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Sample records for tennessee browns ferry

  1. Alabama Nuclear Profile - Browns Ferry

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Browns Ferry" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  2. ATWS analysis for Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant Unit 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dallman, R.J.; Jouse, W.C.

    1985-01-01

    Analyses of postulated Anticipated Transients Without Scram (ATWS) were performed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant Unit 1 (BFNP1) was selected as the subject of this work because of the cooperation of the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). The work is part of the Severe Accident Sequence Analysis (SASA) Program of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). A Main Steamline Isolation Valve (MSIV) closure served as the transient initiator for these analyses, which proceeded a complete failure to scram. Results from the analyses indicate that operator mitigative actions are required to prevent overpressurization of the primary containment. Uncertainties remain concerning the effectiveness of key mitigative actions. The effectiveness of level control as a power reduction procedure is limited. Power level resulting from level control only reduce the Pressure Suppression Pool (PSP) heatup rate from 6 to 4F/min.

  3. ATWS at Browns Ferry Unit One - accident sequence analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrington, R.M.; Hodge, S.A.

    1984-07-01

    This study describes the predicted response of Unit One at the Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant to a postulated complete failure to scram following a transient occurrence that has caused closure of all Main Steam Isolation Valves (MSIVs). This hypothetical event constitutes the most severe example of the type of accident classified as Anticipated Transient Without Scram (ATWS). Without the automatic control rod insertion provided by scram, the void coefficient of reactivity and the mechanisms by which voids are formed in the moderator/coolant play a dominant role in the progression of the accident. Actions taken by the operator greatly influence the quantity of voids in the coolant and the effect is analyzed in this report. The progression of the accident sequence under existing and under recommended procedures is discussed. For the extremely unlikely cases in which equipment failure and wrongful operator actions might lead to severe core damage, the sequence of emergency action levels and the associated timing of events are presented.

  4. RAMONA-3B application to Browns Ferry ATWS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slovik, G.C.; Neymotin, L.; Cazzoli, E.; Saha, P.

    1984-01-01

    This paper discusses two preliminary MSIV clsoure ATWS calculations done using the RAMONA-3B code and the work being done to create the necessary cross section sets for the Browns Ferry Unit 1 reactor. The RAMONA-3B code employs a three-dimensional neutron kinetics model coupled with one-dimensional, four equation, nonhomogeneous, nonequilibrium thermal hydraulics. To be compatible with 3-D neutron kinetics, the code uses parallel coolant channels in the core. It also includes a boron transport model and all necessary BWR components such as jet pump, recirculation pump, steam separator, steamline with safety and relief valves, main steam isolation valve, turbine stop valve, and turbine bypass valve. A summary of RAMONA-3B neutron kinetics and thermal hydraulics models is presented in the Appendix.

  5. RAMONA-3B application to Browns Ferry ATWS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slovik, G.C.; Neymotin, L.Y.; Saha, P.

    1985-01-01

    The Anticipated Transient Without Scram (ATWS) is known to be a dominant accident sequence for possible core melt in a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR). A recent Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) analysis for the Browns Ferry nuclear power plant indicates that ATWS is the second most dominant transient for core melt in BWR/4 with Mark I containment. The most dominant sequence being the failure of long term decay heat removal function of the Residual Heat Removal (RHR) system. Of all the various ATWS scenarios, the Main Steam Isolation Valve (MSIV) closure ATWS sequence was chosen for present analysis because of its relatively high frequency of occurrence and its challenge to the residual heat removal system and containment integrity. The objective of this paper is to discuss four MSIV closure ATWS calculations using the RAMONA-3B code. The paper is a summary of a report being prepared for the USNRC Severe Accident Sequence Analysis (SASA) program which should be referred to for details. 10 refs., 20 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Severe Accident Sequence Analysis Program: Anticipated transient without scram simulations for Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant Unit 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dallman, R J; Gottula, R C; Holcomb, E E; Jouse, W C; Wagoner, S R; Wheatley, P D

    1987-05-01

    An analysis of five anticipated transients without scram (ATWS) was conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The five detailed deterministic simulations of postulated ATWS sequences were initiated from a main steamline isolation valve (MSIV) closure. The subject of the analysis was the Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant Unit 1, a boiling water reactor (BWR) of the BWR/4 product line with a Mark I containment. The simulations yielded insights to the possible consequences resulting from a MSIV closure ATWS. An evaluation of the effects of plant safety systems and operator actions on accident progression and mitigation is presented.

  7. Applications of the RELAP5 code to the station blackout transients at the Browns Ferry Unit One Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultz, R.R.; Wagoner, S.R.

    1983-01-01

    As a part of the charter of the Severe Accident Sequence Analysis (SASA) Program, station blackout transients have been analyzed using a RELAP5 model of the Browns Ferry Unit 1 Plant. The task was conducted as a partial fulfillment of the needs of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission in examining the Unresolved Safety Issue A-44: Station Blackout (1) the station blackout transients were examined (a) to define the equipment needed to maintain a well cooled core, (b) to determine when core uncovery would occur given equipment failure, and (c) to characterize the behavior of the vessel thermal-hydraulics during the station blackout transients (in part as the plant operator would see it). These items are discussed in the paper. Conclusions and observations specific to the station blackout are presented.

  8. Comparison of MELCOR and SCDAP/RELAP5 results for a low-pressure, short-term station blackout at Browns Ferry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carbajo, J.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-12-31

    This study compares results obtained with two U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-sponsored codes, MELCOR version 1.8.3 (1.8PQ) and SCDAP/RELAP5 Mod3.1 release C, for the same transient - a low-pressure, short-term station blackout accident at the Browns Ferry nuclear plant. This work is part of MELCOR assessment activities to compare core damage progression calculations of MELCOR against SCDAP/RELAP5 since the two codes model core damage progression very differently.

  9. Central Ferry Lower Monumental

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Reliability Projects Expand Projects Skip navigation links Line Projects Big Eddy-Knight Central Ferry Lower Monumental Grand Coulee Transmission Line Replacement...

  10. Reduction of Emissions from a High Speed Ferry | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Emissions from a High Speed Ferry Reduction of Emissions from a High Speed Ferry 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: West Virginia University 2003deerthompson.pdf More Documents &...

  11. EA-1973: Kootenai River Restoration at Bonners Ferry, Boundary...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    73: Kootenai River Restoration at Bonners Ferry, Boundary County, Idaho EA-1973: Kootenai River Restoration at Bonners Ferry, Boundary County, Idaho Summary Bonneville Power...

  12. Tennessee Air Quality Act (Tennessee)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Tennessee Air Quality Act (AQA) delegates the power to maintain air quality in the State to the Department of Environment and Conservation. Under the Department of the Environment and...

  13. BWR ATWS simulations for Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant Unit 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dallman, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    Under auspices of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, simulations of anticipated transients without scram (ATWS) in a boiling water reactor are being performed. A methodology has been developed to study the ATWS, and deterministic analyses have been conducted. Results are presented for one of the most probable (albeit hypothetical) sequences leading to core and containment damage. Areas presenting calculational uncertainties are identified, and requirements for their resolution are proposed.

  14. Tennessee: Tennessee's Clean Energy Resources and Economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-03-25

    This document highlights the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's investments and impacts in the state of Tennessee.

  15. Prehistoric Pipes from the Olds Ferry Dunes Site (10-WN-557), Western Idaho

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pavesic, Max G

    2000-01-01

    Pipes from the Olds Ferry Dunes Site (lO-WN-557), Westernremains at the Olds Ferry Dunes site (lO-WN-557, Fig. 1)Pavesic 1985). Olds Ferry Dunes is one of several pivotal

  16. Paynes Ferry Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly Smart GridNorth Carolina:ParamountEnergy Group LPPaynes Ferry Wind

  17. Ferry Barge | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journal Article) | SciTechSubmitted MoreTrafficFerrin Moore,Ferry Barge

  18. TENNESSEE BUSINESS AND ECONOMIC OUTLOOK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

    TENNESSEE BUSINESS AND ECONOMIC OUTLOOK THE STATE'S ECONOMIC OUTLOOK SPRING 2015 #12;Matthew N Knoxville, Tennessee TENNESSEE BUSINESS AND ECONOMIC OUTLOOK THE STATE'S ECONOMIC OUTLOOK SPRING 2015 #12;ii | SPRING 2015 TENNESSEE BUSINESS AND ECONOMIC OUTLOOK The preparation of this report was financed in part

  19. GWU, RPI, VCU All Rights Reserved Washington State Ferry Risk Assessment Appendix I The Washington State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    © GWU, RPI, VCU ­ All Rights Reserved Washington State Ferry Risk Assessment ­ Appendix I The Washington State Ferries Risk Assessment Appendix I: Historical Data Analysis Results JULY 1, 1999 Prepared for: Blue Ribbon Panel on Washington State Ferry Safety and Washington State Transportation Commission

  20. Software Reuse in High Performance Computing Shirley Browne

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dongarra, Jack

    Software Reuse in High Performance Computing Shirley Browne University of Tennessee 107 Ayres Hall high performance computing architectures in the form of distributed memory mul­ tiprocessors have and cost of programming applications to run on these machines. Economical use of high performance computing

  1. Software Reuse in High Performance Computing Shirley Browne

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dongarra, Jack

    Software Reuse in High Performance Computing Shirley Browne University of Tennessee 107 Ayres Hall high performance computing architectures in the form of distributed memorymul- tiprocessors have become of programming applications to run on these machines. Economical use of high performance computing and subsequent

  2. GERMANIUM--2001 32.1 By Robert D. Brown, Jr.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GERMANIUM--2001 32.1 GERMANIUM By Robert D. Brown, Jr. Domestic survey data and table were prepared. In 2001, the domestic germanium industry consisted of two zinc mining operations in Alaska and Tennessee of germanium was estimated to have remained about the same in 2001. The USGS estimated domestic germanium

  3. GERMANIUM--1999 32.1 By Robert D. Brown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GERMANIUM--1999 32.1 GERMANIUM By Robert D. Brown Domestic survey data and table were prepared. In 1999, the domestic germanium industry consisted of two zinc mining operations in Alaska and Tennessee in 1999, but U.S. consumption has remained steady for 3 years. The USGS estimated domestic germanium

  4. Tennessee: Tennessee's Clean Energy Resources and Economy (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-03-01

    This document highlights the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's investments and impacts in the state of Tennessee.

  5. Effects of Soluble Ferri-Hydroxide Complexes on Microbial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pace, Norman

    Effects of Soluble Ferri-Hydroxide Complexes on Microbial Neutralization of Acid Mine Drainage may result in neutralization of acid mine drainage. However, this effect is extremely sensitive to iron speciation within a relatively small and critical pH range. Introduction Acid mine drainage (AMD

  6. Microsoft Word - BNRS_FERRY_3D_DEA_DRAFT_EA

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    protecting spawning. Kootenai River Habitat Restoration at Bonners Ferry Project Draft Environmental Assessment 10 * Suggestion to create community support through a public...

  7. Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tennessee nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  8. RAMONA-3B calculations for Browns Ferry ATWS (Anticipated Transient Without Scram) study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saha, P; Slovik, G C; Neymotin, L Y

    1987-02-01

    Several aspects of the Anticipated Transient Without Scram (ATWS) initiated by an inadvertent closure of all Main Steam Isolation Valves (MSIV) in a typical BWR/4 are analyzed in the report. The analysis is performed using the Brookhaven National Laboratory code, RAMONA-3B, which employs a three-dimensional neutron kinetics model coupled with a parallel-channel thermal hydraulics in representing a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) Core. Four different transient scenarios have been investigated: (a) downcomer water level and reactor pressure control, (b) manual control rod insertion transient, (c) high pressure boil-off, and (d) recirculation pump trip failure. Results of these calculations should provide better understanding of mitigative effects of operator actions during ATWS, thus helping in the development of adequate Emergency Procedure Guidelines (EPG) required for the BWR plant safety. A few unresolved questions subject to future investigations are also discussed.

  9. Fermilab | Tritium at Fermilab | Ferry Creek Aerial View

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journal Article) | SciTechSubmitted MoreTraffic Safety Traffic CitationFerry

  10. 1999 GWU, RPI, VCU All Rights Reserved Washington State Ferries Risk Assessment -Appendix II The Washington State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    © 1999 GWU, RPI, VCU ­ All Rights Reserved Washington State Ferries Risk Assessment - Appendix II The Washington State Ferries Risk Assessment Appendix II: Collision, Allision, Grounding and Fire/Explosion Results using the WSF Simulation JULY 1, 1999 Prepared for: Blue Ribbon Panel on Washington State Ferry

  11. 1999 GWU, RPI, VCU All Rights Reserved Washington State Ferries Risk Assessment -Appendix III The Washington State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    © 1999 GWU, RPI, VCU ­ All Rights Reserved Washington State Ferries Risk Assessment - Appendix III The Washington State Ferries Risk Assessment Appendix III: Detailed Discussion of Modeling Methodology and Assumptions. JULY 1, 1999 Prepared for: Blue Ribbon Panel on Washington State Ferry Safety and Washington

  12. 1999 GWU, RPI, VCU All Rights Reserved Washington State Ferries Risk Assessment Final Report The Washington State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    © 1999 GWU, RPI, VCU ­ All Rights Reserved Washington State Ferries Risk Assessment Final Report The Washington State Ferries Risk Assessment Executive Summary JULY 1, 1999 Prepared for: Blue Ribbon Panel on Washington State Ferry Safety and Washington State Transportation Commission Olympia, Washington By

  13. CASL - Tennessee Valley Authority

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory of raregovAboutRecovery ActToolsForNorth Carolina State UniversityTennessee

  14. Retrofitting the Tennessee Valley Authority

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeiber, Kristen (Kristen Ann)

    2013-01-01

    As the flagship of the New Deal, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) was a triumph of regional and environmental design that has since fallen on hard times. When writer James Agee toured the region in 1935, he described ...

  15. Fermilab Today | Brown University Profile

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Brown University April 29, 2010 NAME: Brown University HOME TOWN: Providence, Rhode Island MASCOT: Bruno the Bear SCHOOL COLORS: Seal brown and cardinal red PARTICLE PHYSICS...

  16. THE UNIVERSITY Of TENNESSEE Health Science Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yan

    THE UNIVERSITY Of TENNESSEE Health Science Center Human Resources 910 Madison Ave, Suite 722 Memphis, TN 38163 Tel: (901) 448-5600 Fax: (901) 448-5170 THE UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE HEALTH SCIENCE the Personnel Records of UT public domain. This gives any citizen of the State of Tennessee the right to view

  17. The University of Tennessee Health Science Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yan

    The University of Tennessee Health Science Center INSTRUCTIONS FOR TOTALLY DISABLED AND/OR SENIOR CITIZEN ENROLLING IN CREDIT COURSES In accordance with provisions of Tennessee Code Annotated, Section 49 to The University of Tennessee Health Science Center. You must make application for admission to the University

  18. REDUCTION OF EMISSIONS FROM A HIGH SPEED FERRY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson,G.; Gautam, M; Clark, N; Lyons, D; Carder, D; Riddle, W; Barnett, R; Rapp, B; George, S

    2003-08-24

    Emissions from marine vessels are being scrutinized as a major contributor to the total particulate matter (TPM), oxides of sulfur (SOx) and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) environmental loading. Fuel sulfur control is the key to SOx reduction. Significant reductions in the emissions from on-road vehicles have been achieved in the last decade and the emissions from these vehicles will be reduced by another order of magnitude in the next five years: these improvements have served to emphasize the need to reduce emissions from other mobile sources, including off road equipment, locomotives, and marine vessels. Diesel-powered vessels of interest include ocean going vessels with low- and medium-speed engines, as well as ferries with high speed engines, as discussed below. A recent study examined the use of intake water injection (WIS) and ultra low sulfur diesel (ULSD) to reduce the emissions from a high-speed passenger ferry in southern California. One of the four Detroit Diesel 12V92 two-stroke high speed engines that power the Waverider (operated by SCX, inc.) was instrumented to collect intake airflow, fuel flow, shaft torque, and shaft speed. Engine speed and shaft torque were uniquely linked for given vessel draft and prevailing wind and sea conditions. A raw exhaust gas sampling system was utilized to measure the concentration of NOx, carbon dioxide (CO2), and oxygen (O2) and a mini dilution tunnel sampling a slipstream from the raw exhaust was used to collect TPM on 70 mm filters. The emissions data were processed to yield brake-specific mass results. The system that was employed allowed for redundant data to be collected for quality assurance and quality control. To acquire the data, the Waverider was operated at five different steady state speeds. Three modes were in the open sea off Oceanside, CA, and idle and harbor modes were also used. Data have showed that the use of ULSD along with water injection (WIS) could significantly reduce the emissions of NOx and PM while not affecting fuel consumption or engine performance compared to the baseline marine diesel. The results showed that a nominal 40% reduction in TPM was realized when switching from the marine diesel to the ULSD. A small reduction in NOx was also shown between the marine fuel and the ULSD. The implementation of the WIS showed that NOx was reduced significantly by between 11% and 17%, depending upon the operating condition. With the WIS, the TPM was reduced by a few percentage points, which was close to the confidence in measurement.

  19. Middle Tennessee EMC- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Middle Tennessee Electric Membership Corporation (MTEMC) and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) offer incentives for residential customers through the In-Home Energy Evaluation Program. This...

  20. Tennessee: Oak Ridge National Laboratory Optimizes Carbon Fiber...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tennessee: Oak Ridge National Laboratory Optimizes Carbon Fiber Production, Reduces Carbon Fiber Costs by 30% Tennessee: Oak Ridge National Laboratory Optimizes Carbon Fiber...

  1. CX: Categorical Determination-Alcoa Tennessee Automotive Sheet...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    CX: Categorical Determination-Alcoa Tennessee Automotive Sheet Expansion Project CX: Categorical Determination-Alcoa Tennessee Automotive Sheet Expansion Project Categorical...

  2. Solar Field Gives Tennessee Economy a Boost | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Efficient Energy of Tennessee installs panels at a 1-MW solar farm outside Knoxville in July. | Photo by Harvey Abouelata and courtesy of Efficient Energy of Tennessee Efficient...

  3. East Tennessee Technology Park 3-1 3. East Tennessee Technology Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    1 East Tennessee Technology Park 3-1 3. East Tennessee Technology Park ETTP was originally built to the "East Tennessee Technology Park." Environmental management and remediation operations consist by the private sector) also became a major mission at ETTP. Reindustrialization allows private industry to lease

  4. Green Energy Property Tax Assessment (Tennessee) | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the Treasury Tennessee offers a special ad valorem property tax assessment for certified green energy production facilities. Property that generates electricity from a certified...

  5. Where Tennessee Abstinence Education Fails to Protect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrews, Kelley Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Sex  education,  particularly  where  federal  funding  is  abstinence  only  sex  education  to   prohibit  the  Tennessee  Abstinence  Education  Fails  to  Protect   By  

  6. ,"Tennessee Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Tennessee Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  7. ,"Tennessee Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Tennessee Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  8. ,"Tennessee Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Tennessee Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Annual",2014,"06301967" ,"Release...

  9. Tennessee's Manufacturing Sector Before and After the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

    Tennessee's Manufacturing Sector Before and After the Great Recession Prepared by Matthew N. Murray....................................................................................................................................... 1 Manufacturing in the Post Great Recession Era............................................................................... 2 Manufacturing Employment Trends

  10. East Tennessee State University Web Privacy Statement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karsai, Istvan

    East Tennessee State University Web Privacy Statement A Note to Children and Parents East Tennessee through a university Web site is handled. ETSU understands the importance of protecting the privacy of personal information, especially in today's electronic environment. This privacy policy covers the Web

  11. Bellini: Ferrying Application Traffic Flows through Geo-distributed Datacenters in the Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Baochun

    Bellini: Ferrying Application Traffic Flows through Geo-distributed Datacenters in the Cloud Zimu. To take full advantage of superior connectivities between geo-distributed datacenters, application traffic, implementing and deploying such inter- datacenter protocols for various applications, such as messaging

  12. Field Measurements for Estimating Impact Loads on Girder Supports for Ferry Ramps 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyons, Kimberly

    2015-04-30

    obtained. A video camera was installed to allow the research team to distinguish between loading events caused by large or small ferry boats. The recorded data from the instrumentation was accessed remotely from Texas A&M University in College Station...

  13. Interview of Dan Brown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Dan

    2008-06-09

    stream_source_info brown.txt.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 14108 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name brown.txt.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 Dan Brown interviewed by Alan Macfarlane 10th January 2008... down ? the 3?- phosphate [there are four nucleosides in RNA with positions 2?-, 3?- and 5?- which can carry a phosphate group]; amazingly Waldo Cohn found that the methods used to separate metals in the atomic energy field could be used to separate...

  14. BROWN ALGAE Colpomenia sinuosa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, Matthew B.

    BROWN ALGAE Colpomenia sinuosa GREEN ALGAE Dictyosphaeria cavernosa Amphiroa fragilissima Gelidiopsis intricata Botryocladia pyriformis RED ALGAE CYANOBACTERIA Oscillitoria acuminata Schizothrix sp. "ALGAE"­ A DIVERSE ASSORTMENT OF LIFE FORMS Photosynthesis is performed by a taxonomically diverse

  15. Underground Coal Gasification at Tennessee Colony 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garrard, C. W.

    1979-01-01

    The Tennessee Colony In Situ Coal Gasification Project conducted by Basic Resources Inc. is the most recent step in Texas Utilities Company's ongoing research into the utilization of Texas lignite. The project, an application of the Soviet...

  16. University of Tennessee School of Music

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

    University of Tennessee School of Music Ambassador Application Return your completed application to the School of Music Office. Please Read the Information Below before Applying: The School of Music Student Ambassadors

  17. Recoverable DTN Routing based on a Relay of Cyclic Message-Ferries on a MSQ Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayashi, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    An interrelation between a topological design of network and efficient algorithm on it is important for its applications to communication or transportation systems. In this paper, we propose a design principle for a reliable routing in a store-carry-forward manner based on autonomously moving message-ferries on a special structure of fractal-like network, which consists of a self-similar tiling of equilateral triangles. As a collective adaptive mechanism, the routing is realized by a relay of cyclic message-ferries corresponded to a concatenation of the triangle cycles and using some good properties of the network structure. It is recoverable for local accidents in the hierarchical network structure. Moreover, the design principle is theoretically supported with a calculation method for the optimal service rates of message-ferries derived from a tandem queue model for stochastic processes on a chain of edges in the network. These results obtained from a combination of complex network science and computer scie...

  18. Study of Cd-chalcogenide/ferri-ferrocyanide photoelectrochemical cells: effect of surface morphology and added salt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tenne, R.

    1983-11-01

    The authors carried out an investigation of the Cd-chalcogenide/ferri-ferrocyanide photoelectrochemical cells. In particular, the effect of surface morphology and the effect of added salts upon the characteristics of these cells were investigated. Successive etching with Br/sub 2/ (3%)/methanol, aqua regia, and finally photoetching increases the surface roughness of CdSe (CdS, CdTe) which has a marked effect on the cell characteristics in the ferri-ferrocyanide electrolyte (and polysulfide electrolyte as well). In contrast with polysulfide electrolyte, added salts decrease the output stability of the cell and the onset potential for the photocurrent, which can be explained by the removal of the physiosorbed ferrocyanide ions from the electrode surface by the ions of the salt. On increasing the surface roughness of the electrode, while keeping the salt concentration unchanged, the output stability and the onset potential were increased. A kinetic model is used to explain these phenomena. Thus, added salts can be used to probe the strength of the adsorption of the active electrolyte on the surface of the photoelectrode. Finally, we report on the surface morphology of CdSe and CdTe after irradiation in ferri-ferrocyanide solution and compare our findings to surface morphologies which were observed previously with the help of photoelectrochemical etching (photoetching). It is found that small rectangular crystallites, probably of cadmium ferrocyanide, deposit on the crystal surface during the photocorrosion process in addition to elemental Se(Te).

  19. Risk Assessment Sally Brown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    or publicly owned treatment works) whose regulations and rule enforcement work to make sure that the risksRisk Assessment Sally Brown University of Washington Risk in our day to day routines One could argue that every thing that we do, every day is fraught with risks and that the safest approach is just

  20. Tennessee

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979 1.988Prices, SalesMoroccoTurkey

  1. NNSA hosts New Mexico, Tennessee governors | National Nuclear...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Mexico, Tennessee governors | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation...

  2. EA-1175: Proposed Title Transfer of East Tennessee Technology Park Land and Facilities, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to transfer the title of unneeded DOE real property located at the U.S. Department of Energy East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) in...

  3. Bridging Brown County Case Study Bridging Brown County Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    and Finding a Future Summary and Background Communities in the rural Midwest typically understand and solve unique issues facing rural communities? In Brown County, Minnesota, the community developed. But we also belong to a larger rural community: the community formed by all residents of Brown County. We

  4. Hanbury Brown and Twiss Effect Anton Kapliy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanbury Brown and Twiss Effect Anton Kapliy March 10, 2009 #12;Robert Hanbury Brown (1916 - 2002 figure: fermionic Helium #12;Partial list of sources ·http://faculty.virginia.edu/austen/HanburyBrownTwiss

  5. BIOMECHANICS THE UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE FALL 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Auerbach, Benjamin M.

    1 BIOMECHANICS ANTH 595 THE UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE ­ FALL 2013 Instructor: Benjamin M. Auerbach to bblearn.utk.edu for announcements and to access the course readings. Course Description Biomechanics is the study of functional morphology. Broadly, in biomechanical studies, we examine the activities

  6. The physics of brown dwarfs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilles Chabrier

    1999-02-01

    We briefly outline the physics underlying the mechanical and thermal properties of brown dwarfs, which characterizes their interiors and their atmospheres. We mention the most recent improvements realyzed in the theory of brown dwarfs and the connection with experimental and observational tests of this theory.

  7. Energy Secretary to Visit Georgia Nuclear Reactor Site and Tennessee...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to Visit Georgia Nuclear Reactor Site and Tennessee Laboratory to Highlight Administration Support for Nuclear Energy Energy Secretary to Visit Georgia Nuclear Reactor Site and...

  8. ,"Tennessee Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Tennessee...

  9. Michael Allen; Dongarra, Jack. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Toward a new metric for ranking high performance computing systems. Heroux, Michael Allen; Dongarra, Jack. University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN The High Performance Linpack...

  10. ,"Tennessee Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Price (Dollars per Thousand...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Tennessee Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release...

  11. Charles L. Brown Department of Electrical & Computer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    -imaging and -electronics, and superconducting electronics Every faculty member in the Charles L. Brown Department

  12. Harriman, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainableGlynnMassachusetts: EnergySoftware IncHarmon,Tennessee: Energy Resources

  13. Harrison, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainableGlynnMassachusetts: EnergySoftwareMississippi: EnergyHarrisonNewTennessee:

  14. Dartmouth College HANOVER NEW HAMPSHIRE 03755-1420 Safety and Security 5 Rope Ferry Road #6156 Telephone (603) 646-4000 Fax (603) 646-1603

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dartmouth College HANOVER · NEW HAMPSHIRE · 03755-1420 Safety and Security · 5 Rope Ferry Road #6156 · Telephone (603) 646-4000 · Fax (603) 646-1603 Dear New Students; I want to welcome each of you

  15. April, 1999 (Revised) 1 TENNESSEE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

    in Retail Markets which are not Produced and Marketed Under the Tennessee Fancy Fresh Egg Marketing ProgramApril, 1999 (Revised) 1 RULES OF TENNESSEE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DIVISION OF MARKETS CHAPTER 0080-5-4-.12 Eggs Offered for Sale at Retail 0080-5-4-.02 Inedible Eggs 0080-5-4-.13 Out

  16. Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    communities across the state. In recent years, many of the small municipal water suppliers and utility become severely strained, forcing users to seek alternative sources of water. Providing an adequate of Tennessee depends on groundwater for drinking water supply. In West Tennessee, nearly all public suppliers

  17. Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    supplies of many communities across the state. In recent years, many of the small municipal water suppliers wells have become severely strained, forcing users to seek alternative sources of water. Providing of Tennessee depends on groundwater for drinking water supply. In West Tennessee, nearly all public suppliers

  18. State of Tennessee Home Energy Savers' Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-07-21

    The activities of the original Home Energy Savers' Program (HESP) in Tennessee are briefly described. Then the approach, summary, and evaluation of HESP programs, Project Conserve, Manpower Assistance program, and the Information Center are detailed. The HESP Interim Report, May 23, 1977, is included. It deals with the background information on the project; examines the methods, assumptions, and adjustments made during implementation of the program; gives evaluations of program tasks and performance; and details a proposed project extension for June 1977 to March 1978. A survey on Project Conserve is presented. (MCW)

  19. Fairmount, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, AlabamaETEC GmbH JumpEllenville,PowerEvaporative||New Jersey:Public UtilitiesTennessee:

  20. Kentucky Utilities Co (Tennessee) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EAInvervar Hydro JumpHuariKeewatin Public UtilitiesTennessee) Jump to:

  1. Tennessee Valley Electric Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc JumpHeter BatterySolarfinMarketMemberI PLLCsourceValley AuthorityTennessee

  2. Tennessee Valley Authority (Alabama) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJ Automation JumpSet RenewableFuelStandard Jump to:usingTennessee

  3. Chattanooga, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,CammackFLIR JumpMaine: Energy ResourcesTennessee: Energy Resources Jump to:

  4. Chattanooga, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,CammackFLIR JumpMaine: Energy ResourcesTennessee: Energy Resources Jump

  5. Murfreesboro, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII Jump to: navigation, searchsourceEnergy InformationMunicipalitiesTennessee:

  6. Hanbury Brown-Twiss Experiment with Coherent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    39 Chapter 2 Hanbury Brown-Twiss Experiment with Coherent Light This chapter was previously a theory that allows us #12;40 Hanbury Brown-Twiss Experiment with Coherent Light to construct processes

  7. Edited by Allison P. Brown Edited by Allison P. Brown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salzman, Daniel

    at SUNY Geneseo and the Monroe County Library System to identify trends in library publishing, seek outTube Channel by Kara Stock 34 The Library as a Community Publisher 39 Part 2 Trends & Essentials in ScholarlyLibrary Publishing Toolkit Edited by Allison P. Brown #12;Library Publishing Toolkit Edited

  8. 17 Years of Lithium Brown Dwarfs 10/21/12Ringberg Brown Dwarfs 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joergens, Viki

    17 Years of Lithium Brown Dwarfs 10/21/12Ringberg Brown Dwarfs 1 #12;The Keck Search for Lithium 10/21/12Ringberg Brown Dwarfs 2 Lithium was not seen in objects which should have been comfortably into the brown "lithium dating". This adjustment in age meant that the inferred mass of PPl 15 rose to near the substellar

  9. L. Frank Brown, Jr. Publications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    (Upper Pennsylvanian), northern Stephens County, Texas: The University of Texas at Austin, Bureau., and Erxleben, A. W., 1973, Pennsylvanian depositional systems in North-Central Texas: a guide for interpretingL. Frank Brown, Jr. Publications July 8, 2008 Business address: The University of Texas at Austin

  10. Tennessee Valley Shorebird Assessment Project SHOREBIRD CONSERVATION AND MONITORING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    IN 1 YEAR BAR-TAILED GODWIT 6,000 MILES NON-STOP Tennessee Valley Shorebird Assessment Project NICHE Assessment Project Overview Construction of TVA dams over the past 60+ years has created extensive inland

  11. GATTON COLLEGE OF PHARMACY EAST TENNESSEE STATE UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karsai, Istvan

    Accreditation 11 Memberships 11 ETSU Vision Statement 11 ETSU Mission Statement 11 ETSU Values 11 ETSU Strategic........................................................................................ 63 Tennessee Board of Regents 63 ETSU Administration 64 College of Pharmacy Administration 64 FACULTY

  12. Tennessee Technological University 1 A Revolution That Will Transform How

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Robert Caiming

    Technological University 9 #12;Correlation Walmart example Database of past transactions What item each As storms approached, Walmart stocked boxes of Pop-Tarts at the front of stores Tennessee Technological

  13. Tennessee-based IAC Helps Manufacturer Become More Energy Efficient

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Thanks to help from the Tennessee 3-Star Industrial Assessment Center, the FUJIFILM Hunt Chemicals U.S.A facility in Dayton, TN is saving an estimated $39,280 per year in energy savings. Find out more.

  14. Brown DwarfBrown Dwarf Brown Dwarf White Dwarf White Dwarf White Dwarf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bechtold, Jill

    the mass needed for hydrogen fusion. Mass: StarPower Points: 2 Small dim barely detectable ball: 0.5 - 1.4 SM StarPower Points: 6 Medium size star with enough mass to support nuclear fusion Yellow Dwarf Small dim barely detectable ball of gas. When brown dwarf stars form they do not have

  15. Integrated solid waste management of Sevierville, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    The subject document reports the results of an in-depth investigation of the fiscal year 1992 cost of the City of Sevierville, Tennessee integrated municipal solid waste management (IMSWM) system, the energy consumed to operate the system, and the environmental performance requirements for each of the system`s waste-processing and disposal facilities. Actual data from records kept by participants is reported in this document. Every effort was made to minimize the use of assumptions, and no attempt is made to interpret the data reported. Analytical approaches are documented so that interested analysts may perform manipulation or further analysis of the data. As such, the report is a reference document for MSW management professionals who are interested in the actual costs and energy consumption for a one-year period, of an operating IMSWM systems.

  16. INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY REPORT FOR ZONE 1 OF THE EAST TENNESSEE TECHNOLOGY PARK IN OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, David A.

    2012-08-16

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) conducted in-process inspections and independent verification (IV) surveys in support of DOE's remedial efforts in Zone 1 of East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Inspections concluded that the remediation contractor's soil removal and survey objectives were satisfied and the dynamic verification strategy (DVS) was implemented as designed. Independent verification (IV) activities included gamma walkover surveys and soil sample collection/analysis over multiple exposure units (EUs).

  17. Tennessee: Da Vinci Fuel-in-Oil Reduces Emissions, Wins R&D 100...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tennessee: Da Vinci Fuel-in-Oil Reduces Emissions, Wins R&D 100 Award Tennessee: Da Vinci Fuel-in-Oil Reduces Emissions, Wins R&D 100 Award August 19, 2013 - 5:07pm Addthis...

  18. Recommendation 170: Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study for East Tennessee Technology Park

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The ORSSAB Recommendation to DOE on a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study for East Tennessee Technology Park.

  19. Independent Oversight Inspection, East Tennessee Technology Park, Summary Report- May 2003

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health and Emergency Management at the Oak Ridge Operations Office and East Tennessee Technology Park

  20. Edmund G. Brown Jr. LIGHTING CALIFORNIA'S FUTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edmund G. Brown Jr. Governor LIGHTING CALIFORNIA'S FUTURE: SMART LIGHT-EMITTING DIODE LIGHTING's Future: Smart LightEmitting Diode Lighting in Residential Fans. California Energy Commission, PIER

  1. Systems and Professional Development - David Brown, Director...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Workload DOE's Certified Workforce Acquisition Workload The Holy Grail of Contract and Project Management More... Workshop 2015 - BrownSystems & Professional Development.pdf...

  2. Dartmouth College HANOVER NEW HAMPSHIRE 03755-1420 Safety and Security 5 Rope Ferry Road #6156 Telephone (603) 646-4000 Fax (603) 646-1603

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dartmouth College HANOVER · NEW HAMPSHIRE · 03755-1420 Safety and Security · 5 Rope Ferry Road students; and that is our greatest concern. New Hampshire laws pertaining to underage drinking, hazing #6156 · Telephone (603) 646-4000 · Fax (603) 646-1603 Dear New Student Parents and Families

  3. Transition Plan for the K-1203 Sewage Treatment Plant, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffmeister J.

    2008-10-05

    The K-1203 Sewage Treatment Plant (STP) was previously used to treat and process all sanitary sewage waste from the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP). The plant was shut down on May 29, 2008 as a result of the transition of sewage treatment for ETTP to the City of Oak Ridge. The City of Oak Ridge expanded the Rarity Ridge Sewage Treatment Plant (RRSTP) to include capacity to treat the waste from the ETTP and the Community Reuse Organization of East Tennessee (CROET) constructed a new ETTP lift station and force main to RRSTP. In preparation for the shutdown of K-1203, the US Department of Energy (DOE) in conjunction with Operation Management International (OMI) developed a shut down plan to outline actions that need to occur prior to the transition of the facility to Bechtel Jacob Company, LLC (BJC) for decontamination and demolition (D and D). This plan outlines the actions, roles, and responsibilities for BJC in order to support the transition of the K-1203 STP from OMI to the BJC Surveillance and Maintenance (S and M) and D and D programs. The D and D of the K-1203 Facilities is planned under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Remaining Facilities D and D Action Memorandum in the Balance of Site-Utilities D and D Subproject in fiscal year (FY) 2014.

  4. Tennessee Valley and Eastern Kentucky Wind Working Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katie Stokes

    2012-05-03

    In December 2009, the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy (SACE), through a partnership with the Appalachian Regional Commission, EKPC, Kentucky's Department for Energy Development and Independence, SACE, Tennessee's Department of Environment and Conservation, and TVA, and through a contract with the Department of Energy, established the Tennessee Valley and Eastern Kentucky Wind Working Group (TVEKWWG). TVEKWWG consists of a strong network of people and organizations. Working together, they provide information to various organizations and stakeholders regarding the responsible development of wind power in the state. Members include representatives from utility interests, state and federal agencies, economic development organizations, non-government organizations, local decision makers, educational institutions, and wind industry representatives. The working group is facilitated by the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy. TVEKWWG supports the Department of Energy by helping educate and inform key stakeholders about wind energy in the state of Tennessee.

  5. East Tennessee State University (ETSU) eJobs at ETSU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karsai, Istvan

    East Tennessee State University (ETSU) eJobs at ETSU Frequently Asked Questions Q.) How do I obtain an ETSU application for employment? A.) Apply for a regular budgeted position at ETSU using the eJobs at ETSU online system. Please visit the ETSU employment opportunities website for instructions at: http://www.etsu

  6. The UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE Office of Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yan

    The UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE Office of Risk Management 112 Conference Center Building Knoxville, TN to the Office of Risk Management. NOTE: Please share this information within your department/unit with those with University and State requirements. It is imperative that the Office of Risk Management be notified

  7. The Tennessee Board of Regents Institutional Student Housing Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dasgupta, Dipankar

    The Tennessee Board of Regents Institutional Student Housing Policies For The University of Memphis) graduate semester hours by the close of the registration period for which housing is requested. Summer. Students not enrolled in classes during the summer, but need summer housing, may request an exception

  8. Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the state. In recent years, many of the small municipal water suppliers and utility districts that rely strained, forcing users to seek alternative sources of water. Providing an adequate supply of water on groundwater for drinking water supply. In West Tennessee, nearly all public suppliers, industries, and rural

  9. Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , many of the small municipal water suppliers and utility districts that rely on wells, springs, or minor alternative sources of water. Providing an adequate supply of water for industrial, commercial, and domestic supply. In West Tennessee, nearly all public suppliers, industries, and rural residents use groundwater

  10. Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    suppliers and utility districts that rely on wells, springs, or minor tributaries for their water sources, and commercial use wells have become severely strained, forcing users to seek alternative sources of water Tennessee, nearly all public suppliers, industries, and rural residents use groundwater. However, not enough

  11. 2301 Vanderbilt Place Nashville, Tennessee 37240-7741

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmeri, Thomas

    pmb 407741 2301 Vanderbilt Place Nashville, Tennessee 37240-7741 toll free 866.388.4723 tel 615 address by the Nichols-Chancellor's medalist at 11 a.m. followed by Faculty Seminars. The week culminates in the Commencement ceremony on Friday, May 8, beginning at 9:00 a.m. Most Commencement events conclude by 1:30 Friday

  12. Department of Geography The University of Tennessee, Knoxville

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

    1 Department of Geography The University of Tennessee, Knoxville STRATEGIC PLAN Revised April 2010 Geography Department is one of the most productive among Ph.D.-granting departments in North America --The 2004 Program Review Committee 1. MISSION & VISION The mission of the Department of Geography

  13. Searching for Weather in Brown Dwarfs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. G. Tinney; A. J. Tolley

    1998-11-17

    We have used an innovative tuneable filter technique to carry out a search for the variability signatures of meterological processes in the atmospheres of two nearby brown dwarfs. We find no evidence for variability in the L-type brown dwarf DENIS-PJ1228-1547 in an observations spanning approximately half a rotation period (3 hours), and evidence for variability in the M-type brown dwarf LP 944-20 in multiple observations spanning approximately one third of a rotation period (1.5 hours).

  14. EA-2000: Proposed Land Transfer to Develop a General Aviation Airport at the East Tennessee Technology Park Heritage Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE is preparing an EA to assess potential environmental impacts of the proposed land transfer to the Metropolitan Knoxville Airport Authority for the development of a general aviation airport at the East Tennessee Technology Park Heritage Center, in Oak Ridge, Tennessee.

  15. Addendum to the East Tennessee Technology Park Site-Wide Residual Contamination Remedial Investigation Work Plan Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SAIC

    2011-04-01

    The East Tennessee Technology Park Site-Wide Residual Contamination Remedial Investigation Work Plan (DOE 2004) describes the planned fieldwork to support the remedial investigation (RI) for residual contamination at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) not addressed in previous Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) decisions. This Addendum describes activities that will be conducted to gather additional information in Zone 1 of the ETTP for groundwater, surface water, and sediments. This Addendum has been developed from agreements reached in meetings held on June 23, 2010, August 25, 2010, October 13, 2010, November 13, 2010, December 1, 2010, and January 13, 2011, with representatives of the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). Based on historical to recent groundwater data for ETTP and the previously completed Sitewide Remedial Investigation for the ETTP (DOE 2007a), the following six areas of concern have been identified that exhibit groundwater contamination downgradient of these areas above state of Tennessee and EPA drinking water maximum contaminant levels (MCLs): (1) K-720 Fly Ash Pile, (2) K-770 Scrap Yard, (3) Duct Island, (4) K-1085 Firehouse Burn/J.A. Jones Maintenance Area, (5) Contractor's Spoil Area (CSA), and (6) Former K-1070-A Burial Ground. The paper presents a brief summary of the history of the areas, the general conceptual models for the observed groundwater contamination, and the data gaps identified.

  16. Deep Residential Retrofits in East Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boudreaux, Philip R; Hendrick, Timothy P; Christian, Jeffrey E; Jackson, Roderick K

    2012-04-01

    Executive Summary Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is furthering residential energy retrofit research in the mixed-humid climate of East Tennessee by selecting 10 homes and guiding the homeowners in the energy retrofit process. The homeowners pay for the retrofits, and ORNL advises which retrofits to complete and collects post-retrofit data. This effort is in accordance with the Department of Energy s Building America program research goal of demonstrating market-ready energy retrofit packages that reduce home energy use by 30 50%. Through this research, ORNL researchers hope to understand why homeowners decide to partake in energy retrofits, the payback of home energy retrofits, and which retrofit packages most economically reduce energy use. Homeowner interviews help the researchers understand the homeowners experience. Information gathered during the interviews will aid in extending market penetration of home energy retrofits by helping researchers and the retrofit industry understand what drives homeowners in making positive decisions regarding these retrofits. This report summarizes the selection process, the pre-retrofit condition, the recommended retrofits, the actual cost of the retrofits (when available), and an estimated energy savings of the retrofit package using EnergyGauge . Of the 10 households selected to participate in the study, only five completed the recommended retrofits, three completed at least one but no more than three of the recommended retrofits, and two households did not complete any of the recommended retrofits. In the case of the two homes that did none of the recommended work, the pre-retrofit condition of the homes and the recommended retrofits are reported. The five homes that completed the recommended retrofits are monitored for energy consumption of the whole house, appliances, space conditioning equipment, water heater, and most of the other circuits with miscellaneous electric loads (MELs) and lighting. Thermal comfort is also monitored, with temperature and humidity measured in all conditioned zones, attics, crawlspaces, and unconditioned basements. In some homes, heat flux transducers are installed on the basement walls to help determine the insulating qualities of the technologies and practices. EnergyGauge is used to estimate the pre-retrofit and post-retrofit home energy rating system (HERS) index and reduction in energy consumption and energy bill. In a follow-up report, data from the installed sensors will be presented and analyzed as well as a comparison of the post-retrofit energy consumption of the home to the EnergyGauge model of the post-retrofit home. Table ES1 shows the retrofits that were completed at the eight households where some or all of the recommended retrofits were completed. Home aliases are used to keep the homeowners anonymous. Some key findings of this study thus far are listed as follows. Some homeowners (50%) are not willing to spend the money to reach 30 50% energy savings. Quality of retrofit work is significantly variable among contractors which impact the potential energy savings of the retrofit. Challenges exist in defining house volume and floor area. Of the five homes that completed all the recommended retrofits, energy bill savings was not the main driver for energy retrofits. In no case were the retrofits cost neutral given a 15 year loan at 7% interest for the retrofit costs.

  17. Wayne County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin,VillageWarrensourceCentre JumpTennessee: Energy Resources Jump

  18. Weakley County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin,VillageWarrensourceCentreCounty, Tennessee: Energy Resources

  19. Warren County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin,Village ofWaialua,Wallington,SolarMissouri:Tennessee: Energy

  20. Solar heating system installed at Jackson, Tennessee. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-10-01

    The solar energy heating system installed at the Coca-Cola Bottling Works in Jackson, Tennessee is described. The system consists of 9480 square feet of Owens-Illinois evacuated tubular solar collectors with attached specular cylindrical reflectors and will provide space heating for the 70,000 square foot production building in the winter, and hot water for the bottle washing equipment the remainder of the year. Component specifications and engineering drawings are included. (WHK)

  1. EIS-0152: Iroquois/Tennessee Phase I Pipeline Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission prepared this statement to asses the environmental impacts of constructing and operating an interstate natural gas pipeline and associated infrastructure to transport gas from Canada and domestic sources to the New England Market, as proposed by the Iroquois Gas Transmission System and the Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy was a cooperating agency during statement development and adopted the statement on 9/1/1990.

  2. 2301 Vanderbilt Place Nashville, Tennessee 37240-7741

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmeri, Thomas

    pmb 407741 2301 Vanderbilt Place Nashville, Tennessee 37240-7741 toll free 866.388.4723 tel 615-Chancellor's medalist at 11 a.m. followed by Faculty Seminars for families and guests of graduates. The week culminates in the Commencement ceremony on Friday, May 8, beginning at 9:00 a.m. with the graduate schools dismissed at 10:15 a.m

  3. Hamblen County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainableGlynn County,SolarFERCInformationVirginia:Hamblen County, Tennessee:

  4. Henry County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,NavigationIndiana: EnergyTennessee: Energy

  5. Hickman County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources Jump to:Hershey, Pennsylvania: EnergyGtelTennessee: Energy

  6. Rutherford County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk, NewMichigan:Roxbury,Rush County,New York:Tennessee: Energy

  7. Sevier County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission DevelopmentLakes, NorthTennessee: Energy Resources

  8. Signal Mountain, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing Capacity for LowInformationShoshoneEnergyMountain, Tennessee: Energy

  9. Loudon County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma, Arizona:Oregon: EnergyLloyd,Loudon County, Tennessee: Energy Resources

  10. Marshall County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  11. Lincoln County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma, Arizona:Oregon: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, searchTennessee:

  12. Polk County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975) |Texas: Energy ResourcesArkansas: EnergyNebraska:Tennessee:

  13. Perry County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio ProgramInformationMissouri: Energy Resources JumpTennessee:

  14. Tennessee: Bringing Jobs and Economic Development to Piney Flats |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  15. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Programs at Tennessee Schools

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Digg FindPortsasIdle Reduction Programs at Tennessee

  16. On the origin of a phosphate enriched interval in the Chattanooga Shale (Upper Devonian) of Tennessee--A combined sedimentologic,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schieber, Juergen

    ) of Tennessee--A combined sedimentologic, petrographic, and geochemical study Yifan Li a,b, , Juergen Schieber b

  17. MICROLENSING BINARIES WITH CANDIDATE BROWN DWARF COMPANIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shin, I.-G.; Han, C. [Department of Physics, Institute for Astrophysics, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 371-763 (Korea, Republic of); Gould, A.; Skowron, J. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 W. 18th Ave., Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Udalski, A.; Szymanski, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Soszynski, I.; Pietrzynski, G.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Kozlowski, S.; Wyrzykowski, L. [Warsaw University Observatory, Al. Ujazdowskie 4, 00-478 Warszawa (Poland); Sumi, T. [Department of Earth and Space Science, Osaka University, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Dominik, M. [SUPA, University of St. Andrews, School of Physics and Astronomy, North Haugh, St. Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Beaulieu, J.-P. [Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, UMR7095 CNRS-Universite Pierre and Marie Curie, 98 bis boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Tsapras, Y. [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, 6740B Cortona Dr., Suite 102, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States); Bozza, V. [Dipartimento di Fisica 'E. R. Caianiello', Universita degli Studi di Salerno, Via S. Allende, I-84081 Baronissi (Italy); Abe, F. [Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); Collaboration: OGLE Collaboration; MOA Collaboration; muFUN Collaboration; and others

    2012-12-01

    Brown dwarfs are important objects because they may provide a missing link between stars and planets, two populations that have dramatically different formation histories. In this paper, we present the candidate binaries with brown dwarf companions that are found by analyzing binary microlensing events discovered during the 2004-2011 observation seasons. Based on the low mass ratio criterion of q < 0.2, we found seven candidate events: OGLE-2004-BLG-035, OGLE-2004-BLG-039, OGLE-2007-BLG-006, OGLE-2007-BLG-399/MOA-2007-BLG-334, MOA-2011-BLG-104/OGLE-2011-BLG-0172, MOA-2011-BLG-149, and MOA-201-BLG-278/OGLE-2011-BLG-012N. Among them, we are able to confirm that the companions of the lenses of MOA-2011-BLG-104/OGLE-2011-BLG-0172 and MOA-2011-BLG-149 are brown dwarfs by determining the mass of the lens based on the simultaneous measurement of the Einstein radius and the lens parallax. The measured masses of the brown dwarf companions are 0.02 {+-} 0.01 M {sub Sun} and 0.019 {+-} 0.002 M {sub Sun} for MOA-2011-BLG-104/OGLE-2011-BLG-0172 and MOA-2011-BLG-149, respectively, and both companions are orbiting low-mass M dwarf host stars. More microlensing brown dwarfs are expected to be detected as the number of lensing events with well-covered light curves increases with new-generation searches.

  18. The East Tennessee Technology Park Progress Report for the Tennessee Hazardous Waste Reduction Act for Calendar Year 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC

    2000-03-01

    This report is prepared for the East Tennessee Technology Park (formerly the Oak Ridge K-25 Site) (ETTP) in compliance with the ''Tennessee Hazardous Waste Reduction Act of 1990'' (THWRA) (TDEC 1990), Tennessee Code Annotated 68-212-306. Annually, THWRA requires a review of the site waste reduction plan, completion of summary waste reduction information as part of the site's annual hazardous waste reporting, and completion of an annual progress report analyzing and quantifying progress toward THWRA-required waste stream-specific reduction goals. This THWRA-required progress report provides information about ETTP's hazardous waste streams regulated under THWRA and waste reduction progress made in calendar year (CY) 1999. This progress report also documents the annual review of the site plan, ''Oak Ridge Operations Environmental Management and Enrichment Facilities (EMEF) Pollution Prevention Program Plan'', BJC/OR-306/R1 (Bechtel Jacobs Company 199a). In 1996, ETTP established new goal year ratios that extended the goal year to CY 1999 and targeted 50 percent waste stream-specific reduction goals. In CY 1999, these CY 1999 goals were extended to CY 2000 for all waste streams that generated waste in 1999. Of the 70 ETTP RCRA waste streams tracked in this report from base years as early as CY 1991, 51 waste streams met or exceeded their reduction goal based on the CY 1999 data.

  19. SCIENTIFIC NOTE Phloeoxena signata (Dejean): Northern range extensions to Maryland and Tennessee, U.S.A.,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Scott

    the Tennessee River; same data except ``3 Km SE Childers Hill at Leigh Creek, 25 March 2002, R. Ward'' (1 and accompanying notes are as follows: ``Tennessee: Hamilton County, Harrison State Park, 19 March 2003, R. D. Ward, 5 Km W Southside, Chambers Creek, 30 Oct. 2004, R. Ward'' (1), forested bottom lands, inland from

  20. FIA-12-0009- In the Matter of Cynthia Brown

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cynthia Brown filed an Appeal regarding a request she filed under the Freedom of Information Act. In December 2011, Ms. Brown filed a request for records regarding her late mother.

  1. Non-equilibrium Chemistry in Brown Dwarf Atmospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Metchev, Stanimir

    Non-equilibrium Chemistry in Brown Dwarf Atmospheres PHY688 Aaron Jackson April 27, 2009 #12 and convection #12;Non-equilibrium Chemistry In the context of Brown Dwarf Atmospheres, the relevant chemical;Outline What is non-equilibrium chemistry in the context of Brown Dwarfs? What is the observational

  2. Hanbury BrownTwiss effect with partially coherent electromagnetic beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Visser, Taco D.

    Hanbury Brown­Twiss effect with partially coherent electromagnetic beams Gaofeng Wu1,2 and Taco D fluctuations (the Hanbury Brown­Twiss effect) at two points in the same cross section of a random electro; (260.5430) Polarization. http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OL.39.002561 Ever since Hanbury Brown­Twiss (HBT

  3. Update 2-10 Martin J. Brown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    procurement, logistics and travel policy and oversight to the Department. Brown was a Rear Admiral in the Navy from 2004 - 2007 and served as the Competition Advocate General of the Navy and was the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Acquisition Management) for the Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Research

  4. Chemistry of Atmospheric Brown Carbon Alexander Laskin,*,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nizkorodov, Sergey

    Chemistry of Atmospheric Brown Carbon Alexander Laskin,*, Julia Laskin,*, and Sergey A. Nizkorodov fraction of atmospheric aerosol and has profound effects on air quality, atmospheric chemistry, and climate of radiation through Earth's atmosphere. The cloud albedo effect, Special Issue: 2015 Chemistry in Climate

  5. Radial Velocity Variability of Field Brown Dwarfs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prato, L; Rice, E L; McLean, I S; Kirkpatrick, J D; Burgasser, A J; Kim, S S

    2015-01-01

    We present paper six of the NIRSPEC Brown Dwarf Spectroscopic Survey, an analysis of multi-epoch, high-resolution (R~20,000) spectra of 25 field dwarf systems (3 late-type M dwarfs, 16 L dwarfs, and 6 T dwarfs) taken with the NIRSPEC infrared spectrograph at the W. M. Keck Observatory. With a radial velocity precision of ~2 km/s, we are sensitive to brown dwarf companions in orbits with periods of a few years or less given a mass ratio of 0.5 or greater. We do not detect any spectroscopic binary brown dwarfs in the sample. Given our target properties, and the frequency and cadence of observations, we use a Monte Carlo simulation to determine the detection probability of our sample. Even with a null detection result, our 1 sigma upper limit for very low mass binary frequency is 18%. Our targets included 7 known, wide brown dwarf binary systems. No significant radial velocity variability was measured in our multi-epoch observations of these systems, even for those pairs for which our data spanned a significant ...

  6. Africa House PATRICK BROWN, Faculty Director

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    Africa House PATRICK BROWN, Faculty Director LOKANGAKA LOSAMBE, Faculty Director PIERRETTE LUMUMBA of African cultures' role in the world. Africa House will be a valuable program in helping students develop component, Africa House offers students shared experiences as well as opportunities for participation

  7. Disks around Brown Dwarfs and Cool Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Apai; Kevin Luhman; Michael Liu

    2007-02-10

    We review the current picture of disks around cool stars and brown dwarfs, including disk fractions, mass estimates, disk structure and dispersal, accretion, dust composition, and the debris disk phase. We discuss these in the framework of recent planet formation models.

  8. Wilson County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEtGeorgia:Illinois: Energy Resources JumpWillowick,7.5808413°,Tennessee:

  9. Van Buren County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin, NewArkansas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Tennessee:

  10. Tipton County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al., 2013)Open EnergyTinox Jump to: navigation, searchTippingTennessee:

  11. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Tennessee Valley Authority - AL 01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers Co - OHStar CutterTennessee Valley

  12. Grundy County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainableGlynn County,Solar JumpInformationGrowind Jump to:Tennessee: Energy

  13. Franklin County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable Urban TransportFortistar LLC Jumpwells,Maine: EnergyNew York:Tennessee:

  14. DeKalb County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstruments Inc JumpIowa:Minnesota:DaylightingDeFreesTennessee: Energy

  15. East Ridge, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, AlabamaETEC GmbH Jump to:Providence, Rhode Island: Energy Resources JumpTennessee:

  16. Smith County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing Capacity forSilicium de ProvenceSolar JumpSloan,Smart GridTennessee: Energy

  17. Middle Valley, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: Energy ResourcesDec 2005 WindPRO isMickeyWest Energy JumpValley, Tennessee:

  18. Montgomery County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: EnergyInformation Montana Watershed1802095°,Missouri: EnergyTennessee:

  19. Lauderdale County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma, Arizona: Energy ResourcesProject | OpenLathrup Village,Tennessee: Energy

  20. Tennessee Pollution Prevention Partnership | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired Solar FuelTechnologyTel: Name: Rm. Tel: Location: Rm.Tennessee

  1. City of Bristol, Tennessee (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar Energy LLCLtd JumpGeorgia (UtilityBenham,Bowie, TexasTennessee (Utility

  2. City of Brownsville, Tennessee (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar Energy LLCLtd JumpGeorgia (UtilityBenham,Bowie,Tennessee (Utility Company)

  3. City of Covington, Tennessee (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar Energy LLCLtd JumpGeorgiaBurley,Columbus Place: OhioCornell,CouleeTennessee

  4. City of Etowah, Tennessee (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar Energy LLCLtdEllsworth, Iowa (Utility Company) Jump to:Enterprise,Tennessee

  5. City of Rockwood, Tennessee (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar EnergyLawler, Iowa (UtilityIowaIowaKansasTennessee (Utility Company) Jump to:

  6. City of Shelbyville, Tennessee (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar EnergyLawler, IowaScottsboro, Alabama (UtilityShelbyville, Tennessee (Utility

  7. City of Sparta, Tennessee (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar EnergyLawler, IowaScottsboro, AlabamaSlater, Missouri (UtilitySouthTennessee

  8. City of Springfield, Tennessee (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar EnergyLawler, IowaScottsboro, AlabamaSlater, MissouriSpooner,Tennessee

  9. Campbell County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,Cammack Village, Arkansas: Energy Resources JumpVerde,Tennessee: Energy

  10. Cannon County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,Cammack Village, Arkansas: EnergyCounty, Tennessee: Energy Resources Jump

  11. Carroll County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,Cammack Village, Arkansas:Fund forCarnegieIndiana:New Hampshire:Tennessee:

  12. Carter County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,Cammack Village, Arkansas:FundMichigan: EnergyMontana: EnergyTennessee:

  13. Bedford County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental JumpInformation Beaufort County, SouthBecker County,BedfordTennessee: Energy

  14. Benton County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental JumpInformation BeaufortBent County, Colorado:Mississippi:Tennessee: Energy

  15. Bradley County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank, Maine: Energy Resources Jump to:OpenBradfordwoods, Pennsylvania:Tennessee:

  16. Cheatham County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,CammackFLIR JumpMaine: Energy ResourcesTennessee: EnergyNew

  17. City of Chattanooga, Tennessee (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,CammackFLIRChurch Point,Blue Hill,Missouri (UtilityChattanooga, Tennessee

  18. City of Elizabethton, Tennessee (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,CammackFLIRChurch Point,BlueDeaver,Dighton, KansasElizabethton, Tennessee

  19. Claiborne County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation,Vineland, NewCityClackamas,Tennessee:

  20. Clay County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:New York:Clay County,North Carolina: EnergyTennessee:

  1. Tennessee Eastman letter on Y-12 reduction in force

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S. CoalMexicoConference Tight Oil1 Soil Water andFoodTennessee

  2. Tennessee Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S. CoalMexicoConference Tight Oil1 SoilPriceFeet)Tennessee

  3. Movement of tagged dredged sand at thalweg disposal sites in the Upper Mississippi River. Volume 3. Additional results at Gordon's Ferry and Whitney Island sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCown, D.L.; Paddock, R.A.

    1985-04-01

    During routine channel maintenance, hydraulically dredged sand was tagged with sand coated with fluorescent dye before being deposited as a pile in the thalweg at three sites on the Upper Mississippi River. As discussed in the first two volumes of this report, bathymetry was measured and surface sediments were sampled to study changes in the topography of the disposal pile and the downstream movement of the tagged sand. At all three sites, topographic evidence of the pile disappeared after the first period of high river flow, which was followed by redevelopment of dunes in the disposal area. The tagged sand did not migrate into nearby border areas, backwaters, or sloughs, remaining in the main channel as it moved downstream. This volume presents the results of additional surveys at the Gordon's Ferry and Whitney Island sites. At Gordon's Ferry, 25 bottom cores were taken to examine the three-dimensional distribution of tagged sand in the bottom sediments. The core analyses indicated that much of the tagged sand had been incorporated into the dune structure and that it resided primarily in the crests of the dunes.

  4. Indoor nitrogen dioxide in five Chattangooga, Tennessee public housing developments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parkhurst, W.J.; Harper, J.P. ); Spengler, J.D.; Fraumeni, L.P.; Majahad, A.M. ); Cropp, J.W. )

    1988-01-01

    This report summarizes an indoor nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) sampling study conducted during January through March of 1987 in five Chattanooga public housing developments. The origins of this study date to the summer of 1983 when the Piney Woods Community Organization (a citizens action group) expressed concern about toxic industrial air pollution and the effects it might have on their community. In response to these concerns, the Chattanooga-Hamilton County Air Pollution Control Bureau (Bureau) requested assistance from the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment (TDHE) in conducting a community health survey and assistance from the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in conducting a community air quality measurement program. The TDHE community health study did not find any significant differences between the mortality statistics for the Piney Woods community and a demographically similar control group. However, a health survey revealed that Piney Woods residents did not have a statistically significant higher self-reported prevalence of cough, wheezing, phlegm, breathlessness, colds, and respiratory illness.

  5. Tennessee Home to Energy Department's First Net-Zero-Energy Building

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Building 3156 stands on the campus of Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. It's just one of many buildings at the various Energy Department national labs scattered across the country - or so it seems.

  6. THE UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE HEALTH SCIENCE CENTER (UTHSC) 2014 NURSING PRE-MATRICULATION PROGRAM APPLICATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yan

    1 THE UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE HEALTH SCIENCE CENTER (UTHSC) 2014 NURSING PRE-MATRICULATION PROGRAM: _________________________________________________________________________________ CITIZENSHIP: Are you a U.S. Citizen, non-citizen national, or foreign national who possesses a visa permitting

  7. Fiscal year 1993 well plugging and abandonment program, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    This report is a synopsis of the progress of the well plugging and abandonment program at the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, from December 1992 through August 20, 1993. A total of 70 wells and borings were plugged and abandoned during the period of time covered in this report. All wells and borings were plugged and abandoned in accordance with the Monitoring Well Plugging and Abandonment Plan for the US Department of Energy, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (HSW, Inc. 1991).

  8. The measurement of contact areas and temperature during frictional sliding of Tennessee sandstone 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teufel, Lawrence William

    1976-01-01

    THE MEASUREMENT OF CONTACT AREAS AND TEMPERATURE DURING FRICTIONAL SLIDING OF TENNESSEE SANDSTONE A Thesis by LAWRENCE WILLIAM TEUFEL Submit';ed to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTERS OF SCIENCE August 1976 Major Subiect: Geology THE MEASUREMENT OF CONTACT AREAS AND TEMPERATURES DURING FRICTIONAL SLIDING OF TENNESSEE SANDSTONE A Thesis by LAWRENCE WILLIAM TEUFEL Approved as to sty1e and content by: Cha rma...

  9. Ferry Barge 2 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-09-05

    Enhance your courses and personal research with several new services and research tools available from the TAMU Libraries and the World Wide Web. We will pick up where we left off last year with a demonstration of some of our new databases from...

  10. MEMORANDUM FROM: THOMAS E. BROWN, DIRECTOR OFFICE OF CONTRACT...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ,2008 MEMORANDUM FROM: THOMAS E. BROWN, DIRECTOR OFFICE OF CONTRACT MANAGEMENT OFFICE OF PROCUREMENT AND ASSISTANCE MANAGEMENT SUBJECT: Contract Change Order Administration of...

  11. Women @ Energy: Nancy Brown | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'S FUTURE.Energy Wind Power Today,CarolKarenWomenNancy Brown Women @

  12. Light brown apple moth’s arrival in California worries commodity groups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varela, Lucia G.; Johnson, Marshall W; Strand, Larry; Wilen, Cheryl A; Pickel, Carolyn

    2008-01-01

    control of light brown apple moth, Epi- phyas postvittana (2007a. Light brown apple moth host list. www.cdfa.ca.gov/p. CDFA. 2007b. Light brown apple moth project: Advisories.

  13. ORIGINAL RESEARCH Introgression of Brown Norway Chromosome 1 onto the Fawn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helmstetter, Fred J.

    ORIGINAL RESEARCH Introgression of Brown Norway Chromosome 1 onto the Fawn Hooded Hypertensive (FHH) and Brown Norway (BN) parent strains with a Brown Norway chromosome 1 substitution on the FHH

  14. Baseline Environmental Analysis Report for the K-1251 Barge Facility at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Winkle J.E.

    2007-08-24

    This report documents the baseline environmental conditions of the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) K-1251 Barge Facility, which is located at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP). DOE is proposing to lease the facility to the Community Reuse Organization of East Tennessee (CROET). This report provides supporting information for the use, by a potential lessee, of government-owned facilities at ETTP. This report is based upon the requirements of Sect. 120(h) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). The lease footprint is slightly over 1 acre. The majority of the lease footprint is defined by a perimeter fence that surrounds a gravel-covered area with a small concrete pad within it. Also included is a gravel drive with locked gates at each end that extends on the east side to South First Avenue, providing access to the facility. The facility is located along the Clinch River and an inlet of the river that forms its southern boundary. To the east, west, and north, the lease footprint is surrounded by DOE property. Preparation of this report included the review of government records, title documents, historic aerial photos, visual and physical inspections of the property and adjacent properties, and interviews with current and former employees involved in the operations on the real property to identify any areas on the property where hazardous substances and petroleum products or their derivatives and acutely hazardous wastes were known to have been released or disposed. Radiological surveys were conducted and chemical samples were collected to assess the facility's condition.

  15. Publications of Richard E. Brown Refereed Journal Articles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Status of Office Equipment in the USA." Energy. vol. 31, no. 14. (also LBNL-57470). November. pp. 2823-2838. Brown, Richard E., and Jonathan G. Koomey. 2003. "Electricity Use in California: Past Trends and Present, Bruce Nordman, Richard E. Brown, Maryann Piette, Michael Ting, and Alan Meier. 2002. "Electricity Used

  16. BrownMap: Enforcing Power Budget in Shared Data Centers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    BrownMap: Enforcing Power Budget in Shared Data Centers Akshat Verma, Pradipta De, Vijay Mann, we investigate mechanisms to ensure that a shared data center can operate within a power budget). We present the BrownMap methodology that is able to ensure that data centers can deal both

  17. Boiler Gold Rush Prof. Johnny Brown (MATH 700)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Johnny E.

    Boiler Gold Rush Prof. Johnny Brown (MATH 700) jeb@math.purdue.edu #12;#12;#12;David McCullough, Jr help Always be prepared #12;Boiler Gold Rush Prof. Johnny Brown (MATH 700) jeb@math.purdue.edu #12;

  18. Biosorption of Trivalent Chromium on the Brown Seaweed Biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volesky, Bohumil

    Biosorption of Trivalent Chromium on the Brown Seaweed Biomass Y E O U N G - S A N G Y U N , D O N brown alga Ecklonia biomass as a model system. Titration of the biomass revealed that it contains that various biosorbents are able to effectively remove chromium (4-11). Some of the biomass types have

  19. Novel Solvent System for Post Combustion CO{sub 2} Capture Brown...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    COsub 2 Capture Brown, Alfred; Brown, Nathan 20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS Clean Coal Technology Coal - Environmental (Carbon Capture) Clean Coal Technology Coal -...

  20. Abiotic and biotic factors affecting light brown apple moth, Epiphyas postvittana, in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buergi, Linda Patricia

    2012-01-01

    mortality of lightbrown apple moth. In: O’Callaghan, M. (tryoni and the light brown apple moth Epiphyas postvittanaof the light brown apple moth, Epiphyas postvittana (

  1. The Graduate School The School of Graduate Studies has enjoyed more than 50 years of leadership in Tennessee and in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karsai, Istvan

    offerings at ETSU rank only behind the University of Tennessee, Knoxville and the University of Memphis. ETSU, along with Middle Tennessee State University, is the third-largest public graduate school and health sciences. This application booklet is designed to give you a brief overview of ETSU's wide range

  2. Environmental Compliance and Protection Program Description Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Jacobs

    2009-02-26

    The objective of the Environmental Compliance and Protection (EC and P) Program Description (PD) is to establish minimum environmental compliance requirements and natural resources protection goals for the Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) Oak Ridge Environmental Management Cleanup Contract (EMCC) Contract Number DE-AC05-98OR22700-M198. This PD establishes the work practices necessary to ensure protection of the environment during the performance of EMCC work activities on the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, by BJC employees and subcontractor personnel. Both BJC and subcontractor personnel are required to implement this PD. A majority of the decontamination and demolition (D and D) activities and media (e.g., soil and groundwater) remediation response actions at DOE sites on the ORR are conducted under the authority of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). CERCLA activities are governed by individual CERCLA decision documents (e.g., Record of Decision [ROD] or Action Memorandum) and according to requirements stated in the Federal Facility Agreement for the Oak Ridge Reservation (DOE 1992). Applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) for the selected remedy are the requirements for environmental remediation responses (e.g., removal actions and remedial actions) conducted under CERCLA.

  3. The Onset of Planet Formation in Brown Dwarf Disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Apai; I. Pascucci; J. Bouwman; A. Natta; Th. Henning; C. P. Dullemond

    2005-11-14

    The onset of planet formation in protoplanetary disks is marked by the growth and crystallization of sub-micron-sized dust grains accompanied by dust settling toward the disk mid-plane. Here we present infrared spectra of disks around brown dwarfs and brown dwarf candidates. We show that all three processes occur in such cool disks in a way similar or identical to that in disks around low- and intermediate-mass stars. These results indicate that the onset of planet formation extends to disks around brown dwarfs, suggesting that planet formation is a robust process occurring in most young circumstellar disks.

  4. Fiscal year 1996 well plugging and abandonment program Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-04-01

    This report is a synopsis of the progress of the well plugging and abandonment program at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, from August 1995 through August 1996. A total of 27 wells, piezometers, and borings were plugged and abandoned during the period of time covered in this report. All wells and borings were plugged and abandoned in accordance with the Monitoring Well Plugging and Abandonment Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (HSW, Inc. 1991).

  5. Genome sequence of the Brown Norway rat yields insights into

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Payseur, Bret

    Genome sequence of the Brown Norway rat yields insights into mammalian evolution Rat Genome Norway (BN) rat strain. The sequence represents a high-quality `draft' covering over 90% of the genome

  6. Quiescent X-ray emission from an evolved brown dwarf ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Stelzer

    2004-09-27

    I report on the X-ray detection of Gl569Bab. During a 25ksec Chandra observation the binary brown dwarf is for the first time spatially separated in X-rays from the flare star primary Gl569A. Companionship to Gl569A constrains the age of the brown dwarf pair to ~300-800 Myr. The observation presented here is only the second X-ray detection of an evolved brown dwarf. About half of the observing time is dominated by a large flare on Gl569Bab, the remainder is characterized by weak and non-variable emission just above the detection limit. This emission -- if not related to the afterglow of the flare -- represents the first detection of a quiescent corona on a brown dwarf, representing an important piece in the puzzle of dynamos in the sub-stellar regime.

  7. Molecular insights into the niche of harmful brown tides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurch, Louie L. (Louie Lorne)

    2011-01-01

    Recurrent brown tide blooms caused by the harmful alga Alureococcus anophagefferens have decimated coastal ecosystems and shellfisheries along the Eastern U.S and South Africa. The exact mechanisms controlling bloom ...

  8. Intern experience at Brown & Root, Inc.: an internship report 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kibbee, Stephen Edward, 1951-

    2013-03-13

    To document that the objectives of the internship were met, the report examines the organizational approach at Brown & Root and then describes seven major job assignments that were completed by the author during ...

  9. Edmund G. Brown, Jr. ENERGY-EFFICIENT COMMUNITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Lew Office Manager ENERGY EFFICINECY RESEARCH OFFICE Laurie ten Hope Deputy Director ENERGYEdmund G. Brown, Jr. Governor ENERGY-EFFICIENT COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT IN CALIFORNIA: CHULA VISTA PIERFINALPROJECTREPORTPrepared For: California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research Program Prepared By: National

  10. PIECEWISELINEAR DIFFUSION PROCESSES Sid Browne and Ward Whitt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitt, Ward

    PIECEWISE­LINEAR DIFFUSION PROCESSES by Sid Browne and Ward Whitt Graduate School of Business AT&T Bell Laboratories Columbia University Murray Hill, NJ 07974­0636 New York, NY 10027 May 17, 1994 #12

  11. Type B Accident Investigation, Subcontractor Employee Personal Protective Equipment Ignition Incident on February 18, 2003, at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On February 18, 2003, a general laborer employed at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) by MACTEC Constructors, Inc. (MACTEC) was performing rebar removal with a gas-powered cut-off machine. MACTEC is a subcontractor to Bechtel Jacobs Company LL (BJC). The sparks from the cut-off machine ignited the right leg of his 100% cotton anticontamination (anti-c) coveralls and the plastic bootie.

  12. MiR-193b-365, a brown fat enriched microRNA cluster, is essential for brown fat differentiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Lei

    Mammals have two principal types of fat. White adipose tissue primarily serves to store extra energy as triglycerides, whereas brown adipose tissue is specialized to burn lipids for heat generation and energy expenditure ...

  13. Parallaxes of Brown Dwarfs at USNO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. C. Harris; C. C. Dahn; F. J. Vrba; H. H. Guetter; B. Canzian; A. A. Henden; S. E. Levine; C. B. Luginbuhl; A. K. B. Monet; D. G. Monet; J. R. Pier; R. C. Stone; R. L. Walker

    2002-07-31

    Trigonometric parallaxes have been measured by Dahn et al. (2002) for 28 cool dwarfs and brown dwarfs, including 17 L dwarfs and three T dwarfs. Broadband CCD and near-IR photometry (VRIz*JHK) have been obtained for these objects and for 24 additional late-type dwarfs. These data have been supplemented with astrometry and photometry from the literature, including parallaxes for the brighter companions of ten L and two T dwarfs. The absolute magnitudes and colors are reviewed here. The I-J color and the spectral type are both good predictors of absolute magnitude for late-M and L dwarfs. M_J becomes monotonically fainter with I-J color and with spectral type through late-L dwarfs, then brightens for early-T dwarfs. In contrast, the J-K color correlates poorly with absolute magnitude for L dwarfs. Using several other parameters from the literature (Li detection, H-alpha emission strength, projected rotation velocity, and tangential velocity), we fail to uncover any measurable parameter that correlates with the anomalous J-K color.

  14. System Description for the K-25/K-27 D&D Project Polyurethane Foam Delivery System, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boris, G.

    2008-02-21

    The Foam Delivery System used in the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) project for the K-25/K-27 Buildings at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) is comprised of a trailer-mounted Gusmer{reg_sign} H20/35 Pro-TEC Proportioning Unit and the associated equipment to convey electrical power, air, and foam component material to the unit. This high-pressure, plural-component polyurethane foam pouring system will be used to fill process gas and non-process equipment/piping (PGE/P) within the K-25/K-27 Buildings with polyurethane foam to immobilize contaminants prior to removal. The system creates foam by mixing isocyanate and polyol resin (Resin) component materials. Currently, the project plans to utilize up to six foaming units simultaneously during peak foaming activities. Also included in this system description are the foam component material storage containers that will be used for storage of the component material drums in a staging area outside of the K-25/K-27 Buildings. The Foam Delivery System and foam component material storage enclosures (i.e., Foaming Component Protective Enclosures) used to store polymeric methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (PMDI) component material are identified as Safety Significant (SS) Structures, Systems and Components (SSC) in the Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) for the project, Documented Safety Analysis for the K-25 and K-27 Facilities at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, DSA-ET-K-25/K-27-0001.

  15. Proceedings of the 2013 Joint Rail Conference April 15-18, 2013, Knoxville, Tennessee, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    and cumulative freight tonnages, coupled with increased development of high speed passenger rail, is placing of further research are track components used in high speed passenger, heavy haul, and shared infrastructureProceedings of the 2013 Joint Rail Conference JRC2013 April 15-18, 2013, Knoxville, Tennessee, USA

  16. John T. Mihalczo PhD. in Nuclear Engineering : University of Tennessee, 1970

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    security by affecting safer assembly and handling of nuclear weapons components materials. The technologies in nuclear criticality safety, nuclear weapons identification, nuclear materials processing, and nuclearJohn T. Mihalczo PhD. in Nuclear Engineering : University of Tennessee, 1970 Masters in Physics

  17. Transportation impacts on the Tennessee highway system proposed monitored retrievable storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cobble, C.

    1985-12-12

    The issue of the transport of spent fuels to the proposed monitored retrievable storage facility in Tennessee is discussed. Relevant issues include the ability of the roads and bridges on the transport routes to handle the weight of the trucks. (CBS)

  18. Transportation impacts on the Tennessee highway system proposed monitored retrievable storage. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cobble, C.

    1985-12-12

    The issue of the transport of spent fuels to the proposed monitored retrievable storage facility in Tennessee is discussed. Relevant issues include the ability of the roads and bridges on the transport routes to handle the weight of the trucks. (CBS)

  19. Form 207 Version Date: 5/31/07 Page 1 of 4 East Tennessee State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karsai, Istvan

    Form 207 Version Date: 5/31/07 Page 1 of 4 Form 207 East Tennessee State University ETSU. CURRENT APPROVAL DATE: D. Location(s) Where Study is Being Conducted: ETSU VAMC JCMC Other MSHA Site: Name: ETSU Department & Box #: Off Campus Address: Phone: Pager: Fax: Email Address: Study Contact

  20. Self-Optimizing Control of a Large-Scale Plant: The Tennessee Eastman Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Self-Optimizing Control of a Large-Scale Plant: The Tennessee Eastman Process Truls Larsson of freedom reoptimized). The following controlled variables are recommended for this process: optimally Eastman process. We base the variable selection on the concept of self- optimizing control using steady

  1. City of Knoxville, Tennessee City Council Resolution for solar PV system

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This document is a scan of the resolution, dated July 26, 2011, for the approval of the City of Knoxville, Tennessee to use $250,000 of EECBG funding for finding innovative financing mechanisms for a planned installation of a 90-kW solar PV system.

  2. DOE Awards Contract for Decontamination & Decommissioning Project for the East Tennessee Technology Park

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Oak Ridge, Tenn. – As part of its ongoing commitment to cleaning up the legacy of the Cold War at sites across the weapons complex, the U.S. Department of Energy has awarded a contract for the remaining environmental cleanup at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) to URS | CH2M Oak Ridge, LLC.

  3. EA-1113: Lease of Parcel ED-1 of the Oak Ridge Reservation By The East Tennessee Council

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts associated with the proposed lease of 957.16 acres of the Oak Ridge Reservation to the East Tennessee Economic Council (ETEC). ETEC proposes ...

  4. EA-1113: Lease of Parcel ED-1 of the Oak Ridge Reservation By The East Tennessee Economic Council

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lease of Parcel ED-1 of the Oak Ridge Reservation By The East Tennessee Economic Council This EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts for the proposed lease of 957.16 acres of the Oak Ridge Reservation to the East Tennessee Economic Council. ETEC proposes to develop an industrial park on the leased site to provide employment opportunities for DOE and contractor employees affected by decreased federal funding.

  5. The influence of surface interactions on the reversibility of ferri/ferrocyanide at boron-doped diamond thin-film electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Granger, M.C.; Swain, G.M.

    1999-12-01

    The electrochemistry of four redox analytes [Fe(CN){sub 6}{sup {minus}3/{minus}4}, Ru(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}{sup +2/+3}, IrCl{sub 6}{sup {minus}2/{minus}3}, and methyl viologen, MV{sup +2/+/0}] was investigated at polycrystalline, boron-doped diamond thin-film electrodes before and after anodic polarization and hydrogen plasma treatment. The as-deposited diamond surface is predominantly hydrogen treatment, and quasi-reversible cyclic voltammograms ({Delta}E{sub p} of 60--80 mV) were observed for all of these couples at 0.1 V/s. After anodic polarization in H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, the surface atomic O/C ratio, as determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, increased from 0.02 to ca. 0.20. Concomitant with the increase in surface oxygen, the {Delta}E{sub p} for Fe(CN){sub 6}{sup {minus}3/{minus}4} increased to over 200 mV, while the {Delta}E{sub p} values for the other redox systems remained relatively unchanged. After acid washing and rehydrogenating the surface in hydrogen plasma (i.e., atomic hydrogen), the {Delta}E{sub p} for Fe(CN){sub 6}{sup {minus}3/{minus}4} returned to ca. 80 mV, while the {Delta}E{sub p} values for the other three redox analytes remained close to the original values. The results demonstrate the electron transfer for ferri/ferrocyanide is very sensitive to the presence of surface carbon-oxygen functionalities and that the electron transfer involves a site associated with the hydrogen-terminated surface. The results also unequivocally rule out the influence of adventitious nondiamond phases as the sole sites for the electron transfer.

  6. Between Cool Stars and Hot Planets: Origins of Brown Dwarfs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray Jayawardhana

    2003-10-28

    Brown dwarfs, which straddle the mass range between stars and planets, appear to be common both in the solar neighborhood and in star-forming regions. Their ubiquity makes the question of their origin an important one both for our understanding of brown dwarfs themselves as well as for theories on the formation of stars and planets. Studies of young sub-stellar objects could provide valuable insight into their formation and early evolution. Here I report on the latest results from our observational programs at Keck, VLT and Magellan on the disk and accretion properties of young brown dwarfs. We find compelling evidence that they undergo a T Tauri phase analogous to that of their stellar counterparts.

  7. A review of "Thomas Browne" edited by Kevin Killeen 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Black, Joseph L.

    2015-01-01

    vision of Christ all mark him as a student of John Donne and a hyperbolic advocate of Christianity. It is time to recognize his achievement and restore him to the canon of great seventeenth-century English poets. Kevin Killeen, ed. Thomas Browne. 21st... admired, had been largely relegated by the academy to the category of literary curiosity (according to the editors of Sir Thomas Browne: The World Proposed) and increasingly in danger of disappearing from the teaching canon. This volume’s editor, Kevin...

  8. Non-equilibrium chemistry in the atmospheres of brown dwarfs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Saumon; M. S. Marley; K. Lodders; R. S. Freedman

    2002-07-02

    Carbon monoxide and ammonia have been detected in the spectrum of Gl 229B at abundances that differ substantially from those obtained from chemical equilibrium. Vertical mixing in the atmosphere is a mechanism that can drive slowly reacting species out of chemical equilibrium. We explore the effects of vertical mixing as a function of mixing efficiency and effective temperature on the chemical abundances in the atmospheres of brown dwarfs and on their spectra. The models compare favorably with the observational evidence and indicate that vertical mixing plays an important role in brown dwarf atmospheres.

  9. Fiscal Year 2007 Phased Construction Completion Report for the Zone 2 Soils, Slabs, and Subsurface Structures at East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RSI

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this Phased Construction Completion Report (PCCR) is to present the fiscal year (FY) 2007 results of characterization activities and recommended remedial actions (RAs) for 11 exposure units (EUs) in Zone 2 (Z2-01, Z2-03, Z2-08, Z2-23, Z2-24, Z2-28, Z2-34, Z2-37, Z2-41, Z2-43, and Z2-44) at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), which is located in the northwest corner of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Fig. 1). ETTP encompasses a total land area of approximately 5000 acres that has been subdivided into three zones--Zone 1 ({approx}1400 acres), Zone 2 ({approx}800 acres), and the Boundary Area ({approx}2800 acres). Zone 2, which encompasses the highly industrialized portion of ETTP shown in Fig. 1, consists of all formerly secured areas of the facility, including the large processing buildings and direct support facilities; experimental laboratories and chemical and materials handling facilities; materials storage and waste disposal facilities; secure document records libraries; and shipping and receiving warehouses. The Zone 2 Record of Decision for Soil, Buried Waste, and Subsurface Structure Actions in Zone 2, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2005) (Zone 2 ROD) specifies the future end use for Zone 2 acreage as uncontrolled industrial for the upper 10 ft of soils. Characterization activities in these areas were conducted in compliance with the Zone 2 ROD and the Dynamic Verification Strategy (DVS) and data quality objectives (DQOs) presented in the Remedial Design Report/Remedial Action Work Plan for Zone 2 Soils, Slabs, and Subsurface Structures, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2007) (Zone 2 RDR/RAWP). The purpose of this PCCR is to address the following: (1) Document DVS characterization results for the accessible EUs in FY 2007; (2) Describe and document the risk evaluation for each EU, and determine if the EU met the Zone 2 ROD requirements for unrestricted industrial use to 10 ft bgs; (3) Identify additional areas not defined in the Zone 2 ROD that require remediation based on the DVS evaluation results; and (4) Describe the RAs performed in Zone 2. The Zone 2 ROD divided the Zone 2 area into 7 geographic areas and 44 EUs. To facilitate the DQOs of the DVS process, the Zone 2 RDR/RAWP regrouped the 44 EUs into 12 DQO scoping EU groups. These groups facilitated the DQO process by placing similar facilities and their support facilities together and allowed identification of data gaps. The EU groups were no longer pertinent after DQO planning was completed, and characterization was conducted as areas became accessible. As the opportunity to complete characterization became available, the planned DVS program was executed and completed in FY 2007 for the 11 EUs addressed in this document. The main body of this report describes both the DVS process and scope of work performed and the RAs completed. The scope and approach for performing DVS activities performed in FY 2007 that lead to action/no further action decisions are presented in Sects. 2 through 4. RAs performed in FY 2007 are presented in Sects. 5 through 10. Future land use is described in Sect. 11, and the status of all Zone 2 EUs as of this PCCR is presented in Sect. 12.

  10. From Nash and Brown to Maynard Smith: Equilibria, Dynamics, and ESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hofbauer, Josef

    From Nash and Brown to Maynard Smith: Equilibria, Dynamics A-1090 Vienna, Austria Abstract Nash's three, and the Brown-von Neumann-Nash dynamics. We prove that an equilibrium which is evolutionarily stable as d

  11. Effects of Brown v. Board of Education on the growth of social psychology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryant, William Howard McKinley

    1995-01-01

    This study probed the effects of Brown v. Board of Education on the growth of social psychology and psychology in general. Brown v. Board of Education, the 1954 landmark case that made segregation illegal and ended the ...

  12. Flowing with the Tide:Epiphytic Host-Specificity and Phenotypic Plasticity of the Brown Alga Padina boryana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flynn, Sierra Michelle

    2011-01-01

    PLASTICITY OF THE BROWN ALGA PADINA BORYANA SIERRA M. FLYNN94720 USA Abstract. Epiphytic algae form complex communitiesmacroalgae hosts. The brown alga Padina boryana acts as a

  13. TransferRule Induction for ExampleBased Translation Ralf D. Brown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Ralf

    ­Based Machine Translation (EBMT) systems such as those of Veale and Way (1997) and the author (Brown, 1999) have

  14. Remedial investigation/feasibility study for the David Witherspoon, Inc., 901 Site, Knoxville, Tennessee: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-10-01

    This remedial investigation (RI)/feasibility study (FS) supports the selection of remedial actions for the David Witherspoon, Inc. 901 Maryville Pike Site in Knoxville, Tennessee. Operations at the site, used as a recycling center, have resulted in past, present, and potential future releases of hazardous substances in to the environment. This Site is a Tennessee Superfund site. A phased approach was planned to (1) gather existing data from previous investigations managed by the Tenn. Dept. of Environment and Conservation; (2) perform a preliminary RI, including risk assessments, and an FS with existing data to identify areas where remedial action may be necessary; (3) gather additional field data to adequately define the nature and extent of risk-based contaminants that present identifiable threats to human and/or ecological receptors; and (4) develop remedial action alternatives to reduce risks to acceptable levels.

  15. Work plan addendum for David Witherspoon, Inc., 901 Site Building Characterization, Knoxville, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    This building characterization plan was developed as an addendum to the existing site characterization work plan documents, which are in Appendix B of the David Witherspoon, Inc., (DWI) preliminary remedial investigation (RI)/feasibility study (FS). All building characterization activities will be conducted in accordance with the rules of the Hazardous Substance Remedial Action Program under the direction of the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, Division of Superfund (TN Rules 1200-1-3) and its implementing regulations. Additional rules of the state of Tennessee, Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency guidance were consulted during development of this plan. Activities at the DWI site were concerned with scrap metal processing and scrap metal resale.

  16. Photoprotection in the brown alga Macrocystis pyrifera: Evolutionary implications Ernesto Garcia-Mendoza a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Govindjee

    Photoprotection in the brown alga Macrocystis pyrifera: Evolutionary implications Ernesto Garcia xxxx Keywords: Brown algae Evolution Macrocystis pyrifera Non-photochemical quenching Photoprotection-photochemical quenching, NPQ) in the brown alga Macrocystis pyrifera with that of Ficus sp., a higher plant to examine

  17. Toward Systems Biology in Brown Algae to Explore Acclimation and Adaptation to the Shore Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Toward Systems Biology in Brown Algae to Explore Acclimation and Adaptation to the Shore,2 Catherine Boyen,1,2 and Anne Siegel4,5 Abstract Brown algae belong to a phylogenetic lineage distantly siliculosus as a model organism for brown algae has represented a framework in which several omics techniques

  18. Light brown apple moth (LBAM) (Epiphyas postvittana) is an important invasive leafroller pest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    Light brown apple moth (LBAM) (Epiphyas postvittana) is an important invasive leafroller pest for Light Brown Apple Moth IN CALIFORNIA NURSERIES Eggs are not easily observed by nursery scouts or other the head. Male light brown apple moths caught in pheromone traps. e wing-color pattern of males can

  19. Commparison of the Hanbury Brown-Twiss effect for bosons and fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Commparison of the Hanbury Brown-Twiss effect for bosons and fermions T. Jeltes1 , J. M. Mc-sud, Campus Polytechnique RD 128, 91127 Palaiseau Cedex, France. Fifty years ago, Hanbury Brown and Twiss (HBT atoms7,8,9,10,11,12,13 . It goes back to the discovery by Hanbury Brown and Twiss1 , that photons

  20. ccsd00001341 Hanbury-Brown Twiss correlations to probe the population

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ccsd­00001341 (version 1) : 23 Mar 2004 Hanbury-Brown Twiss correlations to probe the population Hanbury- Brown and Twiss correlations. The superpoissonian and poissonian photon statistics of thermal.50.Td,42.50.-p,42.50.Ar 1 #12; The seminal experiment of Hanbury-Brown and Twiss (HBT)[1], consisted

  1. The Hanbury Brown Twiss effect for atomic matter waves Christoph I. Westbrook and Denis Boiron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    The Hanbury Brown Twiss effect for atomic matter waves Christoph I. Westbrook and Denis Boiron This paper discusses our recent work on developing the matter wave analogs to the Hanbury Brown Twiss light in the famous experiments of Robert Hanbury Brown and Richard Twiss (HBT) [4]. Although the effect

  2. Hanbury BrownTwiss Correlations to Probe the Population Statistics of GHz Photons Emitted by Conductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plaçais, Bernard

    Hanbury Brown­Twiss Correlations to Probe the Population Statistics of GHz Photons Emitted of GHz photons in quantum circuits, using Hanbury Brown and Twiss correlations. The super The seminal experiment of Hanbury Brown and Twiss (HBT) [1], consisted in two detectors correlating the power

  3. Application of the Hanbury BrownTwiss effect to scattering from quasi-homogeneous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Visser, Taco D.

    Application of the Hanbury Brown­Twiss effect to scattering from quasi-homogeneous media David: Hanbury Brown-Twiss effect Scattering Born approximation Quasi-homogeneous media Inverse scattering a b scattering media, is studied by the use of the Hanbury Brown­Twiss effect. In particular the two

  4. Hope and despair: visual arts in the drama of Tennessee Williams 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallace, Stephanie

    2013-02-22

    possible cause of their subsequent inattention. Contents Introduction page 2 Section I: Expressionism as the Mind's Landscape Plays and Paintings Tennessee and Vincent 32 Section II: Logistics 36 Section HI: Physical Aihnents Manifest the Unruly... of literary art in each of them He paints his scenes, utilizing many of the devises which artists in the visual arts medium use. Williams himself ties the two worlds of the performing and visual arts closely together in his later work. Mary Ann Corrigan...

  5. World Record Earned Value Management System Certification for Cleanup of the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA - 13181

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haynes, Ray; Hirschy, Anita

    2013-07-01

    On projects that require Earned Value Management (EVMS) Certification, it is critical to quickly prepare for and then successfully obtain certification. This is especially true for government contracts. Projects that do poorly during the review are subject to financial penalties to their company and they lose creditability with their customer creating problems with the project at the outset. At East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), we began preparing for Department of Energy (DOE) certification early during proposal development. Once the contract was awarded, while still in transition phase from the previous contractor to our new company, we immediately began reviewing the project controls systems that were in place on the project and determined if any replacements needed to be made immediately. The ETTP contract required the scheduling software to be upgraded to Primavera P6 and we determined that no other software changes would be done prior to certification. Next, preparation of the Project Controls System Description (PCSD) and associated procedures began using corporate standards as related to the project controls systems. During the transition phase, development was started on the Performance Measurement Baseline which is the resource loaded schedule used to measure our performance on the project and which is critical to good Earned Value Management of the project. Early on, and throughout the baseline review, there was positive feedback from the Department of Energy that the quality of the new baseline was good. Having this superior baseline also contributed to our success in EVMS certification. The combined companies of URS and CH2M Hill had recent experience with certifications at other Department of Energy sites and we were able to capitalize on that knowledge and experience. Generic PCSD and procedures consistent with our co-operations approach to Earned Value Management were available to us and were easily tailorable to the specifics of our contract and site. We also had corporate EVMS experts available to us so as to draw upon their recent certification experiences with lessons learned. This knowledge was especially helpful for training of personnel that were involved in the certification which included Project Controls, Project Management and Control Account Managers. We were also able to bring in these corporate experts to assist with our training efforts. To assure our readiness for the review, we conducted a 'White Hat' review. The 'White Hat' team consisted of corporate experts in EVMS along with an industry expert in EVMS from Humphrey and Associates. This review identified early any weaknesses that we had so corrections could be enacted prior to the EVMS Certification Readiness Review. It also helped give the evaluators confidence that we had done proper due diligence prior to their arrival. Also critical to our success, was early communication with our evaluators. It is important to start the communications early to ensure you understand the expectations of the certification team and the process that will be used during the certification. Communication through the entire process is critical to understand expectations and issues along the way. Very important to the overall process was management commitment, support and reinforcement. Management made sure that all personnel involved knew the importance and made preparations a priority. This was noted as a key strength by the evaluators during the out-brief. As a result of our preparation, our review yielded one Corrective Action Report (CAR) and two Continuous Improvement Opportunities (CIOs). The Certification team in their out-brief explained that this was the lowest number of CARs and CIOs in the history of EVMS certifications in the DOE Complex. (authors)

  6. Retrospective on lessons from 1985 Tennessee MRS attempted siting: The local view

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peelle, E. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1991-11-01

    Six years have elapsed since the unsuccessful US Department of Energy (DOE) effort to site a monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facility in Tennessee. The local MRS task force (TF) effort in 1985 has been described extensively in prior publications. These articles described the successful interactions between DOE and the local TF in the context of extensive state and regional opposition. The MRS TF found that while the proposed facility could be safe, many conditions were needed to ensure its long-term safety and to change the net benefit balance from negative to positive. The DOE and the TF reached agreement on many of the TF conditions but were still far apart on others when negotiations ended in 1985. The local governments that had created the TF unanimously accepted its conclusion. The governor of Tennessee eventually vetoed the siting process, and the state sued in 1985 to stop the DOE from continuing its efforts. When Tennessee's legal block was removed in 1987, DOE presented its MRS recommendations to Congress. Two brief periods of activity among the TF and local political leaders included testimony in 1987 before two Congressional committees and before the MRS Study Commission in 1989. This testimony sought those additional conditions for siting the DOE had not given in its negotiations with the TF. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate key points and lessons learned from this path-breaking effort by a local unpaid TF of citizens and elected officials through its entire life until disbanding in 1989.

  7. Bagels: Plain & Cinnamon Raisin Cereal: Cinnamon Chex, Brown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wenderholm, Elaine

    Free Meal * Gluten Free Friendly Options Spring 2015 Alfredo Sauce Brown Rice Pasta Cheese Ravioli Gluten Free Meals or Menu Planning? Contact our Registered Dietitian, Sarah Formoza at x3284 or Email sarah.formoza@oswego.edu Gluten Free Diet = No Wheat, Rye, Barley or Malt Ask a Manager: Product

  8. Air Traffic Control Using Virtual Stationary Automata Matthew D. Brown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynch, Nancy

    Air Traffic Control Using Virtual Stationary Automata by Matthew D. Brown B.S., Massachusetts by . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Arthur C. Smith Chairman, Department Committee on Graduate Students #12;Air Traffic Control Using Virtual of Engineering Abstract As air travel has become an essential part of modern life, the air traffic control system

  9. INDIUM--2000 38.1 By Robert D. Brown, Jr.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INDIUM--2000 38.1 INDIUM By Robert D. Brown, Jr. Domestic survey data and table were prepared by Carolyn F. Crews, statistical assistant. Indium production in the United States during 2000 was confined, were the major producers of indium metal and indium products in 2000. A number of smaller firms also

  10. Hydroliquefaction of Big Brown lignite in supercritical fluids 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Hui

    1996-01-01

    Big Brown lignite was liquefied in a fixed bed tube reactor. Three solvents were used in the liquefaction studies, toluene, cyclohexane and methanol. Two co-solvents, tetralin and water were used with toluene. The effects of the solvents and co...

  11. Computer Science The George R. Brown School of Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    145 Computer Science The George R. Brown School of Engineering Chair Keith Cooper Professors Robert Chemistry) Professor James Tour #12;146 DEPARTMENTS / Computer Science Computer science is concerned to produce solutions to real-world computational problems. Computer science is the intellectual discipline

  12. Computer Science The George R. Brown School of Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    135 Computer Science The George R. Brown School of Engineering Chair Moshe Y. Vardi Professors Science Computer science is concerned with the study of computers and computing, focusing on algorithms. Computer science is the intellectual discipline underlying information technology, which is widely accepted

  13. Computer Science The George R. Brown School of Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    139 Computer Science The George R. Brown School of Engineering Degrees Offered: BA, BSCS, MCS, MS, and PhD Computer science is concerned with the study of computers and computing, focusingonalgorithms to real-world computational problems. Computer science is the intellectual discipline underlying

  14. Computer Science The George R. Brown School of Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    145 Computer Science The George R. Brown School of Engineering Chair Keith Cooper Professors Robert Tour researCh Professor Peter Druschel #12;146 Departments/ Computer Science Eight courses for a total Intermediate Programming COMP 280 Mathematics of Computer Science COMP 314 Applied Algorithms and Data

  15. Computer Science The George R. Brown School of Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    141 Computer Science The George R. Brown School of Engineering Degrees Offered: BA, BSCS, MCS, MS, and PhD Computer science is concerned with the study of computers and computing, focusingonalgorithmsTour #12;142 DEPARTMENTS/ Computer Science body of knowledge can be used to produce solutions to real

  16. Computer Science The George R. Brown School of Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    153 Computer Science The George R. Brown School of Engineering Chair Joe Warren Professors Robert S'Malley with Chemistry Professor James Tour researCh Professor Peter Druschel #12;154 Departments/ Computer Science Six Matrix Analysis Math and Science Courses Degrees Offered: BA, BSCS, MCS, MS, and PhD Computer science

  17. Nonparametric Regression in Exponential Families Lawrence D. Brown1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Harrison Huibin

    Nonparametric Regression in Exponential Families Lawrence D. Brown1 , T. Tony Cai2 and Harrison H. Zhou3 University of Pennsylvania and Yale University Abstract Most results in nonparametric regression we consider nonparametric regression in exponential families which include, for example, Poisson

  18. Nonparametric Regression in Exponential Families Lawrence D. Brown1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Lawrence D.

    Nonparametric Regression in Exponential Families Lawrence D. Brown1 , T. Tony Cai1 and Harrison H. Zhou2 University of Pennsylvania and Yale University Abstract Most results in nonparametric regression we consider nonparametric regression in exponential families with the main focus on the natural

  19. GEORGE E. BROWN, JR. NETWORK FOR EARTHQUAKE ENGINEERING SIMULATION (NEES)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grether, Gregory

    , Los Angeles Proposal Writing Guide 1 In he University of California, Los Angeles George E. Brown, Jr that would have occurred for any specified base-level acceleration time history (assuming the properties the completion of testing. Wireless field data acquisition system that efficiently transmits data in wireless

  20. Astronomy Advisory Panel Richard Bower, Michael Brown, Anthony

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowther, Paul

    over 10 years Many UK science areas: dark energy/matter, galactic structure, transients, solar systemAstronomy Advisory Panel Richard Bower, Michael Brown, Anthony Challinor, Chris Evans, Paul O;High priority - maintain innovation Provide science for VLT, ALMA, E-ELT, SKA, GAIA, JWST, Euclid

  1. INDIUM--2001 37.1 By Robert D. Brown, Jr.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INDIUM--2001 37.1 INDIUM By Robert D. Brown, Jr. Domestic survey data and tables were prepared in New York and Rhode Island, were the major producers of indium metal and indium products in 2001 products. Domestic consumption in 2001 was estimated by the U.S. Geological Survey to have increased

  2. INDIUM--1999 37.1 By Robert D. Brown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INDIUM--1999 37.1 INDIUM By Robert D. Brown Domestic survey data and tables were prepared by Carolyn F. Crews, statistical assistant. Indium production in the United States during 1999 was confined, were the major producers of indium metal and indium products in 1999. A number of smaller firms also

  3. Lunchtime Brown Bag Discussions in Education Summary Fall '03

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    R., P Beale, S Robertson, A Hasenfratz 9/17 - David Hammer (U Maryland) - epistemology in physics 10 / 9 others At least 25 different faculty from the physics department attended the brown bag sessions. Significant interest from other departments (APS, Engineering, Math) in various programs, particularly

  4. THE PLANE OF THE KUIPER BELT Michael E. Brown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Michael E.

    THE PLANE OF THE KUIPER BELT Michael E. Brown Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences of the Kuiper belt. The derived plane has an inclination with respect to the ecliptic of 1 .86 and an ascending node of 81 .6, with a 1 error in pole position of the plane of 0 .37. The plane of the Kuiper belt

  5. The largest Kuiper belt objects Michael E. Brown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Michael E.

    The largest Kuiper belt objects Michael E. Brown California Institute of Technology ABSTRACT While for the first decade of the study of the Kuiper belt, a gap existed between the sizes of the relatively small and faint Kuiper belt objects (KBOs) that were being studied and the largest known KBO, Pluto, recent years

  6. Environmental Baseline Survey Report for the Title Transfer of Parcel ED-9 at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SAIC

    2010-05-01

    This environmental baseline survey (EBS) report documents the baseline environmental conditions of the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Parcel ED-9 at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP). Parcel ED-9 consists of about 13 acres that DOE proposes to transfer to Heritage Center, LLC (hereafter referred to as 'Heritage Center'), a subsidiary of the Community Reuse Organization of East Tennessee (CROET). The 13 acres include two tracts of land, referred to as ED-9A (7.06 acres) and ED-9B (5.02 acres), and a third tract consisting of about 900 linear feet of paved road and adjacent right-of-way, referred to as ED-9C (0.98 acres). Transfer of the title to ED-9 will be by deed under a Covenant Deferral Request (CDR) pursuant to Section 120(h)(3)(C) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). This report provides a summary of information to support the transfer of this government-owned property at ETTP to a non-federal entity.

  7. Phased Construction Completion Report for Bldg. K-1401 of the Remaining Facilities Demolition Project at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Jacobs

    2008-10-01

    This Phased Construction Completion Report documents the demolition of Bldg. K-1401, Maintenance Building, addressed in the Action Memorandum for the Remaining Facilities Demolition Project at East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2003a) as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 non-time-critical removal action. The objectives of the removal action (DOE 2003a) - to eliminate the source of potential contamination, to eliminate the threat of potential future releases, and/or to eliminate the threats to the general public and the environment - were met. The end state of this action is for the slab to remain with all penetrations sealed and grouted or backfilled. The basement and pits remain open. There is residual radiological and polychlorinated biphenyl contamination on the slab and basement. A fixative was applied to the area on the pad contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls. Interim land-use controls will be maintained until final remediation decisions are made under the Zone 2 Record of Decision (DOE 2005a).

  8. Phased Construction Completion Report for Building K-1401 of the Remaining Facilities Demolition Project at the East Tennessee Technology Park Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garland S.

    2008-03-01

    This Phased Construction Completion Report documents the demolition of Bldg. K-1401, Maintenance Building, addressed in the Action Memorandum for the Remaining Facilities Demolition Project at East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2003a) as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 non-time-critical removal action. The objectives of the removal action (DOE 2003a) - to eliminate the source of potential contamination, to eliminate the threat of potential future releases, and/or to eliminate the threats to the general public and the environment - were met. The end state of this action is for the slab to remain with all penetrations sealed and grouted or backfilled. The basement and pits remain open. There is residual radiological and polychlorinated biphenyl contamination on the slab and basement. A fixative was applied to the area on the pad contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls. Interim land-use controls will be maintained until final remediation decisions are made under the Zone 2 Record of Decision (DOE 2005a).

  9. Covenant Deferral Request for the Proposed Transfer of Land Parcel ED-8 at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee - Final - May 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SAIC

    2009-05-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to transfer a land parcel (hereinafter referred to as 'the Property') designated as Land Parcel ED-8 at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, by deed, and is submitting this Covenant Deferral Request (CDR) pursuant to Section 120(h)(3)(C) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended, and applicable U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) guidance. The Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), which includes ETTP, was placed on the National Priorities List (NPL) in November 1989. Environmental investigation and cleanup activities are continuing at ETTP in accordance with CERCLA, the National Contingency Plan (NCP), and the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA). The FFA was entered into by the DOE-Oak Ridge Office (ORO), EPA Region 4, and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) in 1991. The FFA establishes the schedule and milestones for environmental remediation of the ORR. The proposed property transfer is a key component of the Oak Ridge Performance Management Plan (ORPMP) for accelerated cleanup of the ORR. DOE, using its authority under Section 161(g) of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (AEA), proposes to transfer the Property to Heritage Center, LLC, a subsidiary of the Community Reuse Organization of East Tennessee (CROET), hereafter referred to as 'Heritage Center.' CROET is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit corporation established to foster the diversification of the regional economy by re-utilizing DOE property for private-sector investment and job creation. The Property is located in the southern portion of ETTP and consists of approximately 84 acres proposed as the potential site for new facilities to be used for office space, industrial activities, or other commercial uses. The parcel contains both grassy fields located outside the ETTP 'main plant' area and infrastructure located inside the 'main plant' area. No buildings are included in the proposed ED-8 transfer. The buildings in ED-8 have already been transferred (Buildings K-1007, K-1580, K-1330, and K-1000). These buildings are not included in the transfer footprint of Land Parcel ED-8. A number of temporary structures, such as trailers and tents (non-real property), are located within the footprint. These temporary structures are not included in the transfer. DOE would continue to be responsible for any contamination resulting from DOE activities that is present on the property at the time of transfer but found after the date of transfer. The deed transferring the Property contains various restrictions and prohibitions on the use of the Property that are subject to enforcement pursuant to State Law Tennessee Code Annotated (T.C.A.) 68-212-225 and state real property law. These restrictions and prohibitions are designed to ensure protection of human health and the environment.

  10. Barge loading facilities in conjunction with wood chipping and sawlog mill, Tennessee River Mile 145. 9R: Environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-08-01

    The purpose of this Environmental Assessment (EA) is to evaluate the environmental consequences of approving, denying, or adopting reasonable alternatives to a request for barge loading facilities. These facilities would serve a proposed wood chipping and sawlog products operation at Tennessee River Mile (TRM) 145.9, right descending bank, (Kentucky Lake), in Perry County, Tennessee. The site is located between Short Creek and Peters Landing. The applicant is Southeastern Forest Products, L.P. (SFP), Box 73, Linden, Tennessee and the proposed facilities would be constructed on or adjacent to company owned land. Portions of the barge terminal would be constructed on land over which flood easement rights are held by the United States of America and administered by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). The US Army Corps of Engineers (CE) and TVA have regulatory control over the proposed barge terminal facilities since the action would involve construction in the Tennessee River which is a navigable water of the United States. The wood chipping and sawlog products facilities proposed on the upland property are not regulated by the CE or TVA. On the basis of the analysis which follows, it has been determined that a modified proposal (as described herein) would not significantly affect the quality of the human environment, and does not require the preparation of an environmental impact statement. 8 refs.

  11. Helicopter Brown-Out costs the US approximately $100 M per year in casualties/fatalities and signifi-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helicopter Brown-Out costs the US approximately $100 M per year in casualties be used not only for mitigation but also to predict and avoid brown-out conditions. Helicopter Brown) data from RADARSAT-2 is analyzed for detection of soils susceptible to helicopter brown-out. He

  12. Environmental Management Waste Management Facility Proxy Waste Lot Profile 6.999 for Building K-25 West Wing, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rigsby V.P.

    2009-02-12

    In 1989, the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), which includes the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), was placed on the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) National Priorities List. The Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) (DOE 1992), effective January 1, 1992, now governs environmental restoration activities conducted under CERCLA at the ORR. Following signing of the FFA, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the state of Tennessee signed the Oak Ridge Accelerated Cleanup Plan Agreement on June 18, 2002. The purpose of this agreement is to define a streamlined decision-making process to facilitate the accelerated implementation of cleanup, resolve ORR milestone issues, and establish future actions necessary to complete the accelerated cleanup plan by the end of fiscal year 2008. While the FFA continues to serve as the overall regulatory framework for remediation, the Accelerated Cleanup Plan Agreement supplements existing requirements to streamline the decision-making process. Decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) activities of Bldg. K-25, the original gaseous diffusion facility, is being conducted by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) on behalf of the DOE. The planned CERCLA action covering disposal of building structure and remaining components from the K-25 building is scheduled as a non-time-critical CERCLA action as part of DOE's continuous risk reduction strategy for ETTP. The K-25 building is proposed for D&D because of its poor physical condition and the expense of surveillance and maintenance activities. The K-25/K-27 D&D Project proposes to dispose of the commingled waste listed below from the K-25 west side building structure and remaining components and process gas equipment and piping at the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) under waste disposal proxy lot (WPXL) 6.999: (1) Building structure (e.g. concrete floors [excluding basement slab], roofing, structural steel supports, interior walls, and exterior walls) and support system components including the recirculation cooling water (RCW); electrical; communication; fire protection; ventilation; process coolant; process lube oil; utilities such as steam, water and drain lines; (2) Process Piping; (3) Seal Exhaust Headers; (4) Seal Exhaust Traps; (5) Process Valves; (6) Differential Blind Multipliers (DBM)/Partial Blind Multipliers (PBM); and (7) Aftercoolers (also known as Intercell coolers). Converters and compressors while components of the process gas system, are not included in this commingled waste lot. On January 6, 2009, a meeting was held with EPA, TDEC, DOE and the team for the sole purpose of finalizing the objectives, format, and content of WPXL 6.999. The objective of WPXL 6.999 was to provide a crosswalk to the building structure and the PGE components profiles. This was accomplished by providing tables with references to the specific section of the individual profiles for each of the WLs. There are two building profiles and eight PGE profiles. All of the waste identified in the individual profiles will be commingled, shipped, and disposed exclusively under WPXL 6.999. The individual profiles were provided to the EPA and Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) for information purposes only. This summary WPXL 6.999 will be submitted to EPA, TDEC, and DOE for review and approval. The format agreed upon by the regulators and DOE form the basis for WPXL 6.999. The agreed format is found on pages v and vi of the CONTENTS section of this profile. The disposal of this waste will be executed in accordance with the Action Memorandum for the Decontamination and Decommissioning of the K-25 and K-27 Buildings, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2002), Removal Action Work Plan for the K-25 and K-27 Buildings, Process Equipment Removal and Demolition, K-25/K-27 Project, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2008a); Waste Handling Plan for Demolition of the K-25 and K-27 Bui

  13. AA Dor - An Eclipsing sdOB - Brown Dwarf Binary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Rauch

    2003-11-25

    AA Dor is an eclipsing, close, post common-envelope binary consisting of a sdOB primary star and an unseen secondary with an extraordinary small mass - formally a brown dwarf. The brown dwarf may have been a former planet which survived a common envelope phase and has even gained mass. A recent determination of the components' masses from results of NLTE spectral analysis and subsequent comparison to evolutionary tracks shows a discrepancy to masses derived from radial-velocity and the eclipse curves. Phase-resolved high-resolution and high-SN spectroscopy was carried out in order to investigate on this problem. We present results of a NLTE spectral analysis of the primary, an analysis of its orbital parameters, and discuss possible evolutionary scenarios.

  14. Cloudy with a Chance of Iron: Weather on Brown Dwarfs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burgasser, Adam (UCLA) [UCLA

    2003-08-06

    Brown dwarfs are a recently discovered, yet long-contemplated, class of 'star' which bridges the gap between classical stars like the Sun and giant planets like Jupiter. The atmospheres of these objects, with observed temperatures as low as 700 K and pressures of 1-10 bar, are such that the condensation of refractory elements - iron rain and mineral snow - can occur. This has raised the possibility of meteorological phenomena occurring on these objects in the form of clouds and possibly even 'storms'. I present observed evidence for these meteorological effects and the first simple models to use 'cloud coverage' as an explanation for the observed and unexpected brightening of brown dwarfs as they cool over a narrow temperature range. I will show how the tools of planetary atmospheric science (e.g., studies of the Earth's meteorology) can provide a context for studying the atmospheres of these more distant astrophysical objects.

  15. Using Narrow Band Photometry to Classify Stars and Brown Dwarfs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. K. Mainzer; Ian S. McLean; J. L. Sievers; E. T. Young

    2003-12-05

    We present a new system of narrow band filters in the near infrared that can be used to classify stars and brown dwarfs. This set of four filters, spanning the H band, can be used to identify molecular features unique to brown dwarfs, such as H2O and CH4. The four filters are centered at 1.495 um (H2O), 1.595 um (continuum), 1.66 um (CH4), and 1.75 um (H2O). Using two H2O filters allows us to solve for individual objects' reddenings. This can be accomplished by constructing a color-color-color cube and rotating it until the reddening vector disappears. We created a model of predicted color-color-color values for different spectral types by integrating filter bandpass data with spectra of known stars and brown dwarfs. We validated this model by making photometric measurements of seven known L and T dwarfs, ranging from L1 - T7.5. The photometric measurements agree with the model to within +/-0.1 mag, allowing us to create spectral indices for different spectral types. We can classify A through early M stars to within +/-2 spectral types, late-type M and L dwarfs to within +/-0.3 spectral types and T dwarfs to within +/-0.1 spectral types 1-sigma. Thus, we can distinguish between a T1 and a T3 dwarf. The four physical bands can be converted into two reddening-free indices, mu1 and mu2, and an extinction, AV, for the individual object. This technique, which is equivalent to extremely low resolution spectroscopy, can be used to survey large areas to provide rough spectral classifications for all the stars in the area, ranging down to the coolest brown dwarfs. It should prove particularly useful in young clusters where reddening can be high.

  16. Turnover Rates in Insular Biogeography: Effect of Immigration on Extinction Author(s): James H. Brown and Astrid Kodric-Brown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, James H.

    . Brown and Astrid Kodric-Brown Source: Ecology, Vol. 58, No. 2 (Mar., 1977), pp. 445-449 Published by, turnover rate is directly related to the distance between an island and the source of colonizing species: Arizona; biogeography; colonization; extinction; insular biogeography; island; turnover. INTRODUCTION More

  17. Central Ferry-Lower Monumental

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D BGene Network Shaping ofStaff HighlightCentral Activator

  18. Explanation of Significant Differences for the Record of Decision for Interim Actions in Zone 1, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Jacobs

    2011-02-01

    Zone 1 is a 1400-acre area outside the fence of the main plant at The East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The Record of Decision for Interim Actions in Zone, ETTP (Zone 1 Interim ROD) (DOE 2002) identifies the remedial actions for contaminated soil, buried waste, and subsurface infrastructure necessary to protect human health and to limit further contamination of groundwater. Since the Zone 1 Interim Record of Decision (ROD) was signed, new information has been obtained that requires the remedy to be modified as follows: (1) Change the end use in Contractor's Spoil Area (CSA) from unrestricted industrial to recreational; (2) Remove Exposure Units (EU5) ZI-50, 51, and 52 from the scope of the Zone I Interim ROD; (3) Change the end use of the duct bank corridor from unrestricted industrial to restricted industrial; and (4) Remove restriction for the disturbance of soils below 10 feet in Exposure Unit (EU) Z1-04. In accordance with 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 300.435, these scope modifications are a 'significant' change to the Zone 1 Interim ROD. In accordance with CERCLA Sect. 117 (c) and 40 CFR 300.435 (c)(2)(i), such a significant change is documented with an Explanation of Significant Differences (ESD). The purpose of this ESD is to make the changes listed above. This ESD is part of the Administrative Record file, and it, and other information supporting the selected remedy, can be found at the DOE Information Center, 475 Oak Ridge Turnpike, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830, from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday. The ORR is located in Roane and Anderson counties, within and adjacent to the corporate city limits of Oak Ridge, Tennessee. ETTP is located in Roane County near the northwest corner of the ORR. ETTP began operation during World War II as part of the Manhattan Project. The original mission of ETTP was to produce enriched uranium for use in atomic weapons. The plant produced enriched uranium from 1945 until 1985. Uranium production was terminated in 1987. ORR was placed on the National Priorities List in 1989, so remediation activities are conducted under CERCLA. The primary contaminants of concern at ETTP follow: (1) In groundwater - volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at multiple locations (trichloroethene is generally the most prevalent compound); (2) In sediment - inorganic elements, radionuclides, and polychlorinated biphenyls; (3) In soil - inorganic elements, radionuclides, semivolatile organic compounds (particularly the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons), and VOCs; and (4) In facilities - radionuclides and polychlorinated biphenyls (abandoned facilities also pose a safety and health hazard to workers.) The purposes of the remedial actions selected in the Zone 1 Interim ROD are to allow unrestricted industrial use down to 10 feet and to remediate potential sources of groundwater contamination. Following is a summary of the major components of the Zone 1 Interim ROD remedy: (1) Excavation of the Blair Quarry burial area and associated contaminated soil; (2) Excavation of miscellaneous contaminated soil in the K-895 Cylinder Destruct Facility area and in the Powerhouse Area; (3) Removal of sludge and demolition of the K-710 sludge beds and Imhoff tanks; (4) Implementation of land use controls (LUCs); and (5) Characterization of soil and remediation of areas that exceed remediation levels.

  19. Engineering Evaluation Report on K-311-1 Floor Subsidence (2008 Annual Report) at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knott R.B.

    2008-11-13

    The purpose of this task is to evaluate the effect of floor settlement on building structure, piping, and equipment foundations between column lines 1 and 2 and B and K of Bldg. K-311-1 (see Fig. A-1 in Appendix A) at East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Revision 0 of this document covers the 2005 annual inspection. Revision 1 addresses the 2006 annual inspection, Revision 2 addresses the 2007 annual inspection, and Revision 3 covers the 2008 annual inspection, as indicated by the changed report title. A civil survey and visual inspection were performed. Only a representative number of points were measured during the 2008 survey. The exact location of a number of survey points in Table A-1 could not be accurately determined in the 2008 survey since these points had not been spray painted since 2003. The points measured are deemed adequate to support the conclusions of this report. Based on the survey and observations, there has been no appreciable change in the condition of the unit since the 2007 inspection. The subsidence of the floor presents concerns to the building structure due to the possible indeterminate load on the pipe gallery framing. Prior to demolition activities that involve the piping or removal of the equipment, such as vent, purge and drain and foaming, engineering involvement in the planning is necessary. The piping connected to the equipment is under stress, and actions should be implemented to relieve this stress prior to disturbing any of the equipment or associated piping. In addition, the load on the pipe gallery framing needs to be relieved prior to any activities taking place in the pipe gallery. Access to this area and the pipe gallery is not allowed until the stress is released.

  20. Lead test assembly irradiation and analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Tennessee and Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) needs to confirm the viability of using a commercial light water reactor (CLWR) as a potential source for maintaining the nation`s supply of tritium. The Proposed Action discussed in this environmental assessment is a limited scale confirmatory test that would provide DOE with information needed to assess that option. This document contains the environmental assessment results for the Lead test assembly irradiation and analysis for the Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Tennessee, and the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington.

  1. Escape into illusions of the South in characters of Tennessee Williams 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Nieuwenhuize, Paul Franklin

    1963-01-01

    ~ the plays, one should read1ly note the zreat similarity between events in the plays and events in Tennessee Wil)iams' 11fe. ERO'. E . . . it is "-r. =tive work t . e erson . I so "uc~ o al' so clo eiy re . . c to the o. e;ho =oes it. " Bio... himself working for sixty-five dollars a month as a clerk-typist and odd- Job man at the International Shoe Company, where ac! ordinS to the Nelson bioSranhy, Williams often spent ten to twelve hour s a day at a Job he thorouShly despised. At night he...

  2. Ross Woods and Dr. Shane A. Brown Department of Civil Engineering Washington State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    Ross Woods and Dr. Shane A. Brown Department of Civil Engineering · Washington State University al. 2007). Other Findings: · Increased Interest in careers in Science, Technology, Engineering

  3. Moderator: Doug Brown, VP CIPS Alberta 04/12/2012 Computer Science Industry Day 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habib, Ayman

    Moderator: Doug Brown, VP CIPS Alberta 04/12/2012 Computer Science Industry, CIO, Alberta Electric System Operator (AESO) Marlo Nielsen, Sr. Recruiting

  4. EIS-0071: Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division Industrial Fuels Gas Demonstration Plant, Memphis, Shelby County, Tennessee

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy developed this EIS to assesses the potential environmental impacts associated with the construction and operation of a 3,155-ton-per-day capacity facility, which will demonstrate the technical operability, economic viability, and environmental acceptability of the Memphis Division of Light, Gas and Water coal gasification plant at Memphis, Tennessee.

  5. THE UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE KNOXVILLE, COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING www.engr.utk.edu Continued on page 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

    and worked as a U.S. Naval Officer on naval nuclear submarines from 1987 to 1990. He started his career at UT in the nuclear engineering and materials science departments. Dr. J. Wesley Hines, the current interim vice chancellor for research at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville and a nuclear engineering professor, has

  6. EA-1779: Proposed Changes to the Sanitary Biosolids Land Application Program on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to amend (e.g., by changing setback requirements from surface water features and potential channels to groundwater) the Sanitary Biosolids Land Application Program at the Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee.

  7. Final review of the Campbell Creek demonstrations showcased by Tennessee Valley Authority

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gehl, Anthony C.; Munk, Jeffrey D.; Jackson, Roderick K.; Boudreaux, Philip R.; Miller, William A.; New, Joshua Ryan; Khowailed, Giannate

    2015-06-01

    The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Technology Innovation, Energy Efficiency, Power Delivery and Utilization Office funded and managed a showcase demonstration located in the suburbs of west Knox county, Tennessee. Work started March 2008 with the goal of documenting best practices for retrofitting existing homes and for building new high-efficiency homes. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) provided technical support. An analytical base was developed for helping homeowners, homebuyers, builders, practitioners and the TVA make informed economic decisions for the materials and incentives necessary to build a new high-efficiency home or retrofit an existing home. New approaches to more efficiently control active energy subsystems and information for selecting or upgrading to Energy Star appliances, changing all lights to 100% CFL s and upgrading windows to low-E gas filled glazing yields a 40% energy savings with neutral cash flow for the homeowner. Passive designs were reviewed and recommendations made for envelope construction that is durable and energy efficient. The Campbell Creek project complements the DOE Building Technologies Program strategic goal. Results of the project created technologies and design approaches that will yield affordable energy efficient homes. The 2010 DOE retrofit goals are to find retrofit packages that attain 30% whole house energy savings as documented by pre and post Home Energy rating scores (HERS). Campbell Creek met these goals.

  8. Routine environmental audit of the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-09-01

    This report documents the results of the routine environmental audit of the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant (Y-12 Plant), Anderson County, Tennessee. During this audit, the activities conducted by the audit team included reviews of internal documents and reports from previous audits and assessments; interviews with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), State of Tennessee regulatory, and contractor personnel; and inspections and observations of selected facilities and operations. The onsite portion of the audit was conducted August 22-September 2, 1994, by the DOE Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24), located within the Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH). DOE 5482.1 B, {open_quotes}Environment, Safety, and Health Appraisal Program,{close_quotes} establishes the mission of EH-24 to provide comprehensive, independent oversight of DOE environmental programs on behalf of the Secretary of Energy. The ultimate goal of EH-24 is enhancement of environmental protection and minimization of risk to public health and the environment. EH-24 accomplishes its mission by conducting systematic and periodic evaluations of DOE`s environmental programs within line organizations, and by using supplemental activities that strengthen self-assessment and oversight functions within program, field, and contractor organizations. The audit evaluated the status of programs to ensure compliance with Federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations; compliance with DOE Orders, guidance, and directives; and conformance with accepted industry practices and standards of performance. The audit also evaluated the status and adequacy of the management systems developed to address environmental requirements.

  9. Wireless Roadside Inspection Phase II Tennessee Commercial Mobile Radio Services Pilot Test Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franzese, Oscar; Lascurain, Mary Beth; Capps, Gary J; Siekmann, Adam

    2011-05-01

    The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) Wireless Roadside Inspection (WRI) Program is researching the feasibility and value of electronically assessing truck and bus driver and vehicle safety at least 25 times more often than is possible using only roadside physical inspections. The WRI program is evaluating the potential benefits to both the motor carrier industry and to government. These potential benefits include reduction in accidents, fatalities and injuries on our highways and keeping safe and legal drivers and vehicles moving on the highways. WRI Pilot tests were conducted to prototype, test and demonstrate the feasibility and benefits of electronically collecting safety data message sets from in-service commercial vehicles and performing wireless roadside inspections using three different communication methods. This report summarizes the design, conduct and results of the Tennessee CMRS WRI Pilot Test. The purpose of this Pilot test was to demonstrate the implementation of commercial mobile radio services to electronically request and collect safety data message sets from a limited number of commercial vehicles operating in Tennessee. The results of this test have been used in conjunction with the results of the complimentary pilot tests to support an overall assessment of the feasibility and benefits of WRI in enhancing motor carrier safety (reduction in accidents) due to increased compliance (change in motor carrier and driver behavior) caused by conducting frequent safety inspections electronically, at highway speeds, without delay or need to divert into a weigh station

  10. Evaluation of the water quality in the releases from thirty dams in the Tennessee River Valley

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butkus, S.R.

    1990-09-01

    The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) has routinely monitored dissolved oxygen (DO) and temperature from the tailwater releases of its dams since the 1950s. The original objective of this monitoring was to collect baseline information to support reaeration research and determine the relative impact of impoundments on the assimilative capacity of the river system. This monitoring has continued even though the original objective was satisfied. New purposes for this monitoring data have arisen in support of several programs, without new consideration of the monitoring strategy and sampling design. The primary purpose of this report is to compare the historical release data for 30 dams in the Tennessee Valley based on four different objectives: (1) comparison of seasonal patterns, (2) comparison of baseline conditions using descriptive statistics, (3) evaluation of monotonic trends, and (4) discussion of monitoring strategies that might be required to determine compliance with existing and proposed criteria. A secondary purpose of the report is to compile the existing database into tables and figures that would be useful for other investigators. 51 refs., 210 figs., 1 tab.

  11. ATMOSPHERIC CIRCULATION OF BROWN DWARFS: JETS, VORTICES, AND TIME VARIABILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Xi; Showman, Adam P.

    2014-06-10

    A variety of observational evidence demonstrates that brown dwarfs exhibit active atmospheric circulations. In this study we use a shallow-water model to investigate the global atmospheric dynamics in the stratified layer overlying the convective zone on these rapidly rotating objects. We show that the existence and properties of the atmospheric circulation crucially depend on key parameters including the energy injection rate and radiative timescale. Under conditions of strong internal heat flux and weak radiative dissipation, a banded flow pattern comprised of east-west jet streams spontaneously emerges from the interaction of atmospheric turbulence with the planetary rotation. In contrast, when the internal heat flux is weak and/or radiative dissipation is strong, turbulence injected into the atmosphere damps before it can self-organize into jets, leading to a flow dominated by transient eddies and isotropic turbulence instead. The simulation results are not very sensitive to the form of the forcing. Based on the location of the transition between jet-dominated and eddy-dominated regimes, we suggest that many brown dwarfs may exhibit atmospheric circulations dominated by eddies and turbulence (rather than jets) due to the strong radiative damping on these worlds, but a jet structure is also possible under some realistic conditions. Our simulated light curves capture important features from observed infrared light curves of brown dwarfs, including amplitude variations of a few percent and shapes that fluctuate between single-peak and multi-peak structures. More broadly, our work shows that the shallow-water system provides a useful tool to illuminate fundamental aspects of the dynamics on these worlds.

  12. Controlling Brown Stomach Worms in Cattle by Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faries Jr., Floron C.

    2002-02-05

    be weaned and removed from the cow herd before the high risk of exposure to pasture larvae in the spring. Calves and young cattle are more susceptible to worms and pass more eggs in their manure than adult cattle. Older nursing calves are a major source... and adult worms in the stomachs of cattle. *Associate Professor and Extension Program Leader for Veterinary Medicine, The Texas A&M University System Good quality pasture with high protein content controls brown stomach worms in cattle. eggs passed...

  13. Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health and Emergency Management at the Oak Ridge Operations Office and East Tennessee Technology Park, Summary Report, May 2003

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This report provides the results of an inspection of environment, safety, and health and emergency management programs at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP).

  14. MOA-2007-BLG-197: Exploring the brown dwarf desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ranc, C; Albrow, M D; Kubas, D; Bond, I A; Batista, V; Beaulieu, J -P; Bennett, D P; Dominik, M; Dong, Subo; Fouqué, P; Gould, A; Greenhill, J; Jørgensen, U G; Kains, N; Menzies, J; Sumi, T; Bachelet, E; Coutures, C; Dieters, S; Prester, D Dominis; Donatowicz, J; Gaudi, B S; Han, C; Hundertmark, M; Horne, K; Kane, S R; Lee, C -U; Marquette, J -B; Park, B -G; Pollard, K R; Sahu, K C; Street, R; Tsapras, Y; Wambsganss, J; Williams, A; Zub, M; Abe, F; Fukui, A; Itow, Y; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Muraki, Y; Ohnishi, K; Rattenbury, N; Saito, To; Sullivan, D J; Sweatman, W L; Tristram, P J; Yock, P C M; Yonehara, A

    2015-01-01

    We present the analysis of MOA-2007-BLG-197Lb, the first brown dwarf companion to a Sun-like star detected through gravitational microlensing. The event was alerted and followed-up photometrically by a network of telescopes from the PLANET, MOA, and uFUN collaborations, and observed at high angular resolution using the NaCo instrument at the VLT. From the modelling of the microlensing light curve, we derived the binary lens separation in Einstein radius units (s~1.13) and a mass ratio of (4.732+/-0.020)x10^{-2}. Annual parallax, lens orbital motion and finite source effects were included in the models. To recover the lens system's physical parameters, we combined the resulting light curve best-fit parameters with (J,H,Ks) magnitudes obtained with VLT NaCo and calibrated using IRSF and 2MASS data. We derived a lens total mass of 0.86+/-0.04 Msun and a lens distance of 4.2+/-0.3 kpc. We find that the companion of MOA-2007-BLG-197L is a brown dwarf of 41+/-2 Mjup observed at a projected separation of 4.3+/-0.1 A...

  15. GENOMIC DNA ISOLATION FROM GREEN AND BROWN ALGAE (CAULERPALES AND FUCALES) FOR MICROSATELLITE LIBRARY CONSTRUCTION1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borges, Rita

    NOTE GENOMIC DNA ISOLATION FROM GREEN AND BROWN ALGAE (CAULERPALES AND FUCALES) FOR MICROSATELLITE A method for isolating high-quality DNA is pre- sented for the green algae Caulerpa sp. (C. racemosa, C. prolifera, and C. taxifolia) and the brown alga Sargassum muticum. These are introduced, and in- vasive

  16. Light brown apple moth Epiphyas postvittana Michigan State University's invasive species factsheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    Light brown apple moth Epiphyas postvittana Michigan State University's invasive species factsheets University IPM Program and M. Philip of Michigan Department of Agriculture. The light brown apple moth and agricultural commodities. Michigan risk maps for exotic plant pests. Other common names apple leafroller

  17. Pollution-induced behavioural effects in the brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neff, Bryan D.

    Pollution-induced behavioural effects in the brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus) Ross D. Breckels on biodiversity. Thus, it is important to understand the nature of pollution- induced change in aquatic ecosystems. We show that brown bullheads (Ameiurus nebulosus) may have evolved in response to chronic pollution

  18. Optical Flow Estimation using Laplacian Mesh Energy Wenbin Li Darren Cosker Matthew Brown Rui Tang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Ralph R.

    Optical Flow Estimation using Laplacian Mesh Energy Wenbin Li Darren Cosker Matthew Brown Rui Tang.p.cosker,m.brown,r.tang}@bath.ac.uk Abstract In this paper we present a novel non-rigid optical flow algorithm for dense image correspondence and non-rigid registration. The algorithm uses a unique Laplacian Mesh Energy term to encourage local

  19. Movements of Brown Shrimp, Penaeus aztecus, and Pink Shrimp, P. duorarum, Relative to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Movements of Brown Shrimp, Penaeus aztecus, and Pink Shrimp, P. duorarum, Relative to the U.S.-Mexico Border in the Western Gulf of Mexico PETER F. SHERIDAN, FRANK J. PATELLA, Jr., NEAL BAXTER, and DENNIS A of Mexico. Annual U.S. landings of brown shrimp off Texas averaged 13,800 metric tons (t) between 1970

  20. Surprising migration and population size dynamics in ancient Iberian brown bears (Ursus arctos)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Surprising migration and population size dynamics in ancient Iberian brown bears (Ursus arctos United States and northern Mexico, few bears remain in some areas in northern United States, and the species is extinct in Mexico (3). As in the Americas, the brown bear is abundant in the northern parts

  1. D. E. BROWN, R. PAUL SINGH, and R. J. COFFELT A System to Singulate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. E. BROWN, R. PAUL SINGH, and R. J. COFFELT A System to Singulate and Align Squid for Packaging time. A machine to skin and eviscerate L. opa/escens has been recently developed by Singh and Brown into this machine one by one, mantle first. An orientation device (Brooks and Singh, 1979) was used to feed squid

  2. Capping the Brown Energy Consumption of Internet Services at Low Cost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bianchini, Ricardo

    energy" (produced via carbon-intensive means) relative to renewable or "green" energy. This paper their brown energy consumption and lever- age green energy, while respecting their SLAs and minimizing energy-intensive energy as "brown" energy, in contrast with "green" or renewable energy.) We argue that placing caps

  3. Hurricane, Habitat Degradation, and Land Loss Effects on Brown Pelican Nesting Colonies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karubian, Jordan

    Hurricane, Habitat Degradation, and Land Loss Effects on Brown Pelican Nesting Colonies Scott T.J., and Leberg, P.L., 2013. Hurricane, habitat degradation, and land loss effects on Brown Pelican nesting colonies of coastal avifauna are perennially threatened by hurricanes, land loss, and environmental

  4. The Tropical Brown Alga Lobophora variegata (Lamouroux) Womersley: A Prospective Bioindicator for Ag Contamination in Tropical Coastal Waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The Tropical Brown Alga Lobophora variegata (Lamouroux) Womersley: A Prospective Bioindicator determined in the brown alga Lobophora variegata, using radiotracer techniques. Results indicate that this widely distributed alga could be a useful bioindicator species for surveying silver contamination

  5. hal-00080649,version2-30Nov2006 Theory for a Hanbury Brown Twiss experiment with a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    hal-00080649,version2-30Nov2006 Theory for a Hanbury Brown Twiss experiment with a ballistically there is no interaction between the particles. This fact was clearly demonstrated in the celebrated Hanbury Brown Twiss

  6. Fiscal Year 2010 Phased Construction Completion Report for EU Z2-32 in Zone 2, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Jacobs

    2010-02-01

    The Record of Decision for Soil, Buried Waste, and Subsurface Structure Actions in Zone 2, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOEIORJO 1-2161 &D2) (Zone 2 ROD) acknowledged that most of the 800 acres in Zone 2 were contaminated, but that sufficient data to confirm the levels of contamination were lacking. The Zone 2 ROD further specified that a sampling strategy for filling the data gaps would be developed. The Remedial Design Report/Remedial Action Work Plan for Zone 2 Soils, Slabs, and Subsurface Structures, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOEIORIO 1 -2224&D3) (RDRJRAWP) defined the sampling strategy as the Dynamic Verification Strategy (DVS), generally following the approach used for characterization of the Zone I exposure units (EUs). The Zone 2 ROD divided the Zone 2 area into seven geographic areas and 44 EUs. To facilitate the data quality objectives (DQOs) of the DVS process, the RDR/RAWP regrouped the 44 EUs into 12 DQO scoping EU groups. These groups facilitated the DQO process by placing similar facilities and their support facilities together, which allowed identification of data gaps. The EU groups were no longer pertinent after DQO planning was completed and characterization was conducted as areas became accessible. As the opportunity to complete characterization became available, the planned DVS program was completed for the EU addressed in this document (EU Z2-32). The purpose of this Phased Construction Completion Report (PCCR) is to address the following: (1) Document DVS characterization results for EU Z2-32. (2) Describe and document the risk evaluation and determine if the EU meets the Zone 2 ROD requirements for unrestricted industrial use to 10 ft bgs. (3) Identify additional areas not defined in the Zone 2 ROD that require remediation based on the DVS evaluation results. (4) Describe the remedial action performed in the K-1066-G Yard in EU Z2-32. Approximately 18.4 acres are included in the EU addressed in this PCCR. Based on results of the DVS evaluation, all 18.4 acres are recommended for unrestricted industrial use to 10 ft bgs. There are no Federal Facility Agreement Sites included in Appendix A of the Zone 2 ROD in EU Z2-32. The Zone 2 ROD requires land use controls to prevent disturbance of soils below 10 ft deep and to restrict future land use to industrial/commercial activities. In response to stakeholder comments, the U.S. Department of Energy agreed to re-evaluate the need for such land use restrictions. This document includes a screening evaluation to determine the likelihood of land use controls in EU Z2-32 being modified to: (1) eliminate the restriction on disturbance of soils below 10 ft bgs where data indicate the absence of residual contamination at any depth that would result in an unacceptable risk to the future industrial worker, and (2) permit alternative land uses that would be protective of future site occupants. Results of this screening evaluation indicate a high probability that restrictions on disturbing soil below 10 ft bgs could be safely eliminated for EU Z2-32. A qualitative screening evaluation considered the likelihood of unrestricted land use being protective of future site occupants. Based on this qualitative assessment, all 18.4 acres addressed in this PCCR were assigned a high probability for consideration of release for unrestricted land use. This document contains the main text (Sects. 1 through 13) and one appendix. The main text addresses the purpose for this PCCR as described above. Additional supporting detail (e.g., field work and data summaries, graphics) is provided in the EU Z2-32 technical memorandum (Appendix A). Historical and DVS analytical data used in this PCCR are provided on a compact disc accompanying this document and can be accessed through the Oak Ridge Environmental Information System.

  7. The Brown-dwarf Atmosphere Monitoring (BAM) Project II: Multi-epoch monitoring of extremely cool brown dwarfs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajan, A; Wilson, P A; Bulger, J; De Rosa, R J; Ward-Duong, K; Morley, C; Pont, F; Windhorst, R

    2015-01-01

    With the discovery of Y dwarfs by the WISE mission, the population of field brown dwarfs now extends to objects with temperatures comparable to those of Solar System planets. To investigate the atmospheres of these newly identified brown dwarfs, we have conducted a pilot study monitoring an initial sample of three late T-dwarfs (T6.5, T8 and T8.5) and one Y-dwarf (Y0) for infrared photometric variability at multiple epochs. With J-band imaging, each target was observed for a period of 1.0h to 4.5h per epoch, which covers a significant fraction of the expected rotational period. These measurements represent the first photometric monitoring for these targets. For three of the four targets (2M1047, Ross 458C and WISE0458), multi-epoch monitoring was performed, with the time span between epochs ranging from a few hours to ~2 years. During the first epoch, the T8.5 target WISE0458 exhibited variations with a remarkable min-to-max amplitude of 13%, while the second epoch light curve taken ~2 years later did not not...

  8. Rheological properties of water-coal slurries based on brown coal in the presence of sodium lignosulfonates and alkali

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.P. Savitskii; A.S. Makarov; V.A. Zavgorodnii

    2009-07-01

    The effect of the oxidized surface of brown coal on the structural and rheological properties of water-coal slurries was found. The kinetics of structure formation processes in water-coal slurries based on as-received and oxidized brown coal was studied. The effect of lignosulfonate and alkali additives on the samples of brown coal was considered.

  9. PHYSICAL REVIEW B 89, 045137 (2014) Hanbury Brown and Twiss correlations of Cooper pairs in helical liquids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Mahn-Soo

    2014-01-01

    PHYSICAL REVIEW B 89, 045137 (2014) Hanbury Brown and Twiss correlations of Cooper pairs in helical; published 29 January 2014) We propose a Hanbury Brown and Twiss (HBT) experiment of Cooper pairs on the edge a Hanbury Brown and Twiss (HBT) experiment of Cooper pairs on the edge channels of quantum spin Hall

  10. ccsd-00001341(version1):23Mar2004 Hanbury-Brown Twiss correlations to probe the population

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ccsd-00001341(version1):23Mar2004 Hanbury-Brown Twiss correlations to probe the population the first study of the statistics of GHz photons in quantum circuits, using Hanbury- Brown and Twiss experiment of Hanbury-Brown and Twiss (HBT)[1], consisted in two detec- tors correlating the power

  11. Annual Storm Water Report for the Y-12 National Security Complex Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Environment Compliance Department

    2012-01-01

    The storm water pollution prevention program at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex) intends to protect the quality of storm water runoff through: (1) reducing the exposure of metal accumulation areas to precipitation, (2) implementation of Best Management Practices, (3) sampling during rain events and subsequent analysis, and (4) routine surveillances. When prescribed, the analytical data is compared to a set of cut-off concentration values to determine how the Y-12 Complex relates to other metal fabrication industries in the state of Tennessee. The quality of the storm water exiting the Y-12 Complex via East Fork Poplar Creek indicated some improvement in 2011. This improvement is attributable to the completion of several construction, demolition and remediation projects which occurred in 2010 and 2011. Emphasis will continue to be placed on site inspections and the timely implementation of improved storm water control measures as deemed necessary.

  12. Annual Storm Water Report for the Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clean Water Compliance Section of the Environment Compliance Department

    2012-01-01

    The storm water pollution prevention program at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex) intends to protect the quality of storm water runoff through: (1) reducing the exposure of metal accumulation areas to precipitation, (2) implementation of Best Management Practices, (3) sampling during rain events and subsequent analysis, and (4) routine surveillances. When prescribed, the analytical data is compared to a set of cut-off concentration values to determine how the Y-12 Complex relates to other metal fabrication industries in the state of Tennessee. The quality of the storm water exiting the Y-12 Complex via East Fork Poplar Creek indicated some improvement in 2011. This improvement is attributable to the completion of several construction, demolition and remediation projects which occurred in 2010 and 2011. Emphasis will continue to be placed on site inspections and the timely implementation of improved storm water control measures as deemed necessary.

  13. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Guide Produced for the Tennessee Valley Authority (Revised) (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-06-01

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Guide Produced for the Tennessee Valley Authority provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a regional wind resource map and a list of incentives and contacts for more information.

  14. Supplemental Radiological Survey Plan for the Lease of the Rooms Associated with C107 of Building K-1006 at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blevins M.F.

    2010-09-01

    In 1998, a portion of Bldg. K-1006 was leased to the Community Reuse Organization of East Tennessee (CROET) as part of the reindustrialization efforts at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP). The facility was subleased and is being used as an analytical laboratory. The 1998 lease did not include rooms C107, C107-A, C107-B, C107-C, and C107-D. The lease of these rooms is now desired. These rooms comprise the area to be surveyed. The building was constructed as a laboratory facility to support the gaseous diffusion uranium enrichment process. It also contains offices and administrative spaces for laboratory personnel. After the gaseous diffusion process was shut down in the mid-1980s, the building was used to provide research and development support to ETTP environmental, safety, and health programs; the Toxic Substances Control Act Incinerator; the Central Neutralization Facility; and other multi-site waste treatment activities. It also served as the chemistry laboratory for the Environmental Technology Technical Services Organization. The activities currently conducted in Bldg. K-1006 utilize a variety of analytical techniques. Some of the major techniques being employed are X-ray analysis, electron microanalysis, and spectrochemical analysis. In 1998, a portion of Bldg. K-1006 was leased to CROET as part of the reindustrialization efforts at ETTP. The facility was subleased and is being used as an analytical laboratory. The 1998 lease did not include Rooms C107, C107-A, C107-B, C107-C, and C107-D. Some demolition of furniture and decontamination activities has taken place for Rooms C 107 and C 107-B since the last radiological survey of those rooms. In March 2009, a final remedial action (RA) was performed for the Bldg. K-1006 north basement sump. The Bldg. K-1006 north basement sump is a nominal 30-in.-diameter, 36-in.-deep concrete structure in the north corner of room C107B. The building receives groundwater in-leakage that is periodically pumped to the sewer system via this float-controlled pump. Solids in the bottom of the sump consisted of an estimated 1-ft{sup 3} coarse-grained material that varied in thickness from 0 to 4 in. with no suspended fraction. The RA consisted of removing the water in the sump and then removing and sampling the solids. The solids were mixed with grout after removal and allowed to set. The solids were then disposed off-site at an approved disposal facility. The building sump will remain until the K-1006 building is demolished. The actions for the K- 1006 sump are described in the revised Phased Construction Completion Report for Exposure Unit (EU) Z2-33, which received regulatory approval in December 2009.

  15. Remedial investigation/feasibility study for the David Witherspoon, Inc., 901 Site, Knoxville, Tennessee: Volume 2, Appendixes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-10-01

    This document contains the appendixes for the remedial investigation and feasibility study for the David Witherspoon, Inc., 901 site in Knoxville, Tennessee. The following topics are covered in the appendixes: (A) David Witherspoon, Inc., 901 Site Historical Data, (B) Fieldwork Plans for the David Witherspoon, Inc., 901 Site, (C) Risk Assessment, (D) Remediation Technology Discussion, (E) Engineering Support Documentation, (F) Applicable or Relevant and Appropriate Requirements, and (G) Cost Estimate Documentation.

  16. New Zealand lessons may aid efforts to control light brown apple moth in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varela, Lucia G.; Walker, James T.S.; Lo, Peter L; Rogers, David J

    2010-01-01

    1975. Integrated control of apple pests in New Zealand. 1.of the light brown apple moth Epiphyas postvittana (Walker),685–92. Dumbleton L J. 1932. The apple leaf-roller (Tortrix

  17. Tracking a medically important spider: climate change, ecological niche modeling, and the brown recluse (Loxosceles reclusa)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selden, Paul A.; Saupe, Erin E.; Pape?, Monica; Vetter, Richard S.

    2011-03-01

    Most spiders use venom to paralyze their prey and are commonly feared for their potential to cause injury to humans. In North America, one species in particular, Loxosceles reclusa (brown recluse spider, Sicariidae), causes the majority of necrotic...

  18. Cholinergic neurons in the dorsomedial hypothalamus regulate mouse brown adipose tissue metabolism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeong, Jae Hoon; Lee, Dong Kun; Blouet, Clémence; Ruiz, Henry H.; Buettner, Christoph; Chua, Streamson Jr; Schwartz, Gary J.; Jo, Young-Hwan

    2015-04-11

    Objective: Brown adipose tissue (BAT) thermogenesis is critical in maintaining body temperature. The dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) integrates cutaneous thermosensory signals and regulates adaptive thermogenesis. Here, we study the function...

  19. An Archaeological Survey for the Brookesmith Special Utility District Water Line Project in Brown County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, William

    2015-07-30

    with the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station. Henderson, Jerry 1999 An Archaeological Survey of Proposed Water System Improvements, Brookesmith Special Utility District, Brown County, Texas. Texas Water Development Board. Hoffrichter, Norma, and Beth...

  20. Conjectured Security of the ANSI-NIST Elliptic Curve RNG Daniel R. L. Brown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Conjectured Security of the ANSI-NIST Elliptic Curve RNG Daniel R. L. Brown March 29, 2006 Abstract An elliptic curve random number generator (ECRNG) has been proposed in ANSI and NIST draft standards

  1. Craig Brown | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Smit, Berend; Long, Jeffrey R.; Brown, Craig M. Critical Factors Driving the High Volumetric Uptake of Methane in Cu-3(btc)(2). J. Amer. Chem. Soc., 137, 10816-10825 (2015)....

  2. Environmental Baseline Survey Report for the Title Transfer of Land Parcel ED-4 at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SAIC

    2008-05-01

    This environmental baseline survey (EBS) report documents the baseline environmental conditions of a land parcel referred to as 'ED-4' (ED-4) at the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP). DOE is proposing to transfer the title of this land to the Heritage Center, LLC. Parcel ED-4 is a land parcel that consists of two noncontiguous areas comprising a total of approximately 18 acres located east of the ETTP. The western tract of ED-4 encompasses approximately 8.5 acres in the northeastern quadrant of the intersection of Boulevard Road and Highway 58. The eastern tract encompasses an area of approximately 9.5 acres in the northwestern quadrant of the intersection of Blair Road and Highway 58 (the Oak Ridge Turnpike). Aerial photographs and site maps from throughout the history of the ETTP, going back to its initial development in the 1940s as the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP), indicate that this area has been undeveloped woodland with the exception of three support facilities for workers constructing the ORGDP since federal acquisition in 1943. These three support facilities, which were located in the western tract of ED-4, included a recreation hall, the Town Hall Camp Operations Building, and the Property Warehouse. A railroad spur also formerly occupied a portion of Parcel ED-4. These former facilities only occupied approximately 5 percent of the total area of Parcel ED-4. This report provides supporting information for the transfer of this government-owned property at ETTP to a non-federal entity. This EBS is based upon the requirements of Sect. 120(h) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). In order to support a Clean Parcel Determination (CPD) in accordance with CERCLA Sect. 120(h)(4)(d), groundwater and sediment samples were collected within, and adjacent to, the Parcel ED-4 study area. The potential for DOE to make a CPD for ED-4 is further supported by a No Further Investigation (NFI) determination made on land that adjoins ED-4 to the east (DOE 1997a) and to the south (DOE 1997b).

  3. Fingering convection and cloudless models for cool brown dwarf atmospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tremblin, P; Mourier, P; Baraffe, I; Chabrier, G; Drummond, B; Homeier, D; Venot, O

    2015-01-01

    This work aims to improve the current understanding of the atmospheres of brown dwarfs, especially cold ones with spectral type T and Y, whose modeling is a current challenge. Silicate and iron clouds are believed to disappear at the photosphere at the L/T transition, but cloudless models fail to reproduce correctly the spectra of T dwarfs, advocating for the addition of more physics, e.g. other types of clouds or internal energy transport mechanisms. We use a one-dimensional (1D) radiative/convective equilibrium code ATMO to investigate this issue. This code includes both equilibrium and out-of-equilibrium chemistry and solves consistently the PT structure. Included opacity sources are H2-H2, H2-He, H2O, CO, CO2, CH4, NH3, K, Na, and TiO, VO if they are present in the atmosphere. We show that the spectra of Y dwarfs can be accurately reproduced with a cloudless model if vertical mixing and NH3 quenching are taken into account. T dwarf spectra still have some reddening in e.g. J - H compared to cloudless mode...

  4. A new parallax measurement for the coldest known brown dwarf

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luhman, K. L.; Esplin, T. L., E-mail: kluhman@astro.psu.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2014-11-20

    WISE J085510.83–071442.5 was recently discovered as the coldest known brown dwarf based on four epochs of images from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer and the Spitzer Space Telescope. We have improved the accuracy of its parallax measurement by obtaining two additional epochs of Spitzer astrometry. We derive a parallactic distance of 2.31 ± 0.08 pc, which continues to support its rank as the fourth closest known system to the Sun when compared to WISE J104915.57–531906.1 AB (2.02 ± 0.02 pc) and Wolf 359 (2.386 ± 0.012 pc). The new constraint on the absolute magnitude at 4.5 ?m indicates an effective temperature of 235-260 K based on four sets of theoretical models. We also show the updated positions of WISE J085510.83–071442.5 in two color-magnitude diagrams. Whereas Faherty and coworkers cited its location in M {sub W2} versus J – W2 as evidence of water clouds, we find that those data can be explained instead by cloudless models that employ non-equilibrium chemistry.

  5. Baghouse Slipstream Testing at TXU's Big Brown Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Pavlish; Jason Laumb; Robert Jensen; Jeffery Thompson; Christopher Martin; Mark Musich; Brandon Pavlish; Stanley Miller; Lucinda Hamre

    2007-04-30

    Performing sorbent testing for mercury control at a large scale is a very expensive endeavor and requires months of planning and careful execution. Even with good planning, there are plant limitations on what operating/design parameters can be varied/tested and when. For parameters that cannot be feasibly tested at the full scale (lower/higher gas flow, different bag material, cleaning methods, sorbents, etc.), an alternative approach is used to perform tests on a slipstream unit using flue gas from the plant. The advantage that a slipstream unit provides is the flexibility to test multiple operating and design parameters and other possible technology options without risking major disruption to the operation of the power plant. Additionally, the results generated are expected to simulate full-scale conditions closely, since the flue gas used during the tests comes directly from the plant in question. The Energy & Environmental Research Center developed and constructed a mobile baghouse that allows for cost-effective testing of impacts related to variation in operating and design parameters, as well as other possible mercury control options. Multiple sorbents, air-to-cloth ratios, bag materials, and cleaning frequencies were evaluated while flue gas was extracted from Big Brown when it fired a 70% Texas lignite-30% Powder River Basin (PRB) blend and a 100% PRB coal.

  6. Certification report for final closure of Y-12 Centralized Sanitary Landfill II, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-12-31

    This report represents the Geotek Engineering Company, Inc., (Geotek) record of activities to support certification of final closure Of the subject Y-12 Centralized Sanitary Landfill II. Ex as noted herein, final closure of the landfill was completed in accordance with the Y-12 Centralized Sanitary Landfill 11 Closure/Post Closure Plan, Revision 2, submitted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) on April 14, 1992, and approved by TDEC on May 27, 1994 (the ``Closure Plan``). minor modification to the Closure Plan allowing partial closure of the Y-12 Centralized Sanitary Landfill II (Phase 1) was approved by TDEC on August 3, 1994. The Phase I portion of the closure for the subject landfill was completed on March 25, 1995. A closure certification report entitled Certification Report for Partial Closure of Y-12 Centralized Sanitary Landfill II was submitted to Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., (LMES) on March 28, 1995. The final closure represents the completion of the closure activities for the entire Y-12 Centralized Sanitary Landfill II Site. The contents of this report and accompanying certification are based on observations by Geotek engineers and geologists during closure activities and on review of reports, records, laboratory test results, and other information furnished to Geotek by LMES.

  7. Fiscal year 1995 well plugging and abandonment program Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-01

    This report is a synopsis of the progress of the well plugging and abandonment program at the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, from September 1994 through August 1995. A total of 67 wells, piezometers, and borings were plugged and abandoned during the period of time covered in this report. All wells and borings were plugged and abandoned if (1) its construction did not meet current standards (substandard construction); (2) it was irreparably damaged or had deteriorated beyond practical repair; (3) its location interfered with or otherwise impeded site operations, construction, or closure activities; or (4) special circumstances existed as defined on a case-by-case basis and approved by the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) Manager. This summary report contains: general geologic setting of the Y-12 Plant and vicinity; discussion of well plugging and abandonment methods, grouting procedures, and waste management practices (a Waste Management Plan for Drilling Activities is included in Appendix C); summaries of plugging and abandonment activities at each site; and quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) and health and safety protocols used during the FY 1995 Plugging and Abandonment Program.

  8. Environmental monitoring plan for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-01

    This document presents an Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) for Waste Area Grouping (WAG 6) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This document updates a draft monitoring plan developed in 1993. The draft plan was never finalized awaiting resolution of the mechanisms for addressing RCRA concerns at a site where the CERCLA process resulted in a decision to defer action, i.e., postpone closure indefinitely. Over the past two years the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC), US Department of Energy (DOE), and US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region IV, have agreed that RCRA authority at the site will be maintained through a post- closure permit; ``closure`` in this case referring to deferred action. Both a Revised Closure Plan (DOE 1995a) and a Post-Closure Permit Application (DOE 1995b) have been developed to document this agreement; relevant portions of the EMP will be included in the RCRA Post-Closure Permit Application. As the RCRA issues were being negotiated, DOE initiated monitoring at WAG 6. The purpose of the monitoring activities was to (1) continue to comply with RCRA groundwater quality assessment requirements, (2) install new monitoring equipment, and (3) establish the baseline conditions at WAG 6 against which changes in contaminant releases could be measured. Baseline monitoring is scheduled to end September 30, 1995. Activities that have taken place over the past two years are summarized in this document.

  9. Lease of Parcel ED-1 of the Oak Ridge Reservation by the East Tennessee Economic Council

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-04-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has completed an environmental assessment (DOE/EA-1113) for the proposed lease of 957.16 acres of the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) to the East Tennessee Economic Council (ETEC), a non-profit community organization, for a period of 10 years, with an option for renewal. ETEC proposes to develop an industrial park on the leased site to provide employment opportunities for DOE and contractor employees affected by decreased federal funding. Based on the results of the analysis reported in the EA and implementation of mitigation measures defined in this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI), DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action that would significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the context of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not necessary, and DOE is issuing this mitigated FONSI. DOE will implement a Mitigation Action Plan for this project and provide annual reports on mitigation and monitoring.

  10. Underground storage tank management plan, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-09-01

    The Underground Storage Tank (UST) Program at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant was established to locate UST systems at the facility and to ensure that all operating UST systems are free of leaks. UST systems have been removed or upgraded in accordance with Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) regulations and guidance. With the closure of a significant portion of the USTs, the continuing mission of the UST Management Program is to manage the remaining active UST systems and continue corrective actions in a safe regulatory compliant manner. This Program outlines the compliance issues that must be addressed, reviews the current UST inventory and compliance approach, and presents the status and planned activities associated with each UST system. The UST Program provides guidance for implementing TDEC regulations and guidelines for petroleum UST systems. The plan is divided into three major sections: (1) regulatory requirements, (2) active UST sites, and (3) out-of-service UST sites. These sections describe in detail the applicable regulatory drivers, the UST sites addressed under the Program, and the procedures and guidance for compliance.

  11. Report of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) safety workshop, Knoxville, Tennessee, October 25--26, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchanan, J.R.; Dumont, J.N.; Kendrick, C.M.; Row, T.H.; Thompson, P.B.; West, C.D.; Marchaterre, J.F.; Muhlheim, M.D.; McBee, M.R.

    1988-12-01

    On October 25--26, 1988, about 60 people took part in an Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Safety Workshop, organized in cooperation with the Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) Office of the Department of Energy (DOE) and held in Knoxville, Tennessee. After a plenary session at which ANS Project staff presented status reports on the ANS design, research and development (R and D), and safety analysis efforts, the workshop broke into three working groups, each covering a different topic: Environmental and Waste Management, Applicable Regulatory Safety Criteria and Goals, and Reactor Concepts. Each group was asked to review the Project's approach to safety-related issues and to provide guidance on future reactor safety needs or directions for the Project. With the help of able chairmen, assisted by reporters and secretarial support, the working groups were extremely successful. Draft reports from each group were prepared before the workshop closed, and the major findings of each group were presented for review and discussion by the entire workshop attendance. This report contains the final version of the group reports, incorporating the results of the overall review by all the workshop participants.

  12. Routine environmental audit of the K-25 Site, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    This report documents the results of the Routine Environmental Audit of the K-25 Site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, conducted February 14 through February 25, 1994, by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24) located within the Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH). The Routine Environmental Audit for the K-25 site was conducted as an environmental management assessment, supported through reviews of the Waste Management Program and the Decontamination and Decommissioning Program. The assessment was conducted jointly with, and built upon, the results provided by the ``DOE Oak Ridge Operations Office Environment, Safety, health and Quality Assurance Appraisal at the K-25 Site.`` DOE 5482.1B, ``Environment, Safety and Health Appraisal Program,`` established the mission of EH-24 to provide comprehensive, independent oversight of Department-wide environmental programs on behalf of the Secretary of Energy. The purpose of this assessment is to provide the Secretary of Energy and senior DOE managers with concise independent information as part of DOE`s continuing effort to improve environmental program performance. The ultimate goal of EH-24 is enhancement of environmental protection and the minimization of risk to public health and the environment. The routine environmental audit is one method by which EH-24 accomplishes its mission, utilizing systematic and periodic evaluations of the Department`s environmental programs within line organizations.

  13. Site descriptions of environmental restoration units at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goddard, P.L.; Legeay, A.J.; Pesce, D.S.; Stanley, A.M.

    1995-11-01

    This report, Site Descriptions of Environmental Restoration Units at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, is being prepared to assimilate information on sites included in the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program of the K-25 Site, one of three major installations on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) built during World War III as part of the Manhattan Project. The information included in this report will be used to establish program priorities so that resources allotted to the K-25 ER Program can be best used to decrease any risk to humans or the environment, and to determine the sequence in which any remedial activities should be conducted. This document will be updated periodically in both paper and Internet versions. Units within this report are described in individual data sheets arranged alphanumerically. Each data sheet includes entries on project status, unit location, dimensions and capacity, dates operated, present function, lifecycle operation, waste characteristics, site status, media of concern, comments, and references. Each data sheet is accompanied by a photograph of the unit, and each unit is located on one of 13 area maps. These areas, along with the sub-area, unit, and sub-unit breakdowns within them, are outlined in Appendix A. Appendix B is a summary of information on remote aerial sensing and its applicability to the ER program.

  14. Characterization plan for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Area-Wide Groundwater Program, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This characterization plan has been developed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) investigation of the Groundwater Operable Unit (GWOU) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) located near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The first iteration of the characterization plan is intended to serve as a strategy document to guide subsequent GWOU remedial investigations. The plan provides a rationale and organization for groundwater data acquisition, monitoring, and remedial actions to be performed during implementation of environmental restoration activities associated with the ORNL GWOU. It is important to note that the characterization plan for the ORNL GWOU is not a prototypical work plan. As such, remedial investigations will be conducted using annual work plans to manage the work activities, and task reports will be used to document the results of the investigations. Sampling and analysis results will be compiled and reported annually with a review of data relative to risk (screening level risk assessment review) for groundwater. This characterization plan outlines the overall strategy for the remedial investigations and defines tasks that are to be conducted during the initial phase of investigation. This plan is presented with the understanding that more specific addenda to the plan will follow.

  15. Quality assurance plan for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    This Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) is concerned with design and construction (Sect. 2) and characterization and monitoring (Sect. 3). The basis for Sect. 2 is the Quality Assurance Plan for the Design and Construction of Waste Area Grouping 6 Closure at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and the basis for Sect. 3 is the Environmental Restoration Quality Program Plan. Combining the two areas into one plan gives a single, overall document that explains the requirements and from which the individual QAPs and quality assurance project plans can be written. The Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 QAP establishes the procedures and requirements to be implemented for control of quality-related activities for the WAG 6 project. Quality Assurance (QA) activities are subject to requirements detailed in the Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), QA Program and the Environmental Restoration (ER) QA Program, as well as to other quality requirements. These activities may be performed by Energy Systems organizations, subcontractors to Energy Systems, and architect-engineer (A-E) under prime contract to the US Department of Energy (DOE), or a construction manager under prime contract to DOE. This plan specifies the overall Energy Systems quality requirements for the project. The WAG 6 QAP will be supplemented by subproject QAPs that will identify additional requirements pertaining to each subproject.

  16. Environmental Baseline Survey Report for the Title Transfer of the K-792 Switchyard Complex at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SAIC

    2009-12-01

    This environmental baseline survey (EBS) documents the baseline environmental conditions of the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) K-792 Switchyard Complex, which includes the former K-792 Switchyard, the K-79 1-B building, the K-796-A building, and the K-792 Northern Expansion Area located in the northwestern portion of the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP). The total area of the property is approximately 19.91 acres. DOE is proposing to transfer the title of this land area and buildings to the Heritage Center, LLC (Heritage Center), a subsidiary corporation of the Community Reuse Organization of East Tennessee (CROET). This report provides supporting information for the transfer of this government-owned facility at ETTP to a non-federal entity. The area proposed for title transfer includes the former K-792 Switchyard, the K-792 Northern Expansion Area, Bldg. K-791-B, Bldg. K-796-A, and the underlying property known as the underlying fee. Located within the K-792 Switchyard footprint but not included in the transfer are Bldg. K-131 0-MP and Bldg. K- 131 0-MQ, two buildings owned by a private company that leases space in the northern portion of the Switchyard. The transfer footprint is bounded by Perimeter Road to the north and west, the parking area for Portal 8 to the south, and primarily the former K-792 Powerhouse Complex and Avenue 'U' North to the east; however, the eastern boundary along the Northern Expansion area has no physical features associated with it. Zone 2 remedial action objectives were developed by the DVS to support the future use of ETTP as a mixed-use commercial and industrial park. Therefore, remediation criteria were designed for the protection of the future industrial worker under the assumption the worker normally would not have the potential for exposure to soils at depths below 10 ft below ground surface (bgs). Accordingly, land use controls (LUCs) have been established to restrict disturbance of soils below 10 ft deep and to limit future land use to industriallcornmercial activities. Where the need for LUCs below 10 ft bgs is not warranted, this is so stated and explained. Once all actions associated with the DVS for Zone 1 and Zone 2 are completed and the data support it, there will be a re-evaluation with EPA and TDEC for the restriction on excavation below 10 ft. The DVS process and the preparation of this report included visual and physical inspections of the property and adjacent properties, a detailed records search, sampling and analysis of soils, radiological walkover surveys, and a risk evaluation. Resources evaluated as part of the records search included Federal Government records, title documents, aerial photographs that may reflect prior uses, and interviews with current and former employees 1 involved in the operations on the real property to identify any areas on the property where hazardous substances and petroleum products, or their derivatives, and acutely hazardous wastes were stored for one year or more, known to have been released, or disposed of. In addition, radiological surveys of Bldgs. K-791-B and K-796-A were conducted to assess the buildings radiological condition. Soil vapor sampling and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) swipe sampling also were conducted within the buildings. Based on the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) review of the existing information, including discussions and interviews referenced herein, and evaluation of the data gathered in preparation of the environmental baseline survey (EBS) for the K-792 Switchyard Complex, DOE recommends the following: Due to the uncertainty associated with the nature of the on-site groundwater and the need to evaluate and possibly address groundwater in the future, DOE recommends that the transfer of the K-792 Switchyard Complex be achieved by a covenant deferral per the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) Sect. 120(h)(3)(c). Land use restrictions associated with the covenant deferral are described.

  17. Astrometry and Photometry for Cool Dwarfs and Brown Dwarfs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. C. Dahn; H. C. Harris; F. J. Vrba; H. H. Guetter; B. Canzian; A. A. Henden; S. E. Levine; C. B. Luginbuhl; A. K. B. Monet; D. G. Monet; J. R. Pier; R. C. Stone; R. L. Walker; A. J. Burgasser; J. E. Gizis; J. D. Kirkpatrick; J. Liebert; I. N. Reid

    2002-05-03

    Trigonometric parallax determinations are presented for 28 late type dwarfs and brown dwarfs, including eight M dwarfs with spectral types between M7 and M9.5, 17 L dwarfs with spectral types between L0 and L8, and three T dwarfs. Broadband photometry at CCD wavelengths (VRIz) and/or near-IR wavelengths (JHK) are presented for these objects and for 24 additional late-type dwarfs. Supplemented with astrometry and photometry from the literature, including ten L and two T dwarfs with parallaxes established by association with bright, usually HIPPARCOS primaries, this material forms the basis for studying various color-color and color-absolute magnitude relations. The I-J color is a good predictor of absolute magnitude for late-M and L dwarfs. M_J becomes monotonically fainter with I-J color and with spectral type through late-L dwarfs, then brightens for early-T dwarfs. The combination of zJK colors alone can be used to classify late-M, early-L, and T dwarfs accurately, and to predict their absolute magnitudes, but is less effective at untangling the scatter among mid- and late-L dwarfs. The mean tangential velocity of these objects is found to be slightly less than that for dM stars in the solar neighborhood, consistent with a sample with a mean age of several Gyr. Using colors to estimate bolometric corrections, and models to estimate stellar radii, effective temperatures are derived. The latest L dwarfs are found to have T_eff ~ 1360 K.

  18. EIS-0305: Treating Transuranic (TRU)/Alpha Low-Level at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS evaluates DOE's proposal to construct, operate, and decontaminate/decommission a Transuranic (TRU) Waste Treatment Facility in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The four waste types that would be treated at the proposed facility would be remote-handled TRU mixed waste sludge, liquid low-level waste associated with the sludge, contact-handled TRU/alpha low-level waste solids, and remote-handled TRU/alpha low-level waste solids. The mixed waste sludge and some of the solid waste contain metals regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act and may be classified as mixed waste.

  19. Bear Creek Valley Floodplain Hot Spot Removal Action Project Plan, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-01-01

    The Bear Creek Valley Floodplain Hot Spot Removal Action Project Plan, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Y/ER-301) was prepared (1) to safely, cost-effectively, and efficiently evaluate the environmental impact of solid material in the two debris areas in the context of industrial land uses (as defined in the Bear Creek Valley Feasibility Study) to support the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Assessment and (2) to evaluate, define, and implement the actions to mitigate these impacts. This work was performed under Work Breakdown Structure 1.x.01.20.01.08.

  20. Environmental Cleanup of the East Tennessee Technology Park Year One - Execution with Certainty SM - 13120

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schubert, A.L. [URS - CH2M Oak Ridge LLC, P.O. Box 4699, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-7294 (United States)] [URS - CH2M Oak Ridge LLC, P.O. Box 4699, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-7294 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    On August 1, 2011, URS - CH2M Oak Ridge LLC (UCOR) began its five-year, $1.4 billion cleanup of the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), located on the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation in Tennessee. UCOR will close out cleanup operations that began in 1998 under a previous contract. When the Contract Base scope of work [1] is completed in 2016, the K-25 gaseous diffusion building will have been demolished and all waste dispositioned, demolition will have started on the K-27 gaseous diffusion building, all contact-handled and remote-handled transuranic waste in inventory (approximately 500 cubic meters) will have been transferred to the Transuranic Waste Processing Center, previously designated 'No-Path-To-Disposition Waste' will have been dispositioned to the extent possible, and UCOR will have managed DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM)- owned facilities at ETTP, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the Y-12 National Security Complex in a safe and cost-effective manner. Since assuming its responsibilities as the ETTP cleanup contractor, UCOR has completed its life-cycle Performance Measurement Baseline; received its Earned Value Management System (EVMS) certification; advanced the deactivation and demolition (D and D) of the K-25 gaseous diffusion building; recovered and completed the Tank W-1A and K-1070-B Burial Ground remediation projects; characterized, packaged, and shipped contact-handled transuranic waste to the Transuranic Waste Processing Center; disposed of more than 90,000 cubic yards of cleanup waste while managing the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF); and provided operations, surveillance, and maintenance activities at DOE EM facilities at ETTP, ORNL, and the Y-12 National Security Complex. Project performance as of December 31, 2012 has been excellent: - Cost Performance Index - 1.06; - Schedule Performance Index - 1.02. At the same time, since safety is the foundation of all cleanup work, UCOR's safety record goes hand in hand with its excellent project performance. Through calendar year 2012, UCOR's recordable injury rate was 0.33, and the company has worked close to 4 million hours without a lost work day injury. UCOR's safety record is one of the best in the DOE EM Complex. This performance was due, in large part, to the people and processes URS and CH2M HILL, the parent companies of UCOR, brought to the project. Key approaches included: - Selected and deployed experienced staff in key leadership positions throughout the organization; - Approached 'Transition' as the 'true' beginning of the cleanup project - kicking off a number of project initiatives such as Partnering, PMB development, D and D Plan execution, etc. - Established a project baseline for performance measurement and obtained EVMS certification in record time; - Determined material differences and changed conditions that warranted contract change - then quickly addressed these changes with the DOE client; - Aligned the project and the contract within one year - also done in record time; - Implemented Safety Trained Supervisor and Safety Conscious Work Environment Programs, and kicked off the pursuit of certification under DOE's Voluntary Protection Program. (authors)

  1. Survey of protected vascular plants on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Awl, D.J.; Pounds, L.R.; Rosensteel, B.A.; King, A.L.; Hamlett, P.A.

    1996-06-01

    Vascular plant surveys were initiated during fiscal year 1992 by the environmentally sensitive areas program to determine the baseline condition of threatened and endangered (T&E) vascular plant species on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). T&E species receive protection under federal and state regulations. In addition, the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) requires that federally-funded projects avoid or mitigate impacts to listed species. T&E plant species found on or near the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) are identified. Twenty-eight species identified on the ORR are listed by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation as either endangered, threatened, or of special concern. Four of these have been under review by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for possible listing (listed in the formerly-used C2 candidate category). Additional species listed by the state occur near and may be present on the ORR. A range of habitats support the rare taxa on the ORR: river bluffs, sinkholes, calcareous barrens, wetlands, utility corridors, and forests. The list of T&E plant species and their locations on the ORR should be considered provisional because the entire ORR has not been surveyed, and state and federal status of all species continues to be updated. The purpose of this document is to present information on the listed T&E plant species currently known to occur on the ORR as well as listed species potentially occurring on the ORR based on geographic range and habitat availability. For the purpose of this report, {open_quotes}T&E species{close_quotes} include all federal- and state-listed species, including candidates for listing, and species of special concern. Consideration of T&E plant habitats is an important component of resource management and land-use planning; protection of rare species in their natural habitat is the best method of ensuring their long-term survival.

  2. Tennessee Oversight Agreement annual report, May 13, 1993--May 12, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-09-01

    This report discusses the activities of the Division of DOE Oversight in the areas of coordination with other State Agencies with regard to environmental restoration, corrective action, and waste management activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation; and the Division`s efforts to keep the public informed of those DOE activities that may impact their health and the environment. This report includes the status of the Division`s efforts in implementing the Tennessee Oversight Agreement (TOA). Each Program Section provides information concerning the status of its activities. The Administrative Section has been instrumental in achieving access to the ORR without prior notification to DOE and in obtaining documents and environmental, waste management, safety, and health information in a timely manner. The Environmental Restoration Program has provided in-depth document reviews and on-site coordination and monitoring of field activities required under the Federal Facility Agreement. Most notable of the activities are the investigations and planned remediation of the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek and the Watts Bar Reservoir. The Waste Management Program has audited DOE`s compliance with air, water, solid, hazardous, and mixed waste storage, treatment, and disposal regulations. Effort was focused on all three DOE Facilities on the ORR. The final portion of this report discusses the Division`s findings and recommendations. Most significant of these issues is the Division`s request to be an active participant in DOE`s prioritization of its TOA commitments. Other issues discussed include long term storage of radioactive waste and the use of environmental restoration funds. A discussion of those findings and recommendations provided in last year`s annual report and addressed by DOE are included in this report as well. All documents, logs, files, etc. supporting this report are available for review during routine business hours at the Division`s office.

  3. Cooling season performance of an earth-sheltered office/dormitory building in Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christian, J.E.

    1984-07-01

    Detailed hourly measurements taken in and around an underground office-dormitory building for two summers document energy savings; whole building-component interface problems; and specific cooling contributions from earth contact, interior thermal mass, and an economizer. The Joint Institute Dormitory (JID) saves about 30% compared with well-built above-grade buildings in a climate typical of Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and has the potential to save as much as 50%. The detailed measurements, which include extensive thermal comfort data, indicate that at least 90% of the occupants are comfortable all of the time. The thermal performance measurements and analysis determine that the peak cooling requirement of this building is 50% less than that of well-built above-grade structures, permitting a cost savings on installed cooling capacity. The dominant building components contributing to the good thermal performance are the structural thermal mass, the earth-covered roof, and the earth contact provided by the bermed walls and slab floor. The 372-m/sup 2/ (4000 gross ft/sup 2/) building used about $300 (at 5.7 cents/kWh) to cool and ventilate from May through September. Eliminating a number of building design and construction anomalies could improve the whole-building performance and reduce the seasonal cooling cost another $85. Close examination of the thermal performance of this building revealed that a very efficient heat pump and thermally sound envelope do not necessarily produce otpimum performance without careful attention given to component interface details. 8 references, 24 figures, 12 tables.

  4. The field brown dwarf LP 944-20 and the Castor moving group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Ribas

    2003-01-06

    A reliable age estimation for the field brown dwarf LP 944-20 is accomplished through the analysis of its kinematic properties. The space velocities of this star strongly suggest its membership in the so-called Castor moving group. LP 944-20 can be sensibly assumed to have the group's age, which is estimated to be ~320 Myr, and metal content, which is found to be roughly solar. With these new constrains and the available photometry and lithium abundance, current brown dwarf models are put to a test. Using the IR magnitudes and the lithium diagnostics, the models are able to provide a reasonable description of the brown dwarf's properties (to within a few sigma) but yield an age which is roughly 50% larger than our estimate. Possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed.

  5. Effects of pretreatment in steam on the pyrolysis behavior of Loy Yang brown coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai Zeng; George Favas; Hongwei Wu; Alan L. Chaffee; Jun-ichiro Hayashi; Chun-Zhu Li [Monash University, Vic. (Australia). CRC for Clean Power from Lignite, Department of Chemical Engineering

    2006-02-01

    Dewatering/drying of Victorian brown coal will be an integral part of future brown coal utilization processes aimed at the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. This study aims to investigate the effects of the thermal pretreatment of brown coal in the presence of steam/water on its subsequent pyrolysis behavior. A Victorian (Loy Yang) brown coal was thermally pretreated in pressurized steam and inert atmospheres. The pyrolysis behavior of these pretreated coal samples was investigated in a wire-mesh reactor. While the pretreatment in steam at temperatures higher than 250{sup o}C increased the char yield of the steam-treated coal, it did not affect the overall pyrolysis char yield at 1000{sup o} C s{sup -1} if the weight loss during the pretreatment in steam was also considered. However, the tar yield decreased significantly after the pretreatment in the presence of steam. The UV-fluorescence spectroscopy of tars revealed that the release of large aromatic systems from the steam-treated coal was only affected by the pretreatment in steam if the treatment temperature was very high (e.g. 350{sup o}C). The loss of NaCl and the use of high pressure during the pretreatment of brown coal in steam were not the main reasons for the changes in the observed tar yield. The hydrolysis of O-containing structures such as ethers, esters, and carboxylates during the pretreatment in the presence of steam plays an important role in the fates of these O-containing structures during pretreatment and subsequent pyrolysis, leading to changes in the pyrolysis behavior of the brown coal. 36 refs., 8 figs.

  6. A Dendroecological Evaluation of the Effects of Coal Ash on Tree Growth, Kingston Fossil Plant, Harriman, Tennessee, U.S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

    A Dendroecological Evaluation of the Effects of Coal Ash on Tree Growth, Kingston Fossil Plant of fly ash at the Kingston Fossil Plant, Harriman, Tennessee collapsed, releasing 4,434,400 cubic meters of coal ash into the Clinch and Emory Rivers, impacting aquatic life as well as terrestrial flora

  7. Mitigation Action Plan: Lease of Parcel ED-1 of the Oak Ridge Reservation by the East Tennessee Economic Council

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-04-01

    In April 1996, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) completed an environmental assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1113) for the proposed lease of 957-16 acres (Parcel ED-1) of the Oak Ridge (Tennessee) Reservation (ORR) by the East Tennessee Economic Council (ETEC) for industrial development. DOE plans to issue a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the proposed action, conditional upon the implementation of mitigation and monitoring to protect environmental resources. According to DOE`s National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) regulations (10 CFR 1021.322), a FONSI shall include {open_quotes}any commitments to mitigations that are essential to render the impacts of the proposed action not significant, beyond those mitigations that are integral elements of the proposed action, and a reference to the Mitigation Action Plan prepared under 10 CTR 1021.331{close_quotes}. Terms of the lease offer DOE the option of terminating the lease with ETEC should the lessee and/or sublessees fail to implement the mitigation defined in the FONSI.

  8. Site characterization plan for groundwater in Waste Area Grouping 1 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, R.R.; Curtis, A.H.; Houlberg, L.M.; Purucker, S.T.; Singer, M.L.; Tardiff, M.F.; Wolf, D.A.

    1994-07-01

    The Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 1 Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, is undergoing a site characterization to identify environmental contamination that may be present. This document, Site Characterization Report for Groundwater in Waste Area Grouping I at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, identifies areas of concern with respect to WAG 1 groundwater and presents the rationale, justification, and objectives for conducting this continuing site characterization. This report summarizes the operations that have taken place at each of the areas of concern in WAG 1, summarizes previous characterization studies that have been performed, presents interpretations of previously collected data and information, identifies contaminants of concern, and presents an action plan for further site investigations and early actions that will lead to identification of contaminant sources, their major groundwater pathways, and reduced off-site migration of contaminated groundwater to surface water. Site characterization Activities performed to date at WAG I have indicated that groundwater contamination, principally radiological contamination, is widespread. An extensive network of underground pipelines and utilities have contributed to the dispersal of contaminants to an unknown extent. The general absence of radiological contamination in surface water at the perimeter of WAG 1 is attributed to the presence of pipelines and underground waste storage tank sumps and dry wells distributed throughout WAG 1 which remove more than about 40 million gal of contaminated groundwater per year.

  9. Evaluation of Invertebrate Bioaccumulation of Fly Ash Contaminants in the Emory, Clinch, and Tennessee Rivers, 2009 - 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, John G

    2012-05-01

    This report provides a summary of results from studies on invertebrate bioaccumulation of potential contaminants associated with a major fly ash spill into the Emory River following the failure of a dike at the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant (KIF) in Kingston, Tennessee, in late December 2008. Data included in this report cover samples collected in calendar years 2009 and 2010. Samples collected from most sites in 2009 were processed by two different laboratories using different approved U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) analytical methods: ALS Laboratory Group in Ft. Collins, CO, processed sampling using EPA method 6010 (but method 6020 for uranium and SW7470 for mercury), and PACE Analytical in Minneapolis, MN, used EPA method 6020. A preliminary evaluation of results from both laboratories indicated that some differences exited in measured concentrations of several elements, either because of specific differences of the two methods or inter-laboratory differences. While concentration differences between the laboratories were noted for many elements, spatial trends depicted from the results of both methods appeared to be similar. However, because samples collected in the future will be analyzed by Method 6020, only the results from PACE were included in this report to reduce data variation potentially associated with inter-laboratory and analytical method differences.

  10. ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY IN GIANT PLANETS, BROWN DWARFS, AND LOW-MASS DWARF STARS. II. SULFUR AND PHOSPHORUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY IN GIANT PLANETS, BROWN DWARFS, AND LOW-MASS DWARF STARS. II. SULFUR AND PHOSPHORUS Channon Visscher, Katharina Lodders, and Bruce Fegley, Jr. Planetary Chemistry Laboratory to model sulfur and phosphorus chemistry in giant planets, brown dwarfs, and extrasolar giant planets (EGPs

  11. PHYSICAL REVIEW C VOLUME 49, NUMBER 1 JANUARY 1994 Hanbury-Brown --Twiss analysis in a solvable model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertsch George F.

    PHYSICAL REVIEW C VOLUME 49, NUMBER 1 JANUARY 1994 Hanbury-Brown --Twiss analysis in a solvable of meson correlations by Hanbury-~rown --Twiss interferometry is tested with a simple model of meson the correlation function depends on the Bose symmetry of the particles as in the Hanbury-Brown --Twiss (HBT

  12. Species Diversity of Seed-Eating Desert Rodents in Sand Dune Habitats Author(s): James H. Brown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, James H.

    Species Diversity of Seed-Eating Desert Rodents in Sand Dune Habitats Author(s): James H. Brown DIVERSITY OF SEED-EATING DESERT RODENTS IN SAND DUNE HABITATS' JAMES H. BROWN Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City 84112 Abstract.The seed-eatingrodent faunas were sampled on 18 dunes

  13. Operational taxonomy and (paleo-)autecology of round, brown, spiny dinoflagellate cysts from the Quaternary of high northern latitudes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Tom

    Operational taxonomy and (paleo-)autecology of round, brown, spiny dinoflagellate cysts from determination key taxonomy paleoecology Round brown spiny dinoflagellate cysts from high latitudes a synthesis of descriptions with remarks on the mor- phology, taxonomy, nomenclature and ecology of cysts from

  14. Huff & Brown | Teaching Therac Integrating Ethics Into a Computing Curriculm: A Case Study of the Therac-25

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    Huff & Brown | Teaching Therac 1 Integrating Ethics Into a Computing Curriculm: A Case Study of the Therac-25 Chuck Huff1 and Richard Brown2 Abstract Almost all computer ethics courses use cases to some the computer science major, and in particular in the course Ethical Issues in Software Design. We then present

  15. Limits to the potential distribution of light brown apple moth in Arizona–California based on climate suitability and host plant availability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gutierrez, Andrew Paul; Mills, Nicholas J.; Ponti, Luigi

    2010-01-01

    503–531 Dumbleton LJ (1932) The apple leaf roller (TortrixJW (1937) The light-brown apple moth (Tortrix post- vittana,distribution of light brown apple moth in Arizona–California

  16. NATIONAL PRESS RELEASE I PARIS I 30 AUGUST 2013 Brown algae contain phlorotannins, aromatic (phenolic) compounds that are unique in the plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canet, Léonie

    NATIONAL PRESS RELEASE I PARIS I 30 AUGUST 2013 Brown algae contain phlorotannins, aromatic elucidated the key step in the production of these compounds in Ectocarpus siliculosus, a small brown alga phlorotannins from brown algae for use in industry was a complex process, and the biosynthesis pathways

  17. Wind Regimes in Complex Terrain of the Great Valley of Eastern Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birdwell, Kevin R [ORNL

    2011-05-01

    This research was designed to provide an understanding of physical wind mechanisms within the complex terrain of the Great Valley of Eastern Tennessee to assess the impacts of regional air flow with regard to synoptic and mesoscale weather changes, wind direction shifts, and air quality. Meteorological data from 2008 2009 were analyzed from 13 meteorological sites along with associated upper level data. Up to 15 ancillary sites were used for reference. Two-step complete linkage and K-means cluster analyses, synoptic weather studies, and ambient meteorological comparisons were performed to generate hourly wind classifications. These wind regimes revealed seasonal variations of underlying physical wind mechanisms (forced channeled, vertically coupled, pressure-driven, and thermally-driven winds). Synoptic and ambient meteorological analysis (mixing depth, pressure gradient, pressure gradient ratio, atmospheric and surface stability) suggested up to 93% accuracy for the clustered results. Probabilistic prediction schemes of wind flow and wind class change were developed through characterization of flow change data and wind class succession. Data analysis revealed that wind flow in the Great Valley was dominated by forced channeled winds (45 67%) and vertically coupled flow (22 38%). Down-valley pressure-driven and thermally-driven winds also played significant roles (0 17% and 2 20%, respectively), usually accompanied by convergent wind patterns (15 20%) and large wind direction shifts, especially in the Central/Upper Great Valley. The behavior of most wind regimes was associated with detectable pressure differences between the Lower and Upper Great Valley. Mixing depth and synoptic pressure gradients were significant contributors to wind pattern behavior. Up to 15 wind classes and 10 sub-classes were identified in the Central Great Valley with 67 joined classes for the Great Valley at-large. Two-thirds of Great Valley at-large flow was defined by 12 classes. Winds flowed on-axis only 40% of the time. The Great Smoky Mountains helped create down-valley pressure-driven winds, downslope mountain breezes, and divergent air flow. The Cumberland Mountains and Plateau were associated with wind speed reductions in the Central Great Valley, Emory Gap Flow, weak thermally-driven winds, and northwesterly down sloping. Ridge-and-valley terrain enhanced wind direction reversals, pressure-driven winds, as well as locally and regionally produced thermally-driven flow.

  18. Federal Facility Agreement Annual Progress Report for Fiscal Year 1999 Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC

    2000-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations (DOE-ORO) EM Program adopted a watershed approach for performing Remedial Investigations (RIs) and characterizations for ORR because it is an effective system for determining the best methods for protecting and restoring aquatic ecosystems and protecting human health. The basic concept is that water quality and ecosystem problems are best solved at the watershed level rather than at the individual water-body or discharger level. The watershed approach requires consideration of all environmental concerns, including needs to protect public health, critical habitats such as wetlands, biological integrity, and surface and ground waters. The watershed approach provides an improved basis for management decisions concerning contaminant sources and containment. It allows more direct focus by stakeholders on achieving ecological goals and water quality standards rather than a measurement of program activities based on numbers of permits or samples. The watershed approach allows better management strategies for investigations, therefore maximizing the utilization of scarce resources. Feasibility studies (FSs) evaluate various alternatives in terms of environmental standards, the protection of human health and the environment, and the costs of implementation to find the optimum solution among them. Society has to decide how much it is willing to spend to meet the standards and to be protective. Conducting FSs is the process of trading off those criteria to pick that optimum point that society wants to achieve. Performing this analysis at the watershed scale allows those trade-offs to be made meaningfully. In addition, a Land Use Control Assurance Plan for the ORR was prepared to identify the strategy for assuring the long-term effectiveness of land use controls. These land use controls will be relied upon to protect human health and the environment at areas of the ORR undergoing remediation pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act and/or the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. This plan will be implemented by means of a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) incorporating its terms with the United States EPA and TDEC. The majority of projects described in this report are grouped into five watersheds. They are the East Tennessee Technical Park (ETTP) Watershed (formerly the K-25 Site), the Melton Valley (MV) and Bethel Valley (BV) Watersheds at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the Bear Creek Valley (BCV) and Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC) Watersheds at the Y-12 Plant.

  19. Reassessing U.S. nuclear weapons policy Harold Brown[1] and John Deutch[2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deutch, John

    1 Reassessing U.S. nuclear weapons policy Harold Brown[1] and John Deutch[2] The end of the Cold of terrorism and the risks of nuclear proliferation, call for a reassessment of the role of nuclear weapons the goal of the complete elimination of nuclear weapons as a practical means of mobilizing more resolute

  20. EIS-0435: Modification of the Groton Generation Station Interconnection Agreement, Brown County, South Dakota

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal for DOE's Western Area Power Administration to modify its Large Generator Connection Agreement for the Groton Generation Station in Brown County, South Dakota. The modification would allow Basin Electric Power Cooperative, which operates the generation station, to produce power above the current operating limit of 50 average megawatts.

  1. STATE OF CALIFORNIA --NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 STATE OF CALIFORNIA -- NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY ENERGY RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION In the matter of: Preparation of the 2013 of the 2013 IEPR Scoping Order follows. Background Public Resources Code Section 25302 requires the Energy

  2. STATE OF CALIFORNIA --NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATE OF CALIFORNIA -- NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION 1516 Ninth Street Sacramento, California 95814 Main website: www.energy.ca.gov Notice of Availability 2011 Integrated Energy Policy Report [CEC-100-2011-001-CMF / Docket # 11-IEP-1] The 2011

  3. STATE OF CALIFORNIA --NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATE OF CALIFORNIA -- NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION 1516 Ninth Street Sacramento, California 95814 Main website: www.energy.ca.gov Notice of Availability Overall Program Guidebook for the Renewable Energy Program, Fourth Edition Publication No. CEC-300

  4. STATE OF CALIFORNIA --THE NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY Edmund G. Brown, Jr., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    these laws, the Energy Commission is charged with certifying eligible renewable energy resources that may to the state's RPS under statute. Many of the RPS-eligible renewable energy resources may qualify for fundingSTATE OF CALIFORNIA -- THE NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY Edmund G. Brown, Jr., Governor CALIFORNIA

  5. STATE OF CALIFORNIA --NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATE OF CALIFORNIA -- NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION 1516 Ninth Street Sacramento, California 95814 Main website: www.energy.ca.gov Notice of Availability Developing Renewable Generation on State Property Installing Renewable Energy on State Buildings

  6. STATE OF CALIFORNIA --NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATE OF CALIFORNIA -- NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY as eligible renewable energy resources for the RPS and describes how the Energy Commission tracks and verifies COMMISSION 1516 Ninth Street Sacramento, California 95814 Main website: www.energy.ca.gov Notice

  7. Minimax design of vibration absorbers for linear damped systems Brandon Brown, Tarunraj Singh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Tarunraj

    Minimax design of vibration absorbers for linear damped systems Brandon Brown, Tarunraj Singh à Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY addresses the issue of design of a passive vibration absorber in the presence of uncertainties

  8. Compost Tips for the Home Gardener1 Sydney Park Brown2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jawitz, James W.

    ENH1065 Compost Tips for the Home Gardener1 Sydney Park Brown2 1. This document is ENH1065, one. Nick T. Place, dean for UF/IFAS Extension. What Is Compost? Compost is a dark, crumbly material created. Compost is not completely decomposed (like humus); it will contain small pieces of debris that can

  9. Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development in the USA David Duchane and Donald Brown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development in the USA by David Duchane and Donald Brown Los of the world's store of geothermal energy. The real potential for growth in the use of geothermal energy lies-engineered geothermal reservoir in hot, crystalline rock by the application of hydraulic fracturing techniques

  10. STATE OF CALIFORNIA NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor April 25, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , 2011 PON-10-604 GRANT SOLICITATION APPLICATION PACKAGE Buy Down Incentives for Natural Gas and PropaneSTATE OF CALIFORNIA ­ NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor Addendum 3 April 25 Vehicles The purpose of this addendum is to clarify the minimum requirements needed for the original

  11. METHANE AND ETHANE ON THE BRIGHT KUIPER BELT OBJECT 2005 FY9 M. E. Brown,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Michael E.

    METHANE AND ETHANE ON THE BRIGHT KUIPER BELT OBJECT 2005 FY9 M. E. Brown,1 K. M. Barkume,1 G. A indicates the clear presence of ethane, an expected product of UV photolysis of methane. No evidence for N2 of 2005 FY9 that leads to large methane grains, abundant sites for ethane formation through UV photolysis

  12. The First Hundred Brown Dwarfs Discovered by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bochanski, John J.

    We present ground-based spectroscopic verification of 6 Y dwarfs (see also Cushing et al.), 89 T dwarfs, 8 L dwarfs, and 1 M dwarf identified by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Eighty of these are cold brown ...

  13. Computer simulation of three-arm star polymers Scott Brown, Grzegorz Szamel*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szamel, Grzegorz

    14 Computer simulation of three-arm star polymers Scott Brown, Grzegorz Szamel* Department) . In this paper we describe a computer simulation study of three-arm star polymers in the melt. It is believed) have argued that large (spatial) scale diffusive motions are enabled by an "arm-retraction" mechanism

  14. The Static Di#eHellman Problem Daniel R. L. Brown Robert P. Gallant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    The Static Di#e­Hellman Problem Daniel R. L. Brown Robert P. Gallant dbrown@certicom.com rgallant a function that solves a special case of the Di#e­Hellman prob­ lem, called the static Di#e­Hellman problem the static Di#e­Hellman problem for Q (SDHPQ ). Thus the SDHPQ function solves certain instances of the Di

  15. Spectra of Tukey types of ultrafilters on Boolean algebras Jennifer A. Brown and Natasha Dobrinen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobrinen, Natasha

    The structure of Tukey types of ultrafilters on is the subject of much recent and ongoing research. This line in this research stems from the connection via Stone duality between Tukey types of ultrafilters on and cofinalSpectra of Tukey types of ultrafilters on Boolean algebras Jennifer A. Brown and Natasha Dobrinen

  16. Electrical Engineering Graduate Handbook Charles L. Brown Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    1 Electrical Engineering Graduate Handbook 2014-2015 Charles L. Brown Department of Electrical outlines the policies and procedures of the graduate program of the Department of Electrical and Computer from the Chairman Electrical engineers continue to provide technological leadership for developments

  17. Abbott, Albert G., Professor, Genetics and Biochemistry. BS, University of Connecticut, 1976; PhD, Brown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    of Connecticut, 1976; PhD, Brown University, 1980 Abbott, Sherrie Wilder, Lecturer, School of Nursing. BSN, Emory Abramovitch, Rudolph A., Professor, Chemistry. BS, Alexandria University (Egypt), 1950; PhD, 1953, DSc, 1964 (England), 1962; MS, Clemson University, 1963; PhD, Nottingham Trent University (England), 1967 Adams

  18. Short communication Control of brown rot of stone fruits by brief heated water immersion treatments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crisosto, Carlos H.

    Short communication Control of brown rot of stone fruits by brief heated water immersion treatments, this treatment reduced decay incidence from 100 to less than 5% on fruit stored at 20 C and from 73 to 28% on cold-stored fruit. Therefore, brief immersion in heated water can be an effective approach to manage

  19. Brown Dwarf Companions to Young Solar Analogs: An Adaptive Optics Survey Using Palomar and Keck

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Metchev, Stanimir

    Brown Dwarf Companions to Young Solar Analogs: An Adaptive Optics Survey Using Palomar and Keck to its present state, had it not been for the dedication and professionalism of the Palomar and Keck possibilities offered by the technology. Rich and Hal also helped me design the Palomar AO astrometric

  20. Capping the Brown Energy Consumption of Internet Services at Low Cost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capping the Brown Energy Consumption of Internet Services at Low Cost Kien T. Le Ricardo Bianchini Thu D. Nguyen Rutgers University Ozlem Bilgir Margaret Martonosi Princeton University #12;Energy Electricity sources Coal Natural Gas Nuclear Renewables Others 100 105 110 115 120 Nigeria Data Centers Czech

  1. Estimated Impacts on Ex-Vessel Brown Shrimp Prices and Value as a Result of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estimated Impacts on Ex-Vessel Brown Shrimp Prices and Value as a Result of the Texas Closure Regulation JOHN R. POFFENBERGER Introduction Changes in commodity prices may result from any regulatory shrimp landings in Texas and therefore could be expected to affect ex-vessel or dockside prices

  2. Towards Availability Benchmarks: A Case Study of Software RAID Systems Aaron Brown and David A. Patterson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Towards Availability Benchmarks: A Case Study of Software RAID Systems Aaron Brown and David A neglected the areas of availability, maintainability, and evolutionary growth, areas that have recently introduce a general methodology for bench- marking the availability of computer systems. Our methodology

  3. Accepting Failure: Availability through Repair-centric System Design Aaron Brown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    1 Accepting Failure: Availability through Repair-centric System Design Aaron Brown Qualifying Exam Proposal 3 April 2001 Abstract Motivated by the lack of rapid improvement in the availability of Internet server systems, we introduce a new philosophy for designing highly-available systems that better reflects

  4. INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY REPORT FOR EXPOSURE UNITS Z2-24, Z2-31, Z2-32, AND Z2-36 IN ZONE 2 OF THE EAST TENNESSEE TECHNOLOGY PARK OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-10-10

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management selected Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), through the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, to perform independent verification (IV) at Zone 2 of the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. ORAU has concluded IV surveys, per the project-specific plan (PSP) (ORAU 2013a) covering exposure units (EUs) Z2-24, -31, -32, and -36. The objective of this effort was to verify the following. • Target EUs comply with requirements in the Zone 2 Record of Decision (ROD) (DOE 2005), as implemented by using the dynamic verification strategy presented in the dynamic work plan (DWP) (BJC 2007) • Commitments in the DWP were adequately implemented, as verified via IV surveys and soil sampling The Zone 2 ROD establishes maximum remediation level (RLmax) values and average RL (RLavg) values for the primary contaminants of concern (COCs) U-234, U-235, U-238, Cs-137, Np-237, Ra-226, Th-232, arsenic, mercury, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Table 1.1 lists Zone 2 COCs with associated RLs. Additional radiological and chemical contaminants were also identified during past characterization and monitoring actions, though the ROD does not present RLs for these potential contaminants. IV activities focused on the identification and quantification of ROD-specific COCs in surface soils, but also generated data for other analytes to support future decisions. ORAU personnel also reviewed EU-specific phased construction completion reports (PCCRs) to focus IV activities and identify potential judgmental sample locations, if any.

  5. COMPARISON OF RESULTS FOR QUARTER 5 SURFACE WATER SPLIT SAMPLES COLLECTED AT THE NUCLEAR FUEL SERVICES SITE ERWIN TENNESSEE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-09-23

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, collected split surface water samples with Nuclear Fuel Services (NFS) representatives on August 21, 2013. Representatives from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation were also in attendance. Samples were collected at four surface water stations, as required in the approved Request for Technical Assistance number 11-018. These stations included Nolichucky River upstream (NRU), Nolichucky River downstream (NRD), Martin Creek upstream (MCU), and Martin Creek downstream (MCD). Both ORAU and NFS performed gross alpha and gross beta analyses, and the comparison of results using the duplicate error ratio (DER), also known as the normalized absolute difference, are tabulated. All DER values were less than 3 and results are consistent with low (e.g., background) concentrations.

  6. Remedial investigation report on Waste Area Group 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1: Technical summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-03-01

    A remedial investigation (RI) was performed to support environmental restoration activities for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The WAG 5 RI made use of the observational approach, which concentrates on collecting only information needed to assess site risks and support future cleanup work. This information was interpreted and is presented using the framework of the site conceptual model, which relates contaminant sources and release mechanisms to migration pathways and exposure points that are keyed to current and future environmental risks for both human and ecological receptors. The site conceptual model forms the basis of the WAG 5 remedial action strategy and remedial action objectives. The RI provided the data necessary to verify this model and allows recommendations to be made to accomplish those objectives.

  7. Ferry-Based Linear Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jie

    Networks Existing wireless sensor network research Assumption that the network used for sensors does of oil, gas, and water pipeline infrastructure using wireless sensor networks. #12;IEEE Globecom 2013 UAE (2006): 2,580 Km of gas pipelines 2,950 Km of oil pipelines 156 Km of refined products

  8. Ferris, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, AlabamaETEC GmbHFarinello Geothermal PowerGuidelines

  9. Fermilab | Tritium at Fermilab | Ferry Creek Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES OctoberEvan Racah861MayArtQuestions forFeature photo Tritium

  10. Ferris State University | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:ofEnia SpA JumpGmbHFerris State University Jump to:

  11. Central Ferry Lower Monumental | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,CammackFLIR Jump to:RAPIDCavallo EnergyOhio: EnergyFalls, Rhode

  12. Tennessee Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

    2012-06-15

    The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Tennessee homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the 2006 IECC is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Tennessee homeowners will save $1,809 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $6,102 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 1 year for both the 2009 and 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $123 for the 2009 IECC and $415 for the 2012 IECC.

  13. Preliminary assessment report for Grubbs/Kyle Training Center, Smyrna/Rutherford County Regional Airport, Installation 47340, Smyrna, Tennessee. Installation Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis, C.; Stefano, J.

    1993-07-01

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Tennessee Army National Guard (TNARNG) property near Smyrna, Tennessee. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the Grubbs/Kyle Training Center property, the requirement of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program.

  14. In-Process Analysis Program for the Isolock sampler at the Gunite and Associated Tanks, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    The In-Process Analysis Program documents the requirements for handling, transporting, and analyzing waste slurry samples gathered by the Bristol Isolock slurry sampler from the Gunite and Associated Tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Composite samples will be gathered during sludge retrieval operations, labeled, transported to the appropriate laboratory, and analyzed for physical and radiological characteristics. Analysis results will be used to support occupational exposure issues, basic process control management issues, and prediction of radionuclide flow.

  15. The Department of Energy's American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - Tennessee State Energy Program, 0AS-RA-L-12-04

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCEDInstallers/ContractorsPhotovoltaics »TanklessResearchEnergy2FallDepartment ofTennessee State

  16. A T8.5 BROWN DWARF MEMBER OF THE {xi} URSAE MAJORIS SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, Edward L.; Mace, Gregory; McLean, Ian S. [UCLA Astronomy, P.O. Box 951547, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States); Skrutskie, M. F.; Nelson, M. J.; Borish, H. J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Gelino, Christopher R.; Griffith, Roger L.; Jarrett, Tom [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Marsh, Kenneth A. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF243AA (United Kingdom); Mainzer, Amanda K.; Eisenhardt, Peter R. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109-8001 (United States); Tobin, John J. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Cushing, Michael C., E-mail: wright@astro.ucla.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, MS 111, University of Toledo, 2801 W. Bancroft St., Toledo, OH 43606-3328 (United States)

    2013-03-15

    The Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer has revealed a T8.5 brown dwarf (WISE J111838.70+312537.9) that exhibits common proper motion with a solar-neighborhood (8 pc) quadruple star system-{xi} Ursae Majoris. The angular separation is 8.'5, and the projected physical separation is Almost-Equal-To 4000 AU. The sub-solar metallicity and low chromospheric activity of {xi} UMa A argue that the system has an age of at least 2 Gyr. The infrared luminosity and color of the brown dwarf suggests the mass of this companion ranges between 14 and 38 M{sub J} for system ages of 2 and 8 Gyr, respectively.

  17. A T8.5 Brown Dwarf Member of the Xi Ursae Majoris System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Edward L; Kirkpatrick, J Davy; Gelino, Christopher R; Griffith, Roger L; Marsh, Kenneth A; Jarrett, Tom; Nelson, M J; Borish, H J; Mace, Gregory; Mainzer, Amanda K; Eisenhardt, Peter R; McLean, Ian S; Tobin, John J; Cushing, Michael C

    2012-01-01

    The Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer has revealed a T8.5 brown dwarf (WISE J111838.70+312537.9) that exhibits common proper motion with a solar-neighborhood (8 pc) quadruple star system - Xi Ursae Majoris. The angular separation is 8.5 arc-min, and the projected physical separation is about 4000 AU. The sub-solar metallicity and low chromospheric activity of Xi UMa A argue that the system has an age of at least 2 Gyr. The infrared luminosity and color of the brown dwarf suggests the mass of this companion ranges between 28 and 58 Jupiter masses for system ages of 2 and 8 Gyr respectively.

  18. Methane, carbon monoxide, and ammonia in brown dwarfs and self-luminous giant planets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zahnle, Kevin J.; Marley, Mark S. E-mail: Mark.S.Marley@NASA.gov

    2014-12-10

    We address disequilibrium abundances of some simple molecules in the atmospheres of solar composition brown dwarfs and self-luminous extrasolar giant planets using a kinetics-based one-dimensional atmospheric chemistry model. Our approach is to use the full kinetics model to survey the parameter space with effective temperatures between 500 K and 1100 K. In all of these worlds, equilibrium chemistry favors CH{sub 4} over CO in the parts of the atmosphere that can be seen from Earth, but in most disequilibrium favors CO. The small surface gravity of a planet strongly discriminates against CH{sub 4} when compared to an otherwise comparable brown dwarf. If vertical mixing is like Jupiter's, the transition from methane to CO occurs at 500 K in a planet. Sluggish vertical mixing can raise this to 600 K, but clouds or more vigorous vertical mixing could lower this to 400 K. The comparable thresholds in brown dwarfs are 1100 ± 100 K. Ammonia is also sensitive to gravity, but, unlike CH{sub 4}/CO, the NH{sub 3}/N{sub 2} ratio is insensitive to mixing, which makes NH{sub 3} a potential proxy for gravity. HCN may become interesting in high-gravity brown dwarfs with very strong vertical mixing. Detailed analysis of the CO-CH{sub 4} reaction network reveals that the bottleneck to CO hydrogenation goes through methanol, in partial agreement with previous work. Simple, easy to use quenching relations are derived by fitting to the complete chemistry of the full ensemble of models. These relations are valid for determining CO, CH{sub 4}, NH{sub 3}, HCN, and CO{sub 2} abundances in the range of self-luminous worlds we have studied, but may not apply if atmospheres are strongly heated at high altitudes by processes not considered here (e.g., wave breaking).

  19. A Review of "Sir Thomas Browne: The World Proposed" edited by Reid Barbour and Claire Preston 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Black, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    of the most important topics for readers of Milton. Reid Barbour and Claire Preston, eds. Sir Thomas Browne: The World Proposed. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008. xii + 368 pp. + 3 illus. $120.00. Review by joseph l. black, university of massachusetts..., not only Religio Medici (Brooke Conti), Pseudodoxia Epidemica (William N. West and Kevin Killeen), Urne-Buriall (Achsah Guibbory), and Garden of Cyrus (Kathryn Murphy), but also Letter to a Friend (Claire Preston) and Repertorium (Jonathan F.S. Post...

  20. Liquid metallic hydrogen and the structure of brown dwarfs and giant planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. B. Hubbard; T. Guillot; J. I. Lunine; A. Burrows; D. Saumon; M. S. Marley; R. S. Freedman

    1997-03-02

    Electron-degenerate, pressure-ionized hydrogen (usually referred to as metallic hydrogen) is the principal constituent of brown dwarfs, the long-sought objects which lie in the mass range between the lowest-mass stars (about eighty times the mass of Jupiter) and the giant planets. The thermodynamics and transport properties of metallic hydrogen are important for understanding the properties of these objects, which, unlike stars, continually and slowly cool from initial nondegenerate (gaseous) states. Within the last year, a brown dwarf (Gliese 229 B) has been detected and its spectrum observed and analyzed, and several examples of extrasolar giant planets have been discovered. The brown dwarf appears to have a mass of about forty to fifty Jupiter masses and is now too cool to be fusing hydrogen or deuterium, although we predict that it will have consumed all of its primordial deuterium. This paper reviews the current understanding of the interrelationship between its interior properties and its observed spectrum, and also discusses the current status of research on the structure of giant planets, both in our solar system and elsewhere.

  1. Analytical and characterization studies of organic and inorganic species in brown coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Domazetis; M. Raoarun; B.D. James; J. Liesegang; P.; J. Pigram; N. Brack [La Trobe University, Vic. (Australia). Department of Chemistry

    2006-08-15

    Detailed studies have been carried out on the distribution of organic functional groups and inorganic species in as-received (ar) and acid-washed (aw) brown coals using elemental analysis, energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM-EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Time-of-flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS). Surface concentrations of the various carbon groups, organic oxygen, and inorganic hydroxide were obtained using XPS, but oxygen from clay and quartz, if present, interfered with organic oxygen determinations for the coals. A comparison of ar and aw coals using XPS and SEM-EDX is provided in terms of inorganic and organic sulfur groups. Chloride in these coals is present mainly as acid extractable forms, but small amounts of chloride in the organic matrix were indicated by the elemental analysis of ultra low-ash coals. TOF-SIMS fragments from brown coals were indicative of polymers consisting mainly of single aromatic groups linked by hydrocarbons with carboxyl and phenol functional groups. Sulfur fragments were from inorganic sulfur, thiols, organo-sulfates, and S-N-organic species. Numerous fragments containing organically bound chloride were observed. Fragments of the inorganic species Na, Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Fe, Mn, Ni, Cu, and Ga were also observed. Environmentally undesirable species, particularly from organo-sulfur and organo-chloride groups in brown coal, are likely to emerge from processes that heat coal-water mixture. 54 refs., 3 figs., 10 tabs.

  2. The BANYAN All-Sky Survey for Brown Dwarf Members of Young Moving Groups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gagné, Jonathan; Doyon, René; Faherty, Jacqueline K; Malo, Lison; Cruz, Kelle L; Artigau, Étienne; Burgasser, Adam J; Naud, Marie-Eve; Bouchard, Sandie; Gizis, John E; Albert, Loïc

    2015-01-01

    We describe in this work the BASS survey for brown dwarfs in young moving groups of the solar neighborhood, and summarize the results that it generated. These include the discovery of the 2MASS J01033563-5515561 (AB)b and 2MASS J02192210-3925225 B young companions near the deuterium-burning limit as well as 44 new low-mass stars and 69 new brown dwarfs with a spectroscopically confirmed low gravity. Among those, ~20 have estimated masses within the planetary regime, one is a new L4 $\\gamma$ bona fide member of AB Doradus, three are TW Hydrae candidates with later spectral types (L1-L4) than all of its previously known members and six are among the first contenders to low-gravity $\\geq$ L5 $\\beta$/$\\gamma$ brown dwarfs, reminiscent of WISEP J004701.06+680352.1, PSO J318.5338-22.8603 and VHS J125601.92-125723.9 b. Finally, we describe a future version of this survey, BASS-Ultracool, that will specifically target $\\geq$ L5 candidate members of young moving groups. First experimentations in designing the survey h...

  3. Geologic Controls of Hydrocarbon Occurrence in the Southern Appalachian Basin in Eastern Tennessee, Southwestern Virginia, Eastern Kentucky, and Southern West Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert D. Hatcher

    2003-05-31

    This report summarizes the first-year accomplishments of a three-year program to investigate the geologic controls of hydrocarbon occurrence in the southern Appalachian basin in eastern Tennessee, southwestern Virginia, eastern Kentucky, and southern West Virginia. The project: (1) employs the petroleum system approach to understand the geologic controls of hydrocarbons; (2) attempts to characterize the T-P parameters driving petroleum evolution; (3) attempts to obtain more quantitative definitions of reservoir architecture and identify new traps; (4) is working with USGS and industry partners to develop new play concepts and geophysical log standards for subsurface correlation; and (5) is geochemically characterizing the hydrocarbons (cooperatively with USGS). First-year results include: (1) meeting specific milestones (determination of thrust movement vectors, fracture analysis, and communicating results at professional meetings and through publication). All milestones were met. Movement vectors for Valley and Ridge thrusts were confirmed to be west-directed and derived from pushing by the Blue Ridge thrust sheet, and fan about the Tennessee salient. Fracture systems developed during Paleozoic, Mesozoic, and Cenozoic to Holocene compressional and extensional tectonic events, and are more intense near faults. Presentations of first-year results were made at the Tennessee Oil and Gas Association meeting (invited) in June, 2003, at a workshop in August 2003 on geophysical logs in Ordovician rocks, and at the Eastern Section AAPG meeting in September 2003. Papers on thrust tectonics and a major prospect discovered during the first year are in press in an AAPG Memoir and published in the July 28, 2003, issue of the Oil and Gas Journal. (2) collaboration with industry and USGS partners. Several Middle Ordovician black shale samples were sent to USGS for organic carbon analysis. Mississippian and Middle Ordovician rock samples were collected by John Repetski (USGS) and RDH for conodont alteration index determination to better define regional P-T conditions. Efforts are being made to calibrate and standardize geophysical log correlation, seismic reflection data, and Ordovician lithologic signatures to better resolve subsurface stratigraphy and structure beneath the poorly explored Plateau in Tennessee and southern Kentucky. We held a successful workshop on Ordovician rocks geophysical log correlation August 7, 2003 that was cosponsored by the Appalachian PTTC, the Kentucky and Tennessee geological surveys, the Tennessee Oil and Gas Association, and small independents. Detailed field structural and stratigraphic mapping of a transect across part of the Ordovician clastic wedge in Tennessee was begun in January 2003 to assist in 3-D reconstruction of part of the southern Appalachian basin and better assess the nature of a major potential source rock assemblage. (3) Laying the groundwork through (1) and (2) to understand reservoir architecture, the petroleum systems, ancient fluid migration, and conduct 3-D analysis of the southern Appalachian basin.

  4. Geologic Controls of Hydrocarbon Occurrence in the Appalachian Basin in Eastern Tennessee, Southwestern Virginia, Eastern Kentucky, and Southern West Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hatcher, Robert D

    2005-11-30

    This report summarizes the accomplishments of a three-year program to investigate the geologic controls of hydrocarbon occurrence in the southern Appalachian basin in eastern Tennessee, southwestern Virginia, eastern Kentucky, and southern West Virginia. The project: (1) employed the petroleum system approach to understand the geologic controls of hydrocarbons; (2) attempted to characterize the P-T parameters driving petroleum evolution; (3) attempted to obtain more quantitative definitions of reservoir architecture and identify new traps; (4) is worked with USGS and industry partners to develop new play concepts and geophysical log standards for subsurface correlation; and (5) geochemically characterized the hydrocarbons (cooperatively with USGS). Third-year results include: All project milestones have been met and addressed. We also have disseminated this research and related information through presentations at professional meetings, convening a major workshop in August 2003, and the publication of results. Our work in geophysical log correlation in the Middle Ordovician units is bearing fruit in recognition that the criteria developed locally in Tennessee and southern Kentucky are more extendible than anticipated earlier. We have identified a major 60 mi-long structure in the western part of the Valley and Ridge thrust belt that has been successfully tested by a local independent and is now producing commercial amounts of hydrocarbons. If this structure is productive along strike, it will be one of the largest producing structures in the Appalachians. We are completing a more quantitative structural reconstruction of the Valley and Ridge and Cumberland Plateau than has been made before. This should yield major dividends in future exploration in the southern Appalachian basin. Our work in mapping, retrodeformation, and modeling of the Sevier basin is a major component of the understanding of the Ordovician petroleum system in this region. Prior to our undertaking this project, this system was the least understood in the Appalachian basin. This project, in contrast to many if not most programs undertaken in DOE laboratories, has a major educational component wherein three Ph.D. students have been partially supported by this grant, one M.S. student partially supported, and another M.S. student fully supported by the project. These students will be well prepared for professional careers in the oil and gas industry.

  5. Environmental Management Waste Management Facility Waste Lot Profile for the K-770 Scrap Yard Soils and Miscellaneous Debris, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee - EMWMF Waste Lot 4.12

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davenport M.

    2009-04-15

    Waste Lot 4.12 consists of approximately 17,500 yd{sup 3} of low-level, radioactively contaminated soil, concrete, and incidental metal and debris generated from remedial actions at the K-770 Scrap Metal Yard and Contaminated Debris Site (the K-770 Scrap Yard) at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP). The excavated soil will be transported by dump truck to the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF). This profile provides project-specific information to demonstrate compliance with Attainment Plan for Risk/Toxicity-based Waste Acceptance Criteria at the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2001). The K-770 Scrap Yard is an approximately 36-acre storage area located southwest of the main portion of ETTP, outside the security perimeter fence in the Powerhouse Area adjacent to the Clinch River. The K-770 area was used to store radioactively contaminated or suspected contaminated materials during and previous to the K-25 Site cascade upgrading program. The waste storage facility began operation in the 1960s and is estimated to at one time contain in excess of 40,000 tons of low-level, radioactively contaminated scrap metal. Scrap metal was taken to the site when it was found to contain alpha or beta/gamma activity on the surface or if the scrap metal originated from a process building. The segregated metal debris was removed from the site as part of the K-770 Scrap Removal Action (RA) Project that was completed in fiscal year (FY) 2007 by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC). An area of approximately 10 acres is located in EUs 29 and 31 where the scrap was originally located in the 100-year floodplain. In the process of moving the materials around and establishing segregated waste piles above the 100-year floodplain, the footprint of the site was expanded by 10-15 acres in EUs 30 and 32. The area in EUs 29 and 31 that was cleared of metallic debris in the floodplain was sown with grass. The areas in EUs 30 and 32 have some scattered vegetation but are generally open and accessible. With limited exception, all materials contained in the scrap yard have been removed and disposed at the EMWMF. Soils that underlay the original waste storage area in EUs 29 and 31 as well as soils that underlay the scrap piles in EUs 30 and 32 show substantially elevated radioactivity. In addition to soils present at the site, remaining portions of foundations/floor slabs for Bldgs. K-725, K-726, and K-736 as well as the unnamed pad at the northeast corner of the site constructed to support the sort and segregation operations at the K-770 Scrap Removal Project in 2006 and several other small, unnamed concrete pads are included in this waste lot. While many of these foundations/floor slabs will be removed because they are contaminated, some of the smaller unamed concrete pads will be removed in order to access contaminated soils that are around and under the pads and regrade the site. Appendix E contains a map showing the areas of soil and concrete pads that are expected to be excavated. Soils in the areas indicated on this map will be removed to approximately one foot below the surface. (This corresponds to the soil interval sampled and analyzed to characterize this waste lot.) Contaminants present in the soils are directly derived from metallic debris and rubbish handled by the waste storage operations, are concentrated in the top few inches, and include the predominant constituents of concern associated with the metallic waste already disposed at EMWMF. Additionally, some residual metallic debris remains embedded in the shallow soils that underlay the former debris piles. This residual metallic debris is eligible for disposal in the EMWMF WAC criteria as defined in Waste Profile for: Disposal of the Scrap Removal Project Waste Lot 65.1 East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (BJC 2004a). This waste, however, has been included in Waste Lot 4.12 to conform to the more rigorous profiling requirements currently contained in Waste Acceptance Criteria Attainment Team Project Execution Plan Environmental Manag

  6. Progress and Future Plans for Mercury Remediation at the Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee - 13059

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilkerson, Laura O. [DOE Oak Ridge, P.O. Box 2001, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)] [DOE Oak Ridge, P.O. Box 2001, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); DePaoli, Susan M. [Pro2Serve, 1100 Bethel Valley Rd., Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States)] [Pro2Serve, 1100 Bethel Valley Rd., Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States); Turner, Ralph [P.O. Box 421, Squamish, BC V8B 0A4 (United States)] [P.O. Box 421, Squamish, BC V8B 0A4 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), along with the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), has identified mercury contamination at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) as the highest priority cleanup risk on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The historic loss of mercury to the environment dwarfs any other contaminant release on the ORR. Efforts over the last 20 years to reduce mercury levels leaving the site in the surface waters of Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC) have not resulted in a corresponding decrease in mercury concentrations in fish. Further reductions in mercury surface water concentrations are needed. Recent stimulus funding through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) has supported several major efforts involving mercury cleanup at Y-12. Near-term implementation activities are being pursued with remaining funds and include design of a centrally located mercury treatment facility for waterborne mercury, treatability studies on mercury-contaminated soils, and free mercury removal from storm drains. Out-year source removal will entail demolition/disposal of several massive uranium processing facilities along with removal and disposal of underlying contaminated soil. As a National Priorities List (NPL) site, cleanup is implemented under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and directed by the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) between DOE, EPA, and TDEC. The CERCLA process is followed to plan, reach approval, implement, and monitor the cleanup. (authors)

  7. COMPARISON OF RESULTS FOR QUARTER 2 SURFACE WATER SPLIT SAMPLES COLLECTED AT THE NUCLEAR FUEL SERVICES SITE, ERWIN, TENNESSEE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-01-21

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, collected split surface water samples with Nuclear Fuel Services (NFS) representatives on November 15, 2012. Representatives from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation were also in attendance. Samples were collected at four surface water stations, as required in the approved Request for Technical Assistance number 11-018. These stations included Nolichucky River upstream (NRU), Nolichucky River downstream (NRD), Martin Creek upstream (MCU), and Martin Creek downstream (MCD). Both ORAU and NFS performed gross alpha and gross beta analyses, and the results are compared using the duplicate error ratio (DER), also known as the normalized absolute difference. A DER {<=} 3 indicates that, at a 99% confidence interval, split sample results do not differ significantly when compared to their respective one standard deviation (sigma) uncertainty (ANSI N42.22). The NFS split sample report does not specify the confidence level of reported uncertainties (NFS 2012). Therefore, standard two sigma reporting is assumed and uncertainty values were divided by 1.96. In conclusion, all DER values were less than 3 and results are consistent with low (e.g., background) concentrations.

  8. Remedial investigation plan for Waste Area Grouping 1 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee: Responses to regulator comments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-05-01

    This document, ES/ER-6 D2, is a companion document to ORNL/RAP/Sub-87/99053/4 R1, Remedial Investigation Plan for ORNL Waste Area Grouping 1, dated August 1989. This document lists comments received from the Environmental Protection Agency, Region 4 (EPA) and the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment (TDHE) and responses to each of these comments. As requested by EPA, a revised Remedial Investigation (RI) Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 1 will not be submitted. The document is divided into two Sections and Appendix. Section I contains responses to comments issued on May 22, 1990, by EPA's Region 4 program office responsible for implementing the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). Section 2 contains responses to comments issued on April 7, 1989, by EPA's program office responsible for implementing the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA); these comments include issues raised by the TDHE. The Appendix contains the attachments referenced in a number of the responses. 35 refs.

  9. A review of the history of alkali-aggregate reaction at three of the Tennessee Valley Authority`s dams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, C.D.; Newell, V.A.

    1995-12-31

    Three of The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) major hydroelectric projects are experiencing alkali-aggregate reaction (AAR), These projects include Fontana Dam and Powerhouse, Hiwassee Dam and Powerhouse, and Chickamauga Lock, Dam and Powerhouse, All of these dams are considered {open_quotes}high hazard,{close_quotes} causing significant economic losses from loss of power, replacement of the dam and generation facilities, and loss of life should they fail. This paper presents an overview of the descriptions of each of these projects, including construction and original instrumentation installed in the structure during construction, All of these projects are now 50 to 60 years old and are experiencing problems in one or more locations due to AAR with no indication of any slowing of the concrete growth process, Concrete problems at these projects came as no surprise. Cracks were noted within 5 years of construction, and by 1980 some of these cracks were 1/2 inch in width. continuous monitoring of these projects has always been a priority. This paper will discuss how the growth from AAR has affected each structure, which structures have been affected most, and why. It will discuss how TVA has managed AAR at these projects in the past and how TVA is changing from a reactive to a pro-active approach in its response to AAR.

  10. The development of an aquatic spill model for the White Oak Creek watershed, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R.O.

    1996-05-01

    This study develops an aquatic spill model applicable to the White Oak Creek watershed draining the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Hazardous, toxic, and radioactive chemicals are handled and stored on the laboratory reservation. An accidental spill into the White Oak Creek watershed could contaminate downstream water supplies if insufficient dilution did not occur. White Oak Creek empties into the Clinch River, which flows into the Tennessee River. Both rivers serve as municipal water supplies. The aquatic spill model provides estimates of the dilution at sequential downstream locations along White Oak creek and the Clinch River after an accidental spill of a liquid containing a radioactively decaying constituent. The location of the spill on the laboratory is arbitrary, while hydrologic conditions range from drought to extreme flood are simulated. The aquatic spill model provides quantitative estimates with which to assess water quality downstream from the site of the accidental spill, allowing an informed decision to be made whether to perform mitigating measures so that the integrity of affected water supplies is not jeopardized.

  11. Remedial investigation work plan for the Groundwater Operable Unit at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    This Remedial Investigation (RI) Work Plan has been developed as part of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) investigation of the Groundwater Operable Unit (GWOU) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) located near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The first iteration of the GWOU RI Work Plan is intended to serve as a strategy document to guide the ORNL GWOU RI. The Work Plan provides a rationale and organization for groundwater data acquisition, monitoring, and remedial actions to be performed during implementation of environmental restoration activities associated with the ORNL GWOU. It Is important to note that the RI Work Plan for the ORNL GWOU is not a prototypical work plan. The RI will be conducted using annual work plans to manage the work activities, and task reports will be used to document the results of the investigations. Sampling and analysis results will be compiled and reported annually with a review of data relative to risk (screening level risk assessment review) for groundwater. This Work Plan outlines the overall strategy for the RI and defines tasks which are to be conducted during the initial phase of investigation. This plan is presented with the understanding that more specific addenda to the plan will follow.

  12. Confirmatory Sampling and Analysis Plan for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek operable unit, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    On December 21, 1989, the EPA placed the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) on the National Priorities List (NPL). On January 1, 1992, a Federal Facilities Agreement (FFA) between the DOE Field Office in Oak Ridge (DOE-OR), EPA Region IV, and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) went into effect. This FFA establishes the procedural framework and schedule by which DOE-OR will develop, coordinate, implement and monitor environmental restoration activities on the ORR in accordance with applicable federal and state environmental regulations. The DOE-OR Environmental Restoration Program for the ORR addresses the remediation of areas both within and outside the ORR boundaries. This sampling and analysis plan focuses on confirming the cleanup of the stretch of EFPC flowing from Lake Reality at the Y-12 Plant through the City of Oak Ridge, to Poplar Creek on the ORR and its associated floodplain. Both EFPC and its floodplain have been contaminated by releases from the Y-12 Plant since the mid-1950s. Because the EFPC site-designated as an ORR operable unit (OU) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) is included on the NPL, its remediation must follow the specific procedures mandated by CERCLA, as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act in 1986.

  13. Double Conscious Brother in the Veil Toward an Intellectual Biography of Sterling A. Brown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tidwell, John E.

    1998-09-01

    green Better'n most. "I kin talk out dis worl' As you folks all know, An' I'm good wid de women, Dey'll tell you so . . . V "An' I says to all de Bishops, What is hearin' my song— Ef de cap fits you, brother, Put it on." —Sterling Allen Brown... to the [Aran Islands] as a poet, seeking the real quality of the folk, not as a social scientist amassing statistics. His poetic insight availed, he has left us unforgettable pictures of the dignity of these inarticulate people, their courage in the teeth...

  14. Mid-infrared followup of cold brown dwarfs: diversity in age, mass and metallicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saumon, Didier; Leggett, Sandy K; Burningham, Ben; Marley, Mark S; Waren, S J; Jones, H R A; Pinfield, D J; Smart, R L

    2009-01-01

    We present new Spitzer IRAC [3.6], [4.5], [5.8] and [8.0] photometry of nine very late-type T dwarfs. Combining this with previously published photometry, we investigate trends with type and color that are useful for both the planning and interpretation of infrared surveys designed to discover the coldest T or Y dwarfs. Brown dwarfs with effective temperature (T{sub eff}) below 700 K emit more than half their flux at wavelengths longer than 3 {micro}m, and the ratio of the mid-infrared flux to the near-infrared flux becomes very sensitive to T{sub eff} at these low temperatures. We confirm that the color H (1.6 {micro}m) - [4.5] is a good indicator of T{sub eff} with a relatively weak dependence on metallicity and gravity. Conversely, the colors H - K (2.2 {micro}m) and [4.5] - [5.8] are sensitive to metallicity and gravity. Thus near- and mid-infrared photometry provide useful indicators of the fundamental properties of brown dwarfs, and if temperature and gravity are known, then mass and age can be reliably determined from evolutionary models. There are twelve dwarfs currently known with H - [4.5] > 3.0, and {approx} 500 < T{sub eff} K {approx}< 800, which we examine in detail. The ages of the dwarfs in the sample range from very young (0.1 - 1.0 Gyr) to relatively old (3 - 12 Gyr). The mass range is possibly as low as 5 Jupiter masses to up to 70 Jupiter masses, i.e. near the hydrogen burning limit. The metallicities also span a large range, from [m/H]= -0.3 to [m/H]= +0.2. The small number of T8 - T9 dwarfs found in the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey to date appear to be predominantly young low-mass dwarfs. Accurate mid-infrared photometry of cold brown dwarfs is essentially impossible from the ground, and extensions to the mid-infrared space missions warm-Spitzer and WISE are desirable in order to obtain the vital mid-infrared data for cold brown dwarfs, and to discover more of these rare objects.

  15. Trenton strata in western Illinois Basin, Brown and Schuyler Counties, Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pochel, R.M.

    1984-12-01

    Trenton strata in the western Illinois basin are very good prospects for oil exploration. Much drilling has been done in the area but, as yet, no producing wells have been completed. Oil stains and some tars have been found in some samples from most wells. The Trenton in the area of Brown and Schuyler Counties is a fine-grained limestone that underlies the Maquoketa Shale at an average depth of 800 ft (244 m). Because of its position near the edge of the Illinois basin, the stratigraphy varies considerably and inconsistencies are present in most samples viewed.

  16. Genetic analysis of hybridization and introgression between wild mongoose and brown lemurs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pastorini, Jennifer; Zaramody, Alphonse; Curtis, Deborah J.; Nievergelt, Caroline M.; Mundy, Nicholas I.

    2009-02-05

    :32 http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2148/9/32 been found across the animal kingdom, including insects [7], fish [8], amphibians [9], birds [10,11], carnivores [12], and monkeys [13-15]. Among the Malagasy lemurs, a few cases of hybridization between... , and nectar [31]. The most important potential competitor for mongoose lemurs at Anjamena is E. f. rufus, as it not only shares food resources (fruit and leaves) with E. mongoz but also exhib- its a similar activity pattern [26]. Brown lemurs at Anja- mena...

  17. Harold Brown, 1992 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-Dose Lowï‚—34OctoberK West60Harnessing theHarold Brown, 1992

  18. Site characterization summary report for dry weather surface water sampling upper East Fork Poplar Creek characterization area Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    This report describes activities associated with conducting dry weather surface water sampling of Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This activity is a portion of the work to be performed at UEFPC Operable Unit (OU) 1 [now known as the UEFPC Characterization Area (CA)], as described in the RCRA Facility Investigation Plan for Group 4 at the Oak- Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee and in the Response to Comments and Recommendations on RCRA Facility Investigation Plan for Group 4 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, Volume 1, Operable Unit 1. Because these documents contained sensitive information, they were labeled as unclassified controlled nuclear information and as such are not readily available for public review. To address this issue the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) published an unclassified, nonsensitive version of the initial plan, text and appendixes, of this Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) Plan in early 1994. These documents describe a program for collecting four rounds of wet weather and dry weather surface water samples and one round of sediment samples from UEFPC. They provide the strategy for the overall sample collection program including dry weather sampling, wet weather sampling, and sediment sampling. Figure 1.1 is a schematic flowchart of the overall sampling strategy and other associated activities. A Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPJP) was prepared to specifically address four rounds of dry weather surface water sampling and one round of sediment sampling. For a variety of reasons, sediment sampling has not been conducted and has been deferred to the UEFPC CA Remedial Investigation (RI), as has wet weather sampling.

  19. ENVIRONMENTAL BASELINE SURVEY REPORT FOR WEST BLACK OAK RIDGE, EAST BLACK OAK RIDGE, MCKINNEY RIDGE, WEST PINE RIDGE, AND PARCEL 21D IN THE VICINITY OF THE EAST TENNESSEE TECHNOLOGY PARK, OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David A. King

    2012-11-29

    This environmental baseline survey (EBS) report documents the baseline environmental conditions of five land parcels located near the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), including West Black Oak Ridge, East Black Oak Ridge, McKinney Ridge, West Pine Ridge, and Parcel 21d. The goal is to obtain all media no-further-investigation (NFI) determinations for the subject parcels considering existing soils. To augment the existing soils-only NFI determinations, samples of groundwater, surface water, soil, and sediment were collected to support all media NFI decisions. The only updates presented here are those that were made after the original issuance of the NFI documents. In the subject parcel where the soils NFI determination was not completed for approval (Parcel 21d), the full process has been performed to address the soils as well. Preparation of this report included the detailed search of federal government records, title documents, aerial photos that may reflect prior uses, and visual inspections of the property and adjacent properties. Interviews with current employees involved in, or familiar with, operations on the real property were also conducted to identify any areas on the property where hazardous substances and petroleum products, or their derivatives, and acutely hazardous wastes may have been released or disposed. In addition, a search was made of reasonably obtainable federal, state, and local government records of each adjacent facility where there has been a release of any hazardous substance or any petroleum product or their derivatives, including aviation fuel and motor oil, and which is likely to cause or contribute to a release of any hazardous substance or any petroleum product or its derivatives, including aviation fuel or motor oil, on the real property. A radiological survey and soil/sediment sampling was conducted to assess baseline conditions of Parcel 21d that were not addressed by the soils-only NFI reports. Groundwater sampling was also conducted to support a Parcel 21d decision.

  20. Brown - leaves

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L OBransen Plasma Asher An O2Brookhaven Site Office EA /LASE

  1. Brown - leaves

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L OBransen Plasma Asher An O2Brookhaven Site Office EA

  2. DISCOVERY OF A ?250 K BROWN DWARF AT 2 pc FROM THE SUN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luhman, K. L.

    2014-05-10

    Through a previous analysis of multi-epoch astrometry from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), I identified WISE J085510.83–071442.5 as a new high proper motion object. By combining astrometry from WISE and the Spitzer Space Telescope, I have measured a proper motion of 8.1 ± 0.1'' yr{sup –1} and a parallax of 0.454 ± 0.045'' (2.20{sub ?0.20}{sup +0.24} pc) for WISE J085510.83–071442.5, giving it the third highest proper motion and the fourth largest parallax of any known star or brown dwarf. It is also the coldest known brown dwarf based on its absolute magnitude at 4.5 ?m and its color in [3.6]-[4.5]. By comparing M {sub 4.5} with the values predicted by theoretical evolutionary models, I estimate an effective temperature of 225-260 K and a mass of 3-10 M {sub Jup} for the age range of 1-10 Gyr that encompasses most nearby stars.

  3. Assessment and use of Loy Yang brown coal for power generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ottrey, A.; Woskoboenko, F. [HRL Technology Pty Ltd., Mulgrave, Victoria (Australia); Draper, I.; Fitzclarence, N. [Loy Yang Power Ltd., Traralgon, Victoria (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    The Loy Yang brown coal resource in the Latrobe Valley of Victoria has been extensively characterized in respect of: the extent, distribution and structure of the resource; the variations in properties throughout the resource; and evaluation of the behavior of the coal during processing. The resource characterization program involved an extensive borehole drilling program, backed by geological modelling and comprehensive material characterization (chemical, physical and petrological). Evaluation of the behavior of the coal has involved theoretical modelling, laboratory-scale investigations, pilot-scale combustion tests and observations on full-scale boilers. The Loy Yang open cut mine currently annually supplies 26 million tonne (Mt) of brown coal to: the 4 x 4500 MW units operated by Loy Yang Power Ltd.; the 2 x 500 MW units operated by Edison Mission Ltd.; and a steam-fluidized bed dryer operated by Dry Coal Australia Pty Ltd. (a joint venture between Lurgi and Australian Char Pty Ltd.). This paper highlights significant features of Loy Yang Power`s operations in the mine and the power station, with particular emphasis on ash fouling and slagging behavior.

  4. Antagonist effect between violaxanthin and de-epoxidated pigments in nonphotochemical quenching induction in the qE deficient brown alga

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Govindjee

    induction in the qE deficient brown alga Macrocystis pyrifera Héctor Ocampo-Alvarez a , Ernesto GarcíaZ) De-epoxidation rate control Brown alga Macrocystis pyrifera Nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ quenching (qE), is not present in this alga. In contrast to higher plants, NPQ in this organism is much more

  5. Nonnative Lizards Nile Monitor 4 to 6 ft. Brown/yellow body bands; forked black/blue tongue; long sharp claws

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazzotti, Frank

    beneath the eye Reticulated Python 14 to 18 ft. Distinct reddish eyes; tan body with dark brown net dull with age. Males have larger spikes along back. Black and White Tegu 2 to 3 ft. Dark bands. Yellowish-tan to dark brown; red dewlap with yellow border Ianaré Sévi NATIVE Look-a-Likes David Barkasy

  6. Observation of Transverse Bose-Einstein Condensation via Hanbury BrownTwiss Correlations Wu RuGway, A. G. Manning, S. S. Hodgman, R. G. Dall, and A. G. Truscott

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kheruntsyan, Karen

    Observation of Transverse Bose-Einstein Condensation via Hanbury Brown­Twiss Correlations Wu Ru a three-dimensional thermal gas to a gas undergoing transverse condensation by probing Hanbury Brown­Twiss

  7. Phase I remedial investigation report of Waste Area Grouping 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D.E. [ed.

    1995-07-01

    This report presents the activities and findings of the first phase of a three-phase remedial investigation (RI) of Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and updates the scope and strategy for WAG-2-related efforts. WAG 2 contains White Oak Creek (WOC) and its tributaries downstream of the ORNL main plant area, White Oak Lake, White Oak Creek Embayment on the Clinch River, and the associated floodplain and subsurface environment. Water, sediment, soil, and biota in WAG 2 are contaminated and continue to receive contaminants from upgradient WAGs. This report includes field activities completed through October 1992. The remediation of WAG 2 is scheduled to follow the cessation of contaminant input from hydrologically upgradient WAGs. While upgradient areas are being remediated, the strategy for WAG 2 is to conduct a long-term monitoring and investigation program that takes full advantage of WAG 2`s role as an integrator of contaminant fluxes from other ORNL WAGs and focuses on four key goals: (1) Implement, in concert with other programs, long-term, multimedia environmental monitoring and tracking of contaminants leaving other WAGs, entering WAG 2, and being transported off-site. (2) Provide a conceptual framework to integrate and develop information at the watershed-level for pathways and processes that are key to contaminant movement, and so support remedial efforts at ORNL. (3) Provide periodic updates of estimates of potential risk (both human health and ecological) associated with contaminants accumulating in and moving through WAG 2 to off-site areas. (4) Support the ORNL Environmental Restoration Program efforts to prioritize, remediate, and verify remedial effectiveness for contaminated sites at ORNL, through long-term monitoring and continually updated risk assessments.

  8. Removal action work plan for the YS-860 Firing Ranges, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-03-01

    The US Department of Energy is conducting environmental restoration activities at the Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. As part of these efforts, a removal action is planned for the former YS-860 Firing Ranges as described in the Action Memorandum for the project. This removal action work plan (RmAWP) is focused on the former YS-860 Firing Ranges, located outside the primary fenceline at the eastern end of the plant. This RmAWP defines the technical approach, procedures, and requirements for the removal of lead-contaminated soil and site restoration of the former YS-860 Firing Ranges at the Y-12 Plant. This RmAWP describes excavation, verification/confirmatory sampling, and reporting requirements for the project. Lower tier plans associated with the RmAWP, which are submitted as separate stand-alone documents, include a field sampling and analysis plan, a health and safety plan, a quality assurance project plan, a waste management plan, a data management implementation plan, and a best management practices plan. A site evaluation of the YS-86O Firing Ranges conducted in 1996 by Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., determined that elevated lead levels were present in the Firing Ranges target berm soils. The results of this sampling event form the basis for the removal action recommendation as described in the Action Memorandum for this project. This RmAWP contains a brief history and description of the Former YS-860 Firing Ranges Project, along with the current project schedule and milestones. This RmAWP also provides an overview of the technical requirements of the project, including a summary of the approach for the removal activities. Finally, the RmAWP identifies the regulatory requirements and the appropriate removal action responses to address applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements to achieve the project goals of substantially reducing the risk to human health and the environment.

  9. Waste Area Grouping 4 Site Investigation Sampling and Analysis Plan, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-01

    Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 4 is one of 17 WAGs within and associated with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), on the Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. WAG 4 is located along Lagoon Road south of the main facility at ORNL. WAG 4 is a shallow-waste burial site consisting of three separate areas: (1) Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 4, a shallow-land burial ground containing radioactive and potentially hazardous wastes; (2) an experimental Pilot Pit Area, including a pilot-scale testing pit; and (3) sections of two abandoned underground pipelines formerly used for transporting liquid, low-level radioactive waste. In the 1950s, SWSA 4 received a variety of low-and high-activity wastes, including transuranic wastes, all buried in trenches and auger holes. Recent surface water data indicate that a significant amount of {sup 90}Sr is being released from the old burial trenches in SWSA 4. This release represents a significant portion of the ORNL off-site risk. In an effort to control the sources of the {sup 90}Sr release and to reduce the off-site risk, a site investigation is being implemented to locate the trenches containing the most prominent {sup 90}Sr sources. This investigation has been designed to gather site-specific data to confirm the locations of {sup 90}Sr sources responsible for most off-site releases, and to provide data to be used in evaluating potential interim remedial alternatives prepared to direct the site investigation of the SWSA 4 area at WAG 4.

  10. Results of 1995 characterization of Gunite and Associated Tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    This technical memorandum (TM) documents the 1995 characterization of eight underground radioactive waste tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These tanks belong to the Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT) operable unit, and the characterization is part of the ongoing GAAT remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) process. This TM reports both field observations and analytical results; analytical results are also available from the Oak Ridge Environmental Information System (OREIS) data base under the project name GAAT (PROJ-NAME = GAAT). This characterization effort (Phase II) was a follow-up to the {open_quotes}Phase I{close_quotes} sampling campaign reported in Results of Fall 1994 Sampling of Gunite and Associated Tanks at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, ORNL/ER/Sub/87-99053/74, June 1995. The information contained here should be used in conjunction with that in the previous TM. The sampling plan is documented in ORNL Inactive Waste Tanks Sampling and Analysis Plan, ORNL/RAP/LTR-88/24, dated April 1988, as amended by Addendum 1, Revision 2: ORNL Inactive Tanks Sampling and Analysis Plan, DOE/OR/02-1354&D2, dated February 1995. Field team instructions are found in ORNL RI/FS Project Field Work Guides 01-WG-20, Field Work Guide for Sampling of Gunite and Associated Tanks, and 01-WG-21, Field Work Guide for Tank Characterization System Operations at ORNL. The field effort was conducted under the programmatic and procedural umbrella of the ORNL RI/FS Program, and the analysis was in accordance with ORNL Chemical and Analytical Sciences Division (CASD) procedures. The characterization campaign is intended to provide data for criticality safety, engineering design, and waste management as they apply to the GAAT treatability study and remediation. The Department of Energy (DOE) Carlsbad office was interested in results of this sampling campaign and provided funding for certain additional sample collection and analysis.

  11. Phase I Archaeological Survey of Parcel ED-3 and Historic Assessement of the Happy Valley Worker Camp Roane County, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    New South Associates

    2009-08-17

    Parcel ED-3 was the location of a portion of 'Happy Valley', a temporary worker housing area occupied from 1943 to 1947 during the construction of the K-25 Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The project was carried out under subcontract for the Department of Energy. The survey report will be used in the preparation of an Environmental Assessment under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). New South Associates conducted a Phase I Archaeological Survey of Parcel ED-3 at the US Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Reservation in Roane County, Tennessee. The survey was conducted in two parts. The first survey was carried out in 2008 and covered an area measuring approximately 110 acres. The second survey took place in 2009 and focused on 72 acres west of the first survey area. The objective of the surveys was to identify any archaeological remains associated with Happy Valley and any additional sites on the property and to assess these sites for National Register eligibility. New South Associates also conducted a historic assessment to gather information on Happy Valley. This historic assessment was used in conjunction with the archaeological survey to evaluate the significance of the Happy Valley site. Archaeological remains of Happy Valley were located throughout the parcel, but no additional sites were located. The official state site number for Happy Valley is 40RE577. During the two surveys a total of 13 artifact concentrations, 14 isolated finds, and 75 structural features were located. Due to the Happy Valley's stron gassociation with the Manhattan Project, the site is recommended eligible for the National Register of Historic Places under Criterion A.

  12. Tennessee-Tennessee Natural Gas Plant Processing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan3 November18.5 385.5 47,187.8Year Jan Feb Mar340 340 340 340 2011

  13. H1N1 (swine flu) Information for Students, Faculty & Staff There have been confirmed H1N1 cases and a death in Tennessee. The Center for Disease Control (CDC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karsai, Istvan

    virus causing illness in people. This new virus was first detected in people in the United States, in the United States, on average 36,000 people die from flu-related complications and more than 200,000 people and a death in Tennessee. The Center for Disease Control (CDC) reports that H1N1 is contagious

  14. Finding of no significant impact: Changes in the sanitary sludge land application program on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has completed an environmental assessment (DOE/EA-1042) that evaluates potential impacts of proposed changes in the sanitary sludge land application program on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Changes in lifetime sludge land application limits and radionuclide loading are proposed, and two new sources of sewage sludge from DOE facilities would be transported to the City of Oak Ridge Publicly Owned Treatment Works (COR POTW). Lifetime sludge land application limits would increase from 22 tons/acre to 50 tons/acre, which is the limit approved and permitted by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). With the approval of TDEC, the permissible radiological dose from sludge land application would change from the current limit of 2x background radionuclide concentrations in receiving soils to a risk-based dose limit of 4 millirem (mrem) per year for the maximally exposed individual. Sludge land application sites would not change from those that are currently part of the program. Based on the results of the analysis reported in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major federal action that would significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the context of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not necessary, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). 70 refs., 2 figs., 17 tabs.

  15. DISTINCT PATTERNS OF NITRATE REDUCTASE ACTIVITY IN BROWN ALGAE: LIGHT AND AMMONIUM SENSITIVITY IN LAMINARIA DIGITATA IS ABSENT IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berges, John A.

    DISTINCT PATTERNS OF NITRATE REDUCTASE ACTIVITY IN BROWN ALGAE: LIGHT AND AMMONIUM SENSITIVITY and lowest in summer. This is the first report of NR activity in any alga that is not strongly regulated the regulation of NR by light that has been observed in other algae and higher plants. Key index words: ammonium

  16. Arsenic Modulates Cell Proliferation Pathways in MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells Krystle Brown, Somaly Neang, Dorrelyn Patacsil, and Deepak Kumar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    District of Columbia, University of the

    Arsenic Modulates Cell Proliferation Pathways in MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells Krystle Brown, Somaly Viability Assay: The cell viability and proliferation of MCF-7 breast cancer cell lines were determined as indicated. The cells were fixed in methanol and stained with 4'-6-Diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) nuclear

  17. A Field-Wise Wind Retrieval Algorithm for Satellite Scatterometers Charles G. Brown and David G . Long

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    A Field-Wise Wind Retrieval Algorithm for Satellite Scatterometers Charles G. Brown and David G-378-6586 browncg@salt.ee.byii.edu Abstract-Traditional satellite scatterometer wind retrieval algorithms consist of point-wise wind estimation and point- wise ambiguity removal. Point-wise estimation yields mul- tiple

  18. Facies architecture of the upper Calvert Bluff Formation exposed in the highwall of Big Brown Mine, Fairfield, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sturdy, Michael Dale

    2006-10-30

    or liquefaction of adjacent sandy banks (Turner and Munro, 1987; Reading, 1996). Incised Valley Fill Description These brown to gray fine-grained cross stratified sands vary from zero to over 70 feet (21.3 m) thick. The lower bounding contact is an erosion surface...

  19. Influence of Drought Conditions on Brown Trout Biomass and Size Structure in the Black Hills, South Dakota

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of pool habitat can limit the carrying capacity for adult fish (Elliot 1987; Hakala and Hartman 2004). Elliot (2000) found that temperature increased and oxygen decreased as pool size decreased during drought pools during nondrought years (Elliot 2000). The survival of brown trout can be affected by drought

  20. Overview of the SSX-FRC experiment M. R. Brown, C. D. Cothran, M. Landreman, V. S. Lukin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    be a big step towards an FRC fusion reactor. Design and construction: Plasma in SSX-FRC will stillOverview of the SSX-FRC experiment M. R. Brown, C. D. Cothran, M. Landreman, V. S. Lukin Swarthmore to produce a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) by merging two counter-helicity spheromaks. A new, higher

  1. Hanbury-Brown-Twiss Interferometry with Identical Bosons in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions: Comparisons with Hadronic Scattering Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas J. Humanic

    2005-10-17

    Identical boson Hanbury-Brown-Twiss interferometry as applied to relativistic heavy-ion collisions is reviewed. Emphasis is placed on the use of hadronic scattering models to interpret the physical significance of experimental results. Interferometric studies with center-of-mass energies from < 1 GeV/nucleon up to 5500 GeV/nucleon are considered.

  2. On Pipelining Dynamic Instruction Scheduling Logic Jared Stark y Mary D. Brown z Yale N. Patt z

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patt, Yale

    On Pipelining Dynamic Instruction Scheduling Logic Jared Stark y Mary D. Brown z Yale N. Patt z operation. Either you sacrifice IPC by pipelin­ ing this logic, thereby eliminating its ability to execute de­ pendent instructions in consecutive cycles. Or you sacrifice clock frequency by not pipelining it

  3. New Joint Design for Three-dimensional Hyper Redundant Robots Elie Shammas Alon Wolf H. Ben Brown, Jr. Howie Choset

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choset, Howie

    New Joint Design for Three-dimensional Hyper Redundant Robots Elie Shammas Alon Wolf H. Ben Brown makes it ideal for constructing spatial or three-dimensional hyper redundant robots. We also identify that are suitable for constructing spatial hyper redundant (SHR) robots, i.e., SHR robots with three- dimensional

  4. Abstract of "Revealing White Matter Fiber Structure with Diffusion Imaging" by Song Zhang, Ph.D., Brown University, August 2006.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laidlaw, David

    . Apart from qualitative exploration, I also present quantitative methods such as metrics on tractography. The work in this dissertation advances both qualitative visualization and quantitative analysis of the 3D. S., Nankai University, 1996 Sc. M, Brown University, 2000 Ph.D. Thesis Providence, Rhode Island

  5. The adhesive strength of the palettes of males of a boreal water beetle, Dytiscus alaskanus J. Balfour Browne (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aiken, Ron

    The adhesive strength of the palettes of males of a boreal water beetle, Dytiscus alaskanus J., and KHAN,A. 1992. The adhesive strength of the palettes of males of a boreal water beetle, Dytiscus alaskanus J. Balfour Browne (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae). Can. J. Zool. 70: 1321- 1324. The adhesive strength

  6. A companion to AB Pic at the planet/brown dwarf boundary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Chauvin; A. -M. Lagrange; B. Zuckerman; C. Dumas; D. Mouillet; I. Song; J. -L. Beuzit; P. Lowrance; M. S. Bessell

    2005-04-29

    We report deep imaging observations of the young, nearby star AB Pic, a member of the large Tucana-Horologium as sociation. We have detected a faint, red source 5.5" South of the star with JHK colors compatible with that of a young substellar L dwarf. Follow-up observations at two additional epochs confirm, with a confidence level of 4.7sigma, that the faint red object is a companion to AB Pic rather than it being a stationary background object. A low resolution K-band spectrum indicates an early-L spectral type for the companion. Finally, evolutionary model predictions based on the JHK photometry of AB Pic b indicate a mass of 13 to 14 MJup if its age is ~30Myr. Is AB Pic b a massive planet or a minimum mass brown dwarf?

  7. Evolutionary models for cool brown dwarfs and extrasolar giant planets. The case of HD 20945

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Baraffe; G. Chabrier; T. Barman; F. Allard; P. H. Hauschildt

    2003-02-14

    We present evolutionary models for cool brown dwarfs and extra-solar giant planets. The models reproduce the main trends of observed methane dwarfs in near-IR color-magnitude diagrams. We also present evolutionary models for irradiated planets, coupling for the first time irradiated atmosphere profiles and inner structures. We focus on HD 209458-like systems and show that irradiation effects can substantially affect the radius of sub-jovian mass giant planets. Irradiation effects, however, cannot alone explain the large observed radius of HD 209458b. Adopting assumptions which optimise irradiation effects and taking into account the extension of the outer atmospheric layers, we still find $\\sim$ 20% discrepancy between observed and theoretical radii. An extra source of energy seems to be required to explain the observed value of the first transit planet.

  8. On the Cool Side: Modeling the Atmospheres of Brown Dwarfs and Giant Planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marley, Mark S

    2014-01-01

    The atmosphere of a brown dwarf or extrasolar giant planet controls the spectrum of radiation emitted by the object and regulates its cooling over time. While the study of these atmospheres has been informed by decades of experience modeling stellar and planetary atmospheres, the distinctive characteristics of these objects present unique challenges to forward modeling. In particular, complex chemistry arising from molecule-rich atmospheres, molecular opacity line lists (sometimes running to 10 billion absorption lines or more) multiple cloud-forming condensates, and disequilibrium chemical processes all combine to create a challenging task for any modeling effort. This review describes the process of incorporating these complexities into one-dimensional radiative-convective equilibrium models of sub-stellar objects. We discuss the underlying mathematics as well as the techniques used to model the physics, chemistry, radiative transfer, and other processes relevant to understanding these atmospheres. The revi...

  9. Hanbury Brown-Twiss effect and thermal light ghost imaging: A unified approach 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Li-Gang; Qamar, Sajid; Zhu, Shi-Yao; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2009-01-01

    /z=2x10 -4 #1;I/z=10 -3 #1;I/z=10 -2 #1;I/z=0.1 FIG. 2. #1;Color online#2; HBT effect for different ?I / z?=10?4 , 2#5;10?4 ,10?3 ,10?2, and 0.1 #1;from top to below#2;, with ?g=10 and z?=105. WANG et al. PHYSICAL REVIEW A 79, 033835 #1;2009...#2; ?I / z?1=0.2, with ?g=4, #1;d#2; ?I / z?1=0.2 and ?g=1, and #1;e#2; ?I / z?1=0.2 and ?g=0.1. HANBURY BROWN?TWISS EFFECT AND THERMAL LIGHT? PHYSICAL REVIEW A 79, 033835 #1;2009#2; 033835-3 and one-third. The more information in the object...

  10. X-ray Detection from Bona-fide and Candidate Brown Dwarfs in the Rho Ophiuchi Cloud with Chandra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kensuke Imanishi; Masahiro Tsujimoto; Katsuji Koyama

    2001-08-06

    We present results of an X-ray search from bona-fide and candidate brown dwarfs in the Rho Ophiuchi cloud cores with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The selected areas are two fields near the cloud center and are observed with the ACIS-I array of a 17'x17' size and a ~100 ks exposure. Among 18 bona-fide and candidate brown dwarfs listed by the infrared spectroscopy, we find X-ray emission from 7 sources above 99.9% confidence level. Therefore ~40% of the infrared-selected brown dwarfs in this cloud emit X-rays. For the brightest 4 sources, the X-ray spectra are made and are fitted with a thin-thermal plasma model of a temperature 1-2.5 keV. The X-rays are also time variable with rapid flares from 2 of the brown dwarfs. Assuming 2 keV temperature and using the empirical relation of Av vs. NH, we estimate the X-ray luminosity or its upper limit of the other faint or non-X-ray sources. The X-ray luminosity (Lx) of the X-ray-detected sources is in the range of 0.3-90x10^28 ergs s^-1, while the luminosity ratio of X-ray to bolometric (Lx/Lbol) is 10^-3 - 10^-5, similar to those of low-mass pre-main-sequence and dMe stars. All these results suggest that the X-ray origin of brown dwarfs is the same as low-mass stars; strong magnetic activity at the stellar surface.

  11. COMPARISON OF RESULTS FOR QUARTER 3 SURFACE WATER SPLIT SAMPLES COLLECTED AT THE NUCLEAR FUEL SERVICES SITE, ERWIN, TENNESSEE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-05-28

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, collected split surface water samples with Nuclear Fuel Services (NFS) representatives on March 20, 2013. Representatives from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation were also in attendance. Samples were collected at four surface water stations, as required in the approved Request for Technical Assistance number 11-018. These stations included Nolichucky River upstream (NRU), Nolichucky River downstream (NRD), Martin Creek upstream (MCU), and Martin Creek downstream (MCD). Both ORAU and NFS performed gross alpha and gross beta analyses, and Table 1 presents the comparison of results using the duplicate error ratio (DER), also known as the normalized absolute difference. A DER {<=} 3 indicates that at a 99% confidence interval, split sample results do not differ significantly when compared to their respective one standard deviation (sigma) uncertainty (ANSI N42.22). The NFS split sample report does not specify the confidence level of reported uncertainties (NFS 2013). Therefore, standard two sigma reporting is assumed and uncertainty values were divided by 1.96. In conclusion, most DER values were less than 3 and results are consistent with low (e.g., background) concentrations. The gross beta result for sample 5198W0012 was the exception. The ORAU result of 9.23 ± 0.73 pCi/L from location MCD is well above NFS's result of -0.567 ± 0.63 pCi/L (non-detected). NFS's data package included a detected result for U-233/234, but no other uranium or plutonium detection, and nothing that would suggest the presence of beta-emitting radionuclides. The ORAU laboratory reanalyzed sample 5198W0012 using the remaining portion of the sample volume and a result of 11.3 ± 1.1 pCi/L was determined. As directed, the laboratory also counted the filtrate using gamma spectrometry analysis and identified only naturally occurring or ubiquitous man-made constituents, including beta emitters that are presumably responsible for the elevated gross beta values.

  12. Field Testing of Activated Carbon Injection Options for Mercury Control at TXU's Big Brown Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Pavlish; Jeffrey Thompson; Christopher Martin; Mark Musich; Lucinda Hamre

    2009-01-07

    The primary objective of the project was to evaluate the long-term feasibility of using activated carbon injection (ACI) options to effectively reduce mercury emissions from Texas electric generation plants in which a blend of lignite and subbituminous coal is fired. Field testing of ACI options was performed on one-quarter of Unit 2 at TXU's Big Brown Steam Electric Station. Unit 2 has a design output of 600 MW and burns a blend of 70% Texas Gulf Coast lignite and 30% subbituminous Powder River Basin coal. Big Brown employs a COHPAC configuration, i.e., high air-to-cloth baghouses following cold-side electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), for particulate control. When sorbent injection is added between the ESP and the baghouse, the combined technology is referred to as TOXECON{trademark} and is patented by the Electric Power Research Institute in the United States. Key benefits of the TOXECON configuration include better mass transfer characteristics of a fabric filter compared to an ESP for mercury capture and contamination of only a small percentage of the fly ash with AC. The field testing consisted of a baseline sampling period, a parametric screening of three sorbent injection options, and a month long test with a single mercury control technology. During the baseline sampling, native mercury removal was observed to be less than 10%. Parametric testing was conducted for three sorbent injection options: injection of standard AC alone; injection of an EERC sorbent enhancement additive, SEA4, with ACI; and injection of an EERC enhanced AC. Injection rates were determined for all of the options to achieve the minimum target of 55% mercury removal as well as for higher removals approaching 90%. Some of the higher injection rates were not sustainable because of increased differential pressure across the test baghouse module. After completion of the parametric testing, a month long test was conducted using the enhanced AC at a nominal rate of 1.5 lb/Macf. During the time that enhanced AC was injected, the average mercury removal for the month long test was approximately 74% across the test baghouse module. ACI was interrupted frequently during the month long test because the test baghouse module was bypassed frequently to relieve differential pressure. The high air-to-cloth ratio of operations at this unit results in significant differential pressure, and thus there was little operating margin before encountering differential pressure limits, especially at high loads. This limited the use of sorbent injection as the added material contributes to the overall differential pressure. This finding limits sustainable injection of AC without appropriate modifications to the plant or its operations. Handling and storage issues were observed for the TOXECON ash-AC mixture. Malfunctioning equipment led to baghouse dust hopper plugging, and storage of the stagnant material at flue gas temperatures resulted in self-heating and ignition of the AC in the ash. In the hoppers that worked properly, no such problems were reported. Economics of mercury control at Big Brown were estimated for as-tested scenarios and scenarios incorporating changes to allow sustainable operation. This project was funded under the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory project entitled 'Large-Scale Mercury Control Technology Field Testing Program--Phase II'.

  13. Department of Energy - Oak Ridge Operations and URS - CH2M Oak Ridge LLC. Partnering Framework for the Cleanup of the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA - 12348

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schubert, Allen L. [URS - CH2M Oak Ridge LLC (UCOR), East Tennessee Technology Park D and D and Environmental Remediation Project, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The cleanup and re-industrialization of the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) hinges on a collaborative working relationship between the cleanup contractor and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE)-Oak Ridge Office (ORO). A Partnering Framework document was signed on June 30, 2011, with an ultimate goal of completing the contract scope of work ahead of schedule and under budget. This partnering process was the first time that DOE and its contractor, jointly developed and signed such an agreement before the contractor assumed management responsibilities of the Site. A strong desire of both parties to utilize a partnering approach in the performance of their respective responsibilities is evident. The Partnering Framework was modeled after a partnering process employed by the California Department of Transportation, Division of Construction. This partnering process has been used successfully by the California Department of Transportation and its major contractors for many years with great success. The partnering process used at ETTP was a phased approach. First, a Partnering Framework document was developed and signed June 30, 2011, by the Partnering Sponsors, the two leaders of the ETTP cleanup and re-industrialization project, the DOE-ORO Assistant Manager for Environmental Management and the contractor's President and Program Manager. In this way the partnering process could begin when the contactor assumed ETTP Site management responsibilities on August 1, 2011. The Partnering Framework then set the stage for the second phase of the partnering process which would be development of the Partnering Agreement and the kick-off of the first of a number of facilitated Partnering Workshops. Key elements of the Partnering Framework document include: (1) a statement of commitment which affirms the desire of both parties to work collaboratively toward the cleanup and re-industrialization of the ETTP Site; (2) a vision which describes both parties ultimate goal of safe, efficient cleanup, and (3) an implementation section which describes how the partnering process will be conducted, as well as how disputes will be managed. The signed Partnering Framework and Partnering Agreement provide the needed foundation of the safe and cost-effective cleanup and re-industrialization of the ETTP Site. The benefits of partnering have already been observed as the Partnering Teams effectively addressed a number of early contract and project challenges such as funding reductions and progress in resolving Material Differences. Based, in part of the successes achieved as a result of the partnering between UCOR and DOE-ORO, UCOR and DOE-ORO are extending this partnering approach to a number of the ETTP Site stakeholders. For example, DOE-ORO, UCOR and CROET signed a Partnering Agreement on November 3, 2011. This Partnering Agreement affirms the parties' commitment to work collaboratively to re-industrialize the ETTP Site. Both DOE-ORO and UCOR are looking to extend this partnering approach with other Site stakeholders such as its employees, its subcontractors, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Y-12 Security Complex in the future. (authors)

  14. SUPPLEMENTAL FIGURES Fig. S1 a-d: Cloud photographs taken on the Ron H. Brown on 29 October 2008 between 1 and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuter, Sandra

    SUPPLEMENTAL FIGURES Fig. S1 a-d: Cloud photographs taken on the Ron H. Brown on 29 October 2008 `Wilbanksetal2015_supplemental_animation.mp4' Hourly GOES satellite IR image loop capturing the cloud field

  15. Final Environmental Impact Statement for Treating Transuranic (TRU)/Alpha Low-level Waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2000-06-30

    The DOE proposes to construct, operate, and decontaminate/decommission a TRU Waste Treatment Facility in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The four waste types that would be treated at the proposed facility would be remote-handled TRU mixed waste sludge, liquid low-level waste associated with the sludge, contact-handled TRU/alpha low-level waste solids, and remote-handled TRU/alpha low-level waste solids. The mixed waste sludge and some of the solid waste contain metals regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act and may be classified as mixed waste. This document analyzes the potential environmental impacts associated with five alternatives--No Action, the Low-Temperature Drying Alternative (Preferred Alternative), the Vitrification Alternative, the Cementation Alternative, and the Treatment and Waste Storage at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Alternative.

  16. SURVEY REPORT FOR THE CHARACTERIZATION OF THE FIVE TANKS LOCATED NEAR THE OLD SALVAGE YARD AT THE Y-12 NATIONAL SECURITY COMPLEX, OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rollow, Kathy

    2012-08-23

    This summary report presents analytical results, radiological survey data, and other data/information for disposition planning of the five tanks located west of the Old Salvage Yard (OSY) at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Field personnel from Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) and URS?CH2M Oak Ridge LLC completed data collection in May 2012 per the project-specific plan (PSP) (ORAU 2012). Deviations from the PSP are addressed in the body of this report. Characterization activities included three data collection modes: visual inspection, radiological survey, and volumetric sampling/analysis. This report includes the final validated dataset and updates associated with the Tank 2 residues originally thought to be a biological bloom (e.g., slime mold) but ultimately identified as iron sulfate crystals.

  17. Implementation plan for liquid low-level radioactive waste systems under the FFA for fiscal years 1996 and 1997 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-06-01

    This document is the fourth annual revision of the plans and schedules for implementing the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) compliance program, originally submitted in 1992 as ES/ER-17&D1, Federal Facility Agreement Plans and Schedules for Liquid Low-Level Radioactive Waste Tank Systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This document summarizes the progress that has been made to date implementing the plans and schedules for meeting the FFA commitments for the Liquid Low-Level Waste (LLLW) System at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). In addition, this document lists FFA activities planned for FY 1997. Information presented in this document provides a comprehensive summary to facilitate understanding of the FFA compliance program for LLLW tank systems and to present plans and schedules associated with remediation, through the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) process, of LLLW tank systems that have been removed from service.

  18. Update and Expansion of the Center of Automotive Technology Excellence Under the Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Program at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Irick, David

    2012-08-30

    The Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Center at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville has completed its seventh year of operation under this agreement, its thirteenth year in total. During this period the Center has involved eleven GATE Fellows and three GATE Research Assistants in preparing them to contribute to advanced automotive technologies in the center’s focus area: Advanced Hybrid Propulsion and Control Systems. In addition to the impact that the Center has had on the students and faculty involved, the presence of the center has led to the acquisition of resources that probably would not have been obtained if the GATE Center had not existed. Significant industry interaction such as equipment donations, and support for GATE students has been realized. The value of the total resources brought to the university (including related research contracts) exceeds $2,000,000.

  19. Proceedings of the Joint IAEA/CSNI Specialists` Meeting on Fracture Mechanics Verification by Large-Scale Testing held at Pollard Auditorium, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pugh, C.E.; Bass, B.R.; Keeney, J.A.

    1993-10-01

    This report contains 40 papers that were presented at the Joint IAEA/CSNI Specialists` Meeting Fracture Mechanics Verification by Large-Scale Testing held at the Pollard Auditorium, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, during the week of October 26--29, 1992. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe recent large-scale fracture (brittle and/or ductile) experiments, analyses of these experiments, and comparisons between predictions and experimental results. The goal of the meeting was to allow international experts to examine the fracture behavior of various materials and structures under conditions relevant to nuclear reactor components and operating environments. The emphasis was on the ability of various fracture models and analysis methods to predict the wide range of experimental data now available. The individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  20. Work plan for support to Upper East Fork Poplar Creek east end VOC plumes well installation project at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-03-01

    Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 guidelines and requirements from the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC), the Y-12 Plant initiated investigation and monitoring of various sites within its boundaries in the mid-1980s. The entire Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) was placed on the National Priorities List of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) sites in November 1989. Following CERCLA guidelines, sites within the ORR require a remedial investigation (RI) to define the nature and extent of contamination, evaluate the risks to public health and the environment, and determine the goals for a feasibility study (FS) or an engineering evaluation/cost analysis (EE/CA) of potential remedial actions. Data from monitoring wells at the east end of the Y-12 Plant have identified an area of groundwater contamination dominated by the volatile organic compound (VOC) carbon tetrachloride; other VOCs include chloroform, tetrachloroethene, and trichloroethene.

  1. Quality Assurance Project Plan for the Environmental Monitoring Program in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 is a hazardous and low-level radioactive waste disposal site at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Extensive site investigations have revealed contaminated surface water, sediments, groundwater, and soils. Based on the results of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) conducted from 1989--1991 and on recent interactions with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC), a decision was made to defer implementing source control remedial measures at the WAG. The information shows WAG 6 contributes < 2% of the total off-site contaminant risk released over White Oak Dam (WOD). The alternative selected to address hazards at WAG 6 involves maintenance of site access controls to prevent public exposure to on-site contaminants, continued monitoring of contaminant releases to determine if source control measures will be required in the future, and development of technologies to support final remediation of WAG 6. This Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) has been developed as part of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE/OR/01-1192&D1). Environmental monitoring will be conducted in two phases: the baseline monitoring phase and the routine annual monitoring phase. The baseline monitoring phase will be conducted to establish the baseline contaminant release conditions at the Waste Area Grouping (WAG), to confirm the site-related chemicals of concern (COC), and to gather data to confirm the site hydrologic model. The baseline monitoring phase is expected to begin in 1994 and continue for 12-18 months. The routine annual monitoring phase will consist of continued sampling and analyses of COC to determine off-WAG contaminant flux, to identify trends in releases, and to confirm the COC. The routine annual monitoring phase will continue for {approximately}4 years.

  2. Finite element simulations of compositionally graded InGaN solar cells G.F. Brown a,b,n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Junqiao

    for cheap multi-junction solar cells [4]. Previous simulations have shown that double-junction InxGa1ÀxFinite element simulations of compositionally graded InGaN solar cells G.F. Brown a,b,n , J.W. Ager conversion efficiency of compositionally graded InxGa1ÀxN solar cells was simulated using a finite element

  3. Calendar Year 2004 Groundwater Monitoring Report, U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2005-09-01

    This report contains the groundwater and surface water monitoring data that were obtained during calendar year (CY) 2004 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12) on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The CY 2004 monitoring data were obtained from groundwater and surface water sampling locations in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12 (Figure A.1). The Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) between the west end of Y-12 and the west end of the Bear Creek Watershed (directions are in reference to the Y-12 grid system). The Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) encompasses the Y-12 industrial facilities and support structures in BCV. The Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime) encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge south of Y-12. The CY 2004 monitoring data were obtained under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) managed by BWXT Y-12, L.L.C. (BWXT) and several monitoring programs managed by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC). Data contained in this report meet applicable requirements of DOE Order 450.1 (Environmental Protection Program) regarding evaluation of groundwater and surface water quality in areas: (1) which are, or could be, affected by operations at Y-12 (surveillance monitoring); and (2) where contaminants from Y-12 are most likely to migrate beyond the boundaries of the ORR (exit pathway/perimeter monitoring). However, detailed analysis, evaluation, and interpretation of the CY 2004 monitoring data is deferred to the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater Monitoring Data Compendium (BWXT 2005). For each monitoring well, spring, and surface water sampling station included in this report, the GWPP Compendium provides: (1) pertinent well installation and construction information; (2) a complete sampling history, including sampling methods and distinguishing sampling characteristics; (3) an evaluation of hydrologic characteristics, based on pre-sampling groundwater elevations, along with a compilation of available test results (e.g., hydraulic conductivity test data); (4) a discussion of geochemical characteristics based on evaluation of the analytical results for the primary anions and cations; and (5) a detailed analysis and interpretation of the available data for the principal groundwater contaminants at Y-12: nitrate, uranium, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), gross alpha activity, and gross beta activity. The following sections of this report provide details regarding the CY 2004 groundwater and surface water monitoring activities in the Bear Creek, East Fork, and Chestnut Ridge Regime. Section 2 briefly describes the hydrogeologic system and generalized extent of groundwater contamination in each regime. Section 3 describes the monitoring programs implemented and associated sampling activities performed in each regime during CY 2004. Section 4 presents an a summary of the CY 2004 monitoring data with regard to the provisions of DOE Order 450.1 (surveillance and exit pathway/perimeter monitoring), including highlights of notable findings and time-series plots of data for CY 2004 sampling locations that provide representative examples of long-term contaminant concentration trends. Brief conclusions and proposed recommendations are provided in Section 5. Section 6 lists the documents cited for more detailed operational, regulatory, and technical information. The narrative sections of the report reference several appendices. Figures (maps and diagrams) and tables (excluding data summary tables presented in the narrative sections) are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. Monitoring well construction details are in Appendix C. Results of field measurements and laboratory analyses of the groundwater and surface water samples collected during CY 2004 are in Appendix D (Bear Creek Regime), Appendix E (East Fork Regime and surrounding areas), and Appendix F (Chestnut Ridge Regime). Appendix G contai

  4. Calendar Year 2011 Groundwater Monitoring Report, U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elvado Environmental LLC,

    2012-12-01

    This report contains the groundwater and surface water monitoring data that were obtained during calendar year (CY) 2011 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The CY 2011 monitoring data were obtained from wells, springs, and surface water sampling locations in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12. The Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) between the west end of Y-12 and the west end of the Bear Creek Watershed (directions are in reference to the Y-12 grid system). The Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) encompasses the Y-12 industrial facilities and support structures in BCV. The Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime) encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge directly south of Y-12. This report provides background information pertinent to groundwater and surface water quality monitoring in each hydrogeologic regime, including the topography and bedrock geology, surface water drainage, groundwater system, and known extent of groundwater contamination. The CY 2011 groundwater and surface water monitoring data in this report were obtained from sampling and analysis activities implemented under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) managed by Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC (B&W Y-12) and from sampling and analysis activities implemented under several monitoring programs managed by the DOE Environmental Management (EM) contractor responsible for environmental cleanup on the ORR. In August 2011, URS | CH2M Oak Ridge LLC (UCOR) replaced Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) as the DOE EM contractor. For this report, BJC/UCOR will be referenced as the managing contractor for CY 2011. Cooperative implementation of the monitoring programs directed by the Y-12 GWPP and BJC/UCOR (i.e., coordinating sample collection and sharing data) ensures that the CY 2011 monitoring results fulfill requirements of all the applicable monitoring drivers with no duplication of sampling and analysis efforts. This report contains a summary of information regarding the groundwater and surface water sampling and analysis activities implemented under the Y-12 GWPP including sampling locations and frequency; quality assurance (QA)/quality control (QC) sampling; sample collection and handling; field measurements and laboratory analytes; data management and data quality objective (DQO) evaluation; and groundwater elevation monitoring. However, this report does not include equivalent QA/QC or DQO evaluation information regarding the groundwater and surface water sampling and analysis activities associated with the monitoring programs implemented by BJC/UCOR. Such details are deferred to the respective programmatic plans and reports issued by BJC. Collectively, the groundwater and surface water monitoring data obtained during CY 2011 by the Y-12 GWPP and BJC/UCOR address DOE Order 436.1 and DOE Order 458.1 requirements for monitoring groundwater and surface water quality in areas (1) which are, or could be, affected by operations at Y-12 (surveillance monitoring) and (2) where contaminants from Y-12 are most likely to migrate beyond the boundaries of the ORR (exit pathway/perimeter monitoring). This report presents a summary evaluation of the monitoring data with regard to the respective objectives of surveillance monitoring and exit pathway/perimeter monitoring, based on the analytical results for the principal groundwater contaminants at Y-12: nitrate, uranium, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), gross alpha activity, and gross beta activity. This report summarizes the most pertinent findings regarding the principal contaminants, along with recommendations proposed for ongoing groundwater and surface water quality monitoring performed under the Y-12 GWPP.

  5. Calendar Year 2005 Groundwater Monitoring Report, U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-09-01

    This report contains the groundwater and surface water monitoring data that were obtained during calendar year (CY) 2005 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12) on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The CY 2005 monitoring data were obtained from groundwater and surface water sampling locations in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12 (Figure A.1). The Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) between the west end of Y-12 and the west end of the Bear Creek Watershed (directions are in reference to the Y-12 grid system). The Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) encompasses the Y-12 industrial facilities and support structures in BCV. The Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime) encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge south of Y-12. The CY 2005 monitoring data were obtained under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) managed by BWXT Y-12, L.L.C. (BWXT) and several monitoring programs managed by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC). Data contained in this report meet applicable requirements of DOE Order 450.1 (Environmental Protection Program) regarding evaluation of groundwater and surface water quality in areas: (1) which are, or could be, affected by operations at Y-12 (surveillance monitoring); and (2) where contaminants from Y-12 are most likely to migrate beyond the boundaries of the ORR (exit pathway/perimeter monitoring). However, detailed analysis, evaluation, and interpretation of the CY 2005 monitoring data is deferred to the ''Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater Monitoring Data Compendium'' (BWXT 2006). For each monitoring well, spring, and surface water sampling station included in this report, the GWPP Compendium provides: (1) pertinent well installation and construction information; (2) a complete sampling history, including sampling methods and distinguishing sampling characteristics; (3) an evaluation of hydrologic characteristics, based on pre-sampling groundwater elevations, along with a compilation of available test results (e.g., hydraulic conductivity test data); (4) a discussion of geochemical characteristics based on evaluation of the analytical results for the primary anions and cations; and (5) a detailed analysis and interpretation of the available data for the principal groundwater contaminants at Y-12: nitrate, uranium, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), gross alpha activity, and gross beta activity. The following sections of this report provide details regarding the CY 2005 groundwater and surface water monitoring activities in the Bear Creek, East Fork, and Chestnut Ridge Regime. Section 2 briefly describes the hydrogeologic system and generalized extent of groundwater contamination in each regime. Section 3 describes the monitoring programs implemented and associated sampling activities performed in each regime during CY 2005. Section 4 presents an a summary of the CY 2005 monitoring data with regard to the provisions of DOE Order 450.1 (surveillance and exit pathway/perimeter monitoring), including highlights of notable findings and time-series plots of data for CY 2005 sampling locations that provide representative examples of long-term contaminant concentration trends. Brief conclusions and proposed recommendations are provided in Section 5. Section 6 lists the documents cited for more detailed operational, regulatory, and technical information. The narrative sections of the report reference several appendices. Figures (maps and diagrams) and tables (excluding data summary tables presented in the narrative sections) are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. Monitoring well construction details are in Appendix C. Results of field measurements and laboratory analyses of the groundwater and surface water samples collected during CY 2005 are in Appendix D (Bear Creek Regime), Appendix E (East Fork Regime and surrounding areas), and Appendix F (Chestnut Ridge Regime). Appendix G co

  6. M-dwarf binaries as tracers of star and brown dwarf formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marks, Michael; Kroupa, Pavel; Leigh, Nathan; Thies, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    The separation distribution for M-dwarf binaries in the ASTRALUX survey is narrower and peaking at smaller separations than the distribution for solar-type binaries. This is often interpreted to mean that M-dwarfs constitute a continuous transition from brown dwarfs (BDs) to stars. Here a prediction for the M-dwarf separation distribution is presented, using a dynamical population synthesis (DPS) model in which "star-like" binaries with late-type primaries ($\\lesssim1.5 M_{\\rm sun}$) follow universal initial distribution functions and are dynamically processed in their birth embedded clusters. A separate "BD-like" population has both its own distribution functions for binaries and initial mass function (IMF), which overlaps in mass with the IMF for stars. Combining these two formation modes results in a peak on top of a wider separation distribution for late M-dwarfs consistent with the late ASTRALUX sample. The DPS separation distribution for early M-dwarfs shows no such peak and is in agreement with the M-d...

  7. SUBSTELLAR OBJECTS IN NEARBY YOUNG CLUSTERS (SONYC). II. THE BROWN DWARF POPULATION OF {rho} OPHIUCHI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geers, Vincent; Jayawardhana, Ray; Lee, Eve; Lafreniere, David [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Scholz, Alexander [School of Cosmic Physics, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 31 Fitzwilliam Place, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Tamura, Motohide, E-mail: vcgeers@astro.utoronto.ca [National Astronomical Observatory, Osawa 2-21-2, Mitaka, Tokyo 181 (Japan)

    2011-01-01

    SONYC-Substellar Objects in Nearby Young Clusters-is a survey program to investigate the frequency and properties of brown dwarfs (BDs) down to masses below the deuterium-burning limit in nearby star-forming regions. In this second paper, we present results on the {approx}1 Myr old cluster {rho} Ophiuchi, combining our own deep optical- and near-infrared imaging using Subaru with photometry from the Two Micron All Sky Survey and the Spitzer Space Telescope. Of the candidates selected from iJK{sub s} photometry, we have confirmed three-including a new BD with a mass close to the deuterium limit-as likely cluster members through low-resolution infrared spectroscopy. We also identify 27 substellar candidates with mid-infrared excess consistent with disk emission, of which 16 are new and 11 are previously spectroscopically confirmed BDs. The high and variable extinction makes it difficult to obtain the complete substellar population in this region. However, current data suggest that its ratio of low-mass stars to BDs is similar to those reported for several other clusters, though higher than what was found for NGC 1333 in Scholz et al.

  8. A pulsation search among young brown dwarfs and very-low-mass stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cody, Ann Marie; Hillenbrand, Lynne A., E-mail: amc@ipac.caltech.edu [California Institute of Technology, Department of Astrophysics, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    In 2005, Palla and Baraffe proposed that brown dwarfs (BDs) and very-low-mass stars (VLMSs; < 0.1 solar masses) may be unstable to radial oscillations during the pre-main-sequence deuterium burning phase. With associated periods of one to four hours, this potentially new class of pulsation offers unprecedented opportunities to probe the interiors and evolution of low-mass objects in the 1-15 million year age range. Following up on reports of short-period variability in young clusters, we designed a high-cadence photometric monitoring campaign to search for deuterium-burning pulsation among a sample of 348 BDs and VLMSs in the four young clusters ? Orionis, Chamaeleon I, IC 348, and Upper Scorpius. In the resulting light curves we achieved sensitivity to periodic signals of amplitude several millimagnitudes, on timescales from 15 minutes to two weeks. Despite the exquisite data quality, we failed to detect any periodicities below seven hours. We conclude that D-burning pulsations are not able to grow to observable amplitudes in the early pre-main sequence. In spite of the nondetection, we did uncover a rich set of variability behavior—both periodic and aperiodic—on day to week timescales. We present new compilations of variable sources from our sample, as well as three new candidate cluster members in Chamaeleon I.

  9. Characterization of novel sorghum brown midrib mutants from an EMS-mutagenized population

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sattler, Scott E.; Saballos, Ana; Xin, Zhanguo; Funnell-Harris, Deanna L.; Vermerris, Wilfred; Pedersen, Jeffrey F.

    2014-09-02

    Reducing lignin concentration in lignocellulosic biomass can increase forage digestibility for ruminant livestock and saccharification yields of biomass for bioenergy. In sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench) and several other C4 grasses, brown midrib (bmr) mutants have been shown to reduce lignin concentration. Putative bmr mutants isolated from an EMS-mutagenized population were characterized and classified based on their leaf midrib phenotype and allelism tests with the previously described sorghum bmr mutants bmr2, bmr6, and bmr12. These tests resulted in the identification of additional alleles of bmr2, bmr6,and bmr12, and, in addition, six bmr mutants were identified that were not allelic tomore »these previously described loci. Further allelism testing among these six bmr mutants showed that they represented four novel bmr loci. Based on this study, the number of bmr loci uncovered in sorghum has doubled. The impact of these lines on agronomic traits and lignocellulosic composition was assessed in a 2-yr field study. Most of the identified bmr lines showed reduced lignin concentration of their biomass relative to wild-type (WT). Effects of the six new bmr mutants on enzymatic saccharification of lignocellulosic materials were determined, but the amount of glucose released from the stover was similar to WT in all cases. Like bmr2, bmr6, and bmr12, these mutants may affect monolignol biosynthesis and may be useful for bioenergy and forage improvement when stacked together or in combination with the three previously described bmr alleles.« less

  10. Spitzer IRAC mid-infrared photometry of 500-750 brown dwarf

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saumon, Didier; Leggett, Sandy K; Albert, Loic; Artigau, Etienne; Burningham, Ben; Delfosse, Xavier; Delorme, Philippe; Forveille, Thierry; Lucas, Philip W; Marley, Mark S; Pinfield, David J; Reyle, Celine; Smart, Richard L; Warren, Stephen J

    2010-10-26

    Mid-infrared data, including Spitzer warm-IRAC [3.6] and [4.5] photometry, is critical for understanding the cold population of brown dwarfs now being found, objects which have more in common with planets than stars. As effective temperature (T{sub eff}) drops from 800K to 400K, the fraction of flux emitted beyond 3 {mu}m increases rapidly, from about 40% to > 75%. This rapid increase makes a color like H-[4.5] a very sensitive temperature indicator, and it can be combined with a gravity- and metallicity-sensitive color like H-K to constrain all three of these fundamental properties, which in turn gives us mass and age for these slowly cooling objects. Determination of mid-infrared color trends also allows better exploitation of the WISE mission by the community. We use new Spitzer Cycle 6 IRAC photometry, together with published data, to present trends of color with type for L0 to T10 dwarfs. We also use the atmospheric and evolutionary models of Saumon and Marley to investigate the masses and ages of 13 very late-type T dwarfs, which have H-[4.5] > 3.2 and T{sub eff} {approx} 500K to 750K.

  11. Probing the properties of event-by-event distributions in Hanbury-Brown--Twiss radii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plumberg, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Hanbury-Brown--Twiss interferometry is a technique which yields effective widths (i.e., "HBT radii") of homogeneity regions in the fireballs produced in heavy ion collisions. Because the initial conditions of these collisions are stochastically fluctuating, the measured HBT radii also exhibit variation on an event-by-event basis. However, HBT measurements have, to date, been performed only on an ensemble-averaged basis, due to inherent limitations of finite particle statistics. In this paper, we show that experimental measurements to date are best characterized theoretically as weighted averages of the event-by-event HBT radii, and we propose a new method for extracting experimentally both the arithmetic mean and the variance of the event-by-event distribution of HBT radii. We demonstrate the extraction of the mean and variance of this distribution for a particular ensemble of numerically generated events, and offer some ideas to extend and generalize the method to enable measurement of higher moments of the ...

  12. Probing the properties of event-by-event distributions in Hanbury-Brown--Twiss radii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher Plumberg; Ulrich Heinz

    2015-07-17

    Hanbury-Brown--Twiss interferometry is a technique which yields effective widths (i.e., "HBT radii") of homogeneity regions in the fireballs produced in heavy ion collisions. Because the initial conditions of these collisions are stochastically fluctuating, the measured HBT radii also exhibit variation on an event-by-event basis. However, HBT measurements have, to date, been performed only on an ensemble-averaged basis, due to inherent limitations of finite particle statistics. In this paper, we show that experimental measurements to date are best characterized theoretically as weighted averages of the event-by-event HBT radii, and we propose a new method for extracting experimentally both the arithmetic mean and the variance of the event-by-event distribution of HBT radii. We demonstrate the extraction of the mean and variance of this distribution for a particular ensemble of numerically generated events, and offer some ideas to extend and generalize the method to enable measurement of higher moments of the HBT distribution as well.

  13. DE0823$-$49 is a juvenile binary brown dwarf at 20.7 pc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahlmann, J; Martín, E L; Lazorenko, P F; Gagliuffi, D C Bardalez; Mayor, M; Ségransan, D; Queloz, D; Udry, S

    2015-01-01

    Astrometric monitoring of the nearby early-L dwarf DE0823$-$49 has revealed a low-mass companion in a 248-day orbit that was announced in an earlier work. Here, we present new astrometric and spectroscopic observations that allow us to characterise the system in detail. The optical spectrum shows LiI-absorption indicative of a young age and/or substellar mass for the primary component. The near-infrared spectrum is best reproduced by a binary system of brown dwarfs with spectral types of L1.5 $+$ L5.5 and effective temperatures of $2150\\pm100$ K and $1670\\pm140$ K. To conform with the photocentric orbit size measured with astrometry and the current understanding of substellar evolution, the system must have an age in the 80--500 Myr range. Evolutionary models predict component masses in the ranges of $M_1\\simeq0.028-0.063\\,M_\\odot$ and $M_2\\simeq0.018-0.045\\,M_\\odot$ with a mass ratio of $q\\simeq0.64-0.74$. Multi-epoch radial velocity measurements unambiguously establish the three-dimensional orbit of the sys...

  14. Effects of water hardness on the toxicity of manganese to developing brown trout (Salmo trutta)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stubblefield, W.A.; Garrison, T.D.; Hockett, J.R.; Brinkman, S.F.; Davies, P.H.; McIntyre, M.W.

    1997-10-01

    Manganese is a common constituent of point and nonpoint discharges from mining and smelting activities. Available data indicate that Mn is acutely toxic at relatively high aqueous concentrations, when compared with trace metals, and its toxicity is affected by water hardness. Little information is available regarding the chronic toxicity of manganese. Early-life-stage (ELS) tests were conducted to determine the toxicity of manganese to brown trout (Salmo trutta) and to evaluate the extent to which water hardness (ranging from 30 to 450 mg/L as CaCO{sub 3}) affects the chronic toxicity of Mn. Water hardness of significantly affected Mn chronic toxicity, with toxicity decreasing with increasing hardness. Decreased survival was the predominant effect noted in the 30-mg/L hardness experiment, while significant effects on growth (as measured by changes in body weight) were observed in both the 150- and 450-mg/L hardness experiments. Twenty-five percent inhibition concentration (IC25) values, based on the combined endpoints (i.e., survival and body weight), were 4.67, 5.59, and 8.68 mg Mn/L (based on measured Mn concentration) at hardness levels of approximately 30, 150, and 450 mg/L as CaCO{sub 3}, respectively.

  15. A Brown Dwarf Microlens Candidate in the OGLE-II Database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. C. Smith; S. Mao; P. R. Wozniak

    2003-01-16

    We describe a unique mass determination for a microlensing event from the second phase of the Optical Gravitational Microlensing Experiment (OGLE-II). The event, sc26_2218, which is very bright (baseline magnitude I=15.10), appears to exhibit both parallax and finite source effects. The parallax effect allows us to determine the projected Einstein radius on the observer plane (approx. 3.8 AU), while the finite source effect allows us to determine the ratio of the angular source size and the angular Einstein radius. As the angular size of the star can be estimated using its color and magnitude, we can hence determine the angular Einstein radius (approx. 0.1 mas). By combining both the projected and angular Einstein radius we can determine the lens mass M = 0.050^{+0.016}_{-0.011} solar masses, independent of the source distance. The lens is therefore a brown dwarf candidate. However, the `parallax' signature is weak and so we cannot completely discount the possibility that these signatures originate from binary rotation of the source (which would prevent any estimate of the lens mass), rather than parallax. However, this can be tested by future spectroscopic observations. This event highlights the scientific returns for intense monitoring of bright microlensing events, since the parallax and finite source effects can be more easily identified due to their high signal-to-noise ratios.

  16. Pyrolysis product distribution of a Victorian brown coal under high pressures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sathe, C.; Li, C.Z.

    1999-07-01

    A Loy Yang brown coal sample was pyrolyzed in a wire-mesh reactor at pressures ranging from 100 kPa to 1000 kPa. Tar yield was found to be very sensitive to changes in heating rate, peak temperature, holding time and pressure. Tar yield decreased with increases in pressure at high heating rate. At low heating rate tar yield was not sensitive to changes in pressure. Char yields were found to be much less sensitive to changes in pressure and/or heating rate. UV absorption spectroscopy of the tar samples indicated that the yields of larger aromatic ring systems decreased with increasing pressure and/or decreasing heating rate. The effects of pressure are mainly due to the changes in the transportation of volatile precursors with pressure. Increases in pressure might have slowed down the bulk diffusion within meso- and macro-pores in char, which in turn have slowed down the Knudsen diffusion in the micro-pores due to the reduced concentration gradients for the Knudsen diffusion. During the extended stay within the char particle, volatile precursors were thermally cracked, leading to the retention of some larger aromatic ring systems as char and the release of other components as tar and gas.

  17. Chattanooga folio, Tennessee 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayes, C. W. (Charles Willard), 1859-1916.

    1894-01-01

    encouragement as I continued my education. I would like to thank Mr. Don Daugherty of ARGO-Midland and ARGO Oil Company for information and financial support used in completion of this thesis. ARCO supplied the cores and associated data necessary... and other associated fields which produce from Morrowan clastics. 22 Sedimentary structures in Lower Morrow sandstones and limestones, Hondo Federal 10-1 (HF101), South Empire field area. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Sedimentary structures in Lower...

  18. CORPORATIONS APAC Tennessee Incorporated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dasgupta, Dipankar

    Business Resources Breast Cancer Eradication Initiative Incorporated Brother International Corporation Resources Incorporated ETI Corporation Corporate and Foundation Giving The University of Memphis is grateful Family of Companies KPMG Peat Marwick LLP Knox Music Incorporated Frank Ricks/Looney Ricks Kiss Lane

  19. East Tennessee State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karsai, Istvan

    site (www.etsu.edu/irb). Contact the IRB at 439-6053 with any questions. Reporting Unanticipated- tional Officials. ETSU and ETSU/VA Office for the Protection of Human Research Subjects PO Box 70565 Johnson City, TN 37614 Version 10/23/07 Phone: (423) 439-6053 Fax: (423)439-6060 Website: www.etsu

  20. Standingstone folio, Tennessee 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Marius R. (Marius Robinson), 1858-1940.

    1899-01-01

    Winograd, Its Happening (Santa Barbara, 1966); Roy Ald, The Youth Communes (New York, 1970); Rosabeth Moss Kanter, Commitment and Community: Communes and Utopias in Sociological Perspective (Cambridge, 1972); Keith Melville, Communes in the Counter...

  1. Morristown folio, Tennessee 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keith, Arthur.

    1896-01-01

    The horizontal well with multiple transverse fractures has proven to be an effective strategy for shale gas reservoir exploitation. Some operators are successfully producing shale oil using the same strategy. Due to its higher viscosity and eventual...

  2. Wartburg folio, Tennessee 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keith, Arthur.

    1897-01-01

    is to generate field-wide production forecast of the Eagle Ford Shale (EFS). This study considered oil production of the EFS only. More than 6 thousand oil wells were put online in the EFS basin between 2008 and December 2013. The method started by generating...

  3. Kingston folio, Tennessee 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayes, C. W. (Charles Willard), 1859-1916.

    1894-01-01

    Shale gas and oil are playing a significant role in US energy independence by reversing declining production trends. Successful exploration and development of the Eagle Ford Shale Play requires reservoir characterization, recognition of fluid...

  4. Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Sequoyah

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Sequoyah" "Unit","Summer Capacity (MW)","Net Generation (Thousand MWh)","Summer Capacity Factor (Percent)","Type","Commercial Operation Date","License Expiration Date"...

  5. TENNESSEE'S WETLANDS REGULATORY PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    SectionNatural Resources Section Division of Water Pollution ControlDivision of Water Pollution Control to unpolluted water DefinesDefines ""waterswaters"" of the stateof the state Defines pollutionDefines pollution 1200-4-7) "Pollution" means such alteration of...properties of the waters that will...result in harm

  6. Briceville folio, Tennessee 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keith, Arthur.

    1896-01-01

    section can be divided up into Lower, Middle, and non-bioturbated and bioturbated Upper units of interbedded sandstones and shales. Strike-trending, pod-shaped concentrations of bioturbated Upper sandstones are the principle reservoirs in these fields.... 6 percent have been recorded for Lower, Middle, and non-bioturbated Upper sandstones in the same well. Lower and Middle sandstones are thinly to thickly bedded and isolated in black, non-bioturbated shales. Thinner sandstones average 0. 25 ft...

  7. Cleveland folio, Tennessee 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayes, C. W. (Charles Willard), 1859-1916.

    1895-01-01

    into the 10,300? sand ...................................................................................................19 13. Interbedded shale thickness from well log data ...................................................19 14. Time... ...............................................................52 34. RDSgTM1 vs. time ................................................................................................53 35. RDSgTM2 vs. Tf of TM2 at t=30 ky .....................................................................55...

  8. Loudon folio, Tennessee 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keith, Arthur.

    1896-01-01

    in horizontal well application for Tight Gas reservoirs. Numerous field case histories are available in literature for optimizing number of hydraulic fracture stages, although the conclusions are case specific. In contrast, a general method is being presented...

  9. Tennessee Natural Gas Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: AlternativeMonthly","10/2015"Monthly","10/2015" ,"Release7CubicthroughtheSeptemberFeet) Decade Year-0 Year-1NetThousand4.60

  10. Carolina, Tennessee, and Washington.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits &BradburyMay 1, 2013,CafeCarbon-free SubscribeWhy I A.Carlsbadmore

  11. Tennessee Natural Gas Summary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1Plant Processing DefinitionsThousand Cubic Feet)3.83 4.35

  12. University of Tennessee

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4)9 Federal RegisterStorm1 3 6 5SecurityThi

  13. Tennessee Natural Gas Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYearbyWithdrawalsHome6,672 7,2060 (Million3 4.35 1967-2010

  14. Young Low-Mass Stars and Brown Dwarfs in IC 348

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. L. Luhman

    1999-05-21

    I present new results from a continuing program to identify and characterize the low-mass stellar and substellar populations in the young cluster IC 348 (1-10~Myr). Optical spectroscopy has revealed young objects with spectral types as late as M8.25. The intrinsic J-H and H-K colors of these sources are dwarf-like, whereas the R-I and I-J colors appear intermediate between the colors of dwarfs and giants. Furthermore, the spectra from 6500 to 9500 A are reproduced well with averages of standard dwarf and giant spectra, suggesting that such averages should be used in the classification of young late-type sources. An H-R diagram is constructed for the low-mass population in IC 348 (K6-M8). The presumably coeval components of the young quadruple system GG~Tau (White et al.) and the locus of stars in IC 348 are used as empirical isochrones to test the theoretical evolutionary models. For the models of Baraffe et al., an adjustment of the temperature scale to progressively warmer temperatures at later M types, intermediate between dwarfs and giants, brings all components of GG~Tau onto the same model isochrone and gives the population of IC 348 a constant age and age spread as a function of mass. When other observational constraints are considered, such as the dynamical masses of GM~Aur, DM~Tau, and GG~Tau~A, the models of Baraffe et al. are the most consistent with observations of young systems. With compatible temperature scales, the models of both D'Antona & Mazzitelli and Baraffe et al. suggest that the hydrogen burning mass limit occurs near M6 at ages of <10 Myr. Thus, several likely brown dwarfs are discovered in this study of IC 348, with masses down to ~20-30 M_J.

  15. Formation of NH{sub 3} during the pyrolysis of a brown coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, C.Z.; Pang, Y.; Li, X.G. [Monash Univ., Clayton, Victoria (Australia). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1998-12-31

    Emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NO, NO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O) from power generation using coal are an important environmental problem, contributing to the formation of photochemical smog and acid rain or to the enhancement of greenhouse effects and to the enhanced depletion of stratospheric ozone. During pyrolysis, the nitrogen in coal, as a part of coal organic matter, is converted into NOx precursors (eg. NH{sub 3}, HCN, HNCO and the nitrogen in tar and char). These NOx precursors may then be converted into either NOx or N{sub 2} during subsequent combustion or gasification/combustion. The conversion efficiency of these NOx precursors into NOx depends strongly upon the type of NOx precursor. Knowledge of the formation of these NOx precursors during pyrolysis is therefore essential for the accurate predictions of NOx emissions from large scale power plants, and therefore for the development of optimum strategies for NOx reduction. Formation of NH{sub 3} during the pyrolysis of a Victorian brown coal (Loy Yang) has been studied in a novel reactor. The experimental results obtained suggest that a considerable amount of the nitrogen in the nascent char could be converted into NH{sub 3} if the char is held at high temperatures for a long period of time. The formation of NH{sub 3} from the thermal cracking of char was seen to last for more than an hour even at temperatures as high as 700--900 C. The experimental results seem to suggest that the differences in reactor geometries would account at least partially for some of the discrepancies in the literature regarding the formation of NH{sub 3} during the pyrolysis of coals. It is thought that NH{sub 3} may be formed from the hydrogenation of the N sites in the char by the active hydrogen generated from the thermal cracking of the char.

  16. Ozone induces glucose intolerance and systemic metabolic effects in young and aged brown Norway rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bass, V.; Gordon, C.J.; Jarema, K.A.; MacPhail, R.C.; Cascio, W.E.; Phillips, P.M.; Ledbetter, A.D.; Schladweiler, M.C.; Andrews, D.; Miller, D.; Doerfler, D.L.; Kodavanti, U.P.

    2013-12-15

    Air pollutants have been associated with increased diabetes in humans. We hypothesized that ozone would impair glucose homeostasis by altering insulin signaling and/or endoplasmic reticular (ER) stress in young and aged rats. One, 4, 12, and 24 month old Brown Norway (BN) rats were exposed to air or ozone, 0.25 or 1.0 ppm, 6 h/day for 2 days (acute) or 2 d/week for 13 weeks (subchronic). Additionally, 4 month old rats were exposed to air or 1.0 ppm ozone, 6 h/day for 1 or 2 days (time-course). Glucose tolerance tests (GTT) were performed immediately after exposure. Serum and tissue biomarkers were analyzed 18 h after final ozone for acute and subchronic studies, and immediately after each day of exposure in the time-course study. Age-related glucose intolerance and increases in metabolic biomarkers were apparent at baseline. Acute ozone caused hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance in rats of all ages. Ozone-induced glucose intolerance was reduced in rats exposed for 13 weeks. Acute, but not subchronic ozone increased ?{sub 2}-macroglobulin, adiponectin and osteopontin. Time-course analysis indicated glucose intolerance at days 1 and 2 (2 > 1), and a recovery 18 h post ozone. Leptin increased day 1 and epinephrine at all times after ozone. Ozone tended to decrease phosphorylated insulin receptor substrate-1 in liver and adipose tissues. ER stress appeared to be the consequence of ozone induced acute metabolic impairment since transcriptional markers of ER stress increased only after 2 days of ozone. In conclusion, acute ozone exposure induces marked systemic metabolic impairments in BN rats of all ages, likely through sympathetic stimulation. - Highlights: • Air pollutants have been associated with increased diabetes in humans. • Acute ozone exposure produces profound metabolic alterations in rats. • Age influences metabolic risk factors in aging BN rats. • Acute metabolic effects are reversible and repeated exposure reduces these effects. • Ozone metabolic effects are only slightly exacerbated in geriatric rats.

  17. HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM BLEND DOWN PROGRAM AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE PRESENT AND FUTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magoulas, V; Charles Goergen, C; Ronald Oprea, R

    2008-06-05

    The Department of Energy (DOE) and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) entered into an Interagency Agreement to transfer approximately 40 metric tons of highly enriched uranium (HEU) to TVA for conversion to fuel for the Browns Ferry Nuclear Power Plant. Savannah River Site (SRS) inventories included a significant amount of this material, which resulted from processing spent fuel and surplus materials. The HEU is blended with natural uranium (NU) to low enriched uranium (LEU) with a 4.95% 235U isotopic content and shipped as solution to the TVA vendor. The HEU Blend Down Project provided the upgrades needed to achieve the product throughput and purity required and provided loading facilities. The first blending to low enriched uranium (LEU) took place in March 2003 with the initial shipment to the TVA vendor in July 2003. The SRS Shipments have continued on a regular schedule without any major issues for the past 5 years and are due to complete in September 2008. The HEU Blend program is now looking to continue its success by dispositioning an additional approximately 21 MTU of HEU material as part of the SRS Enriched Uranium Disposition Project.

  18. 2010 Remediation Effectiveness Report for the U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee - Data and Evaluations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Jacobs

    2010-09-01

    Under the requirements of the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) established between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, (EPA) and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) in 1992, all environmental restoration activities on the ORR are performed in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). Since the 1990s, the environmental restoration activities have experienced a gradual shift from characterization to remediation. As this has occurred, it has been determined that the assessment of the individual and cumulative performance of all ORR CERCLA remedial actions (RAs) is most effectively tracked in a single document. The Remediation Effectiveness Report (RER) is an FFA document intended to collate all ORR CERCLA decision requirements, compare pre- and post-remediation conditions at CERCLA sites, and present the results of any required post-decision remediation effectiveness monitoring. First issued in 1997, the RER has been reissued annually to update the performance histories of completed actions and to add descriptions of new CERCLA actions. Monitoring information used in the 2010 RER to assess remedy performance was collected and/or compiled by DOE's Water Resources Restoration Program (WRRP). Only data used to assess performance of completed actions are provided. In addition to collecting CERCLA performance assessment data, the WRRP also collects baseline data to be used to gauge the effectiveness of future actions once implemented. These baseline data are maintained in the Oak Ridge Environmental Information System and will be reported in future RERs, as necessary, once the respective actions are completed. However, when insufficient data exist to assess the impact of the RAs, e.g., when the RA was only recently completed, a preliminary evaluation is made of early indicators of effectiveness at the watershed scale, such as contaminant trends at surface water integration points (IPs). Long-term stewardship (LTS) information used in this report is collected, compiled, and tracked by the WRRP in conjunction with the Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) Surveillance and Maintenance (S&M) program, the BJC Radiation Protection Organization at East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), and the ETTP Environmental Compliance Program. Additionally, documentation verifying the implementation of administrative land use controls (LUCs) [i.e., property record restrictions, property record notices, zoning notices, and excavation/penetration permit (EPP) program] is also obtained from many sources throughout the fiscal year (FY), including County Register of Deeds offices for property record restrictions and property record notices, City Planning Commission for zoning notices, and BJC project engineers for EPP program verification. Copies of this documentation are obtained by the WRRP and maintained with the project RER files.

  19. THE BROWN DWARF KINEMATICS PROJECT (BDKP). III. PARALLAXES FOR 70 ULTRACOOL DWARFS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Shara, Michael M.; Cruz, Kelle L.; Burgasser, Adam J.; Walter, Frederick M.; Van der Bliek, Nicole; Vrba, Frederick J.; Anglada-Escude, Guillem

    2012-06-10

    We report parallax measurements for 70 ultracool dwarfs (UCDs) including 11 late-M, 32 L, and 27 T dwarfs. In this sample, 14 M and L dwarfs exhibit low surface gravity features, 6 are close binary systems, and 2 are metal-poor subdwarfs. We combined our new measurements with 114 previously published UCD parallaxes and optical-mid-IR photometry to examine trends in spectral-type/absolute magnitude, and color-color diagrams. We report new polynomial relations between spectral type and M{sub JHK}. Including resolved L/T transition binaries in the relations, we find no reason to differentiate between a 'bright' (unresolved binary) and a 'faint' (single source) sample across the L/T boundary. Isolating early T dwarfs, we find that the brightening of T0-T4 sources is prominent in M{sub J} where there is a [1.2-1.4] mag difference. A similar yet dampened brightening of [0.3-0.5] mag happens at M{sub H} and a plateau or dimming of [-0.2 to -0.3] mag is seen in M{sub K} . Comparison with evolutionary models that vary gravity, metallicity, and cloud thickness verifies that for L into T dwarfs, decreasing cloud thickness reproduces brown dwarf near-IR color-magnitude diagrams. However we find that a near constant temperature of 1200 {+-}100 K along a narrow spectral subtype of T0-T4 is required to account for the brightening and color-magnitude diagram of the L-dwarf/T-dwarf transition. There is a significant population of both L and T dwarfs which are red or potentially 'ultra-cloudy' compared to the models, many of which are known to be young indicating a correlation between enhanced photospheric dust and youth. For the low surface gravity or young companion L dwarfs we find that 8 out of 10 are at least [0.2-1.0] mag underluminous in M{sub JH} and/or M{sub K} compared to equivalent spectral type objects. We speculate that this is a consequence of increased dust opacity and conclude that low surface gravity L dwarfs require a completely new spectral-type/absolute magnitude polynomial for analysis.

  20. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Monitoring Optimization Plan For Groundwater Monitoring Wells At The U.S. Department Of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-09-01

    This document is the monitoring optimization plan for groundwater monitoring wells associated with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The plan describes the technical approach that is implemented under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) to focus available resources on the monitoring wells at Y-12 that provide the most useful hydrologic and groundwater quality monitoring data. The technical approach is based on the GWPP status designation for each well. Under this approach, wells granted "active" status are used by the GWPP for hydrologic monitoring and/or groundwater quality sampling, whereas wells granted "inactive" status are not used for either purpose. The status designation also defines the frequency at which the GWPP will inspect applicable wells, the scope of these well inspections, and extent of any maintenance actions initiated by the GWPP. Details regarding the ancillary activities associated with implementation of this plan (e.g., well inspection) are deferred to the referenced GWPP plans. This plan applies to groundwater wells associated with Y-12 and related waste management areas and facilities located within three hydrogeologic regimes.