D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Short-Term Energy Outlook ... Search EIA .gov. A-Z Index; A-Z ... Arizona's 250-megawatt Solana generation station became the first major solar ...

106

Short-Term Energy Outlook - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and

107

Energy use and intensity in the industrial sector, 1972 - 1991  

SciTech Connect

Energy use in the United States is substantially lower now than it would have been had energy intensities not fallen after the oil price shocks of the 1970s. The United States would have consumed over 30 quadrillion Btu (QBtu) more energy in 1991 if the energy-GDP ratio (energy divided by gross domestic product) had remained at its 1972 value. Much of this improvement has stemmed from developments within the industrial sector. This paper examines industrial energy use from two perspectives. First, the contribution of the industrial sector to the decline in the overall energy-GDP ratio is estimated. Second, the components of change in conservation trends within the industrial sector are examined. This part of the analysis identifies the change in overall industrial intensity (total energy consumption/total industrial output) that is due to improvements in energy intensity at the individual industry level in comparison to various aspects of the composition of industrial output. This paper is based upon recent work conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the Office of Energy Efficiency and Alternative Fuels Policy, U.S. Department of Energy. Discussion of other end-use sectors and some additional analysis of industrial sector energy trends is found in Energy Conservation Trends - Understanding the Factors Affecting Conservation Gains and their Implications for Policy Development.

Belzer, D.B.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Short-Term Energy Outlook - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Short-Term Energy Outlook August 2013 2 Global Crude Oil and Liquid Fuels . The recent increase in crude oil and liquid fuels ...

109

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (Early Release)-Energy Intensity Section  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Intensity Intensity Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (Early Release) Energy Intensity Figure 7. Energy use per capita and per dollar of gross domestic product, 1980-2030 (index, 1980 = 1). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Energy intensity, measured as energy use (in thousand Btu) per dollar of GDP (in 2000 dollars), is projected to decline at an average annual rate of 1.6 percent from 2006 to 2030 in the AEO2008 reference case (Figure 7). Although energy use generally increases as the economy grows, continuing improvement in the energy efficiency of the U.S. economy and a shift to less energy-intensive activities are projected to keep the rate of energy consumption growth lower than the rate of GDP growth. Since 1992, the energy intensity of the U.S. economy has declined on

110

DOE/EIA-0202(87/2Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2Q) 2Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections April 1987 . m erm Term t-Term rt-Term jrt-Term ort-Term iort-Term ion-Term ion-Term lort-Term lort-Term ort-Term ort-Term Tt-Term ".-Term -Term Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term

111

DOE/EIA-0202(84/1Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1Q) 1Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections February 1984 Published: March 1984 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. t rt jrt- .ort- iort- iort- .iort- iort- lort- Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term Term Term .-Term -Term uergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Short-Term' Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term

112

Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - August 2005  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook August 2005 Short-Term Energy Outlook - Regional Enhancements Starting with this edition of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO), EIA is introducing regional projections (the scope of which will vary by fuel) of energy prices, consumption, and production. The addition of regional data and forecasts will allow us to examine regional fuel demands and prices, regional fuel inventory trends, the interaction between regional electricity demand shifts, and regional electric generating capacity. This edition of STEO includes regional projections for heating oil, propane, and gasoline prices and natural gas and electricity demand and prices. Over the next 2 months, we will include additional regional

113

Industrial Sector Energy Demand: Revisions for Non-Energy-Intensive Manufacturing (released in AEO2007)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

For the industrial sector, EIAs analysis and projection efforts generally have focused on the energy-intensive industriesfood, bulk chemicals, refining, glass, cement, steel, and aluminumwhere energy cost averages 4.8 percent of annual operating cost. Detailed process flows and energy intensity indicators have been developed for narrowly defined industry groups in the energy-intensive manufacturing sector. The non-energy-intensive manufacturing industries, where energy cost averages 1.9 percent of annual operating cost, previously have received somewhat less attention, however. In AEO2006, energy demand projections were provided for two broadly aggregated industry groups in the non-energy-intensive manufacturing sector: metal-based durables and other non-energy-intensive. In the AEO2006 projections, the two groups accounted for more than 50 percent of the projected increase in industrial natural gas consumption from 2004 to 2030.

Information Center

2007-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

114

Renewable Energy Pipeline Development Terms of Reference | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewable Energy Pipeline Development Terms of Reference Renewable Energy Pipeline Development Terms of Reference Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Renewable Energy Pipeline Development Terms of Reference Agency/Company /Organization: World Bank Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Biomass, Hydro, Solar, Wind Topics: Implementation Website: web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/TOPICS/EXTENERGY2/EXTRENENERGYTK/0,, References: Renewable Energy Pipeline Development Terms of Reference[1] Resources Preparation of Mini-hydro Private Power Projects Off-Grid Village Hydro Subproject Preparation Off-Grid Subprojects Pipeline Development Development of Wind Farm Projects - Local Consultants Bagasse/Rice Husk Co-generation Project Preparation Biomass Cogeneration Projects Preparation Design of a PV Pilot Concession

115

A comparison of energy intensity in the United States and Japan  

SciTech Connect

This report compares energy intensity in the US and Japan in 1985. Energy intensity is examined for each of the following end-use energy consuming sectors: residential and commercial, transportation, and industrial (manufacturing). In each sector, comparative measures of the relative energy intensity are developed. The comparison indicates that when adjustments are made for certain differences between the two countries, energy intensity in the US compares more favorably with Japan than when just the aggregate energy-to-gross-domestic-product ratio is used. For instance, climate and residential floor space explain a good portion of the difference between residential energy consumption in the US and Japan. Likewise, although the US requires about twice as much energy for passenger travel, it requires about half the energy for freight movement (when normalized for distance and vehicle capacity) compared with Japan. Finally, the US manufacturing sector, as a whole, is about equal to Japan in terms of the amount of energy consumed in producing a dollar's worth of goods, in current dollars and using 1985 exchange rates. 53 refs.

McDonald, S.C.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

DOE/EIA-0202(88/1Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8/1Q) 8/1Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections January 1988 .m erm Term t-Term rt-Term jrt-Term ort-Term ion-Term ion-Term tort-Term jort-Term ion-Term ort-Term ore-Term rt-Term 't-Term -Term Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy "^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook ~">Mook Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term

117

DE-AC03-76SF00098. Energy Use and Energy Intensity of the U.S. Chemical Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The U.S. chemical industry is the largest in the world, and responsible for about 11 % of the U.S. industrial production measured as value added. It consumes approximately 20 % of total industrial energy consumption in the U.S. (1994), and contributes in similar proportions to U.S. greenhouse gas emissions. Surprisingly, there is not much information on energy use and energy intensity in the chemical industry available in the public domain. This report provides detailed information on energy use and energy intensity for the major groups of energy-intensive chemical products. Ethylene production is the major product in terms of production volume of the petrochemical industry. The petrochemical industry (SIC 2869) produces a wide variety of products. However, most energy is used for a small number of intermediate compounds, of which ethylene is the most important one. Based on a detailed assessment we estimate fuel use for ethylene manufacture at 520 PJ (LHV), excluding feedstock use. Energy intensity is estimated at 26 GJ/tonne ethylene (LHV), excluding feedstocks. The nitrogenous fertilizer production is a very energy intensive industry, producing a variety of fertilizers and other nitrogen-compounds. Ammonia is the most important intermediate chemical

Ernst Worrell; Dian Phylipsen; Dan Einstein; Nathan Martin; Ernst Worrell; Dian Phylipsen; Dan Einstein; Nathan Martin

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Short-term energy outlook. Quarterly projections  

SciTech Connect

Energy Information Administration (EIA) quarterly forecasts of short-term energy supply, demand, and prices are revised in February, May, August, and November for publication in the Short-Term Energy Outlook, quarterly projections. Methodology volumes, which are published with the May and November issues, contain descriptions of the forecasting system and detailed analyses of the current issues that affect EIA's short-term energy forecasts. The forecasts are produced using the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS). Two principal driving variables are used in the STIFS model: the macroeconomic forecast and the world oil price assumptions. The macroeconomic forecasts, which are produced by Data Resources, Inc., (DRI), are adjusted by EIA in cases where EIA projections of the world price of crude oil differ from DRI estimates. EIA's Oil Market Simulation Model is used to project the world oil prices. The three projections for petroleum supply and demand are based on low, medium, and high economic growth scenarios which incorporate high, medium, and low crude oil price trajectories. In general, the following discussion of the forecast refers to the medium, or base case, scenario. Total petroleum consumption sensitivities, using varying assumptions about the level of price, weather, and economic activity are tabulated.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

B. Appendix: Scaling of Cost with Energy and Intensity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

B. Appendix: Scaling of Cost with Energy and Intensity B. Appendix: Scaling of Cost with Energy and Intensity With the two ongoing studies, one for the physics program, [1] and one for the accelerator and facilities [2] on the "Neutrino Factory Based on a Muon Storage Ring", a number of interesting suggestions and ideas came up. Almost immediately the question of scaling cost with the storage ring energy and with intensity came up. Nevertheless, it was impossible to explore all those questions in great detail, either in the report or in the preliminary cost estimate that is presented in Appendix A. During the study it became more and more clear, that one of the unique features of a neutrino source, namely the possibility to balance the cost of the accelerator with the cost of the detector, would urge the accelerator people to find an answer to this

120

Long-term global nuclear energy and fuel cycle strategies  

SciTech Connect

The Global Nuclear Vision Project is examining, using scenario building techniques, a range of long-term nuclear energy futures. The exploration and assessment of optimal nuclear fuel-cycle and material strategies is an essential element of the study. To this end, an established global E{sup 3} (energy/economics/environmental) model has been adopted and modified with a simplified, but comprehensive and multi-regional, nuclear energy module. Consistent nuclear energy scenarios are constructed using this multi-regional E{sup 3} model, wherein future demands for nuclear power are projected in price competition with other energy sources under a wide range of long-term demographic (population, workforce size and productivity), economic (price-, population-, and income-determined demand for energy services, price- and population-modified GNP, resource depletion, world-market fossil energy prices), policy (taxes, tariffs, sanctions), and top-level technological (energy intensity and end-use efficiency improvements) drivers. Using the framework provided by the global E{sup 3} model, the impacts of both external and internal drivers are investigated. The ability to connect external and internal drivers through this modeling framework allows the study of impacts and tradeoffs between fossil- versus nuclear-fuel burning, that includes interactions between cost, environmental, proliferation, resource, and policy issues.

Krakowski, R.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Technology and Safety Assessment Div.

1997-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "term energy intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Energy Use and Energy Intensity of the U.S. Chemical Industry | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Intensity of the U.S. Chemical Industry Intensity of the U.S. Chemical Industry Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories

122

DOE/EIA-0202(84/2QH Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2QH 2QH Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections May 1984 Published: June 1984 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. t rt jrt .ort lort .iort .iort- iort- iort- '.ort- ort- .m .erm Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term i-Term rTerm -Term xrm uergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Short-Tern Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term

123

DOE/EIA-0202(85/2Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2Q) 2Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook amm Quarterly Projections April 1985 Published: May 1985 Energy Information Administration Washington, D C t rt jrt .ort lort .iort iort iort lort '.ort ort .erm -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term xrm nergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term

124

Short-term energy outlook, January 1999  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares the Short-Term Energy Outlook (energy supply, demand, and price projections) monthly. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from January 1999 through December 2000. Data values for the fourth quarter 1998, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in EIA`s Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations that use the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated by using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled in the January 1999 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS model is driven principally by three sets of assumptions or inputs: estimates of key macroeconomic variables, world oil price assumptions, and assumptions about the severity of weather. Macroeconomic estimates are produced by DRI/McGraw-Hill but are adjusted by EIA to reflect EIA assumptions about the world price of crude oil, energy product prices, and other assumptions which may affect the macroeconomic outlook. By varying the assumptions, alternative cases are produced by using the STIFS model. 28 figs., 19 tabs.

NONE

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Energy Use and Energy Intensity of the U.S. Chemical Industry...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ENERGY STAR Partner Resources You are here Home Buildings & Plants Energy Use and Energy Intensity of the U.S. Chemical Industry Secondary menu About us Press room Contact...

126

Energy prices and energy intensity in China : a structural decomposition analysis and econometric study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the start of its economic reforms in 1978, China's energy prices relative to other prices have increased. At the same time, its energy intensity, i.e., physical energy consumption per unit of Gross Domestic Product ...

Shi, Xiaoyu, M.C.P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Energy prices and energy intensity in China : a structural decomposition analysis and econometrics study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the start of its economic reforms in 1978, China's energy prices relative to other prices have increased. At the same time, its energy intensity, i.e., energy consumption per unit of Gross Domestic Product (GDP), has ...

Shi, Xiaoyu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

A Comparison of Iron and Steel Production Energy Use and Energy Intensity in China and the U.S.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Production of iron and steel is an energy-intensive manufacturing process. In 2006, the iron and steel industry accounted for 13.6% and 1.4% of primary energy consumption in China and the U.S., respectively (U.S. DOE/EIA, 2010a; Zhang et al., 2010). The energy efficiency of steel production has a direct impact on overall energy consumption and related carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. The goal of this study is to develop a methodology for making an accurate comparison of the energy intensity (energy use per unit of steel produced) of steel production. The methodology is applied to the steel industry in China and the U.S. The methodology addresses issues related to boundary definitions, conversion factors, and indicators in order to develop a common framework for comparing steel industry energy use. This study uses a bottom-up, physical-based method to compare the energy intensity of China and U.S. crude steel production in 2006. This year was chosen in order to maximize the availability of comparable steel-sector data. However, data published in China and the U.S. are not always consistent in terms of analytical scope, conversion factors, and information on adoption of energy-saving technologies. This study is primarily based on published annual data from the China Iron & Steel Association and National Bureau of Statistics in China and the Energy Information Agency in the U.S. This report found that the energy intensity of steel production is lower in the United States than China primarily due to structural differences in the steel industry in these two countries. In order to understand the differences in energy intensity of steel production in both countries, this report identified key determinants of sector energy use in both countries. Five determinants analyzed in this report include: share of electric arc furnaces in total steel production, sector penetration of energy-efficiency technologies, scale of production equipment, fuel shares in the iron and steel industry, and final steel product mix in both countries. The share of lower energy intensity electric arc furnace production in each country was a key determinant of total steel sector energy efficiency. Overall steel sector structure, in terms of average plant vintage and production capacity, is also an important variable though data were not available to quantify this in a scenario. The methodology developed in this report, along with the accompanying quantitative and qualitative analyses, provides a foundation for comparative international assessment of steel sector energy intensity.

Hasanbeigi, Ali; Price, Lynn; Aden, Nathaniel; Chunxia, Zhang; Xiuping, Li; Fangqin, Shangguan

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

129

A Comparison of Iron and Steel Production Energy Use and Energy Intensity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Comparison of Iron and Steel Production Energy Use and Energy Intensity A Comparison of Iron and Steel Production Energy Use and Energy Intensity in China and the U.S. Title A Comparison of Iron and Steel Production Energy Use and Energy Intensity in China and the U.S. Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2011 Authors Hasanbeigi, Ali, Lynn K. Price, Nathaniel T. Aden, Zhang Chunxia, Li Xiuping, and Shangguan Fangqin Date Published June/2011 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Iron & Steel Research Institute, Iron and Steel Industry Keywords energy intensity, energy use, Low Emission & Efficient Industry Abstract Production of iron and steel is an energy-intensive manufacturing process. In 2006, the iron and steel industry accounted for 13.6% and 1.4% of primary energy consumption in China and the U.S., respectively (U.S. DOE/EIA, 2010a; Zhang et al., 2010). The energy efficiency of steel production has a direct impact on overall energy consumption and related carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. The goal of this study is to develop a methodology for making an accurate comparison of the energy intensity (energy use per unit of steelproduced) of steel production. The methodology is applied to the steel industry in China and the U.S. The methodology addresses issues related to boundary definitions, conversion factors, and indicators in order industry energy use to develop a common framework for comparing steel intensity energy use.

130

Glossary of Energy-Related Terms | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Glossary of Energy-Related Terms Glossary of Energy-Related Terms Glossary of Energy-Related Terms August 20, 2013 - 9:20am Addthis Here you'll find a glossary of energy-related terms. A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z A Absolute Humidity The ratio of the mass of water vapor to the volume occupied by a mixture of water vapor and dry air. Absorbent A material that extracts one or more substances from a fluid (gas or liquid) medium on contact, and which changes physically and/or chemically in the process. The less volatile of the two working fluids in an absorption cooling device. Absorber The component of a solar thermal collector that absorbs solar radiation and converts it to heat, or, as in a solar photovoltaic device, the material

131

Glossary of Energy-Related Terms | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Glossary of Energy-Related Terms Glossary of Energy-Related Terms Glossary of Energy-Related Terms August 20, 2013 - 9:20am Addthis Here you'll find a glossary of energy-related terms. A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z A Absolute Humidity The ratio of the mass of water vapor to the volume occupied by a mixture of water vapor and dry air. Absorbent A material that extracts one or more substances from a fluid (gas or liquid) medium on contact, and which changes physically and/or chemically in the process. The less volatile of the two working fluids in an absorption cooling device. Absorber The component of a solar thermal collector that absorbs solar radiation and converts it to heat, or, as in a solar photovoltaic device, the material

132

Quasiperiodic oscillations in Cen X-3 and the long term intensity variations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have investigated properties of the Quasi Periodic Oscillation (QPO) features in the accretion powered X-ray pulsar Cen X-3 over a period of about four years using observations carried out with the Proportional Counter Array (PCA) of the {\\it {Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer}}. The observations cover a wide range of X-ray intensity of the source in excess of the binary intensity modulation. We have detected QPOs in 11 out of a total 81 pointings with the PCA with rms intensity fluctuation upto 10%. The QPO peak frequency shows clustering around 40 and 90 mHz with the QPO frequency having no dependence on X-ray intensity. This indicates that either (a) the observed X-ray luminosity of the source is not related to the mass accretion rate or inner radius of the accretion disk or (b) that the QPO generation mechanism in Cen X-3 is different from the beat frequency model or Keplerian frequency model that is believed to be operational in most other transient and persistent X-ray pulsars. We have also found that, the rms variation in the 40 mHz QPO feature is not dependent on the X-ray energy, indicating that disk absorption related origin for the QPO is unlikely.

Harsha Raichur; Biswajit Paul

2008-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

133

Short-Term Energy Outlook Figures  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Independent Statistics & Analysis" Independent Statistics & Analysis" ,"U.S. Energy Information Administration" ,"Short-Term Energy Outlook Figures, December 2013" ,"U.S. Prices" ,,"West Texas Intermediate (WTI) Crude Oil Price" ,,"U.S. Gasoline and Crude Oil Prices" ,,"U.S. Diesel Fuel and Crude Oil Prices" ,,"Henry Hub Natural Gas Price" ,,"U.S. Natural Gas Prices" ,"World Liquid Fuels" ,,"World Liquid Fuels Production and Consumption Balance" ,,"Estimated Unplanned Crude Oil Production Outages Among OPEC Producers" ,,"Estimated Unplanned Crude Oil Production Disruptions Among non-OPEC Producers" ,,"World Liquid Fuels Consumption" ,,"World Liquid Fuels Consumption Growth"

134

Short-term energy outlook, July 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares The Short-Term Energy Outlook (energy supply, demand, and price projections) monthly for distribution on the internet at: www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/steo/pub/contents.html. In addition, printed versions of the report are available to subscribers in January, April, July and October. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from July 1998 through December 1999. Values for second quarter of 1998 data, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in EIA`s Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations that use the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated by using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled in the July 1998 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. 28 figs., 19 tabs.

NONE

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

A Comparison of Iron and Steel Production Energy Use and Energy Intensity in China and the U.S.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

indicators of steel sector energy efficiency and intensity.Energy intensity in the iron and steel industry: a comparison of physical and economic indicators,

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

DOE/EIA-0202(87/4Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4Q) 4Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections October 1987 i- rt- jrt ort lort lort lort- iort- lort- ort- ort Tt- " t- . m erm Perm -Term -Term -Term -Term ,-Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term 71 e rrn TT1 "1 Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy "nergy -cry Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook ""'tlook Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term

137

Dictionary of energy. [Definitions of interdisciplinary energy terms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A cross-disciplinary dictionary of energy terms defined in language understandable to experts in several related fields, this dictionary contains an alphabetical listing of words associated with fuel technology, energy sources and transformation, economics, and the environment, both natural and built. Besides the definitions, readers will find conversion tables and lists of acronyms and abbreviations, institutions, and symbols. (DCK)

Slesser, M. (ed.)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Table 6a. U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity Using Weather ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity Using Weather-Adjusted Site Energy by Census Region and Principal Building Activity.

139

Short-Term Energy Outlook July 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 July 2013 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) Highlights  The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) expects that the Brent crude oil spot price will average $102 per barrel over the second half of 2013, and $100 per barrel in 2014. This forecast assumes there are no disruptions to energy markets arising from the recent unrest in Egypt. After increasing to $119 per barrel in early February 2013, the Brent crude oil spot price fell to a low of $97 per barrel in mid-April and then recovered to an average of $103 per barrel in May and June, about the same as its average over the same two-month period last year.  The discount of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil to Brent crude oil, which averaged $18 per barrel in 2012 and increased to a monthly average of more than $20 per barrel in

140

Long-term Energy Plan (Ontario, Canada) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Long-term Energy Plan (Ontario, Canada) Long-term Energy Plan (Ontario, Canada) Long-term Energy Plan (Ontario, Canada) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info Start Date 2007 State Ontario Program Type Climate Policies Industry Recruitment/Support Renewables Portfolio Standards and Goals Provider Ontario Ministry of Energy Currently, Ontario's electricity system has a capacity of approximately 35,000 MW of power. The Ontario Power Authority forecasts that more than 15,000 MW will need to be renewed, replaced or added by 2030.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "term energy intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Energy end-use intensities in commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect

This report examines energy intensities in commercial buildings for nine end uses: space heating, cooling, ventilation, lighting, water heating, cooking, refrigeration, office equipment, and other. The objective of this analysis was to increase understanding of how energy is used in commercial buildings and to identify targets for greater energy efficiency which could moderate future growth in demand. The source of data for the analysis is the 1989 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption survey (CBECS), which collected detailed data on energy-related characteristics and energy consumption for a nationally representative sample of approximately 6,000 commercial buildings. The analysis used 1989 CBECS data because the 1992 CBECS data were not yet available at the time the study was initiated. The CBECS data were fed into the Facility Energy Decision Screening (FEDS) system, a building energy simulation program developed by the US Department of Energy`s Pacific Northwest Laboratory, to derive engineering estimates of end-use consumption for each building in the sample. The FEDS estimates were then statistically adjusted to match the total energy consumption for each building. This is the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) first report on energy end-use consumption in commercial buildings. This report is part of an effort to address customer requests for more information on how energy is used in buildings, which was an overall theme of the 1992 user needs study. The end-use data presented in this report were not available for publication in Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1989 (DOE/EIA-0318(89), Washington, DC, April 1992). However, subsequent reports on end-use energy consumption will be part of the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures series, beginning with a 1992 data report to be published in early 1995.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Table 5c. Residential Energy Intensity Using Site Energy by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

51. 52. 58. 42 . 37: ... Except for 1997, estimates include all the floor area of the housing unit that was enclosed from the weather. Sources: Energy ...

143

DOE/EIA-0202(88/2Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2Q) 2Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections April 1988 aergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy E nergy Energy Energy Energy Energy '? nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook '"""look Short-Terni Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term

144

Table 6. Energy intensity by state (2000 - 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy intensity by state (2000 - 2010)" Energy intensity by state (2000 - 2010)" "thousand Btu per dollar of GDP" ,,,,,,,,,,,,"Change" ,,,,,,,,,,,,"2000 to 2010" "State",2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percent","Absolute" "Alabama",18.27258197,17.12573602,17.40982338,17.21199023,16.87274619,16.36600572,16.26201029,16.16667416,15.88996309,15.31511861,15.97051076,-0.1259849985,-2.302071213 "Alaska",21.74118991,20.61708506,19.78031734,20.18143227,20.28953911,21.09573287,18.72961653,17.79373817,15.85124571,14.13669694,14.24461661,-0.3448097058,-7.496573297 "Arizona",8.723022426,8.474435286,8.399371812,7.993493579,8.274516227,7.602521438,7.232690272,7.328159916,7.62679414,7.507000095,7.628169778,-0.1255129924,-1.094852647

145

EIA Energy Efficiency-Residential Sector Energy Intensities, 1978-2001  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Sector Energy Intensities Residential Sector Energy Intensities RESIDENTIAL SECTOR ENERGY INTENSITIES: 1978-2005 Released Date: August 2004 Page Last Modified:June 2009 These tables provide estimates of residential sector energy consumption and energy intensities for 1978 -1984, 1987, 1990, 1993, 1997, 2001 and 2005 based on the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). Total Site Energy Consumption (U.S. and Census Region) Html Excel PDF By Type of Housing Unit (Table 1a) html Table 1a excel table 1a. excel table 1a. Weather-Adjusted by Type of Housing Unit (Table 1b) html table 1b excel table 1b excel table 1b Total Primary Energy Consumption (U.S. and Census Region) By Type of Housing Unit (Table 1c) html Table 1c excel table 1c excel table 1c Weather-Adjusted by Type of Housing Unit (Table 1d)

146

Short-Term Energy Outlook June 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 June 2013 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) Highlights * After increasing to $119 per barrel in early February 2013, the Brent crude oil spot price fell to a low of $97 per barrel in mid-April and then recovered to an average of $103 per barrel in May. EIA expects that the Brent crude oil spot price will average $102 per barrel over the second half of 2013, and $100 per barrel in 2014. * EIA expects the price of regular gasoline will average $3.53 per gallon over the summer driving season (April through September). The annual average regular gasoline retail price is projected to decline from $3.63 per gallon in 2012 to $3.49 per gallon in 2013 and to $3.37 per gallon in 2014. Energy price forecasts are highly uncertain, and the current values of

147

Short-term energy outlook quarterly projections. First quarter 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short- term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes the performance of previous forecasts, compares recent cases with those of other forecasting services, and discusses current topics related to the short-term energy markets.

Not Available

1994-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

148

Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - October 2005  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 1 October 2005 Short-Term Energy Outlook and Winter Fuels Outlook October 12, 2005 Release (Next Update: November 8, 2005) Overview Warnings from previous Outlooks about the potential adverse impacts of an active hurricane season on domestic energy supply and prices are unfortunately being reflected in the challenging realities brought about by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. The impact of the hurricanes on oil and natural gas production, oil refining, natural gas processing, and pipeline systems have further strained already-tight natural gas and petroleum product markets on the eve of the 2005-2006 heating season (October through March). This combined Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook provides a current view of domestic energy supply and

149

Optical Fiber High Temperature Sensor Instrumentation for Energy Intensive Industries  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes technical progress during the program Optical Fiber High Temperature Sensor Instrumentation for Energy Intensive Industries, performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. The objective of this program was to use technology recently invented at Virginia Tech to develop and demonstrate the application of self-calibrating optical fiber temperature and pressure sensors to several key energy-intensive industries where conventional, commercially available sensors exhibit greatly abbreviated lifetimes due primarily to environmental degradation. A number of significant technologies were developed under this program, including a laser bonded silica high temperature fiber sensor with a high temperature capability up to 700C and a frequency response up to 150 kHz, the worlds smallest fiber Fabry-Perot high temperature pressure sensor (125 x 20 ?m) with 700C capability, UV-induced intrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric sensors for distributed measurement, a single crystal sapphire fiber-based sensor with a temperature capability up to 1600C. These technologies have been well demonstrated and laboratory tested. Our work plan included conducting major field tests of these technologies at EPRI, Corning, Pratt & Whitney, and Global Energy; field validation of the technology is critical to ensuring its usefulness to U.S. industries. Unfortunately, due to budget cuts, DOE was unable to follow through with its funding commitment to support Energy Efficiency Science Initiative projects and this final phase was eliminated.

Cooper, Kristie L.; Wang, Anbo; Pickrell, Gary R.

2006-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

150

Changes in energy intensity in the manufacturing sector 1985--1991  

SciTech Connect

In this report, energy intensity is defined as the ratio of energy consumption per unit of output. Output is measured as the constant dollar of value of shipments and receipts, and two measures of energy consumption are presented in British thermal units (Btu): Offsite-Produced Energy and Total Inputs of Energy. A decrease in energy intensity from one period to another suggests an increase in energy efficiency, and vice versa. Energy efficiency can be defined and measured in various ways. Certain concepts of energy efficiency, especially those limited to equipment efficiencies, cannot be measured over time using changes in energy-intensity ratios. While improved energy efficiency will tend to reduce energy intensity, it is also true that a change in energy intensity can be due to factors unrelated to energy efficiency. For this report, energy intensity is used as a surrogate measure for energy efficiency, based on industry knowledge and current methodological analyses.

1995-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

151

Short-term energy outlook, April 1999  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from April 1999 through December 2000. Data values for the first quarter 1999, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in EIA`s Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations that use the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated by using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled in the April 1999 version of the Short-Term Integrated forecasting system (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS model is driven principally by three sets of assumptions or inputs: estimates of key macroeconomic variables, world oil price assumptions, and assumptions about the severity of weather. Macroeconomic estimates are produced by DRI/McGraw-Hill but are adjusted by EIA to reflect EIA assumptions about the world price of crude oil, energy product prices, and other assumptions which may affect the macroeconomic outlook. By varying the assumptions, alternative cases are produced by using the STIFS model. 25 figs., 19 tabs.

NONE

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Search EIA.gov. A-Z Index; A-Z Index A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W XYZ Analysis & Projections Short-Term Energy Outlook . ...

153

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Short-Term Energy Outlook Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook: EIA projects that natural gas prices will remain relatively high through the rest of 2003, with...

154

Term Energy The Implications of Lower Natural Gas Prices for ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement May 2009 2 average delivered natural gas price from $4.75 to $4.25 per MMBtu ...

155

Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Understanding the Decline in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement October 2009 2 Projected reductions in CO2 emissions associated with changes in the ...

156

Short-Term Energy Outlook September 2002 Overview  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Forecasting System database, and Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels. Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook -- September 2002 10

157

Short-Term Energy Outlook- May 2003  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook May 2003 Overview World Oil Markets. The April 24 meeting of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) raised official quotas for members (excluding Iraq) by 0.9 million barrels per day from the previous (suspended) quota to 25.4 million barrels per day. OPEC members also sought tighter compliance with quotas, calling for production cuts of 2 million barrels per day from April levels. We expect these measures to result in an average total OPEC (including Iraq) crude oil production rate of about 26.7 million barrels per day in the second and third quarters. This production level is not significantly different from our base case assumptions in last month's report. Individual OPEC country shares of these output levels will depend upon the speed with which

158

Short Term Energy Outlook ,October 2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

October 2002 October 2002 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook October 2002 Overview World Oil Markets: Continued high oil prices are the result of declining OECD commercial oil inventories, worries over a potential clash with Iraq, and OPEC's decision to leave production quotas unchanged at its September meeting. Solid growth in world oil demand this winter (and for 2003 as a whole) is likely to tighten world oil markets and reduce commercial oil inventories. The West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil spot price averaged $29.75 in September, about $3.50 per barrel above the year-ago level and about $10 per barrel above a low point seen last January. Home Heating Costs Outlook: While fuel supplies should remain sufficient under normal weather

159

August 2012 Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

August 2012 1 August 2012 1 August 2012 Short-Term Energy Outlook Highlights  EIA projects that the Brent crude oil spot price will average about $103 per barrel during the second half of 2012, about $3.50 per barrel higher than in last month's Outlook. The forecast Brent crude oil spot price falls to an average of $100 per barrel in 2013. The projected West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil spot price discount to Brent crude oil narrows from about $14 in the third quarter of 2012 to $9 by late 2013. These price forecasts assume that world oil-consumption-weighted real gross domestic product (GDP), which increased by 3.0 percent in 2011, grows by 2.8 percent in 2012 and 2.9

160

Short Term Energy Outlook, February 2003  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook February 2003 Overview World Oil Markets. World oil markets will likely remain tight through most of 2003, as petroleum inventories and global spare production capacity continue to dwindle amid blasts of cold weather and constrained output from Venezuela. OPEC efforts to increase output to make up for lower Venezuela output has reduced global spare production capacity to only 2 million barrels per day, leaving little room to make up for unexpected supply or demand surprises. Meanwhile, the average West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil price increased by $3.50 to $33 per barrel from December to January (Figure 1). For the year 2003, WTI oil prices are expected to remain over $30 per barrel, even though Venezuelan output appears to be moving toward normal sooner than expected. Also,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "term energy intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Short Term Energy Outlook ,November 2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

November 2002 November 2002 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook November 2002 Overview World Oil Markets: During the past 3-4 months, OPEC 10 production has risen more quickly than projected, thus reducing upward pressure on prices. More specifically, while the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil spot price averaged $28.84 in October, about $6.70 per barrel above the year-ago level (Figure 1), the WTI average price for fourth quarter 2002 is now projected to soften to $28.20, which is about $2 per barrel below our fourth-quarter projection from last month. Meanwhile, OECD inventory levels, which are now approaching 5 -year lows, should begin to rise over the next few months as additional supplies reach markets, and return to the middle of their observed range by spring.

162

Short Term Energy Outlook, March 2003  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook March 2003 Overview World Oil Markets. February crude oil prices moved higher than expected pushed by fears of a war in Iraq, low inventories, slow recovery in Venezuelan exports, continued cold weather and sharply higher natural gas prices in the United States. West Texas Intermediate prices averaged close to $36 for the month (Figure 1), a level not seen since October 1990. Oil inventories continued lower through the month resulting in a cumulative reduction in total commercial stocks of 101 million barrels since September 30, 2002, the beginning of the heating season. Total OECD inventories reached an estimated 2,424 million barrels at the end of February, which would be the lowest level since

163

Short Term Energy Outlook, December 2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2002 December 2002 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook December 2002 Overview World Oil Markets: Average crude oil prices fell by about $2.50 per barrel between October and November in response to continued high production levels from OPEC 10 countries (Figure 1). However, by the end of November oil prices had risen to end-October levels as concerns over the situations in Iraq and Venezuela pushed prices up. Oil inventories, which are currently in the lower portion of the previous 5-year range, are poised to rise to more comfortable levels soon if OPEC output continues at or above current levels. OPEC is considering cutbacks from current levels. Heating Fuels Update. As in October, weather was m uch colder than normal in November, boosting

164

Short-term energy outlook annual supplement, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement (supplement) is published once a year as a complement to the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook), Quarterly Projections. The purpose of the Supplement is to review the accuracy of the forecasts published in the Outlook, make comparisons with other independent energy forecasts, and examine current energy topics that affect the forecasts.

NONE

1993-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

165

Short-term energy outlook, annual supplement 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement (Supplement) is published once a year as a complement to the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook), Quarterly Projections. The purpose of the Supplement is to review the accuracy of the forecasts published in the Outlook, make comparisons with other independent energy forecasts, and examine current energy topics that affect the forecasts.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Renewable Energy Specifications, Testing and Certification Terms of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewable Energy Specifications, Testing and Certification Terms of Renewable Energy Specifications, Testing and Certification Terms of Reference Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Renewable Energy Specifications, Testing and Certification Terms of Reference Agency/Company /Organization: World Bank Sector: Energy Focus Area: Solar, - Solar PV Topics: Market analysis, Co-benefits assessment Website: web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/TOPICS/EXTENERGY2/EXTRENENERGYTK/0,, References: Renewable Energy Specifications, Testing and Certification Terms of Reference[1] Resources Establishment of Local PV Systems Certification Capability Preparation of Small Private Power Producers Grid Connection Standards Establishment of Local PV System Battery Testing Procedure References ↑ "Renewable Energy Specifications, Testing and Certification

167

AN ASSESSMENT OF ENERGY INTENSITY INDICATORS AND THEIR ROLE AS POLICY -MAKING TOOLS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AN ASSESSMENT OF ENERGY INTENSITY INDICATORS AND THEIR ROLE AS POLICY - MAKING TOOLS by Mallika as a basis for policy-making has been on the rise. The idea that trends in both energy intensity policy criteria. Estimates of economic energy intensity from decomposition analyses are found to be data

168

Table 7. Carbon intensity of the energy supply by state (2000...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 7. Carbon intensity of the energy supply by state (2000 - 2010)" "kilograms of energy-related carbon dioxide per million Btu" ,,,"Change" ,,,"2000 to 2010"...

169

U.S. energy intensity projected to continue its steady decline ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil ... Energy use in homes, ... the role of energy-intensive industries in the United States declined with continuing structural changes ...

170

EIA Energy Efficiency-Iron and Steel Energy Intensity, 1998-2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Iron and Steel Manufacturing Energy Intensities, 1998, 2002, and 2006 Below are data for iron and steel industry from the 1998, 2002, and 2006 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS). The tables provide estimates for energy consumed for all purposes, end uses of fuel consumption, offsite-produced fuel consumption, expenditures for purchased energy, as well as energy intensities per value of production and per ton of steel. Energy Consumption 1998, 2002, and 2006 Table 1. Consumption of Energy for All Purposes (First Use) html Table 1 excel table 1. pdf table 1. Table 2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption html table 2. excel table 2. pdf table 2. Table 3. Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption html table 3. excel table 3. pdf table 3. Table 4. Expenditures for Purchased Energy

171

Challenges for Long-Term Energy Models: Modeling Energy Use and Energy Efficiency  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Long-Term Energy Models: Long-Term Energy Models: Modeling Energy Use and Energy Efficiency James Sweeney Stanford University Director, Precourt Institute for Energy Efficiency Professor, Management Science and Engineering Presentation to EIA 2008 Energy Conference 34 ! Years of Energy Information and Analysis Some Modeling History * Original Federal Energy Administration Demand Models in PIES and IEES (1974) - Residential, Industrial, Commercial Sectors * Econometric models * Dynamic specification * Allowed matrix of own-elasticities and cross- elasticities of demand for PIES and IEES - Electricity, Natural Gas, Oil, Coal - Designed to examine implications of changes in energy prices, taxes, price regulation - For analysis of "energy conservation" options, estimate of direct impacts used as reduction of

172

SHOET-TERM - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

System, maintained by the Energy Analysis and Forecasting Division of the Office of Energy Markets and End Use. 21. PennWell Publishing Company., ...

173

DOBEIA-0202(83/4Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

DOBEIA-0202(83/4Q) DOBEIA-0202(83/4Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections November 1983 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. t rt jrt .ort lort .lort lort lort lort <.ort ort Tt- .-m .erm -Term -Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Nrm ,iergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Short Short Short Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short Short Short Short Short-

174

DOE/EIA-0202(85/1Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1Q) 1Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections January 1985 Published: February 1985 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. t rt jrt .ort lort lort lort nort lort *.ort ort Tt .m .erm -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term uergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short

175

DOE/EIA-0202(84/4Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4Q) 4Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections October 1984 Published: November 1984 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. t rt jrt .ort lort iort lort iort lort \ort ort Tt .erm Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term -Term -Term xrm nergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short Short- Short- Short Short Short Short Short Short

176

TERMS AND CONDITIONS PUBLIC INTEREST ENERGY RESEARCH GRANTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TERMS AND CONDITIONS PUBLIC INTEREST ENERGY RESEARCH GRANTS AWARD # PIR-09-0xx #12;i TERMS............................................................................................3 1 #12;PON 09-002 Terms and Cond-attch N (12-30-09 jm).doc 1 TERMS AND CONDITIONS 1. Grant

177

Short-term energy outlook. Quarterly projections, Third quarter 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes the performance of previous forecasts, compares recent cases with those of other forecasting services, and discusses current topics related to the short-term energy markets. (See Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement, DOE/EIA-0202). The feature article for this issue is Demand, Supply and Price Outlook for Reformulated Gasoline, 1995.

1994-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

178

Renewable Energy Institutional Arrangements for Implementation Terms of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewable Energy Institutional Arrangements for Implementation Terms of Renewable Energy Institutional Arrangements for Implementation Terms of Reference Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Renewable Energy Institutional Arrangements for Implementation Terms of Reference Agency/Company /Organization: World Bank Sector: Energy Focus Area: Solar Topics: Implementation, Market analysis Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/TOPICS/EXTENERGY2/EXTRENENERGYTK/0,, References: Renewable Energy Institutional Arrangements for Implementation Terms of Reference[1] Resources Solar Home Systems Business Planning Advisory Services Preparation, Administration, Monitoring and Evaluation of the Solar Battery Charging Stations Subproject Off-Grid Rural Electrification Project Advisor PV Market Study

179

HIGH INTENSITY LOW-ENERGY POSITRON SOURCE AT JEFFERSON  

SciTech Connect

We present a novel concept of a low-energy e{sup +} source with projected intensity on the order of 10{sup 10} slow e{sup +}/s. The key components of this concept are a continuous wave e{sup -} beam, a rotating positron-production target, a synchronized raster/anti-raster, a transport channel, and extraction of e{sup +} into a field-free area through a magnetic plug for moderation in a cryogenic solid. Components were designed in the framework of GEANT4-based (G4beamline) Monte Carlo simulation and TOSCA magnetic field calculation codes. Experimental data to demonstrate the effectiveness of the magnetic plug is presented.

Serkan Golge, Bogdan Wojtsekhowski, Branislav Vlahovic

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Industry Terms and Definitions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2007 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Industry Terms and Definitions Citation Liberty Pioneer educational...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "term energy intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Designing Renewable Energy Financing Mechanism Terms of Reference | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Designing Renewable Energy Financing Mechanism Terms of Reference Designing Renewable Energy Financing Mechanism Terms of Reference (Redirected from Designing Renewable Energy Financing Mechanisms) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Designing Renewable Energy Financing Mechanisms Agency/Company /Organization: World Bank Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Finance, Implementation, Market analysis Website: web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/TOPICS/EXTENERGY2/EXTRENENERGYTK/0,, References: Designing Renewable Energy Financing Mechanisms[1] Resources Design of Micro-hydro Funding Facility and Community Mobilization Support Design of Institutional and Financial Intermediation Scheme for a Micro hydro Power Development Program Design of a Rural Energy Fund References ↑ "Designing Renewable Energy Financing Mechanisms"

182

Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - May 2005  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook May 2005 2005 Summer Motor Gasoline Outlook Update (Figure 1) A considerable break in the expected strength of near-term crude oil prices has resulted in a lower forecast for retail gasoline prices this spring. Gasoline prices may well have seen their peak for the year, barring sharp disruptions in crude oil supply or refinery operations. Pump prices for the summer (April-September) are now projected to average $2.17 per gallon, still high by historical standards but well below the $2.28 anticipated last month. Our projection has been revised downward from the last Outlook as crude oil prices fell from the high $50s per barrel to the low $50s. However, oil prices remain high enough to keep expected

183

World Best Practice Energy Intensity Values for Selected Industrial Sectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers.An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers.

Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Neelis, Maarten; Galitsky, Christina; Zhou, Nan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Short-Term Energy Carbon Dioxide Emissions Forecasts August 2009  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Supplement to the Short-Term Energy Outlook. Short-term projections for U.S. carbon dioxide emissions of the three fossil fuels: coal, natural gas, and petroleum.

Information Center

2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

185

Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement 1995  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5) 5) Distribution Category UC-950 Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement 1995 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration/ Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement 1995 ii Contacts Contacts The Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), Office of Energy Markets and End Use (EMEU). General questions concerning the content of the report may be directed to W. Calvin Kilgore (202/586-1617),

186

Short-Term Energy Outlook, Annual Supplement 1994  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4) 4) Distribution Category UC-950 Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement 1994 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration/ Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement 1994 ii Contacts Contacts The Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), Office of Energy Markets and End Use (EMEU). General questions concerning the content of the report may be directed to W. Calvin Kilgore (202/586-1617),

187

Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - February 2005  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

February 2005 February 2005 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook February 2005 Winter Fuels Update (Figure 1) Despite some cold weather during the second half of January, expected average consumer prices for heating fuels this heating season are little changed since the January Outlook, leaving projections for household heating fuel expenditures about the same as previously reported. Heating oil expenditures by typical Northeastern households are expected to average 32 percent above last winter's levels, with residential fuel oil prices averaging $1.82 per gallon for the October-to-March period. Expenditures for propane-heated households are expected to increase about

188

Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - January 2005  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

January 2005 January 2005 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook January 2005 Winter Fuels Update (Figure 1) Consumer prices for heating fuels are relatively unchanged since the December Outlook, leaving projections for household heating fuel expenditures about the same as previously projected, despite continued warm weather in the middle of the heating season. Heating oil expenditures by typical Northeastern households are expected to average 30 percent above last winter's levels, with residential fuel oil prices averaging $1.82 per gallon for the October-to-March period. Expenditures for propane-heated households are expected to increase about 20 percent this winter.

189

Extreme rainfall intensities and long-term rainfall risk from tropical cyclones  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a methodology for the frequency of extreme rainfall intensities caused by tropical cyclones (TCs) in coastal areas. The mean rainfall field associated with a TC with maximum tangential wind speed Vmax, radius ...

Langousis, Andreas, 1981-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Carbon Intensity, - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Carbon Intensity using Market Exchange Rates (Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide per Thousand Year 2005 U.S. Dollars) Loading...

191

Renewable Energy Economic and Financial Analysis Terms of Reference | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewable Energy Economic and Financial Analysis Terms of Reference Renewable Energy Economic and Financial Analysis Terms of Reference Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Renewable Energy Economic and Financial Analysis Terms of Reference Agency/Company /Organization: World Bank Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Finance, Implementation, Market analysis Website: web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/TOPICS/EXTENERGY2/EXTRENENERGYTK/0,, References: Renewable Energy Economic and Financial Analysis Terms of Reference[1] Resources Techno-Economic Comparison of Off-grid Options -- Assessment of Household, Battery Charging and Isolated Micro-Grid Systems Economic Analysis of Solar PV Systems Component References ↑ "Renewable Energy Economic and Financial Analysis Terms of Reference" Retrieved from

192

Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly/Biennial Updates  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Short-term forecasts of energy supply, demand, and price projections through 2001 for U.S. and International oil forecasts

Joe Ayoub

193

Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly/Biennial Updates  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Short-term forecasts of energy supply, demand, and price projections through 2001 for U.S. and International oil forecasts

2013-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

194

Short-Term Energy Outlook and Winter Fuels Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Short-Term Energy Outlook and Winter Fuels Outlook For NASEO Winter Fuels Outlook Conference November 1, 2013| Washington, DC By Adam Sieminski, Administrator EIA works closely...

195

Renewable Energy Cross Sectoral Assessments Terms of Reference...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Renewable Energy Cross Sectoral Assessments Terms of Reference Jump to: navigation, search...

196

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Greenhouse gas data, voluntary report- ing, electric power plant emissions. Highlights Short-Term Energy Outlook ...

197

Regional Short-Term Energy Model (RSTEM) Overview  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Regional Short-Term Energy Model (RSTEM) utilizes estimated econometric relationships for demand, inventories and prices to forecast energy market outcomes across key sectors and selected regions throughout the United States.

Information Center

2009-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

198

Renewable Energy Terms of Reference: Laws, Policies and Regulations | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Renewable Energy Terms of Reference: Laws, Policies and Regulations Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Renewable Energy Terms of Reference: Laws, Policies and Regulations Agency/Company /Organization: World Bank Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Policies/deployment programs Website: web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/TOPICS/EXTENERGY2/EXTRENENERGYTK/0,, References: Renewable Energy Terms of Reference: Laws, Policies and Regulations[1] Resources Sustainable Service Delivery Model Through Distributed Renewable

199

Table 22. Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu / real GDP in billion 2005 chained dollars) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 11.2 11.1 11.0 10.8 10.7 10.5 10.4 10.3 10.1 10.0 9.9 9.8 9.7 9.6 9.5 9.4 9.3 9.2 AEO 1995 10.9 10.8 10.6 10.4 10.3 10.1 10.0 9.9 9.8 9.6 9.5 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.1 9.1 9.0 AEO 1996 10.7 10.6 10.4 10.3 10.1 10.0 9.8 9.7 9.6 9.5 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.2 9.1 9.0 8.9 AEO 1997 10.3 10.3 10.2 10.1 9.9 9.8 9.7 9.6 9.5 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.2 9.1 9.0 8.9 AEO 1998 10.1 10.1 10.1 10.0 9.9 9.8 9.7 9.6 9.5 9.5 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.1 9.0 AEO 1999 9.6 9.7 9.7 9.7 9.6 9.4 9.3 9.1 9.0 8.9 8.8 8.7 8.6 8.5 AEO 2000 9.4 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.1 9.0 8.9 8.8 8.7 8.7 8.6 8.5 8.4 AEO 2001 8.7 8.6 8.5 8.4 8.3 8.1 8.0 7.9 7.8 7.6 7.5 7.4

200

SHORT-TERM - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Analysis and Forecasting Division (202/586-5382). Macroeconomic Forecast: Energy Product Prices: ... scenario, it is assumed that, after the first

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "term energy intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Renewable Energy Specifications, Testing and Certification Terms...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Company Organization: World Bank Sector: Energy Focus Area: Solar, - Solar PV Topics: Market analysis, Co-benefits assessment Website: web.worldbank.orgWBSITEEXTERNALTOPICS...

202

Alternative Dispute Resolution Terms | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alternative Dispute Resolution Terms Alternative Dispute Resolution Terms Alternative Dispute Resolution Terms Dispute Systems Design Dispute systems design is a process for assisting an organization to develop a structure for handling a series of similar recurring or anticipated disputes (e.g., environmental enforcement cases or EEO complaints within a federal agency) more effectively. Facilitation Facilitation is a collaborative process in which a neutral seeks to assist a group of individuals or other parties to discuss constructively a number of complex, potentially controversial issues. The neutral in a facilitation process (the "facilitator") plays a less active role than a mediator and, unlike a mediator, does not see "resolution" of a conflict as a goal of his or her work.

203

Designing Renewable Energy Financing Mechanism Terms of Reference | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Designing Renewable Energy Financing Mechanism Terms of Reference Designing Renewable Energy Financing Mechanism Terms of Reference Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Designing Renewable Energy Financing Mechanisms Agency/Company /Organization: World Bank Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Finance, Implementation, Market analysis Website: web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/TOPICS/EXTENERGY2/EXTRENENERGYTK/0,, References: Designing Renewable Energy Financing Mechanisms[1] Resources Design of Micro-hydro Funding Facility and Community Mobilization Support Design of Institutional and Financial Intermediation Scheme for a Micro hydro Power Development Program Design of a Rural Energy Fund References ↑ "Designing Renewable Energy Financing Mechanisms" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Designing_Renewable_Energy_Financing_Mechanism_Terms_of_Reference&oldid=383234"

204

Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - April 2005  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

April 2005 April 2005 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook April 2005 2005 Summer Motor Gasoline Outlook (Figure 1) Gasoline prices in 2005 are projected to remain high, at an expected average of $2.28 per gallon for the April to September summer season, 38 cents above last summer. Similar high motor gasoline prices are expected through 2006. Monthly average prices are projected to peak at about $2.35 per gallon in May. Summer diesel fuel prices are expected to average $2.24 per gallon. As in 2004, the primary factor behind these price increases is crude oil costs. WTI, for example, is projected to average 37 cents per gallon higher than last summer. High world oil demand will continue to support crude oil prices and increase competition for

205

Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - June 2005  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook June 2005 2005 Summer Motor Fuels Outlook Update (Figure 1) In May, while West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil prices oscillated from the low $50s range to $47 and back again, retail gasoline prices declined steadily from about $2.24 per gallon at the beginning of the month to $2.10 on May 30. On June 6, average retail prices were $2.12 per gallon. Pump gasoline prices for the summer (April-September) are now projected to average $2.17 per gallon, similar to last month's projection but still about 26 cents per gallon above the year-ago level. Crude oil prices are expected to remain high enough to keep monthly average gasoline prices above $2.00 per gallon through 2006. The

206

Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - April 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 1 April 2006 Short-Term Energy Outlook and Summer Fuels Outlook April 11, 2006 Release Contents Overview Global Petroleum Markets U.S. Petroleum Markets Motor Gasoline Diesel Fuel Natural Gas Markets Electricity Markets Coal Markets Overview Continued steady world oil demand growth, combined with only modest increases in world spare oil production capacity and the continuing risks of geopolitical instability, are expected to keep crude oil prices high through 2006. The price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil is projected to average $65 per barrel in 2006 and $61 in 2007 (Figure 1. West Texas Intermediate Crude Oil Price). Retail regular gasoline prices are projected to average $2.50 per gallon in 2006 and $2.40 in

207

Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - July 2005  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

July 2005 July 2005 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook July 2005 2005 Summer Motor Fuels Outlook Update (Figure 1) Retail regular-grade gasoline prices moved up from about $2.12 per gallon at the beginning of June to $2.33 on July 11. Gasoline pump prices for the summer (April-September) are now projected to average $2.25 per gallon, 8 cents per gallon higher than last month's projection and about 35 cents per gallon above the year-ago level. Crude oil prices are expected to remain high enough to keep quarterly average gasoline prices above $2.20 per gallon through 2006. The projected average for retail diesel this summer is $2.33 per gallon, up about 56 cents per gallon from last summer. Nationally, annual average diesel fuel prices

208

Short-term energy outlook. Quarterly projections, Third quarter 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes the performance of previous forecasts, compares recent projections with those of other forecasting services, and discusses current topics related to the short-term energy markets. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the third quarter of 1995 through the fourth quarter of 1996. Values for the second quarter of 1995, however, are preliminary EIA estimates.

NONE

1995-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

209

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration - EIA ... Consumption & Efficiency. Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, manufacturing, and ...

210

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Analysis & Projections. Monthly and yearly energy forecasts, analysis of energy topics, financial analysis, Congressional reports. Markets & ...

211

Changes in Energy Intensity in the Manufacturing Sector 1985-1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Changes in Energy Intensity in the Manufacturing Sector 1985 - 1994 Full Report Introduction Summary of Data Data Tables Data Summaries All (20-39) Food (20) Textiles (22) Apparel (23) Lumber (24) Furniture (25) Paper (26) Printing (27) Chemicals (28) Refineries (29) Rubber (30) Stone (32) Metals (33) Fab. Metals (34) Machinery (35) El. Equip.(36) Instruments (38) Misc. (39) Appendices Survey Design Quality of Data Sector Description Nonobservation Errors Glossary Intensity Sites Commercial Residential Transportation International Manufacturing Energy Intensity Changes in Energy Intensity Click for Full Graph Manufacturing Energy Consumption Consumption of Energy Click for Full Graph Manufacturing Shipments History of Shipments Click for Full Graph The focus of this data report is on intensity of energy use, measured by energy consumption relative to constant dollar shipments of manufactured products -- commonly called energy intensities (EI) by energy analysts. This report explicitly relates changes in two energy measures of energy intensity to efficiency, while being cognizant that there are structural and behavioral effects enmeshed in those measures of energy efficiency. Reporting EI serves to continue the Intensity Change report series.

212

World Best Practice Energy Intensity Values for Selected Industrial Sectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cracking and alternative processes, Energy 31 (2006), pp.cracking and alternative processes, Energy 31 (2006), pp.cracking and alternative processes, Energy 31 (2006), pp.

Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Neelis, Maarten; Galitsky, Christina; Zhou, Nan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Table US1. Total Energy Consumption, Expenditures, and Intensities ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Part 1: Housing Unit Characteristics and Energy Usage Indicators Energy Consumption 2 Energy Expenditures 2 Total U.S. (quadrillion Btu) Per Household (Dollars) Per

214

Glass manufacturing is an energy-intensive industry mainly ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration ... There is substantial potential for energy efficiency improvements in glass manufacturing. Estimates range from ...

215

Long Term Operation of Renewable Energy Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As part of a renewable energy project, a building was designed and constructed to demonstrate several renewable energy technologies at the Wind Test Center of the Alternative Energy Institute (AEI). The systems are passive and active heating, solar hot water, daylighting, passive cooling, and generation of electricity from a 10 kW wind turbine and 1.9 kW of photovoltaic panels, each connected to the utility grid through inverters. Since 1991, 16,900 kWh have been purchased and 31,300 kWh returned to the utility grid. A significant portion of the purchased power has been used in charging our electric van. The building does not have auxiliary heating or cooling systems powered by fossil fuels. A data acquisition system monitors building, exterior, and system temperatures as well as power outputs of the wind and PV systems. The data are sampled at 1 Hz and averaged each 15 minutes. Annual, seasonal and diurnal patterns are shown in graphical format. Temperatures for the coldest days of winter and hottest summer days are also presented.

Nelson, V.; Starcher, K.; Davis, D.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Report Monthly Energy Review Residential Energy ... and Heat Generation from ... became the first major solar thermal electric power plant to ...

217

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration - EIA - Official Energy Statistics from the U.S. Government. ... storage, imports and exports, production, prices, sales.

218

Estimating material and energy intensities of urban areas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this thesis is to develop methods to estimate, analyze and visualize the resource intensity of urban areas. Understanding the resource consumption of the built environment is particularly relevant in cities ...

Quinn, David James, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Short-term energy outlook: Annual supplement, 1987  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) publishes forecasts of short-term energy supply, demand, and prices in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). This volume, Short-Term Energy Outlook, Annual Supplement, (Supplement) discusses major changes in the forecasting methodology, analyzes previous forecast errors, and examines current issues that affect EIA's short-term energy forecasts. The principal users of the Supplement are managers and energy analysts in private industry and government. Chapter 2 evaluates the accuracy of previous short-term energy forecasts and the major assumptions underlying these forecasts published in the last 13 issues of the Outlook. Chapter 3 compares the EIA's present energy projections with past projections and with recent projections made by other forecasting groups. Chapter 4 analyzes the 1986 increase in residual fuel oil demand after 8 consecutive years of decline. Sectoral analysis shows where and why this increase occurred. Chapter 5 discusses the methodology, estimation, and forecasts of fossil fuel shares used in the generation of electricity. Chapter 6 presents an update of the methodology used to forecast natural gas demand, with an emphasis on sectoral disaggregation. Chapter 7 compares the current use of generation data as a representation of short-term electricity demand with proposed total and sectoral sales equations. 8 refs., 7 figs., 63 tabs.

1987-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

220

Energy Efficiency CO2 Intensity Calculator (EE-CO2 Intensity Calculator) Version 3.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This spreadsheet calculator will allow members to quantify the impact of their energy efficiency savings and fuel displacement on carbon-dioxide emissions, specific to their region and the end-uses ...

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "term energy intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Long-Term Stewardship Study | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Long-Term Stewardship Study Long-Term Stewardship Study Long-Term Stewardship Study The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Long-term Stewardship Study ("Study" or "Final Study") to comply with the terms of a settlement agreement between DOE, the Natural Resources Defense Council, and 38 other plaintiffs [Natural Resources Defense Council, et al. v. Richardson, et al., Civ. No. 97-936 (SS) (D.D.C. Dec. 12, 1998)]. The Study describes and analyzes several issues and a variety of information associated with long-term stewardship. Long-Term Stewardship Study More Documents & Publications EIS-0226: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0226: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Program 2003 Report

222

Long-Term Stewardship Study | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Long-Term Stewardship Study Long-Term Stewardship Study Long-Term Stewardship Study The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Long-term Stewardship Study ("Study" or "Final Study") to comply with the terms of a settlement agreement between DOE, the Natural Resources Defense Council, and 38 other plaintiffs [Natural Resources Defense Council, et al. v. Richardson, et al., Civ. No. 97-936 (SS) (D.D.C. Dec. 12, 1998)]. The Study describes and analyzes several issues and a variety of information associated with long-term stewardship. Long-Term Stewardship Study More Documents & Publications Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Program 2003 Report Site Transition Process upon Completion of the Cleanup Mission: Fact Sheet (September 2013) Chairs Meeting - April 2010

223

World Best Practice Energy Intensity Values for Selected Industrial Sectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Use in the Steel Industry. Brussels: IISI. Worrell,1998. Energy Use in the Steel Industry. Brussels: IISI. 2.2.1998. Energy Use in the Steel Industry. Brussels: IISI. Best

Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Neelis, Maarten; Galitsky, Christina; Zhou, Nan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Short?Term Energy Outlook February 2013 5 modestly in this forecast, increasing by 50,000 bbl/d (0 ...

225

Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Short?Term Energy Outlook January 2013 5 Forecast motor gasoline consumption in 2013 and 2014 ...

226

Glass manufacturing is an energy-intensive industry mainly fueled ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration - EIA - Official Energy Statistics from the U.S. Government ... solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. Nuclear & Uranium.

227

The cement industry is the most energy intensive of all ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration - EIA - Official Energy Statistics from the U.S. Government ... solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. Nuclear & Uranium.

228

You Provide the Search Term, Green Energy Portal Provides the...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

7, 2011 You Provide the Search Term, Green Energy Portal Provides the Concepts New Semantic Search Technology plus Auto-complete Gets You a More Direct Line to Rich Scientific...

229

Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook October 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Winter Fuels Outlook October 2013 1 October 2013 Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook (STEO) Highlights EIA projects average U.S. household expenditures for natural...

230

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Monthly and yearly energy forecasts, analysis of energy topics, ... Release Date: October 8, 2013 | Next Release Date: November 13, 2013 ...

231

Zambia-Long-Term Generation Expansion Study | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zambia-Long-Term Generation Expansion Study Zambia-Long-Term Generation Expansion Study Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Zambia-Long-Term Generation Expansion Study Name Zambia-Long-Term Generation Expansion Study Agency/Company /Organization Argonne National Laboratory Sector Energy Topics Implementation, GHG inventory, Background analysis Resource Type Software/modeling tools, Lessons learned/best practices Website http://www.dis.anl.gov/pubs/61 Country Zambia UN Region Eastern Africa References Zambia-Long-Term Generation Expansion Study[1] Abstract The objective of this study is to analyze possible long-term development options of the Zambian electric power system in the period up to 2015. Overview "The objective of this study is to analyze possible long-term development options of the Zambian electric power system in the period up to 2015. The

232

Short Term Energy Outlook July - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System and by EIAs office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels (hydroelectric and nuclear).

233

Samish Indian Nation Long-Term Strategic Energy Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Tribes strategic energy planning effort is divided into three phases: (1) Completing an Energy Resource Assessment; (2) Developing a Long-Term Strategic Energy Plan; and (3) Preparing a Strategic Energy Implementation Plan for the Samish Homelands. The Samish Indian Nation developed a comprehensive Strategic Energy plan to set policy for future development on tribal land that consists of a long-term, integrated, systems approach to providing a framework under which the Samish Community can use resources efficiently, create energy-efficient infrastructures, and protect and enhance quality of life. Development of the Strategic Energy plan will help the Samish Nation create a healthy community that will sustain current and future generations by addressing economic, environmental, and social issues while respecting the Samish Indian Nation culture and traditions.

Christine Woodward; B. Beckley; K. Hagen

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

234

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration ... Retail and Other Industry ... Airline Ticket Price Index Raw Steel Production

235

Short-term energy outlook: Quarterly projections. Second quarter 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes the performance of previous forecasts, compares recent projections with those of other forecasting services, and discusses current topics related to the short-term energy markets. (See Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement, DOE/EIA-0202.) The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the second quarter of 1995 through the fourth quarter of 1996. Values for the first quarter of 1995, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in the Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations using the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled into the second quarter 1995 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS database is archived quarterly and is available from the National Technical Information Service.

NONE

1995-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

236

Long-Term Stewardship Resource Center | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Long-Term Stewardship Long-Term Stewardship Resource Center Long-Term Stewardship Resource Center WELCOME TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY'S LONG-TERM STEWARDSHIP RESOURCE CENTER The purpose of this web site is to provide the public and the Department of Energy's (DOE) community with a variety of information resources for long-term stewardship (LTS) responsibilities. LTS includes the physical controls, institutions, information and other mechanisms needed to ensure protection of people and the environment at sites or portions of sites where DOE has completed or plans to complete "cleanup" (e.g., landfill closures, remedial actions, corrective actions, removal actions and facility stabilization) and where legacy contamination will remain hazardous. The DOE's Legacy Management (LM) procedures for DOE sites

237

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Weekly Update Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook This summary is based on the most recent Short-Term Energy Outlook released May 6, 2002. EIA projects that natural gas wellhead prices will average $2.73 per MMBtu in 2002 compared with about $4.00 per MMBtu last year (Short-Term Energy Outlook, May 2002). This projection reflects the sharp increases in spot and near-term futures prices in recent weeks. Average wellhead prices have risen 38 percent from $2.14 per MMBtu in February to an estimated $2.96 in April. Spot prices at the Henry Hub have increased to an even greater extent, rising more than $1.50 per MMBtu since early February. The upward price trend reflects a number of influences, such as unusual weather patterns that have led to increased gas consumption, and tensions in the Middle East and rising crude oil prices. Other factors contributing to the recent price surge include the strengthening economy, the increased capacity and planned new capacity of gas-burning power plants, and concerns about the decline in gas-directed drilling.

238

Short-term energy outlook. Quarterly projections, second quarter 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy Information Administration prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections. The forecasts in this issue cover the second quarter of 1996 through the fourth quarter of 1997. Changes to macroeconomic measures by the Bureau of Economic Analysis have been incorporated into the STIFS model used.

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Energy intensities in OECD countries, 1970--1989: A sectoral analysis  

SciTech Connect

We discuss the evolution of energy intensities in key sectors or subsectors between the early 1970s and the late 1980s in nine OECD countries. The sectors covered are manufacturing, automobile and air travel, freight trucking, residential space heating, and the service sector. Intensity changes varied among the sectors and countries, but common trends are visible in many cases. In most cases, the intensity decline slowed or ceased in the mid-1980s. We discuss the causes for the changes observed in each area, showing how energy-price changes were but one of many factors that played a role. Weighting the changes in intensities by 1973 energy use patterns, we find that the aggregate energy intensity index fell by 14--19% between 1973 and 1988 in the US, Japan, and West Germany.

Schipper, L.; Meyers, S.; Howarth, R.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

a: Includes lease condensate. b: Total consumption includes Independent Power Producer (IPP) consumption. c: Renewable energy includes minor ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "term energy intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Small Wind Guidebook/Glossary of Terms | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Small Wind Guidebook/Glossary of Terms Small Wind Guidebook/Glossary of Terms < Small Wind Guidebook Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid? * State Information Portal * Glossary of Terms * For More Information

242

Short-term energy outlook, quarterly projections, second quarter 1998  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections. The details of these projections, as well as monthly updates, are available on the Internet at: www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/steo/pub/contents.html. The paper discusses outlook assumptions; US energy prices; world oil supply and the oil production cutback agreement of March 1998; international oil demand and supply; world oil stocks, capacity, and net trade; US oil demand and supply; US natural gas demand and supply; US coal demand and supply; US electricity demand and supply; US renewable energy demand; and US energy demand and supply sensitivities. 29 figs., 19 tabs.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Short-term energy outlook: Annual supplement 1989  

SciTech Connect

This Supplement is published once a year as a complement to the Short-Term Energy Outlook, Quarterly Projections (Outlook). The purpose is to review the accuracy of the forecasts presented in the Outlook, make comparisons with other independent energy forecasts, and examine current energy topics that affect the forecasts. A brief description of the content of each chapter follows below: Chapter 2 evaluates the accuracy of the short-term energy forecasts published in the last 6 issues of the Outlook, for 1988/1989. Chapter 3 discusses the economics of the petrochemical feedstock market, and describes a new model which more fully captures the determinants of feedstock demand. Chapter 4 examines present and proposed new methods of forecasting short-term natural gas prices at the wellhead and spot prices. Chapter 5 discusses the modeling of natural demand in the short term. Chapter 6 discusses regional trends in the demand for fuel by electric utilities. Chapter 7 focuses on industrial coal use trends in recent years. Chapter 8 compares EIA's base case energy projections as published in the Outlook (89/2Q) with recent projections made by three other major forecasting groups. The chapter focuses on macroeconomic assumptions, primary energy demand, and primary energy supply, showing the differences and similarities in the four forecasts.

1989-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

244

Short-Term Energy Outlook: Quarterly projections. Fourth quarter 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes the performance of previous forecasts, compares recent cases with those of other forecasting services, and discusses current topics related to the short-term energy markets. (See Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement, DOE/EIA-0202.) The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the fourth quarter of 1993 through the fourth quarter of 1994. Values for the third quarter of 1993, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in the Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations using the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated using actual weather data). The historical energy data are EIA data published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications.

Not Available

1993-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

245

Short-term energy outlook, Quarterly projections. Third quarter 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes the performance of previous forecasts, compares recent cases with those of other forecasting services, and discusses current topics related to the short-term energy markets. (See Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement, DOE/EIA-0202.) The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the third quarter of 1993 through the fourth quarter of 1994. Values for the second quarter of 1993, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in the Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations using the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated using actual weather data). The historical energy data are EIA data published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding.

NONE

1993-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

246

The cement industry is the most energy intensive of all ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Today in Energy July 1, 2013.. ... tags: consumption industrial manufacturing. Email Updates. RSS Feeds. Facebook. Twitter. YouTube. Add us to your site.

247

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings 1989 data -- Publication  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End-Use Intensities Executive Summary > Publication and Tables End-Use Intensities Executive Summary > Publication and Tables Publication and Tables Energy End Uses Ranked by Energy Consumption, 1989 Figure on Energy End Uses Ranked by Energy Consumption, 1989 Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Forms EIA-871A through F of the 1989 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. Divider Bar To View and/or Print Reports (requires Adobe Acrobat Reader) - Download Adobe Acrobat Reader If you experience any difficulties, visit our Technical Frequently Asked Questions. Divider Bar You have the option of downloading the entire report or selected sections of the report. Full Report - Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings (1989 data) (file size .89 MB) pages: 140

248

Reducing Cache Access Energy in Array-Intensive Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mahmut Kandemir Microsystems Design Lab Pennsylvania State University University Park, PA, 16802, USA Ibrahim Kolcu UMIST P.O. Box 88, Sackville Street Manchester, M60 1QD, UK Cache memories are known to consume a large percentage of on-chip energy in current microprocessors. For example, [1] reports that the on-chip cache in DEC Alpha 21264 consumes approximately 25% of the on-chip energy. Both sizes and complexities of state-of-the-art caches play a major role in their energy consumption. Direct-mapped caches are, in general, more energy efficient (from a per access energy consumption viewpoint) as they are simpler as compared to set-associative caches, and require no complex line replacement mechanisms (i.e., there is no decision concerning which line has to be evicted when a new line is to be loaded).

Exte Nd Ed; Mahmut Kandemir; Ibrahim Kolcu

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

The structure and intensity of energy use: Trends in five OECD nations  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines trends in the structure and intensity of final energy demand in five OECD nations between 1973 and 1988. Our focus is on primary energy use, which weights fuels by their thermal content and multiplies district heat and electricity by factors of 1.15 and 3.24 to approximate the losses that occur in the conversion and distribution of these energy carriers. Grouch in the level of energy-using activities, given 1973 energy intensities (energy use per unit of activity), would have raised primary energy use by 46% in the US, 42% in Norway, 33% in Denmark, 37% in West Germany, and 53% in Japan. Reductions in end-use energy intensities, given 1973 activity levels, would have reduced primary energy use by 19% in the US, 3% in Norway, 20% in Denmark, 15% in West Germany, and l4% in Japan. Growth in national income parallelled increases in a weighted index of energy-using activities in the US, West Germany, and Denmark but substantially outstripped activity growth in Norway and Japan. We conclude that changes in the structure of a nation's economy may lead to substantial changes in its energy/GDP ratio that are unrelated to changes in the technical efficiency of energy utilization. Similarly, changes in energy intensities may be greater or less than the aggregate change in the energy/GDP ratio of a given country, a further warning that this ratio may be an unreliable indicator of technical efficiency.

Howarth, R.B.; Schipper, L. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Andersson, B. (Stockholm School of Economics (Sweden))

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

The structure and intensity of energy use: Trends in five OECD nations. Revision  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines trends in the structure and intensity of final energy demand in five OECD nations between 1973 and 1988. Our focus is on primary energy use, which weights fuels by their thermal content and multiplies district heat and electricity by factors of 1.15 and 3.24 to approximate the losses that occur in the conversion and distribution of these energy carriers. Grouch in the level of energy-using activities, given 1973 energy intensities (energy use per unit of activity), would have raised primary energy use by 46% in the US, 42% in Norway, 33% in Denmark, 37% in West Germany, and 53% in Japan. Reductions in end-use energy intensities, given 1973 activity levels, would have reduced primary energy use by 19% in the US, 3% in Norway, 20% in Denmark, 15% in West Germany, and l4% in Japan. Growth in national income parallelled increases in a weighted index of energy-using activities in the US, West Germany, and Denmark but substantially outstripped activity growth in Norway and Japan. We conclude that changes in the structure of a nation`s economy may lead to substantial changes in its energy/GDP ratio that are unrelated to changes in the technical efficiency of energy utilization. Similarly, changes in energy intensities may be greater or less than the aggregate change in the energy/GDP ratio of a given country, a further warning that this ratio may be an unreliable indicator of technical efficiency.

Howarth, R.B.; Schipper, L. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Andersson, B. [Stockholm School of Economics (Sweden)

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

The structure and intensity of energy use: Trends in five OECD nations  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines trends in the structure and intensity of final energy demand in five OECD nations between 1973 and 1988. Our focus is on primary energy use, which weights fuels by their thermal content and multiplies district heat and electricity by factors of 1.15 and 3.24 to approximate the losses that occur in the conversion and distribution of these energy carriers. Growth in the level of energy-using activities, given 1973 energy intensities (energy use per unit of activity), would have raised primary energy use by 47% in the US, 44% in Norway, 33% in Denmark, 37% in West Germany, and 54% in Japan. Reductions in end-use energy intensities, given 1973 activity levels, would have reduced primary energy use by 20% in the US, 3% in Norway, 20% in Denmark, 17% in West Germany, and 14% in Japan. Growth in national income parallelled increases in a weighted index of energy-using activities in the US, West Germany, and Denmark but substantially outstripped activity growth in Norway and Japan. We conclude that changes in the structure of a nation's economy may lead to substantial changes in its energy/GDP ratio that are unrelated to changes in the technical efficiency of energy utilization. Similarly, changes in energy intensities may be greater or less than the aggregate change in the energy/GDP ratio of a given country, a further warning that this ratio may be an unreliable indicator of technical efficiency.

Howarth, R.B.; Schipper, L.; Andersson, B.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

The structure and intensity of energy use: Trends in five OECD nations  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines trends in the structure and intensity of final energy demand in five OECD nations between 1973 and 1988. Our focus is on primary energy use, which weights fuels by their thermal content and multiplies district heat and electricity by factors of 1.15 and 3.24 to approximate the losses that occur in the conversion and distribution of these energy carriers. Growth in the level of energy-using activities, given 1973 energy intensities (energy use per unit of activity), would have raised primary energy use by 47% in the US, 44% in Norway, 33% in Denmark, 37% in West Germany, and 54% in Japan. Reductions in end-use energy intensities, given 1973 activity levels, would have reduced primary energy use by 20% in the US, 3% in Norway, 20% in Denmark, 17% in West Germany, and 14% in Japan. Growth in national income parallelled increases in a weighted index of energy-using activities in the US, West Germany, and Denmark but substantially outstripped activity growth in Norway and Japan. We conclude that changes in the structure of a nation`s economy may lead to substantial changes in its energy/GDP ratio that are unrelated to changes in the technical efficiency of energy utilization. Similarly, changes in energy intensities may be greater or less than the aggregate change in the energy/GDP ratio of a given country, a further warning that this ratio may be an unreliable indicator of technical efficiency.

Howarth, R.B.; Schipper, L.; Andersson, B.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Short-Term Energy Outlook - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The historical energy ... programs could make the system more vulnerable to local outages and ... on the country and the time of year. Compared with the cost of Phase ...

254

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

a: Conventional hydroelectric power only. Hydroelectricity generated by pumped storage is not included in renewable energy. b: Wood and wood-derived ...

255

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Department of Energy USA.gov FedStats. Stay Connected Facebook Twitter YouTube Email Updates RSS Feeds ...

256

SHORT-TERM ENERGY OUTLOOK - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be ... Order and Information Desk at 202-783-3238 to verify prices.

257

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration - EIA ... Non-hydro renewable power generation rises by 3.6% this winter, which is a lower growth rate than in recent years.

258

World Best Practice Energy Intensity Values for SelectedIndustrial Sectors  

SciTech Connect

"World best practice" energy intensity values, representingthe most energy-efficient processes that are in commercial use in atleast one location worldwide, are provided for the production of iron andsteel, aluminium, cement, pulp and paper, ammonia, and ethylene. Energyintensity is expressed in energy use per physical unit of output for eachof these commodities; most commonly these are expressed in metric tonnes(t). The energy intensity values are provided by major energy-consumingprocesses for each industrial sector to allow comparisons at the processlevel. Energy values are provided for final energy, defined as the energyused at the production facility as well as for primary energy, defined asthe energy used at the production facility as well as the energy used toproduce the electricity consumed at the facility. The "best practice"figures for energy consumption provided in this report should beconsidered as indicative, as these may depend strongly on the materialinputs.

Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Neelis, Maarten; Galitsky,Christina; Zhou, Nan

2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

259

A Comparison of Iron and Steel Production Energy Intensity in China and the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Comparison of Iron and Steel Production Energy Intensity in China and the A Comparison of Iron and Steel Production Energy Intensity in China and the U.S Title A Comparison of Iron and Steel Production Energy Intensity in China and the U.S Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2011 Authors Price, Lynn K., Ali Hasanbeigi, Nathaniel T. Aden, Zhang Chunxia, Li Xiuping, and Shangguan Fangqin Conference Name ACEEE Industrial Summer Study Date Published 07/2011 Publisher American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy Conference Location New York Keywords china, energy intensity, iron and steel, Low Emission & Efficient Industry, united states Abstract The goal of this study was to develop a methodology for making an accurate comparison of the energy intensity of steel production in China and the U.S. The methodology addresses issues related to boundary definitions, conversion factors, and industry structure. In addition to the base case analysis, six scenarios were developed to assess the effect of different factors such as the share of electric arc furnace (EAF) steel production, conversion factors for the embodied energy of imported and exported intermediary and auxiliary products, and the differences in net calorific values of the fuels. The results of the analysis show that for the whole iron and steel production process, the final energy intensity in 2006 was equal to 14.90 GJ/tonne crude steel in the U.S. and 23.11 GJ/tonne crude steel in China in the base scenario. In another scenario that assumed the Chinese share of electric arc furnace production in 2006 (i.e. 10.5%) in the U.S., the energy intensity of steel production in the U.S. increased by 54% to 22.96GJ/tonne crude steel. Thus, when comparing the energy intensity of the U.S and Chinese steel industry,the structure of the industry should be taken into account.

260

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Monthly and yearly energy forecasts, analysis of energy topics, ... Release Date; January 2013: 01/08/2013: February 2013: 02/12/2013: March 2013: 03/12/2013: April 2013:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "term energy intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings 1995 - Index...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1995 End-Use Data 1995 End-Use Data Overview Tables National estimates of energy consumption by fuel (electricity and natural gas) and end use (heating, cooling, lighting, etc.)...

262

EPRI Energy Efficiency CO2 Intensity Calculator, 2013 Edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This spreadsheet calculator will allow members to quantify the impact of their energy efficiency savings and fuel displacement on carbon-dioxide emissions, specific to their region and the end-uses ...

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

263

EPRI Energy Efficiency CO2 Intensity Calculator, 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This spreadsheet calculator will allow members to quantify the impact of their energy efficiency savings on carbon-dioxide emissions, specific to their region and the end-uses for which the savings emanate. This user-friendly COintensity calculator is a Microsoft Excel application to help utility staff calculate the impact of their actual or planned energy efficiency programs on emissions of CO8322. The calculator will access a database of load dispatch simulation runs of the EPRI National Electric Syste...

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Energy efficiency and carbon dioxide emissions reduction opportunities in the U.S. Iron and Steel sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economic energy intensity indicators are expressed in termsPhysical and Economic Energy Intensity Indicators for Steelphysical and economic energy intensity indicators for steel

Worrell, Ernst; Martin, N.; Price, L.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

A New System of Energy Intensity Indicators for the U.S. Economy Focus on Manufacturing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The U.S. commitment to energy efficiency and conservation policy was emphasized in the National Energy Policy (NEP) made public in May 2001. Recommendation 14 in Chapter 4 of the NEP - "Making Energy Efficiency a National Priority" -recommended that "...the President direct the Secretary of Energy to establish a national priority for improving energy efficiency. The priority would be to improve the energy intensity of the U.S. economy, as measured by the amount of energy required for each dollar of economic productivity. This increased efficiency should be pursued through the combined efforts of industry, consumers, and federal, state, and local governments." As part of the effort to make energy efficiency a national priority, the Department of Energy has developed improved national indicators of energy intensity.

Roop, J. M.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

CBECS 1989 - Energy End-use Intensities in Commercial Buildings -- Detailed  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Publication > Detailed Tables Publication > Detailed Tables 1989 Energy End-Use Intensities Detailed Tables Energy End Uses Ranked by Energy Consumption, 1989 Energy End Uses Ranked by Energy Consumption, 1989 Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Forms EIA-871A through F of the 1989 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. Table Organization The following 13 tables present detailed energy end-use consumption data from the 1989 CBECS. Summary tables for all major fuels (electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat) appear first, followed by separate tables for each of the four major fuels. Within each energy source’s group of tables, there is a table showing end-use consumption, a table showing end-use intensities (consumption per square foot), and a table (except for fuel oil and district heat) showing the end-use shares of total consumption.

267

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Privacy/Security Copyright & Reuse Accessibility. Related Sites U.S. Department of Energy USA.gov FedStats. Stay Connected Facebook Twitter YouTube Email Updates

268

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Maps by energy source and topic, includes forecast maps. ... Release Date: October 8, 2013 ... and projects increases of 1.7% in 2013 and 0.9% in 2014.

269

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Maps by energy source and topic, includes ... Release Date: November 13, 2013 ... for electricity and heat generation grow by an average of 8.1% in 2013.

270

Why did China's Energy Intensity Increase during 1998-2006: Decomposition and Policy Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

coal-dependent consumption structure (Fig. 4) and low per capita energy endowments. China's coal use takes up about 70 percent of the total energy consumption. Per capita oil, natural gas and coal deposits). Moreover, industrial consumption increased more rapidly due to expansion in energy-intensive industries

Edwards, Paul N.

271

Roles of Divergent and Rotational Winds in the Kinetic Energy Balance Intense Convective Activity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contibutions of divergent and rotational wind components to the synoptic-scale kinetic energy balance are described using rawinsonde data at 3 and 6 h intervals from NASAs fourth Atmospheric Variability Experiment (AVE 4). Two intense ...

Henry E. Fuelberg; Peter A. Browning

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

On the mass formula and Wigner and curvature energy terms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The efficiency of different mass formulas derived from the liquid drop model including or not the curvature energy, the Wigner term and different powers of the relative neutron excess $I$ has been determined by a least square fitting procedure to the experimental atomic masses assuming a constant R$_{0,charge}$/A$^{1/3}$ ratio. The Wigner term and the curvature energy can be used independently to improve the accuracy of the mass formula. The different fits lead to a surface energy coefficient of around 17-18 MeV, a relative sharp charge radius r$_0$ of 1.22-1.23 fm and a proton form-factor correction to the Coulomb energy of around 0.9 MeV.

G. Royer

2007-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

273

Comparison of the Evolution of Energy Intensity in Spain and in the EU15. Why is Spain Different?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy intensity in Spain has increased since 1990, while the opposite has happened in the EU15. Decomposition analysis of primary energy intensity ratios has been used to identify which are the key sectors driving the ...

Ocaa, Carlos

274

Long-Term U.S. Energy Outlook: Different Perspectives  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Paul Holtberg, Moderator Paul Holtberg, Moderator April 26, 2011 | Washington, D.C. Long-Term U.S. Energy Outlook: Different Perspectives Speakers 2 Paul Holtberg, 2011 EIA Energy Conference Washington, D.C., April 26, 2011 * John Conti, Assistant Administrator of Energy Analysis, Energy Information Administration * Mark Finley, General Manager, Global Energy Markets and U.S. Economics, BP * Douglas Meade, Director of Research, INFORUM Forecasts/projections and uncertainty 3 Paul Holtberg, 2011 EIA Energy Conference Washington, D.C., April 26, 2011 * Forecast or projections? * Know your analyst * Tools * Uncertainty - Basic underlying trends (e.g., population growth, economic growth, social norms) - Technology (e.g., new technologies, improved technology, breakthroughs vs. evolutionary, new applications)

275

Short-Term Solar Energy Forecasting Using Wireless Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Short-Term Solar Energy Forecasting Using Wireless Sensor Networks Stefan Achleitner, Tao Liu in power output is a major concern and forecasting is, therefore, a top priority. We propose a sensing infrastructure to enable sensing of solar irradiance with application to solar array output forecasting

Cerpa, Alberto E.

276

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Market Prices and Uncertainty Report. This is a regular monthly supplement to the EIA Short-Term Energy Outlook. Contact: James Preciado (James.Preciado@eia.gov) Full ...

277

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, manufacturing, and transportation. ... Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances in the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting Model:

278

EIA Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels OutlookWinter Fuels Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home heating oil retail price includes taxes. 16 Source: EIA Short-Term Energy Outlook, October 2012 Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook October 10, 2012.

279

Long-Term Stewardship Resource Center FAQS | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Long-Term Stewardship Resource Center FAQS Long-Term Stewardship Resource Center FAQS Long-Term Stewardship Resource Center FAQS IS DOE RESPONSIBLE FOR LONG-TERM STEWARDSHIP IF DOE TRANSFERS PROPERTY TO A PUBLIC ENTITY? By Order from the Secretary of Energy, The DOE, including the National Nuclear Security Administration must comply with Order 454.1: Use of Institutional Controls, www.directives.doe.gov/directives/0454.1-APolicy/view. The Order requires DOE to maintain institutional controls as long as necessary to perform their intended protective purposes and to seek sufficient funds. DOE must also determine whether responsibility for required institutional controls on transferred property can be maintained by subsequent owners consistent with applicable law. If this implementation responsibility cannot be

280

Life-cycle energy savings potential from aluminum-intensive vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The life-cycle energy and fuel-use impacts of US-produced aluminum-intensive passenger cars and passenger trucks are assessed. The energy analysis includes vehicle fuel consumption, material production energy, and recycling energy. A model that stimulates market dynamics was used to project aluminum-intensive vehicle market shares and national energy savings potential for the period between 2005 and 2030. We conclude that there is a net energy savings with the use of aluminum-intensive vehicles. Manufacturing costs must be reduced to achieve significant market penetration of aluminum-intensive vehicles. The petroleum energy saved from improved fuel efficiency offsets the additional energy needed to manufacture aluminum compared to steel. The energy needed to make aluminum can be reduced further if wrought aluminum is recycled back to wrought aluminum. We find that oil use is displaced by additional use of natural gas and nonfossil energy, but use of coal is lower. Many of the results are not necessarily applicable to vehicles built outside of the United States, but others could be used with caution.

Stodolsky, F.; Vyas, A.; Cuenca, R.; Gaines, L.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "term energy intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Target Allocation Methodology for China's Provinces: Energy Intensity in the 12th FIve-Year Plan  

SciTech Connect

Experience with China's 20% energy intensity improvement target during the 11th Five-Year Plan (FYP) (2006-2010) has shown the challenges of rapidly setting targets and implementing measures to meet them. For the 12th FYP (2011-2015), there is an urgent need for a more scientific methodology to allocate targets among the provinces and to track physical and economic indicators of energy and carbon saving progress. This report provides a sectoral methodology for allocating a national energy intensity target - expressed as percent change in energy per unit gross domestic product (GDP) - among China's provinces in the 12th FYP. Drawing on international experience - especially the European Union (EU) Triptych approach for allocating Kyoto carbon targets among EU member states - the methodology here makes important modifications to the EU approach to address an energy intensity rather than a CO{sub 2} emissions target, and for the wider variation in provincial energy and economic structure in China. The methodology combines top-down national target projections and bottom-up provincial and sectoral projections of energy and GDP to determine target allocation of energy intensity targets. Total primary energy consumption is separated into three end-use sectors - industrial, residential, and other energy. Sectoral indicators are used to differentiate the potential for energy saving among the provinces. This sectoral methodology is utilized to allocate provincial-level targets for a national target of 20% energy intensity improvement during the 12th FYP; the official target is determined by the National Development and Reform Commission. Energy and GDP projections used in the allocations were compared with other models, and several allocation scenarios were run to test sensitivity. The resulting allocations for the 12th FYP offer insight on past performance and offer somewhat different distributions of provincial targets compared to the 11th FYP. Recommendations for reporting and monitoring progress on the targets, and methodology improvements, are included.

Ohshita, Stephanie; Price, Lynn

2011-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

282

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings1992 -- Overview/End-Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

> Overview > Overview 1992 Energy End-Use Intensities Overview Energy Consumption by End Use, 1992 Figure on Energy Consumption By End Use, 1992 Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Forms EIA-871A through F of the 1992 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. End-Use Estimation Methodology The end-use estimates had two main sources: (1) survey data collected by the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) and (2) building energy simulations provided by the Facility Energy Decision Screening (FEDS) system. The CBECS provided data on building characteristics and total energy consumption (i.e., for all end uses) for a national sample of commercial buildings. Using data collected by the CBECS, the FEDS engineering modules were used to produce estimates of energy consumption by end use. The FEDS engineering estimates were then statistically adjusted to match the CBECS total energy consumption.

283

Short-term energy outlook, Annual supplement 1995  

SciTech Connect

This supplement is published once a year as a complement to the Short- Term Energy Outlook, Quarterly Projections. The purpose of the Supplement is to review the accuracy of the forecasts published in the Outlook, make comparisons with other independent energy forecasts, and examine current energy topics that affect the forecasts. Chap. 2 analyzes the response of the US petroleum industry to the recent four Federal environmental rules on motor gasoline. Chap. 3 compares the EIA base or mid case energy projections for 1995 and 1996 (as published in the first quarter 1995 Outlook) with recent projections made by four other major forecasting groups. Chap. 4 evaluates the overall accuracy. Chap. 5 presents the methology used in the Short- Term Integrated Forecasting Model for oxygenate supply/demand balances. Chap. 6 reports theoretical and empirical results from a study of non-transportation energy demand by sector. The empirical analysis involves the short-run energy demand in the residential, commercial, industrial, and electrical utility sectors in US.

1995-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

284

We often think about energy in personal terms. People comment on the energy young children  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Overview We often think about energy in personal terms. People comment on the energy young children seem to possess. Others mention that they don't feel they have enough energy to make it through the day. We've heard that the world is running out of certain types of energy. In spite of all of our everyday

Hardy, Darel

285

Explaining Long-Run Changes in the Energy Intensity of the U.S. Economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent events have revived interest in explaining the long-run changes in the energy intensity of the U.S. economy. We use a KLEM dataset for 35 industries over 39 years to decompose changes in the aggregate energy-GDP ...

Sue Wing, Ian.

286

Changes in Energy Intensity in the Manufacturing Sector 1985-1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Introduction Rankeda EI Numbers of Total Inputs of Energy SIC Codeb Intensity for 1985c Intensity for 1994c 29 18.11 25.85 26 17.82 17.71 33 19.57 16.27 32 14.75 14.69 28 11.09 12.14 All 5.34 5.77 24 5.24 5.05 22 4.07 3.82 20 2.41 2.72 30 2.81 2.22 34 1.91 1.98 25 1.37 1.16 39 1.14 1.16 38 0.92 1.10 36 1.11 0.90 35 1.14 0.86 27 0.62 0.74 23 0.47 0.38 c For this report, all energy-intensity ratios are presented in units of thousands of Btu per 1992 constant dollars. Source: Table 12 of this report. The focus of this data report is on energy consumption relative to constant dollar shipments of manufactured products -- commonly called energy intensities (EI) by energy analysts. This report presents two measures of energy consumption, Offsite-Produced Energy and Total Inputs of Energy,

287

Changes in Energy Intensity in the Manufacturing Sector 1985-1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Introduction Rankeda EI Numbers of Total Inputs of Energy SIC Codeb Intensity for 1985c Intensity for 1994c 29 18.11 25.85 26 17.82 17.71 33 19.57 16.27 32 14.75 14.69 28 11.09 12.14 All 5.34 5.77 24 5.24 5.05 22 4.07 3.82 20 2.41 2.72 30 2.81 2.22 34 1.91 1.98 25 1.37 1.16 39 1.14 1.16 38 0.92 1.10 36 1.11 0.90 35 1.14 0.86 27 0.62 0.74 23 0.47 0.38 c For this report, all energy-intensity ratios are presented in units of thousands of Btu per 1992 constant dollars. Source: Table 12 of this report. The focus of this data report is on energy consumption relative to constant dollar shipments of manufactured products -- commonly called energy intensities (EI) by energy analysts. This report presents two measures of energy consumption, Offsite-Produced Energy and Total Inputs of Energy,

288

Climate Policy Design for Energy-Intensive Industries - And The Rest of Us  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate Policy Design for Energy-Intensive Industries - And The Rest of Us Climate Policy Design for Energy-Intensive Industries - And The Rest of Us Speaker(s): Holmes Hummel Date: January 8, 2009 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Richard Diamond Driving the U.S. energy system toward climate stabilization requires integration of multiple policy instruments in a staged series of legislative and regulatory policy vehicles. Qualifying the limitations of a cap-and-trade approach, Dr. Hummel will present a framework for orienting and organizing a multi-faceted policy development process. After surveying key design recommendations for specific sectors, the presentation will drill deeper into the specific challenge of engaging energy-intensive industries subject to global competition. After briefly discussing some of

289

Department of Energy Support of Energy Intensive Manufacturing Related to Refractory Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For many years, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) richly supported refractory related research to enable greater energy efficiency processes in energy intensive manufacturing industries such as iron and steel, glass, aluminum and other non-ferrous metal production, petrochemical, and pulp and paper. Much of this support came through research projects funded by the former DOE Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) under programs such as Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM), Industrial Materials of the Future (IMF), and the Industrial Technologies Program (ITP). Under such initiatives, work was funded at government national laboratories such as Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), at universities such as West Virginia University (WVU) and the Missouri University of Science and Technology (MS&T) which was formerly the University of Missouri Rolla, and at private companies engaged in these manufacturing areas once labeled industries of the future by DOE due to their strategic and economic importance to American industry. Examples of such projects are summarized below with information on the scope, funding level, duration, and impact. This is only a sampling of representative efforts funded by the DOE in which ORNL was involved over the period extending from 1996 to 2011. Other efforts were also funded during this time at various other national laboratories, universities and private companies under the various programs mentioned above. Discussion of the projects below was chosen because I was an active participant in them and it is meant to give a sampling of the magnitude and scope of investments made by DOE in refractory related research over this time period.

Hemrick, James Gordon [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

HOT ELECTRON ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS FROM ULTRA-INTENSE LASER SOLID INTERACTIONS  

SciTech Connect

We present experimental data of electron energy distributions from ultra-intense (>10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}) laser-solid interactions using the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory Vulcan petawatt laser. These measurements were made using a CCD-based magnetic spectrometer. We present details on the distinct effective temperatures that were obtained for a wide variety of targets as a function of laser intensity. It is found that as the intensity increases from 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2} to 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}, a 0.4 dependence on the laser intensity is found. Between 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} and 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}, a gradual rolling off of temperature with intensity is observed.

Chen, H; Wilks, S C; Kruer, W L; Moon, S; Patel, N; Patel, P K; Shepherd, R; Snavely, R

2005-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

291

Portfolio Manager Technical Reference: U.S. National Energy Use Intensity |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. National Energy Use U.S. National Energy Use Intensity Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder

292

Scaling to Ultra-High Intensities by High-Energy Petawatt Beam Combining  

SciTech Connect

The output pulse energy from a single-aperture high-energy laser amplifier (e.g. fusion lasers such as NIF and LMJ) are critically limited by a number of factors including optical damage, which places an upper bound on the operating fluence; parasitic gain, which limits together with manufacturing costs the maximum aperture size to {approx} 40-cm; and non-linear phase effects which limits the peak intensity. For 20-ns narrow band pulses down to transform-limited sub-picosecond pulses, these limiters combine to yield 10-kJ to 1-kJ maximum pulse energies with up to petawatt peak power. For example, the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) project at NIF is designed to provide kilo-Joule pulses from 0.75-ps to 50-ps, with peak focused intensity above 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. Using such a high-energy petawatt (HEPW) beamline as a modular unit, they discuss large-scale architectures for coherently combining multiple HEPW pulses from independent apertures, called CAPE (Coherent Addition of Pulses for Energy), to significantly increase the peak achievable focused intensity. Importantly, the maximum intensity achievable with CAPE increases non-linearly. Clearly, the total integrated energy grows linearly with the number of apertures N used. However, as CAPE combines beams in the focal plane by increasing the angular convergence to focus (i.e. the f-number decreases), the foal spot diameter scales inversely with N. Hence the peak intensity scales as N{sup 2}. Using design estimates for the focal spot size and output pulse energy (limited by damage fluence on the final compressor gratings) versus compressed pulse duration in the ARC system, Figure 2 shows the scaled focal spot intensity and total energy for various CAPE configurations from 1,2,4, ..., up to 192 total beams. They see from the fixture that the peak intensity for event modest 8 to 16 beam combinations reaches the 10{sup 21} to 10{sup 22} W/cm{sup 2} regime. With greater number of apertures, or with improvements to the focusability of the individual beams, the maximum peak intensity can be increased further to {approx} 10{sup 24} W/cm{sup 2}. Lastly, an important feature of the CAPE architecture is the ability to coherently combine beams to produce complex spatio-temporal intensity distributions for laser-based accelerators (e.g. all-optical electron injection and acceleration) and high energy density science applications such as fast ignition.

Siders, C W; Jovanovic, I; Crane, J; Rushford, M; Lucianetti, A; Barty, C J

2006-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

293

Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook October 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and Winter Fuels Outlook October 2013 1 and Winter Fuels Outlook October 2013 1 October 2013 Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook (STEO) Highlights  EIA projects average U.S. household expenditures for natural gas and propane will increase by 13% and 9%, respectively, this winter heating season (October 1 through March 31) compared with last winter. Projected U.S. household expenditures are 2% higher for electricity and 2% lower for heating oil this winter. Although EIA expects average expenditures for households that heat with natural gas will be significantly higher than last winter, spending for gas heat will still be lower than the previous 5-year average (see EIA Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook slideshow).  Brent crude oil spot prices fell from a recent peak of $117 per barrel in early September to

294

National Level Co-Control Study of the Targets for Energy Intensity and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Level Co-Control Study of the Targets for Energy Intensity and National Level Co-Control Study of the Targets for Energy Intensity and Sulfur Dioxide in China Title National Level Co-Control Study of the Targets for Energy Intensity and Sulfur Dioxide in China Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5253E Year of Publication 2011 Authors Zhou, Nan, Lynn K. Price, Nina Zheng, Jing Ke, and Ali Hasanbeigi Date Published 10/2011 Publisher Lawrence Berkerley National Laboratory ISBN Number LBNL-5253E Keywords china, china energy, co-control, energy intensity, industrial energy efficiency, iron and steel industry, Low Emission & Efficient Industry, policy studies, sulfur dioxide Abstract Since 2006, China has set goals of reducing energy intensity, emissions, and pollutants in multiple guidelines and in the Five Year Plans. Various strategies and measures have then been taken to improve the energy efficiency in all sectors and to reduce pollutants. Since controlling energy, CO2 emissions, and pollutants falls under the jurisdiction of different government agencies in China, many strategies are being implemented to fulfill only one of these objectives.Co-controls or integrated measures could simultaneously reduce greenhouse gas (GHG)emissions and criteria air pollutant emissions. The targets could be met in a more cost effective manner if the integrated measures can be identified and prioritized. This report provides analysis and insights regarding how these targets could be met via co-control measures focusing on both CO2 and SO2 emissions in the cement, iron & steel, and power sectors to 2030 in China. An integrated national energy and emission model was developed in order to establish a baseline scenario that was used to assess the impact of actions already taken by the Chinese government as well as planned and expected actions. In addition, CO2 mitigation scenarios and SO2 control scenarios were also established to evaluate the impact of each of the measures and the combined effects.

295

Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Model  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Description of the procedures for estimating carbon dioxide emissions in the Short-Term Energy Outlook

Information Center

2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

296

Terms and Conditions for Site Transition | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Terms and Conditions for Site Transition Terms and Conditions for Site Transition Terms and Conditions for Site Transition Terms and Conditions for Site Transition More Documents &...

297

Short-term energy outlook: Quarterly projections, second quarter 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in January, April, July, and October in the Outlook. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the second quarter of 1997 through the fourth quarter of 1998. Values for the first quarter of 1997, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in EIA`s Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations that use the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated by using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled in the second quarter 1997 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS database is archived quarterly and is available from the National Technical Information Service. The STIFS model is driven principally by three sets of assumptions or inputs: estimates of key macroeconomic variables, world oil price assumptions, and assumptions about the severity of weather. Macroeconomic estimates are produced by DRI/McGraw-Hill but are adjusted by EIA to reflect EIA assumptions about the world price of crude oil, energy product prices, and other assumptions which may affect the macroeconomic outlook. By varying the assumptions, alternative cases are produced by using the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS). 34 figs., 19 tabs.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Short-term energy outlook. Quarterly projections, first quarter 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Outlook. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the first quarter of 1996 through the fourth quarter of 1997. Values for the fourth quarter of 1995, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in the Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations using the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled into the first quarter 1996 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS database is archived quarterly and is available from the National Technical Information Service. The cases are produced using the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS). The STIFS model is driven principally by three sets of assumptions or inputs: estimates of key macroeconomic variables, world oil price assumptions, and assumptions about the severity of weather. Macroeconomic estimates are produced by DRI/McGraw-Hill but are adjusted by EIA to reflect EIA assumptions about the world price of crude oil, energy product prices, and other assumptions which may affect the macroeconomic outlook.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

DOE/EIA-0202(85/2Q) Short-Term Washington, D C Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook, 1984 Published January 1985 The Short-Term Energy Outlook provides forecasts of the energy situation for 1985 and the first half of 1986.

300

Short-Term Test Results: Multifamily Home Energy Efficiency Retrofit  

SciTech Connect

Multifamily deep energy retrofits (DERs) represent great potential for energy savings, while also providing valuable insights on research-generated efficiency measures, cost-effectiveness metrics, and risk factor strategies for the multifamily housing industry. The Bay Ridge project is comprised of a base scope retrofit with a goal of achieving 30% savings (relative to pre-retrofit), and a DER scope with a goal of 50% savings (relative to pre-retrofit). The base scope has been applied to the entire complex, except for one 12-unit building which underwent the DER scope. Findings from the implementation, commissioning, and short-term testing at Bay Ridge include air infiltration reductions of greater than 60% in the DER building; a hybrid heat pump system with a Savings to Investment Ratio (SIR) > 1 (relative to a high efficiency furnace) which also provides the resident with added incentive for energy savings; and duct leakage reductions of > 60% using an aerosolized duct sealing approach. Despite being a moderate rehab instead of a gut rehab, the Bay Ridge DER is currently projected to achieve energy savings ? 50% compared to pre-retrofit, and the short-term testing supports this estimate.

Lyons, J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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301

Short-term energy outlook. Quarterly projections, third quarter 1996  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in January, April, July, and October in the Outlook. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the third quarter of 1996 through the fourth quarter of 1997. Values for the second quarter of 1996, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in the Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations using the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled in the third quarter 1996 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS database is archived quarterly and is available from the National Technical Information Service.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Long vs. short-term energy storage:sensitivity analysis.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report extends earlier work to characterize long-duration and short-duration energy storage technologies, primarily on the basis of life-cycle cost, and to investigate sensitivities to various input assumptions. Another technology--asymmetric lead-carbon capacitors--has also been added. Energy storage technologies are examined for three application categories--bulk energy storage, distributed generation, and power quality--with significant variations in discharge time and storage capacity. Sensitivity analyses include cost of electricity and natural gas, and system life, which impacts replacement costs and capital carrying charges. Results are presented in terms of annual cost, $/kW-yr. A major variable affecting system cost is hours of storage available for discharge.

Schoenung, Susan M. (Longitude 122 West, Inc., Menlo Park, CA); Hassenzahl, William V. (,Advanced Energy Analysis, Piedmont, CA)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

California Long Term Energy Efficiency Strategic Plan (CPUC, 2008) The Long Term Energy Efficiency Strategic Plan (Plan) was developed through a collaborative process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California Long Term Energy Efficiency Strategic Plan (CPUC, 2008) The Long Term Energy Efficiency together over an elevenmonth period. This Plan sets forth a roadmap for energy efficiency in California costeffective deep levels of energy efficiency improvements including building shell upgrades, highefficiency

304

Prospective Outlook on Long-Term Energy Systems (POLES) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Prospective Outlook on Long-Term Energy Systems (POLES) Prospective Outlook on Long-Term Energy Systems (POLES) Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Prospective Outlook on Long-Term Energy Systems (POLES) Agency/Company /Organization: European Commission, Enerdata, in collaboration with LEPII Sector: Climate, Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Greenhouse Gas Topics: Low emission development planning Resource Type: Software/modeling tools Complexity/Ease of Use: Advanced Website: www.enerdata.net/docssales/press-office-20th-world-energy-congress.pdf Cost: Free Related Tools Modular Applied General Equilibrium Tool (MAGNET) WorldScan SEAGA Intermediate Level Handbook

305

Department of Energy Commercial Building Benchmarks (New Construction): Energy Use Intensities, May 5, 2009  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Benchmarks Benchmarks New Construction Energy Use Intensities (EUIs) [kBtu/ft 2 /yr] May 5, 2009 Miami Houston Phoenix Atlanta Los Angeles Las Vegas San Francisco Baltimore Albuquerque Seattle Chicago Denver Minneapolis Helena Duluth Fairbanks 2003 CBECS Avg. Climate Zone 1A 2A 2B 3A 3B 3B 3C 4A 4B 4C 5A 5B 6A 6B 7 8 Large Office 39 42 40 39 32 40 34 43 39 37 43 38 47 44 49 62 99 Medium Office 38 44 42 44 35 41 40 51 43 46 53 47 59 54 62 82 94 Small Office 46 48 49 46 36 44 38 53 47 47 61 52 70 62 77 110 80 Warehouse 15 15 15 16 14 16 14 18 17 16 21 20 26 23 27 43 48 Stand-alone Retail 48 46 46 41 34 41 35 45 42 40 48 45 54 51 61 88 70 Strip Mall 46 44 44 44 35 43 38 48 45 42 51 47 60 55 66 99 110 Primary School 65 71 69 69 57 65 71 78 68 65 85 74 99 88 107 147 68 Secondary School 69 74 74 73 50 68 67 87 72 72 99 81 117 101 128 181 80 Supermarket 161 171 161 175 155 162 171 191 174 186 206 188 224 209 240

306

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Short-Term Energy Outlook ... Search EIA.gov. A-Z Index; ... but EIA expects that several large solar thermal generation projects will enter service in 2013 and 2014.

307

South Africa Long Term Mitigation Scenarios | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South Africa Long Term Mitigation Scenarios South Africa Long Term Mitigation Scenarios Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: South Africa Long Term Mitigation Scenarios Agency/Company /Organization: South Africa Department of Environment Affairs and Tourism Sector: Energy, Land Topics: Background analysis, Low emission development planning Resource Type: Case studies/examples Website: www.erc.uct.ac.za/Research/publications/07Scenario_team-LTMS_Scenarios Country: South Africa Southern Africa Coordinates: -30.559482°, 22.937506° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-30.559482,"lon":22.937506,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

308

Smart Grid as a Driver for Energy-Intensive Industries: A Data Center Case  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Smart Grid as a Driver for Energy-Intensive Industries: A Data Center Case Smart Grid as a Driver for Energy-Intensive Industries: A Data Center Case Study Title Smart Grid as a Driver for Energy-Intensive Industries: A Data Center Case Study Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBNL-6104E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Ganti, Venkata, and Girish Ghatikar Conference Name Grid-Interop 2012 Date Published 12/2012 Conference Location Irving, TX Keywords data centers, market sectors, technologies Abstract The Smart Grid facilitates integration of supply- and demand-side services, allowing the end-use loads to be dynamic and respond to changes in electricity generation or meet localized grid needs. Expanding from previous work, this paper summarizes the results from field tests conducted to identify demand response opportunities in energy-intensive industrial facilities such as data centers. There is a significant opportunity for energy and peak-demand reduction in data centers as hardware and software technologies, sensing, and control methods can be closely integrated with the electric grid by means of demand response. The paper provides field test results by examining distributed and networked data center characteristics, end-use loads and control systems, and recommends opportunities and challenges for grid integration. The focus is on distributed data centers and how loads can be "migrated" geographically in response to changing grid supply (increase/decrease). In addition, it examines the enabling technologies and demand-response strategies of high performance computing data centers. The findings showed that the studied data centers provided average load shed of up to 10% with short response times and no operational impact. For commercial program participation, the load-shed strategies must be tightly integrated with data center automation tools to make them less resource-intensive.

309

Energy use and carbon dioxide emissions in energy-intensive industries in key developing countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Structural Factors Affecting Energy Use and Carbon DioxideStructural Factors Affecting Energy Use and Carbon Dioxide

Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Phylipsen, Dian

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

PSTAR: Primary and secondary terms analysis and renormalization: A unified approach to building energy simulations and short-term monitoring  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents a unified method of hourly simulation of a building and analysis of performance data. The method is called Primary and Secondary Terms Analysis and Renormalization (PSTAR). In the PSTAR method, renormalized parameters are introduced for the primary terms such that the renormalized energy balance equation is best satisfied in the least squares sense, hence, the name PSTAR. PSTAR allows extraction of building characteristics from short-term tests on a small number of data channels. These can be used for long-term performance prediction (''ratings''), diagnostics, and control of heating, ventilating, and air conditioning systems (HVAC), comparison of design versus actual performance, etc. By combining realistic building models, simple test procedures, and analysis involving linear equations, PSTAR provides a powerful tool for analyzing building energy as well as testing and monitoring. It forms the basis for the Short-Term Energy Monitoring (STEM) project at SERI.

Subbarao, K.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation Title Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 -...

312

DOE/EIA-0202(84/2QH Short-Term Energy Information Administration ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE/EIA-0202(84/2QH Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections May 1984 Published: June 1984 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C.

313

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

63 and $2.72 per MMBtu during the months through October without the wide variations that occurred over the spring and early summer months (Short-Term Energy Outlook, August 2002). Prices are expected to be less variable unless unusually hot weather in late summer results in gas being diverted from storage to meet the added cooling demand, or colder-than-normal weather for October results in an unexpected drawdown of storage stocks. Overall in 2002, wellhead prices are expected to average about $2.73 per MMBtu compared with $4.00 in 2001. Prices during the upcoming heating season (November through March), assuming normal weather, are expected to average close to $3.12 per MMBtu, which is about $0.75 higher than last winter's price but only about 10-15 percent higher than current prices.

314

January 2013 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(STEO) (STEO)  This edition of the Short-Term Energy Outlook is the first to include forecasts for 2014.  EIA expects that the Brent crude oil spot price, which averaged $112 per barrel in 2012, will fall to an average of $105 per barrel in 2013 and $99 per barrel in 2014. The projected discount of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil to Brent, which averaged $18 per barrel in 2012, falls to an average of $16 per barrel in 2013 and $8 per barrel in 2014, as planned new pipeline capacity lowers the cost of moving Mid-continent crude oil to the Gulf Coast refining centers.  EIA expects that falling crude prices will help national average regular gasoline retail prices

315

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cool Earth - Innovative Energy Technology Plan," (14) AgencySuper-Long-Term Energy Technology Roadmap (Super-Long-TermTechnology Strategy Map (Energy Technology Strategy 2007),"

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Short-term energy outlook, quarterly projections, first quarter 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the first quarter of 1998 through the fourth quarter of 1999. Values for the fourth quarter of 1997, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in EIA`s Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations that use the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated by using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled in the first quarter 1998 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS model is driven principally by three sets of assumptions or inputs: estimates of key macroeconomic variables, world oil price assumptions, and assumptions about the severity of weather. Macroeconomic estimates are adjusted by EIA to reflect EIA assumptions which may affect the macroeconomic outlook. By varying the assumptions, alternative cases are produced by using the STIFS model. 24 figs., 19 tabs.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Energy Use Intensity and its Influence on the Integrated Daylighting Design of a Large Net Zero Energy Building: Preprint  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Use Intensity and its Use Intensity and its Influence on the Integrated Daylighting Design of a Large Net Zero Energy Building Preprint Rob Guglielmetti, Jennifer Scheib, Shanti D. Pless, and Paul Torcellini National Renewable Energy Laboratory Rachel Petro RNL Design Presented at the ASHRAE Winter Conference Las Vegas, Nevada January 29 - February 2, 2011 Conference Paper NREL/CP-5500-49103 March 2011 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (Alliance), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308. Accordingly, the US Government and Alliance retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for US Government purposes.

318

Large hospitals tend to be energy-intensive - Today in Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration ... solar, wind, geothermal, ... natural gas was the most common main space heating fuel, ...

319

QUARTER SHORT-TERM ENERGY OUTLOOK QUARTERLY PROJECTIONS ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1Q) 1Q) 1991 1 QUARTER SHORT-TERM ENERGY OUTLOOK QUARTERLY PROJECTIONS ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION February 1991 This publication may be purchased from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office. Purchasing in formation for this or other Energy Information Administration (EIA) publications may be obtained from the Government Printing Office or ElA's National Energy Information Center. Questions on energy statistics should be directed to the Center by mail, telephone, or telecommunications device for the hearing impaired. Addresses, telephone numbers, and hours are as follows: National Energy Information Center, El-231 Energy Information Administration Forrestal Building, Room 1F-048 Washington, DC 20585 (202) 586-8800 Telecommunications Device for the

320

ENERGY DISTRIBUTION OF TWO-ELECTRON IONIZATION OF HELIUM IN AN INTENSE LASER FIELD.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is well known that a neutral atom interacting with a strong laser field will ionize at sufficiently high intensity even for photon energies well below the ionization threshold. When the required number of photons becomes very large, this process is best described by the suppression of the Coulomb barrier by the laser's oscillating electric field, allowing the electron to tunnel into the continuum. As the laser intensity is increased, more tightly bound electrons may be successively liberated by this mechanism. Such a sequential multiple ionization, long accepted as a reasonable approach to the formidable problem of a multielectron atom interacting nonperturbatively with an intense electromagnetic field, provides fair estimates of the various charge state appearance intensities while the tunneling rates are in excellent agreement with single ionization yields. However, more accurate measurements revealed systematic and very large deviations from the tunneling rates: near appearance intensity under standard experimental conditions, the observed double ion yield is several orders of magnitude larger than predicted by the sequential rate. It soon became clear that electrons could not be considered as independent and that electron-electron correlation had to be taken into account. Dynamic correlations have been considered in several theories. First qualitatively in the shakeoff model; then empirically through the e-2e cross-section in the quantum/classical three-step model (tunnel ionization, acceleration by the oscillating electric field and e-2e recollision with the ion); recently through the so-called intense field many-body-S-matrix theory and a purely empirical model of collective tunnel ionization. The validity of these ideas has been examined using numerical models. The measurement of total ion yields over a dynamic range exceeding ten orders of magnitude, a major breakthrough made possible by the availability of high-repetition rate lasers at the beginning of the 90's, was for a long time the only quantitative data to confront theory.

LAFON,R.; CHALOUPKA,J.L.; SHEEHY,B.; DIMAURO,L.F.; PAUL,P.M.; AGOSTINI,P.; KULANDER,K.C.

2000-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "term energy intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Effect of Long-term Lime and Potassium Applications on Quantity-Intensity (Q/I) Relationships in Sandy Soil1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Sandy Soil1 D. L. SPARKS AND W. C. LiEBHARDT2 ABSTRACT The effects of long-term lime and K applications on quan- tity-intensity (Q/I) relationships were investigated on the Ap and B21t horizons of a Kalmia soil, and chloritized ver- miculite. Soil pH and exchangeable bases increased with depth and with lime additions

Sparks, Donald L.

322

Analysis of the Performance Benefits of Short-Term Energy Storage in Wind-Diesel Hybrid Power Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A variety of prototype high penetration wind-diesel hybrid power systems have been implemented with different amounts of energy storage. They range from systems with no energy storage to those with many hours worth of energy storage. There has been little consensus among wind-diesel system developers as to the appropriate role and amount of energy storage in such systems. Some researchers advocate providing only enough storage capacity to supply power during the time it takes the diesel genset to start. Others install large battery banks to allow the diesel(s) to operate at full load and/or to time-shift the availability of wind-generated electricity to match the demand. Prior studies indicate that for high penetration wind-diesel systems, short-term energy storage provides the largest operational and economic benefit. This study uses data collected in Deering, Alaska, a small diesel-powered village, and the hybrid systems modeling software Hybrid2 to determine the optimum amount of short-term storage for a particular high penetration wind-diesel system. These findings were then generalized by determining how wind penetration, turbulence intensity, and load variability affect the value of short term energy storage as measured in terms of fuel savings, total diesel run time, and the number of diesel starts.

Shirazi, M.; Drouilhet, S.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

ENERGY ISSUES WORKING GROUP ON LONG-TERM VISIONS FOR FUSION POWER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENERGY ISSUES WORKING GROUP ON LONG-TERM VISIONS FOR FUSION POWER Don Steiner, Jeffrey Freidberg Farrokh Najmabadi William Nevins , and John Perkins The Energy Issues Working Group on Long-Term Visions energy production in the next century? 2. What is fusion's potential for penetrating the energy market

Najmabadi, Farrokh

324

Renewable Energy Business Development Terms of Reference | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Organization: World Bank Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Finance, Market analysis Website: web.worldbank.orgWBSITEEXTERNALTOPICSEXTENERGY2...

325

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

average $2.83 per MMBtu in 2002 compared with about $4.00 last year (Short-Term Energy Outlook, June 2002). Average wellhead prices have increased by nearly 50 percent from $2.09 per MMBtu in February to an estimated $3.11 per MMBtu in May. Spot prices at the Henry Hub have also increased, rising more than $1.00 per MMBtu since early February. It is atypical to see higher spot gas prices in the cooling season than during the heating season, particularly when working gas in underground storage is at high levels, as it has been for the past several months. As of the end of May, working gas levels were more than 20 percent above the previous 5-year average for that month. Moreover, gas-directed drilling, while down sharply from summer 2001 levels, is still quite strong from a historical perspective. The gas rig count as of May 31 was up 22 percent from the recent low of 591 for the week ending April 5.

326

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4.41 per MMBtu in December 2003, although spot prices are expected to average $5.38 (Short-Term Energy Outlook, December 2003). The average wellhead price is expected to increase moderately to $4.56 during the first three months of 2004. Natural gas prices were lower in November than previously expected but forward price expectations remain sensitive to weather conditions. Prices increased rapidly in futures trading in early December as some cold weather moved into the Eastern United States and reported withdrawals from gas storage were slightly larger than expected. Spot prices above $5 per MMBtu remain likely over the next few months if normal (or colder) weather prevails, especially with oil prices remaining at relatively high levels. Natural gas storage levels are still above average and hold the potential to push prices back down if warm temperatures and weak heating demand materialize later in the winter, just as upward spikes remain a strong possibility if the weather turns cold.

327

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

about $3.49 per MMBtu through December 2002 and then increase to $3.76 in January 2003, the peak demand month of the heating season (Short-Term Energy Outlook, released November 7, 2002). Natural gas prices were higher than expected in October as storms in the Gulf of Mexico in late September temporarily shut in some gas production, causing spot prices at the Henry Hub and elsewhere to rise above $4.00 per million Btu for most of October. In addition, early winter-like temperatures, particularly in the Midwest and Northeast, increased demand for natural gas, placing upward pressure on gas prices. Overall in 2002, wellhead prices are expected to average about $2.84 per MMBtu compared with $4.00 in 2001. Prices during the heating season (November through March), assuming normal weather, are expected to average $3.56 per MMBtu, which is about $1.20 higher than last winter's price. Prices to residential customers during the heating season are expected to average $7.81 per MMBtu compared with $7.14 last winter. In 2003, wellhead prices are projected to average $3.28 per MMBtu, or about $0.44 per MMBtu more than in 2002, owing to expectations of increasing economic growth, little or no change in the annual average crude oil price for 2003, and lower storage levels for most of 2003 compared with 2002 levels.

328

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 per MMBtu during the last 3 months of 2003 and increase to $4.32 in January 2004 (Short-Term Energy Outlook, October 2003). Prices have fallen somewhat from the unusually high levels that prevailed in the first half of the year and most of July, as mild summer weather and reduced industrial demand allowed record storage refill rates. As of October 3, 2003, working gas levels were only 1 percent below the 5-year average and, barring any disruptions, are on target to reach 3 Tcf by the end of October. With the improved storage situation, wellhead prices during the upcoming heating season (November through March), assuming normal weather, are expected to be about 13 percent less than last winter ($4.17 vs. $4.68 per MMBtu). But prices in the residential sector are projected to be about 9 percent higher than last winter, as the recent decline in wellhead prices is too recent and insufficient to offset the impact of the substantial spring-summer increase in wellhead prices on residential prices. Overall in 2003, wellhead prices are expected to average $4.75 per MMBtu, which is nearly $2 more than the 2002 annual average and the largest year-to-year increase on record. For 2004, wellhead prices are projected to drop by nearly $0.90 per MMBtu, or about 20 percent, to $3.86 per MMBtu as the overall supply situation improves.

329

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

in September and range between $4.37 and $4.58 per MMBtu in the last 3 months of 2003 (Short-Term Energy Outlook, September 2003). Spot prices at the Henry Hub have fallen somewhat from the unusually high levels that prevailed in the first half of the year and most of July, as mild summer weather in many areas of the country has reduced cooling demand and allowed record storage refill rates. As of September 5, working gas levels were only 5.5 percent below the 5-year average and, barring any disruptions, are on target to reach 3 Tcf by the end of October. However, gas prices remain high-wellhead prices this summer are estimated to be 60 to 70 percent higher than levels last summer. Overall in 2003, wellhead prices are expected to average $4.84 per MMBtu, which is nearly $2 more than the 2002 annual average and the largest year-to-year increase on record. For 2004, assuming normal weather, wellhead prices are projected to drop by about $1 per MMBtu, or almost 20 percent, to $3.89 per MMBtu, as the overall supply situation improves.

330

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5.57 per MMBtu in January 2004 and $5.40 in February, and then decrease to $4.77 in March as the heating season winds down (Short-Term Energy Outlook, January 2004). Spot prices were quite variable in December, with prices at the Henry Hub starting the month at around $5.00 per MMBtu, spiking to roughly $7.00 in the middle of the month, then falling to $5.50 toward the end of the month as warmer-than-normal weather eased demand. Spot prices will likely remain well above $5.00 over the next few months if normal or colder weather prevails, especially with oil prices remaining at relatively high levels. (Oil prices this winter are expected to average $31.35 per barrel (19 cents higher than last winter's average), or 5.41 per MMBtu.) Natural gas storage levels were 8 percent above average as of January 2, which could place downward pressure on prices if warm temperatures and weak heating demand occur later this winter, just as rising prices are possible if the weather becomes colder. Overall in 2004, natural gas wellhead prices are expected to average $4.73 per MMBtu, while spot prices will average nearly $5.00. In 2005, natural gas spot prices are projected to fall to an average of $4.83 per MMBtu under the assumption that domestic and imported supply can continue to grow by about 1-1.5 percent per year.

331

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Now that the heating season has ended, natural gas wellhead prices have fallen from the exceptionally high levels seen in February and early March. Nevertheless, they still remain historically and unseasonably high, hovering around $5.00 per MMBtu. EIA projects that natural gas wellhead prices will remain above $5.00 per MMBtu in April and then decrease to $4.36 in May and $4.26 in June (Short-Term Energy Outlook, April 2003). Wellhead prices for the 2002-2003 heating season (November through March) averaged $4.44 per MMBtu, or $2.08 more than last winter's price. Overall in 2003, wellhead prices are projected to increase about $1.53 per MMBtu over the 2002 level to $4.40 per MMBtu. This projection is based on the expectation of lower volumes of natural gas in underground storage compared with last year and continued increases in demand over 2002 levels. Cold temperatures this past winter led to a record drawdown of storage stocks. By the end of March, estimated working gas stocks were 676 Bcf (prior estimates were 696 Bcf), which is the lowest end-of-March level in EIA records and 44 percent below the previous 5-year average. In 2004, continued tightness of domestic natural gas supply and high demand levels are expected to keep the average wellhead price near the 2003 level.

332

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4.20 per MMBtu through January 2003 and then increase to $4.61 in February and $4.23 in March (Short-Term Energy Outlook, released January 8, 2003). Wellhead prices for the overall heating season (November through March), assuming normal weather, are expected to average about $4.10 per MMBtu, or $1.74 more than last winter's levels, while prices to residential customers are expected to average $8.51 per MMBtu compared with $7.14 last winter. Natural gas prices were higher than expected in November and December as below-normal temperatures throughout much of the nation increased heating demand, placing upward pressure on gas prices. Spot prices at the Henry Hub climbed above $5.00 per MMBtu in the second week of December and stayed near or above this threshold through the end of the month. Overall in 2002, wellhead prices are expected to average $2.90 per MMBtu compared with $4.00 in 2001. In 2003, average wellhead prices are projected to increase about $1.00 per MMBtu over the 2002 level to $3.90 per MMBtu, owing to expectations of higher demand levels than in 2002 and lower storage levels for most of the year compared with 2002 levels.

333

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 per MMBtu during the last 2 months of 2003 and increase to $4.36 in January 2004 (Short-Term Energy Outlook, November 2003). Prices have fallen in the past few months as mild weather and reduced industrial demand have allowed record storage refill rates. As of October 31, 2003, working gas levels had reached 3,155 Bcf, which is about 3 percent higher than the 5-year average and the first time since October 2002 that stocks exceeded the year-earlier levels. With the improved storage situation, wellhead prices during the current heating season (November through March) are expected to be about 12 percent less than last winter ($4.12 vs. $4.68 per MMBtu). However, prices in the residential sector will likely be about 8 percent higher than last winter, as accumulated natural gas utility costs through 2003 are recovered in higher household delivery charges. Overall in 2003, wellhead prices are expected to average $4.76 per MMBtu, which is nearly $2 more than the 2002 annual average and the largest year-to-year increase on record. For 2004, wellhead prices are projected to drop by nearly $0.90 per MMBtu, or about 18 percent, to $3.88 per MMBtu as the overall supply situation improves.

334

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

the rest of the winter and the first part of spring, with prices averaging $5.19 per MMBtu through March and $4.58 in April (Short-Term Energy Outlook, February 2004). Wellhead prices for the current heating season (November 2003 through March 2004) are expected to average $4.99 per MMBtu, or about 7 percent higher than last winter's level. Spot prices at the Henry Hub averaged $5.90 per MMBtu in January as cold temperatures (6 percent colder than normal nationally and 19 percent colder than normal in the Northeast) kept natural gas prices and heating demand high. Despite the severe weather, natural gas storage stocks were 3 percent above average as of January 30 and spot prices in early February have moved down somewhat. Overall in 2004, spot prices are expected to average about $4.90 per MMBtu and wellhead prices are expected to average $4.63 per MMBtu, declining moderately from the 2003 levels. In 2005, natural gas spot prices are projected to average about $5.00 per MMBtu, under the assumption that domestic and imported supply can continue to grow by about 1 percent per year.

335

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

this summer and continue at elevated levels through the rest of 2003 (Short-Term Energy Outlook, June 2003). Natural gas wellhead prices are expected to average $5.40 per MMBtu in June and remain above $5.13 through December 2003. Spot prices at the Henry Hub have stayed well above $5.00 per MMBtu on a monthly basis since the beginning of the year and have been above $6.00 for the first 10 days of June. The low level of underground storage is the principal reason for these unusually high prices. As of June 6, 2003, working gas stocks were 1,324 Bcf, which is about 35 percent below year-earlier levels and 25 percent below the 5-year average. Natural gas prices are likely to stay high as long as above-normal storage injection demand competes with industrial and power sector demand for gas. Overall in 2003, wellhead prices are projected to increase about $2.33 per MMBtu (the largest U.S. annual wellhead price increase on record) over the 2002 level to a record annual high of about $5.20 per MMBtu. For 2004, prices are projected to ease only moderately, as supplies are expected to remain tight.

336

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

range from $2.91 to $3.19 per MMBtu through December 2002 and then increase to $3.53 in January 2003, the peak demand month of the heating season (Short-Term Energy Outlook, October 2002). Natural gas prices climbed sharply in late September as hurricanes Isidore and Lili caused production shut downs in the Gulf of Mexico. However, this price surge is expected to be short-lived, unless the weather in October is unusually cold or if additional storm activity in the Gulf curbs production further. Overall in 2002, wellhead prices are expected to average about $2.76 per MMBtu compared with $4.00 in 2001. Prices during the upcoming heating season (November through March), assuming normal weather, are expected to average $3.32 per MMBtu, which is about $0.96 higher than last winter's price. Prices to residential customers during the heating season are expected to average $7.55 per MMBtu compared with $7.14 last winter.

337

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

prices will remain relatively high during the storage refill season (April through October) and the rest of 2004. Wellhead prices are expected to average $4.87 per MMBtu in April and May, $4.71 from June through October, and $5.12 for November and December (Short-Term Energy Outlook, April 2004). Spot prices during the storage refill months will likely average $5.23 per MMBtu, virtually the same as the average price ($5.22) this past heating season. Overall in 2004, spot prices are expected to average $5.31 per MMBtu, slightly less than the 2003 price ($5.35), while wellhead prices will average about $4.90. In 2005, natural gas spot prices will likely average about $5.25 per MMBtu, under the assumption that domestic supply can continue to grow by about 1 percent per year. Total available supply (including imports and storage inventories) is expected to increase to 22.31 Tcf in 2004 compared with 21.78 Tcf in 2003. Storage stocks at the end of the traditional heating season (March 31) were about 6 percent less than the 5-year average but nearly 50 percent more than year-earlier levels.

338

HOT ELECTRON ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS FROM ULTRA-INTENSE LASER SOLID INTERACTIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of electron energy distributions from ultra-intense (>10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}) laser-solid interactions using an electron spectrometer are presented. These measurements were performed on the Vulcan petawatt laser at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory and the Callisto laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The effective hot electron temperatures (T{sub hot}) have been measured for laser intensities (I{lambda}{sup 2}) from 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} {micro}m{sup 2} to 10{sup 21} W/cm{sup 2} {micro}m{sup 2} for the first time, and T{sub hot} is found to increase as (I{lambda}{sup 2}){sup 0.34} {+-} 0.4. This scaling agrees well with the empirical scaling published by Beg et al. (1997), and is explained by a simple physical model that gives good agreement with experimental results and particle-in-cell simulations.

Chen, H; Wilks, S C; Kruer, W; Patel, P; Shepherd, R

2008-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

339

Energy loss estimates at several beam intensities in the Fermilab Booster  

SciTech Connect

The difference between the effective rf voltage and the accelerating voltage required to match the rate of change of the Booster magnetic field can be used to estimate the energy loss per beam turn. Although the effective rf voltage (RFSUM) and the synchronous phase can be experimentally measured and used to calculate the accelerating voltage, the calibration of the signals during the fast change of the Booster rf frequency is difficult and appears to introduce some offset to the beam energy loss estimation. An observed linear relationship between energy loss and beam intensity is used to evaluate the offset, which is then applied to the experimental data. This approach, rather than recalibrating the signals, is simple and suitable for minimizing the error in the data.

Xi Yang and James MacLachlan

2004-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

340

Designing indicators of long-term energy supply security. Energy research Centre of the Netherlands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report brings out results of a pre-study commissioned by the Netherlands Environmental Assessment agency, MNP. These are due to serve as inputs in the imminent Sustainability Outlook, being prepared by MNP and CPB. The authors thank Joop Oude Lohuis, Jacco Farla, Bert de Vries, and Detlef van Vuuren and co-reader Michiel van Werven for constructive input and comments. The ECN reference number of the present research activity is 7.7551. To our knowledge, so far amazingly little research work has been undertaken to construct meaningful indicators of long-run energy supply security for a particular nation or region. Currently, in addressing energy supply security, policy makers tend to emphasise short-term supply disruptions. In contrast, this pre-study accords with the broader Sustainability Outlook in considering the long-term perspective. This report starts with taking stock, in a concise way, of the official EU energy outlook and issues related to the opportunities to administer changes in the energy mix at the level of major energy use categories. Then a brief survey of relevant literature is made on long-term strategies to ensure survival of systems- be it biological, social, etc.- in an environment largely characterised by high uncertainty and a lot of unchartered territory. We

W. G. Van Arkel; M. G. Boots Acknowledgement

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "term energy intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Short-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outlook Release Date: January 7, 2014 | Next Release Date: February 11, 2014 | Full Report | Text Only | All Tables | All Figures Glossary › FAQS › Overview STEO Report Highlights Prices Global Crude Oil and Liquid Fuels U.S. Crude Oil and Liquid Fuels Natural Gas Coal Electricity Renewables and CO2 Emissions U.S. Economic Assumptions Data Figures Tables Custom Table Builder Real Prices Viewer Forecast Changes (PDF) Special Analysis Price Uncertainty < Back to list of tables Working correctly. Table 1 : U.S. Energy Markets Summary Either scripts and active content are not permitted to run or Adobe Flash Player version ${version_major}.${version_minor}.${version_revision} or greater is not installed. Get Adobe Flash Player a Includes lease condensate.

342

Large hospitals tend to be energy-intensive - Today in Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... used energy for generating electricity, primarily for emergency back-up generation. Fuel oil was by far the most common fuel used for this ...

343

Long-Term Modeling of the California Energy System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

energy systems and climate policies. Some issues specific to modeling the California energy system will be discussed, including building equipment efficiency and electricity trade....

344

Financial Terms - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. States. State energy information, detailed and overviews. Maps. Maps by energy source and topic, includes forecast maps. Countries. Country ...

345

Short Term Energy Outlook and Summer Fuels Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Projections: EIA, Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System database, and Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels (hydroelectric and nuclear).

346

Enhancing the energy of terahertz radiation from plasma produced by intense femtosecond laser pulses  

SciTech Connect

Terahertz (THz) radiation from atomic clusters illuminated by intense femtosecond laser pulses is investigated. By studying the angular distribution, polarization properties and energy dependence of THz waves, we aim to obtain a proper understanding of the mechanism of THz generation. The properties of THz waves measured in this study differ from those predicted by previously proposed mechanisms. To interpret these properties qualitatively, we propose that the radiation is generated by time-varying quadrupoles, which are produced by the ponderomotive force of the laser pulse.

Jahangiri, Fazel [Advanced Research Center for Beam Science, ICR, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan) [Advanced Research Center for Beam Science, ICR, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hashida, Masaki; Tokita, Shigeki; Sakabe, Shuji [Advanced Research Center for Beam Science, ICR, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan) [Advanced Research Center for Beam Science, ICR, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Physics, GSS, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Nagashima, Takeshi; Hangyo, Masanori [Department of Physics, GSS, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan) [Department of Physics, GSS, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan)

2013-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

347

A long-term investment planning model for mixed energy infrastructure integrated with renewable  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A long-term investment planning model for mixed energy infrastructure integrated with renewable- mental friendly. Compared with fossil energy, it is expensive to transport renewable energy for a long distance. Another problem of renewable energy is fluctuation and it is not so stable as fossil energy

348

Diversity in OECD energy consumption: Achievements and long-term goals  

SciTech Connect

Energy consumption in the industrialized world has resumed a rising trend but has been moderated by increased energy efficiency. The demand for energy is also being spread more evenly over a variety of fuels. This paper provides a measure for diversity and examines the implications for energy prices, while reiterating the long-term goal of lower energy consumption.

Heal, D.W. (Univ. College of Wales, Aberystwyth (England))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Liquid lithium target as a high intensity, high energy neutron source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides a target jet for charged particles. In one embodiment the charged particles are high energy deuterons that bombard the target jet to produce high intensity, high energy neutrons. To this end, deuterons in a vacuum container bombard an endlessly circulating, free-falling, sheet-shaped, copiously flowing, liquid lithium jet that gushes by gravity from a rectangular cross-section vent on the inside of the container means to form a moving web in contact with the inside wall of the vacuum container. The neutrons are produced via break-up of the beam in the target by stripping, spallation and compound nuclear reactions in which the projectiles (deuterons) interact with the target (Li) to produce excited nuclei, which then "boil off" or evaporate a neutron.

Parkin, Don M. (Los Alamos, NM); Dudey, Norman D. (Glen Ellyn, IL)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

‹ Analysis & Projections ‹ Analysis & Projections Short-Term Energy Outlook Release Date: January 7, 2014 | Next Release Date: February 11, 2014 | Full Report | Text Only | All Tables | All Figures Glossary › FAQS › Overview STEO Report Highlights Prices Global Crude Oil and Liquid Fuels U.S. Crude Oil and Liquid Fuels Natural Gas Coal Electricity Renewables and CO2 Emissions U.S. Economic Assumptions Data Figures Tables Custom Table Builder Real Prices Viewer Forecast Changes (PDF) Special Analysis Price Uncertainty Highlights This edition of the Short-Term Energy Outlook is the first to include forecasts for 2015. After falling to the lowest monthly average of 2013 in November, U.S. regular gasoline retail prices increased slightly to reach an average of $3.28 per gallon (gal) during December. The annual average regular

351

You Provide the Search Term, Green Energy Portal Provides the...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

search box, are you looking for information on solar farms, solar radiation, or solar electric power plants? The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Green Energy portal can now map...

352

DOE/EIA-0202(85/4Q) Short-Term Washington, D C Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

forecasting system, analyzes previous forecast errors, and provides detailed analyses of current issues that affect EIA's short-term energy forecasts.

353

Comparison Study of Energy Intensity in the Textile Industry: A Case Study in Five Textile Sub-sectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper contributes to the understanding of energy use in the textile industry by comparing the energy intensity of textile plants in five major sub-sectors, i.e. spinning, weaving, wet-processing, worsted fabric manufacturing, and carpet manufacturing in Iran. Results of the study showed that spinning plant electricity intensity varies between 3.6 MWh/tonne yarn and 6.6 MWh/tonne yarn, while fuel intensity ranges between 6.7 MBtu/tonne yarn and 11.7 MBtu/tonne yarn. In weaving plants, electricity intensity ranges from 1.2 MWh/tonne fabric to 2.2 MWh/tonne fabric, while fuel intensity was 10.1 MBtu/tonne fabric and 16.4 MBtu/tonne fabric for the two plants studied. In three wet-processing plants, the electricity intensity was found to be between 1.5 MWh/tonne finished fabric and 2.5 MWh/tonne finished fabric, while the fuel intensity was between 38.2 MBtu/tonne finished fabric and 106.3 MBtu/tonne finished fabric. In addition, some methodological issues to improve such energy intensity comparison analysis and benchmarking in the textile industry is discussed.

Hasanbeigi, A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Long-Term Stewardship Related Information | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Communication & Engagement » Long-Term Stewardship » Communication & Engagement » Long-Term Stewardship » Long-Term Stewardship Related Information Long-Term Stewardship Related Information DOE Orders & Policies DOE O 200.l - Information Management Program, 09/30/1996 DOE O 430.1B - Real Property Asset Management, 09/24/2003 DOE O 413.3B, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, 11/29/2010 DOE O 458.1 Chg 2, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment, 06/06/2011 DOE O 430.1B Chg 2, Real Property and Asset Management, 09/24/2003 DOE P 454.1 - Use of Institutional Controls, 04/09/2003 and Guidance DOE Home Page for Guidance and Resources for LTS-related Requirements DOE Documents - Transition from Cleanup to LTS Site Transition Process upon Completion of the Cleanup Mission: Fact

355

Long Term World Oil Supply - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Long-Term World Oil Supply Scenarios. The Future Is Neither as Bleak or Rosy as Some Assert. By. John H. Wood, Gary R. Long, David F. Morehouse Conventionally ...

356

EIA Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Winter Fuels Outlook for National Association of State Energy Officials . ... for all fossil fuels Percent change in fuel bills from last winter (forecast)

357

Short-Term atom Outlook - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

in cooperation with the Department of Energy's Office of International Affairs. ... An order form is enclosed for your convenience. Send order form and payment to:

358

Short?Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Key drivers for EIA ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Source: U.S. Energy ... and increase production, they also reduce producer risk by ensuring that a large cross?section of rock is exposed ...

359

Role of the breeder in long-term energy economics  

SciTech Connect

Private and public decisions affecting the use of nuclear and other energy technologies over a long-run time horizon were studied using the ETA-MACRO model which provides for economic- and energy-sector interactions. The impact on the use of competing energy technologies of a public decision to apply benefit-cost analysis to the production of carbon dioxide that enters the atmosphere is considered. Assuming the public choice is to impose an appropriate penalty tax on those technologies which generate CO/sub 2/ and to allow decentralized private decisions to choose the optimal mix of energy technologies that maximize a nonlinear objective function subject to constraints, the study showed that breeder technology provides a much-larger share of domestically consumed energy. Having the breeder technology available as a substitute permits control of CO/sub 2/ without significant reductions in consumption or gross national product growth paths.

Kosobud, R.F.; Daly, T.A.; Chang, Y.I.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Microsoft PowerPoint - Arseneau_EIA_ShortTermDriversofEnergyPrices.ppt [Compatibility Mode]  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

SHORT-TERM ENERGY PRICES: SHORT-TERM ENERGY PRICES: WHAT DRIVERS MATTER MOST? DAVID M. ARSENEAU FEDERAL RESERVE BOARD U.S. Energy Information Administration & Johns Hopkins University - SAIS FEDERAL RESERVE BOARD Johns Hopkins University SAIS 2010 Energy Conference Washington, D.C., U.S.A. A il 6 2010 April 6, 2010 BROAD COMMODITY PRICES SINCE 2000 Short-term Energy Prices: What Drivers Matters Most? BROAD COMMODITY PRICES SINCE 2000 April 6, 2010 Seminar: 2010 EIA/SAIS Energy Conference 2 A (GROSSLY OVERSIMPLIFIED) FRAMEWORK Short-term Energy Prices: What Drivers Matters Most? A (GROSSLY OVERSIMPLIFIED) FRAMEWORK ...  Two candidate explanations:  "Fundamentals"  Fundamentals  Trend price movements appear broadly interpretable through lens of fundamental market developments...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "term energy intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Newporter Apartments: Deep Energy Retrofit Short-Term Results  

SciTech Connect

This project demonstrates a path to meet the goal of the Building America program to reduce home energy use by 30% in multi-family buildings. The project demonstrates cost effective energy savings targets as well as improved comfort and indoor environmental quality (IEQ) associated with deep energy retrofits by a large public housing authority as part of a larger rehabilitation effort. The project focuses on a typical 1960's vintage low-rise multi-family apartment community (120 units in three buildings).

Gordon, A.; Howard, L.; Kunkle, R.; Lubliner, M.; Auer, D.; Clegg, Z.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Energy savings can be communicated in terms of kilowatt hours (energy), carbon (climate change) or pounds (cost).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AIM Energy savings can be communicated in terms of kilowatt hours (energy), carbon (climate change for saving energy and impact subsequent perceptions and behaviour. A particular focus here is behaviour beyond immediate energy consumption behaviour, i.e., more general environmental behaviours. SOCIAL VALUES

McAuley, Derek

363

Attaining and using extremely high intensities of solar energy with non-imaging concentrators  

SciTech Connect

Using the principles and techniques of non-imaging optics, solar concentrations that approach the theoretical maximum can be achieved. In this paper, the authors review recent progress in attaining, measuring, and using such ultrahigh solar fluxes. In particular, they review the design principles for optimized two-stage concentrators and solar furnaces and discuss the characteristics and properties of a variety of non-imaging secondaries which have been employed. These include Compound Parabolic Concentrators (CPC) type secondaries, Dielectric Totally Internally Reflecting Concentrators (DTIRC), and flow-line or {open_quotes}trumpet{close_quotes} concentrators. The usual design is a configuration where {phi}, the rim angle of the primary, is small, that is, corresponding to a system with a relatively large focal length to diameter (F/D) ratio. All three types of secondary are characterized by a design acceptance angle {phi}{sub a} which must be greater than or equal to {phi}. The design parameters and trade-offs for each of these systems including strategies for choice of particular secondary and degree of truncation, are presented. The authors review the calorimetric techniques used to measure these high intensities and describe a newly developed technique for {open_quotes}extracting{close_quotes} light from inside a high index medium. Finally they review a number of potential applications for highly concentrated solar energy and the current status of the associated technology. By making possible new and unique applications for intense solar flux, these techniques have opened a whole new frontier for research and development of potential economic uses of solar energy. 63 refs., 34 figs., 3 tabs.

Jenkins, D.; O`Gallagher, J.; Winston, R.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

364

Summary Short?Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Energy Price Volatility and Forecast Uncertainty 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is often noted that energy prices are quite volatile, reflecting market participants adjustments to new information from physical energy markets and/or markets in energyrelated financial derivatives. Price volatility is an indication of the level of uncertainty, or risk, in the market. This paper describes how markets price risk and how the marketclearing process for risk transfer can be used to generate price bands around observed futures prices for crude oil, natural gas, and other commodities. These bands provide a quantitative measure of uncertainty regarding the range in which markets expect prices to trade. The Energy Information Administrations (EIA) monthly Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) publishes base case projections for a variety of energy prices that go out 12 to 24 months (every January the STEO forecast is extended through December of the following year). EIA has recognized that all price forecasts are highly uncertain and has described the uncertainty by identifying the market factors that may significantly move prices away from their expected paths, such as economic growth, Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) behavior, geo-political events, and hurricanes.

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Static Equilibrium: Forecasting Long-Term Energy Prices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a static equilibrium model that can be used by power companies to analyze retirement and investment decisions. Given deterministic expectations of prices, technology alternatives, and growth rates, the model defines a long-term equilibrium for an electricity market that can be used as a practical starting point for analyzing dynamic equilibrium, the distribution of outcomes associated with investment and retirement in a probabilistic world. The report includes a spreadsheet that ca...

2005-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

366

Method and apparatus for measuring the momentum, energy, power, and power density profile of intense particle beams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for determining the power, momentum, energy, and power density profile of high momentum mass flow. Small probe projectiles of appropriate size, shape and composition are propelled through an intense particle beam at equal intervals along an axis perpendicular to the beam direction. Probe projectiles are deflected by collisions with beam particles. The net beam-induced deflection of each projectile is measured after it passes through the intense particle beam into an array of suitable detectors.

Gammel, George M. (Merrick, NY); Kugel, Henry W. (Somerset, NJ)

1992-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

367

Method and apparatus for measuring the momentum, energy, power, and power density profile of intense particle beams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for determining the power, momentum, energy, and power density profile for high momentum mass flow. Small probe projectiles of appropriate size, shape and composition are propelled through an intense particle beam at equal intervals along an axis perpendicular to the beam direction. Probe projectiles are deflected by collisions with beam particles. The net beam-induced deflection of each projectile is measured after it passes through the intense particle beam into an array of suitable detectors.

Gammel, G.M.; Kugel, H.W.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

368

Energy Engineering (M.Sc.) Winter Term 2012/2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

groups have been formed: · Section Thermal Energy Systems (at DTU Mekanik) · Group Biomass Gasification- centrated on thermal gasification of biomass and utilisation of gasification gas in IC-engines. Important operated on gasification gas · Modelling of Benson boilers for opti- mal flexibility in low load · Design

369

Short Term Energy Monitoring: What Does This Information Mean to the Facility Energy Manager?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engineers at the Energy Systems Laboratory at Texas A&M University have completed short term energy metering studies at a complex of offices in northern Texas and several buildings on the Texas A&M University campus during the past 18 months. These studies typically consisted of installing electrical metering at the, whole building level and included sub-metering of selected circuits when possible. Personnel would go through the entire facility ensuring that all lighting, fan, and mechanical systems were active and on. After a period of approximately 10 minutes, a selected areas of the building would be "turned off." This sequence was repeated for all areas of interest in the facility. At the end of the lighting test, air handlers, then chilling and pumping equipment was turned off (if applicable) and a final ten minutes of electrical use data taken. In each of these facilities, lighting system load verification was the primary goal and the data provided a very good accounting for all buildings studied. The northern Texas office buildings in particular, were interested in these data for comparison with a recently hired performance contractor. The A&M study was a follow-up to an earlier lighting study that had been conducted by the campus energy office. Base electrical load data was also determined from these tests. This paper presents results of these studies and suggests that the method is attractive to both contractors and facility energy managers as well.

Bryant, J. A.; Carlson, K. A.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Energy and Emissions Long Term Outlook A Detailed Simulation of Energy Supply-Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper presents the results of a detailed, bottom-up modeling exercise of Mexicos energy markets. The Energy and Power Evaluation Program (ENPEP), the Wien Automatic System Planning (WASP) and the Energy Demand Model (MODEMA) were used to develop forecasts to 2025. Primary energy supply is projected to grow from 9,313 PJ (1999) to 13,130 PJ (2025). Mexicos crude oil production is expected to increase by 1 % annually to 8,230 PJ. As its domestic crude refining capacity becomes unable to meet the rising demand for petroleum products, imports of oil products will become increasingly important. The Mexican natural gas markets are driven by the strong demand for gas in the power generating and manufacturing industries which significantly outpaces projected domestic production. The result is a potential need for large natural gas imports that may reach approximately 46 % of total gas supplies by 2025. The long-term market outlook for Mexicos electricity industry shows a heavy reliance on naturalgas based generating technologies. Gas-fired generation is forecast to increase 26-fold eventually accounting for over 80 % of total generation by 2025. Alternative results for a constrained-gas scenario show a substantial shift to coal-based generation and the associated effects on the natural gas market. A renewables scenario investigates impacts of additional renewables for power generation (primarily wind plus some solar-photovoltaic). A nuclear scenario analyzes the impacts of additional nuclear power

Juan Quintanilla Martnez; Autnoma Mxico; Centro Mario Molina; Juan Quintanilla Martnez

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Why you need to eat: Thermodynamics! I. Why the 2nd Law in terms of free energy is more  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Why you need to eat: Thermodynamics! ! I. Why the 2nd Law in terms of free energy is more useful! 1. In terms of Entropy! 2. In terms of Free energy! Second Law of Thermodynamics describes at the expense of the environment! The second law in terms of free energy# All E transformations tend to proceed

Lycan, Deborah E.

372

A new approach to estimate commercial sector end-use load shapes and energy use intensities  

SciTech Connect

We discuss the application of an end-use load shape estimation technique to develop annual energy use intensities (EUIs) and hourly end-use load shapes (LSs) for commercial buildings in the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) service territory. Results will update inputs for the commercial sector energy and peak demand forecasting models used by PG&E and the California Energy Commission (CEC). EUIs were estimated for 11 building types, up to 10 end uses, 3 fuel types, 2 building vintages, and up to 5 climate regions. The integrated methodology consists of two major parts. The first part is the reconciliation of initial end-use load-shape estimates with measured whole-building load data to produce intermediate EUIs and load shapes, using LBL`s End-use Disaggregation Algorithm, EDA. EDA is a deterministic hourly algorithm that relies on the observed characteristics of the measured hourly whole-building electricity use and disaggregates it into major end-use components. The end-use EUIs developed through the EDA procedure represent a snap-shot of electricity use by building type and end-use for two regions of the PG&E service territory, for the year that disaggregation is performed. In the second part of the methodology, we adjust the EUIs for direct application to forecasting models based on factors such as climatic impacts on space-conditioning EUIs, fuel saturation effects, building and equipment vintage, and price impacts. Core data for the project are detailed on-site surveys for about 800 buildings, mail surveys ({approximately}6000), load research data for over 1000 accounts, and hourly weather data for five climate regions.

Akbari, H.; Eto, J.; Konopacki, S.; Afzal, A.; Heinemeier, K.; Rainer, L.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Sky-maps of the sidereal anisotropy of galactic cosmic ray intensity and its energy dependence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the sidereal daily variations observed between 1985 and 2006 at Matsushiro, Japan (MAT) and between 1993 and 2005 at Liapootah, Tasmania (LPT). These stations comprise the two hemisphere network (THN) of underground muon detectors in Japan and Australia. Yearly mean harmonic vectors at MAT and LPT are more or less stable without any significant change in phase and amplitude in correlation with either the solar activity- or magnetic-cycles. In this paper, therefore, we analyze the average anisotropy over the entire observation periods, i.e. 1985-2006 for MAT and 1993-2005 for LPT. We apply to the THN data a best-fitting analysis based on a model anisotropy in space identical to that adopted by Amenomori et al. (2007) for Tibet III data. The median energies of primary cosmic rays recorded are ~0.5 TeV for THN and ~5 TeV for the Tibet III experiment. It is shown that the intensity distribution of the best-fit anisotropy is quite similar to that derived from Tibet III data, regardless of the order of magnitude difference in energies of primary particles. This, together with the THN observations, confirms that the analysis by Amenomori et al. (2007) based on the Tibet III experiment in the northern hemisphere is not seriously biased. The best-fit amplitudes of the anisotropy, on the other hand, are only one third or less of those reported by the Tibet III experiment, indicating attenuation due to solar modulation. The rigidity dependence of the anisotropy amplitude in the sub-TeV region is consistent with the spectrum reported by Hall et al. (1999), smoothly extending to the Tibet III result in the multi-TeV region. The amplitude at higher energies appears almost constant or gradually decreasing with increasing rigidity.

K. Munakata; N. Matsumoto; S. Yasue; C. Kato; S. Mori; M. Takita; M. L. Duldig; J. E. Humble; J. Kota

2008-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

374

Short-Term Energy Outlook April 1999-Summer Gasoline Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Summer Motor Gasoline Outlook Summer Motor Gasoline Outlook This year's base case outlook for summer (April-September) motor gasoline markets may be summarized as follows: * Pump Prices: (average regular) projected to average about $1.13 per gallon this summer, up 9-10 cents from last year. The increase, while substantial, still leaves average prices low compared to pre-1998 history, especially in inflation-adjusted terms. * Supplies: expected to be adequate, overall. Beginning-of-season inventories were even with the 1998 level, which was at the high end of the normal range. However, some refinery problems on the West Coast have tightened things up, at least temporarily. * Demand: up 2.0 percent from last summer due to solid economic growth and low (albeit rising) fuel prices; highway travel may reach 1.4 trillion miles for the

375

U.S. Energy Infrastructure Investment: Long-Term Strategic Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. Energy Infrastructure Investment: Long-Term Strategic Planning to Inform Policy Development/University Cooperative Research Center since 1996 PSERC #12;Intentionally Blank Page #12;U.S. Energy Infrastructure Research Center program under which PSERC was created. #12;U.S. Energy Infrastructure Investment: Long

376

Assessing climate change impacts on the near-term stability of the wind energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessing climate change impacts on the near-term stability of the wind energy resource over- ble emissions of carbon dioxide. The wind energy resource is natu- rally a function of the climate, leading some to question the continued viability of the wind energy industry. Here we briefly articulate

Pryor, Sara C.

377

March 2013 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(STEO) (STEO) Highlights  The weekly U.S. average regular gasoline retail price fell in early March for the first time since mid-December. The March 11 average was $3.71 per gallon, down $0.07 per gallon from February 25. EIA expects that lower crude oil prices will result in monthly average regular gasoline prices staying near the February average of $3.67 per gallon over the next few months, with the annual average regular gasoline retail price declining from $3.63 per gallon in 2012 to $3.55 per gallon in 2013 and $3.38 per gallon in 2014. Energy price forecasts are highly uncertain and the current values of futures and options contracts suggest that prices

378

Ultra-Thin, Energy Efficient Facades- A Contradiction in Terms?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Within the European Union about 40 percent of the energy is consumed in buildings. In Germany roughly a quarter of the primary energy demand is used for the heating of buildings. A detailed analysis reveals that more than 90 percent of this energy can be related to old buildings, which were constructed before 1977. Reducing the heat losses through faades and using transparent or translucent faade elements to profit from solar heat gains are some of the first measures to improve energy efficiency of buildings. With the use of state-of-the-art insulation materials, thermal heat losses via the faade could be sufficiently reduced to provide an excellent insulation standard. However in some cases, lack of space or aesthetic needs, do not allow for sufficiently thick insulation layers. Within the last decade vacuum insulation panels (VIP) were developed, whose thermal conductivity values are 5 to 10 times lower (e.g. 0.002 to 0.008 W/(mK) at ambient conditions) than those reported for standard insulation materials. Thus a 2 cm thick VIP could replace a 20 cm of standard insulation material, e.g. polystyrene foam, with no changes to the thermal performance. Nowadays VIPs are commercially available and used more and more for the insulation of buildings, especially if space for insulation is expensive or not sufficiently available or a slim architecture is preferred. Right now an innovative evacuated double glazing (VIG) is being developed which provides an U-value below 0.5 W/(mK) for a system thickness of only 9 mm. The low weight of such a glazing reduces the mechanical requirements in comparison to a standard triple glazing and thus allows for the use of thin, highly insulating frames. With these slim opaque and transparent insulation elements (VIP, VIG) ultra-thin and aesthetic faade construction can be realized. However, reducing the construction mass of building walls also leads to a loss of thermal capacity and therefore more regulation measures are needed to keep a comfortable living climate within such a building. It is expected that in future multifunctional faade elements will further improve the thermal performance of buildings. One example is the switchable insulation, where the thermal conductivity can be electrically switched from 0.002 W/(mK) to 0.16 W/(mK) within minutes. Future research work is dedicated to the application of textiles in architecture. Such textiles can be functionalized by using low-e coatings to reduce radiative heat transfer or by adding phase-change- materials (PCM) to enhance the thermal capacity of the textile based, low-weight constructions. The combination of such textiles with vacuum insulation panels to improve the insulation properties or with flexible photovoltaic cells to generate electricity is another key aspect of textile architecture. This research work was supported in the past by the Bavarian Ministry for Economics, Information, Traffic and Technology and is actually supported by the Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology.

Ebert, H. P.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Collective Focusing of Intense Ion Beam Pulses for High-energy Density Physics Applications  

SciTech Connect

The collective focusing concept in which a weak magnetic lens provides strong focusing of an intense ion beam pulse carrying a neutralizing electron background is investigated by making use of advanced particle-in-cell simulations and reduced analytical models. The original analysis by Robertson Phys. Rev. Lett. 48, 149 (1982) is extended to the parameter regimes of particular importance for several high-energy density physics applications. The present paper investigates (1) the effects of non-neutral collective focusing in a moderately strong magnetic field; (2) the diamagnetic effects leading to suppression of the applied magnetic field due to the presence of the beam pulse; and (3) the influence of a finite-radius conducting wall surrounding the beam cross-section on beam neutralization. In addition, it is demonstrated that the use of the collective focusing lens can significantly simplify the technical realization of the final focusing of ion beam pulses in the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-I (NDCX-I) , and the conceptual designs of possible experiments on NDCX-I are investigated by making use of advanced numerical simulations. 2011 American Institute of Physics

Mikhail A. Dorf, Igor D. Kaganovich, Edward A. Startsev and Ronald C. Davidson

2011-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

380

Narrow Energy Spread Protons and Ions from High-Intensity, High-Contrast Laser Solid Target Interactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent simulations show that an idealized, high intensity, short pulse laser can generate quasi-monoenergetic proton beams with energies over 100 MeV in an interaction with a thin film. However, most short pulse laser facilities with sufficient intensity have difficulty controlling the nanosecond and picosecond contrast necessary to realize such a regime. Experiments were performed to investigate proton and ion acceleration from a high contrast, short pulse laser by employing dual plasma mirrors along with a deformable mirror at the HERCULES laser facility at the Center for Ultrafast Optical Sciences, University of Michigan. Plasma mirrors were characterized, allowing a 50% throughput with an intensity contrast increase of 105. The focal spot quality was also exceptional, showing a 1.1 micron full width at half maximum (FWHM) focal diameter. Experiments were done using temporally cleaned 30 TW, 32 fs pulses to achieve an intensity of up to 10{sup 21} Wcm{sup -2} on Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and Mylar targets with thicknesses ranging 50 nm to 13 microns. Proton beams with energy spreads below 2 MeV were observed from all thicknesses, peaking with energies up to 10.3 MeV and an energy spread of 0.8 MeV. Similar narrow energy spreads were observed for oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon at the silicon nitride thickness of 50 nm with energies up to 24 MeV with an energy spread of 3 MeV, whereas the energy spread is greatly increased at a larger thickness. Maximum energies were confirmed with CR39 track detectors, while a Thomson ion spectrometer was used to gauge the monoenergetic nature of the beam.

Dollar, Franklin; Matsuoka, Takeshi; McGuffey, Christopher; Bulanov, Stepan S.; Chvykov, Vladimir; Kalintchenko, Galina; Thomas, Alec G. R.; Willingale, Louise; Yanovsky, Victor; Maksimchuk, Anatoly; Krushelnick, Karl [Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, Univ. Of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Davis, Jack; Petrov, George [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

2010-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

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381

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

‹ Analysis & Projections ‹ Analysis & Projections Short-Term Energy Outlook Release Date: December 10, 2013 | Next Release Date: January 7, 2014 | Full Report | Text Only | All Tables | All Figures Glossary › FAQS › Overview STEO Report Highlights Prices Global Crude Oil and Liquid Fuels U.S. Crude Oil and Liquid Fuels Natural Gas Coal Electricity Renewables and CO2 Emissions U.S. Economic Assumptions Data Figures Tables Custom Table Builder Real Prices Viewer Forecast Changes (PDF) Special Analysis Price Uncertainty Custom Table Builder Frequency: Annual Monthly Quarterly Select a Year Range: 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 to 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014

382

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

‹ Analysis & Projections ‹ Analysis & Projections Short-Term Energy Outlook Release Date: December 10, 2013 | Next Release Date: January 7, 2014 | Full Report | Text Only | All Tables | All Figures Glossary › FAQS › Overview STEO Report Highlights Prices Global Crude Oil and Liquid Fuels U.S. Crude Oil and Liquid Fuels Natural Gas Coal Electricity Renewables and CO2 Emissions U.S. Economic Assumptions Data Figures Tables Custom Table Builder Real Prices Viewer Forecast Changes (PDF) Special Analysis Price Uncertainty Highlights After falling by more than 40 cents per gallon from the beginning of September through mid-November, weekly U.S. average regular gasoline retail prices increased by 8 cents per gallon to reach $3.27 per gallon on December 2, 2013, due in part to unplanned refinery maintenance and higher

383

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Release Schedule Release Schedule Release Date. The Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) scheduling procedure calls for the release of the STEO on the first Tuesday following the first Thursday of each month. For example, since the first Thursday of July 2009 was July 2, under this plan, the July edition was released on Tuesday, July 7. If a Federal holiday falls on the Monday before the normal release date the release is delayed until Wednesday. There may be the occasional unusual delay in the release because of scheduling around other events, such as the annual EIA Conference in April 2009. Barring holidays or unusual rescheduling, the STEO will normally appear between the 6th and the 12th of the month. Any unforeseen scheduling adjustments will be posted here and/or on the STEO homepage.

384

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Special Analysis Special Analysis + EXPAND ALL Feature Articles Status of Libyan Loading Ports and Oil and Natural Gas Fields September 2013 PDF EIA Estimates of Crude Oil and Liquid Fuels Supply Disruptions September 2013 PDF 2013 Outlook for Gulf of Mexico Hurricane-Related Production Outages June 2013 PDF Summer 2013 Outlook for Residential Electric Bills June 2013 PDF Key drivers for EIA's short-term U.S. crude oil production outlook February 2013 PDF Constraints in New England likely to affect regional energy prices this winter January 2013 PDF Change in STEO Regional and U.S. Degree Day Calculations September 2012 PDF Changes to Electricity and Renewables Tables August 2012 PDF Brent Crude Oil Spot Price Forecast July 2012 PDF 2012 Outlook for Hurricane-Related Production Outages in the Gulf of Mexico June 2012 PDF

385

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Market Prices and Uncertainty Report Market Prices and Uncertainty Report This is a regular monthly supplement to the EIA Short-Term Energy Outlook. Contact: James Preciado (James.Preciado@eia.gov) Full Report Crude Oil Prices: International crude oil benchmarks moved higher in November, showing their first month-over-month increase since August, while U.S. crude oil prices moved higher during the first week of December. The North Sea Brent front month futures price settled at $110.98 per barrel on December 5, an increase of $5.07 per barrel since its close on November 1 (Figure 1). The West Texas Intermediate (WTI) front month futures contract rose $2.77 per barrel compared to November 1, settling at $97.38 per barrel on December 5. Figure 1: Historical crude oil front month futures prices

386

What's New for the Department of Energy's (DOE) Long-Term Stewardship (LTS)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

What's New for the Department of Energy's (DOE) Long-Term What's New for the Department of Energy's (DOE) Long-Term Stewardship (LTS) What's New for the Department of Energy's (DOE) Long-Term Stewardship (LTS) On 11 February 2011, the Department replaced its DOE Order 5400.5 Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment, Chg 2, dated 1-7-93 except for Chapter III (-Derived Concentration Guides for Air and Water‖) and Figure IV-1 (-Surface Contamination Guidelines‖) with a new DOE Order 458.1 Radiation Protection and the Environment. In DOE Order 458.1, DOE establishes more requirements to protect the public and the environment against undue risk from radiation (including long-term stewardship requirements) associated with radiological activities conducted under the control of the Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to the Atomic

387

Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Motor Gasoline Consumption Model  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The motor gasoline consumption module of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) model is designed to provide forecasts of total U.S. consumption of motor gasolien based on estimates of vehicle miles traveled and average vehicle fuel economy.

Tancred Lidderdale

2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

388

Implications of Long-Term Trends in the Energy Efficiency of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Implications of Long-Term Trends in the Energy Efficiency of Computing and Communications Speaker(s): Jonathan Koomey Date: November 14, 2012 - 4:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar...

389

EIA Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels OutlookWinter Fuels Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

heating oil electricity South U.S. total wood kerosene/other/no heating 116 million homes 4 Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook October 8, 2013

390

On Measuring the Terms of the Turbulent Kinetic Energy Budget from an AUV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The terms of the steady-state, homogeneous turbulent kinetic energy budgets are obtained from measurements of turbulence and fine structure from the small autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) Remote Environmental Measuring Units (REMUS). The ...

Louis Goodman; Edward R. Levine; Rolf G. Lueck

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Regional Residential Heating Oil Price Model  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The regional residential heating oil price module of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) model is designed to provide residential retail price forecasts for the 4 census regions: Northeast, South, Midwest, and West.

Information Center

2009-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

392

Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Regional Residential Propane Price Model  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The regional residential propane price module of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) model is designed to provide residential retail price forecasts for the 4 census regions: Northeast, South, Midwest, and West.

Information Center

2009-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

393

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) projects that natural gas prices will remain relatively high for the rest of 2004. Wellhead prices are expected to average $5.41 per MMBtu through the end of the storage refill season (October 31) and $5.59 in November and December. Spot prices (composites for producing-area hubs) averaged about $5.30 per MMBtu in the first quarter of this year but are currently near $6.00. Barring cooler-than-normal weather this summer, the likelihood appears small that spot prices will fall significantly below $5.65 per MMBtu for the rest of 2004. Overall in 2004, spot prices will likely average $5.62 per MMBtu and wellhead prices will average $5.33. In 2005, spot prices are expected to increase to $5.90 per MMBtu. As in other recent projections, this outcome depends on modest growth in domestic production and total available supply (including imports and storage inventories) in both 2004 and 2005. Underground storage facilities reported net injections of 199 Bcf for April, well above the previous 5-year average of 139 Bcf. At the end of April, storage stocks were only about 2 percent below the 5-year average level and 37 percent higher than last year at this time based on monthly survey data.

394

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration ... Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, ... crude oil benchmarks fell in September.

395

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

STEO Archives STEO Archives Previous Short-Term Energy Outlook reports are available in the original Adobe Acrobat PDF file with text, charts, and tables, or just the monthly data tables in an Excel file. + EXPAND ALL 2013 STEO Issues Release Date Full PDF Report Excel Data File Energy Price Volatility and Forecast Uncertainty December 2013 12/10/2013 dec13.pdf dec13_base.xlsx dec13_uncertainty.pdf November 2013 11/13/2013 nov13.pdf nov13_base.xlsx nov13_uncertainty.pdf October 2013 10/08/2013 oct13.pdf oct13_base.xlsx oct13_uncertainty.pdf September 2013 09/10/2013 sep13.pdf sep13_base.xlsx sep13_uncertainty.pdf August 2013 08/06/2013 aug13.pdf aug13_base.xlsx aug13_uncertainty.pdf July 2013 07/09/2013 jul13.pdf jul13_base.xlsx jul13_uncertainty.pdf

396

You Provide the Search Term, Green Energy Portal Provides the Concepts |  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

You Provide the Search Term, Green Energy Portal Provides the Concepts You Provide the Search Term, Green Energy Portal Provides the Concepts NEWS MEDIA CONTACT: Cathey Daniels, (865) 576-9539 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE September 7, 2011 You Provide the Search Term, Green Energy Portal Provides the Concepts New Semantic Search Technology plus Auto-complete Gets You a More Direct Line to Rich Scientific Content When you type "solar power" into a search box, are you looking for information on solar farms, solar radiation, or solar electric power plants? The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Green Energy portal can now map your keyword query to scientific concepts. This semantic technique, called "keyword to concept mapping," is applied to your search behind the scenes and helps hone your search for more efficient knowledge access and

397

Long-term affected energy production of waste to energy technologies identified by use of energy system analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Affected energy production is often decisive for the outcome of consequential life-cycle assessments when comparing the potential environmental impact of products or services. Affected energy production is however difficult to determine. In this article the future long-term affected energy production is identified by use of energy system analysis. The focus is on different uses of waste for energy production. The Waste-to-Energy technologies analysed include co-combustion of coal and waste, anaerobic digestion and thermal gasification. The analysis is based on optimization of both investments and production of electricity, district heating and bio-fuel in a future possible energy system in 2025 in the countries of the Northern European electricity market (Denmark, Norway, Sweden, Finland and Germany). Scenarios with different CO{sub 2} quota costs are analysed. It is demonstrated that the waste incineration continues to treat the largest amount of waste. Investments in new waste incineration capacity may, however, be superseded by investments in new Waste-to-Energy technologies, particularly those utilising sorted fractions such as organic waste and refuse derived fuel. The changed use of waste proves to always affect a combination of technologies. What is affected varies among the different Waste-to-Energy technologies and is furthermore dependent on the CO{sub 2} quota costs and on the geographical scope. The necessity for investments in flexibility measures varies with the different technologies such as storage of heat and waste as well as expansion of district heating networks. Finally, inflexible technologies such as nuclear power plants are shown to be affected.

Muenster, M., E-mail: maem@risoe.dtu.d [Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, Frederiksborgvej 399, 4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Meibom, P. [Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, Frederiksborgvej 399, 4000 Roskilde (Denmark)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

398

Manifestation of quantum chaos on scattering techniques: application to low-energy and photo-electron diffraction intensities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Intensities of LEED and PED are analyzed from a statistical point of view. The probability distribution is compared with a Porter-Thomas law, characteristic of a chaotic quantum system. The agreement obtained is understood in terms of analogies between simple models and Berry's conjecture for a typical wavefunction of a chaotic system. The consequences of this behaviour on surface structural analysis are qualitatively discussed by looking at the behaviour of standard correlation factors.

P. L. de Andres; J. A. Vergs

1997-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

399

Target Allocation Methodology for China's Provinces: Energy Intensity in the 12th FIve-Year Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2015. 23 In 2005, national energy consumption structure wasof: (a) national average annual energy consumption growthnational average) rate of change in energy consumption.

Ohshita, Stephanie

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Target Allocation Methodology for China's Provinces: Energy Intensity in the 12th FIve-Year Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of China’ s Energy-Saving and Emission Reductionrates: provincial trends Energy saving goals: equal ratesrates: provincial trends Energy saving goals: provincial

Ohshita, Stephanie

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "term energy intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Target Allocation Methodology for China's Provinces: Energy Intensity in the 12th FIve-Year Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

World Resources Institute (WRI). 2009. Energy Consumption:Residential energy consumption per capita. WRI EarthTrendstargets. Total primary energy consumption is separated into

Ohshita, Stephanie

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Changes in Natural Gas Monthly Consumption Data Collection and the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Beginning with the December 2010 issue of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO), the EnergyInformation Administration (EIA) will present natural gas consumption forecasts for theresidential and commercial sectors that are consistent with recent changes to the Form EIA-857monthly natural gas survey.

Information Center

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Monthly and yearly energy forecasts, analysis of energy topics, financial analysis, Congressional reports. Markets & Finance. ... Market-Derived Probabilities: ...

404

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration - EIA - Official Energy Statistics from the U.S. Government ... imports and exports, production, prices, sales. Electricity.

405

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration ... imports and exports, production, prices, sales. ... Maps by energy source and topic, includes forecast maps.

406

Zimbabwe-Terms of Reference for Future LEDS | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zimbabwe-Terms of Reference for Future LEDS Zimbabwe-Terms of Reference for Future LEDS Jump to: navigation, search Name Zimbabwe-Terms of Reference for Future LEDS Agency/Company /Organization Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN), United Kingdom Department for International Development Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, Market analysis, Pathways analysis Website http://cdkn.org/ Country Zimbabwe UN Region Southern Africa References CDKN-Zimbabwe-Terms of Reference for Future LEDS[1] This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. References ↑ "CDKN-Zimbabwe-Terms of Reference for Future LEDS" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Zimbabwe-Terms_of_Reference_for_Future_LEDS&oldid=698706"

407

CDKN-Zimbabwe-Terms of Reference for Future LEDS | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zimbabwe-Terms of Reference for Future LEDS Zimbabwe-Terms of Reference for Future LEDS Jump to: navigation, search Name CDKN-Zimbabwe-Terms of Reference for Future LEDS Agency/Company /Organization Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN), United Kingdom Department for International Development Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, Market analysis, Pathways analysis Website http://cdkn.org/ Country Zimbabwe UN Region Southern Africa References CDKN-Zimbabwe-Terms of Reference for Future LEDS[1] This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. References ↑ "CDKN-Zimbabwe-Terms of Reference for Future LEDS" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=CDKN-Zimbabwe-Terms_of_Reference_for_Future_LEDS&oldid=407560"

408

Biodiesel Supply and Consumption in the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The historical biodiesel consumption data published in the EIA Monthly Energy Review (http://www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/mer/contents.html) March 2009 edition were revised to account for imports and exports. Table 10.4 of the Monthly Energy Review was expanded to display biodiesel imports, exports, stocks, stock change, and consumption. Similar revisions were made in the April 2009 edition of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO).

Information Center

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

A Comparison of Iron and Steel Production Energy Use and Energy Intensity in China and the U.S.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

flow models for the US steel industry, Energy 26, no. 2 (of Energy, Energy Information Administration (U.S. DOE/EIA).of Energy, Energy Information Administration (U.S. DOE/EIA).

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Target Allocation Methodology for China's Provinces: Energy Intensity in the 12th FIve-Year Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and toward a low-energy service sector. In line with theseand toward a low-energy service sector. In line with theseand toward a low- energy service sector. In line with these

Ohshita, Stephanie

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Implications of Long-Term Trends in the Energy Efficiency of Computing and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Implications of Long-Term Trends in the Energy Efficiency of Computing and Implications of Long-Term Trends in the Energy Efficiency of Computing and Communications Speaker(s): Jonathan Koomey Date: November 14, 2012 - 4:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Alan Meier Long-standing trends in the energy efficiency of computing promise an explosion in data collected from mobile sensors, controls, and portable computing devices. This talk will describe the research that revealed those efficiency trends and the implications of those trends for our ability to understand and respond to the world around us. The talk will also summarize work in progress characterizing related trends in mobile communications, sensors, batteries, and energy harvesting. A recording of this talk will be available on the UCB Energy and Resources

412

A Comparison of Iron and Steel Production Energy Use and Energy Intensity in China and the U.S.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

only provide national energy consumption data up to 2003.and data on national energy consumption are provided bymetals Total energy consumption: national steel industry

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

What's New for the Department of Energy's (DOE) Long-Term Stewardship (LTS)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

What's New for the Department of Energy's (DOE) Long-Term Stewardship (LTS) What's New for the Department of Energy's (DOE) Long-Term Stewardship (LTS) https://www.directives.doe.gov/directives/0458.1-BOrder/view On 11 February 2011, the Department replaced its DOE Order 5400.5 Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment, Chg 2, dated 1-7-93 except for Chapter III (-Derived Concentration Guides for Air and Water‖) and Figure IV-1 (-Surface Contamination Guidelines‖) with a new DOE Order 458.1 Radiation Protection and the Environment. In DOE Order 458.1, DOE establishes more requirements to protect the public and the environment against undue risk from radiation (including long-term stewardship requirements) associated with radiological activities conducted under the control of the Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to

414

Comparison of operational energy intensities and consumption of pipelines versus coastal tankers: US Gulf coast to northeast coast routes  

SciTech Connect

This report is a comparative analysis of operational energy intensities and consumption for pipeline shipments versus coastal tanker and tanker-barge movements of light petroleum products from the US Gulf Coast to US East Coast Mid-Atlantic states. It has been prepared for the Office of Transportation Programs of the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of a project designed to develop energy conservation strategies in the areas of modal shifts and energy materials transport. It also answers an expressed interest of DOE's Office of Competition as to whether energy penalties are being paid in this region by the shipment of this oil by tanker rather than pipeline. Detailed estimates are made of the 1977 energy intensities (EIs) for tankers and the two major pipelines serving these routes; these are the Colonial pipeline (from Houston) and the Plantation pipeline (from Baton Rouge). Estimates of potential operational energy savings gained from diverting these shipments from tankers to pipelines are figured from these EIs plus 1977 tanker short-ton volumes for these products. Also estimated for these diversions are additional savings of petroleum available through shifts from the fuel oil used to power tankers, to the other energy sources used by pipelines (e.g., coal, which is burned by the utilities serving them). Table 1 indicates that these tanker volumes have been large and steady as a whole; however, individual origin ports have had substantial variations since the 1973 Arab oil embargo. Indirect energy requirements of the two modes are not included in this analysis because the methodology for calculating them is still an unresolved research area (e.g., diagreements exist as to how much supporting-infrastructure energy usage should be included for a mode).

Hooker, J.; Rose, A.B.; Bertram, K.M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Previous STEO Forecasts: Changes in Forecast from Last Month; STEO Archives; Other EIA Forecasts: Annual Energy Outlook; International Energy Outlook; Thank ...

416

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook; International Energy Outlook; Thank You. We welcome your comments or suggestions (optional). EIA - 1000 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, DC ...

417

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration - EIA - Official Energy Statistics from the U.S. Government ... solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. Nuclear & Uranium.

418

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration - EIA - Official Energy Statistics from the U.S. Government. ... solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. Nuclear & Uranium.

419

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Renewable energy includes minor components of non-marketed renewable energy that is neither bought nor sold, either directly or indirectly, ...

420

A Resource Intensive Traffic-Aware Scheme for Cluster-based Energy Conservation in Wireless Devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wireless traffic that is destined for a certain device in a network, can be exploited in order to minimize the availability and delay trade-offs, and mitigate the Energy consumption. The Energy Conservation (EC) mechanism can be node-centric by considering ... Keywords: Energy Conservation, Traffic-aware scheme, End-to-end communication, Capacity consideraiton for Energy Harvesting

Marios C. Charalambous; Constandinos X. Mavromoustakis; Muneer Bani Yassein

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "term energy intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Energy Market and Economic Impacts Proposal to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Intensity with a Cap and Trade System  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), in response to a September 27, 2006, request from Senators Bingaman, Landrieu, Murkowski, Specter, Salazar, and Lugar. The Senators requested that EIA assess the impacts of a proposal that would regulate emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) through an allowance cap-and-trade system. The program would set the cap to achieve a reduction in emissions relative to economic output, or greenhouse gas intensity.

John J. Conti

2007-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

422

Short-Term Energy Outlook November 2004 - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System and by EIAs office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels (hydroelectric and nuclear).

423

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration ... nuclear reactors, ... Weather projections from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

424

PSTAR: Primary and secondary terms analysis and renormalization: A unified approach to building energy simulations and short-term monitoring: A summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes a longer report entitled PSTAR - Primary and Secondary Terms Analysis and Renormalization. A Unified Approach to Building Energy Simulations and Short-Term Monitoring. These reports highlight short-term testing for predicting long-term performance of residential buildings. In the PSTAR method, renormalized parameters are introduced for the primary terms such that the renormalized energy balance equation is best satisfied in the least squares sense; hence, the name PSTAR. Testing and monitoring the energy performance of buildings has several important applications, among them: extrapolation to long-term performance, refinement of design tools through feedback from comparing design versus actual parameters, building-as-a-calorimeter for heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) diagnostics, and predictive load control. By combining realistic building models, simple test procedures, and analysis involving linear equations, PSTAR provides a powerful tool for analyzing building energy as well as testing and monitoring. It forms the basis for the Short-Term Energy Monitoring (STEM) project at SERI. 3 figs., 1 tab.

Subbarao, K.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 : U.S. Energy Markets Summary 1 : U.S. Energy Markets Summary Either scripts and active content are not permitted to run or Adobe Flash Player version ${version_major}.${version_minor}.${version_revision} or greater is not installed. Get Adobe Flash Player a Includes lease condensate. b Total consumption includes Independent Power Producer (IPP) consumption. c Renewable energy includes minor components of non-marketed renewable energy that is neither bought nor sold, either directly or indirectly, as inputs to marketed energy. EIA does not estimate or project end-use consumption of non-marketed renewable energy. d The conversion from physical units to Btu is calculated by using a subset of conversion factors used in the calculations of gross energy consumption in EIA’s Monthly Energy Review (MER). Consequently, the historical data may not precisely match those published in the MER or the Annual Energy Review (AER).

426

Energy Production, Frictional Dissipation, and Maximum Intensity of a Numerically Simulated Tropical Cyclone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A tropical cyclone (TC) viewed as a heat engine converts heat energy extracted from the ocean into the kinetic energy of the TC, which is eventually dissipated due to surface friction. Since the energy production rate is a linear function while ...

Yuqing Wang; Jing Xu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Differences between Kinetic Energy Budget Terms Derived from SESAME and NWS Data Sets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Upper air data collected during AVE-SESAME 1, 1200 GMT 10 April 1200 GMT 11 April 1979, are used to detect differences between calculations of kinetic energy budget terms derived from two sets of analyses. Barnes's objective analysis scheme is ...

Dayton G. Vincent; Thomas Q. Carney

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Other Petroleum Products Consumption Model  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The other petroleum product consumption module of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) model is designed to provide U.S. consumption forecasts for 6 petroleum product categories: asphalt and road oil, petrochemical feedstocks, petroleum coke, refinery still gas, unfinished oils, and other miscvellaneous products

Tancred Lidderdale

2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

429

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration ... prices, sales. Electricity. Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions. ...

430

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nuclear & Uranium. Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. Total Energy. Comprehensive data summaries, comparisons, analysis, and projections ...

431

Short-term energy outlook. Quarterly projections, 2nd quarter 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes the performance of previous forecasts, compares recent cases with those of other forecasting services, and discusses current topics related to the short-term energy markets. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the second quarter of 1994 through the fourth quarter of 1995. Values for the first quarter of 1994, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in the Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations using the latest exogenous information available. The historical energy data, compiled into the second quarter 1994 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS database is archived quarterly and is available from the National Technical Information Service. The cases are produced using the STIFS. The STIFS model is driven principally by three sets of assumptions or inputs: estimates of key macroeconomic variables, world oil price assumptions, and assumptions about the severity of weather. Macroeconomic estimates are produced by DRI/McGraw-Hill but are adjusted by EIA to reflect EIA assumptions about the world price of crude oil, energy product prices, and other assumptions which may affect the macroeconomic outlook. The EIA model is available on computer tape from the National Technical Information Service.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Phase II Study of Long-Term Androgen Suppression With Bevacizumab and Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) in High-Risk Prostate Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: We report a Phase II trial assessing the acute and late toxicities of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), long-term androgen suppression (LTAS), and bevacizumab in patients with high-risk localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We treated 18 patients with LTAS with bicalutamide and goserelin in combination with bevacizumab and IMRT. Bevacizumab (10 mg/kg every 2 weeks) was administered for the first 16 weeks, and 15 mg/kg was then given every 3 weeks for 12 additional weeks, with an IMRT dose of 77.9 Gy to the prostate, 64.6 Gy to the seminal vesicles, and 57 Gy to the pelvic lymph nodes. Patients were eligible if they had clinical stage T2b to T4, a Gleason sum score of 8 to 10, or a prostate- specific antigen level of 20ng/mL or greater. The primary endpoint of the study was evaluation of acute and late toxicities. Results: The median age was 69 years, with a median pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level of 12.5 ng/mL and Gleason score of 8. The pretreatment clinical stage was T1c in 4 patients, T2 in 11, and T3 in 3. All patients completed IMRT with median follow-up of 34 months (range, 28-40 months) The most common Grade 2 or higher toxicities were hypertension (61% of patients with Grade 2 and 11% with Grade 3), proteinuria (28% with Grade 2 and 6% with Grade 3), and leucopenia (28% with Grade 2). No Grade 4 or higher acute toxicities were reported. Late toxicities included proctitis (6% of patients with Grade 2 and 11% with Grade 3), rectal bleeding (6% with Grade 2 and 11% with Grade 3), hematuria (6% with Grade 2), proteinuria (17% with Grade 2), hyponatremia (6% with Grade 3), cystitis (6% with Grade 3), and urinary retention (6% with Grade 2 and 11% with Grade 3). Grade 4 prostatitis occurred in 1 patient (6%). Conclusions: Bevacizumab does not appear to exacerbate the acute effects of IMRT. Late toxicities may have been worsened with this regimen. Further investigations of bevacizumab with LTAS and IMRT should be performed cautiously.

Vuky, Jacqueline, E-mail: vukyja@ohsu.edu [Section of Community Hematology/Oncology, Knight Cancer Institute, Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland, OR (United States); Pham, Huong T. [Section of Hematology/Oncology and Radiation Oncology, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Warren, Sarah; Douglass, Erika [Benaroya Research Institute, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Badiozamani, Kasra [Section of Hematology/Oncology and Radiation Oncology, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Madsen, Berit; Hsi, Alex [Peninsula Cancer Center, Poulsbo, WA (United States); Song Guobin [Section of Hematology/Oncology and Radiation Oncology, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

433

A Comparison of Iron and Steel Production Energy Use and Energy Intensity in China and the U.S.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

industry, encouraging widespread energy saving, emission reduction, increased steel scrap recycling rate,

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Contributions of weather and fuel mix to recent declines in U.S.energy and carbon intensity  

SciTech Connect

A recent (1996-2000) acceleration of declines in energy andcarbon intensity in the U.S. remains largely unexplained. This study usesDivisia decomposition and regression to test two candidate explanations -fuel mix and weather. The Divisia method demonstrates that fuel mix doesnot explain the declines in carbon intensity. The fuel mix, both overalland for electricity generation, became slightly more carbon intensiveover the study period (though the slight trend reversed before the end ofthe period). A regression-based correction to the Divisia indices,accounting for variation in heating- and cooling-degree-days, indicatesthat warmer weather accounts for about 30 percent ofthe total declines.This leaves declines of more than 2 percent per year (and an accelerationof more than 1 percent over previous decade) remaining to beexplained.

Davis, W. Bart; Sanstad, Alan H.; Koomey, Jonathan G.

2002-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

435

Session 4: "Short-Term Energy Prices - What Drivers Matter Most?"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4: "Short-Term Energy Prices - What Drivers Matter Most?" 4: "Short-Term Energy Prices - What Drivers Matter Most?" Speakers: Howard K. Gruenspecht, EIA David M. Arseneau, Federal Reserve Board Guy F. Caruso, Center for Strategic and International Studies Christopher Ellsworth, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Edward L. Morse, Credit Suisse Securities [Note: Recorders did not pick up introduction of panel (see biographies for details on the panelists) or introduction of session.] Howard: And this presentation could not be more timely, given current developments in oil and natural gas markets and the start of the traditional summer driving season. In discussions of rapidly rising oil prices leading to a peak of $147 per barrel in the summer of 2008, the factors that were traditionally the focus of EIA's

436

Table 6c. U.S. Residential Energy Intensity Using Weather ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

51. 61. 46 . 42 . Single-Family ... Except for 1997, estimates include all the floor area of the housing unit that was enclosed from the weather. Sources: Energy ...

437

U.S. energy intensity projected to continue its steady decline ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Comprehensive data summaries, comparisons, analysis, ... The events surrounding the Arab oil embargo in 1973 were associated with a dramatic rise in energy prices.

438

U.S. energy intensity projected to continue its steady decline ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Greenhouse gas data, voluntary report- ing, electric power plant emissions. ... Light-duty vehicles are by far the largest energy consuming part of ...

439

Sensitivity to Dark Energy candidates by searching for four-wave mixing of high-intensity lasers in the vacuum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Theoretical challenges to understand Dark Matter and Dark Energy suggest the existence of low-mass and weakly coupling fields in the universe. The quasi-parallel photon-photon collision system (QPS) can provide chances to probe the resonant production of these light dark fields and the induced decay by the coherent nature of laser fields simultaneously. By focusing high-intensity lasers with different colors in the vacuum, new colors emerge as the signature of the interaction. Because four photons in the initial and final states interplay via the dark field exchange, this process is analogous to four-wave mixing in quantum optics, where the frequency sum and difference among the incident three waves generate the fourth wave with a new frequency via the nonlinear property of crystals. The interaction rate of the four-wave mixing process has the cubic dependence on the intensity of each wave. Therefore, if high-intensity laser fields are given, the sensitivity to the weakly coupling of dark fields to photons rapidly increases over the wide mass range below sub-eV. Based on the experimentally measurable photon energies and the linear polarization states, we formulate the relation between the accessible mass-coupling domains and the high-intensity laser parameters, where the effects of the finite spectrum width of pulse lasers are taken into account. The expected sensitivity suggests that we have a potential to explore interactions at the Super-Planckian coupling strength in the sub-eV mass range, if the cutting-edge laser technologies are properly combined.

Kensuke Homma

2012-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

440

SR/OIAF/2006-01 Energy Market Impacts of Alternative Greenhouse Gas Intensity Reduction Goals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Service Reports are prepared by the Energy Information Administration upon special request and are based on assumptions specified by the requester. Preface and Contacts The Energy Information Administration (EIA) is the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. EIA provides timely, high-quality energy information and prepares objective, transparent analyses for use of Congress, the Administration and the public. EIA does not, however, take positions on policy issues. Because of EIA?s statutory independence with respect to the content of its energy information program, the analysis presented herein is strictly its own and should not be construed as representing the views of the U.S. Department of Energy or the Administration. The model projections in this report are not statements of what will happen but of what might happen, given the assumptions and methodologies used. The reference case projections are businessas-usual trend forecasts, given known technology, technological and demographic trends, and current laws and regulations. Thus, they provide a policy-neutral starting point that can be used to

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "term energy intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

See "Petroleum Administration for Defense District" in EIA's Energy Glossary for a list of states in ... Petroleum Marketing Monthly, DOE/EIA-0380; Petroleum ...

442

High-Intensity and High-Density Charge-Exchange Injection Studies into the CERN PS Booster at Intermediate Energies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For the high brilliance LHC ultimate beam and the high intensity CNGS beam, single batch injections into the CERN Proton Synchrotron (PS) will be used to increase the overall machine intensity compared with the present double batch injections. Charge-exchange injection into the PS Booster with a new linac at intermediate energies is thus examined. A key parameter to consider is the energy dependence of beam incoherent tune shifts at injection. Increasing the linac energy from the present 50 MeV to 160 MeV should yield a safer tune shift. For each PS Booster ring, a charge-exchange injection scheme is envisaged inside a proper straight section, redesigned with new bends to make a local bump and using the existing fast bump magnets for horizontal phase-space painting. ACCSIM simulations for charge-exchange injection at 160 MeV have been investigated for both LHC and CNGS beams. After optimizing the parameters that are used for the space charge tracking routines, the results of the simulations agree well with ex...

Martini, M

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Long-Term Global Trade-Offs Related to Nuclear Energy  

SciTech Connect

An overall comparative assessment of different energy systems and their potential long-term role in contributing to a sustainable energy mix is examined through the use of a global, long-term Energy, Economics, Environment (E{sup 3}) model. This model is used to generate a set of surprise-free futures that encompass a range of economic potentialities. The focus of this study is nuclear energy (NE), and the range of possible futures embodies extrema of NE growth [a Basic Option (BO)] to an NE Phase Out (PO). These NE scenario extrema are expressed against a background that reflects E{sup 3} circumstances ranging from a Business-As-Usual (BAU) to one that is Ecologically Driven (ED), with the latter emphasizing price-induced reductions in greenhouse-gas (GHG) emissions associate with a mix of fossil energy sources. Hence, four ''views-of-the-future'' scenarios emerge to form the framework of this study: BAU/BO, BAU/PO, ED/BO, and ED/PO. Model results ranging from (regional and temporal) primary- and nuclear-energy demands, carbon-dioxide emissions, nuclear-material (plutonium) accumulations and attendant proliferation-risk implications, Gross National Product (GNP) impacts, and a range of technology requirements provide essential input to the subject assessment.

Krakowski, R.A.

1999-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

444

In-situ determination of energy species yields of intense particle beams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Objects of the present invention are provided for a particle beam having a full energy component at least as great as 25 keV, which is directed onto a beamstop target, such that Rutherford backscattering, preferably near-surface backscattering occurs. The geometry, material composition and impurity concentration of the beam stop are predetermined, using any suitable conventional technique. The energy-yield characteristic response of backscattered particles is measured over a range of angles using a fast ion electrostatic analyzer having a microchannel plate array at its focal plane. The knee of the resulting yield curve, on a plot of yield versus energy, is analyzed to determine the energy species components of various beam particles having the same mass.

Kugel, H.W.; Kaita, R.

1983-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

445

Industrial Application of High Combustion Intensity Systems and Energy Conservation Implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the past decade industrial combustion technology has been advanced through adaptations of the equipment operating with dramatically reduced excess air requirements and use of air preheat techniques. The importance of operating industrial combustion equipment at stoichiometric conditions is emphasized. The calculated fuel savings resulting from elimination of excess air and use of heat recovery air preheat are reviewed. Design parameters for the aerodynamic design and control of the combustion process are quantified for vortex stabilized systems. Design analyses of the fuel injectors used with gaseous, liquid and pulverized coal fuels are also presented. The resulting high intensity combustion systems evolved are illustrated with photographs of flames in actual installations and during equipment development testing. Attention to detail in equipment manufacture and proper field adjustment of combustion equipment is essential in achieving the dramatic fuel savings that are possible.

Williams, F. D. M.; Anderson, L. E.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 : U.S. Energy Prices 2 : U.S. Energy Prices Either scripts and active content are not permitted to run or Adobe Flash Player version ${version_major}.${version_minor}.${version_revision} or greater is not installed. Get Adobe Flash Player a Average for all sulfur contents. b Average self-service cash price. c Includes fuel oils No. 4, No. 5, No. 6, and topped crude. - = no data available Notes: Prices are not adjusted for inflation. The approximate break between historical and forecast values is shown with estimates and forecasts in italics. Prices exclude taxes unless otherwise noted. Historical data: Latest data available from Energy Information Administration databases supporting the following reports: Petroleum Marketing Monthly, DOE/EIA-0380; Weekly Petroleum Status Report, DOE/EIA-0208; Natural Gas Monthly, DOE/EIA-0130; Electric Power Monthly, DOE/EIA-0226; and Monthly Energy Review, DOE/EIA-0035.

447

Laser sustained discharge nozzle apparatus for the production of an intense beam of high kinetic energy atomic species  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Laser sustained discharge apparatus for the production of intense beams of high kinetic energy atomic species. A portion of the plasma resulting from a laser sustained continuous optical discharge which generates energetic atomic species from a gaseous source thereof is expanded through a nozzle into a region of low pressure. The expanded plasma contains a significant concentration of the high kinetic energy atomic species which may be used to investigate the interaction of surfaces therewith. In particular, O-atoms having velocities in excess of 3.5 km/s can be generated for the purpose of studying their interaction with materials in order to develop protective materials for spacecraft which are exposed to such energetic O-atoms during operation in low earth orbit.

Cross, Jon B. (Santa Fe, NM); Cremers, David A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Experimental investigation of the trapping and energy loss mechanisms of intense relativistic electron rings in hydrogen gas and plasma  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of an experimental study on the trapping and energy loss mechanisms of intense, relativistic electron rings confined in Astron-like magnetic field geometries are presented. The work is subdivided into four sections: gas trapping; average ring electron energetics; plasma trapping, and hollow-beam cusp-injection into gas and plasma. The mechanisms by which the injected beam coalesces into a current ring in the existing Cornell RECE-Berta facility are considered. To investigate the nature of ring electron energy loss mechanisms following completion of the trapping process, a diagnostic was developed utilizing multi-foil X-ray absorption spectroscopy to analyze the Bremsstrahlung generated by the electrons as they impinge upon a thin tungsten wire target suspended in the circulating current. Finally, a set of preliminary experimental results is presented in which an annular electron beam was passed through a coaxial, non-adiabatic magnetic cusp located at one end of a magnetic mirror well.

Smith, A.C. Jr.

1977-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

449

Laser sustained discharge nozzle apparatus for the production of an intense beam of high kinetic energy atomic species  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Laser sustained discharge apparatus for the production of intense beams of high kinetic energy atomic species is described. A portion of the plasma resulting from a laser sustained continuous optical discharge which generates energetic atomic species from a gaseous source thereof is expanded through a nozzle into a region of low pressure. The expanded plasma contains a significant concentration of the high kinetic energy atomic species which may be used to investigate the interaction of surfaces therewith. In particular, O-atoms having velocities in excess of 3.5 km/s can be generated for the purpose of studying their interaction with materials in order to develop protective materials for spacecraft which are exposed to such energetic O-atoms during operation in low earth orbit.

Cross, J.B.; Cremers, D.A.

1986-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

450

GRPANL: a program for fitting complex peak groupings for gamma and x-ray energies and intensities  

SciTech Connect

GRPANL is a general-purpose peak-fitting program that calculates gamma-ray and x-ray energies and intensities from a given spectral region. The program requires that the user supply input information such as the first and last channels of the region, the channels to be used as pre- and post-region background, the system gain and zero-intercept, and a list of approximate energy values at which peaks occur in the region. Because the peak position and peak-shape parameters enter nonlinearly into the peak-fitting algorithm, an iterative least-square procedure is used in the fitting process. The program iterates until either all convergence criteria are met or ten iterations have elapsed. The code described here allows for twenty free parameters and a region as large as 240 data channels. This code runs on an LSI-11 computer with 32K memory and disk-storage capability.

Gunnink, R.; Ruhter, W.D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Long-Term Modeling of Solar Energy: Analysis of Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) and PV Technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents an overview of research conducted on solar energy technologies and their implementation in the ObjECTS framework. The topics covered include financing assumptions and selected issues related to the integration of concentrating thermal solar power (CSP) and photovoltaics PV technologies into the electric grid. A review of methodologies for calculating the levelized energy cost of capital-intensive technologies is presented, along with sensitivity tests illustrating how the cost of a solar plant would vary depending on financing assumptions. An analysis of the integration of a hybrid concentrating thermal solar power (CSP) system into the electric system is conducted. Finally a failure statistics analysis for PV plants illustrates the central role of solar irradiance uncertainty in determining PV grid integration characteristics.

Zhang, Yabei; Smith, Steven J.

2007-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

452

Measures to reduce industrial consumption of petroleum under a short-term energy emergency  

SciTech Connect

Significant opportunities for petroleum conservation in the industrial sector in the event of an energy emergency are discussed. The most feasible government options identified are presented. These and the probable savings are: removing institutional barriers to fuel switching in industrial boilers and burners (384 to 407 Mbbl/day); rescinding certain air pollution regulations (19 to 100 Mbbl/day); restricting export of energy-intensive goods (20 to 60 Mbbl/day); rescinding thermal pollution regulations for power plants (16 to 27 Mbbl/day); removing trade barriers on certain imports; restricting electricity production by industry; and restricting export of recyclable materials. The bases for many of the recommended options are presented. Specifically, characteristics of industrial petroleum consumption for the chemical, steel, cement, and paper industries are presented.

Tessmer, R.G. Jr; D' Acierno, J.; Pilati, D.A.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Macro Bridge Procedure to Update Regional Macroeconomic Forecasts with National Macroeconomic Forecasts  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Regional Short-Term Energy Model (RSTEM) uses macroeconomic variables such as income, employment, industrial production and consumer prices at both the national and regional1 levels as explanatory variables in the generation of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO). This documentation explains how national macroeconomic forecasts are used to update regional macroeconomic forecasts through the RSTEM Macro Bridge procedure.

Information Center

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Fast Reactor Technology: A Path to Long-Term Energy Sustainability Position Statement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The American Nuclear Society believes that the development and deployment of advanced nuclear reactors based on fast-neutron fission technology is important to the sustainability, reliability, and security of the worlds long-term energy supply. Of the known and proven energy technologies, only nuclear fission can provide the large quantities of energy required by industrial societies in a sustainable and environmentally acceptable manner. Natural uranium mined from the earth's crust is composed primarily of two isotopes: 99.3 % is U-238, and 0.7 % is the fissile U-235. Nearly all current power reactors are of the thermal neutron design, and their capability to extract the potential energy in the uranium fuel is limited to less than 1 % of that available. The remainder of the potential energy is left unused in the spent fuel and in the uranium, depleted in U-235, that remains from the process of enriching the natural uranium in the isotope U-235 for use in thermal reactors. With known fast reactor technology, this unutilized energy can be harvested, thereby extending by a hundred-fold the amount of energy extracted from the same amount of mined uranium. Fast reactors can convert U-238 into fissile material at rates faster than it is consumed making it economically feasible to utilize ores with very low uranium concentrations and potentially even

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

China's Building Energy Use: A Long-Term Perspective based on a Detailed Assessment  

SciTech Connect

We present here a detailed, service-based model of China's building energy use, nested in the GCAM (Global Change Assessment Model) integrated assessment framework. Using the model, we explore long-term pathways of China's building energy use and identify opportunities of reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The inclusion of a structural model of building energy demands within an integrated assessment framework represents a major methodological advance. It allows for a structural understanding of the drivers of building energy consumption while simultaneously considering the other human and natural system interactions that influence changes in the global energy system and climate. We also explore a range of different scenarios to gain insights into how China's building sector might evolve and what the implications might be for improved building energy technology and carbon policies. The analysis suggests that China's building energy growth will not wane anytime soon, although technology improvement will put downward pressure on this growth. Also, regardless of the scenarios represented, the growth will involve the continued, rapid electrification of the buildings sector throughout the century, and this transition will be accelerated by the implementation of carbon policy.

Eom, Jiyong; Clarke, Leon E.; Kim, Son H.; Kyle, G. Page; Patel, Pralit L.

2012-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

456

China's Building Energy Demand: Long-Term Implications from a Detailed Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present here a detailed, service-based model of Chinas building energy use, nested in the GCAM (Global Change Assessment Model) integrated assessment framework. Using the model, we explore long-term pathways of Chinas building energy use and identify opportunities of reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The inclusion of a structural model of building energy demands within an integrated assessment framework represents a major methodological advance. It allows for a structural understanding of the drivers of building energy consumption while simultaneously considering the other human and natural system interactions that influence changes in the global energy system and climate. We also explore a range of different scenarios to gain insights into how Chinas building sector might evolve and what the implications might be for improved building energy technology and carbon policies. The analysis suggests that Chinas building energy growth will not wane anytime soon, although technology improvement will put downward pressure on this growth. Also, regardless of the scenarios represented, the growth will involve the continued, rapid electrification of the buildings sector throughout the century, and this transition will be accelerated by the implementation of carbon policy.

Eom, Jiyong; Clarke, Leon E.; Kim, Son H.; Kyle, G. Page; Patel, Pralit L.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

A Calibration Methodology for Retrofit Projects Using Short-Term Monitoring and Disaggregated Energy Use Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents an improved methodology to calibrate energy simulation models to better represent the actual energy use breakdowns in existing buildings. The goal of this methodology is to help architects and engineers accurately determine the current energy use and identify any energy-related problems in the building before proposing the retrofit design solutions, without conducting long-term monitoring. The methodology includes procedures to conduct systematic data collection, "on-off' tests to determine the power densities of the electrical loads, up to four weeks of building energy monitoring to derive the energy use profiles and temperature settings, and disaggregation of the measured energy use data. The procedures also utilize the monthly utility billing records and site weather data. The calibration to the measured data is done on both hourly and monthly basis. The procedures are built into a computer program and integrated with previously developed simulation software. The user interface of the program includes guidelines to help the user decide which simulation input variable has to be altered in order to match the measured data. It also produces graphical outputs to help in visualizing the results, and several guidelines to help study different retrofit strategies after the model has been calibrated.

Soebarto, V. I.; Degelman, L. O.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Resonant energy conversion of 3-minute intensity oscillations into Alfven waves in the solar atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nonlinear coupling between 3-minute oscillations and Alfven waves in the solar lower atmosphere is studied. 3-minute oscillations are considered as acoustic waves trapped in a chromospheric cavity and oscillating along transversally inhomogeneous vertical magnetic field. It is shown that under the action of the oscillations the temporal dynamics of Alfven waves is governed by Mathieu equation. Consequently, the harmonics of Alfven waves with twice period and wavelength of 3-minute oscillations grow exponentially in time near the layer where the sound and Alfven speeds equal. Thus the 3-minute oscillations are resonantly absorbed by pure Alfven waves near this resonant layer. The resonant Alfven waves may penetrate into the solar corona taking energy from the chromosphere. Therefore the layer c_s=v_A may play a role of energy channel for otherwise trapped acoustic oscillations.

D. Kuridze; T. V. Zaqarashvili

2007-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

459

A study of fast electron energy transport in relativistically intense laser-plasma interactions with large density scalelengths  

SciTech Connect

A systematic experimental and computational investigation of the effects of three well characterized density scalelengths on fast electron energy transport in ultra-intense laser-solid interactions has been performed. Experimental evidence is presented which shows that, when the density scalelength is sufficiently large, the fast electron beam entering the solid-density plasma is best described by two distinct populations: those accelerated within the coronal plasma (the fast electron pre-beam) and those accelerated near or at the critical density surface (the fast electron main-beam). The former has considerably lower divergence and higher temperature than that of the main-beam with a half-angle of {approx}20 Degree-Sign . It contains up to 30% of the total fast electron energy absorbed into the target. The number, kinetic energy, and total energy of the fast electrons in the pre-beam are increased by an increase in density scalelength. With larger density scalelengths, the fast electrons heat a smaller cross sectional area of the target, causing the thinnest targets to reach significantly higher rear surface temperatures. Modelling indicates that the enhanced fast electron pre-beam associated with the large density scalelength interaction generates a magnetic field within the target of sufficient magnitude to partially collimate the subsequent, more divergent, fast electron main-beam.

Scott, R. H. H.; Norreys, P. A. [Department of Physics, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Didcot, Oxford OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Perez, F.; Baton, S. D. [LULI, Ecole Polytechnique, UMR 7605, CNRS/CEA/UPMC, Route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Santos, J. J.; Nicolai, Ph.; Hulin, S. [Univ. Bordeaux/CNRS/CEA, CELIA, UMR 5107, 33405 Talence (France); Ridgers, C. P. [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Davies, J. R. [GoLP, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear - Laboratorio Associado, Instituto Superior Tecnico, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Lancaster, K. L.; Trines, R. M. G. M. [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Didcot, Oxford OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Bell, A. R.; Tzoufras, M. [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Didcot, Oxford OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Rose, S. J. [Department of Physics, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

460

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

All Tables All Tables Tables Table WF01. Average Consumer Prices and Expenditures for Heating Fuels During the Winter PDF Table 1. U.S. Energy Markets Summary PDF Table 2. U.S. Energy Prices PDF Table 3a. International Crude Oil and Liquid Fuels Production, Consumption, and Inventories PDF Table 3b. Non-OPEC Crude Oil and Liquid Fuels Supply PDF Table 3c. OPEC Crude Oil (excluding condensates) Supply PDF Table 3d. World Liquid Fuels Consumption PDF Table 4a. U.S. Crude Oil and Liquid Fuels Supply, Consumption, and Inventories PDF Table 4b. U.S. Petroleum Refinery Balance PDF Table 4c. U.S. Regional Motor Gasoline Prices and Inventories PDF Table 5a. U.S. Natural Gas Supply, Consumption, and Inventories PDF Table 5b. U.S. Regional Natural Gas Prices PDF Table 6. U.S. Coal Supply, Consumption, and Inventories PDF

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "term energy intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

A Comparison of Iron and Steel Production Energy Use and Energy Intensity in China and the U.S.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mt, net imported Direct-Reduced Iron (DRI) in 2006 was 2.61in Figure 3) pig iron, direct-reduced iron (DRI), pellets,of net imported direct reduced iron Energy used for the

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Energy Use Intensity and its Influence on the Integrated Daylighting Design of a Large Net Zero Energy Building: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Net-zero energy buildings generate as much energy as they consume and are significant in the sustainable future of building design and construction. The role of daylighting (and its simulation) in the design process becomes critical. In this paper we present the process the National Renewable Energy Laboratory embarked on in the procurement, design, and construction of its newest building, the Research Support Facility (RSF) - particularly the roles of daylighting, electric lighting, and simulation. With a rapid construction schedule, the procurement, design, and construction had to be tightly integrated; with low energy use. We outline the process and measures required to manage a building design that could expect to operate at an efficiency previously unheard of for a building of this type, size, and density. Rigorous simulation of the daylighting and the electric lighting control response was a given, but the oft-ignored disconnect between lighting simulation and whole-building energy use simulation had to be addressed. The RSF project will be thoroughly evaluated for its performance for one year; preliminary data from the postoccupancy monitoring efforts will also be presented with an eye toward the current efficacy of building energy and lighting simulation.

Guglielmetti , R.; Scheib, J.; Pless, S. D.; Torcellini , P.; Petro, R.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Contacts Contacts Overview Tancred Lidderdale 202-586-7321 tancred.lidderdale@eia.gov World Oil Prices/International Petroleum Erik Kreil 202-586-6573 erik.kreil@eia.gov Energy Prices Sean Hill 202-586-4247 sean.hill@eia.gov Futures Markets and Energy Price Uncertainty James Preciado 202-586-8769 james.preciado@eia.gov U.S. Crude Oil Production John Staub 202-586-6344 john.staub@eia.gov U.S. Petroleum Demand Michael Morris 202-586-1199 michael.morris@eia.gov U.S. Refinery Supply Arup Mallik 202-586-7713 arup.mallik@eia.gov U.S. Ethanol Tony Radich 202-586-0504 anthony.radich@eia.gov U.S. Biodiesel Sean Hill 202-586-4247 sean.hill@eia.gov U.S. Natural Gas Katherine Teller 202-586-6201 katherine.teller@eia.gov U.S. Coal Supply and Demand Elias Johnson 202-586-7277 elias.johnson@eia.gov U.S. Coal Prices

464

High intensity discharge lamp self-adjusting ballast system sensitive to the radiant energy or heat of the lamp  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a self-adjusting ballast system for mercury vapor, high intensity discharge lamps having outputs of 100 watts or greater, comprising: a direct current source; a lamp circuit containing a high intensity discharge lamp; sensing means for sensing the radiant energy output of the lamp; a pulse width modulator which, in response to the output of the sensing means, varies the width of the pulses that power the lamp during warm-up of the lamp; a high frequency oscillator; a DC to AC converter that converts current from the direct source to pulses of alternating current for powering the lamp, the converter comprising: at least one switch for gating current to the lamp; a switch control means, responsive to the high frequency oscillator, for controlling the switch and controlling the frequency of the alternating current pulses that power the lamp; current sensing means for sensing the current being supplied to the lamp; and current control means for limiting the current through the lamp to a predetermined safe level when the current sensed by the current sensing means exceeds a reference value.

Kuhnel, D.S.; Ottenstein, S.A.

1987-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

465

Measured commercial load shapes and energy-use intensities and validation of the LBL end-use disaggregation algorithm  

SciTech Connect

The Southern California Edison Company (SCE) has conducted an extensive metering project in which electricity end use in 53 commercial buildings in Southern California has been measured. The building types monitored include offices, retail stores, groceries, restaurants, and warehouses. One year (June 1989 through May 1990) of the SCE measured hourly end-use data are reviewed in this report. Annual whole-building and end-use energy use intensities (EUIs) and monthly load shapes (LSs) have been calculated for the different building types based on the monitored data. This report compares the monitored buildings' EUIs and LSs to EUIs and LSs determined using whole-building load data and the End-Use Disaggregation Algorithm (EDA). Two sets of EDA determined EUIs and LSs are compared to the monitored data values. The data sets represent: (1) average buildings in the SCE service territory and (2) specific buildings that were monitored.

Akbari, H.; Rainer, L.; Heinemeier, K.; Huang, J.; Franconi, E.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Probing TeV Left-Right Seesaw at Energy and Intensity Frontiers: a Snowmass White Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss ways to probe the origin of neutrino masses at the Energy and Intensity frontiers, in TeV-scale left-right seesaw models where small neutrino masses arise via type-I seesaw mechanism. We consider generic ('vanilla') version of such models as well as a version which leads to 'large' light-heavy neutrino mixing while keeping the neutrino masses small in a natural manner. We point out specific observable implications of these classes of models at the LHC as well as in searches for lepton flavor violating processes such as $\\mu\\to e\\gamma$ and $\\mu\\to 3e$, and also in searches for lepton number violating neutrinoless double beta decay.

P. S. Bhupal Dev; R. N. Mohapatra

2013-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

467

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Projected Winter Fuel Expenditures by Fuel and Region Projected Winter Fuel Expenditures by Fuel and Region The average household winter heating fuel expenditures discussed in this STEO provide a broad guide to changes compared with last winter. However, fuel expenditures for individual households are highly dependent on local weather conditions, market size, the size and energy efficiency of individual homes and their heating equipment, and thermostat settings (see Winter Fuels Outlook table). Forecast temperatures are close to last winter nationally, with the Northeast about 3% colder and the West 3% warmer. Natural Gas About one-half of U.S. households use natural gas as their primary heating fuel. EIA expects households heating with natural gas to spend an average of $80 (13%) more this winter than last winter. The increase in natural gas

468

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Electricity So far this year (through October 2013), the electricity industry has added 10.0 gigawatts (GW) of new generating capacity. Much of this new capacity (6.2 GW) is fueled by natural gas. Renewable energy sources are used in 2.3 GW of the new capacity while two new coal plants (1.5 GW) have also started producing electricity this year. However, these new sources for power generation have been more than offset by 11.1 GW of retired capacity. Coal-fired and nuclear plants comprise the largest proportion of year-to-date retired capacity (3.8 GW and 3.6 GW, respectively). A total of 2.3 GW of natural-gas-fired capacity has been retired so far this year. U.S. Electricity Consumption Electricity sales during 2013 have experienced little, if any, growth.

469

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9c : U.S. Regional Weather Data 9c : U.S. Regional Weather Data Either scripts and active content are not permitted to run or Adobe Flash Player version ${version_major}.${version_minor}.${version_revision} or greater is not installed. Get Adobe Flash Player - = no data available Notes: Regional degree days for each period are calculated by EIA as contemporaneous period population-weighted averages of state degree day data published by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). See STEO Supplement: Change in Regional and U.S. Degree-Day Calculations for more information. The approximate break between historical and forecast values is shown with historical data printed in bold; estimates and forecasts in italics. Regions refer to U.S. Census divisions. See "Census division" in EIA's Energy Glossary for a list of states in each region.

470

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9b : U.S. Regional Macroeconomic Data 9b : U.S. Regional Macroeconomic Data Either scripts and active content are not permitted to run or Adobe Flash Player version ${version_major}.${version_minor}.${version_revision} or greater is not installed. Get Adobe Flash Player - = no data available Notes: The approximate break between historical and forecast values is shown with estimates and forecasts in italics. Regions refer to U.S. Census divisions. See "Census division" in EIA's Energy Glossary for a list of states in each region. Historical data: Latest data available from U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis; Federal Reserve System, Statistical release G17. Minor discrepancies with published historical data are due to independent rounding. Projections: Macroeconomic projections are based on the Global Insight Model of the U.S. Economy

471

National Level Co-Control Study of the Targets for Energy Intensity and Sulfur Dioxide in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steel Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and PlantAn ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers.

Zhou, Nan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Design features of high-intensity medium-energy superconducting heavy-ion Linac.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The proposed Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) requires the construction of a cw 1.4 GV superconducting (SC) linac that is capable of producing 400 kW beams of all ions from protons at 900 MeV to uranium at 400 MeV/u. The design of such a linac was outlined at the previous Linac conference. This linac will accelerate multiple-charge-states (multi-q) of the heaviest ion beams, for which the beam current is limited by ion-source performance. The linac consists of two different types of accelerating and focusing lattice: for uranium below {approx}85 MeV/u the focusing is provided by SC solenoids installed in cryostats with the SC resonators while in the high-beta section the focusing elements are located outside of the cryostats. A detailed design has been developed for the focusing-accelerating lattice of the linac. Beam dynamics studies have been performed with the goal of optimization of the linac structure in order to reduce a possible effective emittance growth of the multi-q uranium beam. A wide tuning range of the accelerating and focusing fields is required for acceleration of the variety of ions with different charge-to-mass ratios to the highest possible energy in single charge state mode. The focusing must be retuned for different ion masses to avoid resonance coupling between the transverse and longitudinal motions. Any visible impact of this coupling on the formation of beam halo must be avoided due to the high beam power.

Ostroumov, P. N.

2002-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

473

The implications of future building scenarios for long-term building energy research and development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a discussion of alternative future scenarios of the building environment to the year 2010 and assesses the implications these scenarios present for long-term building energy R and D. The scenarios and energy R and D implications derived from them are intended to serve as the basis from which a strategic plan can be developed for the management of R and D programs conducted by the Office of Buildings and Community Systems, US Department of Energy. The scenarios and analysis presented here have relevance not only for government R and D programs; on the contrary, it is hoped that the results of this effort will be of interest and useful to researchers in both private and public sector organizations that deal with building energy R and D. Making R and D decisions today based on an analysis that attempts to delineate the nexus of events 25 years in the future are clearly decisions made in the face of uncertainty. Yet, the effective management of R and D programs requires a future-directed understanding of markets, technological developments, and environmental factors, as well as their interactions. The analysis presented in this report is designed to serve that need. Although the probability of any particular scenario actually occurring is uncertain, the scenarios to be presented are sufficiently robust to set bounds within which to examine the interaction of forces that will shape the future building environment.

Flynn, W.T.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Preliminary long-term stability criteria for compressed air energy storage caverns in salt domes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Air storage caverns, which are an essential and integral component of a CAES plant, should be designed and operated so as to perform satisfactorily over the intended life of the overall facility. It follows that the long-term ''stability'' of air storage caverns must be considered as a primary concern in projecting the satisfactory operation of CAES facilities. As used in the report, ''stability'' of a storage cavern implies the extent to which an acceptable amount of cavern storage volume can be utilized with routine maintenance for a specified time interval, e.g., 35 years. In this context, cavern stability is relative to both planned utilization and time interval of operation. The objective of the study was to review the existing literature and consult knowledgeable workers in the storage industry, and then report state-of-the-art findings relative to long-term stability of compressed air energy storage caverns in salt domes. Further, preliminary cavern stability criteria were to be presented in a form consistent with the amount of information available on cavern performance in salt domes. Another objective of the study was to outline a methodology for determining the long-term stability of site-specific CAES cavern systems in salt domes.

Thoms, R.L.; Martinez, J.D.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Long-Term US Industrial Energy Use and CO2 Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We present a description and scenario results from our recently-developed long-term model of United States industrial sector energy consumption, which we have incorporated as a module within the ObjECTS-MiniCAM integrated assessment model. This new industrial model focuses on energy technology and fuel choices over a 100 year period and allows examination of the industrial sector response to climate policies within a global modeling framework. A key challenge was to define a level of aggregation that would be able to represent the dynamics of industrial energy demand responses to prices and policies, but at a level that remains tractable over a long time frame. In our initial results, we find that electrification is an important response to a climate policy, although there are services where there are practical and economic limits to electrification, and the ability to switch to a low-carbon fuel becomes key. Cogeneration of heat and power using biomass may also play a role in reducing carbon emissions under a policy constraint.

Wise, Marshall A.; Sinha, Paramita; Smith, Steven J.; Lurz, Joshua P.

2007-12-03T23:59:59.000Z