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Sample records for temperature-time settling treatment

  1. DOE Settles Elk Hills Equity Claims | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Settles Elk Hills Equity Claims DOE Settles Elk Hills Equity Claims April 22, 2011 - 4:58pm Addthis The Department of Energy announced today that it has settled a longstanding...

  2. DOE, Texas settle super(conducting) differences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, M.

    1994-08-02

    The US DOE agreed to pay over $200 million in cash and transfer $510 million in property to Texas to settle the state`s claims against the federal government for cancellation of the Superconducting Super Collider. This article discusses the settlement and its history and what will be done with the facilities.

  3. System and technique for ultrasonic characterization of settling suspensions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenwood, Margaret S. (Richland, WA); Panetta, Paul D. (Richland, WA); Bamberger, Judith A. (Richland, WA); Pappas, Richard A. (Richland, WA)

    2006-11-28

    A system for determining properties of settling suspensions includes a settling container, a mixer, and devices for ultrasonic interrogation transverse to the settling direction. A computer system controls operation of the mixer and the interrogation devices and records the response to the interrogating as a function of settling time, which is then used to determine suspension properties. Attenuation versus settling time for dilute suspensions, such as dilute wood pulp suspension, exhibits a peak at different settling times for suspensions having different properties, and the location of this peak is used as one mechanism for characterizing suspensions. Alternatively or in addition, a plurality of ultrasound receivers are arranged at different angles to a common transmitter to receive scattering responses at a variety of angles during particle settling. Angular differences in scattering as a function of settling time are also used to characterize the suspension.

  4. Parties agree to settle stormwater lawsuit

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/O StreamsParticipantsParties agree to settle stormwater lawsuit

  5. Physical Modeling of Spinel Crystals Settling at Low Reynolds...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    waste (HLW) vitrification process poses a potential danger to electrically heated ceramic melters. Large spinel crystals rapidly settle under gravitational attraction and...

  6. The gas temperature in circumstellar disks: effects of dust settling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zadelhoff, Gerd-Jan van

    The gas temperature in circumstellar disks: effects of dust settling F. Faas, G.J. van Zadelhoff, E distributions. The disk gas-temperature (T ¢¡¢£ ) is in general assumed to be equal to the dust-temperature (T¤¦¥ £ § ), due to collisions. Dust settling depends on both the gas and dust temperature. T

  7. TANK 4 CHARACTERIZATION, SETTLING, AND WASHING STUDIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C.; Pareizs, J.; Click, D.; Zamecnik, J.

    2009-09-29

    A sample of PUREX sludge from Tank 4 was characterized, and subsequently combined with a Tank 51 sample (Tank 51-E1) received following Al dissolution, but prior to a supernate decant by the Tank Farm, to perform a settling and washing study to support Sludge Batch 6 preparation. The sludge source for the majority of the Tank 51-E1 sample is Tank 12 HM sludge. The Tank 51-E1 sample was decanted by SRNL prior to use in the settling and washing study. The Tank 4 sample was analyzed for chemical composition including noble metals. The characterization of the Tank 51-E1 sample, used here in combination with the Tank 4 sample, was reported previously. SRNL analyses on Tank 4 were requested by Liquid Waste Engineering (LWE) via Technical Task Request (TTR) HLE-TTR-2009-103. The sample preparation work is governed by Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), and analyses were controlled by an Analytical Study Plan and modifications received via customer communications. Additional scope included a request for a settling study of decanted Tank 51-E1 and a blend of decanted Tank 51-E1 and Tank 4, as well as a washing study to look into the fate of undissolved sulfur observed during the Tank 4 characterization. The chemistry of the Tank 4 sample was modeled with OLI Systems, Inc. StreamAnalyzer to determine the likelihood that sulfate could exist in this sample as insoluble Burkeite (2Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} {center_dot} Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}). The OLI model was also used to predict the composition of the blended tank materials for the washing study. The following conclusions were drawn from the Tank 4 analytical results reported here: (1) Any projected blend of Tank 4 and the current Tank 51 contents will produce a SB6 composition that is lower in Ca and U than the current SB5 composition being processed by DWPF. (2) Unwashed Tank 4 has a relatively large initial S concentration of 3.68 wt% on a total solids basis, and approximately 10% of the total S is present as an insoluble or undissolved form. (3) There is 19% more S than can be accounted for by IC sulfate measurement. This additional soluble S is detected by ICP-AES analysis of the supernate. (4) Total supernate and slurry sulfur by ICP-AES should be monitored during washing in addition to supernate sulfate in order to avoid under estimating the amount of sulfur species removed or remaining in the supernate. (5) OLI simulation calculations show that the presence of undissolved Burkeite in the Tank 4 sample is reasonable, assuming a small difference in the Na concentration that is well within the analytical uncertainties of the reported value. The following conclusions were drawn from the blend studies of Tank 4 and decanted Tank 51-E1: (1) The addition of Tank 4 slurry to a decanted Tank 51-E1 sample significantly improved the degree and time for settling. (2) The addition of Tank 4 slurry to a decanted Tank 51-E1 sample significantly improved the plastic viscosity and yield stress. (3) The SRNL washing test, where nearly all of the wash solution was decanted from the solids, indicates that approximately 96% or more of the total S was removed from the blend in these tests, and the removal of the sulfur tracks closely with that of Na. Insoluble (undissolved) S remaining in the washed sludge was calculated from an estimate of the final slurry liquid fraction, the S result in the slurry digestion, and the S in the final decant (which was very close to the method detection limit). Based on this calculated result, about 4% of the initial total S remained after these washes; this amount is equivalent to about 18% of the initially undissolved S.

  8. Nonlinear chaos in temperature time series: Part I: Case studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaron Rosenstein; Gal Zahavi

    2012-11-27

    In this work we present 3 case studies of local temperature time series obtained from stations in Europe and Israel. The nonlinear nature of the series is presented along with model based forecasting. Data is nonlinearly filtered using high dimensional projection and analysis is performed on the filtered data. A lorenz type model of 3 first order ODEs is then fitted. Forecasts are shown for periods of 100 days ahead, outperforming any existing forecast method known today. While other models fail at forecasting periods above 11 days, ours shows remarkable stability 100 days ahead. Thus finally a local dynamical system if found for local temperature forecasting not requiring solution of Navier-Stokes equations. Thus saving computational costs.

  9. Treatment of Wood Preserving Wastewater 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reynolds, T. D.; Shack, P. A.

    1976-01-01

    procedure, solids accumulation, and miscellaneous design aspects are discussed. A treatment scheme incorporating atmospheric evaporation ponds after chemical coagulation and settling is proposed....

  10. An Approach to Understanding Cohesive Slurry Settling, Mobilization, and Hydrogen Gas Retention in Pulsed Jet Mixed Vessels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Wells, Beric E.; Fort, James A.; Meyer, Perry A.

    2009-05-22

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being designed and built to pretreat and vitrify a large portion of the waste in Hanford’s 177 underground waste storage tanks. Numerous process vessels will hold waste at various stages in the WTP. Some of these vessels have mixing-system requirements to maintain conditions where the accumulation of hydrogen gas stays below acceptable limits, and the mixing within the vessels is sufficient to release hydrogen gas under normal conditions and during off-normal events. Some of the WTP process streams are slurries of solid particles suspended in Newtonian fluids that behave as non-Newtonian slurries, such as Bingham yield-stress fluids. When these slurries are contained in the process vessels, the particles can settle and become progressively more concentrated toward the bottom of the vessels, depending on the effectiveness of the mixing system. One limiting behavior is a settled layer beneath a particle-free liquid layer. The settled layer, or any region with sufficiently high solids concentration, will exhibit non-Newtonian rheology where it is possible for the settled slurry to behave as a soft solid with a yield stress. In this report, these slurries are described as settling cohesive slurries.

  11. RHEOLOGY OF SETTLED SOLIDS IN THE SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE PROCESS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferguson, C.; Prior, M.; Koopman, D.; Edwards, T.

    2011-06-20

    The Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process is being developed to remove cesium, strontium, and actinides from Savannah River Site (SRS) Liquid Waste using an existing waste tank as process housing. This method includes the addition of monosodium titanate (MST) to a waste tank containing salt solution and entrained sludge solids, followed by tank mixing and filtration. The filtrate is then processed through in-tank ion exchange columns containing crystalline silicotitanate (CST) media. While the process is operating, it is known that solid particles begin to settle in the tank and temperatures may reach beyond 45 C. Previous testing has shown that sludge-MST slurries that sit for extended periods at elevated temperatures can develop large shear strengths, making them difficult to resuspend and remove from the tank. The authors conducted rheological testing of mixtures containing various concentrations of sludge simulant, MST, and CST (three preparations) that were aged at different times (i.e., 0 to 13 weeks) and isothermally maintained to 30, 45, or 60 C. Two types of grinding methodologies were employed to prepare CST for this testing, herein called Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) ground materials. Unground CST particles were also tested. A small number of samples were irradiated prior to 4 week settling and 60 C temperature treatment, with exposures ranging from 0 to 100 MRad. Additional tests are also being conducted that will allow the solid particles to settle at 45 C for 6, 12, and 24 months. The objectives of this task are to determine the impact of feed composition, settling time, and temperature on the shear strength, yield stress, and consistency of the slurries and to determine the impact of radiation on slurry rheology. The testing will determine the relative impact of these parameters rather than predict the shear strength, yield stress, and consistency as a function of feed and operating conditions. This document describes the rheology of slurries containing MST, CST, and simulated sludge that sat at indicated temperatures for up to 13 weeks. A previous SRNL report described preliminary rheology data of slurries containing MST and sludge. Preliminary results of the irradiation tests are also presented in this report, though additional data are still being collected. Rheology of the long term settling samples (6, 12, and 24 months) and additional irradiation test results will be reported at a later date. Conclusions from this analysis are as follows: (1) Slurries containing MST and unground CST have the largest shear strength. Due to the high shear strengths measured in slurries containing unground CST, evaluations of specific tank contents and mixing capability should be performed prior to any addition of this material into a waste tank. Experimentally determined shear strengths indicate mixing could be problematic in mixtures containing unground CST. (2) Increasing the ground CST fraction in the slurry increases the slurry shear strength, yield stress, and consistency. (3) Increasing the sludge fraction in the slurry decreases the slurry shear strength, yield stress, and consistency. (4) Slurries containing VSL ground CST have larger shear strength, yield stress, and consistency than slurries containing SRNL ground CST. (5) The effects of settling time and temperature on slurry shear strength are slurry dependent. (6) No effects of settling time and temperature on slurry yield stress or consistency were observed. (7) Radiation up to 100 MRad does not appear to affect properties of shear strength, yield stress, or consistency of process feeds.

  12. DUST TRANSPORT IN PROTOSTELLAR DISKS THROUGH TURBULENCE AND SETTLING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, N. J.; Carballido, A. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Sano, T., E-mail: neal.turner@jpl.nasa.go [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2010-01-01

    We apply ionization balance and magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) calculations to investigate whether magnetic activity moderated by recombination on dust grains can account for the mass accretion rates and the mid-infrared spectra and variability of protostellar disks. The MHD calculations use the stratified shearing-box approach and include grain settling and the feedback from the changing dust abundance on the resistivity of the gas. The two-decade spread in accretion rates among solar-mass T Tauri stars is too large to result solely from variations in the grain size and stellar X-ray luminosity, but can plausibly be produced by varying these parameters together with the disk magnetic flux. The diverse shapes and strengths of the mid-infrared silicate bands can come from the coupling of grain settling to the distribution of the magnetorotational turbulence, through the following three effects. First, recombination on grains 1 mum or smaller yields a magnetically inactive dead zone extending more than two scale heights from the midplane, while turbulent motions in the magnetically active disk atmosphere overshoot the dead zone boundary by only about one scale height. Second, grains deep in the dead zone oscillate vertically in wave motions driven by the turbulent layer above, but on average settle at the rates found in laminar flow, so that the interior of the dead zone is a particle sink and the disk atmosphere will become dust-depleted unless resupplied from elsewhere. Third, with sufficient depletion, the dead zone is thinner and mixing dredges grains off the midplane. The last of these processes enables evolutionary signatures such as the degree of settling to sometimes decrease with age. The MHD results also show that the magnetic activity intermittently lifts clouds of small grains into the atmosphere. Consequently the photosphere height changes by up to one-third over timescales of a few orbits, while the extinction along lines of sight grazing the disk surface varies by factors of 2 over times down to a tenth of an orbit. We suggest that the changing shadows cast by the dust clouds on the outer disk are a cause of the daily to monthly mid-infrared variability found in many young stars.

  13. Spiral and never-settling patterns in active suspensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X. Yang; D. Marenduzzo; M. C. Marchetti

    2013-06-18

    We present a combined numerical and analytical study of pattern formation in an active system where particles align, possess a density-dependent motility, and are subject to a logistic reaction. This is a model for suspensions of reproducing bacteria, but it can also represent, in the ordered phase, actomyosin gels in vitro or in vivo. In the disordered phase, we find that motility suppression and growth compete to yield stable or blinking patterns, which, when dense enough, acquire internal orientational ordering, to yield asters or spirals. In the ordered phase, the reaction term leads to previously unobserved never-settling patterns which can provide a simple framework to understand the formation of motile and spiral patterns in actin.

  14. Under consideration for publication in J. Fluid Mech. 1 Dynamics of particle settling and 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertozzi, Andrea L.

    resuspension in viscous liquid films 2 N. Murisic1 , B. Pausader2, D. Peschka3, A.L. Bertozzi1 3 1 Department of negatively buoyant particles on an incline. 11 Our model includes settling due to gravity and resuspension in industrial and environmental applications, the systems in- 21 volving settling and resuspension of particles

  15. Respiratory and Reproductive Characteristics of Eastern Mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki) Inhabiting a Coal Ash Settling Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkins, William A.

    ) Inhabiting a Coal Ash Settling Basin B. P. Staub, W. A. Hopkins, J. Novak, J. D. Congdon Savannah River 2002/Accepted: 29 March 2002 Abstract. Coal fly ash and effluent from coal ash settling basins viable populations in areas contaminated by coal ash. While eastern mosquitofish are present

  16. ON CENTRIFUGAL SETTLING OF POLYDISPERSE SUSPENSIONS WITH A CONTINUOUS PARTICLE SIZE DISTRIBUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bürger, Raimund

    ON CENTRIFUGAL SETTLING OF POLYDISPERSE SUSPENSIONS WITH A CONTINUOUS PARTICLE SIZE DISTRIBUTION@ucn.cl ABSTRACT Gravity or centrifugal sedimentation of polydisperse suspensions with a continuous particle size is extended to settling in a rotating tube or basket centrifuge. Numerical simulations are presented

  17. Settling Velocities of Fractal C L I F F O R D P . J O H N S O N ,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in paddle mixers and analyzed each aggregate individually for its size, porosity, and settling velocity aggregates formed in activated sludge aeration tanks and other bioreactors are also removed by settling). The equations used to model particle settling in coagulation (3) and sedimentation tanks (4) and filtration

  18. A sphere settling in a stratified fluid at small Reynolds number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yick, King-Yeung, 1978-

    2008-01-01

    We present a combined theoretical, experimental and numerical investigation of a sphere settling in a linearly stratified fluid at low Reynolds number (0.01

  19. Settling velocities of particulate systems: 14. Unified model of sedimentation, centrifugation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bürger, Raimund

    Settling velocities of particulate systems: 14. Unified model of sedimentation, centrifugation­liquid separation of flocculated suspensions including sedimentation- thickening, centrifugation and filtration. After identifying the variables and equations for each of the operations, thickening, centrifugation

  20. On the settling of clouds of particles in viscous fluids Bloen Metzger, Maxime Nicolas & Elisabeth Guazzelli

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Metzger, Bloen

    particle of radius a settles in a viscous fluid of viscosity µ, the drag force D = -6µaU exerted). The amplitude of the generated flow field decays very slowly, like the inverse of the distance to the sphere. We of particles. When two identical spheres sediment in a viscous fluid, the fluid motion induced by the fall

  1. Under consideration for publication in J. Fluid Mech. 1 Dynamics of particle settling and 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertozzi, Andrea L.

    /sedimentation due to gravity 12 as well as the resuspension of particles induced by shear-induced migration, leading resuspension in viscous liquids 2 N. Murisic1 , B. Pausader2, D. Peschka3, A.L. Bertozzi1 3 1 Department sedimentation, settling, and resuspension of particles in viscous liquids are 27 still not fully understood

  2. On gravity and centrifugal settling of polydisperse suspensions forming compressible sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bürger, Raimund

    On gravity and centrifugal settling of polydisperse suspensions forming compressible sediments is presented. The specific new element is a centrifugal configuration, which gives rise to a non-constant body numerically, and thereby to simulate centrifugation of two polydisperse suspensions. Ó 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All

  3. Retention and entrainment effects: Experiments and theory for porous spheres settling in sharply stratified fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLaughlin, Richard M.

    Retention and entrainment effects: Experiments and theory for porous spheres settling in sharply OF FLUIDS 25, 081701 (2013) Retention and entrainment effects: Experiments and theory for porous spheres of the sphere but does not capture the retention time at the density transition quantitatively. Entrainment

  4. Description of work for 100-N Hanford Generating Plant settling pond drilling and sampling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galbraith, R.P.

    1993-09-01

    This description of work details the field activities associated with borehole drilling and sampling of the 100-N Hanford Generating Plant (HGP) Settling Pond and will serve as a field guide for those performing the work. It should be used in conjunction with the Environmental Investigations and Site Characterization Manual (WHC 1988a) for specific procedures. The borehole location is shown in Figure 1. The settling pond, the dimensions of which are 40 m by 16 m (131.3 ft by 52.5 ft), is located at the HGP adjacent to the 100-N Area. The pond received process water from the plant. The water contained trace oxygen scavenging conditioners such as morpholine, hydrazine, and ammonia. Surface radioactivity readings are 150 to 500 cpm. Trace levels of surface contamination are present. Drilling and sampling will be in accordance with procedures in the EII manual (WHC 1988a).

  5. Resuspension and Settling of Monosodium Titanate and Sludge in Supernate Simulate for the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, P.A.; Mattus, C.H.

    1999-10-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is testing several methods for their effectiveness in removing the major radionuclides from the supernate solutions that are stored in the high-level waste tanks at the site. One option is to mix the tank contents (sludge and supernate), in situ, with monosodium titanate (MST) powder to remove 90Sr and transuranics. The sludge and MST would be allowed to settle, and thet reated supernate would then be decanted. The sludge and MST would need to be resuspended later so that the solids could be pumped to the Defense Waste Processing Facility for vitrification. Small-scale tests evaluated the effect of various storage conditions on the rheological properties of the sludge/MST slurry. Laboratory-scale and pilot-scale tests were conducted to determine the mixing requirements for resuspending slurries of sludge simulant and MST, following settleing periods of various lengths.`

  6. The determination of settling velocities for sewage sludge disposed at 106-Mile Site 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernandez, Daniel Saul

    1991-01-01

    THE DBTERMZNATZON OF SETTLING VELOCZTZES FOR SEWAGE SLUDGE DZSPOSED AT 106-MILE SITE A Thesis by DANIEL SAUL HERNANDEZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1991 Major Subject: Civil Engineering THB DETERMZNATZON OF SBTTLZNG VELOCZTZES FOR SEWAGE SLUDGE DZSPOSBD AT 106-MZLE SZTB A Thesis by DANIEL SAUL HERNANDEZ Approved as to style and content by: James S. Bonner '(Chair...

  7. TANK 21 AND TANK 24 BLEND AND FEED STUDY: BLENDING TIMES, SETTLING TIMES, AND TRANSFERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.; Leishear, R.; Poirier, M.

    2012-05-31

    The Salt Disposition Integration (SDI) portfolio of projects provides the infrastructure within existing Liquid Waste facilities to support the startup and long term operation of the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). Within SDI, the Blend and Feed Project will equip existing waste tanks in the Tank Farms to serve as Blend Tanks where salt solutions of up to 1.2 million gallons will be blended in 1.3 million gallon tanks and qualified for use as feedstock for SWPF. In particular, Tanks 21 and 24 are planned to be used for blending and transferring to the SDI feed tank. These tanks were evaluated here to determine blending times, to determine a range of settling times for disturbed sludge, and to determine that the SWPF Waste Acceptance Criteria that less than 1200 mg/liter of solids will be entrained in salt solutions during transfers from the Tank 21 and Tank 24 will be met. Overall conclusions for Tank 21 and Tank 24 operations include: (1) Experimental correction factors were applied to CFD (computational fluid dynamics) models to establish blending times between approximately two and five hours. As shown in Phase 2 research, blending times may be as much as ten times greater, or more, if lighter fluids are added to heavier fluids (i.e., water added to salt solution). As the densities of two salt solutions converge this effect may be minimized, but additional confirmatory research was not performed. (2) At the current sludge levels and the presently planned operating heights of the transfer pumps, solids entrainment will be less than 1200 mg/liter, assuming a conservative, slow settling sludge simulant. (3) Based on theoretical calculations, particles in the density range of 2.5 to 5.0 g/mL must be greater than 2-4 {micro}m in diameter to ensure they settle adequately in 30-60 days to meet the SWPF feed criterion (<1200 mg/l). (4) Experimental tests with sludge batch 6 simulant and field turbidity data from a recent Tank 21 mixing evolution suggest the solid particles have higher density and/or larger size than indicated by previous analysis of SRS sludge and sludge simulants. (5) Tank 21 waste characterization, laboratory settling tests, and additional field turbidity measurements during mixing evolutions are recommended to better understand potential risk for extended (> 60 days) settling times in Tank 21.

  8. An Experimental Setup to Study the Settling Behavior of Epoxy Based Fluids 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El-Mallawany, Ibrahim Ismail

    2012-07-16

    or liquid. It assumes that the settling object is a small sphere and that the difference in densities is not large. This is because Stokes? law takes into account only the viscous forces that cause drag and does not account for drag due to impact forces.... Therefore, Stokes? law only applies where Reynolds number is very low. Stokes? law is given by the following equation (Batchelor 1967) ??????.?. (1) where Fd is the drag force, ? is the fluid?s viscosity, R is the sphere?s radius and V...

  9. Noble Metals and Spinel Settling in High Level Waste Glass Melters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sundaram, S. K.; Perez, Joseph M.

    2000-09-30

    In the continuing effort to support the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the noble metals issue is addressed. There is an additional concern about the amount of noble metals expected to be present in the future batches that will be considered for vitrification in the DWPF. Several laboratory, as well as melter-scale, studies have been completed by various organizations (mainly PNNL, SRTC, and WVDP in the USA). This letter report statuses the noble metals issue and focuses at the settling of noble metals in melters.

  10. Final Report - Crystal Settling, Redox, and High Temperature Properties of ORP HLW and LAW Glasses, VSL-09R1510-1, Rev. 0, dated 6/18/09

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruger, Albert A.; Wang, C.; Gan, H.; Pegg, I. L.; Chaudhuri, M.; Kot, W.; Feng, Z.; Viragh, C.; McKeown, D. A.; Joseph, I.; Muller, I. S.; Cecil, R.; Zhao, W.

    2013-11-13

    The radioactive tank waste treatment programs at the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) have featured joule heated ceramic melter technology for the vitrification of high level waste (HLW). The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) employs this same basic technology not only for the vitrification of HLW streams but also for the vitrification of Low Activity Waste (LAW) streams. Because of the much greater throughput rates required of the WTP as compared to the vitrification facilities at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) or the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the WTP employs advanced joule heated melters with forced mixing of the glass pool (bubblers) to improve heat and mass transport and increase melting rates. However, for both HLW and LAW treatment, the ability to increase waste loadings offers the potential to significantly reduce the amount of glass that must be produced and disposed and, therefore, the overall project costs. This report presents the results from a study to investigate several glass property issues related to WTP HLW and LAW vitrification: crystal formation and settling in selected HLW glasses; redox behavior of vanadium and chromium in selected LAW glasses; and key high temperature thermal properties of representative HLW and LAW glasses. The work was conducted according to Test Plans that were prepared for the HLW and LAW scope, respectively. One part of this work thus addresses some of the possible detrimental effects due to considerably higher crystal content in waste glass melts and, in particular, the impact of high crystal contents on the flow property of the glass melt and the settling rate of representative crystalline phases in an environment similar to that of an idling glass melter. Characterization of vanadium redox shifts in representative WTP LAW glasses is the second focal point of this work. The third part of this work focused on key high temperature thermal properties of representative WTP HLW and LAW glasses over a wide range of temperatures, from the melter operating temperature to the glass transition.

  11. APS/123-QED A Theory for Particle Settling and Shear-Induced Migration in Thin Film Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferguson, Thomas S.

    APS/123-QED A Theory for Particle Settling and Shear-Induced Migration in Thin Film Flow Benjamin P the film depth, unlike Zhou et al.'s model. Average velocities for the liquid and particulate phases are computed, and the implications for phase separation are discussed. It is found that the equilibrium depth

  12. Influence of sediment settling velocity on mechanistic soil erosion H. J. Tromp-van Meerveld,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    -Rose erosion model were rewritten to account for infiltration. The newly collected data were used to test the model under conditions that had not been explored before (steeper slopes, infiltration, more realistic with the optimized settling velocities. This study moves the Hairsine-Rose model another step closer

  13. CX-002880: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Preparation, Irradiation, and Temperature-Time Settling Treatment of Rheology SamplesCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 06/09/2010Location(s): Aiken, South CarolinaOffice(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office

  14. CX-009625: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Preparation and Temperature-Time Settling Treatment of Rheology Samples CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 10/25/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  15. End Uses Mechanical Properties Settled By The Modified Sintering Conditions Of The Metal Injection Molding Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marray, Tarek [Laboratoire Materiaux, ECAM, 40 montee Saint Barthelemy, 69321, Lyon, Cedex 05 (France); Arts et Metiers ParisTech, MecaSurf Laboratory (EA 4496), 2, Cours des Arts et Metiers, 13617 Aix en Provence (France); Jaccquet, Philippe; Moinard-Checot, Delphine [Laboratoire Materiaux, ECAM, 40 montee Saint Barthelemy, 69321, Lyon, Cedex 05 (France); Arts et Metiers ParisTech, LaBoMaP, Rue Porte de Paris, 71250 CLUNY (France); Fabre, Agnes; Barrallier, Laurent [Arts et Metiers ParisTech, MecaSurf Laboratory (EA 4496), 2, Cours des Arts et Metiers, 13617 Aix en Provence (France)

    2011-01-17

    Most common mechanical applications require parts with specific properties as hard faced features. It is well known that treating parts under suitable atmospheres may improve hardness and strength yield of steels. Heat treatment process and more particularly thermo-chemical diffusion processes (such as carburizing or its variation: carbonitriding) can be performed to reach the industrial hardness profile requirements. In this work, a low-alloyed steel feedstock based on water soluble binder system is submitted to the MIM process steps (including injection molding, debinding and sintering). As-sintered parts are then treated under a low pressure carbonitriding treatment. This contribution focuses on preliminary results such as microstructural analyses and mechanical properties which are established at each stage of the process to determine and monitor changes.

  16. DEMONSTRATION OF MIXING AND TRANSFERRING SETTLING COHESIVE SLURRY SIMULANTS IN THE AY-102 TANK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamson, D.; Gauglitz, P.

    2012-01-03

    In support of Hanford's feed delivery of high level waste (HLW) to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), pilot-scale testing and demonstrations with simulants containing cohesive particles were performed as a joint collaboration between Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) staff. The objective of the demonstrations was to determine the impact that cohesive particle interactions in the simulants, and the resulting non-Newtonian rheology, have on tank mixing and batch transfer of large and dense seed particles. The work addressed the impacts cohesive simulants have on mixing and batch transfer performance in a pilot-scale system. Kaolin slurries with a range of wt% concentrations to vary the Bingham yield stress were used in all the non-Newtonian simulants. To study the effects of just increasing the liquid viscosity (no yield stress) on mixing and batch transfers, a glycerol/water mixture was used. Stainless steel 100 micron particles were used as seed particles due to their density and their contrasting color to the kaolin and glycerol. In support of Hanford's waste certification and delivery of tank waste to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked by Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) to evaluate the effectiveness of mixing and transferring tank waste in a Double Shell Tank (DST) to the WTP Receipt Tank. The work addresses the impacts cohesive simulants have on mixing and batch transfer performance. This work is follow-on to the previous tasks 'Demonstration of Mixer Jet Pump Rotational Sensitivity on Mixing and Transfers of the AY-102 Tank' and 'Demonstration of Simulated Waste Transfers from Tank AY-102 to the Hanford Waste Treatment Facility'. The cohesive simulants were investigated and selected jointly by SRNL and PNNL and a white paper was written on this evaluation. The testing and demonstrations of cohesive simulants was a joint effort performed as collaboration between SRNL and PNNL staff. The objective of the demonstrations was to determine the impact that cohesive particle interactions in the simulants have on tank mixing using the 1/22nd scale mixing system and batch transfer of seed particles. Seed particles are particles of contracting color added to mixing tank for visual inspection and an indicator of how well the contents of the tank are mixing. Also the seed particles serve as a measuring stick for how well the contents of the tank are transferred from the mixing tank during batch transfers. This testing is intended to provide supporting evidence to the assumption that Hanford Small Scale Mixing Demonstration (SSMD) testing in water is conservative.

  17. Research on jet mixing of settled sludges in nuclear waste tanks at Hanford and other DOE sites: A historical perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, M.R.; Onishi, Y.; Shekarriz, R.

    1997-09-01

    Jet mixer pumps will be used in the Hanford Site double-shell tanks to mobilize and mix the settled solids layer (sludge) with the tank supernatant liquid. Predicting the performance of the jet mixer pumps has been the subject of analysis and testing at Hanford and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) waste sites. One important aspect of mixer pump performance is sludge mobilization. The research that correlates mixer pump design and operation with the extent of sludge mobilization is the subject of this report. Sludge mobilization tests have been conducted in tanks ranging from 1/25-scale (3 ft-diameter) to full scale have been conducted at Hanford and other DOE sites over the past 20 years. These tests are described in Sections 3.0 and 4.0 of this report. The computational modeling of sludge mobilization and mixing that has been performed at Hanford is discussed in Section 5.0.

  18. Demonstration of Mixing and Transferring Settling Cohesive Slurry Simulants in the AY-102 Tank - 12323

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamson, Duane J.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.

    2012-07-01

    In support of Hanford's feed delivery of high level waste (HLW) to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), pilot-scale testing and demonstrations with simulants containing cohesive particles were performed as a joint collaboration between Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) staff. The objective of the demonstrations was to determine the impact that cohesive particle interactions in the simulants, and the resulting non- Newtonian rheology, have on tank mixing and batch transfer of large and dense seed particles. The work addressed the impacts cohesive simulants have on mixing and batch transfer performance in a pilot-scale system. Kaolin slurries with a range of wt% concentrations to vary the Bingham yield stress were used in all the non-Newtonian simulants. To study the effects of just increasing the liquid viscosity (no yield stress) on mixing and batch transfers, a glycerol/water mixture was used. Stainless steel 100 micron particles were used as seed particles due to their density and their contrasting color to the kaolin and glycerol. Testing results show that water always transfers less seed particles, and is conservative when compared to fluids with a higher yield stress and/or higher viscosity at the same mixing/transfer parameters. The impact of non-Newtonian fluid properties depends on the magnitude of the yield stress. A higher yield stress in the carrier fluid resulted in more seed particles being transferred to the RTs. A dimensional analysis highlighting the role of a yield stress (due to cohesive particle interactions) defined four regions of behavior and indicates how the results obtained in this study can be applied to the full-scale mixing behavior of a high level waste tank. The analysis indicates that the regions of behavior for full-scale mixing have been adequately represented by the current small-scale tests. (authors)

  19. Since Iceland was settled 1100 y ago, declines in vegetated land cover has been accompanied by severe wind and water erosion. Interaction of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Archer, Steven R.

    Since Iceland was settled 1100 y ago, declines in vegetated land cover has been accompanied microtopography (i.e. hummock shape and size). DEGRADATION OF ICELANDIC RANGELANDS: PROCESSESS AND PROPERTIES J&M University, College Station, 2Soil Conservation Service, Gunnarsholt, Iceland, 3Agricultural Research

  20. DEMONSTRATION OF MIXING AND TRANSFERRING SETTLING COHESIVE SLURRY SIMULANTS IN THE AY-102 TANK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamson, D.

    2011-08-04

    In support of Hanford's waste certification and delivery of tank waste to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked by the Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) to evaluate the effectiveness of mixing and transferring tank waste in a Double Shell Tank (DST) to the WTP Receipt Tank. The work discussed in this report (Phase III) address the impacts cohesive simulants have on mixing and batch transfer performance. The objective of the demonstrations performed in Phase III was to determine the impact that cohesive particle interactions in the simulants have on tank mixing using 1/22{sup nd} scale mixing system and batch transfer of seed particles. This testing is intended to provide supporting evidence to the assumption that Hanford Small Scale Mixing Demonstration (SSMD) testing in water is conservative. The batch transfers were made by pumping the simulants from the Mixing Demonstration Tank (MDT) to six Receipt Tanks (RTs), and the consistency in the amount of seed particles in each batch was compared. Tests were conducted with non-Newtonian cohesive simulants with Bingham yield stress ranging from 0.3 Pa to 7 Pa. Kaolin clay and 100 {mu}m stainless steel seed particles were used for all the non-Newtonian simulants. To specifically determine the role of the yield stress on mixing and batch transfer, tests were conducted with a Newtonian mixture of glycerol and water with at viscosity of 6.2 cP that was selected to match the Bingham consistency (high shear rate viscosity) of the higher yield stress kaolin slurries. The water/glycerol mixtures used the same 100 {mu}m stainless steel seed particles. For the transfer demonstrations in Phase III, the mixer jet pumps were operated either at 10.0 gpm (28 ft/s nozzle velocity, U{sub o}D=0.63 ft{sup 2}/s) or 8.0 gpm (22.4 ft/s nozzle velocity, U{sub o}D=0.504 ft{sup 2}/s). All batch transfers from the MDT to the RTs were made at 0.58 gpm (MDT suction velocity 3.95 ft/s). The demonstrations that used simulants that ranged from 1.6 Pa to 7 Pa yield stress had the most successful batch transfer of solids to the RTs in terms of the total quantity of seed particles transferred. Testing suggest that when mixing water/seed particles and transferring, water provides the least desired batch transfer of solids based on the total quantity transferred. For the water tests, large dead zones of solids formed in the MDT and fewer solids get transferred to the RTs. For simulants with a yield stress of 0.3 Pa and below, the batch transfer behavior in terms of total transfer of seed particles was slightly higher than water test results. The testing did show somewhat more batch-to-batch variation in the transfer of seed particles with the slurries in comparison to water. A comparison of batch transfers with the kaolin slurries that had Bingham consistencies (viscosities) that wernearly the same as the Newtonian glycerol/water mixtures showed that the kaolin slurries with Bingham yield stresses of 1.6 and 7 Pa gave better batch transfer of seed particles based on the total quantities transferred. Overall, the batch transfer testing results show that testing with water is conservative, since using a simulant with a yield stress and/or elevated viscosity always resulted in a better total transfer of solids.

  1. SLUDGE BATCH 7 (SB7) WASHING DEMONSTRATION TO DETERMINE SULFATE/OXALATE REMOVAL EFFICIENCY AND SETTLING BEHAVIOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reboul, S.; Click, D.; Lambert, D.

    2010-12-10

    To support Sludge Batch 7 (SB7) washing, a demonstration of the proposed Tank Farm washing operation was performed utilizing a real-waste test slurry generated from Tank 4, 7, and 12 samples. The purpose of the demonstration was twofold: (1) to determine the settling time requirements and washing strategy needed to bring the SB7 slurry to the desired endpoint; and (2) to determine the impact of washing on the chemical and physical characteristics of the sludge, particularly those of sulfur content, oxalate content, and rheology. Seven wash cycles were conducted over a four month period to reduce the supernatant sodium concentration to approximately one molar. The long washing duration was due to the slow settling of the sludge and the limited compaction. Approximately 90% of the sulfur was removed through washing, and the vast majority of the sulfur was determined to be soluble from the start. In contrast, only about half of the oxalate was removed through washing, as most of the oxalate was initially insoluble and did not partition to the liquid phase until the latter washes. The final sulfur concentration was 0.45 wt% of the total solids, and the final oxalate concentration was 9,900 mg/kg slurry. More oxalate could have been removed through additional washing, although the washing would have reduced the supernatant sodium concentration.The yield stress of the final washed sludge (35 Pa) was an order of magnitude higher than that of the unwashed sludge ({approx}4 Pa) and was deemed potentially problematic. The high yield stress was related to the significant increase in insoluble solids that occurred ({approx}8 wt% to {approx}18 wt%) as soluble solids and water were removed from the slurry. Reduction of the insoluble solids concentration to {approx}14 wt% was needed to reduce the yield stress to an acceptable level. However, depending on the manner that the insoluble solids adjustment was performed, the final sodium concentration and extent of oxalate removal would be prone to change. As such, the strategy for completing the final wash cycle is integral to maintaining the proper balance of chemical and physical requirements.

  2. EFFECTS OF DUST GROWTH AND SETTLING ON THE IONIZATION BY RADIONUCLIDES. I. FORMULATION AND RESULTS IN A QUIESCENT STATE OF PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Umebayashi, Toyoharu; Katsuma, Norihito; Nomura, Hideko

    2013-02-10

    We investigate the evolution of the ionization rates by the decay of radionuclides in protoplanetary disks at the early stage of planet formation where size growth and settling of dust particles proceed extensively. Because most of the nuclides to ionize gas, such as short-lived nuclide {sup 26}Al and long-lived one {sup 40}K, are refractory elements, they are contained in the solid material of dust particles. Thus, the ionization by these nuclides is affected by the following three processes: (1) the change of the relative abundance of dust particles due to the settling toward the midplane of the disk, (2) the energy loss of emitted energetic particles inside the solid material of dust particles, and (3) the absorption of energetic particles by the other dust particles located nearby. In this series of papers we comprehensively investigate the basic physical processes, calculate the settling and size growth of dust particles numerically, and clarify the evolution of the ionization rates relative to their initial values in various disk models at this stage. In this paper we investigate the energy-loss processes concerning dust particles, formulate the coalescence equation for settling particles, and apply them to quiescent disk models that are similar to the solar nebula. For simplicity, dust particles are assumed to be compact spheres that remain perfect sticking for mutual collisions. Because the settling of dust particles is not appreciable in the first 10{sup 3} yr, the ionization rate varies little except in the outermost part near the disk surface. As the settling proceeds, the rate around the midplane increases considerably. The maximum ionization rates by {sup 26}Al in the minimum mass solar nebula are about 100, 51, and 14 times larger than their initial values for the orbits R = 0.5, 1, and 5 AU, respectively, which are close to or exceed the ionization rate by cosmic ray in the interstellar medium. The rates by {sup 40}K also increase by factors of about 36, 19, and 5 at the same orbits. In the inner orbital regions, these rates exceed the rates by the attenuated cosmic rays by an order of magnitude. The rates in the residual parts decrease extensively as time goes by, because amounts of the floating dust particles decrease continuously.

  3. The mutagenic potential of soil and runoff water from land treatment of three hazardous industrial wastes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davol, Phebe

    1987-01-01

    compounds in the environment. Dibble and Bartha (1979) observed an increase in concentration of condensed ring fractions as oily wastes degrade in soil. The accumulation of PNAs in the soil at a land treatment facility is of concern since many... pentachlorophenol and creosote as preservative agents. The effluent from the treatment process was pumped from a concrete storage basin to a large lagoon where the solids were allowed to settle while the liquids evaporated. At the ti me the waste was collected...

  4. SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT COST COMPARISON BETWEEN HYDRAULIC LOADING AND SMALL CANISTER LOADING CONCEPTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GEUTHER J; CONRAD EA; RHOADARMER D

    2009-08-24

    The Sludge Treatment Project (STP) is considering two different concepts for the retrieval, loading, transport and interim storage of the K Basin sludge. The two design concepts under consideration are: (1) Hydraulic Loading Concept - In the hydraulic loading concept, the sludge is retrieved from the Engineered Containers directly into the Sludge Transport and Storage Container (STSC) while located in the STS cask in the modified KW Basin Annex. The sludge is loaded via a series of transfer, settle, decant, and filtration return steps until the STSC sludge transportation limits are met. The STSC is then transported to T Plant and placed in storage arrays in the T Plant canyon cells for interim storage. (2) Small Canister Concept - In the small canister concept, the sludge is transferred from the Engineered Containers (ECs) into a settling vessel. After settling and decanting, the sludge is loaded underwater into small canisters. The small canisters are then transferred to the existing Fuel Transport System (FTS) where they are loaded underwater into the FTS Shielded Transfer Cask (STC). The STC is raised from the basin and placed into the Cask Transfer Overpack (CTO), loaded onto the trailer in the KW Basin Annex for transport to T Plant. At T Plant, the CTO is removed from the transport trailer and placed on the canyon deck. The CTO and STC are opened and the small canisters are removed using the canyon crane and placed into an STSC. The STSC is closed, and placed in storage arrays in the T Plant canyon cells for interim storage. The purpose of the cost estimate is to provide a comparison of the two concepts described.

  5. 4-70C Propane (molar mass = 44.1 kg/kmol) poses a greater fire danger than methane (molar mass = 16 kg/kmol) since propane is heavier than air (molar mass = 29 kg/kmol), and it will settle near the floor.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    4-36 Ideal Gas 4-70C Propane (molar mass = 44.1 kg/kmol) poses a greater fire danger than methane (molar mass = 16 kg/kmol) since propane is heavier than air (molar mass = 29 kg/kmol), and it will settle

  6. Waste Treatment Plant Overview

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    contracted Bechtel National, Inc., to design and build the world's largest radioactive waste treatment plant. The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), also known as the...

  7. Technology for Treatment of Liquid Radioactive Waste Generated during Uranium and Plutonium Chemical and Metallurgical Manufacturing in FSUE PO Mayak - 13616

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamovich, D. [SUE MosSIA Radon, 2/14 7th Rostovsky lane, Moscow, 119121 (Russian Federation)] [SUE MosSIA Radon, 2/14 7th Rostovsky lane, Moscow, 119121 (Russian Federation); Batorshin, G.; Logunov, M.; Musalnikov, A. [FSUE 'PO Mayak', 31 av. Lenin, Ozyorsk, Chelyabinsk region, 456780 (Russian Federation)] [FSUE 'PO Mayak', 31 av. Lenin, Ozyorsk, Chelyabinsk region, 456780 (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-01

    Created technological scheme for treatment of liquid radioactive waste generated while uranium and plutonium chemical and metallurgical manufacturing consists of: - Liquid radioactive waste (LRW) purification from radionuclides and its transfer into category of manufacturing waste; - Concentration of suspensions containing alpha-nuclides and their further conversion to safe dry state (calcinate) and moving to long controlled storage. The following technologies are implemented in LRW treatment complex: - Settling and filtering technology for treatment of liquid intermediate-level waste (ILW) with volume about 1500m{sup 3}/year and alpha-activity from 10{sup 6} to 10{sup 8} Bq/dm{sup 3} - Membrane and sorption technology for processing of low-level waste (LLW) of radioactive drain waters with volume about 150 000 m{sup 3}/year and alpha-activity from 10{sup 3} to 10{sup 4} Bq/dm{sup 3}. Settling and filtering technology includes two stages of ILW immobilization accompanied with primary settling of radionuclides on transition metal hydroxides with the following flushing and drying of the pulp generated; secondary deep after settling of radionuclides on transition metal hydroxides with the following solid phase concentration by the method of tangential flow ultrafiltration. Besides, the installation capacity on permeate is not less than 3 m{sup 3}/h. Concentrates generated are sent to calcination on microwave drying (MW drying) unit. Membrane and sorption technology includes processing of averaged sewage flux by the method of tangential flow ultrafiltration with total capacity of installations on permeate not less than 18 m{sup 3}/h and sorption extraction of uranium from permeate on anionite. According to radionuclide contamination level purified solution refers to general industrial waste. Concentrates generated during suspension filtering are evaporated in rotary film evaporator (RFE) in order to remove excess water, thereafter they are dried on infrared heating facility. Solid concentrate produced is sent for long controlled storage. Complex of the procedures carried out makes it possible to solve problems on treatment of LRW generated while uranium and plutonium chemical and metallurgical manufacturing in Federal State Unitary Enterprise (FSUE) Mayak and cease its discharge into open water reservoirs. (authors)

  8. Settling Multiple Debts: Lesson Plan Tom Verhoeff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verhoeff, Tom

    plants, . . . 3. The notion of a person's balance, and how to calculate them 4. How to state the problem? 5. What input is given? A list of transfers 6. What output is to be produced? For small groups

  9. Furnace Litigation Settled | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof Energy Services »Information Resources

  10. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Aerobic Treatment Unit 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-10-31

    Aerobic units treat wastewater using the same process, only scaled down, as municipal wastewater treatment systems. This publication explains how aerobic units work, what their design requirements are, and how to maintain them....

  11. DETECTING REGIMES IN TEMPERATURE TIME SERIES PATRICK J. CLEMINS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Povinelli, Richard J.

    , such as the northern hemisphere during the winter, tend to follow a regime structure. The El Nino cycle, which has two

  12. Emergency Medical Treatment Required

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McQuade, D. Tyler

    Emergency Medical Treatment Required Non-Emergency Medical Treatment Required If possible, get help from colleague or supervisor Call 911 or go to hospital emergency room (for chemical exposure, bring Investigation Report" to Environmental Health & Safety within 48 hours Emergency Medical Treatment Required

  13. Radioactive Water Treatment at a United States Environmental Protection Agency Superfund Site - 12322

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beckman, John C.

    2012-07-01

    A water treatment system at a United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Superfund site impacted by radiological contaminants is used to treat water entering the site. The United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is actively managing the remedial action for the USEPA using contracts to support the multiple activities on site. The site is where former gas mantle production facilities operated around the turn of the century. The manufacturing facilities used thorium ores to develop the mantles and disposed of off-specification mantles and ore residuals in the surrounding areas. During Site remedial actions, both groundwater and surface water comes into contact with contaminated soils and must be collected and treated at an on-site treatment facility. The radionuclides thorium and radium with associated progeny are the main concern for treatment. Suspended solids, volatile organic compounds, and select metals are also monitored during water treatment. The water treatment process begins were water is pumped to a collection tank where debris and grit settle out. Stored water is pumped to a coagulant tank containing poly-aluminum chloride to collect dissolved solids. The water passes into a reaction tube where aspirated air is added or reagent added to remove Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC'S) by mass transfer and convert dissolved iron to a solid. The water enters the flocculent polymer tank to drop solids out. The flocculated water overflows to a fluidized bed contact chamber to increase precipitation. Flocculation is where colloids of material drop out of suspension and settle. The settled solids are periodically removed and disposed of as radioactive waste. The water is passed through filters and an ion exchange process to extract the radionuclides. Several million liters of water are processed each year from two water treatment plants servicing different areas of the remediation site. Ion exchange resin and filter material are periodically replaced and disposed of as radioactive waste. A total of 0.85 m{sup 3} of waste sludge per year requires disposal on average, in addition to another 6.6 m{sup 3} of waste cartridge filters. All water discharges are regulated by a state of New Jersey Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Permit implemented by the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (Clean Water Act). Laboratory analyses are required to satisfy requirements of the state NPDES permit. Specific monitoring parameters and discharge rates will be provided. Use of the water treatment systems drastically reduces the amount of contaminated water requiring solidification and water disposal to near zero. Millions of liters of potentially contaminated water from excavation activities is treated and released within permit limits. A small volume of solid radioactive waste (21 cubic meters) is generated annually from water treatment process operations. Management of ground and surface water is effectively controlled in remediation areas by the use of sumps, erosion control measures and pumping of water to storage vessels. Continued excavations can be made as water impacting the site is effectively controlled. (authors)

  14. Fate of As, Se, and Hg in a Passive Integrated System for Treatment of Fossil Plant Wastewater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terry Yost; Paul Pier; Gregory Brodie

    2007-12-31

    TVA is collaborating with EPRI and DOE to demonstrate a passive treatment system for removing SCR-derived ammonia and trace elements from a coal-fired power plant wastewater stream. The components of the integrated system consist of trickling filters for ammonia oxidation, reaction cells containing zero-valent iron (ZVI) for trace contaminant removal, a settling basin for storage of iron hydroxide floc, and anaerobic vertical-flow wetlands for biological denitrification. The passive integrated treatment system will treat up to 0.25 million gallons per day (gpd) of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) pond effluent, with a configuration requiring only gravity flow to obviate the need for pumps. The design of the system will enable a comparative evaluation of two parallel treatment trains, with and without the ZVI extraction trench and settling/oxidation basin components. One of the main objectives is to gain a better understanding of the chemical transformations that species of trace elements such as arsenic, selenium, and mercury undergo as they are treated in passive treatment system components with differing environmental conditions. This progress report details the design criteria for the passive integrated system for treating fossil power plant wastewater as well as performance results from the first several months of operation. Engineering work on the project has been completed, and construction took place during the summer of 2005. Monitoring of the passive treatment system was initiated in October 2005 and continued until May 18 2006. The results to date indicate that the treatment system is effective in reducing levels of nitrogen compounds and trace metals. Concentrations of both ammonia and trace metals were lower than expected in the influent FGD water, and additions to increase these concentrations will be done in the future to further test the removal efficiency of the treatment system. In May 2006, the wetland cells were drained of FGD water, refilled with less toxic ash pond water, and replanted due to low survival rates from the first planting the previous summer. The goals of the TVA-EPRI-DOE collaboration include building a better understanding of the chemical transformations that trace elements such as arsenic, selenium, and mercury undergo as they are treated in a passive treatment system, and to evaluate the performance of a large-scale replicated passive treatment system to provide additional design criteria and economic factors.

  15. Treatment-resistant pyoderma gangrenosum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kosari, Payman; Feldman, Steven R

    2012-01-01

    of compliance with psoriasis treatment. J Cutan Med Surg .in the treatment of psoriasis: a systematic review.acid gel for plaque psoriasis treatment. Arch Dermatol 141(

  16. Considering biomedical/CAM treatments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, JX; Widjaja, F; Choi, JE; Hendren, RL

    2013-01-01

    and possible use of biomedical CAM treatments, including24 April 2013 ? 6:40 pm Biomedical Complementary Treatment24 April 2013 ? 6:40 pm Biomedical Complementary Treatment

  17. Advances in Psoriasis Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feldman, Steven R

    2000-01-01

    population of patients with psoriasis. Cutis 58 (3):216-220,The economic impact of psoriasis increases with psoriasisterm cyclosporin treatment of psoriasis [see comments]. Br J

  18. SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT ENGINEERED CONTAINER RETRIEVAL AND TRANSFER SYSTEM PRELMINARY DESIGN HAZARD AND OPERABILITY STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CARRO CA

    2011-07-15

    This Hazard and Operability (HAZOP) study addresses the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) Engineered Container Retrieval and Transfer System (ECRTS) preliminary design for retrieving sludge from underwater engineered containers located in the 105-K West (KW) Basin, transferring the sludge as a sludge-water slurry (hereafter referred to as 'slurry') to a Sludge Transport and Storage Container (STSC) located in a Modified KW Basin Annex, and preparing the STSC for transport to T Plant using the Sludge Transport System (STS). There are six, underwater engineered containers located in the KW Basin that, at the time of sludge retrieval, will contain an estimated volume of 5.2 m{sup 3} of KW Basin floor and pit sludge, 18.4 m{sup 3} of 105-K East (KE) Basin floor, pit, and canister sludge, and 3.5 m{sup 3} of settler tank sludge. The KE and KW Basin sludge consists of fuel corrosion products (including metallic uranium, and fission and activation products), small fuel fragments, iron and aluminum oxide, sand, dirt, operational debris, and biological debris. The settler tank sludge consists of sludge generated by the washing of KE and KW Basin fuel in the Primary Clean Machine. A detailed description of the origin of sludge and its chemical and physical characteristics can be found in HNF-41051, Preliminary STP Container and Settler Sludge Process System Description and Material Balance. In summary, the ECRTS retrieves sludge from the engineered containers and hydraulically transfers it as a slurry into an STSC positioned within a trailer-mounted STS cask located in a Modified KW Basin Annex. The slurry is allowed to settle within the STSC to concentrate the solids and clarify the supernate. After a prescribed settling period the supernate is decanted. The decanted supernate is filtered through a sand filter and returned to the basin. Subsequent batches of slurry are added to the STSC, settled, and excess supernate removed until the prescribed quantity of sludge is collected. The sand filter is then backwashed into the STSC. The STSC and STS cask are then inerted and transported to T Plant.

  19. Thermal treatment wall

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aines, Roger D. (Livermore, CA); Newmark, Robin L. (Livermore, CA); Knauss, Kevin G. (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A thermal treatment wall emplaced to perform in-situ destruction of contaminants in groundwater. Thermal destruction of specific contaminants occurs by hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation at temperatures achievable by existing thermal remediation techniques (electrical heating or steam injection) in the presence of oxygen or soil mineral oxidants, such as MnO.sub.2. The thermal treatment wall can be installed in a variety of configurations depending on the specific objectives, and can be used for groundwater cleanup, wherein in-situ destruction of contaminants is carried out rather than extracting contaminated fluids to the surface, where they are to be cleaned. In addition, the thermal treatment wall can be used for both plume interdiction and near-wellhead in-situ groundwater treatment. Thus, this technique can be utilized for a variety of groundwater contamination problems.

  20. Medical Actinium Therapeutic Treatment

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-28

    Learn how INL researchers are increasing world supplies of Bismuth 213 to help with cancer treatments. For more information about INL research projects, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  1. Portable treatment systems study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherick, M.J.; Schwinkendorf, W.E.; Bechtold, T.E.; Cole, L.T.

    1997-03-01

    In developing their Site Treatment Plans (STPs), many of the Department of Energy installations identified some form of portable treatment, to facilitate compliant disposition of select mixed low-level wastestreams. The Environmental Management Office of Science and Technology requested that a systems study be performed to better define the potential role of portable treatment with respect to mixed low-level waste, highlight obstacles to implementation, and identify opportunities for future research and development emphasis. The study was performed by first establishing a representative set of mixed waste, then formulating portable treatment system concepts to meet the required processing needs for these wastes. The portable systems that were conceptualized were evaluated and compared to a fixed centralized treatment alternative. The system evaluations include a life-cycle cost analysis and an assessment of regulatory, institutional, and technical issues associated with the potential use of portable systems. The results of this study show that when all costs are included, there are no significant cost differences between portable systems and fixed systems. However, it is also emphasized that many uncertainties exist that could impact the cost of implementing portable treatment systems. Portable treatment could be made more attractive through private sector implementation, although there is little economic incentive for a commercial vendor to develop small, specialized treatment capabilities with limited applicability. Alternatively, there may also be valid reasons why fixed units cannot be used for some problematic wastestreams. In any event, there are some site-specific problems that still need to be addressed, and there may be some opportunity for research and development to make a positive impact in these areas.

  2. Treatment Deployment Evaluation Tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rynearson, Michael Ardel; Plum, Martin Michael

    1999-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the final disposition of legacy spent nuclear fuel (SNF). As a response, DOE's National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP) has been given the responsibility for the disposition of DOE -owned SNF. Many treatment technologies have been identified to treat some forms of SNF so that the resulting treated product is acceptable by the disposition site. One of these promising treatment processes is the electrometallurgical treatment (EMT) currently in development; a second is an Acid Wash Decladding process. The NSNFP has been tasked with identifying possible strategies for the deployment of these treatment processes in the event that the treatment path is deemed necessary. To support the siting studies of these strategies, economic evaluations are being performed to identify the least-cost deployment path. This model (tool) was developed to consider the full scope of costs, technical feasibility, process material disposition, and schedule attributes over the life of each deployment alternative. Using standard personal computer (PC) software, the model was developed as a comprehensive technology economic assessment tool using a Life-Cycle Cost (LCC) analysis methodology. Model development was planned as a systematic, iterative process of identifying and bounding the required activities to dispose of SNF. To support the evaluation process, activities are decomposed into lower level, easier to estimate activities. Sensitivity studies can then be performed on these activities, defining cost issues and testing results against the originally stated problem.

  3. 11/17/11 Treatment Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    wastewater treatment faciliOes, combined sewer overflows, municipal stormwater, industry ­ Wastewater treatment ­ Stormwater treatment ­ Flood control ConvenOonal Wastewater Treatment · Primary Treatment ­ grit and solids removal · Secondary Treatment

  4. Fate of Radionuclides in Wastewater Treatment Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shabani Samgh Abadi, Farzaneh

    2013-01-01

    by Aerobic Treatment. Journal (Water Pollution ControlWastewater Treatment Plants. Journal (Water Pollution

  5. Heat treatment furnace

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seals, Roland D; Parrott, Jeffrey G; DeMint, Paul D; Finney, Kevin R; Blue, Charles T

    2014-10-21

    A furnace heats through both infrared radiation and convective air utilizing an infrared/purge gas design that enables improved temperature control to enable more uniform treatment of workpieces. The furnace utilizes lamps, the electrical end connections of which are located in an enclosure outside the furnace chamber, with the lamps extending into the furnace chamber through openings in the wall of the chamber. The enclosure is purged with gas, which gas flows from the enclosure into the furnace chamber via the openings in the wall of the chamber so that the gas flows above and around the lamps and is heated to form a convective mechanism in heating parts.

  6. TREATMENT SYSTEMS AN INTEGRATED APPROACH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for on-site management and treatment of effluent and solid waste 3. Provide for surface water attenuationECOLOGICAL TREATMENT SYSTEMS AN INTEGRATED APPROACH TO THE TREATMENT OF WASTE AND WASTE WATER In nature there is no waste, because the waste of one organism is food for another Inherent

  7. Integrated nonthermal treatment system study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biagi, C.; Bahar, D.; Teheranian, B.; Vetromile, J. [Morrison Knudsen Corp. (United States); Quapp, W.J. [Nuclear Metals (United States); Bechtold, T.; Brown, B.; Schwinkendorf, W. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Swartz, G. [Swartz and Associates (United States)

    1997-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study of nonthermal treatment technologies. The study consisted of a systematic assessment of five nonthermal treatment alternatives. The treatment alternatives consist of widely varying technologies for safely destroying the hazardous organic components, reducing the volume, and preparing for final disposal of the contact-handled mixed low-level waste (MLLW) currently stored in the US Department of Energy complex. The alternatives considered were innovative nonthermal treatments for organic liquids and sludges, process residue, soil and debris. Vacuum desorption or various washing approaches are considered for treatment of soil, residue and debris. Organic destruction methods include mediated electrochemical oxidation, catalytic wet oxidation, and acid digestion. Other methods studied included stabilization technologies and mercury separation of treatment residues. This study is a companion to the integrated thermal treatment study which examined 19 alternatives for thermal treatment of MLLW waste. The quantities and physical and chemical compositions of the input waste are based on the inventory database developed by the US Department of Energy. The Integrated Nonthermal Treatment Systems (INTS) systems were evaluated using the same waste input (2,927 pounds per hour) as the Integrated Thermal Treatment Systems (ITTS). 48 refs., 68 figs., 37 tabs.

  8. Underground Coal Thermal Treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. Smith; M. Deo; E. Eddings; A. Sarofim; K. Gueishen; M. Hradisky; K. Kelly; P. Mandalaparty; H. Zhang

    2011-10-30

    The long-term objective of this work is to develop a transformational energy production technology by insitu thermal treatment of a coal seam for the production of substitute natural gas (SNG) while leaving much of the coalâ??s carbon in the ground. This process converts coal to a high-efficiency, low-GHG emitting gas fuel. It holds the potential of providing environmentally acceptable access to previously unusable coal resources. This topical report discusses the development of experimental capabilities, the collection of available data, and the development of simulation tools to obtain process thermo-chemical and geo-thermal parameters in preparation for the eventual demonstration in a coal seam. It also includes experimental and modeling studies of CO{sub 2} sequestration. Efforts focused on: â?¢ Constructing a suite of three different coal pyrolysis reactors. These reactors offer the ability to gather heat transfer, mass transfer and kinetic data during coal pyrolysis under conditions that mimic in situ conditions (Subtask 6.1). â?¢ Studying the operational parameters for various underground thermal treatment processes for oil shale and coal and completing a design matrix analysis for the underground coal thermal treatment (UCTT). This analysis yielded recommendations for terms of targeted coal rank, well orientation, rubblization, presence of oxygen, temperature, pressure, and heating sources (Subtask 6.2). â?¢ Developing capabilities for simulating UCTT, including modifying the geometry as well as the solution algorithm to achieve long simulation times in a rubblized coal bed by resolving the convective channels occurring in the representative domain (Subtask 6.3). â?¢ Studying the reactive behavior of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) with limestone, sandstone, arkose (a more complex sandstone) and peridotite, including mineralogical changes and brine chemistry for the different initial rock compositions (Subtask 6.4). Arkose exhibited the highest tendency of participating in mineral reactions, which can be attributed to the geochemical complexity of its initial mineral assemblage. In experiments with limestone, continuous dissolution was observed with the release of CO{sub 2} gas, indicated by the increasing pressure in the reactor (formation of a gas chamber). This occurred due to the lack of any source of alkali to buffer the solution. Arkose has the geochemical complexity for permanent sequestration of CO{sub 2} as carbonates and is also relatively abundant. The effect of including NH{sub 3} in the injected gas stream was also investigated in this study. Precipitation of calcite and trace amounts of ammonium zeolites was observed. A batch geochemical model was developed using Geochemists Workbench (GWB). Degassing effect in the experiments was corrected using the sliding fugacity model in GWB. Experimental and simulation results were compared and a reasonable agreement between the two was observed.

  9. BULKING SLUDGE TREATMENT BY MICROSCOPIC OBSERVATION AND MECHANICAL TREATMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the conventional physico­chemical parameters for the evaluation and control of biological stages of waste water for the operation of the biological stage of waste water treatment plants. If the threatening extensive growth status and for the regulation of biological parts in waste water treatment plants. Furthermore, e

  10. Laser welding and post weld treatment of modified 9Cr-1MoVNb steel.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Z.

    2012-04-03

    Laser welding and post weld laser treatment of modified 9Cr-1MoVNb steels (Grade P91) were performed in this preliminary study to investigate the feasibility of using laser welding process as a potential alternative to arc welding methods for solving the Type IV cracking problem in P91 steel welds. The mechanical and metallurgical testing of the pulsed Nd:YAG laser-welded samples shows the following conclusions: (1) both bead-on-plate and circumferential butt welds made by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser show good welds that are free of microcracks and porosity. The narrow heat affected zone has a homogeneous grain structure without conventional soft hardness zone where the Type IV cracking occurs in conventional arc welds. (2) The laser weld tests also show that the same laser welder has the potential to be used as a multi-function tool for weld surface remelting, glazing or post weld tempering to reduce the weld surface defects and to increase the cracking resistance and toughness of the welds. (3) The Vicker hardness of laser welds in the weld and heat affected zone was 420-500 HV with peak hardness in the HAZ compared to 240 HV of base metal. Post weld laser treatment was able to slightly reduce the peak hardness and smooth the hardness profile, but failed to bring the hardness down to below 300 HV due to insufficient time at temperature and too fast cooling rate after the time. Though optimal hardness of weld made by laser is to be determined for best weld strength, methods to achieve the post weld laser treatment temperature, time at the temperature and slow cooling rate need to be developed. (4) Mechanical testing of the laser weld and post weld laser treated samples need to be performed to evaluate the effects of laser post treatments such as surface remelting, glazing, re-hardening, or tempering on the strength of the welds.

  11. Harvesting Energy from Wastewater Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvesting Energy from Wastewater Treatment Bruce Logan Penn State University #12;Energy Costs? 5 #12;Energy content of Wastewaters · Electricity "lost" to water and wastewater treatment= 0.6 quad wastewater (primary clarifier effluent) Arrows indicate wastewater addition P= 28 mW/m2 (PEM/Nafion) =146 m

  12. Modeling Hepatitis C treatment policy.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuypers, Marshall A.; Lambert, Gregory Joseph; Moore, Thomas W.; Glass, Robert John,; Finley, Patrick D.; Ross, David [Clinical Public Health Group, Veterans Health Administration, Washington, D.C.; Chartier, Maggie

    2013-09-01

    Chronic infection with Hepatitis C virus (HCV) results in cirrhosis, liver cancer and death. As the nation's largest provider of care for HCV, US Veterans Health Administration (VHA) invests extensive resources in the diagnosis and treatment of the disease. This report documents modeling and analysis of HCV treatment dynamics performed for the VHA aimed at improving service delivery efficiency. System dynamics modeling of disease treatment demonstrated the benefits of early detection and the role of comorbidities in disease progress and patient mortality. Preliminary modeling showed that adherence to rigorous treatment protocols is a primary determinant of treatment success. In depth meta-analysis revealed correlations of adherence and various psycho-social factors. This initial meta-analysis indicates areas where substantial improvement in patient outcomes can potentially result from VA programs which incorporate these factors into their design.

  13. Waste Treatment Plant - 12508

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harp, Benton; Olds, Erik

    2012-07-01

    The Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) will immobilize millions of gallons of Hanford's tank waste into solid glass using a proven technology called vitrification. The vitrification process will turn the waste into a stable glass form that is safe for long-term storage. Our discussion of the WTP will include a description of the ongoing design and construction of this large, complex, first-of-a-kind project. The concept for the operation of the WTP is to separate high-level and low-activity waste fractions, and immobilize those fractions in glass using vitrification. The WTP includes four major nuclear facilities and various support facilities. Waste from the Tank Farms is first pumped to the Pretreatment Facility at the WTP through an underground pipe-in-pipe system. When construction is complete, the Pretreatment Facility will be 12 stories high, 540 feet long and 215 feet wide, making it the largest of the four major nuclear facilities that compose the WTP. The total size of this facility will be more than 490,000 square feet. More than 8.2 million craft hours are required to construct this facility. Currently, the Pretreatment Facility is 51 percent complete. At the Pretreatment Facility the waste is pumped to the interior waste feed receipt vessels. Each of these four vessels is 55-feet tall and has a 375,000 gallon capacity, which makes them the largest vessels inside the Pretreatment Facility. These vessels contain a series of internal pulse-jet mixers to keep incoming waste properly mixed. The vessels are inside the black-cell areas, completely enclosed behind thick steel-laced, high strength concrete walls. The black cells are designed to be maintenance free with no moving parts. Once hot operations commence the black-cell area will be inaccessible. Surrounded by black cells, is the 'hot cell canyon'. The hot cell contains all the moving and replaceable components to remove solids and extract liquids. In this area, there is ultrafiltration equipment, cesium-ion exchange columns, evaporator boilers and recirculation pumps, and various mechanical process pumps for transferring process fluids. During the first phase of pretreatment, the waste will be concentrated using an evaporation process. Solids will be filtered out, and the remaining soluble, highly radioactive isotopes will be removed using an ion-exchange process. The high-level solids will be sent to the High-Level Waste (HLW) Vitrification Facility, and the low activity liquids will be sent to the Low-Activity Waste (LAW) Vitrification Facility for further processing. The high-level waste will be transferred via underground pipes to the HLW Facility from the Pretreatment Facility. The waste first arrives at the wet cell, which rests inside a black-cell area. The pretreated waste is transferred through shielded pipes into a series of melter preparation and feed vessels before reaching the melters. Liquids from various facility processes also return to the wet cell for interim storage before recycling back to the Pretreatment Facility. (authors)

  14. Settling of rubber particles in asphalt-rubber blends 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wattanachai, Piyachat

    1998-01-01

    of the binders seemed to be deteriorated by these severe curing conditions. Air blowing was conducted with an expectation of improving high temperature properties while the added rubber benefited low temperature properties. Low molecular weight asphalt or low...

  15. Behaviour of settling coral reef fishes and supplementary mamagement tools 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heenan, Adel

    2010-01-01

    Coral reef fish larvae take an active role in selecting their settlement site and sensory cues may help them to orientate during this process. As settlement is a period of transition through which the majority of individuals ...

  16. More than 1 million foreigners settle in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Youqin

    -Offs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Migration From Mexico and NAFTA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Figure 5. The Long-Term Fiscal Impact of One Immigrant: 1996 . . . . . . . . . 30 Figure 6. Mexico-U.S. Migration With and Without NAFTA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Naturalization and Politics

  17. Nazim Bharmal Anthony Slingo Jeff Settle Gary Robinson Helen White

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolar Photovoltaic(MillionNature and Origin of the| NationalNavigating

  18. Physical Modeling of Spinel Crystals Settling at Low Reynolds Numbers

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTech ConnectSpeeding accessusers' guide. V1.0.0.Report) |Article)Whole

  19. DOE Settles Elk Hills Equity Claims | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-in electricLaboratory | Department of Energyof Energy Energy'ssettled

  20. Lab Work for Sewage Treatment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    that provides better estimates of the outcome of a sandstone acidizing treatment is developed following a review of previous sandstone acidizing models. The model follows the lumped mineral methodology and is based mainly on the kinetic approach. The use...

  1. Chemical Treatment Fosters Zero Discharge by Making Cooling Water Reusable 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boffardi, B. P.

    1996-01-01

    controlled by adding sulfuric acid to convert the scale to calcium sulfate, which is more soluble. Because fluctuations in the acid feed rate can produce variability in pH levels, which can accelerate corrosion, close control of feed is essential. More... blowdown. Foulants Foulants are water-borne deposits that can settle on heat-transfer equipment and interfere with cooling water flow, as well as stimulate corrosion. They include such diverse substances as particulate matter scrubbed from air...

  2. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Constructed Wetlands 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-10-23

    A constructed wetland system for domestic wastewater treatment is designed to mimic the natural wetland treatment process of Mother Nature. This publication explains the treatment, design, operation and maintenance of constructed wetlands....

  3. Evaluation of biological treatment of pharmaceutical wastewater with PAC (powdered activated carbon) addition. Volume 2. Appendices. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, D.A.; Osantowski, R.A.

    1988-05-01

    A lack of information on applicable removal technologies for total chemical oxygen demand (TCOD) prevented promulgation of best available technology economically achievable (BAT) limitations and new source performance standards (NSPS) for TCOD for pharmaceutical manufacturing plants in 1983 (EPA/440/1-83/084). Therefore, in 1984 EPA conducted a pilot-plant study of activated-carbon-treatment technologies utilizing pharmaceutical waste waters from a manufacturing plant that produces fermentation products (Subcategory A) and chemical synthesis products (Subcategory C). The purposes of the study were to: (1) attempt to find the cause of the formation of the VFMLS; (2) generate additional research data for TCOD removal from pharmaceutical wastewater using the PACT process; (3) evaluate the efficiency of PACT in removing specific organics; (4) evaluate the effectiveness of PACT in reducing effluent aquatic toxicity; and, (5) evaluate the use of a selector to improve the settleability of the mixed liquor. One control unit, two PACT units and a unit equipped with a series of selector basins for improving the settling characteristics of the mixed-liquor suspended solids were operated.

  4. WASTEWATER TREATMENT IN THE OIL SHALE INDUSTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, J.P.

    2010-01-01

    and sludges produced by retort water treatment should bewaters woulp not require treatment since they are producedtreatment technology. Mine waters, by contrast, are produced

  5. Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    3 Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - March 2013 March 2013 Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction...

  6. Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2 Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - March 2012 March 2012 Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project...

  7. Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    August 2011 Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - August 2011 August 2011 Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality...

  8. Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    October 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - October 2012 October 2012 Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant...

  9. Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    January 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - January 2013 January 2013 Review of the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant...

  10. Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    May 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - May 2013 May 2013 Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction...

  11. Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    August 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - August 2012 August 2012 Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant...

  12. Independent Oversight Assessment, Waste Treatment and Immobilization...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - January 2012 Independent Oversight Assessment, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - January 2012 January 2012 Assessment of the...

  13. Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2015 Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - October 2013 Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification Facility...

  14. Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2013 More Documents & Publications Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification Facility Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Analytical Laboratory...

  15. Clot Busting Simulations Test Potential Stroke Treatment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Clot Busting Simulations Test Potential Stroke Treatment Clot Busting Simulations Test Potential Stroke Treatment September 24, 2013 | Tags: Biological and Environmental Research...

  16. Independent Oversight Review, Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2012 Review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Integrated Waste Treatment Unit Federal Operational Readiness Review This report documents the results of an...

  17. Independent Oversight Review, Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2012 Review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Integrated Waste Treatment Unit Contractor Operational Readiness Review This report documents the results of an...

  18. Independent Oversight Review, Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project - April 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project - April 2013 April 2013 Review of Radiation Protection...

  19. Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Sludge Treatment...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Activity Report, Hanford Sludge Treatment Project - September 2013 Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Sludge Treatment Project - September 2013 November 2013 Hanford...

  20. Waste Treatment Facility Passes Federal Inspection, Completes...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Waste Treatment Facility Passes Federal Inspection, Completes Final Milestone, Begins Startup Waste Treatment Facility Passes Federal Inspection, Completes Final Milestone, Begins...

  1. Scaled Testing to Evaluate Pulse Jet Mixer Performance in Waste Treatment Plant Mixing Vessels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fort, James A.; Meyer, Perry A.; Bamberger, Judith A.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Scott, Paul A.; Minette, Michael J.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.

    2010-03-07

    The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) at Hanford is being designed and built to pre-treat and vitrify the waste in Hanford’s 177 underground waste storage tanks. Numerous process vessels will hold waste at various stages in the WTP. These vessels have pulse jet mixer (PJM) systems. A test program was developed to evaluate the adequacy of mixing system designs in the solids-containing vessels in the WTP. The program focused mainly on non-cohesive solids behavior. Specifically, the program addressed the effectiveness of the mixing systems to suspend settled solids off the vessel bottom, and distribute the solids vertically. Experiments were conducted at three scales using various particulate simulants. A range of solids loadings and operational parameters were evaluated, including jet velocity, pulse volume, and duty cycle. In place of actual PJMs, the tests used direct injection from tubes with suction at the top of the tank fluid. This gave better control over the discharge duration and duty cycle and simplified the facility requirements. The mixing system configurations represented in testing varied from 4 to 12 PJMs with various jet nozzle sizes. In this way the results collected could be applied to the broad range of WTP vessels with varying geometrical configurations and planned operating conditions. Data for “just-suspended velocity”, solids cloud height, and solids concentration vertical profile were collected, analyzed, and correlated. The correlations were successfully benchmarked against previous large-scale test results, then applied to the WTP vessels using reasonable assumptions of anticipated waste properties to evaluate adequacy of the existing mixing system designs.

  2. Sunlight-Mediated Inactivation Mechanisms of Enteroccocus faecalis and Escherichia coli in Waste Stabilization Ponds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kadir, Khalid

    2010-01-01

    with a primary focus on wastewater treatment pond systems.of primary treatment, through the settling of wastewateris the primary beneficiary of wastewater treatment? There is

  3. TRAITEMENT DES EFFLUENTS WASTE TREATMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    residence time the production of biogas (7l-78 p. 100 CH,) was 237 1 per kg dry matter, i.e. 479 1 of CH to obtain the same amount of biogas four times quicklier. The treatment yield was improved (65 p. 100 COD). The mean production was 4931 biogas/kg degraded COD. It seems to be possible to apply that procedure

  4. Water Resources Water Quality and Water Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    Water Resources TD 603 Lecture 1: Water Quality and Water Treatment CTARA Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay 2nd November, 2011 #12;OVERVIEW Water Quality WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TRE OVERVIEW OF THE LECTURE 1. Water Distribution Schemes Hand Pump

  5. Environmental Assessment for the High Explosives Wastewater Treatment Facility, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-03

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has identified a need to improve the management of wastewater resulting from high explosives (HE) research and development work at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). LANL`s current methods off managing HE-contaminated wastewater cannot ensure that discharged HE wastewater would consistently meet the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) standards for wastewater discharge. The DOE needs to enhance He wastewater management to e able to meet both present and future regulatory standards for wastewater discharge. The DOE also proposes to incorporate major pollution prevention and waste reduction features into LANL`s existing HE production facilities. Currently, wastewater from HE processing buildings at four Technical Areas (TAs) accumulates in sumps where particulate HE settles out and barium is precipitated. Wastewater is then released from the sumps to the environment at 15 permitted outfalls without treatment. The released water may contain suspended and dissolved contaminants, such as HE and solvents. This Environmental Assessment (EA) analyzes two alternatives, the Proposed Action and the Alternative Action, that would meet the purpose and need for agency action. Both alternatives would treat all HE process wastewater using sand filters to remove HE particulates and activated carbon to adsorb organic solvents and dissolved HE. Under either alternative, LANL would burn solvents and flash dried HE particulates and spent carbon following well-established procedures. Burning would produce secondary waste that would be stored, treated, and disposed of at TA-54, Area J. This report contains the Environmental Assessment, as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact and Floodplain Statement of Findings for the High Explosives Wastewater Treatment Facility.

  6. Treatment of radionuclide contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pettis, S.A.; Kallas, A.J.; Kochen, R.L.; McGlochlin, S.C.

    1988-06-01

    Rockwell, International, Rocky Flats Plants, is committed to remediating within the scope of RCRA/CERCLA, Solid Waste Managements Units (SWMUs) at Rocky Flats found to be contaminated with hazardous substances. SWMUs fund to have radionuclide (uranium, plutonium, and/or americium) concentrations in the soils and/or groundwater that exceed background levels or regulatory limits will also be included in this remediation effort. This paper briefly summarizes past and present efforts by Rockwell International, Rocky Flats Plant, to identify treatment technologies appropriate for remediating actinide contaminated soils. Many of the promising soil treatments evaluated in Rocky Flats' laboratories during the late 1970's and early 1980's are currently being revisited. These technologies are generally directed toward substantially reducing the volume of contaminated soils, with the subsequent intention of disposing of a small remaining concentrated fraction of contaminated soil in a facility approved to receive radioactive wastes. Treatment processes currently will be treated to remove actinides, and recycled back to the process. Past investigations have included evaluations of dry screening, wet screening, scrubbing, ultrasonics, chemical oxidation, calcination, desliming, flotation, and heavy-liquid density separation. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Treatment of mercury containing waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kalb, Paul D. (Wading River, NY); Melamed, Dan (Gaithersburg, MD); Patel, Bhavesh R (Elmhurst, NY); Fuhrmann, Mark (Babylon, NY)

    2002-01-01

    A process is provided for the treatment of mercury containing waste in a single reaction vessel which includes a) stabilizing the waste with sulfur polymer cement under an inert atmosphere to form a resulting mixture and b) encapsulating the resulting mixture by heating the mixture to form a molten product and casting the molten product as a monolithic final waste form. Additional sulfur polymer cement can be added in the encapsulation step if needed, and a stabilizing additive can be added in the process to improve the leaching properties of the waste form.

  8. Apparatus and process for water treatment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phifer, Mark A. (North Augusta, SC); Nichols, Ralph L. (North Augusta, SC)

    2001-01-01

    An apparatus is disclosed utilizing permeable treatment media for treatment of contaminated water, along with a method for enhanced passive flow of contaminated water through the treatment media. The apparatus includes a treatment cell including a permeable structure that encloses the treatment media, the treatment cell may be located inside a water collection well, exterior to a water collection well, or placed in situ within the pathway of contaminated groundwater. The passive flow of contaminated water through the treatment media is maintained by a hydraulic connection between a collecting point of greater water pressure head, and a discharge point of lower water pressure head. The apparatus and process for passive flow and groundwater treatment utilizes a permeable treatment media made up of granular metal, bimetallics, granular cast iron, activated carbon, cation exchange resins, and/or additional treatment materials. An enclosing container may have an outer permeable wall for passive flow of water into the container and through the enclosed treatment media to an effluent point. Flow of contaminated water is attained without active pumping of water through the treatment media. Remediation of chlorinated hydrocarbons and other water contaminants to acceptable regulatory concentration levels is accomplished without the costs of pumping, pump maintenance, and constant oversight by personnel.

  9. Simultaneous wastewater treatment and biological electricity generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    anaerobic treatment technologies, based on methane production, economical. The costs of wastewater treatment, and a calculation is made on the potential for electricity recovery. Assuming a town of 100,000 people generate 16.4 £ 106 L of wastewater, a wastewater treatment plant has the potential to become a 2.3 MW power plant

  10. OptFuels: Fuel Treatment Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OptFuels: Fuel Treatment Optimization Scientists a Rocky Mountain Research Station Missoula, MT, scientists at the University of Montana, are developing a tool to help forest managers prioritize forest fuel reduction treatments. Although several computer models analyz stand-level effects of fuel treatments

  11. Situ treatment of contaminated groundwater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McNab, Jr., Walt W. (Concord, CA); Ruiz, Roberto (Tracy, CA); Pico, Tristan M. (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01

    A system for treating dissolved halogenated organic compounds in groundwater that relies upon electrolytically-generated hydrogen to chemically reduce the halogenated compounds in the presence of a suitable catalyst. A direct current is placed across at least a pair, or an array, of electrodes which are housed within groundwater wells so that hydrogen is generated at the cathode and oxygen at the anode. A pump is located within the well housing in which the cathode(s) is(are) located and draws in groundwater where it is hydrogenated via electrolysis, passes through a well-bore treatment unit, and then transported to the anode well(s) for reinjection into the ground. The well-bore treatment involves a permeable cylinder located in the well bore and containing a packed bed of catalyst material that facilitates the reductive dehalogenation of the halogenated organic compounds by hydrogen into environmentally benign species such as ethane and methane. Also, electro-osmatic transport of contaminants toward the cathode also contributes to contaminant mass removal. The only above ground equipment required are the transfer pipes and a direct circuit power supply for the electrodes. The electrode wells in an array may be used in pairs or one anode well may be used with a plurality of cathode wells. The DC current flow between electrode wells may be periodically reversed which controls the formation of mineral deposits in the alkaline cathode well-bore water, as well as to help rejuvenate the catalysis.

  12. Copyright Awwa Research Foundation 2006 Advanced Water Treatment Impacts onAdvanced Water Treatment Impacts on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Arturo A.

    , brackish groundwater, produced water, etc.produced water, etc. Advanced treatmentAdvanced treatment Water© Copyright Awwa Research Foundation 2006 Advanced Water Treatment Impacts onAdvanced Water Treatment Impacts on EnergyEnergy--Water LinkagesWater Linkages (The Water Utility Perspective)(The Water

  13. HEAT TREATMENT AND CHARACTERIZATION OF DUPLEX 1010 AND 1020 STEELS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, M.J.

    2010-01-01

    B. Materials 'Preparation . Heat Treatment C. IntermediateCAPTIONS FIGURES,f« -V- HEAT TREATMENT AND CHARACTERIZATIONconcerning the heat treatment of duplex ferritic-martensitic

  14. Cyanide treatment options in coke plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minak, H.P.; Lepke, P. [Krupp Uhde GmbH, Dortmund (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    The paper discusses the formation of cyanides in coke oven gas and describes and compares waste processing options. These include desulfurization by aqueous ammonia solution, desulfurization using potash solution, desulfurization in oxide boxes, decomposition of NH{sub 3} and HCN for gas scrubbing. Waste water treatment methods include chemical oxidation, precipitation, ion exchange, reverse osmosis, and biological treatment. It is concluded that biological treatment is the most economical process, safe in operation and requires a minimum of manpower.

  15. Casimir force: an alternative treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. R. Silva

    2009-01-07

    The Casimir force between two parallel uncharged closely spaced metallic plates is evaluated in ways alternatives to those usually considered in the literature. In a first approximation we take in account the suppressed quantum numbers of a cubic box, representing a cavity which was cut in a metallic block. We combine these ideas with those of the MIT bag model of hadrons, but adapted to non-relativistic particles. In a second approximation we consider the particles occupying the energy levels of the Bohr atom, so that the Casimir force depends explicitly on the fine structure constant alpha. In both treatments, the mean energies which have explicit dependence on the particle mass and on the maximum occupied quantum number (related to the Fermi level of the system) at the beginning of the calculations, have these dependences mutually canceled at the end of them. Finally by comparing the averaged energies computed in both approximations, we are able to make an estimate of the value of the fine structure constant alpha.

  16. Unified algebraic treatment of resonance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. D. Alhaidari

    2004-05-05

    Energy resonance in scattering is usually investigated either directly in the complex energy plane (E-plane) or indirectly in the complex angular momentum plane (L-plane). Another formulation complementing these two approaches was introduced recently. It is an indirect algebraic method that studies resonances in a complex charge plane (Z-plane). This latter approach will be generalized to provide a unified algebraic treatment of resonances in the complex E-, L-, and Z-planes. The complex scaling (rotation) method will be used in the development of this approach. The resolvent operators (Green's functions) are formally defined in these three spaces. Bound states spectrum and resonance energies in the E-plane are mapped onto a discrete set of poles of the respective resolvent operator on the real line of the L- and Z-planes. These poles move along trajectories as the energy is varied. A finite square integrable basis is used in the numerical implementation of this approach. Stability of poles and trajectories against variation in all computational parameters is demonstrated. Resonance energies for a given potential are calculated and compared with those obtained by other studies.

  17. Integrating treatment strategies for children with autism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jobin, Allison Brooke

    2012-01-01

    for teaching based on autism research. Austin: Pro-Ed.2010). Treatment approach, autism severity and interventionin young children. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 4,

  18. WASTEWATER TREATMENT IN THE OIL SHALE INDUSTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, J.P.

    2010-01-01

    H. H. Peters, Shale Oil Waste Water Recovery by Evaporation,treatment of oil shale waste products. Consequently, bothmost difficult and costly oil shale waste stream requiring

  19. Pyrochemical Treatment of Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. M. Goff; K. L. Howden; G. M. Teske; T. A. Johnson

    2005-10-01

    Over the last 10 years, pyrochemical treatment of spent nuclear fuel has progressed from demonstration activities to engineering-scale production operations. As part of the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative within the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology, pyrochemical treatment operations are being performed as part of the treatment of fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor II at the Idaho National Laboratory. Integral to these treatment operations are research and development activities that are focused on scaling further the technology, developing and implementing process improvements, qualifying the resulting high-level waste forms, and demonstrating the overall pyrochemical fuel cycle.

  20. Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Project - October 2010 Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project - October 2010 October 2010 Review of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Hanford...

  1. Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    - October 2013 October 2013 Observation of Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter and Melter Off-gas Process System Hazards Analysis Activities...

  2. Overview of Integrated Waste Treatment Unit

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Environmental Management Integrated Waste Treatment Unit Overview Overview for the DOE High Level Waste Corporate Board March 5, 2009 safety performance cleanup closure...

  3. Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant Pretreatment Facility

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    7 Technology Readiness Assessment for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Pretreatment Facility L. Holton D. Alexander M. Johnson H. Sutter August 2007 Prepared by...

  4. Remissions of psoriasis with excimer laser treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feldman, Steven R.

    2002-01-01

    mechanism of action in psoriasis. Photodermatol PhotoimmunolM. Duration of remission of psoriasis therapies. J Am Acadlaser treatment of psoriasis. Submitted for publication. ©

  5. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Liquid Chlorination 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weaver, Richard; Lesikar, Bruce J.; Richter, Amanda; O'Neill, Courtney

    2008-10-23

    This publication explains the process, components, legal requirements, factors affecting performance, and maintenance needs of liquid chlorination systems for onsite wastewater treatment....

  6. Washington Environmental Permit Handbook - Dangerous Waste Treatment...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Washington Environmental Permit Handbook - Dangerous Waste Treatment Storage Disposal Facility New Permit Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web...

  7. Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    November 2011 Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project Construction Quality This report documents the results of an independent oversight review...

  8. Identifying client-by-treatment interactions in couple therapy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castellani, Angela Marie

    2002-01-01

    Treatment-matching research involves matching clients to the best fitting treatment to enhance overall treatment efficacy. Specific matching hypotheses are supported by superior treatment gains in matched cases over mismatched cases...

  9. Limited success of heat treatments for curing HLB affected trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopes, S. A.; Luiz, F. Q.B.F.; Fassini, C. G.; Oliveira, H. T.; Oliveira, S. L.A.

    2014-01-01

    Limited success of heat treatments for curing HLB affectedthe lack of success of the heat treatments against HLB. 3rd

  10. Assessment of Groundwater Contamination, In Situ Treatment, and Disposal of Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scanlon, Bridget R.

    Assessment of Groundwater Contamination, In Situ Treatment, and Disposal of Treatment Residuals in the Vicinity of Lubbock, Texas Report Prepared for Texas Commission on Environmental Quality Austin Texas ........................................................................................................ 2 GIS Analysis of Groundwater Quality Using Available Data

  11. Implementing Personalized Medicine: Estimating Optimal Treatment Regimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidian, Marie

    Schulte, Anastasios Tsiatis, Eric Laber, and Marie Davidian Department of Statistics North Carolina State with primary operable breast cancer ? · Treatment options : L-phenylalanine mustard and 5-fluorouracil (c1: · Decision 1 : Induction chemotherapy (options c1, c2) · Decision 2 : Maintenance treatment for patients who

  12. DISTRICT OF HOPE SEWAGE TREATMENT STUDY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;DISTRICT OF HOPE SEWAGE TREATMENT STUDY DOE FIL4P 1994-12 Preparedfor: Districtof Hope.0 7.0 8.0 . DISTRICT OF HOPE SEWAGE TREATMENT STUDY CONTENTS INTRODUCTION ASSESS LOADING AND IMPACT CONTROLLING SEPTAGE DISCHARGES EX(STING SLUDGE LEVELS IN LAGOONS Figure 3 Sounding Locations Figure 4 West

  13. System and process for biomass treatment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunson, Jr., James B; Tucker, III, Melvin P; Elander, Richard T; Lyons, Robert C

    2013-08-20

    A system including an apparatus is presented for treatment of biomass that allows successful biomass treatment at a high solids dry weight of biomass in the biomass mixture. The design of the system provides extensive distribution of a reactant by spreading the reactant over the biomass as the reactant is introduced through an injection lance, while the biomass is rotated using baffles. The apparatus system to provide extensive assimilation of the reactant into biomass using baffles to lift and drop the biomass, as well as attrition media which fall onto the biomass, to enhance the treatment process.

  14. Update on the treatment of genital warts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scheinfeld, Noah

    2013-01-01

    IP. Protective effects of green tea extracts(polyphenon EPMID: 19709100 18. Rosen T. Green tea catechins: biologicSM, Monk BJ, Tewari KS. Green tea catechins for treatment of

  15. Innovative Mercury Treatment Benefits Stream, Fish

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    AIKEN, S.C. – A team of scientists is working at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to evaluate the impact of an innovative, inexpensive treatment system that removes mercury from water.

  16. Renewable Energy Powered Water Treatment Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards, Bryce S.; Schäfer, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    There are many motivations for choosing renewable energy technologies to provide the necessary energy to power water treatment systems for reuse and desalination. These range from the lack of an existing electricity grid, ...

  17. WASTEWATER TREATMENT IN THE OIL SHALE INDUSTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, J.P.

    2010-01-01

    treatment goals and design criteria and to resolve a numberbe scaled up and design criteria and cost data developed.continuous-flow systems and design criteria developed for a

  18. WASTEWATER TREATMENT IN THE OIL SHALE INDUSTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, J.P.

    2010-01-01

    Waters from Green River Oil Shale," Chem. and Ind. , 1. ,Effluents from In-Situ oil Shale Processing," in Proceedingsin the Treatment of Oil Shale Retort Waters," in Proceedings

  19. Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    June 2013 Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter Off-gas Process System Hazards Analysis Activity Observation HIAR-WTP-2013-05-13 This...

  20. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Sand Filters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-10-23

    Sand filters are beds of granular material, or sand, drained from underneath so that pretreated wastewater can be treated, collected and distributed to a land application system. This publication explains the treatment, design, operation...

  1. Paracetamol poisoning and its treatment in man 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pakravan, Nasrin

    2008-01-01

    Paracetamol is the most common drug taken in overdose in the UK. Although it has been used in overdose for about 50 years, there are many aspects of its toxicity and treatment that are not fully understood. In this thesis ...

  2. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Ultraviolet Light Disinfection 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-10-02

    Some onsite wastewater treatment systems include a disinfection component. This publication explains how homeowners can disinfect wastewater with ultraviolet light, what the components of such a system are, what factors affect the performance of a...

  3. Independent Activity Report, Hanford Sludge Treatment Project...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    February 2012 Hanford Sludge Treatment Project Operational Awareness Review HIAR-RL-2012-02-27 The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within...

  4. Reactive Attachment Disorder: Concepts, Treatment, and Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, Uta M.; Petr, Chris

    2004-06-01

    Reactive Attachment Disorder (RAD) is a disorder characterized by controversy, both with respect to its definition and its treatment. By definition, the RAD diagnosis attempts to characterize and explain the origin of certain troubling behaviors...

  5. Inpatient Treatment of Children and Adolescents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barfield, Sharon T.; Petr, Chris

    2001-10-01

    protocols differed, but components tended to include varying degrees of: Behavior modification; milieu-based treatment; individual and family therapy; therapeutic, psycho-educational, and family groups; medication, spiritual awareness and recreational... from other An impressionistic descriptive, and of four homes and three treatment placements because of staff, peers, and community. evaluation of the phenomenological combined classes utilizing Milieu Therapy to However, the initial placement...

  6. Ammonia fiber explosion (AFEX) treatment of grass 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashok, Ganesh

    1991-01-01

    AMMONIA FIBER EXPLOSION (AFEX) TREATMENT OF GRASS A Thesis by GANESH ASHOK Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1991... Major Subject: Chemical Engineering AMMONIA FIBER EXPLOSION (AFEX) TREATMENT OF GRASS A Thesis by GANESH ASHOK Approved as to style and content by: M. T. 1 e (Chair of Committee) R. W. Flumerfelt (Member) F. M, By (Membe C. R. Engler (Member...

  7. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Graywater 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melton, Rebecca; Lesikar, Bruce J.; Smith, David; O'Neill, Courtney

    2008-04-03

    . meet plant water requirements during peak-water-use months. However, such sizing can follow the guidelines for the soil-absorption component of an onsite wastewater treatment system. These sizing guidelines are based on type of soil accepting... State Soil and Water Conservation Board USEPA 319(h) Program Texas On-Site Wastewater Treatment Research Council Texas AgriLife Extension Service Texas Commission on Environmental Quality Texas AgriLife Research USDA Water Quality Demonstration...

  8. Hydrophilization of Liquid Surfaces by Plasma Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victor Multanen; Gilad Chaniel; Roman Grynyov; Ron Yosef Loew; Naor Siany; Edward Bormashenko

    2014-09-01

    The impact of the cold radiofrequency air plasma on the surface properties of silicone oils (polydimethylsiloxane) was studied. Silicone oils of various molecular masses were markedly hydrophilized by the cold air plasma treatment. A pronounced decrease of the apparent water contact angles was observed after plasma treatment. A general theoretical approach to the calculation of apparent contact angles is proposed. The treated liquid surfaces demonstrated hydrophobic recovery. The characteristic time of the hydrophobic recovery grew with the molecular mass of the silicone oil.

  9. System Description for the KW Basin Integrated Water Treatment System (IWTS) (70.3)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DERUSSEAU, R.R.

    2000-04-18

    This is a description of the system that collects and processes the sludge and radioactive ions released by the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) processing operations conducted in the 105 KW Basin. The system screens, settles, filters, and conditions the basin water for reuse. Sludge and most radioactive ions are removed before the water is distributed back to the basin pool. This system is part of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNFP).

  10. Request for Infertility Treatment Expense Reimbursement Employee Name: ____________________________ Dartmouth ID: ______________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bucci, David J.

    Request for Infertility Treatment Expense Reimbursement Employee Name-mail #12;Information about the Infertility Treatment Reimbursement Benefit: Description of Benefit of infertility treatments and associated services. This benefit is available to regular benefits

  11. Oxidative particle mixtures for groundwater treatment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siegrist, Robert L. (Boulder, CO); Murdoch, Lawrence C. (Clemson, SC)

    2000-01-01

    The invention is a method and a composition of a mixture for degradation and immobilization of contaminants in soil and groundwater. The oxidative particle mixture and method includes providing a material having a minimal volume of free water, mixing at least one inorganic oxidative chemical in a granular form with a carrier fluid containing a fine grained inorganic hydrophilic compound and injecting the resulting mixture into the subsurface. The granular form of the inorganic oxidative chemical dissolves within the areas of injection, and the oxidative ions move by diffusion and/or advection, therefore extending the treatment zone over a wider area than the injection area. The organic contaminants in the soil and groundwater are degraded by the oxidative ions, which form solid byproducts that can sorb significant amounts of inorganic contaminants, metals, and radionuclides for in situ treatment and immobilization of contaminants. The method and composition of the oxidative particle mixture for long-term treatment and immobilization of contaminants in soil and groundwater provides for a reduction in toxicity of contaminants in a subsurface area of contamination without the need for continued injection of treatment material, or for movement of the contaminants, or without the need for continuous pumping of groundwater through the treatment zone, or removal of groundwater from the subsurface area of contamination.

  12. CHP and Bioenergy for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment Plants...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment Plants: Market Opportunities CHP and Bioenergy for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment Plants: Market Opportunities This document explores...

  13. DOE Selects Seven Contractors for Waste Treatment Basic Ordering...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Selects Seven Contractors for Waste Treatment Basic Ordering Agreements DOE Selects Seven Contractors for Waste Treatment Basic Ordering Agreements June 4, 2015 - 12:00pm Addthis...

  14. Hanford Tank Waste Retrieval, Treatment, and Disposition Framework...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Hanford Tank Waste Retrieval, Treatment, and Disposition Framework Hanford Tank Waste Retrieval, Treatment, and Disposition Framework Forty years of plutonium production at the...

  15. RISK ANALYSIS REPORT FOR THE BAY PARK SEWAGE TREATMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Minghua

    RISK ANALYSIS REPORT FOR THE BAY PARK SEWAGE TREATMENT PLANT (STP) TR-0 analyzes the flooding risks of the Bay Park Sewage Treatment Plant (STP

  16. New Groundwater Treatment Facility Begins Operation: Boost in...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Efficiency, Reduces Costs in Hanford Site Groundwater Treatment Recovery Act Funds Expand Groundwater Treatment at Hanford Site: Contractor CH2M HILL drills record number of wells...

  17. PH/sub 3/ treatment for polymer stabilization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Not Available

    1982-07-20

    Polymers are stabilized against oxidative degradation by treatment with phosphine gas. The treatment can be used in situ on polymeric components already in use.

  18. Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project Achieves Impressive Safety...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project Achieves Impressive Safety and Production Marks Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project Achieves Impressive Safety and Production Marks June...

  19. Idaho Waste Treatment Facility Improves Worker Safety and Efficiency...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Idaho Waste Treatment Facility Improves Worker Safety and Efficiency, Saves Taxpayer Dollars Idaho Waste Treatment Facility Improves Worker Safety and Efficiency, Saves Taxpayer...

  20. Treatment of Locally Advanced Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Treatment of Locally Advanced Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Trachea With Neutron Radiotherapy Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Treatment of Locally Advanced Adenoid...

  1. Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater Cleanup - Efficiency delivered more than 6 million in cost savings, 3 million in annual savings Treatment Resin...

  2. ILC Treatment of JLab Cavity Garners Exciting Result | Jefferson...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    https:www.jlab.orgnewsarticlesilc-treatment-jlab-cavity-garners-exciting-result ILC Treatment of JLab Cavity Garners Exciting Result Accelerator cavity HG-6 was...

  3. Receipt of Guideline-Concordant Treatment in Elderly Prostate...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Receipt of Guideline-Concordant Treatment in Elderly Prostate Cancer Patients Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Receipt of Guideline-Concordant Treatment in Elderly...

  4. Three-Dimensional Thermal Tomography Advances Cancer Treatment...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Three-Dimensional Thermal Tomography Advances Cancer Treatment Technology available for licensing: A 3D technique to detect early skin changes due to radiation treatment in breast...

  5. Application of Iron Activated Persulfate for Disinfection in Water Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wordofa, Dawit Negash

    2014-01-01

    Chlorine/Chloramine Drinking Water Treatment. Environ. Scl.S. Disinefction products in water treatmnet. Environ. Scl.oxidation technologies for water treatment decontamination.

  6. Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Site Waste Treatment and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - June 2014 June 2014 Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality This report documents the...

  7. Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilizati...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Treatment and Immobilization Plant - March 2014 March 2014 Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality This report documents the...

  8. Enterprise Assessments Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality - June 2015 Enterprise Assessments Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant...

  9. ACTIVATED CARBON FROM LIGNITE FOR WATER TREATMENT (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ACTIVATED CARBON FROM LIGNITE FOR WATER TREATMENT Citation Details In-Document Search Title: ACTIVATED CARBON FROM LIGNITE FOR WATER TREATMENT You are accessing a document from...

  10. Waste Treatment Plant Liquid Effluent Treatability Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LUECK, K.J.

    2001-06-07

    Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) provided a forecast of the radioactive, dangerous liquid effluents expected to be generated by the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). The forecast represents the liquid effluents generated from the processing of 25 distinct batches of tank waste through the WTP. The WTP liquid effluents will be stored, treated, and disposed of in the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility (LERF) and the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). Fluor Hanford, Inc. (FH) evaluated the treatability of the WTP liquid effluents in the LERFIETF. The evaluation was conducted by comparing the forecast to the LERFIETF treatability envelope, which provides information on the items that determine if a liquid effluent is acceptable for receipt and treatment at the LERFIETF. The WTP liquid effluent forecast is outside the current LERFlETF treatability envelope. There are several concerns that must be addressed before the WTP liquid effluents can be accepted at the LERFIETF.

  11. Sludge treatment facility preliminary siting study for the sludge treatment project (A-13B)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WESTRA, A.G.

    1999-06-24

    This study evaluates various sites in the 100 K area and 200 areas of Hanford for locating a treatment facility for sludge from the K Basins. Both existing facilities and a new standalone facility were evaluated. A standalone facility adjacent to the AW Tank Farm in the 200 East area of Hanford is recommended as the best location for a sludge treatment facility.

  12. In-tank recirculating arsenic treatment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brady, Patrick V. (Albuquerque, NM); Dwyer, Brian P. (Albuquerque, NM); Krumhansl, James L. (Albuquerque, NM); Chwirka, Joseph D. (Tijeras, NM)

    2009-04-07

    A low-cost, water treatment system and method for reducing arsenic contamination in small community water storage tanks. Arsenic is removed by using a submersible pump, sitting at the bottom of the tank, which continuously recirculates (at a low flow rate) arsenic-contaminated water through an attached and enclosed filter bed containing arsenic-sorbing media. The pump and treatment column can be either placed inside the tank (In-Tank) by manually-lowering through an access hole, or attached to the outside of the tank (Out-of-Tank), for easy replacement of the sorption media.

  13. Radioactive waste treatment technologies and environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HORVATH, Jan; KRASNY, Dusan [JAVYS, PLc. - Nuclear and Decommisioning Company, PLc. (Slovakia)

    2007-07-01

    The radioactive waste treatment and conditioning are the most important steps in radioactive waste management. At the Slovak Electric, plc, a range of technologies are used for the processing of radioactive waste into a form suitable for disposal in near surface repository. These technologies operated by JAVYS, PLc. Nuclear and Decommissioning Company, PLc. Jaslovske Bohunice are described. Main accent is given to the Bohunice Radwaste Treatment and Conditioning Centre, Bituminization plant, Vitrification plant, and Near surface repository of radioactive waste in Mochovce and their operation. Conclusions to safe and effective management of radioactive waste in the Slovak Republic are presented. (authors)

  14. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Operation and Maintenance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-10-23

    Two-compartment septic tank Perforated pipe for effluent disposal Sand/loam soil Gravel Geotextile fabric Onsite wastewater treatment systems Operation and maintenance L-5347 8-08 Figure 1: A septic tank and soil absorption field system. I f your home or business uses... system or consult manufactur- ers? literature. A conventional septic system ?the most common onsite wastewa- ter treatment system?consists of a septic tank and a soil absorption field. Wastewater from a home or busi- ness first goes to the septic tank...

  15. Zinc Bromide Waste Solution Treatment Options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langston, C.A.

    2001-01-16

    The objective of this effort was to identify treatment options for 20,000 gallons of low-level radioactively contaminated zinc bromide solution currently stored in C-Area. These options will be relevant when the solutions are declared waste.

  16. Passive treatment of wastewater and contaminated groundwater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phifer, Mark A.; Sappington, Frank C.; Millings, Margaret R.; Turick, Charles E.; McKinsey, Pamela C.

    2006-12-12

    A bioremediation system using inorganic oxide-reducing microbial consortia for the treatment of, inter alia coal mine and coal yard runoff uses a containment vessel for contaminated water and a second, floating phase for nutrients. Biodegradable oils are preferred nutrients.

  17. Passive treatment of wastewater and contaminated groundwater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phifer, Mark A. (N. Augusta, SC); Sappington, Frank C. (Dahlonega, GA); Millings, Margaret R. (N. Augusta, SC); Turick, Charles E. (Aiken, SC); McKinsey, Pamela C. (Aiken, SC)

    2007-11-06

    A bioremediation system using inorganic oxide-reducing microbial consortia for the treatment of, inter alia coal mine and coal yard runoff uses a containment vessel for contaminated water and a second, floating phase for nutrients. Biodegradable oils are preferred nutrients.

  18. Silver doped catalysts for treatment of exhaust

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Park, Paul Worn (Peoria, IL); Hester, Virgil Raymond (Edelstein, IL); Ragle, Christie Susan (Havana, IL); Boyer, Carrie L. (Shiloh, IL)

    2009-06-02

    A method of making an exhaust treatment element includes washcoating a substrate with a slurry that includes a catalyst support material. At least some of the catalyst support material from the slurry may be transferred to the substrate, and silver metal (Ag) is dispersed within the catalyst support material.

  19. Costing Summaries for Selected Water Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    · Engineering News-Record Construction Cost Index · Consumer Prices Index · Year Index = average of the monthly values of the year )( )( )()( yyearIndexCost xyearIndexCost yyearCostxyearCostUpdated ×= #12;Slow SandCosting Summaries for Selected Water Treatment Processes Alix Montel Ecole Centrale de Nantes M

  20. Polymer surface treatment with particle beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stinnett, Regan W. (1033 Tramway La. NE., Albuquerque, NM 87122); VanDevender, J. Pace (7604 Lamplighter NE., Albuquerque, NM 87109)

    1999-01-01

    A polymer surface and near surface treatment process produced by irradiation with high energy particle beams. The process is preferably implemented with pulsed ion beams. The process alters the chemical and mechanical properties of the polymer surface in a manner useful for a wide range of commercial applications.

  1. Isotope Cancer Treatment Research at LANL

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Weidner, John; Nortier, Meiring

    2014-06-02

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has produced medical isotopes for diagnostic and imaging purposes for more than 30 years. Now LANL researchers have branched out into isotope cancer treatment studies. New results show that an accelerator-based approach can produce clinical trial quantities of actinium-225, an isotope that has promise as a way to kill tumors without damaging surrounding healthy cells.

  2. Treatment of Anthrax Disease Frequently Asked Questions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judd, Kathleen S.; Young, Joan E.; Lesperance, Ann M.; Malone, John D.

    2010-05-14

    This document provides a summary of Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) on the treatment of anthrax disease caused by a wide-area release of Bacillus anthracis spores as an act bioterrorism. These FAQs are intended to provide the public health and medical community, as well as others, with guidance and communications to support the response and long-term recovery from an anthrax event.

  3. Stochastic Programming Model for Fuel Treatment Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kabli, Mohannad Reda A

    2014-04-28

    Due to the increased number and intensity of wild fires, the need for solutions that minimize the impact of fire are needed. Fuel treatment is one of the methods used to mitigate the effects of fire at a certain area. In this thesis, a two...

  4. Waste water treatment cuts plant's pollution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-01-09

    New waste water treatment facilities at the U.S. Oil and Refining Co. refinery, Tacoma, Wash., have allowed that plant to exceed NPDES (National Pollution Discharge Elimination System) standards for effluent discharge. This comes in an area where maintaining water quality is a sensitive public issue. The waste treatment system at the 25,000 b/d refinery enables it to discharge negligible quantities of waterborne pollutants, according to Envirex Inc. Envirex designed and built the activated sludge waste treatment system at the refinery (Fig. 1). The system utilizes large rotating vertical discs for aeration of the waste water. These discs churn air into the waste water. They also keep the solidsladen water moving in an orbital path in a specially constructed treatment basin. The rotating discs and flowing water facilitate formation of large floc particles which are conducive to solids capture. A higher concentration of mixed-liquor suspended solids (MLSS) is therefore possible, enhancing the efficient removal of waste materials from the water.

  5. Polymer surface treatment with particle beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stinnett, R.W.; VanDevender, J.P.

    1999-05-04

    A polymer surface and near surface treatment process produced by irradiation with high energy particle beams is disclosed. The process is preferably implemented with pulsed ion beams. The process alters the chemical and mechanical properties of the polymer surface in a manner useful for a wide range of commercial applications. 16 figs.

  6. Scale-up of Algal Biofuel Production Using Waste Nutrients

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    raceways Paddle wheels Site of Cal Poly Algal Biomass Yield Project Delhi, Calif. Algae Wastewater Treatment Plant Facultative Ponds Settling Ponds In Phase 2, the Delhi...

  7. Oil sands processes-affected water treatment Research field: Oil sands processes-affected water treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milgram, Paul

    Oil sands processes-affected water treatment Research field: Oil sands processes-affected water., to make the system work as desired. We have experimental projects on oil extraction, polymers, fluid

  8. Thermal treatment of dyes from military munitions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed thermal treatment equipment to treat Navy smoke and dye compounds. Navy smokes were burned in the Los Alamos Controlled Air Incinerator (CAI) in the early 1980s. These test results were used in the development of a portable system consisting of a Thermal Treatment Unit (TTU), feed preparation and pumping skid, utility skid, and control trailer. This equipment was started up at Navy facilities at China Lake, CA where several destruction removal efficiency tests were completed in 1993 burning smoke compositions. The equipment was set up at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in 1996 where tests were completed burning green Navy spotting dyes. Operating and test results from the NTS efforts resulted in clearer understanding of equipment deficiencies, dye characteristics and composition, and secondary wastes generated. Future tests, scheduled for July, 1996 will demonstrate higher bum rates, better pH measurement and control, and stack emission test results for other colored dyes.

  9. Post-treatment control of HIV infection

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Conway, Jessica M.; Perelson, Alan S.

    2015-04-13

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV is not a cure. However, recent studies suggest that ART, initiated early during primary infection, may induce post-treatment control (PTC) of HIV infection with HIV RNA maintained at more »cells, virus, and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). Analysis of our model reveals a range in CTL response strengths where a patient may show either VR or PTC, depending on the size of the latent reservoir at treatment termination. Below this range, patients will always rebound, whereas above this range, patients are predicted to behave like elite controllers. As a result, using data on latent reservoir sizes in patients treated during primary infection, we also predict population-level VR times for non-controllers consistent with observations.« less

  10. Mixed waste characterization, treatment & disposal focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    The mission of the Mixed Waste Characterization, Treatment, and Disposal Focus Area (referred to as the Mixed Waste Focus Area or MWFA) is to provide treatment systems capable of treating DOE`s mixed waste in partnership with users, and with continual participation of stakeholders, tribal governments, and regulators. The MWFA deals with the problem of eliminating mixed waste from current and future storage in the DOE complex. Mixed waste is waste that contains both hazardous chemical components, subject to the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), and radioactive components, subject to the requirements of the Atomic Energy Act. The radioactive components include transuranic (TRU) and low-level waste (LLW). TRU waste primarily comes from the reprocessing of spent fuel and the use of plutonium in the fabrication of nuclear weapons. LLW includes radioactive waste other than uranium mill tailings, TRU, and high-level waste, including spent fuel.

  11. Pancreatic cancer: Pathogenesis, prevention and treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarkar, Fazlul H. Banerjee, Sanjeev; Li, Yiwei

    2007-11-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States with a very low survival rate of 5 years. To better design new preventive and/or therapeutic strategies for the fight against pancreatic cancer, the knowledge of the pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer at the molecular level is very important. It has been known that the development and the progression of pancreatic cancer are caused by the activation of oncogenes, the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, and the deregulation of many signaling pathways among which the EGFR, Akt, and NF-{kappa}B pathways appear to be most relevant. Therefore, the strategies targeting EGFR, Akt, NF-{kappa}B, and their downstream signaling could be promising for the prevention and/or treatment of pancreatic cancer. In this brief review, we will summarize the current knowledge regarding the pathogenesis, prevention, and treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  12. Genome Science and Personalized Cancer Treatment

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Gray, Joe

    2010-01-08

    August 4, 2009 Berkeley Lab lecture: Results from the Human Genome Project are enabling scientists to understand how individual cancers form and progress. This information, when combined with newly developed drugs, can optimize the treatment of individual cancers. Joe Gray, director of Berkeley Labs Life Sciences Division and Associate Laboratory Director for Life and Environmental Sciences, will focus on this approach, its promise, and its current roadblocks ? particularly with regard to breast cancer.

  13. Genome Science and Personalized Cancer Treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, Joe

    2009-08-07

    August 4, 2009 Berkeley Lab lecture: Results from the Human Genome Project are enabling scientists to understand how individual cancers form and progress. This information, when combined with newly developed drugs, can optimize the treatment of individual cancers. Joe Gray, director of Berkeley Labs Life Sciences Division and Associate Laboratory Director for Life and Environmental Sciences, will focus on this approach, its promise, and its current roadblocks — particularly with regard to breast cancer.

  14. Genome Science and Personalized Cancer Treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, Joe

    2009-08-04

    Summer Lecture Series 2009: Results from the Human Genome Project are enabling scientists to understand how individual cancers form and progress. This information, when combined with newly developed drugs, can optimize the treatment of individual cancers. Joe Gray, director of Berkeley Labs Life Sciences Division and Associate Laboratory Director for Life and Environmental Sciences, will focus on this approach, its promise, and its current roadblocks — particularly with regard to breast cancer.

  15. HydrodynamicallyBased Overshoot Treatment and Nucleosynthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hydrodynamically­Based Overshoot Treatment and Nucleosynthesis in AGB Stars F. Herwig 1 , T. Bl dominated by 12 C. This leads to the nucleosynthesis of 13 C via 12 C(p; fl) 13 N(fi; + š) 13 C and is prob­ ably the major source of neutrons ( 13 C(ff; n) 16 O) for subsequent s­process nucleosynthesis. We

  16. Process for the treatment of lignocellulosic biomass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dale, Bruce E.; Lynd, Lee R.; Laser, Mark

    2013-03-12

    A process for the treatment of biomass to render structural carbohydrates more accessible and/or digestible using concentrated ammonium hydroxide with or without anhydrous ammonia addition, is described. The process preferably uses steam to strip ammonia from the biomass for recycling. The process yields of monosaccharides from the structural carbohydrates are good, particularly as measured by the enzymatic hydrolysis of the structural carbohydrates. The monosaccharides are used as animal feeds and energy sources for ethanol production.

  17. Process for the treatment of lignocellulosic biomass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dale, Bruce E.

    2014-07-08

    A process for the treatment of biomass to render structural carbohydrates more accessible and/or digestible using concentrated ammonium hydroxide with or without anhydrous ammonia addition, is described. The process preferably uses steam to strip ammonia from the biomass for recycling. The process yields of monosaccharides from the structural carbohydrates are good, particularly as measured by the enzymatic hydrolysis of the structural carbohydrates. The monosaccharides are used as animal feeds and energy sources for ethanol production.

  18. Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Open Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California -- Phase I Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex

    2010-01-01

    Wastewater flows are also equalized during primary treatment.Primary treatment Secondary treatment Disinfection Advanced wastewaterthe wastewater treatment process. Primary treatment removes

  19. Opportunities for Open Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California - Phase II Report. San Luis Rey Wastewater Treatment Plant Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    wastewater treatment at San Luis Rey are primary and secondary treatment.primary treatment at the San Luis Rey facility, the wastewater

  20. Chronomodulation of topotecan or X-radiation treatment increases treatment efficacy without enhancing acute toxicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mullins, Dana; Proulx, Denise; Saoudi, A.; Ng, Cheng E. . E-mail: cng@ohri.ca

    2005-05-01

    Purpose: Topotecan (TPT), a camptothecin analog, is currently used to treat human ovarian and small-cell lung cancer and is in clinical trials for other tumor sites. However, it is unknown whether chronomodulation of TPT treatment is beneficial. We examined the effects of administering TPT or X-radiation (XR) alone at different times of the day or night. Methods: We treated mice bearing human colorectal tumor xenografts at four different times representing the early rest period (9 AM or 3 HALO [hours after light onset]), late rest period (3 PM or 9 HALO), early active period (9 PM or 15 HALO), and late active period (3 AM or 21 HALO) of the mice. We gave either TPT (12 mg/kg, injected i.p.) or XR (4 Gy, directed to the tumor) twice weekly on Days 0, 4, 7, 10 within 2 weeks. Results: Treatment with either TPT or XR at 3 AM demonstrated the greatest efficacy (measured by a tumor regrowth assay) without significantly increasing acute toxicity (assessed by a decrease in leukocyte counts or body weight). Conversely, treatment at 3 PM, in particular, showed increased toxicity without any enhanced efficacy. Conclusions: Our study provided the first evidence that chronomodulation of TPT treatments, consistent with the findings of other camptothecin analogs, is potentially clinically beneficial. Additionally, our findings suggest that chronomodulation of fractionated XR treatments is also potentially clinically beneficial.

  1. Deep hypothermia for the treatment of refractory status epilepticus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    as: Niquet J, et al, Deep hypothermia for the treatment ofas: Niquet J, et al, Deep hypothermia for the treatment ofSchmitt FC, Holtkamp M. Deep hypothermia terminates status

  2. Emerging nanotechnology approaches for HIV/AIDS treatment and prevention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    von Andrian, Ulrich H.

    Emerging nanotechnology approaches for HIV/AIDS treatment and prevention The emergence of AIDS effects and is ineffective in patients in whom the virus develops resistance. Nanotechnology of nanotechnology to provide more effective treatment and preven

  3. Treasury, Energy Announce Guidance for Tax Treatment of Smart...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Guidance for Tax Treatment of Smart Grid Investment Grants Treasury, Energy Announce Guidance for Tax Treatment of Smart Grid Investment Grants March 10, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis...

  4. ENVIRONMENTAL BIOTECHNOLOGY Brewery wastewater treatment using air-cathode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENVIRONMENTAL BIOTECHNOLOGY Brewery wastewater treatment using air-cathode microbial fuel cells using actual wastewaters. The efficiency of wastewater treatment of a beer brewery wastewater to solution conductivity. These results show that brewery wastewater can be effectively treated using MFCs

  5. Modeling Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems in the Dickinson Bayou Watershed 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forbis-Stokes, Aaron

    2012-10-19

    Onsite wastewater treatment systems (OWTSs) are a commonly used means of wastewater treatment in the Dickinson Bayou watershed which is located between Houston and Galveston. The Dickinson Bayou is classified as "impaired" by the Texas Commission...

  6. High throughput chemical munitions treatment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haroldsen, Brent L. (Manteca, CA); Stofleth, Jerome H. (Albuquerque, NM); Didlake, Jr., John E. (Livermore, CA); Wu, Benjamin C-P (San Ramon, CA)

    2011-11-01

    A new High-Throughput Explosive Destruction System is disclosed. The new system is comprised of two side-by-side detonation containment vessels each comprising first and second halves that feed into a single agent treatment vessel. Both detonation containment vessels further comprise a surrounding ventilation facility. Moreover, the detonation containment vessels are designed to separate into two half-shells, wherein one shell can be moved axially away from the fixed, second half for ease of access and loading. The vessels are closed by means of a surrounding, clam-shell type locking seal mechanisms.

  7. Hydrothermal Liquefaction Treatment Preliminary Hazard Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowry, Peter P.; Wagner, Katie A.

    2015-08-31

    A preliminary hazard assessment was completed during February 2015 to evaluate the conceptual design of the modular hydrothermal liquefaction treatment system. The hazard assessment was performed in 2 stages. An initial assessment utilizing Hazard Identification and Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA) techniques identified areas with significant or unique hazards (process safety-related hazards) that fall outside of the normal operating envelope of PNNL and warranted additional analysis. The subsequent assessment was based on a qualitative What-If analysis. This analysis was augmented, as necessary, by additional quantitative analysis for scenarios involving a release of hazardous material or energy with the potential for affecting the public.

  8. Computerized Energy and Treatment Cost Calculations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trace, W. L.

    1981-01-01

    operating conditions. This fact will be demonstrated graphically by comparing sodium zeolite softening versus demineralization on a typical raw water analysis. RAW WATER pH 7.2 Bicarbonate as HC0 3 102 mg I L Chloride as CI 10 mgt L Sulfate as S04... be necessary to control scale and corrosion throughout the boiler system. DE!\\i1N ERALIZAnON Let us now consider using the same raw water analysis, but using demineralization as treatment on the typical raw water. Figure 7 lists the ~2rlysis effluent...

  9. Sandusky Wastewater Treatment | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-bRenewableSMUD WindI Jump to:Miguel,Wastewater Treatment

  10. Inhibiting Individual Notch Receptors Improves Treatment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation CurrentHenryInhibiting Individual Notch Receptors Improves Treatment Print

  11. Laser research shows promise for cancer treatment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse Bergkamp Graduate studentScienceLaboratoryandBryanoutreachCancer treatment

  12. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Selecting and Permitting (Spanish) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2005-04-30

    This publication explains how to select and obtain a permit for an on-site wastewater treatment system in Texas....

  13. Biologically Inspired Photocatalytically Active Membranes for Water Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinsinger, Nichola

    2013-01-01

    sludge from the water stream following the bioreactor with the supernatant being the effluent from the wastewater treatment plant .

  14. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Waste Treatment Plant...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    More Documents & Publications Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Intermech Inc., Waste Treatment Plant Construction Site - November 2013 Voluntary Protection Program...

  15. Maintenance and Operations study for K basins sludge treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WESTRA, A.G.

    1998-11-30

    This study evaluates maintenance and operating concepts for the chemical treatment of sludge from the 100 K Basins at Hanford. The sludge treatment equipment that will require remote operation or maintenance was identified. Then various maintenance and operating concepts used in the nuclear industry were evaluated for applicability to sludge treatment. A hot cell or cells is recommended as the best maintenance and operating concept for a sludge treatment facility.

  16. Evaluation of biological treatment of pharmaceutical wastewater with pac addition. Project summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, D.A.; Osantowski, R.A.

    1988-07-01

    The purposes of the study were to: (1) attempt to find the cause of the formation of the viscous floating mass of mixed liquor solids (VFMLS), (2) generate additional research data for total chemical oxygen demand (TCOD) removal from pharmaceutical wastewater using the PACT process, (3) evaluate the efficiency of PACT in removing specific organics, (4) evaluate the effectiveness of PACT in reducing effluent aquatic toxicity, and (5) evaluate the use of a selector to improve the settling characteristics of the mixed liquor. One control unit, two PACT units, and a unit equipped with a series of selector basins were operated.

  17. BEHAVIOR CANOLA (BRASSICA NAPUS) FOLLOWING A SEWAGE SLUDGE TREATMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    . INTRODUCTION In Tunisia, the amount of sludge produced by wastewater treatment stations is constantly waste water treatment stations, in other words, most of it is wastewater from domestic sourcesBEHAVIOR CANOLA (BRASSICA NAPUS) FOLLOWING A SEWAGE SLUDGE TREATMENT Najla LASSOUED1,2 , Essaid

  18. ADAPTIVE MODEL BASED CONTROL FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boucherie, Richard J.

    that obliged the water boards to increase the energy-efficiency of wastewater treatment plants with at least 2ADAPTIVE MODEL BASED CONTROL FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANTS Arie de Niet1 , Maartje van de Vrugt2.j.boucherie@utwente.nl Abstract In biological wastewater treatment, nitrogen and phosphorous are removed by activated sludge

  19. MIP Models and BB Strategies in Brachytherapy Treatment Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Robert R.

    MIP Models and BB Strategies in Brachytherapy Treatment Optimization Robert R. Meyer (rrm­Madison Abstract. Brachytherapy (brachy being derived from a Greek word meaning short) is the treatment of cancer: brachytherapy, prostate cancer, branch­and­bound, optimization, inte­ ger programming, treatment planning

  20. Applications of nanotechnology in water and wastewater treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    Applications of nanotechnology in water and wastewater treatment Xiaolei Qu, Pedro J.J. Alvarez Accepted 11 September 2012 Available online 26 March 2013 Keywords: Nanotechnology Nanomaterials Water. Nanotechnology holds great potential in advancing water and wastewater treatment to improve treatment efficiency

  1. COORDINATING ADVICE AND ACTUAL TREATMENT Thomas A. Russ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russ, Thomas A.

    's treatment. Information about the treatment can come from one of three sources--advice from the program, clinical orders and records of actual treatment. At different times each of these information sources must. Using this assumption, complete care plans can be generated. It is also the only source of information

  2. Production of Electricity during Wastewater Treatment Using a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    treatment (2). However, effective methods for generating products other than methane from wastewater haveProduction of Electricity during Wastewater Treatment Using a Single Chamber Microbial Fuel Cell H provide potential for reducing treatment costs, but these technologies are generally only suitable

  3. Simulation of Heat Treatment Distortion R.A. Hardin1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    Simulation of Heat Treatment Distortion R.A. Hardin1 and C. Beckermann2 1 Research Engineer, 2 Abstract This paper gives an overview of the problem of heat treatment stress and distortion and a review reported in the literature of heat treatment distortion on Navy-C rings made from 4140 and 8620 steel

  4. Wastewater treatment and energy : an analysis on the feasibility of using renewable energy to power wastewater treatment plants in Singapore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foley, Kevin John

    2010-01-01

    Wastewater treatment is a very energy intensive industry. Singapore has a state-of-the-art wastewater treatment system that uses a number of sustainable techniques that greatly improve its overall efficiency. The centralized ...

  5. The New England Water Treatment Technology Assistance CenterThe New England Water Treatment Technology Assistance Center at theat the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raw water Supernatant drain Filter drain & backfill Sand media Support gravel Drain tile Overflow weir11 The New England Water Treatment Technology Assistance CenterThe New England Water Treatment Filtration Treatment Performance #12;22 TACsTACs Mission StatementMission Statement The small public water

  6. Lignin-blocking treatment of biomass and uses thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Bin (Hanover, NH); Wyman, Charles E. (Norwich, VT)

    2009-10-20

    Disclosed is a method for converting cellulose in a lignocellulosic biomass. The method provides for a lignin-blocking polypeptide and/or protein treatment of high lignin solids. The treatment enhances cellulase availability in cellulose conversion. Cellulase efficiencies are improved by the protein or polypeptide treatment. The treatment may be used in combination with steam explosion and acid prehydrolysis techniques. Hydrolysis yields from lignin containing biomass are enhanced 5-20%, and enzyme utilization is increased from 10% to 50%. Thus, a more efficient and economical method of processing lignin containing biomass materials utilizes a polypeptide/protein treatment step that effectively blocks lignin binding of cellulase.

  7. Evaluation of biological treatment for the degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in a wastewater treatment plant 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basu, Pradipta Ranjan

    2005-08-29

    . Samples were taken for two seasons, winter (Nov 03 ?? Jan 03) and summer (Jun 04 ?? Aug 04), from each of the four treatment units: the inlet tank, equalization tank, aeration tank and the outfall tank. The population of aliphatic hydrocarbon degraders...

  8. Revisiting the Past and Settling the Score: Index Revision for House Price Derivatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clapham, Eric; Englund, Peter; Quigley, John M.; Redfearn, Christian L.

    2007-01-01

    Method for Real Estate Price Index Construction. Journal ofRevision Bias in Repeat Sale Home Price Indices. UnpublishedCalhoun, C.A. 1996. OFHEO House Price Indexes: HPI Technical

  9. SETTLING OF SPINEL IN A HIGH-LEVEL WASTE GLASS MELTER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pavel Hrma; Pert Schill; Lubomir Nemec

    2002-01-07

    High-level nuclear waste is being vitrified, i.e., converted to a durable glass that can be stored in a safe repository for hundreds of thousands of years. Waste vitrification is accomplished in reactors called melters to which the waste is charged together with glass-forming additives. The mixture is electrically heated to a temperature as high as 1150 decrees C to create a melt that becomes glass on cooling.

  10. Settle for Segregation or Strive for Diversity? A Defining Moment for Maryland’s Public Schools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ayscue, Jennifer B.; Flaxman, Greg; Kucsera, John; Siegel?Hawley, Genevieve

    2013-01-01

    S. E. Eaton (Eds. ), Dismantling desegregation: The quietEaton, S. E. (1996). Dismantling desegregation: The quietS. E. Eaton (Eds. ), Dismantling desegregation: The quiet

  11. Design of a fast-settling OTA for high frequency switched-capacitor applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Jinki

    2002-01-01

    The ever-growing technology has enabled switched-capacitor (SC) circuits to operate at the MHz frequency range. The equally increasing demand for high speed signal processing using SC technique dictates the need of high performance operational...

  12. A design for an RGB LED driver with independent PWM control and fast settling time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashiabor, Awo Dede O

    2007-01-01

    A small sized and efficient method to power RGB LEDs for use as backlights in flat panel displays is explored in this thesis. The proposed method is to drive a parallel switched connection of LEDs with a single Average ...

  13. Utilization of salt marsh edge habitats by newly settled Sciaenids in a subtropical estuary 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geary, Bert Wilson

    2000-01-01

    and salinity, and S. ocellatus with water depth in vegetation. Cynoscion nebulosus were smaller, and significantly more numerous, along interior bay sites than near the tidal pass. Conversely, S. ocellatus were collected in significantly higher numbers...

  14. Concentration and velocity patterns in a horizontal rotating suspension of non-Brownian settling particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tong, Penger

    of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong, China Received 2 October 2004; published 22 in a wide range of technological applications 1­3 . Examples include the flow of mud, glass fibers industrial processes in chemical, metallur- gical, plastics, pharmaceutical, and food processing involve

  15. Fractionation of soil gases by diffusion of water vapor, gravitational settling, and thermal diffusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Severinghaus, J.P.; Bender, M.L. [Univ. of Rhode Island, RI (United States)] [Univ. of Rhode Island, RI (United States); Keeling, R.F. [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, LaJolla, CA (United States)] [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, LaJolla, CA (United States); Broecker, W.S. [Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Palisades, NY (United States)] [Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Palisades, NY (United States)

    1996-03-01

    Air sampled from the moist unsaturated zone in a sand dune exhibits depletion in the heavy isotopes of N{sub 2} and O{sub 2}. We propose that the depletion is caused by a diffusive flux of water vapor out of the dune, which sweeps out the other gases, forcing them to diffuse back into the dune. The heavy isotopes of N{sub 2} and O{sub 2} diffuse back more slowly, resulting in a steady-state depletion of the heavy isotopesin the dune interior. We predict the effect`s magnitude with molecular diffusion theory and reproduce it in a laboratory simulation, finding good agreement between field, theory, and lab. The magnitude of the effect is governed by the ratio of the binary diffusivities against water vapor of a pair of gases, and increases {approximately} linearly with the difference between the water vapor mole fraction of the site and the advectively mixed reservoir with which it is in diffusive contact (in most cases the atmosphere). 32 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  16. Microsoft Word - JMatyas_Empirical model of spinel settling.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Waste Glass, Ceramic Transactions 119, 301-308 (2001). 6 K.S. Matlack, W.K. Kot, W. Gong, W. Lutze, I.L. Pegg, and I. Joseph, Effects of High Spinel and Chromium Oxide Crystal...

  17. Settling Rates for Flocculation of Iron and Manganese Ore-Containing Suspensions by Cationic Glycogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Texas, University of

    of floccu- lants to liquid suspensions causes aggregation of particles in so-called flocs, thereby be recycled, water used for industrial processes can be reused successfully if purified; and purification in the recycling of domestic wastewater and of industrial and mineral processing effluents [1­3]. Flocculation

  18. Savannah River Site Contractor Agrees to Pay $3.8 Million to Settle False

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram: Report AppendicesA TokenCommercialSTEMSarah L. Gamage About Us

  19. Optimized alumina coagulants for water treatment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nyman, May D. (Albuquerque, NM); Stewart, Thomas A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2012-02-21

    Substitution of a single Ga-atom or single Ge-atom (GaAl.sub.12 and GeAl.sub.12 respectively) into the center of an aluminum Keggin polycation (Al.sub.13) produces an optimal water-treatment product for neutralization and coagulation of anionic contaminants in water. GaAl.sub.12 consistently shows .about.1 order of magnitude increase in pathogen reduction, compared to Al.sub.13. At a concentration of 2 ppm, GaAl.sub.12 performs equivalently to 40 ppm alum, removing .about.90% of the dissolved organic material. The substituted GaAl.sub.12 product also offers extended shelf-life and consistent performance. We also synthesized a related polyaluminum chloride compound made of pre-hydrolyzed dissolved alumina clusters of [GaO.sub.4Al.sub.12(OH).sub.24(H.sub.2O).sub.12].sup.7+.

  20. Siphons for Geosiphon{trademark} Treatment Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phifer, M.A.

    2001-07-26

    GeoSiphon{trademark} systems (patent pending) induce contaminated groundwater flow through permeable treatment media by utilizing a siphon between two points of hydraulic head difference. A siphon is a closed conduit that conveys liquid from a point of higher hydraulic head to one of lower head after raising it to a higher intermediate elevation, at sub-atmospheric conditions (negative gauge pressures or vacuum), without external power input. All surface waters and groundwaters contain dissolved gases, which degas within a siphon due to the vacuum and temperature within the siphon. Bubbles form, and if not properly managed will accumulate in the siphon, gradually reducing the flow rate until the system is ultimately shut down. Therefore appropriate management of gas within a siphon is the primary factor that must be considered to maintain continuous siphon flow. This report provides an overview of GeoSiphon technology and generic details concerning de-gassing in siphons and associated gas management methods.

  1. Medical waste treatment and decontamination system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC); Schulz, Rebecca L. (Aiken, SC); Clark, David E. (Gainesville, FL)

    2001-01-01

    The invention discloses a tandem microwave system consisting of a primary chamber in which hybrid microwave energy is used for the controlled combustion of materials. A second chamber is used to further treat the off-gases from the primary chamber by passage through a susceptor matrix subjected to additional hybrid microwave energy. The direct microwave radiation and elevated temperatures provide for significant reductions in the qualitative and quantitative emissions of the treated off gases. The tandem microwave system can be utilized for disinfecting wastes, sterilizing materials, and/or modifying the form of wastes to solidify organic or inorganic materials. The simple design allows on-site treatment of waste by small volume waste generators.

  2. Pressurized heat treatment of glass ceramic

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kramer, D.P.

    1984-04-19

    A method of producing a glass-ceramic having a specified thermal expansion value is disclosed. The method includes the step of pressurizing the parent glass material to a predetermined pressure during heat treatment so that the glass-ceramic produced has a specified thermal expansion value. Preferably, the glass-ceramic material is isostatically pressed. A method for forming a strong glass-ceramic to metal seal is also disclosed in which the glass-ceramic is fabricated to have a thermal expansion value equal to that of the metal. The determination of the thermal expansion value of a parent glass material placed in a high-temperature environment is also used to determine the pressure in the environment.

  3. Metallic Stents for Tracheobronchial Pathology Treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serrano, Carolina; Laborda, Alicia; Lozano, Juan M.; Caballero, Hugo; Sebastian, Antonio; Lopera, Jorge; Gregorio, Miguel Angel de

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To present the 7-year experience of the treatment of benign and malignant tracheobronchial stenoses using metallic stents. Patients and Methods: One hundred twenty-three stents were inserted in 86 patients (74 benign and 12 malignant stenoses). Ninety-seven stents were placed in the trachea and 26 in the bronchi. The procedures were performed under fluoroscopic and flexible bronchoscopic guidance with the patient under light sedation. In cases of severe stenotic lesions or obstructions, laser resection was performed before stent placement. Clinical and functional pulmonary data were recorded before and 3 months after the procedure. Follow-up involved clinical data and radiographic techniques at 48 h and at 1-, 3-, 6-, and 12-month intervals. Results: The technical success was 100 %. Dyspnea disappearance, forced expiratory volume in the first second, and pulmonary functional data improvement was observed in all patients (p < 0.001). Complications were detected in 23 patients (26.7 %). Mean follow-up time was 6.3 {+-} 1.2 months in patients with malignant lesions and 76.2 {+-} 2.3 months patients with in benign lesions. By the end of the study, 100 % of patients with malignant pathology and 6.7 % of patients with benign lesions had died. Conclusion: Endoluminal treatment of tracheobronchial stenosis with metallic stents is a therapeutic alternative in patients who are poor candidates for surgery. In unresectable malignant lesions, the benefit of metallic stenting is unquestionable. In benign lesions, the results are satisfactory, but sometimes other interventions are required to treat complications. New stent technology may improve these results.

  4. The efficacy of 308nm laser treatment of psoriasis compared to historical controls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodewald, Erin J; Housman, Tamara Salam; Mellen, Beverly G; Feldman, Steven R

    2001-01-01

    effective treatment for localized psoriasis. This study willReferences 1. Feldman SR: Psoriasis Treatment. Curr Proba realistic expectation of psoriasis treatment. J Am Acad

  5. A Case of Heat Treatment of Lithic Materials in Aboriginal Northwestern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gould, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    error approach to heat treatment would have been feasiblein Flint Knap- ping: 1, Heat Treatment of Silica Mine- rals.and descriptions of heat treatment under con- trolled

  6. The Role of Vitamin E in the Treatment of Male Infertility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wen, Joanne C

    2006-01-01

    be recommended as a treatment for male infertility. However,F (2005) Treatment of male infertility. Contraception. 72:in the treatment of male infertility A handful of studies

  7. Proposed Site Treatment Plan (PSTP). STP reference document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-02-22

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is required by Section 3021(b) of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), as amended by the Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFCAct), to prepare a plan describing the development of treatment capacities and technologies for treating mixed waste (hazardous/radioactive waste). DOE decided to prepare its site treatment plan in a three phased approach. The first phase, called the Conceptual Site Treatment Plan (CSTP), was issued in October 1993. At the Savannah River Site (SRS) the CSTP described mixed waste streams generated at SRS and listed treatment scenarios for each waste stream utilizing an onsite, offsite DOE, and offsite or onsite commercial or vendor treatment option. The CSTP is followed by the Draft Site Treatment Plan (DSTP), due to be issued in August 1994. The DSTP, the current activity., will narrow the options discussed in the CSTP to a preferred treatment option, if possible, and will include waste streams proposed to be shipped to SRS from other DOE facilities as well as waste streams SRS may send offsite for treatment. The SRS DSTP process has been designed to address treatment options for each of the site`s mixed waste streams. The SRS Proposed Site Treatment Plan (PSTP) is due to be issued in February 1995. The compliance order would be derived from the PSTP.

  8. Mixed and low-level waste treatment facility project. Volume 3, Waste treatment technologies (Draft)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    The technology information provided in this report is only the first step toward the identification and selection of process systems that may be recommended for a proposed mixed and low-level waste treatment facility. More specific information on each technology will be required to conduct the system and equipment tradeoff studies that will follow these preengineering studies. For example, capacity, maintainability, reliability, cost, applicability to specific waste streams, and technology availability must be further defined. This report does not currently contain all needed information; however, all major technologies considered to be potentially applicable to the treatment of mixed and low-level waste are identified and described herein. Future reports will seek to improve the depth of information on technologies.

  9. Waste treatment at the La Hague and Marcoule sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    In this report, an overview of waste treatment and solidification facilities located at the La Hague and Marcoule sites, which are owned and/or operated by Cogema, provided. The La Hague facilities described in this report include the following: The STE3 liquid effluent treatment facility (in operation); the AD2 solid waste processing facility (also in operation); and the UCD alpha waste treatment facility (under construction). The Marcoule facilities described in this report, both of which are in operation, include the following: The STEL-EVA liquid effluent treatment facilities for the entire site; and the alpha waste incinerator of the UPI plant. This report is organized into four sections: this introduction, low-level waste treatment at La Hague, low-level waste treatment at Marcoule, and new process development. including the solvent pyrolysis process currently in the development stage for Cogema`s plants.

  10. Implementation of Treatment Systems for Low and Intermediate Radioactive Waste at Site Radwaste Treatment Facility (SRTF), PR China - 12556

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lohmann, Peter; Nasarek, Ralph; Aign, Joerg

    2012-07-01

    The AP1000 reactors being built in the People's Republic of China require a waste treatment facility to process the low and intermediate radioactive waste produced by these nuclear power stations. Westinghouse Electric Germany GmbH was successful in being awarded a contract as to the planning, delivery and commissioning of such a waste treatment facility. The Site Radwaste Treatment Facility (SRTF) is a waste treatment facility that can meet the AP1000 requirements and it will become operational in the near future. The SRTF is situated at the location of Sanmen, People's Republic of China, next to one of the AP1000 and is an adherent building to the AP1000 comprising different waste treatment processes for radioactive spent filter cartridges, ion-exchange resins and radioactive liquid and solid waste. The final product of the SRTF-treatment is a 200 l drum with cemented waste or grouted waste packages for storage in a local storage facility. The systems used in the SRTF are developed for these special requirements, based on experience from similar systems in the German nuclear industry. The main waste treatment systems in the SRTF are: - Filter Cartridge Processing System (FCS); - HVAC-Filter and Solid Waste Treatment Systems (HVS); - Chemical Liquid Treatment Systems (CTS); - Spent Resin Processing Systems (RES); - Mobile Treatment System (MBS). (authors)

  11. Chemical Dust Treatment of Cottonseed for Planting Purposes. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, H. P. (Harris Pearson)

    1936-01-01

    -. lHEMICAL DUST TREATMENT OF COTTONSEED FOR PLANTING PURPOSES H. P. Smith, Chief, Division of Agricultural Engineering D. L. Jones, Superintendent, Substation No. 8, Lubl~ock D. T. Killough, Agronomist, Division of Agronomy H. C. Mc... Reports 3 6 to 41, inclusive. 10. Killough, D. T., "Cottonseed Treatment Proves Profitable." Progres- sive Farmer, Vol. 4 8, No. 3, March 19 3 3. 11. Lehman, S. G., "Studies on Treatment of Cottonseed." North Caro- lina Agricultural Experiment Station...

  12. No Chemical, Zero Bleed Cooling Tower Water Treatment Process 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coke, A. L.

    1992-01-01

    BLEED COOLING TOWER WATER TREATMENT PROCESS ALDEN L. COKE, CWS IV, PRESIDENT, AQUA-FLO, INC., BALTIMORE, MARYLAND ABSTRACT This paper describes a process to treat cooling tower water by means of a fully automated and chemical free mechanical water... treatment process. This is an alternative to conventional chemical treatment. Beginning with a suction pump to draw water out of the tower sump, water goes through a permanent magnetic descaler to increase the water solubility and begin the scale...

  13. Accelerated carbonation treatment of industrial wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunning, Peter J., E-mail: gunning_peter@hotmail.co [Centre for Contaminated Land Remediation, University of Greenwich, Chatham Maritime (United Kingdom); Hills, Colin D.; Carey, Paula J. [Centre for Contaminated Land Remediation, University of Greenwich, Chatham Maritime (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-15

    The disposal of industrial waste presents major logistical, financial and environmental issues. Technologies that can reduce the hazardous properties of wastes are urgently required. In the present work, a number of industrial wastes arising from the cement, metallurgical, paper, waste disposal and energy industries were treated with accelerated carbonation. In this process carbonation was effected by exposing the waste to pure carbon dioxide gas. The paper and cement wastes chemically combined with up to 25% by weight of gas. The reactivity of the wastes to carbon dioxide was controlled by their constituent minerals, and not by their elemental composition, as previously postulated. Similarly, microstructural alteration upon carbonation was primarily influenced by mineralogy. Many of the thermal wastes tested were classified as hazardous, based upon regulated metal content and pH. Treatment by accelerated carbonation reduced the leaching of certain metals, aiding the disposal of many as stable non-reactive wastes. Significant volumes of carbon dioxide were sequestrated into the accelerated carbonated treated wastes.

  14. Strategies for automatic online treatment plan reoptimization using clinical treatment planning system: A planning parameters study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Taoran; Wu, Qiuwen; Zhang, You; Vergalasova, Irina; Lee, W. Robert; Yin, Fang-Fang; Wu, Q. Jackie

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Adaptive radiation therapy for prostate cancer using online reoptimization provides an improved control of interfractional anatomy variations. However, the clinical implementation of online reoptimization is currently limited by the low efficiency of current strategies and the difficulties associated with integration into the current treatment planning system. This study investigates the strategies for performing fast (?2 min) automatic online reoptimization with a clinical fluence-map-based treatment planning system; and explores the performance with different input parameters settings: dose-volume histogram (DVH) objective settings, starting stage, and iteration number (in the context of real time planning).Methods: Simulated treatments of 10 patients were reoptimized daily for the first week of treatment (5 fractions) using 12 different combinations of optimization strategies. Options for objective settings included guideline-based RTOG objectives, patient-specific objectives based on anatomy on the planning CT, and daily-CBCT anatomy-based objectives adapted from planning CT objectives. Options for starting stages involved starting reoptimization with and without the original plan's fluence map. Options for iteration numbers were 50 and 100. The adapted plans were then analyzed by statistical modeling, and compared both in terms of dosimetry and delivery efficiency.Results: All online reoptimized plans were finished within ?2 min with excellent coverage and conformity to the daily target. The three input parameters, i.e., DVH objectives, starting stage, and iteration number, contributed to the outcome of optimization nearly independently. Patient-specific objectives generally provided better OAR sparing compared to guideline-based objectives. The benefit in high-dose sparing from incorporating daily anatomy into objective settings was positively correlated with the relative change in OAR volumes from planning CT to daily CBCT. The use of the original plan fluence map as the starting stage reduced OAR dose at the mid-dose region, but increased the monitor units by 17%. Differences of only 2cc or less in OAR V50%/V70Gy/V76Gy were observed between 100 and 50 iterations.Conclusions: It is feasible to perform automatic online reoptimization in ?2 min using a clinical treatment planning system. Selecting optimal sets of input parameters is the key to achieving high quality reoptimized plans, and should be based on the individual patient's daily anatomy, delivery efficiency, and time allowed for plan adaptation.

  15. Microsoft Word - WaterTreatmentBuilding_20110428.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Suzanne Heaston, Bechtel National, Inc., (509) 371-2329 Carrie Meyer, Department of Energy, (509) 372-0810 Richland, Wash. -- Recently, crews at the Hanford Waste Treatment...

  16. Treatment of Difficult Waters: Arsenic Removal Silica Control...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Difficult Waters: Arsenic Removal Silica Control Carbon Capture and Enhanced Oil Recovery. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Treatment of Difficult Waters:...

  17. Energy-Efficient Window Treatments | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Window Treatments September 25, 2012 - 9:04am Addthis The awnings on this home shade the windows and generate electricity. | Photo courtesy of iStockphoto...

  18. Oct. 25 Lecture Highlights Treatment Technology of HU's Proton...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oct. 25 Lecture Highlights Treatment Technology of HU's Proton Therapy Institute Cynthia Keppel Hampton University Proton Therapy Institute Scientific and Technical Director,...

  19. Enterprise Assessments Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Office of Enterprise Assessments Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality June 2015 Office of Nuclear Safety and Environmental...

  20. Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality May 2011 August 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of...

  1. Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Independent Oversight Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality May 2011 October 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management...

  2. Hanford ETR Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - Hanford...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    More Documents & Publications Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification Facility EMAB Reports and Recommendations - September 2010 System Planning for...

  3. EA-1190: Wastewater Treatment Capability Upgrade, Amarillo, Texas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposed upgrade of the U.S. Department of Energy Pantex Plant Wastewater Treatment Plant in Amarillo, Texas.

  4. Enterprise Assessments Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Hazards Analysis Report for the Low-Activity Waste Facility Reagent Systems - July 2015 Enterprise Assessments Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant...

  5. Enterprise Assessments Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low-Activity Waste Facility Hazards Analysis Reports for the Melter and Melter Offgas Systems - September 2015...

  6. Operational Awareness Review of the Hanford Sludge Treatment...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Operations Office Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Sludge Treatment Project Dates of...

  7. Wastewater treatment -- New regs add emissions control to managers' duties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorman, P.M. (Environmental Process Technologies Inc., Munster, IN (United States)); Forrest, C.J. (Equinox Environmental Consultants Ltd., Wheaton, IL (United States))

    1994-06-01

    Wastewater treatment facilities traditionally were regulated primarily from the standpoint of effluent criteria and solid waste disposal requirements. However, since passage of the Clean Air Act (CAA) Amendments, wastewater treatment facility operators must be concerned with air emissions, especially of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), generated by their processes. Three basic approaches are used to manage VOC emissions from wastewater treatment systems--pollution prevention activities, wastewater treatment control methods and emissions control methods. These approaches may be used in combination to minimize VOCs in industrial and municipal wastewater streams.

  8. Nanotechnology in Cancer Treatment and Detection Richard Acosta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fygenson, Deborah Kuchnir

    Nanotechnology in Cancer Treatment and Detection Richard Acosta #12;Motivation ·Ineffectiveness or roughly 100 times smaller than most human cells Cancer Nanotechnology research is interdisciplinary

  9. Enterprise Assessments Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Project Engineering Processes - October 2015 Enterprise Assessments Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project Engineering Processes - October 2015...

  10. Report: EM Tank Waste Subcommittee Full Report for Waste Treatment...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    meeting, enclosed please find the Environmental Management Advisory Board EM Tank Waste Subcommittee Report for Waste Treatment Plant; Report Number EMAB EM-TWS WTP-001,...

  11. Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Analytical Laboratory...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2 Technology Readiness Assessment for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Analytical Laboratory, Balance of Facilities and LAW Waste Vitrification Facilities L....

  12. Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    6 Technology Readiness Assessment for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) HLW Waste Vitrification Facility L. Holton D. Alexander C. Babel H. Sutter J. Young August...

  13. Improvement in severe psoriasis associated with isoniazid treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiriac, Anca; Ferariu, Dan; Solovan, Caius; Brzezinski, Piotr; Feldman, Steven R

    2014-01-01

    macrolide treatment for psoriasis vulgaris. J Dermatol. 2000F, Petri V.. Erythrodermic psoriasis with regression afterguttate and chronic plaque psoriasis. Br J Dermatol. 2001

  14. Effects of Surface Plasma Treatment on Tribology of Thermoplastic Polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Texas, University of

    Effects of Surface Plasma Treatment on Tribology of Thermoplastic Polymers Alexander Bismarck,1 polyethylene (LDPE), polystyrene (PS), polypropylene (PP), and Hytrel1 (HY, a thermoplastic elastomer

  15. Recovery Act Supports Construction of Site's Largest Groundwater Treatment Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Construction of the largest groundwater treatment facility at the Hanford Site – a major American Recovery and Reinvestment Act project – is on schedule and more than 70 percent...

  16. ORS 466 - Storage, Treatment, and Disposal of Hazardous Waste...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History ORS 466 - Storage, Treatment, and Disposal of Hazardous Waste and Materials Jump to: navigation, search...

  17. Oregon Procedure and Criteria for Hazardous Waste Treatment,...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Oregon Procedure and Criteria for Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage or Disposal Permits Fact Sheet Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Permitting...

  18. Characterization of monolayer surface treatments for MEMS exposed...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Characterization of monolayer surface treatments for MEMS exposed to possible back-end-of-line conditions. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Characterization...

  19. automated improvement of radiation therapy treatment plans by ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-11-06

    The ROIs of the treatment plan are indexed by the set R, which is partitioned ...... F. Ricchetti, G. Sanguineti, M. Kazhdan, P. Simari, R. Jacques, R. Taylor, and.

  20. SECONDARY WASTE MANAGEMENT STRATEGY FOR EARLY LOW ACTIVITY WASTE TREATMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CRAWFORD TW

    2008-07-17

    This study evaluates parameters relevant to River Protection Project secondary waste streams generated during Early Low Activity Waste operations and recommends a strategy for secondary waste management that considers groundwater impact, cost, and programmatic risk. The recommended strategy for managing River Protection Project secondary waste is focused on improvements in the Effiuent Treatment Facility. Baseline plans to build a Solidification Treatment Unit adjacent to Effluent Treatment Facility should be enhanced to improve solid waste performance and mitigate corrosion of tanks and piping supporting the Effiuent Treatment Facility evaporator. This approach provides a life-cycle benefit to solid waste performance and reduction of groundwater contaminants.

  1. Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilizati...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and Immobilization Plant - December 2013 December 2013 Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality This report documents the...

  2. Enterprise Assessments Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Enterprise Assessments Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality - June 2015 Enterprise Assessments Review of the Hanford Site Waste...

  3. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Waste Treatment Project...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Hanford Site - June 2010 Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Intermech Inc., Waste Treatment Plant Construction Site - November 2013 Voluntary Protection Program...

  4. Enterprise Assessments Review, Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilizat...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and Immobilization Plant - January 2015 January, 2015 Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality The U.S. Department of...

  5. Enterprise Assessments Review, Hanford Site Waste Treatment and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Immobilization Plant - September 2014 September 2014 Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality The U.S. Department of...

  6. Development of New Treatments for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiPaola, R. S.; Abate-Shen, C.; Hait, W. N.

    2005-02-01

    The Dean and Betty Gallo Prostate Cancer Center (GPCC) was established with the goal of eradicating prostate cancer and improving the lives of men at risk for the disease through research, treatment, education and prevention. GPCC was founded in the memory of Dean Gallo, a beloved New Jersey Congressman who died tragically of prostate cancer diagnosed at an advanced stage. GPCC unites a team of outstanding researchers and clinicians who are committed to high-quality basic research, translation of innovative research to the clinic, exceptional patient care, and improving public education and awareness of prostate cancer. GPCC is a center of excellence of The Cancer Institute of New Jersey, which is the only NCI-designated comprehensive cancer center in the state. GPCC efforts are now integrated well as part of our Prostate Program at CINJ, in which Dr. Robert DiPaola and Dr. Cory Abate-Shen are co-leaders. The Prostate Program unites 19 investigators from 10 academic departments who have broad and complementary expertise in prostate cancer research. The overall goal and unifying theme is to elucidate basic mechanisms of prostate growth and oncogenesis, with the ultimate goal of promoting new and effective strategies for the eradication of prostate cancer. Members' wide range of research interests collectively optimize the chances of providing new insights into normal prostate biology and unraveling the molecular pathophysiology of prostate cancer. Cell culture and powerful animal models developed by program members recapitulate the various stages of prostate cancer progression, including prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, adenocarcinoma, androgen-independence, invasion and metastases. These models promise to further strengthen an already robust program of investigator-initiated therapeutic clinical trials, including studies adopted by national cooperative groups. Efforts to translate laboratory results into clinical studies of early detection and chemoprevention are underway. The specific goals of this program are: (1) To investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying normal prostate growth and differentiation and elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying prostate oncogenesis. (2) To build on fundamental knowledge to develop effective therapeutic approaches for the treatment of prostate cancer. (3) To improve the control of prostate cancer through early detection, chemoprevention, and outreach and education. This new disease-based program is structured to improve interdisciplinary interactions and translational results. Already, through the dynamic leadership of Drs. Cory Abate-Shen and Robert DiPaola, new investigators were attracted to the field, new collaborations engendered, and numerous investigator-initiated trials implemented. Progress in GPCC and the program overall has been outstanding. The Center has success in uniting investigators with broad and complementary expertise in prostate cancer research. The overall goal and unifying theme is to elucidate basic mechanisms of prostate growth and oncogenesis, with the ultimate goal of promoting new and effective strategies for the eradication of prostate cancer in patients and populations at risk. Members wide range of research interests collectively optimize the chances of providing new insights into normal prostate biology and unraveling the molecular pathophysiology of prostate cancer. Studies in cell culture and powerful animal models developed recapitulate the various stages of prostate cancer progression, including prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, adenocarcinoma, androgen-independence, invasion and metastases. These models promise to further strengthen an already robust program of investigator-initiated therapeutic clinical trials, including studies adopted by national cooperative groups. Efforts to translate laboratory results into clinical studies of early detection and chemoprevention are underway.

  7. Aqueous Waste Treatment Plant at Aldermaston

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keene, D. [RWE NUKEM, Ltd, 424 Harwell, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX 110GJ (United Kingdom); Fowler, J.; Frier, S. [AWE plc, Aldermaston, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-01

    For over half a century the Pangbourne Pipeline formed part of AWE's liquid waste management system. Since 1952 the 11.5 mile pipeline carried pre-treated wastewater from the Aldermaston site for safe dispersal in the River Thames. Such discharges were in strict compliance with the exacting conditions demanded by all regulatory authorities, latterly, those of the Environment Agency. In March 2005 AWE plc closed the Pangbourne Pipeline and ceased discharges of treated active aqueous waste to the River Thames via this route. The ability to effectively eliminate active liquid discharges to the environment is thanks to an extensive programme of waste minimization on the Aldermaston site, together with the construction of a new Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). Waste minimization measures have reduced the effluent arisings by over 70% in less than four years. The new WTP has been built using best available technology (evaporation followed by reverse osmosis) to remove trace levels of radioactivity from wastewater to exceptionally stringent standards. Active operation has confirmed early pilot scale trials, with the plant meeting throughput and decontamination performance targets, and final discharges being at or below limits of detection. The performance of the plant allows the treated waste to be discharged safely as normal industrial effluent from the AWE site. Although the project has had a challenging schedule, the project was completed on programme, to budget and with an exemplary safety record (over 280,000 hours in construction with no lost time events) largely due to a pro-active partnering approach between AWE plc and RWE NUKEM and its sub-contractors. (authors)

  8. Embedded NICT* tools and traceability to control phytochemical treatments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    the possible tracks allowing the management of news methods of treatment. 1. Introduction Water pollution treatment in order to provide acceptable drinking water. Different studies [7] show that some pesticides, pesticide reaching the vegetal target and pesticide contamination of surface waters. 1.2. The context Author-produced

  9. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Composting is an effective treatment option for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Composting is an effective treatment option for sanitization of Phytophthora of California, Berkeley, CA, USA 2 Sonoma Compost, Sonoma, CA, USA 3 McEvoy Ranch, Marin, CA, USA Introduction.1111/j.1365-2672.2006.03008.x Abstract Aims: To determine the effects of heat and composting treatments

  10. Application of Matrix Completion on Water Treatment Data Sofia Savvaki

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsakalides, Panagiotis

    Application of Matrix Completion on Water Treatment Data Sofia Savvaki savvaki@csd.uoc.gr Grigorios) have rev- olutionized water management in urban areas. Nevertheless, literature reports minor progress in introducing CPS-based systems at industrial water treatment plants, responsible for water purification

  11. CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health- Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Occupational Safety and Industrial Hygiene programs at the MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project.

  12. Idaho Site Launches Corrective Actions Before Restarting Waste Treatment Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    IDAHO FALLS, Idaho – The Idaho site and its cleanup contractor have launched a series of corrective actions they will complete before safely resuming startup operations at the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU) following an incident in June that caused the new waste treatment facility to shut down.

  13. Treatment-Based Traffic Classification for Residential Wireless Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinicki, Robert E.

    provide no QoS support (e.g., the 5th generation Apple Airport Extreme IEEE 802.11n wireless router [101 Treatment-Based Traffic Classification for Residential Wireless Networks Feng Li, Mark Claypool concurrently over bottlenecked wireless access points (APs). This paper presents Classification and Treatment

  14. Extracting yeast stress genes by dependencies between stress treatments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaski, Samuel

    Extracting yeast stress genes by dependencies between stress treatments Arto Klamia,b , Janne, Finland c Medicel Oy, Helsinki, Finland 17 data sets from different stress treatments, obtained from two different sources (Gasch et al. 2000, Causton et al. 2001) Heat (3), acid, alkali, peroxide, Na

  15. Case history advanced coatings for water treatment plant components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephenson, L.D.; Kumar, A.

    2008-12-15

    Components of water treatment plants (WTPs) are susceptible to corrosion from constant immersion in water. A case history of corrosion and proximity to chlorine problems and their treatment at an Army WTP is presented. Solutions included using high micro-silica restoration mortar and advanced coal tar epoxy coatings.

  16. Desalination and Water Treatment www.deswater.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Desalination and Water Treatment www.deswater.com 1944-3994 / 1944-3986 © 2011 Desalination 1. Introduction Membrane distillation (MD) is a thermally driven desalination process that involves. / Desalination and Water Treatment 32 (2011) 234­241 235 100% rejection of ions, dissolved non-volatile organics

  17. CITY OF PRINCE GEORGE: RADIO FREQUENCY TREATMENT OF PARTIALLY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;CITY OF PRINCE GEORGE: RADIO FREQUENCY TREATMENT OF PARTIALLY DIGESTED/DEWATERED BIOSOLIDS Vancouver, B.C. V7M 3H7 #12;S-1 CITY OF PRINCE GEORGE RADIO FREQUENCY TREATMENT OF PARTIALLY DIGESTED/DEWATERED BIOSOLIDS FINAL REPORT SUMMARY The City of Prince George recently proposed to investigate the possibility

  18. DOES PHOSPHATE TREATMENT FOR PREVENTION OF EUTROPHICATION PASS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bateman, Ian J.

    , eutrophication, pollution. #12;1 1. INTRODUCTION The eutrophication of water bodies is a natural phenomenonDOES PHOSPHATE TREATMENT FOR PREVENTION OF EUTROPHICATION PASS THE BENEFIT-COST TEST? by Ian Subramanian CSERGE Working Paper EDM 06-13 #12;Does phosphate treatment for prevention of eutrophication pass

  19. METHODOLOGY Open Access TRIzol treatment of secretory phase endometrium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    METHODOLOGY Open Access TRIzol treatment of secretory phase endometrium allows combined proteomic/proteins. Conclusion: TRIzol treatment of secretory phase EM allows combined proteomic and mRNA microarray analysis abnormal bleeding; infertility and chronic fatigue. Well established biological differences between eutopic

  20. Low level mixed waste thermal treatment technical basis report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Place, B.G.

    1994-12-01

    Detailed characterization of the existing and projected Hanford Site Radioactive Mixed Waste (RMW) inventory was initiated in 1993 (Place 1993). This report presents an analysis of the existing and projected RMW inventory. The subject characterization effort continues to be in support of the following engineering activities related to thermal treatment of Hanford Site RMW: (1) Contracting for commercial thermal treatment; (2) Installation and operation of an onsite thermal treatment facility (Project W-242); (3) Treatment at another Department of Energy (DOE) site. The collation of this characterization information (data) has emphasized the establishment of a common data base for the entire existing RMW inventory so that the specification of feed streams destined for different treatment facilities can be coordinated.

  1. Simplifying EPID dosimetry for IMRT treatment verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pecharroman-Gallego, R.; Mans, Anton; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Stroom, Joep C.; Olaciregui-Ruiz, Igor; Herk, Marcel van; Mijnheer, Ben J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) are increasingly used for IMRT dose verification, both pretreatment and in vivo. In this study, an earlier developed backprojection model has been modified to avoid the need for patient-specific transmission measurements and, consequently, leads to a faster procedure. Methods: Currently, the transmission, an essential ingredient of the backprojection model, is estimated from the ratio of EPID measurements with and without a phantom/patient in the beam. Thus, an additional irradiation to obtain ''open images'' under the same conditions as the actual phantom/patient irradiation is required. However, by calculating the transmission of the phantom/patient in the direction of the beam instead of using open images, this extra measurement can be avoided. This was achieved by using a model that includes the effect of beam hardening and off-axis dependence of the EPID response on photon beam spectral changes. The parameters in the model were empirically obtained by performing EPID measurements using polystyrene slab phantoms of different thickness in 6, 10, and 18 MV photon beams. A theoretical analysis to verify the sensitivity of the model with patient thickness changes was performed. The new model was finally applied for the analysis of EPID dose verification measurements of step-and-shoot IMRT treatments of head and neck, lung, breast, cervix, prostate, and rectum patients. All measurements were carried out using Elekta SL20i linear accelerators equipped with a hydrogenated amorphous silicon EPID, and the IMRT plans were made using PINNACLE software (Philips Medical Systems). Results: The results showed generally good agreement with the dose determined using the old model applying the measured transmission. The average differences between EPID-based in vivo dose at the isocenter determined using either the new model for transmission and its measured value were 2.6{+-}3.1%, 0.2{+-}3.1%, and 2.2{+-}3.9% for 47 patients treated with 6, 10, and 18 MV IMRT beams, respectively. For the same group of patients, the differences in mean {gamma} analysis (3% maximum dose, 3 mm) were 0.16{+-}0.26%, 0.21{+-}0.24%, and 0.02{+-}0.12%, respectively. For a subgroup of 11 patients, pretreatment verification was also performed, showing similar dose differences at the isocenter: -1.9{+-}0.9%, -1.4{+-}1.2%, and -0.4{+-}2.4%, with somewhat lower mean {gamma} difference values: 0.01{+-}0.09%, 0.01{+-}0.07%, and -0.09{+-}0.10%, respectively. Clinical implementation of the new model would save 450 h/yr spent in measurement of open images. Conclusions: It can be concluded that calculating instead of measuring the transmission leads to differences in the isocenter dose generally smaller than 2% (2.6% for 6 MV photon beams for in vivo dose) and yielded only slightly higher {gamma}-evaluation parameter values in planes through the isocenter. Hence, the new model is suitable for clinical implementation and measurement of open images can be omitted.

  2. Closed Fuel Cycle Waste Treatment Strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vienna, J. D.; Collins, E. D.; Crum, J. V.; Ebert, W. L.; Frank, S. M.; Garn, T. G.; Gombert, D.; Jones, R.; Jubin, R. T.; Maio, V. C.; Marra, J. C.; Matyas, J.; Nenoff, T. M.; Riley, B. J.; Sevigny, G. J.; Soelberg, N. R.; Strachan, D. M.; Thallapally, P. K.; Westsik, J. H.

    2015-02-01

    This study is aimed at evaluating the existing waste management approaches for nuclear fuel cycle facilities in comparison to the objectives of implementing an advanced fuel cycle in the U.S. under current legal, regulatory, and logistical constructs. The study begins with the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) Integrated Waste Management Strategy (IWMS) (Gombert et al. 2008) as a general strategy and associated Waste Treatment Baseline Study (WTBS) (Gombert et al. 2007). The tenets of the IWMS are equally valid to the current waste management study. However, the flowsheet details have changed significantly from those considered under GNEP. In addition, significant additional waste management technology development has occurred since the GNEP waste management studies were performed. This study updates the information found in the WTBS, summarizes the results of more recent technology development efforts, and describes waste management approaches as they apply to a representative full recycle reprocessing flowsheet. Many of the waste management technologies discussed also apply to other potential flowsheets that involve reprocessing. These applications are occasionally discussed where the data are more readily available. The report summarizes the waste arising from aqueous reprocessing of a typical light-water reactor (LWR) fuel to separate actinides for use in fabricating metal sodium fast reactor (SFR) fuel and from electrochemical reprocessing of the metal SFR fuel to separate actinides for recycle back into the SFR in the form of metal fuel. The primary streams considered and the recommended waste forms include; Tritium in low-water cement in high integrity containers (HICs); Iodine-129: As a reference case, a glass composite material (GCM) formed by the encapsulation of the silver Mordenite (AgZ) getter material in a low-temperature glass is assumed. A number of alternatives with distinct advantages are also considered including a fused silica waste form with encapsulated nano-sized AgI crystals; Carbon-14 immobilized as a CaCO3 in a cement waste form; Krypton-85 stored as a compressed gas; An aqueous reprocessing high-level waste (HLW) raffinate waste immobilized by the vitrification process; An undissolved solids (UDS) fraction from aqueous reprocessing of LWR fuel either included in the borosilicate HLW glass or immobilized in the form of a metal alloy or titanate ceramics; Zirconium-based LWR fuel cladding hulls and stainless steel (SS) fuel assembly hardware super-compacted for disposal or purified for reuse (or disposal as low-level waste, LLW) of Zr by reactive gas separations; Electrochemical process salt HLW incorporated into a glass bonded Sodalite waste form; and Electrochemical process UDS and SS cladding hulls melted into an iron based alloy waste form. Mass and volume estimates for each of the recommended waste forms based on the source terms from a representative flowsheet are reported. In addition to the above listed primary waste streams, a range of secondary process wastes are generated by aqueous reprocessing of LWR fuel, metal SFR fuel fabrication, and electrochemical reprocessing of SFR fuel. These secondary wastes have been summarized and volumes estimated by type and classification. The important waste management data gaps and research needs have been summarized for each primary waste stream and selected waste process.

  3. Sodium-Bearing Waste Treatment, Applied Technology Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lance Lauerhass; Vince C. Maio; S. Kenneth Merrill; Arlin L. Olson; Keith J. Perry

    2003-06-01

    Settlement Agreement between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho mandates treatment of sodium-bearing waste at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center within the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. One of the requirements of the Settlement Agreement is to complete treatment of sodium-bearing waste by December 31, 2012. Applied technology activities are required to provide the data necessary to complete conceptual design of four identified alternative processes and to select the preferred alternative. To provide a technically defensible path forward for the selection of a treatment process and for the collection of needed data, an applied technology plan is required. This document presents that plan, identifying key elements of the decision process and the steps necessary to obtain the required data in support of both the decision and the conceptual design. The Sodium-Bearing Waste Treatment Applied Technology Plan has been prepared to provide a description/roadmap of the treatment alternative selection process. The plan details the results of risk analyzes and the resulting prioritized uncertainties. It presents a high-level flow diagram governing the technology decision process, as well as detailed roadmaps for each technology. The roadmaps describe the technical steps necessary in obtaining data to quantify and reduce the technical uncertainties associated with each alternative treatment process. This plan also describes the final products that will be delivered to the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office in support of the office's selection of the final treatment technology.

  4. Salix sp. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hugh D. Wilson

    2011-08-10

    for the treatment and utilization of milking parlor wastewater and open lot runoff. Wastewater and runoff were routed through settling basins and anaerobic treatment lagoons before irrigation onto cropland. Specific objectives of the study were to integrate a...

  5. Commercial waste treatment program annual progress report for FY 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McElroy, J.L.; Burkholder, H.C. (comps.)

    1984-02-01

    This annual report describes progress during FY 1983 relating to technologies under development by the Commercial Waste Treatment Program, including: development of glass waste form and vitrification equipment for high-level wastes (HLW); waste form development and process selection for transuranic (TRU) wastes; pilot-scale operation of a radioactive liquid-fed ceramic melter (LFCM) system for verifying the reliability of the reference HLW treatment proces technology; evaluation of treatment requirements for spent fuel as a waste form; second-generation waste form development for HLW; and vitrification process control and product quality assurance technologies.

  6. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Gravel-less Pipe 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2000-04-10

    absorption field Gravel-less pipe On-site wastewater treatment systems Gravel-less pipe Bruce Lesikar and Russell Persyn Extension Agricultural Engineering Specialist, Extension Assistant-Water Conservation The Texas A&M University System L-5343 1-00 Figure... are surrounded by geotextile fabric instead of gravel. A gravel-less pipe system includes: 3 A treatment device, generally a septic tank, but it can be an advanced treatment system. 3 Gravel-less pipe, which is made of corrugated, perforated polyeth- ylene...

  7. Waste Treatment Technology Process Development Plan For Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste Recycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCabe, Daniel J.; Wilmarth, William R.; Nash, Charles A.

    2013-08-29

    The purpose of this Process Development Plan is to summarize the objectives and plans for the technology development activities for an alternative path for disposition of the recycle stream that will be generated in the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility (LAW Recycle). This plan covers the first phase of the development activities. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to recycle it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be concentrated by evaporation and returned to the LAW vitrification facility. Because this stream contains components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are also problematic for the glass waste form, they accumulate in the Recycle stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers. Approximately 32% of the sodium in Supplemental LAW comes from glass formers used to make the extra glass to dilute the halides to acceptable concentrations in the LAW glass, and reducing the halides in the Recycle is a key component of this work. Additionally, under possible scenarios where the LAW vitrification facility commences operation prior to the WTP Pretreatment facility, this stream does not have a proven disposition path, and resolving this gap becomes vitally important. This task seeks to examine the impact of potential future disposition of this stream in the Hanford tank farms, and to develop a process that will remove radionuclides from this stream and allow its diversion to another disposition path, greatly decreasing the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste. The origin of this LAW Recycle stream will be from the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS) and the Wet Electrostatic Precipitator (WESP) from the LAW melter off-gas system. The stream is expected to be a dilute salt solution with near neutral pH, and will likely contain some insoluble solids from melter carryover or precipitates of scrubbed components (e.g. carbonates). The soluble components are mostly sodium and ammonium salts of nitrate, chloride, and fluoride. This stream has not been generated yet, and will not be available until the WTP begins operation, causing uncertainty in its composition, particularly the radionuclide content. This plan will provide an estimate of the likely composition and the basis for it, assess likely treatment technologies, identify potential disposition paths, establish target treatment limits, and recommend the testing needed to show feasibility. Two primary disposition options are proposed for investigation, one is concentration for storage in the tank farms, and the other is treatment prior to disposition in the Effluent Treatment Facility. One of the radionuclides that is volatile and expected to be in high concentration in this LAW Recycle stream is Technetium-99 ({sup 99}Tc), a long-lived radionuclide with a half-life of 210,000 years. Technetium will not be removed from the aqueous waste in the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), and will primarily end up immobilized in the LAW glass, which will be disposed in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Because {sup 99}Tc has a very long half-life and is highly mobile, it is the largest dose contributor to the Performance Assessment (PA) of the IDF. Other radionuclides that are also expected to be in appreciable concentration in the LAW Recycle are {sup 129}I, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, and {sup 241}Am. The concentrations of these radionuclides in this stream will be much lower than in the LAW, but they will still be higher than limits for some of the other disposition pathways currently available. Although the baseline process will recycle this stream to the Pretreatment Facility, if the LAW facility begins operation first, this stream will not have a disposition path internal to WTP. One potential solution is to return the stream to the tank farms where it can be evaporated in the 242-A evaporator, or perhaps deploy an auxiliary evaporator to concentrate it prior to return to the tank farms. In either case, testing is needed to evaluat

  8. The index of tobacco treatment quality: development of a tool to assess evidence-based treatment in a national sample of drug treatment facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cupertino, Ana Paula; Hunt, Jamie J.; Gajewski, Byron J.; Jiang, Yu; Marquis, Janet; Friedman, Peter D.; Engelman, Kimberly K.; Richter, Kimber P.

    2013-03-15

    to treatment in a national s facilities© 2013 Cupertino et al.; licensee BioMed Cent Commons Attribution License (http://creativec reproduction in any medium, provided the orOpen Access tment quality: assess evidence-based mple of drug treatmentral Ltd.... This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative ommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and iginal work is properly cited. Cupertino et al. Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention, and Policy 2013, 8...

  9. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Selecting and Permitting 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2005-04-30

    This publication explains factors to consider when choosing an on-site wastewater treatment system and lists the nine steps required to obtain a permit for one. It includes addresses and phone numbers of Texas Natural Resource Conservation...

  10. Automatically Identifying Candidate Treatments from Existing Medical Literature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pratt, Wanda

    fish oil to treat Raynaud's disease (Swanson and Smalheiser 1997). Medical scientists are nowAutomatically Identifying Candidate Treatments from Existing Medical Literature Catherine Blake to transform the titles to known medical concepts, and the other applied additional semantic constraints

  11. 300 Area waste acid treatment system closure plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    This section provides a description of the Hanford Site, identifies the proposed method of 300 Area Waste Acid Treatment System (WATS) closure, and briefly summarizes the contents of each chapter of this plan.

  12. Characterization and Pre-treatment of LLW in Turkey - 12572

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osmanlioglu, Ahmet Erdal

    2012-07-01

    Pre-treatment of radioactive waste is the first step in waste management program that occurs after waste generation from various applications in Turkey. Pre-treatment and characterization practices are carried out in Radioactive Waste Management Unit (RWMU) at Cekmece Nuclear Research and Training Center (CNRTC) in Istanbul. This facility has been assigned to take all low-level radioactive wastes generated by nuclear applications in Turkey. The wastes are generated from research and nuclear applications mainly in medicine, biology, agriculture, quality control in metal processing and construction industries. These wastes are classified as low- level radioactive wastes. Pre-treatment practices cover several steps. In this paper, main steps of pre-treatment and characterization are presented. Basically these are; collection, segregation, chemical adjustment, size reduction and decontamination operations. (author)

  13. Life-cycle assessment of wastewater treatment plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Bo, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01

    This thesis presents a general model for the carbon footprints analysis of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), using a life cycle assessment (LCA) approach. In previous research, the issue of global warming is often related ...

  14. Boiler System Efficiency Improves with Effective Water Treatment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bloom, D.

    1999-01-01

    efficiency. Condensate which is contaminated with corrosion products or process chemicals, however, is ill fit for reuse; and steam which leaks from piping, valves, traps and connections cannot be recovered. Effective chemical treatment, in conjunction...

  15. Critical Review of Desalination Concentrate Management, Treatment and Beneficial Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University, Las Cruces, New Mexico. 3 Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, Colorado School for deep well injection, land availability), costs, and potential environmental impacts. Converting and environmental impacts. This paper critically reviews con- centrate management strategies, treatment technologies

  16. Advanced Reduction Processes - A New Class of Treatment Processes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vellanki, Bhanu Prakash

    2012-10-19

    intensity on perchlorate and nitrate degradation were investigated. The effectiveness of the sulfite/UV-L treatment process improved with increasing pH for both perchlorate and nitrate....

  17. Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Treatment Plan Compliance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Order Requiring Compliance with Site Treatment Plan No. 95-10-03-01 State Colorado Agreement Type Consent Order Legal Driver(s) FFCAct Scope Summary Approve with modifications the...

  18. Idaho Site Advances Recovery Act Cleanup after Inventing Effective Treatment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For the first time in history, workers at the Idaho site achieved success in the initial cleanup of potentially dangerous sodium in a decommissioned nuclear reactor using an innovative treatment...

  19. OBJECTIVE EVALUATION OF FUNCTIONAL ANKLE INSTABILITY AND BALANCE EXERCISE TREATMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jain, Tarang Kumar

    2014-08-31

    OBJECTIVE EVALUATION OF FUNCTIONAL ANKLE INSTABILITY AND BALANCE EXERCISE TREATMENT By Copyright 2014 Tarang Kumar Jain D.P.T., University of Kansas Medical Center, 2012 B.P.T., MGM Medical College, DAVV University, Indore, INDIA, 2003...

  20. ANAEROBIC BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT OF IN-SITU RETORT WATER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ossio, Edmundo

    2012-01-01

    Phyllis Fox INTRODUCTION Oil shale retorting produces fromWaste Water from Oil Shale Processing" ACS Division of FuelEvaluates Treatments for Oil-Shale Retort Water," Industrial

  1. Summary - Building C-400 Thermal Treatment Remedial Design Report...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Paducah, KY EM Project: Building C400 Thermal Treatment ETR Report Date: August 2007 ETR-8 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External...

  2. Surface treatment of nanocrystal quantum dots after film deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sykora, Milan; Koposov, Alexey; Fuke, Nobuhiro

    2015-02-03

    Provided are methods of surface treatment of nanocrystal quantum dots after film deposition so as to exchange the native ligands of the quantum dots for exchange ligands that result in improvement in charge extraction from the nanocrystals.

  3. Applications of Energy Efficiency Technologies in Wastewater Treatment Facilities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chow, S.; Werner, L.; Wu, Y. Y.; Ganji, A. R.

    2009-01-01

    % of the electrical power in Northern and Central California. Activated sludge is the most common method for wastewater treatment, and at the same time the most energy intensive process. New energy efficient technologies can help reduce energy consumption...

  4. An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of Choosing Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez, Andres Golden

    2012-01-01

    of mental illness: Labels, causes, dangerousness, and socialN. , & Wegner, D. M. (2010). Causes and consequences of mindInquiry into the Nature and Causes of Choosing Treatment By

  5. SRS Tank 48H Waste Treatment Project Technology Readiness Assessment

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Savannah River Site Tank 48H Waste Treatment Project Technology Readiness Assessment Harry D. Harmon Joan B. Berkowitz John C. DeVine, Jr. Herbert G. Sutter Joan K. Young...

  6. Hanford ETR Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - Hanford...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    NO. DE-AC27-01RV14136 - REPORT OF EXTERNAL FLOWSHEET REVIEW TEAM FOR THE HANFORD TANK WASTE TREATMENT AND IMMOBILIZATION PLANT - FINAL REPORT TITLED: "COMPREHENSIVE REVIEW OF THE...

  7. Steroid estrogens in primary and tertiary wastewater treatment plants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braga, Olga; Smythe, George A.; Schäfer, Andrea; Feitz, Andrew J.

    2005-01-01

    The concentrations of two natural estrogens (Estrone (E1) and Estradiol (E2)) and one synthetic progestin (Ethinylestradiol (EE2)) were measured for different unit operations in an advanced sewage treatment plant and in ...

  8. Chemically enhanced primary treatment of wastewater in Honduran Imhoff tanks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mikelonis, Anne M. (Anne Marie)

    2008-01-01

    Imhoff tanks represent approximately 40% of the wastewater treatment infrastructure in Honduras. This thesis evaluates the usage of solid aluminum sulfate as a means to achieving national effluent regulations in Imhoff ...

  9. Complications of treatment of Hodgkin's disease in children

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donaldson, S.S.; Kaplan, H.S.

    1982-04-01

    An analysis of complications of therapy requires long-term and frequent followup. Reported here is a review of 179 consecutive children with Hodgkin's disease from Stanford University Medical Center who were seen, treated, and followed over a 20-year period. Complications of treatment are related to the extent of disease and the aggressiveness of therapy. Severe complications from radiotherapy are associated with high-dose, extended-field treatment in preadolescent children. Severe chemotherapy-associated complications include immunosuppression, sterility, and secondary oncogenesis. As cure rates are increasingly optimistic among children with Hodgkin's disease, successful treatment with minimal morbidity remains our greatest challenge. Therapy programs require continual refinement utilizing assessment of short- and long-term side effects of treatment.

  10. Optimizing Aeration in Pulp Mill Secondary Treatment Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahmood, T.; Banerjee, S.; Welsh, J. T.; Sackellares, R. W.

    1997-01-01

    With better spill control and lower carbon loads to the treatment system, there is excess aeration occurring at the lagoon. This leads to unnecessary power costs, especially during peak demand summer periods. A study was conducted to determine...

  11. Investigation of Created Fracture Geometry through Hydraulic Fracture Treatment Analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmed, Ibraheem 1987-

    2012-11-30

    Successful development of shale gas reservoirs is highly dependent on hydraulic fracture treatments. Many questions remain in regards to the geometry of the created fractures. Production data analysis from some shale gas wells quantifies a much...

  12. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Evapotranspiration Bed 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    1999-09-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) beds treat wastewater in the soil by evaporation and by transpiration from plants growing there. This publication explains the treatment, design, operation and maintenance of ET beds....

  13. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Homeowner's Guide to Evaluating Service Contracts 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; O'Neill, Courtney; Deal, Nancy; Loomis, George; Gustafson, David; Lindbo, David

    2008-10-23

    This guide helps homeowners who are seeking maintenance services for their onsite wastewater treatment systems (such as septic systems). Included are definitions of common terms used in service contracts, types of service contracts available...

  14. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Septic Tank/Soil Absorption Field 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-10-23

    For septic tank and soil absorption systems to work properly, homeowners must choose the right kind of system for their household size and soil type, and they must maintain them regularly. This publication explains the treatment, design, operation...

  15. Boron-Nitride Nanotubes Show Potential in Cancer Treatment |...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Boron-Nitride Nanotubes Show Potential in Cancer Treatment NEWPORT NEWS, VA, April 26 - A new study has shown that adding boron-nitride nanotubes to the surface of cancer cells can...

  16. High Carbon Fly Ash Treatment | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High Carbon Fly Ash Treatment NETL Collaborators Invent Method for Treating High Carbon Fly Ash The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office has assigned Patent No. 8,440,015 to...

  17. Surface wettability studies of PDMS using flame plasma treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xin C

    2009-01-01

    The flame plasma treatment studied in this thesis was able to oxidize the surface of Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) in a fraction of a second. It was found to be a much faster way to modify PDMS surface wettability than the ...

  18. Alcohols as hydrogen-donor solvents for treatment of coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ross, David S. (Palo Alto, CA); Blessing, James E. (Menlo Park, CA)

    1981-01-01

    A method for the hydroconversion of coal by solvent treatment at elevated temperatures and pressure wherein an alcohol having an .alpha.-hydrogen atom, particularly a secondary alcohol such as isopropanol, is utilized as a hydrogen donor solvent. In a particular embodiment, a base capable of providing a catalytically effective amount of the corresponding alcoholate anion under the solvent treatment conditions is added to catalyze the alcohol-coal reaction.

  19. Method for surface treatment of a cadmium zinc telluride crystal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    James, R.; Burger, A.; Chen, K.T.; Chang, H.

    1999-08-03

    A method for treatment of the surface of a CdZnTe (CZT) crystal is disclosed that reduces surface roughness (increases surface planarity) and provides an oxide coating to reduce surface leakage currents and thereby, improve resolution. A two step process is disclosed, etching the surface of a CZT crystal with a solution of lactic acid and bromine in ethylene glycol, following the conventional bromine/methanol etch treatment, and after attachment of electrical contacts, oxidizing the CZT crystal surface. 3 figs.

  20. Method for surface treatment of a cadmium zinc telluride crystal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    James, Ralph (5420 Lenore Ave., Livermore, CA 94550); Burger, Arnold (753 Adkisson La., Nashville, TN 37205); Chen, Kuo-Tong (7800 River Fork Dr., Nashville, TN 37221); Chang, Henry (6535 Premier Dr., Apt. A7, Nashville, TN 37209)

    1999-01-01

    A method for treatment of the surface of a CdZnTe (CZT) crystal that reduces surface roughness (increases surface planarity) and provides an oxide coating to reduce surface leakage currents and thereby, improve resolution. A two step process is disclosed, etching the surface of a CZT crystal with a solution of lactic acid and bromine in ethylene glycol, following the conventional bromine/methanol etch treatment, and after attachment of electrical contacts, oxidizing the CZT crystal surface.

  1. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Mound System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, B.; Waynard, V.

    2002-01-01

    system is generally a septic tank, which re- moves the settleable and floatable solids from the wastewater. Advanced pretreatment systems, such as aerobic treatment units or media filters, can also be used to remove additional solids and organic matter..., New For Sale Only $1 The On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems series of publications is a result of collaborative efforts of various agencies, organizations and funding sources. We would like to acknowledge the following collaborators: Texas State Soil...

  2. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Understanding and Maintaining your Septic System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Mechell, Justin; Alexander, Rachel

    2008-10-23

    could fill the system, leaving no room for wastewater. Design landscaping to carry runoff water around the soil treatment area. Health considerations Maintain the disinfection com- ? ponent of your system. Add the appropriate chlorine product... in water bod- ies. The level of treatment is selected to match the receiving environment and the intended use of the effluent. The quantity of contaminants must be reduced to a level the soil can ac- cept and treat. Wastewater pretreatment com- ponents...

  3. Residential Treatment: A Review of the National Literature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, Uta M.; Petr, Chris

    2007-08-01

    such as cognitive-behavioral treatment, psychodynamic milieu-therapy, psychoeducation, family and group therapy, special education etc. It appears that similar set of services is provided to all RT residents regardless of their presenting problems. Staff... that employed “milieu-therapy” has given way to a broader range of theoretical orientations (Epstein, 2004). The American Association of Residential Treatment Centers (AACRC) compiled a national survey (2000) which indicated that of the 96 surveyed RTCs from...

  4. Solar Treatment for Mountain Pine Beetle Solar treatment may be appropriate in some areas of Colorado to reduce beetle populations in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solar Treatment for Mountain Pine Beetle Solar treatment may be appropriate in some areas number of logs in high-value areas. There are two options of solar treatment: with plastic sheeting, and without plastic. Below is a brief description on set-up and difficulties when using solar treatment

  5. Online Produced Water Treatment Catalog and Decision Tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Arthur

    2012-03-31

    The objective of this project was to create an internet-based Water Treatment Technology Catalog and Decision Tool that will increase production, decrease costs and enhance environmental protection. This is to be accomplished by pairing an operator's water treatment cost and capacity needs to specific water treatments. This project cataloged existing and emerging produced water treatment technologies and allows operators to identify the most cost-effective approaches for managing their produced water. The tool captures the cost and capabilities of each technology and the disposal and beneficial use options for each region. The tool then takes location, chemical composition, and volumetric data for the operator's water and identifies the most cost effective treatment options for that water. Regulatory requirements or limitations for each location are also addressed. The Produced Water Treatment Catalog and Decision Tool efficiently matches industry decision makers in unconventional natural gas basins with: 1) appropriate and applicable water treatment technologies for their project, 2) relevant information on regulatory and legal issues that may impact the success of their project, and 3) potential beneficial use demands specific to their project area. To ensure the success of this project, it was segmented into seven tasks conducted in three phases over a three year period. The tasks were overseen by a Project Advisory Council (PAC) made up of stakeholders including state and federal agency representatives and industry representatives. ALL Consulting has made the catalog and decision tool available on the Internet for the final year of the project. The second quarter of the second budget period, work was halted based on the February 18, 2011 budget availability; however previous project deliverables were submitted on time and the deliverables for Task 6 and 7 were completed ahead of schedule. Thus the application and catalog were deployed to the public Internet. NETL did not provide additional funds and work on the project stopped on February 18, 2011. NETL ended the project on March 31, 2012.

  6. ALLOYING AND HEAT TREATMENT OPTIMIZATION OF Fe/Cr/C STEELS FOR IMPROVED MECHANICAL PROPERTIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarikaya, M.

    2010-01-01

    Proc. 16th Intern. Heat Treatment Conf. , The Metals S o c ,Schematic illustration of heat-treatments employed in thiswas the conventional heat treatment (H.T. (c), Fie. 3) to

  7. Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Waste Water Treatment Plant [The Inhabited Landscape: An Exhibition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Architects, Centerbrook

    1988-01-01

    Spring Harbor Laboratory Waste Water Treatment Plant JuryThe Cold Spring Harbor Waste Water Treatment Plant makes aA Cold Spring Harbor Waste Water Treatment Plant Photograph

  8. Process modeling for the Integrated Thermal Treatment System (ITTS) study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liebelt, K.H.; Brown, B.W.; Quapp, W.J.

    1995-09-01

    This report describes the process modeling done in support of the integrated thermal treatment system (ITTS) study, Phases 1 and 2. ITTS consists of an integrated systems engineering approach for uniform comparison of widely varying thermal treatment technologies proposed for treatment of the contact-handled mixed low-level wastes (MLLW) currently stored in the U.S. Department of Energy complex. In the overall study, 19 systems were evaluated. Preconceptual designs were developed that included all of the various subsystems necessary for a complete installation, from waste receiving through to primary and secondary stabilization and disposal of the processed wastes. Each system included the necessary auxiliary treatment subsystems so that all of the waste categories in the complex were fully processed. The objective of the modeling task was to perform mass and energy balances of the major material components in each system. Modeling of trace materials, such as pollutants and radioactive isotopes, were beyond the present scope. The modeling of the main and secondary thermal treatment, air pollution control, and metal melting subsystems was done using the ASPEN PLUS process simulation code, Version 9.1-3. These results were combined with calculations for the remainder of the subsystems to achieve the final results, which included offgas volumes, and mass and volume waste reduction ratios.

  9. Draft Site Treatment Plan (DSTP), Volumes I and II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D`Amelio, J.

    1994-08-30

    Site Treatment Plans (STP) are required for facilities at which the DOE generates or stores mixed waste. This Draft Site Treatment Plan (DSTP) the second step in a three-phase process, identifies the currently preferred options for treating mixed waste at the Savannah River Site (SRS) or for developing treatment technologies where technologies do not exist or need modification. The DSTP reflects site-specific preferred options, developed with the state`s input and based on existing available information. To the extent possible, the DSTP identifies specific treatment facilities for treating the mixed waste and proposes schedules. Where the selection of specific treatment facilities is not possible, schedules for alternative activities such as waste characterization and technology assessment are provided. All schedule and cost information presented is preliminary and is subject to change. The DSTP is comprised of two volumes: this Compliance Plan Volume and the Background Volume. This Compliance Plan Volume proposes overall schedules with target dates for achieving compliance with the land disposal restrictions (LDR) of RCRA and procedures for converting the target dates into milestones to be enforced under the Order. The more detailed discussion of the options contained in the Background Volume is provided for informational purposes only.

  10. Automated Demand Response Opportunities in Wastewater Treatment Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, Lisa; Song, Katherine; Lekov, Alex; McKane, Aimee

    2008-11-19

    Wastewater treatment is an energy intensive process which, together with water treatment, comprises about three percent of U.S. annual energy use. Yet, since wastewater treatment facilities are often peripheral to major electricity-using industries, they are frequently an overlooked area for automated demand response opportunities. Demand response is a set of actions taken to reduce electric loads when contingencies, such as emergencies or congestion, occur that threaten supply-demand balance, and/or market conditions occur that raise electric supply costs. Demand response programs are designed to improve the reliability of the electric grid and to lower the use of electricity during peak times to reduce the total system costs. Open automated demand response is a set of continuous, open communication signals and systems provided over the Internet to allow facilities to automate their demand response activities without the need for manual actions. Automated demand response strategies can be implemented as an enhanced use of upgraded equipment and facility control strategies installed as energy efficiency measures. Conversely, installation of controls to support automated demand response may result in improved energy efficiency through real-time access to operational data. This paper argues that the implementation of energy efficiency opportunities in wastewater treatment facilities creates a base for achieving successful demand reductions. This paper characterizes energy use and the state of demand response readiness in wastewater treatment facilities and outlines automated demand response opportunities.

  11. A Methodology for Developing Performance-Related Specifications for Pavement Preservation Treatments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Litao

    2013-09-23

    Current materials and construction specifications for pavement preservation treatments are predominantly prescriptive and they have little or no methodical linkage between initial treatment quality and future performance. ...

  12. DOE/EIS-0200-SA-03: Supplement Analysis for the Treatment of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Treatment of Transuranic Waste at the Idaho National Laboratory February 2008 U.S. Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office Suplement Analysis for the Treatment of Transuranic...

  13. Deterrence and theTax Treatment of Monetary Sanctions and Litigation Costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tabach, Avi

    2004-01-01

    Tax Treatment of Monetary Sanctions. International Review ofTREATMENT OF MONETARY SANCTIONS AND LITIGATION COSTS Jacobrules regarding monetary sanctions and litigation costs on

  14. Increasing Hepatitis C treatment uptake among HIV-infected patients using an HIV primary care model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    Hemophilia Combination Hepatitis C genotype 2 (1/4 vs. 2/3)Table 4 Predictors of Hepatitis C treatment among patientsmultidisciplinary management of hepatitis C virus treatment

  15. A Systematic Review of Adverse Effects Associated with Topical Treatments for Psoriasis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruner, Christine R. MD; Feldman, Steven R. MD PhD; Ventrapragada, Madhuri BS; Fleischer, Alan B. Jr MD

    2003-01-01

    Topical Treatments for Psoriasis Christine R. Bruner, MD,Abstract Mild to moderate psoriasis is a disease that canwith different topical psoriasis treatments. A review of

  16. TREATMENT OF MULTIVARIATE ENVIRONMENTAL AND HEALTH PROBLEMS ASSOCIATED WITH OIL SHALE TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kland, M.J.

    2010-01-01

    Applic.ation of Multivariate Analysis for Interpretation ofthe Proceedings TREATMENT OF MULTIVARIATE ENVIRONMENTAL ANDENG-48 TREATMENT OF MULTIVARIATE ENVIRONMENTAL AND HEALTH

  17. A Pre-Treatment Model for Ethanol Production Using a Colorimetric...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Pre-Treatment Model for Ethanol Production Using a Colorimetric Analysis of Starch Solutions (1 Activity) A Pre-Treatment Model for Ethanol Production Using a Colorimetric...

  18. Summary of the Dutch S3-Guidelines on the treatment of psoriasis 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01

    possibly with adequate sunscreens). The area of covered skinexposure and/or to use sunscreens After treatment After aadvice the use of sunscreens. During treatment Objective

  19. Effect of ammonia plasma treatment on graphene oxide LB monolayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Gulbagh; Botcha, V. Divakar; Narayanam, Pavan K.; Sutar, D. S.; Talwar, S. S.; Major, S. S.; Srinivasa, R. S.

    2013-02-05

    Graphene oxide monolayer sheets were transferred on Si and SiO{sub 2}/Si substrates by Langmuir-Blodgett technique and were exposed to ammonia plasma at room temperature. The monolayer character of both graphene oxide and plasma treated graphene oxide sheets were ascertained by atomic force microscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy revealed that ammonia plasma treatment results in enhancement of graphitic carbon content along with the incorporation of nitrogen. The conductivity of graphene oxide monolayers, which was in the range of 10{sup -6}-10{sup -7} S/cm, increased to 10{sup -2}-10{sup -3} S/cm after the ammonia plasma treatment. These results indicate that the graphene oxide was simultaneously reduced and N-doped during ammonia plasma treatment, without affecting the morphological stability of sheets.

  20. Effect of heat treatment temperature on nitinol wire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai, S.; Schaffer, J. E.; Daymond, M. R.; Yu, C.; Ren, Y.

    2014-08-18

    In-situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction has been used to study the influence of the heat treatment temperature on the subsequent micromechanical behavior of nitinol wire. It was found that increase in the heat treatment temperature rotated the austenite texture from the (332){sub B2} fiber towards the (111){sub B2} fiber, and the texture of the Stress-Induced Martensite phase changed from the (1{sup ¯}40){sub B19'} to the (1{sup ¯}20){sub B19'} fiber accordingly. Heat treatment at a low temperature reduces the internal residual strains in the austenite during super-elastic deformation and therefore improves the materials fatigue performance. The development of internal residual strains in austenite is controlled by transformation induced plasticity and the reversal martensite to austenite transformation.

  1. Sodium-Bearing Waste Treatment Alternatives Implementation Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles M. Barnes; James B. Bosley; Clifford W. Olsen

    2004-07-01

    The purpose of this document is to discuss issues related to the implementation of each of the five down-selected INEEL/INTEC radioactive liquid waste (sodium-bearing waste - SBW) treatment alternatives and summarize information in three main areas of concern: process/technical, environmental permitting, and schedule. Major implementation options for each treatment alternative are also identified and briefly discussed. This report may touch upon, but purposely does not address in detail, issues that are programmatic in nature. Examples of these include how the SBW will be classified with respect to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA), status of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) permits and waste storage availability, available funding for implementation, stakeholder issues, and State of Idaho Settlement Agreement milestones. It is assumed in this report that the SBW would be classified as a transuranic (TRU) waste suitable for disposal at WIPP, located in New Mexico, after appropriate treatment to meet transportation requirements and waste acceptance criteria (WAC).

  2. An Energy Savings Model for the Heat Treatment of Castings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Y. Rong; R. Sisson; J. Morral; H. Brody

    2006-12-31

    An integrated system of software, databases, and design rules have been developed, verified, and to be marketed to enable quantitative prediction and optimization of the heat treatment of aluminum castings to increase quality, increase productivity, reduce heat treatment cycle times and reduce energy consumption. The software predicts the thermal cycle in critical locations of individual components in a furnace, the evolution of microstructure, and the attainment of properties in heat treatable aluminum alloy castings. The model takes into account the prior casting process and the specific composition of the component. The heat treatment simulation modules can be used in conjunction with software packages for simulation of the casting process. The system is built upon a quantitative understanding of the kinetics of microstructure evolution in complex multicomponent alloys, on a quantitative understanding of the interdependence of microstructure and properties, on validated kinetic and thermodynamic databases, and validated quantitative models.

  3. An Evaluation of a Measure of the Proportion of the Treatment Effect Explained by a Surrogate Marker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul W. Bycott; Jeremy M.G. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    De Gruttola V. Estimating the proportion of treatment effectof a Measure of the Proportion of the Treatment Effectstatistic to measure the proportion of the treatment effect

  4. Hanford Tank Waste - Near Source Treatment of Low Activity Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramsey, William Gene

    2013-08-15

    Abstract only. Treatment and disposition of Hanford Site waste as currently planned consists of 100+ waste retrievals, waste delivery through up to 8+ miles of dedicated, in-ground piping, centralized mixing and blending operations- all leading to pre-treatment combination and separation processes followed by vitrification at the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The sequential nature of Tank Farm and WTP operations requires nominally 15-20 years of continuous operations before all waste can be retrieved from many Single Shell Tanks (SSTs). Also, the infrastructure necessary to mobilize and deliver the waste requires significant investment beyond that required for the WTP. Treating waste as closely as possible to individual tanks or groups- as allowed by the waste characteristics- is being investigated to determine the potential to 1) defer, reduce, and/or eliminate infrastructure requirements, and 2) significantly mitigate project risk by reducing the potential and impact of single point failures. The inventory of Hanford waste slated for processing and disposition as LAW is currently managed as high-level waste (HLW), i.e., the separation of fission products and other radionuclides has not commenced. A significant inventory of this waste (over 20M gallons) is in the form of precipitated saltcake maintained in single shell tanks, many of which are identified as potential leaking tanks. Retrieval and transport (as a liquid) must be staged within the waste feed delivery capability established by site infrastructure and WTP. Near Source treatment, if employed, would provide for the separation and stabilization processing necessary for waste located in remote farms (wherein most of the leaking tanks reside) significantly earlier than currently projected. Near Source treatment is intended to address the currently accepted site risk and also provides means to mitigate future issues likely to be faced over the coming decades. This paper describes the potential near source treatment and waste disposition options as well as the impact these options could have on reducing infrastructure requirements, project cost and mission schedule.

  5. The application of Geant4 simulation code for brachytherapy treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agostinelli, S; Garelli, S; Paoli, G; Nieminen, P; Pia, M G

    2000-01-01

    Brachytherapy is a radiotherapeutic modality that makes use of radionuclides to deliver a high radiation dose to a well-defined volume while sparing surrounding healthy structures. At the National Institute for Cancer Research of Genova a High Dose Rate remote afterloading system provides Ir(192) endocavitary brachytherapy treatments. We studied the possibility to use the Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation toolkit in brachytherapy for calculation of complex physical parameters, not directly available by experiment al measurements, used in treatment planning dose deposition models.

  6. Surface Treatment And Protection Method For Cadium Zinc Telluride Crystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wright, Gomez W. (Nashville, TN); James, Ralph B. (Livermore, CA); Burger, Arnold (Nashville, TN); Chinn, Douglas A. (Livermore, CA)

    2006-02-21

    A method for treatment of the surface of a CdZnTe (CZT) crystal that provides a native dielectric coating to reduce surface leakage currents and thereby, improve the resolution of instruments incorporating detectors using CZT crystals. A two step process is disclosed, etching the surface of a CZT crystal with a solution of the conventional bromine/methanol etch treatment, and after attachment of electrical contacts, passivating the CZT crystal surface with a solution of 10 w/o NH4F and 10 w/o H2O2 in water.

  7. Surface treatment and protection method for cadmium zinc telluride crystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wright, Gomez W. (Nashville, TN); James, Ralph B. (Livermore, CA); Burger, Arnold (Nashville, TN); Chinn, Douglas A. (Livermore, CA)

    2003-01-01

    A method for treatment of the surface of a CdZnTe (CZT) crystal that provides a native dielectric coating to reduce surface leakage currents and thereby, improve the resolution of instruments incorporating detectors using CZT crystals. A two step process is disclosed, etching the surface of a CZT crystal with a solution of the conventional bromine/methanol etch treatment, and after attachment of electrical contacts, passivating the CZT crystal surface with a solution of 10 w/o NH.sub.4 F and 10 w/o H.sub.2 O.sub.2 in water.

  8. Compositions and Methods for the Treatment of Pierce's Disease

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gupta, Goutam (Santa Fe, NM)

    2008-10-07

    Chimeric anti-microbial proteins, compositions, and methods for the therapeutic and prophylactic treatment of plant diseases caused by the bacterial pathogen Xylella fastidiosa are provided. The anti-microbial proteins of the invention generally comprise a surface recognition domain polypeptide, capable of binding to a bacterial membrane component, fused to a bacterial lysis domain polypeptide, capable of affecting lysis or rupture of the bacterial membrane, typically via a fused polypeptide linker. In particular, methods and compositions for the treatment or prevention of Pierce's disease of grapevines are provided. Methods for the generation of transgenic Vitus vinefera plants expressing xylem-secreted anti-microbial chimeras are also provided.

  9. Challenges With the Diagnosis and Treatment of Cerebral Radiation Necrosis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chao, Samuel T.; Ahluwalia, Manmeet S.; Barnett, Gene H.; Stevens, Glen H.J.; Murphy, Erin S.; Stockham, Abigail L.; Shiue, Kevin; Suh, John H.

    2013-11-01

    The incidence of radiation necrosis has increased secondary to greater use of combined modality therapy for brain tumors and stereotactic radiosurgery. Given that its characteristics on standard imaging are no different that tumor recurrence, it is difficult to diagnose without use of more sophisticated imaging and nuclear medicine scans, although the accuracy of such scans is controversial. Historically, treatment had been limited to steroids, hyperbaric oxygen, anticoagulants, and surgical resection. A recent prospective randomized study has confirmed the efficacy of bevacizumab in treating radiation necrosis. Novel therapies include using focused interstitial laser thermal therapy. This article will review the diagnosis and treatment of radiation necrosis.

  10. Treatment of wastewater from a paint industry using polyelectrolytes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kori, M.M.; Gupta, S.K.

    1994-12-31

    Eleven polyelectrolytes were tried separately to treat the wastewater from a paint manufacturing industry. Among these, Zetag 66, a cationic polyelectrolyte was found to be most effective. A dosage of 5 mg/L of this polyelectrolyte was found to be adequate to achieve 65% COD removal, 97% suspended solids removal, and 90% heavy metals removal. The use of this polyelectrolyte assumes significant importance as it eliminates the use of alum completely. This elimination of alum consumption results in considerable reduction of effluent treatment plant (ETP) sludge, which is a hazardous waste. The savings that results in the primary treatment is an added advantage.

  11. Desalination and Water Treatment www.deswater.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Messalem, Rami

    , desalination, and rainwater harvesting. Irrigation with brackish water from marginal-quality aquifersDesalination and Water Treatment www.deswater.com 1944-3994 / 1944-3986 © 2009 Desalination, Desalination for Clean Water and Energy Cooperation among Mediterranean Countries of Europe and the MENA Region

  12. Flexographic Newspaper Deinking: Treatment of Wash Filtrate Effluent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abubakr, Said

    Flexographic Newspaper Deinking: Treatment of Wash Filtrate Effluent by Membrane Technology B une meilleure qualité d'eau comparativementaux essaisdefloculation Jar-Test. INTRODUCTION Water of filtrate are produced by wash- JOURNAL OF PULP AND PAPER SCIENCE: VOL. 25 NO. 10OCTOBER 1999 ing which

  13. RDX degradation using an integrated Fe(0)-microbial treatment approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    RDX degradation using an integrated Fe(0)-microbial treatment approach M.J. Wildman and P was enhanced by anaerobic bacteria that feed on cathodic hydrogen (i.e., H2 produced during anaerobic Fe(0) corrosion by water). Apparently, the hydrogenotrophic consortium that exploits Fe(0) corrosion

  14. Vitrification and solidification remedial treatment and disposal costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gimpel, R.F.

    1992-03-12

    Solidification (making concrete) and vitrification (making glass) are frequently the treatment methods recommended for treating inorganic or radioactive wastes. Solidification is generally perceived as the most economical treatment method. Whereas, vitrification is considered (by many) as the most effective of all treatment methods. Unfortunately, vitrification has acquired the stigma that it is too expensive to receive further consideration as an alternative to solidification in high volume treatment applications. Ironically, economic studies, as presented in this paper, show that vitrification may be more competitive in some high volume applications. Ex-situ solidification and vitrification are the competing methods for treating in excess of 450,000 m{sup 3} of low-level radioactive and mixed waste at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP or simply, Fernald) located near Cincinnati, Ohio. This paper summarizes a detailed study done to: compare the economics of the solidification and vitrification processes, determine if the stigma assigned to vitrification is warranted and, determine if investing millions of dollars into vitrification development, along with solidification development, at the Fernald is warranted.

  15. RGS proteins: impact on the treatment of depression and anxiety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muma, Nancy A.

    2012-01-25

    strong association with depression and anxiety and their treatments. It is important to note that RGS2 also modulates Gq/11 coupled receptor signalling such as 5-HT2A/2C, sig- nalling pathways (McCoy & Hepler, 2009) which play a major role in depression...

  16. Radioactive Needlework Reconstruction of needle-positions in radiation treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochstenbach, Michiel

    , we explain the background of their problem. Brachytherapy In prostate cancer treatment a new therapy in Veenendaal, the Netherlands, has developed this brachytherapy-- brachys is the Greek word for short (here of prostate problems, patients who have been selected for brachytherapy may have good hope that the tumors

  17. Augmented Vessels for Pre-operative Preparation in Endovascular Treatments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Albert C. S.

    Augmented Vessels for Pre-operative Preparation in Endovascular Treatments Wilbur C.K. Wong1 to construct imaginary disease-free vessel lumens, namely augmented vessels, and demarcate the abnormalities;Augmented Vessels for Pre-operative Preparation 603 Several researchers have suggested to detach a saccular

  18. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Responding to Electrical Power Outages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Responding to Electrical Power Outages and Floods Bruce The Texas A&M University System Electrical power outages and floods can affect you and your residential power outages and flooding. System Components To properly respond to a disaster, homeowners need to know

  19. Water produced at the University of Iowa Water treatment plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neiman, Maurine

    Water produced at the University of Iowa Water treatment plant meets or surpasses all federal and state drinking-water standards at this time. For information about the University of Iowa water supply, call us at 319-335-5168 Water Source The University of Iowa Water Plants' primary source of water

  20. Savannah River Site Approved Site Treatment Plan, 1998 Annual Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence, B.

    1999-04-20

    The Compliance Plan Volume (Volume I) identifies project activity schedule milestones for achieving compliance with Land Disposal Restrictions. Information regarding the technical evaluation of treatment options for SRS mixed wastes is contained in the Background Volume (Volume II) and is provided for information.

  1. Savannah River Site approved site treatment plan, 2000 annual update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence, B.

    2000-04-20

    The Compliance Plan Volume (Volume 1) identifies project activity schedule milestones for achieving compliance with Land Disposal Restrictions. Information regarding the technical evaluation of treatment options for SRS mixed wastes is contained in the Background Volume (Volume 2) and is provided for information.

  2. Interventions for ensuring food safety in mangoes during phytosanitary treatments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kakani, Grihalakshmi

    2009-05-15

    , internalization and the effect of the treatments on the quality of the fruit were also determined. For scar (hydrothermal), a 3.0 log reduction was obtained for control and additional reductions of approximately 2.2 and 1.3 log cycles were obtained with lactic...

  3. Treatment of Chlorinated Solvents by Nitrogen-Fixing and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Kung-Hui "Bella"

    ). Therefore, effective contaminant destruction approaches such as in-situ vadose zone bioremediation or above of ground- water contaminants including aliphatic, aromatic, and halogenated hydrocarbons (3 bioremediation for the treatment of chlorinated solvents at Savannah River (6, 7). At this site, nitrogen

  4. CRAD, Radiological Controls- Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a May 2007 readiness assessment of the Radiation Protection Program at the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project.

  5. Radioactive waste management treatments: A selection for the Italian scenario

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Locatelli, G. [Univ. of Lincoln, Lincoln School of Engineering, Brayford Pool - Lincoln LN6 7TS (United Kingdom); Mancini, M. [Politecnico di Milano, Dept. of Management, Economics and Industrial Engineering, Via Lambruschini 4/B, Milano (Italy); Sardini, M. [Politecnico di Milano, Dept. of Energy, Via Lambruschini 4, Milano (Italy)

    2012-07-01

    The increased attention for radioactive waste management is one of the most peculiar aspects of the nuclear sector considering both reactors and not power sources. The aim of this paper is to present the state-of-art of treatments for radioactive waste management all over the world in order to derive guidelines for the radioactive waste management in the Italian scenario. Starting with an overview on the international situation, it analyses the different sources, amounts, treatments, social and economic impacts looking at countries with different industrial backgrounds, energetic policies, geography and population. It lists all these treatments and selects the most reasonable according to technical, economic and social criteria. In particular, a double scenario is discussed (to be considered in case of few quantities of nuclear waste): the use of regional, centralized, off site processing facilities, which accept waste from many nuclear plants, and the use of mobile systems, which can be transported among multiple nuclear sites for processing campaigns. At the end the treatments suitable for the Italian scenario are presented providing simplified work-flows and guidelines. (authors)

  6. RDX degradation using an integrated Fe(0)-microbial treatment approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    RDX degradation using an integrated Fe(0)-microbial treatment approach M.J. Wildman and P recalci- trance to microbial degradation, low volatility (dimensionless Henry's constant, H' = 2 × 10 attractive for in situ remedia- tion in that they conserve energy and water, and through long-term low

  7. Westinghouse Cementation Facility of Solid Waste Treatment System - 13503

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobs, Torsten; Aign, Joerg

    2013-07-01

    During NPP operation, several waste streams are generated, caused by different technical and physical processes. Besides others, liquid waste represents one of the major types of waste. Depending on national regulation for storage and disposal of radioactive waste, solidification can be one specific requirement. To accommodate the global request for waste treatment systems Westinghouse developed several specific treatment processes for the different types of waste. In the period of 2006 to 2008 Westinghouse awarded several contracts for the design and delivery of waste treatment systems related to the latest CPR-1000 nuclear power plants. One of these contracts contains the delivery of four Cementation Facilities for waste treatment, s.c. 'Follow on Cementations' dedicated to three locations, HongYanHe, NingDe and YangJiang, of new CPR-1000 nuclear power stations in the People's Republic of China. Previously, Westinghouse delivered a similar cementation facility to the CPR-1000 plant LingAo II, in Daya Bay, PR China. This plant already passed the hot functioning tests successfully in June 2012 and is now ready and released for regular operation. The 'Follow on plants' are designed to package three 'typical' kind of radioactive waste: evaporator concentrates, spent resins and filter cartridges. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview on the Westinghouse experience to design and execution of cementation facilities. (authors)

  8. Automatic Detection of Treatment Relationships for Patent Retrieval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cárdenas, Alfonso F.

    Automatic Detection of Treatment Relationships for Patent Retrieval Aaron Chu UCLA Computer Science Department Los Angeles, California 90024 aaronc@ucla.edu Shigeyuki Sakurai1 4 th Patent Examination Department Japan Patent Office Tokyo, Japan sakurai-shigeyuki@jpo.go.jp Alfonso F. Cardenas UCLA Computer

  9. BSA Treatment to Enhance Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose in Lignin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    BSA Treatment to Enhance Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose in Lignin Containing Substrates Bin Yang cellulose and solids containing 56% cellulose and 28% lignin from dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment of corn stover. Little BSA was adsorbed on Avicel cellulose, while pretreated corn stover solids adsorbed

  10. Method for treatment of soils contaminated with organic pollutants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wickramanayake, Godage B. (Cranbury, NJ)

    1993-01-01

    A method for treating soil contaminated by organic compounds wherein an ozone containing gas is treated with acid to increase the stability of the ozone in the soil environment and the treated ozone applied to the contaminated soil to decompose the organic compounds. The soil may be treated in situ or may be removed for treatment and refilled.

  11. CDC Lead Poisoning Prevention and Treatment Recommendations for Refugee Children

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CDC Lead Poisoning Prevention and Treatment Recommendations for Refugee Children 1. Background of elevated blood lead levels is much higher among newly resettled refugee children in the United States than poisoning, regardless of the age of their housing. This occurrence is common among certain refugee

  12. 8-Waste treatment and disposal A. Responsibility for waste management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    8- Waste treatment and disposal A. Responsibility for waste management 1. Each worker is responsible for correctly bagging and labeling his/her own waste. 2. A BSL3 technician will be responsible for transporting and autoclaving the waste. Waste will be autoclaved once or twice per day, depending on use

  13. Innovative Treatment Technologies for Natural Waters and Wastewaters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childress, Amy E.

    2011-07-01

    The research described in this report focused on the development of novel membrane contactor processes (in particular, forward osmosis (FO), pressure retarded osmosis (PRO), and membrane distillation (MD)) in low energy desalination and wastewater treatment applications and in renewable energy generation. FO and MD are recently gaining national and international attention as viable, economic alternatives for removal of both established and emerging contaminants from natural and process waters; PRO is gaining worldwide attention as a viable source of renewable energy. The interrelationship of energy and water are at the core of this study. Energy and water are inextricably bound; energy usage and production must be considered when evaluating any water treatment process for practical application. Both FO and MD offer the potential for substantial energy and resource savings over conventional treatment processes and PRO offers the potential for renewable energy or energy offsets in desalination. Combination of these novel technologies with each other, with existing technologies (e.g., reverse osmosis (RO)), and with existing renewable energy sources (e.g., salinity gradient solar ponds) may enable much less expensive water production and also potable water production in remote or distributed locations. Two inter-related projects were carried out in this investigation. One focused on membrane bioreactors for wastewater treatment and PRO for renewable energy generation; the other focused on MD driven by a salinity gradient solar pond.

  14. Ozone Treatments of Fresh Atlantic Cod, Gadus morhua

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozone Treatments of Fresh Atlantic Cod, Gadus morhua ELINOR M. RAVESI, JOSEPH J. L1CCIARDELLO and LINDA D. RACICOT Introduction The strong oxidizing nature of ozone, known since its discovery in 1840 (1977) cited in a review article numerous reports of the successful use of ozone to I) control microbial

  15. PROPERTIES OF TREATMENT SLUDGE DURING SEDIMENTATION AND CONSOLIDATION TESTS1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubertin, Michel

    on sludge produced from an acid mine drainage (AMD) treatment plant. The testing program involved International Conference on Acid Rock Drainage (ICARD), March 26-30, 2006, St. Louis MO. R.I. Barnhisel (ed drainage (AMD) have to treat their effluent before discharge. These acid waters typically contain high

  16. Activated carbon testing for the 200 area effluent treatment facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, R.N.

    1997-01-17

    This report documents pilot and laboratory scale testing of activated carbon for use in the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility peroxide decomposer columns. Recommendations are made concerning column operating conditions and hardware design, the optimum type of carbon for use in the plant, and possible further studies.

  17. Glucose conjugation for the specific targeting and treatment of cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hergenrother, Paul J.

    Glucose conjugation for the specific targeting and treatment of cancer Emilia C. Calvaresia and Paul J. Hergenrother*ab Cancers of diverse origins exhibit marked glucose avidity and high rates has led to an interest in targeting it for cancer therapy. One promising strategy for such targeting

  18. Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility: Environmental Information Document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haagenstad, H.T.; Gonzales, G.; Suazo, I.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1993-11-01

    At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the treatment of radioactive liquid waste is an integral function of the LANL mission: to assure U.S. military deterrence capability through nuclear weapons technology. As part of this mission, LANL conducts nuclear materials research and development (R&D) activities. These activities generate radioactive liquid waste that must be handled in a manner to ensure protection of workers, the public, and the environment. Radioactive liquid waste currently generated at LANL is treated at the Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF), located at Technical Area (TA)-50. The RLWTF is 30 years old and nearing the end of its useful design life. The facility was designed at a time when environmental requirements, as well as more effective treatment technologies, were not inherent in engineering design criteria. The evolution of engineering design criteria has resulted in the older technology becoming less effective in treating radioactive liquid wastestreams in accordance with current National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) and Department of Energy (DOE) regulatory requirements. Therefore, to support ongoing R&D programs pertinent to its mission, LANL is in need of capabilities to efficiently treat radioactive liquid waste onsite or to transport the waste off site for treatment and/or disposal. The purpose of the EID is to provide the technical baseline information for subsequent preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the RLWTF. This EID addresses the proposed action and alternatives for meeting the purpose and need for agency action.

  19. Cotton responses to mepiquat chloride and PGR-IV treatments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biles, Stephen Paul

    1998-01-01

    . The application of MC causes plants to be shorter while PGR-IV treatment often results in taller plants. The use of sequential applications of these PGRs to obtain increased yields and height control has been questioned. The objective of this study...

  20. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Responding to Power Outages and Floods 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Mechell, Justin; Alexander, Rachel

    2008-10-23

    People and the environment can be harmed if a home's onsite wastewater treatment system does not work properly after a flood or power outage. This publication explains the steps to take after such an event to get the system back into service. 4 pp...

  1. Overview of conservation treatments applied to rock glyph archaeological sites 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dandridge, Debra E

    2000-01-01

    . Conservation efforts to save the world's ancient rock glyphs have been approached from a scientific basis for only the last twenty-five years. Many site managers, both private and public, have little knowledge of, or training in, the use of treatments that can...

  2. High-Level Treatment of Stormwater Heavy Metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Shirley E.

    11/1/2008 1 High-Level Treatment of Stormwater Heavy Metals R. Pitt1, S. Clark2, P.D. Johnson1, R M for Urban Stormwater Conducted by the University of Alabama from 1999 to 2003 · Examined the characteristics and treatability of stormwater heavy metals. · Conducted detailed laboratory and field tests for the control

  3. Current Status of Interventional Radiology Treatment of Infrapopliteal Arterial Disease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rand, T., E-mail: thomas.rand@wienkav.at [General Hospital Hietzing, Department of Radiology (Austria); Uberoi, R. [John Radcliffe Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom)

    2013-06-15

    Treatment of infrapopliteal arteries has developed to a standard technique during the past two decades. With the introduction of innovative devices, a variety of techniques has been created and is still under investigation. Treatment options range from plain balloon angioplasty (POBA), all sorts of stent applications, such as bare metal, balloon expanding, self-expanding, coated and drug-eluting stents, and bio-absorbable stents, to latest developments, such as drug-eluting balloons. Regarding the scientific background, several prospective, randomized studies with relevant numbers of patients have been (or will be) published that are Level I evidence. In contrast to older studies, which primarily were based mostly on numeric parameters, such as diameters or residual stenoses, more recent study concepts focus increasingly on clinical features, such as amputation rate improvement or changes of clinical stages and quality of life standards. Although it is still not decided, which of the individual techniques might be the best one, we can definitely conclude that whatever treatment of infrapopliteal arteries will be used it is of substantial benefit for the patient. Therefore, the goal of this review is to give an overview about the current developments and techniques for the treatment of infrapopliteal arteries, to present clinical and technical results, to weigh individual techniques, and to discuss the recent developments.

  4. Treatment of addiction and addiction-related behavior

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dewey, Stephen L.; Brodie, Jonathan D.; Ashby, Jr., Charles R.

    2005-05-10

    The present invention relates to the use of a composition that increases central nervous system GABA levels in a mammal, for the treatment of addiction to drugs of abuse and modification of behavior associated with addiction to drugs of abuse in said mammal.

  5. Testing outer boundary treatments for the Einstein equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver Rinne; Lee Lindblom; Mark A. Scheel

    2007-07-25

    Various methods of treating outer boundaries in numerical relativity are compared using a simple test problem: a Schwarzschild black hole with an outgoing gravitational wave perturbation. Numerical solutions computed using different boundary treatments are compared to a `reference' numerical solution obtained by placing the outer boundary at a very large radius. For each boundary treatment, the full solutions including constraint violations and extracted gravitational waves are compared to those of the reference solution, thereby assessing the reflections caused by the artificial boundary. These tests use a first-order generalized harmonic formulation of the Einstein equations. Constraint-preserving boundary conditions for this system are reviewed, and an improved boundary condition on the gauge degrees of freedom is presented. Alternate boundary conditions evaluated here include freezing the incoming characteristic fields, Sommerfeld boundary conditions, and the constraint-preserving boundary conditions of Kreiss and Winicour. Rather different approaches to boundary treatments, such as sponge layers and spatial compactification, are also tested. Overall the best treatment found here combines boundary conditions that preserve the constraints, freeze the Newman-Penrose scalar Psi_0, and control gauge reflections.

  6. EIS-0224: Southeast Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant Facilities Improvements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "This EIS analyzes the Lake County Sanitation District joint venture with the geothermal industry, specifically the Northern California Power Agency, Calpine Corporation (Calpine), and Pacific Gas and Electric Company, to develop a plan for disposal of secondary-treated effluent from the Southeast Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant near the City of Clearlake, California, in the Southeast Geysers Geothermal Steam Field."

  7. Research Fund for the Prevention and Treatment of Kidney Disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, David J.

    and economic costs associated with these diseases. UMMC accommodates one million patient visits a year With a reputation for innovation and technical and surgical excellence, the UMSOM Division of Transplantation is one global cost for treatment of kidney disease in terms of dialysis and transplantation over the next decade

  8. Original article Modelling herbicide treatment impact on groundwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Original article Modelling herbicide treatment impact on groundwater quality in a central Italy of different weed control strategies on groundwater quality in a Central Italy area (Umbria) where the drinking and twenty-two weed control strategies were tested for their groundwater concentrations. Two maps reporting

  9. Numerical Code for LHCD Simulations with Self-consistent Treatment of Alpha Particles in Tokamak Geometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Numerical Code for LHCD Simulations with Self-consistent Treatment of Alpha Particles in Tokamak Geometry

  10. Gas injection to inhibit migration during an in situ heat treatment process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuhlman, Myron Ira (Houston, TX); Vinegar; Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Baker, Ralph Sterman (Fitchburg, MA); Heron, Goren (Keene, CA)

    2010-11-30

    Methods of treating a subsurface formation are described herein. Methods for treating a subsurface treatment area in a formation may include introducing a fluid into the formation from a plurality of wells offset from a treatment area of an in situ heat treatment process to inhibit outward migration of formation fluid from the in situ heat treatment process.

  11. Development and Optimization of Chemically-Active Electrospun Nanofibers for Treatment of Impaired Water Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nalbandian, Michael Jean-Claude

    2014-01-01

    wastewater; however, the primary entry route into these systems is via effluent from wastewater treatment. [

  12. Effect of pre-harvest and post-harvest conditions and treatments on plum fruit quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crisosto, Carlos H.

    include heat treatment, ozone, polyamine and calcium treatments, as well as fumigationReview Effect of pre-harvest and post-harvest conditions and treatments on plum fruit quality G. A ethylene, which is a key ripening regulator, while treatments with 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP

  13. CHP and Bioenergy for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment Plants: Market Opportunities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Overview of market opportunities for CHP and bioenergy for landfills and wastewater treatment plants

  14. NDMA Formation During Drinking Water Treatment: Veterinary Antibiotics as Precursors, the Effect of Natural Organic Matter and the Significance of Treatment Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roback, Shannon

    2015-01-01

    in aquatic environments. Water, Air, and Soil Pollution 32 (Drinking Water Treatment.1418 E.3. Removal During Water

  15. Development of equations to determine the increase in pavement condition due to treatment and the rate of decrease in condition after treatment for a local agency pavement network. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deshmukh, Maithilee Mukund.

    2010-07-14

    OF EQUATIONS TO DETERMINE THE INCREASE IN PAVEMENT CONDITION DUE TO TREATMENT AND THE RATE OF DECREASE IN CONDITION AFTER TREATMENT FOR A LOCAL AGENCY PAVEMENT NETWORK A Thesis by MAITHILEE MUKUND DESHMUKH Submitted to the Office of Graduate... TO TREATMENT AND THE RATE OF DECREASE IN CONDITION AFTER TREATMENT FOR A LOCAL AGENCY PAVEMENT NETWORK A Thesis by MAITHILEE MUKUND DESHMUKH Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

  16. NDMA Formation During Drinking Water Treatment: Veterinary Antibiotics as Precursors, the Effect of Natural Organic Matter and the Significance of Treatment Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roback, Shannon

    2015-01-01

    agricultural watershed. Desalination 226 (1–3):121-133. Ash,Nitrosodimethylamine. Desalination and Water Treatment 54 (

  17. Opportunities for Automated Demand Response in California Wastewater Treatment Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aghajanzadeh, Arian; Wray, Craig; McKane, Aimee

    2015-08-30

    Previous research over a period of six years has identified wastewater treatment facilities as good candidates for demand response (DR), automated demand response (Auto-­DR), and Energy Efficiency (EE) measures. This report summarizes that work, including the characteristics of wastewater treatment facilities, the nature of the wastewater stream, energy used and demand, as well as details of the wastewater treatment process. It also discusses control systems and automated demand response opportunities. Furthermore, this report summarizes the DR potential of three wastewater treatment facilities. In particular, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has collected data at these facilities from control systems, submetered process equipment, utility electricity demand records, and governmental weather stations. The collected data were then used to generate a summary of wastewater power demand, factors affecting that demand, and demand response capabilities. These case studies show that facilities that have implemented energy efficiency measures and that have centralized control systems are well suited to shed or shift electrical loads in response to financial incentives, utility bill savings, and/or opportunities to enhance reliability of service. In summary, municipal wastewater treatment energy demand in California is large, and energy-­intensive equipment offers significant potential for automated demand response. In particular, large load reductions were achieved by targeting effluent pumps and centrifuges. One of the limiting factors to implementing demand response is the reaction of effluent turbidity to reduced aeration at an earlier stage of the process. Another limiting factor is that cogeneration capabilities of municipal facilities, including existing power purchase agreements and utility receptiveness to purchasing electricity from cogeneration facilities, limit a facility’s potential to participate in other DR activities.

  18. Linking ceragenins to water-treatment membranes to minimize biofouling.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hibbs, Michael R.; Altman, Susan Jeanne; Feng, Yanshu (Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah); Savage, Paul B. (Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah); Pollard, Jacob (Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah); Branda, Steven S.; Goeres, Darla (Montana State University, Bozeman, MT); Buckingham-Meyer, Kelli (Montana State University, Bozeman, MT); Stafslien, Shane (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Marry, Christopher; Jones, Howland D. T.; Lichtenberger, Alyssa; Kirk, Matthew F.; McGrath, Lucas K. (LMATA, Albuquerque, NM)

    2012-01-01

    Ceragenins were used to create biofouling resistant water-treatment membranes. Ceragenins are synthetically produced antimicrobial peptide mimics that display broad-spectrum bactericidal activity. While ceragenins have been used on bio-medical devices, use of ceragenins on water-treatment membranes is novel. Biofouling impacts membrane separation processes for many industrial applications such as desalination, waste-water treatment, oil and gas extraction, and power generation. Biofouling results in a loss of permeate flux and increase in energy use. Creation of biofouling resistant membranes will assist in creation of clean water with lower energy usage and energy with lower water usage. Five methods of attaching three different ceragenin molecules were conducted and tested. Biofouling reduction was observed in the majority of the tests, indicating the ceragenins are a viable solution to biofouling on water treatment membranes. Silane direct attachment appears to be the most promising attachment method if a high concentration of CSA-121a is used. Additional refinement of the attachment methods are needed in order to achieve our goal of several log-reduction in biofilm cell density without impacting the membrane flux. Concurrently, biofilm forming bacteria were isolated from source waters relevant for water treatment: wastewater, agricultural drainage, river water, seawater, and brackish groundwater. These isolates can be used for future testing of methods to control biofouling. Once isolated, the ability of the isolates to grow biofilms was tested with high-throughput multiwell methods. Based on these tests, the following species were selected for further testing in tube reactors and CDC reactors: Pseudomonas ssp. (wastewater, agricultural drainage, and Colorado River water), Nocardia coeliaca or Rhodococcus spp. (wastewater), Pseudomonas fluorescens and Hydrogenophaga palleronii (agricultural drainage), Sulfitobacter donghicola, Rhodococcus fascians, Rhodobacter katedanii, and Paracoccus marcusii (seawater), and Sphingopyxis spp. (groundwater). The testing demonstrated the ability of these isolates to be used for biofouling control testing under laboratory conditions. Biofilm forming bacteria were obtained from all the source water samples.

  19. Delta Drinking Water Quality and TreatmentDelta Drinking Water Quality and Treatment WeiWei--Hsiang ChenHsiang Chen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    ­ ozonation use, ()- Under construction SOURCE: CALFED (2005) and MWDSC (http://www.mwdh2o.com/index.htm ) #1211 Delta Drinking Water Quality and TreatmentDelta Drinking Water Quality and Treatment CostsCosts · Treatments for Delta water quality conditions to minimize cost within technology limits. · Results using

  20. Heat treatment giving a stable high temperature micro-structure in cast austenitic stainless steel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anton, Donald L. (Toland, CT); Lemkey, Franklin D. (Windsor, CT)

    1988-01-01

    A novel micro-structure developed in a cast austenitic stainless steel alloy and a heat treatment thereof are disclosed. The alloy is based on a multicomponent Fe-Cr-Mn-Mo-Si-Nb-C system consisting of an austenitic iron solid solution (.gamma.) matrix reinforced by finely dispersed carbide phases and a heat treatment to produce the micro-structure. The heat treatment includes a prebraze heat treatment followed by a three stage braze cycle heat treatment.

  1. Dosimetric evaluation of PLATO and Oncentra treatment planning systems for High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy gynecological treatments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Hardev; De La Fuente Herman, Tania; Showalter, Barry; Thompson, Spencer J.; Syzek, Elizabeth J.; Herman, Terence; Ahmad, Salahuddin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peggy and Charles Stephenson Oklahoma Cancer Center, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK 73104 (United States)

    2012-10-23

    This study compares the dosimetric differences in HDR brachytherapy treatment plans calculated with Nucletron's PLATO and Oncentra MasterPlan treatment planning systems (TPS). Ten patients (1 T1b, 1 T2a, 6 T2b, 2 T4) having cervical carcinoma, median age of 43.5 years (range, 34-79 years) treated with tandem and ring applicator in our institution were selected retrospectively for this study. For both Plato and Oncentra TPS, the same orthogonal films anterior-posterior (AP) and lateral were used to manually draw the prescription and anatomical points using definitions from the Manchester system and recommendations from the ICRU report 38. Data input for PLATO was done using a digitizer and Epson Expression 10000XL scanner was used for Oncentra where the points were selected on the images in the screen. The prescription doses for these patients were 30 Gy to points right A (RA) and left A (LA) delivered in 5 fractions with Ir-192 HDR source. Two arrangements: one dwell position and two dwell positions on the tandem were used for dose calculation. The doses to the patient points right B (RB) and left B (LB), and to the organs at risk (OAR), bladder and rectum for each patient were calculated. The mean dose and the mean percentage difference in dose calculated by the two treatment planning systems were compared. Paired t-tests were used for statistical analysis. No significant differences in mean RB, LB, bladder and rectum doses were found with p-values > 0.14. The mean percent difference of doses in RB, LB, bladder and rectum are found to be less than 2.2%, 1.8%, 1.3% and 2.2%, respectively. Dose calculations based on the two different treatment planning systems were found to be consistent and the treatment plans can be made with either system in our department without any concern.

  2. POOL WATER TREATMENT AND COOLING SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    V. King

    2000-06-19

    The Pool Water Treatment and Cooling System is located in the Waste Handling Building (WHB), and is comprised of various process subsystems designed to support waste handling operations. This system maintains the pool water temperature within an acceptable range, maintains water quality standards that support remote underwater operations and prevent corrosion, detects leakage from the pool liner, provides the capability to remove debris from the pool, controls the pool water level, and helps limit radiological exposure to personnel. The pool structure and liner, pool lighting, and the fuel staging racks in the pool are not within the scope of the Pool Water Treatment and Cooling System. Pool water temperature control is accomplished by circulating the pool water through heat exchangers. Adequate circulation and mixing of the pool water is provided to prevent localized thermal hotspots in the pool. Treatment of the pool water is accomplished by a water treatment system that circulates the pool water through filters, and ion exchange units. These water treatment units remove radioactive and non-radioactive particulate and dissolved solids from the water, thereby providing the water clarity needed to conduct waste handling operations. The system also controls pool water chemistry to prevent advanced corrosion of the pool liner, pool components, and fuel assemblies. Removal of radioactivity from the pool water contributes to the project ALARA (as low as is reasonably achievable) goals. A leak detection system is provided to detect and alarm leaks through the pool liner. The pool level control system monitors the water level to ensure that the minimum water level required for adequate radiological shielding is maintained. Through interface with a demineralized water system, adequate makeup is provided to compensate for loss of water inventory through evaporation and waste handling operations. Interface with the Site Radiological Monitoring System provides continuous radiological monitoring of the pool water. The Pool Water Treatment and Cooling System interfaces with the Waste Handling Building System, Site-Generated Radiological Waste Handling System, Site Radiological Monitoring System, Waste Handling Building Electrical System, Site Water System, and the Monitored Geologic Repository Operations Monitoring and Control System.

  3. Evolving treatment plan quality criteria from institution-specific experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruan, D.; Shao, W.; DeMarco, J.; Tenn, S.; King, C.; Low, D.; Kupelian, P.; Steinberg, M.

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: The dosimetric aspects of radiation therapy treatment plan quality are usually evaluated and reported with dose volume histogram (DVH) endpoints. For clinical practicality, a small number of representative quantities derived from the DVH are often used as dose endpoints to summarize the plan quality. National guidelines on reference values for such quantities for some standard treatment approaches are often used as acceptance criteria to trigger treatment plan review. On the other hand, treatment prescription and planning approaches specific to each institution warrants the need to report plan quality in terms of practice consistency and with respect to institution-specific experience. The purpose of this study is to investigate and develop a systematic approach to record and characterize the institution-specific plan experience and use such information to guide the design of plan quality criteria. In the clinical setting, this approach will assist in (1) improving overall plan quality and consistency and (2) detecting abnormal plan behavior for retrospective analysis. Methods: The authors propose a self-evolving methodology and have developed an in-house prototype software suite that (1) extracts the dose endpoints from a treatment plan and evaluates them against both national standard and institution-specific criteria and (2) evolves the statistics for the dose endpoints and updates institution-specific criteria. Results: The validity of the proposed methodology was demonstrated with a database of prostate stereotactic body radiotherapy cases. As more data sets are accumulated, the evolving institution-specific criteria can serve as a reliable and stable consistency measure for plan quality and reveals the potential use of the ''tighter'' criteria than national standards or projected criteria, leading to practice that may push to shrink the gap between plans deemed acceptable and the underlying unknown optimality. Conclusions: The authors have developed a rationale to improve plan quality and consistency, by evolving the plan quality criteria from institution-specific experience, complementary to national standards. The validity of the proposed method was demonstrated with a prototype system on prostate stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) cases. The current study uses direct and indirect DVH endpoints for plan quality evaluation, but the infrastructure proposed here applies to general outcome data as well. The authors expect forward evaluation together with intelligent update based on evidence-based learning, which will evolve the clinical practice for improved efficiency, consistency, and ultimately better treatment outcome.

  4. Mixed and low-level waste treatment facility project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    The technology information provided in this report is only the first step toward the identification and selection of process systems that may be recommended for a proposed mixed and low-level waste treatment facility. More specific information on each technology will be required to conduct the system and equipment tradeoff studies that will follow these preengineering studies. For example, capacity, maintainability, reliability, cost, applicability to specific waste streams, and technology availability must be further defined. This report does not currently contain all needed information; however, all major technologies considered to be potentially applicable to the treatment of mixed and low-level waste are identified and described herein. Future reports will seek to improve the depth of information on technologies.

  5. Apparatus and method for ultrasonic treatment of a liquid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chandler, Darrell P [Richland, WA; Posakony, Gerald J [Richland, WA; Bond, Leonard J [Richland, WA; Bruckner-Lea, Cynthia J [Richland, WA

    2003-01-14

    The present invention is an apparatus and method for ultrasonically treating a liquid to generate a product. The apparatus is capable of treating a continuously-flowing, or intermittently-flowing, liquid along a line segment coincident with the flow path of the liquid. The apparatus has one or more ultrasonic transducers positioned asymmetrically about the line segment. The ultrasonic field encompasses the line segment and the ultrasonic energy may be concentrated along the line segment. Lysing treatments have been successfully achieved with efficiencies of greater than 99% using ultrasound at MHz frequencies without erosion or heating problems and without the need for chemical or mechanical pretreatment, or contrast agents. The present invention overcomes drawbacks of current ultrasonic treatments beyond lysing and opens up new sonochemical and sonophysical processing opportunities.

  6. Apparatus and method for ultrasonic treatment of a liquid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chandler, Darrell P.; Posakony, Gerald J.; Bond, Leonard J.; Bruckner-Lea, Cynthia J.

    2006-04-04

    The present invention is an apparatus for ultrasonically treating a liquid to generate a product. The apparatus is capable of treating a continuously-flowing, or intermittently-flowing, liquid along a line segment coincident with the flow path of the liquid. The apparatus has one or more ultrasonic transducers positioned asymmetrically about the line segment. The ultrasonic field encompasses the line segment and the ultrasonic energy may be concentrated along the line segment. Lysing treatments have been successfully achieved with efficiencies of greater than 99% using ultrasound at MHz frequencies without erosion or heating problems and without the need for chemical or mechanical pretreatment, or contrast agents. The present invention overcomes drawbacks of current ultrasonic treatments beyond lysing and opens up new sonochemical and sonophysical processing opportunities.

  7. Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation for Treatment of Recurrent Retroperitoneal Liposarcoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keil, Sebastian, E-mail: keil@rad.rwth-aachen.de; Bruners, Philipp [RWTH Aachen University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital (Germany); Brehmer, Bernhard [RWTH Aachen University, Department of Urology, University Hospital (Germany); Mahnken, Andreas Horst [RWTH Aachen University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital (Germany)

    2008-07-15

    Percutaneous CT-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is becoming more and more established in the treatment of various neoplasms, including retroperitoneal tumors of the kidneys and the adrenal glands. We report the case of RFA in a patient suffering from the third relapse of a retroperitoneal liposarcoma in the left psoas muscle. After repeated surgical resection and supportive radiation therapy of a primary retroperitoneal liposarcoma and two surgically treated recurrences, including replacement of the ureter by a fraction of the ileum, there was no option for further surgery. Thus, we considered RFA as the most suitable treatment option. Monopolar RFA was performed in a single session with a 2-cm umbrella-shaped LeVeen probe. During a 27-month follow-up period the patient remained free of tumor.

  8. Produced Water Treatment Using Microbial Fuel Cell Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borole, A. P.; Campbell, R. [Campbell Applied Physics

    2011-05-20

    ORNL has developed a treatment for produced water using a combination of microbial fuel cells and electrosorption. A collaboration between Campbell Applied Physics and ORNL was initiated to further investigate development of the technology and apply it to treatment of field produced water. The project successfully demonstrated the potential of microbial fuel cells to generate electricity from organics in produced water. A steady voltage was continuously generated for several days using the system developed in this study. In addition to the extraction of electrical energy from the organic contaminants, use of the energy at the representative voltage was demonstrated for salts removal or desalination of the produced water. Thus, the technology has potential to remove organic as well as ionic contaminants with minimal energy input using this technology. This is a novel energy-efficient method to treat produced water. Funding to test the technology at larger scale is being pursued to enable application development.

  9. INTEC CPP-603 Basin Water Treatment System Closure: Process Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimmitt, Raymond Rodney; Faultersack, Wendell Gale; Foster, Jonathan Kay; Berry, Stephen Michael

    2002-09-01

    This document describes the engineering activities that have been completed in support of the closure plan for the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) CPP-603 Basin Water Treatment System. This effort includes detailed assessments of methods and equipment for performing work in four areas: 1. A cold (nonradioactive) mockup system for testing equipment and procedures for vessel cleanout and vessel demolition. 2. Cleanout of process vessels to meet standards identified in the closure plan. 3. Dismantlement and removal of vessels, should it not be possible to clean them to required standards in the closure plan. 4. Cleanout or removal of pipelines and pumps associated with the CPP-603 basin water treatment system. Cleanout standards for the pipes will be the same as those used for the process vessels.

  10. Carbide and carbonitride surface treatment method for refractory metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meyer, G.A.; Schildbach, M.A.

    1996-12-03

    A carbide and carbonitride surface treatment method for refractory metals is provided, in steps including, heating a part formed of boron, chromium, hafnium, molybdenum, niobium, tantalum, titanium, tungsten or zirconium, or alloys thereof, in an evacuated chamber and then introducing reaction gases including nitrogen and hydrogen, either in elemental or water vapor form, which react with a source of elemental carbon to form carbon-containing gaseous reactants which then react with the metal part to form the desired surface layer. Apparatus for practicing the method is also provided, in the form of a carbide and carbonitride surface treatment system including a reaction chamber, a source of elemental carbon, a heating subassembly and a source of reaction gases. Alternative methods of providing the elemental carbon and the reaction gases are provided, as well as methods of supporting the metal part, evacuating the chamber with a vacuum subassembly and heating all of the components to the desired temperature. 5 figs.

  11. West Point Treatment Plant Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEtGeorgia: Energy Resources JumpChicago,Islip,Point Treatment Plant Biomass

  12. Treatment of addiction and addiction-related behavior

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dewey, Stephen L. (Manorville, NY); Brodie, Jonathan D. (Cos Cob, CT); Ashby, Jr., Charles R. (Miller Place, NY)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides a highly efficient method for treating substance addiction and for changing addiction-related behavior of a primate suffering from substance addiction. The method includes administering to a primate an effective amount of a pharmaceutical composition including gamma vinylGABA. The present invention also provides a method of treatment of nicotine addiction by treating a patient with an effective amount of a composition including gamma vinylGABA.

  13. Unruh effect with back reaction--A first quantized treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Reznik

    1998-01-29

    We present a first-quantized treatment of the back reaction on an accelerated particle detector. The accelerated detector is described as a first quantized, charged, pointlike particle in a constant field with internal energy levels. A quantum version of canonically conjugate future and past Rindler horizon operators is introduced to facilitate the calculation. The evaluated transition amplitude for detection agrees with previously obtained results.

  14. Genome Science and Personalized Cancer Treatment (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Gray, Joe

    2011-04-28

    Summer Lecture Series 2009: Results from the Human Genome Project are enabling scientists to understand how individual cancers form and progress. This information, when combined with newly developed drugs, can optimize the treatment of individual cancers. Joe Gray, director of Berkeley Labs Life Sciences Division and Associate Laboratory Director for Life and Environmental Sciences, will focus on this approach, its promise, and its current roadblocks ? particularly with regard to breast cancer.

  15. Microwave off-gas treatment apparatus and process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schulz, Rebecca L. (Aiken, SC); Clark, David E. (Gainesville, FL); Wicks, George G. (North Aiken, SC)

    2003-01-01

    The invention discloses a microwave off-gas system in which microwave energy is used to treat gaseous waste. A treatment chamber is used to remediate off-gases from an emission source by passing the off-gases through a susceptor matrix, the matrix being exposed to microwave radiation. The microwave radiation and elevated temperatures within the combustion chamber provide for significant reductions in the qualitative and quantitative emissions of the gas waste stream.

  16. Treatment of Organic-Contaminated Wastewater by Pervaporation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wijmans, J. G.; Kaschemekat, J.; Baker, R. W.; Simmons, V. L.

    1991-01-01

    -CONTAMINATED WASTEWATER BY PERVAPORATION J.G. WIJMANS J. KASCHEMEKAT R.W. BAKER V.L. SIMMONS Research Director Design Engineer President Marketing Director Membrane Technology and Research, Inc., Menlo Park, CA ABSTRACT The removal and recovery of organic... contaminants from aqueous streams by pervaporation membrane systems is a viable and economical treatment for many waste streams. Specific opportunities for the technology are identified in this paper. La~oratory and pilot system data are used to develop...

  17. Genome Science and Personalized Cancer Treatment (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, Joe

    2009-08-04

    Summer Lecture Series 2009: Results from the Human Genome Project are enabling scientists to understand how individual cancers form and progress. This information, when combined with newly developed drugs, can optimize the treatment of individual cancers. Joe Gray, director of Berkeley Labs Life Sciences Division and Associate Laboratory Director for Life and Environmental Sciences, will focus on this approach, its promise, and its current roadblocks — particularly with regard to breast cancer.

  18. Prostate Bed Motion During Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klayton, Tracy; Price, Robert; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Sobczak, Mark; Greenberg, Richard; Li, Jinsheng; Keller, Lanea; Sopka, Dennis; Kutikov, Alexander; Horwitz, Eric M.

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Conformal radiation therapy in the postprostatectomy setting requires accurate setup and localization of the prostatic fossa. In this series, we report prostate bed localization and motion characteristics, using data collected from implanted radiofrequency transponders. Methods and Materials: The Calypso four-dimensional localization system uses three implanted radiofrequency transponders for daily target localization and real-time tracking throughout a course of radiation therapy. We reviewed the localization and tracking reports for 20 patients who received ultrasonography-guided placement of Calypso transponders within the prostate bed prior to a course of intensity-modulated radiation therapy at Fox Chase Cancer Center. Results: At localization, prostate bed displacement relative to bony anatomy exceeded 5 mm in 9% of fractions in the anterior-posterior (A-P) direction and 21% of fractions in the superior-inferior (S-I) direction. The three-dimensional vector length from skin marks to Calypso alignment exceeded 1 cm in 24% of all 652 fractions with available setup data. During treatment, the target exceeded the 5-mm tracking limit for at least 30 sec in 11% of all fractions, generally in the A-P or S-I direction. In the A-P direction, target motion was twice as likely to move posteriorly, toward the rectum, than anteriorly. Fifteen percent of all treatments were interrupted for repositioning, and 70% of patients were repositioned at least once during their treatment course. Conclusion: Set-up errors and motion of the prostatic fossa during radiotherapy are nontrivial, leading to potential undertreatment of target and excess normal tissue toxicity if not taken into account during treatment planning. Localization and real-time tracking of the prostate bed via implanted Calypso transponders can be used to improve the accuracy of plan delivery.

  19. Economic Analysis of Wastewater Treatment Alternatives in Rural Texas Communities. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victurine, Raymond F.; Goodwin, H.L. Jr; Lacewell, Ronald D.

    1985-01-01

    reclamation and recycling through the production of agricultural crops. The law authorized federal funding of up to 75% of construction costs to engender investment in improved wastewater treatment facilities. In response to delays in compliance... communities utilizing this alternative need only lagoons rather than more costly mechanical systems. Because the soil acts as a biological filter providing for efficient removal of the pOllQtants contained in residential wastewater. communities can eliminate...

  20. CLASSIFICATION OF THE MGR WASTE TREATMENT BUILDING VENTILATION SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.E. Salzman

    1999-08-31

    The purpose of this analysis is to document the Quality Assurance (QA) classification of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) waste treatment building ventilation system structures, systems and components (SSCs) performed by the MGR Safety Assurance Department. This analysis also provides the basis for revision of YMP/90-55Q, Q-List (YMP 1998). The Q-List identifies those MGR SSCs subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-0333P, ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (QARD) (DOE 1998).

  1. Emission of reduced malodorous sulfur gases from wastewater treatment plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devai, I.; DeLaune, R.D.

    1999-03-01

    The emission of malodorous gaseous compounds from wastewater collection and treatment facilities is a growing maintenance and environmental problem. Numerous gaseous compounds with low odor detection thresholds are emitted from these facilities. Sulfur-bearing gases represent compounds with the lowest odor detection threshold. Using solid adsorbent preconcentration and gas chromatographic methods, the quantity and composition of reduced malodorous sulfur gases emitted from various steps of the treatment process were determined in wastewater treatment plants in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Hydrogen sulfide, which is a malodorous, corrosive, and potentially toxic gas, was the most dominant volatile reduced sulfur (S) compound measured. Concentrations were not only more than the odor detection threshold of hydrogen sulfide, but above levels that may affect health during long-term exposure. The concentrations of methanethiol, dimethyl sulfide, carbon disulfide, and carbonyl sulfide were significantly less than hydrogen sulfide. However, even though emissions of reduced sulfur gases other than hydrogen sulfide were low, previous studies suggested that long-term exposure to such levels may cause respiratory problems and other symptoms.

  2. Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    Mixed and low-level wastes generated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are required to be managed according to applicable State and Federal regulations, and Department of Energy Orders that provide for the protection of human health and the environment. The Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility Project was chartered in 1991, by the Department of Energy to provide treatment capability for these mixed and low-level waste streams. The first project task consisted of conducting engineering studies to identify the waste streams, their potential treatment strategies, and the requirements that would be imposed on the waste streams and the facilities used to process them. This report, Appendix A, Environmental Regulatory Planning Documentation, identifies the regulatory requirements that would be imposed on the operation or construction of a facility designed to process the INEL's waste streams. These requirements are contained in five reports that discuss the following topics: (1) an environmental compliance plan and schedule, (2) National Environmental Policy Act requirements, (3) preliminary siting requirements, (4) regulatory justification for the project, and (5) health and safety criteria.

  3. WASTE TREATMENT PLANT (WTP) LIQUID EFFLUENT TREATABILITY EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LUECK, K.J.

    2004-10-18

    A forecast of the radioactive, dangerous liquid effluents expected to be produced by the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) was provided by Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI 2004). The forecast represents the liquid effluents generated from the processing of Tank Farm waste through the end-of-mission for the WTP. The WTP forecast is provided in the Appendices. The WTP liquid effluents will be stored, treated, and disposed of in the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility (LERF) and the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). Both facilities are located in the 200 East Area and are operated by Fluor Hanford, Inc. (FH) for the US. Department of Energy (DOE). The treatability of the WTP liquid effluents in the LERF/ETF was evaluated. The evaluation was conducted by comparing the forecast to the LERF/ETF treatability envelope (Aromi 1997), which provides information on the items which determine if a liquid effluent is acceptable for receipt and treatment at the LERF/ETF. The format of the evaluation corresponds directly to the outline of the treatability envelope document. Except where noted, the maximum annual average concentrations over the range of the 27 year forecast was evaluated against the treatability envelope. This is an acceptable approach because the volume capacity in the LERF Basin will equalize the minimum and maximum peaks. Background information on the LERF/ETF design basis is provided in the treatability envelope document.

  4. A study of light ion accelerators for cancer treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prelec, K.

    1997-07-01

    This review addresses several issues, such as possible advantages of light ion therapy compared to protons and conventional radiation, the complexity of such a system and its possible adaptation to a hospital environment, and the question of cost-effectiveness compared to other modalities for cancer treatment or to other life saving procedures. Characteristics and effects of different types of radiation on cells and organisms will be briefly described; this will include conventional radiation, protons and light ions. The status of proton and light ion cancer therapy will then be described, with more emphasis on the latter; on the basis of existing experience the criteria for the use of light ions will be listed and areas of possible medical applications suggested. Requirements and parameters of ion beams for cancer treatment will then be defined, including ion species, energy and intensity, as well as parameters of the beam when delivered to the target (scanning, time structure, energy spread). Possible accelerator designs for light ions will be considered, including linear accelerators, cyclotrons and synchrotrons and their basic features given; this will be followed by a review of existing and planned facilities for light ions. On the basis of these considerations a tentative design for a dedicated light ion facility will be suggested, a facility that would be hospital based, satisfying the clinical requirements, simple to operate and reliable, concluding with its cost-effectiveness in comparison with other modalities for treatment of cancer.

  5. Approved Site Treatment Plan, Volumes 1 and 2. Revision 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helmich, E.H.; Molen, G.; Noller, D.

    1996-03-22

    The US Department of Energy, Savannah River Operations Office (DOE-SR), has prepared the Site Treatment Plan (STP) for Savannah River Site (SRS) mixed wastes in accordance with RCRA Section 3021(b), and SCDHEC has approved the STP (except for certain offsite wastes) and issued an order enforcing the STP commitments in Volume 1. DOE-SR and SCDHEC agree that this STP fulfills the requirements contained in the FFCAct, RCRA Section 3021, and therefore, pursuant to Section 105(a) of the FFCAct (RCRA Section 3021(b)(5)), DOE`s requirements are to implement the plan for the development of treatment capacities and technologies pursuant to RCRA Section 3021. Emerging and new technologies not yet considered may be identified to manage waste more safely, effectively, and at lower cost than technologies currently identified in the plan. DOE will continue to evaluate and develop technologies that offer potential advantages in public acceptance, privatization, consolidation, risk abatement, performance, and life-cycle cost. Should technologies that offer such advantages be identified, DOE may request a revision/modification of the STP in accordance with the provisions of Consent Order 95-22-HW. The Compliance Plan Volume (Volume 1) identifies project activity schedule milestones for achieving compliance with Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR). Information regarding the technical evaluation of treatment options for SRS mixed wastes is contained in the Background Volume (Volume 2) and is provided for information.

  6. Sodium-bearing Waste Treatment Technology Evaluation Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles M. Barnes; Arlin L. Olson; Dean D. Taylor

    2004-05-01

    Sodium-bearing waste (SBW) disposition is one of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Idaho Operation Office’s (NE-ID) and State of Idaho’s top priorities at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL has been working over the past several years to identify a treatment technology that meets NE-ID and regulatory treatment requirements, including consideration of stakeholder input. Many studies, including the High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), have resulted in the identification of five treatment alternatives that form a short list of perhaps the most appropriate technologies for the DOE to select from. The alternatives are (a) calcination with maximum achievable control technology (MACT) upgrade, (b) steam reforming, (c) cesium ion exchange (CsIX) with immobilization, (d) direct evaporation, and (e) vitrification. Each alternative has undergone some degree of applied technical development and preliminary process design over the past four years. This report presents a summary of the applied technology and process design activities performed through February 2004. The SBW issue and the five alternatives are described in Sections 2 and 3, respectively. Details of preliminary process design activities for three of the alternatives (steam reforming, CsIX, and direct evaporation) are presented in three appendices. A recent feasibility study provides the details for calcination. There have been no recent activities performed with regard to vitrification; that section summarizes and references previous work.

  7. Geothermal injection treatment: process chemistry, field experiences, and design options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kindle, C.H.; Mercer, B.W.; Elmore, R.P.; Blair, S.C.; Myers, D.A.

    1984-09-01

    The successful development of geothermal reservoirs to generate electric power will require the injection disposal of approximately 700,000 gal/h (2.6 x 10/sup 6/ 1/h) of heat-depleted brine for every 50,000 kW of generating capacity. To maintain injectability, the spent brine must be compatible with the receiving formation. The factors that influence this brine/formation compatibility and tests to quantify them are discussed in this report. Some form of treatment will be necessary prior to injection for most situations; the process chemistry involved to avoid and/or accelerate the formation of precipitate particles is also discussed. The treatment processes, either avoidance or controlled precipitation approaches, are described in terms of their principles and demonstrated applications in the geothermal field and, when such experience is limited, in other industrial use. Monitoring techniques for tracking particulate growth, the effect of process parameters on corrosion and well injectability are presented. Examples of brine injection, preinjection treatment, and recovery from injectivity loss are examined and related to the aspects listed above.

  8. Mixed and Low-Level Treatment Facility Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    This appendix contains the mixed and low-level waste engineering design files (EDFS) documenting each low-level and mixed waste stream investigated during preengineering studies for Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility Project. The EDFs provide background information on mixed and low-level waste generated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. They identify, characterize, and provide treatment strategies for the waste streams. Mixed waste is waste containing both radioactive and hazardous components as defined by the Atomic Energy Act and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, respectively. Low-level waste is waste that contains radioactivity and is not classified as high-level waste, transuranic waste, spent nuclear fuel, or 11e(2) byproduct material as defined by DOE 5820.2A. Test specimens of fissionable material irradiated for research and development only, and not for the production of power or plutonium, may be classified as low-level waste, provided the concentration of transuranic is less than 100 nCi/g. This appendix is a tool that clarifies presentation format for the EDFS. The EDFs contain waste stream characterization data and potential treatment strategies that will facilitate system tradeoff studies and conceptual design development. A total of 43 mixed waste and 55 low-level waste EDFs are provided.

  9. Savannah River Site Approved Site Treatment Plan, 1998 Annual Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence, B.; Berry, M.

    1998-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, Savannah River Operations Office (DOE- SR),has prepared the Site Treatment Plan (STP) for Savannah River Site (SRS) mixed wastes in accordance with RCRA Section 3021(b), and SCDHEC has approved the STP (except for certain offsite wastes) and issued an order enforcing the STP commitments in Volume I. DOE-SR and SCDHEC agree that this STP fulfills the requirements contained in the FFCAct, RCRA Section 3021, and therefore,pursuant to Section 105(a) of the FFCAct (RCRA Section 3021(b)(5)), DOE`s requirements are to implement the plan for the development of treatment capacities and technologies pursuant to RCRA Section 3021.Emerging and new technologies not yet considered may be identified to manage waste more safely, effectively, and at lower cost than technologies currently identified in the plan. DOE will continue to evaluate and develop technologies that offer potential advantages in public acceptance, privatization, consolidation, risk abatement, performance, and life-cycle cost. Should technologies that offer such advantages be identified, DOE may request a revision/modification of the STP in accordance with the provisions of Consent Order 95-22-HW.The Compliance Plan Volume (Volume I) identifies project activity schedule milestones for achieving compliance with Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR). Information regarding the technical evaluation of treatment options for SRS mixed wastes is contained in the Background Volume (Volume II) and is provided for information.

  10. Handbook of industrial and hazardous wastes treatment. 2nd ed.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence Wang; Yung-Tse Hung; Howard Lo; Constantine Yapijakis

    2004-06-15

    This expanded Second Edition offers 32 chapters of industry- and waste-specific analyses and treatment methods for industrial and hazardous waste materials - from explosive wastes to landfill leachate to wastes produced by the pharmaceutical and food industries. Key additional chapters cover means of monitoring waste on site, pollution prevention, and site remediation. Including a timely evaluation of the role of biotechnology in contemporary industrial waste management, the Handbook reveals sound approaches and sophisticated technologies for treating: textile, rubber, and timber wastes; dairy, meat, and seafood industry wastes; bakery and soft drink wastes; palm and olive oil wastes; pesticide and livestock wastes; pulp and paper wastes; phosphate wastes; detergent wastes; photographic wastes; refinery and metal plating wastes; and power industry wastes. This final chapter, entitled 'Treatment of power industry wastes' by Lawrence K. Wang, analyses the stream electric power generation industry, where combustion of fossil fuels coal, oil, gas, supplies heat to produce stream, used then to generate mechanical energy in turbines, subsequently converted to electricity. Wastes include waste waters from cooling water systems, ash handling systems, wet-scrubber air pollution control systems, and boiler blowdown. Wastewaters are characterized and waste treatment by physical and chemical systems to remove pollutants is presented. Plant-specific examples are provided.

  11. Characterization of self-propagating formation reactions in Ni/Zr multilayered foils using reaction heats, velocities, and temperature-time profiles

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Barron, S. C.; Knepper, R.; Walker, N.; Weihs, T. P.

    2011-01-11

    We report on intermetallic formation reactions in vapor-deposited multilayered foils of Ni/Zr with 70 nm bilayers and overall atomic ratios of Ni:Zr, 2 Ni:Zr, and 7 Ni:2 Zr. The sequence of alloy phase formation and the stored energy is evaluated at slow heating rates (~1 K/s) using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) traces to 725ºC. All three chemistries initially form a Ni-Zr amorphous phase which crystallizes first to the intermetallic NiZr. The heat of reaction to the final phase is 34-36 kJ/mol atom for all chemistries. Intermetallic formation reactions are also studied at rapid heating rates (greater than 105 K/s) inmore »high temperature, self-propagating reactions which can be ignited in these foils by an electric spark. We find that reaction velocities and maximum reaction temperatures (Tmax) are largely independent of foil chemistry at 0.6 ± 0.1 m/s and 1220 ± 50 K, respectively, and that the measured Tmax is more than 200 K lower than predicted adiabatic temperatures (Tad). The difference between Tmax and Tad is explained by the prediction that transformation to the final intermetallic phases occurs after Tmax and results in the release of 20-30 % of the total heat of reaction and a delay in rapid cooling.« less

  12. Characterization of self-propagating formation reactions in Ni/Zr multilayered foils using reaction heats, velocities, and temperature-time profiles

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Barron, S. C.; Knepper, R.; Walker, N.; Weihs, T. P.

    2011-01-11

    We report on intermetallic formation reactions in vapor-deposited multilayered foils of Ni/Zr with 70 nm bilayers and overall atomic ratios of Ni:Zr, 2 Ni:Zr, and 7 Ni:2 Zr. The sequence of alloy phase formation and the stored energy is evaluated at slow heating rates (~1 K/s) using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) traces to 725ºC. All three chemistries initially form a Ni-Zr amorphous phase which crystallizes first to the intermetallic NiZr. The heat of reaction to the final phase is 34-36 kJ/mol atom for all chemistries. Intermetallic formation reactions are also studied at rapid heating rates (greater than 105 K/s) in high temperature, self-propagating reactions which can be ignited in these foils by an electric spark. We find that reaction velocities and maximum reaction temperatures (Tmax) are largely independent of foil chemistry at 0.6 ± 0.1 m/s and 1220 ± 50 K, respectively, and that the measured Tmax is more than 200 K lower than predicted adiabatic temperatures (Tad). The difference between Tmax and Tad is explained by the prediction that transformation to the final intermetallic phases occurs after Tmax and results in the release of 20-30 % of the total heat of reaction and a delay in rapid cooling.

  13. Evaluation of the transport and resuspension of a simulated nuclear waste slurry: Nuclear Waste Treatment Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carleson, T.E.; Drown, D.C.; Hart, R.E.; Peterson, M.E.

    1987-09-01

    The Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Idaho conducted research on the transport and resuspension of a simulated high-level nuclear waste slurry. In the United States, the reference process for treating both defense and civilian HLLW is vitrification using the liquid-fed ceramic melter process. The non-Newtonian behavior of the slurry complicates the evaluation of the transport and resuspension characteristics of the slurry. The resuspension of a simulated (nonradioactive) melter feed slurry was evaluated using a slurry designated as WV-205. The simulated slurry was developed for the West Valley Demonstration Project and was used during a pilot-scale ceramic melter (PSCM) experiment conducted at PNL in July 1985 (PSCM-21). This study involved determining the transport characteristics of a fully suspended slurry and the resuspension characteristics of settled solids in a pilot-scale pipe loop. The goal was to predict the transport and resuspension of a full-scale system based on rheological data for a specific slurry. The rheological behavior of the slurry was evaluated using a concentric cylinder rotational viscometer, a capillary tube viscometer, and the pilot-scale pipe loop. The results obtained from the three approaches were compared. 40 refs., 74 figs., 15 tabs.

  14. SULFUR HEXAFLUORIDE TREATMENT OF USED NUCLEAR FUEL TO ENHANCE SEPARATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, J.; Torres, R.; Korinko, P.; Martinez-Rodriguez, M.; Becnel, J.; Garcia-Diaz, B.; Adams, T.

    2012-09-25

    Reactive Gas Recycling (RGR) technology development has been initiated at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), with a stretch-goal to develop a fully dry recycling technology for Used Nuclear Fuel (UNF). This approach is attractive due to the potential of targeted gas-phase treatment steps to reduce footprint and secondary waste volumes associated with separations relying primarily on traditional technologies, so long as the fluorinators employed in the reaction are recycled for use in the reactors or are optimized for conversion of fluorinator reactant. The developed fluorination via SF{sub 6}, similar to the case for other fluorinators such as NF{sub 3}, can be used to address multiple fuel forms and downstream cycles including continued processing for LWR via fluorination or incorporation into a aqueous process (e.g. modified FLUOREX) or for subsequent pyro treatment to be used in advanced gas reactor designs such metal- or gas-cooled reactors. This report details the most recent experimental results on the reaction of SF{sub 6} with various fission product surrogate materials in the form of oxides and metals, including uranium oxides using a high-temperature DTA apparatus capable of temperatures in excess of 1000{deg}C . The experimental results indicate that the majority of the fission products form stable solid fluorides and sulfides, while a subset of the fission products form volatile fluorides such as molybdenum fluoride and niobium fluoride, as predicted thermodynamically. Additional kinetic analysis has been performed on additional fission products. A key result is the verification that SF{sub 6} requires high temperatures for direct fluorination and subsequent volatilization of uranium oxides to UF{sub 6}, and thus is well positioned as a head-end treatment for other separations technologies, such as the volatilization of uranium oxide by NF{sub 3} as reported by colleagues at PNNL, advanced pyrochemical separations or traditional full recycle approaches. Based on current results of the research at SRNL on SF{sub 6} fluoride volatility for UNF separations, SF{sub 6} treatment renders all anticipated volatile fluorides studied to be volatile, and all non-volatile fluorides studied to be non-volatile, with the notable exception of uranium oxides. This offers an excellent opportunity to use this as a head-end separations treatment process because: 1. SF{sub 6} can be used to remove volatile fluorides from a UNF matrix while leaving behind uranium oxides. Therefore an agent such as NF{sub 3} should be able to very cleanly separate a pure UF{sub 6} stream, leaving compounds in the bottoms such as PuF{sub 4}, SrF{sub 2} and CsF after the UNF matrix has been pre-treated with SF{sub 6}. 2. Due to the fact that the uranium oxide is not separated in the volatilization step upon direct contact with SF{sub 6} at moderately high temperatures (? 1000{deg}C), this fluoride approach may be wellsuited for head-end processing for Gen IV reactor designs where the LWR is treated as a fuel stock, and it is not desired to separate the uranium from plutonium, but it is desired to separate many of the volatile fission products. 3. It is likely that removal of the volatile fission products from the uranium oxide should simplify both traditional and next generation pyroprocessing techniques. 4. SF{sub 6} treatment to remove volatile fission products, with or without treatment with additional fluorinators, could be used to simplify the separations of traditional aqueous processes in similar fashion to the FLUOREX process. Further research should be conducted to determine the separations efficiency of a combined SF{sub 6}/NF{sub 3} separations approach which could be used as a stand-alone separations technology or a head-end process.

  15. MWIP: Surrogate formulations for thermal treatment of low-level mixed waste. Part 4, Wastewater treatment sludges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bostick, W.D.; Hoffmann, D.P.; Stevenson, R.J.; Richmond, A.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Bickford, D.F. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1994-01-01

    The category of sludges, filter cakes, and other waste processing residuals represent the largest volume of low-level mixed (hazardous and radioactive) wastes within the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Treatment of these wastes to minimize the mobility of contaminants, and to eliminate the presence of free water, is required under the Federal Facility Compliance Act agreements between DOE and the Environmental Protection Agency. In the text, we summarize the currently available data for several of the high priority mixed-waste sludge inventories within DOE. Los Alamos National Laboratory TA-50 Sludge and Rocky Flats Plant By-Pass Sludge are transuranic (TRU)-contaminated sludges that were isolated with the use of silica-based filter aids. The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant West End Treatment Facility Sludge is predominantly calcium carbonate and biomass. The Oak Ridge K-25 Site Pond Waste is a large-volume waste stream, containing clay, silt, and other debris in addition to precipitated metal hydroxides. We formulate ``simulants`` for the waste streams described above, using cerium oxide as a surrogate for the uranium or plutonium present in the authentic material. Use of nonradiological surrogates greatly simplifies material handling requirements for initial treatability studies. The use of synthetic mixtures for initial treatability testing will facilitate compositional variation for use in conjunction with statistical design experiments; this approach may help to identify any ``operating window`` limitations. The initial treatability testing demonstrations utilizing these ``simulants`` will be based upon vitrification, although the materials are also amenable to testing grout-based and other stabilization procedures. After the feasibility of treatment and the initial evaluation of treatment performance has been demonstrated, performance must be verified using authentic samples of the candidate waste stream.

  16. A study of the effect of temperature on the rate of settling of crude cotton-seed oil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeffrey, Jack Cassels

    1933-01-01

    in Crude Cottonseed Oi1 " Cotton Oil ~'ress? V: &So? 6? ~Q 50? 19M ~ Jamieson, 0 F, andi B~u;~, '. P. 'C~sitioa of Credo CottoneeeC Oi1s; a Smamary. " Journal of Oi1 omK Fat Xnlustry 5: 547-bb? 1985? A14818787798 ...

  17. Settling into the Younger Dryas: Human Behavioral Adaptations During the Pleistocene to Holocene Transition in the Midsouth United States 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tune, Jesse W

    2015-08-11

    . .................................................................... 36 xi Figure 12 Planview of Area B bonebed from 1994-1995 excavations with locations of lithic specimens. A) Lithic specimens previously reported in situ. B) Lithic specimens with unequivocal provenience. Image adapted from Breitburg et.... ............................. 106 Figure 27 Distribution of Clovis bifaces by raw material type. A, Fort Payne; B, St. Louis; C, Other. .................................................................... 107 Figure 28 Distribution of Cumberland bifaces by raw material...

  18. The Population Policy Pendulum: Needs to Settle Near the Middle--And Acknowledge the Importance of Numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potts, Malcolm

    1999-01-01

    and male and female sterilisation account for 98% of allflirted with coercive sterilisation. In 1984 in Mexico City

  19. Distribution, condition, and growth of newly settled southern flounder (Paralichthys lethostigma) in the Galveston Bay Estuary, TX 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glass, Lindsay Ann

    2006-08-16

    . ................................................................................................... 27 1 INTRODUCTION Effectively managing estuarine nursery habitats requires an understanding of population dynamics and the causes of variability in recruitment (Houde 1987; Sinclair 1988; Jones 1990; Cushing and Horwood 1994; Leggett and De...). Usually a spawning ground is fixed, and environmental variation in factors associated with hydrography dictates the number of larvae that are transported to the nursery (Sinclair 1988). Hjort (1914) suggested that food was a limiting factor during...

  20. Wastewater Reclamation and Biofuel Production Using Algae

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Africa, New Zealand (but not designed for nutrient removal). 9 Typical Electro-Mechanical Treatment Plant 10 Aeration Basins with Air Blowers Sludge Settling Tanks -100,000 0...

  1. Palliative Treatment of Rectal Carcinoma Recurrence Using Radiofrequency Ablation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mylona, Sophia Karagiannis, Georgios Patsoura, Sofia; Galani, Panagiota; Pomoni, Maria; Thanos, Loukas

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of CT-guided radiofrequency (RF) ablation for the palliative treatment of recurrent unresectable rectal tumors. Materials and Methods: Twenty-seven patients with locally recurrent rectal cancer were treated with computed tomography (CT)-guided RF ablation. Therapy was performed with the patient under conscious sedation with a seven- or a nine-array expandable RF electrode for 8-10 min at 80-110 Degree-Sign C and a power of 90-110 W. All patients went home under instructions the next day of the procedure. Brief Pain Inventory score was calculated before and after (1 day, 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months) treatment. Results: Complete tumor necrosis rate was 77.8% (21 of a total 27 procedures) despite lesion location. BPI score was dramatically decreased after the procedure. The mean preprocedure BPI score was 6.59, which decreased to 3.15, 1.15, and 0.11 at postprocedure day 1, week 1, and month 1, respectively, after the procedure. This decrease was significant (p < 0.01 for the first day and p < 0.001 for the rest of the follow-up intervals (paired Student t test; n - 1 = 26) for all periods during follow-up. Six patients had partial tumor necrosis, and we were attempted to them with a second procedure. Although the necrosis area showed a radiographic increase, no complete necrosis was achieved (secondary success rate 65.6%). No immediate or delayed complications were observed. Conclusion: CT-guided RF ablation is a minimally invasive, safe, and highly effective technique for treatment of malignant rectal recurrence. The method is well tolerated by patients, and pain relief is quickly achieved.

  2. Written emotional expression and health: efficacy of treatment implementation via mail 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Erin Leigh

    2013-02-22

    not found to impact treatment effectiveness. Participants in the treatment condition exhibited better health outcomes overall than participants in the control condition. The study's results suggest that even when administered through e-mail, the emotional...

  3. Summary of the Dutch S3-Guidelines on the treatment of psoriasis 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01

    on the treatment of psoriasis 2011 J. Zweegers, E.M.G.J. deon the systemic treatment of psoriasis vulgaris. J Eur AcadCambazard F, Duvold LB. Psoriasis of the face and flexures.

  4. A Systematic Study of Matrix Acidizing Treatments Using Skin Monitoring Method 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pandya, Nimish

    2012-07-16

    The goal of this work was to evaluate matrix acidizing treatments of vertical and horizontal wells in carbonate reservoirs. Twenty field cases for acidizing treatments were analyzed by evaluating the skin factor evolution from on-site rate/pressure...

  5. Evaluation of functionality for whey protein concentrate with different ultrafiltration treatments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Ying

    1995-01-01

    the ultrafiltration separation and its product WPC functionality. The objective of this research is to evaluate the WPC functionality with two treatment during separation. The whey powder was dissolved into the distilled water and tested for two treatment using...

  6. An investigation of the reaction kinetics of photocatalytic wastewater treatment using suspended titanium dioxide catalyst

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hotz, William Joseph, Jr

    2014-01-01

    The goal of wastewater treatment is to remove compounds that may be harmful to the natural ecosystem or to humans. Although traditional treatment is fairly effective in meeting water quality standards, current technologies ...

  7. Balancing Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Western Utility Resource Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2005-01-01

    the likely cost of renewable energy in the longer term. ItBalancing Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable EnergyBalancing Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy

  8. Cancer survivors and survivorship care: Provider expectations, post-treatment health services, and patient reported outcomes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hahn, Erin Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    treatment and the impact of cancer-related infertility,treatment such as chronic fatigue, cardiomyopathy, second malignancies, chronic pain, menopausal symptoms, lymphedema, cognitive deficits, sexual dysfunction, and infertility.

  9. Sour gas injection for use with in situ heat treatment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fowler, Thomas David (Houston, TX)

    2009-11-03

    Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one method for providing acidic gas to a subsurface formation is described herein. The method may include providing heat from one or more heaters to a portion of a subsurface formation; producing fluids that include one or more acidic gases from the formation using a heat treatment process. At least a portion of one of the acidic gases may be introduced into the formation, or into another formation, through one or more wellbores at a pressure below a lithostatic pressure of the formation in which the acidic gas is introduced.

  10. Cotton Seed-Treatment Studies at the Blackland Experiment Station. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, Cyril H.

    1943-01-01

    the possibility of using less seed is in- dicated when properly-treated seed is planted. LITERATURE CITED ndt, C. XX. and 0.. W. Boozer. Cotton seedling diseases. S. C. Agr. Exp. 5ta. 53rd Ann. Rpt. p. 48-51. 1940. own, J. G.._-.Blackarm of cotton: a.... Sta. Bull. 198. 41 p. 1919. 5. Hall, E. E, and George M. Armstrong. Cotton experiments at P S. C. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bull. 225. 1926. 6. Hall, E. E. Seed treatment. S. C. Agr. Exp. Sta. Ann. Rpt. 46. 1933. 7. Raskell, R. J. and H. D. Barker. Cotton...

  11. Apparatus for treatment of soils contaminated with organic pollutants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wickramanayake, Godage B. (Columbus, OH)

    1993-01-01

    An apparatus for treating soil contaminated by organic compounds wherein an ozone containing gas is treated with acid to increase the stability of the ozone in the soil environment and the treated ozone applied to the contaminated soil in a manner adapted to decompose the organic compounds; one embodiment of the apparatus comprises a means to supply ozone as a gas-ozone mixture, a stability means to treat ozone obtained from the supply and distribution means to apply the stabilized gas-ozone to soil. The soil may be treated in situ or may be removed for treatment and refilled.

  12. Advanced Fuel Cycle Treatment, Recycling, and Disposal of Nuclear Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, Emory D [ORNL; Jubin, Robert Thomas [ORNL; DelCul, Guillermo D [ORNL; Spencer, Barry B [ORNL; Renier, John-Paul [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear waste, in the form of used and spent nuclear fuel, is currently being stored in the U.S., mostly at reactor sites to await future direct disposal or treatment to permit recycle of re-usable components and minimization of wastes requiring geologic disposal. The used fuel is currently accumulating at a rate of over 2,000 tons per year and a total of over 60,000 tons is in storage. New dry storage capacity is estimated to cost {approx} $0.6 B per year. Technologies have been developed and deployed worldwide to treat only a portion of the nuclear waste that is generated. Recent research, development, and systems analysis studies have shown that nuclear waste treatment could be done at the rate of generation in a safe, environmentally friendly, and cost-effective manner. These studies continue to show that major benefits can be obtained by allowing the used fuel assemblies to remain in safe storage for 30 years or longer before treatment. During this time, the radioactivity and decay heat generation decrease substantially, such that the separations process can be simplified and made less costly, waste gases containing {sup 85}Kr can be released below regulatory limits, and the solid fission product wastes containing {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr require decay storage for a much shorter time-period before geologic disposal. In addition, the need for separating curium from americium and for extra purification cycles for the uranium and uranium-plutonium-neptunium products is greatly diminished. Moreover, during the 30+ years of storage prior to treatment, the quality of the recyclable fuel is only degraded by less than 5 percent. The 30+ year storage period also enables recycle of long-lived transuranic actinides to be accomplished in existing light water reactors without waiting on and incurring the cost of the development, licensing, and deployment of future Gen IV reactors. Overall, the safety, environmental, and cost benefits of treating the longer aged used nuclear wastes are substantial.

  13. Compositions produced using an in situ heat treatment process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria; Nair, Vijay; Munsterman, Erwin Hunh; Van Bergen, Petrus Franciscus; Van Den Berg, Franciscus Gondulfus Antonius

    2013-05-28

    Methods for treating a subsurface formation and compositions produced therefrom are described herein. At least one method for producing hydrocarbons from a subsurface formation includes providing heat to the subsurface formation using an in situ heat treatment process. One or more formation particles may be formed during heating of the subsurface formation. Fluid that includes hydrocarbons and the formation particles may be produced from the subsurface formation. The formation particles in the produced fluid may include cenospheres and have an average particle size of at least 0.5 micrometers.

  14. Effluent treatment options for nuclear thermal propulsion system ground tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shipers, L.R.; Brockmann, J.E.

    1992-10-16

    A variety of approaches for handling effluent from nuclear thermal propulsion system ground tests in an environmentally acceptable manner are discussed. The functional requirements of effluent treatment are defined and concept options are presented within the framework of these requirements. System concepts differ primarily in the choice of fission-product retention and waste handling concepts. The concept options considered range from closed cycle (venting the exhaust to a closed volume or recirculating the hydrogen in a closed loop) to open cycle (real time processing and venting of the effluent). This paper reviews the strengths and weaknesses of different methods to handle effluent from nuclear thermal propulsion system ground tests.

  15. Sampling and Analysis Plan - Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Boreholes Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reidel, Steve P.

    2006-05-26

    This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) describes planned data collection activities for four entry boreholes through the sediment overlying the basalt, up to three new deep rotary boreholes through the basalt and sedimentary interbeds, and one corehole through the basalt and sedimentary interbeds at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) site. The SAP will be used in concert with the quality assurance plan for the project to guide the procedure development and data collection activities needed to support borehole drilling, geophysical measurements, and sampling. This SAP identifies the American Society of Testing Materials standards, Hanford Site procedures, and other guidance to be followed for data collection activities.

  16. Treatment of addiction and addiction-related behavior

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dewey, Stephen L.; Brodie, Jonathan D.; Ashby, Jr., Charles R.

    2004-12-07

    The present invention provides a highly efficient method for treating substance addiction and for changing addiction-related behavior of a mammal suffering from substance addiction. The method includes administering to a mammal an effective amount of gamma vinylGABA or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof. The present invention also provides a method of treatment of cocaine, morphine, heroin, nicotine, amphetamine, methamphetamine, or ethanol addiction by treating a mammal with an effective amount of gamma vinylGABA or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof.

  17. Compositions produced using an in situ heat treatment process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria (Houston, TX); Nair, Vijay (Katy, TX); Munsterman, Erwin Henh (Amsterdam, NL); Van Bergen, Petrus Franciscus (Amsterdam, NL); Van Den Berg, Franciscus Gondulfus Antonius (Amsterdam, NL)

    2009-10-20

    Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one method for producing hydrocarbons from a subsurface formation includes providing heat to the subsurface formation using an in situ heat treatment process. One or more formation particles may be formed during heating of the subsurface formation. Fluid that includes hydrocarbons and the formation particles may be produced from the subsurface formation. The formation particles in the produced fluid may include cenospheres and have an average particle size of at least 0.5 micrometers.

  18. Waste Treatment & Immobilization Plant Project - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAbout /Two0Photos and Videos/01/2012 Page 1 ofTreatment Plant

  19. Supplemental Treatment Technologies Hanford Advisory Board Tank Waste Committee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With Livermore National Lab onSupercriticalVehiclesTreatment

  20. Medical treatments, fuel sources from studying elusive enzyme

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on dark matter By SarahMODELING Release date: ToddMedical treatments,

  1. Radiologic MS disease activity during natalizumab treatment interruption: findings from RESTORE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    treatment for multiple sclerosis: updated recommendationsleukoencephalopathy multiple sclerosis patients. Mult SclerSan Francisco Multiple Sclerosis Center, San Francisco, CA,

  2. Transacting generation attributes across market boundaries: Compatible information systems and the treatment of imports and exports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grace, Robert; Wiser, Ryan

    2002-01-01

    Treatment of Imports and Exports Robert Grace Sustainableand Exports 31 AlternativeImports and Exports 34 Geographic

  3. Nd:YAG laser offers promising treatment option for familial glomuvenous malformation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, CB; Guerrero, C; Theos, A

    2015-01-01

    2015 Letter Nd:YAG laser offers promising treatment optionlaser therapy appears to offer an effective, well-tolerated,

  4. CONTROL OF AN IDEAL ACTIVATED SLUDGE PROCESS IN WASTEWATER TREATMENT VIA AN ODE-PDE MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diehl, Stefan

    CONTROL OF AN IDEAL ACTIVATED SLUDGE PROCESS IN WASTEWATER TREATMENT VIA AN ODE-PDE MODEL STEFAN treatment plants, consists basically of a biological reactor followed by a sedi- mentation tank, which has. 1. Introduction The need for efficient wastewater treatment plants in terms of low effluent con

  5. Optimization of low-cost phosphorus removal from wastewater using co-treatments with constructed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    water treatment residuals with vertical-flow constructed wetland mesocosms planted with Schoenoplectus treatment residual; iron; lime sludge; municipal wastewater Introduction The US-EPA has identifiedOptimization of low-cost phosphorus removal from wastewater using co-treatments with constructed

  6. Evolutionary parameter optimization of a fuzzy controller which is used to control a sewage treatment plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ebner, Marc

    treatment plant Marc Ebner Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, Wilhelm-Schickard-Institut für Informatik, sewage treatment plants may need to be redesigned or extended. Instead of reconstructing large parts of a sewage treatment plant, which can be very costly, it is in many cases sufficient to install relatively

  7. 11:375:302 Syllabus page 1 11:375:302 Water and Wastewater Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vetriani, Costantino

    Catalog Data: 11:375:302 ­Water and Wastewater Treatment This lecture course covers fundamental11:375:302 Syllabus page 1 11:375:302 ­ Water and Wastewater Treatment 3 credits; Fall Semester and emerging aspects of chemical, physical and biological processes used in the treatment of water

  8. ASSESSING GHG EMISSIONS FROM SLUDGE TREATMENT AND DISPOSAL ROUTES THE METHOD BEHIND GESTABOUES TOOL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    stakeholders to better understand the carbon footprint of sludge treatment and disposal options, we developed by a wastewater treatment plant of x per-captia-equivalents (PCE) during one year. The carbon footprint method we developed is adapted to sludge treatment and disposal processes and based on the "Bilan Carbone® " method

  9. The effects of heat treatments on ectomycorrhizal resistant propagules and their ability to colonize bioassay seedlings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The effects of heat treatments on ectomycorrhizal resistant propagules and their ability, USA and then subjected to four heat treatments of none, 45 C, 60 C, and 75 C. After eight months in soils receiving the 75 C heat treatment. One species significantly increased in frequency, Rhizopogon

  10. Austenite in transformation-induced plasticity steel subjected to multiple isothermal heat-treatments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Austenite in transformation-induced plasticity steel subjected to multiple isothermal heat-treatments range of strain during a tensile test. A significant corollary is that the two-step heat treatments the mechanical proper- ties. Other circumstances in which multiple heat treatments are necessary are also

  11. PREDICTION OF HEAT TREATMENT DISTORTION OF CAST STEEL C-RINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    PREDICTION OF HEAT TREATMENT DISTORTION OF CAST STEEL C-RINGS Brandon Elliott Brooks1 and Christoph the commercial heat treatment distortion simulation software DANTE. The parts were machined and then measured-measured and compared to pre-heat treatment values. The CF8M experiments show that the gap in the C-Ring closes due

  12. Proceedings of the Sudden Oak Death Third Science Symposium Preliminary Observations of Heat Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by actionable plant pests and pathogens into uninfested areas is important. Heat treatment has been used is to determine the efficacy of heat treatment to control Phytophthora ramorum in wood species. Artificially, and 60 minute durations. Key words: Phytophthora ramorum, sudden oak death, heat treatment, tanoak

  13. Differential Effects of Serum Heat Treatment on Chemotaxis and Phagocytosis by Human Neutrophils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinrich, Volkmar

    Differential Effects of Serum Heat Treatment on Chemotaxis and Phagocytosis by Human Neutrophils with flow cytometry to examine how temperature-dependent heat treatment of serum affects human neutrophil as well as the phagocytic neutrophil responses to zymosan, we find that serum heat treatment modulates

  14. Fuel additives and heat treatment effects on nanocrystalline zinc ferrite phase composition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volinsky, Alex A.

    Fuel additives and heat treatment effects on nanocrystalline zinc ferrite phase composition Ping Hu October 2010 Keywords: Zinc ferrite Fuel additive Heat treatment Phase composition a b s t r a c considered the influence of fuel additives and heat treatment conditions on the phase composition

  15. Estimating the Mean Response of Treatment Duration Regimes in an Observational Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidian, Marie

    Introduction to Dynamic Treatment Regimes 2 #12;The ESPRIT Infusion Trial Study of the effect of Integrilin Integrilin infusion for 18-24 hours · Outcome: composite endpoint of death, MI, or urgent target on determining a "recommended" treatment duration. Treatment duration decision: · Infusion length ends when

  16. CAST STONE TECHNOLOGY FOR TREATMENT & DISPOSAL OF IODINE RICH CAUSTIC WASTE DEMONSTRATION FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LOCKREM, L.L.

    2005-07-14

    CH2M HILL is working to develop, design, and construct low-activity waste (LAW) treatment and imcholization systems to supplement the LAW capacity provided by the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant. CH2M HILL is investigating use of cast stone technology for treatment and immobilization of caustic solutions containing high concentrations of radioactive Iodine-129.

  17. Fuel Treatment, Prescribed Fire, and Fire Restoration: Are the Benefits Worth It?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuel Treatment, Prescribed Fire, and Fire Restoration: Are the Benefits Worth It? Chairs: Susan Husari and Melanie Miller #12;Applying Simulation and Optimization to Plan Fuel Treatments at Landscape Scales1 J. Greg Jones,2 Jimmie D. Chew,2 Hans R. Zuuring3 Abstract Fuel treatment activities are analyzed

  18. A multilevel coordinated control strategy for energy conservation in wastewater treatment plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    @dsi.unifi.it) Abstract: Wastewater treatment is an energy-intensive process pursuing two objectives: pollution abatement efficiency of the process. Keywords: Process control; PID control; Fuzzy control; Water pollution; Waste treatment. 1. INTRODUCTION A wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) is a complex process for pollution removal

  19. Treatment methods for breaking certain oil and water emulsions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sealock, Jr., L. John (W. Richland, WA); Baker, Eddie G. (Richland, WA); Elliott, Douglas C. (Richland, WA)

    1992-01-01

    Disclosed are treatment methods for breaking emulsions of petroleum oil and salt water, fatty oil and water, and those resulting from liquefication of organic material. The emulsions are broken by heating to a predetermined temperature at or above about 200.degree. C. and pressurizing to a predetermined pressure above the vapor pressure of water at the predetermined temperature to produce a heated and pressurized fluid. The heated and pressurized fluid is contained in a single vessel at the predetermined temperature and pressure for a predetermined period of time to effectively separate the emulsion into substantially distinct first and second phases, the first phase comprising primarily the petroleum oil, the second phase comprising primarily the water. The first and second phases are separately withdrawn from the vessel at a withdraw temperature between about 200.degree. C. and 374.degree. C. and a withdraw pressure above the vapor pressure of water at the withdraw temperature. Where solids are present in the certain emulsions, the above described treatment may also effectively separate the certain emulsion into a substantially distinct third phase comprising primarily the solids.

  20. A Dispersive Treatment of $K_{\\ell4}$ Decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilberto Colangelo; Emilie Passemar; Peter Stoffer

    2015-01-22

    $K_{\\ell4}$ decays offer several reasons of interest: they allow an accurate measurement of $\\pi\\pi$-scattering lengths; they provide the best source for the determination of some low-energy constants of ChPT; one form factor is directly related to the chiral anomaly, which can be measured here. We present a dispersive treatment of $K_{\\ell4}$ decays that provides a resummation of $\\pi\\pi$- and $K\\pi$-rescattering effects. The free parameters of the dispersion relation are fitted to the data of the high-statistics experiments E865 and NA48/2. The matching to ChPT at NLO and NNLO enables us to determine the LECs $L_1^r$, $L_2^r$ and $L_3^r$. With recently published data from NA48/2, the LEC $L_9^r$ can be determined as well. In contrast to a pure chiral treatment, the dispersion relation describes the observed curvature of one of the form factors, which we understand as a rescattering effect beyond NNLO.