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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tentatively identified compound" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Identifying Sources of Volatile Organic Compounds and Aldehydes in a High  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Identifying Sources of Volatile Organic Compounds and Aldehydes in a High Identifying Sources of Volatile Organic Compounds and Aldehydes in a High Performance Building Title Identifying Sources of Volatile Organic Compounds and Aldehydes in a High Performance Building Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-3979e Year of Publication 2010 Authors Ortiz, Anna C., Marion L. Russell, Wen-Yee Lee, Michael G. Apte, and Randy L. Maddalena Pagination 29 Date Published 09/2010 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract The developers of the Paharpur Business Center (PBC) and Software Technology Incubator Park in New Delhi, India offer an environmentally sustainable building with a strong emphasis on energy conservation, waste minimization and superior indoor air quality (IAQ). To achieve the IAQ goal, the building utilizes a series of air cleaning technologies for treating the air entering the building. These technologies include an initial water wash followed by ultraviolet light treatment and biolfiltration using a greenhouse located on the roof and numerous plants distributed throughout the building. Even with the extensive treatment of makeup air and room air in the PBC, a recent study found that the concentrations of common volatile organic compounds and aldehydes appear to rise incrementally as the air passes through the building from the supply to the exhaust. This finding highlights the need to consider the minimization of chemical sources in buildings in combination with the use of advanced air cleaning technologies when seeking to achieve superior IAQ. The goal of this project was to identify potential source materials for indoor chemicals in the PBC. Samples of building materials, including wood paneling (polished and unpolished), drywall, and plastic from a hydroponic drum that was part of the air cleaning system, were collected from the building for testing. All materials were collected from the PBC building and shipped to the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for testing. The materials were pre-conditioned for two different time periods before measuring material and chemical specific emission factors for a range of VOCs and Aldehydes. Of the six materials tested, we found that the highest emitter of formaldehyde was new plywood paneling. Although polish and paint contribute to some VOC emissions, the main influence of the polish was in altering the capacity of the surface to accumulate formaldehyde. Neither the new nor aged polish contributed significantly to formaldehyde emissions. The VOC emission stream (excluding formaldehyde) was composed of up to 18 different chemicals and the total VOC emissions ranged in magnitude from 7 μg/m2/h (old wood with old polish) to >500 μg/m2/h (painted drywall). The formaldehyde emissions from drywall and old wood with either new or old polish were ~ 15 μg/m2/h while the new wood material emitted > 100 μg/m2/h. However, when the projected surface area of each material in the building was considered, the new wood, old wood and painted drywall material all contributed substantially to the indoor formaldehyde loading while the coatings contributed primarily to the VOCs

2

August 23, 2010 Tentative Syllabus, rev. 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

August 23, 2010 Tentative Syllabus, rev. 3 CS 4317: Human-Computer Interaction Fall 2010 Monday. Main Topics Human Perception, Ergonomics, Cognition, and Psychology Task Analysis User Interface Design Interface Programming System Evaluation Types of Applications Covered Information Presentation Graphical

Ward, Karen

3

A Focused Small-Molecule Screen Identifies 14 Compounds with Distinct Effects on Toxoplasma gondii  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Compounds with Distinct Effects on Toxoplasma gondii Edwin T. Kamau Ananth R. Srinivasan Mark J. Brown Matthew G. Fair Erin J. Caraher Jon P. Boyle Address correspondence to Jon P. Boyle, boylej@pitt.edu . University of Pittsburgh, Department of Biological...

Edwin T. Kamau; Ananth R. Srinivasan; Mark J. Brown; Matthew G. Fair; Erin J. Caraher; Jon P. Boyle

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

4

Forensic Management Academy Spring 2011 Tentative Schedule Forensic Management Academy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forensic Management Academy ­ Spring 2011 Tentative Schedule Forensic Management Academy Spring:00 Tour Forensic Program Facilities 4:30 ­ 7:30 Session VIII Conflict Management Joyce Heames7:00 Free

Mohaghegh, Shahab

5

Artificial Neural Network Processing of Stripping Analysis Responses for Identifying and Quantifying Heavy Metals in the Presence of Intermetallic Compound Formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Artificial Neural Network Processing of Stripping Analysis Responses for Identifying and Quantifying Heavy Metals in the Presence of Intermetallic Compound Formation ... Using simulated data, modeled after complex interactions experimentally observed in samples containing Cu and Zn, it has been demonstrated that networks containing two layers of neurons (a nonlinear hidden layer and a linear output layer) can be trained to calculate concentrations under a variety of complicated situations. ... The output of any particular neuron in a feed-forward neural network is determined by passing the sum of the weighted inputs through a transfer function, where the transfer function can have any of a variety of forms (linear and sigmoidal transfer functions are most common). ...

Helen Chan; Alexander Butler; David M. Falck; Michael S. Freund

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

An array of Escherichia coli clones over-expressing essential proteins: A new strategy of identifying cellular targets of potent antibacterial compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the advancement of high throughput screening, it has become easier and faster to discover hit compounds that inhibit proliferation of bacterial cells. However, development in technologies used to identify cellular targets of potent antibacterial inhibitors has lagged behind. Here, we describe a novel strategy of target identification for antibacterial inhibitors using an array of Escherichia coli clones each over-expressing one essential protein. In a proof-of-concept study, eight essential genes were cloned into pLex5BA vector under the control of an inducible promoter. Over-expression of target proteins was confirmed. For two clones, one over-expressing FabI and the other over-expressing MurA enzymes, the host cells became 17- and 139-fold more resistant to the specific inhibitors triclosan and phosphomycin, respectively, while the susceptibility of other clones towards these inhibitors remained unchanged after induction of gene expression. Target identification via target protein over-expression was demonstrated using both mixed clone and individual clone assay formats.

Xu, H. Howard [Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Los Angeles, CA 90032 (United States)]. E-mail: hxu3@calstatela.edu; Real, Lilian [Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Los Angeles, CA 90032 (United States); Bailey, Melissa Wu [Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Los Angeles, CA 90032 (United States)

2006-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

7

GEOL 467/667/MAST 667 -GEOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF OFFSHORE WIND PROJECTS **TENTATIVE** COURSE SYLLABUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GEOL 467/667/MAST 667 - GEOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF OFFSHORE WIND PROJECTS **TENTATIVE** COURSE SYLLABUS Description: Investigation of the geological and geotechnical aspects of offshore wind projects. Emphasis will be designed around geological and geotechnical topics that are relevant to the development of offshore wind

Firestone, Jeremy

8

Manhattan Project: A Tentative Decision to Build the Bomb<!--Include title  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

President Franklin Roosevelt's note to Vannevar Bush giving Bush the tentative go-ahead to build the atomic bomb. A TENTATIVE DECISION TO BUILD THE BOMB President Franklin Roosevelt's note to Vannevar Bush giving Bush the tentative go-ahead to build the atomic bomb. A TENTATIVE DECISION TO BUILD THE BOMB Washington, D.C.(1941-1942) Events > Early Government Support, 1939-1942 Einstein's Letter, 1939 Early Uranium Research, 1939-1941 Piles and Plutonium, 1939-1941 Reorganization and Acceleration, 1940-1941 The MAUD Report, 1941 A Tentative Decision to Build the Bomb, 1941-1942 Vannevar Bush moved swiftly to take advantage of the positive MAUD Report. Without waiting for Arthur Compton's latest committee to finish its work confirming the MAUD Committee's conclusions, Bush on October 9, 1941, met with President Franklin D. Roosevelt and Vice President Henry A. Wallace (who had been briefed on uranium research in July). Bush summarized the British findings, discussed cost and duration of a bomb project, and emphasized the uncertainty of the situation. He also received the President's permission to explore construction needs with the Army. Roosevelt instructed him to move as quickly as possible but not to go beyond research and development. Bush, then, was to find out if a bomb could be built and at what cost but not to proceed to the production stage without further presidential authorization. Roosevelt indicated that he could find a way to finance the project and asked Bush to draft a letter so that the British government could be approached "at the top.

9

EXPLORING IO'S ATMOSPHERIC COMPOSITION WITH APEX: FIRST MEASUREMENT OF {sup 34}SO{sub 2} AND TENTATIVE DETECTION OF KCl  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The composition of Io's tenuous atmosphere is poorly constrained. Only the major species SO{sub 2} and a handful of minor species have been positively identified, but a variety of other molecular species should be present, based on thermochemical equilibrium models of volcanic gas chemistry and the composition of Io's environment. This paper focuses on the spectral search for expected yet undetected molecular species (KCl, SiO, S{sub 2}O) and isotopes ({sup 34}SO{sub 2}). We analyze a disk-averaged spectrum of a potentially line-rich spectral window around 345 GHz, obtained in 2010 at the APEX 12 m antenna. Using different models assuming either extended atmospheric distributions or a purely volcanically sustained atmosphere, we tentatively measure the KCl relative abundance with respect to SO{sub 2} and derive a range of 4 10{sup 4}-8 10{sup 3}. We do not detect SiO or S{sub 2}O and present new upper limits on their abundances. We also present the first measurement of the {sup 34}S/{sup 32}S isotopic ratio in gas phase on Io, which appears to be twice as high as the Earth and interstellar medium reference values. Strong lines of SO{sub 2} and SO are also analyzed to check for longitudinal variations of column density and relative abundance. Our models show that, based on their predicted relative abundance with respect to SO{sub 2} in volcanic plumes, both the tentative KCl detection and SiO upper limit are compatible with a purely volcanic origin for these species.

Moullet, A. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA-22902 (United States); Lellouch, E.; Moreno, R. [LESIA-Observatoire de Paris, 5 place J. Janssen, F-92195 Meudon CEDEX (France); Gurwell, M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA-02138 (United States); Black, J. H [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Onsala Space Observatory, SE-43992 Onsala (Sweden); Butler, B. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM-87801 (United States)

2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

10

tentative program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sep 28, 2014 ... with Jon Brown, Gabriel Nagy, Aidan Sims, and Dana Williams. David Fisher Groups acting on Manifolds: Around the Zimmer Program.

2014-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

11

The Y(4140), X(4260), psi(2D), psi(4S) and tentative psi(3D)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Data on B+ --> J/psi phi K+ and the Y(4140) enhancement recently reported by the CDF collaboration [arxiv:0903.2229] are analysed. The threshold behaviour, as well as traces of the X(4260) enhancement, the known c-cbar resonances psi(2D), psi(4S), and a tentative psi(3D) state, as observed in the mass distribution, suggest that the J/psi+phi system has quantum numbers JPC=1--. It is then argued that the Y(4140) enhancement does not represent any kind of resonance, but instead is a natural consequence of the opening of the J/psi+phi channel.

Eef van Beveren; George Rupp

2009-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

12

Polybenzimidazole compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A PBI compound that includes imidazole nitrogens, at least a portion of which are substituted with an organic-inorganic hybrid moiety. At least 85% of the imidazole nitrogens may be substituted. The organic-inorganic hybrid moiety may be an organosilane moiety, for example, (R)Me.sub.2SiCH.sub.2--, where R is selected from among methyl, phenyl, vinyl, and allyl. The PBI compound may exhibit similar thermal properties in comparison to the unsubstituted PBI. The PBI compound may exhibit a solubility in an organic solvent greater than the solubility of the unsubstituted PBI. The PBI compound may be included in separatory media. A substituted PBI synthesis method may include providing a parent PBI in a less than 5 wt % solvent solution. Substituting may occur at about room temperature and/or at about atmospheric pressure. Substituting may use at least five equivalents in relation to the imidazole nitrogens to be substituted or, preferably, about fifteen equivalents.

Klaehn, John R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Peterson, Eric S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wertsching, Alan K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Orme, Christopher J. (Shelley, ID); Luther, Thomas A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Jones, Michael G. (Pocatello, ID)

2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

13

Compound J in Late Cretaceous/Tertiary terrigenous oils revisited: Structure elucidation of a rearranged oleanane coeluting on GC with 18?(H)-oleanane  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A C30 pentacyclic triterpane eluting slightly after 18?(H)-oleanane in the m/z 191 mass chromatograms of Late Cretaceous/Tertiary terrigenous oils (peak J in the early literature) has been isolated from a Niger Delta oil and identified using NMR spectroscopy as 3?-methyl-24-nor-18?(H)-oleanane. The previous assignment as 18?(H)-oleanane is therefore partly erroneous. 3?-Methyl-24-nor-18?(H)-oleanane affords a larger m/z 412?356 response than the oleananes and the relative contribution of 3?-methyl-24-nor-18?(H)-oleanane to the 412?191 oleanane peak can be roughly estimated from comparison of the 412?356/412?191 ratio from the oleanane peak with that of the pure compounds. 3?-Methyl-24-nor-18?(H)-oleanane can be as abundant as 18?(H)-oleanane in oils having a high concentration of early eluting rearranged oleananes. 3?-Methyl-24-nor-19?(H)-taraxastane was also tentatively assigned in the oils on the basis of its mass spectrum as well as its gas chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography retention times. 3?-Methyl-24-nor-gammacerane was tentatively assigned in a similar way in an oil containing gammacerane. All 3?-methyl-24-nor-triterpanes could be formed via dehydration, rearrangement and hydrogenation of triterpenoids having an OH group at C-3.

Hans Peter Nytoft; Geir Kildahl-Andersen; Tatjana olevi? Knudsen; Ksenija Stojanovi?; Frode Rise

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

CONSTRAINING THE DISTRIBUTION OF DARK MATTER IN THE INNER GALAXY WITH AN INDIRECT DETECTION SIGNAL: THE CASE OF A TENTATIVE 130 GeV {gamma}-RAY LINE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dark matter distribution in the very inner region of our Galaxy is still debated. In N-body simulations, a cuspy dark matter halo density profile is favored. Several dissipative baryonic processes, however, are found to be able to significantly flatten dark matter distribution, and a cored dark matter halo density profile is possible. Baryons dominate the gravitational potential in the inner Galaxy, hence a direct constraint on the abundance of dark matter particles is rather challenging. Recently, a few groups have identified a tentative 130 GeV line signal in the Galactic center, which could be interpreted as the signal of dark matter annihilation. Using current 130 GeV line data and adopting the generalized Navarro-Frenk-White profile of the dark matter halo-local dark matter density {rho}{sub 0} = 0.4 GeV cm{sup -3} and r{sub s} = 20 kpc-we obtain a 95% confidence level lower (upper) limit on the inner slope of dark matter density distribution, {alpha} = 1.06 (the cross section of dark matter annihilation into {gamma}-rays ({sigma}v){sub {chi}{chi}{sub {yields}{sub {gamma}{gamma}}}} = 1.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -27} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1}). Such a slope is consistent with the results of some N-body simulations and, if the signal is due to dark matter, suggests that baryonic processes may be unimportant.

Yang Ruizhi; Feng Lei; Li Xiang; Fan Yizhong, E-mail: yzfan@pmo.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Dark Matter and Space Astronomy, Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China)

2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

15

Crystallographic properties of fertilizer compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bulletin is a compilation of crystallographic data collected at NFERC on 450 fertilizer-related compounds. In TVA's fertilizer R and D program, petrographic examination, XRD, and infrared spectroscopy are combined with conventional chemical analysis methods in identifying the individual compounds that occur in fertilizer materials. This handbook brings together the results of these characterization studies and supplemental crystallographic data from the literature. It is in one-compound-per-page, loose-leaf format, ordered alphabetically by IUPAC name. Indexes provided include IUPAC name, formula, group, alternate formula, synonyms, x-ray data, optical data. Tables are given for solids, compounds in commercial MAP and DAP, and matrix materials in phosphate rock.

Frazier, A.W.; Dillard, E.F.; Thrasher, R.D.; Waerstad, K.R.; Hunter, S.R.; Kohler, J.J.; Scheib, R.M.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

TENTATIVE EDITORIAL SCHEDULE:  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Gas Chromatographic Analysis of Carbendazim from a Flash-Heater Reaction with Trimethylanilinium Hydroxide --Leonard Ogierman...Chromatographic Determination of Indoles in Human Mouth Saliva Using a Flameless Alkali Sensitized Detector (Nitrogen Phosphorous-Specific......

Tentative Editorial Schedule

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Mononuclear Organolead Compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tetraorganolead compounds in general exhibit lower thermal stability and greater reactivity than the corresponding compounds of the lighter Group 14 elements. The thermal stability is strongly dependent on the...

Friedo Huber; Wolfgang Petz

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

sample recovery not within control limits. Organic: Tentatively identified compound (TIC). P > 25% difference in detected pesticide or Aroclor concentrations between 2 columns....

19

DOE/RL-96-68  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

100114 Vol. 4: ix RPD Relative Percent Difference RSD Relative Standard Deviation TIC Tentatively Identified Compound TPU Total Propagated Uncertainty VOC Volatile Organic...

20

CONTENTS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Operations Office RPD relative percent difference RSD relative standard deviation TIC tentatively identified compound DOERL-96-68, HASQARD Table of Contents, Rev. 3 Volume...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tentatively identified compound" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Elements & Compounds Atoms (Elements)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Elements & Compounds #12;Atoms (Elements) Molecules (Compounds) Cells Elements & Compounds #12;Nucleus Electrons Cloud of negative charge (2 electrons) Fig. 2.5: Simplified model of a Helium (He) Atom He 4.002602 2 Helium Mass Number (~atomic mass) = number of Neutrons + Protons = 4 for Helium Atomic

Frey, Terry

22

Electric Turbo Compounding Technology Update  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Turbo Compounding Technology Update Electric Turbo Compounding Technology Update 15 August, 2007 Carl Vuk 15 August, 2007 Carl Vuk Electric Turbo Compounding Highlights Electric...

23

Anti-HIV drugs: 25 compounds approved within 25 years after the discovery of HIV  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In 2008, 25 years after the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was discovered as the then tentative aetiological agent of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), exactly 25 anti-HIV compounds have been formally approved for clinical use in the treatment of AIDS. These compounds fall into six categories: nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs: zidovudine, didanosine, zalcitabine, stavudine, lamivudine, abacavir and emtricitabine); nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NtRTIs: tenofovir); non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs: nevirapine, delavirdine, efavirenz and etravirine); protease inhibitors (PIs: saquinavir, ritonavir, indinavir, nelfinavir, amprenavir, lopinavir, atazanavir, fosamprenavir, tipranavir and darunavir); cell entry inhibitors [fusion inhibitors (FIs: enfuvirtide) and co-receptor inhibitors (CRIs: maraviroc)]; and integrase inhibitors (INIs: raltegravir). These compounds should be used in drug combination regimens to achieve the highest possible benefit, tolerability and compliance and to diminish the risk of resistance development.

Erik De Clercq

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Metal alloy identifier  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

To identify the composition of a metal alloy, sparks generated from the alloy are optically observed and spectrographically analyzed. The spectrographic data, in the form of a full-spectrum plot of intensity versus wavelength, provide the "signature" of the metal alloy. This signature can be compared with similar plots for alloys of known composition to establish the unknown composition by a positive match with a known alloy. An alternative method is to form intensity ratios for pairs of predetermined wavelengths within the observed spectrum and to then compare the values of such ratios with similar values for known alloy compositions, thereby to positively identify the unknown alloy composition.

Riley, William D. (Avondale, MD); Brown, Jr., Robert D. (Avondale, MD)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Partially fluorinated ionic compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Partially fluorinated ionic compounds are prepared. They are useful in the preparation of partially fluorinated dienes, in which the repeat units are cycloaliphatic.

Han, legal representative, Amy Qi (Hockessin, DE); Yang, Zhen-Yu (Hockessin, DE)

2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

26

Identifying Classified Information  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish the program to identify information classified under the Atomic Energy Act [Restricted Data (RD), Formerly Restricted Data (FRD), and Transclassified Foreign Nuclear Information (TFNI)] or Executive Order (E.O.) 13526 [National Security Information (NSI)], so that it can be protected against unauthorized dissemination.

2014-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

27

Identifying Classified Information  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order establishes the program to identify information classified under the Atomic Energy Act [Restricted Data (RD), Formerly Restricted Data (FRD), and Transclassified Foreign Nuclear Information (TFNI)]or Executive Order (E.O.) 13526 [National Security Information (NSI)], so that it can be protected against unauthorized dissemination.

2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

28

Identifying Classified Information  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order establishes the program to identify information classified under the Atomic Energy Act [Restricted Data (RD), Formerly Restricted Data (FRD), and Transclassified Foreign Nuclear Information (TFNI)] or Executive Order (E.O.) 13526 [National Security Information (NSI)], so that it can be protected against unauthorized dissemination. Cancels DOE O 475.2 and DOE M 475.1-1B.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Identifying Classified Information  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order establishes the program to identify information classified under the Atomic Energy Act [Restricted Data (RD) and Formerly Restricted Data (FRD)] or Executive Order 12958, as amended [National Security Information (NSI)], so that it can be protected against unauthorized dissemination. Canceled by DOE O 475.2

2007-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

30

Most Commonly Identified Recommendations  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Most Commonly Identified Recommendations Most Commonly Identified Recommendations DOE ITP In Depth ITP Energy Assessment Webcast Presented by: Dr. Bin Wu, Director, Professor of Industrial Engineering Dr. Sanjeev Khanna, Assistant Director, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering With Contribution From MO IAC Student Engineers: Chatchai Pinthuprapa Jason Fox Yunpeng Ren College of Engineering, University of Missouri. April 16, 2009 Missouri Industrial Assessment Center Missouri IAC is one of the 26 centers founded by the U.S. DOE in the nation. Since its establishment in 2005, we have been working closely with the MoDNR, the MU University Extension, utility providers in the state, etc, to provide education, development and services in industrial energy efficiency. Our services (audits, workshops, etc), have already covered many locations across the state of Missouri.

31

Materials Chemistry and Performance of Silicone-Based Replicating Compounds.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Replicating compounds are used to cast reproductions of surface features on a variety of materials. Replicas allow for quantitative measurements and recordkeeping on parts that may otherwise be difficult to measure or maintain. In this study, the chemistry and replicating capability of several replicating compounds was investigated. Additionally, the residue remaining on material surfaces upon removal of replicas was quantified. Cleaning practices were tested for several different replicating compounds. For all replicating compounds investigated, a thin silicone residue was left by the replica. For some compounds, additional inorganic species could be identified in the residue. Simple solvent cleaning could remove some residue.

Brumbach, Michael T.; Mirabal, Alex James; Kalan, Michael; Trujillo, Ana B; Hale, Kevin

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Exploratory and Newer Compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In writing a chapter on Exploratory and Newer Compounds in a book concerned with anesthesia, the authors feel that it is most important to have a clear idea of the aims of their work. The Why? must never b...

T. H. S. Burns; A. Bracken

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Heart testing compound  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The compound 15-(p-[.sup.125 I]-iodophenyl)-6-tellurapentadecanoic acid is disclosed as a myocardial imaging agent having rapid and pronounced uptake, prolonged myocardial retention, and low in vivo deiodination.

Knapp, Jr., Furn F. (Oak Ridge, TN); Goodman, Mark M. (Knoxville, TN)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Heart testing compound  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The compound 15-(p-(/sup 125/I)-iodophenyl)-6-tellurapentadecanoic acid is disclosed as a myocardial imaging agent having rapid and pronounced uptake, prolonged myocardial retention, and low in vivo deiodination.

Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Goodman, M.M.

1983-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

35

Charge Density Wave Compounds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fisher Research Group Fisher Research Group Layered Chalcogenides 29 February 2008 Controlling the Wave by Brad Plummer, SLAC Communications Stanford University researchers working in part at SSRL have discovered a novel set of properties pertaining to a compound of materials called tritellurides. These compounds, composed of three atoms of tellurium and a single atom of one of the rare earth elements, demonstrate unique electronic properties that can be controlled by altering the temperature of the material. The tritellurides display phenomena known as charge density waves (CDW). In a normal conductive metal, electrons persist in a "sea" wherein they are evenly distributed and equally available, or conductive. A CDW occurs under certain circumstances and causes the electrons to clump together, lowering their availability, and thereby lowering the compound's conductivity. Tellurium, when crystallized into quasi-two-dimensional planes and combined with rare earth elements, produces a material with CDWs that can be manipulated and controlled.

36

Microoptical compound lens  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apposition microoptical compound lens comprises a plurality of lenslets arrayed around a segment of a hollow, three-dimensional optical shell. The lenslets collect light from an object and focus the light rays onto the concentric, curved front surface of a coherent fiber bundle. The fiber bundle transports the light rays to a planar detector, forming a plurality of sub-images that can be reconstructed as a full image. The microoptical compound lens can have a small size (millimeters), wide field of view (up to 180.degree.), and adequate resolution for object recognition and tracking.

Sweatt, William C. (Albuquerque, NM); Gill, David D. (Albuquerque, NM)

2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

37

Unsaturated macrocyclic carbonyl bridge compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Unsaturated macrocyclic carbonyl bridge compounds ... Catalytic Ring-Closing Metathesis of Doubly Armed, Bridged Bicyclic Sulfones. ...

C. F. H. Allen; J. A. VanAllan

1953-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Particle Data Group - PDG Identifiers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

PDG Identifiers PDG Identifiers PDG Identifiers are references to items of PDG data such as particles, particle properties, decay modes and review articles. Once defined, a PDG Identifier is guaranteed to not change and can thus be used in other systems as a permanent reference to PDG data. Note that although the meaning of a given PDG Identifier will not change, there is no guarantee that the corresponding data will be included into future editions of the Review of Particle Physics. Each PDG Identifier consists of a single string without embedded spaces. PDG Identifiers are not case-sensitive. More details on PDG Identifiers can be found in this proposal. Future versions of pdgLive will directly support PDG Identifiers both for viewing and for downloading the data associated with a given PDG Identifier.

39

Compound floating pivot micromechanisms  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A new class of tilting micromechanical mechanisms have been developed. These new mechanisms use compound floating pivot structures to attain far greater tilt angles than are practical using other micromechanical techniques. The new mechanisms are also capable of bi-directional tilt about multiple axes.

Garcia, Ernest J. (Albuquerque, NM)

2001-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

40

E-Print Network 3.0 - al-ni intermetallic compound Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Therefore, it is key that these intermetallic compounds are identified... the solderconductor interface toward the inside of the IMC ... Source: Ekere, Ndy - School of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tentatively identified compound" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

CHARACTERISTICS Nitrated compounds constitute a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

compounds. If there is a chance of an explosive reaction, conduct the operation behind a blast shield

Wilcock, William

42

Naming chemical compounds: Calculator drill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

36. Bits and pieces, 13. A calculator can be programmed to drill students on chemical compound naming rules.

David Holdsworth; Evelyn Lacanienta

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Boronated porphyrin compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compound is described having the structure ##STR1## where R preferably is ##STR2## and most preferably R.sup.3 is a closo-carborane and R.sup.2 is --H, an alkyl or aryl having 1 to about 7 carbon atoms, This invention was made with Government support under NIH Grant No. CA-37961 awarded by the Department of Health and Human Services and under the Associated Universities Inc. Contract No. De-AC02-76CH00016 with the U.S. Department of Energy. The Government has rights in this invention.

Kahl, S.B.; Koo, M.S.

1992-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

44

Boronated porphyrin compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compound is described having the structure ##STR1## where R preferably is ##STR2## and most preferably R.sup.3 is a closo-carborane and R.sup.2 is --H, an alkyl or aryl having 1 to about 7 carbon atoms, This invention was made with Government support under NIH Grant No. CA-37961 awarded by the Department of Health and Human Services and under the Associated Universities Inc. Contract No. De-AC02-76CH00016 with the U.S. Department of Energy. The Government has rights in this invention.

Kahl, Stephen B. (Portola Valley, CA); Koo, Myoung-Seo (San Francisco, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Technologies de l'information et organisation : de la tentation de la flexibilit la centralisation* Ce texte a fait l'objet d'une prsentations lors du 2me colloque international "Usages et services des tlcommunications" Bordeaux,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Technologies de l'information et organisation : de la tentation de la flexibilité à la diversifiés (workflow, ERP, Intranet). L'analyse de cas d'entreprises permet de dégager plusieurs facteurs d de cohérence, technologies supposant des organisations déjà structurées, nécessité de routines

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

46

CCPPolicyBriefing Identifying Fuel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CCPPolicyBriefing June 2007 Identifying Fuel Poverty Using Objective and Subjective Measures W: www.ccp.uea.ac.uk T: +44 (0)1603 593715 A: UEA, Norwich, NR4 7TJ Identifying Fuel Poverty Using Objective and Subjective Measures BACKGROUND · The government defines fuel poverty as occurring when a household needs

Feigon, Brooke

47

Chemoprevention by Fruit Phenolic Compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter summarizes available information on the chemopreventive effects of fruit phenolic compounds in various experimental systems. Emphasis is placed on the anticarcinogenic activity of these phenolics ...

Gary D. Stoner PhD; Bruce C. Casto ScD

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Identifying Sources of Volatile Organic Compounds and Aldehydes in a High Performance Building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologiesand Renewable Energy, Office of Building Technology, State,

Ortiz, Anna C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Polishing compound for plastic surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A polishing compound for plastic surfaces. The compound contains by weight approximately 4 to 17 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, 1 to 6 parts mineral spirits, 2.5 to 15 parts abrasive particles, and 2.5 to 10 parts water. The abrasive is tripoli or a similar material that contains fine particles silica. Preferably, most of the abrasive particles are less than approximately 10 microns, more preferably less than approximately 5 microns in size. The compound is used on PLEXIGLAS.TM., LEXAN.TM., LUCITE.TM., polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and similar plastic materials whenever a smooth, clear polished surface is desired.

Stowell, Michael S. (New Ellenton, SC)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Polishing compound for plastic surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A polishing compound for plastic surfaces is disclosed. The compound contains by weight approximately 4 to 17 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, 1 to 6 parts mineral spirits, 2.5 to 15 parts abrasive particles, and 2.5 to 10 parts water. The abrasive is tripoli or a similar material that contains fine particles silica. Preferably, most of the abrasive particles are less than approximately 10 microns, more preferably less than approximately 5 microns in size. The compound is used on PLEXIGLAS{trademark}, LEXAN{trademark}, LUCITE{trademark}, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and similar plastic materials whenever a smooth, clear polished surface is desired. 5 figs.

Stowell, M.S.

1995-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

51

Polishing compound for plastic surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A polishing compound for plastic surfaces is disclosed. The compound contains by weight approximately 4 to 17 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, 1 to 6 parts mineral spirits, 2.5 to 15 parts abrasive particles, and 2.5 to 10 parts water. The abrasive is tripoli or a similar material that contains colloidal silica. Preferably, most of the abrasive particles are less than approximately 10 microns, more preferably less than approximately 5 microns in size. The compound is used on PLEXIGLAS{sup TM}, LEXAN{sup TM}, LUCITE{sup TM}, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and similar plastic materials whenever a smooth, clear polished surface is desired.

Stowell, M.S.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Polishing compound for plastic surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention is comprised of a polishing compound for plastic materials. The compound includes approximately by approximately by weight 25 to 80 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, 1 to 12 parts mineral spirits, 50 to 155 parts abrasive paste, and 15 to 60 parts water. Preferably, the compound includes approximately 37 to 42 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, up to 8 parts mineral spirits, 95 to 110 parts abrasive paste, and 50 to 55 parts water. The proportions of the ingredients are varied in accordance with the particular application. The compound is used on PLEXIGLAS{trademark}, LEXAN{trademark}, LUCITE{trademark}, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), and similar plastic materials whenever a smooth, clear polished surface is desired.

Stowell, M.S.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Detection of chlorinated aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for making a composition for measuring the concentration of chloated aromatic compounds in aqueous fluids, and an optical probe for use with the method. The composition comprises a hydrophobic polymer matrix, preferably polyamide, with a fluorescent indicator uniformly dispersed therein. The indicator fluoresces in the presence of the chlorinated aromatic compounds with an intensity dependent on the concentration of these compounds in the fluid of interest, such as 8-amino-2-naphthalene sulfonate. The probe includes a hollow cylindrical housing that contains the composition in its distal end. The probe admits an aqueous fluid to the probe interior for exposure to the composition. An optical fiber transmits excitation light from a remote source to the composition while the indicator reacts with chlorinated aromatic compounds present in the fluid. The resulting fluorescence light signal is reflected to a second optical fiber that transmits the light to a spectrophotometer for analysis.

Ekechukwu, Amy A. (Augusta, GA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Liquefaction of cellulosic wastes. 6: Oxygen compounds in pyrolytic oil and water fractions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liquid hydrocarbon oil and water have been produced from the liquefaction of cellulosic matter present in municipal solid wastes. The produced pyrolytic oil and water fraction seemed to be contaminated with considerable amounts of oxygen compounds as compared with fuels derived from a petroleum origin. The oxygen compounds included organic acids (fatty and naphthenic acids), phenols, and carbonyl compounds. These classes of oxygen compounds were extracted selectively from the pyrolytic oils and water using chemical extraction methods. Methyl esters of fatty acids and 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazones of carbonyl compounds were identified by gas chromatography and thin layer chromatography, respectively. It was suggested that the identified oxygen compounds could be produced from the pyrolysis of volatiles (e.g., levoglucosane, which is the primary product of cellulose depolymerization) via different mechanistic pathways.

Gharieb, H.K.; Faramawy, S.; El-Amrousi, F.A.; El-Sabagh, S.M. [Egyptian Petroleum Research Inst., Cairo (Egypt)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Nitroaromatic Compounds, from Synthesis to Biodegradation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...compounds that enter the TCA cycle. Interestingly, expression...and then converted to TCA cycle compounds, with salicylate...nitroaromatic compounds, but several fundamental aspects regarding their biosynthesis...Explosives development and fundamentals of explosives technology...

Kou-San Ju; Rebecca E. Parales

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

compound queries | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jweers's picture Submitted by Jweers(83) Contributor 16 May, 2013 - 14:22 Multicolor Maps from Compound Queries ask queries compound queries developer Google maps maps...

57

Electric Turbo Compounding Technology Update | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Compounding Technology Update Electric Turbo Compounding Technology Update Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007)....

58

Novel Phosphazene Compounds for Enhancing Electrolyte Stability...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Phosphazene Compounds for Enhancing Electrolyte Stability and Safety of Lithium-ion Cells Novel Phosphazene Compounds for Enhancing Electrolyte Stability and Safety of Lithium-ion...

59

Novel Phosphazene Compounds for Enhancing Electrolyte Stability...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Novel Phosphazene Compounds for Enhancing Electrolyte Stability and Safety of Lithium-ion Cells Novel Phosphazene Compounds for Enhancing Electrolyte Stability and Safety of...

60

E-Print Network 3.0 - applied antiandrogenic compounds Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Vol. 75, Nos. 1112, pp. 23052320, 2003. 2003 IUPAC Summary: identified in the alli- gator yolk. When all eight compounds were applied in a single-dose mixture... level) as...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tentatively identified compound" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Water quality studies in Kranji Catchment, Singapore : use of organic tracer and PEDs for identifying potential sewage sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective of this study was to identify organic compounds that could serve as indicators of potential human fecal contamination sources to the Kranji Reservoir in Singapore that could be used as confirmation indicators ...

Mendez Sagel, Adriana (Adriana Raquel)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Volatile compounds from marine algae  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Volatile compounds from marine algae ... Seasonal Variations of Bromophenols in Brown Algae (Padina arborescens, Sargassum siliquastrum, and Lobophora variegata) Collected in Hong Kong ... Seasonal Variations of Bromophenols in Brown Algae (Padina arborescens, Sargassum siliquastrum, and Lobophora variegata) Collected in Hong Kong ...

Richard E. Moore

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Identify Institutional Change Tools for Sustainability  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

After identifying institutional change rules and roles, a Federal agency should identify the tools that create the infrastructural context within which it can achieve its sustainability goals.

64

Identified Patent Waivers | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Identified Identified Patent Waivers Identified Patent Waivers June 18, 2013 Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2012-012 This is a request by DR. F. JEFFREY MARTIN for a DOE Identified patent waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-AC52-06NA25396. March 1, 2013 Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2012-005 This is a request by UCHICAGO ARGONNE, LLC for a DOE Identified patent waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-AC02-06CH11357. March 1, 2013 Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2012-004 This is a request by UCHICAGO ARGONNE, LLC for a DOE Identified patent waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-AC02-06CH11357. March 1, 2013 Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2012-003 This is a request by UCHICAGO ARGONNE, LLC for a DOE Identified patent

65

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 fig.

Smith, L.A. Jr.

1989-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

66

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Houston, TX)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Bellaire, TX); Arganbright, Robert P. (Seabrook, TX); Hearn, Dennis (Houston, TX)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a molecular sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene to about the mid point of the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 figures.

Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

1993-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

69

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a molecular sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 fig.

Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

1994-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

70

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene to about the mid point of the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Bellaire, TX); Arganbright, Robert P. (Seabrook, TX); Hearn, Dennis (Houston, TX)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Hyperpolarizable compounds and devices fabricated therefrom  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Substituted compounds having relatively large molecular first order hyperpolarizabilities are provided, along with devices and materials containing them. In general, the compounds bear electron-donating and electron-withdrawing chemical substituents on a polyheterocyclic core. 13 figs.

Therien, M.J.; DiMagno, S.G.

1998-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

72

The neutron identified: Sir James Chadwick  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The neutron identified: Sir James Chadwick ... Uses source material to describe the discovery of the neutron by James Chadwick. ...

Alfred B. Garrett

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Method of identifying plant pathogen tolerance  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for identifying a plant having disease tolerance comprising administering to a plant an inhibitory amount of ethylene and screening for ethylene insensitivity, thereby identifying a disease tolerant plant, is described. Plants identified by the foregoing process are also described. 7 figs.

Ecker, J.R.; Staskawicz, B.J.; Bent, A.F.; Innes, R.W.

1997-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

74

Method of identifying plant pathogen tolerance  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for identifying a plant having disease tolerance comprising administering to a plant an inhibitory amount of ethylene and screening for ethylene insensitivity, thereby identifying a disease tolerant plant, is described. Plants identified by the foregoing process are also described.

Ecker, Joseph R. (Erial, NJ); Staskawicz, Brian J. (Castro Valley, CA); Bent, Andrew F. (Piedmont, CA); Innes, Roger W. (Bloomington, IN)

1997-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

75

INSENSITIVE HIGH-NITROGEN COMPOUNDS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The conventional approach to developing energetic molecules is to chemically place one or more nitro groups onto a carbon skeleton, which is why the term ''nitration'' is synonymous to explosives preparation. The nitro group carries the oxygen that reacts with the skeletal carbon and hydrogen fuels, which in turn produces the heat and gaseous reaction products necessary for driving an explosive shock. These nitro-containing energetic molecules typically have heats of formation near zero and therefore most of the released energy is derived from the combustion process. Our investigation of the tetrazine, furazan and tetrazole ring systems has offered a different approach to explosives development, where a significant amount of the chemical potential energy is derived from their large positive heats of formation. Because these compounds often contain a large percentage of nitrogen atoms, they are usually regarded as high-nitrogen fuels or explosives. A general artifact of these high-nitrogen compounds is that they are less sensitive to initiation (e.g. by impact) when compared to traditional nitro-containing explosives of similar performances. Using the precursor, 3,6-bis-(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl)-s-tetrazine, several useful energetic compounds based on the s-tetrazine system have been synthesized and studied. Some of the first compounds are 3,6-diamino-s-tetrazine-1,4-dioxide (LAX-112) and 3,6-dihydrazino-s-tetrazine (DHT). LAX-112 was once extensively studied as an insensitive explosive by Los Alamos; DHT is an example of a high-nitrogen explosive that relies entirely on its heat of formation for sustaining a detonation. Recent synthesis efforts have yielded an azo-s-tetrazine, 3,3'-azobis(6-amino-s-tetrazine) or DAAT, which has a very high positive heat of formation. The compounds, 4,4'-diamino-3,3'-azoxyfurazan (DAAF) and 4,4'-diamino-3,3'-azofurazan (DAAzF), may have important future roles in insensitive explosive applications. Neither DAAF nor DAAzF can be initiated by laboratory impact drop tests, yet both have in some aspects better explosive performances than 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene TATB--the standard of insensitive high explosives. The thermal stability of DAAzF is equal to that of hexanitrostilbene (HNS), yet it too is a better explosive performer. The recently discovered tetrazol derivative, 3,6-bis-(1H-1,2,3,4-tetrazol-5-ylamino)-s-tetrazine (BTATz) was measured to have exceptional positive heats of formation and to be insensitive to explosive initiation. Because of its high burn rate with low sensitivity to pressure, this material is of great interest to the propellant community.

D. CHAVEZ; ET AL

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Effect of Outside Air Ventilation Rate on Volatile Organic Compound  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Outside Air Ventilation Rate on Volatile Organic Compound Outside Air Ventilation Rate on Volatile Organic Compound Concentrations in a Call Center Title Effect of Outside Air Ventilation Rate on Volatile Organic Compound Concentrations in a Call Center Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2003 Authors Hodgson, Alfred T., David Faulkner, Douglas P. Sullivan, Dennis L. DiBartolomeo, Marion L. Russell, and William J. Fisk Journal Atmospheric Environment Volume 37 Start Page Chapter Pagination 5517-5528 Abstract A study of the relationship between outside air ventilation rate and concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) generated indoors was conducted in a call center office building. The building, with two floors and a floor area of 4,600 m2, was located in the San Francisco Bay Area, CA. Ventilation rates were manipulated with the building's four air handling units (AHUs). VOC concentrations in the AHU returns were measured on seven days during a 13-week period. VOC emission factors were determined for individual zones on days when they were operating at near steady-state conditions. The emission factor data were subjected to principal component (PC) analysis to identify groups of co-varying compounds. Potential sources of the PC vectors were ascribed based on information from the literature supporting the associations. Two vectors with high loadings of compounds including formaldehyde, 2,2,4-trimethyl-1,3- pentanediol monoisobutyrate, decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (d5 siloxane), and isoprene likely identified occupant-related sources. One vector likely represented emissions from building materials. Another vector represented emissions of solvents from cleaning products. The relationships between indoor minus outdoor VOC concentrations and ventilation rate were qualitatively examined for eight VOCs. Of these, acetaldehyde and hexanal, which were likely associated with material sources, and d5 siloxane exhibited general trends of higher concentrations at lower ventilation rates. For other compounds, the operation of the building and variations in pollutant generation and removal rates apparently combined to obscure the inverse relationship between VOC concentrations and ventilation. This result emphasizes the importance of utilizing source control measures, in addition to adequate ventilation, to limit concentrations of VOCs of concern in office buildings

77

Geography 547: Fluvial Geomorphology Tentative Lecture Schedule  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

& Field Hydrology Easterbrook, p.111-113; Adv: Simon 9 Shear stress; flow regimes: critical, subcritical, binomial probability theory -------- 18 Discharge data calibrations; hydrograph development; Water

James, L. Allan

78

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a combination reactor/distillation column comprising a vessel suitable for operating between 70 C and 500 C and from 0.5 to 20 atmospheres pressure; an inert distillation packing in the lower one-third of said vessel; solid acidic catalytic material such as zeolites or an acidic cation exchange resin supported in the middle one-third of said vessel; and inert distillation packing in the upper one-third of said vessel. A benzene inlet is located near the upper end of the vessel; an olefin inlet is juxtaposed with said solid acidic catalytic material; a bottoms outlet is positioned near the bottom of said vessel for removing said cumene and ethyl benzene; and an overhead outlet is placed at the top of said vessel for removing any unreacted benzene and olefin.

Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

1993-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

79

Volatile organic compound sensing devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus employing vapochromic materials in the form of inorganic double complex salts which change color reversibly when exposed to volatile organic compound (VOC) vapors is adapted for VOC vapor detection, VOC aqueous matrix detection, and selective VOC vapor detection. The basic VOC vapochromic sensor is incorporated in various devices such as a ground probe sensor, a wristband sensor, a periodic sampling monitor, a soil/water penetrometer, an evaporative purge sensor, and various vacuum-based sensors which are particularly adapted for reversible/reusable detection, remote detection, continuous monitoring, or rapid screening of environmental remediation and waste management sites. The vapochromic sensor is used in combination with various fiber optic arrangements to provide a calibrated qualitative and/or quantitative indication of the presence of VOCs.

Lancaster, Gregory D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Moore, Glenn A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Stone, Mark L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Reagen, William K. (Stillwater, MN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Volatile organic compound sensing devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus employing vapochromic materials in the form of inorganic double complex salts which change color reversibly when exposed to volatile organic compound (VOC) vapors is adapted for VOC vapor detection, VOC aqueous matrix detection, and selective VOC vapor detection. The basic VOC vapochromic sensor is incorporated in various devices such as a ground probe sensor, a wristband sensor, a periodic sampling monitor, a soil/water penetrometer, an evaporative purge sensor, and various vacuum-based sensors which are particularly adapted for reversible/reusable detection, remote detection, continuous monitoring, or rapid screening of environmental remediation and waste management sites. The vapochromic sensor is used in combination with various fiber optic arrangements to provide a calibrated qualitative and/or quantitative indication of the presence of VOCs. 15 figs.

Lancaster, G.D.; Moore, G.A.; Stone, M.L.; Reagen, W.K.

1995-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tentatively identified compound" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Solid tags for identifying failed reactor components  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A solid tag material which generates stable detectable, identifiable, and measurable isotopic gases on exposure to a neutron flux to be placed in a nuclear reactor component, particularly a fuel element, in order to identify the reactor component in event of its failure. Several tag materials consisting of salts which generate a multiplicity of gaseous isotopes in predetermined ratios are used to identify different reactor components.

Bunch, Wilbur L. (Richland, WA); Schenter, Robert E. (Richland, WA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Energy Assessment Results: Most Commonly Identified Recommendations...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Assessment Results: Most Commonly Identified Recommendations The Missouri Industrial Assessment Center shares its experience providing energy assessments to local industry. Energy...

83

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Report Identifies Research...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Report Identifies Research Needed to Address Power Market Design Challenges Developing a New Primer on the Nation's Electricity Markets...

84

Identifying Green Meetings in the Hospitality Industry.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to identify what constitutes green meetings in the hospitality industries with special attentions on the applications of modern (more)

Chiou, Shin Yi (Felicity)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Recoverable Resource Estimate of Identified Onshore Geopressured...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Recoverable Resource Estimate of Identified Onshore Geopressured Geothermal Energy in Texas and Louisiana AAPG 2012 Annual Convention and Exhibition Ariel Esposito and Chad...

86

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Identifying Potential Geothermal...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Identifying Potential Geothermal Resources from Co-Produced Fluids Using Existing Data from Drilling Logs: Williston Basin, North Dakota Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection...

87

Guide to Identifying Official Use Only Information  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Guide supplements information contained in Department of Energy (DOE) O 471.3, Identifying and Protecting Official Use Only Information, dated 4-9-03, and DOE M 471.3-1, Manual for Identifying and Protecting Official Use Only Information, dated 4-9-03.

2003-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

88

Identifying Risk Groups Associated with Colorectal Cancer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Identifying Risk Groups Associated with Colorectal Cancer Jie Chen1 , Hongxing He1 , Huidong Jin1 of identifying and describing risk groups for colorectal cancer (CRC) from population based administrative health are applied to the colorectal cancer patients' profiles in contrast to background pa- tients' profiles

Jin, Huidong "Warren"

89

Reading Comprehension - Dissecting and Compound Microscopes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Dissecting and Compound Microscopes Two types of microscopes. _________ Dissecting and Compound Microscopes Two types of microscopes. _________ Dissecting Microscope Compound Microscope _________ eyepiece focus knob light light switch objective stage _________ eyepiece focus knob light light switch objective stage _________ eyepiece focus knob light light switch objective stage _________ eyepiece focus knob light light switch objective stage _________ eyepiece focus knob light light switch objective stage _________ eyepiece focus knob light light switch objective stage _________ Dissecting Microscope Compound Microscope _________ eyepieces focus knob light light switch objective stage _________ eyepieces focus knob light light switch objective stage _________ eyepieces focus knob light light switch objective stage _________ eyepieces focus knob light

90

Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Research: Compound Semiconductor...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and chemistry foundations to advance the state-of-the-art compound semiconductor optoelectronic materials and devices. Our approach is based on a focused effort including...

91

Compound cryopump for fusion reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We reconsider an old idea: a three-stage compound cryopump for use in fusion reactors such as DEMO. The helium "ash" is adsorbed on a 4.5 K charcoal-coated surface, while deuterium and tritium are adsorbed at 15-22 K on a second charcoal-coated surface. The helium is released by raising the first surface to ~30 K. In a separate regeneration step, deuterium and tritium are released at ~110 K. In this way, the helium can be pre-separated from other species. In the simplest design, all three stages are in the same vessel, with a single valve to close the pump off from the tokamak during regeneration. In an alternative design, the three stages are in separate vessels, connected by valves, allowing the stages to regenerate without interfering with each other. The inclusion of the intermediate stage would not affect the overall pumping speed significantly. The downstream exhaust processing system could be scaled down, as much of the deuterium and tritium could be returned directly to the reactor. This could reduce ...

Kovari, M; Shephard, T

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

High-throughput respirometric assay identifies predictive toxicophore of mitochondrial injury  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many environmental chemicals and drugs negatively affect human health through deleterious effects on mitochondrial function. Currently there is no chemical library of mitochondrial toxicants, and no reliable methods for predicting mitochondrial toxicity. We hypothesized that discrete toxicophores defined by distinct chemical entities can identify previously unidentified mitochondrial toxicants. We used a respirometric assay to screen 1760 compounds (5 ?M) from the LOPAC and ChemBridge DIVERSet libraries. Thirty-one of the assayed compounds decreased uncoupled respiration, a stress test for mitochondrial dysfunction, prior to a decrease in cell viability and reduced the oxygen consumption rate in isolated mitochondria. The mitochondrial toxicants were grouped by chemical similarity and two clusters containing four compounds each were identified. Cheminformatic analysis of one of the clusters identified previously uncharacterized mitochondrial toxicants from the ChemBridge DIVERSet. This approach will enable the identification of mitochondrial toxicants and advance the prediction of mitochondrial toxicity for both drug discovery and risk assessment. - Highlights: Respirometric assay conducted in RPTC to create mitochondrial toxicant database. Chemically similar mitochondrial toxicants aligned as mitochondrial toxicophores Mitochondrial toxicophore identifies five novel mitochondrial toxicants.

Wills, Lauren P. [MitoHealth Inc., Charleston, SC 29403 (United States); Beeson, Gyda C.; Trager, Richard E.; Lindsey, Christopher C. [Department of Drug Discovery and Biomedical Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States); Beeson, Craig C. [MitoHealth Inc., Charleston, SC 29403 (United States); Peterson, Yuri K. [Department of Drug Discovery and Biomedical Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States); Schnellmann, Rick G., E-mail: schnell@musc.edu [Department of Drug Discovery and Biomedical Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States); Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center, Charleston, SC 29401 (United States)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

93

Molecular docking and NMR binding studies to identify novel inhibitors of human phosphomevalonate kinase  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Natural and synthetic inhibitors of human phosphomevalonate kinase identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Virtual screening yielded a hit rate of 15%, with inhibitor K{sub d}'s of 10-60 {mu}M. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NMR studies indicate significant protein conformational changes upon binding. -- Abstract: Phosphomevalonate kinase (PMK) phosphorylates mevalonate-5-phosphate (M5P) in the mevalonate pathway, which is the sole source of isoprenoids and steroids in humans. We have identified new PMK inhibitors with virtual screening, using autodock. Promising hits were verified and their affinity measured using NMR-based {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) chemical shift perturbation and fluorescence titrations. Chemical shift changes were monitored, plotted, and fitted to obtain dissociation constants (K{sub d}). Tight binding compounds with K{sub d}'s ranging from 6-60 {mu}M were identified. These compounds tended to have significant polarity and negative charge, similar to the natural substrates (M5P and ATP). HSQC cross peak changes suggest that binding induces a global conformational change, such as domain closure. Compounds identified in this study serve as chemical genetic probes of human PMK, to explore pharmacology of the mevalonate pathway, as well as starting points for further drug development.

Boonsri, Pornthip [Chemical Proteomics Facility at Marquette, Department of Chemistry, Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States) [Chemical Proteomics Facility at Marquette, Department of Chemistry, Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States); Department of Chemistry, NANOTEC Center of Nanotechnology, National Nanotechnology Center, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand); Neumann, Terrence S.; Olson, Andrew L.; Cai, Sheng [Chemical Proteomics Facility at Marquette, Department of Chemistry, Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States)] [Chemical Proteomics Facility at Marquette, Department of Chemistry, Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States); Herdendorf, Timothy J.; Miziorko, Henry M. [Division of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, School of Biological Sciences, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States)] [Division of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, School of Biological Sciences, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Hannongbua, Supa [Department of Chemistry, NANOTEC Center of Nanotechnology, National Nanotechnology Center, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand)] [Department of Chemistry, NANOTEC Center of Nanotechnology, National Nanotechnology Center, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand); Sem, Daniel S., E-mail: daniel.sem@cuw.edu [Chemical Proteomics Facility at Marquette, Department of Chemistry, Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States)

2013-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

94

Identifying chromatin interactions at high spatial resolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents two computational approaches for identifying chromatin interactions at high spatial resolution from ChIA-PET data. We introduce SPROUT which is a hierarchical probabilistic model that discovers high ...

Reeder, Christopher Campbell

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Identifying Chemicals That Are Planetary Boundary Threats  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Identifying Chemicals That Are Planetary Boundary Threats ... Our point of departure to develop profiles for chemicals that are potential planetary boundary threats is to identify scenarios in which a chemical could fulfill each of the three conditions for being a planetary boundary threat. ... Note that chemicals named as examples do not necessarily represent planetary boundary threats since at least one scenario from each of the three conditions must be fulfilled for a chemical to pose a planetary boundary threat. ...

Matthew MacLeod; Magnus Breitholtz; Ian T. Cousins; Cynthia A. de Wit; Linn M. Persson; Christina Rudn; Michael S. McLachlan

2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

96

Research Article Decomposition of Epoxy Model Compounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-critical water (NCW) or subcritical water, i.e., water at 250­300 °C [20], turn out to be alternative candidatesResearch Article Decomposition of Epoxy Model Compounds in Near-Critical Water Two tpyes of epoxy water (NCW). In the case of model compound I, at low temperatures the water molecules behave

Guo, John Zhanhu

97

Response of Different Types of Sulfur Compounds to Oxidative Desulfurization of Jet Fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Michael T. Timko *, Ezequiel Schmois , Pushkaraj Patwardhan , Yuko Kida , Caleb A. Class , William H. Green , Robert K. Nelson , and Christopher M. Reddy ... Refer to ref 3 for a summary of our previous efforts to identify specific BT isomers in jet fuel using one-dimensional gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GCMS), and ref 44 provides even greater detail. ... We then analyzed the JP-8 samples using GCGCSCD to resolve the UCM and identify specific compound classes within it. ...

Michael T. Timko; Ezequiel Schmois; Pushkaraj Patwardhan; Yuko Kida; Caleb A. Class; William H. Green; Robert K. Nelson; Christopher M. Reddy

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

98

Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Print Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Print For decades, intermetallic compounds of rare-earth metals have been favorite systems of the research community studying strong electron correlations in solids. Nowadays rare-earth intermetallics are often treated as model systems for studies of zero-temperature quantum critical phase transitions, since heavy-fermion rare-earth compounds (in which the electron effective mass is orders of magnitude larger than the bare electron mass) have provided the clearest evidence for these continuous phase transitions, which are controlled by such parameters as chemical composition, magnetic field, and pressure, rather than temperature. A new study of a europium-based compound by an international team led by researchers from the Technische Universität Dresden in Germany hints that this compound could join well-known compounds of cerium, ytterbium, and uranium as a new material suitable for research on quantum critical transitions. This finding is exciting, since physicists hope that the use of a new material will give an additional degree of freedom for researching quantum critical behavior.

99

Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Towards Heavy Fermions in Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Print Wednesday, 29 July 2009 00:00 For decades, intermetallic compounds of rare-earth metals have been favorite systems of the research community studying strong electron correlations in solids. Nowadays rare-earth intermetallics are often treated as model systems for studies of zero-temperature quantum critical phase transitions, since heavy-fermion rare-earth compounds (in which the electron effective mass is orders of magnitude larger than the bare electron mass) have provided the clearest evidence for these continuous phase transitions, which are controlled by such parameters as chemical composition, magnetic field, and pressure, rather than temperature. A new study of a europium-based compound by an international team led by researchers from the Technische Universität Dresden in Germany hints that this compound could join well-known compounds of cerium, ytterbium, and uranium as a new material suitable for research on quantum critical transitions. This finding is exciting, since physicists hope that the use of a new material will give an additional degree of freedom for researching quantum critical behavior.

100

Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Print Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Print For decades, intermetallic compounds of rare-earth metals have been favorite systems of the research community studying strong electron correlations in solids. Nowadays rare-earth intermetallics are often treated as model systems for studies of zero-temperature quantum critical phase transitions, since heavy-fermion rare-earth compounds (in which the electron effective mass is orders of magnitude larger than the bare electron mass) have provided the clearest evidence for these continuous phase transitions, which are controlled by such parameters as chemical composition, magnetic field, and pressure, rather than temperature. A new study of a europium-based compound by an international team led by researchers from the Technische Universität Dresden in Germany hints that this compound could join well-known compounds of cerium, ytterbium, and uranium as a new material suitable for research on quantum critical transitions. This finding is exciting, since physicists hope that the use of a new material will give an additional degree of freedom for researching quantum critical behavior.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tentatively identified compound" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Print Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Print For decades, intermetallic compounds of rare-earth metals have been favorite systems of the research community studying strong electron correlations in solids. Nowadays rare-earth intermetallics are often treated as model systems for studies of zero-temperature quantum critical phase transitions, since heavy-fermion rare-earth compounds (in which the electron effective mass is orders of magnitude larger than the bare electron mass) have provided the clearest evidence for these continuous phase transitions, which are controlled by such parameters as chemical composition, magnetic field, and pressure, rather than temperature. A new study of a europium-based compound by an international team led by researchers from the Technische Universität Dresden in Germany hints that this compound could join well-known compounds of cerium, ytterbium, and uranium as a new material suitable for research on quantum critical transitions. This finding is exciting, since physicists hope that the use of a new material will give an additional degree of freedom for researching quantum critical behavior.

102

Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Print Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Print For decades, intermetallic compounds of rare-earth metals have been favorite systems of the research community studying strong electron correlations in solids. Nowadays rare-earth intermetallics are often treated as model systems for studies of zero-temperature quantum critical phase transitions, since heavy-fermion rare-earth compounds (in which the electron effective mass is orders of magnitude larger than the bare electron mass) have provided the clearest evidence for these continuous phase transitions, which are controlled by such parameters as chemical composition, magnetic field, and pressure, rather than temperature. A new study of a europium-based compound by an international team led by researchers from the Technische Universität Dresden in Germany hints that this compound could join well-known compounds of cerium, ytterbium, and uranium as a new material suitable for research on quantum critical transitions. This finding is exciting, since physicists hope that the use of a new material will give an additional degree of freedom for researching quantum critical behavior.

103

Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Print Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Print For decades, intermetallic compounds of rare-earth metals have been favorite systems of the research community studying strong electron correlations in solids. Nowadays rare-earth intermetallics are often treated as model systems for studies of zero-temperature quantum critical phase transitions, since heavy-fermion rare-earth compounds (in which the electron effective mass is orders of magnitude larger than the bare electron mass) have provided the clearest evidence for these continuous phase transitions, which are controlled by such parameters as chemical composition, magnetic field, and pressure, rather than temperature. A new study of a europium-based compound by an international team led by researchers from the Technische Universität Dresden in Germany hints that this compound could join well-known compounds of cerium, ytterbium, and uranium as a new material suitable for research on quantum critical transitions. This finding is exciting, since physicists hope that the use of a new material will give an additional degree of freedom for researching quantum critical behavior.

104

Identify Institutional Change Roles for Sustainability  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

To achieve the sustainability goals you've identified, take into account the network of roles essential to make or maintain the desired changes. As a rule of thumb, it may help to think about what roles are necessary for determining what changes to make, implementing those changes, and supporting or abiding by those changes. One place to start is by identifying leaders in your organization who have the authority, resources, and influence to make change happen. Those leadership roles typically include: Senior management Policy and technology officers Facilities and operations managers.

105

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Geysers Area (Lambert & Epstein, 1992) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Geysers Area Compound and Elemental Analysis At Geysers Area (Lambert & Epstein, 1992) Exploration Activity Details Location Geysers Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Rocks and minerals were visually identified in cuttings, and identifications were confirmed through examination of thin sections. X-ray powder diffraction was used to test the purity of some mineral separates. The chemical compositions of some metamorphic minerals were determined by electron microprobe. References Steven J. Lambert, Samuel Epstein (1992) Stable-Isotope Studies Of Rocks And Secondary Minerals In A Vapor-Dominated Hydrothermal System At The Geysers, Sonoma County, California Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Compound_and_Elemental_Analysis_At_Geysers_Area_(Lambert_%26_Epstein,_1992)&oldid=510406"

106

A Four Phase Model for Predicting the Probabilistic Situation of Compound Events  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

talented middle school students to the probabilistic compound event problem: "How many doubles are expected, identifying the process the students underwent as they attempted to answer the question. We explain each phase complete sets of outcomes for the events and use sample space symmetry and composition to make probability

Spagnolo, Filippo

107

Identifying Microbially Influenced Corrosion in Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Identifying Microbially Influenced Corrosion in Paper Machines and elsewhere Sandy Sharp, SharpConsultant, Columbia, MD, USA Symposium on Corrosion in Pulp and Paper Mills and Biorefineries, Georgia Tech., November (floating in solution) do not cause corrosion, but Sessile bacteria (attached to metal surfaces) can

Das, Suman

108

Call Identifier: CIP-IEE-2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

://ec.europa.eu/intelligentenergy #12;Intelligent Energy ­ Europe Call for Proposals 2009 2/17 CALL FOR PROPOSALS 2009 FOR ACTIONS UNDER THE PROGRAMME "INTELLIGENT ENERGY ­ EUROPE" Call Identifier: CIP-IEE-2009 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. THE INTELLIGENT ENERGY ­ EUROPE PROGRAMME 3 2. BUDGET, FUNDING RATES AND ELIGIBILITY OF COSTS 5 3. ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA 5

De Cindio, Fiorella

109

Compound and Elemental Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Compound and Elemental Analysis Compound and Elemental Analysis Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Compound and Elemental Analysis Details Activities (104) Areas (69) Regions (6) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Fluid Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Fluid Lab Analysis Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Results can aid in the determination of fluid source regions and circulation pathways. Thermal: Certain elements exhibit high spatial correlation with high-temperature geothermal systems. Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 15.001,500 centUSD 0.015 kUSD 1.5e-5 MUSD 1.5e-8 TUSD / compound Median Estimate (USD): 30.003,000 centUSD

110

Digital Construction Platform: A Compound Arm Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We introduce a novel large-scale Digital Construction Platform (DCP) for on-site sensing, analysis, and fabrication. The DCP is an in-progress research project consisting of a compound robotic arm system comprised of a ...

Spielberg, Nathan A.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Monitoring Estrogen Compounds in Wastewater Recycling Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The presence of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) and endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in treated wastewater is gaining attention due to their potential ... quantify estrogen compounds in sa...

Deborah M. Kvanli; Sreelatha Marisetty; Todd A. Anderson

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Perfluorohalogenoorgano Compounds of Main Group 5 Elements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The compounds of the Main Group 5 elements phosphorus, arsenic, antimony, and bismuth, are covered to the end of 1973 in Perfluorhalogenorgano-Verbindungen der Hauptgruppenelemente, Part 3, 1975 (cited here ...

Alois Haas; Michael R. Chr. Gerstenberger

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Volatile Organic Compounds Emissions from Biomass Combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) from biomass combustion have been investigated. VOC contribute both to ... 0.510 MW. A variety of biomass fuel types and combustion equipment was covered. The su...

Lennart Gustavsson; Mats-Lennart Karlsson

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Personally Identifiable Information | Scientific and Technical Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Personally Identifiable Information Personally Identifiable Information Print page Print page Email page Email page PII is any information about an individual which can be used to distinguish or trace an individual's identity. PII is categorized as either Public PII or Protected PII. Public PII is available in public sources such as telephone books, public websites, business cards, university listings, etc. Public PII does not require redaction prior to document submission to OSTI. Some common examples of Public PII include: · First and last name · Address · Work telephone number · E-mail address · Home telephone number · General educational credentials (e.g., those credentials typically found in resumes) Protected PII is defined as an individual's first name or first initial

115

Guidelines for identifying suspect/counterfeit material  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These guidelines are intended to assist users of products in identifying: substandard, misrepresented, or fraudulently marked items. The guidelines provide information about such topics as: precautions, inspection and testing, dispositioning identified items, installed inspection and reporting suspect/counterfeit materials. These guidelines apply to users who are developing procurement documents, product acceptance/verification methods, company procedures, work instructions, etc. The intent of these SM guidelines in relation to the Quality Assurance Program Description (QAPD) and implementing company Management Control Procedures is not to substitute or replace existing requirements, as defined in either the QAPD or company implementing instructions (Management Control Procedures). Instead, the guidelines are intended to provide a consolidated source of information addressing the issue of Suspect/Counterfeit materials. These guidelines provide an extensive suspect component listing and suspect indications listing. Users can quickly check their suspect items against the list of manufacturers products (i.e., type, LD. number, and nameplate information) by consulting either of these listings.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Identifying extended Higgs models at the LHC  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We make a complete catalog of extended Higgs sectors involving SU(2)L doublets and singlets, subject to natural flavor conservation. In each case we present the couplings of a light neutral CP-even Higgs state h in terms of the model parameters, and identify which models are distinguishable in principle based on this information. We also give explicit expressions for the model parameters in terms of h couplings and exhibit the behaviors of the couplings in the limit where the deviations from the standard model (SM) Higgs couplings are small. Finally, we discuss prospects for differentiation of extended Higgs models based on measurements at the LHC and International Linear Collider and identify the regions in which these experiments could detect deviations from the SM Higgs predictions.

Vernon Barger; Heather E. Logan; Gabe Shaughnessy

2009-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

117

Locating and identifying codes in circulant networks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A set S of vertices of a graph G is a dominating set of G if every vertex u of G is either in S or it has a neighbour in S. In other words, S is dominating if the sets S@?N[u] where u@?V(G) and N[u] denotes the closed neighbourhood of u in G, are all ... Keywords: Circulant network, Domination, Identifying code, Locating code, Locating-dominating set

M. Ghebleh; L. Niepel

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Locating and identifying codes in circulant networks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A set S of vertices of a graph G is a dominating set of G if every vertex u of G is either in S or it has a neighbour in S . In other words, S is dominating if the sets S ? N [ u ] where u ? V ( G ) and N [ u ] denotes the closed neighbourhood of u in G , are all nonempty. A set S ? V ( G ) is called a locating code in G , if the sets S ? N [ u ] where u ? V ( G ) ? S are all nonempty and distinct. A set S ? V ( G ) is called an identifying code in G , if the sets S ? N [ u ] where u ? V ( G ) are all nonempty and distinct. We study locating and identifying codes in the circulant networks C n ( 1 , 3 ) . For an integer n ? 7 , the graph C n ( 1 , 3 ) has vertex set Z n and edges x y where x , y ? Z n and | x ? y | ? { 1 , 3 } . We prove that a smallest locating code in C n ( 1 , 3 ) has size ? n / 3 ? + c , where c ? { 0 , 1 } , and a smallest identifying code in C n ( 1 , 3 ) has size ? 4 n / 11 ? + c ? , where c ? ? { 0 , 1 } .

M. Ghebleh; L. Niepel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Interrogator system for identifying electrical circuits  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for interrogating electrical leads to correctly ascertain the identity of equipment attached to remote ends of the leads is disclosed. The system includes a source of a carrier signal generated in a controller/receiver to be sent over the leads and an identifier unit at the equipment. The identifier is activated by command of the carrier and uses a portion of the carrier to produce a supply voltage. Each identifier is uniquely programmed for a specific piece of equipment, and causes the impedance of the circuit to be modified whereby the carrier signal is modulated according to that program. The modulation can be amplitude, frequency or phase modulation. A demodulator in the controller/receiver analyzes the modulated carrier signal, and if a verified signal is recognized displays and/or records the information. This information can be utilized in a computer system to prepare a wiring diagram of the electrical equipment attached to specific leads. Specific circuit values are given for amplitude modulation, and the system is particularly described for use with thermocouples. 6 figs.

Jatko, W.B.; McNeilly, D.R.

1988-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

120

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Rye Patch Area (DOE GTP) ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Rye Patch Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Rye Patch Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tentatively identified compound" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP)...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Fort Bliss Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity...

122

Identifying Needed Capabilities in Multifamily Models  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Identifying Needed Capabilities in Multifamily Models Building America Technical Update Meeting Eric Wilson April 30, 2013 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Definitions Current definitions for HSP/BEopt: Single Family Attached = Townhouses, row houses, duplexes Multifamily Buildings = 5+ units; shared floors/ceilings 2 Single Family Attached - Rowhouses 3 Multifamily - Stacked Units * Enable Superinsulated Slab and Roof options in Option Manager 4 Multifamily Modeling Needs * Adiabatic shared walls, floors, and ceilings * Unit multipliers  Whole-Building Model * Corridors * Common Areas * Operating Conditions (Benchmark)

123

Process for production of a borohydride compound  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for production of a borohydride compound M(BH.sub.4).sub.y. The process has three steps. The first step combines a compound of formula (R.sup.1O).sub.yM with aluminum, hydrogen and a metallic catalyst containing at least one metal selected from the group consisting of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, vanadium, tantalum and iron to produce a compound of formula M(AlH.sub.3OR.sup.1).sub.y, wherein R.sup.1 is phenyl or phenyl substituted by at least one alkyl or alkoxy group; M is an alkali metal, Be or Mg; and y is one or two; wherein the catalyst is present at a level of at least 200 ppm based on weight of aluminum. The second step combines the compound of formula M(AlH.sub.3OR.sup.1).sub.y with a borate, boroxine or borazine compound to produce M(BH.sub.4).sub.y and a byproduct mixture containing alkali metal and aluminum aryloxides. The third step separates M(BH.sub.4).sub.y from the byproduct mixture.

Allen, Nathan Tait; Butterick, III, Robert; Chin, Arthur Achhing; Millar, Dean Michael; Molzahn, David Craig

2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

124

Manmade organic compounds in the surface waters of the United States: A review of current understanding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On the basis of their aqueous solubilities, nonionic organic compounds partition themselves between water, dissolved organic matter, particulate organic matter, and the lipid reservoirs of aquatic organisms. Ionized organic compounds can be adsorbed to sediments, thereby reducing their aqueous concentrations. Transformation processes of photolysis, hydrolysis, biodegradation, and volatilization can attenuate organic compounds, and attenuation rates commonly follow a first-order kinetic process. Eight groups of manmade organic compounds are discussed: (1) polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine insecticides; (2) carbamate and organophosphorus; (3) herbicides; (4) phenols; (5) halogenated aliphatic and monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; (6) phthalate esters; (7) polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, and (8) polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. For each compound group, data pertaining to use, production, and properties are presented and discussed. Process that influence the environmental fate of each group, as determined primarily through laboratory studies, are reviewed, and important fate process are identified. Environmental concentrations of compounds from each group in water, biota, and sediment are given to demonstrate representative values for comparison to concentrations determined during ongoing research. Finally, where sufficient data exist, regional and temporal contamination trends in the US are discussed. 699 refs., 26 figs., 47 tabs.

Smith, J.A.; Witkowski, P.J.; Fusillo, T.V.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Process for producing phenolic compounds from lignins  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for the production of low molecular weight phenolic compounds from lignins through the pyrolysis of the lignins in the presence of a strong base. In a preferred embodiment, potassium hydroxide is present in an amount of from about 0.1% to about 5% by weight, the pyrolysis temperature is from about 400 C to about 600 C at atmospheric pressure, and the time period for substantial completion of the reaction is from about 1--3 minutes. Examples of low molecular weight phenolic compounds produced include methoxyphenols, non-methoxylated phenols, and mixtures thereof. 16 figs.

Agblevor, F.A.

1998-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

126

Organic photosensitive devices using subphthalocyanine compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An organic photosensitive optoelectronic device, having a donor-acceptor heterojunction of a donor-like material and an acceptor-like material and methods of making such devices is provided. At least one of the donor-like material and the acceptor-like material includes a subphthalocyanine, a subporphyrin, and/or a subporphyrazine compound; and/or the device optionally has at least one of a blocking layer or a charge transport layer, where the blocking layer and/or the charge transport layer includes a subphthalocyanine, a subporphyrin, and/or a subporphyrazine compound.

Rand, Barry (Princeton, NJ); Forrest, Stephen R. (Ann Arbor, MI); Mutolo, Kristin L. (Hollywood, CA); Mayo, Elizabeth (Alhambra, CA); Thompson, Mark E. (Anaheim Hills, CA)

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

127

Identification of quaternary ammonium compounds as potent inhibitors of hERG potassium channels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) channel, a member of a family of voltage-gated potassium (K{sup +}) channels, plays a critical role in the repolarization of the cardiac action potential. The reduction of hERG channel activity as a result of adverse drug effects or genetic mutations may cause QT interval prolongation and potentially leads to acquired long QT syndrome. Thus, screening for hERG channel activity is important in drug development. Cardiotoxicity associated with the inhibition of hERG channels by environmental chemicals is also a public health concern. To assess the inhibitory effects of environmental chemicals on hERG channel function, we screened the National Toxicology Program (NTP) collection of 1408 compounds by measuring thallium influx into cells through hERG channels. Seventeen compounds with hERG channel inhibition were identified with IC{sub 50} potencies ranging from 0.26 to 22 {mu}M. Twelve of these compounds were confirmed as hERG channel blockers in an automated whole cell patch clamp experiment. In addition, we investigated the structure-activity relationship of seven compounds belonging to the quaternary ammonium compound (QAC) series on hERG channel inhibition. Among four active QAC compounds, tetra-n-octylammonium bromide was the most potent with an IC{sub 50} value of 260 nM in the thallium influx assay and 80 nM in the patch clamp assay. The potency of this class of hERG channel inhibitors appears to depend on the number and length of their aliphatic side-chains surrounding the charged nitrogen. Profiling environmental compound libraries for hERG channel inhibition provides information useful in prioritizing these compounds for cardiotoxicity assessment in vivo.

Xia Menghang, E-mail: mxia@mail.nih.gov [NIH Chemical Genomics Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Shahane, Sampada A.; Huang, Ruili; Titus, Steven A. [NIH Chemical Genomics Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Shum, Enoch; Zhao Yong [Cerep, Inc., Redmond, WA (United States); Southall, Noel; Zheng, Wei [NIH Chemical Genomics Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Witt, Kristine L.; Tice, Raymond R. [National Toxicology Program, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Austin, Christopher P. [NIH Chemical Genomics Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fenton Hill Hdr Fenton Hill Hdr Area (Laughlin, Et Al., 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Thin sections were prepared of the different lithologies from each core. Standard petrographic techniques were used to identify constituent minerals and to obtain modal analyses. The number of points counted varied from about 500 to several thousand, depending upon the grain size of the rock. Whole-rock chemical analysis was performed by John Husler, University of New Mexico, using a variety of techniques (Laughlin and Eddy, 1977). The precision for SiO2 is + 1% relative; for the other oxides it is + 2% relative. Accuracy was monitored by using USGS standard rock samples. Where

129

Los Alamos identifies internal material control issue  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Internal material control issue Internal material control issue Los Alamos identifies internal material control issue The error relates to internal inventory and accounting that documents movement of sensitive materials within a small portion of Technical Area 55. February 26, 2009 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

130

Element 104 identified by characteristic x rays  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A research team at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has recently announced that they have conclusively identified the 257 isotope of element 104. This new work shows promise of shedding light on the controversy between Albert Ghiorso and Georgi N. Flerov the leaders respectively of the groups at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research Dubna. The isotope 104 X 257 decays by alpha emission to 102 No 253 with a half?life of 4.3 seconds. The Oak Ridge group observed the K?series x rays from nobelium in coincidence with the alpha particles from 104 X 257 ; the observation of x?ray spectra has never been reported previously by the Berkeley or Dubna workers according to Curtis E. Bemis Jr spokesman for the group.

Ronald J. Cohn

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Boron-containing amino carboxylic acid compounds and uses thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Novel compounds which are useful for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) are disclosed. The compounds comprise a stable boron-containing group and an aminocycloalkane carboxylic acid group or a boronated acyclic hydrocarbon-linked amino carboxylic acid. Methods for synthesis of the compounds and for use of the compounds in BNCT are disclosed.

Kabalka, George W. (Knoxville, TN); Srivastava, Rajiv R. (Knoxville, TN)

2000-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

132

Compositions containing borane or carborane cage compounds and related applications  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Compositions comprising a polymer-containing matrix and a filler comprising a cage compound selected from borane cage compounds, carborane cage compounds, metal complexes thereof, residues thereof, mixtures thereof, and/or agglomerations thereof, where the cage compound is not covalently bound to the matrix polymer. Methods of making and applications for using such compositions are also disclosed.

Bowen, III, Daniel E; Eastwood, Eric A

2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

133

Cytokinin Regulates Compound Leaf Development in Tomato  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...sample values fell within the standard curve (efficiency of 0.96...relative to the respective standard curve. At least three independent...compound leaves: A critical review. Plant Cell 22 : 1019-1032...plants with different body plans. Curr. Biol. 12 : 1557-1565...

Eilon Shani; Hadas Ben-Gera; Sharona Shleizer-Burko; Yogev Burko; David Weiss; Naomi Ori

2010-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

134

Nitroaromatic Compounds, from Synthesis to Biodegradation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...explosives but also are the fundamental building blocks in...from all combustion engines contains hydrocarbons...atmospheric pollution is diesel engine-powered motor...compounds, but several fundamental aspects regarding their...Explosives development and fundamentals of explosives technology...

Kou-San Ju; Rebecca E. Parales

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

High Performance Subgraph Mining in Molecular Compounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High Performance Subgraph Mining in Molecular Compounds Giuseppe Di Fatta1,2 and Michael R data makes distributed graph mining techniques particularly relevant. In this paper, we present method has been evaluated on the well-known National Cancer Institute's HIV-screening dataset, where

Reiterer, Harald

136

HYDROGEN LOCAL VIBRATIONAL MODES IN COMPOUND SEMICONDUCTORS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HYDROGEN LOCAL VIBRATIONAL MODES IN COMPOUND SEMICONDUCTORS M.D. MCCLUSKEY* University) spectroscopy of hydrogen and deuterium in GaP, AlSb, ZnSe, and GaN has provided important information about the structures of dopant- hydrogen complexes and their interaction with the host lattice. In GaN:Mg, for example

McCluskey, Matthew

137

Identifying dark matter interactions in monojet searches  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the discrimination of quark-initiated jets from gluon-initiated jets in monojet searches for dark matter using the technique of averaged jet energy profiles. We demonstrate our results in the context of effective field theories of dark matter interactions with quarks and gluons, but our methods apply more generally to a wide class of models. Different effective theories of dark matter and the standard model backgrounds each have a characteristic quark/gluon fraction for the leading jet. When used in conjunction with the traditional cut-and-count monojet search, the jet energy profile can be used to set stronger bounds on contact interactions of dark matter. In the event of a discovery of a monojet excess at the 14 TeV LHC, contact interactions between dark matter with quarks or with gluons can be differentiated at the 95% confidence level. For a given rate at the LHC, signal predictions at direct detection experiments for different dark matter interactions can span five orders of magnitude. The ability to identify these interactions allows us to make a tighter connection between LHC searches and direct detection experiments.

Prateek Agrawal; Vikram Rentala

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

138

Canopy hot-spot as crop identifier  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Illuminating any reflective rough or structured surface by a directional light source results in an angular reflectance distribution that shows a narrow peak in the direction of retro-reflection. This is called the Heiligenschein or hot-spot of vegetation canopies and is caused by mutual shading of leaves. The angular intensity distribution of the hot-spot, its brightness and slope, are therefore indicators of the plant's geometry. We propose the use of hot-spot characteristics as crop identifiers in satellite remote sensing because the canopy hot-spot carries information about plant stand architecture that is more distinctive for different plant species than, for instance, their spectral reflectance characteristics. A simple three-dimensional Monte Carlo/ray tracing model and an analytic two-dimensional model are developed to estimate the angular distribution of the hot-spot as a function of the size of the plant leaves. The results show that the brightness-distribution and slope of the hot-spot change distinctively for different leaf sizes indicating a much more peaked maximum for the smaller leaves.

Gerstl, S.A.W.; Simmer, C.; Powers, B.J.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Catalyst Structure-Performance Relationship Identified by High...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Identified by High-Throughput Operando Method: New Insight for Silica-Supported Catalyst Structure-Performance Relationship Identified by High-Throughput Operando Method: New...

140

Identify Institutional Change Rules, Roles, and Tools Constituting...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Identify Institutional Change Rules, Roles, and Tools Constituting Context for Sustainability Identify Institutional Change Rules, Roles, and Tools Constituting Context for...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tentatively identified compound" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Chlorinated organic compounds in urban river sediments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Among anthropogenic chemicals, many chlorinated organic compounds have been used as insecticides and detected frequently as contaminants in urban river sediments so far. However, the number and total amount of chemicals produced commercially and used are increasing year by year, though each amount of chemicals is not so high. New types of contaminants in the environment may be detected by the use of newly developed chemicals. Chlorinated organic compounds in the urban river sediments around Tokyo and Kyoto, large cities in Japan, were surveyed and recent trends of contaminants were studied. Contaminants of the river sediments in industrial areas had a variety, but PCB (polychlorinated biphenyls) was detected in common in industrial areas. Concentration of PCB related well to the number of factories on both sides of rivers, although the use of PCB was stopped 20 years ago. In domestic areas, Triclosan (5-chloro-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)-phenol) and Triclocarban (3,4,4{prime}-trichlorocarbanilide)(both are contained in soap or shampoo for fungicides), p-dichlorobenzene (insecticides for wears) and TCEP(tris-chloroethyl phosphate) were detected. EOX(extracted organic halogen) in the sediments was 5 to 10 times of chlorinated organic compounds detected by GC/MS. Major part of organic halogen was suggested to be included in chlorinated organics formed by bleaching or sterilization.

Soma, Y.; Shiraishi, H.; Inaba, K. [National Inst. of Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

142

Compound refractive X-ray lens  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for focusing X-rays. In one embodiment, his invention is a commercial-grade compound refractive X-ray lens. The commercial-grade compound refractive X-ray lens includes a volume of low-Z material. The volume of low-Z material has a first surface which is adapted to receive X-rays of commercially-applicable power emitted from a commercial-grade X-ray source. The volume of low-Z material also has a second surface from which emerge the X-rays of commercially-applicable power which were received at the first surface. Additionally, the commercial-grade compound refractive X-ray lens includes a plurality of openings which are disposed between the first surface and the second surface. The plurality of openings are oriented such that the X-rays of commercially-applicable power which are received at the first surface, pass through the volume of low-Z material and through the plurality openings. In so doing, the X-rays which emerge from the second surface are refracted to a focal point.

Nygren, David R. (Berkeley, CA); Cahn, Robert (Walnut Creek, CA); Cederstrom, Bjorn (Traellborg, SE); Danielsson, Mats (Stocksund, SE); Vestlund, Jonas (Stockholm, SE)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Hydromechanical transmission with compound planetary assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A power transmission having three distinct ranges: (1) hydrostatic, (2) simple power-split hydromechanical, and (3) compound power-split hydromechanical. A single compound planetary assembly has two sun gears, two ring gears, and a single carrier with two sets of elongated planet gears. The two sun gears may be identical in size, and the two ring gears may be identical in size. A speed-varying module in driving relationship to the first sun gear is clutchable, in turn, to (1) the input shaft and (2) the second sun gear. The speed-varying means may comprise a pair of hydraulic units hydraulically interconnected so that one serves as a pump while the other serves as a motor and vice versa, one of the units having a variable stroke and being the one clutchable to either the input shaft or to the second sun gear. The other unit, which may have a fixed stroke, is connected in driving relation to the first sun gear. A brake grounds the carrier in the first range and in reverse and causes drive to be delivered to the output shaft through the first ring gear in a hydrostatic mode, the first ring gear being rigidly connected to the output shaft. The input shaft is also clutchable to the second ring gear of the compound planetary assembly.

Orshansky, Jr., deceased, Elias (late of San Francisco, CA); Weseloh, William E. (San Diego, CA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Stable Carbon Isotope Ratios of Phenolic Compounds in Secondary Particulate Organic Matter Formed by Photooxidation of Toluene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Compound-specific stable carbon isotope ratios for phenolic compounds in secondary particulate organic matter (POM) formed by photooxidation of toluene were studied. Secondary POM generated by photooxidation of toluene using a continuous-flow reactor and an 8 cubic meter indoor smog chamber was collected, and then extracted with acetonitrile. Eight phenolic compounds were identified in the extracts by a gas chromatograph coupled with a mass spectrometer, and their compound-specific stable carbon isotope ratios were determined by a gas chromatograph coupled with a combustion furnace followed by an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. The majority of the products, including methylnitrophenols and methylnitrocatechols, were isotopically depleted by 5 to 6 permil compared to the initial isotope ratio for toluene, whereas the isotope ratio for 4_nitrophenol remained the same as the initial isotope ratio for toluene. Based on the reaction mechanisms postulated in literature, stable carbon isotope ratios of these produc...

Irei, Satoshi; Huang, Lin; Auld, Janeen; Collin, Fabrice; Hastie, Donald

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 3: Identify and Engage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3: 3: Identify and Engage Financial Partners to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 3: Identify and Engage Financial Partners on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 3: Identify and Engage Financial Partners on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 3: Identify and Engage Financial Partners on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 3: Identify and Engage Financial Partners on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 3: Identify and Engage Financial Partners on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 3: Identify and Engage Financial Partners on AddThis.com... Getting Started Driving Demand Financing Assess the Market

146

Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Rules,  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Identify Identify Institutional Change Rules, Roles, and Tools Constituting Context for Sustainability to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Rules, Roles, and Tools Constituting Context for Sustainability on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Rules, Roles, and Tools Constituting Context for Sustainability on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Rules, Roles, and Tools Constituting Context for Sustainability on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Rules, Roles, and Tools Constituting Context for Sustainability on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional

147

-ray Irradiation Enhanced Boron-10 Compound Accumulation in Murine Tumors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......gamma-ray Irradiation Enhanced Boron-10 Compound Accumulation in Murine Tumors...effects of gamma-ray irradiation on boron-10 compound accumulation in a murine...sodium) administration. Then, the boron-10 concentrations in tumor and normal......

Yong Liu; Kenji Nagata; Shin-ichiro Masunaga; Minoru Suzuki; Genro Kashino; Yuko Kinashi; Hiroki Tanaka; Yoshinori Sakurai; Akira Maruhashi; Koji Ono

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

A knowledge base of the chemical compounds of intermediary metabolism  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Press August 1992 other ORIGINAL PAPERS A knowledge base of the chemical compounds of intermediary...paper describes a publicly available knowledge base of the chemical compounds involved...consider the motivations for constructing a knowledge base of metabolic compounds, the methodology......

Peter D. Karp

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Novel amine-based presursor compounds and composite membranes thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Novel amine-based precursor compounds comprising the condensation products of dialkylenetriamine and alpha, beta-unsaturated acid halides are disclosed, as well as composite membranes containing such compounds, the membranes being useful in RO-type processes for desalination and the removal of low molecular weight organic compounds such as phenols and carboxylic acids.

Lee, Eric K. L. (Wilmington, DE); Tuttle, Mark E. (Bend, OR)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Method for conversion of .beta.-hydroxy carbonyl compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is disclosed for conversion of salts of .beta.-hydroxy carbonyl compounds forming useful conversion products including, e.g., .alpha.,.beta.-unsaturated carbonyl compounds and/or salts of .alpha.,.beta.-unsaturated carbonyl compounds. Conversion products find use, e.g., as feedstock and/or end-use chemicals.

Lilga, Michael A. (Richland, WA); White, James F. (Richland, WA); Holladay, Johnathan E. (Kennewick, WA); Zacher, Alan H. (Kennewick, WA); Muzatko, Danielle S. (Kennewick, WA); Orth, Rick J. (Kennewick, WA)

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

151

Sorption of naphthoic acids and quinoline compounds to estuarine sediment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sorption of naphthoic acids and quinoline compounds to estuarine sediment William D. Burgos The sorption of 16 ionizable organic compounds (IOCs) to an estuarine sediment was measured in synthetic were quinoline compounds. The linear sorption distribution coefficient (Kd) was used to correlate

Burgos, William

152

Ternary compound electrode for lithium cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and of light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and normally is operated in the temperature range of about 350 to 500/sup 0/C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell in which lithium is the electroactive species. The cell has a positive electrode which includes a ternary compound generally represented as Li-M-O, wherein M is a transition metal. Corrosion of the inventive cell is considerably reduced.

Raistrick, I.D.; Godshall, N.A.; Huggins, R.A.

1980-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

153

Vapor deposition of tantalum and tantalum compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tantalum, and many of its compounds, can be deposited as coatings with techniques ranging from pure, thermal chemical vapor deposition to pure physical vapor deposition. This review concentrates on chemical vapor deposition techniques. The paper takes a historical approach. The authors review classical, metal halide-based techniques and current techniques for tantalum chemical vapor deposition. The advantages and limitations of the techniques will be compared. The need for new lower temperature processes and hence new precursor chemicals will be examined and explained. In the last section, they add some speculation as to possible new, low-temperature precursors for tantalum chemical vapor deposition.

Trkula, M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology Div.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Air toxic emissions from the combustion of coal: Identifying and quantifying hazardous air pollutants from US coals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses the key air toxic emissions likely to emanate from continued and expanded use of domestic coal. It identifies and quantifies those trace elements specified in the US 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, by tabulating selected characterization data on various source coals by region, state, and rank. On the basis of measurements by various researchers, this report also identifies those organic compounds likely to be derived from the coal combustion process (although their formation is highly dependent on specific boiler configurations and operating conditions).

Szpunar, C.B.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Method of digesting an explosive nitro compound  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a process wherein bleaching oxidants are used to digest explosive nitro compounds. The process has an excellent reaction rate for digesting explosives and operates under multivariate conditions. Reaction solutions may be aqueous, non-aqueous or a combination thereof, and can also be any pH, but preferably have a pH between 2 and 9. The temperature may be ambient as well as any temperature above which freezing of the solution would occur and below which any degradation of the bleaching oxidant would occur or below which any explosive reaction would be initiated. The pressure may be any pressure, but is preferably ambient or atmospheric, or a pressure above a vapor pressure of the aqueous solution to avoid boiling of the solution. Because the bleaching oxidant molecules are small, much smaller than an enzyme molecule for example, they can penetrate the microstructure of plastic explosives faster. The bleaching oxidants generate reactive hydroxyl radicals, which can destroy other organic contaminants, if necessary, along with digesting the explosive nitro compound.

Shah, Manish M. (Richland, WA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Compound Refractive Lenses for Thermal Neutron Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project designed and built compound refractive lenses (CRLs) that are able to focus, collimate and image using thermal neutrons. Neutrons are difficult to manipulate compared to visible light or even x rays; however, CRLs can provide a powerful tool for focusing, collimating and imaging neutrons. Previous neutron CRLs were limited to long focal lengths, small fields of view and poor resolution due to the materials available and manufacturing techniques. By demonstrating a fabrication method that can produce accurate, small features, we have already dramatically improved the focal length of thermal neutron CRLs, and the manufacture of Fresnel lens CRLs that greatly increases the collection area, and thus efficiency, of neutron CRLs. Unlike a single lens, a compound lens is a row of N lenslets that combine to produce an N-fold increase in the refraction of neutrons. While CRLs can be made from a variety of materials, we have chosen to mold Teflon lenses. Teflon has excellent neutron refraction, yet can be molded into nearly arbitrary shapes. We designed, fabricated and tested Teflon CRLs for neutrons. We demonstrated imaging at wavelengths as short as 1.26 ? with large fields of view and achieved resolution finer than 250 ?m which is better than has been previously shown. We have also determined designs for Fresnel CRLs that will greatly improve performance.

Gary, Charles K.

2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

157

Recent developments in filamentary compound superconductors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Filamentary A15 Compound superconductors are indispensable for the generation of magnetic fields over 10 T at 4.2 K. The fabrication of Nb/sub 3/ Sn and Va/sub 3/Ga wires is based on the composite process in which a composite of niobium or vanadium cores in a Cu-Sn or Cu-Ca solid-solution alloy matrix is fabricated and then heat-treated. The addition of a third element, such as aluminum, titanium, hafnium, or magnesium, to the niobium or vanadium core affects the transition temperature and the upper critical field and produces fine Nb/sub 3/ Sn grains in an A15 compound. Other effects resulting from such an addition, in areas such as critical current densities in high magnetic fields and stress, are analyzed. Use of the in situ technique for the fabrication of filamentary A15 superconductors as an alternative to the composite process is described. The fabrication and potential of multifilamentary C15 V/sub 2/ (Hf or Zr) wires as a high-field superconductor for magnetic fusion reactor use are presented. Graphs and data analyses are included.

Tachikawa, I.T.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Rules for  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Rules for Sustainability to someone by E-mail Rules for Sustainability to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Rules for Sustainability on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Rules for Sustainability on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Rules for Sustainability on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Rules for Sustainability on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Rules for Sustainability on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Rules for Sustainability on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance

159

Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Roles for  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Roles for Sustainability to someone by E-mail Roles for Sustainability to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Roles for Sustainability on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Roles for Sustainability on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Roles for Sustainability on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Roles for Sustainability on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Roles for Sustainability on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Roles for Sustainability on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance

160

Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Tools for  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tools for Sustainability to someone by E-mail Tools for Sustainability to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Tools for Sustainability on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Tools for Sustainability on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Tools for Sustainability on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Tools for Sustainability on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Tools for Sustainability on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Tools for Sustainability on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tentatively identified compound" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Promoter sequences and algorithmical methods for identifying them , Laurent Marsan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Promoter sequences and algorithmical methods for identifying them Anne Vanet a b , Laurent Marsan c available mathematical models algorithmical methods trying identify promoter sequences. The methods concern both types of organisms. survey therefore covers methods; however, emphasis placed prokaryotic promoter

Sagot, Marie-France

162

Identifying protein-protein interactions of a cell cycle regulator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The role of anachronism (ana) protein in stem cell division of Drosophila melanogaster was examined. Synthesis of identifiable ana protein was necessary. The identifying method exploited was that of antibody tagging using a myc epitope or a poly...

Amos, Joseph Edward

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

163

Synchrotron radiation identified human chemical fingerprints a novel forensic approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Synchrotron radiation identified human chemical fingerprints ­ a novel forensic approach T with the goal of developing an advanced forensic technique to identify complicated partial latent prints a forensic analysis of the fingerprint chemistry, or to identify the latent prints of pre-pubescent children

164

Radiological Control Programs for Special Tritium Compounds  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

84-2004 84-2004 SEPTEMBER 2004 CHANGE NOTICE NO. 1 Date June 2006 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL PROGRAMS FOR SPECIAL TRITIUM COMPOUNDS U.S. Department of Energy AREA OCSH Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE ii Table of Changes Page Change 67 (near bottom) In row 1, column 2 of the table titled "dosimetric properties" 6 mrem was changed to 6 x 10 -2 mrem Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web site at http://tis.eh.doe.gov/techstds/ DOE-HDBK-1184-2004 iii Foreword The Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor agencies have undertaken a wide variety

165

Radiological Control Programs for Special Tritium Compounds  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

F 1325.8 F 1325.8 (08-93) United States Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE: May 11, 2006 REPLY TO EH-52:JRabovsky:3-2 135 ATTN OF: APPROVAL OF CHANGE NOTICE 1 TO DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (DOE) SUBJECT. HANDBOOK 1184-2004, RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL PROGRAMS FOR SPECIAL TRITIUM COMPOUNDS TO: Dennis Kubicki, EH-24 Technical Standards Manager This memorandum forwards the subject Change Notice 1 to DOE Handbook, DOE- HDBK- 1184-2004, which has approved for publication and distribution. The change to this handbook consists of a correction to the rule of thumb, listed in Appendix A, for converting the uptake of tritium oxide into radiation dose. A factor of 1/100 was inadvertently omitted from this rule of thumb when this DOE Handbook was originally published. This change does not affect the references, is not of a technical nature, and

166

Electric Resistivity of Interstitial Compounds of Graphite  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Assuming that the formation of interstitial compounds is accompanied by creation of excess holes in the otherwise full band of graphite it is shown that a linear energy?momentum relation at the Brillouin zone corners is incapable of explaining the decrease of the electric resistance with oxidation. It appears that for a more general model the decrease in relative resistance should be independent of temperature for large oxidations if suitable corrections for the initial conditions are made. Data for polycrystallinegraphite corrected for the existence of an energy gap and of excess holes in the untreated material give curves which converge for higher oxidation with the curve for natural graphite. Discussion of the low temperature properties of graphite leads to the conclusion that large graphite crystals possess slightly overlapping zones.

S. Mrozowski

1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Microbial transformations of natural organic compounds and radionuclides in subsurface environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A major national concern in the subsurface disposal of energy wastes is the contamination of ground and surface waters by waste leachates containing radionuclides, toxic metals, and organic compounds. Microorganisms play an important role in the transformation of organic compounds, radionuclides, and toxic metals present in the waste and affect their mobility in subsurface environments. Microbial processes involved in dissolution, mobilization, and immobilization of toxic metals under aerobic and anaerobic conditions are briefly reviewed. Metal complexing agents and several organic acids produced by microbial action affect mobilization of radionuclides and toxic metals in subsurface environments. Information on the persistence of and biodegradation rates of synthetic as well as microbiologically produced complexing agents is scarce but important in determining the mobility of metal organic complexes in subsoils. Several gaps in knowledge in the area of microbial transformation of naturally occurring organics, radionuclides, and toxic metals have been identified, and further basic research has been suggested. 31 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

Francis, A.J.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Warpinski,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Warpinski, Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Lake City Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The Lake City site, which is located in far northeastern California, consists of a previously identified geothermal site that has been explored with both geophysics and drilling (Hedel, 1981), but has not been characterized adequately to allow accurate siting or drilling of production wells. Some deep wells, several seismic lines, limited gravity surveys, and geochemical and geological studies have suggested that the geothermal

169

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kodosky & Keith, 1993) Kodosky & Keith, 1993) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area (Kodosky & Keith, 1993) Exploration Activity Details Location Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The purpose of this paper is to examine whether statistical analysis of encrustation chemistries, when supplemented with petrologic data, can identify the individual processes that generate and degrade fumarolic encrustations. Knowledge of these specific processes broadens the applications of fumarolic alteration studies. Geochemical data for a 47-element suite were obtained for an air-dried subset of the collected

170

Complex Hydride Compounds with Enhanced Hydrogen Storage Capacity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), in collaboration with major partners Albemarle Corporation (Albemarle) and the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), conducted research to discover new hydride materials for the storage of hydrogen having on-board reversibility and a target gravimetric capacity of ? 7.5 weight percent (wt %). When integrated into a system with a reasonable efficiency of 60% (mass of hydride / total mass), this target material would produce a system gravimetric capacity of ? 4.5 wt %, consistent with the DOE 2007 target. The approach established for the project combined first principles modeling (FPM - UTRC) with multiple synthesis methods: Solid State Processing (SSP - UTRC), Solution Based Processing (SBP - Albemarle) and Molten State Processing (MSP - SRNL). In the search for novel compounds, each of these methods has advantages and disadvantages; by combining them, the potential for success was increased. During the project, UTRC refined its FPM framework which includes ground state (0 Kelvin) structural determinations, elevated temperature thermodynamic predictions and thermodynamic / phase diagram calculations. This modeling was used both to precede synthesis in a virtual search for new compounds and after initial synthesis to examine reaction details and options for modifications including co-reactant additions. The SSP synthesis method involved high energy ball milling which was simple, efficient for small batches and has proven effective for other storage material compositions. The SBP method produced very homogeneous chemical reactions, some of which cannot be performed via solid state routes, and would be the preferred approach for large scale production. The MSP technique is similar to the SSP method, but involves higher temperature and hydrogen pressure conditions to achieve greater species mobility. During the initial phases of the project, the focus was on higher order alanate complexes in the phase space between alkaline metal hydrides (AmH), Alkaline earth metal hydrides (AeH2), alane (AlH3), transition metal (Tm) hydrides (TmHz, where z=1-3) and molecular hydrogen (H2). The effort started first with variations of known alanates and subsequently extended the search to unknown compounds. In this stage, the FPM techniques were developed and validated on known alanate materials such as NaAlH4 and Na2LiAlH6. The coupled predictive methodologies were used to survey over 200 proposed phases in six quaternary spaces, formed from various combinations of Na, Li Mg and/or Ti with Al and H. A wide range of alanate compounds was examined using SSP having additions of Ti, Cr, Co, Ni and Fe. A number of compositions and reaction paths were identified having H weight fractions up to 5.6 wt %, but none meeting the 7.5 wt%H reversible goal. Similarly, MSP of alanates produced a number of interesting compounds and general conclusions regarding reaction behavior of mixtures during processing, but no alanate based candidates meeting the 7.5 wt% goal. A novel alanate, LiMg(AlH4)3, was synthesized using SBP that demonstrated a 7.0 wt% capacity with a desorption temperature of 150C. The deuteride form was synthesized and characterized by the Institute for Energy (IFE) in Norway to determine its crystalline structure for related FPM studies. However, the reaction exhibited exothermicity and therefore was not reversible under acceptable hydrogen gas pressures for on-board recharging. After the extensive studies of alanates, the material class of emphasis was shifted to borohydrides. Through SBP, several ligand-stabilized Mg(BH4)2 complexes were synthesized. The Mg(BH4)2*2NH3 complex was found to change behavior with slightly different synthesis conditions and/or aging. One of the two mechanisms was an amine-borane (NH3BH3) like dissociation reaction which released up to 16 wt %H and more conservatively 9 wt%H when not including H2 released from the NH3. From FPM, the stability of the Mg(BH4)2*2NH3 compound was found to increase with the inclusion of NH3 groups in the inner-Mg coordination

Mosher, Daniel A.; Opalka, Susanne M.; Tang, Xia; Laube, Bruce L.; Brown, Ronald J.; Vanderspurt, Thomas H.; Arsenault, Sarah; Wu, Robert; Strickler, Jamie; Anton, Donald L.; Zidan, Ragaiy; Berseth, Polly

2008-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

171

Control of insects and spider mites by translocated compounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

applied to soil could be detected in a bioassay method using Aedes larvae. Schrader (1947a), working in Germany during World War II, prepared several phosphorus and fluorine compounds that were shown to be systemic. These compounds were taken up... ............................ .. . . . 113 Attempts to Isolate a Toxic Principle from Plants Treated with Octamethyl Pyrophosphoramide ? ? ? ? ? ? . . ? 118 RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CHEMICAL STRUCTURE AND SYSTEMIC ACTIVITY OF ORGANIC PHOSPHORUS COMPOUNDS............... 125 Derivatives...

Ivy, Edward Everett

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

172

Recovery of mercury from mercury compounds via electrolytic methods  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for electrolytically recovering mercury from mercury compounds is provided. In one embodiment, Hg is recovered from Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2 employing as the electrolyte solution a mixture of HCl and H.sub.2 O. In another embodiment, Hg is electrolytically recovered from HgO wherein the electrolyte solution is comprised of glacial acetic acid and H.sub.2 O. Also provided is an apparatus for producing isotopically enriched mercury compounds in a reactor and then transporting the dissolved compounds into an electrolytic cell where mercury ions are electrolytically reduced and elemental mercury recovered from the mercury compounds.

Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); George, William A. (Rockport, MA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Recovery of mercury from mercury compounds via electrolytic methods  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for electrolytically recovering mercury from mercury compounds is provided. In one embodiment, Hg is recovered from Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2] employing as the electrolyte solution a mixture of HCl and H[sub 2]O. In another embodiment, Hg is electrolytically recovered from HgO wherein the electrolyte solution is comprised of glacial acetic acid and H[sub 2]O. Also provided is an apparatus for producing isotopically enriched mercury compounds in a reactor and then transporting the dissolved compounds into an electrolytic cell where mercury ions are electrolytically reduced and elemental mercury recovered from the mercury compounds. 3 figures.

Grossman, M.W.; George, W.A.

1991-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

174

Recovery of mercury from mercury compounds via electrolytic methods  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for electrolytically recovering mercury from mercury compounds is provided. In one embodiment, Hg is recovered from Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2 employing as the electrolyte solution a mixture of HCl and H.sub.2 O. In another embodiment, Hg is electrolytically recovered from HgO wherein the electrolyte solution is comprised of glacial acetic acid and H.sub.2 O. Also provided is an apparatus for producing isotopically enriched mercury compounds in a reactor and then transporting the dissolved compounds into an electrolytic cell where mercury ions are electrolytically reduced and elemental mercury recovered from the mercury compounds.

Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); George, William A. (Rockport, MA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Recovery of mercury from mercury compounds via electrolytic methods  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for electrolytically recovering mercury from mercury compounds is provided. In one embodiment, Hg is recovered from Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2 employing as the electrolyte solution a mixture of HCl and H.sub.2 O. In another embodiment, Hg is electrolytically recovered from HgO wherein the electrolyte solution is comprised of glacial acetic acid and H.sub.2 O. Also provided is an apparatus for producing isotopically enriched mercury compounds in a reactor and then transporting the dissolved compounds into an electrolytic cell where mercury ions are electrolytically reduced and elemental mercury recovered from the mercury compounds.

Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); George, William A. (Rockport, MA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Recovery of mercury from mercury compounds via electrolytic methods  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for electrolytically recovering mercury from mercury compounds is provided. In one embodiment, Hg is recovered from Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2] employing as the electrolyte solution a mixture of HCl and H[sub 2]O. In another embodiment, Hg is electrolytically recovered from HgO wherein the electrolyte solution is comprised of glacial acetic acid and H[sub 2]O. Also provided is an apparatus for producing isotopically enriched mercury compounds in a reactor and then transporting the dissolved compounds into an electrolytic cell where mercury ions are electrolytically reduced and elemental mercury recovered from the mercury compounds. 3 figs.

Grossman, M.W.; George, W.A.

1989-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

177

Turbo Compounding: A Technology Whose Time Has Come | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

A Technology Whose Time Has Come Turbo Compounding: A Technology Whose Time Has Come 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters...

178

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Fish...

179

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fish Lake Valley Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References (1 January 2011) GTP ARRA...

180

Compound and Elemental Analysis At International Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Improving Exploration Models of Andesite-Hosted Geothermal...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tentatively identified compound" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date - 1983 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Thin sections were prepared of the different lithologies from...

182

Model Compound Studies of Fuel Cell Membrane Degradation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation on Model Compound Studies of Fuel Cell Membrane Degradation to the High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting held in Arlington, Virginia, May 26,2005.

183

Possibilities of Production and Use of Rubber-Bitumen Compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Procedures are discussed for production of rubber-bitumen compounds based on spent rubber items. A possibility of using these binders...

D. G. Shunin; A. G. Filippova; N. A. Okhotina

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Introduction Compound-specific identification, or biomarker analysis,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

269 Introduction Compound-specific identification, or biomarker analysis, in organic geochemistry cases highlighting subtle yet important details not revealed by bulk analyses alone. For example

Long, Bernard

185

Microfluidic self-assembly of quantum dot compound micelles.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis is devoted to the development of microfluidic processes for the controlled self-assembly of quantum dot compound micelles (QDCMs). Microfluidic processes are developed to (more)

Schabas, Greg

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area (White, Et Al., 1992) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Compound and...

187

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Redondo Geothermal Area (White, Et Al., 1992) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis...

188

Prediction of New Hydrogen Storage Compounds and Mixtures  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8, 2006 DOE Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials Prediction of New Hydrogen Storage Compounds and Mixtures Vidvuds Ozoli UCLA Research supported by DOE grants No....

189

Prediction of New Hydrogen Storage Compounds and Mixtures  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation on the Prediction of New Hydrogen Storage Compounds and Mixtures given at the DOE Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials on May 18, 2006.

190

Hydrogen-Evolving Organic Compounds - Energy Innovation Portal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Storage Energy Storage Find More Like This Return to Search Hydrogen-Evolving Organic Compounds Los Alamos National Laboratory Contact LANL About This Technology Technology...

191

Process for preparing a chemical compound enriched in isotope content  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process to prepare a chemical enriched in isotope content which includes: (a) A chemical exchange reaction between a first and second compound which yields an isotopically enriched first compound and an isotopically depleted second compound; (b) the removal of a portion of the first compound as product and the removal of a portion of the second compound as spent material; (c) the conversion of the remainder of the first compound to the second compound for reflux at the product end of the chemical exchange reaction region; (d) the conversion of the remainder of the second compound to the first compound for reflux at the spent material end of the chemical exchange region; and the cycling of the additional chemicals produced by one conversion reaction to the other conversion reaction, for consumption therein. One of the conversion reactions is an oxidation reaction, and the energy that it yields is used to drive the other conversion reaction, a reduction. The reduction reaction is carried out in a solid polymer electrolyte electrolytic reactor. The overall process is energy efficient and yields no waste by-products.

Michaels, Edward D. (Spring Valley, OH)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Glass Buttes Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding...

193

Process for synthesizing compounds from elemental powders and product  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for synthesizing intermetallic compounds from elemental powders. The elemental powders are initially combined in a ratio which approximates the stoichiometric composition of the intermetallic compound. The mixed powders are then formed into a compact which is heat treated at a controlled rate of heating such that an exothermic reaction between the elements is initiated. The heat treatment may be performed under controlled conditions ranging from a vacuum (pressureless sintering) to compression (hot pressing) to produce a desired densification of the intermetallic compound. In a preferred form of the invention, elemental powders of Fe and Al are combined to form aluminide compounds of Fe.sub.3 Al and FeAl.

Rabin, Barry H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Richard N. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Selective Conversion of Lignin into Simple Aromatic Compounds...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Lignin into Simple Aromatic Compounds Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center Contact GLBRC About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary Lignin is a major component of...

195

Comment on Tunable generation and adsorption of energetic compounds...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tunable generation and adsorption of energetic compounds in the vapor phase at trace levels: A tool for testing and Comment on Tunable generation and adsorption of energetic...

196

Identify Institutional Change Rules, Roles, and Tools Constituting Context  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Identify Institutional Change Rules, Roles, and Tools Constituting Identify Institutional Change Rules, Roles, and Tools Constituting Context for Sustainability Identify Institutional Change Rules, Roles, and Tools Constituting Context for Sustainability October 8, 2013 - 11:43am Addthis Graphic showing 5 gears. They progress from Determine Goal to Identify Context-Rules, Roles and Tools to Develop Action Plan to Implement Plan to Measure and Evaluate. Institutional Change Continuous Improvement Cycle After determining your agency's institutional change sustainability goals, the next step is to analyze the context within which these goals are to be achieved. Start by identifying the organizational rules, roles, and tools that shape the current context and may influence success in achieving these goals. Identifying the linkages among rules, roles, and tools and how they

197

Elimination of Radio-Frequency Noise by Identifying and Diverting Large RF Ground Currents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The problem of electromagnetic interference in scientific instruments is compounded for high-power plasma experiments by the large currents and voltages as well as by the broad bandwidths of the instruments. Ground loops are known to allow stray magnetic fields to drive large ground currents that can induce spurious signals and damage electronics. Furthermore, even when a ground loop is broken, capacitive coupling can still permit the flow of radio-frequency current, resulting in high-frequency spurious signals that can overwhelm the desired signal. We present the effects of RF ground loops on the output of vacuum photodiodes used in the Caltech Solar Loop Experiment and demonstrate the elimination of the spurious signals by diverting the ground currents away from the most vulnerable point of the signal line. Techniques for identifying the RF ground loops are also discussed. These techniques should be valuable in many high-power systems where interference from spurious coupling is an issue.

Perkins, R. J.; Bellan, P. M. [Applied Physics, California Institute of Technology (United States)

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

198

FIELD SCREENING FOR HALOGENATED VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Western Research Institute (WRI) initiated exploratory work towards the development of new field screening methodology and a test kit to measure halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Heated diode and corona discharge sensors are commonly used to detect leaks of refrigerants from air conditioners, freezers, and refrigerators. They are both selective to the presence of carbon-halogen bonds. Commercially available heated diode and corona discharge leak detectors were procured and evaluated for halogenated VOC response. The units were modified to provide a digital readout of signal related to VOC concentration. Sensor response was evaluated with carbon tetrachloride and tetrachloroethylene (perchloroethylene, PCE), which represent halogenated VOCs with and without double bonds. The response characteristics were determined for the VOCs directly in headspace in Tedlar bag containers. Quantitation limits in air were estimated. Potential interferences from volatile hydrocarbons, such as toluene and heptane, were evaluated. The effect of humidity was studied also. The performance of the new devices was evaluated in the laboratory by spiking soil samples and monitoring headspace for halogenated VOCs. A draft concept of the steps for a new analytical method was outlined. The results of the first year effort show that both devices show potential utility for future analytical method development work towards the goal of developing a portable test kit for screening halogenated VOCs in the field.

John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani Jr.; Theresa M. Bomstad

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Identifying Project Potential and Options Webinar | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Identifying Project Potential and Options Webinar Identifying Project Potential and Options Webinar Identifying Project Potential and Options Webinar April 30, 2014 11:00AM MDT Attendees will understand the components of identifying energy project potential and options. Presenters will discuss market considerations, initial site considerations, project savings or rate-of-return estimates, production potential, final site selection, tribal options, finance, partnerships, and participation processes. Attendees will also become familiar with data gathering and analysis procedures such as tribal facility electric cost data, regulations, and interconnection requirements; paths to market for project power; and renewable sales, risks; and utility rules. By following the steps outlined in the webinar, Tribes can determine

200

Xlink-Identifier: An Automated Data Analysis Platform for Confident...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Chemically Cross-linked Peptides using Xlink-Identifier: An Automated Data Analysis Platform for Confident Identifications of Chemically Cross-linked Peptides using Abstract:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tentatively identified compound" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Save Energy Now Data Center Assessments to Identify Efficiency Opportunities  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Power Point presentation from a Webcast held on November 13, 2008, to discuss DOE's and FEMP's data center assessments that can identify efficiency opportunities.

202

Step 4: Identify Target Audiences and Behavior Changes | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

the program tailored marketing strategies to each segment's motivations. Coordinated Brain Trust in Wisconsin In an effort to better identify various customer and market...

203

Study identifies two Northwest basalt rock caverns sites for...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

PNNL and BPA have identified two possible sites in eastern Washington to build compressed air energy storage facilities that could temporarily store the Northwest's excess wind...

204

Stable Separator Identified for High-Energy Batteries | ornl...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Functional Materials for Energy Stable Separator Identified for High-Energy Batteries November 04, 2014 A combination of carbon coating and cryo-STEM technique enables atomic level...

205

Electrocatalytic Materials and Techniques for the Anodic Oxidation of Various Organic Compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The focus of this thesis was first to characterize and improve the applicability of Fe(III) and Bi(V) doped PbO{sub 2} film electrodes for use in anodic O-transfer reactions of toxic and waste organic compounds, e.g. phenol, aniline, benzene, and naphthalene. Further, they investigated the use of alternative solution/electrode interfacial excitation techniques to enhance the performance of these electrodes for remediation and electrosynthetic applications. Finally, they have attempted to identify a less toxic metal oxide film that may hold promise for future studies in the electrocatalysis and photoelectrocatalysis of O-transfer reactions using metal oxide film electrodes.

Stephen Everett Treimer

2002-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

206

New Method for Production Data Analysis to Identify New  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Decline curve analysis Type curve matching Single-well reservoir simulation Fuzzy pattern recognition. Identify sweet spots. Track fluid movement (remaining reserves ­ water flooding). Identify remedial Shahab D. Mohaghegh RESERVOIR SIMULATIONS History matching of production data using a single-well radial

Mohaghegh, Shahab

207

LEAN ENERGY ANALYSIS: IDENTIFYING, DISCOVERING AND TRACKING ENERGY SAVINGS POTENTIAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. INTRODUCTION Most energy reduction opportunities in industrial facilities are identified after observation and analysis of the facility. However, much can be done before a site visit to identify possible energy-reduction and Fuel Cell Technologies Conference, Livonia, MI, Oct 11-13, 2004. 1 #12;For example, the anomaly

Kissock, Kelly

208

Energy Cost Reduction Measures Identified for Texas State Agencies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

audit programs examined a total of 35.3 million square feet of state-owned space. Energy cost reduction measures with paybacks of four years or less were identified. The purpose of this paper is to present the projects identified in 1986. Most relate...

Grigg, T. J.; Verdict, M. E.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Examine existing ULS access services to identify potential avenues of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Promote an organizational culture· that emphasizes continuous improvement through learning and identify, and the establishment of trusted repositories for the research output of the University. Organizational Agility 5Encourage initiatives that will identify areas for innovative changes in our organizational and operational

Jiang, Huiqiang

210

IDENTIFYING FRACTURES AND FLUID TYPES USING FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IDENTIFYING FRACTURES AND FLUID TYPES USING FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY IDENTIFYING FRACTURES AND FLUID TYPES USING FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: IDENTIFYING FRACTURES AND FLUID TYPES USING FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy (FIS) is a method currently being developed for use in geothermal systems to identify fractures and fluid types. This paper is the third in a series of papers on the development of FIS. Fluid inclusion gas chemistry is analyzed and plotted on well log diagrams. The working hypothesis is that select gaseous species and species ratios indicate areas of groundwater and reservoir fluid flow and reservoir seals. Previously we showed that FIS analyses identify fluid types and

211

Method for converting asbestos to non-carcinogenic compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Hazardous and carcinogenic asbestos waste characterized by a crystalline fibrous structure is transformed into non-carcinogenic, relatively nonhazardous, and non-crystalline solid compounds and gaseous compounds which have commercial utilization. The asbestos waste is so transformed by the complete fluorination of the crystalline fibrous silicate mineral defining the asbestos. 7 figs.

Selby, T.W.

1996-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

212

Process for reducing aromatic compounds in ethylenediamine with calcium  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Olefins are produced by containing an organic compound having at least one benzene ring with ethylenediamine and calcium metal, the calcium metal being used in large excess or alternatively in conjunction with an inert abrasive particulate substance. Substantially all of the organic compounds are converted to corresponding cyclic olefins, largely mono-olefins.

Benkeser, R.A.; Laugal, J.A.; Rappa, A.

1985-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

213

Experimental investigation of single carbon compounds under hydrothermal conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experimental investigation of single carbon compounds under hydrothermal conditions Jeffrey S; accepted in revised form 8 September 2005 Abstract The speciation of carbon in subseafloor hydrothermal reactant during the abiotic synthesis of reduced carbon compounds via Fischer­Tropsch-type processes

Rhoads, James

214

Method for selective dehalogenation of halogenated polyaromatic compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for dehalogenating halogenated polyaromatic compounds is provided wherein the polyaromatic compounds are mixed with a hydrogen donor solvent and a carbon catalyst in predetermined proportions, the mixture is maintained at a predetermined pressure, and the mixture is heated to a predetermined temperature and for a predetermined time.

Farcasiu, Malvina (Pittsburgh, PA); Petrosius, Steven C. (Library, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Preparation of high nitrogen compound and materials therefrom  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The high-nitrogen compound of the formula ##STR00001## was prepared. Pyrolysis of the compound yields carbon nitrides C.sub.2N.sub.3 and C.sub.3N.sub.5. The carbon nitrides vary in their density, texture, and morphology.

Huynh, My Hang V. (Los Alamos, NM); Hiskey, Michael A. (Los Alamos, NM)

2006-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

216

Presence and Distribution of Organic Wastewater Compounds in Wastewater,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Presence and Distribution of Organic Wastewater Compounds in Wastewater, Surface, Ground.W., Meyer, M.T., and Zaugg, S.D., 2004, Presence and distri- bution of organic wastewater compounds in wastewater, surface, ground, and drinking waters, Minnesota, 2000-02: U.S. Geological Survey Scientific

217

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Brookins & Laughlin, 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Brookins & Laughlin, 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Fenton Hill HDR Site References D. G. Brookins, A. W. Laughlin (1983) Rb-Sr Geochronologic Investigation Of Precambrian Samples From Deep Geothermal Drill Holes, Fenton Hill, New Mexico Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Compound_and_Elemental_Analysis_At_Fenton_Hill_Hdr_Geothermal_Area_(Brookins_%26_Laughlin,_1983)&oldid=511281"

218

Definition: Compound and Elemental Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Compound and Elemental Analysis Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Compound and Elemental Analysis Compound and elemental analysis is a process where a sample of some material (e.g., soil, waste or drinking water, bodily fluids, minerals, chemical compounds) is analyzed for its elements and compounds and sometimes its isotopic composition. Elemental analysis can be qualitative (determining what elements are present), and it can also be quantitative (determining how much of each type are present).[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition References ↑ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elemental_analysis Ret Like Like You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from

219

Multicolor Maps from Compound Queries | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Multicolor Maps from Compound Queries Multicolor Maps from Compound Queries Home > Groups > OpenEI Community Central Jweers's picture Submitted by Jweers(83) Contributor 16 May, 2013 - 14:22 ask queries compound queries developer Google maps maps multicolor result formats results Semantic Mediawiki Hi all, Recently, a couple of people on OpenEI have asked me how to do compound (or multicolor) maps like this one: Thanks to the new Google Maps v3 API, this is really easy. I put together a quick sample of how this is done, complete with code snippits, here: http://en.openei.org/wiki/User:Jweers/Test5. First, create a compound query, then atttribute a custom marker icon to each query using the ;param=value syntax. The new OpenEI maps extension will take care of the rest. Here is an example of it in use on OpenEI by NREL's Geothermal team:

220

Process for forming a metal compound coating on a substrate  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of coating a substrate with a thin layer of a metal compound by forming a dispersion of an electrophoretically active organic colloid and a precursor of the metal compound in an electrolytic cell in which the substrate is an electrode. Upon application of an electric potential, the electrode is coated with a mixture of the organic colloid and the precursor to the metal compound, and the coated substrate is then heated in the presence of an atmosphere or vacuum to decompose the organic colloid and form a coating of either a combination of metal compound and carbon, or optionally forming a porous metal compound coating by heating to a temperature high enough to chemically react the carbon.

Sharp, Donald J. (Albuquerque, NM); Vernon, Milton E. (Albuquerque, NM); Wright, Steven A. (Albuquerque, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tentatively identified compound" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Process for forming a metal compound coating on a substrate  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of coating a substrate with a thin layer of a metal compound by forming a dispersion of an electrophoretically active organic colloid and a precursor of the metal compound in an electrolytic cell in which the substrate is an electrode. Upon application of an electric potential, the electrode is coated with a mixture of the organic colloid and the precursor to the metal compound, and the coated substrate is then heated in the presence of an atmosphere or vacuum to decompose the organic colloid and form a coating of either a combination of metal compound and carbon, or optionally forming a porous metal compound coating by heating to a temperature high enough to chemically react the carbon.

Sharp, D.J.; Vernon, M.E.; Wright, S.A.

1988-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

222

Device for collecting chemical compounds and related methods  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device for sampling chemical compounds from fixed surfaces and related methods are disclosed. The device may include a vacuum source, a chamber and a sorbent material. The device may utilize vacuum extraction to volatilize the chemical compounds from the fixed surfaces so that they may be sorbed by the sorbent material. The sorbent material may then be analyzed using conventional thermal desorption/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD/GC/MS) instrumentation to determine presence of the chemical compounds. The methods may include detecting release and presence of one or more chemical compounds and determining the efficacy of decontamination. The device may be useful in collection and analysis of a variety of chemical compounds, such as residual chemical warfare agents, chemical attribution signatures and toxic industrial chemicals.

Scott, Jill R.; Groenewold, Gary S.; Rae, Catherine

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

AlGeTi: Phase equilibria and structural characterization of new ternary compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Phase equilibria of AlGeTi have been investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). Partial isothermal sections at 400C, 520C and 1000C were obtained with focus on the titanium-poor part up to 50at.% titanium. Three ternary compounds were found to exist. The compound Al3GeTi (?1) crystallizes in an own structure type (P4/nmm, tP10). Two structurally closely related compounds were found at the composition Al1?xGe1+xTi: ?2 (0.61?x?0.73), Al4Si5Zr3-type, I41/amd, tI24 and ? 2 ? (0.36?x?0.57), Si2Zr-type, Cmcm, oC12. DTA data were used to construct a ternary reaction scheme (Scheil diagram) up to approximately 1300C, a partial liquidus projection and two vertical sections, at 10at.% Ti and at a constant Al:Ti ratio of 1:1. A total number of 12 ternary invariant reactions were identified.

Roland W. Bittner; Matthias Grth; Liliana I. Duarte; Christian Leinenbach; Herta S. Effenberger; Klaus W. Richter

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Identifying the motives and behaviors of brand hate University of Twente IDENTIFYING THE MOTIVES AND BEHAVIORS OF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Brand hate can be a serious risk for companies, since it can damage the brand image and reputationIdentifying the motives and behaviors of brand hate ­ University of Twente 9 IDENTIFYING THE MOTIVES AND BEHAVIORS OF BRAND HATE Marianne van Delzen Master Thesis Communication Science February 24th

Vellekoop, Michel

225

FIELD SCREENING FOR HALOGENATED VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Western Research Institute (WRI) is continuing work toward the development of new screening methodology and a test kit to measure halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Heated diode and corona discharge sensors are commonly used to detect leaks of refrigerants from air conditioners, freezers, and refrigerators. They are both selective to the presence of halogens. In prior work, the devices were tested for response to carbon tetrachloride, heptane, toluene, and water vapors. In the current work, sensor response was evaluated with sixteen halogenated VOCs relative to carbon tetrachloride. The results show that the response of the various chlorinated VOCs is within an order of magnitude of the response to carbon tetrachloride for each of the sensors. Thus, for field screening a single response factor can be used. Both types of leak detectors are being further modified to provide an on-board LCD signal readout, which is related to VOC concentration. The units will be fully portable and will operate with 115-V line or battery power. Signal background, noise level, and response data on the Bacharach heated diode detector and the TIF corona discharge detector show that when the response curves are plotted against the log of concentration, the plot is linear to the upper limit for the particular unit, with some curvature at lower levels. When response is plotted directly against concentration, the response is linear at the low end and is curved at the high end. The dynamic ranges for carbon tetrachloride of the two devices from the lower detection limit (S/N=2) to signal saturation are 4-850 vapor parts per million (vppm) for the corona discharge unit and 0.01-70 vppm for the heated diode unit. Additional circuit modifications are being made to lower the detection limit and increase the dynamic response range of the corona discharge unit. The results indicate that both devices show potential utility for future analytical method development work toward the goal of developing a portable test kit for screening halogenated VOCs in the field.

John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani, Jr.; Theresa M. Bomstad

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

A tentative programme towards a full scale energy amplifier  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a proposal of a full scale demonstration plant of the Energy Amplifier (EA), following the conceptual design of Ref. [1]. Unlike the presently on going CERN experiments, reaction rates will be sufficiently massive to permit demonstrating the practical feasibility of energy generation on an industrial scale and to tackle the complete family chains of [1] the breeding process in Thorium fuel, [2] the burning of the self-generated Actinides, [3] the Plutonium (higher Actinides) burning of spent fuel from ordinary Reactors and [4] Fuel reprocessing/regeneration. The accelerator must provide a beam power which is commensurate to the rate of transformations which are sought. No existing accelerator can meet such a performance and a dedicated facility must be built. We describe an alternative based on the superconducting cavities (SC) now in standard use at the LEP \\[e^+-e^-\\] collider which is scheduled to terminate its operation by year 200 After this time, with reasonable modifications, the fully opera...

Rubbia, Carlo

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

A novel yeast cell-based screen identifies flavone as a tankyrase inhibitor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The telomere-associated protein tankyrase 1 is a poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and is considered to be a promising target for cancer therapy, especially for BRCA-associated cancers. However, an efficient assay system for inhibitor screening has not been established, mainly due to the difficulty of efficient preparation of the enzyme and its substrate. Here, we report a cell-based assay system for detecting inhibitory activity against tankyrase 1. We found that overexpression of the human tankyrase 1 gene causes a growth defect in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Chemicals that restore the growth defect phenotype can be identified as potential tankyrase 1 inhibitors. We performed a high-throughput screen using this system, and identified flavone as a compound that restores the growth of yeast cells overexpressing tankyrase 1. Indeed, flavone inhibited poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of proteins caused by overexpression of tankyrase 1 in yeast cells. This system allows rapid identification of inhibitory activity against tankyrase 1 and is amenable to high-throughput screening using robotics.

Yashiroda, Yoko, E-mail: ytyy@riken.jp [Chemical Genomics Research Group/Chemical Genetics Laboratory, RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)] [Chemical Genomics Research Group/Chemical Genetics Laboratory, RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Okamoto, Reika [Chemical Genomics Research Group/Chemical Genetics Laboratory, RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan) [Chemical Genomics Research Group/Chemical Genetics Laboratory, RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Japan Biological Informatics Consortium (JBIC), Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8073 (Japan); Hatsugai, Kaori [Division of Molecular Biotherapy, Cancer Chemotherapy Center, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan) [Division of Molecular Biotherapy, Cancer Chemotherapy Center, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Division of Chemotherapy, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Keio University, Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-8512 (Japan); Takemoto, Yasushi [Chemical Genomics Research Group/Chemical Genetics Laboratory, RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)] [Chemical Genomics Research Group/Chemical Genetics Laboratory, RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Goshima, Naoki [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-0064 (Japan)] [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-0064 (Japan); Saito, Tamio [Chemical Biology Core Facility/Antibiotics Laboratory, RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)] [Chemical Biology Core Facility/Antibiotics Laboratory, RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Hamamoto, Makiko [Department of Life Sciences, School of Agriculture, Meiji University, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan)] [Department of Life Sciences, School of Agriculture, Meiji University, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Sugimoto, Yoshikazu [Division of Chemotherapy, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Keio University, Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-8512 (Japan)] [Division of Chemotherapy, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Keio University, Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-8512 (Japan); Osada, Hiroyuki [Chemical Biology Core Facility/Antibiotics Laboratory, RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)] [Chemical Biology Core Facility/Antibiotics Laboratory, RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Seimiya, Hiroyuki [Division of Molecular Biotherapy, Cancer Chemotherapy Center, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan)] [Division of Molecular Biotherapy, Cancer Chemotherapy Center, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Yoshida, Minoru [Chemical Genomics Research Group/Chemical Genetics Laboratory, RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan) [Chemical Genomics Research Group/Chemical Genetics Laboratory, RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); CREST Research Project, Japan Science and Technology Corporation, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan)

2010-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

228

Cold cases heat up through Lawrence Livermore approach to identifying  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

10-03 10-03 For immediate release: 10/10/2012 | NR-12-10-03 Cold cases heat up through Lawrence Livermore approach to identifying remains Anne M Stark, LLNL, (925) 422-9799, stark8@llnl.gov Printer-friendly Bruce Buchholz loads a sample in the accelerator. High Resolution Image LIVERMORE, Calif. -- In an effort to identify the thousands of John/Jane Doe cold cases in the United States, a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory researcher and a team of international collaborators have found a multidisciplinary approach to identifying the remains of missing persons. Using "bomb pulse" radiocarbon analysis developed at Lawrence Livermore, combined with recently developed anthropological analysis and forensic DNA techniques, the researchers were able to identify the remains of a missing

229

Photo of the Week: Identifying and Protecting Alaskan Fishery Habitats |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Identifying and Protecting Alaskan Fishery Identifying and Protecting Alaskan Fishery Habitats Photo of the Week: Identifying and Protecting Alaskan Fishery Habitats September 27, 2013 - 3:08pm Addthis This aerial photo shows open water and floating ice on ponds, lakes and river channels in the Sagavanirktok River Delta in Alaska’s North Slope. PNNL scientists employed satellite technology to understand the impacts of oil development activities on the environment. Using satellite radar to “see” through the ice, scientists detected critical fish overwintering habitats by identifying where ice was grounded and where it was floating. Utilizing this information on critical habitats, fishery managers can suggest locations for energy development activities that increase the sustainability of fishery resources and minimize environmental impacts. Research was funded by the U.S. Department of the Interior. | Photo courtesy of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

230

Identify Employee Commuting Clusters for Greenhouse Gas Profile |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Identify Employee Commuting Clusters for Greenhouse Gas Profile Identify Employee Commuting Clusters for Greenhouse Gas Profile Identify Employee Commuting Clusters for Greenhouse Gas Profile October 7, 2013 - 1:53pm Addthis YOU ARE HERE: Step 2 For evaluating a greenhouse gas profile for employee commuting, use survey data on employee home location and arrival/departure times to identify geographic areas to target for vanpool and carpool ride-matching efforts. Those who live in close proximity or en route to the workplace and with similar hours may be clustered to determine which locations might represent the best candidates for ride-share matching. As illustrated in Figure 1, areas with higher concentrations of employees that live farther from the worksite might be good candidate locations for targeted carpool and vanpool

231

Property:IdentifiedHydrothermalPotential | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IdentifiedHydrothermalPotential IdentifiedHydrothermalPotential Jump to: navigation, search Property Name IdentifiedHydrothermalPotential Property Type Quantity Description Conventional hydrothermal electricity generation potential from identified hydrothermal sites, as determined by the USGS 2008 Geothermal Resource Assessment (Williams et al, 2008). Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS

232

Identifying Consumer Groups with Satisfactory Characteristics for Electric Mobility Usage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Who will use an electric car? This question will be addressed by identifying ... that are compatible with a future usage of electric cars. To answer this question a survey in...

Dominik Santner; Dirk Fornahl

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Standard Operating Procedure Review and Reduce Personally Identifiable  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Standard Operating Procedure Review and Reduce Personally Identifiable Information (PH the NASA Plan for Reviewing and Reducing PH, assuring that NASA retains only the minimum PH holdings ITS 1382.l, NASA Plan for Reviewing and

Christian, Eric

234

Step 4: Identify Target Audiences and Behavior Changes  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

With yourresearch results in hand, you are now ready to identify your target audiences and the behavior changes you would like them to adopt. Target audiences are individuals or groups of...

235

Energy Department Announces $3 Million to Identify New Geothermal...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

12:00am Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy today announced 3 million to spur geothermal energy development using play fairway analysis. This technique identifies prospective...

236

Energy Department Announces $3 Million to Identify New Geothermal...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

2:23pm Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy today announced 3 million to spur geothermal energy development using play fairway analysis. This technique identifies prospective...

237

Manual for Identifying and Protecting Official Use Only Information  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Department of Energy (DOE) Manual provides detailed requirements to supplement DOE O 471.3, Identifying and Protecting Official Use Only Information, dated 4-9-03. Admin Chg dated 1-13-11.

2003-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

238

Identifying characteristics of charge transfer transitions in minerals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Criteria used to identify Fe2+-Fe3+ and Fe2+-Ti4+ intervalence charge transfer absorption bands in electronic spectra are reviewed and compared to the characteristics of unperturbed Fe2+ crystal field bands and t...

Stephanie M. Mattson; George R. Rossman

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Identifying Non-Federal Cooperating Agencies in Implementing the Procedural  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Identifying Non-Federal Cooperating Agencies in Implementing the Identifying Non-Federal Cooperating Agencies in Implementing the Procedural Requirements of NEPA Identifying Non-Federal Cooperating Agencies in Implementing the Procedural Requirements of NEPA The purpose of this Council on Environmental Quality Memorandum is to ensure that all federal and non-federal cooperating agencies are identified on the cover sheet of each Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) prepared by your agency. G-CEQ-IdentnonfedCooperatingAgencies.pdf More Documents & Publications Designation of Non-Federal Agencies as Cooperating Agencies Cooperating Agencies in Implementing the Procedural Requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act Reporting Cooperating Agencies in Implementing the Procedural Requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act

240

Identify Vehicle Usage Mission Constraints for Reducing Greenhouse Gas  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Identify Vehicle Usage Mission Constraints for Reducing Greenhouse Identify Vehicle Usage Mission Constraints for Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions Identify Vehicle Usage Mission Constraints for Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions October 7, 2013 - 11:46am Addthis YOU ARE HERE: Step 2 As Federal agencies work to identify opportunities for right-sizing the fleet and replacing inefficient vehicles with new, efficient, and/or alternatively fueled models to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, they should flag potential mission constraints associated with vehicle usage. This may involve further data collection to understand the mission considerations associated with individual vehicles. For instance, in Figure 1, Vehicle 004 appears to be underutilized, having both a low user-to-vehicle ratio and a relatively low time in use per day. However,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tentatively identified compound" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Energy Department Announces $3 Million to Identify New Geothermal Resources  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

The U.S. Department of Energy today announced $3 million to spur geothermal energy development using play fairway analysis. This technique identifies prospective geothermal resources in areas with...

242

Identifying vocalizations and their possible function in Texas Blue Jays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IDENTIFYING VOCALIZATIONS AND THEIR POSSIBLE FUNCTION IN TEXAS BLUE JAYS A Thesis JULIE JETER-EDWARDS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1989 Major Subject: Wildlife & Fisheries Science IDENTIFYING VOCALIZATIONS AND THEIR POSSIBLE FUNCTION IN TEXAS BLUE JAYS A Thesis JULIE JETER-EDWARDS Approved as to style and content by: Keith A. Arnold (Chair of Committee...

Jeter-Edwards, Julie

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

243

Emissions of non-methane organic compounds from a grassland site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A mixture of oxygenated hydrocarbons (OxHCs), isoprene, and monoterpenes was detected in the emissions from a grassland site in the Midwestern United States. A plot dominated by crown vetch (Coronilla varia) and bluegrass (Poa spp.), exhibited a constant decrease in emissions of total non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs) from 580 {mu}g m{sup -2} hr{sup -1} in June 1992 to 150 {mu}g m{sup - 2} hr{sup -1} in October 1992, except for a slight increase in August. Oxygenated hydrocarbons (methanol, acetaldehyde, and acetone) and terpenes (isoprene, limonene, myrcene, {alpha}-pinene, and {beta}- pinene) composed about 90% and 10% of the identified NMOC emissions, respectively. Isoprene represented about 10% of the terpene emissions. Total NMOC emission rates based on vegetative biomass averaged 2.3 {mu}g g{sup -1} hr{sup -1}, with 10% of the identified NMOCs attributed to monoterpenes and the remainder mainly OxHCs. Over the course of the investigation, the relationship between the monoterpene emission rate and the temperature for a single plot was logarithmic and similar to the one between compound vapor pressure and temperature. However, emission rates normalized to temperature decreased throughout the summer and fall, indicating that parameterizations of emission rates from herbaceous plants must include a factor to compensate for environmental conditions such as soil moisture and nutrient deposition, which affect plant phenology and the seasonal pattern of species dominance.

Fukui, Yoshiko; Doskey, P.V.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Dosimeter for monitoring vapors and aerosols of organic compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A dosimeter is provided for collecting and detecting vapors and aerosols of organic compounds. The dosimeter comprises a lightweight, passive device that can be conveniently worn by a person as a badge or placed at a stationary location. The dosimeter includes a sample collector comprising a porous web treated with a chemical for inducing molecular displacement and enhancing phosphorescence. Compounds are collected onto the web by molecular diffusion. The web also serves as the sample medium for detecting the compounds by a room temperature phosphorescence technique. 7 figs.

Vo-Dinh, T.

1987-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

245

Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Sulfur Compound Emissions  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Sulfur Compound Emissions Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Sulfur Compound Emissions (Connecticut) Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Sulfur Compound Emissions (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Energy and Environmental Protection These regulations set limits on the sulfur content of allowable fuels (1.0%

246

Lattice mismatched compound semiconductors and devices on silicon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

III-V compound semiconductors, due to their superior electron mobility, are promising candidates for n-type metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs). However, the limited size of III-V substrates and ...

Yang, Li, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Catalysis of 6? Electrocyclizations & Catalytic Disproportionation of Lignin Model Compounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J. D. ; McNally, T. J. Lignin. In Kirk-Othmer EncyclopediaK. ; Gellerstedt, G. Lignin. In Analytical Methods in Woodof a 1-phenylpropane-1,3-diol lignin model compound via ?-

Bishop, Lee

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Low-molecular-mass asphaltene compounds from Usa heavy oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By the extraction, adsorption chromatography, it has been shown that asphaltene macromolecules from Usa crude oil contain compounds with a relatively low molecular mass represented by normal and branched alkan...

V. P. Sergun; E. Yu. Kovalenko; T. A. Sagachenko; R. S. Min

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Wood-Fiber/High-Density-Polyethylene Composites: Compounding Process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wood-Fiber/High-Density-Polyethylene Composites: Compounding Process J. Z. Lu,1 Q. Wu,1 I. I parameters for the wood-fiber/high-density-polyethylene blends at 60 rpm were a temperature of 180°C

250

Electrochemically driven phase transformation in energy storage compounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanoscale lithium transition metal phosphate olivines have become commercially important as positive electrode materials in a new generation of lithium-ion batteries. Not surprisingly, many energy storage compounds undergo ...

Gao, Yuhua

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Hypoxia-selective compounds for boron neutron capture therapy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a biochemically targeted form of radiotherapy for cancer. In BNCT, a compound labeled with the stable isotope boron-10 is systemically administered, and tumor cells selectively uptake ...

Shah, Jungal (Jugal Kaushik)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Determination of Selenium in Seleno Compounds and Marine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atomization Atomic Absorption Spectrometry Journalof Analytical I Atomic I Spectrometry M. DEAKER AND W. MAHER determination; electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry; seleno compounds; marine biological tissues; chemical modijcation Electrothermal (graphite furnace) atomic absorption spec- trometry (ETAAS

Canberra, University of

253

Thermal Analysis of CompoundParabolic Concentrating Solar Energy Collectors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Despite the vast attention devoted recently to the design and development of effective collectors for harnessing solar energy at medium and high temperatures (>100 ... in the design of the compound parabolic con...

B. Norton; D. E. Prapas

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

The Influence of Bromine Compounds on Combustion Processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

17 December 1963 research-article The Influence of Bromine Compounds on Combustion Processes C. F. Cullis A. Fish R. B. Ward Studies of the effect of small additions of hydrogen bromide and of four bromomethanes on...

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Process for synthesizing compounds from elemental powders and product  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for synthesizing intermetallic compounds from elemental powders is described. The elemental powders are initially combined in a ratio which approximates the stoichiometric composition of the intermetallic compound. The mixed powders are then formed into a compact which is heat treated at a controlled rate of heating such that an exothermic reaction between the elements is initiated. The heat treatment may be performed under controlled conditions ranging from a vacuum (pressureless sintering) to compression (hot pressing) to produce a desired densification of the intermetallic compound. In a preferred form of the invention, elemental powders of Fe and Al are combined to form aluminide compounds of Fe[sub 3] Al and FeAl. 25 figures.

Rabin, B.H.; Wright, R.N.

1993-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

256

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Yellowstone Region (Hurwitz, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Yellowstone Region (Hurwitz, Et Al., Compound and Elemental Analysis At Yellowstone Region (Hurwitz, Et Al., 2007) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Yellowstone Region (Hurwitz, Et Al., 2007) Exploration Activity Details Location Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes In this paper, we present and evaluate a chemical dataset that includes the concentrations and fluxes of HCO3_, SO42_, Cl_, and F_ in rivers draining YNP for the 2002-2004 water years (1 October 2001 - 30 September 2004). These solutes were chosen because they are likely derived in part, from the magmatic volatiles CO2, SO2, H2S, HCl, HF (Symonds et al., 2001). Weekly to

257

Laboratory evaluation of the IriScan prototype biometric identifier  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One thing that all access control applications have in common is the need to identify those individuals authorized to gain access to an area. Traditionally, the identification is based on something that person possesses, such as a key or badge, or something they know, such as a PIN or password. Biometric identifiers make their decisions based on the physiological or behavioral characteristics of individuals. The potential of biometrics devices to positively identify individuals has made them attractive for use in access control and computer security applications. However, no systems perform perfectly, so it is important to understand what a biometric device`s performance is under real world conditions before deciding to implement one in an access control system. This paper will describe the evaluation of a prototype biometric identifier provided by IriScan Incorporated. This identifier was developed to recognize individual human beings based on the distinctive visual characteristics of the irises of their eyes. The main goal of the evaluation was to determine whether the system has potential as an access control device within the Department of Energy (DOE). The primary interest was an estimate of the accuracy of the system in terms of false accept and false reject rates. Data was also collected to estimate throughput time and user acceptability. The performance of the system during the test will be discussed. Lessons learned during the test which may aid in further testing and simplify implementation of a production system will also be discussed.

Bouchier, F.; Ahrens, J.S.; Wells, G.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Device for aqueous detection of nitro-aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to a compact and portable detection apparatus for nitro-aromatic based chemical compounds, such as nitrotoluenes, dinitrotoluenes, and trinitrotoluene (TNT). The apparatus is based upon the use of fiber optics using filtered light. The preferred process of the invention relies upon a reflective chemical sensor and optical and electronic components to monitor a decrease in fluorescence when the nitro-aromatic molecules in aqueous solution combine and react with a fluorescent polycyclic aromatic compound. 4 figures.

Reagen, W.K.; Schulz, A.L.; Ingram, J.C.; Lancaster, G.D.; Grey, A.E.

1994-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

259

Permeation of acrylate compounds through four commercially available gloves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PERMEATION OF ACRYLATE COMPOUNDS THROUGH FOUR COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE GLOVES A Thesis DAVID SAMUEL HORN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... May l986 Major Subject: Industrial Hygiene PERMEATION OF ACRYLATE COMPOUNDS THROUGH FOUR COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE GLOVES A Thesis DAVID SAMUEL HORN Approved as to style and content by: ichar B. Ko en (Chairman of Conunittee) Harry uggs (Member...

Horn, David Samuel

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

260

Bioluminescent Yeast Assay for Detection of Organotin Compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Organotin compounds are toxic and endocrine disrupting compounds, which have been intensively used as antifouling paints for ship hulls and thus are widely spread in the environment. ... (23) Adding the working steps together (3 h pregrowth of the yeast cells, robot-assisted pipetting and 35 h incubation), this assay gives results within one working day. ... with flakes of antifouling paint abraded from vessel hulls, resulting in patchy but locally intense contamination of sediments. ...

Grit Kabiersch; Johanna Rajasrkk; Marja Tuomela; Annele Hatakka; Marko Virta; Kari Steffen

2013-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tentatively identified compound" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Theoretical descriptions of compound-nuclear reactions: open problems & challenges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Compound-nuclear processes play an important role for nuclear physics applications and are crucial for our understanding of the nuclear many-body problem. Despite intensive interest in this area, some of the available theoretical developments have not yet been fully tested and implemented. We revisit the general theory of compound-nuclear reactions, discuss descriptions of pre-equilibrium reactions, and consider extensions that are needed in order to get cross section information from indirect measurements.

Brett V. Carlson; Jutta E. Escher; Mahir S. Hussein

2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

262

Lattice thermal expansion for normal tetrahedral compound semiconductors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cubic root of the deviation of the lattice thermal expansion from that of the expected value of diamond for group IV semiconductors, binary compounds of III-V and II-VI, as well as several ternary compounds from groups I-III-VI{sub 2}, II-IV-V{sub 2} and I-IV{sub 2}V{sub 3} semiconductors versus their bonding length are given straight lines. Their slopes were found to be 0.0256, 0.0210, 0.0170, 0.0259, 0.0196, and 0.02840 for the groups above, respectively. Depending on the valence electrons of the elements forming these groups, a formula was found to correlate all the values of the slopes mentioned above to that of group IV. This new formula which depends on the melting point and the bonding length as well as the number of valence electrons for the elements forming the compounds, will gives best calculated values for lattice thermal expansion for all compounds forming the groups mentioned above. An empirical relation is also found between the mean ionicity of the compounds forming the groups and their slopes mentioned above and that gave the mean ionicity for the compound CuGe{sub 2}P{sub 3} in the range of 0.442.

Omar, M.S. [Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Salahaddin, Arbil, Iraqi Kurdistan (Iraq)]. E-mail: dr_m_s_omar@yahoo.com

2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

263

Digital Object Identifiers (DOI) | Scientific and Technical Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Digital Object Identifiers (DOI) Digital Object Identifiers (DOI) Print page Print page Email page Email page A Digital Object Identifier (DOI) is a permanent, unique name used in the web-based global naming and resolution system that provides for the identification, retrieval, exchange and maintenance of intellectual property. DOIs assist the publishing community with electronic commerce and copyright management of digital objects published on the Internet. Development of the DOI System was initiated in 1997 by the Association of American Publishers, and is now managed by the International DOI Foundation. The DOI System was initially developed by the publishing community but is now a non-profit collaboration to develop infrastructure for persistent identification and management of content. Approximately 2000

264

Identify energy-saving actions | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Identify energy-saving actions Identify energy-saving actions Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Learn the benefits Get started Use Portfolio Manager Save energy Stamp out energy waste Find cost-effective investments Engage occupants Provide a seat at the table Share energy goals and progress Identify energy-saving actions Spread the word about how to help

265

Identify Institutional Change Tools for Sustainability | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Tools for Sustainability Tools for Sustainability Identify Institutional Change Tools for Sustainability October 8, 2013 - 11:49am Addthis After identifying institutional change rules and roles, a Federal agency should identify the tools that create the infrastructural context within which it can achieve its sustainability goals. A tool is defined simply as a technology, system, or process used to meet a need. An example would be a time card, which is a system for tracking and verifying work hours. An organization's tools support its standard operations and ensure consistency over the long term; tools both allow and constrain behavior practices. Changes to institutional behavior must be supported by modified operational standards and tools. When an organization's tools are in opposition to

266

Sharing De-identified Data | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Information Center » Worker » Former Worker Program » Program Information Center » Worker » Former Worker Program » Program Implementation » Sharing De-identified Data Sharing De-identified Data Sharing De-identified Data: Use the collected information to implement new strategies for worker safety and health at DOE sites and to inform industry-specific researchers while still protecting sensitive participant information and confidentiality. The confidentiality and privacy rights of former workers are not only a legal requirement, they are crucial to establishing and maintaining credibility with the former worker community. All medical information that is collected as part of this program is treated as confidential and is used only as allowed by the Privacy Act of 1974. All FWP activities are conducted with the approval of the Institutional Review Boards, or Human

267

Protecting FWP Participant Personally Identifiable Information/Protected  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Protecting FWP Participant Personally Identifiable Protecting FWP Participant Personally Identifiable Information/Protected Health Information Protecting FWP Participant Personally Identifiable Information/Protected Health Information The confidentiality and privacy rights of former workers are not only a legal requirement, they are crucial to establishing and maintaining credibility with the former worker community. All medical information that is collected as part of this program is treated as confidential and is used only as allowed by the Privacy Act of 1974. All FWP activities are conducted with the approval of the Institutional Review Boards, or Human Subjects Committees, of DOE and involved universities. All individuals sign an informed consent and Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act

268

Identify Institutional Change Rules for Sustainability | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Rules for Sustainability Rules for Sustainability Identify Institutional Change Rules for Sustainability October 8, 2013 - 11:45am Addthis It is important to analyze formal and informal workplace rules governing the behavior of individuals and organizations to meet a Federal agency's institutional change goals for sustainability. It is also important to determine how these rules actually affect people filling different roles in the organization, and how they mesh with the technologies, systems, and processes that constitute tools. Identify Formal and Informal Rules First, identify the formal and informal rules that shape current or desired behaviors. This includes checking the extent to which they align with one another in support of your agency's sustainability objectives. You may want

269

A Study of Scientometric Methods to Identify Emerging Technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work examines a scientometric model that tracks the emergence of an identified technology from initial discovery (via original scientific and conference literature), through critical discoveries (via original scientific, conference literature and patents), transitioning through Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs) and ultimately on to commercial application. During the period of innovation and technology transfer, the impact of scholarly works, patents and on-line web news sources are identified. As trends develop, currency of citations, collaboration indicators, and on-line news patterns are identified. The combinations of four distinct and separate searchable on-line networked sources (i.e., scholarly publications and citation, worldwide patents, news archives, and on-line mapping networks) are assembled to become one collective network (a dataset for analysis of relations). This established network becomes the basis from which to quickly analyze the temporal flow of activity (searchable events) for the example subject domain we investigated.

Abercrombie, Robert K [ORNL] [ORNL; Udoeyop, Akaninyene W [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

A pharmacologically-based array to identify targets of cyclosporine A-induced toxicity in cultured renal proximal tubule cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mechanisms of cyclosporine A (CsA)-induced nephrotoxicity were generally thought to be hemodynamic in origin; however, there is now accumulating evidence of a direct tubular effect. Although genomic and proteomic experiments by our group and others provided overall information on genes and proteins up- or down-regulated by CsA in proximal tubule cells (PTC), a comprehensive view of events occurring after CsA exposure remains to be described. For this purpose, we applied a pharmacologic approach based on the use of known activities of a large panel of potentially protective compounds and evaluated their efficacy in preventing CsA toxicity in cultured mouse PTC. Our results show that compounds that blocked protein synthesis and apoptosis, together with the CK2 inhibitor DMAT and the PI3K inhibitor apigenin, were the most efficient in preventing CsA toxicity. We also identified GSK3, MMPs and PKC pathways as potential targets to prevent CsA damage. Additionally, heparinase-I and MAPK inhibitors afforded partial but significant protection. Interestingly, antioxidants and calcium metabolism-related compounds were unable to ameliorate CsA-induced cytotoxicity. Subsequent experiments allowed us to clarify the hierarchical relationship of targeted pathways after CsA treatment, with ER stress identified as an early effector of CsA toxicity, which leads to ROS generation, phenotypical changes and cell death. In summary, this work presents a novel experimental approach to characterizing cellular responses to cytotoxics while pointing to new targets to prevent CsA-induced toxicity in proximal tubule cells. Highlights: ? We used a novel pharmacological approach to elucidate cyclosporine (CsA) toxicity. ? The ability of a broad range of compounds to prevent CsA toxicity was evaluated. ? CsA toxicity was monitored using LDH release assay and PARP cleavage. ? Protein synthesis, PI3K, GSK3, MMP, PKC and caspase inhibitors prevented CsA toxicity. ? We also identified ER stress as an early effector of CsA toxicity.

Sarr, Eduard, E-mail: eduard.sarro@vhir.org [Departament de Bioqumica i Biologia Molecular, Unitat de Bioqumica de Biocincies, Universitat Autnoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain) [Departament de Bioqumica i Biologia Molecular, Unitat de Bioqumica de Biocincies, Universitat Autnoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Renal Physiopathology, CIBBIM-Nanomedicine, Vall d'Hebron Research Institute (VHIR), 08035 Barcelona (Spain); Jacobs-Cach, Conxita, E-mail: conxita.jacobs@vhir.org [Renal Physiopathology, CIBBIM-Nanomedicine, Vall d'Hebron Research Institute (VHIR), 08035 Barcelona (Spain)] [Renal Physiopathology, CIBBIM-Nanomedicine, Vall d'Hebron Research Institute (VHIR), 08035 Barcelona (Spain); Itarte, Emilio, E-mail: emili.itarte@uab.es [Departament de Bioqumica i Biologia Molecular, Unitat de Bioqumica de Biocincies, Universitat Autnoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain)] [Departament de Bioqumica i Biologia Molecular, Unitat de Bioqumica de Biocincies, Universitat Autnoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Meseguer, Anna, E-mail: ana.meseguer@vhir.org [Renal Physiopathology, CIBBIM-Nanomedicine, Vall d'Hebron Research Institute (VHIR), 08035 Barcelona (Spain) [Renal Physiopathology, CIBBIM-Nanomedicine, Vall d'Hebron Research Institute (VHIR), 08035 Barcelona (Spain); Departament de Bioquimica i Biologia Molecular, Facultat de Medicina, Universitat Autnoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

271

Volatile Organic Compound Investigation Results, 300 Area, Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Unexpectedly high concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOC) were discovered while drilling in the unconfined aquifer beneath the Hanford Sites 300 Area during 2006. The discovery involved an interval of relatively finer-grained sediment within the unconfined aquifer, an interval that is not sampled by routine groundwater monitoring. Although VOC contamination in the unconfined aquifer has been identified and monitored, the concentrations of newly discovered contamination are much higher than encountered previously, with some new results significantly higher than the drinking water standards. The primary contaminant is trichloroethene, with lesser amounts of tetrachloroethene. Both chemicals were used extensively as degreasing agents during the fuels fabrication process. A biological degradation product of these chemicals, 1,2-dichloroethene, was also detected. To further define the nature and extent of this contamination, additional characterization drilling was undertaken during 2007. Four locations were drilled to supplement the information obtained at four locations drilled during the earlier investigation in 2006. The results of the combined drilling indicate that the newly discovered contamination is limited to a relatively finer-grained interval of Ringold Formation sediment within the unconfined aquifer. The extent of this contamination appears to be the area immediately east and south of the former South Process Pond. Samples collected from the finer-grained sediment at locations along the shoreline confirm the presence of the contamination near the groundwater/river interface. Contamination was not detected in river water that flows over the area where the river channel potentially incises the finer-grained interval of aquifer sediment. The source for this contamination is not readily apparent. A search of historical documents and the Hanford Waste Information Data System did not provide definitive clues as to waste disposal operations and/or spills that might have resulted in groundwater contamination in this sediment, although several relatively small accidental releases of VOCs have occurred in the past in the northern portion of the 300 Area. It is likely that large quantities of degreasing solutions were disposed to the North and South Process Ponds during the 1950s and 1960s, and that evidence for them in the upper portion of the unconfined aquifer has been removed because of groundwater movement through the much more transmissive sediment. Also, investigations to date have revealed no evidence to suggest that a dense, non-aqueous phase liquid remains undetected in the subsurface. Potential pathways for contamination to migrate from this finer-grained sediment include groundwater movement through the interval to offshore locations in the Columbia River channel, dispersion out of the finer-grained interval into the overlying transmissive sediment (again, with transport to the riverbed), and potential future withdrawal via water supply wells.

Peterson, Robert E.; Williams, Bruce A.; Smith, Ronald M.

2008-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

272

Identifying and Indoctrinating Qualifying Officials - Nevada Site Office  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

IDENTIFYING AND INDOCTRINATING QUALIFYING OFFICIALS (QO) QOs verify and certify Technical Qualification Program (TQP) participant qualifications. QOs are identified and indoctrinated as follows: QO IDENTIFICATION AND INDOCTRINATION PROCESS STEPS Process Steps/Work Instructions Step Who Does It What Happens 1 Designating Supervisor/Federal Technical Capability (FTC) Agent/TQP Manager NOMINATE an individual to serve as a QO. CONSIDER the nominee's technical and personal skills, knowledge, experience, and past performance, and ability to evaluate a TQP participant's attainment or equivalency of assigned competencies. 2 QO Nominee COMPLETE assigned QO orientation training and the expectations briefing with the FTC Agent. NOTE: The QO orientation training is provided by the

273

Draft Proposal for PDG Identifiers Purpose and Use Cases  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Proposal for PDG Identifiers Proposal for PDG Identifiers Purpose and Use Cases PDG Identif iers are strings that can be used to ref erence items in PDG such as rev iew articles, particles, datablocks or decay modes. Currently env isaged use cases include: External ref erences to items in the PDG database. For example, giv en a PDG Identif ier one can directly go to a specif ic page in pdgLiv e. Tags that can be included into the meta data of publication databases (in particular INSPIRE).

274

Prompt {gamma}-ray spectroscopy of isotopically identified fission fragments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements of prompt Doppler-corrected deexcitation {gamma} rays from uniquely identified fragments formed in fusion-fission reactions of the type {sup 12}C({sup 238}U,{sup 134}Xe)Ru are reported. The fragments were identified in both A and Z using the variable-mode, high-acceptance magnetic spectrometer VAMOS. States built on the characteristic neutron configurations forming high-spin isomers (7{sup -} and 10{sup +}) in {sup 134}Xe are presented and compared with the predictions of shell-model calculations using a new effective interaction in the region of Z{>=}50 and N{<=}82.

Shrivastava, A.; Caamano, M.; Rejmund, M.; Navin, A.; Rejmund, F.; Lemasson, A.; Schmitt, C.; Derkx, X.; Fernandez-Dominguez, B.; Golabek, C.; Roger, T. [GANIL, CEA/DSM--CNRS/IN2P3, Bd Henri Becquerel, BP 55027, F-14076 Caen Cedex 5 (France); Schmidt, K.-H. [GANIL, CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, Bd Henri Becquerel, BP 55027, F-14076 Caen Cedex 5 (France) and GSI-Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Planckstrasse 1, D-64220 Darmstadt (Germany); Gaudefroy, L.; Taieb, J. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Sieja, K. [GSI-Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Planckstrasse 1, D-64220 Darmstadt (Germany); Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Audouin, L.; Bacri, C. O. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, IN2P3-CNRS, Universite Paris Sud, F-91406 Orsay (France); Barreau, G.; Jurado, B. [Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Bordeaux Gradignan--UMR 5797, CNRS/IN2P3-Universite Bordeaux 1, F-33175 Gradignan Cedex (France); Benlliure, J. [Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)] (and others)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

275

B To Identify Slag-Affected Sediment in Southern  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and boron isotopes could be used to identify and delineate slag-affected bed sediment in Lake Michigan for the protection of water and ecosystem resources in the Great Lakes motivated this study to determine if strontium collected offshore from three Lake Michigan cities (+11.7 to 12.7o/oo). Contoured isotope data indicated

276

Identifying Energy Waste through Dense Power Sensing and Utilization Monitoring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Identifying Energy Waste through Dense Power Sensing and Utilization Monitoring Maria Kazandjieva the efficiency of such a computing system requires detailed data of both en- ergy consumption and energy waste to differentiate energy used well from energy waste. This is an important difference from pre- vious work [8, 14

Stanford University

277

Classifying Web Search Queries to Identify High Revenue Generating Customers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

searching, the set of terms for which a user searches is called the query. If a user enters a query and then clicks on a result, these query terms are embedded within the URL that is passed from the search engineClassifying Web Search Queries to Identify High Revenue Generating Customers Adan Ortiz-Cordova 329

Jansen, James

278

Identifying fracture zones in the Austin Chalk using seismic attributes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An attribute analysis was conducted in an attempt to reduce the risks involved in developing the Austin Chalk. The objective is to identify a set of attributes that directly indicate regions of intense fracturing using short offset 3-D seismic data...

Bafia, Daniel Joseph

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

279

Identify and Visualize Differences in Traffic Data Zhonghua Xi*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Identify and Visualize Differences in Traffic Data Zhonghua Xi* , Jyh-Ming Lien* , Yi-Chang Chiu visualization is developed to automatically search for events of interest using quantitative metrics, while also relies on traffic analysis. Traffic analysis can be approached as a problem of searching for trends

Lien, Jyh-Ming

280

SHORT REPORT Open Access Nuclear lipid droplets identified by electron  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SHORT REPORT Open Access Nuclear lipid droplets identified by electron microscopy of serial that nuclear lipid droplets (LDs) are organized into domains similar to those of cytoplasmic LDs with the nuclear envelope, it could be suggested however that nuclear LDs are cytoplamic LDs trapped within

Boyer, Edmond

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tentatively identified compound" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Using Probabilistic Clustering to help identify multiple protein instances in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

protein instances in static PPI datasets Colin Mclean, Douglas Armstrong, Oksana Sorokina, Ian Simpson Instance Proteins: - Degree-correlated-Bridgeness. 2 Friday, 6 December 13 #12;THE U N I V E R S ITY OF E D synapse. - identify structure/function of multi-protein complexes in pre-synapse. - improve predictions

Edinburgh, University of

282

Element A "Identifying Sources and Causes of Impairment in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-based plan (and to achieve any other watershed goals identified in the watershed-based plan). What Does that into plan. Characterizing the Watershed is Element A Refer to Handbook Chapters 5,6,7 Gather existing data (Social and Environmental tools) Data Typical for Watershed Characterization Physical and Natural Features

283

Identifying the Original Contribution of a Document via Language Modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Identifying the Original Contribution of a Document via Language Modeling Benyah Shaparenko Cornell that a document contributes to a corpus, focusing on self-referential diachronic corpora such as research pub Detection and Tracking [2], our model provides an operational definition of originality by combining novelty

Joachims, Thorsten

284

Energy Department Announces $3 Million to Identify New Geothermal Resources  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Play Fairway Analysis is a practice first developed in the O&G industry that uses regional and detailed geologic and geophysical data to build a detailed picture of a buried basin to identify the most likely candidate locations for drilling.

285

Identifying Transformer Incipient Events for Maintaining Distribution System Reliability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Identifying Transformer Incipient Events for Maintaining Distribution System Reliability Karen L events in single-phase distribution transformers. This analysis will aid in the development of an automatic detection method for internal incipient faults in the transformers. The detection method can

286

Engineering Identifying the source of an atmospheric pollutant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemical Engineering Abstract Identifying the source of an atmospheric pollutant or phenomena this question using combinations of atmospheric models and remote sensing observations will be presented challenge currently facing the US EPA in developing secondary standards for the control of this pollutant

287

Local Connectivity Tests to Identify Wormholes in Wireless Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Local Connectivity Tests to Identify Wormholes in Wireless Networks Xiaomeng Ban Computer Science and removal algorithm based on local connectivity tests. The basic idea is that the neighborhood of a wormhole contains two sets of nodes corresponding to two sides of the wormhole. The distance between these two sets

Gao, Jie

288

A Chemical Stain for Identifying Arsenic-Treated Wood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Chemical Stain for Identifying Arsenic-Treated Wood (FINAL) Submitted June 23, 2006 Amy Omae-TREATED WOOD II.1 Applying Phosphate Stains to Arsenate Stains 7 II.2 A Potential Arsenic-Test Kit 14 II.3 Whole Wood Application of the Modified Stannous Chloride Stain 19 II.4 Other Attempted Stain

Florida, University of

289

A SIMPLE ALGORITHM FOR IDENTIFYING ABBREVIATION DEFINITIONS IN BIOMEDICAL TEXT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A SIMPLE ALGORITHM FOR IDENTIFYING ABBREVIATION DEFINITIONS IN BIOMEDICAL TEXT ARIEL S. SCHWARTZ of biomedical text is growing at a fast rate, creating challenges for humans and computer systems alike. One of these challenges arises from the frequent use of novel abbreviations in these texts, thus requiring that biomedical

Hearst, Marti

290

E-Print Network 3.0 - antimicrobial compounds produced Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

, isolation, identification of phenolic compounds from industry co-products, and plants. "Green" food... -grade solvents are being used to extract phenolic compounds from a variety...

291

E-Print Network 3.0 - antimicrobial compounds tylosin Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

, isolation, identification of phenolic compounds from industry co-products, and plants. "Green" food... -grade solvents are being used to extract phenolic compounds from a variety...

292

E-Print Network 3.0 - antifungal compound produced Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

requirements to produce the antifungal response and can provide a guide for the design of compounds... with this biological activity. Antifungal activity of these compounds...

293

E-Print Network 3.0 - analogues compounds lnap6i3 Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

millions of compounds can be examined in silico... compound. In particular, within the pharmaceutical industry, the use of virtual screening as a filter Source: Skop, Ahna -...

294

SPECIES DETERMINATION OF ORGANOMETALLIC COMPOUNDS USING ZEEMAN ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY WITH LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Compounds Using Zeeman Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy WithCompounds Using Zeeman ,Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy withcapabilities of Zeeman atomic absorption spectroscopy (ZAA)

Koizumi, H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenide-based ternary compounds Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

gallium arsenide-based... separately claimed breakthroughs in solar cell production. Gallium arsenide (GaAs) and related compounds... of manufacturing compound semiconductors...

296

Sorption to soil of hydrophobic and ionic organic compounds: measurement and modeling.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The sorption of organic compounds to soil, sediments and dissolved organic matter affects the fate of organic compounds. Given the central role of this process (more)

Laak, Thomas Laurens ter

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

E-Print Network 3.0 - ammonium compounds n-alkyl Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

which are incompatible with other compounds. Summary: compounds, fulminic acid Sodium carbon tetrachloride, carbon dioxide, water Sodium nitrite ammonium nitrate... chemicals...

298

E-Print Network 3.0 - ammonium compounds Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

which are incompatible with other compounds. Summary: compounds, fulminic acid Sodium carbon tetrachloride, carbon dioxide, water Sodium nitrite ammonium nitrate... chemicals...

299

E-Print Network 3.0 - ammonium compounds efecto Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

which are incompatible with other compounds. Summary: compounds, fulminic acid Sodium carbon tetrachloride, carbon dioxide, water Sodium nitrite ammonium nitrate... chemicals...

300

Technical description of candidate fluorescence compounds and radioisotopes for a nuclear smuggling deterrence tag (IL500E)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the efforts completed in identifying candidate fluorescence compounds and radioisotopes for a developing tagging system. The tagging system is being developed as a deterrent to nuclear smuggling, by providing a means of: (1) tracing materials and pilferers to the facility of origin for any recovered special nuclear materials; (2) inventory control of long-term stored items containing special nuclear materials; and (3) tracking materials transferred between facilities. The tagging system uses four types of tagging materials to cover a range of applications intended to prevent the pilfering of special nuclear materials. One material, fluorescent compounds which are invisible without ultraviolet or near-infrared detection systems, is marked on controlled items with a tracking pattern that corresponds to a specified item in a specified location in the data control system. The tagging system uses an invisible, fluorescent dusting powder to mark equipment and personnel who inappropriately handle the tagged material. The tagging system also uses unique combinations of radionuclides to identify the facility of origin for any special nuclear material. Currently, 18 long-lived radioisotopes, 38 short-live radioisotopes and 10 fluorescent compounds have been selected as candidate materials for the tagging system.

Hartenstein, S.D.; Aryaeinejad, R.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tentatively identified compound" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Chemical degradation of fluorosulfonamide fuel cell membrane polymer model compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The durability of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell membrane, along with high proton conductivity and mechanical performance is critical to the success of these energy conversion devices. Extending our work in perfluorinated membrane stability, aromatic trifluoromethyl sulfonamide model compounds were prepared, and their oxidative degradation was examined. The chemical structures for the models were based on mono-, di- and tri-perfluorinated sulfonamide modified phenyl rings. Durability of the model compounds was evaluated by exposure to hydroxyl radicals generated using Fenton reagent and UV irradiation of hydrogen peroxide. LCMS results for the mono-substituted model compound indicate greater stability to radical oxidation than the di-substituted species; loss of perfluorinated fonamide side chains appears to be an important pathway, along with dimerization and aromatic ring hydroxylation. The tri-substituted model compound also shows loss of side chains, with the mono-substituted compound being a major oxidation product, along with a limited amount of hydroxylation and dimerization of the starting material.

Jamela M. Alsheheri; Hossein Ghassemi; David A. Schiraldi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Enhancement of catalytic activities of serine proteases by tripeptides compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The tripeptide compounds, Glu-Arg-Pro-amide (ERPm), d-Pro-Thr-Trp-amide (dPTWm) and thioproline-Thr-Trp (tPTW), were obtained by screening of synthetic peptides for growth-inhibitory activity toward cultured transformed cells. The effects of these peptide compounds on proteases were investigated and the results showed that these compounds enhanced the amidolytic activity of serine proteases despite the fact that each reaction was carried out under optimal conditions. \\{ERPm\\} stimulated the activities of trypsin, chymotrypsin, thrombin, plasmin urokinase and elastase. dPTWm also showed similar effects except that toward chymotrypsin. tPTW elevated the activity only of trypsin, chymotrypsin and thrombin. Stimulation of trypsin activity by these compounds was also confirmed by using casein as a substrate. None of these compounds affected the amidolytic activities of metalloproteinases (MMP-1 and MMP-9), cysteine proteinases (m- and ?-calpains, cathepsin B and papain) or an exopeptidase (leucine aminopeptidase). The activation was at least partly due to the stabilization of the catalytic activity of proteases as well as prevention of autolysis.

Takaki Hiwasa; Sachiko Ogawa; Hisashi Kobayashi; Yoshimasa Ike

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Identifying Opportunities for Low-Carbon Supply Chains  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Identifying Opportunities for Low-Carbon Supply Chains Identifying Opportunities for Low-Carbon Supply Chains Speaker(s): Eric Masanet Date: April 11, 2011 - 1:30pm Location: 90-3075 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Barbara Adams There is growing interest in the development of tools and methods for calculating the supply chain energy and carbon "footprints" associated with products and services. Much of the activity has been in response to "low carbon" product reporting mandates by large global retailers, such as Wal-Mart and Tesco. However, relatively little attention has been paid to the development of models that allow decision makers to assess realistic opportunities for reducing such footprints once they've been established. This presentation will provide an overview of a new supply chain energy use

304

CEQ Memorandum - Identifying Cooperating Agencies - 09/25/2000  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5, 2000 5, 2000 MEMORANDUM FOR DEPUTY/ASSISTANT HEADS OF FEDERAL AGENCIES FROM: HORST G. GRECZMIEL Associate Director for NEPA Oversight SUBJECT: IDENTIFYING NON-FEDERAL COOPERATING AGENCIES IN IMPLEMENTING THE PROCEDURAL REQUIREMENTS OF THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT The purpose of this Memorandum is to ensure that all federal and non- federal cooperating agencies are identified on the cover sheet of each Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) prepared by your agency. In his Memorandum of July 28, 1999 (attached below), George T. Frampton, Jr., the CEQ Chair, urged all agencies to more actively solicit the participation of state, tribal and local governments as cooperating agencies in implementing the environmental impact statement process under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). Agencies are

305

Chapter 3 - Building Skills with Basics: Learning to Identify Threats  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The karate student builds skills in a variety of ways, but one of the fundamental ways to practice is through repetition of the basics: blocks, punches, and kicks. A student learns to respond to real attacks from any direction, through continual training on the right way to defend and to eliminate an opponent. This is the starting point where a student develops proper techniques to attack and counterattack against a variety of violent threats. Organizations must recognize harmful hazards. Hazards may be obvious, such as risks from hurricanes, or may be less evident, such as the risks from a chemical spill on a nearby roadway. Threats to your organization can come in many formats, from natural to accidental to deliberate. To successfully prepare for problems, the next step in the assessment process calls for identifying potential risks and using available sources to identify what things you really should worry about.

Eric N. Smith

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Methods for characterizing, classifying, and identifying unknowns in samples  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a method for taking the data generated from an array of responses from a multichannel instrument, and determining the characteristics of a chemical in the sample without the necessity of calibrating or training the instrument with known samples containing the same chemical. The characteristics determined by the method are then used to classify and identify the chemical in the sample. The method can also be used to quantify the concentration of the chemical in the sample.

Grate, Jay W [West Richland, WA; Wise, Barry M [Manson, WA

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Central Nevada Compound and Elemental Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical Sampling of Thermal and Non-thermal Waters in Nevada, Shevenell and Garside. The objective of this project is to obtain geochemical data from springs (and some wells) for which data are not publicly available, or for which the analyses are incomplete, poor, or nonexistent. With these data, geothermometers are being calculated and a preliminary assessment of the geothermal potential and ranking of the sampled areas is being conducted using the new geochemical data. Objectives changed slightly in

308

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Chipera,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Et Al., 2008) Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Chipera, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Redondo Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes X-Ray Diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy, and Electron Microprobe. References Steve J. Chipera, Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Goff, Melissa Fittipaldo (2008) Zeolitization Of Intracaldera Sediments And Rhyolitic Rocks In The 1.25 Ma Lake Of Valles Caldera, New Mexico, Usa Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Compound_and_Elemental_Analysis_At_Valles_Caldera_-_Redondo_Area_(Chipera,_Et_Al.,_2008)&oldid=510462

309

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Area Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from fumaroles, springs, and/or wells. References Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Janik (2002) Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico And Comparisons With Gases At Yellowstone, Long Valley And Other Geothermal Systems Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Compound_and_Elemental_Analysis_At_Valles_Caldera_-_Sulphur_Springs_Area_(Goff_%26_Janik,_2002)&oldid=510466

310

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References C. O. Grigsby, J. W. Tester, P. E. Trujillo, D. A. Counce, J. Abbott, C. E. Holley, L. A. Blatz (1983) Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Compound_and_Elemental_Analysis_At_Fenton_Hill_Hdr_Geothermal_Area_(Grigsby,_Et_Al.,_1983)&oldid=511285

311

LANL researchers improve path to producing uranium compounds, candidates  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Researchers improve path to producing uranium compounds Researchers improve path to producing uranium compounds LANL researchers improve path to producing uranium compounds, candidates for advanced nuclear fuels Enhance the ability to develop advanced nuclear fuels in a safer, simpler manner. April 7, 2011 This illustration shows the structures of UI4(1,4-dioxane)2 (left) and the UI3(1,4-dioxane)1.5 complexes. This illustration shows the structures of UI4(1,4-dioxane)2 (left) and the UI3(1,4-dioxane)1.5 complexes. Contact Kevin Roark Communicatons Office (505) 665-9202 Email LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, April 7, 2010- Advances made by researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory could enhance the ability of scientists to develop advanced nuclear fuels in a safer, simpler manner. Uranium chemistry research relies heavily on a variety of uranium "starting

312

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Dixie Valley Compound and Elemental Analysis At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geothermal fluids from hot springs and wells have been sampled from a number of locations, including: 1) the North Island of New Zealand (three sets of samples from three different years) and the South Island of New Zealand (1 set of samples); 2) the Cascades of Oregon; 3) the Harney, Alvord Desert and Owyhee geothermal areas of Oregon; 4) the Dixie Valley and Beowawe fields in Nevada; 5) Palinpiiion, the Philippines; 6) the Salton Sea and Heber geothermal fields of southern California; and 7) the

313

Reactions of Lignin Model Compounds in Ionic Liquids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lignin, a readily available form of biomass, awaits novel chemistry for converting it to valuable aromatic chemicals. Recent work has demonstrated that ionic liquids are excellent solvents for processing woody biomass and lignin. Seeking to exploit ionic liquids as media for depolymerization of lignin, we investigated reactions of lignin model compounds in these solvents. Using Brnsted acid catalysts in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium triflate at moderate temperatures, we obtained up to 11.6% yield of the dealkylation product guaiacol from the model compound eugenol and cleaved phenethyl phenyl ether, a model for lignin ethers. Despite these successes, acid catalysis failed in dealkylation of the unsaturated model compound 4-ethylguaiacol and did not produce monomeric products from organosolv lignin, demonstrating that further work is required to understand the complex chemistry of lignin depolymerization.

Holladay, John E.; Binder, Joseph B.; Gray, Michel J.; White, James F.; Zhang, Z. Conrad

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

314

Characterization of the crude oil polar compound extract  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research is designed to determine if there are any naturally occurring constituents in crude oils that can be chemically altered to bring about increased oil production. An extract containing only the polar organic compounds of the crude oil was obtained by using a modification of the ASTM-2007 procedure. Chemical characterization of the polar compounds were carried out using high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas chromatography. The HPLC analyses indicated a range of polar organic compound content of 10 crude oils from 1.6% to 12.7%. Wettability determinations show that by adding a small amount of the polar fraction from a crude oil, to a mineral oil, a 40 to 111% change of wettability toward a more oil-wet system will occur, depending on the specific extract used.

Donaldson, E.C.; Crocker, M.E.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Low work function, stable compound clusters and generation process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Low work function, stable compound clusters are generated by co-evaporation of a solid semiconductor (i.e., Si) and alkali metal (i.e., Cs) elements in an oxygen environment. The compound clusters are easily patterned during deposition on substrate surfaces using a conventional photo-resist technique. The cluster size distribution is narrow, with a peak range of angstroms to nanometers depending on the oxygen pressure and the Si source temperature. Tests have shown that compound clusters when deposited on a carbon substrate contain the desired low work function property and are stable up to 600.degree. C. Using the patterned cluster containing plate as a cathode baseplate and a faceplate covered with phosphor as an anode, one can apply a positive bias to the faceplate to easily extract electrons and obtain illumination.

Dinh, Long N. (Concord, CA); Balooch, Mehdi (Berkeley, CA); Schildbach, Marcus A. (Livermore, CA); Hamza, Alex V. (Livermore, CA); McLean, II, William (Oakland, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Et Al., 2008) Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Chipera, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes X-Ray Diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy, and Electron Microprobe. References Steve J. Chipera, Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Goff, Melissa Fittipaldo (2008) Zeolitization Of Intracaldera Sediments And Rhyolitic Rocks In The 1.25 Ma Lake Of Valles Caldera, New Mexico, Usa Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Compound_and_Elemental_Analysis_At_Valles_Caldera_-_Sulphur_Springs_Area_(Chipera,_Et_Al.,_2008)&oldid=51046

317

E-Print Network 3.0 - analysis identifies mode Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: , identifying the causes of an identified failure mode is another benefit of FMEA analysis. When consistently... consequences. C. Identify Causes for a Given Failure...

318

Compound and Elemental Analysis At International Geothermal Area, Indonesia  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Indonesia Indonesia (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At International Geothermal Area Indonesia (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location International Geothermal Area Indonesia Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Improving Exploration Models of Andesite-Hosted Geothermal Systems, Allis, Browne, Bruton, Christensen, Hulen, Lutz, Mindenhall, Nemcok, Norman, Powell and Stimac. The approach we are using is to characterize the petrology, geochemistry and fractures in core and cuttings samples and then integrate these data with measured downhole temperatures and pressures and with the compositions of the reservoir fluids. Our investigations represent

319

Compound and Elemental Analysis At International Geothermal Area, Mexico  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mexico Mexico (Norman & Moore, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At International Geothermal Area Mexico (Norman & Moore, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location International Geothermal Area Mexico Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Our examination of Cerro Prieto gas analyses indicates that the geothermal system structure is changing with time. Gas data routinely measured in most geothermal fields; hence fluid-flow plots as presented here can be accomplished with little cost. Gas analytical data, therefore, are useful in developing management procedures for geothermal fields characterized by

320

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Northern Basin & Range Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Northern Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes "This second paper provides more detailed documentation on water and rock geochemistries and describes diagnostic major and trace element ratios and concentrations that can be used to distinguish tufa columns formed from thermal waters from those that formed from non-thermal waters." "In addition to providing a potentially diagnostic lithogeochemical tool for

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tentatively identified compound" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1992) 1992) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (White, Et Al., 1992) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Used various geochemical techniques to obtain data from which information regarding mass transfer rates. This then led to conclucions of the history/evolution of the geothermal system. Unclear whether useful for exploration purposes. References Art F. White, Nancy J. Chuma, Fraser Goff (1992) Mass Transfer Constraints On The Chemical Evolution Of An Active Hydrothermal System, Valles Caldera, New Mexico

322

Method for digesting a nitro-bearing explosive compound  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a process wherein superoxide radicals from superoxide salt are used to break down the explosive compounds. The process has an excellent reaction rate for degrading explosives, and operates at ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure in aqueous or non-aqueous conditions. Because the superoxide molecules are small, much smaller than an enzyme molecule for example, they can penetrate the microstructure of plastic explosives faster. The superoxide salt generates reactive hydroxyl radicals, which can destroy other organic contaminants, if necessary, along with digesting the explosive nitro-bearing compound.

Shah, Manish M. (Richland, WA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Semiconductor-To-Metal Transitions in Transition-Metal Compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The theory presented in a previous paper is applied to the transition-metal compounds which are known to exhibit semiconductor-to-metal transitions. In particular, the predictions of the theory are compared with the experimental results of Feinleib and Paul on V2O3. Very good agreement is obtained for the magnitude of the energy gap and for its pressure and stress coefficients. The theory appears to be consistent with the available data on the other oxides of vanadium and titanium as well. Band models for all of these compounds are suggested. The effects of spin-disorder scattering and broadening, polaron formation, and non-stoichiometry are considered quantitatively.

David Adler; Julius Feinleib; Harvey Brooks; William Paul

1967-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

324

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Nw Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nw Basin & Range Nw Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical Sampling of Thermal and Non-thermal Waters in Nevada, Shevenell and Garside. The objective of this project is to obtain geochemical data from springs (and some wells) for which data are not publicly available, or for which the analyses are incomplete, poor, or nonexistent. With these data, geothermometers are being calculated and a preliminary assessment of the geothermal potential and ranking of the sampled areas is being conducted using the new geochemical data. Objectives changed slightly in 2004. Samples are now being collected at sites identified by other

325

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Laney, 2005) Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical Sampling of Thermal and Non-thermal Waters in Nevada, Shevenell and Garside. The objective of this project is to obtain geochemical data from springs (and some wells) for which data are not publicly available, or for which the analyses are incomplete, poor, or nonexistent. With these data, geothermometers are being calculated and a preliminary assessment of the geothermal potential and ranking of the sampled areas is being conducted using the new geochemical data. Objectives changed slightly in 2004. Samples are now being collected at sites identified by other

326

Apparatus for controlling system state based on unique identifiers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus allows workers to assert and release control over the energization of a system. The apparatus does not require the workers to carry any additional paraphernalia, and is not be easily defeated by other workers. Users asserting and releasing control present tokens uniquely identifying each user to a reader, and the apparatus prevents transition of the system to an undesired state until an appropriate number of users are currently asserting control. For example, a dangerous manufacturing robot can be prevented from energizing until all the users that have asserted control when entering the robot's controlled space have subsequently released control when leaving the robot's controlled space.

Drotning, William D. (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Energy Department Announces $3 Million to Identify New Geothermal Resources  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

The U.S. Department of Energy today announced $3 million to spur geothermal energy development using play fairway analysis. This technique identifies prospective geothermal resources in areas with no obvious surface expression by mapping the most favorable intersections of heat, permeability, and fluid. While commonly used in oil and gas exploration, play fairway analysis is not yet widely used in the geothermal industry. By improving success rates for exploration drilling, this data-mapping tool could help attract investment in geothermal energy projects and significantly lower the costs of geothermal energy.

328

1D ISING MODELS, COMPOUND GEOMETRIC DISTRIBUTIONS AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1­D ISING MODELS, COMPOUND GEOMETRIC DISTRIBUTIONS AND SELFDECOMPOSABILITY # Zbigniew J. Jurek that the inverse of the partition function in 1­ D Ising model, as a function of the external field, is a product the L??evy­ Khintchine formula for infinite divisible variables. Key words and phrases: 1­D Ising model

Jurek, Zbigniew J.

329

1-D ISING MODELS, COMPOUND GEOMETRIC DISTRIBUTIONS AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1-D ISING MODELS, COMPOUND GEOMETRIC DISTRIBUTIONS AND SELFDECOMPOSABILITY Zbigniew J. Jurek that the inverse of the partition function in 1- D Ising model, as a function of the external field, is a product the L´evy- Khintchine formula for infinite divisible variables. Key words and phrases: 1-D Ising model

Jurek, Zbigniew J.

330

HOT NEW SPIN-1/2 PERFECT KAGOM COMPOUND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ground state : The energy can be minimized by providing the 1200 condition. Kagomé has a unique property is the Hamiltonian of this compound ? Can we characterize it? Research Questions #12;Muon Spin Resonance (µSR) Perfectly spin polarized muons. Muons are implanted into the sample. Muons rotate at a larmor frequency

Keren, Amit

331

Synthesis and characterization of nanocrystalline binary and ternary intermetallic compounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nanocrystalline powders. Using this process, I was able to access several binary and ternary intermetallics, including two new phases: AuCuSn2 and AuNiSn2. These compounds were isolated as nanocrystals using low temperature solution synthesis techniques, which had...

Leonard, Brian Matthew

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

332

1. PRECONCENTRATION, THERMAL DESORPTION & ANALYSIS OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: peltier, liq. N?.. Heated transfer line 2) Desorption & transfer by fastheatlng Cooled & heated trap jas trap. The trap is then quickly heated, under a low flow of hélium, to desorb and inject thé compounds. This highly concentrated plug of sample is transferred via a heated transfer line, to a capillary

Boyer, Edmond

333

Epoxy Coenzyme A Thioester Pathways for Degradation of Aromatic Compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Fe-O-Fe center in stearoyl-ACP desaturase. Primary sequence identity with other diiron-oxo proteins. Biochemistry 33 :12776-12786. 29. Fuchs, G , M Boll and J Heider. 2011. Microbial degradation of aromatic compounds-from one strategy to four...

Wael Ismail; Johannes Gescher

2012-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

334

Method and apparatus for measuring properties of a compound  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system that incorporates teachings of the present disclosure may include, for example, an apparatus having a collimator having at least one aperture and a fluorescence detector. The collimator can be positioned next to a compound. The compound can emit fluorescence X-rays when impacted by an X-ray beam generated by an X-ray source. The collimator can absorb at least a first portion of the fluorescence X-rays emitted by the compound and release at least a second portion of the fluorescence X-rays at the at least one aperture. The second portion of the fluorescence X-rays released by the at least one aperture have known directional information based on a position of the collimator. The fluorescence detector can detect the second portion of the fluorescence X-rays released by the at least one aperture. A three-dimensional (3-D) rendering of an elemental distribution of the compound can be determined from the fluorescence X-rays detected and the directional information. Additional embodiments are disclosed.

Meng, Ling Jian

2013-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

335

Thermoelectric materials ternary penta telluride and selenide compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Ternary tellurium compounds and ternary selenium compounds may be used in fabricating thermoelectric devices with a thermoelectric figure of merit (ZT) of 1.5 or greater. Examples of such compounds include Tl.sub.2 SnTe.sub.5, Tl.sub.2 GeTe.sub.5, K.sub.2 SnTe.sub.5 and Rb.sub.2 SnTe.sub.5. These compounds have similar types of crystal lattice structures which include a first substructure with a (Sn, Ge) Te.sub.5 composition and a second substructure with chains of selected cation atoms. The second substructure includes selected cation atoms which interact with selected anion atoms to maintain a desired separation between the chains of the first substructure. The cation atoms which maintain the desired separation between the chains occupy relatively large electropositive sites in the resulting crystal lattice structure which results in a relatively low value for the lattice component of thermal conductivity (.kappa..sub.g). The first substructure of anion chains indicates significant anisotropy in the thermoelectric characteristics of the resulting semiconductor materials.

Sharp, Jeffrey W. (Richardson, TX)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Thermoelectric materials: ternary penta telluride and selenide compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Ternary tellurium compounds and ternary selenium compounds may be used in fabricating thermoelectric devices with a thermoelectric figure of merit (ZT) of 1.5 or greater. Examples of such compounds include Tl.sub.2 SnTe.sub.5, Tl.sub.2 GeTe.sub.5, K.sub.2 SnTe.sub.5 and Rb.sub.2 SnTe.sub.5. These compounds have similar types of crystal lattice structures which include a first substructure with a (Sn, Ge) Te.sub.5 composition and a second substructure with chains of selected cation atoms. The second substructure includes selected cation atoms which interact with selected anion atoms to maintain a desired separation between the chains of the first substructure. The cation atoms which maintain the desired separation between the chains occupy relatively large electropositive sites in the resulting crystal lattice structure which results in a relatively low value for the lattice component of thermal conductivity (.kappa..sub.g). The first substructure of anion chains indicates significant anisotropy in the thermoelectric characteristics of the resulting semiconductor materials.

Sharp, Jeffrey W. (Richardson, TX)

2002-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

337

Volatile organic compound losses from sewage sludge-amended soils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) applied to soil in sludge have been assumed to disappear quickly and completely. The VOC behavior in sludge-amended soils has been studied previously only in laboratory systems where the sludged soil has been spiked with compounds of interest. Behavior in these systems may not necessarily represent compound behavior in field soils to which contaminated sludge is added. A series of laboratory microcosm experiments were designed therefore to investigate the behavior of toluene, ethyl benzene, o-, m-, and p-xylene applied to soil in contaminated sludge, and factors influencing loss processes. The VOC loss from sludge-amended soil was well described by a simple one step pseudo-first-order model but in certain soils was better described by a two step first-order model. Volatilization was the predominant loss process. Rates of loss depended on sludge application rate, method of sludge application, soil properties, and on compound characteristics. Experiments indicated that spiking sludge-amended soils gave a reasonable indication of VOC loss rates from systems amended with contaminated sludge at least over a period of 23 d. The majority of VOCs applied to soils in sludge volatilizes quickly to the atmosphere over a few to 10s of days with a small fraction lost more slowly. Potential for VOC crop uptake, livestock ingestion, and contamination of ground water is low under routine, managed applications of sewage sludge to agricultural land.

Wilson, S.C.; Jones, K.C.

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Super-compound Engines Enable Multifuel Vehicles to Match Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Super-compound Engines Enable Multifuel Vehicles to Match Efficiency of Diesel-powered Vehicles is a 30 percent increase in lightload efficiency for a 2.0 liter (L) General Motors Ecotec engine in the last 25 years. Lightduty truck engines historically have poor efficiency, converting only 20 percent

339

Hydrogen in compound semiconductors M. D. McCluskeya)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen in compound semiconductors M. D. McCluskeya) and N. M. Johnson Xerox Palo Alto Research Center, Palo Alto, California 94304 Received 9 October 1998; accepted 18 December 1998 Hydrogen can consequence of hydrogenation is the passivation of dopant impurities, which leads to a decrease

McCluskey, Matthew

340

Polymerizable 2(2-hydroxynaphthyl)2H-benzotriazole compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Benzotriazole compounds having the formula: ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1 is H, Cl, or OCH.sub.3 ; R.sub.2 is a hydroxynaphthyl group; and R.sub.3 is a vinyl unsaturated polymerizable group. Homopolymers or copolymers thereof are effective as UV light stabilizers and absorbers.

Gomez, P.M.; Neidlinger, H.H.

1991-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tentatively identified compound" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Determination of tritium distribution in labeled compounds using EPR spectrometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Usually, the tritium distribution in a labeled compound is analyzed by T-NMR spectrometry. NMR equipment is expensive and its sensitivity is lower in comparison to EPR spectrometry. In this paper, the possibility of determining the distribution of tritium in a labeled molecule using self-radiolytic decay processes was analyzed. (authors)

Postolache, C.; Matei, L.; Georgescu, R. [Horia Hulubei, National Inst. for Physics and Nuclear Engineering IFIN HH, 407 Atomistilor street, 077125 Magurele Ilfov (Romania)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

342

Energy loss of light ions in different carbon compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experimental data on the energy loss of light H, Li, B, and N ions ... have been presented for the range of ion energies from 0.01 to 0.6 MeV/nucleon. It has been shown that the energy loss in the compounds does ...

Yu. A. Belkova; Ya. A. Teplova

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Redundant Data Acquisition in a Distributed Security Compound  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper introduces a new concept for an additional security mechanism which works on every host inside a local network. It is focussed on the used redundant data acquisition to get the complete net-wide network traffic for later analysis. The compound ...

Thomas Droste

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Exome sequencing identifies recurrent somatic RAC1 mutations in melanoma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We characterized the mutational landscape of melanoma, the form of skin cancer with the highest mortality rate, by sequencing the exomes of 147 melanomas. Sun-exposed melanomas had markedly more ultraviolet (UV)-like C>T somatic mutations compared to sun-shielded acral, mucosal and uveal melanomas. Among the newly identified cancer genes was PPP6C, encoding a serine/threonine phosphatase, which harbored mutations that clustered in the active site in 12% of sun-exposed melanomas, exclusively in tumors with mutations in BRAF or NRAS. Notably, we identified a recurrent UV-signature, an activating mutation in RAC1 in 9.2% of sun-exposed melanomas. This activating mutation, the third most frequent in our cohort of sun-exposed melanoma after those of BRAF and NRAS, changes Pro29 to serine (RAC1{sup P29S}) in the highly conserved switch I domain. Crystal structures, and biochemical and functional studies of RAC1{sup P29S} showed that the alteration releases the conformational restraint conferred by the conserved proline, causes an increased binding of the protein to downstream effectors, and promotes melanocyte proliferation and migration. These findings raise the possibility that pharmacological inhibition of downstream effectors of RAC1 signaling could be of therapeutic benefit.

Krauthammer, Michael; Kong, Yong; Ha, Byung Hak; Evans, Perry; Bacchiocchi, Antonella; McCusker, James P.; Cheng, Elaine; Davis, Matthew J.; Goh, Gerald; Choi, Murim; Ariyan, Stephan; Narayan, Deepak; Dutton-Regester, Ken; Capatana, Ana; Holman, Edna C.; Bosenberg, Marcus; Sznol, Mario; Kluger, Harriet M.; Brash, Douglas E.; Stern, David F.; Materin, Miguel A.; Lo, Roger S.; Mane, Shrikant; Ma, Shuangge; Kidd, Kenneth K.; Hayward, Nicholas K.; Lifton, Richard P.; Schlessinger, Joseph; Boggon, Titus J.; Halaban, Ruth (Yale-MED); (UCLA); (Queens)

2012-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

345

Identifying Requirements for Effective Human-Automation Teamwork  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Previous studies have shown that poorly designed human-automation collaboration, such as poorly designed communication protocols, often leads to problems for the human operators, such as: lack of vigilance, complacency, and loss of skills. These problems often lead to suboptimal system performance. To address this situation, a considerable amount of research has been conducted to improve human-automation collaboration and to make automation function better as a team player. Much of this research is based on an understanding of what it means to be a good team player from the perspective of a human team. However, the research is often based on a simplified view of human teams and teamwork. In this study, we sought to better understand the capabilities and limitations of automation from the standpoint of human teams. We first examined human teams to identify the principles for effective teamwork. We next reviewed the research on integrating automation agents and human agents into mixed agent teams to identify the limitations of automation agents to conform to teamwork principles. This research resulted in insights that can lead to more effective human-automation collaboration by enabling a more realistic set of requirements to be developed based on the strengths and limitations of all agents.

Jeffrey C. Joe; John O'Hara; Heather D. Medema; Johanna H. Oxstrand

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Exponential coefficient plots for identifying cement channels from temperature logs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One technique for identifying a cement channel in such a well is to inject cold water or diesel fuel for a period of time, followed by recording shut-in temperature profiles after the injection ceases. Qualitative judgements are made from the appearance of these profiles in order to confirm the existence of a channel. Alternatively, by processing the temperature logs mathematically, an exponential coefficient may be calculated and plotted against depth. This exponential coefficient plot is very responsive to the presence of cold fluid in a cement channel, and confirms a channel's existence quantitatively and conclusively. This paper discusses use of such a mathematical relationship in a predictive fashion for identifying injection zones. Methods are given for deriving and plotting the exponential coefficients from temperature logs of a well placed on cold fluid injection. Three examples are presented on the application of exponential coefficient plots to actual field logs for confirmation of suspected channels and for assessment of the uniformity of cement bonding.

Barnette, J.C.; Lanuke, E.W.; Carlson, N.R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Enhanced Elemental Mercury Removal from Coal-fired Flue Gas by Sulfur-chlorine Compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oxidation of Hg0 with any oxidant or converting it to a particle-bound form can facilitate its removal. Two sulfur-chlorine compounds, sulfur dichloride (SCl2) and sulfur monochloride (S2Cl2), were investigated as oxidants for Hg0 by gas phase reaction and by surface-involved reactions in the presence of flyash or activated carbon. The gas phase reaction rate constants between Hg0 and the sulfur/chlorine compounds were determined, and the effects of temperature and the main components in flue gases were studied. The gas phase reaction between Hg0 and SCl2 is shown to be more rapid than the gas phase reaction with chlorine, and the second order rate constant was 9.1(+-0.5) x 10-18 mL-molecules-1cdots-1 at 373oK. Nitric oxide (NO) inhibited the gas phase reaction of Hg0 with sulfur-chlorine compounds. The presence of flyash or powdered activated carbon in flue gas can substantially accelerate the reaction. The predicted Hg0 removal is about 90percent with 5 ppm SCl2 or S2Cl2 and 40 g/m3 of flyash in flue gas. The combination of activated carbon and sulfur-chlorine compounds is an effective alternative. We estimate that co-injection of 3-5 ppm of SCl2 (or S2Cl2) with 2-3 Lb/MMacf of untreated Darco-KB is comparable in efficiency to the injection of 2-3 Lb/MMacf Darco-Hg-LH. Extrapolation of kinetic results also indicates that 90percent of Hg0 can be removed if 3 Lb/MMacf of Darco-KB pretreated with 3percent of SCl2 or S2Cl2 is used. Unlike gas phase reactions, NO exhibited little effect on Hg0 reactions with SCl2 or S2Cl2 on flyash or activated carbon. Mercuric sulfide was identified as one of the principal products of the Hg0/SCl2 or Hg0/S2Cl2 reactions. Additionally, about 8percent of SCl2 or S2Cl2 in aqueous solutions is converted to sulfide ions, which would precipitate mercuric ion from FGD solution.

Chang, Shih-Ger; Yan, Nai-Qiang; Qu, Zan; Chi, Yao; Qiao, Shao-Hua; Dod, Ray; Chang, Shih-Ger; Miller, Charles

2008-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

348

Identify Institutional Change Roles for Sustainability | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Roles for Sustainability Roles for Sustainability Identify Institutional Change Roles for Sustainability October 8, 2013 - 11:47am Addthis Example of How Roles Affect Sustainability Goals The following scenario is an example of how roles can affect the implementation of a sustainability goal despite best intentions. Policymakers mandate waste reduction. A waste manager determines that a solution is to recycle more. No one notices that the staff responsible for implementing the solution forgets to order enough recycling bins for a building. Office workers continue to put recyclable material in the trash instead of a recycling bin. Janitorial staff members don't have the time to sort the recyclable material from the trash. Municipal waste personnel dump recyclable material in a landfill. Lesson: It is important that action plans

349

Identify Strategies to Reduce Business Travel for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Strategies to Reduce Business Travel for Greenhouse Gas Strategies to Reduce Business Travel for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Identify Strategies to Reduce Business Travel for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation October 7, 2013 - 1:34pm Addthis YOU ARE HERE The tables below illustrate some of the more common strategies that can enable employees to travel less and travel more efficiently for business. The "Purpose of Travel" analysis in the previous step can be used with the guidance below to help determine what type of trips may be most appropriately substituted with each business travel alternative. Table 1. Strategies that Enable Employees to Travel Less Business Travel Strategy Best Potential Application Best Practices Web meetings/webinars, including option for video Purpose of travel: training, conferences.

350

Identify types of development and climate impacts that are country  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Identify types of development and climate impacts that are country priorities Jump to: navigation, search Stage 3 LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Develop_BAU Stage 4: Prioritizing and Planning for Actions Begin execution of implementation plans 1.0. Organizing the LEDS Process 1.1. Institutional Structure for LEDS 1.2. Workplan to Develop the LEDS 1.3. Roles and responsibilities to develop LEDS 2.1. Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities 2.2. Compile lessons learned and good practices from ongoing and

351

Identify Petroleum Reduction Strategies for Vehicles and Mobile Equipment |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Petroleum Reduction Strategies for Vehicles and Mobile Petroleum Reduction Strategies for Vehicles and Mobile Equipment Identify Petroleum Reduction Strategies for Vehicles and Mobile Equipment October 7, 2013 - 11:50am Addthis YOU ARE HERE: Step 3 As defined by the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reduction strategies for Federal vehicles and equipment are based on the three driving principles of petroleum reduction: Reduce vehicle miles traveled Improve fuel efficiency Use alternative fuels. These strategies provide a framework for an agency to use when developing a strategic plan that can be specifically tailored to match the agency's fleet profile and meet its mission. Agency fleet managers should evaluate petroleum reduction strategies and tactics for each fleet location, based on an evaluation of site-specific

352

Microsoft Word - IDENTIFY AND PROTECT YOUR VITAL RECORDS  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

I I I D D E E N N T T I I F F Y Y A A N N D D P P R R O O T T E E C C T T Y Y O O U U R R V V I I T T A A L L R R E E C C O O R R D D S S July 2010 Records Management Division Office of IT Planning, Architecture, and E-Government Office of the Chief Information Officer 2 INTRODUCTION Each Federal agency is responsible for establishing a Vital Records Program for the identification and protection of those records needed for continuity of operations before, during, and after emergencies; and those records needed to protect the legal and financial rights of the Government and persons affected by Government activities. This means identifying, safeguarding, and having readily available documents, databases, and information systems that support an organization's performance of its essential functions

353

GAMQUEST, a Computer Program to Identify Gamma Rays  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

GAMQUEST GAMQUEST A Computer Program to Identify Gamma Rays Edgardo Browne, Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 EBROWNE@LBL.Gov Table of Contents Introduction. Program Access and Output Files. How to Run GAMQUEST. From Individual Accounts. From Guest Account. Gamma-Ray Data. GAMQUEST, a Tool for Applied Research. Searching Strategies. Examples. Neutron Activation Analysis. Gamma-Ray Spectrum Between 100 and 800 keV. Gamma-Ray Spectrum Between 800 and 1600 keV. A List of X Rays and Gamma Rays from the Decay of 192Ir (74 hr). Run GAMQUEST from Guest Account Acknowledgments. References. 1. Introduction. The characteristic energies and intensities of gamma rays emitted by radioactive isotopes are commonly used as fingerprints for isotope

354

Identifying features in biological sequences: Sixth workshop report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers the sixth of an annual series of workshops held at the Aspen Center for Physics concentrating particularly on the identification of features in DNA sequence, and more broadly on related topics in computational molecular biology. The workshop series originally focused primarily on discussion of current needs and future strategies for identifying and predicting the presence of complex functional units on sequenced, but otherwise uncharacterized, genomic DNA. We addressed the need for computationally-based, automatic tools for synthesizing available data about individual consensus sequences and local compositional patterns into the composite objects (e.g., genes) that are -- as composite entities -- the true object of interest when scanning DNA sequences. The workshop was structured to promote sustained informal contact and exchange of expertise between molecular biologists, computer scientists, and mathematicians.

Burks, C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Myers, E. [Univ. of Arizona (United States); Pearson, W.R. [Univ. of Virginia (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

355

70 DA WHITE DWARFS IDENTIFIED IN LAMOST PILOT SURVEY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a spectroscopically identified catalog of 70 DA white dwarfs (WDs) from the LAMOST pilot survey. Thirty-five are found to be new identifications after cross-correlation with the Eisenstein et al. and Villanova catalogs. The effective temperature and gravity of these WDs are estimated by Balmer lines fitting. Most of them are hot WDs. The cooling times and masses of these WDs are estimated by interpolation in theoretical evolution tracks. The peak of the mass distribution is found to be {approx}0.6 M {sub Sun }, which is consistent with prior work in the literature. The distances of these WDs are estimated using the method of synthetic spectral distances. All of these WDs are found to be in the Galactic disk from our analysis of space motions. Our sample supports the expectation that WDs with high mass are concentrated near the plane of the Galactic disk.

Zhao, J. K.; Luo, A. L.; Zhao, G. [Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Oswalt, T. D., E-mail: zjk@bao.ac.cn, E-mail: gzhao@bao.ac.cn, E-mail: lal@bao.ac.cn, E-mail: toswalt@fit.edu [Physics and Space Science Department, Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, FL 32901 (United States)

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Information-Theoretic Methods for Identifying Relationships among Climate Variables  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Information-theoretic quantities, such as entropy, are used to quantify the amount of information a given variable provides. Entropies can be used together to compute the mutual information, which quantifies the amount of information two variables share. However, accurately estimating these quantities from data is extremely challenging. We have developed a set of computational techniques that allow one to accurately compute marginal and joint entropies. These algorithms are probabilistic in nature and thus provide information on the uncertainty in our estimates, which enable us to establish statistical significance of our findings. We demonstrate these methods by identifying relations between cloud data from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) and data from other sources, such as equatorial pacific sea surface temperatures (SST).

Knuth, Kevin H; Rossow, William B

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Identifying Calcium Channels and Porters in Plant Membranes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objectives of the proposal submitted in 6/90 was to understand how Ca was transported across plant membranes, and how these transport pathways were regulated. Ca participates in many cellular processes, including the transduction of hormonal and environmental signals, secretion, and protein folding. These processes depend on the coordination of passive Ca fluxes via channels and active Ca pumps; however these transport pathways are poorly understood in plants. We had, therefore, proposed to identify and characterize Ca transport proteins, such as the inositol-1 ,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-sensitive Ca channels and Ca pumps. We have had difficulties characterizing and cloning the IP3-sensitive Ca channel, but have made considerable progress on the biochemical characterization, and partial purification of a 120 kD Ca-pumping ATPase. We have begun to determine the structure of Ca pumps by molecular cloning and have already obtained a partial cDNA with features characteristic of Ca pumps.

Sze, Heven

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Identifying Suitable Degradation Parameters for Individual-Based Prognostics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ultimate goal of most prognostic systems is accurate prediction of the remaining useful life of individual systems or components based on their use and performance. Traditionally, individual-based prognostic methods use a measure of degradation to make lifetime estimates. Degradation measures may include sensed measurements, such as temperature or vibration level, or inferred measurements, such as model residuals or physics-based model predictions. Often, it is beneficial to combine several measures of degradation into a single parameter. Parameter features such as trendability, monotonicity, and prognosability can be used to compare candidate prognostic parameters to determine which is most useful for individual-based prognosis. By quantifying these features for a given parameter, the metrics can be used with any traditional optimization technique to identify an appropriate parameter. This parameter may be used with a parametric extrapolation model to make prognostic estimates for an individual unit. The proposed methods are illustrated with an application to simulated turbofan engine data.

Coble, Jamie B.; Hines, Wes

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

359

Method To Identify Specific Inhibiutors Of Imp Dehydrogenase  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to methods to identify specific inhibitors of the purine nucleotide synthesis enzyme, IMP dehydrogenase (IMPDH). IMPDH is an essential enzyme found in all free-living organisms from humans to bacteria and is an important therapeutic target. The invention allows the identification of specific inhibitors of any IMPDH enzyme which can be expressed in a functional form in a recombinant host cell. A variety of eukaryotic or prokaryotic host systems commonly used for the expression of recombinant proteins are suitable for the practice of the invention. The methods are amenable to high throughput systems for the screening of inhibitors generated by combinatorial chemistry or other methods such as antisense molecule production. Utilization of exogenous guanosine as a control component of the methods allows for the identification of inhibitors specific for IMPDH rather than other causes of decreased cell proliferation.

Collart, Frank R. (Bolingbrook, IL); Huberman, Eliezer (LaGrange, IL)

2000-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

360

Identifying web navigation behaviour and patterns automatically from clickstream data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A user's clickstream, such as that which is found in server-side logs, can be a rich source of data concerning the ways in which a user navigates a site, but the volume and level of detail found in these logs makes it difficult to identify and categorise specific navigational patterns. In this paper, we describe the three-step automatic pattern discovery (APD) method, a tool that utilises sequential mining to extract a user's navigation route based on two levels of basic navigational elements. This paper contains descriptions of two studies in which the APD was used; the first makes use of APD to analyse the usage of an educational website; the second describes how APD was used to improve the design of a technical support website in a university department.

I-Hsien Ting; Lillian Clark; Chris Kimble

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tentatively identified compound" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

being collected at sites identified by other components of the Center's geothermal research as having high potential for geothermal development. These samples are being...

362

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Lassen Volcanic National Park Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Analyses of eight well samples taken consecutively during the flow test showed an inverse correlation between NH3 and Cl_ concentrations. The last sample taken had a pH of 8.35 and contained 2100 ppm Cl_ and 0.55 ppm NH3. Ratios of Na+/K+ and Na+/Cl_ remained nearly constant throughout the flow test. Cation geothermometers (with inherent uncertainties of at least

363

Compound and Elemental Analysis At International Geothermal Area,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Philippines (Wood, 2002) Philippines (Wood, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At International Geothermal Area Philippines (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location International Geothermal Area Philippines Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geothermal fluids from hot springs and wells have been sampled from a number of locations, including: 1) the North Island of New Zealand (three sets of samples from three different years) and the South Island of New Zealand (1 set of samples); 2) the Cascades of Oregon; 3) the Harney, Alvord Desert and Owyhee geothermal areas of Oregon; 4) the Dixie Valley

364

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Breitenbush Hot Springs Area (Wood,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Breitenbush Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Breitenbush Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geothermal fluids from hot springs and wells have been sampled from a number of locations, including: 1) the North Island of New Zealand (three sets of samples from three different years) and the South Island of New Zealand (1 set of samples); 2) the Cascades of Oregon; 3) the Harney, Alvord Desert and Owyhee geothermal areas of Oregon; 4) the Dixie Valley and Beowawe fields in Nevada; 5) Palinpiiion, the Philippines; 6) the

365

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (1991) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1) 1) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (1991) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date 1991 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine the fluid origin by looking at variations in dissolved gas compositions of reservoir fluids Notes Gas concentrations and ratios in 110 analyses of geothermal fluids from 47 wells in the Coso geothermal system illustrate the complexity of this two-phase reservoir in its natural state. Two geographically distinct regions of single-phase (liquid) reservoir are present and possess distinctive gas and liquid compositions. Steam sampled from wells in the

366

Compound and Elemental Analysis At International Geothermal Area, New  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New New Zealand (Wood, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At International Geothermal Area New Zealand (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location International Geothermal Area New Zealand Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geothermal fluids from hot springs and wells have been sampled from a number of locations, including: 1) the North Island of New Zealand (three sets of samples from three different years) and the South Island of New Zealand (1 set of samples); 2) the Cascades of Oregon; 3) the Harney, Alvord Desert and Owyhee geothermal areas of Oregon; 4) the Dixie Valley

367

Zirconia coating on stainless steel sheets from organozirconium compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The stability and the coating characteristics of a variety of organozirconium compounds have been investigated to coat ZrO/sub 2/ films on stainless steel sheets for the improvement of heat resistance against oxidation. Zirconium tetraoctylate and zirconium tetrakis(acetylacetonate). The authors discuss how the compounds were found to be more stable than zirconium alkoxides in an ambient atmosphere. The ZrO/sub 2/ films from zirconium alkoxides became white and discontinuous when the thickness of the films exceeded about 200 A (20nm). On the other hand, transparent ZrO/sub 2/ films were obtained from zirconium tetraoctylate and zirconium tetrakis(acetylacetonate). The IR spectra of the films showed that the heat treatment at 400{sup 0}C for 5 min produced organic-free ZrO/sub 2/ films. The heat resistance of stainless steel sheets against oxidation was improved by the ZrO/sub 2/ coating, depending on the film thickness.

Izumi, K.; Murakami, M.; Deguchi, T.; Morita, A. (Nisshin Steel Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)); Tohge, N.; Minami, T. (Dept. of Applied Chemistry, Univ. of Osaka Prefecture, Mozu-Umekmachi, Sakai-Shi, Osaka- Fu 591 (JP))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Bioactive compounds obtained by immobilisation of serine protease inhibitors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We studied the preparation of polymeric membranes formed of solutions of poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) and chitosan. PHB-chitosan biomaterials from these solutions may form various structural types, which determine the biodegradation time, the adsorption capacity, and the kinetics of the release of medicinal compounds from polymeric matrices. Serine protease inhibitors, SERPINs, continue to catch the attention of researchers because of their increasing use in medicine and biotechnology. We prepared and studied the properties of biodegradable materials containing the serine protease inhibitors, soybean trypsin inhibitor (abbreviate STI) and watermelon (Citrullus vulgaris) trypsin inhibitor (abbreviate CVTI). Properties of bioactive compounds bound to the above mentioned polymers (proteolytic activity, porous structure, and increased hydrophilicity) account for their use in two key medical applications: drug delivery and tissue engineering.

Mihaela Carmen Eremia; Irina Lupescu; Luminita Tcacenco

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Electronic structure of metallic antiperovskite compound GaCMn3  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have investigated the electronic structures of antiperovskite GaCMn3 and related Mn compounds SnCMn3, ZnCMn3, and ZnNMn3. In the paramagnetic state of GaCMn3, the Fermi surface nesting feature along the ?R direction is observed, which induces the antiferromagnetic (AFM) spin ordering with the nesting vector Q??R. Calculated susceptibilities confirm the nesting scenario for GaCMn3, and also explain various magnetic structures of other antiperovskite compounds. Through the band folding effect, the AFM phase of GaCMn3 is stabilized. Nearly equal densities of states at the Fermi level in the ferromagnetic and AFM phases of GaCMn3 indicate that two phases are competing in the ground state.

J. H. Shim; S. K. Kwon; B. I. Min

2002-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

370

Performance Analysis: Work Control Events Identified January - August 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This performance analysis evaluated 24 events that occurred at LLNL from January through August 2010. The analysis identified areas of potential work control process and/or implementation weaknesses and several common underlying causes. Human performance improvement and safety culture factors were part of the causal analysis of each event and were analyzed. The collective significance of all events in 2010, as measured by the occurrence reporting significance category and by the proportion of events that have been reported to the DOE ORPS under the ''management concerns'' reporting criteria, does not appear to have increased in 2010. The frequency of reporting in each of the significance categories has not changed in 2010 compared to the previous four years. There is no change indicating a trend in the significance category and there has been no increase in the proportion of occurrences reported in the higher significance category. Also, the frequency of events, 42 events reported through August 2010, is not greater than in previous years and is below the average of 63 occurrences per year at LLNL since 2006. Over the previous four years, an average of 43% of the LLNL's reported occurrences have been reported as either ''management concerns'' or ''near misses.'' In 2010, 29% of the occurrences have been reported as ''management concerns'' or ''near misses.'' This rate indicates that LLNL is now reporting fewer ''management concern'' and ''near miss'' occurrences compared to the previous four years. From 2008 to the present, LLNL senior management has undertaken a series of initiatives to strengthen the work planning and control system with the primary objective to improve worker safety. In 2008, the LLNL Deputy Director established the Work Control Integrated Project Team to develop the core requirements and graded elements of an institutional work planning and control system. By the end of that year this system was documented and implementation had begun. In 2009, training of the workforce began and as of the time of this report more than 50% of authorized Integration Work Sheets (IWS) use the activity-based planning process. In 2010, LSO independently reviewed the work planning and control process and confirmed to the Laboratory that the Integrated Safety Management (ISM) System was implemented. LLNL conducted a cross-directorate management self-assessment of work planning and control and is developing actions to respond to the issues identified. Ongoing efforts to strengthen the work planning and control process and to improve the quality of LLNL work packages are in progress: completion of remaining actions in response to the 2009 DOE Office of Health, Safety, and Security (HSS) evaluation of LLNL's ISM System; scheduling more than 14 work planning and control self-assessments in FY11; continuing to align subcontractor work control with the Institutional work planning and control system; and continuing to maintain the electronic IWS application. The 24 events included in this analysis were caused by errors in the first four of the five ISMS functions. The most frequent cause was errors in analyzing the hazards (Function 2). The second most frequent cause was errors occurring when defining the work (Function 1), followed by errors during the performance of work (Function 4). Interestingly, very few errors in developing controls (Function 3) resulted in events. This leads one to conclude that if improvements are made to defining the scope of work and analyzing the potential hazards, LLNL may reduce the frequency or severity of events. Analysis of the 24 events resulted in the identification of ten common causes. Some events had multiple causes, resulting in the mention of 39 causes being identified for the 24 events. The most frequent cause was workers, supervisors, or experts believing they understood the work and the hazards but their understanding was incomplete. The second most frequent cause was unclear, incomplete or confusing documents directing the work. Together, these two causes were mentioned 17 times and co

De Grange, C E; Freeman, J W; Kerr, C E; Holman, G; Marsh, K; Beach, R

2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

371

THE OPTX PROJECT. V. IDENTIFYING DISTANT ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Baldwin, Phillips, and Terlevich emission-line ratio diagnostic ([O III]/H{beta} versus [N II]/H{alpha}, hereafter BPT diagram) efficiently separates galaxies whose signal is dominated by star formation (BPT-SF) from those dominated by active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity (BPT-AGN). Yet this BPT diagram is limited to z < 0.5, the redshift at which [N II]{lambda}6584 leaves the optical spectral window. Using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), we construct a new diagnostic, or TBT diagram, that is based on rest-frame g - z color, [Ne III]{lambda}3869, and [O II]{lambda}{lambda}3726 + 3729 and can be used for galaxies out to z < 1.4. The TBT diagram identifies 98.7% of the SDSS BPT-AGN as TBT-AGN and 97% of the SDSS BPT-SF as TBT-SF. Furthermore, it identifies 97% of the OPTX Chandra X-ray-selected AGNs as TBT-AGN. This is in contrast to the BPT diagram, which misidentifies 20% of X-ray-selected AGNs as BPT-SF. We use the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey North and Lockman Hole galaxy samples, with their accompanying deep Chandra imaging, to perform X-ray and infrared stacking analyses to further validate our TBT-AGN and TBT-SF selections; that is, we verify the dominance of AGN activity in the former and star formation activity in the latter. Finally, we address the inclusion of the majority of the BPT-comp (sources lying between the BPT-SF and BPT-AGN regimes) in our TBT-AGN regime. We find that the stacked BPT-comp source is X-ray hard (({Gamma}{sub eff}) = 1.0{sup +0.4}{sub -0.4}) and has a high X-ray luminosity to total infrared luminosity ratio. This suggests that, on average, the X-ray signal in BPT-comp is dominated by obscured or low accretion rate AGN activity rather than by star formation, supporting their inclusion in the TBT-AGN regime.

Trouille, L. [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Barger, A. J.; Tremonti, C. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 475 N. Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

2011-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

372

CSP-based counter abstraction for systems with node identifiers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The Parameterised Model Checking Problem asks whether an implementation I m p l ( t ) satisfies a specification S p e c ( t ) for all instantiations of parameter t . In general, t can determine numerous entities: the number of processes used in a network, the type of data, the capacities of buffers, etc. The main theme of this paper is automation of uniform verification of a subclass of PMCP with the parameter of the first kind, i.e.where it determines the number of processes used in a network. We use CSP as our formalism. Counter abstraction is a technique that replaces a concrete state space by an abstract one, where each abstract state is a tuple of integer counters ( c 1 , , c k ) such that for each i , c i counts how many node processes are currently in the i -th state. Each counter c i is given a finite threshold z i and we interpret c i = z i as there being z i or more processes in the i -th state. Standard counter abstraction techniques require all processes to be identical, which means that nodes cannot use node identifiers. In this paper we present how counter abstraction techniques can be extended to processes that make use of node identifiers in a symmetrical way. Our method creates a process A b s t r that is independent of t and is refined by ? ( I m p l ( T ) ) for all sufficiently large T , where ? maps all (sufficiently large) instantiations T of the parameter to some fixed type. By transitivity of refinement, testing if A b s t r refines S p e c ( ? ( t ) ) implies that S p e c ( ? ( t ) ) is refined by ? ( I m p l ( T ) ) . Then, using the type reduction theory from Mazur and Lowe (2012) [29], we can deduce that S p e c ( T ) is refined by I m p l ( T ) for all sufficiently large T , thus obtaining a positive answer to the original verification problem.

Tomasz Mazur; Gavin Lowe

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Process for production of an aluminum hydride compound  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compound of formula M(AlH.sub.3OR.sup.1).sub.y, wherein R.sup.1 is phenyl substituted by at least one of: (i) an alkoxy group having from one to six carbon atoms; and (ii) an alkyl group having from three to twelve carbon atoms; wherein M is an alkali metal, Be or Mg; and y is one or two.

Allen, Nathan Tait; Butterick, III, Robert; Chin, Arthur Achhing; Miller, Dean Michael; Molzahn, David Craig

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

374

Expanded Use of Bicyclic Guanidinate Ligands in Dimetal Paddlewheel Compounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EXPANDED USE OF BICYCLIC GUANIDINATE LIGANDS IN DIMETAL PADDLEWHEEL COMPOUNDS A Dissertation by MARK DAVID YOUNG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved by: Co-Chairs of Committee, Carlos A. Murillo Marcetta Y. Darensbourg Committee Members, Paul A. Lindahl George Kattawar Head...

Young, Mark D.

2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

375

Process for removing heavy metal compounds from heavy crude oil  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is provided for removing heavy metal compounds from heavy crude oil by mixing the heavy crude oil with tar sand; preheating the mixture to a temperature of about 650.degree. F.; heating said mixture to up to 800.degree. F.; and separating tar sand from the light oils formed during said heating. The heavy metals removed from the heavy oils can be recovered from the spent sand for other uses.

Cha, Chang Y. (Golden, CO); Boysen, John E. (Laramie, WY); Branthaver, Jan F. (Laramie, WY)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Control of spider mites on cotton by organic sulphur compounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of two species of spider mites using 8 gallons of spray per acre. . 57 10. Results of laboratory ovicidal tests for control of two species of spider mites using 100 gallons of spray per acre.................................................. 59 11...-volurae sprays in the control of cotton pests has presented the problem of getting enough effective sulphur into these sprays to control the spider mites# A series of tests was conducted to evaluate the toxicity of various sulphur compounds in low...

King, Charles Edward

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

377

The Phosphorus Compounds of Cotton Seed Meal and Wheat Bran.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Phar. & Expt. Therapeutics 1,151) claims that ? the chief poisonous principle of cottonseed meal is a salt of pyrophos- phoric acid.? It has been shown by the writer (Bulletin 146) that the product which these writers thought was inorganic... compound as phytin, but do not report complete analyses of the product. Levine (Biochem. Ztscher. 16, 390) describes a semicrystalline barium salt of an organic phosphorus acid. Yorbrodt (Anzeiger. Akad. Wiss. Krakau, 1910. Series A. 414) separated...

Rather, J. B. (James Burness)

1913-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Trigger factor assisted folding of the recombinant epoxide hydrolases identified from C. pelagibacter and S. nassauensis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Epoxide hydrolases (EHs), are enantioselective enzymes as they catalyze the kinetic resolution of racemic epoxides into the corresponding enantiopure vicinal diols, which are useful precursors in the synthesis of chiral pharmaceutical compounds. Here, we have identified and cloned two putative epoxide hydrolase genes (cpeh and sneh) from marine bacteria, Candidatus pelagibacter ubique and terrestrial bacteria, Stackebrandtia nassauensis, respectively and overexpressed them in pET28a vector in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). The CPEH protein (42kDa) was found to be overexpressed as inactive inclusion bodies while SNEH protein (40kDa) was found to form soluble aggregates. In this study, the recombinant CPEH was successfully transformed from insoluble aggregates to the soluble and functionally active form, using pCold TF vector, though with low EH activity. To prevent the soluble aggregate formation of SNEH, it was co-expressed with GroEL/ES chaperone and was also fused with trigger factor (TF) chaperone at its N-terminus. The TF chaperone-assisted correct folding of SNEH led to a purified active EH with a specific activity of 3.85?mol/min/mg. The pure enzyme was further used to biocatalyze the hydrolysis of 10mM benzyl glycidyl ether (BGE) and ?-methyl styrene oxide (MSO) with an enantiomeric excess of the product (eep) of 86% and 73% in 30 and 15min, respectively. In conclusion, this is the first report about the heterologous expression of epoxide hydrolases using TF as a molecular chaperone in pCold TF expression vector, resulting in remarkable increase in the solubility and activity of the otherwise improperly folded recombinant epoxide hydrolases.

Priya Saini; Shadil Ibrahim Wani; Ranjai Kumar; Ravneet Chhabra; Swapandeep Singh Chimni; Dipti Sareen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Progress in donor assisted coal liquefaction: Hydroaromatic compound formation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The role of hydrogen donor compounds in coal liquefaction has been extensively investigated since the mid 1960`s using model compounds and process derived hydrogen donor solvents. Our recent research and that of other investigators have shown that two model compounds in particular have great efficacy in solvating low rank coals. 1,2,3,10b tetrahydrofluoranthene (H{sub 4}Fl) and 1,2,3,6,7,8 hexahydropyrene (H{sub 6}Py) have been used to dissolve Wyodak coal to > 95% soluble material as measured by tetrahydrofuran (THF). Although these hydrogen donors are very effective, they may not be found in any significant concentrations in actual liquefaction process recycle solvents. Therefore, studies with process derived recycle materials are necessary to understand donor solvent chemistry. The objective of this paper is to present results of solvent hydrogenation experiments using heavy distillate solvents produced during testing at the Wilsonville Advanced Coal Liquefaction Test Facility. We evaluated the impact of hydrogenation conditions upon hydrogen donor formation in process derived distillates and compared these process derived solvents with the highly effective H{sub 4}Fl and H{sub 6}Py donors in coal liquefaction tests. This paper presents data on reaction conditions used for distillate hydrotreating and subsequent coal liquefaction, with an aim toward understanding the relationship between reaction conditions and donor solvent quality in recycle distillates.

Kottenstette, R.J.; Stephens, H.P.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

380

Risk and Performance Technologies: Identifying the Keys to Successful Implementation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nuclear power industry has been utilizing risk and performance based technologies for over thirty years. Applications of these technologies have included risk assessment (e.g. Individual Plant Examinations), burden reduction (e.g. Risk-Informed Inservice Inspection, RI-ISI) and risk management (Maintenance Rule, 10CFR50.65). Over the last five to ten years the number of risk-informed (RI) burden reduction initiatives has increased. Unfortunately, the efficiencies of some of these applications have been questionable. This paper investigates those attributes necessary to support successful, cost-effective RI-applications. The premise to this paper is that by understanding the key attributes that support one successful application, insights can be gleaned that will streamline/coordinate future RI-applications. This paper is an extension to a paper presented at the Pressure Vessel and Piping (PVP-2001) Conference. In that paper, a number issues and opportunities were identified that needed to be assessed in order to support future (and efficient) RI-applications. It was noted in the paper that a proper understanding and resolution of these issues will facilitate implementation of risk and performance technology in the operation, maintenance and design disciplines. In addition, it will provide the foundation necessary to support regulatory review and approval. (authors)

McClain, Lynn [Niagara Mohawk (United States); Smith, Art [Entergy Operations (United States); O'Regan, Patrick [Electric Power Research Institute - EPRI, 3420 Hillview Avenue, Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tentatively identified compound" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Measurement of Passive Uptake Rates for Volatile Organic Compounds on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Measurement of Passive Uptake Rates for Volatile Organic Compounds on Measurement of Passive Uptake Rates for Volatile Organic Compounds on Commercial Thermal Desorption Tubes and the Effect of Ozone on Sampling Title Measurement of Passive Uptake Rates for Volatile Organic Compounds on Commercial Thermal Desorption Tubes and the Effect of Ozone on Sampling Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-6257E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Maddalena, Randy L., Amanda Parra, Marion L. Russell, and Wen-Yee Lee Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Keywords indoor air quality, Passive Sampling, Uptake Rates, vocs Abstract Diffusive or passive sampling methods using commercially filled axial-sampling thermal desorption tubes are widely used for measuring volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in air. The passive sampling method provides a robust, cost effective way to measure air quality with time-averaged concentrations spanning up to a week or more. Sampling rates for VOCs can be calculated using tube geometry and Fick's Law for ideal diffusion behavior or measured experimentally. There is evidence that uptake rates deviate from ideal and may not be constant over time. Therefore, experimentally measured sampling rates are preferred. In this project, a calibration chamber with a continuous stirred tank reactor design and constant VOC source was combined with active sampling to generate a controlled dynamic calibration environment for passive samplers. The chamber air was augmented with a continuous source of 45 VOCs ranging from pentane to diethyl phthalate representing a variety of chemical classes and physiochemical properties. Both passive and active samples were collected on commercially filled Tenax TA thermal desorption tubes over an 11-day period and used to calculate passive sampling rates. A second experiment was designed to determine the impact of ozone on passive sampling by using the calibration chamber to passively load five terpenes on a set of Tenax tubes and then exposing the tubes to different ozone environments with and without ozone scrubbers attached to the tube inlet. During the sampling rate experiment, the measured diffusive uptake was constant for up to seven days for most of the VOCs tested but deviated from linearity for some of the more volatile compounds between seven and eleven days. In the ozone experiment, both exposed and unexposed tubes showed a similar decline in terpene mass over time indicating back diffusion when uncapped tubes were transferred to a clean environment but there was no indication of significant loss by ozone reaction.

382

Quantifying Community Assembly Processes and Identifying Features that Impose Them  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Across a set of ecological communities connected to each other through organismal dispersal (a meta-community), turnover in composition is governed by (ecological) Drift, Selection, and Dispersal Limitation. Quantitative estimates of these processes remain elusive, but would represent a common currency needed to unify community ecology. Using a novel analytical framework we quantitatively estimate the relative influences of Drift, Selection, and Dispersal Limitation on subsurface, sediment-associated microbial meta-communities. The communities we study are distributed across two geologic formations encompassing ~12,500m3 of uranium-contaminated sediments within the Hanford Site in eastern Washington State. We find that Drift consistently governs ~25% of spatial turnover in community composition; Selection dominates (governing ~60% of turnover) across spatially-structured habitats associated with fine-grained, low permeability sediments; and Dispersal Limitation is most influential (governing ~40% of turnover) across spatially-unstructured habitats associated with coarse-grained, highly-permeable sediments. Quantitative influences of Selection and Dispersal Limitation may therefore be predictable from knowledge of environmental structure. To develop a system-level conceptual model we extend our analytical framework to compare process estimates across formations, characterize measured and unmeasured environmental variables that impose Selection, and identify abiotic features that limit dispersal. Insights gained here suggest that community ecology can benefit from a shift in perspective; the quantitative approach developed here goes beyond the niche vs. neutral dichotomy by moving towards a style of natural history in which estimates of Selection, Dispersal Limitation and Drift can be described, mapped and compared across ecological systems.

Stegen, James C.; Lin, Xueju; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Chen, Xingyuan; Kennedy, David W.; Murray, Christopher J.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Konopka, Allan

2013-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

383

SPECIATION OF TRACE ORGANIC LIGANDS AND INORGANIC AND ORGANOMETALLIC COMPOUNDS IN OIL SHALE PROCESS WATERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Presented at the 13th Oil Shale Symposium, Golden, CO, April~1ETALLIC COMPOUNDS IN OIL SHALE PROCESS WATERS Richard H.compounds in the seven oil shale process waters. These

Fish, Richard H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Hafnium metallocene compounds used as cathode interfacial layers for enhanced electron transfer in organic solar cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have used hafnium metallocene compounds as cathode interfacial layers for organic solar cells [OSCs]. A metallocene compound consists of...6, 6]-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester, bis-(ethylcyclopentadienyl...

Keunhee Park; Seungsik Oh; Donggeun Jung; Heeyeop Chae

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Discrete polyene oligomer synthesis and related polymer characterization : (Appendix I: Reduced tungsten dimeric compounds)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Molybdenum complexes ... were used to synthesize polyene oligomeric compounds with up to 15 conjugated double bonds by reaction with aldehyde compounds in a Wittig-like fashion. The optical properties of highly nr-conjugated ...

Hafer, Jillian E. (Jillian Elizabeth)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

E-Print Network 3.0 - antiparasitic compounds based Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to inhibitory compounds, thus... mg, 0.12 mmol), and the Synthetic Ligand for FKBP (SLF, compound 2, 40 mg, 0.8 mmol) were dissolved Source: Wandless, Tom - Department of...

387

E-Print Network 3.0 - absence epilepsy identifies Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

epilepsy identifies Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: absence epilepsy identifies Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 BOAZ UNIVERSITY TAM...

388

Compound class specific {sup 14}C analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons associated with PM10 and PM1.1 aerosols from residential areas of suburban Tokyo  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Compound class specific radiocarbon analysis (CCSRA) was performed for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) associated with airborne particulate matter (APM) with diameter {lt}10 {mu}m (PM{sub 10}) and {lt}1.1 {mu}m (PM{sub 1.1}) collected from a residential area of suburban Tokyo, Japan, and seasonal and particle-size radiocarbon variations were investigated. Source diagnostic isomer pair ratios indicated mixed contributions from petroleum combustion and from biomass and coal combustion to the PAHs in APM. The {Delta}{sup 14}C-PAHs in APM, ranging from -787 to -514{per_thousand}, indicated dominance of fossil fuel combustion. The {Delta}{sup 14}C of 5-6 rings (HMW) PAHs were higher than the 3-4 rings (LMW) species in both PM{sub 10} and PM{sub 1.1} samples. The {Delta}{sup 14}C of HMW-PAHs indicated greater biomass-burning contributions in summer than in winter and no apparent particle-size variation. Conversely, the {Delta}{sup 14}C of LMW species showed a greater contribution from fossil sources in summer and in larger particles (PM10). This finding could be tentatively attributed to the recondensation of fossil-PAHs vaporized from petroleum sources. A {Delta}{sup 14}C isotopic mass balance approach estimated that biomass burning contributes 17-45% of the PAH burden in suburban Tokyo, and that the increase in the biomass-PAH accounts for approximately 27% and 22% of winter-time elevation of LMW- and HMW-PAHs, respectively. These are far exceeding what is expected from the emission statistics for CO{sub 2} and combusted materials in Japan and emphasizing the importance of biomass-burning as a source of PAHs; which, in turn, demonstrates the utility and the significance of field-based source assessment by using CCSRA for an effective regulation of atmospheric pollution by PAHs. 37 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Hidetoshi Kumata; Masao Uchida; Eisuke Sakuma; Tatsuya Uchida; Kitao Fujiwara; Mikio Tsuzuki; Minoru Yoneda; Yasuyuki Shibata [Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Science, Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Life Science

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Polybenzimidazole Compounds, Polymeric Media, and Methods of Post-Polymerization Modifications  

Energy Innovation Portal (Marketing Summaries) [EERE]

INL has developed a patented process to handle and process polybenzimdazole (PBI) compounds that previously could only be handled in very heavy low vapor pressure organic solvents. With the new process the resulting compounds are modified to provide increased solubility in higher vapor pressure solvents and at significantly greater concentrations. These compounds may be utilized in a wide array of applications where high temperature and polymeric materials are utilized. Compounds made with...

2014-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

390

Structural and Electronic Investigations of Complex Intermetallic Compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In solid state chemistry, numerous investigations have been attempted to address the relationships between chemical structure and physical properties. Such questions include: (1) How can we understand the driving forces of the atomic arrangements in complex solids that exhibit interesting chemical and physical properties? (2) How do different elements distribute themselves in a solid-state structure? (3) Can we develop a chemical understanding to predict the effects of valence electron concentration on the structures and magnetic ordering of systems by both experimental and theoretical means? Although these issues are relevant to various compound classes, intermetallic compounds are especially interesting and well suited for a joint experimental and theoretical effort. For intermetallic compounds, the questions listed above are difficult to answer since many of the constituent atoms simply do not crystallize in the same manner as in their separate, elemental structures. Also, theoretical studies suggest that the energy differences between various structural alternatives are small. For example, Al and Ga both belong in the same group on the Periodic Table of Elements and share many similar chemical properties. Al crystallizes in the fcc lattice with 4 atoms per unit cell and Ga crystallizes in an orthorhombic unit cell lattice with 8 atoms per unit cell, which are both fairly simple structures (Figure 1). However, when combined with Mn, which itself has a very complex cubic crystal structure with 58 atoms per unit cell, the resulting intermetallic compounds crystallize in a completely different fashion. At the 1:1 stoichiometry, MnAl forms a very simple tetragonal lattice with two atoms per primitive unit cell, while MnGa crystallizes in a complicated rhombohedral unit cell with 26 atoms within the primitive unit cell. The mechanisms influencing the arrangements of atoms in numerous crystal structures have been studied theoretically by calculating electronic structures of these and related materials. Such calculations allow us to examine various interactions at the atomic scale, interactions which include orbital overlap, two-electron interactions, and Madelung terms. Moreover, these electronic studies also provide links between the angstrom-scale atomic interactions and the macro-scale physical properties, such as magnetism. Over the past few decades, there have been many significant developments toward understanding structure-bonding-property relationships in extended solids in terms of variables including atomic size, valence electron concentration, and electronegativity. However, many simple approaches based on electron counting, e.g., the octet rule, the 18-electron rule, or Wade's rules for boranes, cannot be applied adequately or universally to many of the more complex intermetallic compounds. For intermetallic phases that include late transition metals and post transition main group elements as their constituents, one classification scheme has been developed and effectively applied by using their valence electron count per atom (vec). These compounds are known as Hume-Rothery electron phases, and they have a variety of structure types with vec < 2.0 as shown in Table 1.

Hyunjin Ko

2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

391

ME 4171 Environmentally Conscious Design & Manufacturing (Bras) Assignment -Sheet Molding Compound Manufacture Pollution Prevention  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Compound Manufacture Pollution Prevention Sheet Molding Compound (SMC) is a fiberglass-resin compound options for pollution prevention specifically for this process. (10 points) #12; of styrene occurs at room temperature and atmospheric pressure from the paste or resin at all stages

392

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nevada Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes "This second paper provides more detailed documentation on water and rock geochemistries and describes diagnostic major and trace element ratios and concentrations that can be used to distinguish tufa columns formed from thermal waters from those that formed from non-thermal waters." "In addition to providing a potentially diagnostic lithogeochemical tool for geothermal exploration, the analysis of lithium and other elements in tufa deposits could serve as exploration guides for hot spring lithium

393

Synthesis of model compounds for coal liquefaction research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this project are to develop feasible synthetic routes to produce (1) 4(4{prime}- hydroxy- 5{prime},6{prime},7{prime},8{prime}- tetrahydro-1{prime}- naphthylmethyl)- 6-methyl dibenzothiophene, and (2) a 1-hydroxy naphthalene- dibenzothiophene polymer. These compounds are thought to be representative of sulfur containing molecules in coal. The program is divided into three tasks, the first of which is a project work plan that we have already submitted. Our experimental work during this quarter concentrated on Task 2: Synthesis of 4(4{prime}- hydroxy- 5{prime},6{prime},7{prime},8{prime}- tetrahydro-1{prime}- naphthylmethyl)- 6-methyldibenzothiophene. 11 refs.

Hirschon, A.S.; Asaro, M.; Bottaro, J.

1990-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

394

Affinity Adsorbents Based on Carriers Activated by Epoxy-compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The review is devoted to the synthesis and applications of affinity adsorbents based on carriers activated by epoxy-compounds. The methods for the introduction of epoxy-groups into carriers of different chemical types are discussed and conditions for the immobilisation of three-dimensional spacers and low-molecular-weight and polymeric ligands on carriers containing epoxy-groups are considered. Data are presented on the properties and applications of adsorbents of this type in affinity chromatography. The bibliography includes 144 references.

B A Klyashchitskii; P V Kuznetsov

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

The integrated compound parabolic concentrator: From development to demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors describe the fabrication, testing and application of the Integrated Compound Parabolic Concentrator (ICPC) to solar cooling. The cooling technology is a double effect absorption cycle chiller operating at 165 C. The design parameters are optimized for this temperature range. The optical and mechanical design of the solar collector is chosen for compatibility with mass production. A project to employ approximately 350 of these collector tubes to drive a 20 ton commercial double effect chiller on an office building in Sacramento, CA has started. The authors expect the system to be operational this year.

Winston, R.; O`Gallagher, J.J. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Duff, W.S. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Cavallaro, A. [Solar Enterprises International, Chicago, IL (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

396

Process for removing an organic compound from water  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for removing organic compounds from water is disclosed. The process involves gas stripping followed by membrane separation treatment of the stripping gas. The stripping step can be carried out using one or multiple gas strippers and using air or any other gas as stripping gas. The membrane separation step can be carried out using a single-stage membrane unit or a multistage unit. Apparatus for carrying out the process is also disclosed. The process is particularly suited for treatment of contaminated groundwater or industrial wastewater.

Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA); Kaschemekat, Jurgen (Palo Alto, CA); Wijmans, Johannes G. (Menlo Park, CA); Kamaruddin, Henky D. (San Francisco, CA)

1993-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

397

Electrolytic photodissociation of chemical compounds by iron oxide photochemical diodes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Chemical compounds can be dissociated by contacting the same with a p/n type semi-conductor photochemical diode having visible light as its sole source of energy. The photochemical diode consists of low cost, readily available materials, specifically polycrystalline iron oxide doped with silicon in the case of the n-type semi-conductor electrode, and polycrystalline iron oxide doped with magnesium in the case of the p-type electrode. So long as the light source has an energy greater than 2.2 electron volts, no added energy source is needed to achieve dissociation.

Somorjai, Gabor A. (Berkeley, CA); Leygraf, Christofer H. (Berkeley, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Electrolytic photodissociation of chemical compounds by iron oxide electrodes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Chemical compounds can be dissociated by contacting the same with a p/n type semi-conductor diode having visible light as its sole source of energy. The diode consists of low cost, readily available materials, specifically polycrystalline iron oxide doped with silicon in the case of the n-type semi-conductor electrode, and polycrystalline iron oxide doped with magnesium in the case of the p-type electrode. So long as the light source has an energy greater than 2.2 electron volts, no added energy source is needed to achieve dissociation.

Somorjai, Gabor A. (Berkeley, CA); Leygraf, Christofer H. (Berkeley, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Xlink-Identifier: An Automated Data Analysis Platform for Confident Identifications of Chemically Cross-linked Peptides using Tandem Mass Spectrometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical cross-linking combined with mass spectrometry provides a powerful method for identifying protein-protein interactions and probing the structure of protein complexes. Cross-linking is the process of covalently joining two proteins using cross-linking reagents. After proteolytic cleavage, the cross-linked peptides can be identified using tandem mass spectrometry. A number of strategies have been reported that take advantage of the high sensitivity and high resolution of modern mass spectrometers. Approaches typically include synthesis of novel cross-linking compounds and/or isotopic labelling of the cross-linkering reagent and/or protein to aid both identification and quantitation. However, these approaches have various limitations. These limitations can be overcome with a label-free approach and application of associated data analysis algorithms described in this work.

Du, Xiuxia; Chowdhury, Saiful M.; Manes, Nathan P.; Wu, Si; Mayer, M. Uljana; Adkins, Joshua N.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

2011-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

400

A COMPOUND MODEL FOR THE ORIGIN OF EARTH'S WATER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the most important subjects of debate in the formation of the solar system is the origin of Earth's water. Comets have long been considered as the most likely source of the delivery of water to Earth. However, elemental and isotopic arguments suggest a very small contribution from these objects. Other sources have also been proposed, among which local adsorption of water vapor onto dust grains in the primordial nebula and delivery through planetesimals and planetary embryos have become more prominent. However, no sole source of water provides a satisfactory explanation for Earth's water as a whole. In view of that, using numerical simulations, we have developed a compound model incorporating both the principal endogenous and exogenous theories, and investigating their implications for terrestrial planet formation and water delivery. Comets are also considered in the final analysis, as it is likely that at least some of Earth's water has cometary origin. We analyze our results comparing two different water distribution models, and complement our study using the D/H ratio, finding possible relative contributions from each source and focusing on planets formed in the habitable zone. We find that the compound model plays an important role by showing greater advantage in the amount and time of water delivery in Earth-like planets.

Izidoro, A.; Winter, O. C. [UNESP, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Grupo de Dinamica Orbital and Planetologia, Guaratingueta, CEP 12.516-410, Sao Paulo (Brazil)] [UNESP, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Grupo de Dinamica Orbital and Planetologia, Guaratingueta, CEP 12.516-410, Sao Paulo (Brazil); De Souza Torres, K. [UTFPR, Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (Brazil)] [UTFPR, Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (Brazil); Haghighipour, N., E-mail: ocwinter@pq.cnpq.br [Institute for Astronomy and NASA Astrobiology Institute, University of Hawaii-Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tentatively identified compound" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Evaluation of rice husk ash as filler in tread compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Rice which is one of the largest agriculture crops produces around 22% of rice rusk during its milling process. This material is mainly used as fuel for energy generation which results in an ash which disposal represents an environmental issue. The rice husk ash (RHA) contains over than 70% of silica in an amorphous form and a lot of applications is being developed for it all over the world. The use of silica as a filler in the tire industry is growing since it contributes significantly to the reduction of fuel consumption of the automobiles allowing at the same time better traction (safety). This paper presents an evaluation of the use of RHA as filler in rubber tread compounds prepared in lab scale and compares its performance with compounds prepared with commercial silica and carbon black the fillers normally used in tire industry. Mechanical and rheological properties are evaluated with emphasis for tan delta as an indicator of tread performance related with rolling resistance (fuel consumption) and wet grip/traction (safety).

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Characteristics of the volatile organic compounds -- Arid Integrated Demonstration Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Volatile Organic Compounds -- Arid Integrated Demonstration Program (VOC-Arid ID) is targeted at demonstration and testing of technologies for the evaluation and cleanup of volatile organic compounds and associated contaminants at arid DOE sites. The initial demonstration site is an area of carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}) contamination located near the center of the Hanford Site. The movement of CCl{sub 4} and other volatile organic contaminants in the subsurface is very complex. The problem at the Hanford Site is further complicated by the concurrent discharge of other waste constituents including acids, lard oil, organic phosphates, and transuranic radionuclides. In addition, the subsurface environment is very complex, with large spatial variabilities in hydraulic properties. A thorough understanding of the problem is essential to the selection of appropriate containment, retrieval, and/or in situ remedial technologies. The effectiveness of remedial technologies depends on knowing where the contaminants are, how they are held up in a given physical and chemical subsurface environment; and knowing the physical, chemical, and microbiological changes that are induced by the various remedial technologies.

Last, G.V.; Lenhard, R.J.; Bjornstad, B.N.; Evans, J.C.; Roberson, K.R.; Spane, F.A.; Amonette, J.E.; Rockhold, M.L.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Photon interaction parameters of some spin ice compound materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Spin ice compounds (SICs) are the frustrated magnetic materials which are used in nuclear reactor control system and semiconductor electronic circuits. Photon interaction parameters such as the effective atomic number, Zeff, and the effective electron density, Neff, for SICs such as Dy2Ti2O7, Dy2Sn2O7, Ho2Ti2O7 and Ho2Sn2O7 have been computed at photon energies from 10 keV to 100 GeV. The Zeff of the spin ice compounds is approximately constant in energy range 0.34 MeV where Compton scattering is the main photon interaction process. The Zeff increases sharply below 0.3 MeV due to photoelectric absorption process and above 3 MeV due to pair-production process. The well type structures of Zeff and Neff for HSO and DSO have been observed in the photon energy range 30-60 keV due to involvement of k-shell electron in the interaction. Dy2Sn2O7 and Ho2Sn2O7 are suitable materials for gamma shielding.

Vishwanath P. Singh; N.M. Badiger

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Notice of Intent to Revise DOE O 475.2A, Identifying Classified Information  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The revision will incorporate changes that were identified during the 1-year review after initial issuance

2014-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

405

Generation of low work function, stable compound thin films by laser ablation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Generation of low work function, stable compound thin films by laser ablation. Compound thin films with low work function can be synthesized by simultaneously laser ablating silicon, for example, and thermal evaporating an alkali metal into an oxygen environment. For example, the compound thin film may be composed of Si/Cs/O. The work functions of the thin films can be varied by changing the silicon/alkali metal/oxygen ratio. Low work functions of the compound thin films deposited on silicon substrates were confirmed by ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS). The compound thin films are stable up to 500.degree. C. as measured by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Tests have established that for certain chemical compositions and annealing temperatures of the compound thin films, negative electron affinity (NEA) was detected. The low work function, stable compound thin films can be utilized in solar cells, field emission flat panel displays, electron guns, and cold cathode electron guns.

Dinh, Long N. (Concord, CA); McLean, II, William (Oakland, CA); Balooch, Mehdi (Berkeley, CA); Fehring, Jr., Edward J. (Dublin, CA); Schildbach, Marcus A. (Livermore, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

First-Principles Study of the Li-Na-Ca-N-H System: Compound Structures and Hydrogen-Storage Properties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

system for reversible hydrogen storage, J. Alloys Comp, volCompound structures and hydrogen-storage properties, J.compounds: Application to hydrogen storage materials, Phys.

Teeratchanan, Pattanasak

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

New Physics in Iridium Compounds | Advanced Photon Source  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Self-Improvement of Lithium-Ion Batteries The Self-Improvement of Lithium-Ion Batteries Architecture and Viral Disease RNA Folding: A Little Cooperation Goes a Long Way A New Phase in Cellular Communication Engineering Thin-Film Oxide Interfaces Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed New Physics in Iridium Compounds DECEMBER 10, 2012 Bookmark and Share An unprecedented "magnon gap" of Sr3Ir2O7 was revealed using resonant inelastic x-ray scattering beamline at the XSD 9-ID beamline at the APS. This implies that dipolar interactions, analogous to classical bar magnets, are extremely strong in a composite spin-orbit coupled state and that these interactions control the behavior of magnetic moments at the quantum level.

408

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (2004) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coso Geothermal Coso Geothermal Area (2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date 2004 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes In order to test FIS for geothermal exploration, drill chips from Coso well 83-16 were analyzed, which were selected at 1000 ft intervals by Joseph Moore. Sequential crushes done by the CFS (crushfast-scan) method (Norman 1996) show that chips have a high density of homogeneous fluid inclusions. Analyses were averaged and plotted verses depth (Fig. 4), and interpreted. Fluid inclusion gas analyses done on vein minerals from drill hole 68-6 that were earlier analyzed (Adams 2000) were plotted for comparison in order to confirm that similar analyses are obtained from chips and vein

409

Teasing Out the Nature of Structural Instabilities in Ceramic Compounds |  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Doubling Estimates of Light Elements in the Earth's Core Doubling Estimates of Light Elements in the Earth's Core A New Material for Warm-White LEDs Probing Ultrafast Solvation Dynamics with High Repetition-Rate Laser/X-ray Methodologies Ultrafast X-Ray Spectroscopy as a Probe of Nonequilibrium Dynamics in Ruthenium Complexes The Electronic Origin of Photoinduced Strain Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Teasing Out the Nature of Structural Instabilities in Ceramic Compounds MARCH 12, 2013 Bookmark and Share The simple perovskite structure of EuTiO3 illustrated above shows the essential competing structural instabilities. At the center of the figure is the oxygen cage rotation, and to the right is the central titanium

410

Detection of volatile organic compounds using surface enhanced Raman scattering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors present the detection of volatile organic compounds directly in their vapor phase by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates based on lithographically-defined two-dimensional rectangular array of nanopillars. The type of nanopillars is known as the tapered pillars. For the tapered pillars, SERS enhancement arises from the nanofocusing effect due to the sharp tip on top. SERS experiments were carried out on these substrates using various concentrations of toluene vapor. The results show that SERS signal from a toluene vapor concentration of ppm level can be achieved, and the toluene vapor can be detected within minutes of exposing the SERS substrate to the vapor. A simple adsorption model is developed which gives results matching the experimental data. The results also show promising potential for the use of these substrates in environmental monitoring of gases and vapors.

Chang, A S; Maiti, A; Ileri, N; Bora, M; Larson, C C; Britten, J A; Bond, T C

2012-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

411

Two-Stroke Uniflow Turbo-Compound IC Engine  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

An evaluation study of a turbo-compounded concept engine consisting of a two-stroke, uniflow, four cylinder air cooled flat-four engine has been completed The concept includes a high pressure ratio supercharger compressor that is powered by an exhaust driven turbine. Downstream of the high pressure turbine is a low pressure power turbine that is geared to the engine crankshaft. The engine cylinders have 360 degree circumferential intake ports with swirl vanes, located at the bottom of the piston stroke. A large single exhaust valve is at the top of the cylinder. The fuel is injected downstream directly into the swirling airflow near the top of the piston stroke. The fuel is ignited by a high energy sparkplug. This engine offers very low fuel consumption in a compact, light weight package, with fuel flexibility.

412

Pressure induced phase transitions in ceramic compounds containing tetragonal zirconia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Stabilized tetragonal zirconia compounds exhibit a transformation toughening process in which stress applied to the material induces a crystallographic phase transition. The phase transition is accompanied by a volume expansion in the stressed region thereby dissipating stress and increasing the fracture strength of the material. The hydrostatic component of the stress required to induce the phase transition can be investigated by the use of a high pressure technique in combination with Micro-Raman spectroscopy. The intensity of Raman lines characteristic for the crystallographic phases can be used to calculate the amount of material that has undergone the transition as a function of pressure. It was found that pressures on the order of 2-5 kBar were sufficient to produce an almost complete transition from the original tetragonal to the less dense monoclinic phase; while a further increase in pressure caused a gradual reversal of the transition back to the original tetragonal structure.

Sparks, R.G.; Pfeiffer, G.; Paesler, M.A.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Neutral-ionic transitions in organic mixed-stack compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Torrance et al. have made the interesting observation that several mixed-stack organic compounds undergo transitions from neutral states to ionic states as the temperature or pressure is varied. We examine a simple model of such transitions including Coulomb interaction and hybridization of neutral and ionic states. In the limit of weak hybridization and long-range repulsive interaction between ionic planes, it is proven that there is a complete devil's staircase where the degree of ionicity assumes an infinity of rational values. For attractive interactions between ionic planes, the neutral-ionic transition is shown to be first order for weak hybridization. Comparison with experiment indicates that this situation applies to tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) chloranil. For strong hybridization the transition is continuous but goes through a metallic phase. It is shown, for the first time, that the spectrum of the charge-transfer Hamiltonian contains both a bound spectrum, the observed charge-transfer excitations, and a continuum.

Bruinsma, R.; Bak, P.; Torrance, J.B.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Dissolution rates of uranium compounds in simulated lung fluid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Maximum dissolution rates of uranium into simulated lung fluid from a variety of materials were measured at 37/sup 0/in the where f/sub i/ is in order to estimate clearance rates from the deep lung. A batch procedure was utilized in which samples containing as little as 10 ..mu..g of natural uranium could be tested. The materials included: products of uranium mining, milling and refining operations, coal fly ash, an environmental sample from a site exposed to multiple uranium sources, and purified samples of (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/U/sub 2/O/sub 7/ U/sub 3/O/sub 8/, UO/sub 2/, and UF/sub 4/. Dissolution of uranium from several materials indicated the presence of more than one type of uranium compound; but in all cases, the fraction F of uranium remaining undissolved at any time t could be represented by the sum of up to three terms in the series: F = ..sigma../sub i/f/sub i/ exp (-0.693t/UPSILON/sub i/), where f/sub i/ is the initial fraction of component i with dissolution half-time epsilon/sub i/. Values of epsilon/sub i/ varied from 0.01 day to several thousand days depending on the physical and chemical form of the uranium. Dissolution occurred predominantly by formation of the (UO/sub 2/(CO/sub 3/)/sub 3/)/sup 4 -/ ion; and as a result, tetravalent uranium compounds dissolved slowly. Dissolution rates of size-separated yellow-cake aerosols were found to be more closely correlated with specific surface area than with aerodynamic diameter.

Kalkwarf, D.R.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Microscopic description of neutron emission rates in compound nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The neutron emission rates in thermal excited nuclei are conventionally described by statistical models with a phenomenological level density parameter that depends on excitation energies, deformations and mass regions. In the microscopic view of hot nuclei, the neutron emission rates can be determined by the external neutron gas densities without any free parameters. Therefore the microscopic description of thermal neutron emissions is desirable that can impact several understandings such as survival probabilities of superheavy compound nuclei and neutron emissivity in reactors. To describe the neutron emission rates microscopically, the external thermal neutron gases are self-consistently obtained based on the Finite-Temperature Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (FT-HFB) approach. The results are compared with the statistical model to explore the connections between the FT-HFB approach and the statistical model. The Skyrme FT-HFB equation is solved by HFB-AX in deformed coordinate spaces. Based on the FT-HFB approach, the thermal properties and external neutron gas are properly described with the self-consistent gas substraction procedure. Then neutron emission rates can be obtained based on the densities of external neutron gases. The thermal statistical properties of $^{238}$U and $^{258}$U are studied in detail in terms of excitation energies. The thermal neutron emission rates in $^{238, 258}$U and superheavy compound nuclei $_{112}^{278}$Cn and $_{114}^{292}$Fl are calculated, which agree well with the statistical model by adopting an excitation-energy-dependent level density parameter. The coordinate-space FT-HFB approach can provide reliable microscopic descriptions of neutron emission rates in hot nuclei, as well as microscopic constraints on the excitation energy dependence of level density parameters for statistical models.

Yi Zhu; Junchen Pei

2014-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

416

Process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds from petroleum products  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, from petroleum products by solvent extraction. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from a petroleum product into a polar solvent by contacting the petroleum product with the polar solvent. The polar solvent is characterized by a high solubility for the extracted halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, a low solubility for the petroleum product and considerable solvent power for polyhydroxy compound. The preferred polar solvent is dimethylformamide. A miscible compound, such as, water or a polyhydroxy compound, is added to the polar extraction solvent to increase the polarity of the polar extraction solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from the highly-polarized mixture of water or polyhydroxy compound and polar extraction solvent into a low polar or nonpolar solvent by contacting the water or polyhydroxy compound-polar solvent mixture with the low polar or nonpolar solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds and the low polar or nonpolar solvent are separated by physical means, e.g., vacuum evaporation. The polar and nonpolar solvents are recovered from recycling. The process can easily be designed for continuous operation. Advantages of the process include that the polar solvent and a major portion of the nonpolar solvent can be recycled, the petroleum products are reclaimable and the cost for disposing of waste containing polychlorinated biphenyls is significantly reduced. 1 fig.

Googin, J.M.; Napier, J.M.; Travaglini, M.A.

1983-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

417

Chapter 10 - The Use of Natural Compounds and Botanicals in the Development of Anti-Aging Skin Care Products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter discusses the evidence for the application of botanicals and natural products to modulate several of these targets, namely, oxidation, inflammation, the skin barrier, the extracellular matrix (ECM), and DNA repair. Cosmetic formulations have been based on botanical ingredients since ancient times, and botanical and natural extracts maintain a major role in contemporary cosmetics. Present means of treating aging skin have become more technological and more invasive; however, natural products including botanicals are still relevant and can be highly efficacious. Scientific research continues to corroborate traditional uses of many plants for skin benefits, and to elucidate biochemical mechanisms of action for a growing number of phytochemicals. Additional clinical trials are necessary to optimize the application of natural ingredients for cosmetics, but scientific substantiation for the safety and efficacy of a host of botanical extracts and compounds for treating aging skin is evident, with the continued potential of many more. It is highly unlikely that science will ever identify all of the active compounds in a given plant, but it is equally unlikely that one will stop finding new activities in plants that have relevance to healthier aging. The main barrier to continued discovery might indeed be the accelerating loss of biodiversity on the planet.

Cindy K. Angerhofer; Daniel Maes; Paolo U. Giacomoni

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Identifiability and sensitivity analysis of a Photodynamic Therapy model Simona Dobrea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

model composed of six nonlinear differential equations. The model parameters can be used to compare parameters estimability through a local practical identifiability study combined with a global sensitivity. Identifiability, sensitivity analysis, nonlinear systems, biomedical systems * Corresponding author. Tel.: +33

Boyer, Edmond

419

Left invertibility, flatness and identifiability of switched linear dynamical systems: a framework  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Left invertibility, flatness and identifiability of switched linear dynamical systems: a framework invertibility and flatness, dynamical systems are structurally equivalent to some specific cryptographic invertibility, flatness and identifiability of discrete- time switched linear systems are investigated

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

420

Tandem Mass Spectrometry identifies many mouse brain O-GlcNAcylated...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tandem Mass Spectrometry identifies many mouse brain O-GlcNAcylated proteins including EGF domain-specific O-GlcNAc transferase Tandem Mass Spectrometry identifies many mouse brain...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tentatively identified compound" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

identifier. occurrences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

union{}(S;T) inl{}(s), inr{}(t) decide{}( e ; x.u; y.v) S+T inl(s), inr(t) case e of inl(x) ## u | inr

Kreitz, Christoph

422

Methods and systems for chemoautotrophic production of organic compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present disclosure identifies pathways, mechanisms, systems and methods to confer chemoautotrophic production of carbon-based products of interest, such as sugars, alcohols, chemicals, amino acids, polymers, fatty acids and their derivatives, hydrocarbons, isoprenoids, and intermediates thereof, in organisms such that these organisms efficiently convert inorganic carbon to organic carbon-based products of interest using inorganic energy, such as formate, and in particular the use of organisms for the commercial production of various carbon-based products of interest.

Fischer, Curt R.; Che, Austin J.; Shetty, Reshma P.; Kelly, Jason R.

2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

423

Statement of Work: Standard Service Offerings for Contractor-Identified Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Excel file offers a template for a statement of work for standard service offerings for projects identified by a contractor.

424

Briefing, DOE Order 475.2B, Identifying Classified Information, What Derivative Classifiers Should Know  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This briefing provides Derivative Classifiers with information regarding the changes to the DOE Order on Identifying Classified Information.

425

New P2 Compound with Brucite-Like Layers: Potassium Lithiostannate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

New P2 Compound with Brucite-Like Layers: Potassium Lithiostannate ... A new compound with brucite-like layers (K0.72Li0.24Sn0.76O2) ... A new compound with brucite-like layers, K0.72Li0.24Sn0.76O2, has been obtained two ways, via solid-state reactions: with a big excess of KOH and in a controllable atmosphere without water and carbon dioxide. ...

Igor L. Shukaev; Vera V. Butova

2012-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

426

E-Print Network 3.0 - azo compounds Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

search results for: azo compounds Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Photochemical Phase Transition versus Photochemical Phase Separation Xia Tong, Guang Wang, and Yue Zhao* Summary:...

427

Chemical compounds and toxicological assessments of drinking water stored in polyethylene terephthalate (PET)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemical compounds and toxicological assessments of drinking water stored in polyethyleneMS, gas chromatographyemass spectrometry; HDPE, high density polyethylene; HULYs, human blood lymphocytes

Short, Daniel

428

Portable instrument and method for detecting reduced sulfur compounds in a gas  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A portable real time instrument for detecting concentrations in the part per billion range of reduced sulfur compounds in a sample gas. Ozonized air or oxygen and reduced sulfur compounds in a sample gas stream react to produce chemiluminescence in a reaction chamber and the emitted light is filtered and observed by a photomultiplier to detect reduced sulfur compounds. Selective response to individual sulfur compounds is achieved by varying reaction chamber temperature and ozone and sample gas flows, and by the use of either air or oxygen as the ozone source gas.

Gaffney, J.S.; Kelly, T.J.; Tanner, R.L.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

E-Print Network 3.0 - active methylene compounds Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

spectrum from an analogous deuterated compound. Introduction... active dyes at the oil- water interface using fluorescence,3,4 resonance Raman scattering,5-7 and second... to...

430

E-Print Network 3.0 - antifouling compound zinc Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Toxicol 20: 467-474, 2005. Keywords... antifouling (AF) surface coat- ings. Many heavy-metal compounds, including organomer- cury, lead, arsenic... Periodicals, Inc. 467 12;toxic...

431

E-Print Network 3.0 - antifouling compounds sodium Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Toxicol 20: 467-474, 2005. Keywords... antifouling (AF) surface coat- ings. Many heavy-metal compounds, including organomer- cury, lead, arsenic... Periodicals, Inc. 467 12;toxic...

432

E-Print Network 3.0 - absorbing compounds called Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

which readily collectsabsorbs compounds. Protective clothing (e.g. sleeves, impervious boots or PVC... with detergent and flush thoroughly with water. Absorb wash liquid and place...

433

E-Print Network 3.0 - aroma active compounds Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

val- ue, to characterize odor-active strawberry aroma compounds (Latrasse 1991... - tic odors and several are ... Source: Tang, Juming - Department of Biological Systems...

434

Precipitate hydrolysis process for the removal of organic compounds from nuclear waste slurries  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for removing organic compounds from a nuclear waste slurry comprising reacting a mixture of radioactive waste precipitate slurry and an acid in the presence of a catalytically effective amount of a copper (II) catalyst whereby the organic compounds in the precipitate slurry are hydrolyzed to form volatile organic compounds which are separated from the reacting mixture. The resulting waste slurry, containing less than 10 percent of the orginal organic compounds, is subsequently blended with high level radioactive sludge and transferred to a virtrification facility for processing into borosilicate glass for long-term storage.

Doherty, Joseph P. (Elkton, MD); Marek, James C. (Augusta, GA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Precipitate hydrolysis process for the removal of organic compounds from nuclear waste slurries  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for removing organic compounds from a nuclear waste slurry comprising reacting a mixture of radioactive waste precipitate slurry and an acid in the presence of a catalytically effective amount of a copper(II) catalyst whereby the organic compounds in the precipitate slurry are hydrolyzed to form volatile organic compounds which are separated from the reacting mixture. The resulting waste slurry, containing less than 10 percent of the original organic compounds, is subsequently blended with high level radioactive sludge land transferred to a vitrification facility for processing into borosilicate glass for long-term storage. 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Doherty, J.P.; Marek, J.C.

1987-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

436

Functionalized electrospun nanofibers impregnated with nanoparticles for degradation of chlorinated compounds .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Supported bimetallic Fe/Ni nanoparticles have been used for years as catalysts for the dechlorination of organochlorine compounds in ground water remediation. However, their fate and (more)

Mapazi, Odwa

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Inorganic Compounds in Biomass Feedstocks. 1. Effect on the Quality of Fast Pyrolysis Oils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Inorganic Compounds in Biomass Feedstocks. 1. ... Inorganic compoundsespecially potassium, calcium, sodium, silicon, phosphorus, and chlorineare the main constituents of the ash in biomass feedstocks. ...

F. A. Agblevor; S. Besler

1996-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

438

Suggested Use of a Bismuth Mercaptoimidazole Compound as a Specific Colour Reagent for Iodides  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... /169708a0 Suggested Use of a Bismuth Mercaptoimidazole Compound as a Specific Colour Reagent for IodidesRONALD A.McALLISTERR. A.

RONALD A. McALLISTER

1952-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

439

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinide intermetallic compounds Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for TbGa,. A large number of rare earth intermetallic compounds... occurs in rare earth nickel intermetallics, for example RNi, ... Source: Ecole Polytechnique, Centre de...

440

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbon compounds Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

bases in Iraq and Afghanistan that lack Summary: Compounds Toxic Organic Halogenated Dioxins Furans (dioxins) Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons found... and detected all of the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tentatively identified compound" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic organic compounds Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

bases in Iraq and Afghanistan that lack Summary: Compounds Toxic Organic Halogenated Dioxins Furans (dioxins) Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons found... and detected all of the...

442

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic chemical compounds Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

bases in Iraq and Afghanistan that lack Summary: Compounds Toxic Organic Halogenated Dioxins Furans (dioxins) Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons found... in burn pits include, but...

443

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkali metal compounds Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . . . . . . . . 3-3 3.3 Formation of sulphur compounds during combustion and gasification . ... Source: Laughlin, Robert B. - Department of Physics, Stanford University...

444

Process for preparing a chemical compound enriched in isotope content. [nitrogen 15-enriched nitric acid  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process to prepare a chemical enriched in isotope content includes: a chemical exchange reaction between a first and second compound which yields an isotopically enriched first compound and an isotopically depleted second compound; the removal of a portion of the first compound as product and the removal of a portion of the second compound as spent material; the conversion of the remainder of the first compound to the second compound for reflux at the product end of the chemical exchange reaction region; the conversion of the remainder of the second compound to the first compound for reflux at the spent material end of the chemical exchange region; and the cycling of the additional chemicals produced by one conversion reaction to the other conversion reaction, for consumption therein. One of the conversion reactions is an oxidation reaction, and the energy that it yields is used to drive the other conversion reaction, a reduction. The reduction reaction is carried out in a solid polymer electrolyte electrolytic reactor. The overall process is energy efficient and yields no waste by-products. A particular embodiment of the process in the production of nitrogen-15-enriched nitric acid.

Michaels, E.D.

1981-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

445

E-Print Network 3.0 - adsorbing uranium compounds Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

compound, davidite-brannerite-absite type of uranium titanates and the euxenite... Uranium geology and mining Ranger 1 ... Source: Uppsala Universitet, Department of...

446

Examination of the Potential for Formation of Energetic Compounds in Dry Sludge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report details initial results from an investigation of the potential formation and fate of energetic compounds in Savannah River Site sludge.

Barnes, M.J.

1998-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

447

E-Print Network 3.0 - alicyclic compounds Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

associated with the aerobic microbial oxidation of methane, ethane, propane and butane Summary: prove useful in further studying the microbial oxi- dation of these compounds...

448

Synthesis and characterization of several molybdenum chloride cluster compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Investigation into the direct synthesis of Mo/sub 4/Cl/sub 8/(P(C/sub 2/H/sub 5/)/sub 3/)/sub 4/ from Mo/sub 2/(OAc)/sub 4/ led to a synthetic procedure that produces yields greater than 80%. The single-crystal structure disclosed a planar rectangular cluster of molybdenum atoms. Metal-metal bond distances suggest that the long edges of the rectangular cluster should be considered to be single bonds and the short metal-metal bonds to be triple bonds. This view is reinforced by an extended Hueckel calculation. Attempts to add a metal atom to Mo/sub 4/Cl/sub 8/(PR/sub 3/)/sub 4/ to form Mo/sub 5/Cl/sub 10/(PR/sub 3/)/sub 3/ led instead to a compound with the composition Mo/sub 8/Cl/sub 16/(PR/sub 3/)/sub 4/. Solution and reflectance uv-visible spectra and x-ray photoelectron spectra suggest that tetranuclear molybdenum units are present. The facile reaction between Mo/sub 8/Cl/sub 16/(PR/sub 3/)/sub 4/ and PR/sub 3/ imply that the linkage between tetrameric units is weak.

Beers, W.W.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Volatile organic compound monitoring by photo acoustic radiometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two methods for sampling and analyzing volatile organics in subsurface pore gas were developed for use at the Hazardous Waste Disposal Site at Los Alamos National Laboratory. One is Thermal Desorption Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (TDGCMS), the other is Photoacoustic Radiometry (PAR). Presented here are two years worth of experience and lessons learned as both techniques matured. The sampling technique is equally as important as the analysis method. PAR is a nondispersive infrared technique utilizing band pass filters in the region from 1 to 15 {mu}m. A commercial instrument, the Model 1302 Multigas Analyzer, made by Bruel and Kjaer, was adapted for field use. To use the PAR there must be some a priori knowledge of the constellation of analytes to be measured. The TDGCMS method is sensitive to 50 analytes. Hence TDGCMS is used in an initial survey of the site to determine what compounds are present and at what concentration. Once the major constituents of the soil-gas vapor plume are known the PAR can be configured to monitor for the five analytes of most interest. The PAR can analyse a sample in minutes, while in the field. The PAR is also quite precise in controlled situations.

Sollid, J.E.; Trujillo, V.L.; Limback, S.P.; Woloshun, K.A.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Mechanistic Study of the Acid Degradation of Lignin Model Compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lignin is a major constituent of biomass, which remains underutilized in selective biomass conversion strategies to renewable fuels and chemicals. Here we are interested in understanding the mechanisms related to the acid deconstruction of lignin with a combined theoretical and experimental approach. Two model dimers with a b-O-4 aryl ether linkage (2-phenoxy-1-phenethanol and 2-phenoxy-1-phenyl-1,3 propanediol) and model dimmers with an a-O-4 aryl ether linkage were synthesized and deconstructed in H2SO4. The major products of the acidolysis of the b-O-4 compounds consisted of phenol and two aldehydes, phenylacetaldehyde and benzaldehyde. Quantum mechanical calculations were employed to elucidate possible deconstruction mechanisms with transition state theory. To confirm proposed mechanisms several possible intermediates were studied under similar acidolysis conditions. Although the resonance time for cleavage was on the order several hours, we have shown that the cleavage of the aryl ether linkage affords phenol and aldehydes. We would next like to utilize our mechanism of aryl ether cleavage in actual lignin.

Sturgeon, M.; Kim, S.; Chmely, S. C.; Foust, T. D.; Beckham, G. T.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Photodissociation of cyclic compounds in a molecular beam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A discussion on the dynamics and kinematics of photofragmentation-translational spectroscopy is presented, and the results are applied to experimental studies of four cyclic compounds: hexahydro-1,3,5- trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX), s-tetrazine (ST), cyclohexene, (CHN), and 1,4-cyclohexadiene (CHDN). In infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) of RDX, the dominant primary channel is concerted triple fission to produce three CH/sub 2/N/sub 2/O/sub 2/ fragments which subsequently undergo secondary dissociation. Concerted reactions predominate over simple bond rupture not only in the number of channels, but also in the amount of products. Following /sup 1/B/sub 3u/ reverse arrow /sup 1/A/sub g/ (S/sub 1/ reverse arrow S/sub 0/) or /sup 1/B/sub 2u/ reverse arrow /sup 1/A/sub g/ (248 nm) excitation, ST reverts to the highly vibrationally excited ground electronic state through internal conversion (IC), and then decomposes into 2HCN + N/sub 2/ via concerted triple dissociation. The asymptotic angles between the N/sub 2/ and HCN groups from the center-of-mass of ST are 117.2/degree/ and 114.4/degree/ for S/sub 1/ reverse arrow S/sub 0/ and 248 nm excitation respectively.

Zhao, Xinsheng

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Conversion of depleted uranium hexafluoride to a solid uranium compound  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for converting UF.sub.6 to a solid uranium compound such as UO.sub.2 and CaF. The UF.sub.6 vapor form is contacted with an aqueous solution of NH.sub.4 OH at a pH greater than 7 to precipitate at least some solid uranium values as a solid leaving an aqueous solution containing NH.sub.4 OH and NH.sub.4 F and remaining uranium values. The solid uranium values are separated from the aqueous solution of NH.sub.4 OH and NH.sub.4 F and remaining uranium values which is then diluted with additional water precipitating more uranium values as a solid leaving trace quantities of uranium in a dilute aqueous solution. The dilute aqueous solution is contacted with an ion-exchange resin to remove substantially all the uranium values from the dilute aqueous solution. The dilute solution being contacted with Ca(OH).sub.2 to precipitate CaF.sub.2 leaving dilute NH.sub.4 OH.

Rothman, Alan B. (Willowbrook, IL); Graczyk, Donald G. (Lemont, IL); Essling, Alice M. (Elmhurst, IL); Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

8.08 - Photophysics of Lanthanoid Coordination Compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In recent years, lanthanoids have become vital components to a wealth of advanced optical materials and related technologies. Sharp visible and near-infrared emissions result in exciting applications in lighting devices (fluorescent lamps and light-emitting diodes/organic light-emitting diodes), displays, telecommunications, lasers, sensors, luminescent bioprobes, or solar energy conversion and photocatalysts, to name a few. Many of these applications are presently based on coordination compounds, so that the field of luminescent lanthanoid complexes with organic ligands has literally exploded during the past two decades and presently more than 500 original articles are published annually on the subject. An exhaustive presentation of these works would require an entire book. Therefore, in this chapter, the focus is more on the basic aspects pertaining to the design of luminescent lanthanoid-containing complexes. After an introduction to lanthanoid spectroscopy, energy transfer processes are presented and analyzed, as well as ways of avoiding nonradiative deactivation through vibrations. Representative examples are detailed but extensive enumeration of data is avoided. Furthermore, the chapter gives some highlights on application to fields as diverse as biosciences, telecommunications, electroluminescent materials, and photovoltaics.

J.-C.G. Bnzli; S.V. Eliseeva

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

New Soil Volatile Organic Compound Samplers U S  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Soil Volatile Organic Soil Volatile Organic Compound Samplers U . S . D e p a r t m e n t o f E n e r g y * O f f i c e o f F o s s i l E n e r g y N a t i o n a l E n e r g y T e c h n o l o g y L a b o r a t o r y Successes AdvAnced ReseARch To support coal and power systems development, NETL's Advanced Research Program conducts a range of pre-competitive research focused on breakthroughs in materials and processes, coal utilization science, sensors and controls, computational energy science, and bioprocessing-opening new avenues to gains in power plant efficiency, reliability, and environmental quality. NETL also sponsors cooperative educational initiatives in University Coal Research, Historically Black Colleges and Universities, and Other Minority Institutions. Accomplishments P Process improvement P Cost reduction P Greater efficiency

455

Transient liquid phase bonding of structural intermetallic compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The intermetallic compound NiAl is a candidate material for high-temperature structural applications, for example in the hot-zone of aero gas turbine engines. However, if this material is to find significant structural applications, methodologies for primary fabrication of complex components and post-service repair will be required. In particular, joining technologies suitable for bonding NiAl to nickel-base alloys are required. This paper examines transient liquid phase (TLP) bonding as a method of joining NiAl to nickel-base alloys. The focus of the paper is microstructural development at the bond-line and in the adjacent (nickel-base and NiAl) substrates. Two different interlayer materials are considered in this paper, namely: Ni 4.5 wt.% Si 3.2 wt.%B (designated by the American Welding Society as 'BNi-3') and commercially pure copper. Bonds between binary, nominally-stoichiometric NiAl and both commercially pure nickel and Martin Marietta 247 are examined using edge-on transmission electron microscopy. The paper considers the character of the isothermal solidification process, the formation of second-phases at the bond-line and in the adjacent substrates and the extent to which NiAl-Ni-base alloy TLP bonds obey the assumptions implicit in standard models of the TLP process.

W.F. Gale; Y. Guan; S.V. Orel

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Ultra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance and magnetic resonance imaging to discriminate and identify materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ultra-low magnetic field NMR system can non-invasively examine containers. Database matching techniques can then identify hazardous materials within the containers. Ultra-low field NMR systems are ideal for this purpose because they do not require large powerful magnets and because they can examine materials enclosed in conductive shells such as lead shells. The NMR examination technique can be combined with ultra-low field NMR imaging, where an NMR image is obtained and analyzed to identify target volumes. Spatial sensitivity encoding can also be used to identify target volumes. After the target volumes are identified the NMR measurement technique can be used to identify their contents.

Kraus, Robert H. (Los Alamos, NM); Matlashov, Andrei N. (Los Alamos, NM); Espy, Michelle A. (Los Alamos, NM); Volegov, Petr L. (Los Alamos, NM)

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

457

State Application Identifier Applicant Identifier  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. APPLICANT INFORMATION * Organizational DUNS: * Legal Name: Department: Division: * Street1: Street2: * City 4333 Brooklyn Ave Office of Research 17th floor Seattle King 98195-9472 Lynne Chronister 206

Kaminsky, Werner

458

Atmospheric outflow of anthropogenic semivolatile organic compounds from East Asia in Spring 2004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To estimate the emissions of anthropogenic semivolatile organic compounds (SOCs) from East Asia and to identify unique SOC molecular markers in Asian air masses, high-volume air samples were collected on the island of Okinawa, Japan between 22 March and 2 May 2004. Contributions from different source regions (China, Japan, the Koreas, Russia, and ocean/local) were estimated by use of source region impact factors (SRIFs). Elevated concentrations of hexachlorobenzene (HCB), hexachlorcyclohexanes (HCHs), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes (DDTs), and particulate-phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were attributed to air masses from China. A large proportion of the variation in the current-use pesticides, gas-phase PAHs, and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) concentrations was explained by meteorology. Chlordanes showed a technical mixture profile and similar concentrations regardless of source region. {alpha}/{gamma} HCH and trans/cis chlordane ratios did not vary significantly with different source regions and had regional averages of 2.5 {+-} 1.0 and 1.2 {+-} 0.3, respectively. Particulate-phase PAH concentrations were significantly correlated (p value {lt} 0.05) with other incomplete combustion byproduct concentrations, including elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}), CO, NOx{asterisk}, black carbon, submicrometer aerosols, and SO{sub 2}. By use of measured PAH, CO, and black carbon concentrations and estimated CO and black carbon emission inventories, the emission of six carcinogenic particulate-phase PAHs was estimated to be 1518-4179 metric tons/year for Asia and 778-1728 metric tons/year for China, respectively. These results confirm that East Asian outflow contains significant emissions of carcinogenic particulate-phase PAHs. 39 refs., 3 figs.

Toby Primbs; Staci Simonich; David Schmedding; Glenn Wilson; Dan Jaffe; Akinori Takami; Shungo Kato; Shiro Hatakeyama; Yoshizumi Kajii [Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (United States). Departments of Chemistry and Environmental and Molecular Toxicology

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

459

Electrically evoked compound action potentials artefact rejection by independent component analysis: Procedure automation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AbstractBackground Independent-components-analysis (ICA) successfully separated electrically-evoked compound action potentials (ECAPs) from the stimulation artefact and noise (ECAP-ICA, Akhoun et al., 2013). New method This paper shows how to automate the ECAP-ICA artefact cancellation process. Raw-ECAPs without artefact rejection were consecutively recorded for each stimulation condition from at least 8 intra-cochlear electrodes. Firstly, amplifier-saturated recordings were discarded, and the data from different stimulus conditions (different current-levels) were concatenated temporally. The key aspect of the automation procedure was the sequential deductive source categorisation after ICA was applied with a restriction to 4 sources. The stereotypical aspect of the 4 sources enables their automatic classification as two artefact components, a noise and the sought ECAP based on theoretical and empirical considerations. Results The automatic procedure was tested using 8 cochlear implant (CI) users and one to four stimulus electrodes. The artefact and noise sources were successively identified and discarded, leaving the ECAP as the remaining source. The automated ECAP-ICA procedure successfully extracted the correct \\{ECAPs\\} compared to standard clinical forward masking paradigm in 22 out of 26 cases. Comparison with existing method(s) ECAP-ICA does not require extracting the ECAP from a combination of distinct buffers as it is the case with regular methods. It is an alternative that does not have the possible bias of traditional artefact rejections such as alternate-polarity or forward-masking paradigms. Conclusions The ECAP-ICA procedure bears clinical relevance, for example as the artefact rejection sub-module of automated ECAP-threshold detection techniques, which are common features of CI clinical fitting software.

Idrick Akhoun; Colette McKay; Wael El-deredy

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Artificial Neural Network Modeling of Surface Tension for Pure Organic Compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Artificial Neural Network Modeling of Surface Tension for Pure Organic Compounds ... This study investigates the applicability of artificial neural networks as an efficient tool for the prediction of pure organic compounds surface tensions for a wide range of temperatures. ... The most accurate network among several constructed configurations has one hidden layer with 20 neurons. ...

Aliakbar Roosta; Payam Setoodeh; Abdolhossein Jahanmiri

2011-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tentatively identified compound" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Hydroconversion of heavy crude oils using soluble metallic compounds in the presence of hydrogen or methane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hydroconversion of heavy crude oil was studied under thermal and catalytic conditions using soluble organo-metallic compounds of Mo, Fe, Cr, V, Ni, and Co as a catalyst precursors. All catalysts are effective for the hydroconversion, however, molybdenum and nickel compounds are preferred.

Morales, A.; Salazar, A.; Ovalles, C.; Filgueiras, E. [INTEVEP, Caracas (Venezuela)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

462

Progress in Understanding Low-Temperature Organic Compound Oxidation Using a Jet-Stirred Reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Progress in Understanding Low-Temperature Organic Compound Oxidation Using a Jet-Stirred Reactor Lorraine, CNRS, ENSIC, BP 20451, 1 rue Grandville, 54000 Nancy, France Abstract The jet-stirred reactor compounds that can be found in fuels and biofuels. Such an improvement in understanding requires

463

Lithium diffusion mechanisms in layered intercalation compounds A. Van der Ven*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lithium diffusion mechanisms in layered intercalation compounds A. Van der Ven* , G. Ceder; accepted 28 December 2000 Abstract We investigate the mechanisms of lithium diffusion in layered intercalation compounds from ®rst-principles. We focus on LixCoO2 and ®nd that lithium diffusion

Ceder, Gerbrand

464

"Optimization of Zero Length Chromatographic System and Measuring Properties of Model Compounds from Biomass Pyrolysis"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Compounds from Biomass Pyrolysis" Ross Kendall Faculty Mentor: Dr. Paul Dauenhauer, Chemical Engineering by using what he made to measure many of the compounds involved in biomass pyrolysis. If we can understand to retrieve diffusion coefficients of many intermediates of the biomass pyrolysis reaction. From this data

Mountziaris, T. J.

465

Photochemical Reactivity of RuII(?6-p-cymene) Flavonolato Compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Photoactivation is a promising approach for modulating the biological activity of RuII compounds. In this work, RuII flavonolato compounds, [Ru(?6-p-cymene)(L)(3-Hfl)]OTf (8; 3-Hfl = monoanion of 3-hydroxyflavone; L = solvent) and [Ru(?6-p-cymene)Cl(3-Hfl-...

Sushma L. Saraf; Trevor J. Fish; Abby D. Benninghoff; Ashley A. Buelt; Rhett C. Smith; Lisa M. Berreau

2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

466

Microbial Electrosynthesis: Feeding Microbes Electricity To Convert Carbon Dioxide and Water to Multicarbon Extracellular Organic Compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...extracellular organic compounds...directly to the cells with a graphite...dioxide to organic compounds...microbial production of multicarbon...to convert solar energy that...hydrogen production was verified...outlet, but a solar-powered...a) H-cell device for...errors of the organic acid and...

Kelly P. Nevin; Trevor L. Woodard; Ashley E. Franks; Zarath M. Summers; Derek R. Lovley

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Enthalpies of formation of magnesium compounds from first-principles calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Enthalpies of formation of magnesium compounds from first-principles calculations Hui Zhang t An energetics database of binary magnesium compounds has been developed from first-principles calculations. Introduction Magnesium alloys are of great importance to the industrial world. With a density of 1.741 g/cm3

Chen, Long-Qing

468

Hydrogen absorption characteristics of oxygen-stabilized rare-earth iron intermetallic compounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen absorption characteristics of oxygen-stabilized rare-earth iron intermetallic compounds M Abstract. -- The thermal behavior of oxygen-stabilized RjFegO^-hydrogen (R = Y, Dy, Ho) systems was studied decade to the study of the hydrogenation characte- ristics of a variety of intermetallic compounds, our

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

469

Methanobactin: a copper binding compound having antibiotic and antioxidant activity isolated from methanotrophic bacteria  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A means and method for treating bacterial infection, providing antioxidant activity, and chelating copper using a copper binding compound produced by methanotrophic bacteria is described. The compound, known as methanobactin, is the first of a new class of antibiotics having gram-positive activity. Methanobactin has been sequenced, and its structural formula determined.

DiSpirito, Alan A. (Ames, IA); Zahn, James A. (Harbor Beach, MI); Graham, David W. (Lawrence, KS); Kim, Hyung J. (St. Paul, MN); Alterman, Michail (Lawrence, KS); Larive, Cynthia (Lawrence, KS)

2007-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

470

Opportunities for reducing volatile organic compound emissions in manufacturing office furniture partitions: a feasibility analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A feasibility analysis is reported of reduction opportunities for volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions in manufacturing office furniture partitions. The pollution prevention (P2) methodology as defined by the Ontario Ministry of the Environment ... Keywords: emissions, manufacturing, office furniture, pollution prevention, volatile organic compound

Frank S. Luisser; Marc A. Rosen

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Phenyl boron-based compounds as anion receptors for non-aqueous battery electrolytes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Novel fluorinated boronate-based compounds which act as anion receptors in non-aqueous battery electrolytes are provided. When added to non-aqueous battery electrolytes, the fluorinated boronate-based compounds of the invention enhance ionic conductivity and cation transference number of non-aqueous electrolytes. The fluorinated boronate-based anion receptors include different fluorinated alkyl and aryl groups.

Lee, Hung Sui (East Setauket, NY); Yang, Xiao-Qing (Port Jefferson Station, NY); McBreen, James (Bellport, NY); Sun, Xuehui (Middle Island, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Compound Poisson approximation in systems reliability A.D. Barbour, University of Zurich,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in clusters, W may be better approximated by a compound Poisson distribution, and the reliability IP[W = 0Compound Poisson approximation in systems reliability A.D. Barbour, University of Z¨urich, Ourania `local' formulation of the Stein-Chen method is applied to problems in reliability theory. Bounds

Barbour, Andrew

473

The reaction kinetics of gasoline sulfur compounds: Catalytic mechanisms for sulfur reduction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the key elements of reformulated gasoline is the reduction of the sulfur compounds produced by fluid catalytic cracking. This paper probes the reaction kinetics of refractory gasoline-range thiophene derivatives (thiophene, tetrahydrothiophene, and alkylthiophenes) in an effort to determine the mechanisms of sulfur compound cracking in the FCC unit. The gasoline-range sulfur compounds were analyzed using gas chromatography with an atomic emission detector. The authors` results show that the FCC catalysts affects the cracking of sulfur compounds through both hydrogen transfer and zeolite pore restriction mechanisms. An experimental FCC catalyst is shown to reduce gasoline sulfur content in the Davidson Circulating Riser (DCR{sup TM}) pilot unit. Model compound tests show that the activity of the catalyst is due to both its catalytic and adsorptive properties. Tetrahydrothiophene, which is produced from thiophenes by hydrogen transfer, is completely removed by the experimental catalyst.

Harding, R.H.; Gatte, R.R.; Albro, T.G.; Wormsbecher, R.F. [W.R. Grace & Co. Conn, Columbia, MD (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

474

Method of upgrading oils containing hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds to highly aromatic gasoline  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a multi-stepped method of converting an oil which is produced by various biomass and coal conversion processes and contains primarily single and multiple ring hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds to highly aromatic gasoline. The single and multiple ring hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds in a raw oil material are first deoxygenated to produce a deoxygenated oil material containing single and multiple ring aromatic compounds. Then, water is removed from the deoxygenated oil material. The next step is distillation to remove the single ring aromatic compounds as gasoline. In the third step, the multiple ring aromatics remaining in the deoxygenated oil material are cracked in the presence of hydrogen to produce a cracked oil material containing single ring aromatic compounds. Finally, the cracked oil material is then distilled to remove the single ring aromatics as gasoline.

Baker, E.G.; Elliott, D.C.

1993-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

475

NREL-Using RETScreen To Identify the Most Promising Clean Energy Projects  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NREL-Using RETScreen To Identify the Most Promising Clean Energy Projects NREL-Using RETScreen To Identify the Most Promising Clean Energy Projects Webinar Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Using RETScreen To Identify the Most Promising Clean Energy Projects Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Partner: United States Department of Energy Sector: Energy Topics: Market analysis, Pathways analysis, Technology characterizations Resource Type: Training materials, Software/modeling tools, Webinar User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.nrel.gov/applying_technologies/state_local_activities/webinar_2010 Cost: Free Using RETScreen To Identify the Most Promising Clean Energy Projects Screenshot References: Using RETScreen To Identify the Most Promising Clean Energy Projects[1] Logo: Using RETScreen To Identify the Most Promising Clean Energy Projects

476

Identifying and Resolving Issues in EnergyPlus and DOE-2 Window Heat Transfer Calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Issues in building energy software accuracy are often identified by comparative, analytical, and empirical testing as delineated in the BESTEST methodology. As described in this report, window-related discrepancies in heating energy predictions were identified through comparative testing of EnergyPlus and DOE-2. Multiple causes for discrepancies were identified, and software fixes are recommended to better align the models with the intended algorithms and underlying test data.

Booten, C.; Kruis, N.; Christensen, C.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

E-Print Network 3.0 - analysis identifies age-associated Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

be to forward apply the identified ... Source: Columbia University, Taub Institute, Cognitive Neuroscience Division Collection: Biology and Medicine 2 Aging and Memory in Humans...

478

E-Print Network 3.0 - approach identified growth Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: not be a significant effect for strongly faceted growth, but we expect that our LCA approach would not produce accurate... not been identified in previous investigations...

479

Intergrating Magnetotellurics, Soil Gas Geochemistry and Structural Analysis to Identify Hidden, High Enthalpy, Extensional Geothermal Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Intergrating Magnetotellurics, Soil Gas Geochemistry and Structural Analysis to Identify Hidden, High Enthalpy, Extensional Geothermal Systems presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

480

E-Print Network 3.0 - analysis identifies genetic Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Representing genetic variation as continuous surfaces: an approach for identifying spatial... theoretical base for data analysis between popula- tion genetics and spatial...

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

E-Print Network 3.0 - analysis identifies salmonella Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for Salmonella, including the time to identify presumptive ... Source: Singer, Randall - College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota Collection: Biology and...

482

Testing and Evaluation Protocol for Handheld Radionuclide Identifiers for Use in Homeland Security  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Testing and Evaluation Protocol for Handheld Radionuclide Identifiers for Use in Homeland Security................................................................................1 4. Test and evaluation steps .........................................................................................1 5. Recording test results

483

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaplastic astrocytoma identifies Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

astrocytoma identifies Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Abstract. Gliomas, the most common brain tumors, are generally categorized into two lineages (astrocytic and Summary: ),...

484

E-Print Network 3.0 - ago2 immunoprecipitation identifies Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biology of the Cell Vol. 11, 14991507, May 2000 Summary: could be identified in the FBC culture system, fibrillin was immunoprecipitated from the medium... , two protein...

485

E-Print Network 3.0 - analysis identifies susceptibility Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: analysis identifies susceptibility Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Biodiversity and Conservation 10: 14191472, 2001. 2001 Kluwer...

486

Method for loading lipsomes with ionizable phosphorylated hydrophobic compounds, pharmaceutical preparations and a method for administering the preparations  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of entrapping ionizable compounds, preferably phosphorylated hydrophobic compounds, into liposomes having transmembrane gradients is disclosed. The procedures involve forming liposomes in an acidic medium or a basic medium, adding to the acidic medium a cationic compound or to the basic medium an anionic compound and then adding a base to the cationic-containing medium or an acid to the anionic-containing medium, thereby inducing the ionizable compound into the liposomes' internal aqueous phase. The compound-entrapped liposomes prepared in accordance with the disclosed methods may be used as pharmaceutical preparations. Methods of administering such pharmaceutical preparations are also disclosed.

Mehlhorn, Rolf Joachim (Richmond, CA)

1998-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

487

Characterization of the fate and transport of nitroaromatic compounds at a former DoD ordnance depot site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 975-acre Former Nansemond Ordnance Depot (FNOD) in Suffolk, Virginia was used by the Department of Defense (DoD) from 1917 until the mid-1950's for preparation, storage, transportation, inspection and demilitarization of many classes of ammunition and ordnance. Approximately 28 areas of Concern (AOC) have been identified by the EPA as areas that could pose potential risk to human health or the environment. The primary contaminants of concern are some trace metals and explosive compounds. During a summer 1987 field investigation, a slab of crystalline TNT was found which was estimated to weigh several tons. An enhanced MODFLOW model is being used to identify subsurface flow patterns. The calibrated model will be used to identify contaminant fate and transport behavior at the site. Enhancements to the MODFLOW model include an updated block-centered flow package (BCF4) and an updated recharge-seepage face boundary package (RSF4) to utilize for the FNOD site flow characterization. BCF4 package accurately delineates the water table without relying on an ad hoc rewetting procedure. This is accomplished by calculating the hydraulic head value required to transmit recharging water through the unsaturated zone without inactivating dry cells. The recharge-seepage face package eliminates the projection of heads above the ground surface by adjusting recharge to a cell when a user supplied ponding depth is reached. Using a regional model, a telescoping grid refinement technique was implemented to calculate the boundary conditions around the area of interest and to model quantity and quality interactions between surface and subsurface water regimes in a realistic manner.

Klausmeier, M.E.; Yoon, J.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Mathematics in Engineering: Identifying, Enhancing and Linking the Implicit Mathematics Curriculum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mathematics in Engineering: Identifying, Enhancing and Linking the Implicit Mathematics Curriculum of Technology Abstract A study is undertaken to lay out in a structured manner the mathematics skills required of Technology. The key objective of the research is to identify barriers to deep mathematical understanding

Peraire, Jaime

489

The Effects of Age and Experience on Drivers Ability to Identify Threats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Effects of Age and Experience on Drivers Ability to Identify Threats Ethan Fisher Professor The purpose of this study was to determine how long it takes for a driver to identify if a threat exists and where the threat is located in a static image. It is known that both older experienced and younger

Mountziaris, T. J.

490

An algorithm for identifying clusters of functionally related genes in genomes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rise to them. I present a basis of algorithm to identify gene clusters in eukaryotic genomes that utilizes functional categories defined in graph-based vocabularies such as the Gene Ontology (GO). Clusters identified in this manner need only have a...

Yi, Gang Man

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

491

Identifying a High Fraction of the Human Genome to be under Selective Constraint Using GERP++  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Identifying a High Fraction of the Human Genome to be under Selective Constraint Using GERP genomes leverage comparative sequence information by looking for regions that exhibit evidence identify over 1.3 million constrained elements spanning over 7% of the human genome. We predict a higher

Sidow, Arend

492

An advanced diffusion model to identify emergent research issues: the case of optoelectronic devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 An advanced diffusion model to identify emergent research issues: the case of optoelectronic of keywords in published articles. In this paper we show how emerging topics in the field of optoelectronic the identified keywords were used to technological topics in the field of optoelectronic devices

Boyer, Edmond

493

Iconizer: A Framework to Identify and Create Effective Representations for Visual Information Encoding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Iconizer: A Framework to Identify and Create Effective Representations for Visual Information, the degree of semantics encoded in these visual representations is still quite limited. The use of icons databases to help users identify icons suitable to visually encode abstract semantic concepts. Keywords

Mueller, Klaus

494

John von Neumann Institute for Computing Different Types of Protein Folding Identified with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

John von Neumann Institute for Computing Different Types of Protein Folding Identified://www.fz-juelich.de/nic-series/volume40 #12;Different Types of Protein Folding Identified with a Coarse-Grained Heteropolymer Model Stefan The identification of folding channels is one of the key tasks of protein folding studies. While secondary structures

Janke, Wolfhard

495

Identifying Thesis and Conclusion Statements in Student Essays to Scaffold Peer Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Identifying Thesis and Conclusion Statements in Student Essays to Scaffold Peer Review Mohammad H, Intelligent Systems Program, University of Pittsburgh {mhf11, ashley, schunn, dlitman}@pitt.edu Abstract. Peer-reviewing is a recommended instructional technique to encourage good writing. Peer reviewers, however, may fail to identify

Litman, Diane J.

496

DOE to Invest up to $2.3 Million to Identify Renewable Energy Zones In  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

to Invest up to $2.3 Million to Identify Renewable Energy Zones to Invest up to $2.3 Million to Identify Renewable Energy Zones In Western States, May 28, 2008 DOE to Invest up to $2.3 Million to Identify Renewable Energy Zones In Western States, May 28, 2008 DOE to Invest up to $2.3 Million to Identify Renewable Energy Zones In Western States. The Renewable Energy Zones Initiative will promote regional transmission planning and encourage the development of renewable sources of energy. DOE to Invest up to $2.3 Million to Identify Renewable Energy Zones In Western States, May 28, 2008 More Documents & Publications Senior DOE Official to Deliver Remarks at Western Governors' Association Renewable Energy Zones Initiative Launch Western Renewable Energy Zones-Phase 1 Report Statement of Patricia Hoffman Acting Assistant Secretary for Electricity

497

Scientists Identify New Family of Iron-Based Absorber Materials for Solar Cells (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights, Science  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Use of Earth-abundant materials in solar absorber films is critical for expanding the reach of photovoltaic (PV) technologies. The use of Earth-abundant and inexpensive Fe in PV was proposed more than 25 years ago in the form of FeS{sub 2} pyrite - fool's gold. Unfortunately, the material has been plagued by performance problems that to this day are both persistent and not well understood. Researchers from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Oregon State University, working collaboratively in the Center for Inverse Design, an Energy Frontier Research Center, have uncovered several new insights into the problems of FeS{sub 2}. They have used these advances to propose and implement design rules that can be used to identify new Fe-containing materials that can circumvent the limitations of FeS{sub 2} pyrite. The team has identified that it is the unavoidable metallic secondary phases and surface defects coexisting near the FeS{sub 2} thin-film surfaces and grain boundaries that limit its open-circuit voltage, rather than the S vacancies in the bulk, which has long been commonly assumed. The materials Fe{sub 2}SiS{sub 4} and Fe{sub 2}GeS{sub 4} hold considerable promise as PV absorbers. The ternary Si compound is especially attractive, as it contains three of the more abundant low-cost elements available today. The band gap (E{sub g} = 1.5 eV) from both theory and experiment is higher than those of c-Si and FeS{sub 2}, offering better absorption of the solar spectrum and potentially higher solar cell efficiencies. More importantly, these materials do not have metallic secondary phase problems as seen in FeS{sub 2}. High calculated formation energies of donor-type defects are consistent with p-type carriers in thin films and are prospects for high open-circuit voltages in cells.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Kilauea Southwest Rift And South Flank  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flank Flank Area (Coombs, Et Al., 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Kilauea Southwest Rift And South Flank Area (Coombs, Et Al., 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Kilauea Southwest Rift And South Flank Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Michelle L. Coombs, Thomas W. Sisson, Peter W. Lipman (2006) Growth History Of Kilauea Inferred From Volatile Concentrations In Submarine-Collected Basalts Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Compound_and_Elemental_Analysis_At_Kilauea_Southwest_Rift_And_South_Flank_Area_(Coombs,_Et_Al.,_2006)&oldid=510423"

499

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Jemez Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Janik, 2002) Janik, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Jemez Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Jemez Springs Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from fumaroles, springs, and/or wells. References Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Janik (2002) Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico And Comparisons With Gases At Yellowstone, Long Valley And Other Geothermal Systems Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Compound_and_Elemental_Analysis_At_Jemez_Springs_Area_(Goff_%26_Janik,_2002)&oldid=510418" Categories: Exploration Activities

500

Ethanol as Internal Standard for Quantitative Determination of Volatile Compounds in Spirit Drinks by Gas Chromatography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The new methodical approach of using ethanol as internal standard in gas chromatographic analysis of volatile compounds in spirit drinks in daily practice of testing laboratories is proposed. This method provides determination of volatile compounds concentrations in spirit drinks directly expressed in milligrams per liter (mg/L) of absolute alcohol according to official methods without measuring of alcohol strength of analyzed sample. The experimental demonstration of this method for determination of volatile compounds in spirit drinks by gas chromatography is described. Its validation was carried out by comparison with experimental results obtained by internal standard method and external standard method.

Charapitsa, Siarhei V; Kulevich, Nikita V; Makoed, Nicolai M; Mazanik, Arkadzi L; Sytova, Svetlana N

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z