Sample records for tera giga mega

  1. Presented by The Neutron Science TeraGrid Gateway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Cobb_TeraGridn_SC10 Outline collaborations 2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Cobb_TeraGrid_SC09 #12;3 Managed by UT-Battelle;4 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Cobb_TeraGridn_SC10 TeraGrid resources · 11

  2. THE RUBBER SHOWCASE IN SUMATRA Eric Penot CIRAD-TERA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 THE RUBBER SHOWCASE IN SUMATRA Eric Penot CIRAD-TERA Penot E. (2004) The rubber showcase-312. ________________________________________________________________ 1 The Indonesian rubber boom : a progressive evolution. As with cocoa a combination of available land and centres with fairly dense population is a prerequisite for a boom. But in the case of rubber

  3. The Neutron Science TeraGrid Gateway, a TeraGrid Science Gateway to Support the Spallation Neutron Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vazhkudai, Sudharshan

    by a service oriented architecture for functional implementation. KEY WORDS: Portal, Neutron Scattering, TeraGrid, Science Gateway, Service Architecture, Grid 1. INTRODUCTION Neutron Science: Neutron scattering is used, earth science, and fundamental physics [3]. As a diagnostic tool, neutron scattering provides unique

  4. MEGA

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    002444SUPER00 Modular Environment for Graph Research and Analysis with a Persistent  http://software.sandia.gov/trac/megraphs 

  5. Evaluating Titanium SPMD Programs on the Tera MTA Carleton Miyamoto, Chang Lin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Evaluating Titanium SPMD Programs on the Tera MTA Carleton Miyamoto, Chang Lin {miyamoto model for performance-oriented languages such as Titanium [2]. Some parallel architectures, however a port of the Titanium compiler to the Tera MTA and the mapping of its SPMD constructs to a more dynamic

  6. The Preliminary Guides to the MegaWave2 Software, Versions 2.x MegaWave2 System Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Preliminary Guides to the MegaWave2 Software, Versions 2.x Volume Two MegaWave2 System Library;Contents MegaWave2 System Library Contents 2 Contents 1 Introduction 6 1.1 What you will find in this guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 1.2 The MegaWave2 memory (internal) types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 1.3 File

  7. MegaPipe: the MegaCam image stacking pipeline at the Canadian Astronomical Data Centre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephen. D. J. Gwyn

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the MegaPipe image processing pipeline at the Canadian Astronomical Data Centre. The pipeline combines multiple images from the MegaCam mosaic camera on CFHT and combines them into a single output image. MegaPipe takes as input detrended MegaCam images and does a careful astrometric and photometric calibration on them. The calibrated images are then resampled and combined into image stacks. The astrometric calibration of the output images is accurate to within 0.15 arcseconds relative to external reference frames and 0.04 arcseconds internally. The photometric calibration is good to within 0.03 magnitudes. The stacked images and catalogues derived from these images are available through the CADC website:

  8. The Preliminary Guides to the MegaWave2 Software, Versions 2.x MegaWave2 System Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Preliminary Guides to the MegaWave2 Software, Versions 2.x Volume Two MegaWave2 System Library://www.cmla.ens-cachan.fr/Cmla/Megawave #12; Contents MegaWave2 System Library Contents 2 Contents 1 Introduction 6 1.1 What you will #12;nd) types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 1.3 File (external) types or #12;le formats

  9. Introducing MegaHAL Jason L. Hutchens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of convers- ing with a user in natural language. Alan Turing devised a simple test in order to de- cide- ings of MegaHAL, the primary author's entry to the 1998 Loebner contest. 1 Introduction Alan Turing pose hypothetical situations in order to ask the subjects how they would react. Alan Turing died

  10. GigaCrete Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd toWell2008) |GigaCrete Inc Jump to:

  11. arapaima gigas arapaimidae: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - Phenomenology (arXiv) Summary: By running the prospective high-energy e+e- collider TESLA in the GigaZ mode on the Z resonance, experiments can be performed on the basis of...

  12. Developing a TeraGrid Based Land Surface Hydrology and Weather Modeling Interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Wen

    Developing a TeraGrid Based Land Surface Hydrology and Weather Modeling Interface Hsin-I Chang1 iclimate@purdue.edu -------------------- -------------------- 1 INTRODUCTION Real world hydrologic cyberinfrastructure (CI) has been articulated in many workshops and meetings of the environmental and hydrologic

  13. Remote Job Testing for the Neutron Science TeraGrid Gateway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynch, Vickie E [ORNL; Cobb, John W [ORNL; Miller, Stephen D [ORNL; Reuter, Michael A [ORNL; Smith, Bradford C [ORNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Remote job execution gives neutron science facilities access to high performance computing such as the TeraGrid. A scientific community can use community software with a community certificate and account through a common interface of a portal. Results show this approach is successful, but with more testing and problem solving, we expect remote job executions to become more reliable.

  14. MegaWatt Solar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville, Ohio: Energy8429°,Meeteetse, Wyoming: Energy ResourcesMegaWatt Solar

  15. Brookhaven Forum 2011 "A First Glimpse of the Tera Scale" Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY --October 19-21, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    of the LUX Dark Matter Experiment" I. Lewis: "Majorana Neutrino and W' Chiral Couplings at Brookhaven Forum 2011 "A First Glimpse of the Tera Scale" Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY

  16. The TeraFERMI terahertz source at the seeded FERMI free-electron-laser facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perucchi, A. [Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., Area Science Park, I-34012 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); INSTM UdR Trieste-ST, Area Science Park, I-34012 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Di Mitri, S.; Penco, G.; Allaria, E. [Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., Area Science Park, I-34012 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Lupi, S. [CNR-IOM and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma 'La Sapienza', P.le Aldo Moro 2, I-00185 Roma (Italy)

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the project for the construction of a terahertz (THz) beamline to be called TeraFERMI at the seeded FERMI free electron laser (FEL) facility in Trieste, Italy. We discuss topics as the underlying scientific case, the choice of the source, the expected performance, and THz beam propagation. Through electron beam dynamics simulations we show that the installation of the THz source in the beam dump section provides a new approach for compressing the electron bunch length without affecting FEL operation. Thanks to this further compression of the FEL electron bunch, the TeraFERMI facility is expected to provide THz pulses with energies up to the mJ range during normal FEL operation.

  17. aviles giga energy: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aviles giga energy First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Evolutionary Ecology Research, 1999,...

  18. Submillimetre/TeraHertz Astronomy at Dome C with CEA filled bolometer array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent Minier; Gilles Durand; Pierre-Olivier Lagage; Michel Talvard; Tony Travouillon; Maurizio Busso; Gino Tosti

    2007-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Submillimetre/TeraHertz (e.g. 200, 350, 450 microns) astronomy is the prime technique to unveil the birth and early evolution of a broad range of astrophysical objects. A major obstacle to carry out submm observations from ground is the atmosphere. Preliminary site testing and atmospheric transmission models tend to demonstrate that Dome C could offer the best conditions on Earth for submm/THz astronomy. The CAMISTIC project aims to install a filled bolometer-array camera with 16x16 pixels on IRAIT at Dome C and explore the 200-$\\mu$m windows for potential ground-based observations.

  19. Mega-masers, Dark Energy and the Hubble Constant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lo, Fred K. Y.

    2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Powerful water maser emission (water mega-masers) can be found in accretion disks in the nuclei of some galaxies. Besides providing a measure of the mass at the nucleus, such mega-masers can be used to determine the distance to the host galaxy, based on a kinematic model. We will explain the importance of determining the Hubble Constant to high accuracy for constraining the equation of state of Dark Energy and describe the Mega-maser Cosmology Project that has the goal of determining the Hubble Constant to better than 3%. Time permitting, we will also present the scientific capabilities of the current and future NRAO facilities: ALMA, EVLA, VLBA and GBT, for addressing key astrophysical problems

  20. The Preliminary Guides to the MegaWave2 Software, Versions 2.x Volume Two

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Two MegaWave2 System Library by Jacques FromentWave2 System Library Contents * * 2 Contents 1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . * *. . . . . . . . . 6 1.2 The MegaWave2 memory (internal) types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . * *. . . . . . 6

  1. INVASION NOTE Crassostrea gigas in natural oyster banks in southern Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solé-Cava, Antonio M.

    INVASION NOTE Crassostrea gigas in natural oyster banks in southern Brazil Cla´udio M. R. Melo Æ.V. 2009 Abstract We report on the invasion of Brazil by the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas, and discuss was found amongst the native species in oyster banks up to 100 km south of oyster farms in South Brazil

  2. ,Mega London` bezeichnet erstens das Entwurfsthema fr ein Gebude, in dem zwei Nutzungsprogramme hnlicher Gre Platz finden ein Megastore fr Sportartikel und ein Fitnesscenter fr Sportbegeisterte. ,Mega London` charakterisiert zweitens die Stand-ortwahl d

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berlin,Technische Universität

    ,Mega London` bezeichnet erstens das Entwurfsthema für ein Gebäude, in dem zwei Nutzungsprogramme. ,Mega London` charakterisiert zweitens die Stand- ortwahl ­ das Projektgebiet ,Royal Albert Dock` ist ein wichtiger Entwicklungsbereich im Londoner Osten. Der hier betrachtete Bereich zeigt die

  3. A collaborative network middleware project by Lambda Station, TeraPaths, and Phoebus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bobyshev, A.; /Fermilab; Bradley, S.; /Brookhaven; Crawford, M.; /Fermilab; DeMar, P.; /Fermilab; Katramatos, D.; /Brookhaven; Shroff, K.; /Brookhaven; Swany, M.; /Delaware U.; Yu, D.; /Brookhaven

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The TeraPaths, Lambda Station, and Phoebus projects, funded by the US Department of Energy, have successfully developed network middleware services that establish on-demand and manage true end-to-end, Quality-of-Service (QoS) aware, virtual network paths across multiple administrative network domains, select network paths and gracefully reroute traffic over these dynamic paths, and streamline traffic between packet and circuit networks using transparent gateways. These services improve network QoS and performance for applications, playing a critical role in the effective use of emerging dynamic circuit network services. They provide interfaces to applications, such as dCache SRM, translate network service requests into network device configurations, and coordinate with each other to setup up end-to-end network paths. The End Site Control Plane Subsystem (ESCPS) builds upon the success of the three projects by combining their individual capabilities into the next generation of network middleware. ESCPS addresses challenges such as cross-domain control plane signalling and interoperability, authentication and authorization in a Grid environment, topology discovery, and dynamic status tracking. The new network middleware will take full advantage of the perfSONAR monitoring infrastructure and the Inter-Domain Control plane efforts and will be deployed and fully vetted in the Large Hadron Collider data movement environment.

  4. Lessons for Chinese mega-mall development : a case study of the South China Mall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ai, Lu, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    China is embracing mega-mall development: Seven out of the ten largest shopping malls in the world will have been located in China by the year 2010. All the completed mega-malls are now suffering from high vacancy rates ...

  5. Giga-bit optical data transmission module for Beam Instrumentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roedne, L T; Cenkeramaddi, L R; Jiao, L

    Particle accelerators require electronic instrumentation for diagnostic, assessment and monitoring during operation of the transferring and circulating beams. A sensor located near the beam provides an electrical signal related to the observable quantity of interest. The front-end electronics provides analog-to-digital conversion of the quantity being observed and the generated data are to be transferred to the external digital back-end for data processing, and to display to the operators and logging. This research project investigates the feasibility of radiation-tolerant giga-bit data transmission over optic fibre for beam instrumentation applications, starting from the assessment of the state of the art technology, identification of challenges and proposal of a system level solution, which should be validated with a PCB design in an experimental setup. Radiation tolerance of 10 kGy (Si) Total Ionizing Dose (TID) over 10 years of operation, Bit Error Rate (BER) 10-6 or better. The findings and results of th...

  6. Investigating fusion plasma instabilities in the Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak using mega electron volt proton emissions (invited)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez, R. V., E-mail: rvale006@fiu.edu; Boeglin, W. U.; Angulo, A.; Avila, P.; Leon, O.; Lopez, C. [Department of Physics, Florida International University, 11200 SW 8 ST, CP204, Miami, Florida 33199 (United States); Darrow, D. S. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, James Forrestal Campus, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Cecconello, M.; Klimek, I. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Uppsala SE-751 20 (Sweden); Allan, S. Y.; Akers, R. J.; Keeling, D. L.; McClements, K. G.; Scannell, R.; Conway, N. J. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Turnyanskiy, M. [ITER Physics Department, EFDA CSU Garching, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748, Garching (Germany); Jones, O. M. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Michael, C. A. [Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The proton detector (PD) measures 3 MeV proton yield distributions from deuterium-deuterium fusion reactions within the Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST). The PD’s compact four-channel system of collimated and individually oriented silicon detectors probes different regions of the plasma, detecting protons (with gyro radii large enough to be unconfined) leaving the plasma on curved trajectories during neutral beam injection. From first PD data obtained during plasma operation in 2013, proton production rates (up to several hundred kHz and 1 ms time resolution) during sawtooth events were compared to the corresponding MAST neutron camera data. Fitted proton emission profiles in the poloidal plane demonstrate the capabilities of this new system.

  7. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Giga Life Cycle: Manufacture of Cells from Recycled EV Li-ion Batteries

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by OnTo Technology at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Giga Life Cycle: manufacture...

  8. Generation of mega-electron-volt electron beams by an ultrafast intense laser pulse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Umstadter, Donald

    Generation of mega-electron-volt electron beams by an ultrafast intense laser pulse Xiaofang Wang emission from the interaction of an ultrafast ( 29 fs), intense ( 1018 W/cm2 ) laser pulse with underdense of such an ultrafast laser pulse with matter and possible new approaches to MeV electron generation. In this paper we

  9. MegaPipe: A New Programming Interface for Scalable Network I/O Sangjin Han+

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Irvine, University of

    that, by embracing a clean-slate design approach, MegaPipe is able to exploit new opportunities to which it can be optimized for performance. In contrast, a clean- slate redesign offers the opportunity and tedious burden of layering several abstractions for the sake of concurrency. Once again, a clean-slate

  10. EWEC2006 Scientific Track Offshore Meteorology for Multi-Mega-Watt Turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    resource assessments, to calculate loads and wakes as well as for reliable short-term wind power forecastsEWEC2006 ­ Scientific Track Offshore Meteorology for Multi-Mega-Watt Turbines Jens Tambke1 Durante5 , Jörg-Olaf Wolff6 1 ForWind - Center for Wind Energy Research, Institute of Physics, University

  11. HW Componentizing Kernel: A New Approach to address the Mega Complexity of Future Automotive CPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajkumar, Ragunathan "Raj"

    HW Componentizing Kernel: A New Approach to address the Mega Complexity of Future Automotive CPS of CPS (Cyber Physical System). However, current software development process in the automotive industry automotive software devel- opment process in the perspective of CPS and proposes a new kernel-based approach

  12. Entering the Era of Mega-genomics ( JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schatz, Michael C [Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory] [Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

    2012-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Michael Schatz from Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory on "Entering the Era of Mega-genomics" at the 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 21, 2012 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  13. Entering the Era of Mega-genomics ( JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Schatz, Michael C [Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Michael Schatz from Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory on "Entering the Era of Mega-genomics" at the 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 21, 2012 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  14. Giga-z: A 100,000 OBJECT SUPERCONDUCTING SPECTROPHOTOMETER FOR LSST FOLLOW-UP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marsden, Danica W.; Mazin, Benjamin A. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); O'Brien, Kieran [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Hirata, Chris [Department of Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, 1216 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91106 (United States)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We simulate the performance of a new type of instrument, a Superconducting Multi-Object Spectrograph (SuperMOS), that uses microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs). MKIDs, a new detector technology, feature good quantum efficiency in the UVOIR, can count individual photons with microsecond timing accuracy, and, like X-ray calorimeters, determine their energy to several percent. The performance of Giga-z, a SuperMOS designed for wide field imaging follow-up observations, is evaluated using simulated observations of the COSMOS mock catalog with an array of 100,000 R{sub 423{sub nm}} = E/{Delta}E = 30 MKID pixels. We compare our results against a simultaneous simulation of LSST observations. In 3 yr on a dedicated 4 m class telescope, Giga-z could observe Almost-Equal-To 2 billion galaxies, yielding a low-resolution spectral energy distribution spanning 350-1350 nm for each; 1000 times the number measured with any currently proposed LSST spectroscopic follow-up, at a fraction of the cost and time. Giga-z would provide redshifts for galaxies up to z Almost-Equal-To 6 with magnitudes m{sub i} {approx}< 25, with accuracy {sigma}{sub {Delta}z/(1+z)} Almost-Equal-To 0.03 for the whole sample, and {sigma}{sub {Delta}z/(1+z)} Almost-Equal-To 0.007 for a select subset. We also find catastrophic failure rates and biases that are consistently lower than for LSST. The added constraint on dark energy parameters for WL + CMB by Giga-z using the FoMSWG default model is equivalent to multiplying the LSST Fisher matrix by a factor of {alpha} = 1.27 (w{sub p} ), 1.53 (w{sub a} ), or 1.98 ({Delta}{gamma}). This is equivalent to multiplying both the LSST coverage area and the training sets by {alpha} and reducing all systematics by a factor of 1/{radical}({alpha}), advantages that are robust to even more extreme models of intrinsic alignment.

  15. Out of equilibrium GigaPa Young modulus of water nanobridge probed by Force Feedback Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon Carpentier; Mario S. Rodrigues; Luca Costa; Miguel V. Vitorino; Elisabeth Charlaix; Joel Chevrier

    2015-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of capillary condensation, water droplets appear in nano/micropores. The large associated surface interactions can deeply influence macroscopic properties as in granular media. We report that dynamical properties of such nanobridge dramatically change when probed at different time scales. Using a novel AFM mode, the Force Feedback Microscopy, the gap between the nanotip and the surface is continuously varied, and we observe this change in the simultaneous measurements, at different frequencies, of the stiffness G'(N/m), the dissipative coefficient G"(kg/sec) together with the static force. As the measuring time approaches the microsecond, the liquid droplet exhibits a large positive stiffness (it is small and negative in the long time limit). Although clearly controlled by surface effects, it compares to the stiffness of a solid nanobridge with a 1 GigaPa Young modulus. We argue that as evaporation and condensation gradually lose efficiency, the contact line progressively becomes immobile, which explains this behavior.

  16. Out of equilibrium GigaPa Young modulus of water nanobridge probed by Force Feedback Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carpentier, Simon; Costa, Luca; Vitorino, Miguel V; Charlaix, Elisabeth; Chevrier, Joel

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of capillary condensation, water droplets appear in nano/micropores. The large associated surface interactions can deeply influence macroscopic properties as in granular media. We report that dynamical properties of such nanobridge dramatically change when probed at different time scales. Using a novel AFM mode, the Force Feedback Microscopy, the gap between the nanotip and the surface is continuously varied, and we observe this change in the simultaneous measurements, at different frequencies, of the stiffness G'(N/m), the dissipative coefficient G"(kg/sec) together with the static force. As the measuring time approaches the microsecond, the liquid droplet exhibits a large positive stiffness (it is small and negative in the long time limit). Although clearly controlled by surface effects, it compares to the stiffness of a solid nanobridge with a 1 GigaPa Young modulus. We argue that as evaporation and condensation gradually lose efficiency, the contact line progressively becomes immobile, which expla...

  17. Experimental and numerical study of the Geodesic Acoustic Mode at the edge region of Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sengun, Mehmet Haluk

    Spherical Tokamak J. R. Robinson1, B. Hnat1, P. Dura1, A. Kirk2, P. Tamain3, A. Thyagaraja4, K. G. Mc Acoustic Mode (GAM) at the edge of an Ohmic plasma on the Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST). A strong 10 k

  18. Overview of the ARGOS X-ray framing camera for Laser MegaJoule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trosseille, C., E-mail: clement.trosseille@cea.fr; Aubert, D.; Auger, L.; Bazzoli, S.; Brunel, P.; Burillo, M.; Chollet, C.; Jasmin, S.; Maruenda, P.; Moreau, I.; Oudot, G.; Raimbourg, J.; Soullié, G.; Stemmler, P.; Zuber, C. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Beck, T. [CEA, DEN, CADARACHE, F-13108 St Paul lez Durance (France); Gazave, J. [CEA, DAM, CESTA, F-33116 Le Barp (France)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Commissariat à l’Énergie Atomique et aux Énergies Alternatives has developed the ARGOS X-ray framing camera to perform two-dimensional, high-timing resolution imaging of an imploding target on the French high-power laser facility Laser MegaJoule. The main features of this camera are: a microchannel plate gated X-ray detector, a spring-loaded CCD camera that maintains proximity focus in any orientation, and electronics packages that provide remotely-selectable high-voltages to modify the exposure-time of the camera. These components are integrated into an “air-box” that protects them from the harsh environmental conditions. A miniaturized X-ray generator is also part of the device for in situ self-testing purposes.

  19. New Songdo City and the value of flexibility : a case study of implementation and analysis of a mega-scale project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Junho (Junho Justin)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the modern real estate industry, mega-scale developments have been a notable feature. The distinctiveness of these projects is that they are enormous in scale and thus require many years to develop. Unlike regular sized ...

  20. AFLP-based study of genetic difference and mega-base DNA isolation for BAC library construction from greenbug Schizaphis graminum (Rondani) (Homoptera:Aphididae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Haiwen

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research focuses on the study of genetic differences among eight greenbug biotypes revealed by AFLP analyses and isolation of mega-base DNA for BAC library construction. Genetic relationship among greenbug biotypes is an old, but interesting...

  1. Toroidal ripple transport of beam ions in the mega-ampere spherical tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McClements, K. G. [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Hole, M. J. [Plasma Research Laboratory, Research School of Physical Science and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The transport of injected beam ions due to toroidal magnetic field ripple in the mega-ampere spherical tokamak (MAST) is quantified using a full orbit particle tracking code, with collisional slowing-down and pitch-angle scattering by electrons and bulk ions taken into account. It is shown that the level of ripple losses is generally rather low, although it depends sensitively on the major radius of the outer midplane plasma edge; for typical values of this parameter in MAST plasmas, the reduction in beam heating power due specifically to ripple transport is less than 1%, and the ripple contribution to beam ion diffusivity is of the order of 0.1 m{sup 2} s{sup -1} or less. It is concluded that ripple effects make only a small contribution to anomalous transport rates that have been invoked to account for measured neutron rates and plasma stored energies in some MAST discharges. Delayed (non-prompt) losses are shown to occur close to the outer midplane, suggesting that banana-drift diffusion is the most likely cause of the ripple-induced losses.

  2. Coherence imaging of scrape-off-layer and divertor impurity flows in the Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak (invited)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silburn, S. A., E-mail: s.a.silburn@durham.ac.uk; Sharples, R. M. [Centre for Advanced Instrumentation, Department of Physics, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Harrison, J. R.; Meyer, H.; Michael, C. A. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Howard, J. [Plasma Research Laboratory, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Gibson, K. J. [York Plasma Institute, Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new coherence imaging Doppler spectroscopy diagnostic has been deployed on the UK’s Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak for scrape-off-layer and divertor impurity flow measurements. The system has successfully obtained 2D images of C III, C II, and He II line-of-sight flows, in both the lower divertor and main scrape-off-layer. Flow imaging has been obtained at frame rates up to 1 kHz, with flow resolution of around 1 km/s and spatial resolution better than 1 cm, over a 40° field of view. C III data have been tomographically inverted to obtain poloidal profiles of the parallel impurity flow in the divertor under various conditions. In this paper we present the details of the instrument design, operation, calibration, and data analysis as well as a selection of flow imaging results which demonstrate the diagnostic's capabilities.

  3. Satellite Remote Sensing of Air Pollution in Mega CitiesSatellite Remote Sensing of Air Pollution in Mega Cities Sundar A. Christopher 1; J.Wang1; P. Gupta 1; M.A. Box2; and G.P. Box2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Jun

    Satellite Remote Sensing of Air Pollution in Mega CitiesSatellite Remote Sensing of Air Pollution, consistent, and cost-effective way for monitoring air pollution. Using Terra/Aqua data, we demonstrate (PM2.5) is an important tool for evaluating air quality. However, PM2.5 has larger spatiotemporal

  4. Using Bayesian analysis and Gaussian processes to infer electron temperature and density profiles on the Mega-Ampere Spherical Tokamak experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nessi, G. T. von; Hole, M. J. [Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A unified, Bayesian inference of midplane electron temperature and density profiles using both Thomson scattering (TS) and interferometric data is presented. Beyond the Bayesian nature of the analysis, novel features of the inference are the use of a Gaussian process prior to infer a mollification length-scale of inferred profiles and the use of Gauss-Laguerre quadratures to directly calculate the depolarisation term associated with the TS forward model. Results are presented from an application of the method to data from the high resolution TS system on the Mega-Ampere Spherical Tokamak, along with a comparison to profiles coming from the standard analysis carried out on that system.

  5. Suppression of spurious mode oscillation in mega-watt 77-GHz gyrotron as a high quality probe beam source for the collective Thomson scattering in LHD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogasawara, S. [Department of Energy Engineering and Science, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8463 (Japan); Kubo, S. [Department of Energy Engineering and Science, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8463 (Japan); National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki-shi 509-5292 (Japan); Nishiura, M.; Tanaka, K.; Shimozuma, T.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Takahashi, H.; Ito, S.; Takita, Y.; Kobayashi, S.; Mizuno, Y.; Okada, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki-shi 509-5292 (Japan); Tatematsu, Y.; Saito, T. [Research Center for Development of Far-Infrared Region, University of Fukui, Fukui 910-8507 (Japan); Minami, R.; Kariya, T.; Imai, T. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8577 (Japan)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Collective Thomson scattering (CTS) diagnostic requires a strong probing beam to diagnose a bulk and fast ion distribution function in fusion plasmas. A mega-watt gyrotron for electron cyclotron resonance heating is used as a probing beam in the large helical device. Spurious mode oscillations are often observed during the turning on/off phase of the modulation. The frequency spectra of the 77-GHz gyrotron output power have been measured, and then one of the spurious modes, which interferes with the CTS receiver system, is identified as the TE{sub 17,6} mode at the frequency of 74.7 GHz. The mode competition calculation indicates that the increase of the magnetic field strength at the gyrotron resonator can avoid such a spurious mode and excite only the main TE{sub 18,6} mode. The spurious radiation at the 74.7 GHz is experimentally demonstrated to be suppressed in the stronger magnetic field than that optimized for the high-power operation.

  6. APE project: a Gigaflop processor for lattice calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bacilieri, P.; Cabasino, S.; Marzano, F.; Paohicci, P.; Petrarce, S.; Salina, G.; Cabibo, H.; Giovannella, C.; Marinari, E.; Parisi, G.

    1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new special purpose parallel processor (APE) presently under development is presented. The theoretical computing power of the processor is 1 Giga-Flop and the memory can be expanded to 512 Mega-bytes. Sixteen 52 bit floating point processors each with a computing power of 64 Mega-Flops are driven in parallel as a single instruction multiple data machine under the control of a 3081/E. Each floating point unit is connected to two 8 Mega-byte memories which can also be accessed by the 3081.E. Though this machine can be used as a general purpose array processor the hardware has been optimized for lattice QCD calculations.

  7. Towards tera terra: Terabase sequencing of terrestrial metagenomics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jansson, J.

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Microbial ecologists are taking a metagenomics approach to analyze complex and diverse soil microbial communities.

  8. DEFINIR HOMEPAGE Tera-feira, 28 de Maio de 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

    dinossauro estão na Lourinhã Sismos: Técnicas tornam casas de adobe mais seguras Cientistas encontram sangue

  9. TERA Application and Review Process Flowchart | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolar Jump to:Holdings Co08.0 -TEEMP Jump to: navigation, searchTEP

  10. Mega Nap Kft | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville, Ohio: Energy8429°,Meeteetse, Wyoming: Energy Resources

  11. Mega Energy, LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu an Group JumpNewMassachusettsMayoOregon:Medical

  12. PUBLISHED VERSION Investigating fusion plasma instabilities in the Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak using mega electron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I, Allan S Y, Akers R J, Keeling D L, McClements K G, Scannell R, Turnyanskiy M, Angulo A, Avila P emissions (invited)a) R. V. Perez, W. U. Boeglin, D. S. Darrow, M. Cecconello, I. Klimek, S. Y. Allan, R. J. Allan,4 R. J. Akers,4 D. L. Keeling,4 K. G. McClements,4 R. Scannell,4 M. Turnyanskiy,5 A. Angulo,1 P

  13. Application of Volume diffraction grating for TeraHertz lasing in Volume FEL (VFEL)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. G. Baryshevsky; K. G. Batrakov; V. I. Stolyarsky

    2002-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The generation of induced radiation in volume resonator formed by metal threads is considered. It is shown that using of such volume diffraction grating allows increasing of lasing efficiency in terahertz range. The requirements on beam and grating parameters are obtained.

  14. ASCI Red -- Experiences and lessons learned with a massively parallel teraFLOP supercomputer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christon, M.A.; Crawford, D.A.; Hertel, E.S.; Peery, J.S.; Robinson, A.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Computational Physics R and D Dept.

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) program involves Sandia, Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories. At Sandia National Laboratories, ASCI applications include large deformation transient dynamics, shock propagation, electromechanics, and abnormal thermal environments. In order to resolve important physical phenomena in these problems, it is estimated that meshes ranging from 10{sup 6} to 10{sup 9} grid points will be required. The ASCI program is relying on the use of massively parallel supercomputers initially capable of delivering over 1 TFLOPs to perform such demanding computations. The ASCI Red machine at Sandia National Laboratories consists of over 4,500 computational nodes with a peak computational rate of 1.8 TFLOPs, 567 GBytes of memory, and 2 TBytes of disk storage. Regardless of the peak FLOP rate, there are many issues surrounding the use of massively parallel supercomputers in a production environment. These issues include parallel I/O, mesh generation, visualization, archival storage, high-bandwidth networking and the development of parallel algorithms. In order to illustrate these issues and their solution with respect to ASCI Red, demonstration calculations of time-dependent buoyancy-dominated plumes, electromechanics, and shock propagation will be presented.

  15. Spencer Robbins > Materials Scientist - TeraPore Technologies, Inc. >

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary900 Special Report: IG-0900Market Luciana JuvenalCenter

  16. angelica gigas nakai: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 MeV near the W+ W- threshold. In this note, we study the accuracy with which the Higgs boson mass can be determined from loop corrections to these observables in the Standard...

  17. Giga-Dalton Mass Spectrometry - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.NewofGeothermal Heat Pump Basics Acrobat XGettingGift Tag

  18. Dissolution of mega-voids in resin transfer molding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Paul Nordstrom

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation Coupled Thermionic Converters. 8 th InternationalMulti-Cell (CIM) Thermionic Converter for Solar Power andCylindrical Inverted Thermionic Converter. Proceedings of 1

  19. Transportation planning for mega events : a model of urban change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kassens, Eva

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    My study is about opportunities for revolutionary developments in urban transport. Often, we think of transport and urban development as an evolutionary process, yet there exist a few opportunities for cities to revolutionize ...

  20. Micro-home ownership in a mega-metropolis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacCarroll, Christian D. (Christian David)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a means to keep pace with today's globally networked society, the home is reconceived as a portable, transformable device that adapts and reconfigures itself to coexist within a range of changing terrains. Ownership ...

  1. Exhaust Energy Recovery: 2008 Semi-Mega Merit Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reduce or eliminate the need for increased heat rejection capacity for future heavy duty engines in Class 8 Tractors A 10% increase in fuel efficiency would: Save a linehaul,...

  2. Wasting Time : a leisure infrastructure for mega-landfill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Elizabeth M. (Elizabeth Margaret)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Landfills are consolidating into fewer, taller, and more massive singular objects in the exurban landscape.This thesis looks at one instance in Virginia, the first regional landfill in the state to accept trash from New ...

  3. Mega shed : regional rooms for the Orgman's City

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perdue, Stephen Andrew

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent legitimization of Landscape Urbanism as a theory for architectural design may signal a growing cultural shift toward environmental custodianship. Design strategies that blur buildings and landscape have become ...

  4. Gulf of Mexico Miocene CO2 Site Characterization Mega Transect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meckel, Timothy; Trevino, Ramon

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This project characterized the Miocene-age sub-seafloor stratigraphy in the near-offshore portion of the Gulf of Mexico adjacent to the Texas coast. The large number of industrial sources of carbon dioxide (CO2) in coastal counties and the high density of onshore urbanization and environmentally sensitive areas make this offshore region extremely attractive for long-term storage of carbon dioxide emissions from industrial sources (CCS). The study leverages dense existing geologic data from decades of hydrocarbon exploration in and around the study area to characterize the regional geology for suitability and storage capacity. Primary products of the study include: regional static storage capacity estimates, sequestration “leads” and prospects with associated dynamic capacity estimates, experimental studies of CO2-brine-rock interaction, best practices for site characterization, a large-format ‘Atlas’ of sequestration for the study area, and characterization of potential fluid migration pathways for reducing storage risks utilizing novel high-resolution 3D (HR3D) seismic surveys. In addition, three subcontracted studies address source-to-sink matching optimization, offshore well bore management and environmental aspects. The various geologic data and interpretations are integrated and summarized in a series of cross-sections and maps, which represent a primary resource for any near-term commercial deployment of CCS in the area. The regional study characterized and mapped important geologic features (e.g., Clemente-Tomas fault zone, the regionally extensive Marginulina A and Amphistegina B confining systems, etc.) that provided an important context for regional static capacity estimates and specific sequestration prospects of the study. A static capacity estimate of the majority of the Study area (14,467 mi2) was estimated at 86 metric Gigatonnes. While local capacity estimates are likely to be lower due to reservoir-scale characteristics, the offshore Miocene interval is a storage resource of National interest for providing CO2 storage as an atmospheric emissions abatement strategy. The natural petroleum system was used as an analog to infer seal quality and predict possible migration pathways of fluids in an engineered system of anthropogenic CO2 injection and storage. The regional structural features (e.g., Clemente-Tomas fault zone) that exert primary control on the trapping and distribution of Miocene hydrocarbons are expected to perform similarly for CCS. Industrial?scale CCS will require storage capacity utilizing well?documented Miocene hydrocarbon (dominantly depleted gas) fields and their larger structural closures, as well as barren (unproductive, brine?filled) closures. No assessment was made of potential for CO2 utilization for enhanced oil and gas recovery. The use of 3D numerical fluid flow simulations have been used in the study to greatly assist in characterizing the potential storage capacity of a specific reservoir. Due to the complexity of geologic systems (stratigraphic heterogeneity) and inherent limitations on producing a 3D geologic model, these simulations are typically simplified scenarios that explore the influence of model property variability (sensitivity study). A specific site offshore San Luis Pass (southern Galveston Island) was undertaken successfully, indicating stacked storage potential. Downscaling regional capacity estimates to the local scale (and the inverse) has proven challenging, and remains an outstanding gap in capacity assessments. In order to characterize regional seal performance and identify potential brine and CO2 leakage pathways, results from three high-resolution 3D (HR3D) seismic datasets acquired by the study using novel HR3D (P-Cable) acquisition system showed steady and significant improvements in data quality because of improved acquisition and processing technique. Finely detailed faults and stratigraphy in the shallowest 1000 milliseconds (~800 m) of data allowed for the identification and mapping of unconformable surfaces including what is probably

  5. Dissolution of mega-voids in resin transfer molding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Paul Nordstrom

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Gas Bubbles in an Epoxy Resin: Evaluating the Inputof Gas Bubbles in an Epoxy Resin: Evaluating the Inputin panel mold Item: Epoxy resin and hardener Manufacturer:

  6. August 2000 (Convex Optimization ) JP Goux The mega title ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yair Censor , Eli Tom .... Yair Censor , Tommy Elfving , Nirit Kopf , Thomas Bortfeld .... Peder Olsen, Figen Oztoprak, Jorge Nocedal, Stephen Rennie

  7. Mega-Pore Nano-Structured Carbon - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighand Retrievals from aRod Eggert ImageMeetings High Energy PhysicsEnergy

  8. Acoustic Source Localization via Time Difference of Arrival Estimation for Distributed Sensor Networks Using Tera-Scale Optical Core Devices

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Imam, Neena; Barhen, Jacob

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For real-time acoustic source localization applications, one of the primary challenges is the considerable growth in computational complexity associated with the emergence of ever larger, active or passive, distributed sensor networks. These sensors rely heavily on battery-operated system components to achieve highly functional automation in signal and information processing. In order to keep communication requirements minimal, it is desirable to perform as much processing on the receiver platforms as possible. However, the complexity of the calculations needed to achieve accurate source localization increases dramatically with the size of sensor arrays, resulting in substantial growth of computational requirements that cannot bemore »readily met with standard hardware. One option to meet this challenge builds upon the emergence of digital optical-core devices. The objective of this work was to explore the implementation of key building block algorithms used in underwater source localization on the optical-core digital processing platform recently introduced by Lenslet Inc. This demonstration of considerably faster signal processing capability should be of substantial significance to the design and innovation of future generations of distributed sensor networks.« less

  9. Automating Climate Science: Large Ensemble Simulations on the TeraGrid with the GriPhyN Virtual Data System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deelman, Ewa

    scale and nonfluid processes (referred to as "physics" in atmosphere modeling). The atmosphere component

  10. Segunda 29/07 Tera 30/07 Quarta 31/07 8:30 -9:00

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paraná, Universidade Federal do

    (milho) Vivian Jaskiw Szilagyi 11:30 - 12:20 Apresentação de Laboratório 12:20 - 14:00 Almoço 14:00 - 15

  11. Time-Domain TeraHertz Spectroscopy and Observational Probes of Prebiotic Interstellar Gas and Ice Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winfree, Erik

    !) for being a second family away from my home. #12;v Three individuals bear special recognition, Jacob, Matt, Xander, Masha, Coco, Alex, and Dana have been fantastic to work with and great friends

  12. 50 May/June2010 PublishedbytheIEEEComputerSociety 0272-1716/10/$26.002010IEEE UltrascaleVisualization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Andrew

    . Such envi- ronments include TeraGrid, the BlueWaters Petascale Facility, the European Organization

  13. Use of encapsulated live microalgae to investigate pre-ingestive selection in the oyster Crassostrea gigas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allam, Bassem

    Use of encapsulated live microalgae to investigate pre-ingestive selection in the oyster, this study clearly demonstrate that extracellular metabolites produced by microalgae play a crucial role reserved. Keywords: Alginate; Beads; Bivalve; Feeding; Microalgae; Particle processing 1. Introduction

  14. Dosidicus gigas, the only species in the genus Dosidicus, is commonly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El Colegio de la Frontera Sur Calle 10 x 61 No 264 Colonia Centro, 24000 Campeche, Mexico Joshua J. C

  15. A Short Wavelength GigaHertz Clocked Fiber-Optic Quantum Key Distribution System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karen J. Gordon; Veronica Fernandez; Paul D. Townsend; Gerald S. Buller

    2006-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A quantum key distribution system has been developed, using standard telecommunications optical fiber, which is capable of operating at clock rates of greater than 1 GHz. The quantum key distribution system implements a polarization encoded version of the B92 protocol. The system employs vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with emission wavelengths of 850 nm as weak coherent light sources, and silicon single photon avalanche diodes as the single photon detectors. A distributed feedback laser of emission wavelength 1.3 micro-metres, and a linear gain germanium avalanche photodiode was used to optically synchronize individual photons over the standard telecommunications fiber. The quantum key distribution system exhibited a quantum bit error rate of 1.4%, and an estimated net bit rate greater than 100,000 bits-per-second for a 4.2 km transmission range. For a 10 km fiber range a quantum bit error rate of 2.1%, and estimated net bit rate of greater than 7,000 bits-per-second was achieved.

  16. Protective role of Arapaima gigas fish scales: Structure and mechanical , Vincent R. Sherman a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    to catastrophic failure, providing high toughness and resis- tance to penetration by predator teeth. We show that the arapaima's scale has evolved to minimize dam- age from penetration by predator teeth through a Bouligand architectures and exhibit excellent properties with complex mechanisms of failure avoidance. They are inspiring

  17. Trace Elemental Variation in Dosidicus Gigas Statoliths Using LA-ICP-MS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arbuckle, Nancy 1980-

    2012-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    concentrations at depth with variability in low oxygen environments (Johnson et al., 1996, Donat and Bruland, 1994, Bruland, 1983). Some authors suggest that relative to levels found in statoliths, manganese concentration is nearly uniform in the ocean... (Zumholz et al., 2007c). Copper exhibits a nutrient like profile with reduced concentrations in surface waters (Bruland, 1983, Donat and Bruland, 1994). It has not been measured in many statolith studies but was successfully used to distinguish between...

  18. Silicon based millimeterwave integrated circuits for multi giga-bits-per-second wireless data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kodkani, Rahul M.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    66 Simulated short-circuit current loss RF frequency3.14: Simulated short-circuit current loss RF frequencyof simulated short-circuit RF-IF current conversion loss. A

  19. Ecology and Trophic Interactions of Jumbo Squid (Dosidicus gigas) in the California Current Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilly, William; Field, John

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    12:00, Humboldt squid ecology and climate effects, 40Date: 2/28/2012 Title Ecology and Trophic Interactions ofNOAA NMFS SWFSC Fisheries Ecology Division 110 Shaffer Rd.

  20. Silicon based millimeterwave integrated circuits for multi giga-bits-per-second wireless data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kodkani, Rahul M.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Figure 1.8: Direct-conversion receiverL. Larson, “ A 24-GHz CMOS Direct-Conversion Sub- Harmonic2000. [17] A. Abidi, “Direct-conversion radio transceivers

  1. Differential tissue distribution and specificity of phenoloxidases from the Pacific oyster1 Crassostrea gigas2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and characterise the different sub-classes of POs (i.e. tyrosinase,31 catecholase and/or laccase) involved, and muscle. These results34 suggest the presence of catecholase and laccase but not of tyrosinase activities enzymes include tyrosinases (EC 1.14.18.1), catecholases (EC 1.10.3.1) and laccases (EC54 1.10.3.2), all

  2. Ryan Naraine, InternetNews, 2004.09.08: "Apple issues mega security update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Daniel

    -language instructions handling registers int *sp and int cx: A (i.e., 0x41) means ++cx. D means sp += 0.25. I means --cx. L means sp -= 0.25. Q means *--sp = cx. T means *--sp = sp. Y means cx = *sp++. hABCD means *--sp = 0x44434241. kaDA means sp = ((int*)cx)[17] * 65. hABCDhABCDYIQDYAQDYIIQDYAAQD means what? #12;Look

  3. A world-class challenge: Kazakhstan mega-project still looming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This issue of Energy Detente describes how one massive development plan has been scaled back for the moment, but which is destined to play a major role in the future -- no matter how the particulars of development evolve. Last month, Chevron downward adjusted its budget for the development of the Tengiz oil field in Kazakhstan. This article highlights the media attention that has been paid to the Former Soviet Union as a potential oil giant, which will increase further with Chevron`s recent decision.

  4. Design of Mega-Voltage X-ray Digital Radiography and Computed Tomography Performance Phantoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aufderheide, M B; Martz, H E; Curtin, M

    2009-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of fundamental scientific questions have arisen concerning the operation of high-energy DR and CT systems. Some of these questions include: (1) How deeply can such systems penetrate thickly shielded objects? (2) How well can such systems distinguish between dense and relatively high Z materials such as lead, tungsten and depleted uranium and lower Z materials such as steel, copper and tin? (3) How well will such systems operate for a uranium material which is an intermediate case between low density yellowcake and high density depleted uranium metal? These questions have led us to develop a set of phantoms to help answer these questions, but do not have any direct bearing on any smuggling concern. These new phantoms are designed to allow a systemic exploration of these questions by gradually varying their compositions and thicknesses. These phantoms are also good probes of the blurring behavior of radiography and tomography systems. These phantoms are composed of steel ({rho} assumed to be 7.8 g/cc), lead ({rho} assumed to be 11.4 g/cc), tungsten ({rho} assumed to be 19.25 g/cc), uranium oxide (UO{sub 3}) ({rho} assumed to be 4.6 g/cc), and depleted uranium (DU) ({rho} assumed to be 18.9 g/cc). There are five designed phantoms described in this report: (1) Cylindrical shells of Tungsten and Steel; (2) Depleted Uranium Inside Tungsten Hemi-cube Shells; (3) Nested Spherical Shells; (4) UO{sub 3} Cylinder; and (5) Shielded DU Sphere.

  5. New SLED 3 system for Multi-mega Watt RF compressor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Chen; Tantawi, Sami

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact X band SLED is introduced for X band RF compressing application. This SLED compressor consists two major parts: a rectangular to circular waveguide converter and an overmoded spherical cavity. The RF compressor is designed to convert 50 magawatt X band RF power with pulse length 1.5 microseconds and deliver 200 megawatts with pulse length 106 nanoseconds to the X band accelerating structure.

  6. Making climate adaptation work : strategies for resource constrained South Asian mega-cities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dutta-Koehler, Madhu Chhanda

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation compares the responses of Dhaka, Bangladesh and Kolkata, India to the serious challenges posed by climate change, particularly in the water sector. Drawing on the theories of "adaptation as development" ...

  7. MEGA-Event Stadiums as vehicles for urban transformation : an argument for integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendez, Soledad (Candace Soledad)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    All cultures across the world engage in significant public events whether religious, traditional or competitive. Many of these celebrations, small or large, are central to their communities and cultures, bringing people ...

  8. Bi-directional Alfvén cyclotron instabilities in the mega-amp spherical tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharapov, S. E., E-mail: Sergei.Sharapov@ccfe.ac.uk; Akers, R.; Ayed, N. Ben; Cunningham, G. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Lilley, M. K. [Physics Department, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Cecconello, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, SE-75105 Uppsala (Sweden); Cook, J. W. C.; Verwichte, E. [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Alfvén cyclotron instabilities excited by velocity gradients of energetic beam ions were investigated in MAST experiments with super-Alfvénic neutral beam injection over a wide range of toroidal magnetic fields from ?0.34?T to ?0.585?T. In MAST discharges with high magnetic field, a discrete spectrum of modes in the sub-cyclotron frequency range is excited toroidally propagating counter to the beam and plasma current (toroidal mode numbers n??0 arises, in addition to the modes with n??0 become dominant, they are observed in frequency range from ?250 kHz for n=1 to ?3.5?MHz for n=15, well above the on-axis ion cyclotron frequency (?2.5 MHz). The data is interpreted in terms of normal and anomalous Doppler resonances modified by magnetic drift terms due to inhomogeneity and curvature of the magnetic field. A Hall MHD model is applied for computing the eigenfrequencies and the spatial mode structure of CAEs and a good agreement with the experimental frequencies is found.

  9. IBM Research -ChinaIBM Research China Internet-of-Things for Sustainability of Mega Cities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ge, Zigang

    people, physical objects and IT systems, supported by scalable and affordable technologies, to better Corporation Process efficiency, automation and control #12;Case: System Coordination of Traffic, Water Pipe and LogisticsCase: System Coordination of Traffic, Water Pipe and Logistics © 2010 IBM Corporation #12;

  10. RESTARAUNTS 24 hour dining at Nafis located at the BIG mega shopping compound. There are also

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berend, Daniel

    , Russian, Japanese, Spanish and many Middle Eastern restaurants in town which are moderately pricy. Beer, behind Gimmel Dormitories Manga - Teacher's Center, Rager St KOSHER ESTABLISHMENTS IN BEER SHEVA, ISRAEL: Avaz HaZahav Hebron 60 Beer Sheva, Israel Tel: 08-628-7675 Cuisine: Self Serve, Mediterranean

  11. Emerald cities : the emergence of mega developments in the 21st century

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weikal, Steven P

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis examines the recent worldwide boom in megacity development. Its basis is a global survey of megacity building that quantifies the amount of current development and qualifies the various city types and themes, ...

  12. Commissioning and Start Up of a 110 MegaWatt Cogeneration Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Good, R.

    manufacturing facility constraints 4. Mechanical problems 5. Electrical problems 6. Control system/instrumentation problems The commissioning and start up had to be coordinated with existing Plant operations. As a result of the Project Team's efforts...

  13. Maximizing nuclear power plant performance via mega-uprates and subsequent license renewal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeWitte, Jacob D. (Jacob Dominic)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this thesis is to develop a methodology to evaluate the engineering and economic implications of maximizing performance of the United States' commercial fleet of nuclear power plants. This methodology addresses ...

  14. Mega-project politics : the evolution of Lahore's first BRT corridor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sajjad, Fizzah

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis asks how opportunities emerge for states in the Global South to undertake large-scale spending on public transport, particularly in cases where they have previously withdrawn from its provision. In recent years, ...

  15. Exhaust Energy Recovery: 2008 Semi-Mega Merit Review | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisoryStandardGenerationEducational OpportunitiesEngineRecovery: 2008

  16. Investigating Aeroelastic Performance of Multi-Mega Watt Wind Turbine Rotors Using CFD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn OtherEnergyBPA-Film-Collection Sign Investigating

  17. %HermesFileInfo:A-30:20121023: A30 Vida TERA-FEIRA, 23 DE OUTUBRO DE 2012 O ESTADO DE S. PAULO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbosa, Marcia C. B.

    . Paraconcorreraoprêmioépre- ciso ser indicada por colegas. O nomedeMarciafoiapontadope- los americanos Anneke Senger e

  18. ASSESSMENT OF MORTALIlY IN AN OFFSHORE POPULATION OF QUEEN CONCH, STROMBUS GIGAS L., IN SOUTHWEST PUERTO RICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PUERTO RICO RICHARD S. APPELDOORN1 ABSTRACT A Jolly-Seber multiple tag-recapture experiment was conducted for 2 years on a queen conch popula- tion offshore ofLa Parguera, Puerto Rico in order to estimate Sciences, University of Puerto Rico, Mayag\\iez. Puerto Rico 00709. Manuscript accepted July 1987. FISHERY

  19. Enhanced immunological and detoxification responses in Pacific oysters, Crassostrea gigas, exposed1 to chemically dispersed oil2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    to chemically dispersed oil2 3 Luna-Acosta, A.a,* , Kanan, R.b , Le Floch, S.b , Huet, V.a , Pineau P;Abstract: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of chemically dispersed oil on an20 of the chemical dispersant. After 2 days of exposure to chemically dispersed28 oil, alkylated naphthalenes

  20. Effects of Alexandrium minutum exposure on nutrition-related processes and reproductive output in oysters Crassostrea gigas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    to the harmful microalgae presented a strong inflammatory response in different tissues of the digestive gland suggests that an exposure of oysters to A. minutum, reducing energy status and motility of spermatozoa to accumulate PSTs by feeding on PST-producing microalgae (Oshima et al., 1990; Bricelj and Shumway, 1998). Mode

  1. Abstract--During power deregulation, companies and ISOs are releasing their transmission grids to form RTOs/Mega-RTOs.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Abstract--During power deregulation, companies and ISOs are releasing their transmission grids, College Station, TX 77843, USA E-mail: huang@ee.tamu.edu, lei.jiansheng@ieee.org during power deregulation under such a power deregulation environment: First of all, the state estimation over the whole grid

  2. PUBLISHED VERSION Coherence imaging of scrape-off-layer and divertor impurity flows in the Mega Amp Spherical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kingdom 3 Plasma Research Laboratory, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia 4 York

  3. Incorporating Sustainability into Brownfield Remediation and Redevelopment in Mega-project: Experience and Lessons Learnt at the London Olympic Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hou, Deyi; Al-Tabbaa, Abir; Hellings, Jan

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sustainability issues. The third source of information is qualitative interview with two anonymous decision makers who worked on the remediation at the Olympic Park site. The interviewees were assured anonymity and confidentiality, and that no business... sensitive information would be released. This source of information was used to identify challenges and lessons learned during the course of the remediation process. This study uses a single, exploratory case study to investigate how sustainability...

  4. THE ROLE OF LAND USE IN ENVIRONMENTAL DECISION MAKING AT THREE DOE MEGA-CLEANUP SITES FERNALD & ROCKY FLATS & MOUND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JEWETT MA

    2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper explores the role that future land use decisions have played in the establishment of cost-effective cleanup objectives and the setting of environmental media cleanup levels for the three major U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites for which cleanup has now been successfully completed: the Rocky Flats, Mound, and Fernald Closure Sites. At each site, there are distinct consensus-building histories throughout the following four phases: (1) the facility shut-down and site investigation phase, which took place at the completion of their Cold War nuclear-material production missions; (2) the decision-making phase, whereby stakeholder and regulatory-agency consensus was achieved for the future land-use-based environmental decisions confronting the sites; (3) the remedy selection phase, whereby appropriate remedial actions were identified to achieve the future land-use-based decisions; and (4) the implementation phase, whereby the selected remedial actions for these high-profile sites were implemented and successfully closed out. At each of the three projects, there were strained relationships and distrust between the local community and the DOE as a result of site contamination and potential health effects to the workers and local residents. To engage citizens and interested stakeholder groups - particularly in the role of final land use in the decision-making process, the site management teams at each respective site developed new public-participation strategies to open stakeholder communication channels with site leadership, technical staff, and the regulatory agencies. This action proved invaluable to the success of the projects and reaching consensus on appropriate levels of cleanup. With the implementation of the cleanup remedies now complete, each of the three DOE sites have become models for future environmental-remediation projects and associated decision making.

  5. An emplacement mechanism for the mega-block zone within the Chicxulub crater, (Yucata n, Mexico) based on chemostratigraphy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claeys, Philippe

    -5100.2012.01345.x #12;information obtained from wells drilled by PEMEX in the 1950s­1960s for oil exploration

  6. Pairing mega events and hydrological systems for urban sustainability : strategy framework for Delhi beyond the Commonwealth Games 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cherian, Danny, 1978-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (cont.) initiate a process by which the city learns to seize opportunities through benign and sustainable change. Furthermore, this thesis intends to inform decision makers with a checklist of crucial tradeoffs, risks and ...

  7. N 55, tera-feira, 22 de maro de 2011 15ISSN 1677-7042 Este documento pode ser verificado no endereo eletrnico http://www.in.gov.br/autenticidade.html,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Floeter, Sergio Ricardo

    constar os resultados obtidos, conforme estabelece a legisla- ção em vigor. COORDENA��O DE APERFEI�OAMENTO

  8. N 48, tera-feira, 12 de maro de 2013 69ISSN 1677-7069 Este documento pode ser verificado no endereo eletrnico http://www.in.gov.br/autenticidade.html,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, I-Shih

    anexo do laboratório de energia solar, denominado prédio 42715. Fundamento Legal: 8666/93 . Vigência: 11

  9. Development of the analysis of fecal stanols in the oyster Crassostrea gigas and identification3 of fecal contamination in shellfish harvesting areas4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    pathways compared, the two21 including water extraction or NH2 purification did not lead to higher and identification3 of fecal contamination in shellfish harvesting areas4 5 Loïc Harrault, Emilie Jardé*, Laurent recoveries and decreased22 repeatabilities of extractions compared to the single purification on silica gel

  10. Spatial variability of stable isotope ratios in oysters (Crassostrea1 gigas) and primary producers along an estuarine gradient (Bay of2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , LEMAR, Institut Universitaire Européen de la Mer, place Nicolas Copernic, 29280 Plouzané, France7 b UMR

  11. Toroidal ripple transport of beam ions in the mega-ampre spherical K. G. McClements and M. J. Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia (Received 30 April 2012; accepted 27 June 2012; published online 20

  12. Southwest Region Experiment Station - Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenthal, A

    2011-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Southwest Technology Development Institute (SWTDI), an independent, university-based research institute, has been the operator of the Southwest Region Photovoltaic Experiment Station (SWRES) for almost 30 years. The overarching mission of SWTDI is to position PV systems and solar technologies to become cost-effective, major sources of energy for the United States. Embedded in SWTDI's general mission has been the more-focused mission of the SWRES: to provide value added technical support to the DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program (SETP) to effectively and efficiently meet the R&D needs and targets specified in the SETP Multi-Year Technical Plan. : The DOE/SETP goals of growing U.S. PV manufacturing into giga-watt capacities and seeing tera-watt-hours of solar energy production in the U.S. require an infrastructure that is under development. The staff of the SWRES has supported DOE/SETP through a coherent, integrated program to address infrastructural needs inhibiting wide-scale PV deployment in three major technical categories: specialized engineering services, workforce development, and deployment facilitation. The SWRES contract underwent three major revisions during its five year period-of- performance, but all tasks and deliverables fell within the following task areas: Task 1: PV Systems Assistance Center 1. Develop a Comprehensive multi-year plan 2. Provide technical workforce development materials and workshops for PV stakeholder groups including university, professional installers, inspectors, state energy offices, Federal agencies 3. Serve on the NABCEP exam committee 4. Provide on-demand technical PV system design reviews for U.S. PV stakeholders 5. Provide PV system field testing and instrumentation, technical outreach (including extensive support for the DOE Market Transformation program) Task 2: Design-for-Manufacture PV Systems 1. Develop and install 18 kW parking carport (cost share) and PV-thermal carport (Albuquerque) deriving and publishing lessons learned Task 3: PV Codes and Standards 1. Serve as the national lead for development and preparation of all proposals (related to PV) to the National Electrical Code 2. Participate in the Standards Technical Panels for modules (UL1703) and inverters (UL1741) Task 4: Assess Inverter Long Term Reliability 1. Install and monitor identical inverters at SWRES and SERES 2. Operate and monitor all inverters for 5 years, characterizing all failures and performance trends Task 5: Test and Evaluation Support for Solar America Initiative 1. Provide test and evaluation services to the National Laboratories for stage gate and progress measurements of SAI TPP winners

  13. Opportunities for Saving Energy and Improving Air Quality in Urban Heat Islands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, Hashem

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    World energy use is the main contributor to atmospheric CO2. In 2002, about 7.0 giga metric tons of carbon (GtC) were emitted internationally by combustion of gas, liquid, and solid fuels (CDIAC, 2006), 2 to 5 times the amount contributed by deforestation (Brown et al., 1988). The share of atmospheric carbon emissions for the United States from fossil fuel combustion was 1.6 GtC. Increasing use of fossil fuel and deforestation together have raised atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration some 25% over the last 150 years. According to global climate models and preliminary measurements, these changes in the composition of the atmosphere have already begun raising the Earth's average temperature. If current energy trends continue, these changes could drastically alter the Earth's temperature, with unknown but potentially catastrophic physical and political consequences. During the last three decades, increased energy awareness has led to conservation efforts and leveling of energy consumption in the industrialized countries. An important byproduct of this reduced energy use is the lowering of CO{sub 2} emissions. Of all electricity generated in the United States, about one-sixth is used to air-condition buildings. The air-conditioning use is about 400 tera-watt-hours (TWh), equivalent to about 80 million metric tons of carbon (MtC) emissions, and translating to about $40 billion (B) per year. Of this $40 B/year, about half is used in cities that have pronounced 'heat islands'. The contribution of the urban heat island to the air-conditioning demand has increased over the last 40 years and it is currently at about 10%. Metropolitan areas in the United States (e.g., Los Angeles, Phoenix, Houston, Atlanta, and New York City) have typically pronounced heat islands that warrant special attention by anyone concerned with broad-scale energy efficiency (HIG, 2006). The ambient air is primarily heated through three processes: direct absorption of solar radiation, convection of heat from hot surfaces, and man-made heat (exhaust from cars, buildings, etc.). Air is fairly transparent to light--the direct absorption of solar radiation in atmospheric air only raises the air temperature by a small amount. Typically about 90% of solar radiation reaches the Earth's surface and then is either absorbed or reflected. The absorbed radiation on the surface increases the surface temperature. And in turn the hot surfaces heat the air. This convective heating is responsible for the majority of the diurnal temperature range. The contribution of man-made heat (e.g., air conditioning, cars) is very small, compared to the heating of air by hot surfaces, except for the downtown high-rise areas.

  14. Evolution, ecology and distribution of bats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilkinson, Gerald S.

    diversity · Energy stability ­ more solar energy allows for more diversity · Greater specialization gigas Australia #12;Megaderma lyra (Family: Megadermatidae) India #12;Old World Rhinolophidae

  15. Page 1 of 8 Seasonal variation of pollution biomarkers to assess the impact on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    · Monitoring · Antioxidant enzymes · Immune defences · Crassostrea gigas A. Luna-Acosta ( ) · P. Bustamante · J, cytokines, heat shock proteins, nitric oxide synthases, proteases, antimicrobial peptides, phenoloxidases

  16. --No Title--

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    International Energy Statistics - Units Close Window Energy Equivalent Conversions Million Btu (British thermal units) Giga (109) Joules TOE (Metric Tons of Oil Equivalent) TCE...

  17. AVTA: Neighborhood All-Electric Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 BRP Commander Electric2010 Electric Vehicles International E-Mega2009 Vantage Pickup EVX10002009 Vantage Van EVC1000

  18. 0.25m CMOS LVDS(Low Voltage Differential Signaling) I/O interface circuits are designed. Designed interface circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Woo-Young

    Çб³Àü±â¡¤ÀüÀÚ°øÇаú * Çѱ¹ÀüÀÚÅë½Å¿¬±¸¿ø IP½ºÀ§ÄªÆÀ Tel: (02) 2123-2874 / bluewat@tera.yonsei.ac.kr 0.25¥ìm CMOS LVDS I

  19. Jack Dongarra University of Tennessee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) Tera-100 Bull bullx super- node S6010/S6030 France 138,368 1.050 84 4.59 229 7 DOE / NNSA Los Alamos (FZJ) Jugene / IBM Blue Gene/P Solution Germany 294,912 .825 82 2.26 365 10 DOE/ NNSA / LANL & SNL Cray) Tera-100 Bull bullx super- node S6010/S6030 France 138,368 1.050 84 4.59 229 7 DOE / NNSA Los Alamos

  20. Light Duty Efficient Clean Combustion

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Efficient Clean Combustion February 27, 2008 Tim Frazier Research & Technology 2008 Semi-Mega Merit Review Agenda Project Goals and Objectives Project Partners Technical...

  1. Enabling High Efficiency Clean Combustion

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Efficiency Clean Combustion 2008 Semi-Mega Merit Review Donald Stanton Research & Technology February 26 th , 2008 This presentation does not contain any proprietary or...

  2. Supporting Text Identification of co-regulated genes through Bayesian clustering of predicted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Jun

    .e., the total counts of nucleotide type i in the jth column of the kth mega-profile. Let 4 kjk( )k i W

  3. advanced cold moderator: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    issues CERN Preprints Summary: The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute and the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization have been developing a Mega-Watt scale spallation...

  4. Merit Review: EPAct State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets Merit Review: EPAct State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit...

  5. Low Cost Components: Advanced High Power & High Energy Battery...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on February 25, 2008 in Bethesda, Maryland. merit08amine2.pdf More Documents & Publications Engineering of High...

  6. DOEs Effort to Reduce Truck Aerodynamic Drag through Joint...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on February 25, 2008 in Bethesda, Maryland. merit08salari.pdf More Documents & Publications DOEs Effort to Reduce...

  7. Ultra Large Castings for Lightweight Vehicle Structures ?AMD...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on February 25, 2008 in Bethesda, Maryland. merit08mccarty6.pdf More Documents & Publications Ultra Large Castings...

  8. NonDestructive Inspection of Adhesive Bonds in Metal-Metal Joints...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on February 25, 2008 in Bethesda, Maryland. merit08dasch2.pdf More Documents & Publications Non-Destructive...

  9. Bonding Similar and Dissimilar Lightweight Materials using Reactive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on February 25, 2008 in Bethesda, Maryland. merit08sun.pdf More Documents & Publications Characterization of...

  10. Benchmarking of Advanced HEVs and PHEVs over a Wide Range...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on February 25, 2008 in Bethesda, Maryland. merit08carlson.pdf More Documents & Publications Off-Cycle Benchmarking...

  11. Magnesium Research and Technology Development: Project 48976...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on February 25, 2008 in Bethesda, Maryland. merit08smith5.pdf More Documents & Publications FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting...

  12. Molecular Simulations of Electrolytes and Electrolyte/Electrode...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on February 25, 2008 in Bethesda, Maryland. merit08smith.pdf More Documents & Publications Molecular dynamics simulation and ab intio studies...

  13. Natural Fiber Composites: Retting, Preform Manufacture & Molding...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on February 25, 2008 in Bethesda, Maryland. merit08smith3.pdf More Documents & Publications Natural Fiber Composites: Retting, Preform...

  14. Characterization of Thermo-Mechanical Behaviors of Advanced High...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on February 25, 2008 in Bethesda, Maryland. merit08smith7.pdf More Documents & Publications Characterization of Thermo-Mechanical Behaviors of...

  15. Western Meter Policy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    as Western) VAC Voltage Alternating Current VAR, Mvar Volt-Ampere-Reactive (Instantaneous Reactive Power), Mega-Var VDC Voltage Direct Current Western Area Power Administration...

  16. Microsoft PowerPoint - LANL Student Symposium Poster.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    potential effects of large wildfires, thereby encouraging managers to implement best management practices to decrease the probability of mega-fires in Southwestern forests. Authors...

  17. Treatment of experimental asthma using a novel peptide inhibitor of the inducible T cell kinase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guimond, David M.; Guimond, David M.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    supernatant -! small centrifuge tubes (4 per MegaPrep) forvacuum manifold -! centrifuge -! -20°C freezer Materials: -!freezer -! refrigerated centrifuge -! liquid nitrogen vessel

  18. Regulatory Science in a Developing State: Environmental Politics in Chile, 1980-2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barandiaran, Javiera

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mega-hydroelectric dams in the Patagonia, that received EIA134 Chapter 6: Dams in Patagonia? Evaluatingfor Ecology Research in Patagonia Europe-Latin America

  19. Principal Characteristics of a Modern Grid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is an essential component of the modern grid: IC creates a dynamic, interactive "mega-infrastructure" for real-time information and power exchange IC allows the various...

  20. E-Print Network 3.0 - air base korea Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    quality in areas where ground-based observations are limited. Fire Emission... Satellite Remote Sensing of Air Pollution in Mega CitiesSatellite ... Source: Wang, Jun - Department...

  1. UC Davis Fuel Cell, Hydrogen, and Hybrid Vehicle (FCH2V) GATE Center of Excellence

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on February 25, 2008 in Bethesda, Maryland.

  2. Materials Compatibility of Power Electronics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on February 25, 2008 in Bethesda, Maryland.

  3. Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES) NETL Agreement...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NETL Agreement 13919 Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES) NETL Agreement 13919 Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on...

  4. Fishery Bulletin Index Volume 103(14), 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    vertical larval 728 walleye pollock 574 DNA 516, 588 Dosidicus gigas 219 Drag and lift 63 Dredging 712 Egg Southern Oscillation 685 Endangered Species Act 270 Energetic cost 63 Energy consumption 71 Enhydra lutris

  5. The Molecular Ingenuity of a Unique Fish Scale

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Molecular Ingenuity of a Unique Fish Scale Print Arapaima gigas, a freshwater fish found in the Amazon Basin, has a remarkable ability to resist predation by piranhas through...

  6. AmericanGeneticAssociation ISSN 0022-1503 (Print)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Browne, William E.

    Resources to Study Diverse Invertebrate Genomes GIGA CommunIty of SCIentIStS* Address correspondence to Dr a blastula stage, which is followed by cell differentiation and morphogenesis (Slack et al. 1993; Valentine

  7. Tissue sampling and standards for vertebrate genomics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and standards for vertebrate genomics. GigaScience 2012 1:8.transition to conservation genomics. TIG 2010, 26:177–187.Siemens DH: Ecological genomics––changing perspectives on

  8. Nano-ChemoMechanical assessment of Rice Husk Ash cement by wavelength dispersive spectroscopy and nanoindentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abuhaikal, Muhannad (Muhannad A. R.)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cement global production stands at 3 Giga tons making concrete the most consumed structural mateial worldwide. This massively produced material comes with a heavy environmental footprint rendering the cement industry ...

  9. 3Energy in the Home Every month, we get the Bad

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    operating, the accelerator requires 70 megaWatts of electricity ­ about the same as the power consumption) What is the Tevatron's electricity consumption in kilowatt hours? B) At $0.11 per kilowatt hour, how operating, the accelerator requires 70 megaWatts of electricity ­ about the same as the power consumption

  10. Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 392, 617629 (2009) doi:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2008.14068.x Evolution of the radio-loud galaxy population

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Best, Philip

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Z- luminous red galaxy (MegaZ-LRG) catalogue of LRGs derived from Sloan Digital Sky Survey imaging data constructed from the cross-correlation of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory Very Large Array Sky Survey (NVSS) and Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty centimetres (FIRST) radio surveys with the Mega

  11. A very short literature search Target videoconference 28.1.2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    · ... 28.1.2004 A.Fabich, CERN #12;MegaPie · MegaPie: Megawatt Pilot Experiment ­ Spallation source · Li­50 · IPUL, RIGA working for ESS, LiSoR · http://mhd.sal.lv/ ­ High pressure and high flowrate induction

  12. Poverty Reduction during the Rural-Urban Transformation -The Role of the Missing Middle *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krivobokova, Tatyana

    Poverty Reduction during the Rural-Urban Transformation - The Role of the Missing Middle * Luc (rural diversification versus agglomeration in mega-cities) affects the rate of poverty reduction towns ) is strongly associated with poverty reduction, while expansion of mega-cities is not. Migration

  13. 40th Anniversary of the First Proton-Proton Collisions in the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Welcome, Luigi di Lella and Rolf HeuerDesign and Construction of the ISR, Kurt HubnerPhysics at small angles, Ugo Amaldi (TERA Foundation)The Impact of the ISR on Accelerator Physics and Technology, Philip J. BryantPhysics at high transverse momentum, Pierre Darriulat (VATLY-Hanoi)Concluding remarks, Rolf Heuer

  14. A Proposal for a TESLA Accelerator Module Test Facility W.D.Moeller, B.Petersen, B.Sparr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 A Proposal for a TESLA Accelerator Module Test Facility W.D.Moeller, B.Petersen, B.Sparr Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron TESLA Report No. 2001-08 Abstract The Tera-eV Energy Superconducting Linear Accelerator (TESLA), a 32 km long superconducting linear electron/positron collider of 500 GeV (upgradeable

  15. THE CRYOGENIC SYSTEM OF TESLA S. Wolff, DESY, Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg, Germany

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE CRYOGENIC SYSTEM OF TESLA S. Wolff, DESY, Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg, Germany for the TESLA collaboration Abstract TESLA, a 33 km long 500 GeV centre-of-mass energy superconducting linear collider The 33 km long e+ e- linear collider TESLA (Tera eV Energy Superconductiong Linear Accelerator) with 500

  16. FEB 19, 2001 TESLA-2001-17

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­i­ FEB 19, 2001 TESLA-2001-17 CONCEPTUAL DESIGN FOR THE FINAL FOCUS QUADRUPOLE MAGNETS FOR TESLA A a preliminary design of the superconducting final focusing quadrupole magnets for TESLA and all their associated The Tera Electron volts Superconducting Linear Accelerator (TESLA) is an electron/positron linear collider

  17. YunKyong Hyon National Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Voice: +82-42-717-5736

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hyon, YunKyong

    , Differen- tial Equations. Department of Mathematics, Hanyang University, Seoul, Korea - System Manager of Computational Lab. March 1997 to February 1999 in Department of Mathematics · Manager of Departmental Fellowship for Young Scientists, March 2012 TeraGrid Project - Startup Allocation for "Energy Variational

  18. Enabling online geospatial isotopic model development and analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Tonglin

    Enabling online geospatial isotopic model development and analysis Hyojeong Lee1 , Lan Zhao1 leverages the computation resources available on the TeraGrid to perform geospatial data operations and geostatistical model calculations. It builds on a variety of open source technologies for GIS, geospatial data

  19. VOLUME 88, NUMBER 19 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 13 MAY 2002 Size Scaling of Turbulent Transport in Magnetically Confined Plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhihong

    for the design of fusion reactors. At present, the reactor design studies [1] rely on extrapolations of turbulent with respect to device size is critically examined using first-principles gyrokinetic particle simulations of tera-scale massively parallel computers. In the absence of a fundamental, first-principles turbu- lence

  20. Natural and experimental host range of the Maize Dwarf Mosaic Virus in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leisy, Ralph Herbert

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Panicum antidotale Reta (blue panicum)(W) Seghal (30) P~L L. ( (l hb . ) (M) Bancroft et al. (3) Ford (14) e. , S +, S Pas alum notatum Flugge var. notatum (Bahiagraas) (W) Bancroft et al. (3) -, NS Ph laris steno tera Hack (Harding grass...

  1. Multi-touch Interfaces for Content-Based Video Searches | U.S. Geoscience Information Network (GIN) and Convergence towards Global Data Integration in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasayya, Vivek

    , navigators, and routes. | Water Resource Model Interoperability | TeraPixel: A Spherical Image of the Sky | Capturing the Long Tail of Sensor Web | Forecasting Changes in Urban Land Use with Bing Maps | Towards GeoS3, Decisions, and Actions | Seamless Integration and Visualization of Heterogeneous and Distributed Earth

  2. Advanced Scientific Computing Research Computer Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    Advanced Scientific Computing Research Computer Science FY 2006 Accomplishment High Performance collections of scientific data. In recent years, much of the work in computer and computational science has problem. It is generally accepted that as sciences move into the tera- and peta-scale regimes that one

  3. Analysis of Noise Isolation Methods on Split Power/Ground Plane of Multi-layered Package and PCB for Low Jitter Mixed Mode System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Yong Jung

    for Low Jitter Mixed Mode System Youchul Jeong, Hyungsoo Kim, Jingook Kim, Jongbae Park, and Joungbo Kim://tera.kaist.ac.kr ABSTRACT - Various noise isolation methods for low jitter on powerlground plane are thoroughly analyzed/ground noise to analog circuit with jitter measurement. II.Analysis of noise isolation methods and experiment

  4. National Level Computing at UTK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennessee, University of

    at NICS q NSF TeraGrid XD center: Remote Data Analysis & Visualization (RDAV). $10M/3-year award to UT) Computing hardware Computing infrastructure (space, network, power, cooling) Community organization cluster · 4200 processors, 8TB RAM, 40 Gbit/sec network · 50 TB High-performance storage · Remote data

  5. A single-pixel terahertz imaging system based on compressed sensing Wai Lam Chan,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in areas such as detection of foam insula- tion defects,1 illicit drug detection,2 and package inspection3 insensitive to terahertz radiation, so a bright tera- hertz source is needed.6 Single-shot electro of the object or the terahertz beam. In addition, one would like to preserve the superior detection sensitivity

  6. Barry Bolding, Ph.D. VP, Cray Product Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    density, upgradeability, liquid and air-cooling Packaging System Interconnect Slide 6 #12; PNNL has a long #12;Seymour Cray founded Cray Research in 1972 SGI purchased Cray Research in 1996 Cray Inc. formed April 2000 Tera purchased Cray Research assets from SGI Nasdaq: CRAY 850 employees across 20

  7. Paradigms for Biomolecular Computation John H. Reif

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, John H.

    in weak solution in one liter of water can encode 10 7 to 10 8 tera­bytes, and we can perform massively parallel associative searches (see Baum [B95] and Reif and LaBean [RL00]) on these memories. \\Lambda of water can encode the state of about 10 18 processors, and since certain recombinant DNA operations can

  8. A Variational Finite Element Method for Source Inversion for Convective-Diffusive Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghattas, Omar

    variation regularization for discontinuous sources, the invertibility of the source as the transport becomes's Scientific Discovery Through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) program through the Teras- cale Optimal PDE hope to recover components of the source function that are more oscillatory than dictated

  9. Experience with Remote Job Execution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynch, Vickie E [ORNL; Cobb, John W [ORNL; Green, Mark L [ORNL; Kohl, James Arthur [ORNL; Miller, Stephen D [ORNL; Ren, Shelly [ORNL; Smith, Bradford C [ORNL; Vazhkudai, Sudharshan S [ORNL

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Neutron Science Portal at Oak Ridge National Laboratory submits jobs to the TeraGrid for remote job execution. The TeraGrid is a network of high performance computers supported by the US National Science Foundation. There are eleven partner facilities with over a petaflop of peak computing performance and sixty petabytes of long-term storage. Globus is installed on a local machine and used for job submission. The graphical user interface is produced by java coding that reads an XML file. After submission, the status of the job is displayed in a Job Information Service window which queries globus for the status. The output folder produced in the scratch directory of the TeraGrid machine is returned to the portal with globus-url-copy command that uses the gridftp servers on the TeraGrid machines. This folder is copied from the stage-in directory of the community account to the user's results directory where the output can be plotted using the portal's visualization services. The primary problem with remote job execution is diagnosing execution problems. We have daily tests of submitting multiple remote jobs from the portal. When these jobs fail on a computer, it is difficult to diagnose the problem from the globus output. Successes and problems will be presented.

  10. Grid Portal Interface for Interactive Use and Monitoring of High-Throughput Proteome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bourne, Philip E.

    Grid Portal Interface for Interactive Use and Monitoring of High-Throughput Proteome Annotation software on a high performance computing platform such as the grid. The Encyclopedia of Life (EOL) project application to drive grid software development. It is a flagship application for the TeraGrid project [3

  11. Article published in Built Environment, Volume 36, No 2, "Arab Mega projects", ed. P.-A. Barthel, 2010, p.162-175. Valrie Clerc is Post-Doc Researcher at Institut franais du Proche-Orient (French Institute for Near-East) in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    government adopted the 10th Plan (2006­2010), which introduced a new model of development: the social market in investments in the Mediterranean. The rise in oil prices, particularly from 2003, created large hard currency reserves in the Gulf countries. Faced with saturated local markets, they invested more and more money

  12. Introverted architecture and the human dimension : the conflict of placemaking in the disconnected urban fabric of Doha, Qatar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sabouni, Farrah

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Doha, the capital city of Qatar, has become a metropolis of disconnected inward-facing mega-projects with no regard to the remaining fabric of the city. This can be owed to the relatively short urbanization period that the ...

  13. units.sty -nicefrac.sty Axel Reichert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mintmire, John W.

    your collection of delicious recipes (typeset in a mega-cool ultra condensed bold italic calligraphical font) contain those spindle Computer Modern Roman just for half a litre of milk

  14. androgen receptor coregulator: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the total counts of nucleotide type i in the jth column of the kth mega-profile. Let 4 kjk( )k i W column is equally informative, then the full likelihood function can be written...

  15. Urban stairs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, Yoonhee

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent decades, Seoul in Korea has experienced a rapid economic and urban development. As a result, the city exposes extreme disharmony between different zones. For example, the heavy mega structures are inconsiderately ...

  16. The Challenges of Massive On-chip Concurrency Kostas Bousias and Chris Jesshope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jesshope, Chris

    . Chip-level mul- tiprocessors exploiting massive concurrency we term Microgrids. The direc- tions Microgrids. Microgrids will also form the basis of mega-scale computing systems, comprising millions

  17. Design against nature : flooding, water supply, and public space in Los Angeles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thelander, Max William

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Starting in the late 19th century, Southern California saw the first of several waves of explosive population growth that have resulted in today's mega-region. While many early settlers were attracted by the city's famous ...

  18. Save Energy Now Data Center Assessments to Identify Efficiency...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    - raising total energy use * Most don't know if their center is good or bad Slide 7 LBNL super computer systems power: 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 MegaWatts 2001 2003 2005 2007...

  19. Bill -n- (kris'tl) at OSB, Chicago

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benson, Robert Anthony

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Can the individual be implicated in the mega-scale environment by mediating the barriers and marginal zones of the urban landscape? This investigation engages the megalopolis and its full grotesqueness in terms of scale ...

  20. Understanding Trends in Wind Turbine Prices Over the Past Decade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hand, A. Laxson. 2006. Wind Turbine Design Cost and Scalingof a Multi-MegaWatt Wind Turbine. ” Renewable Energy, vol.David. 2008. “Dissecting Wind Turbine Costs. ” WindStats

  1. http://www.caymannetnews.com/cgi-script/csArticles/articles/000107/010744.htm Barkers National Park or Dump?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exeter, University of

    by mega-ships which loomed over the island like mythical monoliths. Then up West Bay Road and past . . . the very thing that is the focus of the Brac's eco-tourism marketing program. Put in proper park gates. How

  2. New information technologies in the old political economy : an exploration of community-based GIS for improving basic services for the poor in New Delhi, India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canepa, Claudia

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rapid urbanization, limited neighborhood-level data, and the multiplicity of overlapping agencies in mega-cities in the developing world are creating a significant gap between citizens, particularly the poor, and government. ...

  3. PROGRAMME BLANC EDITION 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vigny, Christophe

    proposition de projet Mega-séismes au Chili: Exemple de Maule en 2010 (Mw 8.8) et implications sismo-tectoniques Proposal title Megathrust earthquakes in Chile: 2010 Maule Earthquake (Mw 8.8) and sismo

  4. Genetic Relatedness Among Co-Foundresses of Two Desert Ants, Veromessor Pergandei and Acromyrmex Versicolor (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hagen, Robert H.; Smith, Deborah R.; Rissing, Steven W.

    1988-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    hymenop- tera. Polistine wasp foundress associations are usually composed of close relatives (reviewed in Gamboa et al. 1986, Michener and Smith 1987) suggesting kin selection may play an important role in estab- lishment of such groups. Cooperative colony... resulting from unequal Pgm allele frequencies and relatively small numbers of queens in each foundress association (mean = 3.8) (Crozier et al. 1984, Wilkinson and McCracken 1985) rather than an indication that queens avoid kin (Hamilton 1972). The small...

  5. The design of laser trimmable temperature invariant active NMOS filters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rybicki, Mathew Anton

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE DESIGN OF LASER TRIMMABLE TEMPERATURE INVARIANT ACTIVE NMOS FILTERS A Thesis MATHEW ANTON RYBICKI Submitted to the Graduate College of Teras A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 1983 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering THE DESIGN OF LASER TRIMMABLE TEMPERA'IURE INVARIANT ACTIVE NMOS FILTERS A Thesis by MATHEW ANTON RYBICKI Approved as to style and content by: Randall L. Geiger (Chairman of Committee) Phil ip ED...

  6. Projet INCO-WADEMED Actes du Seminaire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Agronomique et V´et´erinaire Hassan II, BP 6202, Rabat, Maroc (2) CIRAD/TERA, Montpellier, 34398 Montpellier Tadla, Fquih Ben Salah, Maroc E-mail : a.hammani@iav.ac.ma R´esum´e - Le p´erim`etre irrigu´e du Tadla'a connue le Maroc entre 1981 et 1984. Le probl`eme de p´enurie d'eau devient structurel et l'eau d

  7. UNIVERSIDADE DA CORU~NA PLAN DE ESTUDIOS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraguela, Basilio B.

    ´ecnicos como orga- nizativos y de gesti´on). El creciente grado de optatividad permite al estudiante dise- ratorio de Control de Calidad de la Demarcaci´on de Carre- teras del Estado en Galicia dependiente del´on general del sistema universitario espa~nol. El Plan de Estu- dios de M´aster en Ingenier´ia de Caminos

  8. UNIVERSIDADE DA CORU~NA PLAN DE ESTUDIOS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraguela, Basilio B.

    ´ecnicos como orga- nizativos y de gesti´on). El creciente grado de optatividad permite al estudiante dise- ratorio de Control de Calidad de la Demarcaci´on de Carre- teras del Estado en Galicia dependiente del marco de la reestructuraci´on general del sistema universi- tario espa~nol que se llev´o a cabo con el

  9. Sunday November 1 17:00 19:00 Registration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Holger

    MBE invited A. Georgakilas 9:30 ­ 9:45 Regrowth of GaN quantum wells on GaN substrates for Tera:00 (0001) GaN grown on (111) single crystal diamond substrate for high power electronic applications A 2 8:00 ­ 8:45 Registration 8:45 ­ 9:00 Welcome and Conference Opening 9:00 ­ 10:15 Session 1 - GaN

  10. Preludium in G minor Jef Denyn (1862-1941) Concerto in D (for Guitar) Antonio Vivaldi (1678-1741)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Jing

    -1741) Allegro guisto Largo Allegro arr. L. Cobb Spanish Music Leyenda (Legend) Isaac Albéniz (1860-1909) arr. A an allegro in 4/4 time and lastly by a giga in 6/8. Isaac Albéniz was a child prodigy performing worldwide

  11. Rick Whitaker 212 854 1623

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salzman, Daniel

    Vivaldi Prelude: Andante Corrente: Allegro Adagio Giga: Allegro #12;Sonata for cello and continuo in C, Opus 5 #3 Francesco Geminiani Andante Allegro Affetuoso Allegro Sonata for violin and continuo in G minor Nicola Porpora Adagio Fuga Adagio Allegro Sonata for violin, cello and continuo in A major Opus 8

  12. Why do we keep burning coal? Richard L. Axelbaum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    climate change. CO2 Emission Trends (in giga-tonnes of CO2) The Carbon Dioxide Issue Non-OECD China OECD;Sources: ACI, MSHA · Rapid increases in CO2 emissions in Asia · China is now the largest emitter of CO2 water Clean drinking water #12;But what about Carbon Dioxide? Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) I

  13. Scale and Concurrency of Massive File System Directories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GIGA+ servers, on top of a backend storage system, which manages on-disk directory representation. Copyright © 2013 Swapnil Patil. This research was sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) under grant and companies of the PDL Consortium for their interest, insights, feedback, and support. The views

  14. Ann. Geophys., 24, 941959, 2006 www.ann-geophys.net/24/941/2006/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . In this paper, electric field data derived from the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) are used power of the order of tens of Giga Watts is continually deposited into the Earth's ionosphere, heating, and creating a large system of circulating plasma (Richmond and Thayer, 2000). This transfer of energy

  15. Ecological and environmental footprint of 50 years of agricultural expansion in Argentina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

    Ecological and environmental footprint of 50 years of agricultural expansion in Argentina E R N E Gestio´n Ambiental (GIGA), Av. Spinetto 785, 6300 Santa Rosa, La Pampa, Argentina, wINCITAP-CONICET, Ruta 35, km 335, 6300 Santa Rosa, La Pampa, Argentina, zUNLPam, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales

  16. The Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science Michigan State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by carboxylate multi-wall carbon nanotubes, across giga-ohm nanopore pBLM, were measured. The chronoamperometricBLM, including enhanced stability and ion reservoir. Another advantage associated with tethered BLM polypropargyl glycolide nanoparticles (PGL) were characterized using high insulating tethered BLM. Electrical

  17. Developments in South American Squid Fisheries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as "insignificant amount" in statistics. The commercially exploited species is Dosidicus gigas ("jibia," "calamar Table I shows total yields of each South American coastal country, as well as principal species. COLOMBIA Total 54,500 37,700 110,700 105,300 62,418 66,575 75,107 75,107 F Characins (freshwater) 57,400 52

  18. Coordinating the 2009 RHIC Run

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Brookhaven Lab - Mei Bai

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Physicists working at the Brookhaven National Lab's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are exploring the puzzle of proton spin as they begin taking data during the 2009 RHIC run. For the first time, RHIC is running at a record energy of 500 giga-elect

  19. Interactive Stereoscopic Installation: A Photographic Collage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kannapurakkaran, Shyam

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Processing Unit DIY Do It Yourself FAT Free Art and Technology GB Giga Bytes GPU Graphics Processing Unit HDR High Dynamic Range IEEE Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers IR Infrared LAN Local Area Network LED Light-Emitting Diode MSP Max Signal...

  20. RESEARCH ARTICLE Biomarker discovery in asthma-related inflammation and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liège, Université de

    GIGA-Management, Plateforme bioinformatique, University of Liège and Centre Hospitalier Universitaire and Development, University of Liège and Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU-Liège), Belgium 2 Laboratory of Medical Chemistry, University of Liège and Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU-Liège), Belgium 3

  1. Subjects: Trematoda And Trematode Diseases, Part 2: Supergenera And Genera C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roach, Katharine F.; Breen, Virginia L.

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . S., 1960a, 315-320,pl. (tod) (Ci r rhina fulungel; inte s tine ; T ungab- hadra Dam, India). CABALLEROTREMA Prudhoe.S., 1960a, 415, 418(tod:C . brasiliense). brasiliense Pr?dhoe, S., 1960a, 415-418, figs. 1 -2 (tod)(Arapaima gigas...

  2. Gigapixel fluorescence microscopy with a water immersion microlens array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Kunnavakkam, F. M. Houlihan, M. Schlax, J. A. Liddle, P. Kolonder, O. Nalamasu, and J. A. Rogers, "Low-cost Conference on Computational Photography, 1­8 (2011). 6. G. Zheng, X. Ou, and C. Yang, "Towards giga, "Design, fabrication and testing of microlens arrays for sensors and microsystems," Pure Appl. Opt. 6

  3. I' om Data Mining to Knowledge Discovery: Usama M. Fayyad

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raghavan, Vijay

    I' om Data Mining to Knowledge Discovery: Overview Usama M. Fayyad Jet Propulsion Laboratory knowledge discovery and data ~g. We begin with a definition of the KDD process and basic data mining :=c on the order of 50 giga- bytes of remotely sensed image data per hour when operational in the late 1990s

  4. Characterization Methodology for Decommissioning Low and Intermediate Level Fissile Nuclide Contaminated Buried Soils and Process Piping Using Photon Counting 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pritchard, Megan L

    2014-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Photon GEANT4 GEometry ANd Tracking Monte Carlo Code GWD Giga-Watt Days HDP Hematite Decommissioning Project HEU Highly Enriched Uranium IAEA International Atomic Energy Agency ILW Intermediate Level Waste ISOCs In-Situ Object... Field Measured LaBr Overlay on MCNP Spectra for HEU ................................. 44 3 Code System and Software Summary .................................................................. 52 4 Dimensions of the Canberra Industries Model IPROL-1...

  5. Deciphering the genetic basis for polyketide variation among mycobacteria producing mycolactones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pidot, Sacha J; Hong, Hui; Seemann, Torsten; Porter, Jessica L; Yip, Marcus J; Men, Artem; Johnson, Matthew; Wilson, Peter; Davies, John K; Leadlay, Peter F; Stinear, Timothy P

    2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    . Chembiochem 2003, 4:654-657. 24. Kaser M, Rondini S, Naegeli M, Stinear T, Portaels F, Certa U, Pluschke G: Evolution of two distinct phylogenetic lineages of the emerging human pathogen Mycobacterium ulcerans. BMC Evol Biol 2007, 7:177. 25. Nei M, Rooney AP... . Nucleic Acids Research 1995, 23:4992-4999. 35. Tamura K, Dudley J, Nei M, Kumar S: MEGA4: Molecular Evolu- tionary Genetics Analysis (MEGA) Software Version 4.0. Mol Biol Evol 2007, 24:1596-1599. 36. Sonnhammer EL, Durbin R: A dot-matrix program...

  6. Acquisition and control command system for power pulsed detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cornat, R; Magniette, F

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A DAQ system is developed within the SiW-Ecal ILC collaboration. It provides a flexible and scalable architecture, compound of four parts. A detector interface (DIF) extracting data from front-end electronics and sending them as packets. Two levels of data concentration, control clock and fast command fanout. The two cards, named DCC and GDCC, use respectively FastEthernet and GigaEthernet. A software suite (named Calicoes) allows to control the DAQ and the detector chips and to acquire data from GigaEthernet. It also includes programs for decoding frontend readout to various formats, and also dispatching and aggregating data. Overall architecture, performance in test beam and prospects for use with hundreds of thousands channels are discussed.

  7. Issues in Numerical Simulation of Fire Suppression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tieszen, S.R.; Lopez, A.R.

    1999-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper outlines general physical and computational issues associated with performing numerical simulation of fire suppression. Fire suppression encompasses a broad range of chemistry and physics over a large range of time and length scales. The authors discuss the dominant physical/chemical processes important to fire suppression that must be captured by a fire suppression model to be of engineering usefulness. First-principles solutions are not possible due to computational limitations, even with the new generation of tera-flop computers. A basic strategy combining computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation techniques with sub-grid model approximations for processes that have length scales unresolvable by gridding is presented.

  8. Foraminiferal and lithologic characteristics through the zone of the Midway-Wilcox contact in Bastrop, Williamson, and Milam counties, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, David Irving

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to deterniae tho sedincntcry parsactors of qccrtilc deviatioa, qaartile shewacss, and qacrtile hartesis. The perceatages of sca, silt, snd clay~ the coefficient of sorting~ sad the ne4isa 4isnetor were nsefal ia iaterpreting the eaviroancatal coaditioas... (1807, p. 62) ia a revised versioa ef the Eoceae ca4 Gretaceoas ef iiabswa. peeress (1050, p. 10?20) aced the ease "Wills peiat" or "Easel Clays" te 4esigaate the Midway Creep ef Texas. Ia the saae pablicatioa, pcarose applied the tera "Tueler Selt...

  9. Operational characteristics of the three-level diamond interchange

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCann, Charles Howard Wesley

    1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    phasiaS (City of Soustca IssiSa) IosiSS '0 With T7 Tera Lace ~ ~ ~ o ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 27 27 ~ ~ ~ 2S ~ * ~ 29 ~ . . 29 ~ ~ e 3O ~ ~ ~ 33 SSFINITIONS Arterial reap; Rsnp joining ss artcc'isl with either cn fntsrssctioa or ss interchange... ~ 1 peu articles hsw bees publishe4 coaeoraisg the three-lewl disused interchange. gcgschern reporte4 that ths throe-level dtcsosd iater 6o chaago offers s specific advantage shen s fully diractioaal interchaage io not justified~ ssd ~ cuo lovel...

  10. Sideband generation of transient lasing without population inversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luqi Yuan; Da-Wei Wang; Christopher O'Brien; Anatoly A. Svidzinsky; Marlan O. Scully

    2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We suggest a method to generate coherent short pulses by generating a frequency comb using lasing without inversion in the transient regime. We use a universal method to study the propagation of a pulse in various spectral regions through an active medium that is strongly driven on a low-frequency transition on a time scale shorter than the decoherence time. The results show gain on the sidebands at different modes can be produced even if there is no initial population inversion prepared. Besides the production of ultra-short pulse this frequency comb may have applications towards making short-wavelength or Tera-hertz lasers.

  11. Stratigraphy and environment of deposition of the San Miguel lignite deposit northern McMullen and southeastern Atascosa counties, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snedden, John William

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in alternate energy sources such as coal and lignite, The state of Texas has the capability to supoly a large portion of its energy needs with its near-surface lignite resources. These resources are estimated at ten billion tons (Fisher, 1978). The lignite...S RATIGRAPHY AND ENVIRONMENT OF DEPOSITION OF THE SAN MIGUEL LIGNITE DEPOSI NORTHERN M. MULLER 'VD SOUTHEASTERN ATASCOSA COUNTIES, TEXAS A Tnesis by UOH1'1 91IILIAM SNEDDZN Submitted n he Gra 'uate College of Tera. ASM University in partial...

  12. The life cycles of Damalinia limbata (Gervais), order Mallophaga and Linognathus stenopsis (Burmeister), order Anoplura

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Howard Wayne

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EVIEW OF LITERATURE ~ SYNONYMY' LIFE CYCLE STUDY OFF THE HOST f'f. THC:5 Or LIFE CYCLE STUDY Ori THE HOST ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ TABLES OF LENSTH OF DE'VELOr IEI'!TAL STADE8 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ )FSCRIPTI ON . '!F LIFE O'TA ES ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ KEY TO FIDURES ~ ~ F I CU...:-IF-S ~ l3I SC USE I 8 I ~ ~ ~ 5UMMARY ~ LI TERA URE CITED ~ ~ IV ACKNOIJLEDGEllENYS THE WRITER WISHES TO EXPRESS HIS SINCERE APPPECIATION TO PROFESSOR (l ~ A PRICE f' OR Hl S DI RECT I ON DF TH I S PROBI, EH AND FDR PROV I SINO A PI. ACE TO KEEP...

  13. ALT-3 Target & CMU Version 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griego, Jeffrey R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Atchison, Walter L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Holtkamp, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oro, David M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reinovsky, Robert E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rousculp, Christopher L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tabaka, Leonard J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The third Advance Liner Technology (ALT-3) experiment is the next in a long tradition of collaborations between LANL and RFNC/VNIIEF in high-explosive pulsed-power. Here a VNIIEF provided Disk Explosive Magnetic Generator (DEMG) will drive a LANL provided experimental load and diagnostic package. The objective of the experiment is to explore the use of a cylindrical liner-ontarget in tera-Pascal equation of state measurement. This presentation will discuss version 4 of the experimental target and central measuring unit (CMU) along with R & D already performed in fabrication of the target.

  14. Algae fed Artemia salina Nauplii as a food source for larval Cynoscion nebulosus 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGeachin, Robert Bruce

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Cpnoscion proximate analysis. . . . . 22 Table 4. ArCemia salina nauplii size (Tl in rrrn). . . . . . . 24 Table 5. Ar tera SaLina nauplii proximate analysis. Table 6. Average caloric values for Aztemia salina nauplii. . 3O Tabl e 7. Compari son of naupl...) substantiated this with proximate analysis and calorimetry, comparing newly-hatched with one day old nauplii. He reported a 22K decrease in organic substances and a 24/ decrease in the caloric content within 24 hours. Morris (1956) related that in some cases...

  15. An evaluation of the Triffin and Bernstein proposals for improving international liquidity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbott, John Michael

    1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    capital loss. Fourth, the currency aust, be free froa recurrent scarcity. Th1s iaplies that the reserve oountry be willing to foU, ow certain balance- of-payaents policies such as offsetting a ourrent account surplus by long-tera lending and avo1ding... of the magnitude of financing which the authorities must undertake in order to support their rats of exchange. For example, U. S. balanoe of payments account1ng shows short-term capital movements to bs balancing items 1n the system of inter national accounts...

  16. Texas Fever: Experiments Made by the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station, in Co-operation with the Missouri Experiment Station and the Missouri State Board of Agriculture, in Immunizing Northern Breeding Cattle Against Texas Fever.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connaway, J. W.; Francis, M. (Mark)

    1899-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of preventing these 1ocssc.s h.rs led the Experiment Stations of lfissouri and Teras and the Missouri State Board of Agriculture to undertake the experimelits re- ported herein. This co-operative work was begun in 1896, and is still in prog- ress... Station before shipping, and three after their arrival in Missis- sippi. These cattle varied In age from 1 1-2 years to 11 years. They were inoculated daily with serum in doses of 40 to 60 cc., according to size of animal. The minin~um quqntity injected...

  17. Note: A portable, light-emitting diode-based ruby fluorescence spectrometer for high-pressure calibration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng Yejun [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Ruby (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, with {approx}0.5 wt. % Cr doping) is one of the most widely used manometers at the giga-Pascal scale. Traditionally, its fluorescence is excited with intense laser sources. Here, I present a simple, robust, and portable design that employs light-emitting diodes (LEDs) instead. This LED-based system is safer in comparison with laser-based ones.

  18. HIGH ENERGY PULSED POWER SYSTEM FOR AGS SUPER NEUTRINO FOCUSING HORN.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ZHANG, S.Y.; SANDBERG, J.; WENG, W.-T.

    2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper present a preliminary design of a 300 kA, 2.5 Hz pulsed power system. This system will drive the focusing horn of proposed Brookhaven AGS Neutrino Super Beam Facility for Very Long Baseline Neutrino Oscillation Experiment. The peak output power of the horn pulsed power system will reach Giga-watts, and the upgraded AGS will be capable of delivering 1 MW in beam power.

  19. Product Innovation and Strategy, case Stora Enso

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Construction Structural products for building and construction industries Fibre products to pulp, panel and Strategy, case Stora Enso Timber Mega trends in society Drivers in construction value chain Stora Enso raw materials ­ Circular flow economy · We have a good story to tell! low carbon footprint we help

  20. 1/12/14 Energytechnologyand engineering: Micro-windmills mayone daypower your smart phone energy-engineer.blogspot.com/2014/01/micro-windmills-may-one-day-power-your.html 1/11

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiao, Jung-Chih

    trends in 2014 and beyond Two more mega solar deals in China Oil markets and the shale boom 2014 System overload slows Hawaii's solar energy boom Power play: Utilities want solar users to pay up China adds solar pollution funds poised to deliver on advanc... US new solar PV installations reach record 4.2 GW Solar

  1. Compressing magnetic fields with high-energy lasersa... J. P. Knauer,1,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Compressing magnetic fields with high-energy lasersa... J. P. Knauer,1,b O. V. Gotchev,1,2,3 P. Y, Rochester, New York 14623, USA 3 Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Rochester, 250 East-driven magnetic-field compression producing a magnetic field of tens of megaGauss is reported for the first time

  2. Departments Project title Department of Biology and Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pulfrey, David L.

    . Greening mega data centers 3. A distributed resource allocation framework using Hadoop 4. GPU network data 8. 5G Wireless Network Resource Allocation and Interference Management 9. Cyber Security Protocols for Online Social Network 10. Network Resilience in the Internet of Things 11

  3. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 8, 51615186, 2008 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/8/5161/2008/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    and Physics Aerosol optical properties in a rural environment near the mega-city Guangzhou, China and absorption of solar radiation by atmospheric aerosols is a key element of the Earth's ra- diative energy balance and climate. The optical properties of aerosol particles are, however, highly variable

  4. Vehicle Technologies Office: AVTA- Neighborhood All-Electric Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) uses standard procedures and test specifications to test and collect data from vehicles on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. Data on the following vehicles is available in downloadable form: 2013 BRP Commander Electric, 2010 Electric Vehicles International E-Mega, 2009 Vantage Pickup EVX1000, and 2009 Vantage Van EVC1000.

  5. Seminario Internacional Licitaciones en Mercados Elctricos, Santiago, Noviembre 2005 Estrategias de generadores yEstrategias de generadores y

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudnick, Hugh

    50 60 MWmedio Mega Leilão 50 30 10 2005 2006 2007 26 Valor Esperado das Contratações 0 10 20 30 40 50 Precios Subastas 24 Ejemplo (datos de entrada: parámetros) #12;25 Ejemplos: resultados (1/4) 0 10 20 30 40

  6. Beyond Myopic Best Response (in Cournot Competition)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ligett, Katrina

    . Petroleum. Wildcat Drillers has a production cost of $0.5 USD per mega-barrel; W. Petroleum has a production Cournot competition) or to maximize revenue (by masquerading as a firm with zero production costs will depress market prices, (2) which will reduce the production of other firms, (3) which will gain market

  7. 1120 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER ELECTRONICS, VOL. 25, NO. 5, MAY 2010 Digital Sliding-Mode Controller For High-Frequency DC/DC SMPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    -frequency switching-mode power supply (SMPS), sliding-mode (SM) control. I. INTRODUCTION DIGITAL control technique has-performance control algorithms. Most existing digital controller for high-frequency (in mega- hertz range) and low-power limitations to control low-power high-frequency SMPS. Analog controllers are sensitive to analog component

  8. Progress and prospects for an FI relevant point design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Key, M; Amendt, P; Bellei, C; Clark, D; Cohen, B; Divol, L; Ho, D; Kemp, A; Larson, D; Marinak, M; Patel, P; Shay, H; Strozzi, D; Tabak, M

    2011-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The physics issues involved in scaling from sub ignition to high gain fast ignition are discussed. Successful point designs must collimate the electrons and minimize the stand off distance to avoid multi mega-joule ignition energies. Collimating B field configurations are identified and some initial designs are explored.

  9. Annual Report of the EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Programme 2007/08 5 Tokamak Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Annual Report of the EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Programme 2007/08 5.1 5 Tokamak Development 5 Tokamak Development 5.1 OVERVIEW The centrepiece of the EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association tokamak development programme is the Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST), a leading low aspect-ratio, or so-called spherical, tokamak (ST

  10. Annual Report of the EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Programme 2010/11 5 Tokamak Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Annual Report of the EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Programme 2010/11 5.1 5 Tokamak Development 5 Tokamak Development 5.1 OVERVIEW The primary focus of the EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association Tokamak Development programme is MAST, the Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak (Figure 5.1). A key feature of spherical tokamaks (STs

  11. Annual Report of the EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Programme 2008/09 5 Tokamak Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Annual Report of the EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Programme 2008/09 5.1 5 Tokamak Development 5 Tokamak Development 5.1 OVERVIEW The focus of the EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association tokamak development programme is the Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST), a leading low aspect- ratio, or so-called spherical, tokamak (ST

  12. Annual Report of the EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Programme 2006/07 5 Tokamak Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Annual Report of the EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Programme 2006/07 5.1 5 Tokamak Development 5 TOKAMAK DEVELOPMENT 5.1 OVERVIEW The EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association tokamak development programme is based primarily on the Mega-Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST) a leading low aspect-ratio, or so-called spherical, tokamak (ST). STs

  13. ISET Journal of Earthquake Technology, Paper No. 461, Vol. 42, No. 4, December 2005, pp. 137-145 A COMPUTATIONALAPPROACH TO DESIGN CODES FOR TSUNAMI-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Vinay Kumar

    of South-East Asia and the unique videotaped scenes of the tsunami evolution over the coastal zone-145 A COMPUTATIONALAPPROACH TO DESIGN CODES FOR TSUNAMI- RESISTING COASTAL STRUCTURES Christopher Koutitas* and Theophanis The recent mega-tsunami event on the 26th December 2004, revealed the importance and the necessity

  14. CX-004104: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    State Energy Program Conductor Optimized Rotary Energy Mega-Watt Scale Direct Wind GeneratorCX(s) Applied: A9, B5.1Date: 09/29/2010Location(s): Ronan, MontanaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  15. Satellite observations of Mexico City pollution outflow from the Tropospheric Emissions Spectrometer (TES)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satellite observations of Mexico City pollution outflow from the Tropospheric Emissions 12 November 2008 Keyword: Mega-city pollution TES O3­CO correlation INTEX-B Mexico city a b s t r a c regions were used to examine Mexico City pollution outflow on a regional scale. The pollution outflow from

  16. DISEASE-SPECIFIC BRAIN ATLASES Paul M. Thompson, 1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Paul

    1 DISEASE-SPECIFIC BRAIN ATLASES 1 Paul M. Thompson, 1,2 Michael S. Mega, and 1 Arthur W. Toga 1. Mazziotta and Arthur W. Toga, Editors Academic Press Please address correspondence to: Dr. Paul Thompson (Rm-mail: thompson@loni.ucla.edu Acknowledgments: This work was supported by research grants from the National Center

  17. Determination of Optimal Electricity Reserve Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    load demand forecast error, the wind production forecast error and the failures of the power plants of wind power production and power load demand 14 2.4.2 Mega Watts failed to avoid it is to allocate electricity reserves and use them to balance up the system if required

  18. Outdoor Programs Coordinator Equipment Room Nathan van der Most 907-564-8614

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scheel, David

    Diamond Mega-Mid -3-4person/4season 5.00 10.00 Synthetic Sleeping Bag (+20) 3.00 5.00 Synthetic Sleeping.00 2.00 Rubber Boots 1.00 2.00 Neoprene Boots 1.00 2.00 More Rentals on back page! Accepted Forms

  19. APPLYING BUSINESS PROCESS MODELING TO ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 APPLYING BUSINESS PROCESS MODELING TO ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE Ricardo Mendes, João Mateus, Eduardo.mendes}@ceo.inesc.pt {jgm ,ejms}@mega.ist.utl.pt {jose.tribolet}@ceo.inesc.pt Abstract Organizational change can be regarded Modeling, Organizational Change, UML, Process Re-engineering, Process Improvement, Business Strategy

  20. Numro d'ordre: 2011ISAL0066 Anne 2011 prsente devant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    .72.43 83 18 Fax 04 72 43 85 28 Jean-marc.Pelletier@insa-lyon.fr MEGA MECANIQUE, ENERGETIQUE, GENIE CIVIL some new ideas and methods to solve the problem of choosing the coming back paths of underwater robot

  1. Power and Poverty: The Dilemma of NGO-Supported Development in Africa from a Danish Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Power and Poverty: The Dilemma of NGO-Supported Development in Africa from a Danish Perspective of people in Sub-Saharan Africa still lives and dies in poverty. With a public image determined by disasters of the many factors, powers and interests from micro- to mega-level that maintain the poverty and oppression

  2. Technical Assistance Project Data Center Efficiency Opportunities...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    with infrastructure upgrades * Most don't know if their center is good or bad Slide 9 LBNL feels the energy cost pain Slide 10 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 MegaW atts 2001 2003 2005...

  3. Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, Vol. 97, No. 5, pp. 16071620, October 2007, doi: 10.1785/0120060236 Subsidence, Compaction, and Gravity Sliding: Implications for 3D

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    fault geometry. A prime example occurs along the San Cayetano fault that bounds the eastern Ventura of this mega-slide off the hanging-wall block most likely occurred within the Rincon Formation, a thick ductile-dipping fault beneath the San Fer- nando Valley that is considered part of the active fault and fold system

  4. Daniel Delahaye ENAC 7, Ave Ed Belin 31055 Toulouse France Stephane Puechmorel ENAC 7, Ave Ed Belin 31055 Toulouse France

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    a high energy electromagnetic pulse (several mega watts (peak power) during one micro second is developed for which a Kalman lter is used to produce high quality wind estimate. When only aircraft position their routes (heading, speed, altitude) in order to keep a minimum distance be- tween them during the crossing

  5. The birth of ant genomics Raghavendra Gadagkar1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gadagkar, Raghavendra

    and dominance, accounting for more than a third of all insect biomass and, along with termites, for more than 25% of all animal biomass in some tropical forests (1). Whole-genome sequencing was, until recently most of Europe and North America (9), and even more so because it appears to form mega

  6. Choices and benefits : alternative access and venue sites for Ä°stanbul Olympics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alkan, Özgür, BaÅŸ ak, 1977-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis is based on the idea that the Olympics, a global mega-project that interrupts and re-channels the forces of urban evolution in its host city, can be planned in ways that bring long-term benefits to that city. ...

  7. Pasqualetti_Answers 111.pdf Student questions: Martin (Mike) Pasqualetti colloquium on "Renewable Energy and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhoads, James

    thermal energy require so much use of water (~1200 gals/megaWatt)? There is a steam cycle involved turbines that are more visually aesthetic than the current functioning models? The current models are much: Are vertical axis wind turbines more or less socially accepted than windmill-style? Can these wind farms

  8. Numerical Investigation of a Wind Turbine Rotor with an aerodynamically redesigned hub-region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Numerical Investigation of a Wind Turbine Rotor with an aerodynamically redesigned hub-region J methods on a redesigned modern Mega-Watt sized wind turbine, where the new design includes an increase of the blade in the vicinity of the wind turbine nacelle, to obtain an aerodynamically more efficient rotor

  9. Infrasound, the Ear and Wind Turbines Alec N. Salt, Ph.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salt, Alec N.

    Infrasound, the Ear and Wind Turbines Alec N. Salt, Ph.D. Department of Otolaryngology there happens to be a castle nearby). #12;Wind turbines haveWind turbines have been getting biggerbeen getting MegaWatts(MW) Total Installed Change by year 3% of US Energy Needs Wind turbines are "green" and areWind

  10. Method for generating high-energy and high repetition rate laser pulses from CW amplifiers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhang, Shukui

    2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for obtaining high-energy, high repetition rate laser pulses simultaneously using continuous wave (CW) amplifiers is described. The method provides for generating micro-joule level energy in pico-second laser pulses at Mega-hertz repetition rates.

  11. Abstract: During power deregulation, power companies are releasing their transmission grids to form ISOs/RTOs while

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to form ISOs/RTOs while maintaining their own state estimators over their own areas. A recent trend for these ISOs/RTOs is to further combine and enlarge to become a bigger Mega-RTO grid for a better market the whole state; in our algorithm, the existing state estimators in local companies/ISOs/RTOs are fully

  12. Low-Cost High-Concentration Photovoltaic Systems for Utility Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McConnell, R.; Garboushian, V.; Gordon, R.; Dutra, D.; Kinsey, G.; Geer, S.; Gomez, H.; Cameron, C.

    2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Under DOE's Technology Pathway Partnership (TPP) program, Amonix, Inc. developed a new generation of high-concentration photovoltaic systems using multijunction technology and established the manufacturing capacity needed to supply multi-megawatt power plants buing using the new Amonix 7700-series solar energy systems. For this effort, Amonix Collaborated with a variety of suppliers and partners to complete project tasks. Subcontractors included: Evonik/Cyro; Hitek; the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Raytech; Spectrolab; UL; University of Nevada, Las Vegas; and TUV Rheinland PTL. The Amonix TPP tasks included: Task 1: Multijunction Cell Optimization for Field Operation, Task 2: Fresnel Lens R&D, Task 3: Cell Package Design & Production, Task 4: Standards Compliance and Reliability Testing, Task 5: Receiver Plate Production, Task 6: MegaModule Performance, Task 7: MegaModule Cost Reduction, Task 8: Factory Setup and MegaModule Production, Task 9: Tracker and Tracking Controller, Task 10: Installation and Balance of System (BOS), Task 11: Field Testing, and Task 12: Solar Advisor Modeling and Market Analysis. Amonix's TPP addressed nearly the complete PV value chain from epitaxial layer design and wafer processing through system design, manufacturing, deployment and O&M. Amonix has made progress toward achieving these reduced costs through the development of its 28%+ efficient MegaModule, reduced manufacturing and installation cost through design for manufacturing and assembly, automated manufacturing processes, and reduced O&M costs. Program highlights include: (1) Optimized multijunction cell and cell package design to improve performance by > 10%; (2) Updated lens design provided 7% increased performance and higher concentration; (3) 28.7% DC STC MegaModule efficiency achieved in Phase II exceeded Phase III performance goal; (4) New 16' focal length MegaModule achieved target materials and manufacturing cost reduction; (5) Designed and placed into production 25 MW/yr manufacturing capacity for complete MegaModules, including cell packages, receiver plates, and structures with lenses; (6) Designed and deployed Amonix 7700 series systems rated at 63 kW PTC ac and higher. Based on an LCOE assessment using NREL's Solar Advisor Model, Amonix met DOE's LCOE targets: Amonix 2011 LCOE 12.8 cents/kWh (2010 DOE goal 10-15); 2015 LCOE 6.4 cents/kWh (2015 goal 5-7) Amonix and TPP participants would like to thank the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Energy Technology Program for funding received under this program through Agreement No. DE-FC36-07GO17042.

  13. Acquisition System and Detector Interface for Power Pulsed Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cornat, R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A common DAQ system is being developed within the CALICE collaboration. It provides a flexible and scalable architecture based on giga-ethernet and 8b/10b serial links in order to transmit either slow control data, fast signals or read out data. A detector interface (DIF) is used to connect detectors to the DAQ system based on a single firmware shared among the collaboration but targeted on various physical implementations. The DIF allows to build, store and queue packets of data as well as to control the detectors providing USB and serial link connectivity. The overall architecture is foreseen to manage several hundreds of thousands channels.

  14. Gigabeira Energia | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd toWell2008) |GigaCrete Inc Jump to:Gigabeira

  15. Gilbert, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd toWell2008) |GigaCrete Inc Jump

  16. Gillard Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd toWell2008) |GigaCrete Inc JumpGillard Hot

  17. Gilpin County School Wind Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd toWell2008) |GigaCrete Inc JumpGillard

  18. Giner Electrochemicals Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd toWell2008) |GigaCrete Inc JumpGillardGiner

  19. Glacier Bay Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd toWell2008) |GigaCrete Inc JumpGillardGinerBay

  20. Glacier Hills | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd toWell2008) |GigaCrete Inc

  1. Glacier I Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd toWell2008) |GigaCrete IncI Wind Farm Jump to:

  2. Glacier II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd toWell2008) |GigaCrete IncI Wind Farm Jump

  3. Gladstone, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd toWell2008) |GigaCrete IncI Wind Farm

  4. Gland, Switzerland: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd toWell2008) |GigaCrete IncI Wind FarmGland,

  5. Gleason, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd toWell2008) |GigaCrete IncI Wind

  6. Glen Gardner, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd toWell2008) |GigaCrete IncI WindGardner, New

  7. Glendale, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd toWell2008) |GigaCrete IncI WindGardner,

  8. Glendale, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd toWell2008) |GigaCrete IncI

  9. Glenrock III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd toWell2008) |GigaCrete IncIGlenrock III Wind

  10. Glenrock Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd toWell2008) |GigaCrete IncIGlenrock III

  11. Global Alternative Fuels | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd toWell2008) |GigaCrete IncIGlenrock III Place:

  12. Global Biomass Power Generation Market | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd toWell2008) |GigaCrete IncIGlenrock III

  13. Global Celsius SL | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd toWell2008) |GigaCrete IncIGlenrock IIICelsius

  14. Global Change Associates | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd toWell2008) |GigaCrete IncIGlenrock

  15. Global Clean Energy Holdings LLC GCEH | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd toWell2008) |GigaCrete IncIGlenrockGCEH Jump

  16. Global Coal Fired Power Generation Market | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd toWell2008) |GigaCrete IncIGlenrockGCEH

  17. Global Combined Heat And Power Installation Market | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd toWell2008) |GigaCrete IncIGlenrockGCEHGlobal

  18. Global Dicyandiamide Industry 2015 Market Research Report | OpenEI

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd toWell2008) |GigaCrete

  19. Global Dicyandiamide Industry 2015 Market Research Report | OpenEI

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd toWell2008) |GigaCreteCommunity Global

  20. Global EV Outlook | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd toWell2008) |GigaCreteCommunity

  1. Global Electric Motorcars | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd toWell2008) |GigaCreteCommunityMotorcars

  2. Construction Cost Growth for New Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kubic, Jr., William L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Cost growth and construction delays are problems that plague many large construction projects including the construction of new Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities. A study was conducted to evaluate cost growth of large DOE construction projects. The purpose of the study was to compile relevant data, consider the possible causes of cost growth, and recommend measures that could be used to avoid extreme cost growth in the future. Both large DOE and non-DOE construction projects were considered in this study. With the exception of Chemical and Metallurgical Research Building Replacement Project (CMRR) and the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF), cost growth for DOE Nuclear facilities is comparable to the growth experienced in other mega construction projects. The largest increase in estimated cost was found to occur between early cost estimates and establishing the project baseline during detailed design. Once the project baseline was established, cost growth for DOE nuclear facilities was modest compared to non-DOE mega projects.

  3. Feasibility of Starting a Waterjet Fabrication Plant in Amman, Jordan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Khaled A.

    2010-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    be seen in expanding and upgrading infrastructure across the Kingdom such as: mega-real estate projects, transport (rail, airports, and port), municipality developments (Amman Master Plan, Salt Master Plan), Red Sea to Dead Sea Canal and many more... and granite. According to the expert tile layers interviewed above, imported tiles have more selection of colors and patterns than locally extracted marble and granite slabs. Marble and granite slabs that compete in quality and color selections...

  4. Molecular evolution of the control region in feliform carnivores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rice, John Edward

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -based phylogenetic analysis was performed using the neighbor- joining tree building method (Saitou and Nei 1987) as implemented in the MEGA program (Kumar et al. 1993). OC BC8 Car1 CL EurF Car2 IBM Eur Jagl IBU Jag2 SER BC5 Fcatus . . . . . . C. . 4...-RATRCRTGCCCTCCCTRAGRCTTCARGGRFIGARGCFIRTAGCCCCRCCRT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C. . . . . . . . T . . . C. . . C T OC BCB Carl CL EurF Car2 IBM Eur Jag1 IBU Jag2 SER BC5 Fcatus 128 CFIGCRCCCARFIGCTGAARTTCTTTCTTRARCTRTTCCTTGCTRATRCCRARRACTRRCCC C. . . . . . C. . . . . C. . . . C. . . . . . . G. . . . . C...

  5. Physical space and cosmology. I: Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valeriy P. Polulyakh

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nature of the physical space seems the most important subject in physics. A present paper proceeds from the assumption of physical reality of space contrary to the standard view of the space as a purely relational nonexistence - void. The space and its evolution are the primary sources of phenomena in Mega- and micro-worlds. Thus cosmology and particle physics have the same active agent - physical space.

  6. Integrated Energy Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heins, S.

    Integrated Energy Efficiency Steve Heins VP Communications and Government Affairs Orion Energy Systems, Inc. 2 MegaTrend Convergence We need companies to commercialize technologies that use less energy without compromise to operations. Energy... Environment US electricity consumption growing 43% by 2030 Power generation expected to account for 50% of CO 2 emission increases 3 How Electricity Is Used 24 Hour Operation Midnight 6 a.m. Noon 6 p.m. Midnight kW 4 Lighting is a Major Component...

  7. Optical synchronization system for femtosecond X-ray sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilcox, Russell B. (El Cerrito, CA); Holzwarth, Ronald (Munich, DE)

    2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Femtosecond pump/probe experiments using short X-Ray and optical pulses require precise synchronization between 100 meter-10 km separated lasers in a various experiments. For stabilization in the hundred femtosecond range a CW laser is amplitude modulated at 1-10 GHz, the signal retroreflected from the far end, and the relative phase used to correct the transit time with various implementations. For the sub-10 fsec range the laser frequency itself is upshifted 55 MHz with an acousto-optical modulator, retroreflected, upshifted again and phase compared at the sending end to a 110 MHz reference. Initial experiments indicate less than 1 fsec timing jitter. To lock lasers in the sub-10 fs range two single-frequency lasers separated by several teraHertz will be lock to a master modelocked fiber laser, transmit the two frequencies over fiber, and lock two comb lines of a slave laser to these frequencies, thus synchronizing the two modelocked laser envelopes.

  8. The Murchison Widefield Array Correlator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ord, S M; Emrich, D; Pallot, D; Wayth, R B; Clark, M A; Tremblay, S E; Arcus, W; Barnes, D; Bell, M; Bernardi, G; Bhat, N D R; Bowman, J D; Briggs, F; Bunton, J D; Cappallo, R J; Corey, B E; Deshpande, A A; deSouza, L; Ewell-Wice, A; Feng, L; Goeke, R; Greenhill, L J; Hazelton, B J; Herne, D; Hewitt, J N; Hindson, L; Hurley-Walker, H; Jacobs, D; Johnston-Hollitt, M; Kaplan, D L; Kasper, J C; Kincaid, B B; Koenig, R; Kratzenberg, E; Kudryavtseva, N; Lenc, E; Lonsdale, C J; Lynch, M J; McKinley, B; McWhirter, S R; Mitchell, D A; Morales, M F; Morgan, E; Oberoi, D; Offringa, A; Pathikulangara, J; Pindor, B; Prabu, T; Procopio, P; Remillard, R A; Riding, J; Rogers, A E E; Roshi, A; Salah, J E; Sault, R J; Shankar, N Udaya; Srivani, K S; Stevens, J; Subrahmanyan, R; Tingay, S J; Waterson, M; Webster, R L; Whitney, A R; Williams, A; Williams, C L; Wyithe, J S B

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) is a Square Kilometre Array (SKA) Precursor. The telescope is located at the Murchison Radio--astronomy Observatory (MRO) in Western Australia (WA). The MWA consists of 4096 dipoles arranged into 128 dual polarisation aperture arrays forming a connected element interferometer that cross-correlates signals from all 256 inputs. A hybrid approach to the correlation task is employed, with some processing stages being performed by bespoke hardware, based on Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs), and others by Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) housed in general purpose rack mounted servers. The correlation capability required is approximately 8 TFLOPS (Tera FLoating point Operations Per Second). The MWA has commenced operations and the correlator is generating 8.3 TB/day of correlation products, that are subsequently transferred 700 km from the MRO to Perth (WA) in real-time for storage and offline processing. In this paper we outline the correlator design, signal path, and proce...

  9. Plasmonic enhanced ultrafast switch.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Subramania,Ganapathi Subramanian; Reno, John Louis; Passmore, Brandon Scott; Harris, Tom.; Shaner, Eric Arthur; Barrick, Todd A.

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultrafast electronic switches fabricated from defective material have been used for several decades in order to produce picosecond electrical transients and TeraHertz radiation. Due to the ultrashort recombination time in the photoconductor materials used, these switches are inefficient and are ultimately limited by the amount of optical power that can be applied to the switch before self-destruction. The goal of this work is to create ultrafast (sub-picosecond response) photoconductive switches on GaAs that are enhanced through plasmonic coupling structures. Here, the plasmonic coupler primarily plays the role of being a radiation condenser which will cause carriers to be generated adjacent to metallic electrodes where they can more efficiently be collected.

  10. Using High-Speed WANs and Network Data Caches to Enable Remote and Distributed Visualization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bethel, Wes; Lau, Stephen; Tierney, Brian; Lee, Jason; Gunter, Dan

    2000-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Visapult is a prototype application and framework for remote visualization of large scientific datasets. We approach the technical challenges of tera-scale visualization with a unique architecture that employs high speed WANs and network data caches for data staging and transmission. This architecture allows for the use of available cache and compute resources at arbitrary locations on the network. High data throughput rates and network utilization are achieved by parallelizing I/O at each stage in the application, and by pipe-lining the visualization process. On the desktop, the graphics interactivity is effectively decoupled from the latency inherent in network applications. We present a detailed performance analysis of the application, and improvements resulting from field-test analysis conducted as part of the DOE Combustion Corridor project.

  11. The Portals 4.0 network programming interface.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrett, Brian W.; Brightwell, Ronald Brian; Pedretti, Kevin Thomas Tauke; Wheeler, Kyle Bruce; Hemmert, Karl Scott; Riesen, Rolf E. [IBM; Underwood, Keith Douglas [Intel Corporation, Albuquerque, NM; Maccabe, Arthur Bernard [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN; Hudson, Trammell B. [OS Research, Brooklyn, NY

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a specification for the Portals 4.0 network programming interface. Portals 4.0 is intended to allow scalable, high-performance network communication between nodes of a parallel computing system. Portals 4.0 is well suited to massively parallel processing and embedded systems. Portals 4.0 represents an adaption of the data movement layer developed for massively parallel processing platforms, such as the 4500-node Intel TeraFLOPS machine. Sandia's Cplant cluster project motivated the development of Version 3.0, which was later extended to Version 3.3 as part of the Cray Red Storm machine and XT line. Version 4.0 is targeted to the next generation of machines employing advanced network interface architectures that support enhanced offload capabilities.

  12. The portals 4.0.1 network programming interface.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrett, Brian W.; Brightwell, Ronald Brian; Pedretti, Kevin Thomas Tauke; Wheeler, Kyle Bruce; Hemmert, Karl Scott; Riesen, Rolf E. [IBM; Underwood, Keith Douglas [Intel Corporation, Albuquerque, NM; Maccabe, Arthur Bernard [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN; Hudson, Trammell B. [OS Research, Brooklyn, NY

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a specification for the Portals 4.0 network programming interface. Portals 4.0 is intended to allow scalable, high-performance network communication between nodes of a parallel computing system. Portals 4.0 is well suited to massively parallel processing and embedded systems. Portals 4.0 represents an adaption of the data movement layer developed for massively parallel processing platforms, such as the 4500-node Intel TeraFLOPS machine. Sandia's Cplant cluster project motivated the development of Version 3.0, which was later extended to Version 3.3 as part of the Cray Red Storm machine and XT line. Version 4.0 is targeted to the next generation of machines employing advanced network interface architectures that support enhanced offload capabilities. 3

  13. Toxicity and acclimation to ammonia by Tilapia aurea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redner, Barry Duncan

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    operations (Spoti:e, 1970). Sroart (1976) noticed rela . i. vely m'. nor histopathological changes in the gill" of trout when given an acute dcse of ammonia. Ch onic ammonia poI. sosI. ng, however, may d?seg the tissues of the gilI, , kin, 1!&testiue, I... of urine pro- &8&orion declined until it aporoack. ed a rate on!y slightly, :oat& r "han tii& pret sc; slue. , The rr suits were due, tl. . ey '1&cerise&i, t o redo?e k tissue p&trm-abihity wr;tch at loi. 8 th& fi . ki to to'tera'e c&&u ritrat 1 oos...

  14. First Generation ASCI Production Visualization Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heermann, P.D.

    1999-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The delivery of the first one tera-operations/sec computer has significantly impacted production data visualization, affecting data transfer, post processing, and rendering. Terascale computing has motivated a need to consider the entire data visualization system; improving a single algorithm is not sufficient. This paper presents a systems approach to decrease by a factor of four the time required to prepare large data sets for visualization.For daily production use, all stages in the processing pipeline from physics simulation code to pixels on a screen, must be balanced to yield good overall performance. Also, to complete the data path from screen to the analyst's eye, user display systems for individuals and teams are examined. Performance of the initial visualization system is compared with recent improvements. Lessons learned from the coordinated deployment of improved algorithms are also discussed, including the need for 64 bit addressing and a fully parallel data visualization pipeline.

  15. Synchrotron Radiation Circular Dichroism (SRCD) Spectroscopy: An Emerging Method in Structural Biology for Examining Protein Conformations and Protein Interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallace, B.A.; Sutherland, J.; Gekko, K.; Hoffmann, S. V.; Lin, Y.-H.; Tao, Y.; Wien, F.; Janes, R. W.

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy is a well-established technique in structural biology. The use of synchrotron radiation as an intense light source for these measurements extends the applications possible using lab-based instruments. In recent years, there has been a major growth in synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SRCD) beamlines worldwide, including ones at the NSLS, ISA, SRS, HiSOR, BSRF, NSRRC, SOLEIL, Diamond, TERAS, BESSYII, and ANKA synchrotrons. Through the coordinated efforts of beamline scientists and users at these sites, important proof-of-principle studies have been done enabling the method to be developed for novel and productive studies on biological systems. This paper describes the characteristics of SRCD beamlines and some of the new types of applications that have been undertaken using these beamlines.

  16. Level-1 Milestone 350 Definitions v1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, T

    2006-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This milestone is the direct result of work that started seven years ago with the planning for a 100-teraFLOP platform and will be satisfied when 100 teraFLOPS is placed in operation and readied for Stockpile Stewardship Program simulations. The end product of this milestone will be a production-level, high-performance computing system, code named Purple, designed to be used to solve the most demanding stockpile stewardship problems, that is, the large-scale application problems at the edge of our understanding of weapon physics. This fully functional 100 teraFLOPS system must be able to serve a diverse scientific and engineering workload. It must also have a robust code development and production environment, both of which facilitate the workload requirements. This multi-year effort includes major activities in contract management, facilities, infrastructure, system software, and user environment and support. Led by LLNL, the trilabs defined the statement of work for a 100-teraFLOP system that resulted in a contract with IBM known as the Purple contract. LLNL worked with IBM throughout the contract period to resolve issues and collaborated with the Program to resolve contractual issues to ensure delivery of a platform that best serves the Program for a reasonable cost. The Purple system represents a substantial increase in the classified compute resources at LLNL for NNSA. The center computer environment must be designed to accept the Purple system and to scale with the increase of compute resources to achieve required end-to-end services. Networking, archival storage, visualization servers, global file systems, and system software will all be enhanced to support Purple's size and architecture. IBM and LLNL are sharing responsibility for Purple's system software. LLNL is responsible for the scheduler, resource manager, and some code development tools. Through the Purple contract, IBM is responsible for the remainder of the system software including the operating system, parallel file system, and runtime environment. LLNL, LANL, and SNL share responsibility for the Purple user environment. Since LLNL is the host for Purple, LLNL has the greatest responsibility. LLNL will provide customer support for Purple to the tri-labs and as such has the lead for user documentation, negotiating the Purple usage model, mapping of the ASC computational environment requirements to the Purple environment, and demonstrating those requirements have been met. In addition, LLNL will demonstrate important capabilities of the computing environment including full functionality of visualization tools, file transport between Purple and remote site file systems, and the build environment for principle ASC codes. LANL and SNL are responsible for delivering unique capabilities in support of their users, porting important applications and libraries, and demonstrating remote capabilities. The key capabilities that LANL and SNL will test are user authorization and authentication, data transfer, file system, data management, and visualization. SNL and LANL should port and run in production mode a few key applications on a substantial number of Purple nodes.

  17. A comparison of gasoline and LP-gas as a fuel for medium or small size farm tractors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maher, Thomas Francis

    1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X' Ter~a 3. n partial fuH'lllment oX the regulrementa Xor the SeSree of Me]ox SuhJecti3 JLSrlculcuzel En~lneerlnS Age X@58'SIAN 'NQCL ~ e a s e y al. e e a e o o + X R4VJ. 8W 8 f K4 5 Shalt Cgg@ e e ~ e 0 ~ e e e e I'8855OX' 854 IglLLXMQQC e ~ e e... ~ e ~ e e Xao PSN8@W e 0 e e 4 e e ~ ~ o ~ a ~ o ~ 3?e 888'LLt48 Qf EQQXX18 T98'b8 o e ~ a o o o ~ 5X Ve COSC 8lnd SuyyXy Of LP-BRS . . . . . . . SB VX e QOMllMLOXLS ~ o ~ ~ e ~ ~ ~ o ~ ~ ~ ~ a VXXo BB)115gPR+7e ~ ~ ~ 4 ~ ~ ~ ~ o 4 ~ 0 A...

  18. Differential expression of nanog1 and nanogp8 in colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishiguro, Tatsuya; Sato, Ai; Ohata, Hirokazu; Sakai, Hiroaki [Division of Cancer Differentiation, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan)] [Division of Cancer Differentiation, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Nakagama, Hitoshi, E-mail: hnakagam@ncc.go.jp [Division of Cancer Development System, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan)] [Division of Cancer Development System, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Okamoto, Koji, E-mail: kojokamo@ncc.go.jo [Division of Cancer Differentiation, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan)] [Division of Cancer Differentiation, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan)

    2012-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanog is expressed in a majority of colon cancer cell lines examined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both nanog1 and nanogp8 are expressed in colon cancer cells with varying ratios. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanog mediates cell proliferation of colon cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanog predominantly localizes in cytoplasm of colon cancer cells. -- Abstract: Nanog, a homeodomain transcription factor, is an essential regulator for promotion of self-renewal of embryonic stem cells and inhibition of their differentiation. It has been demonstrated that nanog1 as well as nanogp8, a retrogene of nanog1, is preferentially expressed in advanced stages of several types of cancer, suggesting their involvement during cancer progression. Here, we investigated the expression of Nanog in well-characterized colon cancer cell lines. Expression of Nanog was detectable in 5 (HCT116, HT29, RKO, SW48, SW620) out of seven cell lines examined. RNA expression analyses of nanog1 and nanogp8 indicated that, while nanog1 was a major form in SW620 as well as in teratoma cells Tera-2, nanogp8 was preferentially expressed in HT29 and HCT116. In accordance with this, shRNA-mediated knockdown of nanog1 caused the reduction of Nanog in SW620 but not in HT29. Inhibition of Nanog in SW620 cells negatively affected cell proliferation and tumor formation in mouse xenograft. Biochemical subcellular fractionation and immunostaining analyses revealed predominant localization of Nanog in cytoplasm in SW620 and HT29, while it was mainly localized in nucleus in Tera-2. Our data indicate that nanog1 and nanogp8 are differentially expressed in colon cancer cells, and suggest that their expression contributes to proliferation of colon cancer cells.

  19. Theory of current-drive in plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisch, N.J.

    1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The continuous operation of a tokamak fusion reactor requires, among other things, a means of providing continuous toroidal current. Such operation is preferred to the conventional pulsed operation, where the plasma current is induced by a time-varying magnetic field. A variety of methods has been proposed to provide continuous current, including methods which utilize particle beams or radio frequency waves in any of several frequency regimes. Currents as large as half a mega-amp have now been produced in the laboratory by such means, and experimentation in these techniques has now involved major tokamak facilities worldwide.

  20. That Fading Taste of the Inevitable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seay, Thomas

    2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    mistake, it is too late. She has moved on, she doesn't want to talk to him anymore, and he finds himself crushed and abandoned. It is at heart that ultimate mainstream story: "boy loses girl." True, in this case the girl is a mega-smart artificial... their big, frightened eyes, and the way the smart one had built the tall, red, boxy brick house to beat the wolf -- tried to focus on all of that instead of the pain . . . The other books clutched his pages between their covers and ripped him apart...

  1. A wedged-peak-pulse design with medium fuel adiabat for indirect-drive fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan, Zhengfeng; Ren, Guoli; Liu, Bin; Wu, Junfeng [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China); He, X. T.; Liu, Jie; Wang, L. F.; Ye, Wenhua [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China); Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present letter, we propose the design of a wedged-peak pulse at the late stage of indirect drive. Our simulations of one- and two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics show that the wedged-peak-pulse design can raise the drive pressure and capsule implosion velocity without significantly raising the fuel adiabat. It can thus balance the energy requirement and hydrodynamic instability control at both ablator/fuel interface and hot-spot/fuel interface. This investigation has implication in the fusion ignition at current mega-joule laser facilities.

  2. Study of New FNAL-NICADD Extruded Scintillator as Active Media of Large EMCal of ALICE at LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. A. Grachov; T. M. Cormier; A. Pla-Dalmau; A. Bross; V. Rykalin

    2004-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The current conceptual design of proposed Large EMCal of ALICE at LHC is based largely on the scintillating mega-tile/fiber technology implemented in CDF Endplug upgrade project and in both barrel and endcap electromagnetic calorimeters of the STAR. The cost of scintillating material leads us to the choice of extruded polystyrene based scintillator, which is available in new FNAL-NICADD facility. Result of optical measurements, such as light yield and light yield variation, show that it is possible to use this material as active media of Large EMCal of ALICE at LHC.

  3. SOLVING THE STAND-OFF PROBLEM FOR MAGNETIZED TARGET FUSION: PLASMA STREAMS AS DISPOSABLE ELECTRODES, PLUS A LOCAL SPHERICAL BLANKET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryutov, D D; Thio, Y F

    2006-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In a fusion reactor based on the Magnetized Target Fusion approach, the permanent power supply has to deliver currents up to a few mega-amperes to the target dropped into the reaction chamber. All the structures situated around the target will be destroyed after every pulse and have to be replaced at a frequency of 1 to 10 Hz. In this paper, an approach based on the use of spherical blanket surrounding the target, and pulsed plasma electrodes connecting the target to the power supply, is discussed. A brief physic analysis of the processes associated with creation of plasma electrodes is discussed.

  4. Outdoor Programs Coordinator Outdoor Programs Assistant Coordinator Brent Gorman Nathan van der Most

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scheel, David

    .00 $9.00 $18.00 Black Diamond Mega-Mid -3-4person/4season $5.00 $10.00 $8.00 $18.00 Synthetic Sleeping Bag (+20) $3.00 $6.00 $5.00 $9.00 Synthetic Sleeping Bag (-20) $4.00 $8.00 $7.00 $11.00 Thermarest $2.00 $4.00 $4.00 $7.00 Paddle $2.00 $4.00 $4.00 $7.00 Throw Bag $1.00 $2.00 $2.00 $4.00 Rubber Boots

  5. The XMM-LSS Survey: Mapping hot, luminous, obscured and dark material out to z~1-2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marguerite Pierre

    2001-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the unique cosmological implications of the XMM-LSS survey in association with its multi-WL follow-up: (1) Large Scale Structures traced by X-ray clusters and AGNs, optical galaxies, weak lensing as well as Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect; (2) location of IR star forming galaxies and IR (obscured) AGNs within the cosmic web. The XMM/MegaCam/VIRMOS/SIRTF data base will provide the first comprehensive study of structure formation - from hundreds of Mpc to galaxy scale - in close connection with environmental processes.

  6. Theoretical and Experimental Studies of Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor Instabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lau, Yue Ying [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Gilgenbach, Ronald [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2013-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability (MRT) is important to magnetized target fusion, wire-array z-pinches, and equation-of-state studies using flyer plates or isentropic compression. It is also important to the study of the crab nebula. The investigators performed MRT experiments on thin foils, driven by the mega-ampere linear transformer driver (LTD) facility completed in their laboratory. This is the first 1-MA LTD in the USA. Initial experiments on the seeding of MRT were performed. Also completed was an analytic study of MRT for a finite plasma slab with arbitrary magnetic fields tangential to the interfaces. The effects of magnetic shear and feedthrough were analyzed.

  7. Instabilities and transport in magnetized plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosin, Mark

    2011-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    . The ensuing flows and tem- perature profiles are anisotropic with respect to the direction of the magnetic field, and lead to highly filamentary structures. Left Panel: X-ray emission im- age of solar coronal loops taken by the Transition Region and Coronal... Explorer (TRACE) (Reale & Peres, 2000; Reale et al., 2000; TRACE, 2000). Right Panel: D? emission images (visible light) from Edge Localised Modes (ELMS) on the Mega Ampere Spherical Tokomak (MAST) (Kirk et al., 2005; Dudson et al., 2008). in an asymptotic...

  8. Megargel, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville, Ohio: Energy8429°,Meeteetse, Wyoming: Energy ResourcesMegaWatt

  9. An analysis of the double-precision floating-point FFT on FPGAs.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemmert, K. Scott; Underwood, Keith Douglas

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advances in FPGA technology have led to dramatic improvements in double precision floating-point performance. Modern FPGAs boast several GigaFLOPs of raw computing power. Unfortunately, this computing power is distributed across 30 floating-point units with over 10 cycles of latency each. The user must find two orders of magnitude more parallelism than is typically exploited in a single microprocessor; thus, it is not clear that the computational power of FPGAs can be exploited across a wide range of algorithms. This paper explores three implementation alternatives for the fast Fourier transform (FFT) on FPGAs. The algorithms are compared in terms of sustained performance and memory requirements for various FFT sizes and FPGA sizes. The results indicate that FPGAs are competitive with microprocessors in terms of performance and that the 'correct' FFT implementation varies based on the size of the transform and the size of the FPGA.

  10. Mechanical Design of the LSST Camera

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nordby, Martin; Bowden, Gordon; Foss, Mike; Guiffre, Gary; /SLAC; Ku, John; /Unlisted; Schindler, Rafe; /SLAC

    2008-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The LSST camera is a tightly packaged, hermetically-sealed system that is cantilevered into the main beam of the LSST telescope. It is comprised of three refractive lenses, on-board storage for five large filters, a high-precision shutter, and a cryostat that houses the 3.2 giga-pixel CCD focal plane along with its support electronics. The physically large optics and focal plane demand large structural elements to support them, but the overall size of the camera and its components must be minimized to reduce impact on the image stability. Also, focal plane and optics motions must be minimized to reduce systematic errors in image reconstruction. Design and analysis for the camera body and cryostat will be detailed.

  11. Probing electron acceleration and x-ray emission in laser-plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thaury, C.; Ta Phuoc, K.; Corde, S.; Brijesh, P.; Lambert, G.; Malka, V. [Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquée, ENSTA ParisTech—CNRS UMR7639—École Polytechnique ParisTech, Chemin de la Hunière, 91761 Palaiseau (France)] [Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquée, ENSTA ParisTech—CNRS UMR7639—École Polytechnique ParisTech, Chemin de la Hunière, 91761 Palaiseau (France); Mangles, S. P. D.; Bloom, M. S.; Kneip, S. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)] [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    While laser-plasma accelerators have demonstrated a strong potential in the acceleration of electrons up to giga-electronvolt energies, few experimental tools for studying the acceleration physics have been developed. In this paper, we demonstrate a method for probing the acceleration process. A second laser beam, propagating perpendicular to the main beam, is focused on the gas jet few nanosecond before the main beam creates the accelerating plasma wave. This second beam is intense enough to ionize the gas and form a density depletion, which will locally inhibit the acceleration. The position of the density depletion is scanned along the interaction length to probe the electron injection and acceleration, and the betatron X-ray emission. To illustrate the potential of the method, the variation of the injection position with the plasma density is studied.

  12. Data-Mining a Large Digital Sky Survey: From the Challenges to the Scientific Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. G. Djorgovski; R. R. de Carvalho; S. C. Odewahn; R. R. Gal; J. Roden; P. Stolorz; A. Gray

    1997-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The analysis and an efficient scientific exploration of the Digital Palomar Observatory Sky Survey (DPOSS) represents a major technical challenge. The input data set consists of 3 Terabytes of pixel information, and contains a few billion sources. We describe some of the specific scientific problems posed by the data, including searches for distant quasars and clusters of galaxies, and the data-mining techniques we are exploring in addressing them. Machine-assisted discovery methods may become essential for the analysis of such multi-Terabyte data sets. New and future approaches involve unsupervised classification and clustering analysis in the Giga-object data space, including various Bayesian techniques. In addition to the searches for known types of objects in this data base, these techniques may also offer the possibility of discovering previously unknown, rare types of astronomical objects.

  13. The LSST Camera 500 watt -130 degC Mixed Refrigerant Cooling System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowden, Gordon B.; Langton, Brian J.; /SLAC; Little, William A.; /MMR-Technologies, Mountain View, CA; Powers, Jacob R; Schindler, Rafe H.; /SLAC; Spektor, Sam; /MMR-Technologies, Mountain View, CA

    2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The LSST Camera has a higher cryogenic heat load than previous CCD telescope cameras due to its large size (634 mm diameter focal plane, 3.2 Giga pixels) and its close coupled front-end electronics operating at low temperature inside the cryostat. Various refrigeration technologies are considered for this telescope/camera environment. MMR-Technology’s Mixed Refrigerant technology was chosen. A collaboration with that company was started in 2009. The system, based on a cluster of Joule-Thomson refrigerators running a special blend of mixed refrigerants is described. Both the advantages and problems of applying this technology to telescope camera refrigeration are discussed. Test results from a prototype refrigerator running in a realistic telescope configuration are reported. Current and future stages of the development program are described. (auth)

  14. Scalable I/O Systems via Node-Local Storage: Approaching 1 TB/sec File I/O

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bronevetsky, G; Moody, A

    2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In the race to PetaFLOP-speed supercomputing systems, the increase in computational capability has been accompanied by corresponding increases in CPU count, total RAM, and storage capacity. However, a proportional increase in storage bandwidth has lagged behind. In order to improve system reliability and to reduce maintenance effort for modern large-scale systems, system designers have opted to remove node-local storage from the compute nodes. Today's multi-TeraFLOP supercomputers are typically attached to parallel file systems that provide only tens of GBs/s of I/O bandwidth. As a result, such machines have access to much less than 1GB/s of I/O bandwidth per TeraFLOP of compute power, which is below the generally accepted limit required for a well-balanced system. In a many ways, the current I/O bottleneck limits the capabilities of modern supercomputers, specifically in terms of limiting their working sets and restricting fault tolerance techniques, which become critical on systems consisting of tens of thousands of components. This paper resolves the dilemma between high performance and high reliability by presenting an alternative system design which makes use of node-local storage to improve aggregate system I/O bandwidth. In this work, we focus on the checkpointing use-case and present an experimental evaluation of the Scalable Checkpoint/Restart (SCR) library, a new adaptive checkpointing library that uses node-local storage to significantly improve the checkpointing performance of large-scale supercomputers. Experiments show that SCR achieves unprecedented write speeds, reaching a measured 700GB/s of aggregate bandwidth on 8,752 processors and an estimated 1TB/s for a similarly structured machine of 12,500 processors. This corresponds to a speedup of over 70x compared to the bandwidth provided by the 10GB/s parallel file system the cluster uses. Further, SCR can adapt to an environment in which there is wide variation in performance or capacity among the individual node-local storage elements.

  15. Scalable I/O Systems via Node-Local Storage: Approaching 1 TB/sec File I/O

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moody, A; Bronevetsky, G

    2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The growth in the computational capability of modern supercomputing systems has been accompanied by corresponding increases in CPU count, total RAM, and total storage capacity. Indeed, systems such as Blue-Gene/L [3], BlueGene/P, Ranger, and the Cray XT series have grown to more than 100k processors, with 100 TeraBytes of RAM and are attached to multi-PetaByte storage systems. However, as part of this design evolution, large supercomputers have lost node-local storage elements, such as disks. While this decision was motivated by important considerations like overall system reliability, it also resulted in these systems losing a key level in their memory hierarchy, with nothing to fill the gap between local RAM and the parallel file system. While today's large supercomputers are typically attached to fast parallel file systems, which provide tens of GBs/s of I/O bandwidth, the computational capacity has grown much faster than the storage bandwidth capacity. As such, these machines are now provided with much less than 1GB/s of I/O bandwidth per TeraFlop of compute power, which is below the generally accepted limit required for a well-balanced system [8] [16]. The result is that today's limited I/O bandwidth is choking the capabilities of modern supercomputers, specifically in terms of limiting their working sets and making fault tolerance techniques, such as checkpointing, prohibitively expensive. This paper presents an alternative system design oriented on using node-local storage to improve aggregate system I/O bandwidth. We focus on the checkpointing use-case and present an experimental evaluation of SCR, a new checkpointing library that makes use of node-local storage to significantly improve the performance of checkpointing on large-scale supercomputers. Experiments show that SCR achieves unprecedented write speeds, reaching 700GB/s on 8,752 processors. Our results scale such that we expect a similarly structured system consisting of 12,500 processors to achieve aggregate I/O bandwidth of 1 TB/s.

  16. Metal, mutagenicity, and biochemical studies on bivalve molluscs from Spanish coasts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez-Ariza, A.; Abril, N.; Navas, J.I.; Dorado, G.; Lopez-Barea, J.; Pueyo, C. (Departmento de Genetica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cordoba, (Spain))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three species of marine bivalve molluscs (Chamelea gallina, Ruditapes decussatus, and Crassostrea gigas) have been studied in order to evaluate the levels of pollution on the South Atlantic Spanish littoral. Several transition metals (Cu, As, Cd, Sn, Hg, Pb) were determined as a general index of total contamination. Animals from putative contaminated areas exhibited higher metal contents than those from cleaner waters. C. gigas showed 5-20-fold higher total metal content than the other two species. The mutagenicity of ethanolic extracts was assayed by using both the His reversion and the Ara forward mutation tests. Mollusc tissues from the three species did not contain genotoxins active on TA98 (frameshift mutations) or TA100 (mainly G:C base-pair substitutions), but did contain direct-acting genotoxins of a polar nature and oxidative type. This was based on the following observations: (1) mammalian metabolic activation was not required for mutagenicity, (2) mutagens were eluted with the polar fraction from XAD-2 columns, and (3) mutagenic responses were observed with Salmonella typhimurium TA102 (base-pair substitutions; sensitive to oxidative damages) and Escherichia coli catalase-deficient (AraR forward mutations) strains. No relevant differences were found in the mutagenicity of mollusc extracts from areas with different pollution levels. Otherwise, our data suggest that, in general, animals living in contaminated environments had fewer genotoxins of oxidative type than those from less polluted areas. Such a result might be explained by the observation of increased levels of a number of detoxifying and antioxidant enzymes, such as glutathione-S-transferase, glutathione-peroxidase, catalase, and superoxide dismutase.

  17. Obligate Biotrophy Features Unraveled by the Genomic Analysis of the Rust Fungi, Melampsora larici-populina and Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duplessis, Sebastien; Cuomo, Christina A.; Lin, Yao-Cheng; Aerts, Andrea; Tisserant, Emilie; Veneault-Fourrey, Claire; Joly, David L.; Hacquard, Stephane; Amselem, Joelle; Cantarel, Brandi; Chiu, Readman; Couthinho, Pedro; Feau, Nicolas; Field, Matthew; Frey, Pascal; Gelhaye, Eric; Goldberg, Jonathan; Grabherr, Manfred; Kodira, Chinnappa; Kohler, Annegret; Kues, Ursula; Lindquist, Erika; Lucas, Susan; Mago, Rohit; Mauceli, Evan; Morin, Emmanuelle; Murat, Claude; Pangilinan, Jasmyn L.; Park, Robert; Pearson, Matthew; Quesneville, Hadi; Rouhier, Nicolas; Sakthikumar, Sharadha; Salamov, Asaf A.; Schmutz, Jeremy; Selles, Benjamin; Shapiro, Harris; Tangay, Philippe; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Peer, Yves Van de; Henrissat, Bernard; Rouze, Pierre; Ellis, Jeffrey G.; Dodds, Peter N.; Schein, Jacqueline E.; Zhong, Shaobin; Hamelin, Richard C.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Szabo, Les J.; Martin1, Francis

    2011-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Rust fungi are some of the most devastating pathogens of crop plants. They are obligate biotrophs, which extract nutrients only from living plant tissues and cannot grow apart from their hosts. Their lifestyle has slowed the dissection of molecular mechanisms underlying host invasion and avoidance or suppression of plant innate immunity. We sequenced the 101 mega base pair genome of Melampsora larici-populina, the causal agent of poplar leaf rust, and the 89 mega base pair genome of Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici, the causal agent of wheat and barley stem rust. We then compared the 16,841 predicted proteins of M. larici-populina to the 18,241 predicted proteins of P. graminis f. sp tritici. Genomic features related to their obligate biotrophic life-style include expanded lineage-specific gene families, a large repertoire of effector-like small secreted proteins (SSPs), impaired nitrogen and sulfur assimilation pathways, and expanded families of amino-acid, oligopeptide and hexose membrane transporters. The dramatic upregulation of transcripts coding for SSPs, secreted hydrolytic enzymes, and transporters in planta suggests that they play a role in host infection and nutrient acquisition. Some of these genomic hallmarks are mirrored in the genomes of other microbial eukaryotes that have independently evolved to infect plants, indicating convergent adaptation to a biotrophic existence inside plant cells

  18. Recent Progress on Spherical Torus Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ono, Masayuki [PPPL; Kaita, Robert [PPPL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The spherical torus or spherical tokamak (ST) is a member of the tokamak family with its aspect ratio (A = R0/a) reduced to A ~ 1.5, well below the normal tokamak operating range of A ? 2.5. As the aspect ratio is reduced, the ideal tokamak beta ? (radio of plasma to magnetic pressure) stability limit increases rapidly, approximately as ? ~ 1/A. The plasma current it can sustain for a given edge safety factor q-95 also increases rapidly. Because of the above, as well as the natural elongation ?, which makes its plasma shape appear spherical, the ST configuration can yield exceptionally high tokamak performance in a compact geometry. Due to its compactness and high performance, the ST configuration has various near term applications, including a compact fusion neutron source with low tritium consumption, in addition to its longer term goal of attractive fusion energy power source. Since the start of the two megaampere class ST facilities in 2000, National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) in the US and Mega Ampere Spherical Tokamak (MAST) in UK, active ST research has been conducted worldwide. More than sixteen ST research facilities operating during this period have achieved remarkable advances in all of fusion science areas, involving fundamental fusion energy science as well as innovation. These results suggest exciting future prospects for ST research both near term and longer term. The present paper reviews the scientific progress made by the worldwide ST research community during this new mega-ampere-ST era.

  19. Computation Directorate 2008 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, D L

    2009-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Whether a computer is simulating the aging and performance of a nuclear weapon, the folding of a protein, or the probability of rainfall over a particular mountain range, the necessary calculations can be enormous. Our computers help researchers answer these and other complex problems, and each new generation of system hardware and software widens the realm of possibilities. Building on Livermore's historical excellence and leadership in high-performance computing, Computation added more than 331 trillion floating-point operations per second (teraFLOPS) of power to LLNL's computer room floors in 2008. In addition, Livermore's next big supercomputer, Sequoia, advanced ever closer to its 2011-2012 delivery date, as architecture plans and the procurement contract were finalized. Hyperion, an advanced technology cluster test bed that teams Livermore with 10 industry leaders, made a big splash when it was announced during Michael Dell's keynote speech at the 2008 Supercomputing Conference. The Wall Street Journal touted Hyperion as a 'bright spot amid turmoil' in the computer industry. Computation continues to measure and improve the costs of operating LLNL's high-performance computing systems by moving hardware support in-house, by measuring causes of outages to apply resources asymmetrically, and by automating most of the account and access authorization and management processes. These improvements enable more dollars to go toward fielding the best supercomputers for science, while operating them at less cost and greater responsiveness to the customers.

  20. The use of multi-gap resistive plate chambers for in-beam PET in proton and carbon ion therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watts, David; Sauli, Fabio; Amaldi, Ugo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On-line verification of the delivered dose during proton and carbon ion radiotherapy is currently a very desirable goal for quality assurance of hadron therapy treatment plans. In-beam positron emission tomography (ibPET), which can provide an image of the ?+ activity induced in the patient during irradiation, which in turn is correlated to the range of the ion beam, is one of the modalities for achieving this goal. Application to hadron therapy requires that the scanner geometry be modified from that which is used in nuclear medicine. In particular, PET detectors that allow a sub-nanosecond time-of-flight (TOF) registration of the collinear photons have been proposed. Inclusion of the TOF information in PET data leads to more effective PET sensitivity. Considering the challenges inherent in the ibPET technique, namely limited ?+ activity and the effect of biological washout due to blood flow, TOF-PET technologies are very attractive. In this context, the TERA Foundation is investigating the use of resistiv...

  1. Independent quality assurance of a helical tomotherapy machine using the dose magnifying glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, J. H. D.; Hardcastle, N.; Tome, W. A. [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, New South Wales 2522 (Australia); and others

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Helical tomotherapy is a complex delivery technique, integrating CT image guidance and intensity modulated radiotherapy in a single system. The integration of the CT detector ring on the gantry not only allows patient position verification but is also often used to perform various QA procedures. This convenience lacks the rigor of a machine-independent QA process. Methods: In this article, a Si strip detector, known as the Dose Magnifying Glass (DMG), was used to perform machine-independent QA measurements of the multileaf collimator alignment, leaf open time threshold, and leaf fluence output factor (LFOF). Results: The DMG measurements showed good agreements with EDR2 film for the MLC alignment test while the CT detector agrees well with DMG measurements for leaf open time threshold and LFOF measurements. The leaf open time threshold was found to be approximately 20 ms. The LFOF measured with the DMG agreed within error with the CT detector measured LFOF. Conclusions: The DMG with its 0.2 mm spatial resolution coupled to TERA ASIC allowed real-time high temporal resolution measurements of the tomotherapy leaf movement. In conclusion, DMG was shown to be a suitable tool for machine-independent QA of a tomotherapy unit.

  2. Transfer Function Design for Scientific Discovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jian Huang

    2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    As computation scales beyond terascale, the scientific problems under study through computing are increasingly pushing the boundaries of human knowledge about the physical world. It is more pivotal than ever to quickly and reliably extract new knowledge from these complex simulations of ultra scale. In this project, the PI expanded the traditional notion of transfer function, which maps physical quantities to visual cues via table look-ups, to include general temporal as well as multivariate patterns that can be described procedurally through specialty mini programming languages. Their efforts aimed at answering a perpetual question of fundamental importance. That is "what a visualization should show". Instead of waiting for application scientists to initiate the process, the team at University of Tennessee worked closely with scientists at ORNL in a proactive role to envision and design elegant, powerful, and reliable tools that a user can use to specify "what is interesting". Their new techniques include visualization operators that revolve around correlation and graph properties, relative patterns in statistical distribution, temporal regular expressions, concurrent attribute subspaces and traditional compound boolean range queries. The team also paid special attention to ensure that all visualization operators are inherently designed with great parallel scalability to handle tera-scale datasets in both homogeneous and heterogeneous environments. Success has been demonstrated with leading edge computational science areas include climate modeling, combustion and systems genetics.

  3. Research and Development for a Free-Running Readout System for the ATLAS LAr Calorimeters at the High Luminosity LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hils, Maximilian; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ATLAS Liquid Argon (LAr) Calorimeters were designed and built to measure electromagnetic and hadronic energy in proton-proton collisions produced at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at centre-of-mass energies up to \\SI{14}{\\tera\\electronvolt} and instantaneous luminosities up to \\SI{d34}{\\per\\centi\\meter\\squared\\per\\second}. The High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) programme is now developed for up to 5-7 times the design luminosity, with the goal of accumulating an integrated luminosity of \\SI{3000}{\\per\\femto\\barn}. In the HL-LHC phase, the increased radiation levels require a replacement of the front-end (FE) electronics of the LAr Calorimeters. Furthermore, the ATLAS trigger system is foreseen to increase the trigger accept rate and the trigger latency which requires a larger data volume to be buffered. Therefore, the LAr Calorimeter read-out will be exchanged with a new FE and a high bandwidth back-end (BE) system for receiving data from all \

  4. GPU Kernels for High-Speed 4-Bit Astrophysical Data Processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klages, Peter; Denman, Nolan; Recnik, Andre; Sievers, Jonathan; Vanderlinde, Keith

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interferometric radio telescopes often rely on computationally expensive O(N^2) correlation calculations; fortunately these computations map well to massively parallel accelerators such as low-cost GPUs. This paper describes the OpenCL kernels developed for the GPU based X-engine of a new hybrid FX correlator. Channelized data from the F-engine is supplied to the GPUs as 4-bit, offset-encoded real and imaginary integers. Because of the low bit width of the data, two values may be packed into a 32-bit register, allowing multiplication and addition of more than one value with a single fused multiply-add instruction. With this data and calculation packing scheme, as many as 5.6 effective tera-operations per second (TOPS) can be executed on a 4.3 TOPS GPU. The kernel design allows correlations to scale to large numbers of input elements, limited only by maximum buffer sizes on the GPU. This code is currently working on-sky with the CHIME Pathfinder Correlator in BC, Canada.

  5. Massive Science with VO and Grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Nichol; Garry Smith; Christopher Miller; Peter Freeman; Chris Genovese; Larry Wasserman; Brent Bryan; Alexander Gray; Jeff Schneider; Andrew Moore

    2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a growing need for massive computational resources for the analysis of new astronomical datasets. To tackle this problem, we present here our first steps towards marrying two new and emerging technologies; the Virtual Observatory (e.g, AstroGrid) and the computational grid (e.g. TeraGrid, COSMOS etc.). We discuss the construction of VOTechBroker, which is a modular software tool designed to abstract the tasks of submission and management of a large number of computational jobs to a distributed computer system. The broker will also interact with the AstroGrid workflow and MySpace environments. We discuss our planned usages of the VOTechBroker in computing a huge number of n-point correlation functions from the SDSS data and massive model-fitting of millions of CMBfast models to WMAP data. We also discuss other applications including the determination of the XMM Cluster Survey selection function and the construction of new WMAP maps.

  6. National Dioxin Study Tier 4 - combustion sources: final test report - Site 10, secondary-copper-recovery cupola furnace MET-A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, L.E.; McReynolds, J.R.; Benson, D.J.

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of a dioxin/furan emissions test of a secondary-copper-recovery cupola furnace equipped with an afterburner for hydrocarbon emissions control and two baghouses for particulate-emissions control. The cupola furnace is used for recovery of copper from telephone scrap and other copper-bearing materials. The test was No. 10 in a series of dioxin/furan emissions tests conducted under Tier 4 of the National Dioxin Study. The primary objective of Tier 4 is to determine if various combustion sources are sources of dioxin/or furan emissions. If any of the combustion sources are found to emit dioxin or furan, the secondary objective of Tier 4 is to quantify these emissions. Secondary-copper-recovery cupola furnaces are one of 8 combustion-source categories that have been tested in the Tier 4 program. The tested cupola furnace, MET-A, was selected for the test after an initial information screening and a one-day pretest survey visit. Cupola furnace MET-A is a large secondary-copper-recovery cupola furnace relative to others in the United States. The furnace feed includes plastic-bearing materials of various types, some of which may contain chlorinated organic compounds. Data presented in the report include dioxin (tera through octa homologue +2378 TCDD) and furan (tetra through octa homologue +2378 TCDF) results for both stack samples and ash samples. In addition, process data collected during sampling are also presented.

  7. Science and Technology Review April/May 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nikolic, R J

    2011-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the focus is on science and technology research to ensure the nation's security. That expertise is also applied to solve other important national problems in energy, bioscience, and the environment. Science & Technology Review is published eight time a year to communicate, to a broad audience, the Laboratory's scientific and technological accomplishments in fulfilling its primary missions. The publication's goal is to help readers understand these accomplishments and appreciate their value to the individual citizen, the nation, and the world. In this issue for April/May 2011, the features are 'Dealing with the Nonlinear Battlefield' and 'From Video to Knowledge.' Research highlights are 'Kinetic Models Predict Biofuel Efficiency,' Going Deep with MEGa-Rays' and 'Energy on Demand.'

  8. Electron energy boosting in laser-wake-field acceleration with external magnetic field Bapprox1 T and laser prepulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hosokai, Tomonao [Photon Pioneers Center, Osaka University, 2-1, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan and Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), CREST, 2-1, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Zhidkov, Alexei [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, 2-6-1 Nagasaka, Yokosuka, Kanagawa 240-0196 (Japan); Yamazaki, Atsushi [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, 464-8603 (Japan); Mizuta, Yoshio [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Uesaka, Mitsuru [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 22-2 Shirane-shirakata, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Kodama, Ryosuke [Photon Pioneers Center, Osaka University, 2-1, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan) and Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), CREST, 2-1, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2010-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Hundred-mega-electron-volt electron beams with quasi-monoenergetic distribution, and a transverse geometrical emittance as small as approx0.02 pi mm mrad are generated by low power (7 TW, 45 fs) laser pulses tightly focused in helium gas jets in an external static magnetic field, Bapprox1 T. Generation of monoenergetic beams strongly correlates with appearance of a straight, at least 2 mm length plasma channel in a short time before the main laser pulse and with the energy of copropagating picosecond pedestal pulses (PPP). For a moderate energy PPP, the multiple or staged electron self-injection in the channel gives several narrow peaks in the electron energy distribution.

  9. Seismic response of steel suspension bridge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCallen, D.B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Astaneh-Asl, A. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Performing accurate, realistic numerical simulations of the seismic response of long-span bridges presents a significant challenge to the fields of earthquake engineering and seismology. Suspension bridges in particular represent some of the largest and most important man-made structures and ensuring the seismic integrity of these mega-structures is contingent on accurate estimations of earthquake ground motions and accurate computational simulations of the structure/foundation system response. A cooperative, multi-year research project between the Univ. of California and LLNL was recently initiated to study engineering and seismological issues essential for simulating the response of major structures. Part of this research project is focused on the response of the long-span bridges with the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge serving as a case study. This paper reports on the status of this multi-disciplinary research project with emphasis on the numerical simulation of the transient seismic response of the Bay Bridge.

  10. (Medium energy particle physics): Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nefkens, B.M.K.

    1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Investigations currently carried out by the UCLA Particle Physics Research Group can be arranged into four programs: Pion-Nucleon Scattering; Tests of Charge Symmetry and Isospin Invariance; Light Nuclei (Strong Form Factors of /sup 3/H, /sup 3/He, /sup 4/He; Detailed Balance in pd /r reversible/ /gamma//sup 3/H; Interaction Dynamics); and Search for the Rare Decay /Mu//sup +/ /yields/ e/sup +/ + /gamma/ (MEGA). The general considerations which led to the choice of physics problems investigated by our group are given in the next section. We also outline the scope of the research being done which includes over a dozen experiments. The main body of this report details the research carried out in the past year, the status of various experiments, and new projects.

  11. Fully kinetic simulations of megajoule-scale dense plasma focus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, A.; Link, A.; Tang, V.; Halvorson, C.; May, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore California 94550 (United States); Welch, D. [Voss Scientific, LLC, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87108 (United States); Meehan, B. T.; Hagen, E. C. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Las Vegas, Nevada 89030 (United States)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Dense plasma focus (DPF) Z-pinch devices are sources of copious high energy electrons and ions, x-rays, and neutrons. Megajoule-scale DPFs can generate 10{sup 12} neutrons per pulse in deuterium gas through a combination of thermonuclear and beam-target fusion. However, the details of the neutron production are not fully understood and past optimization efforts of these devices have been largely empirical. Previously, we reported on the first fully kinetic simulations of a kilojoule-scale DPF and demonstrated that both kinetic ions and kinetic electrons are needed to reproduce experimentally observed features, such as charged-particle beam formation and anomalous resistivity. Here, we present the first fully kinetic simulation of a MegaJoule DPF, with predicted ion and neutron spectra, neutron anisotropy, neutron spot size, and time history of neutron production. The total yield predicted by the simulation is in agreement with measured values, validating the kinetic model in a second energy regime.

  12. Software digitizer for high granular gaseous detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haddad, Y; Boudry, V

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sampling calorimeter using gaseous sensor layers with digital readout [1] is near perfect for ``Particle Flow Algorithm'' [2,3] approach, since it is homogeneous over large surfaces, robust, cost efficient, easily segmentable to any readout pad dimension and size and almost insensitive to neutrons. Monte-Carlo (MC) programs such as GEANT4 [4] simulate with high precision the energy deposited by particles. The sensor and electronic response associated to a pad are calculated in a separate ``digitization'' process. We develop a general method for simulating the pad response using the spatial information from a simulation done at high granularity. The digitization method proposed here has been applied to gaseous detectors including Glass Resistive Plate Chambers (GRPC) and MicroMegas, and validated on test beam data. Experimental observable such as pad multiplicity and mean number of hits at different thresholds have been reproduced with high precision.

  13. Design and imaging performance of achromatic diffractive/refractive X-ray and Gamma-ray Fresnel lenses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerald K. Skinner

    2004-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Achromatic combinations of a diffractive Phase Fresnel Lens and a refractive correcting element have been proposed for X-ray and gamma-ray astronomy and for microlithography, but considerations of absorption often dictate that the refractive component be given a stepped profile, resulting in a double Fresnel lens. The imaging performance of corrected Fresnel lenses, with and without `stepping' is investigated and the trade-off between resolution and useful bandwidth in different circumstances is discussed. Provided the focal ratio is large, correction lenses made of low atomic number materials can be used with X-rays in the range approximately 10--100 keV without stepping. The use of stepping extends the possibility of correction to higher aperture systems, to energies as low as a few kilo electron volts and to gamma-rays of $\\sim$ mega electron volt energy.

  14. Refurbishment and Testing of the 1970's Era LASS Solenoid Coils for JLab's Hall D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anumagalla, Ravi; Biallas, George; Brindza, Paul; Carstens, Thomas; Creel, Jonathan; Egiyan, Hovanes; Martin, Floyd; Qiang, Yi; Spiegel, Scot; Stevens, Mark; Wissmann, Mark

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    JLab refurbished the LASS1, 1.85 m bore Solenoid, consisting of four superconducting coils to act as the principal analysis magnet for nuclear physics in the newly constructed, Hall D at Jefferson Lab. The coils, built in 1971 at Stanford Linier Accelerator Center and used a second time at the MEGA Experiment at Los Alamos, had electrical shorts and leaks to the insulating vacuum along with deteriorated superinsulation & instrumentation. Root cause diagnosis of the problems and the repair methods are described along with the measures used to qualify the vessels and piping within the Laboratory's Pressure Safety Program (mandated by 10CFR851). The extraordinary refrigerator operational methods used to utilize the obsolete cryogenic apparatus gathered for the off-line, single coil tests are described.

  15. Liquid Cooling in Data Centers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cader, Tahir; Sorell,, Vali; Westra, Levi; Marquez, Andres

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Semiconductor manufacturers have aggressively attacked the problem of escalating microprocessor power consumption levels. Today, server manufacturers can purchase microprocessors that currently have power consumption levels capped at 100W maximum. However, total server power levels continue to increase, with the increase in power consumption coming from the supportin chipsets, memory, and other components. In turn, full rack heat loads are very aggressivley climbing as well, and this is making it increasingly difficult and cost-prohibitive for facility owners to cool these high power racks. As a result, facilities owners are turning to alternative, and more energy efficient, cooling solutions that deploy liquids in one form or another. The paper discusses the advent of the adoption of liquid-cooling in high performance computing centers. An overview of the following competing rack-based, liquid-cooling, technologies is provided: in-row, above rack, refrigerated/enclosed rack, rear door heat exchanger, and device-level (i.e., chip-level). Preparation for a liquid-cooled data center, retroft and greenfield (new), is discussed, with a focus on the key issues that are common to all liquid-cooling technologies that depend upon the delivery of water to the rack (or in some deployments, a Coolant Distribution Unit). The paper then discusses, in some detail, the actual implementation and deployment of a liquid device-level cooled (spray cooled) supercomputer at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Initial results from a successful 30 day compliance test show excellent hardware stability, operating system (OS) and software stack stability, application stability and performance, and an availability level that exceeded expectations at 99.94%. The liquid-cooled supercomputer achieved a peak performance of 9.287 TeraFlops, which placed it at number 101 in the June 2007 Top500 fastest supercomputers worldwide. Long-term performance and energy efficiency testing is currently underway, and detailed results will be reported in upcoming publications.

  16. The Dark Energy Survey Data Management System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohr, Joseph J.; /Illinois U., Urbana, Astron. Dept. /Illinois U., Urbana; Barkhouse, Wayne; /North Dakota U.; Beldica, Cristina; /Illinois U., Urbana; Bertin, Emmanuel; /Paris, Inst. Astrophys.; Dora Cai, Y.; /NCSA, Urbana; Nicolaci da Costa, Luiz A.; /Rio de Janeiro Observ.; Darnell, J.Anthony; /Illinois U., Urbana, Astron. Dept.; Daues, Gregory E.; /NCSA, Urbana; Jarvis, Michael; /Pennsylvania U.; Gower, Michelle; /NCSA, Urbana; Lin, Huan; /Fermilab /Rio de Janeiro Observ.

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Dark Energy Survey (DES) collaboration will study cosmic acceleration with a 5000 deg2 griZY survey in the southern sky over 525 nights from 2011-2016. The DES data management (DESDM) system will be used to process and archive these data and the resulting science ready data products. The DESDM system consists of an integrated archive, a processing framework, an ensemble of astronomy codes and a data access framework. We are developing the DESDM system for operation in the high performance computing (HPC) environments at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) and Fermilab. Operating the DESDM system in an HPC environment offers both speed and flexibility. We will employ it for our regular nightly processing needs, and for more compute-intensive tasks such as large scale image coaddition campaigns, extraction of weak lensing shear from the full survey dataset, and massive seasonal reprocessing of the DES data. Data products will be available to the Collaboration and later to the public through a virtual-observatory compatible web portal. Our approach leverages investments in publicly available HPC systems, greatly reducing hardware and maintenance costs to the project, which must deploy and maintain only the storage, database platforms and orchestration and web portal nodes that are specific to DESDM. In Fall 2007, we tested the current DESDM system on both simulated and real survey data. We used TeraGrid to process 10 simulated DES nights (3TB of raw data), ingesting and calibrating approximately 250 million objects into the DES Archive database. We also used DESDM to process and calibrate over 50 nights of survey data acquired with the Mosaic2 camera. Comparison to truth tables in the case of the simulated data and internal crosschecks in the case of the real data indicate that astrometric and photometric data quality is excellent.

  17. Bivalve embryo bioassay to assess the potential toxicity of dredged material before dumping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quiniou, F. [IFREMER Brest, Plouzane (France)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Dredged harbor sediments frequently contain a wide spectrum of contaminants in addition to a significant percentage of organic matter. Also, dredging and dumping activities into sea water, of these highly contaminated soil may induce a harmful effect on the environment. In France, in accordance with Oslo convention guidelines, a working group on dredging activities and environment (GEODE) created since 1991 decided to set up a pilot research program to assess the intrinsic toxicity of four harbor sludges. Intrinsic toxicity of harbor muds were tested by solid phase (whole sediment) and aqueous extract bioassays (sea water elutriates) using the sublethal toxicity test bivalve embryo bioassay (Crassostrea gigas). Elutriates enable them to detect the toxicity of contaminants which may be released in the soluble form into the water column during dredging operations. While, whole sediment integrate the synergistic effects of all the contaminants (hydrophilic and hydrophobic) including pore water. Bioassays results, correlated to chemical analysis, are compared to contaminant levels determined by French working group GEODE and Canadian sediment quality criteria.

  18. Precision Micron Hole Drilling using a Frequency Doubled, Diode Pumped Solid State Laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedman, H W; Pierce, E L

    2004-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This work represents the second phase of a program to demonstrate precision laser drilling with minimal Heat Affected Zone. The technique uses a Diode Pumped Solid State Laser with two wavelengths and two modes of operation. The fundamental mode of the DPSSL at 1.06 microns is used to drill a hole with a diameter of a fraction of a millimeter diameter in a millimeter thick substrate quickly, but with low precision. This hole is then machined to precision dimensions using the second harmonic of the DPSSL Laser at 532 nm using a trepanning technique. Both lasers operate in the ablative mode with peak powers at or above a giga-watt per square centimeter and pulse durations in the 80 - 100 ns range. Under these conditions, the thermal diffusion distance is of the order of a micron or less and that fact coupled with the ablative nature of the process results in little or no HAZ (heat affected zone). With no HAZ, there isn't any change in the crystalline structure surrounding the hole and the strength of the substrate is maintained. Applications for these precision holes include cooling passages in turbine blades, ports for diesel injectors, suction holes for boundary layer control on wings and holes for dies in precision extrusion processes.

  19. Cosmic Ray Interactions in Shielding Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Kouzes, Richard T.; Ankney, Austin S.; Orrell, John L.; Berguson, Timothy J.; Troy, Meredith D.

    2011-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a detailed study of materials used to shield against the hadronic particles from cosmic ray showers at Earth’s surface. This work was motivated by the need for a shield that minimizes activation of the enriched germanium during transport for the MAJORANA collaboration. The materials suitable for cosmic-ray shield design are materials such as lead and iron that will stop the primary protons, and materials like polyethylene, borated polyethylene, concrete and water that will stop the induced neutrons. The interaction of the different cosmic-ray components at ground level (protons, neutrons, muons) with their wide energy range (from kilo-electron volts to giga-electron volts) is a complex calculation. Monte Carlo calculations have proven to be a suitable tool for the simulation of nucleon transport, including hadron interactions and radioactive isotope production. The industry standard Monte Carlo simulation tool, Geant4, was used for this study. The result of this study is the assertion that activation at Earth’s surface is a result of the neutronic and protonic components of the cosmic-ray shower. The best material to shield against these cosmic-ray components is iron, which has the best combination of primary shielding and minimal secondary neutron production.

  20. Evolution of entropic dark energy and its phantom nature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathew, Titus K; J, Shejeelammal

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assuming the form of the entropic dark energy as arises form the surface term in the Einstein-Hilbert's action, it's evolution were analyzed in an expanding flat universe. The model parameters were evaluated by constraining model using the Union data on Type Ia supernovae. We found that the model predicts an early decelerated phase and a later accelerated phase at the background level. The evolution of the Hubble parameter, dark energy density, equation of state parameter and deceleration parameter were obtained. The model is diagnosed with $Om$ parameter. The model is hardly seems to be supporting the linear perturbation growth for the structure formation. We also found that the entropic dark energy shows phantom nature for redshifts $z<0.257.$ During the phantom epoch, the model predicts big-rip effect at which both the scale factor of expansion and the dark energy density become infinitely large and the big rip time is found to be around 36 Giga Years from now.

  1. Gaia Data Processing Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. O'Mullane; U. Lammers; C. Bailer-Jones; U. Bastian; A. Brown; R. Drimmel; L. Eyer; C. Huc; F. Jansen; D. Katz; L. Lindegren; D. Pourbaix; X. Luri; F. Mignard; J. Torra; F. van Leeuwen

    2006-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Gaia is ESA's ambitious space astrometry mission the main objective of which is to astrometrically and spectro-photometrically map 1000 Million celestial objects (mostly in our galaxy) with unprecedented accuracy. The announcement of opportunity for the data processing will be issued by ESA late in 2006. The Gaia Data Processing and Analysis Consortium (DPAC) has been formed recently and is preparing an answer. The satellite will downlink close to 100 TB of raw telemetry data over 5 years. To achieve its required accuracy of a few 10s of Microarcsecond astrometry, a highly involved processing of this data is required. In addition to the main astrometric instrument Gaia will host a Radial Velocity instrument, two low-resolution dispersers for multi-color photometry and two Star Mappers. Gaia is a flying Giga Pixel camera. The various instruments each require relatively complex processing while at the same time being interdependent. We describe the overall composition of the DPAC and the envisaged overall architecture of the Gaia data processing system. We shall delve further into the core processing - one of the nine, so-called, coordination units comprising the Gaia processing system.

  2. Assessment of Proton Deflectometry for Exploding Wire Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beg, Farhat Nadeem [University of California San Diego] [University of California San Diego

    2013-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This project provides the first demonstration of the application of proton deflectometry for the diagnosis of electromagnetic field topology and current-carrying regions in Z-pinch plasma experiments. Over the course of this project several milestones were achieved. High-energy proton beam generation was demonstrated on the short-pulse high-intensity Leopard laser, (10 Joules in ~350 femtoseconds, and the proton beam generation was shown to be reproducible. Next, protons were used to probe the electromagnetic field structure of short circuit loads in order to benchmark the two numerical codes, the resistive-magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) code, Gorgon, and the hybrid particle-in-cell code, LSP for the interpretation of results. Lastly, the proton deflectometry technique was used to map the magnetic field structure of pulsed-power-driven plasma loads including wires and supersonic jets formed with metallic foils. Good agreement between the modeling and experiments has been obtained. The demonstrated technique holds great promise to significantly improve the understanding of current flow and electromagnetic field topology in pulsed power driven high energy density plasmas. Proton probing with a high intensity laser was for the first time implemented in the presence of the harsh debris and x-ray producing z-pinch environment driven by a mega-ampere-scale pulsed-power machine. The intellectual merit of the program was that it investigated strongly driven MHD systems and the influence of magnetic field topology on plasma evolution in pulsed power driven plasmas. The experimental program involved intense field-matter interaction in the generation of the proton probe, as well as the generation of plasma subjected to 1 MegaGauss scale magnetic fields. The computational aspect included two well-documented codes, in combination for the first time to provide accurate interpretation of the experimental results. The broader impact included the support of 2 graduate students, one at UCSD and one at NTF, who were exposed to both the experimental physics work, the MHD and PIC modeling of the system. A first generation college undergraduate student was employed to assist in experiments and data analysis throughout the project. Data resulting from the research program were broadly disseminated by publication in scientific journals, and presentation at international and national conferences and workshops.

  3. Building a Community Infrastructure for Scalable On-Line Performance Analysis Tools around Open|Speedshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Barton

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Peta-scale computing environments pose significant challenges for both system and application developers and addressing them required more than simply scaling up existing tera-scale solutions. Performance analysis tools play an important role in gaining this understanding, but previous monolithic tools with fixed feature sets have not sufficed. Instead, this project worked on the design, implementation, and evaluation of a general, flexible tool infrastructure supporting the construction of performance tools as “pipelines” of high-quality tool building blocks. These tool building blocks provide common performance tool functionality, and are designed for scalability, lightweight data acquisition and analysis, and interoperability. For this project, we built on Open|SpeedShop, a modular and extensible open source performance analysis tool set. The design and implementation of such a general and reusable infrastructure targeted for petascale systems required us to address several challenging research issues. All components needed to be designed for scale, a task made more difficult by the need to provide general modules. The infrastructure needed to support online data aggregation to cope with the large amounts of performance and debugging data. We needed to be able to map any combination of tool components to each target architecture. And we needed to design interoperable tool APIs and workflows that were concrete enough to support the required functionality, yet provide the necessary flexibility to address a wide range of tools. A major result of this project is the ability to use this scalable infrastructure to quickly create tools that match with a machine architecture and a performance problem that needs to be understood. Another benefit is the ability for application engineers to use the highly scalable, interoperable version of Open|SpeedShop, which are reassembled from the tool building blocks into a flexible, multi-user interface set of tools. This set of tools targeted at Office of Science Leadership Class computer systems and selected Office of Science application codes. We describe the contributions made by the team at the University of Wisconsin. The project built on the efforts in Open|SpeedShop funded by DOE/NNSA and the DOE/NNSA Tri-Lab community, extended Open|Speedshop to the Office of Science Leadership Class Computing Facilities, and addressed new challenges found on these cutting edge systems. Work done under this project at Wisconsin can be divided into two categories, new algorithms and techniques for debugging, and foundation infrastructure work on our Dyninst binary analysis and instrumentation toolkits and MRNet scalability infrastructure.

  4. 2009 fault tolerance for extreme-scale computing workshop, Albuquerque, NM - March 19-20, 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katz, D. S.; Daly, J.; DeBardeleben, N.; Elnozahy, M.; Kramer, B.; Lathrop, S.; Nystrom, N.; Milfeld, K.; Sanielevici, S.; Scott, S.; Votta, L.; Louisiana State Univ.; Center for Exceptional Computing; LANL; IBM; Univ. of Illinois; Shodor Foundation; Pittsburgh Supercomputer Center; Texas Advanced Computing Center; ORNL; Sun Microsystems

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a report on the third in a series of petascale workshops co-sponsored by Blue Waters and TeraGrid to address challenges and opportunities for making effective use of emerging extreme-scale computing. This workshop was held to discuss fault tolerance on large systems for running large, possibly long-running applications. The main point of the workshop was to have systems people, middleware people (including fault-tolerance experts), and applications people talk about the issues and figure out what needs to be done, mostly at the middleware and application levels, to run such applications on the emerging petascale systems, without having faults cause large numbers of application failures. The workshop found that there is considerable interest in fault tolerance, resilience, and reliability of high-performance computing (HPC) systems in general, at all levels of HPC. The only way to recover from faults is through the use of some redundancy, either in space or in time. Redundancy in time, in the form of writing checkpoints to disk and restarting at the most recent checkpoint after a fault that cause an application to crash/halt, is the most common tool used in applications today, but there are questions about how long this can continue to be a good solution as systems and memories grow faster than I/O bandwidth to disk. There is interest in both modifications to this, such as checkpoints to memory, partial checkpoints, and message logging, and alternative ideas, such as in-memory recovery using residues. We believe that systematic exploration of these ideas holds the most promise for the scientific applications community. Fault tolerance has been an issue of discussion in the HPC community for at least the past 10 years; but much like other issues, the community has managed to put off addressing it during this period. There is a growing recognition that as systems continue to grow to petascale and beyond, the field is approaching the point where we don't have any choice but to address this through R&D efforts.

  5. Impact of Extended Daylight Saving Time on National Energy Consumption Report to Congress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belzer, D. B.; Hadley, S. W.; Chin, S-M.

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Policy Act of 2005 (Pub. L. No. 109-58; EPAct 2005) amended the Uniform Time Act of 1966 (Pub. L. No. 89-387) to increase the portion of the year that is subject to Daylight Saving Time. (15 U.S.C. 260a note) EPAct 2005 extended the duration of Daylight Saving Time in the spring by changing its start date from the first Sunday in April to the second Sunday in March, and in the fall by changing its end date from the last Sunday in October to the first Sunday in November. (15 U.S.C. 260a note) EPAct 2005 also called for the Department of Energy to evaluate the impact of Extended Daylight Saving Time on energy consumption in the United States and to submit a report to Congress. (15 U.S.C. 260a note) This report presents the results of impacts of Extended Daylight Saving Time on the national energy consumption in the United States. The key findings are: (1) The total electricity savings of Extended Daylight Saving Time were about 1.3 Tera Watt-hour (TWh). This corresponds to 0.5 percent per each day of Extended Daylight Saving Time, or 0.03 percent of electricity consumption over the year. In reference, the total 2007 electricity consumption in the United States was 3,900 TWh. (2) In terms of national primary energy consumption, the electricity savings translate to a reduction of 17 Trillion Btu (TBtu) over the spring and fall Extended Daylight Saving Time periods, or roughly 0.02 percent of total U.S. energy consumption during 2007 of 101,000 TBtu. (3) During Extended Daylight Saving Time, electricity savings generally occurred over a three- to five-hour period in the evening with small increases in usage during the early-morning hours. On a daily percentage basis, electricity savings were slightly greater during the March (spring) extension of Extended Daylight Saving Time than the November (fall) extension. On a regional basis, some southern portions of the United States exhibited slightly smaller impacts of Extended Daylight Saving Time on energy savings compared to the northern regions, a result possibly due to a small, offsetting increase in household air conditioning usage. (4) Changes in national traffic volume and motor gasoline consumption for passenger vehicles in 2007 were determined to be statistically insignificant and therefore, could not be attributed to Extended Daylight Saving Time.

  6. Intermediate frequency band digitized high dynamic range radiometer system for plasma diagnostics and real-time Tokamak control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bongers, W. A.; Beveren, V. van; Westerhof, E.; Goede, A. P. H.; Krijger, B.; Berg, M. A. van den; Graswinckel, M. F.; Schueller, F. C. [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, PO Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Thoen, D. J. [Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, Lorentzweg 1, 2628 CJ Delft (Netherlands); Nuij, P. J. W. M. [Eindhoven University of Technology, Control Systems Technology Group, and Applied Physics Department, PO Box 513, NL-5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Baar, M. R. de; Donne, A. J. H.; Hennen, B. A. [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, PO Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Eindhoven University of Technology, Control Systems Technology Group, and Applied Physics Department, PO Box 513, NL-5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Kantor, M. [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, PO Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Forschungszentrum Juelich GMBH, Institute of Energy and Climate research, Plasma Physics, Association EURATOM-FZJ, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Ioffe Institute, RAS, Saint-Petersburg, 195256 (Russian Federation)

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An intermediate frequency (IF) band digitizing radiometer system in the 100-200 GHz frequency range has been developed for Tokamak diagnostics and control, and other fields of research which require a high flexibility in frequency resolution combined with a large bandwidth and the retrieval of the full wave information of the mm-wave signals under investigation. The system is based on directly digitizing the IF band after down conversion. The enabling technology consists of a fast multi-giga sample analog to digital converter that has recently become available. Field programmable gate arrays (FPGA) are implemented to accomplish versatile real-time data analysis. A prototype system has been developed and tested and its performance has been compared with conventional electron cyclotron emission (ECE) spectrometer systems. On the TEXTOR Tokamak a proof of principle shows that ECE, together with high power injected and scattered radiation, becomes amenable to measurement by this device. In particular, its capability to measure the phase of coherent signals in the spectrum offers important advantages in diagnostics and control. One case developed in detail employs the FPGA in real-time fast Fourier transform (FFT) and additional signal processing. The major benefit of such a FFT-based system is the real-time trade-off that can be made between frequency and time resolution. For ECE diagnostics this corresponds to a flexible spatial resolution in the plasma, with potential application in smart sensing of plasma instabilities such as the neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) and sawtooth instabilities. The flexible resolution would allow for the measurement of the full mode content of plasma instabilities contained within the system bandwidth.

  7. Micropower impulse radar technology and applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mast, J., LLNL

    1998-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The LLNL-developed Micropower Impulse Radar (MIR) technology has quickly gone from laboratory concept to embedded circuitry in numerous government and commercial systems in the last few years[l]. The main ideas behind MIR, invented by T. McEwan in the Laser Program, are the generation and detection systems for extremely low- power ultra-wideband pulses in the gigaHertz regime using low-cost components. These ideas, coupled with new antenna systems, timing and radio-frequency (RF) circuitry, computer interfaces, and signal processing, have provided the catalyst for a new generation of compact radar systems. Over the past several years we have concentrated on a number of applications of MIR which address a number of remote-sensing applications relevant to emerging programs in defense, transportation, medical, and environmental research. Some of the past commercial successes have been widely publicized [2] and are only now starting to become available for market. Over 30 patents have been filed and over 15 licenses have been signed on various aspects of the MIR technology. In addition, higher performance systems are under development for specific laboratory programs and government reimbursables. The MIR is an ultra- wideband, range-gated radar system that provides the enabling hardware technology used in the research areas mentioned above. It has numerous performance parameters that can be Selected by careful design to fit the requirements. We have improved the baseline, short- range, MIR system to demonstrate its effectiveness. The radar operates over the hand from approximately I to 4 GHz with pulse repetition frequencies up to 10 MHz. It provides a potential range resolution of I cm at ranges of greater than 20 m. We have developed a suite of algorithms for using MIR for image formation. These algorithms currently support Synthetic aperture and multistate array geometries. This baseline MIR radar imaging system has been used for several programmatic applications.

  8. (Catalytic mechanism of hydrogenase from aerobic N sub 2 -fixing microorganisms)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arp, D.J.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of this DOE-sponsored project have contributed to our understanding of the catalytic mechanism of A. vinelandii hydrogenase. A group of inhibitors have been characterized. These provide information about the different types of redox clusters involved in catalysis and the roles of each. One group has already used acetylene in a study of three desulfovibrian hydrogenases and shown that only the NiFe hydrogenases are inhibited. We have characterized a number of spectral properties of A. vinelandii hydrogenase. The EPR signals associated with this hydrogenase in the reduced state are reminiscent of other NiFe dimeric hydrogenases such as A. eutrophus, but distinctly difference from others such as D. gigas and Chromatium vinosum. Thus, while the NiFe dimeric hydrogenases are now recognized as a large group of similar enzymes, there are differences in the spectral and catalytic properties which are not explained by their similar redox inventories, identical subunit structures, immunological cross reactivity and conserved sequences. The inhibitors we have characterized are also proving of value in the spectral characterizations. Surprisingly, we only see a significant EP signal attributable to Ni after the enzyme has been inactivated with O{sub 2} and then reduced (though not reactivated). No spectral perterbations (EPR or UV-V is) of active enzyme can be attributed to binding of H{sub 2}, even though H{sub 2} clearly binds to this form of the enzyme. Acetylene, which does not substantially perterb the EPR signal of active hydrogenase, does result in a new absorption envelope in the UV-V is spectrum. Overall, the results of this project have revealed the complex interactions of the redox clusters in catalysis through studies of inhibitor mechanisms and spectral properties. 14 refs., 9 figs.

  9. Illuminating Dark Photons with High-Energy Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Curtin; Rouven Essig; Stefania Gori; Jessie Shelton

    2015-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    High-energy colliders offer a unique sensitivity to dark photons, the mediators of a broken dark U(1) gauge theory that kinetically mixes with the Standard Model (SM) hypercharge. Dark photons can be detected in the exotic decay of the 125 GeV Higgs boson, h -> Z Z_D -> 4l, and in Drell-Yan events, pp -> Z_D -> ll. If the dark U(1) is broken by a hidden-sector Higgs mechanism, then mixing between the dark and SM Higgs bosons also allows the exotic decay h -> Z_D Z_D -> 4l. We show that the 14 TeV LHC and a 100 TeV proton-proton collider provide powerful probes of both exotic Higgs decay channels. In the case of kinetic mixing alone, direct Drell-Yan production offers the best sensitivity to Z_D, and can probe epsilon >~ 9 x 10^(-4) (4 x 10^(-4)) at the HL-LHC (100 TeV pp collider). The exotic Higgs decay h -> Z Z_D offers slightly weaker sensitivity, but both measurements are necessary to distinguish the kinetically mixed dark photon from other scenarios. If Higgs mixing is also present, then the decay h -> Z_D Z_D can allow sensitivity to the Z_D for epsilon >~ 10^(-9) - 10^(-6) (10^(-10) - 10^(-7)) for the mass range 2 m_mu updating previous work in the literature. Electroweak precision measurements at LEP, Tevatron, and the LHC exclude epsilon as low as 3 x 10^(-2). Sensitivity can be improved by up to a factor of ~2 with HL-LHC data, and an additional factor of ~4 with ILC/GigaZ data.

  10. Large-Scale PV Module Manufacturing Using Ultra-Thin Polycrystalline Silicon Solar Cells: Final Subcontract Report, 1 April 2002--28 February 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wohlgemuth, J.; Narayanan, M.

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The major objectives of this program were to continue advances of BP Solar polycrystalline silicon manufacturing technology. The Program included work in the following areas. (1) Efforts in the casting area to increase ingot size, improve ingot material quality, and improve handling of silicon feedstock as it is loaded into the casting stations. (2) Developing wire saws to slice 100-..mu..m-thick silicon wafers on 290-..mu..m-centers. (3) Developing equipment for demounting and subsequent handling of very thin silicon wafers. (4) Developing cell processes using 100-..mu..m-thick silicon wafers that produce encapsulated cells with efficiencies of at least 15.4% at an overall yield exceeding 95%. (5) Expanding existing in-line manufacturing data reporting systems to provide active process control. (6) Establishing a 50-MW (annual nominal capacity) green-field Mega-plant factory model template based on this new thin polycrystalline silicon technology. (7) Facilitating an increase in the silicon feedstock industry's production capacity for lower-cost solar-grade silicon feedstock..

  11. An Overview of the MILAGRO 2006 Campaign: Mexico City Emissions and their Transport and Transformation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molina, Luisa T.; Madronich, Sasha; Gaffney, Jeffrey; Apel, Eric; de Foy, B.; Fast, Jerome D.; Ferrare, R.; Herndon, Scott C.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Lamb, Brian K.; Orsonio-Vargas, A. R.; Russell, P. B.; Schauer, James J.; Stevens, P. S.; Volkamer, Rainer M.; Zavala, Miguel A.

    2010-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The world’s population is projected to increase 33% during the next three decades, to 8.1 billion. Nearly all of the projected growth is expected to be concentrated in urban centers. These rapidly expanding urban regions and surrounding suburban areas are leading to the phenomenon of megacities (metropolitan areas with populations exceeding 10 million inhabitants). Well governed, densely populated settlements can reduce the need for land conversion and provide proximity to infrastructure and services. However, many urban areas experience uncontrolled sprawl and their activities are the leading cause of environmental problems. These mega-centers of human population are tied directly to increasing demands for energy and associated industrial activities and motorization that lead to more emission of pollutants into the atmosphere. Air pollution is one of the most important environmental challenges of this century. This challenge is particularly acute in the developing world where the rapid growth of megacities is producing atmospheric pollution of unprecedented severity and extent. MILAGRO (Megacity Initiative: Local And Global Research Observations) is the first international collaborative project to examine the behavior and the export of atmospheric pollutants generated in megacities. The Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) - one of the world’s largest megacities and North America’s most populous city -- was selected as the initial case study to characterize the sources and processes of emissions from the urban center and to evaluate the regional and global impacts of the Mexico City air pollution plume

  12. MAST Upgrade - Construction Status

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milnes, Joe; Dhalla, Fahim; Fishpool, Geoff; Hill, John; Katramados, Ioannis; Martin, Richard; Naylor, Graham; O'Gorman, Tom; Scannell, Rory

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST) is the centre piece of the UK fusion research programme. In 2010, a MAST Upgrade programme was initiated with three primary objectives, to contribute to: 1) Testing reactor concepts (in particular exhaust solutions via a flexible divertor allowing Super-X and other extended leg configurations); 2) Adding to the knowledge base for ITER (by addressing important plasma physics questions and developing predictive models to help optimise ITER performance of ITER) and 3) Exploring the feasibility of using a spherical tokamak as the basis for a fusion Component Test Facility. With the project mid-way through its construction phase, progress will be reported on a number of the critical subsystems. This will include manufacture and assembly of the coils, armour and support structures that make up the new divertors, construction of the new set coils that make up the centre column, installation of the new power supplies for powering the divertor coils and enhanced TF coil set, progr...

  13. Analysis Efforts Supporting NSTX Upgrades

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H.Zhang, P. Titus, P. Rogoff, A.Zolfaghari, D. Mangra, M. Smith

    2010-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is a low aspect ratio, spherical torus (ST) configuration device which is located at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) This device is presently being updated to enhance its physics by doubling the TF field to 1 Tesla and increasing the plasma current to 2 Mega-amperes. The upgrades include a replacement of the centerstack and addition of a second neutral beam. The upgrade analyses have two missions. The first is to support design of new components, principally the centerstack, the second is to qualify existing NSTX components for higher loads, which will increase by a factor of four. Cost efficiency was a design goal for new equipment qualification, and reanalysis of the existing components. Showing that older components can sustain the increased loads has been a challenging effort in which designs had to be developed that would limit loading on weaker components, and would minimize the extent of modifications needed. Two areas representing this effort have been chosen to describe in more details: analysis of the current distribution in the new TF inner legs, and, second, analysis of the out-of-plane support of the existing TF outer legs.

  14. A LEO-Based Solar-Shade System to Mitigate Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suresh, Rahul

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of a Low-Earth-Orbit (LEO) based solar-shade system, as part of a technically- and financially-viable multipurpose system to provide long-term solutions to global warming and the energy crisis is discussed. The proposed solar-shade and power system would be enabled by the development of a previously-proposed less-expensive, environment-friendly, space-elevator system to lift mass into space. The solar shades, even during their early deployment and growth in LEO, would provide benefits such as reduction of space-debris and depletion of the Van Allen radiation belts.The Terrestrial temperature profile has been approximated for each latitudinal zone with a one-dimensional model. A shade ring at an altitude of 2000-4000 km, consisting of thin-film mega panels totaling up to 4% of the earths surface area (to block ~1% of insolation), is proposed. The effects of such near-polar rings on the global temperature pattern has been examined using the simple model. Specific emphasis has been laid on this e...

  15. A LEO-Based Solar-Shade System to Mitigate Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahul Suresh; Andrew Meulenberg

    2015-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of a Low-Earth-Orbit (LEO) based solar-shade system, as part of a technically- and financially-viable multipurpose system to provide long-term solutions to global warming and the energy crisis is discussed. The proposed solar-shade and power system would be enabled by the development of a previously-proposed less-expensive, environment-friendly, space-elevator system to lift mass into space. The solar shades, even during their early deployment and growth in LEO, would provide benefits such as reduction of space-debris and depletion of the Van Allen radiation belts.The Terrestrial temperature profile has been approximated for each latitudinal zone with a one-dimensional model. A shade ring at an altitude of 2000-4000 km, consisting of thin-film mega panels totaling up to 4% of the earths surface area (to block ~1% of insolation), is proposed. The effects of such near-polar rings on the global temperature pattern has been examined using the simple model. Specific emphasis has been laid on this effect in the Polar Regions. One such proposed ring could reduce the peak summer temperature of the Polar Regions (80-90 degree latitude) by almost 3K. The tilting of the solar-shades, to reduce their cooling effect at the poles and to increase it in the near-polar regions, is recommended.

  16. Science and Technology of the 10-MA Spherical Tori

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peng, Y-K.M.

    1999-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Spherical Torus (ST) configuration has recently emerged as an example of confinement concept innovation that enables attractive steps in the development of fusion energy. The scientific potential for the ST has been indicated by recent encouraging results from START,2 CDX-U, and HIT. The scientific principles for the D-fueled ST will soon be tested by NSTX (National Spherical Torus Experiment3) in the U.S. and MAST (Mega-Amp Spherical Tokamak4) in the U.K. at the level of l-2 MA in plasma current. More recently, interest has grown in the U.S. in the possibility of near-term ST fusion burn devices at the level of 10 MA in plasma current. The missions for these devices would be to test burning plasma performance in a small, pulsed D-T-fueled ST (i.e., DTST) and to develop fusion energy technologies in a small steady state ST-based Volume Neutron Source (VNS). This paper reports the results of analysis of the key science and technology issues for these devices.

  17. Precision Magnet Measurements for X-Band Accelerator Quadrupole Triplets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marsh, R A; Anderson, S G; Armstrong, J P

    2012-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An X-band test station is being developed at LLNL to investigate accelerator optimization for future upgrades to mono-energetic gamma-ray (MEGa-Ray) technology at LLNL. Beamline magnets will include an emittance compensation solenoid, windowpane steering dipoles, and quadrupole magnets. Demanding tolerances have been placed on the alignment of these magnets, which directly affects the electron bunch beam quality. A magnet mapping system has been established at LLNL in order to ensure the delivered magnets match their field specification, and the mountings are aligned and capable of reaching the specified alignment tolerances. The magnet measurement system will be described which uses a 3-axis Lakeshore gauss probe mounted on a 3-axis translation stage. Alignment accuracy and precision will be discussed, as well as centering measurements and analysis. The dependence on data analysis over direct multi-pole measurement allows a significant improvement in useful alignment information. Detailed analysis of measurements on the beamline quadrupoles will be discussed, including multi-pole content both from alignment of the magnets, and the intrinsic level of multi-pole magnetic field.

  18. Progress in research April 1, 1993--March 31, 1994, Texas A and M University Cyclotron Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The period 1 April 1993--31 March 1994 has seen a number of significant developments of the research program as will be noted by the large increase in individual projects reviewed in this annual report. Among the highlights of the K500 experimental program in Sections 1, 2, and 4 are the investigations of excitation energy deposition and of fission dynamics employing both GDR and particle emission probes, measurements of isospin equilibration, studies of (d, {sup 2}He) reactions with the proton spectrometer and of the {beta} decay of {sup 57}Cu with MARS, and the precise studies of ionic charge state distributions using x-ray measurements. Progress in theoretical studies of the nuclear spectral function and the decay of many body systems, on the properties of mesons in hot hadronic matter and on the determination of astrophysical S-factors from experimental studies of very peripheral reactions are presented in Section 3. The status of the LAMPF based MEGA experiment and of the CERN based NA66 experiment, both of which involve institute scientists, is also briefly presented in this report. The shift to a seven day a week operation coupled with installation of cryopanels and more careful temperature control of the cooling water system have resulted in significant improvements in the operational efficiency and beam capabilities. Operating statistics are presented in Section 5.

  19. Advanced High-Speed 16-Bit Digitizer System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fastest commercially available 16-bit ADC can only perform around 200 mega-samples per second (200 MS/s). Connecting ADC chips together in eight different time domains increases the quantity of samples taken by a factor of eight. This method of interleaving requires that the input signal being sampled is split into eight identical signals and arrives at each ADC chip at the same point in time. The splitting of the input signal is performed in the analog front end containing a wideband filter that impedance matches the input signal to the ADC chips. Each ADC uses a clock to tell it when to perform a conversion. Using eight unique clocks spaced in 45-degree increments is the method used to time shift when each ADC chip performs its conversion. Given that this control clock is a fixed frequency, the clock phase shifting is accomplished by tightly controlling the distance that the clock must travel, resulting in a time delay. The interleaved ADC chips will now generate digital data in eight different time domains. These data are processed inside a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) to move the data back into a single time domain and store it into memory. The FPGA also contains a Nios II processor that provides system control and data retrieval via Ethernet.

  20. Measurement of Activation Reaction Rate Distributions in a Lead Assembly Bombarded with 500-MeV Protons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takada, Hiroshi; Meigo, Shin-ichro; Sasa, Toshinobu; Tsujimoto, Kazufumi; Yasuda, Hideshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (Japan)

    2000-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Reaction rate distributions of various activation detectors such as the {sup nat}Ni(n,x){sup 58}Co, {sup 197}Au(n,2n){sup 196}Au, and {sup 197}Au(n,4n){sup 194}Au reactions were measured to study the production and the transport of spallation neutrons in a lead assembly bombarded with protons of 500 MeV. The measured data were analyzed with the nucleon-meson transport code NMTC/JAERI combined with the MCNP4A code using the nuclide production cross sections based on the JENDL Dosimetry File and those calculated with the ALICE-F code. It was found that the NMTC/JAERI-MCNP4A calculations agreed well with the experiments for the low-energy-threshold reaction of {sup nat}Ni(n,x){sup 58}Co. With the increase of threshold energy, however, the calculation underestimated the experiments, especially above 20 MeV. The reason for the disagreement can be attributed to the underestimation of the neutron yield in the tens of mega-electron-volt regions by the NMTC/JAERI code.

  1. THE CANADA-FRANCE-HAWAII TELESCOPE LEGACY SURVEY: STACKED IMAGES AND CATALOGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gwyn, Stephen D. J., E-mail: Stephen.Gwyn@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca [Canadian Astronomy Data Centre, Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, British Columbia, V9E 2E7 (Canada)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the image stacks and catalogs of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey produced using the MegaPipe data pipeline at the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre. The Legacy Survey is divided into two parts. The Deep Survey consists of four fields each of 1 deg{sup 2}, with magnitude limits (50% completeness for point sources) of u = 27.5, g = 27.9, r = 27.7, i = 27.4, and z = 26.2. It contains 1.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} sources. The Wide Survey consists of 150 deg{sup 2} split over four fields, with magnitude limits of u = 26.0, g = 26.5, r = 25.9, i = 25.7, and z = 24.6. It contains 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} sources. This paper describes the calibration, image stacking, and catalog generation process. The images and catalogs are available on the web through several interfaces: normal image and text file catalog downloads, a 'Google Sky' interface, an image cutout service, and a catalog database query service.

  2. Quantization of Differences Between Atomic and Nuclear Rest Masses and Selforganization of Atoms and Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. A. Gareev; I. E. Zhidkova

    2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We come to the conclusion that all atomic models based on either the Newton equation and the Kepler laws, or the Maxwell equations, or the Schrodinger and Dirac equations are in reasonable agreement with experimental data. We can only suspect that these equations are grounded on the same fundamental principle(s) which is (are) not known or these equations can be transformed into each other. We proposed a new mechanism of LENR: cooperative processes in the whole system - nuclei+atoms+condensed matter - nuclear reactions in plasma - can occur at smaller threshold energies than the corresponding ones on free constituents. We were able to quantize phenomenologically the first time the differences between atomic and nuclear rest masses by the formula (in MeV/$c^{2}$) $\\Delta M=\\frac{n_{1}}{n_{2}}*0.0076294, n_{i}=1,2,3,...$ Note that this quantization rule is justified for atoms and nuclei with different $A, N$ and $Z$ and the nuclei and atoms represent a coherent synchronized systems - a complex of coupled oscillators (resonators). The cooperative resonance synchronization mechanisms are responsible for explanation of how the electron volt world can influence the nuclear mega electron volt world. It means that we created new possibilities for inducing and controlling nuclear reactions by atomic processes.

  3. The Lisbon new international airport: The story of a decision-making process and the role of Strategic Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Partidario, Maria R., E-mail: mrp@civil.ist.utl.p [Instituto Superior Tecnico, Departamento de Engenharia Civil e Arquitectura, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 LISBOA (Portugal); Coutinho, Miguel, E-mail: miguel.coutinho@ua.p [IDAD-Instituto do Ambiente e Desenvolvimento, Campus Universitario, 3810-193 AVEIRO (Portugal)

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the brief story of a decision process and the role of Strategic Environmental Assessment in government political decision-making. Following a prolonged, and agitated, decision process, initiated in the 1960s, the Government of Portugal in 2005 took the final decision to build the new international airport of Lisbon at the controversial location of Ota, 40 km north of Lisbon. The detailed project design and EIA were started. However this decision would change in 2007 due to the challenge raised by a private sponsored study that identified an alternative location for the airport at Campo de Tiro de Alcochete (CTA). This new site, which had never been considered as an option before, appeared to avoid many of the problems that caused public controversy at the Ota site. The Government, pressured by this challenge, promoted a strategic comparative assessment between the two sites. The result of this study was the choice of CTA as the preferred location. This paper discusses this radical change in the decision from a socio-political perspective. It will highlight the relevance of Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA), and the strategic and constructive approach it enables in mega-project decision-making.

  4. Software digitizer for high granular gaseous detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Haddad; M. Ruan; V. Boudry

    2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A sampling calorimeter equipped with gaseous sensor layers with digital readout is near perfect for "Particle Flow Algorithm" approach, since it is homogeneous over large surfaces, robust, cost efficient, easily segmentable to any readout pad dimension and size and almost insensitive to neutrons. The response of a finely segmented digital calorimeter is characterized by track efficiency and multiplicity. Monte Carlo (MC) programs such as GEANT4 simulate with high precision the energy deposited by particles. The sensor and electronic response associated to a pad are calculated in a separate "digitization" process. We developed a general method for simulating the pad response, a digitization, reproducing efficiency and multiplicity, using the spatial information from a simulation done at higher granularity. The digitization method proposed here has been applied to gaseous detectors including Glass Resistive Plate Chambers (GRPC) and MicroMegas. Validating the method on test beam data, experimental observables such as efficiency, multiplicity and mean number of hits at different thresholds have been reproduced with high precision.

  5. A spinning mirror for fast angular scans of EBW emission for magnetic pitch profile measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volpe, Francesco [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A tilted spinning mirror rapidly steers the line of sight of the electron Bernstein wave (EBW) emission radiometer at the Mega-Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST). In order to resist high mechanical stresses at rotation speeds of up to 12 000 rpm and to avoid eddy current induced magnetic braking, the mirror consists of a glass-reinforced nylon substrate of a special self-balanced design, coated with a reflecting layer. By completing an angular scan every 2.5-10 ms, it allows one to characterize with good time resolution the Bernstein-extraordinary-ordinary mode-conversion efficiency as a function of the view angles. Angular maps of conversion efficiency are directly related to the magnetic pitch angle at the cutoff layer for the ordinary mode. Hence, measurements at various frequencies provide the safety factor profile at the plasma edge. Initial measurements and indications of the feasibility of the diagnostic are presented. Moreover, angular scans indicate the best launch conditions for EBW heating.

  6. The Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey. IV. NGC 4216: A Bombarded Spiral in the Virgo Cluster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paudel, Sanjaya; Cote, Patrick; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Ferrarese, Laura; Ferriere, Etienne; Gwyn, Stephen D J; Mihos, J Christopher; Vollmer, Bernd; Balogh, Michael L; Carlberg, Ray G; Boissier, Samuel; Boselli, Alessandro; Durrell, Patrick R; Emsellem, Eric; MacArthur, Lauren A; Mei, Simona; Michel-Dansac, Leo; van Driel, Wim

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an investigation into the origins of a series of interlaced narrow filamentary stellar structures, loops and plumes in the vicinity of the Virgo Cluster, edge-on spiral galaxy, NGC 4216 that were previously identified by the Blackbird Telescope. Using the deeper, higher-resolution and precisely calibrated optical CFHT/MegaCam images obtained as part of the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS), we confirm the previously identified features and identify a few additional structures. The NGVS data allowed us to make a physical study of these low-surface brightness features and investigate their origin. The likely progenitors of the structures were identified as either already catalogued VCC dwarfs or newly discovered satellites caught in the act of being destroyed. They have the same g-i color index and likely contain similar stellar populations. The alignment of three dwarfs along an apparently single stream is intriguing, and we cannot totally exclude that these are second-generation dwarf gal...

  7. Characterization of Dosimetry of the BMRR Horizontal Thimble Tubes and Broad Beam Facility.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu,J.P.; Reciniello, R.N.; Holden, N.E.

    2008-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor was a 5 mega-watt, light-water cooled and heavy-graphite moderated research facility. It has two shutter-equipped treatment rooms, three horizontally extended thimble tubes, and an ex-core broad beam facility. The three experimental thimbles, or activation ports, external to the reactor tank were designed for several uses, including the investigations on diagnostic and therapeutic methods using radioactive isotopes of very short half-life, the analysis of radiation exposure on tissue-equivalent materials using a collimated neutron beam, and the evaluation of dose effects on biological cells to improve medical treatment. At the broad beam facility where the distribution of thermal neutrons was essential uniform, a wide variety of mammalian whole-body exposures were studied using animals such as burros or mice. Also studied at the broad beam were whole-body phantom experiments, involving the use of a neutron or photon beam streaming through a screen to obtain the flux spectrum suitable for dose analysis on the sugar-urea-water mixture, a tissue-equivalent material. Calculations of the flux and the dose at beam ports based on Monte Carlo particle-transport code were performed, and measurements conducted at the same tally locations were made using bare or cadmium-covered gold foils. Analytical results, which show good agreement with measurement data, are presented in the paper.

  8. Post Fukushima tsunami simulations for Malaysian coasts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koh, Hock Lye, E-mail: kohhl@ucsiuniversity.edu.my [Office of Deputy Vice Chancellor for Research and Post Graduate Studies, UCSI University, Jalan Menara Gading, 56000 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Teh, Su Yean, E-mail: syteh@usm.my [School of Mathematical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Pulau Pinang (Malaysia); Abas, Mohd Rosaidi Che [Malaysian Meteorological Department, MOSTI, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2014-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent recurrences of mega tsunamis in the Asian region have rekindled concern regarding potential tsunamis that could inflict severe damage to affected coastal facilities and communities. The 11 March 2011 Fukushima tsunami that crippled nuclear power plants in Northern Japan has further raised the level of caution. The recent discovery of petroleum reserves in the coastal water surrounding Malaysia further ignites the concern regarding tsunami hazards to petroleum facilities located along affected coasts. Working in a group, federal government agencies seek to understand the dynamics of tsunami and their impacts under the coordination of the Malaysian National Centre for Tsunami Research, Malaysian Meteorological Department. Knowledge regarding the generation, propagation and runup of tsunami would provide the scientific basis to address safety issues. An in-house tsunami simulation models known as TUNA has been developed by the authors to assess tsunami hazards along affected beaches so that mitigation measures could be put in place. Capacity building on tsunami simulation plays a critical role in the development of tsunami resilience. This paper aims to first provide a simple introduction to tsunami simulation towards the achievement of tsunami simulation capacity building. The paper will also present several scenarios of tsunami dangers along affected Malaysia coastal regions via TUNA simulations to highlight tsunami threats. The choice of tsunami generation parameters reflects the concern following the Fukushima tsunami.

  9. Perspective: Towards environmentally acceptable criteria for downstream fish passage through mini hydro and irrigation infrastructure in the Lower Mekong River Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baumgartner, Lee J.; Deng, Zhiqun; Thorncraft, Garry; Boys, Craig A.; Brown, Richard S.; Singhanouvong, Douangkham; Phonekhampeng, Oudom

    2014-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Tropical rivers have high annual discharges optimal for hydropower and irrigation development. The Mekong River is one of the largest tropical river systems, supporting a unique mega-diverse fish community. Fish are an important commodity in the Mekong, contributing a large proportion of calcium, protein, and essential nutrients to the diet of the local people and providing a critical source of income for rural households. Many of these fish migrate not only upstream and downstream within main-channel habitats but also laterally into highly productive floodplain habitat to both feed and spawn. Most work to date has focused on providing for upstream fish passage, but downstream movement is an equally important process to protect. Expansion of hydropower and irrigation weirs can disrupt downstream migrations and it is important to ensure that passage through regulators or mini hydro systems is not harmful or fatal. Many new infrastructure projects (<6?m head) are proposed for the thousands of tributary streams throughout the Lower Mekong Basin and it is important that designs incorporate the best available science to protect downstream migrants. Recent advances in technology have provided new techniques which could be applied to Mekong fish species to obtain design criteria that can facilitate safe downstream passage. Obtaining and applying this knowledge to new infrastructure projects is essential in order to produce outcomes that are more favorable to local ecosystems and fisheries.

  10. Advanced X-Band Test Accelerator for High Brightness Electron and Gamma Ray Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marsh, Roark; /LLNL, Livermore; Anderson, Scott; /LLNL, Livermore; Barty, Christopher; /LLNL, Livermore; Chu, Tak Sum; /LLNL, Livermore; Ebbers, Chris; /LLNL, Livermore; Gibson, David; /LLNL, Livermore; Hartemann, Fred; /LLNL, Livermore; Adolphsen, Chris; /SLAC; Jongewaard, Erik; /SLAC; Raubenheimer, Tor; /SLAC; Tantawi, Sami; /SLAC; Vlieks, Arnold; /SLAC; Wang, Juwen; /SLAC

    2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In support of Compton scattering gamma-ray source efforts at LLNL, a multi-bunch test stand is being developed to investigate accelerator optimization for future upgrades. This test stand will enable work to explore the science and technology paths required to boost the current 10 Hz monoenergetic gamma-ray (MEGa-Ray) technology to an effective repetition rate exceeding 1 kHz, potentially increasing the average gamma-ray brightness by two orders of magnitude. Multiple bunches must be of exceedingly high quality to produce narrow-bandwidth gamma-rays. Modeling efforts will be presented, along with plans for a multi-bunch test stand at LLNL. The test stand will consist of a 5.5 cell X-band rf photoinjector, single accelerator section, and beam diagnostics. The photoinjector will be a high gradient standing wave structure, featuring a dual feed racetrack coupler. The accelerator will increase the electron energy so that the emittance can be measured using quadrupole scanning techniques. Multi-bunch diagnostics will be developed so that the beam quality can be measured and compared with theory. Design will be presented with modeling simulations, and layout plans.

  11. ADVANCED X-BAND TEST ACCELERATOR FOR HIGH BRIGHTNESS ELECTRON AND GAMMA RAY BEAMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marsh, R A; Anderson, S G; Barty, C P; Chu, T S; Ebbers, C A; Gibson, D J; Hartemann, F V; Adolphsen, C; Jongewaard, E N; Raubenheimer, T; Tantawi, S G; Vlieks, A E; Wang, J W

    2010-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In support of Compton scattering gamma-ray source efforts at LLNL, a multi-bunch test stand is being developed to investigate accelerator optimization for future upgrades. This test stand will enable work to explore the science and technology paths required to boost the current 10 Hz monoenergetic gamma-ray (MEGa-Ray) technology to an effective repetition rate exceeding 1 kHz, potentially increasing the average gamma-ray brightness by two orders of magnitude. Multiple bunches must be of exceedingly high quality to produce narrow-bandwidth gamma-rays. Modeling efforts will be presented, along with plans for a multi-bunch test stand at LLNL. The test stand will consist of a 5.5 cell X-band rf photoinjector, single accelerator section, and beam diagnostics. The photoinjector will be a high gradient standing wave structure, featuring a dual feed racetrack coupler. The accelerator will increase the electron energy so that the emittance can be measured using quadrupole scanning techniques. Multi-bunch diagnostics will be developed so that the beam quality can be measured and compared with theory. Design will be presented with modeling simulations, and layout plans.

  12. Petrophysical characterization of the Carito Norte, Mulata and Carito fields, Norte de Monagas, Eastern Venezuela

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porras, J.C. [Corpoven, S.A., Puerto La Cruz (Venezuela); De J. Valle, [Amoco Production Company, Tulsa, OK (United States)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Norte de Monagas trend is located in the Eastern Venezuelan Basin and is characterized by high temperature, high initial pressure and production rates, variable PVT properties, GORs, and asphaltene content, and the presence of a tar mat at the base of the oil column. These reservoirs were petrophysically characterized through the integration of core and log data. Productive sands are composed of very coarse- to medium-grained sands deposited primarily in deltaic to shallow marine environments. These sands are quartz-rich, with clay matrix averaging 3% in the Oligocene and 6% in the Cretaceous. The main difference is the presence of up to 30% feldspars in the Cretaceous. Clay mineralogy is dominated by illitic material in the Cretaceous and by kaolinite in the Oligocene. Post-depositional changes dominated by cementation, mechanical compaction and subsequent dissolution processes have resulted in marked improvement or degradation of the productive characteristics of these reservoirs. Rocks were divided into four petrophysical. categories based on grain size, pore throat radius, porosity and permeability. Mercury saturation vs. mercury saturation over capillary pressure plots show the dominant interconnected pore system which controls flow rates is best defined by 50% saturation. Plots constructed using R50 pore aperture correlation indicate the pore throats to be macro to mega porous. Average log calculated water saturation is 14% compared with estimated from capillary pressure data of 12% at 1200{prime} above free water level, and 15% from relative permeability data. Relative permeability data indicate the rocks behave preferably as water-wet.

  13. Constraints on primordial non-Gaussianity from large scale structure probes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xia, Jun-Qing; Baccigalupi, Carlo [Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati, Via Bonomea 265, I-34136 Trieste (Italy); Matarrese, Sabino [Dipartimento di Fisica ''G. Galilei'', Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Verde, Licia [ICREA (Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats) and Instituto de Ciencias del Cosmos, (ICC-UB-IEEC) Universidad de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, 08028, Barcelona (Spain); Viel, Matteo, E-mail: xia@sissa.it, E-mail: bacci@sissa.it, E-mail: sabino.matarrese@pd.infn.it, E-mail: liciaverde@icc.ub.edu, E-mail: viel@oats.inaf.it [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, Via G.B. Tiepolo 11, I-34131 Trieste (Italy)

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we measure the angular power spectra C{sub l} of three high-redshift large-scale structure probes: the radio sources from the NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS), the quasar catalogue of Sloan Digital Sky Survey Release Six (SDSS DR6 QSOs) and the MegaZ-LRG (DR7), the final SDSS II Luminous Red Galaxy (LRG) photometric redshift survey. We perform a global analysis of the constraints on the amplitude of primordial non-Gaussianity from these angular power spectra, as well as from their cross-correlation power spectra with the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature map. In particular, we include non-Gaussianity of the type arising from single-field slow roll, multifields, curvaton (local type), and those which effects on the halo clustering can be described by the equilateral template (related to higher-order derivative type non-Gaussianity) and by the enfolded template (related to modified initial state or higher-derivative interactions). When combining all data sets, we obtain limits of f{sub NL} = 48±20, f{sub NL} = 50±265 and f{sub NL} = 183±95 at 68% confidence level for local, equilateral and enfolded templates, respectively. Furthermore, we explore the constraint on the cubic correction g{sub NL}?{sup 3} on the bias of dark matter haloes and obtain a limit of ?1.2 × 10{sup 5} < g{sub NL} < 11.3 × 10{sup 5} at 95% confidence level.

  14. A Novel MagPipe Pipeline transportation system using linear motor drives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, J.R.; Montgomery, D.B.; Roderick, L. [Magplane Technology Inc., Littleton, MA (United States)

    2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel capsule pipeline transportation system using linear motor drives, called Magplane MagPipe, is under development with the intention to replace trucks and railways for hauling materials from the mine to the rail head, power plant, or processing plant with reduced operating cost and energy consumption. The initial demonstration of a MagPipe line in Inner Mongolia will be a 500-m-long double-pipe coal transport system with the design transportation capacity of 3 Mega-Mg per year. The pipeline consists of 6-m-long plastic pipe modules with an I-beam suspension system inside the pipe to carry sets of five coupled capsules. The pipe will also contain noncontinuous motor winding modules spaced at 50-m intervals. A set of Halbach-arrayed permanent magnets on the bottom of the capsules interact with the linear motor windings to provide propulsion. The motor is driven by variable frequency drives outside the pipe to control the speed. This paper briefly describes the overall MagPipe pipeline transportation system, including the preliminary conclusions of the linear synchronous motor analysis.

  15. Solid State Replacement of Rotating Mirror Cameras

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank, A M; Bartolick, J M

    2006-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Rotating mirror cameras have been the mainstay of mega-frame per second imaging for decades. There is still no electronic camera that can match a film based rotary mirror camera for the combination of frame count, speed, resolution and dynamic range. The rotary mirror cameras are predominantly used in the range of 0.1 to 100 micro-seconds per frame, for 25 to more than a hundred frames. Electron tube gated cameras dominate the sub microsecond regime but are frame count limited. Video cameras are pushing into the microsecond regime but are resolution limited by the high data rates. An all solid state architecture, dubbed ''In-situ Storage Image Sensor'' or ''ISIS'', by Prof. Goji Etoh, has made its first appearance into the market and its evaluation is discussed. Recent work at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has concentrated both on evaluation of the presently available technologies and exploring the capabilities of the ISIS architecture. It is clear though there is presently no single chip camera that can simultaneously match the rotary mirror cameras, the ISIS architecture has the potential to approach their performance.

  16. Geothermal reservoir at Tatapani Geothermal field, Surguja district, Madhya Pradesh, IN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitale, U.L.; Sarolkar, P.B.; Rawat, H.S.; Shukia, S.N.

    1996-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tatapani Geothermal field, located on the Son-Narmada mega lineament is one of the most intense geothermal manifestation, with hot spring temperature of 98°c. in Central India. 21 Exploratory and thermal gradient boreholes followed by 5 production wells for proposed 300 KWe binary cycle power plant, have revealed specific reservoir parameters of shallow geothermal reservoir of 110°c in upper 350 m of geothermal system and their possible continuation to deeper reservoir of anticipated temperature of 160 ± 10°c. Testing of five production wells done by Oil and Natural Gas Corporation concurrently with drilling at different depths and also on completion of drilling, have established feeder zones of thermal water at depth of 175-200 m, 280-300 m, maximum temperature of 112.5°c and bottom hole pressure of 42 kg/cm². Further interpretation of temperature and pressure profiles, injection test, well head discharges and chemical analysis data has revealed thermal characteristics of individual production wells and overall configuration of .thermal production zones with their permeability, temperature, and discharge characteristics in the shallow thermal reservoir area. Well testing data and interpretation of reservoir parameters therefrom, for upper 350 m part of geothermal system and possible model of deeper geothermal reservoir at Tatapani have been presented in the paper.

  17. {open_quotes}Just-in-time inventory{close_quotes} proceed with caution!

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katterhenry, W.E.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Just when the power generation industry was stabilizing along came mega government regulations and changing economic conditions that threw a monkey wrench into the works. Although improved inventory practices have helped solve some coal problems, other still remain. The Clean Air Act has resulted in fuel switching, blending, equipment changes, and other factors, all contributing to power plant personnel grey hair. Then along came Just-In-Time inventory practices. Not only is the plant required to make all these changes to meet regulatory requirements, but reduce the quantity of fuel in inventory to unheard of low levels. Why is it so difficult to precisely account for coal in inventory? After all, inventory is a simple matter of accurately measuring the coal coming in to the plant, measuring the coal used by the plant, and conducting an accurate physical inventory to measure the remaining coal. Add to this, a major coal inventory reduction policy, when base maps are not maintained or updated and are, therefore, not likely to be accurate. Some coal may have been stored below the prevailing water table, rendering the coal unusable. Weather conditions, such as major ice storms can render much of the coal unburnable. Unless accounted for, these things reduce the perceived amount of coal in inventory. This presentation will address these issues to assist in preventing potential unscheduled plant shut down and the need to purchase unscheduled blocks of emergency power. Just-In-Time Inventory isn`t as straightforward as first meets the eye.

  18. SECA Coal-Based Systems - LGFCS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goettler, Richard

    2014-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    LGFCS is developing an integrated planar (IP) SOFC technology for mega-watt scale power generation including the potential for use in highly efficient, economically competitive central generation power plant facilities fuel by coal synthesis gas. This Department of Energy Solid-State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) program has been aimed at achieving further cell and stack technical advancements and assessing the readiness of the LGFCS SOFC stack technology to be scaled to larger-scale demonstrations as a path to commercialization. Significant progress was achieved in reducing to practice a higher performance and lower cost cell technology, identifying and overcoming degradation mechanisms, confirming the structural capability of the porous substrate for reliability, maturing the strip design for improved flow to allow high fuel utilization operation while minimizing degradation mechanisms and obtaining full scale block testing at 19 kW under representative conditions for eventual product and meeting SECA degradation metrics. The SECA program has played a key role within the overall LGFCS development program in setting the foundation of the technology to justify the progression of the technology to the next level of technology readiness testing.

  19. Study of the pulse power supply unit for the four-horn system of the CERN to Fréjus neutrino super beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baussan, E; Dracos, M; Gaudiot, G; Osswald, F; Poussot, P; Vassilopoulos, N; Wurtz, J; Zeter, V

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The power supply studies for the four-horn system for the CERN to Fréjus neutrino Super Beam oscillation experiment are discussed here. The power supply is being studied to meet the physics potential and the mega-watt (MW) power requirements of the proton driver of the Super Beam. A one-half sinusoid current waveform with a 350 kA maximum current and pulse length of 100 \\mu s at 50 Hz frequency is generated and distributed to four-horns. In order to provide the necessary current needed to focus the charged mesons producing the neutrino beam, a bench of capacitors is charged at 50 Hz frequency to a +12 kV reference voltage and then discharged through a large switch to each horn via a set of strip-lines at the same rate. A current recovery stage allows to invert rapidly the negative voltage of the capacitor after the discharging stage in order to recuperate large part of the injected energy and thus to limit the power consuption. The energy recovery efficiency of that system is very high at 97%. For feasibilit...

  20. Microwave Power Beaming Infrastructure for Manned Lightcraft Operations: Part 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myrabo, Leik N. [Lightcraft Technologies, Inc., Bennington, VT (United States)

    2008-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In the past {approx}7 years, microwave gyrotron technology has rapidly evolved to a critical threshold wherein ultra-energetic space launch missions based on beamed energy propulsion (BEP) now appear eminently feasible. Over the next 20 years, hundred megawatt-class microwave power-beaming stations could be prototyped on high deserts and 3- to 4 km mountain peaks before migrating into low Earth orbit, along with their passive microwave relay satellites. Described herein is a 20 GW rechargeable nuclear power satellite and microwave power-beaming infrastructure designed for manned space launch operations in the year 2025. The technological readiness of 2500 GJ superconducting magnetic energy storage 'batteries', 433-m ultralight space structures, 100 MW liquid droplet radiators, 1-6+ MW gyrotron sources, and mega-scale arrays (e.g., 3000 phase-locked units) is addressed. Microwave BEP is 'breakthrough' technology with the very real potential to radically reduce space access costs by factors of 100 to 1000 in the forseeable future.

  1. Precision formed micro magnets: LDRD project summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CHRISTENSON,TODD R.; GARINO,TERRY J.; VENTURINI,EUGENE L.

    2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microfabrication process is described that provides for the batch realization of miniature rare earth based permanent magnets. Prismatic geometry with features as small as 5 microns, thicknesses up through several hundred microns and with submicron tolerances may be accommodated. The processing is based on a molding technique using deep x-ray lithography as a means to generate high aspect-ratio precision molds from PMMA (poly methyl methacrylate) used as an x-ray photoresist. Subsequent molding of rare-earth permanent magnet (REPM) powder combined with a thermosetting plastic binder may take place directly in the PMMA mold. Further approaches generate an alumina form replicated from the PMMA mold that becomes an intermediate mold for pressing higher density REPM material and allows for higher process temperatures. Maximum energy products of 3--8 MGOe (Mega Gauss Oersted, 1 MGOe = 100/4{pi} kJ/m{sup 3}) are obtained for bonded isotropic forms of REPM with dimensions on the scale of 100 microns and up to 23 MGOe for more dense anisotropic REPM material using higher temperature processing. The utility of miniature precision REPMs is revealed by the demonstration of a miniature multipole brushless DC motor that possesses a pole-anisotropic rotor with dimensions that would otherwise prohibit multipole magnetization using a multipole magnetizing fixture at this scale. Subsequent multipole assembly also leads to miniaturized Halbach arrays, efficient magnetic microactuators, and mechanical spring-like elements which can offset miniaturized mechanical scaling behavior.

  2. Range gated strip proximity sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1996-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A range gated strip proximity sensor uses one set of sensor electronics and a distributed antenna or strip which extends along the perimeter to be sensed. A micro-power RF transmitter is coupled to the first end of the strip and transmits a sequence of RF pulses on the strip to produce a sensor field along the strip. A receiver is coupled to the second end of the strip, and generates a field reference signal in response to the sequence of pulse on the line combined with received electromagnetic energy from reflections in the field. The sensor signals comprise pulses of radio frequency signals having a duration of less than 10 nanoseconds, and a pulse repetition rate on the order of 1 to 10 MegaHertz or less. The duration of the radio frequency pulses is adjusted to control the range of the sensor. An RF detector feeds a filter capacitor in response to received pulses on the strip line to produce a field reference signal representing the average amplitude of the received pulses. When a received pulse is mixed with a received echo, the mixing causes a fluctuation in the amplitude of the field reference signal, providing a range-limited Doppler type signature of a field disturbance. 6 figs.

  3. Kinetic simulation studies of laser-triggering in the Z gas switch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welch, D. R.; Rose, D. V.; Thoma, C.; Clark, R. E.; Miller, C.; Madrid, E. A.; Zimmerman, W. R. [Voss Scientific, LLC, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87108 (United States)] [Voss Scientific, LLC, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87108 (United States); Rambo, P. K.; Schwarz, J.; Savage, M.; Atherton, B. W. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1196 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1196 (United States)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced z-pinch accelerators require precise timing of multiple mega-ampere drivers to deliver terawatt power. The triggering of these drivers is now largely initiated by laser ionization of gas switches. In this paper, we discuss detailed fully kinetic simulation of the Z laser-triggered gas switch involving detailed finite-difference time-domain particle-in-cell Monte Carlo modeling of the trigger section of the switch. Other components of the accelerator from the Marx bank through the pulse-forming line are described as circuit elements. The simulations presented here build on a recently developed model of electro-negative gas breakdown and streamer propagation that included photons produced from de-excited neutrals. New effects include multi-photon ionization of the gas in a prescribed laser field. The simulations show the sensitivity of triggering to laser parameters including focal plane within the anode-cathode gap of the trigger section of the switch, intensity at focus, and laser pulse length. Detailed electromagnetic simulations of the trigger section with circuit modeling of the upstream and downstream components are largely in agreement with Z data and demonstrate a new capability.

  4. Range gated strip proximity sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A range gated strip proximity sensor uses one set of sensor electronics and a distributed antenna or strip which extends along the perimeter to be sensed. A micro-power RF transmitter is coupled to the first end of the strip and transmits a sequence of RF pulses on the strip to produce a sensor field along the strip. A receiver is coupled to the second end of the strip, and generates a field reference signal in response to the sequence of pulse on the line combined with received electromagnetic energy from reflections in the field. The sensor signals comprise pulses of radio frequency signals having a duration of less than 10 nanoseconds, and a pulse repetition rate on the order of 1 to 10 MegaHertz or less. The duration of the radio frequency pulses is adjusted to control the range of the sensor. An RF detector feeds a filter capacitor in response to received pulses on the strip line to produce a field reference signal representing the average amplitude of the received pulses. When a received pulse is mixed with a received echo, the mixing causes a fluctuation in the amplitude of the field reference signal, providing a range-limited Doppler type signature of a field disturbance.

  5. The All-Wavelength Extended Groth Strip International Survey(AEGIS) Data Sets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, M.; Guhathakurta, P.; Konidaris, N.P.; Newman, J.A.; Ashby, M.L.N.; Biggs, A.D.; Barmby, P.; Bundy, K.; Chapman, S.C.; Coil,A.L.; Conselice, C.J.; Cooper, M.C.; Croton, D.J.; Eisenhardt, P.R.M.; Ellis, R.S.; Faber, S.M.; Fang, T.; Fazio, G.G.; Georgakakis, A.; Gerke,B.F.; Goss, W.M.; Gwyn, S.; Harker, J.; Hopkins, A.M.; Huang, J.-S.; Ivison, R.J.; Kassin, S.A.; Kirby, E.N.; Koekemoer, A.M.; Koo, D.C.; Laird, E.S.; Le Floc'h, E.; Lin, L.; Lotz, J.M.; Marshall, P.J.; Martin,D.C.; Metevier, A.J.; Moustakas, L.A.; Nandra, K.; Noeske, K.G.; Papovich, C.; Phillips, A.C.; Rich,R. M.; Rieke, G.H.; Rigopoulou, D.; Salim, S.; Schiminovich, D.; Simard, L.; Smail, I.; Small,T.A.; Weiner,B.J.; Willmer, C.N.A.; Willner, S.P.; Wilson, G.; Wright, E.L.; Yan, R.

    2006-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In this the first of a series of Letters, we present a description of the panchromatic data sets that have been acquired in the Extended Groth Strip region of the sky. Our survey, the All-wavelength Extended Groth Strip International Survey (AEGIS), is intended to study the physical properties and evolutionary processes of galaxies at z{approx}1. It includes the following deep, wide-field imaging data sets: Chandra/ACIS X-ray (0.5-10 keV), GALEX ultraviolet (1200-2500 Angstroms), CFHT/MegaCam Legacy Survey optical (3600-9000 Angstroms), CFHT/CFH12K optical (4500-9000 Angstroms), Hubble Space Telescope/ACS optical (4400-8500 Angstroms), Palomar/WIRC near-infrared (1.2-2.2 {micro}m), Spitzer/IRAC mid-infrared (3.6-8.0 {micro}m), Spitzer/MIPS far-infrared (24-70 {micro}m), and VLA radio continuum (6-20 cm). In addition, this region of the sky has been targeted for extensive spectroscopy using the DEIMOS spectrograph on the Keck II 10 m telescope. Our survey is compared to other large multiwavelength surveys in terms of depth and sky coverage.

  6. The All-wavelength Extended Groth Strip International Survey (AEGIS) Data Sets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, M.; Guhathakurta, P.; Konidaris, N.; Newman, J.A.; Ashby, M.L.N.; Biggs, A.D.; Barmby, P.; Bundy, K.; Chapman, S.; Coil, A.L.; Conselice, C.; Cooper, M.; Croton,; Eisenhardt, P.; Ellis, R.; Faber, S.; Fang, T.; Fazio, G.G.; Georgakakis, A.; Gerke, B.; Goss, W.M.; /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept. /Lick Observ. /LBL, Berkeley

    2006-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In this the first of a series of ''Letters'', we present a description of the panchromatic data sets that have been acquired in the Extended Groth Strip region of the sky. Our survey, the All-wavelength Extended Groth Strip International Survey (AEGIS), is intended to study the physical properties and evolutionary processes of galaxies at z {approx} 1. It includes the following deep, wide-field imaging data sets: Chandra/ACIS{sup 30} X-ray (0.5-10 keV), GALEX{sup 31} ultraviolet (1200-2500 A), CFHT/MegaCam Legacy Survey{sup 32} optical (3600-9000 {angstrom}), CFHT/CFH12K optical (4500-9000 {angstrom}), Hubble Space Telescope/ACS{sup 33} optical (4400-8500 {angstrom}), Palomar/WIRC{sup 34} near-infrared (1.2-2.2 {micro}m), Spitzer/IRAC{sup 35} mid-infrared (3.6-8.0 {micro}m), Spitzer/MIPS far-infrared (24-70 {micro}m), and VLA{sup 36} radio continuum (6-20 cm). In addition, this region of the sky has been targeted for extensive spectroscopy using the DEIMOS spectrograph on the Keck II 10 m telescope{sup 37}. Our survey is compared to other large multiwavelength surveys in terms of depth and sky coverage.

  7. Research on pinches driven by SPPED 2 generator hard X-ray and neutron emission in plasma focus configuration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sánchez-Soto, L L; Silva, P; Sylvester, G S; Zambra, M; Pavez, C; Raspa, V; Castillo, F; Kies, W; Soto, Leopoldo; Moreno, Jose; Silva, Patricio; Sylvester, Gustavo; Zambra, Marcelo; Pavez, Cristian; Raspa, Veronica; Castillo, Fermin; Kies, Walter

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SPEED2 is a generator based on Marx technology and was designed in the University of Dusseldorf. SPEED2 consists on 40 +/- Marx modules connected in parallel (4.1 mF equivalent Marx generator capacity, 300 kV, 4 MA in short circuit, 187 kJ, 400 ns rise time, dI/dt~1013 A/s). Currently the SPEED2 is operating at the Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear, CCHEN, Chile, being the most powerful and energetic device for dense transient plasma in the Southern Hemisphere. Most of the previous works developed in SPEED2 at Dusseldorf were done in a plasma focus configuration for soft X-ray emission and the neutron emission from SPEED2 was not completely studied. The research program at CCHEN considers experiments in different pinch configurations (plasma focus, gas puffed plasma focus, gas embedded Z-pinch, wire arrays) at current of hundred of kiloamperes to mega-amperes, using the SPEED2 generator. The Chilean operation has begun implementing and developing diagnostics in a conventional plasma focus configuration oper...

  8. Tests of the Hardware and Software for the Reconstruction of Trajectories in the Experiment MINERvA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palomino Gallo, Jose Luis; /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MINERvA experiment has a highly segmented and high precision neutrino detector able to record events with high statistic (over 13 millions in a four year run). MINERvA uses FERMILAB NuMI beamline. The detector will allow a detailed study of neutrino-nucleon interactions. Moreover, the detector has a target with different materials allowing, for the first time, the study of nuclear effects in neutrino interactions. We present here the work done with the MINERvA reconstruction group that has resulted in: (a) development of new codes to be added to the RecPack package so it can be adapted to the MINERvA detector structure; (b) finding optimum values for two of the MegaTracker reconstruction package variables: PEcut = 4 (minimum number of photo electrons for a signal to be accepted) and Chi2Cut = 200 (maximum value of {chi}{sup 2} for a track to be accepted); (c) testing of the multi anode photomultiplier tubes used at MINERvA in order to determine the correlation between different channels and for checking the device's dark counts.

  9. Forestry management for sustainable development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Silva, E.; Appanah, S.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Forests in the developing world are in crisis. Nowhere is this more acute than in Asia: though one-third of the land mass is covered with forests, this ratio is shrinking rapidly at the rate of 2 million hectares per year. By current trends, half of the original 725 million hectares will disappear by the year 2000. The dramatic declines will occur in India, Nepal, Philippines, Sri Lanka and Thailand. Some of the economic costs of deforestation are obvious. Timber export has long been an important income earner (eg, it is a second major export after oil earning $4.2 billion in 1991 for Indonesia and $3.8 billion in 1992 for Malaysia). Some of the losses from deforestation are of concern to the world community. China, India, Indonesia, and Malaysia are among the 12 'mega-diversity' countries in which half of the earth's plant and animal species are to be found. (Copyright (c) 1993 The International Bank for Reconstruction and Development/The World Bank.)

  10. Machos in M31? Absence of Evidence but not Evidence of Absence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Jong, Jelte T.A.; Widrow, Lawrence M.; Cseresnjes, Patrick; Kuijken, Konrad; Crotts, Arlin P.S.; Bergier, Alexander; Baltz, Edward A.; Gyuk, Geza; Sackett, Penny D.; Uglesich, Robert R.; Sutherland, Will J.; /Kapteyn Astron. Inst., Groningen /Queen's U., Kingston /Columbia U., Astron. Astrophys. /Leiden Observ. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Chicago U.,

    2005-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results of a microlensing survey toward the Andromeda Galaxy (M31) carried out during four observing seasons at the Isaac Newton Telescope (INT). This survey is part of the larger microlensing survey toward M31 performed by the Microlensing Exploration of the Galaxy and Andromeda (MEGA) collaboration. Using a fully automated search algorithm, we indentify 14 candidate microlensing events, three of which are reported here for the first time. Observations obtained at the Mayall telescope are combined with the INT data to produce composite light curves for these candidates. The results from the survey are compared with theoretical predictions for the number and distribution of events. These predictions are based on a Monte Carlo calculation of the detection efficiency and disk-bulge-halo models for M31. The models provide the full phase-space distribution functions (DFs) for the lens and source populations and are motivated by dynamical and observational considerations. They include differential extinction and span a wide range of parameter space characterized primarily by the mass-to-light ratios for the disk and bulge. For most models, the observed event rate is consistent with the rate predicted for self-lensing--a MACHO halo fraction of 30% or higher can be ruled at the 95% confidence level. The event distribution does show a large near-far asymmetry hinting at a halo contribution to the microlensing signal. Two candidate events are located at particularly large projected radii on the far side of the disk. These events are difficult to explain by self lensing and only somewhat easier to explain by MACHO lensing. A possibility is that one of these is due to a lens in a giant stellar stream.

  11. Variation and Trends of Landscape Dynamics, Land Surface Phenology and Net Primary Production of the Appalachian Mountains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yeqiao; Zhao, Jianjun; Zhou, Yuyu; Zhang, Hongyan

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The gradients of the Appalachian Mountains in elevations and latitudes provide a unique regional perspective of landscape variations in the eastern United States and a section of the southeastern Canada. This study reveals patterns and trends of landscape dynamics, land surface phenology and ecosystem production along the Appalachian Mountains using time series data from Global Inventory Modeling and Mapping Studies (GIMMS) and AVHRR Global Production Efficiency Model (GloPEM) datasets. We analyzed the spatial and temporal patterns of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), length of growing season (LOS) and net primary production (NPP) of selected ecoregions along the Appalachian Mountains regions. We compared the results out of the Appalachian Mountains regions in different spatial contexts including the North America and the Appalachian Trail corridor area. To reveal latitudinal variations we analyzed data and compared the results between 30°N-40°N and 40°N-50°N latitudes. The result revealed significant decreases in annual peak NDVI in the Appalachian Mountains regions. The trend for the Appalachian Mountains regions was -0.0018 (R2=0.55, P<0.0001) NDVI unit decrease per year during 25 years between 1982 and 2006. The LOS had prolonged 0.3 day yr-1 during 25 years over the Appalachian Mountains regions. The NPP increased by 2.68 gC m-2yr-2 in Appalachian Mountains regions from 1981 to 2000. The comparison with the North America reveals the effects of topography and ecosystem compositions of the Appalachian Mountains. The comparison with the Appalachian Trail corridor area provides a regional mega-transect view of the measured variables.

  12. A MEGACAM SURVEY OF OUTER HALO SATELLITES. II. BLUE STRAGGLERS IN THE LOWEST STELLAR DENSITY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santana, Felipe A.; Munoz, Ricardo R. [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Chile, Camino El Observatorio 1515, Las Condes, Santiago (Chile); Geha, Marla [Astronomy Department, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Cote, Patrick; Stetson, Peter [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, Victoria, BC, V9E 2E7 (Canada); Simon, Joshua D. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Djorgovski, S. G., E-mail: fsantana@das.uchile.cl, E-mail: rmunoz@das.uchile.cl [Astronomy Department, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, 91125 (United States)

    2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a homogeneous study of blue straggler stars across 10 outer halo globular clusters, 3 classical dwarf spheroidal galaxies, and 9 ultra-faint galaxies based on deep and wide-field photometric data taken with MegaCam on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. We find blue straggler stars to be ubiquitous among these Milky Way satellites. Based on these data, we can test the importance of primordial binaries or multiple systems on blue straggler star formation in low-density environments. For the outer halo globular clusters, we find an anti-correlation between the specific frequency of blue stragglers and absolute magnitude, similar to that previously observed for inner halo clusters. When plotted against density and encounter rate, the frequency of blue stragglers is well fit by a single trend with a smooth transition between dwarf galaxies and globular clusters; this result points to a common origin for these satellites' blue stragglers. The fraction of blue stragglers stays constant and high in the low encounter rate regime spanned by our dwarf galaxies, and decreases with density and encounter rate in the range spanned by our globular clusters. We find that young stars can mimic blue stragglers in dwarf galaxies only if their ages are 2.5 {+-} 0.5 Gyr and they represent {approx}1%-7% of the total number of stars, which we deem highly unlikely. These results point to mass-transfer or mergers of primordial binaries or multiple systems as the dominant blue straggler formation mechanism in low-density systems.

  13. CHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF THE NINTH MAGNITUDE CARBON-ENHANCED METAL-POOR STAR BD+44 Degree-Sign 493

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ito, Hiroko; Aoki, Wako [Department of Astronomical Science, School of Physical Sciences, Graduate University for Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI), 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Beers, Timothy C. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Tominaga, Nozomu [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Konan University, 8-9-1 Okamoto, Kobe, Hyogo 658-8501 (Japan); Honda, Satoshi [Kwasan Observatory, School of Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto 377-0702 (Japan); Carollo, Daniela, E-mail: aoki.wako@nao.ac.jp, E-mail: beers@noao.edu, E-mail: tominaga@konan-u.ac.jp, E-mail: honda@kwasan.kyoto-u.ac.jp, E-mail: daniela.carollo@mq.edu.au [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Astronomy, Astrophysics and Astrophotonic Research Center, Macquarie University, North Ryde, NSW 2109 (Australia)

    2013-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present detailed chemical abundances for the bright carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) star BD+44 Degree-Sign 493, previously reported on by Ito et al. Our measurements confirm that BD+44 Degree-Sign 493 is an extremely metal-poor ([Fe/H] =-3.8) subgiant star with excesses of carbon and oxygen. No significant excesses are found for nitrogen and neutron-capture elements (the latter of which place it in the CEMP-no class of stars). Other elements that we measure exhibit abundance patterns that are typical for non-CEMP extremely metal-poor stars. No evidence for variations of radial velocity has been found for this star. These results strongly suggest that the carbon enhancement in BD+44 Degree-Sign 493 is unlikely to have been produced by a companion asymptotic giant-branch star and transferred to the presently observed star, nor by pollution of its natal molecular cloud by rapidly-rotating, massive, mega metal-poor ([Fe/H] < - 6.0) stars. A more likely possibility is that this star formed from gas polluted by the elements produced in a ''faint'' supernova, which underwent mixing and fallback, and only ejected small amounts of elements of metals beyond the lighter elements. The Li abundance of BD+44 Degree-Sign 493 (A(Li) = log (Li/H)+12 =1.0) is lower than the Spite plateau value, as found in other metal-poor subgiants. The upper limit on Be abundance (A(Be) = log (Be/H)+12 < - 1.8) is as low as those found for stars with similarly extremely-low metallicity, indicating that the progenitors of carbon- (and oxygen-) enhanced stars are not significant sources of Be, or that Be is depleted in metal-poor subgiants with effective temperatures of {approx}5400 K.

  14. Nonlinear interactions of electromagnetic waves with the auroral ionosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, Alfred Y. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA, Los Angeles, California 90024 (United States)

    1999-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The ionosphere provides us with an opportunity to perform plasma experiments in an environment with long confinement times, very large-scale lengths, and no confining walls. The auroral ionosphere with its nearly vertical magnetic field geometry is uniquely endowed with large amount of free energy from electron and ion precipitation along the magnetic field and mega-ampere current across the magnetic field. To take advantage of this giant outdoor laboratory, two facilities HAARP and HIPAS, with frequencies ranging from the radio to optical bands, are now available for active probing of and interaction with this interesting region. The ponderomotive pressures from the self-consistent wave fields have produced significant local perturbations of density and particle distributions at heights where the incident EM frequency matches a plasma resonance. This paper will review theory and experiments covering the nonlinear phenomena of parametric decay instability to wave collapse processes. At HF frequencies plasma lenses can be created by preconditioning pulses to focus what is a normally divergent beam into a high-intensity spot to further enhance nonlinear phenomena. At optical wavelengths a large rotating liquid metal mirror is used to focus laser pulses up to a given height. Such laser pulses are tuned to the same wavelengths of selected atomic and molecular resonances, with resulting large scattering cross sections. Ongoing experiments on dual-site experiments and excitation of ELF waves will be presented. The connection of such basic studies to environmental applications will be discussed. Such applications include the global communication using ELF waves, the ozone depletion and remediation and the control of atmospheric CO{sub 2} through the use of ion cyclotron resonant heating.

  15. PHOTOMETRIC PROPERTIES OF THE M33 STAR CLUSTER SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    San Roman, Izaskun; Sarajedini, Ata [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Science Center, Gainesville, FL 32611-2055 (United States); Aparicio, Antonio, E-mail: izaskun@astro.ufl.ed, E-mail: ata@astro.ufl.ed, E-mail: antapaj@iac.e [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, Via Lactea s/n. E-38205, La Laguna, Tenerife, Canary Islands (Spain)

    2010-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a catalog of 2990 extended sources in a 1{sup 0} x 1{sup 0} area centered on M33 using the MegaCam camera on the 3.6 m Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. The catalog includes 599 new candidate stellar clusters, 204 previously confirmed clusters, 1969 likely background galaxies, and 218 unknown extended objects. We present ugriz integrated magnitudes of the candidates and confirmed star clusters (SCs) as well as the full width at half maximum, ellipticity, and stellarity. Based on the properties of the confirmed SCs, we select a sub-sample of highly probable clusters composed of 246 objects. The integrated photometry of the complete cluster catalog reveals a wide range of colors of -0.4 < (g - r) < 1.5 and -1.0 < (r - i) < 1.0 with no obvious cluster subpopulations. Comparisons with models of simple stellar populations suggest a large range of ages some as old as {approx}10 Gyr. In addition, we find a sequence in the color-color diagrams that deviates from the expected direction of evolution. This feature could be associated with very young clusters (<10{sup 7} yr) possessing significant nebular emission. Analysis of the radial density distribution suggests that the cluster system of M33 has suffered from significant depletion possibly due to interactions with M31. We also detect a gap in the cluster distribution in the color-color diagram at (g - r) {approx_equal} 0.3 and (u - g) {approx_equal} 0.8. This gap could be interpreted as an evolutionary effect. This complete catalog provides promising targets for deep photometry and high-resolution spectroscopy to study the structure and star formation history of M33.

  16. A human chromosome 7 yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) resource: Construction, characterization, and screening

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, E.D.; Braden, V.V.; Fulton, R.S. [Washington Univ. School of Medicine, ST. Louis, MO (United States)] [and others] [Washington Univ. School of Medicine, ST. Louis, MO (United States); and others

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paradigm of sequence-tagged site (STS)-content mapping involves the systematic assignment of STSs to individual cloned DNA segments. To date, yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) represent the most commonly employed cloning system for constructing STS maps of large genomic intervals, such as whole human chromosomes. For developing a complete YAC-based STS-content map of human chromosome 7, we wished to utilize a limited set of YAC clones that were highly enriched for chromosome 7 DNA. Toward that end, we have assembled a human chromosome 7 YAC resource that consists of three major components: (1) a newly constructed library derived from a human-hamster hybrid cell line containing chromosome 7 as its only human DNA; (2) a chromosome 7-enriched sublibrary derived from the CEPH mega-YAC collection by Alu-polymerase chain reaction (Alu-PCR)-based hybridization; and (3) a set of YACs isolated from several total genomic libraries by screening for >125 chromosome 7 STSs. In particular, the hybrid cell line-derived YACs, which comprise the majority of the clones in the resource, have a relatively low chimera frequency (10-20%) based on mapping isolated insert ends to panels of human-hamster hybrid cell lines and analyzing individual clones by fluorescence in situ hybridization. An efficient strategy for polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based screening of this YAC resource, which totals 4190 clones, has been developed and utilized to identify corresponding YACs for >600 STSs. The results of this initial screening effort indicate that the human chromosome 7 YAC resource provides an average of 6.9 positive clones per STS, a level of redundancy that should support the assembly of large YAC contigs and the construction of a high-resolution STS-content map of the chromosome. 72 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Study of electron-positron interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abashian, A.; Gotow, K.; Philonen, L.

    1990-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    For the past seven years, this group has been interested in the study of tests of the Standard Model of Electroweak interactions. The program has centered about the AMY experiment which examines the nature of the final state products in electron-positron collisions in the center of mass energy range near 60 GeV. Results of these measurements have shown a remarkable consistency with the predictions of the minimal model of 3 quark and lepton generations and single charged and neutral intermediate bosons. No new particles or excited states have been observed nor has any evidence for departures in cross sections or angular asymmetries from expectations been observed. These conclusions have been even more firmly established by the higher energy results from the LEP and SLC colliders at center of mass energies of about 90 GeV. Our focus is shifting to the neutrino as a probe to electroweak interactions. The relative merit of attempting to observe neutrinos from point sources versus observing neutrinos generally is not easy to predict. The improved ability to interpret is offset by the probably episodic nature of the emission and irreproducibility of the results. In this phase of development, it is best to be sensitive to both sources of neutrinos. As a second phase of our program at Virginia Tech, we are studying the feasibility of detecting cosmic ray neutrinos in a proposed experiment which we have called NOVA. the results of the test setup will be instrumental in developing an optimum design. A third program we are involved in is the MEGA experiment at Los Alamos, an experiment to place a limit on the rate of muon decay to electron plus photon which is forbidden by the Standard Model.

  18. Evidence cross-validation and Bayesian inference of MAST plasma equilibria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nessi, G. T. von; Hole, M. J. [Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Svensson, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany); Appel, L. [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, current profiles for plasma discharges on the mega-ampere spherical tokamak are directly calculated from pickup coil, flux loop, and motional-Stark effect observations via methods based in the statistical theory of Bayesian analysis. By representing toroidal plasma current as a series of axisymmetric current beams with rectangular cross-section and inferring the current for each one of these beams, flux-surface geometry and q-profiles are subsequently calculated by elementary application of Biot-Savart's law. The use of this plasma model in the context of Bayesian analysis was pioneered by Svensson and Werner on the joint-European tokamak [Svensson and Werner,Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 50(8), 085002 (2008)]. In this framework, linear forward models are used to generate diagnostic predictions, and the probability distribution for the currents in the collection of plasma beams was subsequently calculated directly via application of Bayes' formula. In this work, we introduce a new diagnostic technique to identify and remove outlier observations associated with diagnostics falling out of calibration or suffering from an unidentified malfunction. These modifications enable a good agreement between Bayesian inference of the last-closed flux-surface with other corroborating data, such as that from force balance considerations using EFIT++[Appel et al., ''A unified approach to equilibrium reconstruction'' Proceedings of the 33rd EPS Conference on Plasma Physics (Rome, Italy, 2006)]. In addition, this analysis also yields errors on the plasma current profile and flux-surface geometry as well as directly predicting the Shafranov shift of the plasma core.

  19. [Cyclotron based nuclear science]. Progress in research, April 1, 1992--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The period 1 April 1992--31 March 1993 saw the initial runs of three new spectrometers, which constitute a major portion of the new detection capabilities developed for this facility. These devices are the Proton Spectrometer (PSP) (data from which are shown on the cover of this document), the Mass Achroniat Recoil Mass Spectrometer (MARS), and the Multipole Dipole Multipole (MDM) Particle Spectrometer. The ECR-K500 cyclotron combination operated 5,849 hours. The beam was on target 39% of this time. Studies of nuclear dynamics and nuclear thermodynamics using the neutron ball have come to fruition. A critical re-evaluation of the available data on the giant monopole resonance indicated that the incompressibility is not specified to a range smaller than 200--350 MeV by those data. New systematic experiments using the MDM spectrometer are now underway. The MEGA collaboration obtained the first data on the {mu} {yields} e{gamma} decay rate and determination of the Michel parameter in normal {mu} decay. Experiments appear to confirm the existence of monoenergetic pair peaks even for relatively low Z{sub projectile} -- Z{sub target} combinations. Studies of the ({alpha},2{alpha}) knockout reaction indicate that this reaction may prove to be a valuable tool for determination of reaction rates of astrophysical interest. Theoretical work reported in this document ranges from nuclear structure calculations using the IBM-2 model to calculations of kaon production and the in-medium properties of the rho and phi mesons. Nuclear dynamics and exotic shapes and fragmentation modes of hot nuclei are also addressed. New measurements of x-ray emission from highly ionized ions, of molecular dissociation and of surface interactions are reported. The research is presented in nearly 50 brief summaries usually including data and references.

  20. Advanced Power Plant Development and Analyses Methodologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G.S. Samuelsen; A.D. Rao

    2006-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory, a multi-disciplinary team led by the Advanced Power and Energy Program of the University of California at Irvine is defining the system engineering issues associated with the integration of key components and subsystems into advanced power plant systems with goals of achieving high efficiency and minimized environmental impact while using fossil fuels. These power plant concepts include ''Zero Emission'' power plants and the ''FutureGen'' H{sub 2} co-production facilities. The study is broken down into three phases. Phase 1 of this study consisted of utilizing advanced technologies that are expected to be available in the ''Vision 21'' time frame such as mega scale fuel cell based hybrids. Phase 2 includes current state-of-the-art technologies and those expected to be deployed in the nearer term such as advanced gas turbines and high temperature membranes for separating gas species and advanced gasifier concepts. Phase 3 includes identification of gas turbine based cycles and engine configurations suitable to coal-based gasification applications and the conceptualization of the balance of plant technology, heat integration, and the bottoming cycle for analysis in a future study. Also included in Phase 3 is the task of acquiring/providing turbo-machinery in order to gather turbo-charger performance data that may be used to verify simulation models as well as establishing system design constraints. The results of these various investigations will serve as a guide for the U. S. Department of Energy in identifying the research areas and technologies that warrant further support.

  1. Advanced Power Plant Development and Analysis Methodologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.D. Rao; G.S. Samuelsen; F.L. Robson; B. Washom; S.G. Berenyi

    2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory, a multi-disciplinary team led by the Advanced Power and Energy Program of the University of California at Irvine is defining the system engineering issues associated with the integration of key components and subsystems into advanced power plant systems with goals of achieving high efficiency and minimized environmental impact while using fossil fuels. These power plant concepts include 'Zero Emission' power plants and the 'FutureGen' H2 co-production facilities. The study is broken down into three phases. Phase 1 of this study consisted of utilizing advanced technologies that are expected to be available in the 'Vision 21' time frame such as mega scale fuel cell based hybrids. Phase 2 includes current state-of-the-art technologies and those expected to be deployed in the nearer term such as advanced gas turbines and high temperature membranes for separating gas species and advanced gasifier concepts. Phase 3 includes identification of gas turbine based cycles and engine configurations suitable to coal-based gasification applications and the conceptualization of the balance of plant technology, heat integration, and the bottoming cycle for analysis in a future study. Also included in Phase 3 is the task of acquiring/providing turbo-machinery in order to gather turbo-charger performance data that may be used to verify simulation models as well as establishing system design constraints. The results of these various investigations will serve as a guide for the U. S. Department of Energy in identifying the research areas and technologies that warrant further support.

  2. Building State-of-the-Art Wind Technology Testing Facilities (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The new Wind Technology Test Center is the only facility in the nation capable of testing wind turbine blades up to 90 meters in length. A critical factor to wind turbine design and development is the ability to test new designs, components, and materials. In addition, wind turbine blade manufacturers are required to test their blades as part of the turbine certification process. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Wind Program and the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC) to design, construct, and operate the Wind Technology Center (WTTC) in Boston, Massachusetts. The WTTC offers a full suite of certification tests for turbine blades up to 90 meters in length. NREL worked closely with MTS Systems Corporation to develop the novel large-scale test systems needed to conduct the static and fatigue tests required for certification. Static tests pull wind turbine blades horizontally and vertically to measure blade deflection and strains. Fatigue tests cycle the blades millions of times to simulate what a blade goes through in its lifetime on a wind turbine. For static testing, the WTTC is equipped with servo-hydraulic winches and cylinders that are connected to the blade through cables to apply up to an 84-mega Newton meter maximum static bending moment. For fatigue testing, MTS developed a commercial version of NREL's patented resonant excitation system with hydraulic cylinders that actuate linear moving masses on the blade at one or more locations. This system applies up to a 21-meter tip-to-tip fatigue test tip displacement to generate 20-plus years of cyclic field loads in a matter of months. NREL also developed and supplied the WTTC with an advanced data acquisition system capable of measuring and recording hundreds of data channels at very fast sampling rates while communicating with test control systems.

  3. Bedforms in a turbulent stream.Part 2: Formation of ripples by primary linear instability and of dunes by non-linear pattern coarsening

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Fourrière; P. Claudin; B. Andreotti

    2008-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    It is widely accepted that both ripples and dunes form in rivers by primary linear instability, the wavelength of the former scaling on the grain size, that of the latter being controled by the water depth. We revisit here this problem, using the computation of the turbulent flow over a wavy bottom performed in Part 1. The details of the different mechanisms controlling sediment transport are encoded into three quantities: the saturated flux, the saturation length and the threshold shear stress. Theses quantities are modelled in the case of erosion and momentum limited bed loads. This framework allows to give a clear picture of the instability in terms of dynamical mechanisms. The relation between the wavelength at which ripples form and the flux saturation length is quantitatively derived. Inverting the problem, experimental data is used to determine the saturation length as a function of grain size and shear velocity. Finally, using the systematic expansion of the flow field with respect to the corrugation amplitude, we discuss the non-linear selection of ripple aspect ratio. Investingating the effect of a free surface on the linear instability, we show that the excitation of standing waves at the surface has a stabilising effect, independently of the details of the flow and sediment transport models. Consequently, the shape of the dispersion relation is such that dunes can not result from a primary linear instability. We present the results of field experiments performed in the natural sandy Leyre river, which evidence the formation of ripples by a linear instability and the formation of dunes by a non-linear pattern coarsening limited by the free surface. We show that mega-dunes form when the sand bed presents heterogeneities such as a wide distribution of grain sizes.

  4. Report of the terawatt laser pressure vessel committee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodle, M.H.; Beauman, R.; Czajkowski, C.; Dickinson, T.; Lynch, D.; Pogorelsky, I.; Skjaritka, J.

    2000-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1995 the ATF project sent out an RFP for a CO2 Laser System having a TeraWatt output. Eight foreign and US firms responded. The Proposal Evaluation Panel on the second round selected Optoel, a Russian firm based in St. Petersburg, on the basis of the technical criteria and cost. Prior to the award, BNL representatives including the principal scientist, cognizant engineer and a QA representative visited the Optoel facilities to assess the company's capability to do the job. The contract required Optoel to provide a x-ray preionized high pressure amplifier that included: a high pressure cell, x-ray tube, internal optics and a HV pulse forming network for the main discharge and preionizer. The high-pressure cell consists of a stainless steel pressure vessel with various ports and windows that is filled with a gas mixture operating at 10 atmospheres. In accordance with BNL Standard ESH 1.4.1 ''Pressurized Systems For Experimental Use'', the pressure vessel design criteria is required to comply with the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code In 1996 a Preliminary Design Review was held at BNL. The vendor was requested to furnish drawings so that we could confirm that the design met the above criteria. The vendor furnished drawings did not have all dimensions necessary to completely analyze the cell. Never the less, we performed an analysis on as much of the vessel as we could with the available information. The calculations concluded that there were twelve areas of concern that had to be addressed to assure that the pressure vessel complied with the requirements of the ASME code. This information was forwarded to the vendor with the understanding that they would resolve these concerns as they continued with the vessel design and fabrication. The assembled amplifier pressure vessel was later hydro tested to 220 psi (15 Atm) as well as pneumatically to 181 psi (12.5 Atm) at the fabricator's Russian facility and was witnessed by a BNL engineer. The unit was shipped to the US and installed at the ATF. As part of the commissioning of the device the amplifier pressure vessel was disassembled several times at which time it became apparent that the vendor had not addressed 7 of the 12 issues previously identified. Closer examination of the vessel revealed some additional concerns including quality of workmanship. Although not required by the contract, the vendor furnished radiographs of a number of pressure vessel welds. A review of the Russian X-rays revealed radiographs of both poor and unreadable quality. However, a number of internal weld imperfections could be observed. All welds in question were excavated and then visually and dye penetrant inspected. These additional inspections confirmed that the weld techniques used to make some of these original welds were substandard. The applicable BNL standard, ESH 1.4.1, addresses the problem of pressure vessel non-compliance by having a committee appointed by the Department Chairman review the design and provide engineering solutions to assure equivalent safety. On January 24, 2000 Dr. M. Hart, the NSLS Chairman, appointed this committee with this charge. This report details the engineering investigations, deliberations, solutions and calculations which were developed by members of this committee to determine that with repairs, new components, appropriate NDE, and lowering the design pressure, the vessel can be considered safe to use.

  5. Scattering and; Delay, Scale, and Sum Migration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lehman, S K

    2011-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    How do we see? What is the mechanism? Consider standing in an open field on a clear sunny day. In the field are a yellow dog and a blue ball. From a wave-based remote sensing point of view the sun is a source of radiation. It is a broadband electromagnetic source which, for the purposes of this introduction, only the visible spectrum is considered (approximately 390 to 750 nanometers or 400 to 769 TeraHertz). The source emits an incident field into the known background environment which, for this example, is free space. The incident field propagates until it strikes an object or target, either the yellow dog or the blue ball. The interaction of the incident field with an object results in a scattered field. The scattered field arises from a mis-match between the background refractive index, considered to be unity, and the scattering object refractive index ('yellow' for the case of the dog, and 'blue' for the ball). This is also known as an impedance mis-match. The scattering objects are referred to as secondary sources of radiation, that radiation being the scattered field which propagates until it is measured by the two receivers known as 'eyes'. The eyes focus the measured scattered field to form images which are processed by the 'wetware' of the brain for detection, identification, and localization. When time series representations of the measured scattered field are available, the image forming focusing process can be mathematically modeled by delayed, scaled, and summed migration. This concept of optical propagation, scattering, and focusing have one-to-one equivalents in the acoustic realm. This document is intended to present the basic concepts of scalar scattering and migration used in wide band wave-based remote sensing and imaging. The terms beamforming and (delayed, scaled, and summed) migration are used interchangeably but are to be distinguished from the narrow band (frequency domain) beamforming to determine the direction of arrival of a signal, and seismic migration in which wide band time series are shifted but not to form images per se. Section 3 presents a mostly graphically-based motivation and summary of delay, scale, and sum beamforming. The model for incident field propagation in free space is derived in Section 4 under specific assumptions. General object scattering is derived in Section 5 and simplified under the Born approximation in Section 6. The model of this section serves as the basis in the derivation of time-domain migration. The Foldy-Lax, full point scatterer scattering, method is derived in Section 7. With the previous forward models in hand, delay, scale, and sum beamforming is derived in Section 8. Finally, proof-of-principle experiments are present in Section 9.

  6. Laser-induced magnetic fields in ICF capsules, Final Report, DE-FG02-08ER85128, Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindman, Erick L

    2009-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser-induced magnetic fields in ICF capsules Final Report, DE-FG02-08ER85128, Phase 1 E. L. LINDMAN, Otowi Technical Services, Los Alamos, NM. The performance of an inertial-confinement-fusion (ICF) capsule can be improved by inserting a magnetic field into it before compressing it [Kirkpatrick, et al., Fusion Technol. 27, 205 (1995)]. To obtain standoff in an ICF power generator, a method of inserting the field without the use of low-inductance leads attached to the capsule is desired. A mechanism for generating such a field using a laser was discovered in Japan [Sakagami, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 42, 839 (1979), Kolodner and Yablonovitch, Phys. Rev. Lett. 43, 1402 (1979)] and studied at Los Alamos in the 1980s [M. A. Yates, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 49, 1702 (1982); Forslund and Brackbill, Phys. Rev. Lett. 48, 1614 (1982)]. In this mechanism, a p-polarized laser beam strikes a solid target producing hot electrons that are accelerated away from the target surface by resonant absorption. An electric field is created that returns the hot electrons to the target. But, they do not return to the target along the same trajectory on which they left. The resulting current produces a toroidal magnetic field that was observed to spread over a region outside the hot spot with a radius of a millimeter. No experimental measurements of the magnetic field strength were performed. Estimates from computer simulation suggest that field strengths in the range of 1 to 10 Mega gauss (100 to 1000 Tesla) were obtained outside of the laser spot. To use this mechanism to insert a magnetic field into an ICF capsule, the capsule must be redesigned. In one approach, a central conductor is added, a toroidal gap is cut in the outer wall and the DT fuel is frozen on the inner surface of the capsule. The capsule is dropped into the reaction chamber and struck first with the laser that generates the magnetic field. The laser hot spot is positioned at the center of the toroidal gap. As the magnetic field spreads from the hot spot over the surface that contains the toroidal gap, it will propagate through the gap and set up a steady state in the capsule. The main compression is then initiated. First, it closes the gap and crow-bars the field, then it compresses the fuel to ignition. In addition to this application, we discuss the use of this mechanism to induce Mega-gauss fields in laboratory apparatus for measurements of the effects of large magnetic fields on material samples. A preliminary target design for this purpose is presented. It is made of high-density material with no hydrogen surface contamination to minimize fast ion losses and to minimize x-ray preheat of the sample (the material, whose magnetic properties are to be measured). In it, the gap is designed to allow the magnetic field to move into the interior of the target while minimizing the flow of hot electrons into the interior. By adjusting the size of the gap as well as its configuration, the hot electron effects can be minimized. Since the strength of the magnetic field depends on the radial distance to the sample from the center of the conductor carrying the return current, the sample is located at a point of minimum conductor radius. This location also minimizes the effects on the measurement of any hot electrons that flow into the interior. Useful experiments can be accomplished with the “seed” field alone in this geometry. Compressing the capsule after the insertion of the seed field may allow experiments with even larger magnetic fields. We have used computer-simulation techniques to address a number of issues. Our conclusions include: • This magnetic-field generating mechanism is a viable method for generating magnetic fields in ICF targets and for laboratory experiments. • Useful experiments on material samples can be done with the seed field of 1 to10 Mega gauss (100 to 1000 Tesla) and higher magnetic fields can be obtained by subsequently compressing the capsule. • The results reported here can be studied experimentally with a modest CO2 laser that emits 4.5 J of ene

  7. Nuclear photonics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habs, D.; Guenther, M. M.; Jentschel, M.; Thirolf, P. G. [Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Max Planck Institut fuer Quantenoptik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Institut Laue-Langevin, F-38042 Grenoble (Germany); Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    With the planned new {gamma}-beam facilities like MEGa-ray at LLNL (USA) or ELI-NP at Bucharest (Romania) with 10{sup 13}{gamma}/s and a band width of {Delta}E{gamma}/E{gamma} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -3}, a new era of {gamma} beams with energies up to 20MeV comes into operation, compared to the present world-leading HI{gamma}S facility at Duke University (USA) with 10{sup 8}{gamma}/s and {Delta}E{gamma}/E{gamma} Almost-Equal-To 3 Dot-Operator 10{sup -2}. In the long run even a seeded quantum FEL for {gamma} beams may become possible, with much higher brilliance and spectral flux. At the same time new exciting possibilities open up for focused {gamma} beams. Here we describe a new experiment at the {gamma} beam of the ILL reactor (Grenoble, France), where we observed for the first time that the index of refraction for {gamma} beams is determined by virtual pair creation. Using a combination of refractive and reflective optics, efficient monochromators for {gamma} beams are being developed. Thus, we have to optimize the total system: the {gamma}-beam facility, the {gamma}-beam optics and {gamma} detectors. We can trade {gamma} intensity for band width, going down to {Delta}E{gamma}/E{gamma} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -6} and address individual nuclear levels. The term 'nuclear photonics' stresses the importance of nuclear applications. We can address with {gamma}-beams individual nuclear isotopes and not just elements like with X-ray beams. Compared to X rays, {gamma} beams can penetrate much deeper into big samples like radioactive waste barrels, motors or batteries. We can perform tomography and microscopy studies by focusing down to {mu}m resolution using Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) for detection with eV resolution and high spatial resolution at the same time. We discuss the dominating M1 and E1 excitations like the scissors mode, two-phonon quadrupole octupole excitations, pygmy dipole excitations or giant dipole excitations under the new facet of applications. We find many new applications in biomedicine, green energy, radioactive waste management or homeland security. Also more brilliant secondary beams of neutrons and positrons can be produced.

  8. TomoTherapy MLC verification using exit detector data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Quan; Westerly, David; Fang Zhenyu; Sheng, Ke; Chen Yu [TomoTherapy Inc., 1240 Deming Way, Madison, Wisconsin 53717 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States); Xinghua Cancer Hospital, Xinghua, Jiangsu 225700 (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California-Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); TomoTherapy Inc., 1240 Deming Way, Madison, Wisconsin 53717 (United States)

    2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Treatment delivery verification (DV) is important in the field of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). While IMRT and image guided radiation therapy (IGRT), allow us to create more conformal plans and enables the use of tighter margins, an erroneously executed plan can have detrimental effects on the treatment outcome. The purpose of this study is to develop a DV technique to verify TomoTherapy's multileaf collimator (MLC) using the onboard mega-voltage CT detectors. Methods: The proposed DV method uses temporal changes in the MVCT detector signal to predict actual leaf open times delivered on the treatment machine. Penumbra and scattered radiation effects may produce confounding results when determining leaf open times from the raw detector data. To reduce the impact of the effects, an iterative, Richardson-Lucy (R-L) deconvolution algorithm is applied. Optical sensors installed on each MLC leaf are used to verify the accuracy of the DV technique. The robustness of the DV technique is examined by introducing different attenuation materials in the beam. Additionally, the DV technique has been used to investigate several clinical plans which failed to pass delivery quality assurance (DQA) and was successful in identifying MLC timing discrepancies as the root cause. Results: The leaf open time extracted from the exit detector showed good agreement with the optical sensors under a variety of conditions. Detector-measured leaf open times agreed with optical sensor data to within 0.2 ms, and 99% of the results agreed within 8.5 ms. These results changed little when attenuation was added in the beam. For the clinical plans failing DQA, the dose calculated from reconstructed leaf open times played an instrumental role in discovering the root-cause of the problem. Throughout the retrospective study, it is found that the reconstructed dose always agrees with measured doses to within 1%. Conclusions: The exit detectors in the TomoTherapy treatment systems can provide valuable information about MLC behavior during delivery. A technique to estimate the TomoTherapy binary MLC leaf open time from exit detector signals is described. This technique is shown to be both robust and accurate for delivery verification.

  9. Conceptual Models for Migration of Key Groundwater Contaminants Through the Vadose Zone and Into the Upper Unconfined Aquifer Below the B-Complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Keller, Jason M.; Thorne, Paul D.; Lanigan, David C.; Christensen, J. N.; Thomas, Gregory S.

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The B-Complex contains 3 major crib and trench disposal sites and 3 SST farms that have released nearly 346 mega-liters of waste liquids containing the following high groundwater risk drivers: ~14,000 kg of CN, 29,000 kg of Cr, 12,000 kg of U and 145 Ci of Tc-99. After a thorough review of available vadose zone sediment and pore water, groundwater plume, field gamma logging, field electrical resistivity studies, we developed conceptual models for which facilities have been the significant sources of the contaminants in the groundwater and estimated the masses of these contaminants remaining in the vadose zone and currently present in the groundwater in comparison to the totals released. This allowed us to make mass balance calculations on how consistent our knowledge is on the current deep vadose zone and groundwater distribution of contaminants. Strengths and weaknesses of the conceptual models are discussed as well as implications on future groundwater and deep vadose zone remediation alternatives. Our hypothesized conceptual models attribute the source of all of the cyanide and most of the Tc-99 currently in the groundwater to the BY cribs. The source of the uranium is the BX-102 tank overfill event and the source of most of the chromium is the B-7-A&B and B-8 cribs. Our mass balance estimates suggest that there are much larger masses of U, CN, and Tc remaining in the deep vadose zone within ~20 ft of the water table than is currently in the groundwater plumes below the B-Complex. This hypothesis needs to be carefully considered before future remediation efforts are chosen. The masses of these groundwater risk drivers in the the groundwater plumes have been increasing over the last decade and the groundwater plumes are migrating to the northwest towards the Gable Gap. The groundwater flow rate appears to flucuate in response to seasonal changes in hydraulic gradient. The flux of contaminants out of the deep vadose zone from the three proposed sources also appears to be transient such that the evolution of the contaminant plumes is transient.

  10. The mediation of environmental assessment's influence: What role for power?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cashmore, Matthew, E-mail: cashmore@plan.aau.dk [Danish Centre for Environmental Assessment, Department of Development and Planning, Aalborg University Copenhagen, A.C. Meyers Vaenge 15, DK-2450 Copenhagen SV (Denmark); Axelsson, Anna [Naturskyddsforeningen, Box 4625, 116 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Considerable empirical research has been conducted on why policy tools such as environmental assessment (EA) often appear to have 'little effect' (after Weiss) on policy decisions. This article revisits this debate but looks at a mediating factor that has received limited attention to-date in the context of EA - political power. Using a tripartite analytical framework, a comparative analysis of the influence and significance of power in mediating environmental policy integration is undertaken. Power is analysed, albeit partially, through an exploration of institutions that underpin social order. Empirically, the research examines the case of a new approach to policy-level EA (essentially a form of Strategic Environmental Assessment) developed by the World Bank and its trial application to urban environmental governance and planning in Dhaka mega-city, Bangladesh. The research results demonstrate that power was intimately involved in mediating the influence of the policy EA approach, in both positive (enabling) and negative (constraining) ways. It is suggested that the policy EA approach was ultimately a manifestation of a corporate strategy to maintain the powerful position of the World Bank as a leading authority on international development which focuses on knowledge generation. Furthermore, as constitutive of an institution and reflecting the worldviews of its proponents, the development of a new approach to EA also represents a significant power play. This leads us to, firstly, emphasise the concepts of strategy and intentionality in theorising how and why EA tools are employed, succeed and fail; and secondly, reflect on the reasons why power has received such limited attention to-date in EA scholarship. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conducts empirical research on the neglected issue of power. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Employs an interpretation of power in which it is viewed as a productive phenomenon. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analyses the influence of power in the trial application of a new approach to policy environmental assessment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Demonstrates the importance of power dynamics in understanding the successes and failures of environmental assessment.

  11. "Defense-in-Depth" Laser Safety and the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, J J

    2010-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is the largest and most energetic laser in the world contained in a complex the size of a football stadium. From the initial laser pulse, provided by telecommunication style infrared nanoJoule pulsed lasers, to the final 192 laser beams (1.8 Mega Joules total energy in the ultraviolet) converging on a target the size of a pencil eraser, laser safety is of paramount concern. In addition to this, there are numerous high-powered (Class 3B and 4) diagnostic lasers in use that can potentially send their laser radiation travelling throughout the facility. With individual beam paths of up to 1500 meters and a workforce of more than one thousand, the potential for exposure is significant. Simple laser safety practices utilized in typical laser labs just don't apply. To mitigate these hazards, NIF incorporates a multi layered approach to laser safety or 'Defense in Depth.' Most typical high-powered laser operations are contained and controlled within a single room using relatively simplistic controls to protect both the worker and the public. Laser workers are trained, use a standard operating procedure, and are required to wear Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) such as Laser Protective Eyewear (LPE) if the system is not fully enclosed. Non-workers are protected by means of posting the room with a warning sign and a flashing light. In the best of cases, a Safety Interlock System (SIS) will be employed which will 'safe' the laser in the case of unauthorized access. This type of laser operation is relatively easy to employ and manage. As the operation becomes more complex, higher levels of control are required to ensure personnel safety. Examples requiring enhanced controls are outdoor and multi-room laser operations. At the NIF there are 192 beam lines and numerous other Class 4 diagnostic lasers that can potentially deliver their hazardous energy to locations far from the laser source. This presents a serious and complex potential hazard to personnel. Because of this, a multilayered approach to safety is taken. This paper presents the philosophy and approach taken at the NIF in the multi-layered 'defense-in-depth' approach to laser safety.

  12. Mixed-oxide fuel decay heat analysis for BWR LOCA safety evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiang, R. T. [AREVA Inc., 303 Ravendale Drive, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel decay heat behavior is analyzed for Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) safety evaluation. The physical reasoning on why the decay heat power fractions of MOX fuel fission product (FP) are significantly lower than the corresponding decay heat power fractions of uranium-oxide (UOX) fuel FP is illustrated. This is primarily due to the following physical phenomena. -The recoverable energies per fission of plutonium (Pu)-239 and Pu-241 are significantly higher than those of uranium (U)-235 and U-238. Consequently, the fission rate required to produce the same amount of power in MOX fuel is significantly lower than that in UOX fuel, which leads to lower subsequent FP generation rate and associated decay heat power in MOX fuel than those in UOX fuel. - The effective FP decay energy per fission of Pu-239 is significantly lower than the corresponding effective FP decay energy per fission of U-235, e.g., Pu-239's 10.63 Mega-electron-Volt (MeV) vs. U-235's 12.81 MeV at the cooling time 0.2 second. This also leads to lower decay heat power in MOX fuel than that in UOX fuel. The FP decay heat is shown to account for more than 90% of the total decay heat immediately after shutdown. The FP decay heat results based on the American National Standard Institute (ANSI)/American Nuclear Society (ANS)-5.1-1979 standard method are shown very close to the corresponding FP decay heat results based on the ANSI/ANS-5.1-2005 standard method. The FP decay heat results based on the ANSI/ANS-5.1-1979 simplified method are shown very close to but mostly slightly lower than the corresponding FP decay heat results based on the ANSI/ANS-5.1-1971 method. The FP decay heat results based on the ANSI/ANS-5.1-1979 simplified method or the ANSI/ANS-5.1-1971 method are shown significantly larger than the corresponding FP decay heat results based on the ANSI/ANS-5.1-1979 standard method or the ANSI/ANS-5.1-2005 standard method. (authors)

  13. Deep Geothermal Drilling Using Millimeter Wave Technology Final Technical Research Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oglesby, Kenneth [Impact Technologies LLC; Woskov, Paul [MIT; Einstein, Herbert [MIT

    2014-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Conventional drilling methods are very mature, but still have difficulty drilling through very deep,very hard and hot rocks for geothermal, nuclear waste entombment and oil and gas applications.This project demonstrated the capabilities of utilizing only high energy beams to drill such rocks,commonly called ‘Direct Energy Drilling’, which has been the dream of industry since the invention of the laser in the 1960s. A new region of the electromagnetic spectrum, millimeter wave (MMW) wavelengths at 30-300 giga-hertz (GHz) frequency was used to accomplish this feat. To demonstrate MMW beam drilling capabilities a lab bench waveguide delivery, monitoring and instrument system was designed, built and tested around an existing (but non-optimal) 28 GHz frequency, 10 kilowatt (kW) gyrotron. Low waveguide efficiency, plasma generation and reflected power challenges were overcome. Real-time monitoring of the drilling process was also demonstrated. Then the technical capability of using only high power intense millimeter waves to melt (with some vaporization) four different rock types (granite, basalt, sandstone, limestone) was demonstrated through 36 bench tests. Full bore drilling up to 2” diameter (size limited by the available MMW power) was demonstrated through granite and basalt samples. The project also demonstrated that MMW beam transmission losses through high temperature (260oC, 500oF), high pressure (34.5 MPa, 5000 psi) nitrogen gas was below the error range of the meter long path length test equipment and instruments utilized. To refine those transmission losses closer, to allow extrapolation to very great distances, will require a new test cell design and higher sensitivity instruments. All rock samples subjected to high peak temperature by MMW beams developed fractures due to thermal stresses, although the peak temperature was thermodynamically limited by radiative losses. Therefore, this limited drill rate and rock strength data were not able to be determined experimentally. New methods to encapsulate larger rock specimens must be developed and higher power intensities are needed to overcome these limitations. It was demonstrated that rock properties are affected (weakening then strengthened) by exposure to high temperatures. Since only MMW beams can economically reach rock temperatures of over 1650oC, even exceeding 3000oC, that can cause low viscosity melts or vaporization of rocks. Future encapsulated rock specimens must provide sufficiently large sizes of thermally impacted material to provide for the necessary rock strength, permeability and other analyzes required. Multiple MMW field systems, tools and methods for drilling and lining were identified. It was concluded that forcing a managed over-pressure drilling operation would overcome water influx and hot rock particulates handling problems, while simultaneously forming the conditions necessary to create a strong, sealing rock melt liner. Materials that contact hot rock surfaces were identified for further study. High power windows and gases for beam transmission under high pressures are critical paths for some of the MMW drilling systems. Straightness/ alignment can be a great benefit or a problem, especially if a MMW beam is transmitted through an existing, conventionally drilled bore.

  14. Grout long radius flow testing to support Saltstone disposal Unit 5 design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefanko, D. B.; Langton, C. A.; Serrato, M. G.; Brooks, T. E. II; Huff, T. H.

    2013-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Saltstone Facility, located within the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina, consists of two facility segments: The Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) and the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). The SPF receives decontaminated legacy low level sodium salt waste solution that is a byproduct of prior nuclear material processing. The salt solution is mixed with cementitious materials to form a grout slurry known as “Saltstone”. The grout is pumped to the SDF where it is placed in a Saltstone Disposal Unit (SDU) to solidify. SDU 6 is referred to as a “mega vault” and is currently in the design stage. The conceptual design for SDU 6 is a single cell, cylindrical geometry approximately 114.3 meters in diameter by 13.1 meter high and is larger than previous cylindrical SDU designs, 45.7 meters in diameter by 7.01 meters high (30 million gallons versus 2.9 million gallons of capacity). Saltstone slurry will be pumped into the new waste disposal unit through roof openings at a projected flow rate of about 34.1 cubic meters per hour. Nine roof openings are included in the design to discharge material into the SDU with an estimated grout pour radius of 22.9 to 24.4 meters and initial drop height of 13.1 meters. The conceptual design for the new SDU does not include partitions to limit the pour radius of the grout slurry during placement other than introducing material from different pour points. This paper addresses two technical issues associated with the larger diameter of SDU 6; saltstone flow distance in a tank 114.3 meters in diameter and quality of the grout. A long-radius flow test scaled to match the velocity of an advancing grout front was designed to address these technology gaps. The emphasis of the test was to quantify the flow distance and to collect samples to evaluate cured properties including compressive strength, porosity, density, and saturated hydraulic conductivity. Two clean cap surrogate mixes (saltstone premix plus water) were designed to simulate slurry with the reference saltstone rheology and a saltstone with extra water from the process flushing operation. Long-radius flow tests were run using approximately 4.6 cubic meters of each of these mixes. In both tests the pump rate was 0.063 liters/second (1 gpm). A higher pump rate, 0.19 liters/second (3 gpm), was used in a third long-radius flow test. The angle of repose of the grout wedges increased as a function of time in all three tests. The final angles of repose were measured at 3.0º, 2.4º, and 0.72º. The pump rate had the largest effect on the radial flow distance and slope of the grout surface. The slope on the pour placed at 0.19 liters/second (3 gpm) was most representative of the slope on the grout currently being pumped into SDU 2 which is estimated to be 0.7º to 0.9º. The final grout heights at 1/3 of a meter from the discharge point were 115, 105, and 38 cm. Entrapped air (? 0.25 cm bubbles) was also observed in all of the mixes. The entrapped air appeared to be released from the flows within about 3.1 meters (10 feet) of the discharge point. The bleed water was clear but had a thin layer of floating particulates. The bleed water should be retrievable by a drain water collection system in SDU 6 assuming the system does not get clogged. Layering was observed and was attributed to intervals when the hopper was being cleaned. Heat from the hydration reactions was noticeable to the touch.

  15. Sequestration Options for the West Coast States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myer, Larry

    2006-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (WESTCARB) is one of seven partnerships that have been established by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) technologies best suited for different regions of the country. The West Coast Region comprises Arizona, California, Nevada, Oregon, Washington, Alaska, and British Columbia. Led by the California Energy Commission, WESTCARB is a consortium of about 70 organizations, including state natural resource and environmental protection agencies; national laboratories and universities; private companies working on carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture, transportation, and storage technologies; utilities; oil and gas companies; nonprofit organizations; and policy/governance coordinating organizations. Both terrestrial and geologic sequestration options were evaluated in the Region during the 18-month Phase I project. A centralized Geographic Information System (GIS) database of stationary source, geologic and terrestrial sink data was developed. The GIS layer of source locations was attributed with CO{sub 2} emissions and other data and a spreadsheet was developed to estimate capture costs for the sources in the region. Phase I characterization of regional geological sinks shows that geologic storage opportunities exist in the WESTCARB region in each of the major technology areas: saline formations, oil and gas reservoirs, and coal beds. California offers outstanding sequestration opportunities because of its large capacity and the potential of value-added benefits from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and enhanced gas recovery. The estimate for storage capacity of saline formations in the ten largest basins in California ranges from about 150 to about 500 Gt of CO{sub 2}, the potential CO{sub 2}-EOR storage was estimated to be 3.4 Gt, and the cumulative production from gas reservoirs suggests a CO{sub 2} storage capacity of 1.7 Gt. A GIS-based method for source-sink matching was implemented and preliminary marginal cost curves developed, which showed that 20, 40, or 80 Mega tonnes (Mt) of CO{sub 2} per year could be sequestered in California at a cost of $31/tonne (t), $35/t, or $50/t, respectively. Phase I also addressed key issues affecting deployment of CCS technologies, including storage-site monitoring, injection regulations, and health and environmental risks. A framework for screening and ranking candidate sites for geologic CO{sub 2} storage on the basis of HSE risk was developed. A webbased, state-by-state compilation of current regulations for injection wells, and permits/contracts for land use changes, was developed, and modeling studies were carried out to assess the application of a number of different geophysical techniques for monitoring geologic sequestration. Public outreach activities resulted in heightened awareness of sequestration among state, community and industry leaders in the Region. Assessment of the changes in carbon stocks in agricultural lands showed that Washington, Oregon and Arizona were CO{sub 2} sources for the period from 1987 to 1997. Over the same period, forest carbon stocks decreased in Washington, but increased in Oregon and Arizona. Results of the terrestrial supply curve analyses showed that afforestation of rangelands and crop lands offer major sequestration opportunities; at a price of $20 per t CO{sub 2}, more than 1,233 MMT could be sequestered over 40-years in Washington and more than 1,813 MMT could be sequestered in Oregon.

  16. SECA Coal-Based Systems - LGFCS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goettler, Richard

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LGFCS is developing an integrated planar (IP) SOFC technology for mega-watt scale power generation including the potential for use in highly efficient, economically competitive central generation power plant facilities fuel by coal synthesis gas. This Department of Energy Solid-State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) program is aimed at achieving further cell and stack technical advancements and assessing the readiness of the LGFCS SOFC stack technology to be scaled to larger-scale demonstrations in subsequent phases. LGFCS is currently in Phase 2 of the program with the Phase 1 test carrying over for completion during Phase 2. Major technical results covering the initial Phase 2 budget period include: Metric Stack Testing: 1. The Phase I metric test is a ~7.6 kW block test (2 strips) in Canton that started in March 2012 and logged 2135 hours of testing prior to an event that required the test to be shutdown. The degradation rate through 2135 hours was 0.4%/1000 hours, well below the Phase I target of 2%/1000 hours and the Phase 2 target of 1.5%/1000 hours. 2. The initial Phase II metric test consisting of 5 strips (~19 kW) was started in May 2012. At the start of the test OCV was low and stack temperatures were out of range. Shutdown and inspection revealed localized structural damage to the strips. The strips were repaired and the test restarted October 11, 2012. 3. Root cause analysis of the Phase 1 and initial Phase 2 start-up failures concluded a localized short circuit across adjacent tubes/bundles caused localized heating and thermal stress fracture of substrates. Pre-reduction of strips rather than in-situ reduction within block test rigs now provides a critical quality check prior to block testing. The strip interconnect design has been modified to avoid short circuits. Stack Design: 1. Dense ceramic strip components were redesigned to achieve common components and a uniform design for all 12 bundles of a strip while meeting a flow uniformity of greater than 95% of the mean flow for all bundles. The prior design required unique bundle components and pressure drops specifications to achieve overall strip fuel flow uniformity. 2. Slow crack growth measurements in simulated fuel environments of the MgO-MgAl2O4 substrate by ORNL reveal favorable tolerance against slow crack growth. Evidence as well of a high stress intensity threshold below which crack growth would be avoided. These findings can have very positive implications on long-term structural reliability. More testing is required, including under actual reformate fuels, to gain a deeper understanding of such time dependent reliability mechanisms. 3. A next generation (Gen2) substrate from the LGFCS supplier has been qualified. The substrate incorporates cost reductions and quality improvements. Cell Developments: 1. Subscale testing of the epsilon technology under system relevant conditions surpassed 16,000 hours with a power degradation rate of <1%/1000 hours. Key degradation mechanisms have been identified: (1) MnOx accumulation near the cathode-electrolyte interface and cathode densification (2) metals migration across the anode-ACC bilayer and general microstructure coarsening at high temperatures and peak fuel utilizations and (3) metal migration into primary interconnect (lesser mechanism) 5 2. Alternate LSM cathodes show slightly lower ASR and lesser free MnOx and chromium contamination. Long-term durability screening of three alternate cathodes is being performed. 3. Single layer anodes show very significant improvement in microstructure stability after 5000 hours testing at aggressive conditions of 925C and bundle outlet, high utilization fuel. 4. New primary interconnect designs are being tested that achieve lower ASR. Modeling performed to further balance ASR and cost through optimized designs.

  17. Grout Long Radius Flow Testing to Support Saltstone Disposal Unit 6 Design - 13352

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefanko, D.B.; Langton, C.A.; Serrato, M.G. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Brooks, T.E. II; Huff, T.H. [Savannah River Remediation, LLC, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Remediation, LLC, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Saltstone Facility, located within the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina, consists of two facility segments: The Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) and the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). The SPF receives decontaminated legacy low level sodium salt waste solution that is a byproduct of prior nuclear material processing. The salt solution is mixed with cementitious materials to form a grout slurry known as 'Saltstone'. The grout is pumped to the SDF where it is placed in a Saltstone Disposal Unit (SDU) to solidify. SDU 6 is referred to as a 'mega vault' and is currently in the design stage. The conceptual design for SDU 6 is a single cell, cylindrical geometry approximately 114.3 meters in diameter by 13.1 meter high and is larger than previous cylindrical SDU designs, 45.7 meters in diameter by 7.01 meters high (30 million gallons versus 2.9 million gallons of capacity). Saltstone slurry will be pumped into the new waste disposal unit through roof openings at a projected flow rate of about 34.1 cubic meters per hour. Nine roof openings are included in the design to discharge material into the SDU with an estimated grout pour radius of 22.9 to 24.4 meters and initial drop height of 13.1 meters. The conceptual design for the new SDU does not include partitions to limit the pour radius of the grout slurry during placement other than introducing material from different pour points. This paper addresses two technical issues associated with the larger diameter of SDU 6; Saltstone flow distance in a tank 114.3 meters in diameter and quality of the grout. A long-radius flow test scaled to match the velocity of an advancing grout front was designed to address these technology gaps. The emphasis of the test was to quantify the flow distance and to collect samples to evaluate cured properties including compressive strength, porosity, density, and saturated hydraulic conductivity. Two clean cap surrogate mixes (Saltstone premix plus water) were designed to simulate slurry with the reference Saltstone rheology and a Saltstone with extra water from the process flushing operation. Long-radius flow tests were run using approximately 4.6 cubic meters of each of these mixes. In both tests the pump rate was 0.063 liters/second (1 gpm). A higher pump rate, 0.19 liters/second (3 gpm), was used in a third long-radius flow test. The angle of repose of the grout wedges increased as a function of time in all three tests. The final angles of repose were measured at 3.0 deg., 2.4 deg., and 0.72 deg.. The pump rate had the largest effect on the radial flow distance and slope of the grout surface. The slope on the pour placed at 0.19 liters/second (3 gpm) was most representative of the slope on the grout currently being pumped into SDU 2 which is estimated to be 0.7 deg. to 0.9 deg. The final grout heights at 1/3 of a meter from the discharge point were 115, 105, and 38 cm. Entrapped air (? 0.25 cm bubbles) was also observed in all of the mixes. The entrapped air appeared to be released from the flows within about 3.1 meters (10 feet) of the discharge point. The bleed water was clear but had a thin layer of floating particulates. The bleed water should be retrievable by a drain water collection system in SDU 6 assuming the system does not get clogged. Layering was observed and was attributed to intervals when the hopper was being cleaned. Heat from the hydration reactions was noticeable to the touch. (authors)

  18. An Aerosol Condensation Model for Sulfur Trioxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant, K E

    2008-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes a model for condensation of sulfuric acid aerosol given an initial concentration and/or source of gaseous sulfur trioxide (e.g. fuming from oleum). The model includes the thermochemical effects on aerosol condensation and air parcel buoyancy. Condensation is assumed to occur heterogeneously onto a preexisting background aerosol distribution. The model development is both a revisiting of research initially presented at the Fall 2001 American Geophysical Union Meeting [1] and a further extension to provide new capabilities for current atmospheric dispersion modeling efforts [2]. Sulfuric acid is one of the most widely used of all industrial chemicals. In 1992, world consumption of sulfuric acid was 145 million metric tons, with 42.4 Mt (mega-tons) consumed in the United States [10]. In 2001, of 37.5 Mt consumed in the U.S., 74% went into producing phosphate fertilizers [11]. Another significant use is in mining industries. Lawuyi and Fingas [7] estimate that, in 1996, 68% of use was for fertilizers and 5.8% was for mining. They note that H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} use has been and should continue to be very stable. In the United States, the elimination of MTBE (methyl tertiary-butyl ether) and the use of ethanol for gasoline production are further increasing the demand for petroleum alkylate. Alkylate producers have a choice of either a hydrofluoric acid or sulfuric acid process. Both processes are widely used today. Concerns, however, over the safety or potential regulation of hydrofluoric acid are likely to result in most of the growth being for the sulfuric acid process, further increasing demand [11]. The implication of sulfuric acid being a pervasive industrial chemical is that transport is also pervasive. Often, this is in the form of oleum tankers, having around 30% free sulfur trioxide. Although sulfuric acid itself is not a volatile substance, fuming sulfuric acid (referred to as oleum) is [7], the volatile product being sulfur trioxide. Sulfate aerosols and mist may form in the atmosphere on tank rupture. From chemical spill data from 1990-1996, Lawuyi02 and Fingas [7] prioritize sulfuric acid as sixth most serious. During this period, they note 155 spills totaling 13 Mt, out of a supply volume of 3700 Mt. Lawuyi and Fingas [7] summarize information on three major sulfuric acid spills. On 12 February 1984, 93 tons of sulfuric acid were spilled when 14 railroad cars derailed near MacTier, Parry Sound, Ontario. On 13 December 1978, 51 railroad cars derailed near Springhill, Nova Scotia. One car, containing 93% sulfuric acid, ruptured, spilling nearly its entire contents. In July 1993, 20 to 50 tons of fuming sulfuric acid spilled at the General Chemical Corp. plant in Richmond, California, a major industrial center near San Francisco. The release occurred when oleum was being loaded into a nonfuming acid railroad tank car that contained only a rupture disk as a safety device. The tank car was overheated and this rupture disk blew. The resulting cloud of sulfuric acid drifted northeast with prevailing winds over a number of populated areas. More than 3,000 people subsequently sought medical attention for burning eyes, coughing, headaches, and nausea. Almost all were treated and released on the day of the spill. By the day after the release, another 5,000 people had sought medical attention. The spill forced the closure of five freeways in the region as well as some Bay Area Rapid Transit System stations. Apart from corrosive toxicity, there is the additional hazard that the reactions of sulfur trioxide and sulfuric acid vapors with water are extremely exothermic [10, 11]. While the vapors are intrinsically denser than air, there is thus the likelihood of strong, warming-induced buoyancy from reactions with ambient water vapor, water-containing aerosol droplets, and wet environmental surface. Nordin [12] relates just such an occurrence following the Richmond, CA spill, with the plume observed to rise to 300 m. For all practical purposes, sulfur trioxide was the constituent released from the heated tank

  19. Wind Generation Feasibility Study for Sac & Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa (Meskwaki Nation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lasley, Larry C. [Sac & Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa

    2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    1.2 Overview The Meskwaki Nation will obtain an anemometer tower. Install the tower at the site that has been pre-qualified as the site most likely to produce maximum electric power from the wind. It will collect meteorological data from the tower�s sensors for a one year period, as required for due diligence to identify the site as appropriate for the installation of a wind turbine to provide electric power for the community. Have the collected data analyzed by a meteorologist and a professionally certified wind engineer to produce the reports of expected power generation at the site, for the specific wind turbine(s) under consideration for installation. 1.2.1 Goals of the Tribe The feasibility study reports, including technical and business analyses will be used to obtain contracts and financing required to develop and implement a wind turbine project on the Meskwaki Settlement. Our goal is to produce two (2) mega watts of power and to reduce the cost for electricity currently being paid by the Meskwaki Casino. 1.2.2 Project Objectives Meet the energy needs of the community with clean energy. Bring renewable energy to the settlement in a responsible, affordable manner. Maximize both the economic and the spiritual benefits to the tribe from energy independence. Integrate the Tribe�s energy policies with its economic development goals. Contribute to achieving the Tribe�s long-term goals of self-determination and sovereignty. 1.2.3 Project Location The precise location proposed for the tower is at the following coordinates: 92 Degrees, 38 Minutes, 46.008 Seconds West Longitude 41 Degrees, 59 Minutes, 45.311 Seconds North Latitude. A circle of radius 50.64 meters, enclosing and area of 1.98 acres in PLSS Township T83N, Range R15W, in Iowa. In relative directions, the site is 1,650 feet due west of the intersection of Highway 30 and 305th Street in Tama, Iowa, as approached from the direction of Toledo, Iowa. It is bounded on the north by Highway 30 and on the south by 305th Street, a street which runs along a meandering west-south-west heading from this intersection with Highway 30. In relation to Settlement landmarks, it is 300 meters west of the Meskwaki water tower found in front of the Meskwaki Public Works Department, and is due north of the athletic playing fields of the Meskwaki Settlement School. The accompanying maps (in the Site Resource Maps File) use a red pushpin marker to indicate the exact location, both in the overview frames and in the close-up frame. 1.2.4 Long Term Energy Vision The Meskwaki Tribe is committed to becoming energy self-sufficient, improving the economic condition of the tribe, and maintaining Tribal Values of closeness with Grandmother Earth. The details of the Tribe�s long-term vision continues to evolve. A long term vision exists of: 1) a successful assessment program; 2) a successful first wind turbine project reducing the Tribe�s cost of electricity; 3) creation of a Meskwaki Tribal Power Utility/Coop under the auspices of the new tribal Corporation, as we implement a master plan for economic and business development; 4), and opening the doors for additional wind turbines/renewable energy sources on the community. The additional turbines could lead directly to energy self-sufficiency, or might be the one leg of a multi-leg approach using multiple forms of renewable energy to achieve self-sufficiency. We envision current and future assessment projects providing the data needed to qualify enough renewable energy projects to provide complete coverage for the entire Meskwaki Settlement, including meeting future economic development projects� energy needs. While choosing not to engage in excessive optimism, we can imagine that in the future the Iowa rate-setting bodies will mandate that grid operators pay fair rates (tariffs) to renewable suppliers. We will be ready to expand renewable production of electricity for export, when that time comes. The final report includes the Wind

  20. QER- Comment of Liberty Goodwin

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As suggested by Sen. Jack Reed, below and attached are my comments on energy policy for now and the future: ***************************************************************************** AN OUTLINE FOR PRACTICAL & FRUITFUL ENERGY DEVELOPMENT WITH SPECIAL ATTENTION TO SENSIBLE PUBLIC INVESTMENT (Thoughts on intelligent action for energy that is abundant, affordable, associated with many jobs and economic health in New England and the nation) ** CLINGING TO OUTMODED & DESTRUCTIVE TECHNOLOGIES – WE DON'T NEED TO ARGUE ABOUT CLIMATE CHANGE TO SEE THE WAY FORWARD 1. Fossil fuels and nuclear have clear and present dangers and damaging effects, on human and environmental health. This includes the uncontestable pollution involved in production and use, and the risks of greater disasters, along with concerns about toxic waste that can contaminate our water and more. 2. Renewable sources offer a vast number of possibilities for energy production for a variety of uses. To not explore them is wasteful. To stick to same-old, same-old is foolish, and will leave us at the rear of the pack re: future energy development. **SMALL IS BEAUTIFUL – LESS RISKY – MORE PRODUCTIVE – MORE LOCAL 1 Solyndra is the bad apple that makes the point. Because something costs millions, or even billions of dollars doesn't mean it is the way to achieve huge results. The only thing that is huge about propping up mega-corporations is the risk. 2 Making the money available in far smaller amounts to a variety of solar efforts is both less risky and more promising – gives more chance of positive results. And, to anyone who can do the math – millions of small installations is as productive as one giant. 3 Smaller projects tend to be more labor-intensive – and offer local employment in a bunch of different places, benefiting the economies of all. **BENEFICIAL INNOVATION IS NOT BORN IN A CORPORATE THINK TANK, BUT IN THE MINDS OF INDIVIDUAL GENIUSES. 1. History tells us that great inventions have been developed by unknowns working in garages, bike shops, etc. We need to look beyond the elite in corporate money tanks and prestigious academia to find the gems in our own backyards. 2. One such, Paul Klinkman, has at least 50 inventions on hand, is developing several, has one patent and a few more in process, most related to alternative energy production. 3. The point is that we would find many like him – if we would only look. 4. Also, we should be seeking not just new technologies, but new business models. Check out the example from our greenhouse flyer, below. **SAVVY INVESTORS DON'T PUT THE BULK OF THEIR FORTUNES IN JUST A COUPLE OF STOCKS. THEY SPREAD THE RISK BY DIVERSIFYING. LET US BE LIKEWISE SMART IN USE OF PUBLIC MONEY 1 "Renewable energy" is not just about electricity, or even that and hot water. It is not even just those and wind, and certainly more than "solar panels". 2 We need to explore and use the many different types of alternatives, just as we do in most other aspects of our society. 3 Taking the kind of money that was allocated to Solyndra (or even to 38 Studios here in Rhode Island, and instead investing it in even 10 small projects, is a much wiser choice than betting it on another big boondoggle. **WHAT TO DO? PUT OUR MONEY INTO SUPPORT FOR WIDESPREAD USE OF CURRENT "GREEN" ENERGY TECHNOLOGY, AND EVALUATION & DEVELOPMENT OF NEW, TRULY INNOVATIVE OPTIONS 1 Make renewable energy credits available for all solar, wind and other technologies that show promise for meeting our energy needs. 2 Consider setting up an Important Innovations Center like the one described on the other side. TWO EXAMPLES OF NEW & EXCITING RESEARCH & BUSINESS MODELS A. PROPOSED NEW KSD NON-PROFIT IMPORTANT INNOVATIONS CENTER PURPOSES **Provide a place where small inventors can get help in evaluating and developing their ideas. **Provide a place which will focus specifically on inventions that have the potential to benefit the world and its people. **Provide a place which will especially focus on solutions to energy needs – and to environmental pollution and other

  1. Evaluation of Gas, Oil and Wood Pellet Fueled Residential Heating System Emissions Characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, R.

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study has measured the emissions from a wide range of heating equipment burning different fuels including several liquid fuel options, utility supplied natural gas and wood pellet resources. The major effort was placed on generating a database for the mass emission rate of fine particulates (PM 2.5) for the various fuel types studied. The fine particulates or PM 2.5 (less than 2.5 microns in size) were measured using a dilution tunnel technique following the method described in US EPA CTM-039. The PM 2.5 emission results are expressed in several units for the benefit of scientists, engineers and administrators. The measurements of gaseous emissions of O{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, CO, NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} were made using a combustion analyzer based on electrochemical cells These measurements are presented for each of the residential heating systems tested. This analyzer also provides a steady state efficiency based on stack gas and temperature measurements and these values are included in the report. The gaseous results are within the ranges expected from prior emission studies with the enhancement of expanding these measurements to fuels not available to earlier researchers. Based on measured excess air levels and ultimate analysis of the fuel's chemical composition the gaseous emission results are as expected and fall within the range provided for emission factors contained in the US-EPA AP 42, Emission Factors Volume I, Fifth Edition. Since there were no unexpected findings in these gaseous measurements, the bulk of the report is centered on the emissions of fine particulates, or PM 2.5. The fine particulate (PM 2.5) results for the liquid fuel fired heating systems indicate a very strong linear relationship between the fine particulate emissions and the sulfur content of the liquid fuels being studied. This is illustrated by the plot contained in the first figure on the next page which clearly illustrates the linear relationship between the measured mass of fine particulate per unit of energy, expressed as milligrams per Mega-Joule (mg/MJ) versus the different sulfur contents of four different heating fuels. These were tested in a conventional cast iron boiler equipped with a flame retention head burner. The fuels included a typical ASTM No. 2 fuel oil with sulfur below 0.5 percent (1520 average ppm S), an ASTM No. 2 fuel oil with very high sulfur content (5780 ppm S), low sulfur heating oil (322 ppm S) and an ultra low sulfur diesel fuel (11 ppm S). Three additional oil-fired heating system types were also tested with normal heating fuel, low sulfur and ultralow sulfur fuel. They included an oil-fired warm air furnace of conventional design, a high efficiency condensing warm air furnace, a condensing hydronic boiler and the conventional hydronic boiler as discussed above. The linearity in the results was observed with all of the different oil-fired equipment types (as shown in the second figure on the next page). A linear regression of the data resulted in an Rsquared value of 0.99 indicating that a very good linear relationship exits. This means that as sulfur decreases the PM 2.5 emissions are reduced in a linear manner within the sulfur content range tested. At the ultra low sulfur level (15 ppm S) the amount of PM 2.5 had been reduced dramatically to an average of 0.043 mg/MJ. Three different gas-fired heating systems were tested. These included a conventional in-shot induced draft warm air furnace, an atmospheric fired hydronic boiler and a high efficiency hydronic boiler. The particulate (PM 2.5) measured ranged from 0.011 to 0.036 mg/MJ. depending on the raw material source used in their manufacture. All three stoves tested were fueled with premium (low ash) wood pellets obtained in a single batch to provide for uniformity in the test fuel. Unlike the oil and gas fired systems, the wood pellet stoves had measurable amounts of particulates sized above the 2.5-micron size that defines fine particulates (less than 2.5 microns). The fine particulate emissions rates ranged from 22 to 30 mg/ MJ with an average value

  2. Hanford's 100-HX Pump and Treat Project - a Successful Blend of Science, Technology, Construction, and Project Management - 12412

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albin, Kenneth A.; Bachand, Marie T.; Biebesheimer, Fred H.; Neshem, Dean O.; Smoot, John L. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) recently completed construction and start-up of the $25 million 100-HX Groundwater Pump and Treat Project for the Department of Energy (DOE) at its Hanford Reservation site in Washington State. From the onset, the 100-HX Project Leadership Team was able to successfully blend the science and technology of a state-of-the-art groundwater pump and treat system with the principles, tools, and techniques of traditional industrial-type construction and project management. From the 1940's through most of the 1980's, the United States used the Hanford Site to produce nuclear material for national defense at reactor sites located along the Columbia River. While the reactors were operational, large volumes of river water were treated with sodium dichromate (to inhibit corrosion of the reactor piping) and used as a coolant for the reactors. After a single pass through the reactor and before being discharged back to the river, the coolant water was sent to unlined retention basins to cool and to allow the short-lived radioactive contaminants to decay. As a result of these operations, hexavalent chromium was introduced to the vadose zone, and ultimately into the groundwater aquifer and the adjacent Columbia River. In addition, numerous leaks and spills of concentrated sodium dichromate stock solution over the lifetime of reactor operations led to higher concentrations of chromate in the vadose zone and groundwater in localized areas. As a result, the 100 Area was included in the National Priorities List sites under the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). The mission of the 100-HX Project is to significantly reduce the concentration of hexavalent chromium in the groundwater by treating up to 3.8 billion gallons (14,300 mega-liters) of contaminated water over its first nine years of operations. In order to accomplish this mission, groundwater scientists and geologists using sophisticated scientific modeling optimized the 100-HX's approximately 0.7 square mile (181 hecto-meters) extraction and injection well field to support continuous operation of a maximum of 800 gallons (3,028 liters) per minute, 24 hours per day, and 7 days per week. The use of traditional resin technology for the plant's ion exchange system required a change out of the resin every 12 weeks and shipment to an offsite facility 1,500 miles (2,414 kilometers) away for regeneration. Instead, the project leadership pursued newer technology with a disposable resin that could be disposed of on-site and would require less frequent change outs, reducing the project's life cycle costs by more than $16 million. Constructing the facility had its own challenges. The well field location overlapped ecologically sensitive lands where bald eagles and native wildlife use the land for their mating habitat for nearly half of the year. Building locations had to be planned around historically and culturally sensitive areas, and around another contractor's remediation work zones. Also, the size of the well field required a transfer (pumping) facility and installation of more than 60 miles (97 kilometers) of high-density polypropylene pipe, 23 miles (38 kilometers) of power cable, and 28 miles (46 kilometers) of control cable. Along with schedule and budget constraints typical of any fast-track project, the project team dealt with severe resource constraints due to competing projects across the Hanford Site caused by the influx of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act stimulus funding. In addition, the project team itself was stretched between completing another $25 million dollar construction project while designing and constructing this project. In order to save money, the project schedule was compressed by three months from the original baseline schedule. This was made possible by the strong use of project management principles throughout the design, construction, and testing phases, as well as implementation of many lessons learned from a similar construction project. In summary, the 100-HX