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1

EA-1867: Scale-up of High-Temperature Syngas Cleanup Technology, Polk County, Florida  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to provide cost-shared funding to RTI International (RTI) for its proposed project to demonstrate the precommercial scale-up of RTI’s high-temperature syngas cleanup and carbon capture and sequestration technologies.

2

Progress toward Biomass and Coal-Derived Syngas Warm Cleanup...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Progress toward Biomass and Coal-Derived Syngas Warm Cleanup: Proof-of-Concept Process Demonstration of Multicontaminant Removal Progress toward Biomass and Coal-Derived Syngas...

3

DOE-Sponsored Syngas Cleanup Demonstration Project Reaches Development...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

of Energy (DOE), a demonstration-scale application of RTI International's warm synthesis gas (syngas) cleanup process technology has achieved a key operational milestone at Tampa...

4

Syngas Enhanced High Efficiency Low Temperature Combustion for...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Enhanced High Efficiency Low Temperature Combustion for Clean Diesel Engines Syngas Enhanced High Efficiency Low Temperature Combustion for Clean Diesel Engines A significant...

5

Catalytic Tar Reforming for Cleanup and Conditioning of Biomass-derived Syngas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biomass gasification is being investigated to produce clean syngas from biomass or biorefinery residues as an intermediate that can be used directly as a fuel for integrated heat and power production or further refined and upgraded by various processing technologies. Conditioning of biomass-derived syngas, with an emphasis on tar reforming, to make it a suitable feed for high temperature, pressurized liquid fuels synthesis is the goal of current research efforts.

Dayton, D. C.; Bain, R. L.; Phillips, S. D.; Magrini-Bair, K.; Feik, C. J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Task 3.3: Warm Syngas Cleanup and Catalytic Processes for Syngas Conversion to Fuels Subtask 3: Advanced Syngas Conversion to Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This collaborative joint research project is in the area of advanced gasification and conversion, within the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS)-National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)-Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Memorandum of Understanding. The goal for this subtask is the development of advanced syngas conversion technologies. Two areas of investigation were evaluated: Sorption-Enhanced Synthetic Natural Gas Production from Syngas The conversion of synthetic gas (syngas) to synthetic natural gas (SNG) is typically catalyzed by nickel catalysts performed at moderate temperatures (275 to 325°C). The reaction is highly exothermic and substantial heat is liberated, which can lead to process thermal imbalance and destruction of the catalyst. As a result, conversion per pass is typically limited, and substantial syngas recycle is employed. Commercial methanation catalysts and processes have been developed by Haldor Topsoe, and in some reports, they have indicated that there is a need and opportunity for thermally more robust methanation catalysts to allow for higher per-pass conversion in methanation units. SNG process requires the syngas feed with a higher H2/CO ratio than typically produced from gasification processes. Therefore, the water-gas shift reaction (WGS) will be required to tailor the H2/CO ratio. Integration with CO2 separation could potentially eliminate the need for a separate WGS unit, thereby integrating WGS, methanation, and CO2 capture into one single unit operation and, consequently, leading to improved process efficiency. The SNG process also has the benefit of producing a product stream with high CO2 concentrations, which makes CO2 separation more readily achievable. The use of either adsorbents or membranes that selectively separate the CO2 from the H2 and CO would shift the methanation reaction (by driving WGS for hydrogen production) and greatly improve the overall efficiency and economics of the process. The scope of this activity was to develop methods and enabling materials for syngas conversion to SNG with readily CO2 separation. Suitable methanation catalyst and CO2 sorbent materials were developed. Successful proof-of-concept for the combined reaction-sorption process was demonstrated, which culminated in a research publication. With successful demonstration, a decision was made to switch focus to an area of fuels research of more interest to all three research institutions (CAS-NETL-PNNL). Syngas-to-Hydrocarbon Fuels through Higher Alcohol Intermediates There are two types of processes in syngas conversion to fuels that are attracting R&D interest: 1) syngas conversion to mixed alcohols; and 2) syngas conversion to gasoline via the methanol-to-gasoline process developed by Exxon-Mobil in the 1970s. The focus of this task was to develop a one-step conversion technology by effectively incorporating both processes, which is expected to reduce the capital and operational cost associated with the conversion of coal-derived syngas to liquid fuels. It should be noted that this work did not further study the classic Fischer-Tropsch reaction pathway. Rather, we focused on the studies for unique catalyst pathways that involve the direct liquid fuel synthesis enabled by oxygenated intermediates. Recent advances made in the area of higher alcohol synthesis including the novel catalytic composite materials recently developed by CAS using base metal catalysts were used.

Lebarbier Dagel, Vanessa M.; Li, J.; Taylor, Charles E.; Wang, Yong; Dagle, Robert A.; Deshmane, Chinmay A.; Bao, Xinhe

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

7

High temperature electrolysis for syngas production  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Syngas components hydrogen and carbon monoxide may be formed by the decomposition of carbon dioxide and water or steam by a solid-oxide electrolysis cell to form carbon monoxide and hydrogen, a portion of which may be reacted with carbon dioxide to form carbon monoxide. One or more of the components for the process, such as steam, energy, or electricity, may be provided using a nuclear power source.

Stoots, Carl M. (Idaho Falls, ID); O'Brien, James E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Herring, James Stephen (Idaho Falls, ID); Lessing, Paul A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Hawkes, Grant L. (Sugar City, ID); Hartvigsen, Joseph J. (Kaysville, UT)

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

8

THE PRODUCTION OF SYNGAS VIA HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS AND BIO-MASS GASIFICATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process model of syngas production using high temperature electrolysis and biomass gasification is presented. Process heat from the biomass gasifier is used to improve the hydrogen production efficiency of the steam electrolysis process. Hydrogen from electrolysis allows a high utilization of the biomass carbon for syngas production. Based on the gasifier temperature, 94% to 95% of the carbon in the biomass becomes carbon monoxide in the syngas (carbon dioxide and hydrogen). Assuming the thermal efficiency of the power cycle for electricity generation is 50%, (as expected from GEN IV nuclear reactors), the syngas production efficiency ranges from 70% to 73% as the gasifier temperature decreases from 1900 K to 1500 K.

M. G. McKellar; G. L. Hawkes; J. E. O'Brien

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Progress toward Biomass and Coal-Derived Syngas Warm Cleanup: Proof-of-Concept Process Demonstration of Multicontaminant Removal for Biomass Application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Systems comprising of multiple sorbent and catalytic beds have been developed for the warm syngas cleanup of coal- and biomass-derived syngas. Tailored specifically for biomass application the process described here consists of six primary unit operations: 1) Na2CO3 bed for HCl removal, 2) two regenerable ZnO beds for bulk H2S removal, 3) ZnO bed for H2S polishing, 4) NiCu/SBA-16 sorbent for trace metal (e.g. AsH3) removal, 5) steam reforming catalyst bed for tars and light hydrocarbons reformation and NH3 decomposition, and a 6) Cu-based LT-WGS catalyst bed. Simulated biomass-derived syngas containing a multitude of inorganic contaminants (H2S, AsH3, HCl, and NH3) and hydrocarbon additives (methane, ethylene, benzene, and naphthalene) was used to demonstrate process effectiveness. The efficiency of the process was demonstrated for a period of 175 hours, during which no signs of deactivation were observed. Post-run analysis revealed small levels of sulfur slipped through the sorbent bed train to the two downstream catalytic beds. Future improvements could be made to the trace metal polishing sorbent to ensure complete inorganic contaminant removal (to low ppb level) prior to the catalytic steps. However, dual, regenerating ZnO beds were effective for continuous removal for the vast majority of the sulfur present in the feed gas. The process was effective for complete AsH3 and HCl removal. The steam reforming catalyst completely reformed all the hydrocarbons present in the feed (methane, ethylene, benzene, and naphthalene) to additional syngas. However, post-run evaluation, under kinetically-controlled conditions, indicates deactivation of the steam reforming catalyst. Spent material characterization suggests this is attributed, in part, to coke formation, likely due to the presence of benzene and/or naphthalene in the feed. Future adaptation of this technology may require dual, regenerable steam reformers. The process and materials described in this report hold promise for a warm cleanup of a variety of contaminant species within warm syngas.

Howard, Christopher J.; Dagle, Robert A.; Lebarbier, Vanessa MC; Rainbolt, James E.; Li, Liyu; King, David L.

2013-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

10

PROCESS MODEL FOR THE PRODUCTION OF SYNGAS VIA HIGH TEMPERATURE CO-ELECTROLYSIS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process model has been developed to evaluate the potential performance of a large-scale high-temperature coelectrolysis plant for the production of syngas from steam and carbon dioxide. The coelectrolysis process allows for direct electrochemical reduction of the steam – carbon dioxide gas mixture, yielding hydrogen and carbon monoxide, or syngas. The process model has been developed using the HYSYS systems analysis code. Using this code, a detailed process flowsheet has been defined that includes all the components that would be present in an actual plant such as pumps, compressors, heat exchangers, turbines, and the electrolyzer. Since the electrolyzer is not a standard HYSYS component, a custom one-dimensional coelectrolysis model was developed for incorporation into the overall HYSYS process flowsheet. The 1-D coelectrolysis model assumes local chemical equilibrium among the four process-gas species via the shift reaction. The electrolyzer model allows for the determination of coelectrolysis outlet temperature, composition (anode and cathode sides), mean Nernst potential, operating voltage and electrolyzer power based on specified inlet gas flow rates, heat loss or gain, current density, and cell area-specific resistance. The one-dimensional electrolyzer model was validated by comparison with results obtained from a fully 3-D computational fluid dynamics model developed using FLUENT, and by comparison to experimental data. This paper provides representative results obtained from the HYSYS flowsheet model for a 300 MW coelectrolysis plant, coupled to a high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor. The coelectrolysis process, coupled to a nuclear reactor, provides a means of recycling carbon dioxide back into a useful liquid fuel. If the carbon dioxide source is based on biomass, the entire process would be climate neutral.

M. G. McKellar; J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; G. L. Hawkes

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Parametric Study Of Large-Scale Production Of Syngas Via High Temperature Co-Electrolysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process model has been developed to evaluate the potential performance of a largescale high-temperature co-electrolysis plant for the production of syngas from steam and carbon dioxide. The co-electrolysis process allows for direct electrochemical reduction of the steam – carbon dioxide gas mixture, yielding hydrogen and carbon monoxide, or syngas. The process model has been developed using the Honeywell UniSim systems analysis code. Using this code, a detailed process flow sheet has been defined that includes all the components that would be present in an actual plant such as pumps, compressors, heat exchangers, turbines, and the electrolyzer. Since the electrolyzer is not a standard UniSim component, a custom one-dimensional co-electrolysis model was developed for incorporation into the overall UniSim process flow sheet. The one dimensional co-electrolysis model assumes local chemical equilibrium among the four process-gas species via the gas shift reaction. The electrolyzer model allows for the determination of co-electrolysis outlet temperature, composition (anode and cathode sides); mean Nernst potential, operating voltage and electrolyzer power based on specified inlet gas flow rates, heat loss or gain, current density, and cell area-specific resistance. The one-dimensional electrolyzer model was validated by comparison with results obtained from a fully three dimensional computational fluid dynamics model developed using FLUENT, and by comparison to experimental data. This paper provides representative results obtained from the UniSim flow sheet model for a 300 MW co-electrolysis plant, coupled to a high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor. The coelectrolysis process, coupled to a nuclear reactor, provides a means of recycling carbon dioxide back into a useful liquid fuel. If the carbon dioxide source is based on biomass, the overall process, from production through utilization, would be climate neutral.

J. E. O'Brien; M. G. McKellar; C. M. Stoots; J. S. Herring; G. L. Hawkes

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

The Development of Warm Gas Cleanup Technologies for the Removal of Sulfur Containing Species from Steam Hydrogasification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for biomas-derived syngas. National Renewable EnergyM. Lesemann. RTI/Eastman warm syngas clean-up technology:v the composition of syngas from steam hydrogasification

Luo, Qian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Idaho National Laboratory Experimental Research In High Temperature Electrolysis For Hydrogen And Syngas Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho National Laboratory (Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA), in collaboration with Ceramatec, Inc. (Salt Lake City, Utah, USA), is actively researching the application of solid oxide fuel cell technology as electrolyzers for large scale hydrogen and syngas production. This technology relies upon electricity and high temperature heat to chemically reduce a steam or steam / CO2 feedstock. Single button cell tests, multi-cell stack, as well as multi-stack testing has been conducted. Stack testing used 10 x 10 cm cells (8 x 8 cm active area) supplied by Ceramatec and ranged from 10 cell short stacks to 240 cell modules. Tests were conducted either in a bench-scale test apparatus or in a newly developed 5 kW Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) test facility. Gas composition, operating voltage, and operating temperature were varied during testing. The tests were heavily instrumented, and outlet gas compositions were monitored with a gas chromatograph. The ILS facility is currently being expanded to ~15 kW testing capacity (H2 production rate based upon lower heating value).

Carl M. Stoots; James E. O'Brien; J. Stephen Herring; Joseph J. Hartvigsen

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Manganese and Ceria Sorbents for High Temperature Sulfur Removal from Biomass-Derived Syngas -- The Impact of Steam on Capacity and Sorption Mode  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Syngas derived from biomass and coal gasification for fuel synthesis or electricity generation contains sulfur species that are detrimental to downstream catalysts or turbine operation. Sulfur removal in high temperature, high steam conditions has been known to be challenging, but experimental reports on methods to tackle the problem are not often reported. We have developed sorbents that can remove hydrogen sulfide from syngas at high temperature (700 C), both in dry and high steam conditions. The syngas composition chosen for our experiments is derived from statistical analysis of the gasification products of wood under a large variety of conditions. The two sorbents, Cu-ceria and manganese-based, were tested in a variety of conditions. In syngas containing steam, the capacity of the sorbents is much lower, and the impact of the sorbent in lowering H{sub 2}S levels is only evident in low space velocities. Spectroscopic characterization and thermodynamic consideration of the experimental results suggest that in syngas containing 45% steam, the removal of H{sub 2}S is primarily via surface chemisorptions. For the Cu-ceria sorbent, analysis of the amount of H{sub 2}S retained by the sorbent in dry syngas suggests both copper and ceria play a role in H{sub 2}S removal. For the manganese-based sorbent, in dry conditions, there is a solid state transformation of the sorbent, primarily into the sulfide form.

Cheah, S.; Parent, Y. O.; Jablonski, W. S.; Vinzant, T.; Olstad, J. L.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Development of an Integrated Multi-Contaminant Removal Process Applied to Warm Syngas Cleanup for Coal-Based Advanced Gasification Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project met the objective to further the development of an integrated multi-contaminant removal process in which H2S, NH3, HCl and heavy metals including Hg, As, Se and Cd present in the coal-derived syngas can be removed to specified levels in a single/integrated process step. The process supports the mission and goals of the Department of Energyâ??s Gasification Technologies Program, namely to enhance the performance of gasification systems, thus enabling U.S. industry to improve the competitiveness of gasification-based processes. The gasification program will reduce equipment costs, improve process environmental performance, and increase process reliability and flexibility. Two sulfur conversion concepts were tested in the laboratory under this project, i.e., the solventbased, high-pressure University of California Sulfur Recovery Process â?? High Pressure (UCSRP-HP) and the catalytic-based, direct oxidation (DO) section of the CrystaSulf-DO process. Each process required a polishing unit to meet the ultra-clean sulfur content goals of <50 ppbv (parts per billion by volume) as may be necessary for fuel cells or chemical production applications. UCSRP-HP was also tested for the removal of trace, non-sulfur contaminants, including ammonia, hydrogen chloride, and heavy metals. A bench-scale unit was commissioned and limited testing was performed with simulated syngas. Aspen-Plus®-based computer simulation models were prepared and the economics of the UCSRP-HP and CrystaSulf-DO processes were evaluated for a nominal 500 MWe, coal-based, IGCC power plant with carbon capture. This report covers the progress on the UCSRP-HP technology development and the CrystaSulf-DO technology.

Howard Meyer

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

16

Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup, and Oxygen Separation Equipment; Task 2: Gas Cleanup Design and Cost Estimates -- Black Liquor Gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of Task 2, Gas Cleanup and Cost Estimates, Nexant investigated the appropriate process scheme for removal of acid gases from black liquor-derived syngas for use in both power and liquid fuels synthesis. Two 3,200 metric tonne per day gasification schemes, both low-temperature/low-pressure (1100 deg F, 40 psi) and high-temperature/high-pressure (1800 deg F, 500 psi) were used for syngas production. Initial syngas conditions from each of the gasifiers was provided to the team by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Princeton University. Nexant was the prime contractor and principal investigator during this task; technical assistance was provided by both GTI and Emery Energy.

Nexant Inc.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

HIGH-TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS FOR LARGE-SCALE HYDROGEN AND SYNGAS PRODUCTION FROM NUCLEAR ENERGY – SYSTEM SIMULATION AND ECONOMICS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A research and development program is under way at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to assess the technological and scale-up issues associated with the implementation of solid-oxide electrolysis cell technology for efficient high-temperature hydrogen production from steam. This work is supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, under the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. This paper will provide an overview of large-scale system modeling results and economic analyses that have been completed to date. System analysis results have been obtained using the commercial code UniSim, augmented with a custom high-temperature electrolyzer module. Economic analysis results were based on the DOE H2A analysis methodology. The process flow diagrams for the system simulations include an advanced nuclear reactor as a source of high-temperature process heat, a power cycle and a coupled steam electrolysis loop. Several reactor types and power cycles have been considered, over a range of reactor outlet temperatures. Pure steam electrolysis for hydrogen production as well as coelectrolysis for syngas production from steam/carbon dioxide mixtures have both been considered. In addition, the feasibility of coupling the high-temperature electrolysis process to biomass and coal-based synthetic fuels production has been considered. These simulations demonstrate that the addition of supplementary nuclear hydrogen to synthetic fuels production from any carbon source minimizes emissions of carbon dioxide during the production process.

J. E. O'Brien; M. G. McKellar; E. A. Harvego; C. M. Stoots

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Process for producing ethanol from syngas  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention provides a method for producing ethanol, the method comprising establishing an atmosphere containing methanol forming catalyst and ethanol forming catalyst; injecting syngas into the atmosphere at a temperature and for a time sufficient to produce methanol; and contacting the produced methanol with additional syngas at a temperature and for a time sufficient to produce ethanol. The invention also provides an integrated system for producing methanol and ethanol from syngas, the system comprising an atmosphere isolated from the ambient environment; a first catalyst to produce methanol from syngas wherein the first catalyst resides in the atmosphere; a second catalyst to product ethanol from methanol and syngas, wherein the second catalyst resides in the atmosphere; a conduit for introducing syngas to the atmosphere; and a device for removing ethanol from the atmosphere. The exothermicity of the method and system obviates the need for input of additional heat from outside the atmosphere.

Krause, Theodore R; Rathke, Jerome W; Chen, Michael J

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

19

Simulation and optimization of hot syngas separation processes in integrated gasification combined cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IGCC with CO2 capture offers an exciting approach for cleanly using abundant coal reserves of the world to generate electricity. The present state-of-the-art synthesis gas (syngas) cleanup technologies in IGCC involve ...

Prakash, Kshitij

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Carbon Neutral Production Of Syngas Via High Temperature Electrolytic Reduction Of Steam And CO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the most recent results of experiments conducted at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) studying coelectrolysis of steam and carbon dioxide in solid-oxide electrolysis stacks. Two 10-cell planar stacks were tested under various gas compositions, operating voltages, and operating temperatures. The tests were heavily instrumented, and outlet gas compositions were monitored with a gas chromatograph. Measured outlet compositions, open cell potentials, and coelectrolysis thermal neutral voltages compared reasonably well with a coelectrolysis computer model developed at the INL. Stack ASRs did not change significantly when switching from electrolysis to coelectrolysis operation.

C. Stoots; J. O'Brien; J. Hartvigsen

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature syngas cleanup" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Development of the Ultra-Clean Dry Cleanup Process for Coal-Based Syngases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (SWPC) has proposed a novel scheme for polishing sulfur species, halides, and particulate from syngas to meet stringent cleaning requirements, the ''Ultra-Clean syngas polishing process.'' The overall development objective for this syngas polishing process is to economically achieve the most stringent cleanup requirements for sulfur species, halide species and particulate expected for chemical and fuel synthesis applications (total sulfur species < 60 ppbv, halides < 10 ppbv, and particulate < 0.1 ppmw). A Base Program was conducted to produce ground-work, laboratory test data and process evaluations for a conceptual feasibility assessment of this novel syngas cleaning process. Laboratory testing focused on the identification of suitable sulfur and halide sorbents and operating temperatures for the process. This small-scale laboratory testing was also performed to provide evidence of the capability of the process to reach its stringent syngas cleaning goals. Process evaluations were performed in the Base Program to identify process alternatives, to devise process flow schemes, and to estimate process material & energy balances, process performance, and process costs. While the work has focused on sulfur, halide, and particulate control, considerations of ammonia, and mercury control have also been included.

Newby, R.A.; Slimane, R.B.; Lau, F.S.; Jain, S.C.

2002-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

22

Recent Progress At The Idaho National Laboratory In High Temperature Electrolysis For Hydrogen And Syngas Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the most recent results of experiments conducted at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) studying electrolysis of steam and coelectrolysis of steam / carbon dioxide in solid-oxide electrolysis stacks. Single button cell tests as well as multi-cell stack testing have been conducted. Multi-cell stack testing used 10 x 10 cm cells (8 x 8 cm active area) supplied by Ceramatec, Inc (Salt Lake City, Utah, USA) and ranged from 10 cell short stacks to 240 cell modules. Tests were conducted either in a bench-scale test apparatus or in a newly developed 5 kW Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) test facility. Gas composition, operating voltage, and operating temperature were varied during testing. The tests were heavily instrumented, and outlet gas compositions were monitored with a gas chromatograph. The ILS facility is currently being expanded to 15 kW testing capacity (H2 production rate based upon lower heating value).

C. Stoots; J. O'Brien; J. Herring; J. Hartvigsen

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Coal-Derived Warm Syngas Purification and CO2 Capture-Assisted Methane Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gasifier-derived syngas from coal has many applications in the area of catalytic transformation to fuels and chemicals. Raw syngas must be treated to remove a number of impurities that would otherwise poison the synthesis catalysts. Inorganic impurities include alkali salts, chloride, sulfur compounds, heavy metals, ammonia, and various P, As, Sb, and Se- containing compounds. Systems comprising multiple sorbent and catalytic beds have been developed for the removal of impurities from gasified coal using a warm cleanup approach. This approach has the potential to be more economic than the currently available acid gas removal (AGR) approaches and improves upon currently available processes that do not provide the level of impurity removal that is required for catalytic synthesis application. Gasification also lends itself much more readily to the capture of CO2, important in the regulation and control of greenhouse gas emissions. CO2 capture material was developed and in this study was demonstrated to assist in methane production from the purified syngas. Simultaneous CO2 sorption enhances the CO methanation reaction through relaxation of thermodynamic constraint, thus providing economic benefit rather than simply consisting of an add-on cost for carbon capture and release. Molten and pre-molten LiNaKCO3 can promote MgO and MgO-based double salts to capture CO2 with high cycling capacity. A stable cycling CO2 capacity up to 13 mmol/g was demonstrated. This capture material was specifically developed in this study to operate in the same temperature range and therefore integrate effectively with warm gas cleanup and methane synthesis. By combining syngas methanation, water-gas-shift, and CO2 sorption in a single reactor, single pass yield to methane of 99% was demonstrated at 10 bar and 330oC when using a 20 wt% Ni/MgAl2O4 catalyst and a molten-phase promoted MgO-based sorbent. Under model feed conditions both the sorbent and catalyst exhibited favorable stability after multiple test cycles. The cleanup for warm gas cleanup of inorganics was broken down into three major steps: chloride removal, sulfur removal, and the removal for a multitude of trace metal contaminants. Na2CO3 was found to optimally remove chlorides at an operating temperature of 450şC. For sulfur removal two regenerable ZnO beds are used for bulk H2S removal at 450şC (<5 ppm S) and a non-regenerable ZnO bed for H2S polishing at 300şC (<40 ppb S). It was also found that sulfur from COS could be adsorbed (to levels below our detection limit of 40 ppb) in the presence of water that leads to no detectable slip of H2S. Finally, a sorbent material comprising of Cu and Ni was found to be effective in removing trace metal impurities such as AsH3 and PH3 when operating at 300şC. Proof-of-concept of the integrated cleanup process was demonstrated with gasifier-generated syngas produced at the Western Research Institute using Wyoming Decker Coal. When operating with a ~1 SLPM feed, multiple inorganic contaminant removal sorbents and a tar-reforming bed was able to remove the vast majority of contaminants from the raw syngas. A tar-reforming catalyst was employed due to the production of tars generated from the gasifier used in this particular study. It is envisioned that in a real application a commercial scale gasifier operating at a higher temperature would produce lesser amount of tar. Continuous operation of a poison-sensitive copper-based WGS catalyst located downstream from the cleanup steps resulted in successful demonstration. ?

Dagle, Robert A.; King, David L.; Li, Xiaohong S.; Xing, Rong; Spies, Kurt A.; Zhu, Yunhua; Rainbolt, James E.; Li, Liyu; Braunberger, B.

2014-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

24

Ignition of syngas/air and hydrogen/air mixtures at low temperatures and high pressures: Experimental data interpretation and kinetic modeling implications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The magnitude of ignition delay observations and homogeneous kinetic calculations seen elsewhere is a result in large measure of departures of the experimental configurations from behavior dominated solely by homogeneous gas phase kinetics. In the regime of interest (higher pressures, lower temperatures), the hydrogen-oxygen chemical induction processes can be significantly perturbed by several nonhomogeneous effects, which include catalytic aberrations. The multiple perturbations that can significantly affect induction chemistry are very difficult to remove in research experiments and nearly impossible to control in engineering applications. The implications for developing lean premixing schemes for advanced syngas gas turbine applications are that designs must consider the inherent presence of these perturbations on ignition delay as well as those that might occur from potential particle contamination of the air stream exiting the compressor, if stimulated flashback into the mixing region is to be precluded.

Dryer, Frederick L.; Chaos, Marcos [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544-5263 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

25

Produce syngas for methanol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Combined reforming, in which an oxygen reforming reactor is added downstream from a conventional tubular reactor to produce syngas for methanol, achieves a substantial reduction in energy consumption with the least impact on the environment. This paper reports that the advantages of this process scheme are as follows: 8% to 10% reduction in the consumption of natural gas per ton of methanol, The size of the primary reformer is reduced, Reduction of syngas compression requirement due to increased syngas pressure, Reduced steam consumption, Production of syngas with the stoichiometric composition required by methanol synthesis. Synthesis gases for the production of methanol and synfuels are basically mixtures of hydrogen and carbon oxides. They have been produced from natural gas by steam reforming, autothermal reforming and noncatalytic partial oxidation.

Farina, G.L. (Foster Wheeler International Corp., Milan (IT))

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

High-Temperature Co-electrolysis of Steam and Carbon Dioxide for Direct Production of Syngas; Equilibrium Model and Single-Cell Tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental study has been completed to assess the performance of single solid-oxide electrolysis cells operating over a temperature range of 800 to 850şC in the coelectrolysis mode, simultaneously electrolyzing steam and carbon dioxide for the direct production of syngas. The experiments were performed over a range of inlet flow rates of steam, carbon dioxide, hydrogen and nitrogen and over a range of current densities (-0.1 to 0.25 A/cm2) using single electrolyte-supported button electrolysis cells. Steam and carbon dioxide consumption rates associated with electrolysis were measured directly using inlet and outlet dewpoint instrumentation and a gas chromatograph, respectively. Cell operating potentials and cell current were varied using a programmable power supply. Measured values of open-cell potential and outlet gas composition are compared to predictions obtained from a chemical equilibrium coelectrolysis model. Model predictions of outlet gas composition based on an effective equilibrium temperature are shown to agree well with measurements. Cell area-specific resistance values were similar for steam electrolysis and coelectrolysis.

O'Brien, J. E.; Stoots, C. M.; Herring, J. S.; Hartvigsen, J. J.

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

High-Temperature Co-electrolysis of Carbon Dioxide and Steam for the Production of Syngas; Equilibrium Model and Single-Cell Tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental study has been completed to assess the performance of single solid-oxide electrolysis cells operating over a temperature range of 800 to 850şC in the coelectrolysis mode, simultaneously electrolyzing steam and carbon dioxide for the direct production of syngas. The experiments were performed over a range of inlet flow rates of steam, carbon dioxide, hydrogen and nitrogen and over a range of current densities (-0.1 to 0.25 A/cm2) using single electrolyte-supported button electrolysis cells. Steam and carbon dioxide consumption rates associated with electrolysis were measured directly using inlet and outlet dewpoint instrumentation and a gas chromatograph, respectively. Cell operating potentials and cell current were varied using a programmable power supply. Measured values of open-cell potential and outlet gas composition are compared to predictions obtained from a chemical equilibrium coelectrolysis model. Model predictions of outlet gas composition based on an effective equilibrium temperature are shown to agree well with measurements. Area-specific resistance values were similar for steam electrolysis and coelectrolysis.

J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; G. L. Hawkes; J. S. Herring; J. J. Hartvigsen

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Technical and economic evaluation of ten high temperature, high pressure particulate cleanup systems for pressurized fluidized bed combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this analysis was to provide a technical and economic evaluation of the ten high temperature, high pressure (HTHP) systems for the purpose of prioritizing them according to performance, cost, and general viability of achieving commercial status. The scope primarily included reviewing/normalizing test experience to date, normalizing commercial designs, developing normalized capital and operating costs for each system, performing trade-off studies, and performing an evaluation utilizing in-house and outside inputs. The HTHP particulate cleanup system must be capable of the same stringent operating requirements as a conventional system, except it must do so at HTHP conditions. Utilities will demand nearly the same reliability as found in conventional equipment. Regarding particulate cleanup, the system must meet NSPS requirements at the stack, and also meet turbine inlet requirements. The ten devices evaluated were: Electrostatic Precipitator - Cottrell Environmental Sciences (CES); Ceramic Felt Filter - Acurex Corporation; Ceramic Cross Flow Filter - Westinghouse; Shallow Static Granular Bed Filter - Ducon/Westinghouse; Electrostatic Granular Bed Filter - General Electric (GE); Moving Granular Bed Filter - Combustion Power Company (CPC); Dry Plate Scrubber - Air Pollution Technology (APT); Magnetic Granular Bed Filter - Exxon; Electrocyclone - General Electric; and Acoustic Agglomerator - Aerojet/Pennsylvania State University (PSU). The test data for the ten devices were normalized to standard conditions with a reference inlet particle loading and size distribution. The purpose of system design normalization is to provide, for each of the HTHP concepts, a scaled-up commercial design which reflects a consistent design approach. 104 figures, 136 tables.

Rubow, L.N.; Borden, M.; Buchanan, T.L.; Cramp, J.A.C.; Fischer, W.H.; Klett, M.G.; Maruvada, S.M.; Nelson, E.T.; Weinstein, R.E.; Zaharchuk, R.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Improved heat recovery and high-temperature clean-up for coal-gas fired combustion turbines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study investigates the performance of an Improved Heat Recovery Method (IHRM) applied to a coal-gas fired power-generating system using a high-temperature clean-up. This heat recovery process has been described by Higdon and Lynn (1990). The IHRM is an integrated heat-recovery network that significantly increases the thermal efficiency of a gas turbine in the generation of electric power. Its main feature is to recover both low- and high-temperature heat reclaimed from various gas streams by means of evaporating heated water into combustion air in an air saturation unit. This unit is a packed column where compressed air flows countercurrently to the heated water prior to being sent to the combustor, where it is mixed with coal-gas and burned. The high water content of the air stream thus obtained reduces the amount of excess air required to control the firing temperature of the combustor, which in turn lowers the total work of compression and results in a high thermal efficiency. Three designs of the IHRM were developed to accommodate three different gasifying process. The performances of those designs were evaluated and compared using computer simulations. The efficiencies obtained with the IHRM are substantially higher those yielded by other heat-recovery technologies using the same gasifying processes. The study also revealed that the IHRM compares advantageously to most advanced power-generation technologies currently available or tested commercially. 13 refs., 34 figs., 10 tabs.

Barthelemy, N.M.; Lynn, S.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Elevated-Temperature Corrosion of CoCrCuFeNiAl0.5Bx High-Entropy Alloys in Simulated Syngas Containing H2S  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-entropy alloys are formed by synthesizing five or more principal elements in equimolar or near equimolar concentrations. Microstructure of the CoCrCuFeNiAl{sub 0.5}B{sub x} (x = 0, 0.2, 0.6, 1) high-entropy alloys under investigation is composed of a mixture of disordered bcc and fcc phases and borides. These alloys were tested gravimetrically for their corrosion resistance in simulated syngas containing 0, 0.01, 0.1, and 1 % H{sub 2}S at 500 °C. The exposed coupons were characterized using XRD and SEM. No significant corrosion was detected at 500 °C in syngas containing 0 and 0.01 % H{sub 2}S while significant corrosion was observed in syngas containing 0.1 and 1 % H{sub 2}S. Cu{sub 1.96}S was the primary sulfide in the external corrosion scale on the low-boron high-entropy alloys, whereas FeCo{sub 4}Ni{sub 4}S{sub 8} on the high-boron high-entropy alloys. Multi-phase Cu-rich regions in the low-B high-entropy alloys were vulnerable to corrosive attack.

Dogan, Omer N.; Nielsen, Benjamin C.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Development of ceramic membrane reactors for high temperature gas cleanup. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to develop high temperature, high pressure catalytic ceramic membrane reactors and to demonstrate the feasibility of using these membrane reactors to control gaseous contaminants (hydrogen sulfide and ammonia) in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems. Our strategy was to first develop catalysts and membranes suitable for the IGCC application and then combine these two components as a complete membrane reactor system. We also developed a computer model of the membrane reactor and used it, along with experimental data, to perform an economic analysis of the IGCC application. Our results have demonstrated the concept of using a membrane reactor to remove trace contaminants from an IGCC process. Experiments showed that NH{sub 3} decomposition efficiencies of 95% can be achieved. Our economic evaluation predicts ammonia decomposition costs of less than 1% of the total cost of electricity; improved membranes would give even higher conversions and lower costs.

Roberts, D.L.; Abraham, I.C.; Blum, Y.; Gottschlich, D.E.; Hirschon, A.; Way, J.D.; Collins, J.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Bioenergy Technologies Office Conversion R&D Pathway: Syngas...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Bioenergy Technologies Office Conversion R&D Pathway: Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Syngas upgrading to hydrocarbon fuels is one of...

33

DOE-Sponsored Syngas Cleanup Demonstration Project Reaches Development  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomentheATLANTA, GA - U.S. DepartmenttoJune 16,April 29,May 23,

34

Microsoft PowerPoint - DFT Syngas Cleanup_3  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challenge fundProject Quarterly ReportsMicrofluidicThis DOE10 -10

35

Progress toward Biomass and Coal-Derived Syngas Warm Cleanup:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - SeptemberMicroneedles for4-16Hamada winsProgress Report Workgroup #3Progress on

36

Paducah Cleanup Milestones  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Paducah Site Management Plan sets forth enforceable milestones for cleanup activities. These activities include a series of prioritized cleanup actions, ongoing analysis to support future cleanup decisions, and eventual D&D of the gaseous diffusion plant.

37

Corrosion of Metallic SOFC Interconnects in Coal Syngas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With recent reductions in the operating temperature of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC), the potential of using metallic interconnect has gone up. There is also an interest in using Coal syngas as the fuel gas and thus there is a need to analyze the behavior and performance of metallic interconnects when exposed to Coal syngas. Three high temperature material alloys, Crofer 22 APU, Ebrite and Haynes 230, having the potential to be used as SOFC interconnects were studied in simulated wet coal syngas. These alloys were exposed to syngas at 800 degrees C and for 100 hours. The exposure to coal syngas led to the formation of oxides and spinels, which evidently led to an increase in electrical resistance. Oxidation in a reducing and carburizing environment leads to unique phase and morphology formations. A comparative analysis was carried out for all the three alloys, wherein the samples were characterized by using SEM, EDS, Raman and X-Ray diffraction to obtain the morphology, thickness, composition and crystal structure of the oxides and spinels

Dastane, R.R. (University of West Virginia); Liu, X. (University of West Virginia); Johnson, C., Mao, Scott (University of Pittsburgh)

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Cooling Strategies for Vane Leading Edges in a Syngas Environment Including Effects of Deposition and Turbulence  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy has goals to move land based gas turbine systems to alternate fuels including coal derived synthetic gas and hydrogen. Coal is the most abundant energy resource in the US and in the world and it is economically advantageous to develop power systems which can use coal. Integrated gasification combined cycles are (IGCC) expected to allow the clean use of coal derived fuels while improving the ability to capture and sequester carbon dioxide. These cycles will need to maintain or increase turbine entry temperatures to develop competitive efficiencies. The use of coal derived syngas introduces a range of potential contaminants into the hot section of the gas turbine including sulfur, iron, calcium, and various alkali metals. Depending on the effectiveness of the gas clean up processes, there exists significant likelihood that the remaining materials will become molten in the combustion process and potentially deposit on downstream turbine surfaces. Past evidence suggests that deposition will be a strong function of increasing temperature. Currently, even with the best gas cleanup processes a small level of particulate matter in the syngas is expected. Consequently, particulate deposition is expected to be an important consideration in the design of turbine components. The leading edge region of first stage vanes most often have higher deposition rates than other areas due to strong fluid acceleration and streamline curvature in the vicinity of the surface. This region remains one of the most difficult areas in a turbine nozzle to cool due to high inlet temperatures and only a small pressure ratio for cooling. The leading edge of a vane often has relatively high heat transfer coefficients and is often cooled using showerhead film cooling arrays. The throat of the first stage nozzle is another area where deposition potentially has a strongly adverse effect on turbine performance as this region meters the turbine inlet flow. Based on roughness levels found on in service vanes (Bons, et al., 2001, up to 300 microns) flow blockage in first stage turbine nozzles can easily reach 1 to 2 percent in conventional turbines. Deposition levels in syngas fueled gas turbines are expected to be even more problematic. The likelihood of significant deposition to the leading edge of vanes in a syngas environment indicates the need to examine this effect on the leading edge cooling problem. It is critical to understand the influence of leading edge geometry and turbulence on deposition rates for both internally and showerhead cooled leading edge regions. The expected level of deposition in a vane stagnation region not only significantly changes the heat transfer problem but also suggests that cooling arrays may clog. Addressing the cooling issue suggests a need to better understand stagnation region heat transfer with realistic roughness as well as the other variables affecting transport near the leading edge. Also, the question of whether leading edge regions can be cooled internally with modern cooling approaches should also be raised, thus avoiding the clogging issue. Addressing deposition in the pressure side throat region of the nozzle is another critical issue for this environment. Issues such as examining the protective effect of slot and full coverage discrete-hole film cooling on limiting deposition as well as the influence of roughness and turbulence on effectiveness should be raised. The objective of this present study is to address these technical challenges to help enable the development of high efficiency syngas tolerant gas turbine engines.

Ames, Forrest; Bons, Jeffrey

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

39

System Analysis of Nuclear-Assisted Syngas Production from Coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A system analysis has been performed to assess the efficiency and carbon utilization of a nuclear-assisted coal gasification process. The nuclear reactor is a high-temperature helium-cooled reactor that is used primarily to provide power for hydrogen production via hightemperature electrolysis. The supplemental hydrogen is mixed with the outlet stream from an oxygen-blown coal gasifier to produce a hydrogen-rich gas mixture, allowing most of the carbon dioxide to be converted into carbon monoxide, with enough excess hydrogen to produce a syngas product stream with a hydrogen/carbon monoxide molar ratio of about 2:1. Oxygen for the gasifier is also provided by the high-temperature electrolysis process. Results of the analysis predict 90.5% carbon utilization with a syngas production efficiency (defined as the ratio of the heating value of the produced syngas to the sum of the heating value of the coal plus the high-temperature reactor heat input) of 64.4% at a gasifier temperature of 1866 K for the high-moisture-content lignite coal considered. Usage of lower moisture coals such as bituminous can yield carbon utilization approaching 100% and 70% syngas production efficiency.

E. A. Harvego; M. G. McKellar; J. E. O'Brien

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Imperium/Lanzatech Syngas Fermentation Project - Biomass Gasification and Syngas Conditioning for Fermentation Evaluation: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-12-474  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

LanzaTech and NREL will investigate the integration between biomass gasification and LanzaTech's proprietary gas fermentation process to produce ethanol and 2,3-butanediol. Using three feed materials (woody biomass, agricultural residue and herbaceous grass) NREL will produce syngas via steam indirect gasification and syngas conditioning over a range of process relevant operating conditions. The gasification temperature, steam-to-biomass ratio of the biomass feed into the gasifier, and several levels of syngas conditioning (based on temperature) will be varied to produce multiple syngas streams that will be fed directly to 10 liter seed fermenters operating with the Lanzatech organism. The NREL gasification system will then be integrated with LanzaTech's laboratory pilot unit to produce large-scale samples of ethanol and 2,3-butanediol for conversion to fuels and chemicals.

Wilcox, E.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature syngas cleanup" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Assessment of the SRI Gasification Process for Syngas Generation with HTGR Integration -- White Paper  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This white paper is intended to compare the technical and economic feasibility of syngas generation using the SRI gasification process coupled to several high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) with more traditional HTGR-integrated syngas generation techniques, including: (1) Gasification with high-temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE); (2) Steam methane reforming (SMR); and (3) Gasification with SMR with and without CO2 sequestration.

A.M. Gandrik

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

US Department of Energy`s high-temperature and high-pressure particulate cleanup for advanced coal-based power systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The availability of reliable, low-cost electricity is a cornerstone for the United States` ability to compete in the world market. The Department of Energy (DOE) projects the total consumption of electricity in the US to rise from 2.7 trillion kilowatt-hours in 1990 to 3.5 trillion in 2010. Although energy sources are diversifying, fossil fuel still produces 90 percent of the nation`s energy. Coal is our most abundant fossil fuel resource and the source of 56 percent of our electricity. It has been the fuel of choice because of its availability and low cost. A new generation of high-efficiency power systems has made it possible to continue the use of coal while still protecting the environment. Such power systems greatly reduce the pollutants associated with cola-fired plants built before the 1970s. To realize this high efficiency and superior environmental performance, advanced coal-based power systems will require gas stream cleanup under high-temperature and high-pressure (HTHP) process conditions. Presented in this paper are the HTHP particulate capture requirements for the Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Combustion (PFBC) power systems, the HTHP particulate cleanup systems being implemented in the PFBC and IGCC Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Projects, and the currently available particulate capture performance results.

Dennis, R.A.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup, and Oxygen Separation Equipment; Task 2: Gas Cleanup Design and Cost Estimates -- Wood Feedstock  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of Task 2, Gas Cleanup and Cost Estimates, Nexant investigated the appropriate process scheme for treatment of wood-derived syngas for use in the synthesis of liquid fuels. Two different 2,000 metric tonne per day gasification schemes, a low-pressure, indirect system using the gasifier, and a high-pressure, direct system using gasification technology were evaluated. Initial syngas conditions from each of the gasifiers was provided to the team by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Nexant was the prime contractor and principal investigator during this task; technical assistance was provided by both GTI and Emery Energy.

Nexant Inc.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Gas stream cleanup  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the current status and recent accomplishments of gas stream cleanup (GSCU) projects sponsored by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The primary goal of the Gas Stream Cleanup Program is to develop contaminant control strategies that meet environmental regulations and protect equipment in advanced coal conversion systems. Contaminant control systems are being developed for integration into seven advanced coal conversion processes: Pressurized fludized-bed combustion (PFBC), Direct coal-fueled turbine (DCFT), Intergrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC), Gasification/molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC), Gasification/solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), Coal-fueled diesel (CFD), and Mild gasification (MG). These advanced coal conversion systems present a significant challenge for development of contaminant control systems because they generate multi-contaminant gas streams at high-pressures and high temperatures. Each of the seven advanced coal conversion systems incorporates distinct contaminant control strategies because each has different contaminant tolerance limits and operating conditions. 59 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

Bossart, S.J.; Cicero, D.C.; Zeh, C.M.; Bedick, R.C.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology Pathway  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technology pathway case investigates the upgrading of woody biomass derived synthesis gas (syngas) to hydrocarbon biofuels. While this specific discussion focuses on the conversion of syngas via a methanol intermediate to hydrocarbon blendstocks, there are a number of alternative conversion routes for production of hydrocarbons through a wide array of intermediates from syngas. Future work will also consider the variations to this pathway to determine the most economically viable and lowest risk conversion route. Technical barriers and key research needs have been identified that should be pursued for the syngas-to-hydrocarbon pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel- and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

Talmadge, M.; Biddy, M.; Dutta, A.; Jones, S.; Meyer, A.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Performance of solid oxide fuel cells operated with coal syngas...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Performance of solid oxide fuel cells operated with coal syngas provided directly from a gasification process. Performance of solid oxide fuel cells operated with coal syngas...

47

Fischer-Tropsch Database Calculations Conversions: CO, H2, and Syngas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fischer-Tropsch Database Calculations Conversions: CO, H2, and Syngas f in out in n n n = - 100 n contraction (%) #12;Syngas ratio (H2:CO): sr H in CO in n n = 2 _ _ n: (mols per hour) sr: Syngas ratio Rates active metal (g) r: Rate (mols / hr / g metal) #12;Rate Syngas: syngas H COr r r= +2 r syngas: Syngas

Kentucky, University of

48

Modeling of the reburning process using sewage sludge-derived syngas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gasification provides an attractive method for sewage sludges treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gasification generates a fuel gas (syngas) which can be used as a reburning fuel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reburning potential of sewage sludge gasification gases was defined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Numerical simulation of co-combustion of syngases in coal fired boiler has been done. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Calculation shows that analysed syngases can provide higher than 80% reduction of NO{sub x}. - Abstract: Gasification of sewage sludge can provide clean and effective reburning fuel for combustion applications. The motivation of this work was to define the reburning potential of the sewage sludge gasification gas (syngas). A numerical simulation of the co-combustion process of syngas in a hard coal-fired boiler was done. All calculations were performed using the Chemkin programme and a plug-flow reactor model was used. The calculations were modelled using the GRI-Mech 2.11 mechanism. The highest conversions for nitric oxide (NO) were obtained at temperatures of approximately 1000-1200 K. The combustion of hard coal with sewage sludge-derived syngas reduces NO emissions. The highest reduction efficiency (>90%) was achieved when the molar flow ratio of the syngas was 15%. Calculations show that the analysed syngas can provide better results than advanced reburning (connected with ammonia injection), which is more complicated process.

Werle, Sebastian, E-mail: sebastian.werle@polsl.pl [Institute of Thermal Technology, Silesian University of Technology at Gliwice, 44-100 Gliwice, Konarskiego 22 (Poland)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

49

Development of hollow fiber catalytic membrane reactors for high temperature gas cleanup. Final report, September 1989--March 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to develop economically and technically viable catalytic membrane reactors for high temperature, high pressure gaseous contaminant control in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems. These catalytic membrane reactors decompose H{sub 2}S and separate the reaction products. The reactors were designed to operate in the hostile process environment of the IGCC systems, and at temperatures ranging from 500 to 1000{degrees}C. Severe conditions encountered in the IGCC process (e.g., 900{degrees}C, containing of H{sub 2}S, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O) make it impossible to use polymeric membranes in the process. A list of inorganic membranes that can be employed in the membrane reactor includes Pd metallic membranes, molecular-sieve glass membranes (PPG Industries), porous Vycor glass membranes and porous sol-gel derived membranes such as alumina, zirconia. Alumina and zirconia membranes, however, cannot withstand for a long time at high temperatures in the presence of water vapors. Palladium membranes are a very promising class of inorganic membranes for gas separations that is currently under development. In this project two different types of membranes were used in the design of the membrane reactor -- molecular-sieve glass membrane and Vycor glass porous membrane.

Ma, Yi Hua; Moser, W.R.; Pien, S.; Shelekhin, A.B.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Integrated High Temperature Coal-to-Hydrogen System with CO2 Separation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A significant barrier to the commercialization of coal-to-hydrogen technologies is high capital cost. The purity requirements for H{sub 2} fuels are generally met by using a series of unit clean-up operations for residual CO removal, sulfur removal, CO{sub 2} removal and final gas polishing to achieve pure H{sub 2}. A substantial reduction in cost can be attained by reducing the number of process operations for H{sub 2} cleanup, and process efficiency can be increased by conducting syngas cleanup at higher temperatures. The objective of this program was to develop the scientific basis for a single high-temperature syngas-cleanup module to produce a pure stream of H{sub 2} from a coal-based system. The approach was to evaluate the feasibility of a 'one box' process that combines a shift reactor with a high-temperature CO{sub 2}-selective membrane to convert CO to CO{sub 2}, remove sulfur compounds, and remove CO{sub 2} in a simple, compact, fully integrated system. A system-level design was produced for a shift reactor that incorporates a high-temperature membrane. The membrane performance targets were determined. System level benefits were evaluated for a coal-to-hydrogen system that would incorporate membranes with properties that would meet the performance targets. The scientific basis for high temperature CO{sub 2}-selective membranes was evaluated by developing and validating a model for high temperature surface flow membranes. Synthesis approaches were pursued for producing membranes that integrated control of pore size with materials adsorption properties. Room temperature reverse-selectivity for CO{sub 2} was observed and performance at higher temperatures was evaluated. Implications for future membrane development are discussed.

James A. Ruud; Anthony Ku; Vidya Ramaswamy; Wei Wei; Patrick Willson

2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

51

A Study of Advanced Materials for Gas Turbine Coatings at Elevated Temperatures Using Selected Microstructures and Characteristic Environments for Syngas Combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) that can be suitable for use in industrial gas turbine engines have been processed and compared with electron beam physical vapor deposition (EBPVD) microstructures for applications in advanced gas turbines that use coal-derived synthesis gas. Thermo-physical properties have been evaluated of the processed air plasma sprayed TBCs with standard APS-STD and vertically cracked APS-VC coatings samples up to 1300 C. Porosity of these selected coatings with related microstructural effects have been analyzed in this study. Wet and dry thermal cycling studies at 1125 C and spalling resistance thermal cycling studies to 1200 C have also been carried out. Type I and Type II hot corrosion tests were carried out to investigate the effects of microstructure variations and additions of alumina in YSZ top coats in multi-layered TBC structures. The thermal modeling of turbine blade has also been carried out that gives the capability to predict in-service performance temperature gradients. In addition to isothermal high temperature oxidation kinetics analysis in YSZ thermal barrier coatings of NiCoCrAlY bond coats with 0.25% Hf. This can affect the failure behavior depending on the control of the thermally grown oxide (TGO) growth at the interface. The TGO growth kinetics is seen to be parabolic and the activation energies correspond to interfacial growth kinetics that is controlled by the diffusion of O{sub 2} in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The difference between oxidation behavior of the VC and STD structures are attributed to the effects of microstructure morphology and porosity on oxygen ingression into the zirconia and TGO layers. The isothermal oxidation resistance of the STD and VC microstructures is similar at temperatures up to 1200 C. However, the generally thicker TGO layer thicknesses and the slightly faster oxidation rates in the VC microstructures are attributed to the increased ingression of oxygen through the grain boundaries of the vertically cracked microstructures. The plasma sprayed TBC microstructure (VC and STD) with NiCoCrAlY-Hf bond coat are stable up to 1100 C. However, as with other TBC structures, a considerable amount of interdiffusion was observed in the different layers, although the TBC growth was self-limiting and parabolic. The addition of Hf to the VC microstructure appears to have some potential for the future development of robust TBCs with improved isothermal and service temperatures in advanced gas turbines.

Ravinder Diwan; Patrick Mensah; Guoqiang Li; Nalini Uppu; Strphen Akwaboa; Monica Silva; Ebubekir Beyazoglu; Ogad Agu; Naresh Polasa; Lawrence Bazille; Douglas Wolfe; Purush Sahoo

2011-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

52

A Review of Materials for Gas Turbines Firing Syngas Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Following the extensive development work carried out in the 1990's, gas turbine combined-cycle (GTCC) systems burning natural gas represent a reliable and efficient power generation technology widely used in many parts of the world. A critical factor was that, in order to operate at the high turbine entry temperatures required for high efficiency operation, aero-engine technology, i.e., single-crystal blades, thermal barrier coatings, and sophisticated cooling techniques had to be rapidly scaled up and introduced into these large gas turbines. The problems with reliability that resulted have been largely overcome, so that the high-efficiency GTCC power generation system is now a mature technology, capable of achieving high levels of availability. The high price of natural gas and concern about emission of greenhouse gases has focused attention on the desirability of replacing natural gas with gas derived from coal (syngas) in these gas turbine systems, since typical systems analyses indicate that IGCC plants have some potential to fulfil the requirement for a zero-emissions power generation system. In this review, the current status of materials for the critical hot gas path parts in large gas turbines is briefly considered in the context of the need to burn syngas. A critical factor is that the syngas is a low-Btu fuel, and the higher mass flow compared to natural gas will tend to increase the power output of the engine. However, modifications to the turbine and to the combustion system also will be necessary. It will be shown that many of the materials used in current engines will also be applicable to units burning syngas but, since the combustion environment will contain a greater level of impurities (especially sulfur, water vapor, and particulates), the durability of some components may be prejudiced. Consequently, some effort will be needed to develop improved coatings to resist attack by sulfur-containing compounds, and also erosion.

Gibbons, Thomas [ORNL; Wright, Ian G [ORNL

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Background and Motivation Biomass derived syngas contains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Background and Motivation · Biomass derived syngas contains: CO, H2, small hydrocarbons, H2S prepared by SEA contain smaller metal particle sizes and have higher dispersion · The quantity of reducible

Das, Suman

54

Theoretical study of syngas hydrogenation to methanol on the...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

study of syngas hydrogenation to methanol on the polar Zn-terminated ZnO(0001) surface. Theoretical study of syngas hydrogenation to methanol on the polar Zn-terminated ZnO(0001)...

55

Idaho Cleanup Project Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.ProgramJulietip sheetK-4InFindingIR-2003-TransmissionDepartmentIanCleanup

56

Reactor water cleanup system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A reactor water cleanup system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core submerged in reactor water. First and second parallel cleanup trains are provided for extracting portions of the reactor water from the pressure vessel, cleaning the extracted water, and returning the cleaned water to the pressure vessel. Each of the cleanup trains includes a heat exchanger for cooling the reactor water, and a cleaner for cleaning the cooled reactor water. A return line is disposed between the cleaner and the pressure vessel for channeling the cleaned water thereto in a first mode of operation. A portion of the cooled water is bypassed around the cleaner during a second mode of operation and returned through the pressure vessel for shutdown cooling. 1 figure.

Gluntz, D.M.; Taft, W.E.

1994-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

57

Reactor water cleanup system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A reactor water cleanup system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core submerged in reactor water. First and second parallel cleanup trains are provided for extracting portions of the reactor water from the pressure vessel, cleaning the extracted water, and returning the cleaned water to the pressure vessel. Each of the cleanup trains includes a heat exchanger for cooling the reactor water, and a cleaner for cleaning the cooled reactor water. A return line is disposed between the cleaner and the pressure vessel for channeling the cleaned water thereto in a first mode of operation. A portion of the cooled water is bypassed around the cleaner during a second mode of operation and returned through the pressure vessel for shutdown cooling.

Gluntz, Douglas M. (San Jose, CA); Taft, William E. (Los Gatos, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Syngas Chemistry DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100735  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Syngas Chemistry DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100735 Carbon Chain Growth by Formyl Insertion on Rhodium and Cobalt Catalysts in Syngas Conversion** Yong-Hui Zhao, Keju Sun, Xiufang Ma, Jinxun Liu, Dapeng Sun, Hai-Yan Su, and Wei-Xue Li* Syngas (CO/H2) produced from coal, natural gas, or biomass has attracted much

Li, Weixue

59

BURNER DEVELOPMENT AND OPERABILITY ISSUES ASSOCIATED WITH STEADY FLOWING SYNGAS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BURNER DEVELOPMENT AND OPERABILITY ISSUES ASSOCIATED WITH STEADY FLOWING SYNGAS FIRED COMBUSTORS-Mu¨nchen, Garching, Germany This article addresses the impact of syngas fuel composition on combustor blowout, flash flashback mechanisms are present in swirling flows, and the key thermophysical properties of a syngas

Lieuwen, Timothy C.

60

Syngas into Fuel: Optofluidic Solar Concentrators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Ohio State has developed an iron-based material and process for converting syngas—a synthetic gas mixture—into electricity, H2, and/or liquid fuel with zero CO2 emissions. Traditional carbon capture methods use chemical solvents or special membranes to separate CO2 from the gas exhaust from coal-fired power plants. Ohio State’s technology uses an iron-based oxygen carrier to generate CO2 and H2 from syngas in separate, pure product streams by means of a circulating bed reactor configuration. The end products of the system are H2, electricity, and/or liquid fuel, all of which are useful sources of power that can come from coal or syngas derived from biomass. Ohio State is developing a high-pressure pilot-scale unit to demonstrate this process at the National Carbon Capture Center.

None

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature syngas cleanup" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Mixed conducting membranes for syngas production  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention presents a new class of multicomponent metallic oxides which are particularly suited toward use in fabricating components used in processes for producing syngas. The non-stoichiometric, A-site rich compositions of the present invention are represented by the formula (Ln.sub.x Ca.sub.1-x).sub.y FeO.sub.3-.delta. wherein Ln is La or a mixture of lanthanides comprising La, and wherein 1.0>x>0.5, 1.1.gtoreq.y>1.0 and .delta. is a number which renders the composition of matter charge neutral. Solid-state membranes formed from these compositions provide a favorable balance of oxygen permeance and resistance to degradation when employed in processes for producing syngas. This invention also presents a process for making syngas which utilizes such membranes.

Dyer, Paul Nigel (Allentown, PA); Carolan, Michael Francis (Allentown, PA); Butt, Darryl (Gainesville, FL); Van Doorn, Rene Hendrick Elias (Neckarsulm, DE); Cutler, Raymond Ashton (Bountiful, UT)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Partial oxidation of methane to syngas in different reactor types  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The performance of Rh/ZnO/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst for partial oxidation of methane to syngas was compared in fixed and fluidised bed reactors. Catalyst activity was found not to be a limiting factor under any experimental conditions and complete oxygen conversions were observed in all tests. In the fixed bed reactor both methane conversion and syngas selectivity were increasing with space velocity as the result of an autothermal effect. Satisfactory control of the catalyst temperature at high space velocities could only be achieved with addition of inert diluent or steam to the feed. Different conversion and selectivity patterns were observed in fluidised bed reactor. Methane conversion and carbon monoxide selectivity were decreasing with increasing gas flow. By contrast, hydrogen selectivity showed distinct maximum at medium space velocities. These results are interpreted in terms of catalyst backmixing and its effect on primary and secondary reactions. Improved temperature control was also achieved in fluidised bed reactor. Several experiments using fluidised bed reactor were carried out at elevated pressures. To eliminate the occurrence of non-catalytic gas phase reactions between methane and oxygen very short feed mixing times (< 1 ms) were employed. Despite these measures the reactor could not be successfully operated at pressures above 0.7 MPa. The implications of these findings for process development are discussed.

Lapszewicz, J.A.; Campbell, I.; Charlton, B.G.; Foulds, G.A. [CSIRO Division of Coal and Energy Technology, Menai (Australia)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Producing Clean Syngas via Catalytic Reforming for Fuels Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermochemical biomass conversion to fuels and chemicals can be achieved through gasification to syngas. The biomass derived raw syngas contains the building blocks of carbon monoxide and hydrogen as well as impurities such as tars, light hydrocarbons, and hydrogen sulfide. These impurities must be removed prior to fuel synthesis. We used catalytic reforming to convert tars and hydrocarbons to additional syngas, which increases biomass carbon utilization. In this work, nickel based, fluidizable tar reforming catalysts were synthesized and evaluated for tar and methane reforming performance with oak and model syngas in two types of pilot scale fluidized reactors (recirculating and recirculating regenerating). Because hydrogen sulfide (present in raw syngas and added to model syngas) reacts with the active nickel surface, regeneration with steam and hydrogen was required. Pre and post catalyst characterization showed changes specific to the syngas type used. Results of this work will be discussed in the context of selecting the best process for pilot scale demonstration.

Magrini, K. A.; Parent, Y.; Jablonski, W.; Yung, M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology Pathway  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This pathway case investigates the upgrading of biomass derived synthesis gas (‘syngas’) to hydrocarbon biofuels. While this specific discussion focuses on the conversion of syngas via a methanol intermediate to hydrocarbon blendstocks, there are a number of alternative conversion routes for production of hydrocarbons through a wide array of intermediates from syngas. Future work will also consider the variations to this pathway to determine the most economically viable and risk adverse conversion route. Technical barriers and key research needs have been identified that should be pursued for the syngas to hydrocarbon pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range blendstocks.

Talmadge, M.; Biddy, Mary J.; Dutta, Abhijit; Jones, Susanne B.; Meyer, Pimphan A.

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

65

Improve syngas production using autothermal reforming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Synthesis gas or syngas, i.e., mixtures of CO and H[sub 2], is a major route from hydrocarbons to many important bulk chemicals ranging from acetic acid to ammonia. Syngas conversion uses hydrocarbon feedstocks, steam, O[sub 2] and CO[sub 2], either separately or in combinations. Autothermal reforming (ATR) is a low-investment process using a simple reactor design. The process is soot-free due to burner design and fixed-bed catalyst. Developed in the late '50s, ATR's main application was for ammonia and methanol syntheses. In ammonia plants, hydrogen production was maximized by operating at high H[sub 2]O/C ratios ranging from 2.5 to 3.5 mole/mole. In methanol units, CO[sub 2] recycle adjusted the syngas composition. ATR is also used to co-produce CO and H[sub 2] as separate streams at H[sub 2]O/C ratios of 1.4 to 2.0 mole/mole. recent developments and optimizations allow cost-effective operation at very low H[sub 2]O/C feed ratios to produce CO-rich syngas. The paper describes the process, including feedstocks and reactor design, the chemical reactions, development and improvements to the process, test results, soot formation, burner design, burner testing, applications, thermodynamic calculations, industrial application, noncatalytic and catalytic partial oxidation, and future uses.

Christensen, T.S.; Primdahl, I.I. (Haldor Topsoe, Copenhagen (Denmark))

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

SIMULTANEOUS PRODUCTION OF HIGH-PURITY HYDROGEN AND SEQUESTRATION-READY CO2 FROM SYNGAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final report summarizes the progress made on the program ''Simultaneous Production of High-Purity Hydrogen and Sequestration-Ready CO{sub 2} from Syngas (contract number DE-FG26-99FT40682)'', during October 2000 through September of 2003. GE Energy and Environmental Research (GE-EER) and Southern Illinois University (SIU) at Carbondale conducted the research work for this program. This program addresses improved methods to efficiently produce simultaneous streams of high-purity hydrogen and separated carbon dioxide from synthesis gas (syngas). The syngas may be produced through either gasification of coal or reforming of natural gas. The process of production of H{sub 2} and separated CO{sub 2} utilizes a dual-bed reactor and regenerator system. The reactor produces hydrogen and the regenerator produces separated CO{sub 2}. The dual-bed system can be operated under either a circulating fluidized-bed configuration or a cyclic fixed-bed configuration. Both configurations were evaluated in this project. The experimental effort was divided into lab-scale work at SIU and bench-scale work at GE-EER. Tests in a lab-scale fluidized bed system demonstrated the process for the conversion of syngas to high purity H{sub 2} and separated CO{sub 2}. The lab-scale system generated up to 95% H{sub 2} (on a dry basis). Extensive thermodynamic analysis of chemical reactions between the syngas and the fluidized solids determined an optimum range of temperature and pressure operation, where the extent of the undesirable reactions is minimum. The cycling of the process between hydrogen generation and oxygen regeneration has been demonstrated. The fluidized solids did not regenerate completely and the hydrogen purity in the reuse cycle dropped to 70% from 95% (on a dry basis). Changes in morphology and particle size may be the most dominant factor affecting the efficiency of the repeated cycling between hydrogen production and oxygen regeneration. The concept of simultaneous production of hydrogen and separated stream of CO{sub 2} was proved using a fixed bed 2 reactor system at GE-EER. This bench-scale cyclic fixed-bed reactor system designed to reform natural gas to syngas has been fabricated in another coordinated DOE project. This system was modified to reform natural gas to syngas and then convert syngas to H{sub 2} and separated CO{sub 2}. The system produced 85% hydrogen (dry basis).

Linda Denton; Hana Lorethova; Tomasz Wiltowski; Court Moorefield; Parag Kulkarni; Vladimir Zamansky; Ravi Kumar

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

FEEDSTOCK-FLEXIBLE REFORMER SYSTEM (FFRS) FOR SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL (SOFC)- QUALITY SYNGAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory funded this research collaboration effort between NextEnergy and the University of Michigan, who successfully designed, built, and tested a reformer system, which produced highquality syngas for use in SOFC and other applications, and a novel reactor system, which allowed for facile illumination of photocatalysts. Carbon and raw biomass gasification, sulfur tolerance of non-Platinum Group Metals (PGM) based (Ni/CeZrO2) reforming catalysts, photocatalysis reactions based on TiO2, and mild pyrolysis of biomass in ionic liquids (ILs) were investigated at low and medium temperatures (primarily 450 to 850 C) in an attempt to retain some structural value of the starting biomass. Despite a wide range of processes and feedstock composition, a literature survey showed that, gasifier products had narrow variation in composition, a restriction used to develop operating schemes for syngas cleanup. Three distinct reaction conditions were investigated: equilibrium, autothermal reforming of hydrocarbons, and the addition of O2 and steam to match the final (C/H/O) composition. Initial results showed rapid and significant deactivation of Ni/CeZrO2 catalysts upon introduction of thiophene, but both stable and unstable performance in the presence of sulfur were obtained. The key linkage appeared to be the hydrodesulfurization activity of the Ni reforming catalysts. For feed stoichiometries where high H2 production was thermodynamically favored, stable, albeit lower, H2 and CO production were obtained; but lower thermodynamic H2 concentrations resulted in continued catalyst deactivation and eventual poisoning. High H2 levels resulted in thiophene converting to H2S and S surface desorption, leading to stable performance; low H2 levels resulted in unconverted S and loss in H2 and CO production, as well as loss in thiophene conversion. Bimetallic catalysts did not outperform Ni-only catalysts, and small Ni particles were found to have lower activities under S-free conditions, but did show less effect of S on performance, in this study. Imidazolium-based ILs, choline chloride compounds and low-melting eutectics of metal nitrates were evaluated, and it was found that, ILs have some capacity to dissolve cellulose and show thermal stability to temperatures where pyrolysis begins, have no vapor pressure, (simplifying product recoveries), and can dissolve ionic metal salts, allowing for the potential of catalytic reactions on breakdown intermediates. Clear evidence of photoactive commercial TiO2 was obtained, but in-house synthesis of photoactive TiO2 proved difficult, as did fixed-bed gasification, primarily due to the challenge of removing the condensable products from the reaction zone quickly enough to prevent additional reaction. Further investigation into additional non-PGM catalysts and ILs is recommended as a follow-up to this work.

Kelly Jezierski; Andrew Tadd; Johannes Schwank; Roland Kibler; David McLean; Mahesh Samineni; Ryan Smith; Sameer Parvathikar; Joe Mayne; Tom Westrich; Jerry Mader; F. Michael Faubert

2010-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

68

Biomass-derived Syngas Utilization for Fuels and Chemicals - Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Executive Summary The growing gap between petroleum production and demand, mounting environmental concerns, and increasing fuel prices have stimulated intense interest in research and development (R&D) of alternative fuels, both synthetic and bio-derived. Currently, the most technically defined thermochemical route for producing alternative fuels from lignocellulosic biomass involves gasification/reforming of biomass to produce syngas (carbon monoxide [CO] + hydrogen [H2]), followed by syngas cleaning, Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) or mixed alcohol synthesis, and some product upgrading via hydroprocessing or separation. A detailed techno-economic analysis of this type of process has recently been published [1] and it highlights the need for technical breakthroughs and technology demonstration for gas cleanup and fuel synthesis. The latter two technical barrier areas contribute 40% of the total thermochemical ethanol cost and 70% of the production cost, if feedstock costs are factored out. Developing and validating technologies that reduce the capital and operating costs of these unit operations will greatly reduce the risk for commercializing integrated biomass gasification/fuel synthesis processes for biofuel production. The objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate new catalysts and catalytic processes that can efficiently convert biomass-derived syngas into diesel fuel and C2-C4 alcohols. The goal is to improve the economics of the processes by improving the catalytic activity and product selectivity, which could lead to commercialization. The project was divided into 4 tasks: Task 1: Reactor Systems: Construction of three reactor systems was a project milestone. Construction of a fixed-bed microreactor (FBR), a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR), and a slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR) were completed to meet this milestone. Task 2: Iron Fischer-Tropsch (FT) Catalyst: An attrition resistant iron FT catalyst will be developed and tested. Task 3: Chemical Synthesis: Promising process routes will be identified for synthesis of selected chemicals from biomass-derived syngas. A project milestone was to select promising mixed alcohol catalysts and screen productivity and performance in a fixed bed micro-reactor using bottled syngas. This milestone was successfully completed in collaboration withour catalyst development partner. Task 4: Modeling, Engineering Evaluation, and Commercial Assessment: Mass and energy balances of conceptual commercial embodiment for FT and chemical synthesis were completed.

David C. Dayton

2010-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

69

New Contract Helps Portsmouth GDP Cleanup  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

To accelerate the Portsmouth GDP cleanup efforts left over from the Cold War, the Department of Energy made a huge step forward in our nuclear environmental cleanup efforts.

70

Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology Pathway  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of Energy Strain Rate4SuperhardSuspectEngines | Department ofSyngas

71

Superfund Cleanups and Infant Health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We are the first to examine the effect of Superfund cleanups on infant health rather than focusing on proximity to a site. We study singleton births to mothers residing within 5km of a Superfund site between 1989 and 2003 ...

Currie, Janet

2011-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

72

Environmental Management (EM) Cleanup Projects  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The guide supports DOE O 413.3A, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, and provides guidance on environmental management cleanup projects. Canceled by DOE N 251.105.

2008-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

73

Cleanup Sites | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehiclesTankless orAChief Medical Officerof EnergyCleanup Sites Cleanup

74

Accelerating cleanup: Paths to closure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the status of Environmental Management`s (EM`s) cleanup program and a direction forward to complete achievement of the 2006 vision. Achieving the 2006 vision results in significant benefits related to accomplishing EM program objectives. As DOE sites accelerate cleanup activities, risks to public health, the environment, and worker safety and health are all reduced. Finding more efficient ways to conduct work can result in making compliance with applicable environmental requirements easier to achieve. Finally, as cleanup activities at sites are completed, the EM program can focus attention and resources on the small number of sites with more complex cleanup challenges. Chapter 1 describes the process by which this report has been developed and what it hopes to accomplish, its relationship to the EM decision-making process, and a general background of the EM mission and program. Chapter 2 describes how the site-by-site projections were constructed, and summarizes, for each of DOE`s 11 Operations/Field Offices, the projected costs and schedules for completing the cleanup mission. Chapter 3 presents summaries of the detailed cleanup projections from three of the 11 Operations/Field Offices: Rocky Flats (Colorado), Richland (Washington), and Savannah River (South Carolina). The remaining eight Operations/Field Office summaries are in Appendix E. Chapter 4 reviews the cost drivers, budgetary constraints, and performance enhancements underlying the detailed analysis of the 353 projects that comprise EM`s accelerated cleanup and closure effort. Chapter 5 describes a management system to support the EM program. Chapter 6 provides responses to the general comments received on the February draft of this document.

NONE

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Methods and systems for producing syngas  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and systems are provided for producing syngas utilizing heat from thermochemical conversion of a carbonaceous fuel to support decomposition of at least one of water and carbon dioxide using one or more solid-oxide electrolysis cells. Simultaneous decomposition of carbon dioxide and water or steam by one or more solid-oxide electrolysis cells may be employed to produce hydrogen and carbon monoxide. A portion of oxygen produced from at least one of water and carbon dioxide using one or more solid-oxide electrolysis cells is fed at a controlled flow rate in a gasifier or combustor to oxidize the carbonaceous fuel to control the carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide ratio produced.

Hawkes, Grant L; O'Brien, James E; Stoots, Carl M; Herring, J. Stephen; McKellar, Michael G; Wood, Richard A; Carrington, Robert A; Boardman, Richard D

2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

76

Particulate hot gas stream cleanup technical issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The analyses of hot gas stream cleanup particulate samples and descriptions of filter performance studied under this contract were designed to address problems with filter operation that have been linked to characteristics of the collected particulate matter. One objective of this work was to generate an interactive, computerized data bank of the key physical and chemical characteristics of ash and char collected from operating advanced particle filters and to relate these characteristics to the operation and performance of these filters. The interactive data bank summarizes analyses of over 160 ash and char samples from fifteen pressurized fluidized-bed combustion and gasification facilities utilizing high-temperature, high pressure barrier filters.

Pontius, D.H.; Snyder, T.R.

1999-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

77

Synthesis of Methanol and Dimethyl Ether from Syngas over Pd...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of the catalysts has been established. Hence, two types of sites are required for the direct conversion of syngas to DME: 1) PdZn particles are active for the synthesis of...

78

Soil and Groundwater Cleanup - In-Situ Grouting, Lessons Learned...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Soil and Groundwater Cleanup - In-Situ Grouting, Lessons Learned (Post CD-4), Environmental Management Cleanup, May 2011 Soil and Groundwater Cleanup - In-Situ Grouting, Lessons...

79

Removal of H{sub 2}S using molten carbonate at high temperature  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: • The performance of molten carbonate for the removal of H{sub 2}S improves at higher temperatures. • The degree of H{sub 2}S removal is significantly affected by the CO{sub 2} concentration in syngas. • Addition of carbon elements, such as char and tar, decrease the negative effects of CO{sub 2}. • Continuous addition of carbon elements into molten carbonate enables continuous desulfurization. • Desulfurization using molten carbonate is suitable for gasification gas. - Abstract: Gasification is considered to be an effective process for energy conversion from various sources such as coal, biomass, and waste. Cleanup of the hot syngas produced by such a process may improve the thermal efficiency of the overall gasification system. Therefore, the cleanup of hot syngas from biomass gasification using molten carbonate is investigated in bench-scale tests. Molten carbonate acts as an absorbent during desulfurization and dechlorination and as a thermal catalyst for tar cracking. In this study, the performance of molten carbonate for removing H{sub 2}S was evaluated. The temperature of the molten carbonate was set within the range from 800 to 1000 °C. It is found that the removal of H{sub 2}S is significantly affected by the concentration of CO{sub 2} in the syngas. When only a small percentage of CO{sub 2} is present, desulfurization using molten carbonate is inadequate. However, when carbon elements, such as char and tar, are continuously supplied, H{sub 2}S removal can be maintained at a high level. To confirm the performance of the molten carbonate gas-cleaning system, purified biogas was used as a fuel in power generation tests with a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC). The fuel cell is a high-performance sensor for detecting gaseous impurities. When purified gas from a gas-cleaning reactor was continuously supplied to the fuel cell, the cell voltage remained stable. Thus, the molten carbonate gas-cleaning reactor was found to afford good gas-cleaning performance.

Kawase, Makoto, E-mail: kawase@criepi.denken.or.jp; Otaka, Maromu

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

80

DOE outlines complex cleanup options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Energy Department said last week it will consider four different strategies for cleanup of its nuclear weapons complex in a draft programmatic environmental impact statement due for release this summer. In an implementation plan released for public comment February 17, DOE also said the EIS would look at centralized, decentralized and regional approaches to management of six types of radioactive and hazardous wastes. Other issues to be addressed in the EIS are development of innovative cleanup technology, budgeting and prioritization, job cutbacks and worker retraining, waste minimization and community involvement in cleanup decisions. However, DOE said it had decided not to address spent nuclear fuel storage in the EIS, as had been previously planned. Instead, spent fuel storage options will be reviewed in another environmental study being done under court order for DOE's Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Findings from the INEL study will be incorporated in the department-wide EIS for environmental restoration and waste management.

Lobsenz, G.

1994-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature syngas cleanup" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

ISOBUTANOL FROM SYNGAS IN A THREE PHASE SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With growing interest in oxygenates as octane booster for automotive fuels, various synthesis routes for these chemicals are being investigated. Among others, alternative routes to isobutene, the C4-components in MTBE-synthesis are under investigation. A promising path to isobutene is the heterogeneously catalyzed CO-hydrogenation to isobutanol with following dehydration (Fig. 1). As shown by thermodynamical studies, the heterogeneously catalyzed CO-hydrogenation to isobutanol is not expected to experience any thermodynamic constraints. However, heterogeneous hydrogenation of CO is a very exothermic process, a problem which can only be partly solved when being conducted in a plug flow reactor. When carried out in reaction vessels with moving catalyst bed (e.g. three phase stirred tank), heat transfer problems can be resolved, along with additional benefits connected with this reactor type. Several heterogeneous catalytic systems have been under investigation for their capability of isobutanol synthesis from syngas. Most promising catalysts for an active and selective isobutanol synthesis from CO are modified high temperature methanol catalysts.

Peter Tijrn

2002-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

82

Richland Operations Office Cleanup Strategy, Scope  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Cleanup Work * Deactivate and Demolish facilities * Move buried waste, contaminated soil away from Columbia River * Treat contaminated groundwater * Isolate contamination...

83

Superfund Cleanups and Infant Health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We are the first to examine the effect of Superfund cleanups on infant health rather than focusing on proximity to a site. We study singleton births to mothers residing within 5km of a Superfund site between 1989-2003 in ...

Currie, Janet

84

Airfoil Heat Transfer Characteristics in Syngas and Hydrogen Turbines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrogen or coal-derivative syngas turbines promise increased efficiency with exceptionally low NOx emissions compared to the natural gas based turbines. To reach this goal, turbine inlet temperature (TIT) will need to be elevated to a level exceeding 1700°C [1, 2]. The thermal load induced by such a temperature increase alone will lead to immense challenges in maintaining material integrity of turbine components. In addition, as working fluid in the gas path will primarily be steam, possibly mixed with carbon oxides, the aero-thermal characteristic in a hydrogen turbine is expected to be far different from that of air/nitrogen enriched gas stream in a gas turbine. For instance, steam has distinctly higher density and specific heat in comparison to a mixture of air and combustion gases as they are expanded in a conventional gas turbine. Even if the temperature limits remain about the same, the expansion in a hydrogen turbine will have to proceed with a greater enthalpy drop and therefore requires a larger number of stages. This also implies that the flow areas may need to be expanded and blade span to be enlarged. Meanwhile, a greater number of stages and hot surfaces need to be protected. This also suggests that current cooling technology available for modern day gas turbines has to be significantly improved. The ultimate goal of the present study is to systematically investigate critical issues concerning cooling technology as it is applicable to oxy-fuel and hydrogen turbine systems, and the main scope is to develop viable means to estimate the thermal load on the turbine “gas side”, that is eventually to be removed from the “coolant side”, and to comparatively quantify the implication of external heat load and potential thermal barrier coating (TBC) degradation on the component durability and lifing. The analysis is based on two well-tested commercial codes, FLUENT and ANSYS.

Mazzotta, D.W. (Univ. of Pittsburgh); Chyu, M.K. (Univ. of Pittsburgh); Alvin, M.A.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

The Role of Ir in Ternary Rh-Based Catalysts for Syngas Conversion...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ir in Ternary Rh-Based Catalysts for Syngas Conversion to C2+ Oxygenates. The Role of Ir in Ternary Rh-Based Catalysts for Syngas Conversion to C2+ Oxygenates. Abstract: Transition...

86

MODELING AND ANALYSIS OF CHEMILUMINESCENCE SENSING FOR SYNGAS, METHANE AND JET-A COMBUSTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODELING AND ANALYSIS OF CHEMILUMINESCENCE SENSING FOR SYNGAS, METHANE AND JET-A COMBUSTION of Technology August 2008 #12;MODELING AND ANALYSIS OF CHEMILUMINESCENCE SENSING FOR SYNGAS, METHANE AND JET

Seitzman, Jerry M.

87

Syngas Conversion to Gasoline-Range Hydrocarbons over Pd/ZnO...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Syngas Conversion to Gasoline-Range Hydrocarbons over PdZnOAl2O3 and ZSM-5 Composite Catalyst System. Syngas Conversion to Gasoline-Range Hydrocarbons over PdZnOAl2O3 and ZSM-5...

88

Production of methane-rich syngas from hydrocarbon fuels using multi-functional catalyst/capture agent  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The disclosure provides a gasification process for the production of a methane-rich syngas at temperatures exceeding 700.degree. C. through the use of an alkali hydroxide MOH, using a gasification mixture comprised of at least 0.25 moles and less than 2 moles of water for each mole of carbon, and at least 0.15 moles and less than 2 moles of alkali hydroxide MOH for each mole of carbon. These relative amounts allow the production of a methane-rich syngas at temperatures exceeding 700.degree. C. by enabling a series of reactions which generate H.sub.2 and CH.sub.4, and mitigate the reforming of methane. The process provides a methane-rich syngas comprised of roughly 20% (dry molar percentage) CH.sub.4 at temperatures above 700.degree. C., and may effectively operate within an IGFC cycle at reactor temperatures between 700-900.degree. C. and pressures in excess of 10 atmospheres.

Siefert, Nicholas S; Shekhawat, Dushyant; Berry, David A; Surdoval, Wayne A

2014-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

89

A numerical and experimental study of counterflow syngas flames at different pressures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A numerical and experimental study of counterflow syngas flames at different pressures S. Som, A Synthesis gas or ``Syngas'' is being recognized as a viable energy source worldwide, particularly. There are, however, gaps in the fundamental understanding of syngas combustion and emissions characteristics

Aggarwal, Suresh K.

90

Bayesian methods for the quantification of uncertainties in syngas chemistry models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bayesian methods for the quantification of uncertainties in syngas chemistry models Kalen Braman, Todd Oliver and Venkat Raman, The University of Texas, Austin, Texas, 78712 Syngas chemistry modeling is an integral step toward the development of safe and ef- ficient syngas combustors. Although substantial effort

Raman, Venkat

91

Method for regeneration and activity improvement of syngas conversion catalyst  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is disclosed for the treatment of single particle iron-containing syngas (synthes.s gas) conversion catalysts comprising iron, a crystalline acidic aluminosilicate zeolite having a silica to alumina ratio of at least 12, a pore size greater than about 5 Angstrom units and a constraint index of about 1-12 and a matrix. The catalyst does not contain promoters and the treatment is applicable to either the regeneration of said spent single particle iron-containing catalyst or for the initial activation of fresh catalyst. The treatment involves air oxidation, hydrogen reduction, followed by a second air oxidation and contact of the iron-containing single particle catalyst with syngas prior to its use for the catalytic conversion of said syngas. The single particle iron-containing catalysts are prepared from a water insoluble organic iron compound.

Lucki, Stanley J. (Runnemede, NJ); Brennan, James A. (Cherry Hill, NJ)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Zero Emissions Coal Syngas Oxygen Turbo Machinery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Siemens Energy, Inc. (formerly Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation) worked with Clean Energy Systems and Florida Turbine Technologies to demonstrate the commercial feasibility of advanced turbines for oxy-fuel based power systems that discharge negligible CO{sub 2} into the atmosphere. The approach builds upon ultra supercritical steam turbine and advanced gas turbine technology with the goal of attaining plant efficiencies above 50% in the 2015 timeframe. Conceptual designs were developed for baseline, near term, and long term oxy-fuel turbine cycles, representing commercial introductions of increasingly advanced thermal conditions and increasing exposure to steam-CO{sub 2} mixtures. An economic analysis and market demand study was performed by Science Applications International Corp. (SAIC), and indicated that long-term oxy-fuel turbine cycles start to look attractive in 2025 when the CO{sub 2} tax is assumed to reach $40/ ton, and by 2030 it has a clear advantage over both IGCC with sequestration and pulverized coal with sequestration. A separate risk analysis of the oxy-fuel combustor, HP turbine, re-heater, and IP turbine of the long-term cycle identified and categorized risks and proposed mitigation measures. In 2007 the program began to focus on a potential oxy-fuel turbine power generation demonstration project in the 2012 -13 time period while still maintaining a link to the requirements of the long-term oxy-syngas cycle. The SGT-900 turbine was identified as the best fit for modification into an intermediate pressure turbine (IPT) for this application. The base metals, bond coats, thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), and rotor materials used in the SGT-900 were tested for their ability to operate in the steam- CO{sub 2} environment of the oxy-fuel OFT-900. Test results indicated that these same materials would operate satisfactorily, and the plan, is to use SGT-900materials for the OFT-900. Follow-on programs for corrosion testing and evaluation of crack growth rates in oxy-fuel environments have been proposed to build on these results and provide quantifiable assessments of the effects of oxy-fuel environments on the service lives of turbine components.

Dennis Horazak

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

93

HANFORD SITE CENTRAL PLATEAU CLEANUP COMPLETION STRATEGY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cleanup of the Hanford Site is a complex and challenging undertaking. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a comprehensive vision for completing Hanford's cleanup mission including transition to post-cleanup activities. This vision includes 3 principle components of cleanup: the {approx}200 square miles ofland adjacent to the Columbia River, known as the River Corridor; the 75 square miles of land in the center of the Hanford Site, where the majority of the reprocessing and waste management activities have occurred, known as the Central Plateau; and the stored reprocessing wastes in the Central Plateau, the Tank Wastes. Cleanup of the River Corridor is well underway and is progressing towards completion of most cleanup actions by 2015. Tank waste cleanup is progressing on a longer schedule due to the complexity of the mission, with construction of the largest nuclear construction project in the United States, the Waste Treatment Plant, over 50% complete. With the progress on the River Corridor and Tank Waste, it is time to place increased emphasis on moving forward with cleanup of the Central Plateau. Cleanup of the Hanford Site has been proceeding under a framework defmed in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement). In early 2009, the DOE, the State of Washington Department of Ecology, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency signed an Agreement in Principle in which the parties recognized the need to develop a more comprehensive strategy for cleanup of the Central Plateau. DOE agreed to develop a Central Plateau Cleanup Completion Strategy as a starting point for discussions. This DOE Strategy was the basis for negotiations between the Parties, discussions with the State of Oregon, the Hanford Advisory Board, and other Stakeholder groups (including open public meetings), and consultation with the Tribal Nations. The change packages to incorporate the Central Plateau Cleanup Completion Strategy were signed by the Parties on October 26,2010, and are now in the process of being implemented.

BERGMAN TB

2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

94

German engineers study UMTRA cleanup programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two environmental engineers from Germany's WISMUT, the organization responsible for uranium tailings cleanup in that country, recently completed extensive training as part of a technology transfer program at the US DOE. For six weeks the two engineers studied the practices employed in the cleanup of the DOE's UMTRA (Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action) sites, hoping to gain insight into how Germany's own cleanup program should proceed.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

NOVEL SLURRY PHASE DIESEL CATALYSTS FOR COAL-DERIVED SYNGAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes research conducted to support the DOE program in novel slurry phase catalysts for converting coal-derived synthesis gas to diesel fuels. The primary objective of this research program is to develop attrition resistant catalysts that exhibit high activities for conversion of coal-derived syngas.

Dr. Dragomir B. Bukur; Dr. Ketil Hanssen; Alec Klinghoffer; Dr. Lech Nowicki; Patricia O'Dowd; Dr. Hien Pham; Jian Xu

2001-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

96

The Morgantown Energy Technology Center`s particulate cleanup program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) power systems has made it possible to use coal while still protecting the environment. Such power systems significantly reduce the pollutants associated with coal-fired plants built before the 1970s. This superior environmental performance and related high system efficiency is possible, in part, because particulate gas-stream cleanup is conducted at high-temperature and high-pressure process conditions. A main objective of the Particulate Cleanup Program at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) is to ensure the success of the CCT demonstration projects. METC`s Particulate Cleanup Program supports research, development, and demonstration in three areas: (1) filter-system development, (2) barrier-filter component development, and (3) ash and char characterization. The support is through contracted research, cooperative agreements, Cooperative Research And Development Agreements (CRADAs), and METC`s own in-house research. This paper describes METC`s Particulate Cleanup Program.

Dennis, R.A.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Lab completes record year for environmental cleanup  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Buckman Direct Diversion Board to monitor, sample, and protect the community's future water supply. Cleanup of legacy waste at Los Alamos is a partnership between the Department...

98

Independent Oversight Assessment, Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Bearing Waste Treatment Project - November 2012 November 2012 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project This...

99

Site Cleanup | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of Energyof the Americas |DOE FormerEnergy Data Access SilverSiouxCleanup

100

High temperature ceramic membrane for CO? reuse and syngas production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In recent years, membrane based technologies have attracted much attention thanks to their simplicity in reactor design. The concept proposed is to use mixed ionic-electronic conducting membrane (MIEC) in CO2 reuse and ...

Chang, Le, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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101

Syngas Enhanced High Efficiency Low Temperature Combustion for Clean Diesel  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of Energy Strain Rate4SuperhardSuspectEngines | Department of Energy

102

Development of EPA radiation site cleanup regulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the EPA program to develop radiation site cleanup and identifies many of the issues related to that effort. The material is drawn from portions of the Agency`s Issues Paper on Radiation Site Cleanup Regulations (EPA 402-R-93-084). The site cleanup regulations will be designed to protect human health and the environment and to facilitate the cleanup of sites. EPA believes that developing specific cleanup standards for radionuclides will ensure consistent, protective, and cost-effective site remediation. They will apply to all Federal facilities such as those operated by the US Department of Energy (DOE), the US Department of Defense (DoD), and sites licensed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and its Agreement States.

Burnett, J.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

103

Exemplary Hurricane Damage Cleanup Earns Petroleum Reserve Coveted...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exemplary Hurricane Damage Cleanup Earns Petroleum Reserve Coveted Environmental Award Exemplary Hurricane Damage Cleanup Earns Petroleum Reserve Coveted Environmental Award April...

104

HANFORD SITE RIVER CORRIDOR CLEANUP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2005, the US Department of Energy (DOE) launched the third generation of closure contracts, including the River Corridor Closure (RCC) Contract at Hanford. Over the past decade, significant progress has been made on cleaning up the river shore that bordes Hanford. However, the most important cleanup challenges lie ahead. In March 2005, DOE awarded the Hanford River Corridor Closure Contract to Washington Closure Hanford (WCH), a limited liability company owned by Washington Group International, Bechtel National and CH2M HILL. It is a single-purpose company whose goal is to safely and efficiently accelerate cleanup in the 544 km{sup 2} Hanford river corridor and reduce or eliminate future obligations to DOE for maintaining long-term stewardship over the site. The RCC Contract is a cost-plus-incentive-fee closure contract, which incentivizes the contractor to reduce cost and accelerate the schedule. At $1.9 billion and seven years, WCH has accelerated cleaning up Hanford's river corridor significantly compared to the $3.2 billion and 10 years originally estimated by the US Army Corps of Engineers. Predictable funding is one of the key features of the new contract, with funding set by contract at $183 million in fiscal year (FY) 2006 and peaking at $387 million in FY2012. Another feature of the contract allows for Washington Closure to perform up to 40% of the value of the contract and subcontract the balance. One of the major challenges in the next few years will be to identify and qualify sufficient subcontractors to meet the goal.

BAZZELL, K.D.

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Coprocessing of Highvale coal with Athabasca bitumen in syngas mixtures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coprocessing of Alberta subbituminous coal with bitumen is currently under investigation at the Alberta Research Council. The high oxygen content of the coal results in high hydrogen consumption. The present study compares the effectiveness of syngas/water mixtures catalyzed by potassium carbonate for coprocessing Highvale coal with Athabasca bitumen. Single-stage (solubilization) experiments were performed with syngas (5.1 MPa) at 390/sup 0/C in a stirred autoclave. In simulated two-stage experiments, the second (upgrading) stage employed hydrogen (8.5 MPa) at 440/sup 0/C with a potassium molybdate/dimethyl disulphide catalyst. Coal conversion improved from 47 to 78% systematically when the carbon monoxide: hydrogen ratio was varied from 1:3 to 7:1. The additional yield was confined to pyridine extractable material. In simulated two-stage experiments similar coal conversions were observed when using carbon monoxide/water (91%) or hydrogen (88%) in the first stage.

Parker, R.J.; Clark, P.D.; Ignasiak, B.L.; Lee, T.; Ohuchi, T.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Novel polymer membrane process for pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture from coal-fired syngas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final report describes work conducted for the Department of Energy (DOE NETL) on development of a novel polymer membrane process for pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture from coalfired syngas (award number DE-FE0001124). The work was conducted by Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) from September 15, 2009, through December 14, 2011. Tetramer Technologies, LLC (Tetramer) was our subcontract partner on this project. The National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) at Wilsonville, AL, provided access to syngas gasifier test facilities. The main objective of this project was to develop a cost-effective membrane process that could be used in the relatively near-term to capture CO{sub 2} from shifted syngas generated by a coal-fired Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant. In this project, novel polymeric membranes (designated as Proteus™ membranes) with separation properties superior to conventional polymeric membranes were developed. Hydrogen permeance of up to 800 gpu and H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity of >12 was achieved using a simulated syngas mixture at 150°C and 50 psig, which exceeds the original project targets of 200 gpu for hydrogen permeance and 10 for H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity. Lab-scale Proteus membrane modules (with a membrane area of 0.13 m{sup 2}) were also developed using scaled-up Proteus membranes and high temperature stable module components identified during this project. A mixed-gas hydrogen permeance of about 160 gpu and H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity of >12 was achieved using a simulated syngas mixture at 150°C and 100 psig. We believe that a significant improvement in the membrane and module performance is likely with additional development work. Both Proteus membranes and lab-scale Proteus membrane modules were further evaluated using coal-derived syngas streams at the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC). The results indicate that all module components, including the Proteus membrane, were stable under the field conditions (feed pressures: 150-175 psig and feed temperatures: 120-135°C) for over 600 hours. The field performance of both Proteus membrane stamps and Proteus membrane modules is consistent with the results obtained in the lab, suggesting that the presence of sulfur-containing compounds (up to 780 ppm hydrogen sulfide), saturated water vapor, carbon monoxide and heavy hydrocarbons in the syngas feed stream has no adverse effect on the Proteus membrane or module performance. We also performed an economic analysis for a number of membrane process designs developed in this project (using hydrogen-selective membranes, alone or in the combination with CO{sub 2}- selective membranes). The current field performance for Proteus membranes was used in the design analysis. The study showed the current best design has the potential to reduce the increase in Levelized Cost of Electricity (LCOE) caused by 90% CO{sub 2} capture to about 15% if co-sequestration of H{sub 2}S is viable. This value is still higher than the DOE target for increase in LCOE (10%); however, compared to the base-case Selexol process that gives a 30% increase in LCOE at 90% CO2 capture, the membrane-based process appears promising. We believe future improvements in membrane performance have the potential to reach the DOE target.

Merkel, Tim [MTR Inc., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

2011-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

107

System and process for the production of syngas and fuel gasses  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The production of gasses and, more particularly, to systems and methods for the production of syngas and fuel gasses including the production of hydrogen are set forth. In one embodiment system and method includes a reactor having a molten pool of a material comprising sodium carbonate. A supply of conditioned water is in communication with the reactor. A supply of carbon containing material is also in communication with the reactor. In one particular embodiment, the carbon containing material may include vacuum residuum (VR). The water and VR may be kept at desired temperatures and pressures compatible with the process that is to take place in the reactor. When introduced into the reactor, the water, the VR and the molten pool may be homogenously mixed in an environment in which chemical reactions take place including the production of hydrogen and other gasses.

Bingham, Dennis N; Kllingler, Kerry M; Turner, Terry D; Wilding, Bruce M; Benefiel, Bradley C

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Bench- and Pilot-Scale Studies of Reaction and Regeneration of Ni-Mg-K/Al2O3 for Catalytic Conditioning of Biomass-Derived Syngas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is collaborating with both industrial and academic partners to develop technologies to help enable commercialization of biofuels produced from lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks. The focus of this paper is to report how various operating processes, utilized in-house and by collaborators, influence the catalytic activity during conditioning of biomass-derived syngas. Efficient cleaning and conditioning of biomass-derived syngas for use in fuel synthesis continues to be a significant technical barrier to commercialization. Multifunctional, fluidizable catalysts are being developed to reform undesired tars and light hydrocarbons, especially methane, to additional syngas, which can improve utilization of biomass carbon. This approach also eliminates both the need for downstream methane reforming and the production of an aqueous waste stream from tar scrubbing. This work was conducted with NiMgK/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts. These catalysts were assessed for methane reforming performance in (i) fixed-bed, bench-scale tests with model syngas simulating that produced by oak gasification, and in pilot-scale, (ii) fluidized tests with actual oak-derived syngas, and (iii) recirculating/regenerating tests using model syngas. Bench-scale tests showed that the catalyst could be completely regenerated over several reforming reaction cycles. Pilot-scale tests using raw syngas showed that the catalyst lost activity from cycle to cycle when it was regenerated, though it was shown that bench-scale regeneration by steam oxidation and H{sub 2} reduction did not cause this deactivation. Characterization by TPR indicates that the loss of a low temperature nickel oxide reduction feature is related to the catalyst deactivation, which is ascribed to nickel being incorporated into a spinel nickel aluminate that is not reduced with the given activation protocol. Results for 100 h time-on-stream using a recirculating/regenerating reactor suggest that this type of process could be employed to keep a high level of steady-state reforming activity, without permanent deactivation of the catalyst. Additionally, the differences in catalyst performance using a simulated and real, biomass-derived syngas stream indicate that there are components present in the real stream that are not adequately modeled in the syngas stream. Heavy tars and polycyclic aromatics are known to be present in real syngas, and the use of benzene and naphthalene as surrogates may be insufficient. In addition, some inorganics found in biomass, which become concentrated in the ash following biomass gasification, may be transported to the reforming reactor where they can interact with catalysts. Therefore, in order to gain more representative results for how a catalyst would perform on an industrially-relevant scale, with real contaminants, appropriate small-scale biomass solids feeders or slip-streams of real process gas should be employed.

Magrini-Bair, K. A.; Jablonski, W. S.; Parent, Y. O.; Yung, M. M.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Syngas Segregation Induced by Confinement in Carbon Nanotubes: A Combined First-Principles and Monte Carlo Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Syngas Segregation Induced by Confinement in Carbon Nanotubes: A Combined First of the concave and convex surfaces of CNTs formed by graphene layers. As a result, syngas molecules are enriched of CO/H2 inside CNTs increases with respect to the composition of syngas in the exterior gas phase

Bao, Xinhe

110

ITM Syngas and ITM H2: Engineering Development of Ceramic Membrane Reactor Systems for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(U.S. DOE) and other members of the ITM Syngas/ITM H2 Team, is developing Ion Transport Membrane (ITM of the ITM membrane to oxygen ions, which diffuse through the membrane under a chemical potential gradientITM Syngas and ITM H2: Engineering Development of Ceramic Membrane Reactor Systems for Converting

111

NOx emission characteristics of counterflow syngas diffusion flames with airstream dilution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract Syngas is produced through a gasification process using variety of fossil fuels, including coal, biomass, organic waste, and refinery residual. Although, its composition may vary significantly emissions; Effect of diluents 1. Introduction Syngas or synthetic gas is formed through the gasification

Aggarwal, Suresh K.

112

Liquid Fuel Production from Biomass via High Temperature Steam Electrolysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process model of syngas production using high temperature electrolysis and biomass gasification is presented. Process heat from the biomass gasifier is used to heat steam for the hydrogen production via the high temperature steam electrolysis process. Hydrogen from electrolysis allows a high utilization of the biomass carbon for syngas production. Oxygen produced form the electrolysis process is used to control the oxidation rate in the oxygen-fed biomass gasifier. Based on the gasifier temperature, 94% to 95% of the carbon in the biomass becomes carbon monoxide in the syngas (carbon monoxide and hydrogen). Assuming the thermal efficiency of the power cycle for electricity generation is 50%, (as expected from GEN IV nuclear reactors), the syngas production efficiency ranges from 70% to 73% as the gasifier temperature decreases from 1900 K to 1500 K. Parametric studies of system pressure, biomass moisture content and low temperature alkaline electrolysis are also presented.

Grant L. Hawkes; Michael G. McKellar

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Determination of the Effect of Coal/Biomass-Derived Syngas Contaminants on the Performance of Fischer-Tropsch and Water-Gas-Shift Catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Today, nearly all liquid fuels and commodity chemicals are produced from non-renewable resources such as crude oil and natural gas. Because of increasing scrutiny of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions produced using traditional fossil-fuel resources, the utilization of alternative feedstocks for the production of power, hydrogen, value-added chemicals, and high-quality hydrocarbon fuels such as diesel and substitute natural gas (SNG) is critical to meeting the rapidly growing energy needs of modern society. Coal and biomass are particularly attractive as alternative feedstocks because of the abundant reserves of these resources worldwide. The strategy of co-gasification of coal/biomass (CB) mixtures to produce syngas for synthesis of Fischer-Tropsch (FT) fuels offers distinct advantages over gasification of either coal or biomass alone. Co-feeding coal with biomass offers the opportunity to exploit economies of scale that are difficult to achieve in biomass gasification, while the addition of biomass to the coal gasifier feed leverages proven coal gasification technology and allows CO{sub 2} credit benefits. Syngas generated from CB mixtures will have a unique contaminant composition because coal and biomass possess different concentrations and types of contaminants, and the final syngas composition is also strongly influenced by the gasification technology used. Syngas cleanup for gasification of CB mixtures will need to address this unique contaminant composition to support downstream processing and equipment. To investigate the impact of CB gasification on the production of transportation fuels by FT synthesis, RTI International conducted thermodynamic studies to identify trace contaminants that will react with water-gas-shift and FT catalysts and built several automated microreactor systems to investigate the effect of single components and the synergistic effects of multiple contaminants on water-gas-shift and FT catalyst performance. The contaminants investigated were sodium chloride (NaCl), potassium chloride (KCl), hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), carbonyl sulfide (COS), ammonia (NH{sub 3}), and combinations thereof. This report details the thermodynamic studies and the individual and multi-contaminant results from this testing program.

Trembly, Jason; Cooper, Matthew; Farmer, Justin; Turk, Brian; Gupta, Raghubir

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

114

Gasification of refinery sludge in an updraft reactor for syngas production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study probes into the investigation on gasification of dry refinery sludge. The details of the study includes; influence of operation time, oxidation temperature and equivalence ratios on carbon gas conversion rate, gasification efficiency, heating value and fuel gas yield are presented. The results show that, the oxidation temperature increased sharply up to 858°C as the operating time increased up to 36 min then bridging occurred at 39 min which cause drop in reaction temperature up to 819 °C. This bridging was found to affect also the syngas compositions, meanwhile as the temperature decreased the CO, H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} compositions are also found to be decreases. Higher temperature catalyzed the reduction reaction (CO{sub 2}+C?=?450?2CO), and accelerated the carbon conversion and gasification efficiencies, resulted in more solid fuel is converted to a high heating value gas fuel. The equivalence ratio of 0.195 was found to be the optimum value for carbon conversion and cold gas efficiencies, high heating value of gas, and fuel gas yield to reach their maximum values of 96.1 % and 53.7 %, 5.42 MJ Nm{sup ?3} of, and 2.5 Nm{sup 3} kg{sup ?1} respectively.

Ahmed, Reem; Eldmerdash, Usama [Department of Chemical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia); Sinnathambi, Chandra M., E-mail: chandro@petronas.com.my [Fundamental and Applied Sciences Department, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia)

2014-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

115

Money crunch looms for Federal cleanup effort  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In an unprecedented acknowledgement that federal facility cleanup activities face a money crunch, a federal-state advisory panel is preparing a new strategy to avert enforcement showdowns when funding cuts prevent federal agencies from meeting legally required cleanup schedules set by states. In a draft report the panel said states must recognize that some cleanup [open quotes]milestones[close quotes] will have to be delayed due to budget pressures - a concession that will be politically difficult in some states. At the same time, the panel said federal agencies must be more forthcoming in working with states and local groups to determine how increasingly scarce resources will be distributed. As a general rule, the report recommended that federal agencies and state environmental officials agree on a [open quotes]fair share[close quotes] allocation method under which the pain of a budget cutback would be spread equally among all cleanup sites within an affected federal agency. That fair share approach would be altered only if the federal agency reached agreement with states that a funding cutback could be absorbed at selected sites without affecting any cleanup milestone.

Lobsenz, G.

1992-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

116

Sorption-Enhanced Synthetic Natural Gas (SNG) Production from Syngas: A Novel Process Combining CO Methanation, Water-Gas Shift, and CO2 Capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Synthetic natural gas (SNG) production from syngas is under investigation again due to the desire for less dependency from imports and the opportunity for increasing coal utilization and reducing green house gas emission. CO methanation is highly exothermic and substantial heat is liberated which can lead to process thermal imbalance and deactivation of the catalyst. As a result, conversion per pass is limited and substantial syngas recycle is employed in conventional processes. Furthermore, the conversion of syngas to SNG is typically performed at moderate temperatures (275 to 325°C) to ensure high CH4 yields since this reaction is thermodynamically limited. In this study, the effectiveness of a novel integrated process for the SNG production from syngas at high temperature (i.e. 600?C) was investigated. This integrated process consists of combining a CO methanation nickel-based catalyst with a high temperature CO2 capture sorbent in a single reactor. Integration with CO2 separation eliminates the reverse-water-gas shift and the requirement for a separate water-gas shift (WGS) unit. Easing of thermodynamic constraint offers the opportunity of enhancing yield to CH4 at higher operating temperature (500-700şC) which also favors methanation kinetics and improves the overall process efficiency due to exploitation of reaction heat at higher temperatures. Furthermore, simultaneous CO2 capture eliminates green house gas emission. In this work, sorption-enhanced CO methanation was demonstrated using a mixture of a 68% CaO/32% MgAl2O4 sorbent and a CO methanation catalyst (Ni/Al2O3, Ni/MgAl2O4, or Ni/SiC) utilizing a syngas ratio (H2/CO) of 1, gas-hour-space velocity (GHSV) of 22 000 hr-1, pressure of 1 bar and a temperature of 600oC. These conditions resulted in ~90% yield to methane, which was maintained until the sorbent became saturated with CO2. By contrast, without the use of sorbent, equilibrium yield to methane is only 22%. Cyclic stability of the methanation catalyst and durability of the sorbent were also studied in the multiple carbonation-decarbonation cycle studies proving the potential of this integrated process in a practical application.

Lebarbier, Vanessa MC; Dagle, Robert A.; Kovarik, Libor; Albrecht, Karl O.; Li, Xiaohong S.; Li, Liyu; Taylor, Charles E.; Bao, Xinhe; Wang, Yong

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Micro-Mixing Lean-Premix System for Ultra-Low Emission Hydrogen/Syngas Combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The focus of this project was to develop the next generation of fuel injection technologies for environmentally friendly, hydrogen syngas combustion in gas turbine engines that satisfy DOE's objectives of reducing NOx emissions to 3 ppm. Building on Parker Hannifin's proven Macrolamination technology for liquid fuels, Parker developed a scalable high-performing multi-point injector that utilizes multiple, small mixing cups in place of a single conventional large-scale premixer. Due to the small size, fuel and air mix rapidly within the cups, providing a well-premixed fuel-air mixture at the cup exit in a short time. Detailed studies and experimentation with single-cup micro-mixing injectors were conducted to elucidate the effects of various injector design attributes and operating conditions on combustion efficiency, lean stability and emissions and strategies were developed to mitigate the impact of flashback. In the final phase of the program, a full-scale 1.3-MWth multi-cup injector was built and tested at pressures from 6.9bar (100psi) to 12.4bar (180psi) and flame temperatures up to 2000K (3150 F) using mixtures of hydrogen and natural gas as fuel with nitrogen and carbon dioxide as diluents. The injector operated without flash back on fuel mixtures ranging from 100% natural gas to 100% hydrogen and emissions were shown to be insensitive to combustor pressure. NOx emissions of 3-ppm were achieved at a flame temperature of 1750K (2690 F) when operating on a fuel mixture containing 50% hydrogen and 50% natural gas by volume with 40% nitrogen dilution and 1.5-ppm NOx was achieved at a flame temperature of 1680K (2564 F) using only 10% nitrogen dilution. NOx emissions of 3.5-ppm were demonstrated at a flame temperature of 1730K (2650 F) with only 10% carbon dioxide dilution. Finally, 3.6-ppm NOx emissions were demonstrated at a flame temperature over 1600K (2420 F) when operating on 100% hydrogen fuel with 30% carbon dioxide dilution. Superior operability was demonstrated for the hydrogen-natural gas fuel. The micro-mixing fuel injectors show great promise for use in future gas turbine engines operating on hydrogen, syngas or other fuel mixtures of various compositions, supporting the Department of Energy goals related to increased energy diversity while reducing greenhouse gases.

Erlendur Steinthorsson; Brian Hollon; Adel Mansour

2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

118

Effect of syngas composition and CO2-diluted oxygen on performance of a premixed swirl-stabilized combustor.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Future energy systems based on gasification of coal or biomass for co-production of electrical power and fuels may require gas turbine operation on unusual gaseous fuel mixtures. In addition, global climate change concerns may dictate the generation of a CO{sub 2} product stream for end-use or sequestration, with potential impacts on the oxidizer used in the gas turbine. In this study the operation at atmospheric pressure of a small, optically accessible swirl-stabilized premixed combustor, burning fuels ranging from pure methane to conventional and H{sub 2}-rich and H{sub 2}-lean syngas mixtures is investigated. Both air and CO{sub 2}-diluted oxygen are used as oxidizers. CO and NO{sub x} emissions for these flames have been determined from the lean blowout limit to slightly rich conditions ({phi} - 1.03). In practice, CO{sub 2}-diluted oxygen systems will likely be operated close to stoichiometric conditions to minimize oxygen consumption while achieving acceptable NO{sub x} performance. The presence of hydrogen in the syngas fuel mixtures results in more compact, higher temperature flames, resulting in increased flame stability and higher NO{sub x} emissions. Consistent with previous experience, the stoichiometry of lean blowout decreases with increasing H{sub 2} content in the syngas. Similarly, the lean stoichiometry at which CO emissions become significant decreases with increasing H{sub 2} content. For the mixtures investigated, CO emissions near the stoichiometric point do not become significant until {phi} > 0.95. At this stoichiometric limit, CO emissions rise more rapidly for combustion in O{sub 2}-CO{sub 2} mixtures than for combustion in air.

Williams, Timothy C.; Shaddix, Christopher R.; Schefer, Robert W.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Upton bill offers clean-up incentives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Like castor oil, the Superfund law can be difficult medicine to swallow, and no one wants to volunteer for a dose. Indeed, the law`s harsh and unbending liability scheme sometimes hinders the cleanup of contaminated property. Confronted with the choice of redeveloping an old {open_quotes}brownfield{close_quotes} urban industrial site or building at a pristine new {open_quotes}greenfield{close_quotes} location, most companies opt for the latter. The brownfield problem is especially troubling because the law often prevents voluntary cleanups at relatively low priority sites that usually don`t get caught up in the Superfund program. This paper describes the Upton Bill which would require the US EPA to establish cleanup standards for hazrdous substances, allow for public comment on a proposed response plan, and require a voluntary party to submit detailed annual reports and maintain records.

Black, B. [Weinberg & Green, Baltimore, MD (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Issues paper on radiation site cleanup regulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

EPA prepared the document to present issues, approaches, and preliminary analyses related to its development of radiation site cleanup regulations. It focuses exclusively on issues and approaches related to developing cleanup regulations; it does not address issues specific to waste management regulations, which will be addressed in a separate document. The first three chapters discuss Significant Issues, Regulatory Approaches, and Summary and Next Steps. Appendix A presents background information on radioactive waste and provides additional details of EPA coordination of its rulemaking effort. Appendix B discusses statutory authorities upon which EPA may base its cleanup regulations. Appendix C is a copy of the EPA/NRC MOU. Appendix D discusses the issues raised in NRC's Enhanced Participatory Rulemaking on Radiological Criteria for Decommissioning, in which EPA participated. Appendix E is a list of acronyms, and Appendix F is a glossary of terms used throughout the document.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature syngas cleanup" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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121

Debate over waste imperils 3-Mile cleanup  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cleanup is a task of extraordinary proportions. Every step in the cleanup must be taken in a highly sensitive political and regulatory environment. A demineralizer or ion exchange filtration unit was installed in order that the fission products could be removed from the water spilled in the auxiliary and fuel handling buildings. GPU later vented krypton gas. Twice now engineers have made cautions entries into the containment building as part of the effort to size up the job. Cleanup will be costly, requiring many workers. Some wastes will require special packaging in hundreds of containers with shielded overpacks, plus bulky items of hardware and equipment that cannot be easily packaged. There will be the damaged fuel assemblies from the reactor core. Removing the fuel from the reactor may be difficult. A troublesome waste disposal question has to do with the material to be generated in cleaning up the containment building's sump water. GPU's man in charge of clean-up strategy is to collect the wastes in a form that permits maximum flexibility with respect to their stage, packaging, transport, and ultimate disposal. If plans for disposal of all the wastes from the cleanup are to be completed, an early commitment by Pennsylvania and other northeastern states to establish a burial ground for low level waste generated within the region is needed. Also a speedy commitment by NRC, DOE, and Congress to a plan for disposal of the first-stage zeolites is needed. Should there be a failure to cope with the wastes that Three Mile Island cleanup generates, the whole nuclear enterprise may suffer.

Carter, L.J.

1980-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

122

Hot-gas cleanup system model development. Volume I. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This two-volume report summarizes the state of the art in performance modeling of advanced high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) gas cleanup devices. Volume I contains the culmination of the research effort carried over the past 12 months and is a summary of research achievements. Volume II is the user's manual for the computer programs developed under the present research project. In this volume, Section 2 presents background information on pressurized, fluidized-bed combustion concepts, a description of the role of the advanced gas cleanup systems, and a list of advanced gas cleanup systems that are currently in development under DOE sponsorship. Section 3 describes the methodology for the software architecture that forms the basis of the well-disciplined and structured computer programs developed under the present project. Section 4 reviews the fundamental theories that are important in analyzing the cleanup performance of HTHP gas filters. Section 5 discusses the effect of alkali agents in HTHP gas cleanup. Section 6 evaluates the advanced HTHP gas cleanup models based on their mathematical integrity, availability of supporting data, and the likelihood of commercialization. As a result of the evaluation procedure detailed in Section 6, five performance models were chosen to be incorporated into the overall system simulation code, ASPEN. These five models (the electrocyclone, ceramic bag filter, moving granular bed filter, electrostatic granular bed filter, and electrostatic precipitator) are described in Section 7. The method of cost projection for these five models is discussed in Section 8. The supporting data and validation of the computer codes are presented in Section 9, and finally the conclusions and recommendations for the HTHP gas cleanup system model development are given in Section 10. 72 references, 19 figures, 25 tables.

Ushimaru, K.; Bennett, A.; Bekowies, P.J.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Development of OTM Syngas Process and Testing of Syngas Derived Ultra-clean Fuels in Diesel Engines and Fuel Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final report summarizes work accomplished in the Program from January 1, 2001 through December 31, 2004. Most of the key technical objectives for this program were achieved. A breakthrough material system has lead to the development of an OTM (oxygen transport membrane) compact planar reactor design capable of producing either syngas or hydrogen. The planar reactor shows significant advantages in thermal efficiency and a step change reduction in costs compared to either autothermal reforming or steam methane reforming with CO{sub 2} recovery. Syngas derived ultra-clean transportation fuels were tested in the Nuvera fuel cell modular pressurized reactor and in International Truck and Engine single cylinder test engines. The studies compared emission and engine performance of conventional base fuels to various formulations of ultra-clean gasoline or diesel fuels. A proprietary BP oxygenate showed significant advantage in both applications for reducing emissions with minimal impact on performance. In addition, a study to evaluate new fuel formulations for an HCCI engine was completed.

E.T. Robinson; John Sirman; Prasad Apte; Xingun Gui; Tytus R. Bulicz; Dan Corgard; John Hemmings

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Recovery Act funds advance cleanup efforts at Cold War site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cleanup efforts at Cold War site Recovery Act funds advance cleanup efforts at Cold War site A local small business, ARSEC Environmental, LLC, of White Rock, NM, won a 2 million...

125

Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Idaho Cleanup Project- October 2010  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Evaluation to determine whether Idaho Cleanup Project is continuing to perform at a level deserving DOE-VPP Star recognition.

126

Reformate Cleanup: The Case for Microchannel Architecture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reformate Cleanup: The Case for Microchannel Architecture DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells 2003 Annual for MicrochannelMicrochannel ArchitectureArchitecture DOE Hydrogen and Fuel CellsDOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells 2003, controls Integrated reformer/fuel cell demonstration at ~2 kWeFY 2002 WGS/PROX catalyst studies

127

SYNTHESIS OF METHACRYLATES FROM COAL-DERIVED SYNGAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Eastman Chemical Company, and Bechtel have developed a novel process for synthesis of methyl methacrylate (MMA) from coal-derived syngas, under a contract from the US Department of Energy/Fossil Energy Technology Center (DOE/FETC). This project has resulted in five US patents (four already published and one pending publication). It has served as the basis for the technical and economic assessment of the production of this high-volume intermediate from coal-derived synthesis gas. The three-step process consists of the synthesis of a propionate from ethylene carbonylation using coal-derived CO, condensation of the propionate with formaldehyde to form methacrylic acid (MAA); and esterification of MAA with methanol to yield MMA. The first two steps, propionate synthesis and condensation catalysis, are the key technical challenges and the focus of the research presented here.

Jang, B.W.L.; Spivey, J.J.; Gogate, M.R.; Zoeller, J.R.; Colberg, R.D.; Choi, G.N.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

NREL Patents a Catalyst that Removes Syngas Tar, Boosting the Economics of Biofuels (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NREL has patented a catalyst that reforms tar into syngas, a breakthrough that can accelerate the process of getting biomass ready for fuel synthesis and use as a drop-in fuel.

Not Available

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Ethanol synthesis from syngas over Rh-based/SiO2 catalysts: A...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

over Rh-basedSiO2 catalysts: A combined experimental and theoretical modeling study. Ethanol synthesis from syngas over Rh-basedSiO2 catalysts: A combined experimental and...

130

Single-Step Syngas-to-Distillates (S2D) Synthesis via Methanol and Dimethyl Ether Intermediates: Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the work was to enhance price-competitive, synthesis gas (syngas)-based production of transportation fuels that are directly compatible with the existing vehicle fleet (i.e., vehicles fueled by gasoline, diesel, jet fuel, etc.). To accomplish this, modifications to the traditional methanol-to-gasoline (MTG) process were investigated. In this study, we investigated direct conversion of syngas to distillates using methanol and dimethyl ether intermediates. For this application, a Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 (PdZnAl) catalyst previously developed for methanol steam reforming was evaluated. The PdZnAl catalyst was shown to be far superior to a conventional copper-based methanol catalyst when operated at relatively high temperatures (i.e., >300°C), which is necessary for MTG-type applications. Catalytic performance was evaluated through parametric studies. Process conditions such as temperature, pressure, gas-hour-space velocity, and syngas feed ratio (i.e., hydrogen:carbon monoxide) were investigated. PdZnAl catalyst formulation also was optimized to maximize conversion and selectivity to methanol and dimethyl ether while suppressing methane formation. Thus, a PdZn/Al2O3 catalyst optimized for methanol and dimethyl ether formation was developed through combined catalytic material and process parameter exploration. However, even after compositional optimization, a significant amount of undesirable carbon dioxide was produced (formed via the water-gas-shift reaction), and some degree of methane formation could not be completely avoided. Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 used in combination with ZSM-5 was investigated for direct syngas-to-distillates conversion. High conversion was achieved as thermodynamic constraints are alleviated when methanol and dimethyl are intermediates for hydrocarbon formation. When methanol and/or dimethyl ether are products formed separately, equilibrium restrictions occur. Thermodynamic relaxation also enables the use of lower operating pressures than what would be allowed for methanol synthesis alone. Aromatic-rich hydrocarbon liquid (C5+), containing a significant amount of methylated benzenes, was produced under these conditions. However, selectivity control to liquid hydrocarbons was difficult to achieve. Carbon dioxide and methane formation was problematic. Furthermore, saturation of the olefinic intermediates formed in the zeolite, and necessary for gasoline production, occurred over PdZnAl. Thus, yield to desirable hydrocarbon liquid product was limited. Evaluation of other oxygenate-producing catalysts could possibly lead to future advances. Potential exists with discovery of other types of catalysts that suppress carbon dioxide and light hydrocarbon formation. Comparative techno-economics for a single-step syngas-to-distillates process and a more conventional MTG-type process were investigated. Results suggest operating and capital cost savings could only modestly be achieved, given future improvements to catalyst performance. Sensitivity analysis indicated that increased single-pass yield to hydrocarbon liquid is a primary need for this process to achieve cost competiveness.

Dagle, Robert A.; Lebarbier, Vanessa MC; Lizarazo Adarme, Jair A.; King, David L.; Zhu, Yunhua; Gray, Michel J.; Jones, Susanne B.; Biddy, Mary J.; Hallen, Richard T.; Wang, Yong; White, James F.; Holladay, Johnathan E.; Palo, Daniel R.

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

131

2014 House Nuclear Cleanup Caucus Oak Ridge  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustionImprovement3 Beryllium-Associated Worker2014 House Nuclear Cleanup Caucus Oak Ridge August 16,

132

Sandia National Laboratories: radioactive waste solution cleanup  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1developmentturbine bladelifetimepower-to-gasproduceradiation waste cleanup ECIS

133

Cleanup of Nuclear Licensed Facility 57  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This summary describes the operations to clean up the equipment of the Nuclear Licensed Facility 57 (NLF 57). Due to the diversity of the research and development work carried out on the reprocessing of spent fuel in it, this installation is emblematic of many of the technical and organizational issues liable to be encountered in the final closure of nuclear facilities. The French atomic energy commission's center at Fontenay aux Roses (CEA-FAR) was created in 1946 to house pile ZOE. Laboratories for fuel cycle research were installed in existing buildings at the site. Work was later concentrated on spent fuel reprocessing, in a pilot workshop referred to as the 'Usine Pu'. In the early sixties, after the dismantling of these first generation facilities, a radiochemistry laboratory dedicated to research and development work on reprocessing was constructed, designated Building 18. During the same decade, more buildings were added: Building 54, storehouses and offices, Building 91, a hall and laboratories for chemical engineering research on natural and depleted uranium. Together, these three building constitute NLF 57. Building 18 architecture featured four similar modules. Each module had three levels: a sub-level consisting of technical galleries and rooms for the liquid effluent tanks, a ground floor and roof space in which the ventilation was installed. Offices, change rooms, four laboratories and a hall were situated on the ground floor. The shielded lines were installed in the laboratories and the halls. Construction of the building took place between 1959 and 1962, and its commissioning began in 1961. The research and development programs performed in NLF 57 related to studies of the reprocessing of spent fuel, including dry methods and the Purex process, techniques for the treatment of waste (vitrification, alpha waste decontamination, etc.) as well as studies and production of transuranic elements for industry and research. In addition to this work, the necessary methods of analysis for monitoring it were also developed. The research and development program finally ended on 30 June 1995. The NLF 57 cleanup program was intended to reduce the nuclear and conventional hazards and minimize the quantities of HLW and MLW during the subsequent dismantling work. To facilitate the organization of the cleanup work, it was divided into categories by type: - treatment and removal of nuclear material, - removal of radioactive sources, - treatment and removal of aqueous liquid waste, - treatment and removal of organic effluents, - treatment and removal of solid waste, - pumping out of the PETRUS tank, - flushing and decontamination of the tanks, - cleanup of Buildings 18 and 91/54. To estimate the cost of the operations and to monitor the progress of the work, an indicator system was put in place based on work units representative of the operation. The values of the work units were periodically updated on the basis of experience feedback. The cleanup progress is now 92% complete (06/12/31): - treatment and removal of nuclear material: 100%, - removal of radioactive sources: 100%, - treatment and removal of aqueous liquid waste: 64%, - treatment and removal of organic effluents: 87%, - treatment and removal of solid waste: 99%, - pumping out of the PETRUS tank: 69%, - flushing and decontamination of tank: 75%, - section cleaning of Buildings 18 and 91/: 90%. The DRSN/SAFAR is the delegated Project Owner for cleanup and dismantling operations. It is also the prime contractor for the cleanup and dismantling operations. SAFAR itself is responsible for operations relating to the CEA activity and those with technical risks (Removal of nuclear materials, Removal of radioactive sources, Pumping out plutonium and transuranic contaminated solvent and Flushing and decontamination of tanks and pipes). All other operations are sub-contracted to specialist companies. The NLF57 cleanup program as executed is capable of attaining activity levels compatible with a future dismantling operation using known and mastered techniques and producing a

Jeanjacques, Michel; Bremond, Marie Pierre; Marchand, Carole; Poyau, Cecile; Viallefont, Cecile; Gautier, Laurent; Masure, Frederic [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, Direction de l'Energie Nucleaire, Direction deleguee des Activites Nucleaires de Saclay, Departement des Reacteurs et des Services Nucleaires, Service d'Assainissement de Fontenay Aux Roses: 18, route du Panorama, BP6, 92265 Fontenay aux Roses Cedex (France)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

134

Effects of Combustion-Induced Vortex Breakdown on Flashback Limits of Syngas-Fueled Gas Turbine Combustors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Turbine combustors of advanced power systems have goals to achieve very low pollutants emissions, fuel variability, and fuel flexibility. Future generation gas turbine combustors should tolerate fuel compositions ranging from natural gas to a broad range of syngas without sacrificing operational advantages and low emission characteristics. Additionally, current designs of advanced turbine combustors use various degrees of swirl and lean premixing for stabilizing flames and controlling high temperature NOx formation zones. However, issues of fuel variability and NOx control through premixing also bring a number of concerns, especially combustor flashback and flame blowout. Flashback is a combustion condition at which the flame propagates upstream against the gas stream into the burner tube. Flashback is a critical issue for premixed combustor designs, because it not only causes serious hardware damages but also increases pollutant emissions. In swirl stabilized lean premixed turbine combustors onset of flashback may occur due to (i) boundary layer flame propagation (critical velocity gradient), (ii) turbulent flame propagation in core flow, (iii) combustion instabilities, and (iv) upstream flame propagation induced by combustion induced vortex breakdown (CIVB). Flashback due to first two foregoing mechanisms is a topic of classical interest and has been studied extensively. Generally, analytical theories and experimental determinations of laminar and turbulent burning velocities model these mechanisms with sufficient precision for design usages. However, the swirling flow complicates the flashback processes in premixed combustions and the first two mechanisms inadequately describe the flashback propensity of most practical combustor designs. The presence of hydrogen in syngas significantly increases the potential for flashback. Due to high laminar burning velocity and low lean flammability limit, hydrogen tends to shift the combustor operating conditions towards flashback regime. Even a small amount of hydrogen in a fuel blend triggers the onset of flashback by altering the kinetics and thermophysical characteristics of the mixture. Additionally, the presence of hydrogen in the fuel mixture modifies the response of the flame to the global effects of stretch and preferential diffusion. Despite its immense importance in fuel flexible combustor design, little is known about the magnitude of fuel effects on CIVB induced flashback mechanism. Hence, this project investigates the effects of syngas compositions on flashback resulting from combustion induced vortex breakdown. The project uses controlled experiments and parametric modeling to understand the velocity field and flame interaction leading to CIVB driven flashback.

Ahsan Choudhuri

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

135

Site Transition Process upon Completion of the Cleanup Mission...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

218: Develop a Fact Sheet on Site Transition at On-going Mission Sites Site Transition Summary: Cleanup Completion to Long-Term Stewardship at Department of Energy...

136

Idaho Site Obtains Patent for Nuclear Reactor Sodium Cleanup...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Idaho Site Obtains Patent for Nuclear Reactor Sodium Cleanup Treatment March 28, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis CWI engineers Jeff Jones, David Tolman, right, and Kirk Dooley...

137

Oversight Reports - Idaho Cleanup Project | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Project Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - November 2012 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project...

138

ORNL research reveals new challenges for mercury cleanup | ornl...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Jennifer Brouner Communications 865.241.0709 ORNL research reveals new challenges for mercury cleanup ORNL researchers are learning more about the microbial processes that convert...

139

Biomass Gas Cleanup Using a Therminator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the project is to develop and demonstrate a novel fluidized-bed process module called a �¢����Therminator�¢��� to simultaneously destroy and/or remove tar, NH3 and H2S from raw syngas produced by a fluidized-bed biomass gasifier. The raw syngas contains as much as 10 g/m3 of tar, 4,000 ppmv of NH3 and 100 ppmv of H2S. The goal of the Therminator module would be to use promising regenerable catalysts developed for removing tar, ammonia, and H2S down to low levels (around 10 ppm). Tars are cracked to a non-condensable gas and coke that would deposit on the acid catalyst. We will deposit coke, much like a fluid catalytic cracker (FCC) in a petroleum refinery. The deposited coke fouls the catalyst, much like FCC, but the coke would be burned off in the regenerator and the regenerated catalyst would be returned to the cracker. The rapid circulation between the cracker and regenerator would ensure the availability of the required amount of regenerated catalyst to accomplish our goal. Also, by removing sulfur down to less than 10 ppmv, NH3 decomposition would also be possible in the cracker at 600-700���°C. In the cracker, tar decomposes and lays down coke on the acid sites of the catalyst, NH3 is decomposed using a small amount of metal (e.g., nickel or iron) catalyst incorporated into the catalyst matrix, and H2S is removed by a small amount of a metal oxide (e.g. zinc oxide or zinc titanate) by the H2S-metal oxide reaction to form metal sulfide. After a tolerable decline in activity for these reactions, the catalyst particles (and additives) are transported to the regenerator where they are exposed to air to remove the coke and to regenerate the metal sulfide back to metal oxide. Sulfate formation is avoided by running the regeneration with slightly sub-stoichiometric quantity of oxygen. Following regeneration, the catalyst is transported back to the cracker and the cycling continues. Analogous to an FCC reactor system, rapid cycling will allow the use of very active cracking catalysts that lose activity due to coking within the order of several seconds.

David C. Dayton; Atish Kataria; Rabhubir Gupta

2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

140

Promising Science for Plutonium Cleanup | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature syngas cleanup" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Portsmouth Cleanup Progress | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006PhotovoltaicSeptember 22, 2014 In reply refer to: PE-1Cleanup

142

Portsmouth Environmental Cleanup | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006PhotovoltaicSeptember 22, 2014 In reply refer to:SiteCleanup

143

Sandia National Laboratories: radiation waste cleanup  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1developmentturbine bladelifetimepower-to-gasproduceradiation waste cleanup ECIS and

144

Synthesis of acrylates and Methacrylates from Coal-Derived Syngas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Eastman Chemical Company, and Bechtel collectively are developing a novel process for the synthesis of methyl methacrylate (MMA) from coal-derived syngas, under a contract from the U.S. Department of Energy, Federal Energy Technology Center. This three-step process consists of synthesis of a propionate, its condensation with formaldehyde, and esterification of resulting methacrylic acid (MAA) with methanol to produce MMA. Eastman has focused on the propionate synthesis step. The resultant Mo catalysts work efficiently at much less severe conditions (170{degrees}C and 30 atm) than the conventional Ni catalysts (270{degrees} C and 180 atm). Bechtel has performed an extensive cost analysis which shows that Eastman`s propionate synthesis step is competitive with other technologies to produce the anhydride. Eastman and Bechtel have also compared the RTI- Eastman-Bechtel three-step methanol route to five other process routes to MMA. The results show that the product MMA can be produced at 520/lb, for a 250 Mlb/year MMA plant, and this product cost is competitive to all other process routes to MMA, except propyne carbonylation. In the second step, RTI and Eastman have developed active and stable V-SI-P tertiary metal oxide catalysts, Nb/Si0{sub 2}, and Ta/Si0{sub 2} catalysts for condensation of propionic anhydride or propionic acid with formaldehyde. RTI has demonstrated a novel correlation among the catalyst acid-base properties, condensation reaction yield, and long-term catalyst performance. Eastman and Bechtel have used the RTI experimental results of a 20 percent Nb/Si0{sub 2} catalyst, in terms of reactant conversions, MAA selectivities, and MAA yield, for their economic analysis. Recent research focuses on enhancing the condensation reaction yields, a better understanding of the acid-base property correlation and enhancing the catalyst lifetime.

NONE

1997-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

145

Performance and gas cleanup criterion for a cotton gin waste fluidized-bed gasifier  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biodegradation Combustion Pyrolysis Gasification . Gas Clean-Up . Fluidized-Bed Gasification DESIGN OF THE GASIFICATION SYSTEM Fluidized-Bed Reactor Particle Size Distributor Plate Insulation Preheaters . Cyclone Feed Injection System Gasifier..., The greatest thermal efficiency appeared to occur near 760'C, well below the expected ash fusion temperature. The gasification reaction was operated with no supplemental heat for most of the experiments. The most prominent problem with the gasifier...

Craig, Joe David

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Integrated low emission cleanup system for direct coal-fueled turbines (electrostatic agglomeration)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this contract was to investigate the removal of SO[sub x] and particulate matter from direct coal fired combustion gas streams at high temperature and high pressure conditions. This investigation was to be accomplished through a bench scale testing and evaluation program for SO[sub x] removal and the innovative particulate collection concept of particulate growth through electrostatic agglomeration followed by high efficiency mechanical collection. The process goal was to achieve control better than that required by 1979 New Source Performance Standards. During Phase I, the designs of the combustor and gas cleanup apparatus were successfully completed. Hot gas cleanup was designed to be accomplished at temperature levels between 1800[degrees] and 2500[degrees]F at pressures up to 15 atmospheres. The combustor gas flow rate could be varied between 0.2--0.5 pounds per second. The electrostatic agglomerator residence time could be varied between 0.25 to 3 seconds. In Phase II, all components were fabricated, and erected successfully. Test data from shakedown testing was obtained. Unpredictable difficulties in pilot plant erection and shakedown consumed more budget resources than was estimated and as a consequence DOE, METC, decided ft was best to complete the contract at the end of Phase II. Parameters studied in shakedown testing revealed that high-temperature high pressure electrostatics offers an alternative to barrier filtration in hot gas cleanup but more research is needed in successful system integration between the combustor and electrostatic agglomerator.

Quimby, J.M.; Kumar, K.S.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

IDAHO OPERATIONS OFFICE NAMES NEW IDAHO CLEANUP PROJECT MANAGER  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Idaho Falls, ID – The Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office today announced that James Cooper has been named deputy manager of its highly-successful Idaho Cleanup Project, which oversees the environmental cleanup and waste management mission at DOE’s Idaho site.

148

Single-Step Syngas-to-Distillates (S2D) Process Based on Biomass-Derived Syngas – A Techno-Economic Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study reports the comparison of biomass gasification based syngas-to-distillate (S2D) systems using techno-economic analysis (TEA). Three cases, state of technology (SOT) case, goal case, and conventional case, were compared in terms of performance and cost. The SOT case and goal case represent technology being developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for a process starting with syngas using a single-step dual-catalyst reactor for distillate generation (S2D process). The conventional case mirrors the two-step S2D process previously utilized and reported by Mobil using natural gas feedstock and consisting of separate syngas-to-methanol and methanol-to-gasoline (MTG) processes. Analysis of the three cases revealed that the goal case could indeed reduce fuel production cost over the conventional case, but that the SOT was still more expensive than the conventional. The SOT case suffers from low one-pass yield and high selectivity to light hydrocarbons, both of which drive up production cost. Sensitivity analysis indicated that light hydrocarbon yield, single pass conversion efficiency, and reactor space velocity are the key factors driving the high cost for the SOT case.

Zhu, Yunhua; Jones, Susanne B.; Biddy, Mary J.; Dagle, Robert A.; Palo, Daniel R.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Single-Step Syngas-to-Distillates (S2D) Process Based on Biomass-Derived Syngas - A Techno-Economic Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study compared biomass gasification based syngas-to-distillate (S2D) systems using techno-economic analysis (TEA). Three cases, state of technology (SOT), goal, and conventional, were compared in terms of performance and cost. The SOT case represented the best available experimental results for a process starting with syngas using a single-step dual-catalyst reactor for distillate generation. The conventional case mirrored a conventional two-step S2D process consisting of separate syngas-to-methanol and methanol-to-gasoline (MTG) processes. The goal case assumed the same performance as the conventional, but with a single-step S2D technology. TEA results revealed that the SOT was more expensive than the conventional and goal cases. The SOT case suffers from low one-pass yield and high selectivity to light hydrocarbons, both of which drive up production cost. Sensitivity analysis indicated that light hydrocarbon yield and single pass conversion efficiency were the key factors driving the high cost for the SOT case.

Zhu, Y.; Jones, S. B.; Biddy, M. J.; Dagle, R. A.; Palo, D. R.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Risk management: Reducing brownfield cleanup costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Balancing environmental protection with economic vitality is crucial to maintaining competitiveness in world markets. One key initiative that has been identified as important to both environmental protection and the economy is the redevelopment of brownfields. Brownfield redevelopment can stimulate local economies that have been devastated by lost jobs and can recycle industrial land use, thereby preserving undeveloped lands. Many existing brownfield sites appear on the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) National Priority List (NPL), which designates over 1200 sites and is expected to grow to more than 2000 by the end of the decade. EPA estimates the cost of remediating the sites on the current list will approach $30 billion, with the average cost of remediating a site close to $25 million. Thousands of additional brownfield sites that do not appear on the NPL are listed under state cleanup programs.

Graves, N.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Economic analysis and assessment of syngas production using a modeling approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Economic analysis and modeling are essential and important issues for the development of current feedstock and process technology for bio-gasification. The objective of this study was to develop an economic model and apply to predict the unit cost of syngas production from a micro-scale bio-gasification facility. An economic model was programmed in C++ computer programming language and developed using a parametric cost approach, which included processes to calculate the total capital costs and the total operating costs. The model used measured economic data from the bio-gasification facility at Mississippi State University. The modeling results showed that the unit cost of syngas production was $1.217 for a 60 Nm-3 h-1 capacity bio-gasifier. The operating cost was the major part of the total production cost. The equipment purchase cost and the labor cost were the largest part of the total capital cost and the total operating cost, respectively. Sensitivity analysis indicated that labor costs rank the top as followed by equipment cost, loan life, feedstock cost, interest rate, utility cost, and waste treatment cost. The unit cost of syngas production increased with the increase of all parameters with exception of loan life. The annual cost regarding equipment, labor, feedstock, waste treatment, and utility cost showed a linear relationship with percent changes, while loan life and annual interest rate showed a non-linear relationship. This study provides the useful information for economic analysis and assessment of the syngas production using a modeling approach.

Kim, Hakkwan; Parajuli, Prem B.; Yu, Fei; Columbus, Eugene P.

2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

152

Heterogeneous catalytic process for alcohol fuels from syngas. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this project has been the pursuit of a catalyst system which would allow the selective production from syngas of methanol and isobutanol. It is desirable to develop a process in which the methanol to isobutanol weight ratio could be varied from 70/30 to 30/70. The 70/30 mixture could be used directly as a fuel additive, while, with the appropriate downstream processing, the 30/70 mixture could be utilized for methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) synthesis. The indirect manufacture of MTBE from a coal derived syngas to methanol and isobutanol process would appear to be a viable solution to MTBE feedstock limitations. To become economically attractive, a process fro producing oxygenates from coal-derived syngas must form these products with high selectivity and good rates, and must be capable of operating with a low-hydrogen-content syngas. This was to be accomplished through extensions of known catalyst systems and by the rational design of novel catalyst systems.

Dombek, B.D.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Syngas Production from Propane using Atmospheric Non-Thermal Plasma F. Ouni, A. Khacef*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Syngas Production from Propane using Atmospheric Non-Thermal Plasma F. Ouni, A. Khacef* and J. M Propane steam reforming using a sliding discharge reactor was investigated under atmospheric pressure in the discharge is less than 2 kW. The process efficiency is described in terms of propane conversion rate, steam

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

154

Optimum catalytic process for alcohol fuels from syngas: Second quarterly technical progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A base case process for economic studies of making fuel alcohols from syngas has been developed. It uses existing technologies which have been demonstrated to be feasible or have already been commercialized. The process consists of the following steps: coal or natural gas (reforming or partial oxidation) to syngas; syngas to methanol by ICI technology; methanol to light olefins by proprietary UCC technology using molecular sieves; olefins to alcohols by hydroformylation (with a homogeneous rhodium catalyst) followed by hydrogenation. Process economics for the two natural gas-based routes have been developed. With insights gained from this, an optimized and integrated multi-step process has been conceptualized which allows estimation of the lowest cost at which fuel alcohols can be produced. A 60% methanol and 40% higher alcohol mix was assumed to be a suitable fuel alcohol blend for gasoline. At a natural gas price of $2/MMBTU, the cost of producing this, by either partial oxidation or reforming, is $1.12/gal. An integrated process with autothermal reforming at 750 psia and methanol synthesis at 700 psia allows incorporation of the best features of reforming and partial oxidation as well as elimination of syngas compression. The production cost of fuel alcohols by this process is estimated to be $0.90/gal. This is, therefore, the lowest cost at which fuel alcohols can be produced by an integrated, multi-step process. An ''ideal'' process has also been conceptualized which establishes a target production cost that new technology should strive for to be competitive. This process incorporates autothermal reforming for producing syngas followed by conversion to fuel alcohols using emerging technologies. The target production cost is estimated to be $0.65/gal. 16 figs., 10 tabs.

Not Available

1987-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

155

Update of lessons learned from cleanup projects at Oak Ridge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) has been actively pursuing environmental cleanup of chemically and radioactively contaminated sites for about 7 years. These cleanup projects are carried out under the regulatory requirements of the US Environmental Protection Agency and the various states in which the remedial sites are located. This paper updates and re-examines some of the successes and failures of Oak Ridge cleanup activities, with the intent of encouraging improvements in the areas of safety, project planning, quality assurance, training, and regulatory interactions in future remedial projects.

Sleeman, R.C. [USDOE Oak Ridge Operations, TN (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

156

Central Plateau Cleanup at DOE's Hanford Site - 12504  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The discussion of Hanford's Central Plateau includes significant work in and around the center of the Hanford Site - located about 7 miles from the Columbia River. The Central Plateau is the area to which operations will be shrunk in 2015 when River Corridor cleanup is complete. This work includes retrieval and disposal of buried waste from miles of trenches; the cleanup and closure of massive processing canyons; the clean-out and demolition to 'slab on grade' of the high-hazard Plutonium Finishing Plant; installation of key groundwater treatment facilities to contain and shrink plumes of contaminated groundwater; demolition of all other unneeded facilities; and the completion of decisions about remaining Central Plateau waste sites. A stated goal of EM has been to shrink the footprint of active cleanup to less than 10 square miles by 2020. By the end of FY2011, Hanford will have reduced the active footprint of cleanup by 64 percent exceeding the goal of 49 percent. By 2015, Hanford will reduce the active footprint of cleanup by more than 90 percent. The remaining footprint reduction will occur between 2015 and 2020. The Central Plateau is a 75-square-mile region near the center of the Hanford Site including the area designated in the Hanford Comprehensive Land Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement (DOE 1999) and Record of Decision (64 FR 61615) as the Industrial-Exclusive Area, a rectangular area of about 20 square miles in the center of the Central Plateau. The Industrial-Exclusive Area contains the 200 East and 200 West Areas that have been used primarily for Hanford's nuclear fuel processing and waste management and disposal activities. The Central Plateau also encompasses the 200 Area CERCLA National Priorities List site. The Central Plateau has a large physical inventory of chemical processing and support facilities, tank systems, liquid and solid waste disposal and storage facilities, utility systems, administrative facilities, and groundwater monitoring wells. As a companion to the Hanford Site Cleanup Completion Framework document, DOE issued its draft Central Plateau Cleanup Completion Strategy in September 2009 to provide an outline of DOE's vision for completion of cleanup activities across the Central Plateau. As major elements of the Hanford cleanup along the Columbia River Corridor near completion, DOE believed it appropriate to articulate the agency vision for the remainder of the cleanup mission. The Central Plateau Cleanup Completion Strategy and the Hanford Site Cleanup Completion Framework were provided to the regulatory community, the Tribal Nations, political leaders, the public, and Hanford stakeholders to promote dialogue on Hanford's future. The Central Plateau Cleanup Completion Strategy describes DOE's vision for completion of Central Plateau cleanup and outlines the decisions needed to achieve the vision. The Central Plateau strategy involves steps to: (1) contain and remediate contaminated groundwater, (2) implement a geographic cleanup approach that guides remedy selection from a plateau-wide perspective, (3) evaluate and deploy viable treatment methods for deep vadose contamination to provide long-term protection of the groundwater, and (4) conduct essential waste management operations in coordination with cleanup actions. The strategy will also help optimize Central Plateau readiness to use funding when it is available upon completion of River Corridor cleanup projects. One aspect of the Central Plateau strategy is to put in place the process to identify the final footprint for permanent waste management and containment of residual contamination within the 20-square-mile Industrial-Exclusive Area. The final footprint identified for permanent waste management and containment of residual contamination should be as small as practical and remain under federal ownership and control for as long as a potential hazard exists. Outside the final footprint, the remainder of the Central Plateau will be available for other uses consistent with the Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan (DOE 1999), while

Dowell, Jonathan [US DOE (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Catalysis for Mixed Alcohol Synthesis from Biomass Derived Syngas: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-292  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Dow Chemical Company (Dow) developed and tested catalysts for production of mixed alcohols from synthesis gas (syngas), under research and development (R&D) projects that were discontinued a number of years ago. Dow possesses detailed laboratory notebooks, catalyst samples, and technical expertise related to this past work. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is conducting R&D in support of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) to develop methods for economically producing ethanol from gasified biomass. NREL is currently conducting biomass gasification research at an existing 1/2 ton/day thermochemical test platform. Both Dow and NREL believe that the ability to economically produce ethanol from biomass-derived syngas can be enhanced through collaborative testing, refinement, and development of Dow's mixed-alcohol catalysts at NREL's and/or Dow's bench- and pilot-scale facilities. Dow and NREL further agree that collaboration on improvements in catalysts as well as gasifier operating conditions (e.g., time, temperature, upstream gas treatment) will be necessary to achieve technical and economic goals for production of ethanol and other alcohols.

Hensley, J.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Near-zero emissions combustor system for syngas and biofuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A multi-institutional plasma combustion team was awarded a research project from the DOE/NNSA GIPP (Global Initiative for Prolifereation Prevention) office. The Institute of High Current Electronics (Tomsk, Russia); Leonardo Technologies, Inc. (an American-based industrial partner), in conjunction with the Los Alamos National Laboratory are participating in the project to develop novel plasma assisted combustion technologies. The purpose of this project is to develop prototypes of marketable systems for more stable and cleaner combustion of syngas/biofuels and to demonstrate that this technology can be used for a variety of combustion applications - with a major focus on contemporary gas turbines. In this paper, an overview of the project, along with descriptions of the plasma-based combustors and associated power supplies will be presented. Worldwide, it is recognized that a variety of combustion fuels will be required to meet the needs for supplying gas-turbine engines (electricity generation, propulsion), internal combustion engines (propulsion, transportation), and burners (heat and electricity generation) in the 21st Century. Biofuels and biofuel blends have already been applied to these needs, but experience difficulties in modifications to combustion processes and combustor design and the need for flame stabilization techniques to address current and future environmental and energy-efficiency challenges. In addition, municipal solid waste (MSW) has shown promise as a feedstock for heat and/or electricity-generating plants. However, current combustion techniques that use such fuels have problems with achieving environmentally-acceptable air/exhaust emissions and can also benefit from increased combustion efficiency. This project involves a novel technology (a form of plasma-assisted combustion) that can address the above issues. Plasma-assisted combustion (PAC) is a growing field that is receiving worldwide attention at present. The project is focused on research necessary to develop a novel, high-efficiency, low-emissions (near-zero, or as low as reasonably achievable), advanced combustion technology for electricity and heat production from biofuels and fuels derived from MSW. For any type of combustion technology, including the advanced technology of this project, two problems of special interest must be addressed: developing and optimizing the combustion chambers and the systems for igniting and sustaining the fuel-burning process. For MSW in particular, there are new challenges over gaseous or liquid fuels because solid fuels must be ground into fine particulates ({approx} 10 {micro}m diameter), fed into the advanced combustor, and combusted under plasma-assisted conditions that are quite different than gaseous or liquid fuels. The principal idea of the combustion chamber design is to use so-called reverse vortex gas flow, which allows efficient cooling of the chamber wall and flame stabilization in the central area of the combustor (Tornado chamber). Considerable progress has been made in design ing an advanced, reverse vortex flow combustion chamber for biofuels, although it was not tested on biofuels and a system that could be fully commercialized has never been completed.

Yongho, Kim [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rosocha, Louis [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

PPPL's Earth Week features Colloquium on NYC green plan, cleanup...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

PPPL's Earth Week features Colloquium on NYC green plan, cleanup and awards By Jeanne Jackson DeVoe April 28, 2014 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Volunteers clean...

160

EM SSAB Contributes Community Views to Clean-up Decisions  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

EM has made public participation a fundamental component of its cleanup mission and has found that the EM SSAB, which draws upon diverse community viewpoints to provide advice and recommendations,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature syngas cleanup" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Idaho Site Advances Recovery Act Cleanup after Inventing Effective Treatment  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

For the first time in history, workers at the Idaho site achieved success in the initial cleanup of potentially dangerous sodium in a decommissioned nuclear reactor using an innovative treatment...

162

Radiation site cleanup regulation: An interim progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On October 18 and 19, 1993, the 13 members of the National Advisory Council on Environmental Policy and Technology (NACEPT) Subcommittee on Radiation Site Cleanup Regulations met in Washington D.C. at the invitation of EPA. The Subcommittee discussed a variety of topics relevant to the cleanup of sites contaminated with radiation, and to the regulations which EPA will promulgate to establish cleanup levels for radioactive sites. This Interim Progress Report: condenses and summarizes the major themes, issues, and concerns brought up during the NACEPT Subcommittee meeting in October; Provides a brief description of current Agency thinking regarding each of the major topic areas discussed by the NACEPT Subcommittee; and Serves as a discussion guide for NACEPT Subcommittee members. Four major topics were discussed by the NACEPT Subcommittee members during their first meeting in October 1993: Common Themes; Risk (or Cleanup Levels and Risk Levels); Future Land Use and Local Statutes; and Site-Specific Public Involvement.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Syngas Conversion to Gasoline-Range Hydrocarbons over Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 and ZSM-5 Composite Catalyst System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A composite Pd/ZnO/Al2O3-HZSM-5 (Si/Al=40) catalytic system was evaluated for the synthesis of gasoline-range hydrocarbons directly from synthesis gas. Bifunctional catalyst comprising PdZn metal and acid sites present the required catalytically active sites necessary for the methanol synthesis, methanol dehydration, and methanol-to-gasoline reactions. This system provides a unique catalytic pathway for the production of liquid hydrocarbons directly from syngas. However, selectivity control is difficult and poses many challenges. The composite catalytic system was evaluated under various process conditions. Investigated were the effects of temperature (310-375oC), pressure (300-1000 psig), time-on-stream (50 hrs), and gas-hour space velocity (740-2970 hr-1), using a H2/CO molar syngas ratio of 2.0. By operating at the lower end of the temperature range investigated, liquid hydrocarbon formation was favored, as was decreased amounts of undesirable light hydrocarbons. However, lower operating temperatures also facilitated undesirable CO2 formation via the water-gas shift reaction. Higher operating pressures slightly favored liquid synthesis. Operating at relatively low pressures (e.g. 300 psig) was made possible, whereas for methanol synthesis alone higher pressure are usually required to achieve similar conversion levels (e.g. 1000 psig). Thermodynamic constraints on methanol synthesis are eased by pushing the equilibrium through hydrocarbon formation. Catalytic performance was also evaluated by altering Pd and Zn composition of the Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst. Of the catalysts and conditions tested, selectivity toward liquid hydrocarbon was highest when using a 5% Pd metal loading and Pd/Zn molar ratio of 0.25 and mixed with HZMS-5, operating at 310oC and 300 psig, CO conversion was 43 % and selectivity (carbon weight basis) to hydrocarbons was 49 wt. %. Of the hydrocarbon fraction, 44wt. % was in the C5-C12 liquid product range and consisted primarily of aromatic polymethylbenzenes. However, as syngas conversion increases with increasing temperature, selectivity to liquid product diminished. This is attributed, in large part, to increased saturation of the olefinic intermediates over PdZn metal sites. Under all the conditions and catalysts evaluated in this study, generating liquid product in high yield was challenging (<10 wt. % C5+ yield).

Dagle, Robert A.; Lizarazo Adarme, Jair A.; Lebarbier, Vanessa MC; Gray, Michel J.; White, James F.; King, David L.; Palo, Daniel R.

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Fabrication and Performance of Ni-YSZ Anode Supported Cell for Coal Derived Syngas Application by Tape Casting and Spin Coating  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ni-YSZ anode supported cell has been developed for direct utilization of coal derived syngas as fuel in the temperature range of 700-850° C. The porous Ni-YSZ anode substrate was prepared based on processes of slip casting and lamination of anode tape. Then thin-film YSZ electrolyte was deposited on pre-sintered anode substrate via a colloidal spin coating technique and an optimized final sintering route. Dense and crackfree YSZ electrolyte was successfully obtained after sintering at 1440C for 4hrs. Processing factors like pre-sintering of anode, solvent, coating cycles and sintering route on the final properties of YSZ film was studied. A power density of 0.62W/cm2 has been achieved for the anode supported cell tested in 97%H2/3%H2O at 800°C. EIS test results indicated the cell performance was essentially influenced by interfacial resistance and charge transfer process.

Gong, Mingyang (West Virginia U., Morgantown WV); Jiang, Yinglu (West Virginia U., Morgantown WV); Johnson, C.D.; Xingbo, Liu (West Virginia U., Morgantown WV)

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Implications of the KONVERGENCE Model for Difficult Cleanup Decisions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract—Some cleanup decisions, such as cleanup of intractable contaminated sites or disposal of spent nuclear fuel, have proven difficult to make. Such decisions face high resistance to agreement from stakeholders possibly because they do not trust the decision makers, view the consequences of being wrong as too high, etc. Our project’s goal is to improve sciencebased cleanup decision-making. This includes diagnosing intractable situations, as a step to identifying a path toward sustainable solutions. Companion papers describe the underlying philosophy of the KONVERGENCE Model for Sustainable Decisions,1 and the overall framework and process steps.2 Where knowledge, values, and resources converge (the K, V, and R in KONVERGENCE), you will find a sustainable decision – a decision that works over time. For intractable cases, serious consideration of the adaptable class of alternatives is warranted – if properly implemented and packaged.

Piet, Steven James; Dakins, Maxine Ellen; Gibson, Patrick Lavern; Joe, Jeffrey Clark; Kerr, Thomas A; Nitschke, Robert Leon

2002-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

166

Needs for Risk Informing Environmental Cleanup Decision Making - 13613  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses the needs for risk informing decision making by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM). The mission of the DOE EM is to complete the safe cleanup of the environmental legacy brought about from the nation's five decades of nuclear weapons development and production and nuclear energy research. This work represents some of the most technically challenging and complex cleanup efforts in the world and is projected to require the investment of billions of dollars and several decades to complete. Quantitative assessments of health and environmental risks play an important role in work prioritization and cleanup decisions of these challenging environmental cleanup and closure projects. The risk assessments often involve evaluation of performance of integrated engineered barriers and natural systems over a period of hundreds to thousands of years, when subject to complex geo-environmental transformation processes resulting from remediation and disposal actions. The requirement of resource investments for the cleanup efforts and the associated technical challenges have subjected the EM program to continuous scrutiny by oversight entities. Recent DOE reviews recommended application of a risk-informed approach throughout the EM complex for improved targeting of resources. The idea behind this recommendation is that by using risk-informed approaches to prioritize work scope, the available resources can be best utilized to reduce environmental and health risks across the EM complex, while maintaining the momentum of the overall EM cleanup program at a sustainable level. In response to these recommendations, EM is re-examining its work portfolio and key decision making with risk insights for the major sites. This paper summarizes the review findings and recommendations from the DOE internal reviews, discusses the needs for risk informing the EM portfolio and makes an attempt to identify topics for R and D in integrated risk assessment that could assist in the EM prioritization efforts. (authors)

Zhu, Ming; Moorer, Richard [U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC 20585 (United States)] [U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC 20585 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Clean-up standards and pathways analysis methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Remediation of a radioactively contaminated site requires that certain regulatory criteria be met before the site can be released for unrestricted future use. Since the ultimate objective of remediation is to protect the public health and safety, residual radioactivity levels remaining at a site after cleanup must be below certain preset limits or meet acceptable dose or risk criteria. This paper discusses cleanup standards for radioactively contaminated soils and describes the use of pathways analysis methods for deriving site-specific residual radioactivity guidelines. An example is provided in which a pathways analysis code (RESRAD) was used to establish such guidelines.

Devgun, J.S. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Office of Waste Management Programs

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

168

Integrated low emission cleanup system for direct coal-fueled turbines (electrostatic agglomeration). Draft final technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this contract was to investigate the removal of SO{sub x} and particulate matter from direct coal fired combustion gas streams at high temperature and high pressure conditions. This investigation was to be accomplished through a bench scale testing and evaluation program for SO{sub x} removal and the innovative particulate collection concept of particulate growth through electrostatic agglomeration followed by high efficiency mechanical collection. The process goal was to achieve control better than that required by 1979 New Source Performance Standards. During Phase I, the designs of the combustor and gas cleanup apparatus were successfully completed. Hot gas cleanup was designed to be accomplished at temperature levels between 1800{degrees} and 2500{degrees}F at pressures up to 15 atmospheres. The combustor gas flow rate could be varied between 0.2--0.5 pounds per second. The electrostatic agglomerator residence time could be varied between 0.25 to 3 seconds. In Phase II, all components were fabricated, and erected successfully. Test data from shakedown testing was obtained. Unpredictable difficulties in pilot plant erection and shakedown consumed more budget resources than was estimated and as a consequence DOE, METC, decided ft was best to complete the contract at the end of Phase II. Parameters studied in shakedown testing revealed that high-temperature high pressure electrostatics offers an alternative to barrier filtration in hot gas cleanup but more research is needed in successful system integration between the combustor and electrostatic agglomerator.

Quimby, J.M.; Kumar, K.S.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

169

Microsoft Word - DOE News Release-DOE Completes Cleanup at New...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DOE Completes Cleanup at New York, California Sites Recovery Act funds accelerate cleanup; support job creation and footprint reduction WASHINGTON, D.C. - Last month, the U.S....

170

Technical papers presented at a DOE meeting on criteria for cleanup of transuranium elements in soil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transuranium element soil contamination cleanup experience gained from nuclear weapons accidents and cleanup at Eniwetok Atoll was reviewed. Presentations have been individually abstracted for inclusion in the data base. (ACR)

Not Available

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Syngas production by plasma treatments of alcohols, bio-oils and wood This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Syngas production by plasma treatments of alcohols, bio-oils and wood This article has been Contact us My IOPscience #12;Syngas production by plasma treatments of alcohols, bio-oils and wood K conversion of biomass provide a great variety of products: oils, alcohols and gases. After treatment

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

172

Radiation site cleanup regulations: Technical support document for the development of radionuclide cleanup levels for soil. Review draft  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents EPA`s approach to assessing some of the beneficial and adverse radiation health effects associated with various possible values for an annual dose limit. In particular, it discusses the method developed to determine how the choice of cleanup criterion affects (1) the time-integrated numbers of non-fatal and fatal radiogenic cancers averted among future populations, (2) the occurrence of radiogenic cancers among remediation workers and the public caused by the cleanup process itself, and (3) the volume of contaminated soil that may require remediation.

Wolbarst, A.B.; Mauro, J.; Anigstein, R.; Back, D.; Bartlett, J.W.

1994-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

173

Integrated Process Configuration for High-Temperature Sulfur Mitigation during Biomass Conversion via Indirect Gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sulfur present in biomass often causes catalyst deactivation during downstream operations after gasification. Early removal of sulfur from the syngas stream post-gasification is possible via process rearrangements and can be beneficial for maintaining a low-sulfur environment for all downstream operations. High-temperature sulfur sorbents have superior performance and capacity under drier syngas conditions. The reconfigured process discussed in this paper is comprised of indirect biomass gasification using dry recycled gas from downstream operations, which produces a drier syngas stream and, consequently, more-efficient sulfur removal at high temperatures using regenerable sorbents. A combination of experimental results from NREL's fluidizable Ni-based reforming catalyst, fluidizable Mn-based sulfur sorbent, and process modeling information show that using a coupled process of dry gasification with high-temperature sulfur removal can improve the performance of Ni-based reforming catalysts significantly.

Dutta. A.; Cheah, S.; Bain, R.; Feik, C.; Magrini-Bair, K.; Phillips, S.

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

174

Conducting oxide formation and mechanical endurance of potential solid-oxide fuel cell interconnects in coal syngas environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The oxidation properties of potential SOFCs materials Crofer 22 APU, Ebrite and Haynes 230 exposed in coal syngas at 800 °C for 100 h were studied. The phases and surface morphology of the oxide scales were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). The mechanical endurance and electrical resistance of the conducting oxides were characterized by indentation and electrical impedance, respectively. It was found that the syngas exposure caused the alloys to form porous oxide scales, which increased the electrical resistant and decreased the mechanical stability. As for short-term exposure in syngas, neither carbide nor metal dusting was found in the scales of all samples.

Liu, Kejia; Luo, Junhang; Johnson, Christopher; Liu, Xingbo; Lang, J.; Mao, S.X.

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

175

Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-F-6 Burial Ground  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 118-F-6 Burial Ground located in the 100-FR-2 Operable Unit of the 100-F Area on the Hanford Site. The trenches received waste from the 100-F Experimental Animal Farm, including animal manure, animal carcasses, laboratory waste, plastic, cardboard, metal, and concrete debris as well as a railroad tank car.

H. M. Sulloway

2008-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

176

Cleanup at Los Alamos National Laboratory - the challenges - 9493  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of environmental cleanup at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and some of the unique aspects and challenges. Cleanup of the 65-year old Department of Energy Laboratory is being conducted under a RCRA Consent Order with the State of New Mexico. This agreement is one of the most recent cleanup agreements signed in the DOE complex and was based on lessons learned at other DOE sites. A number of attributes create unique challenges for LANL cleanup -- the proximity to the community and pueblos, the site's topography and geology, and the nature of LANL's on-going missions. This overview paper will set the stage for other papers in this session, including papers that present: Plans to retrieve buried waste at Material Disposal Area B, across the street from oen of Los Alamos' commercial districts and the local newspaper; Progress to date and joint plans with WIPP for disposal of the remaining inventory of legacy transuranic waste; Reviews of both groundwater and surface water contamination and the factors complicating both characterization and remediation; Optimizing the disposal of low-level radioactive waste from ongoing LANL missions; A stakeholder environmental data transparency project (RACER), with full public access to all available information on contamination at LANL, and A description of the approach to waste processing cost recovery from the programs that generate hazardous and radioactive waste at LANL.

Stiger, Susan G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hargis, Kenneth M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Graham, Michael J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rael, George J [NNSL/LASO

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Syngas Production from Propane Using Atmospheric Non-thermal Plasma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Propane steam reforming using a sliding discharge reactor was investigated under atmospheric pressure and low temperature (420 K). Non-thermal plasma steam reforming proceeded efficiently and hydrogen was formed as a main product (H2 concentration up to 50%). By-products (C2-hydrocarbons, methane, carbon dioxide) were measured with concentrations lower than 6%. The mean electrical power injected in the discharge is less than 2 kW. The process efficiency is described in terms of propane conversion rate, steam reforming and cracking selectivity, as well as by-products production. Chemical processes modelling based on classical thermodynamic equilibrium reactor is also proposed. Calculated data fit quiet well experimental results and indicate that the improvement of C3H8 conversion and then H2 production can be achieved by increasing the gas fraction through the discharge. By improving the reactor design, the non-thermal plasma has a potential for being an effective way for supplying hydrogen or synthesis gas.

Ouni, Fakhreddine; Cormier, Jean Marie; 10.1007/s11090-009-9166-2

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Evaluation of syngas production unit cost of bio-gasification facility using regression analysis techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Evaluation of economic feasibility of a bio-gasification facility needs understanding of its unit cost under different production capacities. The objective of this study was to evaluate the unit cost of syngas production at capacities from 60 through 1800Nm 3/h using an economic model with three regression analysis techniques (simple regression, reciprocal regression, and log-log regression). The preliminary result of this study showed that reciprocal regression analysis technique had the best fit curve between per unit cost and production capacity, with sum of error squares (SES) lower than 0.001 and coefficient of determination of (R 2) 0.996. The regression analysis techniques determined the minimum unit cost of syngas production for micro-scale bio-gasification facilities of $0.052/Nm 3, under the capacity of 2,880 Nm 3/h. The results of this study suggest that to reduce cost, facilities should run at a high production capacity. In addition, the contribution of this technique could be the new categorical criterion to evaluate micro-scale bio-gasification facility from the perspective of economic analysis.

Deng, Yangyang; Parajuli, Prem B.

2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

179

Elementary Steps of Syngas Reactions on Mo2C(001): Adsorption Thermochemistry and Bond Dissociation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Density functional theory (DFT) and ab initio thermodynamics are applied in order to investigate the most stable surface and subsurface terminations of Mo{sub 2}C(001) as a function of chemical potential and in the presence of syngas. The Mo-terminated (001) surface is then used as a model surface to evaluate the thermochemistry and energetic barriers for key elementary steps in syngas reactions. Adsorption energy scaling relations and Broensted-Evans-Polanyi relationships are established and used to place Mo{sub 2}C into the context of transition metal surfaces. The results indicate that the surface termination is a complex function of reaction conditions and kinetics. It is predicted that the surface will be covered by either C{sub 2}H{sub 2} or O depending on conditions. Comparisons to transition metals indicate that the Mo-terminated Mo{sub 2}C(001) surface exhibits carbon reactivity similar to transition metals such as Ru and Ir, but is significantly more reactive towards oxygen.

Medford, Andrew

2012-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

180

Development of OTM Syngas Process and Testing of Syngas Derived Ultra-clean Fuels in Diesel Engines and Fuel Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This topical report summarizes work accomplished for the Program from November 1, 2001 to December 31, 2002 in the following task areas: Task 1: Materials Development; Task 2: Composite Development; Task 4: Reactor Design and Process Optimization; Task 8: Fuels and Engine Testing; 8.1 International Diesel Engine Program; 8.2 Nuvera Fuel Cell Program; and Task 10: Program Management. Major progress has been made towards developing high temperature, high performance, robust, oxygen transport elements. In addition, a novel reactor design has been proposed that co-produces hydrogen, lowers cost and improves system operability. Fuel and engine testing is progressing well, but was delayed somewhat due to the hiatus in program funding in 2002. The Nuvera fuel cell portion of the program was completed on schedule and delivered promising results regarding low emission fuels for transportation fuel cells. The evaluation of ultra-clean diesel fuels continues in single cylinder (SCTE) and multiple cylinder (MCTE) test rigs at International Truck and Engine. FT diesel and a BP oxygenate showed significant emissions reductions in comparison to baseline petroleum diesel fuels. Overall through the end of 2002 the program remains under budget, but behind schedule in some areas.

E.T. (Skip) Robinson; James P. Meagher; Prasad Apte; Xingun Gui; Tytus R. Bulicz; Siv Aasland; Charles Besecker; Jack Chen Bart A. van Hassel; Olga Polevaya; Rafey Khan; Piyush Pilaniwalla

2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature syngas cleanup" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Investigation of syngas interaction in alcohol synthesis catalysts. Quartery technical progress report, July 1, 1995--September 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the work done on {open_quotes}Investigation of Syngas Interaction in Alcohol Synthesis Catalysts{close_quotes} during the last three months. In this report the results of the work done on the effect of CO adsorption on the magnetic character of cobalt in the Cu/Co/Cr catalysts is discussed.

Akundi, M.A.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

ENGINEERING A NEW MATERIAL FOR HOT GAS CLEANUP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall purpose of this project was to develop a superior, regenerable, calcium-based sorbent for desulfurizing hot coal gas with the sorbent being in the form of small pellets made with a layered structure such that each pellet consists of a highly reactive lime core enclosed within a porous protective shell of strong but relatively inert material. The sorbent can be very useful for hot gas cleanup in advanced power generation systems where problems have been encountered with presently available materials. An economical method of preparing the desired material was demonstrated with a laboratory-scale revolving drum pelletizer. Core-in-shell pellets were produced by first pelletizing powdered limestone or other calcium-bearing material to make the pellet cores, and then the cores were coated with a mixture of powdered alumina and limestone to make the shells. The core-in-shell pellets were subsequently calcined at 1373 K (1100 C) to sinter the shell material and convert CaCO{sub 3} to CaO. The resulting product was shown to be highly reactive and a very good sorbent for H{sub 2}S at temperatures in the range of 1113 to 1193 K (840 to 920 C) which corresponds well with the outlet temperatures of some coal gasifiers. The product was also shown to be both strong and attrition resistant, and that it can be regenerated by a cyclic oxidation and reduction process. A preliminary evaluation of the material showed that while it was capable of withstanding repeated sulfidation and regeneration, the reactivity of the sorbent tended to decline with usage due to CaO sintering. Also it was found that the compressive strength of the shell material depends on the relative proportions of alumina and limestone as well as their particle size distributions. Therefore, an extensive study of formulation and preparation conditions was conducted to improve the performance of both the core and shell materials. It was subsequently determined that MgO tends to stabilize the high-temperature reactivity of CaO. Therefore, a sorbent prepared from dolomite withstands the effects of repeated sulfidation and regeneration better than one prepared from limestone. It was also determined that both the compressive strength and attrition resistance of core-in-shell pellets depend on shell thickness and that the compressive strength can be improved by reducing both the particle size and amount of limestone in the shell preparation mixture. A semiempirical model was also found which seems to adequately represent the absorption process. This model can be used for analyzing and predicting sorbent performance, and, therefore, it can provide guidance for any additional development which may be required. In conclusion, the overall objective of developing an economical, reusable, and practical material was largely achieved. The material appears suitable for removing CO{sub 2} from fuel combustion products as well as for desulfurizing hot coal gas.

T.D. Wheelock; L.K. Doraiswamy; K.P. Constant

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Site Cleanup Report for Sites PBF-33 and PBF-34  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summaries the actions taken to remove asbestos-reinforced-concrete (transite) pipe and miscellaneous debris from Power Purst Facility (PBF)-33 and PBF-34 sites. Removal of pipe and debris were performed in November 2006 in accordance with the requirements discussed in notice of soil disturbance NSD-PBF-07-01. Debris at these two sites were classified as industrial waste that could be disposed at the Central Facilities Area (CFA) landfill at the Idaho National Laboratory. Asbestos removal was performed as Class IV asbestos cleanup work. All transite pipe was double bagged and dispositioned in the INL Landfill Complex at CFA. The remaining miscellaneous debris was loaded into dump trucks and taken to the INL Landfill Complex at CFA for final disposition. Cleanup actions are complete for both sites, and no debris or hazardous constituents remain. Therefore, both sites will be classified as No action sites.

W. L. Jolley

2007-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

184

Cleanup Verification Package for the 618-8 Burial Ground  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 618-8 Burial Ground, also referred to as the Solid Waste Burial Ground No. 8, 318-8, and the Early Solid Waste Burial Ground. During its period of operation, the 618-8 site is speculated to have been used to bury uranium-contaminated waste derived from fuel manufacturing, and construction debris from the remodeling of the 313 Building.

M. J. Appel

2006-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

185

"Hanford: A Conversation About Nuclear Waste and Cleanup"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In ''Hanford: A Conversation about Nuclear Waste and Cleanup'', Roy Gephart takes us on a journey through a world of facts, values, conflicts, and choices facing the most complex environmental cleanup project in the United States, the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site. Starting with the top-secret Manhattan Project, Hanford was used to create tons of plutonium for nuclear weapons. Hundreds of tons of waste remain. In an easy-to-read, illustrated text, Gephart crafts the story of Hanford becoming the world's first nuclear weapons site to release large amounts of contaminants into the environment. This was at a time when radiation biology was in its infancy, industry practiced unbridled waste dumping, and the public trusted what it was told. The plutonium market stalled with the end of the Cold War. Public accountability and environmental compliance ushered in a new cleanup mission. Today, Hanford is driven by remediation choices whose outcomes remain uncertain. It's a story whose epilogue will be written by future generations. This book is an information resource, written for the general reader as well as the technically trained person wanting an overview of Hanford and cleanup issues facing the nuclear weapons complex. Each chapter is a topical mini-series. It's an idea guide that encourages readers to be informed consumers of Hanford news, to recognize that knowledge, high ethical standards, and social values are at the heart of coping with Hanford's past and charting its future. Hanford history is a window into many environmental conflicts facing our nation; it's about building upon success and learning from failure. And therein lies a key lesson, when powerful interests are involved, no generation is above pretense. Roy E. Gephart is a geohydrologist and senior program manager at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington. He has 30 years experience in environmental studies and the nuclear waste industry.

Gephart, Roy E.

2003-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

186

Rocky Flats Cleanup Agreement implementation successes and challenges  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On July 19, 1996 the US Department of Energy (DOE), State of Colorado (CDPHE), and US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) entered into an agreement called the Rocky Flats Cleanup Agreement (RFCA) for the cleanup and closure of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS or Rocky Flats). Major elements of the agreement include: an Integrated Site-Wide Baseline; up to twelve significant enforceable milestones per year; agreed upon soil and water action levels and standards for cleanup; open space as the likely foreseeable land use; the plutonium and TRU waste removed by 2015; streamlined regulatory process; agreement with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) to coordinate activities; and a risk reduction focus. Successful implementation of RFCA requires a substantial effort by the parties to change their way of thinking about RFETS and meet the deliverables and commitments. Substantial progress toward Site closure through the implementation of RFCA has been accomplished in the short time since the signing, yet much remains to be done. Much can be learned from the Rocky Flats experience by other facilities in similar situations.

Shelton, D.C.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Clean-up of Nuclear Licensed Facility 57  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: In the early sixties a radiochemistry laboratory dedicated to Research and Development was built at the French Atomic Energy Commission's centre at Fontenay aux Roses (CEA-FAR); it was named Building 18. More buildings were added during the decade: Building 54, storehouses and offices and Building 91, a hall and laboratories for chemical engineering research into natural and depleted uranium. These three buildings together constitute NLF57. Construction work took place between 1959 and 1962 and the buildings entered operation in 1961. The research and development programs performed in NLF57 involved spent fuel reprocessing studies, waste treatment processes and studies and production of transuranic elements with the related analytical methods development. The research and development program ended on 30 June 1995. The NLF57 clean-up program was launched to reduce the nuclear and conventional hazards and minimise HLW and MLW production during the dismantling work. The clean-up work was divided into categories by type to facilitate its organisation: treatment and removal of nuclear material, removal of radioactive sources, treatment and removal of organic and aqueous effluents, treatment and removal of solid waste, pumping out of the PETRUS tank, flushing and decontamination of the tanks and clean-up of buildings. (authors)

Jeanjacques, Michel; Bremond, Marie Pierre; Marchand, Carole; Poyau, Cecile; Viallefont, Cecile; Gautier, Laurent; Masure, Frederic [CEA, DANS-DRSN-SAFAR (France)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Development of OTM Syngas Process and Testing of Syngas Derived Ulta-clean Fuels in Diesel Engines and Fuel Cells Budget Period 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This topical report summarizes work accomplished for the Program from January 1, 2003 through December 31,2004 in the following task areas: Task 1--Materials Development; Task 2--Composite Development; Task 4--Reactor Design and Process Optimization; Task 8--Fuels and Engine Testing; 8.1 International Diesel Engine Program; and Task IO: Program Management. Most of the key technical objectives for this budget period were achieved. Only partial success was achieved relative to cycle testing under pressure Major improvements in material performance and element reliability have been achieved. A breakthrough material system has driven the development of a compact planar reactor design capable of producing either hydrogen or syngas. The planar reactor shows significant advantages in thermal efficiency and costs compared to either steam methane reforming with CO{sub 2} recovery or autothermal reforming. The fuel and engine testing program is complete The single cylinder test engine evaluation of UCTF fuels begun in Budget Period 2 was finished this budget period. In addition, a study to evaluate new fuel formulations for an HCCl engine was completed.

E.T. Robinson; John Sirman; Prasad Apte; Xingun Gui; Tytus R. Bulicz; Dan Corgard; Siv Aasland; Kjersti Kleveland; Ann Hooper; Leo Bonnell; John Hemmings; Jack Chen; Bart A. Van Hassel

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

189

Integrated Sensing and Controls for Coal Gasification - Development of Model-Based Controls for GE's Gasifier and Syngas Cooler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the achievements and final results of this program. The objective of this program is to develop a comprehensive systems approach to integrated design of sensing and control systems for an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plant, using advanced model-based techniques. In particular, this program is focused on the model-based sensing and control system design for the core gasification section of an IGCC plant. The overall approach consists of (i) developing a first-principles physics-based dynamic model of the gasification section, (ii) performing model-reduction where needed to derive low-order models suitable for controls analysis and design, (iii) developing a sensing system solution combining online sensors with model-based estimation for important process variables not measured directly, and (iv) optimizing the steady-state and transient operation of the plant for normal operation as well as for startup using model predictive controls (MPC). Initially, available process unit models were implemented in a common platform using Matlab/Simulink{reg_sign}, and appropriate model reduction and model updates were performed to obtain the overall gasification section dynamic model. Also, a set of sensor packages were developed through extensive lab testing and implemented in the Tampa Electric Company IGCC plant at Polk power station in 2009, to measure temperature and strain in the radiant syngas cooler (RSC). Plant operation data was also used to validate the overall gasification section model. The overall dynamic model was then used to develop a sensing solution including a set of online sensors coupled with model-based estimation using nonlinear extended Kalman filter (EKF). Its performance in terms of estimating key unmeasured variables like gasifier temperature, carbon conversion, etc., was studied through extensive simulations in the presence sensing errors (noise and bias) and modeling errors (e.g. unknown gasifier kinetics, RSC fouling). In parallel, an MPC solution was initially developed using ideal sensing to optimize the plant operation during startup pre-heating as well as steady state and transient operation under normal high-pressure conditions, e.g. part-load, base-load, load transition and fuel changes. The MPC simulation studies showed significant improvements both for startup pre-heating and for normal operation. Finally, the EKF and MPC solutions were coupled to achieve the integrated sensing and control solution and its performance was studied through extensive steady state and transient simulations in the presence of sensor and modeling errors. The results of each task in the program and overall conclusions are summarized in this final report.

Aditya Kumar

2010-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

190

Pressure Swing Absorption Device and Process for Separating CO{sub 2} from Shifted Syngas and its Capture for Subsequent Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using the ionic liquid (IL) 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide ([bmim][DCA]) as the absorbent on the shell side of a membrane module containing either a porous hydrophobized ceramic tubule or porous hydrophobized polyether ether ketone (PEEK) hollow fiber membranes, studies for CO{sub 2} removal from hot simulated pre-combustion shifted syngas were carried out by a novel pressure swing membrane absorption (PSMAB) process. Helium was used as a surrogate for H{sub 2} in a simulated shifted syngas with CO{sub 2} around 40% (dry gas basis). In this cyclic separation process, the membrane module was used to achieve non-dispersive gas absorption from a high-pressure feed gas (689-1724 kPag; 100-250 psig) at temperatures between 25-1000C into a stationary absorbent liquid on the module shell side during a certain part of the cycle followed by among other cycle steps controlled desorption of the absorbed gases from the liquid in the rest of the cycle. Two product streams were obtained, one He-rich and the other CO{sub 2}-rich. Addition of polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer of generation 0 to IL [bmim][DCA] improved the system performance at higher temperatures. The solubilities of CO{sub 2} and He were determined in the ionic liquid with or without the dendrimer in solution as well as in the presence or absence of moisture; polyethylene glycol (PEG) 400 was also studied as a replacement for the IL. The solubility selectivity of the ionic liquid containing the dendrimer for CO{sub 2} over helium was considerably larger than that for the pure ionic liquid. The solubility of CO{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}-He solubility selectivity of PEG 400 and a solution of the dendrimer in PEG 400 were higher than the corresponding ones in the IL, [bmim][DCA]. A mathematical model was developed to describe the PSMAB process; a numerical solution of the governing equations described successfully the observed performance of the PSMAB process for the pure ionic liquid-based system.

Sirkar, Kamalesh; Jie, Xingming; Chau, John; Obuskovic, Gordana

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

191

E-Print Network 3.0 - accelerated cleanup risk Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of having cleanup activities guided by ... Source: Flury, Markus - Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, Washington State University Collection: Environmental Management and...

192

Richland Operations Office Completes Cleanup in Hanford’s 300 Area North Section  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

RICHLAND, Wash. – EM met a Tri-Party Agreement milestone by completing cleanup of the north portion of Hanford’s 300 Area.

193

River Corridor Cleanup Contract Fiscal Year 2006 Detailed Work Plan: DWP Summary, Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This detailed work plan provides the scope, cost, and schedule for the Fiscal Year 2006 activities required to support River Corridor cleanup objectives within the directed guidance.

Project Integration

2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

194

Recovery Cleanup Project at Y-12 Leaves Alpha 5 with an Empty...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Cleanup Project at Y-12 Leaves Alpha 5 with an Empty Feeling | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile...

195

LANL selects local small business for post-Recovery Act cleanup...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

up where the Recovery Act leaves off," said Michael Graham, LANL's associate director for Environmental Programs. "The Recovery Act was a huge boost to our cleanup efforts, and...

196

Petroleum cleanup in the United States: A historical review and comparison of state programs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Cleanup of leaking underground storage tank (LUST) sites has been a priority for the United States of America (USA) for more than 20 years due… (more)

Terwilliger, Timothy A

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Recovery Act Helps Y-12 Exceed Cleanup Goal at Manhattan Project...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Helps Y-12 Exceed Cleanup Goal at Manhattan Project-Era Building | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the...

198

Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, CH2M WG LLC, Idaho Cleanup Project – March 2014  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Evaluation to determine whether CH2M WG LLC, Idaho Cleanup Project is performing at a level deserving DOE-VPP Star recognition.

199

Environmental Cleanup of the Idaho National Laboratory Status Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the status of the cleanup of the U.S. Department of Energy's Idaho National Laboratory site (INL). On May 1, 2005 CH2M.WG Idaho, LLC (CWI) began its 7-year, $2.4 billion cleanup of the INL. When the work is completed, 3,406,871 liters (900,000 gallons) of sodium-bearing waste will have been treated; 15 high-level waste tanks will have been grouted and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)- closed; more than 200 facilities will have been demolished or disposed of, including three reactors, several spent fuel basins, and hot cells; thousands of containers of buried transuranic waste will have been retrieved; more than 8,000 cubic meters (10,464 cubic yards) of contact-handled transuranic waste and more than 500 cubic meters (654 cubic yards) of remote-handled transuranic waste will have been characterized, packaged, and shipped offsite; almost 200 release sites and voluntary consent order tank systems will have been remediated; and 3,178 units of spent fuel will have been moved from wet to dry storage. In 2007, CWI began the construction of the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit that will treat the sodium-bearing waste for eventual disposal; removed and disposed the 112-ton Engineering Test Reactor vessel; demolished all significant radiological facilities at Test Area North; continued the exhumation of buried transuranic wastes from the Subsurface Disposal Area at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex; shipped the first of hundreds of containers of remote-handled transuranic waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant; disposed of thousands of cubic meters of low-level and low-level mixed radioactive wastes both onsite and offsite while meeting all regulatory cleanup objectives. (author)

Schubert, A.L. [CH2M.WG Idaho, LLC, Idaho Falls, Idaho (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Thyroid nodularity and cancer among Chernobyl cleanup workers from Estonia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thyroid examinations, including palpation, ultrasound and, selectively, fine-needle aspiration biopsy, were conducted on nearly 2,000 Chernobyl cleanup workers from Estonia to evaluate the occurrence of thyroid cancer and nodular thyroid disease among men with protracted exposure to ionizing radiation. The examinations were conducted in four cities in Estonia during March-April 1995, 9 years after the reactor accident. The study population was selected from a predefined cohort of 4,833 cleanup workers from Estonia under surveillance for cancer incidence. These men had been sent to Chernobyl between 1986 and 1991 to entomb the damaged reactor, remove radioactive debris and perform related cleanup activities. A total of 2,997 men were invited for thyroid screening and 1,984 (66%) were examined. Estimates of radiation dose from external sources were obtained from military or other institutional records, and details about service dates and types of work performed while at Chernobyl were obtained from a self-administered questionnaire. Blood samples were collected for assay of chromosomal translocations in circulating lymphocytes and loss of expression of the glycophorin A (GPA) gene in erythrocytes. The primary outcome measure was the presence or absence of thyroid nodules as determined by the ultrasound examination. Of the screened workers, 1,247 (63%) were sent to Chernobyl in 1986, including 603 (30%) sent in April or May, soon after the accident. Workers served at Chernobyl for an average of 3 months. The average age was 32 years at the time of arrival at Chernobyl and 40 years at the time of thyroid examination. The mean documented radiation dose from external sources was 10.8 cGy. Biological indicators of exposure showed low correlations with documented dose, but did not indicate that the mean dose for the population was higher than the average documented dose. 47 refs., 1 fig., 9 tabs.

Inskip, P.D.; Boice, J.D. Jr. [National Cancer Inst., Rockville, MD (United States); Tekkel, M. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature syngas cleanup" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

FUSRAP - 45 DOE cleanup projects across the country  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) program designed to address radiological contamination exceeding acceptable cleanup standards at 45 sites throughout the United States. The DOE and its predecessor agencies, the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), used many of these sites for processing and storing uranium and thorium ores as part of the nation`s early nuclear production activities. While some of the sites are owned by the federal government, most of the sites were, and are, privately owned.

Price, L.K. [Dept. of Energy, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Harbert, R.R.; Palau, G.L.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

202

Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-F-1 Burial Ground  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 118-F-1 Burial Ground on the Hanford Site. This burial ground is a combination of two locations formerly called Minor Construction Burial Ground No. 2 and Solid Waste Burial Ground No. 2. This waste site received radioactive equipment and other miscellaneous waste from 105-F Reactor operations, including dummy elements and irradiated process tubing; gun barrel tips, steel sleeves, and metal chips removed from the reactor; filter boxes containing reactor graphite chips; and miscellaneous construction solid waste.

E. J. Farris and H. M. Sulloway

2008-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

203

Cleanup Verification Package for the 116-K-2 Effluent Trench  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 116-K-2 effluent trench, also referred to as the 116-K-2 mile-long trench and the 116-K-2 site. During its period of operation, the 116-K-2 site was used to dispose of cooling water effluent from the 105-KE and 105-KW Reactors by percolation into the soil. This site also received mixed liquid wastes from the 105-KW and 105-KE fuel storage basins, reactor floor drains, and miscellaneous decontamination activities.

J. M. Capron

2006-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

204

Groundwater Cleanup Progresses at Paducah Site | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProvedDecember 2005DepartmentDecemberGlossary ofGroundwater Cleanup Progresses at Paducah

205

Recovery Act funds advance cleanup efforts at Cold War site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromising ScienceRecent SREL ReprintsHeaviestRecovery Act »Cleanup

206

Secretary Chu Highlights Recovery Act Cleanup Progress | Department of  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September2-SCORECARD-01-24-13Discovers Transformers inEnergy Cleanup

207

Mercury cleanup efforts intensify | Y-12 National Security Complex  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challenge fund LasDubeyChallenge MelroseMentorMercury cleanup

208

FY14 Guidelines for Brownfields Cleanup Grants | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump37. It isInformationexplainsEnvironmental Assessments andCleanup Grants

209

3D CFD Model of High Temperature H2O/CO2 Co-electrolysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

3D CFD Model of High Temperature H2O/CO2 Co-Electrolysis Grant Hawkes1, James O’Brien1, Carl Stoots1, Stephen Herring1 Joe Hartvigsen2 1 Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho, grant.hawkes@inl.gov 2 Ceramatec Inc, Salt Lake City, Utah INTRODUCTION A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model has been created to model high temperature co-electrolysis of steam and carbon dioxide in a planar solid oxide electrolyzer (SOE) using solid oxide fuel cell technology. A research program is under way at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to simultaneously address the research and scale-up issues associated with the implementation of planar solid-oxide electrolysis cell technology for syn-gas production from CO2 and steam. Various runs have been performed under different run conditions to help assess the performance of the SOE. This paper presents CFD results of this model compared with experimental results. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), in conjunction with Ceramatec Inc. (Salt Lake City, USA) has been researching for several years the use of solid-oxide fuel cell technology to electrolyze steam for large-scale nuclear-powered hydrogen production. Now, an experimental research project is underway at the INL to produce syngas by simultaneously electrolyzing at high-temperature steam and carbon dioxide (CO2) using solid oxide fuel cell technology. A strong interest exists in the large-scale production of syn-gas from CO2 and steam to be reformed into a usable transportation fuel. If biomass is used as the carbon source, the overall process is climate neutral. Consequently, there is a high level of interest in production of syn-gas from CO2 and steam electrolysis. With the price of oil currently around $60 / barrel, synthetically-derived hydrocarbon fuels (synfuels) have become economical. Synfuels are typically produced from syngas – hydrogen (H2) and carbon monoxide (CO) -- using the Fischer-Tropsch process, discovered by Germany before World War II. High-temperature nuclear reactors have the potential for substantially increasing the efficiency of syn-gas production from CO2 and water, with no consumption of fossil fuels, and no production of greenhouse gases. Thermal CO2-splitting and water splitting for syn-gas production can be accomplished via high-temperature electrolysis, using high-temperature nuclear process heat and electricity. A high-temperature advanced nuclear reactor coupled with a high-efficiency high-temperature electrolyzer could achieve a competitive thermal-to-syn-gas conversion efficiency of 45 to 55%.

Grant Hawkes; James O'Brien; Carl Stoots; Stephen Herring; Joe Hartvigsen

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Task 4.9 -- Value-added products from syngas. Semi-annual report, July 1--December 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work on advanced fuel forms in 1996 focused on the synthesis of higher alcohols from mixtures of hydrogen and carbon dioxide (syngas) from coal gasification. Initial work in this project utilized a novel molybdenum sulfide catalyst previously shown to be active for hydrodesulfurization reactions of coal liquids. A pressurized fixed-bed flow-through reactor was constructed, and the MoS{sub 2} catalysts were tested with syngas under a variety of conditions. Unfortunately, the catalysts, even with higher molybdenum loading and addition of promoters, failed to give alcohol products. A batch reactor test of the catalyst was also conducted, but did not produce alcohol products. Group VIII metals have been used previously in catalysts for syngas reactions. Ruthenium and rhodium catalysts were prepared by impregnation of a hydrotalcite support. Tests with these catalysts in flow-through reactors also did not produce the desired alcohol products. The formation of higher alcohols from smaller ones, such as methanol and ethanol, could be commercially important if high selectivity could be achieved. The methanol and ethanol would be derived from syngas and fermentation, respectively. Based on previous work in other laboratories, it was hypothesized that the hydrotalcite-supported MoS{sub 2} or Ru or Rh catalysts could catalyze the formation of butyl alcohols. Although the desired 1-butanol was obtained in batch reactions with the promoted ruthenium catalyst, the reaction was not as selective as desired. Product suitable for a lower-vapor-pressure gasoline oxygenate additive was obtained, but it may not be economical to market such products in competition with methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE). Flow-through catalytic bed reactions were not successful.

Olson, E.S.; Sharma, R.K.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Remediation cleanup options for the Hoe Creek UCG site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy must restore groundwater quality at the Hoe Creek, Wyoming, underground coal gasification site using the best proven practicable technology. Six alternative remediation methods are evaluated in this project: (1) excavation, (2) three variations of groundwater plume containment, (3) in situ vacuum extraction, (4) pump and treat using a defined pattern of pumping wells to obtain an effective matrix sweep, (5) in situ flushing using a surfactant, and (6) in situ bioremediation. Available site characterization data is insufficient to accurately project the cost of remediation. Several alternative hypothetical examples and associated costs are described in the text and in the appendices. However, not enough information is available to use these examples as a basis for comparison purposes. Before a cleanup method is selected, core borings should be taken to define the areal extent and depth of contaminated matrix material. Segments of these core borings should be analyzed for organic contaminants in the soil (e.g., benzene) and their relationship to the groundwater contamination. These analyses and subsequent treatability studies will show whether or not the contaminants can be effectively removed by surface on in situ volatilization, leached from the matrix using washing solutions, or removed by bioremediation. After this information is obtained, each technology should be evaluated with respect to cost and probability of success. A decision tree for implementing remediation cleanup at the Hoe Creek site is presented in this report. 26 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

Nordin, J.; Griffin, W.; Chatwin, T.; Lindblom, S.; Crader, S.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Micellar/Polymer PhysicalProperty Models for Contaminant Cleanup Problems and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/polymer phase behavior have been highly successful in simulating enhanced oil recovery processes using for contaminant cleanup [26] and for enhanced oil recovery [14]. Surfactants can be injected as dilute aqueousMicellar/Polymer Physical­Property Models for Contaminant Cleanup Problems and Enhanced Oil

Trangenstein, John A.

213

Development of a risk-based approach to Hanford Site cleanup  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to a request from Mr. Thomas Grumbly, Assistant Secretary of Energy for Environmental Management, the Hanford Site contractors developed a conceptual set of risk-based cleanup strategies that (1) protect the public, workers, and environment from unacceptable risks; (2) are executable technically; and (3) fit within an expected annual funding profile of 1.05 billion dollars. These strategies were developed because (1) the US Department of Energy and Hanford Site budgets are being reduced, (2) stakeholders are dissatisfied with the perceived rate of cleanup, (3) the US Congress and the US Department of Energy are increasingly focusing on risk and riskreduction activities, (4) the present strategy is not integrated across the Site and is inconsistent in its treatment of similar hazards, (5) the present cleanup strategy is not cost-effective from a risk-reduction or future land use perspective, and (6) the milestones and activities in the Tri-Party Agreement cannot be achieved with an anticipated funding of 1.05 billion dollars annually. The risk-based strategies described herein were developed through a systems analysis approach that (1) analyzed the cleanup mission; (2) identified cleanup objectives, including risk reduction, land use, and mortgage reduction; (3) analyzed the existing baseline cleanup strategy from a cost and risk perspective; (4) developed alternatives for accomplishing the cleanup mission; (5) compared those alternatives against cleanup objectives; and (6) produced conclusions and recommendations regarding the current strategy and potential risk-based strategies.

Hesser, W.A.; Daling, P.M. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Baynes, P.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)] [and others

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Catalytic Process for the Conversion of Coal-derived Syngas to Ethanol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The catalytic conversion of coal-derived syngas to C{sub 2+} alcohols and oxygenates has attracted great attention due to their potential as chemical intermediates and fuel components. This is particularly true of ethanol, which can serve as a transportation fuel blending agent, as well as a hydrogen carrier. A thermodynamic analysis of CO hydrogenation to ethanol that does not allow for byproducts such as methane or methanol shows that the reaction: 2 CO + 4 H{sub 2} {yields} C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH + H{sub 2}O is thermodynamically favorable at conditions of practical interest (e.g,30 bar, {approx}< 250 C). However, when methane is included in the equilibrium analysis, no ethanol is formed at any conditions even approximating those that would be industrially practical. This means that undesired products (primarily methane and/or CO{sub 2}) must be kinetically limited. This is the job of a catalyst. The mechanism of CO hydrogenation leading to ethanol is complex. The key step is the formation of the initial C-C bond. Catalysts that are selective for EtOH can be divided into four classes: (a) Rh-based catalysts, (b) promoted Cu catalysts, (c) modified Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, or (d) Mo-sulfides and phosphides. This project focuses on Rh- and Cu-based catalysts. The logic was that (a) Rh-based catalysts are clearly the most selective for EtOH (but these catalysts can be costly), and (b) Cu-based catalysts appear to be the most selective of the non-Rh catalysts (and are less costly). In addition, Pd-based catalysts were studied since Pd is known for catalyzing CO hydrogenation to produce methanol, similar to copper. Approach. The overall approach of this project was based on (a) computational catalysis to identify optimum surfaces for the selective conversion of syngas to ethanol; (b) synthesis of surfaces approaching these ideal atomic structures, (c) specialized characterization to determine the extent to which the actual catalyst has these structures, and (d) testing at realistic conditions (e.g., elevated pressures) and differential conversions (to measure true kinetics, to avoid deactivation, and to avoid condensable concentrations of products in the outlet gas).

James Spivery; Doug Harrison; John Earle; James Goodwin; David Bruce; Xunhau Mo; Walter Torres; Joe Allison Vis Viswanathan; Rick Sadok; Steve Overbury; Viviana Schwartz

2011-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

215

Development of Comprehensive Detailed and Reduced Reaction Mechanisms for Syngas and Hydrogen Combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The collaborative research initiative culminated in amassing a substantial combustion database of experimental results for dry and moist mixtures of syngas and hydrogen (SGH), including autoignition times using a rapid compression machine as well as laminar flame speeds using a counterflow twin-flame configuration. These experimental data provided the basis for assessment of the kinetics of SGH combustion at elevated pressures using global uncertainty analysis methods. A review of the fundamental combustion characteristics of H{sub 2}/CO mixtures, with emphasis on ignition and flame propagation at high pressures was also conducted to understand the state of the art in SGH combustion. Investigation of the reaction kinetics of CO+HO{sub 2}{center_dot} {yields} CO{sub 2} + {center_dot}OH and HO{sub 2}+OH {yields} H{sub 2}O+O{sub 2} by ab initio calculations and master equation modeling was further carried out in order to look into the discrepancies between the experimental data and the results predicted by the mechanisms.

Chih-Jen Sung; Hai Wang; Angela Violi

2009-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

216

Investigation of H2 Concentration and Combustion Instability Effects on the Kinetics of Strained Syngas Flames  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The flame extinction limits of syngas (H{sub 2}-CO) flames were measured using a twin-flame-counter-flow burner. Plots of Extinction limits vs. global stretch rates were generated at different mixture compositions and an extrapolation method was used to calculate the flame extinction limit corresponding to an experimentally unattainable zero-stretch condition. The zero-stretch extinction limit of H{sub 2}-CO mixtures decreases (from rich to lean) with the increase in H{sub 2} concentration in the mixture. The average difference between the measured flame extinction limit and the Le Chatelier's calculation is around {approx} 7%. The measured OH{sup -} chemiluminescent data indicates that regardless of mixture compositions the OH radical concentration reduces (within the experimental uncertainties) to an extinction value prior to the flame extinction. Flame extinction limits of H{sub 2}-CO mixtures measured in a flat-flame burner configuration also show a similar relation. Additionally, the measured laminar flame velocity close to the extinction indicates that regardless of fuel composition the premixed flame of hydrogen fuel blends extinguishes when the mixture laminar flame velocity falls below a critical value. The critical laminar flame velocity at extinction for H{sub 2}-CO premixed flames (measured in the flat flame burner configuration) is found to be 3.77({+-}0.38) cm/s. An externally perturbed H{sub 2}-CO twin flame was not experimentally achievable for the mixture conditions used in the present investigation. A slightest perturbation in the flow-field distorts the H{sub 2}-CO twin-flame. The flame becomes highly unstable with the introduction of an externally excited flow oscillation.

Ahsan R. Choudhuri

2006-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

217

Comparison of monolith-supported metals for the direct oxidation of methane of syngas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The partial oxidation of CH[sub 4] in O[sub 2] near atmospheric pressure to produce syngas was investigated on monolith-supported Rh, Ni, Pt, Ir, Pd, Pd-La[sub 2]O[sub 3], Fe, Co, Re, and Ru catalysts in an autothermal flow reactor at residence times of [approximately]10 msec (GHSV [approximately] 100,000 hr[sup [minus]1]). Optimal CH[sub 4] conversion and CO and H[sub 2] selectivities of 0.89, 0.95, and 0.90, respectively, were achieved on Rh at 1000[angstrom]C with no loss in activity over many hours. Ni showed similar conversion and selectivities but deactivated. Experiments with up to 25 vol% H[sub 2]O added to the feed showed little evidence of the occurrence of steam reforming and water-gas shift reactions. Pt and Ir sustained stable reaction but a lower selectivities and conversion than Rh or Ni. Pd, Pd-La[sub 2]O[sub 3], and Co deactivated rapidly, while Re, Ru, and Fe would not sustain autothermal reaction. Ni and Re deactivated by volatilization and metal loss, while Pd-La[sub 2]O[sub 3] deactivated by carbon formation, and Pd deactivated by a combination of metal loss and carbon formation. Pd produced up to 14% selectivity to C[sub 2]H[sub 4] and C[sub 2]H[sub 4] and C[sub 2]H[sub 6], Pd-La[sub 2]O[sub 3] up to 5%, Pt [approximately] 1%, and other metals less than 0.2%. 10 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Torniainen, P.M.; Chu, X.; Schmidt, L.D. (Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis (United States))

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

From Cleanup to Stewardship. A companion report to Accelerating Cleanup: Paths to Closure and background information to support the scoping process required for the 1998 PEIS Settlement Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Long-term stewardship is expected to be needed at more than 100 DOE sites after DOE's Environmental Management program completes disposal, stabilization, and restoration operations to address waste and contamination resulting from nuclear research and nuclear weapons production conducted over the past 50 years. From Cleanup to stewardship provides background information on the Department of Energy (DOE) long-term stewardship obligations and activities. This document begins to examine the transition from cleanup to long-term stewardship, and it fulfills the Secretary's commitment to the President in the 1999 Performance Agreement to provide a companion report to the Department's Accelerating Cleanup: Paths to Closure report. It also provides background information to support the scoping process required for a study on long-term stewardship required by a 1998 Settlement Agreement.

None

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Options for improving hazardous waste cleanups using risk-based criteria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper explores how risk- and technology-based criteria are currently used in the RCRA and CERCLA cleanup programs. It identifies ways in which risk could be further incorporated into RCRA and CERCLA cleanup requirements and the implications of risk-based approaches. The more universal use of risk assessment as embodied in the risk communication and risk improvement bills before Congress is not addressed. Incorporating risk into the laws and regulations governing hazardous waste cleanup, will allow the use of the best scientific information available to further the goal of environmental protection in the United States while containing costs. and may help set an example for other countries that may be developing cleanup programs, thereby contributing to enhanced global environmental management.

Elcock, D.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

EM’s December Newsletter Recaps Cold War Cleanup Accomplishments in 2013  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

On Dec. 19, EM completed demolition of the 4.8 million-square-foot Building K-25 at Oak Ridge, a milestone that capped a busy and successful 2013 for the Cold War cleanup program.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature syngas cleanup" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident clean-up workers Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA CHEMICAL SPILL CLEAN-UP PROCEDURES Summary: workers are neither expected, nor allowed, to clean up chemical spills...

222

EA-1345: Cleanup and Closure of the Energy Technology Engineering Center  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE prepared an EA and finding of no significant impact (FONSI) for cleanup and closure of DOE’s Energy Technology Engineering Center at the Santa Susana Field Laboratory in 2003. However, DOE’s...

223

E-Print Network 3.0 - alternate soil clean-up Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3... . The coatings could also be used in clean-up procedures for .ion- radioactive pollutants. 5. Acknowledgments... T>*0>JOOo3>2> Riso M-2912 M The Characterization and Removal...

224

Time series study of urban rainfall suppression during clean-up periods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effect on urban rainfall of pollution aerosols is studied both by data analysis and computational simulation. Our study examines data for urban areas undergoing decadal clean-up. We compare the annual precipitation between polluted sites...

Geng, Jun

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

225

Time series study of urban rainfall suppression during clean-up periods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effect on urban rainfall of pollution aerosols is studied both by data analysis and computational simulation. Our study examines data for urban areas undergoing decadal clean-up. We compare the annual precipitation between polluted sites...

Geng, Jun

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

226

Development of a Calicum-Based Sorbent for Hot Gas Cleanup.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Further review of the technical literature has provided additional information which will support the development of a superior calcium-based sorbent for hot gas cleanup in IGCC systems. Two general methods of sorbent preparation are being investigated. One method involves impregnating a porous refractory substrate with calcium while another method involves pelletizing lime or other calcium containing materials with a suitable binder. Several potential substrates, which are made of alumina and are commercially available, have been characterized by various methods. The surface area and apparent density of the materials have been measured, and it has been shown that some of the high surface area materials (i.e., 200-400 m{sub 2}/g) undergo a large decrease in surface area when heated to higher temperatures. Some of the lower surface area materials (i.e., 1-30 m{sub 2}/g) have been successfully impregnated with calcium by soaking them in a calcium nitrate solution and then heat treating them to decompose the nitrate. Potentially useful sorbents have also been prepared by pelletizing type I Portland cement and mixtures of cement and lime.

Wheelock, T.W.; Constant, K.; Doraiswamy, L.K.; Akiti, T.; Zhu, J.; Amanda, A.; Roe, R.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Hydrogen production by high-temperature steam gasification of biomass and coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-temperature steam gasification of paper, yellow pine woodchips, and Pittsburgh bituminous coal was investigated in a batch-type flow reactor at temperatures in the range of 700 to 1,200{sup o}C at two different ratios of steam to feedstock molar ratios. Hydrogen yield of 54.7% for paper, 60.2% for woodchips, and 57.8% for coal was achieved on a dry basis, with a steam flow rate of 6.3 g/min at steam temperature of 1,200{sup o}C. Yield of both the hydrogen and carbon monoxide increased while carbon dioxide and methane decreased with the increase in gasification temperature. A 10-fold reduction in tar residue was obtained at high-temperature steam gasification, compared to low temperatures. Steam and gasification temperature affects the composition of the syngas produced. Higher steam-to-feedstock molar ratio had negligible effect on the amount of hydrogen produced in the syngas in the fixed-batch type of reactor. Gasification temperature can be used to control the amounts of hydrogen or methane produced from the gasification process. This also provides mean to control the ratio of hydrogen to CO in the syngas, which can then be processed to produce liquid hydrocarbon fuel since the liquid fuel production requires an optimum ratio between hydrogen and CO. The syngas produced can be further processed to produce pure hydrogen. Biomass fuels are good source of renewable fuels to produce hydrogen or liquid fuels using controlled steam gasification.

Kriengsak, S.N.; Buczynski, R.; Gmurczyk, J.; Gupta, A.K. [University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

228

Alternative formulations of regenerable flue gas cleanup catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The major source of man-made SO{sub 2} in the atmosphere is the burning of coal for electric power generation. Coal-fired utility plants are also large sources of NO{sub x} pollution. Regenerable flue gas desulfurization/NO{sub x} abatement catalysts provide one mechanism of simultaneously removing SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} species from flue gases released into the atmosphere. The purpose of this project is to examine routes of optimizing the adsorption efficiency, the adsorption capacity, and the ease of regeneration of regenerable flue gas cleanup catalysts. We are investigating two different mechanisms for accomplishing this goal. The first involves the use of different alkali and alkaline earth metals as promoters for the alumina sorbents to increase the surface basicity of the sorbent and thus adjust the number and distribution of adsorption sites. The second involves investigation of non-aqueous impregnation, as opposed to aqueous impregnation, as a method to obtain an evenly dispersed monolayer of the promoter on the surface.

Mitchell, M.B.; White, M.G.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

High-level waste vitrification off-gas cleanup technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This brief overview is intended to be a basis for discussion of needs and problems existing in the off-gas clean-up technology. A variety of types of waste form and processes are being developed in the United States and abroad. A description of many of the processes can be found in the Technical Alternative Documents (TAD). Concurrently, off-gas processing systems are being developed with most of the processes. An extensive review of methodology as well as decontamination factors can be found in the literature. Since it is generally agreed that the most advanced solidification process is vitrification, discussion here centers about the off-gas problems related to vitrification. With a number of waste soldification facilities around the world in operation, it can be shown that present technology can satisfy the present requirement for off-gas control. However, a number of areas within the technology base show potential for improvement. Fundamental as well as verification studies are needed to obtain the improvements.

Hanson, M.S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Active-to-Passive Environmental Cleanup Transition Strategies - 13220  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site uses a graded approach to environmental cleanup. The selection of groundwater and vadose zone remediation technologies for a specific contamination area is based on the size, contaminant type, contaminant concentration, and configuration of the plume. These attributes are the result of the nature and mass of the source of contamination and the subsurface characteristics in the area of the plume. Many large plumes consist of several zones that are most efficiently addressed with separate complementary corrective action/remedial technologies. The highest concentrations of contaminants are found in the source zone. The most robust, high mass removal technologies are often best suited for remediation of the source zone. In the primary plume zone, active remedies, such as pump-and-treat, may be necessary to remove contaminants and exert hydraulic control of the plume. In the dilute fringe zone, contaminants are generally lower in concentration and can often be treated with passive techniques. A key determination in achieving an acceptable and cost-effective end state for a given waste unit is when to transition from an active treatment system to a more passive or natural approach (e.g., monitored natural attenuation or enhanced attenuation). This paper will discuss the considerations for such a transition as well as provide examples of successful transitions at the Savannah River Site. (authors)

Gaughan, Thomas F. [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Aylward, Robert S.; Denham, Miles E.; Looney, Brian B. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Whitaker, Wade C. [Department of Energy - Savannah River, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Department of Energy - Savannah River, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Mills, Gary L. [Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Assessment of coal gasification/hot gas cleanup based advanced gas turbine systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The major objectives of the joint SCS/DOE study of air-blown gasification power plants with hot gas cleanup are to: (1) Evaluate various power plant configurations to determine if an air-blown gasification-based power plant with hot gas cleanup can compete against pulverized coal with flue gas desulfurization for baseload expansion at Georgia Power Company's Plant Wansley; (2) determine if air-blown gasification with hot gas cleanup is more cost effective than oxygen-blown IGCC with cold gas cleanup; (3) perform Second-Law/Thermoeconomic Analysis of air-blown IGCC with hot gas cleanup and oxygen-blown IGCC with cold gas cleanup; (4) compare cost, performance, and reliability of IGCC based on industrial gas turbines and ISTIG power island configurations based on aeroderivative gas turbines; (5) compare cost, performance, and reliability of large (400 MW) and small (100 to 200 MW) gasification power plants; and (6) compare cost, performance, and reliability of air-blown gasification power plants using fluidized-bed gasifiers to air-blown IGCC using transport gasification and pressurized combustion.

Not Available

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

PROGRESS & CHALLENGES IN CLEANUP OF HANFORDS TANK WASTES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The River Protection Project (RPP), which is managed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of River Protection (ORP), is highly complex from technical, regulatory, legal, political, and logistical perspectives and is the largest ongoing environmental cleanup project in the world. Over the past three years, ORP has made significant advances in its planning and execution of the cleanup of the Hartford tank wastes. The 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs), 28 double-shell tanks (DSTs), and 60 miscellaneous underground storage tanks (MUSTs) at Hanford contain approximately 200,000 m{sup 3} (53 million gallons) of mixed radioactive wastes, some of which dates back to the first days of the Manhattan Project. The plan for treating and disposing of the waste stored in large underground tanks is to: (1) retrieve the waste, (2) treat the waste to separate it into high-level (sludge) and low-activity (supernatant) fractions, (3) remove key radionuclides (e.g., Cs-137, Sr-90, actinides) from the low-activity fraction to the maximum extent technically and economically practical, (4) immobilize both the high-level and low-activity waste fractions by vitrification, (5) interim store the high-level waste fraction for ultimate disposal off-site at the federal HLW repository, (6) dispose the low-activity fraction on-site in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF), and (7) close the waste management areas consisting of tanks, ancillary equipment, soils, and facilities. Design and construction of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), the cornerstone of the RPP, has progressed substantially despite challenges arising from new seismic information for the WTP site. We have looked closely at the waste and aligned our treatment and disposal approaches with the waste characteristics. For example, approximately 11,000 m{sup 3} (2-3 million gallons) of metal sludges in twenty tanks were not created during spent nuclear fuel reprocessing and have low fission product concentrations. We plan to treat these wastes as transuranic waste (TRU) for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), which will reduce the WTP system processing time by three years. We are also developing and testing bulk vitrification as a technology to supplement the WTP LAW vitrification facility for immobilizing the massive volume of LAW. We will conduct a full-scale demonstration of the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System by immobilizing up to 1,100 m{sup 3} (300,000 gallons) of tank S-109 low-curie soluble waste from which Cs-137 had previously been removed. This past year has been marked by both progress and new challenges. The focus of our tank farm work has been retrieving waste from the old single-shell tanks (SSTs). We have completed waste retrieval from three SSTs and are conducting retrieval operations on an additional three SSTs. While most waste retrievals have gone about as expected, we have faced challenges with some recalcitrant tank heel wastes that required enhanced approaches. Those enhanced approaches ranged from oxalic acid additions to deploying a remote high-pressure water lance. As with all large, long-term projects that employ first of a kind technologies, we continue to be challenged to control costs and maintain schedule. However, it is most important to work safely and to provide facilities that will do the job they are intended to do.

HEWITT, W.M.; SCHEPENS, R.

2006-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

233

Cleanup under Airlock of an Old Uranium Foundry - 13273  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 2004, AREVA's subsidiary SICN has been conducting the cleanup and dismantling of an old uranium foundry located in the town of Annecy (France). The first operations consisted in the removal of the foundry's production equipment, producing more than 300 metric tons (MT) of waste. The second step consisted in performing the radiological characterization of the 1,600 m{sup 2} (17,200 ft{sup 2}) building, including underground trenches and galleries. The building was precisely inventoried, based on operations records and direct measurements. All sub-surfaces, which needed to be cleaned up were characterized, and a determination of the contamination migration was established, in particular with trenches and galleries. The wall thicknesses to be treated were empirically justified, knowing that the maximal migration depth inside concrete is 5 mm for a liquid transfer vector. All singularities such as cracks, anchoring points, etc. were spotted for a complete and systematic treatment. Building structures not laying directly on the soil, such as floor slabs, were not cleaned up but directly deconstructed and disposed of as waste. The facility was located within the town of Annecy. Therefore, in order to avoid the risk of dusts dispersion and public exposure during the building deconstruction and the soil treatment, a third of the building's surface was confined in a sliding airlock built from a metal structure capable of resisting to wind and snow, which are frequent in this area. This particular structure provided a static confinement over the half of the building which was covered and a dynamic confinement using a ventilation and high efficiency air filtration system, sized to provide 2.5 air changes per hour. The enclosure and its metallic structure is 33 m long (108 feet), 25 m wide (82 feet), and 13 m high (42 feet), for a volume of 10,000 m{sup 3} (353,000 ft{sup 3}). It was made up of a double skin envelope, allowing the recycling of its structure and outside envelope. After cleaning up and dismantling the first portion of the building, the enclosure was repositioned on the second and the last third of the building, by sliding it on support pads. Almost 7,000 m{sup 2} of concrete surface has been treated with no dust dispersion outside the enclosure. After treatment, all the remaining surfaces were controlled by an independent entity to verify their acceptability with regards to residual contamination (less than 0.4 Bq/cm{sup 2} (24 DPM) for alpha contamination and less than 1 Bq/g of total uranium). Approximately 1,900 MT of equipment and waste were generated in batches of 1m{sup 3}, in order to be staged on site, and then characterized and packaged in 20 foot containers for shipment to the final ANDRA repository. The package certification included the verification of the physical and chemical characteristics and the radiological characteristics (mass activity, dose rate, and residual outside surface contamination). Finally, after cleanup and dismantling of the foundry, a concrete slab was poured on the free surface as a clean base for implementation of new activities. (authors)

Thuillier, Daniel; Houee, Jean-Marie [AREVA D and D BU, Paris La Defense (France)] [AREVA D and D BU, Paris La Defense (France); Chambon, Frederic [AREVA FEDERAL SERVICES, Columbia MD (United States)] [AREVA FEDERAL SERVICES, Columbia MD (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Modeling of Plasma-Assisted Conversion of Liquid Ethanol into Hydrogen Enriched Syngas in the Nonequilibrium Electric Discharge Plasma-Liquid System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work we report recent results of our experimental and theoretical studies related to plasma conversion of liquid ethanol into hydrogen-enriched syngas in the plasma-liquid system with the electric discharge in a gas channel with liquid wall using available diagnostics and numerical modeling.

Levko, Dmitry; Naumov, Vadim; Chernyak, Valery; Yukhymenko, Vitaly; Prysiazhnevych, Irina; Olszewski, Sergey

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

North Slope (Wahluke Slope) expedited response action cleanup plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this action is to mitigate any threat to public health and the environment from hazards on the North Slope and meet the expedited response action (ERA) objective of cleanup to a degree requiring no further action. The ERA may be the final remediation of the 100-I-3 Operable Unit. A No Action record of decision (ROD) may be issued after remediation completion. The US Department of Energy (DOE) currently owns or administers approximately 140 mi{sup 2} (about 90,000 acres) of land north and east of the Columbia River (referred to as the North Slope) that is part of the Hanford Site. The North Slope, also commonly known as the Wahluke Slope, was not used for plutonium production or support facilities; it was used for military air defense of the Hanford Site and vicinity. The North Slope contained seven antiaircraft gun emplacements and three Nike-Ajax missile positions. These military positions were vacated in 1960--1961 as the defense requirements at Hanford changed. They were demolished in 1974. Prior to government control in 1943, the North Slope was homesteaded. Since the initiation of this ERA in the summer of 1992, DOE signed the modified Hanford Federal Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) with the Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in which a milestone was set to complete remediation activities and a draft closeout report by October 1994. Remediation activities will make the North Slope area available for future non-DOE uses. Thirty-nine sites have undergone limited characterization to determine if significant environmental hazards exist. This plan documents the results of that characterization and evaluates the potential remediation alternatives.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

An experimental and kinetic study of syngas/air combustion at elevated temperatures and the effect of water addition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and can be derived from a num- ber of sources such as coal, biomass gasification or from natural gas expanding flame configuration. The measured laminar flame speeds were compared with simulations using with three existing chemical kinetic models ­ GRI Mech 3.0, H2/CO Davis Mechanism and San Diego mecha- nism

Qiao, Li

237

An Act Relative to Environmental Cleanup and Promoting the Redevelopment of Contaminated Property- The “Brownfields” Act (Massachusetts)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts provides liability relief and financial incentives aimed to encourage cleanup and redevelopment of contaminated sites. Financial incentives include encouraging...

238

Surface and subsurface cleanup protocol for radionuclides, Gunnison, Colorado, UMTRA project processing site. Final [report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Surface and subsurface soil cleanup protocols for the Gunnison, Colorado, processing sits are summarized as follows: In accordance with EPA-promulgated land cleanup standards (40 CFR 192), in situ Ra-226 is to be cleaned up based on bulk concentrations not exceeding 5 and 15 pCi/g in 15-cm surface and subsurface depth increments, averaged over 100-m{sup 2} grid blocks, where the parent Ra-226 concentrations are greater than, or in secular equilibrium with, the Th-230 parent. A bulk interpretation of these EPA standards has been accepted by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and while the concentration of the finer-sized soil fraction less than a No. 4 mesh sieve contains the higher concentration of radioactivity, the bulk approach in effect integrates the total sample radioactivity over the entire sample mass. In locations where Th-230 has differentially migrated in subsoil relative to Ra-226, a Th-230 cleanup protocol has been developed in accordance with Supplemental Standard provisions of 40 CFR 192 for NRC/Colorado Department of Health (CDH) approval for timely implementation. Detailed elements of the protocol are contained in Appendix A, Generic Protocol from Thorium-230 Cleanup/Verification at UMTRA Project Processing Sites. The cleanup of other radionuclides or nonradiological hazards that pose a significant threat to the public and the environment will be determined and implemented in accordance with pathway analysis to assess impacts and the implications of ALARA specified in 40 CFR 192 relative to supplemental standards.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Sectored Clean-up Work Plan for Housekeeping Category Waste Sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Sectored Clean-up Work Plan (SCWP) replaces the Housekeeping Category Corrective Action Unit Work Plan and provides a strategy to be used for conducting housekeeping activities using a sectored clean-up approach. This work plan provides a process by which one or more existing housekeeping category Corrective Action Sites (CASS) from the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order and/or non-FFACO designated waste site(s) are grouped into a sector for simultaneous remediation and cleanup. This increases effectiveness and efficiencies in labor, materials, equipment, cost, and time. This plan is an effort by the U.S. Department of Energy to expedite work in a more organized and efficient approach. The objectives of this plan are to: Group housekeeping FFACO CASS and non-FFACO housekeeping sites into sectors and remediate during the same field visit; Provide consistent documentation on FFACO CAS and non-FFACO clean-up activities; Perform similar activities under one approved document; Remediate areas inside the Deactivation and Decommissioning facilities and compounds in a campaign-style remediation; and Increase efficiencies and cost-effectiveness, accelerate cleanups, reduce mobilization, demobilization, and remediation costs.

S. J. Nacht

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Evaluation of sorbents for the cleanup of coal-derived synthesis gas at elevated temperatures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) with carbon dioxide capture is a promising technology to produce electricity from coal at a higher efficiency than with traditional subcritical pulverized coal (PC) power plants. ...

Couling, David Joseph

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature syngas cleanup" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

2020 Vision for Tank Waste Cleanup (One System Integration) - 12506  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mission of the Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (ORP) is to safely retrieve and treat the 56 million gallons of Hanford's tank waste and close the Tank Farms to protect the Columbia River. The millions of gallons of waste are a by-product of decades of plutonium production. After irradiated fuel rods were taken from the nuclear reactors to the processing facilities at Hanford they were exposed to a series of chemicals designed to dissolve away the rod, which enabled workers to retrieve the plutonium. Once those chemicals were exposed to the fuel rods they became radioactive and extremely hot. They also couldn't be used in this process more than once. Because the chemicals are caustic and extremely hazardous to humans and the environment, underground storage tanks were built to hold these chemicals until a more permanent solution could be found. The Cleanup of Hanford's 56 million gallons of radioactive and chemical waste stored in 177 large underground tanks represents the Department's largest and most complex environmental remediation project. Sixty percent by volume of the nation's high-level radioactive waste is stored in the underground tanks grouped into 18 'tank farms' on Hanford's central plateau. Hanford's mission to safely remove, treat and dispose of this waste includes the construction of a first-of-its-kind Waste Treatment Plant (WTP), ongoing retrieval of waste from single-shell tanks, and building or upgrading the waste feed delivery infrastructure that will deliver the waste to and support operations of the WTP beginning in 2019. Our discussion of the 2020 Vision for Hanford tank waste cleanup will address the significant progress made to date and ongoing activities to manage the operations of the tank farms and WTP as a single system capable of retrieving, delivering, treating and disposing Hanford's tank waste. The initiation of hot operations and subsequent full operations of the WTP are not only dependent upon the successful design and construction of the WTP, but also on appropriately preparing the tank farms and waste feed delivery infrastructure to reliably and consistently deliver waste feed to the WTP for many decades. The key components of the 2020 vision are: all WTP facilities are commissioned, turned-over and operational, achieving the earliest possible hot operations of completed WTP facilities, and supplying low-activity waste (LAW) feed directly to the LAW Facility using in-tank/near tank supplemental treatment technologies. A One System Integrated Project Team (IPT) was recently formed to focus on developing and executing the programs that will be critical to successful waste feed delivery and WTP startup. The team is comprised of members from Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI), Washington River Protection Solutions LLC (WRPS), and DOE-ORP and DOE-WTP. The IPT will combine WTP and WRPS capabilities in a mission-focused model that is clearly defined, empowered and cost efficient. The genesis for this new team and much of the 2020 vision is based on the work of an earlier team that was tasked with identifying the optimum approach to startup, commissioning, and turnover of WTP facilities for operations. This team worked backwards from 2020 - a date when the project will be completed and steady-state operations will be underway - and identified success criteria to achieving safe and efficient operations of the WTP. The team was not constrained by any existing contract work scope, labor, or funding parameters. Several essential strategies were identified to effectively realize the one-system model of integrated feed stream delivery, WTP operations, and product delivery, and to accomplish the team's vision of hot operations beginning in 2016: - Use a phased startup and turnover approach that will allow WTP facilities to be transitioned to an operational state on as short a timeline as credible. - Align Tank Farm (TF) and WTP objectives such that feed can be supplied to the WTP when it is required for hot operations. - Ensure immobilized waste and waste recycle streams can be recei

Harp, Benton; Charboneau, Stacy; Olds, Erik [US DOE (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

SOx-NOx-Rox Box{trademark} flue gas clean-up demonstration. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The SNRB{trademark} Flue Gas Cleanup Demonstration Project was cooperatively funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO), B&W, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Ohio Edison, Norton Chemical Process Products Company and the 3M Company. The SNRB{trademark} technology evolved from the bench and laboratory pilot scale to be successfully demonstrated at the 5-MWe field scale. Development of the SNRB{trademark} process at B&W began with pilot testing of high-temperature dry sorbent injection for SO{sub 2} removal in the 1960`s. Integration of NO{sub x} reduction was evaluated in the 1970`s. Pilot work in the 1980`s focused on evaluation of various NO{sub x} reduction catalysts, SO{sub 2} sorbents and integration of the catalyst with the baghouse. This early development work led to the issuance of two US process patents to B&W - No. 4,309,386 and No. 4,793,981. An additional patent application for improvements to the process is pending. The OCDO was instrumental in working with B&W to develop the process to the point where a larger scale demonstration of the technology was feasible. This report represents the completion of Milestone M14 as specified in the Work Plan. B&W tested the SNRB{trademark} pollution control system at a 5-MWe demonstration facility at Ohio Edison`s R. E. Burger Plant located near Shadyside, Ohio. The design and operation were influenced by the results from laboratory pilot testing at B&W`s Alliance Research Center. The intent was to demonstrate the commercial feasibility of the SNRB{trademark} process. The SNRB{trademark} facility treated a 30,000 ACFM flue gas slipstream from Boiler No. 8. Operation of the facility began in May 1992 and was completed in May 1993.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Studies of Plutonium Aerosol Resuspension at the Time of the Maralinga Cleanup  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the former nuclear test site at Maralinga, South Australia, soil cleanup began in October 1996 with the objective to remove the potential for residual plutonium (Pu) exposures to the public. In this case the cleanup was to restore access to the closed test site. The proposed long-term land use was primarily to be a hunting area for Pitjantjatjara (Aboriginal) people, but also presumably to be available to the public who might have an interest in the history of the site. The long-term management objective for the site was to allow casual use, but to prohibit habitation. The goal of this study is to provide an evaluation of the Maralinga soil cleanup in terms of potential long-term public inhalation exposures to particulate Pu, and in terms of a contribution to planning and conducting any such soil Pu-cleanup. Such cleanups might be carried out for example, on the Nevada Test Site in the United States. For Pu that has been deposited on the soil by atmospheric sources of finely divided particles, the dominant exposure pathway to humans is by inhalation. Other exposure pathways are less important because the Pu particles become oxidized into a nearly insoluble form, do not easily enter into the food chain, nor are they significantly transferred through the intestine to the bloodstream should Pu become ingested. The purpose of this report is to provide results of the Pu resuspension measurements made before, during, and after the Pu cleanup at Maralinga, to compare these against similar measurements made elsewhere, and to interpret the results as they relate to potential long-term public exposures. (Exposures to Pu in dust plumes produced by mechanical disturbance during cleanup are considered short-term, unlikely to be significant for purposes of this report, and are not included). A considerable amount of research had been conducted at Maralinga by the Australian Radiation Laboratory, now the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA), prior to the cleanup (Johnston et al, 1992, Williams 1993, Johnston et al 1993, Burns et al 1994, Burns et al 1995). ARPANSA staff made major contributions to delineate the areas with Pu in the soil, to determine the degree of secondary soil contamination by fission products from nuclear testing, to measure Pu resuspension by wind erosion of the undisturbed soil, and to prepare assessments of the human health risk from residual soil Pu. In addition, ARPANSA supported the Maralinga cleanup to assure compliance with criteria set by an independent technical advisory committee. During the cleanup ARPANSA monitored the residual Pu in the soil and certified that the cleanup was complete according to the criteria. It was not the reduction in potential inhalation exposure that usually was the main driver of the cleanup, but the requirement to also remove individual hot particles and fragments. It is the residual microscopic particles of Pu in the soil, however, that have the potential for long-term human exposure. The resuspension of respirable-size Pu particles has been studied with specialized equipment at the Nevada Test Site (Gilbert et al 1988a, Gilbert et al 1988b, Shinn et al 1989, and Shinn 1992), and at Bikini and Enewetak in the Marshall Islands (Shinn et al 1997). These efforts were in large part contributed by the Health and Ecological Assessment Division, University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The study reported here is a collaboration between ARPANSA and LLNL, and was jointly supported by the United States Department of Energy, and the Commonwealth of Australia Department of Primary Industry and Energy.

Shinn, J

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Method for high temperature mercury capture from gas streams  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process to facilitate mercury extraction from high temperature flue/fuel gas via the use of metal sorbents which capture mercury at ambient and high temperatures. The spent sorbents can be regenerated after exposure to mercury. The metal sorbents can be used as pure metals (or combinations of metals) or dispersed on an inert support to increase surface area per gram of metal sorbent. Iridium and ruthenium are effective for mercury removal from flue and smelter gases. Palladium and platinum are effective for mercury removal from fuel gas (syngas). An iridium-platinum alloy is suitable for metal capture in many industrial effluent gas streams including highly corrosive gas streams.

Granite, E.J.; Pennline, H.W.

2006-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

245

Hanford Site Cleanup Challenges and Opportunities for Science and Technology--A Strategic Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The sheer expanse of the Hanford Site, the inherent hazards associated with the significant inventory of nuclear materials and wastes, the large number of aging contaminated facilities, the diverse nature and extent of environmental contamination, and the proximity to the Columbia River make Hanford perhaps the world's largest and most complex environmental cleanup project. It is not possible to address the more complex elements of this enormous challenge in a cost-effective manner without strategic investments in science and technology. Success requires vigorous and sustained efforts to enhance the science and technology basis, develop and deploy innovative solutions, and provide firm scientific bases to support site cleanup and closure decisions at Hanford.

Wood, Thomas W.; Johnson, Wayne L.; Kreid, Dennis K.; Walton, Terry L.

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

``How clean is clean`` in the United States federal and Washington State cleanup regulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The enactment of legislation and promulgation of implementing regulations generally involves the resolution of conflicting goals. Defining ``How Clean is Clean?`` in federal and state cleanup laws, regulations, and policies is no exception. Answering the ``How Clean is Clean?`` question has resulted in the identification of some important and sometimes conflicting goals. Continuing resolution of the following conflicting goals is the key to effect cleanup of hazardous waste sites: Expediency vs. Fairness; Flexibility vs. Consistency; Risk Reduction vs. Risk Causation; and Permanence vs. Cost Effectiveness.

Landau, H.G. [Landau Associates, Inc., Edmonds, WA (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

247

Preliminary evaluation of a concept using microwave energy to improve an adsorption-based, natural gas clean-up process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the results of a preliminary evaluation performed to: (1) determine if microwave energy could be used to regenerate a zeolite adsorbent and (2) to evaluate the feasibility of using microwave energy to improve the desorption phase of a pressure swing adsorption process applied to upgrading natural gas (methane) contaminated with nitrogen. Microwave regeneration was evaluated by comparing the adsorption characteristics of a zeolite preconditioned by heating under vacuum to the characteristics of the same zeolite after various lengths of exposure to microwave energy. The applicability of microwave regeneration to natural gas cleanup was evaluated by measuring the rise in adsorbent temperature resulting from the microwave exposure. Microwave energy consumed by heating the adsorbent is not productive and must therefore be minimal for a process to be economically viable. Exposure of the methane-saturated chabazite for 2 minutes to microwave energy effectively regenerated the adsorbent, but resulted in a 75{degrees}F (42{degrees}C) rise in adsorbent temperature. This temperature rise indicates that the concept is unacceptable for natural gas processing due to excessive energy consumption.

Grimes, R.W.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

DECOMMISSIONING AND ENVRIONMENTAL CLEANUP OF SMALL ARMS TRAINING FACILITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

USDOE performed a (CERCLA) non-time critical removal (NTCR) action at the Small Arms Training Area (SATA) Site Evaluation Area (SEA) located at the Savannah River Site (SRS), in Aiken, South Carolina. From 1951 to May 2010, the SATA was used as a small weapons practice and qualifying firing range. The SATA consisted of 870.1 ha (2,150 ac) of woodlands and open field, of which approximately 2.9 ha (7.3 ac) were used as a firing range. The SATA facility was comprised of three small arms ranges (one static and two interactive), storage buildings for supplies, a weapons cleaning building, and a control building. Additionally, a 113- m (370-ft) long earthen berm was used as a target backstop during live-fire exercises. The berm soils accumulated a large amount of spent lead bullets in the berm face during the facilities 59- years of operation. The accumulation of lead was such that soil concentrations exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) residential and industrial worker regional screening levels (RSLs). The RSL threshold values are based on standardized exposure scenarios that estimate contaminant concentrations in soil that the USEPA considers protective of humans over a lifetime. For the SATA facility, lead was present in soil at concentrations that exceed both the current residential (400 mg/kg) and industrial (800 mg/kg) RSLs. In addition, the concentration of lead in the soil exceeded the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) (40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 261.24) regulatory limit. The TCLP analysis simulates landfill conditions and is designed to determine the mobility of contaminants in waste. In addition, a principal threat source material (PTSM) evaluation, human health risk assessment (HHRA), and contaminant migration (CM) analysis were conducted to evaluate soil contamination at the SATA SEA. This evaluation determined that there were no contaminants present that constitute PTSM and the CM analysis revealed that no constituents posed a migration risk to groundwater. The NTCR action involved removal of approximately 12,092 m3 (15,816 yd3) of spent bullets and lead-impacted soil and off-site disposal. The removal action included soils from the berm area, a fill area that received scraped soils from the berm, and soil from a drainage ditch located on the edge of the berm area. Also included in the removal action was a mixture of soil, concrete, and asphalt from the other three range areas. Under this action, 11,796 m3 (15,429 yd3) of hazardous waste and impacted soil were removed from the SATA and transported to a permitted hazardous waste disposal facility (Lone Mountain Facility in Oklahoma) and 296 m3 (387 yd3) of nonhazardous waste (primarily concrete debris) were removed and transported to a local solid waste landfill for disposal. During the excavation process, the extent was continuously assessed through the use of a hand-held, field-portable X-ray fluorescence unit with results verified using confirmation sampling with certified laboratory analysis. Following the completion of the excavation and confirmation sampling, final contouring, grading, and establishment of vegetative cover was performed to stabilize the affected areas. The NTCR action began on August 17, 2010, and mechanical completion was achieved on April 27, 2011. The selected removal action met the removal action objectives (RAOs), is protective of human health and the environment both in the short- and long-term, was successful in removing potential ecological risks, and is protective of surface water and groundwater. Furthermore, the selected NTCR action met residential cleanup goals and resulted in the release of the SEA from restricted use contributing to the overall footprint reduction at SRS.

Kmetz, T.

2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

249

Guardian Unlimited | The Guardian | Scientists see big role for uranium clean-up bug Sign in Register  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Guardian Unlimited | The Guardian | Scientists see big role for uranium clean-up bug Sign big role for uranium clean-up bug Alok Jha, science correspondent Friday December 12, 2003 The Guardian Scientists have sequenced the DNA of a bacterium which can help to remove uranium from

Lovley, Derek

250

Cleanup Verification Package for the 100-F-20, Pacific Northwest Laboratory Parallel Pits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 100-F-20, Pacific Northwest Laboratory Parallel Pits waste site. This waste site consisted of two earthen trenches thought to have received both radioactive and nonradioactive material related to the 100-F Experimental Animal Farm.

M. J. Appel

2007-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

251

CHEAP CLEAN-UP PROTOCOL To clean BigDye reactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHEAP CLEAN-UP PROTOCOL To clean BigDye reactions: 1. Combine and mix MgCl2/ethanol cocktail. 2. Air dry on a Kimwipe or pulse spin upside down. MgCl2/ethanol 1 µL 0.5M MgCl2 1000 µL 70% ethanol

Russell, Amy L.

252

Idaho Site’s Cold War Cleanup Takes Center Stage in Publication  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

IDAHO FALLS, Idaho – An association with more than 29,000 members featured an in-depth article on EM’s extensive Cold War legacy cleanup at the Idaho site in the current issue of its publication, The Military Engineer.

253

Roundtable on Long-Term Management In The Cleanup of Contaminated Sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Center for Public Environmental Oversight (CPEO) convened a roundtable in Washington, DC on June 28, 2002 to discuss innovative approaches to long-term management in the cleanup of contaminated property. Twenty participants attended the meeting, including representatives of federal agencies, local government, state regulatory agencies, environmental organizations, and thinking tanks, as well as private consultants with experience in site remediation and redevelopment.

Aimee Houghton

2002-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

254

Radiation protection and decision-making on cleanup of contaminated urban environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

--4000 Roskilde,4000 Roskilde, DenmarkDenmark NKS Conference on Radioactive Contamination in Urban Areas-making NKS Conference on Radioactive Contamination in Urban Areas, Risø National Laboratory, 7 - 9 May 2003Justification of cleanup NKS Conference on Radioactive Contamination in Urban Areas, Risø National Laboratory, 7 - 9 May

255

Cleanup Verification Package for the 126-F-1, 184-F Powerhouse Ash Pit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 126-F-1, 184-F Powerhouse Ash Pit. This waste site received coal ash from the 100-F Area coal-fired steam plant. Leakage of process effluent from the 116-F-14 , 107-F Retention Basins flowed south into the ash pit, contaminating the northern portion.

S. W. Clark and H. M Sulloway

2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

256

Cleanup Verification Package for the 126-F-1, 184-F Powerhouse Ash Pit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 126-F-1, 184-F Powerhouse Ash Pit. This waste site received coal ash from the 100-F Area coal-fired steam plant. Leakage of process effluent from the 116-F-14 , 107-F Retention Basins flowed south into the ash pit, contaminating the northern portion.

S. W. Clark and H. M. Sulloway

2007-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

257

Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-C-1, 105-C Solid Waste Burial Ground  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 118-C-1, 105-C Solid Waste Burial Ground. This waste site was the primary burial ground for general wastes from the operation of the 105-C Reactor and received process tubes, aluminum fuel spacers, control rods, reactor hardware, spent nuclear fuel and soft wastes.

M. J. Appel and J. M. Capron

2007-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

258

LIQUID BIO-FUEL PRODUCTION FROM NON-FOOD BIOMASS VIA HIGH TEMPERATURE STEAM ELECTROLYSIS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bio-Syntrolysis is a hybrid energy process that enables production of synthetic liquid fuels that are compatible with the existing conventional liquid transportation fuels infrastructure. Using biomass as a renewable carbon source, and supplemental hydrogen from high-temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE), bio-syntrolysis has the potential to provide a significant alternative petroleum source that could reduce US dependence on imported oil. Combining hydrogen from HTSE with CO from an oxygen-blown biomass gasifier yields syngas to be used as a feedstock for synthesis of liquid transportation fuels via a Fischer-Tropsch process. Conversion of syngas to liquid hydrocarbon fuels, using a biomass-based carbon source, expands the application of renewable energy beyond the grid to include transportation fuels. It can also contribute to grid stability associated with non-dispatchable power generation. The use of supplemental hydrogen from HTSE enables greater than 90% utilization of the biomass carbon content which is about 2.5 times higher than carbon utilization associated with traditional cellulosic ethanol production. If the electrical power source needed for HTSE is based on nuclear or renewable energy, the process is carbon neutral. INL has demonstrated improved biomass processing prior to gasification. Recyclable biomass in the form of crop residue or energy crops would serve as the feedstock for this process. A process model of syngas production using high temperature electrolysis and biomass gasification is presented. Process heat from the biomass gasifier is used to heat steam for the hydrogen production via the high temperature steam electrolysis process. Oxygen produced form the electrolysis process is used to control the oxidation rate in the oxygen-blown biomass gasifier. Based on the gasifier temperature, 94% to 95% of the carbon in the biomass becomes carbon monoxide in the syngas (carbon monoxide and hydrogen). Assuming the thermal efficiency of the power cycle for electricity generation is 50%, (as expected from GEN IV nuclear reactors), the syngas production efficiency ranges from 70% to 73% as the gasifier temperature decreases from 1900 K to 1500 K. Parametric studies of system pressure, biomass moisture content and low temperature alkaline electrolysis are also presented.

G. L. Hawkes; J. E. O'Brien; M. G. McKellar

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Fiber optic temperature sensor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our fiber optic temperature measurement sensor and system is a major improvement over methods currently in use in most industrial processes, and it delivers all of the attributes required simplicity, accuracy, and cost efficiency-to help improve all of these processes. Because temperature is a basic physical attribute of nearly every industrial and commercial process, our system can eventually result in significant improvements in nearly every industrial and commercial process. Many finished goods, and the materials that go into them, are critically dependent on the temperature. The better the temperature measurement, the better quality the goods will be and the more economically they can be produced. The production and transmission of energy requires the monitoring of temperature in motors, circuit breakers, power generating plants, and transmission line equipment. The more reliable and robust the methods for measuring these temperature, the more available, stable, and affordable the supply of energy will become. The world is increasingly realizing the threats to health and safety of toxic or otherwise undesirable by products of the industrial economy in the environment. Cleanup of such contamination often depends on techniques that require the constant monitoring of temperature in extremely hazardous environments, which can damage most conventional temperature sensors and which are dangerous for operating personnel. Our system makes such monitoring safer and more economical.

Rabold, D.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Manhattan Project Truck Unearthed in Recovery Act Cleanup | Department of  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department of Energy Low-TemperatureEnergy Maine09 BalanceStorage andManaging

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature syngas cleanup" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

High-bandwidth Modulation of H2/Syngas Fuel to Control Combustion Dynamics in Micro-Mixing Lean Premix Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this program was to develop and demonstrate fuel injection technologies that will facilitate the development of cost-effective turbine engines for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plants, while improving efficiency and reducing emissions. The program involved developing a next-generation multi-point injector with enhanced stability performance for lean premix turbine systems that burn hydrogen (H2) or synthesis gas (syngas) fuels. A previously developed injector that demonstrated superior emissions performance was improved to enhance static flame stability through zone staging and pilot sheltering. In addition, piezo valve technology was implemented to investigate the potential for enhanced dynamic stability through high-bandwidth modulation of the fuel supply. Prototype injector and valve hardware were tested in an atmospheric combustion facility. The program was successful in meeting its objectives. Specifically, the following was accomplished: Demonstrated improvement of lean operability of the Parker multi-point injector through staging of fuel flow and primary zone sheltering; Developed a piezo valve capable of proportional and high-bandwidth modulation of gaseous fuel flow at frequencies as high as 500 Hz; The valve was shown to be capable of effecting changes to flame dynamics, heat release, and acoustic signature of an atmospheric combustor. The latter achievement indicates the viability of the Parker piezo valve technology for use in future adaptively controlled systems for the mitigation of combustion instabilities, particularly for attenuating combustion dynamics under ultra-lean conditions.

Jeff Melzak; Tim Lieuwen; Adel Mansour

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

262

ENGINEERING A NEW MATERIAL FOR HOT GAS CLEANUP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is the engineering development of a reusable calcium-based sorbent for desulfurizing hot coal gas. A two-step pelletization method has been employed to produce relatively strong, ''core-in-shell,'' spherical pellets. Each pellet consists of a highly reactive core surrounded by a strong, inert, porous shell. A suitable core is composed largely of CaO which reacts with H{sub 2}S to form CaS. Pellet cores have been prepared by pelletizing either pulverized limestone or plaster of Paris, and shells have been made of various materials. The most suitable shell material has been formed from a mixture of alumina and limestone particles. The core-in-shell pellets require treatment at high temperature to convert the core material to CaO and to partially sinter the shell material. Pellet cores derived from plaster of Paris have proved superior to those derived from limestone because they react more rapidly with H{sub 2}S and their reactivity does not seem to decline with repeated loading and regeneration. The rate of reaction of H{sub 2}S with CaO derived from either material is directly proportional to H{sub 2}S concentration. The rate of reaction does not appear to be affected significantly by temperature in the range of 1113 K (840 C) to 1193 K (920 C) but decreases markedly at 1233 K (960 C). The rate is not affected by shell thickness within the range tested, which also provides adequate compressive strength.

T.D. Wheelock; L.K. Doraiswamy; K. Constant

2001-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

263

On-line microdialysis sample cleanup for electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of nucleic acid samples  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A major limitation of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) for oligonucleotide analysis arises due to sodium adduction, a problem that increases with molecular weight. Sodium adduction can preclude useful measurements when limited sample sizes prevent off-line cleanup. A novel and generally useful on-line microdialysis technique is described for the rapid (nearly 1-5 min) DNA sample cleanup for ESI-MS. Mass spectra of oligonucleotides of different size and sequence showing no significant sodium adduct peaks were obtained using the on-line microdialysis system with sodium chloride concentrations as high as 250 mM. Signal-to-noise ratios were also greatly enhanced compared to direct infusion of the original samples. By using ammonium acetate as the dialysis buffer, it was also found that the noncovalent association of double-stranded oligonucleotides could be preserved during the microdialysis process, allowing analysis by ESI-MS. 33 refs., 6 figs.

Liu, C.; Wu, Q.; Harms, A.C.; Smith, R.D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)] [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1996-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

264

The Use of the Hanford Onsite Packaging and Transportation Safety Program to Meet Cleanup Milestones Under the Hanford Site Cleanup 2015 Vision and the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 - 12403  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Site presents unique challenges in meeting the U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) 2015 Cleanup Vision. CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC), its subcontractors, and DOE-RL were challenged to retrieve, transport and remediate a wide range of waste materials. Through a collaborative effort by all Hanford Onsite Central Plateau Cleanup Team Members, disposition pathways for diverse and seemingly impossible to ship wastes were developed under a DOE Order 460.1C-compliant Hanford Onsite Transportation Safety Program. The team determined an effective method for transporting oversized compliant waste payloads to processing and disposition facilities. The use of the onsite TSD packaging authorizations proved to be vital to safely transporting these materials for processing and eventual final disposition. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) provided additional resources to expedite planning and execution of these important cleanup milestones. Through the innovative and creative use of the TSD, the Hanford Onsite Central Plateau Cleanup Team Members have developed and are executing an integrated project plan that enables the safe and compliant transport of a wide variety of difficult-to-transport waste items, accelerating previous cleanup schedules to meet cleanup milestones. (authors)

Lavender, John C. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Edwards, W. Scott [Areva Federal Services, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Macbeth, Paul J.; Self, Richard J. [U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); West, Lori D. [Materials and Energy Corporation, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Impacts of Motor Vehicle Operation on Water Quality in the United States - Clean-up Costs and Policies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Squillace, P. J. (2005). MTBE and gasoline hydrocarbonsP. J. (2004). The risk of MTBE relative to other VOCs inEPA to Settle Santa Monica MTBE Cleanup Costs, Press release

Nixon, Hilary; Saphores, Jean-Daniel

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Development of novel copper-based sorbents for hot-gas cleanup. Technical report, March 1, 1992--May 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this investigation is to evaluate several novel copper-based binary oxides for their suitability as regenerable sorbents for hot gas cleanup application in the temperature range of 650{degrees} to 850{degrees}C. During this quarter cyclic sulfidation/regeneration tests of the sorbents Cu{sub 2}Cr-O and Cu-Ce-0 were conducted using different compositions of the feed gases to investigate the effects of H{sub 2}0, H{sub 2} and CO. These tests were conducted in a packed-bed microreactor at 850{degrees}C. The results of these tests showed that H{sub 2} and CO (along with C02) had a significant effect on the H{sub 2}S pre-breakthrough levels, whereas H{sub 2}0 did not have an effect. The physical properties of the fresh and reacted samples of the Cu-2Cr-O and Cu-Ce-0 sorbents prepared in this program and used in the cyclic sulfidation/regeneration tests were also measured. In addition, sulfidation/regeneration tests were conducted using two commercial copper chromite sorbents (G-13 and G-89, United Catalyst, Inc.) and a zinc titanate sorbent (L-3014) in a one-inch fluidized-bed reactor at 650{degrees}C. The G-13 sorbent appears to have a much higher sulfur capacity than the G-89 sorbent.

Abbasian, J.; Hill, A.H.; Wangerow, J.R. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Bo, L.; Patel, C. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States)

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Initial test results from the Department of Energy`s pressurized fluidized bed combustion Hot Gas Cleanup Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In August 1989 a cooperative agreement was signed between Ohio Power Company, through its agent the American Electric Power Service Corporation, and the United States Department of Energy to assess the readiness and economic viability of high-temperature and high-pressure (HTHP) particulate filter systems for pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) applications. In this agreement, known as the PFBC Hot Gas Cleanup (HGCU) Program, two HTHP particulate filtration systems are to be tested with one seventh of the flow from the Tidd 70-MWe PFBC Clean Coal Demonstration Plant. This paper describes the initial results from the first PFBC HGCU test and an additional proof-of-concept, pilot-scale test used to validate a ceramic candle filter element, which may be used in the second test of the PFBC HGCU Program. The first test consisted of a three-cluster filter system, incorporating 384, 1.5-meter long silicon carbide candle filters. This system utilized a one-seventh flow slipstream, approximately 7360 actual cubic feet per minute, from the Tidd 70-MWe PFBC. The proof-of-concept test is being used to qualify mullite candle filters as a potential candidate for the second test at the Tidd 70-MWe PFBC. Both filter systems were designed and fabricated by the Westinghouse Science and Technology Center.

Dennis, R.A. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States); Lippert, T.E.; Bruck, G.J.; Alvin, M.A. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Science and Technology Center; Mudd, M.J. [Ohio Power Co., Columbus, OH (United States)]|[American Electric Power Service Corp., Columbus, OH (United States)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-B-1, 105-B Solid Waste Burial Ground  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action, sampling activities, and compliance criteria for the 118-B-1, 105-B Solid Waste Burial Ground. This waste site was the primary burial ground for general wastes from the operation of the 105-B Reactor and P-10 Tritium Separation Project and also received waste from the 105-N Reactor. The burial ground received reactor hardware, process piping and tubing, fuel spacers, glassware, electrical components, tritium process wastes, soft wastes and other miscellaneous debris.

J. M. Capron

2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

269

Systems engineering product description report for the Hanford Cleanup Mission: First issue  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the upper level physical and administrative (nonphysical) products that, when delivered, complete the Hanford Cleanup Mission. Development of product descriptions is a continuation of the Sitewide Systems Engineering work described in the Sitewide functional analysis, the architecture synthesis, and is consistent with guidance contained in the mission plan. This document provides a bridge between all three documents and the products required to complete the mission of cleaning up the Hanford Site.

Holmes, J.J.; Bailey, K.B. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Collings, J.L.; Hubbard, A.B.; Niepke, T.M. [Science Applications International Corp. (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-F-8:4 Fuel Storage Basin West Side Adjacent and Side Slope Soils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action, sampling activities, and compliance with cleanup criteria for the 118-F-8:4 Fuel Storage Basin West Side Adjacent and Side Slope Soils. The rectangular-shaped concrete basin on the south side of the 105-F Reactor building served as an underwater collection, storage, and transfer facility for irradiated fuel elements discharged from the reactor.

L. D. Habel

2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

271

Proceedings of the seventh annual gasification and gas stream cleanup systems contractors review meeting: Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On June 16 through 19, 1987, METC sponsored the Seventh Annual Gasification and Gas Stream Cleanup Systems Contractors Review Meeting which was held at the Sheraton Lakeview Conference Center in Morgantown, West Virginia. The primary purpose of the meeting was threefold: to review the technical progress and current status of the gasification and gas stream cleanup projects sponsored by the Department of Energy; to foster technology exchange among participating researchers and other technical communities; to facilitate interactive dialogues which would identify research needs that would make coal-based gasification systems more attractive economically and environmentally. More than 310 representatives of Government, academia, industry, and foreign energy research organizations attended the 4-day meeting. Fifty-three papers and thirty poster displays were presented summarizing recent developments in the gasification and gas stream cleanup programs. Volume I covers information presented at sessions 1 through 4 on systems for the production of Co-products and industrial fuel gas, environmental projects, and components and materials. Individual papers have been processed for the Energy Data Base.

Ghate, M.R.; Markel, K.E. Jr.; Jarr, L.A.; Bossart, S.J. (eds.)

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Surface and subsurface cleanup protocol for radionuclides, Gunnison, Colorado, UMTRA project processing site: Final. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thorium 230 (Th-230) at the Gunnison, Colorado processing site will require remediation, however, a seasonally fluctuating groundwater table at the site significantly complicates conventional remedial action with respect to cleanup. Therefore, to effectively remediate the site with respect to Radium 226 (Ra-226) and Th-230, the following supplemental standard is proposed: In situ Ra-26 will be remediated to the EPA soil cleanup standards independent of groundwater considerations. In situ Th-230 concentrations will be remediated in the region above the encountered water table so the 1000-year projected Ra-226 concentration complies with the EPA soil cleanup concentration limits. If elevated Th-230 persists to the water table, an additional foot of excavation will be performed and the grid will be backfilled. Excavated grids will be backfilled to the final remedial action grade with clean cobbly soil. Final grid verification that is required below the water table will be performed by extracting and analyzing a single bulk soil sample with the bucket of a backhoe. Modeled surface radon flux values will be estimated and documented. A recommendation will be made that land records should be annotated to identify the presence of residual Th-230.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Proceedings of the seventh annual gasification and gas stream cleanup systems contractors review meeting: Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On June 16 through 19, 1987, METC sponsored the Seventh Annual Gasification and Gas Stream Cleanup Systems Contractors Review Meeting which was held at the Sheraton Lakeview Conference Center in Morgantown, West Virginia. The primary purpose of the meeting was threefold: to review the technical progress and current status of the gasification and gas stream cleanup projects sponsored by the Department of Energy; to foster technology exchange among participating researchers and other technical communities; to facilitate interactive dialogues which would identify research needs that would make coal-based gasification systems more attractive economically and environmentally. More than 310 representatives of Government, academia, industry, and foreign energy research organizations attended the 4-day meeting. Fifty-three papers and thirty poster dsplays were presented summarizing recent developments in the gasification and gas stream cleanup programs. Volume II covers papers presented at sessions 5 and 6 on system for the production of synthesis gas, and on system for the production of power. All papers have been processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

Ghate, M.R.; Markel, K.E. Jr.; Jarr, L.A.; Bossart, S.J. (eds.)

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Flashback Characteristics of Syngas-Type Fuels Under Steady and Pulsating Conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to improve understanding and modeling of flashback, a significant issue in low emissions combustors containing high levels of hydrogen. Experimental studies were performed over a range of fuel compositions, flow velocities, reactant temperatures, and combustor pressures to study the factors leading to flashback. In addition, high speed imaging of the flashback phenomenon was obtained. One of the key conclusions of this study was that there existed multiple mechanisms which lead to flashback, each with different underlying parametric dependencies. Specifically, two mechanisms of 'flashback' were noted: rapid flashback into the premixer, presumably through the boundary layer, and movement of the static flame position upstream along the centerbody. The former and latter mechanisms were observed at high and low hydrogen concentrations. In the latter mechanism, flame temperature ratio, not flame speed, appeared to be the key parameter describing flashback tendencies. We suggested that this was due to an alteration of the vortex breakdown location by the adverse pressure gradient upstream of the flame, similar to the mechanism proposed by Sattelmayer and co-workers [1]. As such, a key conclusion here was that classical flashback scalings derived from, e.g., Bunsen flames, were not relevant for some parameter regimes found in swirling flames. In addition, it was found that in certain situations, pure H2 flames could not be stabilized, i.e., the flame would either flashback or blowout at ignition. This result could have significant implications on the development of future high hydrogen turbine systems.

Tim Lieuwen

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

275

System Study of Rich Catalytic/Lean burn (RCL) Catalytic Combustion for Natural Gas and Coal-Derived Syngas Combustion Turbines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rich Catalytic/Lean burn (RCL{reg_sign}) technology has been successfully developed to provide improvement in Dry Low Emission gas turbine technology for coal derived syngas and natural gas delivering near zero NOx emissions, improved efficiency, extending component lifetime and the ability to have fuel flexibility. The present report shows substantial net cost saving using RCL{reg_sign} technology as compared to other technologies both for new and retrofit applications, thus eliminating the need for Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) in combined or simple cycle for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and natural gas fired combustion turbines.

Shahrokh Etemad; Lance Smith; Kevin Burns

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Hot gas cleanup test facility for gasification and pressurized combustion. Quarterly report, April--June 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This quarterly technical progress report summarizes the work completed during the first quarter, April 1 through June 30, 1995. The objective of this project is to evaluate hot gas particle control technologies using coal-derived gas streams. This will entail the design, construction, installation, and use of a flexible test facility which can operate under realistic gasificafion and combustion conditions. The major particulate control device issues to be addressed include the integration of the particulate control devices into coal utilization systems, on-line cleaning techniques, chemical and thermal degradation of components, fatigue or structural failures, blinding, collection efficiency as a function of particle size, and scale-up of particulate control systems to commercial size. The conceptual design of the facility was extended to include a within scope, phased expansion of the existing Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility Cooperative Agreement to also address systems integration issues of hot particulate removal in advanced coal-based power generation systems. This expansion included the consideration of the following modules at the test facility in addition to the original Transport Reactor gas source and Hot Gas Cleanup Units: Carbonizer/pressurized circulating fluidized bed gas source; hot gas cleanup units to mate to all gas streams; combustion gas turbine; and fuel cell and associated gas treatment. The major emphasis during this reporting period was continuing the detailed design of the facility towards completion and integrating the particulate control devices (PCDS) into the structural and process designs. Substantial progress in construction activities was achieved during the quarter. Delivery and construction of the process structural steel continued at a good pace during the quarter.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility for gasification and pressurized combustion. Quarterly report, October--December 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to evaluate hot gas particle control technologies using coal-derived gas streams. This will entail the design, construction, installation, and use of a flexible test facility which can operate under realistic gasification and combustion conditions. The major particulate control device issues to be addressed include the integration of the particulate control devices into coal utilization systems, on-line cleaning techniques, chemical and thermal degradation of components, fatigue or structural failures, blinding, collection efficiency as a function of particle size, and scale-up of particulate control systems to commercial size. The conceptual design of the facility was extended to include a within scope, phased expansion of the existing Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility Cooperative Agreement to also address systems integration issues of hot particulate removal in advanced coal-based power generation systems. This expansion included the consideration of the following modules at the test facility in addition to the original Transport Reactor gas source and Hot Gas Cleanup Units: carbonizer/pressurized circulating fluidized bed gas source; hot gas cleanup units to mate to all gas streams; combustion gas turbine; and fuel cell and associated gas treatment. The major emphasis during this reporting period was continuing the detailed design of the facility and integrating the particulate control devices (PCDs) into structural and process designs. Substantial progress in underground construction activities was achieved during the quarter. Delivery and construction of coal handling and process structural steel began during the quarter. Delivery and construction of coal handling and process structural steel began during the quarter. MWK equipment at the grade level and the first tier are being set in the structure.

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

The Estonian study of Chernobyl cleanup workers: I. Design and questionnaire data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nearly 2% of the male population of Estonia aged 20-39 years were sent to Chernobyl to assist in the cleanup activities after the reactor accident. A cohort of 4,833 cleanup workers was assembled based on multiple and independent sources of information. Information obtained from 3,704 responses to a detailed questionnaire indicated that 63% of the workers were sent to Chernobyl in 1986; 54% were of Estonian and 35% of Russian ethnicity; 72% were married, and 1,164 of their 5,392 children were conceived after the Chernobyl disaster. The workers were less educated than their counterparts than their counterparts in the general population of Estonia, and only 8.5% had attended university. Based on doses entered in workers records, the mean dose was 11 cGy, with only 1.4% over 25 cGy. Nearly 85% of the workers were sent as part of military training activities, and more than half spent in excess of 3 months in the Chernobyl area. Thirty-six percent of the workers reported having worked within the immediate vicinity of the accident site; 11.5% worked on the roofs near the damaged reactor, clearing the highly radioactive debris. The most commonly performed task was the removal and burial of topsoil (55% of the workers). Potassium iodide was given to over 18% of the men. The study design also incorporates biological indicators of exposure based on the glycophorin A mutational assay of red blood cells and chromosome translocation analyses of lymphocytes; record linkage with national cancer registry and mortality registry files to determine cancer incidence and cause-specific mortality; thyroid screening examinations with ultrasound and fine-needle biopsy; and cryopreserved white blood cells and plasma for future molecular studies. Comprehensive studies of Chernobyl cleanup workers have potential to provide a new information about cancer risks due to protracted exposures to ionizing radiation. 21 refs., 1 fig., 11 tabs.

Tekkel, M.; Rahu, M.; Veidebaum, T. [Institute of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, Tallinn (Estonia)] [and others

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Action Memorandum for the Engineering Test Reactor under the Idaho Cleanup Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Action Memorandum documents the selected alternative for decommissioning of the Engineering Test Reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory under the Idaho Cleanup Project. Since the missions of the Engineering Test Reactor Complex have been completed, an engineering evaluation/cost analysis that evaluated alternatives to accomplish the decommissioning of the Engineering Test Reactor Complex was prepared adn released for public comment. The scope of this Action Memorandum is to encompass the final end state of the Complex and disposal of the Engineering Test Reactor vessol. The selected removal action includes removing and disposing of the vessel at the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility and demolishing the reactor building to ground surface.

A. B. Culp

2007-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

280

Action Memorandum for General Decommissioning Activities under the Idaho Cleanup Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Action Memorandum documents the selected alternative to perform general decommissioning activities at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) under the Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP). Preparation of this Action Memorandum has been performed in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended by the "Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986", and in accordance with the "National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan". An engineering evaluation/cost analysis (EE/CA) was prepared and released for public comment and evaluated alternatives to accomplish the decommissioning of excess buildings and structures whose missions havve been completed.

S. L. Reno

2006-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature syngas cleanup" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

FLUOR HANFORD (FH) MAKES CLEANUP A REALITY IN NEARLY 11 YEARS AT HANFORD  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For nearly 11 years, Fluor Hanford has been busy cleaning up the legacy of nuclear weapons production at one of the Department of Energy's (DOE'S) major sites in the United States. As prime nuclear waste cleanup contractor at the vast Hanford Site in southeastern Washington state, Fluor Hanford has changed the face of cleanup. Fluor beginning on October 1, 1996, Hanford Site cleanup was primarily a ''paper exercise.'' The Tri-Party Agreement, officially called the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order - the edict governing cleanup among the DOE, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Washington state - was just seven years old. Milestones mandated in the agreement up until then had required mainly waste characterization, reporting, and planning, with actual waste remediation activities off in the future. Real work, accessing waste ''in the field'' - or more literally in huge underground tanks, decaying spent fuel POO{approx}{approx}S, groundwater, hundreds of contaminated facilities, solid waste burial grounds, and liquid waste disposal sites -began in earnest under Fluor Hanford. The fruits of labors initiated, completed and/or underway by Fluor Hanford can today be seen across the site. Spent nuclear fuel is buttoned up in secure, dry containers stored away from regional water resources, reactive plutonium scraps are packaged in approved containers, transuranic (TRU) solid waste is being retrieved from burial trenches and shipped offsite for permanent disposal, contaminated facilities are being demolished, contaminated groundwater is being pumped out of aquifers at record rates, and many other inventive solutions are being applied to Hanford's most intransigent nuclear wastes. (TRU) waste contains more than 100 nanocuries per gram, and contains isotopes higher than uranium on the Periodic Table of the Elements. (A nanocurie is one-billionth of a curie.) At the same time, Fluor Hanford has dramatically improved safety records, and cost effectively maintained and streamlined infrastructure and equipment that is impossibly old and in many cases ''extinct'' in terms of spare parts and vendor support. The story of Fluor's achievements at the Hanford Site - the oldest and most productive plutonium site in the world - is both inspiring and instructive.

GERBER, M.S.

2007-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

282

Continuing Clean-up at Oak Ridge, Portsmouth and Paducah-Successes and Near-Term Plans  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the complexities and challenges associated with the Oak Ridge Environmental Management (EM) cleanup program and the steps that DOE and Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (the Oak Ridge EM team) have collaboratively taken to make significant physical progress and get the job done. Maintaining significant environmental cleanup progress is a daunting challenge for the Oak Ridge EM Team. The scale and span of the Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) cleanup is immense-five major half-century-old installations in three states (three installations are complete gaseous diffusion plants), with concurrent cleanup at the fully operational Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Y-12 National Security Complex, and with regulatory oversight from three states and two United States (US) Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Regions. Potential distractions arising from funding fluctuations and color-of-money constraints, regulatory negotiations, stakeholder issues, or any one of a number of other potential delay phenomena can not reduce the focus on safely achieving project objectives to maintain cleanup momentum.

Fritz, L. L.; Houser, S. M.; Starling, D. A.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

283

Environmental Cleanup  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing Zirconia NanoparticlesSmartAffects

284

[Tampa Electric Company IGCC project]. 1996 DOE annual technical report, January--December 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tampa Electric Company`s Polk Power Station Unit 1 (PPS-1) Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) demonstration project uses a Texaco pressurized, oxygen-blown, entrained-flow coal gasifier to convert approximately 2,000 tons per day of coal to syngas. The gasification plant is coupled with a combined cycle power block to produce a net 250 MW electrical power output. Coal is slurried in water, combined with 95% pure oxygen from an air separation unit, and sent to the gasifier to produce a high temperature, high pressure, medium-Btu syngas with a heat content of about 250 BTUs/cf (HHV). The syngas then flows through a high temperature heat recovery unit which cools the syngas prior to its entering the cleanup systems. Molten coal ash flows from the bottom of the high temperature heat recovery unit into a water-filled quench chamber where it solidifies into a marketable slag by-product. Approximately 10% of the raw, hot syngas at 900 F is designed to pass through an intermittently moving bed of metal-oxide sorbent which removes sulfur-bearing compounds from the syngas. PPS-1 will be the first unit in the world to demonstrate this advanced metal oxide hot gas desulfurization technology on a commercial unit. The emphasis during 1996 centered around start-up activities.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

285

Exergy Analysis of a GTL Process Based on Low-Temperature Slurry F-T Reactor Technology with a Cobalt Catalyst  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Hans Tropsch; their aim was to use a mixture of CO and H2 (referred to as synthesis gas, syngas) to produce hydrocarbons, chemicals, and liquid fuels. The production of syngas was achieved by coal into syngas and, then, Fischer-Tropsch synthesis of syngas into synthetic liquid fuels. A first plant

Kjelstrup, Signe

286

Surface and subsurface cleanup protocol for radionuclides, Gunnison, Colorado, UMTRA project processing site. Final report: Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Surface and subsurface soil cleanup protocols for the Gunnison, Colorado, processing site are summarized as follows: In accordance with EPA-promulgated land cleanup standards, in situ Ra-226 is to be cleaned up based on bulk concentrations not exceeding 5 and 15 pCi/g in 15-cm surface and subsurface depth increments, averaged over 100m{sup 2} grid blocks, where the parent Ra-226 concentrations are greater than, or in secular equilibrium with, the Th-230 parent. In locations where Th-230 has differentially migrated in subsoil relative to Ra-226, a Th-230 clean up protocol has been developed. The cleanup of other radionuclides or nonradiological hazards that pose a significant threat to the public and the environment will be determined and implemented in accordance with pathway analysis to assess impacts and the implications of ALARA specified in 40 CFR Part 192 relative to supplemental standards.

Gonzales, D.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Effect of radon dose on cleanup criteria and using RESRAD for chemical risk assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy has used RESRAD, a pathway analysis program developed at Argonne National Laboratory, in conjunction with the as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) principle to develop site-specific residual radioactive material guidelines (cleanup criteria) for many sites. This study examines the effects of the radon pathway, recently added to the RESRAD program, on the calculation of uranium, radium, and thorium cleanup criteria. The results show that the derived uranium guidelines will not be affected by the radon ingrowth considerations. The effect of radon on radium and thorium generic guidelines is more significant, but the model does indicate that at the generic soil limits used for radium and thorium the indoor radon decay product concentrations would be below the 0.02 working level standard. This study also examines the feasibility of applying RESRAD to chemical risk assessment. The results show that RESRAD can perform risk assessment of toxic chemicals after simple modifications. Expansion of the RESRAD database to include chemical compounds will increase its capability to handle chemical risk assessments. 11 refs., 3 tabs.

Yu, C.; Cheng, J.-J. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Wallo, A. III (USDOE, Washington, DC (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Phase 1 of the North Site cleanup: Definition of product streams. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Various materials and equipment have accumulated at the Western Research Institute (WRI) North Site Facility since its commissioning in 1968. This facility was built by the US Bureau of Mines, transferred to the US Energy Research Development Administration (ERDA) in 1976, and transferred once again to the US Department of Energy (DOE) shortly thereafter. In 1983, the North Site Facility became part of WRI. The materials that have accumulated over the years at the site have been stored in drums, tanks, and open piles. They vary from oil shale, tar sand, and coal feedstocks to products and materials associated with in situ simulation and surface process developments associated with these feedstocks. The majority of these materials have been associated with DOE North Site activities and work performed at the North Site under DOE-WRI cooperative agreement contracts. In phase I of the North Site Facility cleanup project, these materials were sampled and evaluated to determine their chemical characteristics for proper disposal or use in accordance with current local, state, and federal regulations. Phase I of the North Site Facility cleanup project involved dividing the stored materials into product streams and dividing each product stream into composite groups. Composite groups contain materials known to be similar in composition, source, and process exposure. For each composite group, materials, which are representative of the composite, were selected for sampling, compositing, and analysis.

Sorini, S.; Merriam, N.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) demonstration project, Polk Power Station -- Unit No. 1. Annual report, October 1993--September 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This describes the Tampa Electric Company`s Polk Power Station Unit 1 (PPS-1) Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) demonstration project which will use a Texaco pressurized, oxygen-blown, entrained-flow coal gasifier to convert approximately 2,300 tons per day of coal (dry basis) coupled with a combined cycle power block to produce a net 250 MW electrical power output. Coal is slurried in water, combined with 95% pure oxygen from an air separation unit, and sent to the gasifier to produce a high temperature, high pressure, medium-Btu syngas with a heat content of about 250 Btu/scf (LHV). The syngas then flows through a high temperature heat recovery unit which cools the syngas prior to its entering the cleanup systems. Molten coal ash flows from the bottom of the high temperature heat recovery unit into a water-filled quench chamber where it solidifies into a marketable slag by-product.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Plutonium-aerosol emission rates and potential inhalation exposure during cleanup and treatment test at Area 11, Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Cleanup and Treatment (CAT) test was conducted in 1981 at Area 11, Nevada Test Site. Its purpose was to evaluate the effectiveness of using a large truck-mounted vacuum cleaner similar to those used to clean paved streets for cleaning radiological contamination from the surface of desert soils. We found that four passes with the vehicle removed 97% of the alpha contamination and reduced resuspension by 99.3 to 99.7%. Potential exposure to cleanup workers was slight when compared to natural background exposure. 7 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

Shinn, J.H.; Homan, D.N.

1985-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

291

Transport Reactor Development Unit Modification to Provide a Syngas Slipstream at Elevated Conditions to Enable Separation of 100 LB/D of Hydrogen by Hydrogen Separation Membranes Year - 6 Activity 1.15 - Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gasification of coal when associated with carbon dioxide capture and sequestration has the potential to provide low-cost as well as low-carbon hydrogen for electric power, fuels or chemicals production. The key element to the success of this concept is inexpensive, effective separation of hydrogen from carbon dioxide in synthesis gas. Many studies indicate that membrane technology is one of the most, if not the most, economical means of accomplishing separation; however, the advancement of hydrogen separation membrane technology is hampered by the absence of experience or demonstration that the technology is effective economically and environmentally at larger scales. While encouraging performance has been observed at bench scale (less than 12 lb/d hydrogen), it would be imprudent to pursue a largescale demonstration without testing at least one intermediate scale, such as 100 lb/d hydrogen. Among its many gasifiers, the Energy & Environmental Research Center is home to the transport reactor demonstration unit (TRDU), a unit capable of firing 200—500 lb/hr of coal to produce 400 scfm of synthesis gas containing more than 200 lb/d of hydrogen. The TRDU and associated downstream processing equipment has demonstrated the capability of producing a syngas over a wide range of temperatures and contaminant levels — some of which approximate conditions of commercial-scale gasifiers. Until this activity, however, the maximum pressure of the TRDU’ s product syngas was 120 psig, well below the 400+ psig pressures of existing large gasifiers. This activity installed a high-temperature compressor capable of accepting the range of TRDU products up to 450°F and compressing them to 500 psig, a pressure comparable to some large scale gasifiers. Thus, with heating or cooling downstream of the TRDU compressor, the unit is now able to present a near-raw to clean gasifier synthesis gas containing more than 100 lb/d of hydrogen at up to 500 psig over a wide range of temperatures to hydrogen separation membranes or other equipment for development and demonstration.

Schlasner, Steven

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Bugs boost Cold War clean-up: Bacteria could scrub uranium from sites contaminated decades ago. updated at midnight GMTtoday is friday, november 14  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2003 · Fungus catches radioactive fallout 8 May 2002 · Depleted uranium soils battlefields 12 MarchBugs boost Cold War clean-up: Bacteria could scrub uranium from sites contaminated decades ago boost Cold War clean-up Bacteria could scrub uranium from sites contaminated decades ago. 13 October

Lovley, Derek

293

Z .The Science of the Total Environment 260 2000 1 9 Assessing water quality impacts and cleanup  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Z .The Science of the Total Environment 260 2000 1 9 Assessing water quality impacts and cleanup a California Regional Water Quality Control Board, 1515 Clay St., Suite 1400, Oakland, CA 94612, USA b of the Total En¨ironment 260 2000 1 92 quality trends can be more accurately measured by changes

Kirchner, James W.

294

Commercial Environmental Cleanup -- The products and services directory. Treatment, characterization and extraction/delivery/materials handling technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This directory is patterned after the telephone Yellow Pages and is designed as a reference tool to those who may seek commercial remedies for their environmental cleanup problems. It offers the user the opportunity to survey 325 environmental cleanup businesses that currently market their products and services through 1,134 applications of commercially available technologies. Like the Yellow Pages, the Directory furnishes the user with points-of-contact to investigate the capabilities of the listed companies to perform within acceptable standards, practices, and costs and to meet a user`s specific needs. The three major sections of the Directory are organized under the broad headings of Treatment, Characterization, and Extraction/Delivery/Materials Handling. Within each section, information is grouped according to the applicable contaminant medium and companies are listed alphabetically under each medium heading. Not all vendors in the environmental cleanup business are included in this first edition of the Directory. Future editions will more completely reflect the status of the industry. The database of the commercial cleanup products and services Directory will be offered on the Internet in the future and will be available on the Homepage www.doe.gjpo.com.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Answers to frequently asked questions about cleanup activities at Three Mile Island, Unit 2. Public information report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The document presents answers to frequently asked questions about plans for cleanup and decontamination activities at Three Mile Island, Unit 2. Answers to the questions asked are based on information in the NRC 'Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement related to decontamination and disposal of radioactive wastes resulting from March 28, 1979, accident, Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Unit 2,' NUREG-0683.

Not Available

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Hot gas cleanup test facility for gasification and pressurized combustion project. Quarterly report, October--December 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to evaluate hot gas particle control technologies using coal-derived gas streams. This will entail the design, construction, installation, and use of a flexible test facility which can operate under realistic gasification and combustion conditions. The conceptual design of the facility was extended to include a within scope, phased expansion of the existing Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility Cooperative Agreement to also address systems integration issues of hot particulate removal in advanced coal-based power generation systems. This expansion included the consideration of the following modules at the test facility in addition to the original Transport Reactor gas source and Hot Gas Cleanup Units: Carbonizer/pressurized circulating fluidized bed gas source; hot gas cleanup units to mate to all gas streams; combustion gas turbine; and fuel cell and associated gas treatment. This expansion to the Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility is herein referred to as the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF). The major emphasis during this reporting period was continuing the detailed design of the facility towards completion and integrating the balance-of-plant processes and particulate control devices (PCDs) into the structural and process designs. Substantial progress in construction activities was achieved during this quarter.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Environmental cleanup privatization, products and services directory, January 1997. Second edition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy has undertaken an ambitious ``Ten Year Plan`` for the Weapons Complex, an initiative to complete cleanup at most nuclear sites within a decade. This Second Edition of the Directory is designed to facilitate privatization which is key to the success of the Plan. The Directory is patterned after the telephone Yellow Pages. Like the Yellow Pages, it provides the user with points of contact for inquiring further into the capabilities of the listed companies. This edition retains the original format of three major sections under the broad headings: Treatment, Characterization, and Extraction/Deliver/Materials Handling. Within each section, companies are listed alphabetically. Also, ``company name`` and ``process type`` indices are provided at the beginning of each section to allow the user quick access to listings of particular interest.

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

From Pushing Paper to Pushing Dirt - Canada's Largest LLRW Cleanup Gets Underway - 13111  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Port Hope Project is the larger of the two projects in the Port Hope Area Initiative (PHAI), Canada's largest low level radioactive waste (LLRW) cleanup. With a budget of approximately $1 billion, the Port Hope Project includes a broad and complex range of remedial elements from a state of the art water treatment plant, an engineered waste management facility, municipal solid waste removal, remediation of 18 major sites within the Municipality of Port Hope (MPH), sediment dredging and dewatering, an investigation of 4,800 properties (many of these homes) to identify LLRW and remediation of approximately 450 of these properties. This paper discusses the status of the Port Hope Project in terms of designs completed and regulatory approvals received, and sets out the scope and schedule for the remaining studies, engineering designs and remediation contracts. (authors)

Veen, Walter van [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Port Hope, Ontario (Canada)] [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Port Hope, Ontario (Canada); Lawrence, Dave [Public Works and Government Services Canada, Port Hope, Ontario (Canada)] [Public Works and Government Services Canada, Port Hope, Ontario (Canada)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Conversion of CH{sub 4}/CO{sub 2} to syngas over Ni-Co/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2} nanocatalyst synthesized via plasma assisted co-impregnation method: Surface properties and catalytic performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst promoted by Co and ZrO{sub 2} was prepared by co-impregnation method and treated with glow discharge plasma. The catalytic activity of the synthesized nanocatalysts has been tested toward conversion of CH{sub 4}/CO{sub 2} to syngas. The physicochemical characterizations like XRD, EDX, FESEM, TEM, BET, FTIR, and XPS show that plasma treatment results in smaller particle size, more surface concentration, and uniform morphology. The dispersion of nickel in plasma-treated nanocatalyst was also significantly improved, which was helpful for controlling the ensemble size of active phase atoms on the support surface. Improved physicochemical properties caused 20%–30% enhancement in activity of plasma-treated nanocatalyst that means to achieve the same H{sub 2} or CO yield, the plasma-treated nanocatalyst needed about 100 °C lower reaction temperature. The H{sub 2}/CO ratio got closer to 1 at higher temperatures and finally at 850 °C H{sub 2}/CO = 1 is attained for plasma-treated nanocatalyst. Plasma-treated nanocatalyst due to smaller Ni particles and strong interaction between active phase and support has lower tendency to keep carbon species on its structure and hence excellent stability can be observed for this catalyst.

Rahemi, Nader; Haghighi, Mohammad [Chemical Engineering Faculty, Sahand University of Technology, P.O. Box 51335-1996, Sahand New Town, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of) [Chemical Engineering Faculty, Sahand University of Technology, P.O. Box 51335-1996, Sahand New Town, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Reactor and Catalysis Research Center (RCRC), Sahand University of Technology, P.O. Box 51335-1996, Sahand New Town, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Akbar Babaluo, Ali [Chemical Engineering Faculty, Sahand University of Technology, P.O. Box 51335-1996, Sahand New Town, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of) [Chemical Engineering Faculty, Sahand University of Technology, P.O. Box 51335-1996, Sahand New Town, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nanostructure Material Research Center (NMRC), Sahand University of Technology, P.O. Box 51335-1996, Sahand New Town, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fallah Jafari, Mahdi [National Iranian Oil Refining and Distribution Company (NIORDC), National Iranian Oil Company (NIOC), P.O. Box 15815-3499, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [National Iranian Oil Refining and Distribution Company (NIORDC), National Iranian Oil Company (NIOC), P.O. Box 15815-3499, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khorram, Sirous [Research Institute for Applied Physics and Astronomy (RIAPA), University of Tabriz, P.O. Box: 51665-163, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Research Institute for Applied Physics and Astronomy (RIAPA), University of Tabriz, P.O. Box: 51665-163, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2013-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

300

Building organizational technical capabilities: a new approach to address the office of environmental management cleanup challenges in the 21. century  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for the nations nuclear weapons program legacy wastes cleanup. The EM cleanup efforts continue to progress, however the cleanup continues to be technologically complex, heavily regulated, long-term, and a high life cycle cost estimate (LCCE) effort. Over the past few years, the EM program has undergone several changes to accelerate its cleanup efforts with varying degrees of success. Several cleanup projects continued to experience schedule delays and cost growth. The schedule delays and cost growth have been attributed to several factors such as changes in technical scope, regulatory and safety considerations, inadequacy of acquisition approach and project management. This article will briefly review the background and schools of thought on strategic management and organizational change practiced in the United States over the last few decades to improve an organisation's competitive edge and cost performance. The article will briefly review examples such as the change at General Electric, and the recent experience obtained from the nuclear industry, namely the long-term response to the 1986 Chernobyl accident. The long-term response to Chernobyl, though not a case of organizational change, could provide some insight in the strategic management approaches used to address people issues. The article will discuss briefly EM attempts to accelerate cleanup over the past few years, and the subsequent paradigm shift. The paradigm shift targets enhancing and/or creating organizational capabilities to achieve cost savings. To improve its ability to address the 21. century environmental cleanup challenges and achieve cost savings, EM has initiated new corporate changes to develop new and enhance existing capabilities. These new and enhanced organizational capabilities include a renewed emphasis on basics, especially technical capabilities including safety, project management, acquisition management and people. The new enhanced organizational capabilities coupled with more effective communications; oversight and decision-making processes are expected to help EM meet the 21. century challenges. This article will focus on some of the initiatives to develop and enhance organizational technical capabilities. Some of these development initiatives are a part of DOE corporate actions to respond to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) recommendations 93-3 and 2004-1. Other development initiatives have been tailored to meet EM specific needs for organizational capabilities such as case studies analysis and cost estimating. (authors)

Fiore, J.J.; Rizkalla, E.I. [Office of Environmental Management, The United States Dept. of Energy, Washington, D.C. (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature syngas cleanup" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Turning the Corner on Hanford Tank Waste Cleanup-From Safe Storage to Closure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) is leading the River Protection Project (RPP) which is responsible for the disposition of 204,000 cubic meters (54 million gallons) of high-level radioactive waste that have accumulated in large underground tanks at the Hanford Site since 1944. ORP continues to make good progress on improving the capability to treat Hanford tank waste. Design of the waste vitrification facilities is proceeding well and construction will begin within the next year. Progress is also being made in reducing risk to the worker and the environment from the waste currently stored in the tank farms. Removal of liquids from single-shell tanks (SSTs) is on schedule and we will begin removing solids (salt cake) from a tank (241-U-107) in 2002. There is a sound technical foundation for the waste vitrification facilities. These initial facilities will be capable of treating (vitrifying) the bulk of Hanford tank waste and are the corners tone of the clean-up strategy. ORP recognizes that as the near-term work is performed, it is vital that there be an equally strong and defensible plan for completing the mission. ORP is proceeding on a three-pronged approach for moving the mission forward. First, ORP will continue to work aggressively to complete the waste vitrification facilities. ORP intends to provide the most capable and robust facilities to maximize the amount of waste treated by these initial facilities by 2028 (regulatory commitment for completion of waste treatment). Second, and in parallel with completing the waste vitrification facilities, ORP is beginning to consider how best to match the hazard of the waste to the disposal strategy. The final piece of our strategy is to continue to move forward with actions to reduce risk in the tank farms and complete cleanup.

Boston, H. L.; Cruz, E. J.; Coleman, S. J.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

302

Studies of leukemia and thyroid disease among Chernobyl clean-up workers from the Baltics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Following the reactor accident at Chernobyl in late April of 1986, hundreds of thousands of men from throughout the former Soviet Union were sent to Chernobyl to entomb the damaged reactor, remove radioactive debris, and help decontaminate the local environment. They remained for an average of three months and were allowed to accumulate up to 25 cGy of radiation before being sent home. Doses for some workers may have exceeded the allowable limit. The experience of Chernobyl clean-up workers is potentially informative about cancer risk associated with protracted exposure to low levels of radiation. Cohorts of clean-up workers from the Baltic Republics were assembled for study, based on military records and other lists. The study population includes 4,833 men from Estonia 5,709 from Latvia and at least 5,446 from Lithuania, where a pilot study is underway. They are being monitored for cancer incidence through linkages with the corresponding national cancer registries. Biodosimetric assays, including fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) for chromosome translocation analysis and the glycophorin A (GPA) somatic cell mutation assay, are being used to supplement information about radiation doses from worker records and questionnaires. Thyroid screening examinations, including palpation, ultrasound and, selectively, fine-needle aspiration biopsies were performed on nearly 2,000 workers in the Estonian cohort (mean age, 40 y) during the spring of 1995, nine years after the reactor accident. The study is still in progress. Work began first in Estonia, and results presented here pertain to this subgroup except as otherwise noted. The average age at the time of arrival at Chernobyl was 31 years. 62% were sent in 1986. Possible reasons for the apparent absence or rarity of radiation-induced thyroid nodules include low and protracted doses, low susceptibility among men exposed as adults, and insufficient passage of time since the accident.

Inskip, P.D. [National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD (United States); Tekkel, M.; Rahu, M. [Institute of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, Tallinn (Estonia)] [and others

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Surface and subsurface cleanup protocol for radionuclides Gunnison, Colorado, UMTRA Project Processing Site. Revision 3, Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The supplemental standards provisions of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 192 (40 CFR Part 192) require the cleanup of radionuclides other than radium-226 (Ra-226) to levels ``as low as reasonably achievable`` (ALARA), taking into account site-specific conditions, if sufficient quantities and concentrations are present to constitute a significant radiation hazard. In this context, thorium-230 (Th-230) at the Gunnison, Colorado, processing site will require remediation. However, a seasonally fluctuating groundwater table at the site significantly complicates conventional remedial action with respect to cleanup. Characterization data indicate that in the offpile areas, the removal of residual in situ bulk Ra-226 and Th-230 such that the 1000-year projected Ra-226 concentration (Ra-226 concentration in 1000 years due to the decay of in situ Ra-226 and the in-growth of Ra-226 from in situ Th-230) complies with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) cleanup standard for in situ Ra-226 and the cleanup protocol for in situ Th-230 can be readily achieved using conventional excavation techniques for bulk contamination without encountering significant impacts due to groundwater. The EPA cleanup standard and criterion for Ra-226 and the 1000-year projected Ra-226 are 5 and 15 picocuries per gram (pCi/g) above background, respectively, averaged over 15-centimeter (cm) deep surface and subsurface intervals and 100-square-meter (m{sup 2}) grid areas. Significant differential migration of Th-230 relative to Ra-226 has occurred over 40 percent of the subpile area. To effectively remediate the site with respect to Ra-226 and Th-230, supplemental standard is proposed and discussed in this report.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

THE ROLE OF LAND USE IN ENVIRONMENTAL DECISION MAKING AT THREE DOE MEGA-CLEANUP SITES FERNALD & ROCKY FLATS & MOUND  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper explores the role that future land use decisions have played in the establishment of cost-effective cleanup objectives and the setting of environmental media cleanup levels for the three major U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites for which cleanup has now been successfully completed: the Rocky Flats, Mound, and Fernald Closure Sites. At each site, there are distinct consensus-building histories throughout the following four phases: (1) the facility shut-down and site investigation phase, which took place at the completion of their Cold War nuclear-material production missions; (2) the decision-making phase, whereby stakeholder and regulatory-agency consensus was achieved for the future land-use-based environmental decisions confronting the sites; (3) the remedy selection phase, whereby appropriate remedial actions were identified to achieve the future land-use-based decisions; and (4) the implementation phase, whereby the selected remedial actions for these high-profile sites were implemented and successfully closed out. At each of the three projects, there were strained relationships and distrust between the local community and the DOE as a result of site contamination and potential health effects to the workers and local residents. To engage citizens and interested stakeholder groups - particularly in the role of final land use in the decision-making process, the site management teams at each respective site developed new public-participation strategies to open stakeholder communication channels with site leadership, technical staff, and the regulatory agencies. This action proved invaluable to the success of the projects and reaching consensus on appropriate levels of cleanup. With the implementation of the cleanup remedies now complete, each of the three DOE sites have become models for future environmental-remediation projects and associated decision making.

JEWETT MA

2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

305

[Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility for Gasification and Pressurized Combustion]. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1--December 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This quarterly technical progress report summarizes work completed during the Second Quarter of the Second Budget Period, October 1 through December 31, 1993, under the Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC21-90MC25140 entitled ``Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility for Gasification and Pressurized Combustion.`` The objective of this project is to evaluate hot gas particle control technologies using coal-derived gas streams. This will entail the design, construction, installation, and use of a flexible test facility which can operate under realistic gasification and combustion conditions. The major particulate control device issues to be addressed include the integration of the particulate control devices into coal utilization systems, on-line cleaning techniques, chemical and thermal degradation of components, fatigue or structural failures, blinding, collection efficiency as a function of particle size, and scaleup of particulate control systems to commercial size. The conceptual design of the facility was extended to include a within scope, phased expansion of the existing Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility Cooperative Agreement to also address systems integration issues of hot particulate removal in advanced coal-based power generation systems. This expansion included the consideration of the following modules at the test facility in addition to the existing Transport Reactor gas source and Hot Gas Cleanup Units: (1) Carbonizer/pressurized circulating fluidized bed gas source; (2) hot gas cleanup units to mate to all gas streams; (3) combustion gas turbine; (4) fuel cell and associated gas treatment. This expansion to the Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility is herein referred to as the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF).

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

306

Bio-Fuel Production Assisted with High Temperature Steam Electrolysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two hybrid energy processes that enable production of synthetic liquid fuels that are compatible with the existing conventional liquid transportation fuels infrastructure are presented. Using biomass as a renewable carbon source, and supplemental hydrogen from high-temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE), these two hybrid energy processes have the potential to provide a significant alternative petroleum source that could reduce dependence on imported oil. The first process discusses a hydropyrolysis unit with hydrogen addition from HTSE. Non-food biomass is pyrolyzed and converted to pyrolysis oil. The pyrolysis oil is upgraded with hydrogen addition from HTSE. This addition of hydrogen deoxygenates the pyrolysis oil and increases the pH to a tolerable level for transportation. The final product is synthetic crude that could then be transported to a refinery and input into the already used transportation fuel infrastructure. The second process discusses a process named Bio-Syntrolysis. The Bio-Syntrolysis process combines hydrogen from HTSE with CO from an oxygen-blown biomass gasifier that yields syngas to be used as a feedstock for synthesis of liquid synthetic crude. Conversion of syngas to liquid synthetic crude, using a biomass-based carbon source, expands the application of renewable energy beyond the grid to include transportation fuels. It can also contribute to grid stability associated with non-dispatchable power generation. The use of supplemental hydrogen from HTSE enables greater than 90% utilization of the biomass carbon content which is about 2.5 times higher than carbon utilization associated with traditional cellulosic ethanol production. If the electrical power source needed for HTSE is based on nuclear or renewable energy, the process is carbon neutral. INL has demonstrated improved biomass processing prior to gasification. Recyclable biomass in the form of crop residue or energy crops would serve as the feedstock for this process. A process model of syngas production using high temperature electrolysis and biomass gasification is presented. Process heat from the biomass gasifier is used to heat steam for the hydrogen production via the high temperature steam electrolysis process. Oxygen produced form the electrolysis process is used to control the oxidation rate in the oxygen-blown biomass gasifier.

Grant Hawkes; James O'Brien; Michael McKellar

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Development of a New Flame Speed Vessel to Measure the Effect of Steam Dilution on Laminar Flame Speeds of Syngas Fuel Blends at Elevated Pressures and Temperatures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/s to 16.7 cm/s. The amount of carbon monoxide dilution in the fuel was shown to be the most influential factor on the laminar flame speed from fuel lean to fuel rich. This is verified by comparing the laminar flame speed of the atmospheric mixtures. Also...

Krejci, Michael

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

308

Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup, and Oxygen Separation Equipment; Task 2.3: Sulfur Primer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This deliverable is Subtask 2.3 of Task 2, Gas Cleanup Design and Cost Estimates, of NREL Award ACO-5-44027, ''Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup and Oxygen Separation Equipment''. Subtask 2.3 builds upon the sulfur removal information first presented in Subtask 2.1, Gas Cleanup Technologies for Biomass Gasification by adding additional information on the commercial applications, manufacturers, environmental footprint, and technical specifications for sulfur removal technologies. The data was obtained from Nexant's experience, input from GTI and other vendors, past and current facility data, and existing literature.

Nexant Inc.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Method of and apparatus for preheating pressurized fluidized bed combustor and clean-up subsystem of a gas turbine power plant  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a gas turbine power plant having a pressurized fluidized bed combustor, gas turbine-air compressor subsystem and a gas clean-up subsystem interconnected for fluid flow therethrough, a pipe communicating the outlet of the compressor of the gas turbine-air compressor subsystem with the interior of the pressurized fluidized bed combustor and the gas clean-up subsystem to provide for flow of compressed air, heated by the heat of compression, therethrough. The pressurized fluidized bed combustor and gas clean-up subsystem are vented to atmosphere so that the heated compressed air flows therethrough and loses heat to the interior of those components before passing to the atmosphere.

Cole, Rossa W. (E. Rutherford, NJ); Zoll, August H. (Cedar Grove, NJ)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

CAS-NETL-PNNL CEP Program Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This collaborative joint research project is in the area of advanced gasification and conversion, within the CAS-NETL-PNNL Memorandum of Understanding. The goal is the development and testing of an integrated warm syngas cleanup process. This effort is focused on an advanced, integrated system for capture and removal of alkali, sulfur, PH3, AsH3, chloride, and CO2, leading to a future process demonstration at a CAS gasification facility. Syngas produced by gasification can be used for production of fuels (Fischer-Tropsch, SNG, mixed alcohols), chemicals (MeOH, NH3), and hydrogen for fuel cells and IGCC. To employ this syngas, especially for synthesis reactions, contained impurities must be removed to sub-ppmv levels [1]. Commercially available approaches to remove contaminant species suffer from inefficiencies, employing solvents at ambient or lower temperature along with backup sacrificial sorbents, whereas syngas utilization occurs at higher temperatures. The efficiency and economics syngas utilization can be significantly improved if all the contaminants and CO2 are removed at temperatures higher than the chemical synthesis reaction temperatures (> 250 °C) [2].

King, David L.; Spies, Kurt A.; Rainbolt, James E.; Zhang, Keling

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

311

EA-1642-S1: Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal-Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis, Lexington, KY  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This draft Supplemental Environmental Assessment (SEA) analyzes the potential environmental impacts of DOE’s proposed action of providing cost-shared funding for the University of Kentucky (UK) Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal-Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis project and of the No-Action Alternative.

312

EFFECTIVE ENVIRONMENTAL COMPLIANCE STRATEGY FOR THE CLEANUP OF K BASINS AT HANFORD SITE WASHINGTON  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

K Basins, consisting of two water-filled storage basins (KW and KE) for spent nuclear fuel (SNF), are part of the 100-K Area of the Hanford Site, along the shoreline of the Columbia River, situated approximately 40 km (25 miles) northwest of the City of Richland, Washington. The KW contained 964 metric tons of SNF in sealed canisters and the KE contained 1152 metric tons of SNF under water in open canisters. The cladding on much of the fuel was damaged allowing the fuel to corrode and degrade during storage underwater. An estimated 1,700 cubic feet of sludge, containing radionuclides and sediments, have accumulated in the KE basin. Various alternatives for removing and processing the SNF, sludge, debris and water were originally evaluated, by USDOE (DOE), in the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) with a preferred alternative identified in the Record of Decision. The SNF, sludge, debris and water are ''hazardous substances'' under the Comprehensive, Environmental, Response, Compensation and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). Leakage of radiologically contaminated water from one of the basins and subsequent detection of increased contamination in a down-gradient monitoring well helped to form the regulatory bases for cleanup action under CERCLA. The realization that actual or threatened release of hazardous substances from the waste sites and K Basins, if not addressed in a timely manner, may present an imminent and substantial endangerment to public health, welfare and environment led to action under CERCLA, with EPA as the lead regulatory agency. Clean-up of the K Basins as a CERCLA site required SNF retrieval, processing, packaging, vacuum drying and transport to a vaulted storage facility for storage, in conformance with a quality assurance program approved by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). Excluding the facilities built for SNF drying and vaulted storage, the scope of CERCLA interim remedial action was limited to the removal of fuel, sludge, debris and water. At present, almost all of the spent fuel has been removed from the basins and other activities to remove sludge, debris and water are scheduled to be completed in 2007. Developing environmental documentation and obtaining regulatory approvals for a project which was initiated outside CERCLA and came under CERCLA during execution, was a significant priority to the successful completion of the SNF retrieval, transfer, drying, transport and storage of fuel, within the purview of strong conduct-of-operations culture associated with nuclear facilities. Environmental requirements promulgated in the state regulations by Washington Department of Public Health for radiation were recognized as ''applicable or relevant and appropriate.'' Effective implementation of the environmental compliance strategy in a project that transitioned to CERCLA became a significant challenge involving multiple contractors. This paper provides an overview of the development and implementation of an environmental permitting and surveillance strategy that enabled us to achieve full compliance in a challenging environment, with milestones and cost constraints, while meeting the high safety standards. The details of the strategy as to how continuous rapport with the regulators, facility operators and surveillance groups helped to avoid impacts on the clean-up schedule are discussed. Highlighted are the role of engineered controls, surveillance protocols and triggers for monitoring and reporting, and active administrative controls that were established for the control of emissions, water loss and transport of waste shipments, during the different phases of the project.

AMBALAM, T.

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Micro-structural optimization of polybenzimidazole-based membranes for H2/CO2 separation at elevated temperatures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is compelling need to develop novel separation methods to improve the energy efficiency of synthesis (syn) gas processing operations including H{sub 2} and H{sub 2}/CO production to meet power, chemicals, and fuel producer needs, as well as carbon capture and removal of other undesirable syngas impurities. To be technically and economically viable, a successful separation method must be applicable to industrially relevant gas streams at realistic process conditions and compatible with large gas volumes. H{sub 2} selective membrane technology is a promising method for syngas separations at elevated temperatures (>150 C) that could be positioned upstream or downstream of one or more of the water-gas-shift reactors (WGSRs) or integrated with a WGSR depending on application specific syngas processing. Polybenzimidazole (PBI)-based polymer chemistries are exceptional candidates for H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} separations at elevated temperatures. In general, these materials possess excellent chemical resistance, very high glass transition temperatures (> 400 C), good mechanical properties, and an appropriate level of processability. Although commercially available PBI polymers have demonstrated commercially attractive H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity, their H{sub 2} permeability is low. Our team s employing structural and chemical manipulations to tailor the polymer free-volume achitecture with the ultimate goal of enhancing H{sub 2} permselectivity while retaining the inherent hermochemical stability characteristics of PBI. We will discuss our synthetic approaches and their influences on the gas transport behavior of these PBI-based materials. In general, a decrease in H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity was observed with an increase in H{sub 2} permeability. H{sub 2} permeability and H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity at 250 C ranged from 50 to 1000 barrer and 5 to 45, respectively.

Singh, Rajinder P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Li, Xin [University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC; Dudeck, Kevin W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Benicewicz, Brian C [University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC; Berchtold, Kathryn A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

314

Terminating Safeguards on Excess Special Nuclear Material: Defense TRU Waste Clean-up and Nonproliferation - 12426  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) manages defense nuclear material that has been determined to be excess to programmatic needs and declared waste. When these wastes contain plutonium, they almost always meet the definition of defense transuranic (TRU) waste and are thus eligible for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The DOE operates the WIPP in a manner that physical protections for attractiveness level D or higher special nuclear material (SNM) are not the normal operating condition. Therefore, there is currently a requirement to terminate safeguards before disposal of these wastes at the WIPP. Presented are the processes used to terminate safeguards, lessons learned during the termination process, and how these approaches might be useful for future defense TRU waste needing safeguards termination prior to shipment and disposal at the WIPP. Also described is a new criticality control container, which will increase the amount of fissile material that can be loaded per container, and how it will save significant taxpayer dollars. Retrieval, compliant packaging and shipment of retrievably stored legacy TRU waste has dominated disposal operations at WIPP since it began operations 12 years ago. But because most of this legacy waste has successfully been emplaced in WIPP, the TRU waste clean-up focus is turning to newly-generated TRU materials. A major component will be transuranic SNM, currently managed in safeguards-protected vaults around the weapons complex. As DOE and NNSA continue to consolidate and shrink the weapons complex footprint, it is expected that significant quantities of transuranic SNM will be declared surplus to the nation's needs. Safeguards termination of SNM varies due to the wide range of attractiveness level of the potential material that may be directly discarded as waste. To enhance the efficiency of shipping waste with high TRU fissile content to WIPP, DOE designed an over-pack container, similar to the pipe component, called the criticality control over-pack, which will significantly enhance the efficiency of disposal. Hundreds of shipments of transuranic SNM, suitably packaged to meet WIPP waste acceptance criteria and with safeguards terminated have been successfully emplaced at WIPP (primarily from the Rocky Flats site clean-up) since WIPP opened. DOE expects that thousands more may eventually result from SNM consolidation efforts throughout the weapons complex. (authors)

Hayes, Timothy [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Carlsbad Operations Group (United States); Nelson, Roger [Department Of Energy, Carlsbad Operations Office (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Laboratory tests, statistical analysis and correlations for regained permeability and breakthrough time in unconsolidated sands for improved drill-in fluid cleanup practices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Empirical models for estimating the breakthrough time and regained permeability for selected nondamaging drill-in fluids (DIF's) give a clear indication of formation damage and proper cleanup treatments for reservoir conditions analyzed...

Serrano, Gerardo Enrique

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Achieving Accelerated Cleanup of Cesium Contaminated Stream at the Savannah River Site; Collaboration between Stakeholders, Regulators, and the Federal Government - 13182  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a 310-square-mile United States Department of Energy (US DOE) nuclear facility located along the Savannah River near Aiken, South Carolina that contains six primary stream/river systems. The Lower Three Runs Stream (LTR) is one of the primary streams within the site that is located in the southeast portion of the Savannah River Site and is a large black water stream system that originates in the northeast portion of SRS and follows a southerly direction before it enters the Savannah River. During reactor operations, secondary reactor cooling water, storm sewer discharges, and miscellaneous wastewater was discharged and contaminated a 36 kilometer stretch of Lower Three Runs Stream that narrows providing a limited buffer of US DOE property along the stream and flood plain. Based on data collected during 2009 and 2010 under Recover Act Funding, the stream was determined to be contaminated with cesium-137 at levels that exceeded acceptable risk based limits. As efficiencies were realized within the SRS Recovery Act Program, funding was made available to design, permit and execute remediation of the LTR. This accelerated Project allowed for the remediation of 36 kilometers of LTR in only nine months from inception to completion, contributing significantly to the Foot Print Reduction of SRS. The scope consisted of excavation and disposal of more than 2064 cubic meters of contaminated soil, and installing 11 kilometers of fence and 2,000 signs at 1000 locations. Confirmatory sampling and analysis, and radiological surveying were performed demonstrating that soil concentrations met the cleanup goals. The project completed with a very good safety record considering the harsh conditions including, excessive rain in the early stages of the project, high summer temperatures, swampy terrain, snakes, wild boar, insects and dense vegetation. The regulatory approval process was compressed by over 75% and required significant efforts from SRS's stakeholders including the regulators, U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), and the public including local property owners and the SRS Citizens Advisory Board. Stakeholder buy-in was critical in the up-front planning in order to achieve this challenging cleanup. (authors)

Bergren, Chris; Flora, Mary; Socha, Ron; Burch, Joseph [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC, Bldg. 730-4B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC, Bldg. 730-4B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Freeman, Candice; Hennessey, Brian [United States Department of Energy, Bldg. 730-B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [United States Department of Energy, Bldg. 730-B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility for Gasification and Pressurized Combustion Project. Quarterly report, April--June 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to evaluate hot gas particle control technologies using coal-derived as streams. This will entail the design, construction, installation, and use of a flexible test facility which can operate under realistic gasification and combustion conditions. The major particulate control device issues to be addressed Include the integration of the particulate control devices into coal utilization systems, on-line cleaning, techniques, chemical and thermal degradation of components, fatigue or structural failures, blinding, collection efficiency as a function of particle size, and scale-up of particulate control systems to commercial size. The conceptual design of the facility was extended to include a within scope, phased expansion of the existing, Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility Cooperative Agreement to also address systems integration issues of hot particulate removal in advanced coal-based power generation systems. This expansion included the consideration of the following modules at the test facility in addition to the original Transport Reactor gas source and Hot Gas Cleanup Units: 1 . Carbonizer/Pressurized Circulating, Fluidized Bed Gas Source; 2. Hot Gas Cleanup Units to mate to all gas streams; 3. Combustion Gas Turbine; 4. Fuel Cell and associated gas treatment. This expansion to the Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility is herein referred to as the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF). The major emphasis during, this reporting period was continuing, the detailed design of the FW portion of the facility towards completion and integrating the balance-of-plant processes and particulate control devices (PCDS) into the structural and process designs. Substantial progress in construction activities was achieved during the quarter. Delivery and construction of the process structural steel is complete and the construction of steel for the coal preparation structure is complete.

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

318

Deep Vadose Zone Remediation: Technical and Policy Challenges, Opportunities, and Progress in Achieving Cleanup Endpoints  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current requirements for site remediation and closure are standards-based and are often overly conservative, costly, and in some cases, technically impractical. Use of risk-informed alternate endpoints provides a means to achieve remediation goals that are permitted by regulations and are protective of human health and the environment. Alternate endpoints enable the establishment of a path for cleanup that may include intermediate remedial milestones and transition points and/or regulatory alternatives to standards-based remediation. A framework is presented that is centered around developing and refining conceptual models in conjunction with assessing risks and potential endpoints as part of a system-based assessment that integrates site data with scientific understanding of processes that control the distribution and transport of contaminants in the subsurface and pathways to receptors. This system-based assessment and subsequent implementation of the remediation strategy with appropriate monitoring are targeted at providing a holistic approach to addressing risks to human health and the environment. This holistic approach also enables effective predictive analysis of contaminant behavior to provide defensible criteria and data for making long-term decisions. Developing and implementing an alternate endpoint-based approach for remediation and waste site closure presents a number of challenges and opportunities. Categories of these challenges include scientific and technical, regulatory, institutional, and budget and resource allocation issues. Opportunities exist for developing and implementing systems-based approaches with respect to supportive characterization, monitoring, predictive modeling, and remediation approaches.

Wellman, Dawn M.; Freshley, Mark D.; Truex, Michael J.; Lee, Michelle H.

2013-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

319

Critically safe volume vacuum pickup for use in wet or dry cleanup of radioactive enclosures  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A physical compact vacuum pickup device of critically safe volume and geometric shape is provided for use in radioactive enclosures, such as a small glove box, to facilitate manual cleanup of either wet or dry radioactive material. The device is constructed and arranged so as to remain safe when filled to capacity with plutonium-239 oxide. Two fine mesh filter bags are supported on the exterior of a rigid fine mesh stainless steel cup. This assembly is sealed within, and spaced from, the interior walls of a stainless steel canister. An air inlet communicates with the interior of the canister. A modified conventional vacuum head is physically connected to, and associated with, the interior of the mesh cup. The volume of the canister, as defined by the space between the mesh cup and the interior walls of the canister, forms a critically safe volume and geometric shape for dry radioactive particles that are gathered within the canister. A critically safe liquid volume is maintained by operation of a suction terminating float valve, and/or by operation of redundant vacuum check/liquid drain valves and placement of the air inlet. 5 figures.

Zeren, J.D.

1993-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

320

Alternative formulations of regenerable flue gas cleanup catalysts. Progress report, September 1, 1990--August 31, 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The major source of man-made SO{sub 2} in the atmosphere is the burning of coal for electric power generation. Coal-fired utility plants are also large sources of NO{sub x} pollution. Regenerable flue gas desulfurization/NO{sub x} abatement catalysts provide one mechanism of simultaneously removing SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} species from flue gases released into the atmosphere. The purpose of this project is to examine routes of optimizing the adsorption efficiency, the adsorption capacity, and the ease of regeneration of regenerable flue gas cleanup catalysts. We are investigating two different mechanisms for accomplishing this goal. The first involves the use of different alkali and alkaline earth metals as promoters for the alumina sorbents to increase the surface basicity of the sorbent and thus adjust the number and distribution of adsorption sites. The second involves investigation of non-aqueous impregnation, as opposed to aqueous impregnation, as a method to obtain an evenly dispersed monolayer of the promoter on the surface.

Mitchell, M.B.; White, M.G.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature syngas cleanup" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Landfill gas cleanup for carbonate fuel cell power generation. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Landfill gas represents a significant fuel resource both in the US and worldwide. The emissions of landfill gas from existing landfills has become an environmental liability contributing to global warming and causing odor problems. Landfill gas has been used to fuel reciprocating engines and gas turbines, and may also be used to fuel carbonate fuel cells. Carbonate fuel cells have high conversion efficiencies and use the carbon dioxide present in landfill gas as an oxidant. There are, however, a number of trace contaminants in landfill gas that contain chlorine and sulfur which are deleterious to fuel cell operation. Long-term economical operation of fuel cells fueled with landfill gas will, therefore, require cleanup of the gas to remove these contaminants. The overall objective of the work reported here was to evaluate the extent to which conventional contaminant removal processes could be combined to economically reduce contaminant levels to the specifications for carbonate fuel cells. A pilot plant cleaned approximately 970,000 scf of gas over 1,000 hours of operation. The testing showed that the process could achieve the following polished gas concentrations: less than 80 ppbv hydrogen sulfide; less than 1 ppmv (the detection limit) organic sulfur; less than 300 ppbv hydrogen chloride; less than 20--80 ppbv of any individual chlorinated hydrocarbon; and 1.5 ppm sulfur dioxide.

Steinfield, G.; Sanderson, R.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Prospects for pyrolysis technologies in managing municipal, industrial, and DOE cleanup wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pyrolysis converts portions of municipal solid wastes, hazardous wastes, and special wastes such as tires, medical wastes, and even old landfills into solid carbon and a liquid or gaseous hydrocarbon stream. Pyrolysis heats a carbonaceous waste stream typically to 290--900 C in the absence of oxygen, and reduces the volume of waste by 90% and its weight by 75%. The solid carbon char has existing markets as an ingredient in many manufactured goods, and as an adsorbent or filter to sequester certain hazardous wastes. Pyrolytic gases may be burned as fuel by utilities, or liquefied for use as chemical feedstocks, or low-pollution motor vehicle fuels and fuel additives. This report analyzes the potential applications of pyrolysis in the Long Island region and evaluates for the four most promising pyrolytic systems their technological and commercial readiness, their applicability to regional waste management needs, and their conformity with DOE requirements for environmental restoration and waste management. This summary characterizes their engineering performance, environmental effects, costs, product applications, and markets. Because it can effectively treat those wastes that are inadequately addressed by current systems, pyrolysis can play an important complementing role in the region`s existing waste management strategy. Its role could be even more significant if the region moves away from existing commitments to incineration and MSW composting. Either way, Long Island could become the center for a pyrolysis-based recovery services industry serving global markets in municipal solid waste treatment and hazardous waste cleanup. 162 refs.

Reaven, S.J. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Development of a catalyst for conversion of syngas-derived materials to isobutylene. Quarterly report number 19, October 1--December 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goals of this project are to develop a catalyst and process for the conversion of syngas to isobutanol. After identification and optimization of key catalyst and process characteristics, the commercial potential of the process is to be evaluated by an economic analysis. From independent process variable studies to investigate the conversion of a methanol/ethanol feed to isobutanol, the best performance to date has been achieved with the 2% Pt on Zn/Mn/Zr oxide catalyst. Using Hyprotech Hysim v2.5 process simulation software, and considering both gas and liquid recycle loops in the process flow diagram, the overall carbon conversion is 98% with 22% selectivity to isobutanol. The expected production of isobutanol is 92 MT/day from 500 MT/day of methanol and 172 MT/day of ethanol feed. An additional 13 MT/day of isobutryaldehyde intermediate is recovered in the liquid product and vent streams. Because of the low selectivity (22%) of the methanol conversion catalyst to isobutanol, the process is uneconomical, even if the isobutanol is valued as a solvent ($903/MT) and not as isobutylene for MTBE production ($352/MT).

Spehlmann, B.C.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Integrated Biomass Gasification with Catalytic Partial Oxidation for Selective Tar Conversion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biomass gasification is a flexible and efficient way of utilizing widely available domestic renewable resources. Syngas from biomass has the potential for biofuels production, which will enhance energy security and environmental benefits. Additionally, with the successful development of low Btu fuel engines (e.g. GE Jenbacher engines), syngas from biomass can be efficiently used for power/heat co-generation. However, biomass gasification has not been widely commercialized because of a number of technical/economic issues related to gasifier design and syngas cleanup. Biomass gasification, due to its scale limitation, cannot afford to use pure oxygen as the gasification agent that used in coal gasification. Because, it uses air instead of oxygen, the biomass gasification temperature is much lower than well-understood coal gasification. The low temperature leads to a lot of tar formation and the tar can gum up the downstream equipment. Thus, the biomass gasification tar removal is a critical technology challenge for all types of biomass gasifiers. This USDA/DOE funded program (award number: DE-FG36-O8GO18085) aims to develop an advanced catalytic tar conversion system that can economically and efficiently convert tar into useful light gases (such as syngas) for downstream fuel synthesis or power generation. This program has been executed by GE Global Research in Irvine, CA, in collaboration with Professor Lanny Schmidt's group at the University of Minnesota (UoMn). Biomass gasification produces a raw syngas stream containing H2, CO, CO2, H2O, CH4 and other hydrocarbons, tars, char, and ash. Tars are defined as organic compounds that are condensable at room temperature and are assumed to be largely aromatic. Downstream units in biomass gasification such as gas engine, turbine or fuel synthesis reactors require stringent control in syngas quality, especially tar content to avoid plugging (gum) of downstream equipment. Tar- and ash-free syngas streams are a critical requirement for commercial deployment of biomass-based power/heat co-generation and biofuels production. There are several commonly used syngas clean-up technologies: (1) Syngas cooling and water scrubbing has been commercially proven but efficiency is low and it is only effective at small scales. This route is accompanied with troublesome wastewater treatment. (2) The tar filtration method requires frequent filter replacement and solid residue treatment, leading to high operation and capital costs. (3) Thermal destruction typically operates at temperatures higher than 1000oC. It has slow kinetics and potential soot formation issues. The system is expensive and materials are not reliable at high temperatures. (4) In-bed cracking catalysts show rapid deactivation, with durability to be demonstrated. (5) External catalytic cracking or steam reforming has low thermal efficiency and is faced with problematic catalyst coking. Under this program, catalytic partial oxidation (CPO) is being evaluated for syngas tar clean-up in biomass gasification. The CPO reaction is exothermic, implying that no external heat is needed and the system is of high thermal efficiency. CPO is capable of processing large gas volume, indicating a very compact catalyst bed and a low reactor cost. Instead of traditional physical removal of tar, the CPO concept converts tar into useful light gases (eg. CO, H2, CH4). This eliminates waste treatment and disposal requirements. All those advantages make the CPO catalytic tar conversion system a viable solution for biomass gasification downstream gas clean-up. This program was conducted from October 1 2008 to February 28 2011 and divided into five major tasks. - Task A: Perform conceptual design and conduct preliminary system and economic analysis (Q1 2009 ~ Q2 2009) - Task B: Biomass gasification tests, product characterization, and CPO tar conversion catalyst preparation. This task will be conducted after completing process design and system economics analysis. Major milestones include identification of syngas cleaning requirements for proposed system

Zhang, Lingzhi; Wei, Wei; Manke, Jeff; Vazquez, Arturo; Thompson, Jeff; Thompson, Mark

2011-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

325

Development of site-specific soil cleanup criteria: New Brunswick Laboratory, New Jersey site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential human exposure which results from the residual soil radioactivity at a decommissioned site is a prime concern during D and D projects. To estimate this exposure, a pathway analysis approach is often used to arrive at the residual soil radioactivity criteria. The development of such a criteria for the decommissioning of the New Brunswick Laboratory, New Jersey site is discussed. Contamination on this site was spotty and located in small soil pockets spread throughout the site area. Less than 1% of the relevant site area was contaminated. The major contaminants encountered at the site were /sup 239/Pu, /sup 241/Am, normal and natural uranium, and natural thorium. During the development of the pathway analysis to determine the site cleanup criteria, corrections for the inhomogeneity of the contamination were made. These correction factors and their effect upon the relevant pathway parameters are presented. Major pathways by which radioactive material may reach an individual are identified and patterns of use are specified (scenario). Each pathway is modeled to estimate the transfer parameters along the given pathway, such as soil to air to man, etc. The transfer parameters are then combined with dose rate conversion factors (ICRP 30 methodology) to obtain soil concentration to dose rate conversion factors (pCi/g/mrem/yr). For an appropriate choice of annual dose equivalent rate, one can then arrive at a value for the residual soil concentration. Pathway modeling, transfer parameters, and dose rate factors for the three major pathways; inhalation, ingestion and external exposure, which are important for the NBL site, are discussed.

Veluri, V.R.; Moe, H.J.; Robinet, M.J.; Wynveen, R.A.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Application of Diagnostic/Prognostic Methods to Critical Equipment for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Cleanup Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The management of the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) project at the Hanford K-Basin in the 100 N Area has successfully restructured the preventive maintenance, spare parts inventory requirements, and the operator rounds data requirements. In this investigation, they continue to examine the different facets of the operations and maintenance (O&M) of the K-Basin cleanup project in search of additional reliability and cost savings. This report focuses on the initial findings of a team of PNNL engineers engaged to identify potential opportunities for reducing the cost of O&M through the application of advanced diagnostics (fault determination) and prognostics (residual life/reliability determination). The objective is to introduce predictive technologies to eliminate or reduce high impact equipment failures. The PNNL team in conjunction with the SNF engineers found the following major opportunities for cost reduction and/or enhancing reliability: (1) Provide data routing and automated analysis from existing detection systems to a display center that will engage the operations and engineering team. This display will be operator intuitive with system alarms and integrated diagnostic capability. (2) Change operating methods to reduce major transients induced in critical equipment. This would reduce stress levels on critical equipment. (3) Install a limited sensor set on failure prone critical equipment to allow degradation or stressor levels to be monitored and alarmed. This would provide operators and engineers with advance guidance and warning of failure events. Specific methods for implementation of the above improvement opportunities are provided in the recommendations. They include an Integrated Water Treatment System (IWTS) decision support system, introduction of variable frequency drives on certain pump motors, and the addition of limited diagnostic instrumentation on specified critical equipment.

Casazza, Lawrence O.; Jarrell, Donald B.; Koehler, Theresa M.; Meador, Richard J.; Wallace, Dale E.

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

327

Advanced cleanup device performance design report (Task 4. 3). Volume A. Cyclone theory and data correlation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 100-year-old cyclone is perhaps the best known and least expensive method of gas particulate cleaning. The theory and practice of cyclone operation has been extensively documented. The body of experience indicates that small cyclones operated at high swirl velocity give better separative efficiency although consideration must also be given to coarse particle bouncing and limitations associated with system pressure losses and cyclone erosion. Hence, multicyclones (i.e., many small cyclones operating in parallel), and staging have been employed in situations where unusually clean gas is mandated. Despite the extensive body of literature on the subject, predicting the performance of cyclones in actual service remains an art. The inadequacies in the existing cyclone theories quickly became evident in the course of several experimental programs at GE using various cyclone designs. The most significant finding of this work has been the observation that electrostatic forces could enhance, or, in fact, dominate the separation process. Cyclone separative efficiencies, with natural electrostatic effects present, were found to be independent of flowrate or even to improve at low flowrates, completely contrary to any of the existing cyclone literature. By implication, it is also possible that such electrostatic forces could influence cyclone scaling so that large cyclones employed in the cleanup train may not suffer the performance degradation compared to small cyclones, as projected from conventional inertial theory. Much of the GE work has therefore been oriented toward understanding and augmenting these electrostatic effects. This report is a collection of the most significant papers and memos on cyclone performance generated during the past three years by General Electric under the CFCC program.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Sensitivity of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis and Water-Gas Shift Catalysts to Poisons from High-Temperature High-Pressure Entrained-Flow (EF) Oxygen-Blown Gasifier Gasification of Coal/Biomass Mixtures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The successful adaptation of conventional cobalt and iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalysts for use in converting biomass-derived syngas hinges in part on understanding their susceptibility to byproducts produced during the biomass gasification process. With the possibility that oil production will peak in the near future, and due to concerns in maintaining energy security, the conversion of biomass-derived syngas and syngas derived from coal/biomass blends to Fischer-Tropsch synthesis products to liquid fuels may provide a sustainable path forward, especially considering if carbon sequestration can be successfully demonstrated. However, one current drawback is that it is unknown whether conventional catalysts based on iron and cobalt will be suitable without proper development because, while ash, sulfur compounds, traces of metals, halide compounds, and nitrogen-containing chemicals will likely be lower in concentration in syngas derived from mixtures of coal and biomass (i.e., using an entrained-flow oxygen-blown gasifier) than solely from coal, other byproducts may be present in higher concentrations. The current project examines the impact of a number of potential byproducts of concern from the gasification of biomass process, including compounds containing alkali chemicals like the chlorides of sodium and potassium. In the second year, researchers from the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (UK-CAER) continued the project by evaluating the sensitivity of a commercial iron-chromia high temperature water-gas shift catalyst (WGS) to a number of different compounds, including KHCO{sub 3}, NaHCO{sub 3}, HCl, HBr, HF, H{sub 2}S, NH{sub 3}, and a combination of H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3}. Cobalt and iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FT) catalysts were also subjected to a number of the same compounds in order to evaluate their sensitivities.

Burtron Davis; Gary Jacobs; Wenping Ma; Khalid Azzam; Dennis Sparks; Wilson Shafer

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

329

Idaho Cleanup Project CPP-603A basin deactivation waste management 2007  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CPP-603A basin facility is located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Idaho National Laboratory (INL). CPP-603A operations are part of the Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP) that is managed by CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC (CWI). Once the inventoried fuel was removed from the basins, they were no longer needed for fuel storage. However, they were still filled with water to provide shielding from high activity debris and contamination, and had to either be maintained so the basins did not present a threat to public or worker health and safety, or be isolated from the environment. The CPP-603A basins contained an estimated 50,000 kg (110,200 lbs) of sludge. The sludge was composed of desert sand, dust, precipitated corrosion products, and metal particles from past cutting operations. The sediment also contained hazardous constituents and radioactive contamination, including cadmium, lead, and U-235. An Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis (EE/CA), conducted pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), evaluated the risks associated with deactivation of the basins and the alternatives for addressing those risks. The recommended action identified in the Action Memorandum was to perform interim stabilization of the basins. The sludge in the basins was removed and treated in accordance with the Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (HWMA/RCRA) and disposed at the INL Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). A Non-Time Critical Removal Action (NTCRA) was conducted under CERCLA to reduce or eliminate other hazards associated with maintaining the facility. The CERCLA NTCRA included removing a small high-activity debris object (SHADO 1); consolidating and mapping the location of debris objects containing Co-60; removing, treating, and disposing of the basin water; and filling the basins with grout/controlled low strength material (CLSM). The NTCRA is an interim action that reduces the risks to human health and the environment by minimizing the potential for release of hazardous substances. The interim action does not prejudice the final end-state alternative. (authors)

Croson, D.V.; Davis, R.H.; Cooper, W.B. [CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC, Idaho Cleanup Project, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Precision Dual-Aquifer Dewatering at a Low Level Radiological Cleanup in New Jersey  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cleanup of low-level radioactive wastes at the Wayne Interim Storage Site (WISS), Wayne, New Jersey during the period October, 2000 through November, 2001 required the design, installation and operation of a dual-aquifer dewatering system to support excavation of contaminated soils. Waste disposal pits from a former rare-earth processing facility at the WISS had been in contact with the water table aquifer, resulting in moderate levels of radionuclides being present in the upper aquifer groundwater. An uncontaminated artesian aquifer underlies the water table aquifer, and is a localized drinking water supply source. The lower aquifer, confined by a silty clay unit, is flowing artesian and exhibits potentiometric heads of up to 4.5 meters above grade. This high potentiometric head presented a strong possibility that unloading due to excavation would result in a ''blowout'', particularly in areas where the confining unit was < 1 meter thick. Excavation of contaminated materials w as required down to the surface of the confining unit, potentially resulting in an artesian aquifer head of greater than 8 meters above the excavation surface. Consequently, it was determined that a dual-aquifer dewatering system would be required to permit excavation of contaminated material, with the water table aquifer dewatered to facilitate excavation, and the deep aquifer depressurized to prevent a ''blowout''. An additional concern was the potential for vertical migration of contamination present in the water table aquifer that could result from a vertical gradient reversal caused by excessive pumping in the confined system. With these considerations in mind, a conceptual dewatering plan was developed with three major goals: (1) dewater the water table aquifer to control radionuclide migration and allow excavation to proceed; (2) depressurize the lower, artesian aquifer to reduce the potential for a ''blowout''; and (3) develop a precise dewatering level control mechanism to insure a vertical gradient reversal did not result in cross-contamination. The plan was executed through a hydrogeologic investigation culminating with the design and implementation of a complex, multi-phased dual-aquifer dewatering system equipped with a state of the art monitoring network.

Gosnell, A. S.; Langman, J. W. Jr.; Zahl, H. A.; Miller, D. M.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

331

Platinum-Modulated Cobalt Nanocatalysts for Low-Temperature Aqueous-Phase Fischer Tropsch Synthesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fischer Tropsch synthesis (FTS) is an important catalytic process for liquid fuel generation, which converts coal/shale gas/biomass-derived syngas (a mixture of CO and H2) to oil. While FTS is thermodynamically favored at low temperature, it is desirable to develop a new catalytic system that could allow working at a relatively low reaction temperature. In this article, we present a one-step hydrogenation reduction route for the synthesis of Pt Co nanoparticles (NPs) which were found to be excellent catalysts for aqueous-phase FTS at 433 K. Coupling with atomic-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and theoretical calculations, the outstanding activity is rationalized by the formation of Co overlayer structures on Pt NPs or Pt Co alloy NPs. The improved energetics and kinetics from the change of the transition states imposed by the lattice mismatch between the two metals are concluded to be the key factors responsible for the dramatically improved FTS performance.

Wang, Hang [Peking University; Zhou, Wu [ORNL; Liu, JinXun [Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics; Si, Rui [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Sun, Geng [Peking University; Zhong, Mengqi [Peking University; Su, Haiyan [Peking University; Zhao, Huabo [Peking University; Rodrigues, Jose [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Pennycook, Stephen J [ORNL; Idrobo Tapia, Juan C [ORNL; Li, Weixue [Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics; Kou, Yuan [Peking University; Ma, Ding [Peking University

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Hot gas cleanup test facility for gasification and pressurized combustion. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1--March 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This quarterly technical progress report summarizes work completed during the Sixth Quarter of the First Budget Period, January 1 through March 31, 1992, under the Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC21-90MC25140 entitled ``Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility for Gasification and Pressurized Combustion.`` The objective of this project is to evaluate hot gas particle control technologies using coal-derived gas streams. The major emphasis during this reporting period was expanding the test facility to address system integration issues of hot particulate removal in advanced power generation systems. The conceptual design of the facility was extended to include additional modules for the expansion of the test facility, which is referred to as the Power Systems Development Facility (PSOF). A letter agreement was negotiated between Southern Company Services (SCS) and Foster Wheeler (FW) for the conceptual design of the Advanced Pressurized Fluid-Bed Combustion (APFBC)/Topping Combustor/Gas Turbine System to be added to the facility. The expanded conceptual design also included modifications to the existing conceptual design for the Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility (HGCTF), facility layout and balance of plant design for the PSOF. Southern Research Institute (SRI) began investigating the sampling requirements for the expanded facility and assisted SCS in contacting Particulate Control Device (PCD) vendors for additional information. SCS also contacted the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and two molten carbonate fuel cell vendors for input on the fuel cell module for the PSDF.

Not Available

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Science to support DOE site cleanup: The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Environmental Management Science Program awards. Fiscal year 1998 mid-year progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was awarded ten (10) Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research grants in Fiscal Year 1996 and six (6) in Fiscal Year 1997. This section summarizes how each grant addresses significant US Department of Energy (DOE) cleanup issues, including those at the Hanford Site. The technical progress made to date in each of these research projects is addressed in more detail in the individual progress reports contained in this document. This research is focused primarily in four areas: Tank Waste Remediation, Spent Nuclear Fuel and Nuclear Materials, Soil and Groundwater Cleanup, and Health Effects.

NONE

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Science to support DOE site cleanup: The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Environmental Management Science Program awards. Fiscal year 1997 mid-year progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was awarded ten Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research grants in Fiscal Year 1996. This report gives a summary of how each grant is addressing significant DOE cleanup issues, including those at the Hanford Site. The technical progress made to date in each of these research projects is addressed in more detail in the individual progress reports contained in this document. This research is primarily focused in three areas--Tank Waste Remediation, Soil and Groundwater Cleanup, and Health Effects.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Process for CO.sub.2 capture using zeolites from high pressure and moderate temperature gas streams  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for separating CO.sub.2 from a gas stream comprised of CO.sub.2 and other gaseous constituents using a zeolite sorbent in a swing-adsorption process, producing a high temperature CO.sub.2 stream at a higher CO.sub.2 pressure than the input gas stream. The method utilizes CO.sub.2 desorption in a CO.sub.2 atmosphere and effectively integrates heat transfers for optimizes overall efficiency. H.sub.2O adsorption does not preclude effective operation of the sorbent. The cycle may be incorporated in an IGCC for efficient pre-combustion CO.sub.2 capture. A particular application operates on shifted syngas at a temperature exceeding 200.degree. C. and produces a dry CO.sub.2 stream at low temperature and high CO.sub.2 pressure, greatly reducing any compression energy requirements which may be subsequently required.

Siriwardane, Ranjani V. (Morgantown, WV); Stevens, Robert W. (Morgantown, WV)

2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

336

Decommissioning and Environmental Cleanup of a Small Arms Training Facility - 13225  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

US DOE performed a (CERCLA) non-time critical removal (NTCR) action at the Small Arms Training Area (SATA) Site Evaluation Area (SEA) located at the Savannah River Site (SRS), in Aiken, South Carolina. From 1951 to May 2010, the SATA was used as a small weapons practice and qualifying firing range. The SATA consisted of 870.1 ha (2,150 ac) of woodlands and open field, of which approximately 2.9 ha (7.3 ac) were used as a firing range. The SATA facility was comprised of three small arms ranges (one static and two interactive), storage buildings for supplies, a weapons cleaning building, and a control building. Additionally, a 113- m (370-ft) long earthen berm was used as a target backstop during live-fire exercises. The berm soils accumulated a large amount of spent lead bullets in the berm face during the facilities 59- years of operation. The accumulation of lead was such that soil concentrations exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) residential and industrial worker regional screening levels (RSLs). The RSL threshold values are based on standardized exposure scenarios that estimate contaminant concentrations in soil that the USEPA considers protective of humans over a lifetime. For the SATA facility, lead was present in soil at concentrations that exceed both the current residential (400 mg/kg) and industrial (800 mg/kg) RSLs. In addition, the concentration of lead in the soil exceeded the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) (40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 261.24) regulatory limit. The TCLP analysis simulates landfill conditions and is designed to determine the mobility of contaminants in waste. In addition, a principal threat source material (PTSM) evaluation, human health risk assessment (HHRA), and contaminant migration (CM) analysis were conducted to evaluate soil contamination at the SATA SEA. This evaluation determined that there were no contaminants present that constitute PTSM and the CM analysis revealed that no constituents posed a migration risk to groundwater. The NTCR action involved removal of approximately 12,092 m{sup 3} (15,816 yd{sup 3}) of spent bullets and lead-impacted soil and off-site disposal. The removal action included soils from the berm area, a fill area that received scraped soils from the berm, and soil from a drainage ditch located on the edge of the berm area. Also included in the removal action was a mixture of soil, concrete, and asphalt from the other three range areas. Under this action, 11,796 m{sup 3} (15,429 yd{sup 3}) of hazardous waste and impacted soil were removed from the SATA and transported to a permitted hazardous waste disposal facility (Lone Mountain Facility in Oklahoma) and 296 m{sup 3} (387 yd{sup 3}) of nonhazardous waste (primarily concrete debris) were removed and transported to a local solid waste landfill for disposal. During the excavation process, the extent was continuously assessed through the use of a hand-held, field-portable X-ray fluorescence unit with results verified using confirmation sampling with certified laboratory analysis. Following the completion of the excavation and confirmation sampling, final contouring, grading, and establishment of vegetative cover was performed to stabilize the affected areas. The NTCR action began on August 17, 2010, and mechanical completion was achieved on April 27, 2011. The selected removal action met the removal action objectives (RAOs), is protective of human health and the environment both in the short- and long-term, was successful in removing potential ecological risks, and is protective of surface water and groundwater. Furthermore, the selected NTCR action met residential cleanup goals and resulted in the release of the SEA from restricted use contributing to the overall footprint reduction at SRS. (authors)

Adams, Karen M. [United States Department of Energy - Savannah River Operations Office (United States)] [United States Department of Energy - Savannah River Operations Office (United States); Kmetz, Thomas F.; Smith, Sandra B.; Blount, Gerald C. [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC (United States)] [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Investing in International Information Exchange Activities to Improve the Safety, Cost Effectiveness and Schedule of Cleanup - 13281  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With decreasing budgets and increasing pressure on completing cleanup missions as quickly, safely and cost-effectively as possible, there is significant benefit to be gained from collaboration and joint efforts between organizations facing similar issues. With this in mind, the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the UK Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) have formally agreed to share information on lessons learned on the development and application of new technologies and approaches to improve the safety, cost effectiveness and schedule of the cleanup legacy wastes. To facilitate information exchange a range of tools and methodologies were established. These included tacit knowledge exchange through facilitated meetings, conference calls and Site visits as well as explicit knowledge exchange through document sharing and newsletters. A DOE web-based portal has been established to capture these exchanges and add to them via discussion boards. The information exchange is operating at the Government-to-Government strategic level as well as at the Site Contractor level to address both technical and managerial topic areas. This effort has resulted in opening a dialogue and building working relationships. In some areas joint programs of work have been initiated thus saving resource and enabling the parties to leverage off one another activities. The potential benefits of high quality information exchange are significant, ranging from cost avoidance through identification of an approach to a problem that has been proven elsewhere to cost sharing and joint development of a new technology to address a common problem. The benefits in outcomes significantly outweigh the costs of the process. The applicability of the tools and methods along with the lessons learned regarding some key issues is of use to any organization that wants to improve value for money. In the waste management marketplace, there are a multitude of challenges being addressed by multiple organizations and the effective pooling and exchange of knowledge and experience can only be of benefit to all participants to help complete the cleanup mission more quickly and more cost effectively. This paper examines in detail the tools and processes used to promote information exchange and the progress made to date. It also discusses the challenges and issues involved and proposes recommendations to others who are involved in similar activities. (authors)

Seed, Ian; James, Paula [Cogentus Consulting (United States)] [Cogentus Consulting (United States); Mathieson, John [NDA United Kingdom (United Kingdom)] [NDA United Kingdom (United Kingdom); Judd, Laurie [NuVision Engineering, Inc. (United States)] [NuVision Engineering, Inc. (United States); Elmetti-Ramirez, Rosa; Han, Ana [US DOE (United States)] [US DOE (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Biomass Gasification Research Facility Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While thermochemical syngas production facilities for biomass utilization are already employed worldwide, exploitation of their potential has been inhibited by technical limitations encountered when attempting to obtain real-time syngas compositional data required for process optimization, reliability, and syngas quality assurance. To address these limitations, the Gas Technology Institute (GTI) carried out two companion projects (under US DOE Cooperative Agreements DE-FC36-02GO12024 and DE-FC36-03GO13175) to develop and demonstrate the equipment and methods required to reliably and continuously obtain accurate and representative on-line syngas compositional data. These objectives were proven through a stepwise series of field tests of biomass and coal gasification process streams. GTI developed the methods and hardware for extractive syngas sample stream delivery and distribution, necessary to make use of state-of-the-art on-line analyzers to evaluate and optimize syngas cleanup and conditioning. The primary objectives of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC36-02GO12024 were the selection, acquisition, and application of a suite of gas analyzers capable of providing near real-time gas analyses to suitably conditioned syngas streams. A review was conducted of sampling options, available analysis technologies, and commercially available analyzers, that could be successfully applied to the challenging task of on-line syngas characterization. The majority of thermochemical process streams comprise multicomponent gas mixtures that, prior to crucial, sequential cleanup procedures, include high concentrations of condensable species, multiple contaminants, and are often produced at high temperatures and pressures. Consequently, GTI engaged in a concurrent effort under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC36-03GO13175 to develop the means to deliver suitably prepared, continuous streams of extracted syngas to a variety of on-line gas analyzers. The review of candidate analysis technology also addressed safety concerns associated with thermochemical process operation that constrain the location and configuration of potential gas analysis equipment. Initial analyzer costs, reliability, accuracy, and operating and maintenance costs were also considered prior to the assembly of suitable analyzers for this work. Initial tests at GTI’s Flex-Fuel Test Facility (FFTF) in late 2004 and early 2005 successfully demonstrated the transport and subsequent analysis of a single depressurized, heat-traced syngas stream to a single analyzer (an Industrial Machine and Control Corporation (IMACC) Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR)) provided by GTI. In March 2005, our sampling approach was significantly expanded when this project participated in the U.S. DOE’s Novel Gas Cleaning (NGC) project. Syngas sample streams from three process locations were transported to a distribution manifold for selectable analysis by the IMACC FT-IR, a Stanford Research Systems QMS300 Mass Spectrometer (SRS MS) obtained under this Cooperative Agreement, and a Varian micro gas chromatograph with thermal conductivity detector (?GC) provided by GTI. A syngas stream from a fourth process location was transported to an Agilent Model 5890 Series II gas chromatograph for highly sensitive gas analyses. The on-line analyses made possible by this sampling system verified the syngas cleaning achieved by the NGC process. In June 2005, GTI collaborated with Weyerhaeuser to characterize the ChemrecTM black liquor gasifier at Weyerhaeuser’s New Bern, North Carolina pulp mill. Over a ten-day period, a broad range of process operating conditions were characterized with the IMACC FT-IR, the SRS MS, the Varian ?GC, and an integrated Gas Chromatograph, Mass Selective Detector, Flame Ionization Detector and Sulfur Chemiluminescence Detector (GC/MSD/FID/SCD) system acquired under this Cooperative Agreement from Wasson-ECE. In this field application, a single sample stream was extracted from this low-pressure, low-temperature process and successfully analyzed by these devices. In late 2005,

Snyder, Todd R.; Bush, Vann; Felix, Larry G.; Farthing, William E.; Irvin, James H.

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

339

Molybdenum-based additives to mixed-metal oxides for use in hot gas cleanup sorbents for the catalytic decomposition of ammonia in coal gases  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to additives to mixed-metal oxides that act simultaneously as sorbents and catalysts in cleanup systems for hot coal gases. Such additives of this type, generally, act as a sorbent to remove sulfur from the coal gases while substantially simultaneously, catalytically decomposing appreciable amounts of ammonia from the coal gases.

Ayala, Raul E. (Clifton Park, NY)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Pressure &Pressure & TemperatureTemperature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to measure atmospheric pressure, and thermometer toprobe to measure atmospheric pressure, and thermometer toprobe to measure atmospheric pressure, and thermometer toprobe to measure atmospheric pressure, and thermometer to measure air temperature.measure air temperature.measure air temperature.measure air temperature

California at Santa Cruz, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature syngas cleanup" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Building upon Historical Competencies: Next-generation Clean-up Technologies for World-Wide Application - 13368  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's Savannah River Site has a 60-year history of successfully operating nuclear facilities and cleaning up the nuclear legacy of the Cold War era through the processing of radioactive and otherwise hazardous wastes, remediation of contaminated soil and groundwater, management of nuclear materials, and deactivation and decommissioning of excess facilities. SRS recently unveiled its Enterprise.SRS (E.SRS) strategic vision to identify and facilitate application of the historical competencies of the site to current and future national and global challenges. E.SRS initiatives such as the initiative to Develop and Demonstrate Next generation Clean-up Technologies seek timely and mutually beneficial engagements with entities around the country and the world. One such ongoing engagement is with government and industry in Japan in the recovery from the devastation of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. (authors)

Guevara, K.C. [DOE Savannah River Operations Office, Aiken, South Carolina 29808 (United States)] [DOE Savannah River Operations Office, Aiken, South Carolina 29808 (United States); Fellinger, A.P.; Aylward, R.S.; Griffin, J.C.; Hyatt, J.E.; Bush, S.R. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, South Carolina 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, South Carolina 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Cleanup protocols when encountering thorium-230 at U.S. DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The passage of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, established the regulatory framework, under which the US EPA charged with developing standards for the cleanup and disposal of tailings at 24 designated inactive uranium processing sites located in 10 states. 40 CFR 192.12 requires that the concentration of Ra-226 in land averaged over any area of 100 square meters shall not exceed the background level by more than 5 pCi/g, averaged over the first 15 cm of soil below the surface, 15 pCi/g, averaged over 15-cm-thick layers of soils more than 15 cm below the surface. However, Th-230 is not specifically addressed by the EPA in 40 CFR 192.12, which naturally decays with a half-life of 77,000 years to form Ra-226. Consequently, the cleanup of the initial Ra-226 contamination according to the standards will not necessarily mitigate against the eventual ingrowth of residual Ra-226 with time, due to the radioactive decay of residual Th-230. Therefore, to direct the excavation of residual Th-230, four generic protocols are being used at Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites, as follows: Determining the allowable remaining concentration of Th-230 in surface and subsurface soils; Encountering Th-230 contamination in the unsaturated subsurface soil; Encountering Th-230 contamination in the saturated zone; and Verification sampling. The four generic protocols, developed in conjunction with the supplemental standards provision, ensure protection of the general public by reducing exposures to levels that are As Low As Reasonably Achievable, while considering practical measures necessary to excavate Th-230 under conditions encountered at the UMTRA Project site.

Miller, M.L.; Hylko, J.M.; Cornish, R.E.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

343

Preferential oxidation of methanol and carbon monoxide for gas cleanup during methanol fuel processing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Methanol fuel processing generates hydrogen for low-temperature, PEM fuel cell systems now being considered for transportation and other applications. Although liquid methanol fuel is convenient for this application, existing fuel processing techniques generate contaminants that degrade fuel cell performance. Through mathematical models and laboratory experiments chemical processing is described that removes CO and other contaminants from the anode feed stream.

Birdsell, S.A.; Vanderborgh, N.E.; Inbody, M.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Glow Discharge Enhanced Chemical Reaction: Application in Ammonia Synthesis and Hydrocarbon Gas Cleanup  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hydrocarbons mixture such as EPE (74.8% methane, 8% ethane, 8% ethylene, 2.1% propane and 1.1% Propene). Non-thermal plasmas, due to their unique non-equilibrium characteristics, offer advantages as method of reforming at lower temperature (100-150 ş...

Ming, Pingjia

2014-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

345

SOx-NOx-Rox Box{trademark} flue gas clean-up demonstration. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Babcock and Wilcox`s (B and W) SOx-NOx-Rox Box{trademark} process effectively removes SOx, NOx and particulate (Rox) from flue gas generated from coal-fired boilers in a single unit operation, a high temperature baghouse. The SNRB technology utilizes dry sorbent injection upstream of the baghouse for removal of SOx and ammonia injection upstream of a zeolitic selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst incorporated in the baghouse to reduce NOx emissions. Because the SOx and NOx removal processes require operation at elevated gas temperatures (800--900 F) for high removal efficiency, high-temperature fabric filter bags are used in the baghouse. The SNRB technology evolved from the bench and laboratory pilot scale to be successfully demonstrated at the 5-MWe field scale. This report represents the completion of Milestone M14 as specified in the Work Plan. B and W tested the SNRB pollution control system at a 5-MWe demonstration facility at Ohio Edison`s R.E. Burger Plant located near Shadyside, Ohio. The design and operation were influenced by the results from laboratory pilot testing at B and W`s Alliance Research Center. The intent was to demonstrate the commercial feasibility of the SNRB process. The SNRB facility treated a 30,000 ACFM flue gas slipstream from Boiler No. 8. Operation of the facility began in May 1992 and was completed in May 1993. About 2,300 hours of high-temperature operation were achieved. The main emissions control performance goals of: greater than 70% SO{sub 2} removal using a calcium-based sorbent; greater than 90% NOx removal with minimal ammonia slip; and particulate emissions in compliance with the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) of 0.03 lb/million Btu were exceeded simultaneously in the demonstration program when the facility was operated at optimal conditions. Testing also showed significant reductions in emissions of some hazardous air pollutants.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Process for ammonia syngas manufacture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes an improved process for reforming hydrocarbons to obtain a synthesis gas containing an approximately stoichiometric amount of hydrogen and nitrogen from which ammonia may be formed in which a hydrocarbon is reacted with steam and air in a reforming operation to obtain a first effluent. This effluent consists of hydrogen, nitrogen and carbon monoxide. The carbon monoxide is reacted in a shift conversion stage to produce a second effluent consisting of hydrogen, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide. The improved process has the additional steps of separating the second effluent into a first stream and a second stream. The first stream is reacted with air in a fuel cell to produce a byproduct stream and a product stream which is passed through a de-oxygenation stage to produce a purified stream. The second stream and the purified stream is passed into a pressure swing adsorption unit in which the synthesis gas and a waste fuel stream are separated.

Jungerhans, R.R.J.

1986-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

347

Hanford Site Cleanup Before Cleanup Began  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Bigfront.jpgcommunity200cell 9 Hanford Traffic Safety Video

348

Integrated low emission cleanup system for direct coal-fueled turbines (electrostatic agglomeration)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this contract is to investigate the removal of So{sub x} and particulate matter from direct coal-fired combustion gas streams at high temperature and high pressure conditions. This investigation will be accomplished through a bench-scale testing and evaluation program employing sorbent mixed with a coal-water slurry for So{sub x} removal, and an innovative particulate control concept. The particulate control device utilizes electrostatic agglomeration followed by a high efficiency mechanical collector (cyclone). The process goal is to achieve particulate collection efficiency better than that required by the 1979 new source performance standards. An additional goal is to demonstrate 70% So{sub x} removal efficiency. This research project is now in the second of a 3 phase (Phase II) project. Phase II is to fabricate the combustor and particulate control devices and install the system at a test facility located at Research-Cottrell's, KVB Western Laboratory, Santa Ana, CA. There are three functional categories, or tasks which are to be completed in sequence. These tasks are itemized as follows: Design, procurement, and installation; Shakedown and startup; Reporting. Attempts to validate the concept of electrostatic agglomeration were not possible in the shakedown program before budget constraints halted the program. What was learned was that electrostatic precipitation is feasible in the temperature range of 1600--1800{degrees}F and at pressures above 10 atmospheres.

Quimby, J.M.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Nonaqueous Phase Liquid Dissolution in Porous Media: Multi-Scale Effects of Multi-Component Dissolution Kinetics on Cleanup Time  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Industrial organic solvents such as trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) constitute a principal class of groundwater contaminants. Cleanup of groundwater plume source areas associated with these compounds is problematic, in part, because the compounds often exist in the subsurface as dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). Ganglia (or 'blobs') of DNAPL serve as persistent sources of contaminants that are difficult to locate and remediate (e.g. Fenwick and Blunt, 1998). Current understanding of the physical and chemical processes associated with dissolution of DNAPLs in the subsurface is incomplete and yet is critical for evaluating long-term behavior of contaminant migration, groundwater cleanup, and the efficacy of source area cleanup technologies. As such, a goal of this project has been to contribute to this critical understanding by investigating the multi-phase, multi-component physics of DNAPL dissolution using state-of-the-art experimental and computational techniques. Through this research, we have explored efficient and accurate conceptual and numerical models for source area contaminant transport that can be used to better inform the modeling of source area contaminants, including those at the LLNL Superfund sites, to re-evaluate existing remediation technologies, and to inspire or develop new remediation strategies. The problem of DNAPL dissolution in natural porous media must be viewed in the context of several scales (Khachikian and Harmon, 2000), including the microscopic level at which capillary forces, viscous forces, and gravity/buoyancy forces are manifested at the scale of individual pores (Wilson and Conrad, 1984; Chatzis et al., 1988), the mesoscale where dissolution rates are strongly influenced by the local hydrodynamics, and the field-scale. Historically, the physico-chemical processes associated with DNAPL dissolution have been addressed through the use of lumped mass transfer coefficients which attempt to quantify the dissolution rate in response to local dissolved-phase concentrations distributed across the source area using a volume-averaging approach (Figure 1). The fundamental problem with the lumped mass transfer parameter is that its value is typically derived empirically through column-scale experiments that combine the effects of pore-scale flow, diffusion, and pore-scale geometry in a manner that does not provide a robust theoretical basis for upscaling. In our view, upscaling processes from the pore-scale to the field-scale requires new computational approaches (Held and Celia, 2001) that are directly linked to experimental studies of dissolution at the pore scale. As such, our investigation has been multi-pronged, combining theory, experiments, numerical modeling, new data analysis approaches, and a synthesis of previous studies (e.g. Glass et al, 2001; Keller et al., 2002) aimed at quantifying how the mechanisms controlling dissolution at the pore-scale control the long-term dissolution of source areas at larger scales.

McNab, W; Ezzedine, S; Detwiler, R

2007-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

350

Science to Support DOE Site Cleanup: The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Environmental Management Science Program Awards -- Fiscal Year 2002 Mid-Year Progress Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been awarded a total of 80 Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research grants since the inception of the program in 1996. The Laboratory has collaborated on an additional 14 EMSP awards with funding received through other institution. This report describes how each of the projects awarded in 1999, 2000, and 2001 addresses significant U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) cleanup issues, including those at the Hanford Site. The technical progress made to date in each of these research projects is addressed in the individual project reports included in this document. Projects are under way in three main areas: Tank Waste Remediation, Decontamination and Decommissioning, and Soil and Groundwater Cleanup.

Bredt, Paul R.; Ainsworth, Calvin C.; Brockman, Fred J.; Camaioni, Donald M.; Egorov, Oleg B.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Gorby, Yuri A.; Grate, Jay W.; Greenwood, Margaret S.; Hay, Benjamin P.; Hess, Nancy J.; Hubler, Timothy L.; Icenhower, Jonathan P.; Mattigod, Shas V.; McGrail, B. Peter; Meyer, Philip D.; Murray, Christopher J.; Panetta, Paul D.; Pfund, David M.; Rai, Dhanpat; Su, Yali; Sundaram, S. K.; Weber, William J.; Zachara, John M.

2002-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

351

Science to Support DOE Site Cleanup: The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Environmental Management Science Program Awards - Fiscal Year 2000 Mid-Year Progress Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was awarded ten Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research grants in fiscal year 1996, six in fiscal year 1997, eight in fiscal year 1998, and seven in fiscal year 1999. All of the fiscal year 1996 award projects have been completed and will publish final reports, so their annual updates will not be included in this document. This section summarizes how each of the currently funded grants addresses significant US Department of Energy (DOE) cleanup issues, including those at the Hanford Site. The technical progress made to date in each of these research projects is addressed in more detail in the individual progress reports contained in this document. This research performed at PNNL is focused primarily in four areas: Tank Waste Remediation; Decontamination and Decommissioning; Spent Nuclear Fuel and Nuclear Materials; and Soil and Groundwater Cleanup.

CD Carlson; SQ Bennett

2000-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

352

Science to Support DOE Site Cleanup: The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Environmental Management Science Program Awards - Fiscal Year 2000 Mid-Year Progress Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was awarded ten Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research grants in fiscal year 1996, six in fiscal year 1997, eight in fiscal year 1998 and seven in fiscal year 1999.(a) All of the fiscal year 1996 awards have been completed and the Principal Investigators are writing final reports, so their summaries will not be included in this document. This section summarizes how each of the currently funded grants addresses significant U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) cleanup issues, including those at the Hanford Site. The technical progress made to date in each of these research projects is addressed in more detail in the individual progress reports contained in this document. This research performed at PNNL is focused primarily in four areas: Tank Waste Remediation, Decontamination and Decommissioning, Spent Nuclear Fuel and Nuclear Materials, and Soil and Groundwater Cleanup.

Carlson, Clark D.; Bennett, Sheila Q.

2000-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

353

Zevenhoven & Kilpinen CROSS EFFECTS, TOTAL SYSTEM LAY-OUT 13.6.2001 10-1 Figure 10.1 Typical pulverised coal combustion and gas clean-up system: dry scrubber +  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pulverised coal combustion and gas clean-up system: dry scrubber + baghouse filter for SO2 and particulate For a conventional pulverised coal-fired power plant a set-up is shown in Figure 10.1, with a gas clean-up system scrubber (pH ~ 6) 60 - 70 7 Re-heater 350 - 400 8 SCR DeNOx 300 - 400 9 Active coke bed 100 - 150 Figure 10

Zevenhoven, Ron

354

Sensitivity of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis and Water-Gas Shift Catalysts to Poisons from High-Temperature High-Pressure Entrained-Flow (EF) Oxygen-Blown Gasifier Gasification of Coal/Biomass Mixtures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There has been a recent shift in interest in converting not only natural gas and coal derived syngas to Fischer-Tropsch synthesis products, but also converting biomass-derived syngas, as well as syngas derived from coal and biomass mixtures. As such, conventional catalysts based on iron and cobalt may not be suitable without proper development. This is because, while ash, sulfur compounds, traces of metals, halide compounds, and nitrogen-containing chemicals will likely be lower in concentration in syngas derived from mixtures of coal and biomass (i.e., using entrained-flow oxygen-blown gasifier gasification gasification) than solely from coal, other compounds may actually be increased. Of particular concern are compounds containing alkali chemicals like the chlorides of sodium and potassium. In the first year, University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (UK-CAER) researchers completed a number of tasks aimed at evaluating the sensitivity of cobalt and iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FT) catalysts and a commercial iron-chromia high temperature water-gas shift catalyst (WGS) to alkali halides. This included the preparation of large batches of 0.5%Pt-25%Co/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and 100Fe: 5.1Si: 3.0K: 2.0Cu (high alpha) catalysts that were split up among the four different entities participating in the overall project; the testing of the catalysts under clean FT and WGS conditions; the testing of the Fe-Cr WGS catalyst under conditions of co-feeding NaCl and KCl; and the construction and start-up of the continuously stirred tank reactors (CSTRs) for poisoning investigations. In the second and third years, researchers from the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (UK-CAER) continued the project by evaluating the sensitivity of a commercial iron-chromia high temperature water-gas shift catalyst (WGS) to a number of different compounds, including KHCO{sub 3}, NaHCO{sub 3}, HCl, HBr, HF, H{sub 2}S, NH{sub 3}, and a combination of H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3}. Cobalt and iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FT) catalysts were also subjected to a number of the same compounds in order to evaluate their sensitivities at different concentration levels of added contaminant.

Burton Davis; Gary Jacobs; Wenping Ma; Dennis Sparks; Khalid Azzam; Janet Chakkamadathil Mohandas; Wilson Shafer; Venkat Ramana Rao Pendyala

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

355

Integrated low emission cleanup system for direct coal-fueled turbines (electrostatic agglomeration)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this contract is to investigate the removal of SO[sub x] and particulate matter from direct coal-fired combustion gas streams at high temperature and high pressure conditions. This investigation will be accomplished through a bench-scale testing and evaluation program employing sorbent mixed with a coal-water slurry for SO[sub x] removal, and an innovative particulate control concept. The particulate control device utilizes electrostatic agglomeration followed by a high efficiency mechanical collector (cyclone). The process goal is to achieve particulate collection efficiency better than that required by the 1979 new source performance standards. An additional goal is to demonstrate 70% SO[sub x] removal efficiency. This research project is now in the second of a 3 phase (phase II) project. Phase II is to fabricate the combustor and particulate control devices and install the system at a test facility located at Research-Cottrell's, KVB Western Laboratory, Santa Ana, CA. There are three functional categories, or tasks which are to be completed in sequence. These tasks are itemized as follows: design, procurement, and installation, shakedown and startup, and reporting.

Quimby, J.M.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

High temperature erosion testing in a gasifier environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of materials with the ability to operate in adverse conditions while resisting the effects of erosion and corrosion is essential to the future success of high efficiency power plants. Many next generation coal power plants are envisioned as combined cycle, with gasifiers used to produce both steam and syngas. The gasifier sections of these plants require materials of construction that are resistant to the effects of erosion from silica found in the gas streams and corrosion caused by a reducing atmosphere that may contain sulfur and chloride compounds. The Albany Research Center has developed a test apparatus designed to test the erosion-resistance of candidate materials under a range of environmental conditions, including those found in gasifiers. This Hostile Atmosphere Erosion Wear test apparatus (HAET) has been used to evaluate a group of high alloy candidate materials such as iron aluminide and Haynes HR 160, and compare them to a conventional 310 stainless steel. Erosion tests were conducted using 270?m silica abrasive, a typical impact velocities of 20 m/sec at temperatures up to 700°C in an atmosphere simulating gasifier conditions. The effects of erosion under these conditions on the surface scales that form are described. The total loss rate, loss rates due to erosion and corrosion for the test materials are compared.

Tylczak, Joseph H.; Rawers, James C.; Adler, Thomas A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Multiplexed Sensor for Synthesis Gas Compsition and Temperature  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall goal of this project has been to develop a highly sensitive, multiplexed TDL-based sensor for CO{sub 2}, CO, H{sub 2}O (and temperature), CH{sub 4}, H{sub 2}S, and NH{sub 3}. Such a sensor was designed with so-called 'plug-and-play' characteristics to accommodate additional sensors, and provided in situ path-integrated measurements indicative of average concentrations at speeds suitable for direct gasifier control. The project developed the sensor and culminated in a real-world test of the underlying technology behind the sensor. During the project, new underlying measurements of spectroscopic constants for all of the gases of interest performed, in custom cells built for the project. The envisioned instrument was built from scratch from component lasers, fiber optics, amplifier blocks, detectors, etc. The sensor was tested for nearly a week in an operational power plant. The products of this research are expected to have a direct impact on gasifier technology and the production of high-quality syngas, with substantial broader application to coal and other energy systems. This report is the final technical report on project DE-FG26-04NT42172. During the project we completed all of the milestones planned in the project, with a modification of milestone (7) required due to lack of funding and personnel.

Steven Buckley; Reza Gharavi; Marco Leon

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

SOx-NOx-Rox Box Flue Gas Cleanup Demonstration: A DOE Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The SNRB{trademark} test program demonstrated the feasibility of controlling multiple emissions from a coal-fired boiler in a single processing unit. The degree of emissions removals for SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and particulates all exceeded the project goals. A high degree of removal for HAPs was also achieved. The SNRB system offers low space requirements, control of multiple pollutants, and operating flexibility. The pneumatic SO{sub 2} sorbent and ammonia injection systems are expected to have high reliability because of their mechanical simplicity. Despite these advantages, the SNRB process may not be an economic choice for applications involving SO{sub 2} removals above about 85%. For lower levels of SO{sub 2} removal, the projected economics for SNRB appear to be more favorable than those of existing processes which involve separate units for the same degree of control for SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x} , and particulates. Specific findings are summarized as follows: (1) SO{sub 2} removal of 85-90% was achieved at a calcium utilization of 40-45%, representing a significant improvement in performance over other dry lime injection processes. (2) When firing 3-4% sulfur coal, compliance with the 1990 CAAA Phase I SO{sub 2} emissions limit of 2.5 lb/10{sup 6} Btu was achieved with a Ca/S molar ratio of less than 1.0. For the Phase II SO{sub 2} emissions limit of 1.2 lb/10{sup 6} Btu, compliance was achieved with a Ca/S molar ratio as low as 1.5. Phase II compliance is the more relevant emissions limit. (3) When using NaHCO{sub 3} as the sorbent, the Phase II SO{sub 2} emissions limit was achieved at a Na{sub 2}/S molar ratio of less than 2.0 (NSR < 1.0). (4) Compliance with the Phase I NO{sub x} emissions limit of 0.45 lb/10{sup 6} Btu for Group 1 boilers was achieved at an NH{sub 3}/NO{sub x} ratio of 0.85, with an ammonia slip of 5 ppm or less. (5) Particulate collection efficiency averaged 99.9%, corresponding to an average emissions rate of 0.018 lb/10{sup 6} Btu. This is significantly lower than the NSPS value of 0.03 lb/10{sup 6} Btu. The high-temperature baghouse design incorporating an SCR catalyst for NO{sub x} reduction was demonstrated successfully. The technology is ready for commercial application. The key feature of the technology is control of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and particulates in a single process unit. However, this limits its commercial market to applications requiring control of all three components. Also, although the testing demonstrated greater than 90% SO{sub 2} capture, this was achieved at high sorbent/sulfur ratios. For applications requiring a high percentage of sulfur removal, a modern conventional FGD unit with LNBs for NO{sub x} control may be the preferred option.

National Energy Technology Laboratory

2000-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

359

Use of High Temperature Electrochemical Cells for Co-Generation of Chemicals and Electricity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this project, two key issues were addressed to show the feasibility of electrochemical partial oxidation (EPOx) in a SOFC. First, it was demonstrated that SOFCs can reliably operate directly with natural gas. These results are relevant to both direct-natural-gas SOFCs, where the aim is solely electrical power generation, and to EPOx. Second, it must be shown that SOFCs can work effectively as partial oxidation reactors, i.e, that they can provide high conversion efficiency of natural gas to syngas. The results of this study in both these areas look extremely promising. The main results are summarized briefly: (1) Stability and coke-free direct-methane SOFC operation is promoted by the addition of a thin porous inert barrier layer to the anode and the addition of small amounts of CO{sub 2} or air to the fuel stream; (2) Modeling results readily explained these improvements by a change in the gas composition at the Ni-YSZ anode to a non-coking condition; (3) The operation range for coke-free operation is greatly increased by using a cell geometry with a thin Ni-YSZ anode active layer on an inert porous ceramic support, i.e., (Sr,La)TiO{sub 3} or partially-stabilized zirconia (in segmented-in-series arrays); (4) Ethane and propane components in natural gas greatly increase coking both on the SOFC anode and on gas-feed tubes, but this can be mitigated by preferentially oxidizing these components prior to introduction into the fuel cell, the addition of a small amount of air to the fuel, and/or the use of ceramic-supported SOFC; (5) While a minimum SOFC current density was generally required to prevent coking, current interruptions of up to 8 minutes yielded only slight anode coking that caused no permanent damage and was completely reversible when the cell current was resumed; (6) Stable direct-methane SOFC operation was demonstrated under EPOx conditions in a 350 h test; (7) EPOx operation was demonstrated at 750 C that yielded 0.9 W/cm{sup 2} and a syngas production rate of 30 sccm/cm{sup 2}, and the reaction product composition was close to the equilibrium prediction during the early stages of cell testing; (8) The methane conversion to syngas continuously decreased during the first 100 h of cell testing, even though the cell electrical characteristics did not change, due to a steady decrease in the reforming activity of Ni-YSZ anodes; (9) The stability of methane conversion was substantially improved via the addition of a more stable reforming catalyst to the SOFC anode; (10) Modeling results indicated that a SOFC with anode barrier provides similar non-coking performance as an internal reforming SOFC, and provides a simpler approach with no need for a high-temperature exhaust-gas recycle pump; (11) Since there is little or no heat produced in the EPOx reaction, overall efficiency of the SOFC operated in this mode can, in theory, approach 100%; and (12) The combined value of the electricity and syngas produced allows the EPOx generator to be economically viable at a >2x higher cost/kW than a conventional SOFC.

Scott Barnett

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

360

NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

- 103111 Grand Forks, ND Fischer-Tropsch Fuels Development Construction of a cold-syngas cleanup reactor for the FT portion of the overall project that is designed to use...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature syngas cleanup" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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361

Development of an Acoustic Sensor On-Line Gas Temperature Measurement in Gasifiers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was awarded under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Program Solicitation DE-PS26-02NT41422 and specifically addresses Technical Topical Area 2 - Gasification Technologies. The project team includes Enertechnix, Inc. as the main contractor and ConocoPhillips Company as a technical partner, who also provides access to the SG Solutions Gasification Facility (formerly Wabash River Energy Limited), host for the field-testing portion of the research. The objective of this project was to adapt acoustic pyrometer technology to make it suitable for measuring gas temperature inside a coal gasifier, to develop a prototype sensor based on this technology, and to demonstrate its performance through testing on a commercial gasifier. The project was organized in three phases, each of approximately one year duration. The first phase consisted of researching a variety of sound generation and coupling approaches suitable for use with a high pressure process, evaluation of the impact of gas composition variability on the acoustic temperature measurement approach, evaluation of the impact of suspended particles and gas properties on sound attenuation, evaluation of slagging issues and development of concepts to deal with this issue, development and testing of key prototype components to allow selection of the best approaches, and development of a conceptual design for a field prototype sensor that could be tested on an operating gasifier. The second phase consisted of designing and fabricating a series of prototype sensors, testing them in the laboratory, and developing a conceptual design for a field prototype sensor. The third phase consisted of designing and fabricating the field prototype, and testing it in the lab and in a commercial gasifier to demonstrate the ability to obtain accurate measurements of gas temperature in an operating gasifier. Following the completion of the initial 3 year project, several continuations were awarded by the Department of Energy to allow Enertechnix to conduct extended testing of the sensor at the Wabash River facility. In February, 2008 the sensor was installed on the gasifier in preparation for a long-term test. During the initial testing of the sensor a stainless steel tube on the sensor failed and allowed syngas to escape. The syngas self-ignited and the ensuing small fire damaged some of the components on the sensor. There was no damage to the gasifier or other equipment and no injuries resulted from this incident. Two meetings were held to identify the root causes of the incident-one at Wabash River and one at Enertechnix. A list of recommended improvements that would have addressed the causes of the incident was created and presented to the Department of Energy on May 2, 2008. However, the DOE decided not to pursue these improvements and terminated the project. This report describes all of the activities conducted during the project and reports the findings of each activity in detail. The investigation of potential sound generation and coupling methods led to the selection of a reflected shock method which has been developed into a functioning prototype device. The principles of operation of this device and its performance characteristics are described in the report. Modeling of the attenuation of sound by suspended particles and by interaction of the sound pulses with the high temperature syngas inside the gasifier was conducted and the predictions of those models were used to determine the required sound pulse intensity to allow the sound pulses to be detected after passage through the gasifier environment. These modeling results are presented in this report. A study of the likely spatial and temporal variability of gas composition inside the gasifier was performed and the results of that study was used to predict the impact of that variability on the accuracy of the acoustic temperature method. These results are reported here. A design for a port rodding mechanism was developed to deal with potential slagging issues and was incorporated i

Peter Ariessohn

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

362

Science to Support DOE Site Cleanup: The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Environmental Management Science Program Awards-Fiscal Year 1999 Mid-Year Progress Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was awarded ten Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research grants in fiscal year 1996, six in fiscal year 1997, and eight in fiscal year 1998. This section summarizes how each grant addresses significant U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) cleanup issues, including those at the Hanford Site. The technical progress made to date in each of these research projects is addressed in more detail in the individual progress reports contained in this document. This research is focused primarily in five areas: Tank Waste Remediation, Decontamination and Decommissioning, Spent Nuclear Fuel and Nuclear Materials, Soil and Groundwater Clean Up, and Health Effects.

Peurrung, L.M.

1999-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

363

Relative risk-relative ranking in Defense and Energy Department cleanup programs: Comparison of methods, results, and role in priority setting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper demonstrates how the Department of Energy (DOE) enhanced their Environmental Restoration Program by modifying the Department of Defense (DoD) Cleanup Program`s Relative Risk Site Evaluation Primer in order to create their own framework, the Relative Ranking Evaluation Framework for EM-40 Release Sites, Facilities and Buildings. In addition, this paper discusses and compares the two frameworks and presents the results of relative risk/relative ranking site evaluations for both agencies through July 1996. The status of agency efforts to implement their respective frameworks also is discussed along with plans for strengthening these initiatives in the coming year.

Turkeltaub, R. [Office of the Deputy Under Secretary of Defense, Washington, DC (United States); Treichel, L.C. [Dept. of Energy, Germantown, MD (United States). Office of Environmental Restoration; Rowe, W.D. Jr.; Strohl, A.R. [Booz Allen and Hamilton, McLean, VA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

364

HANDBOOK FOR CONDUCTING ORAL HISTORY INTERVIEWS RELATED TO TRIBAL AND INDIAN PARTICIPATION IN THE CONSTRUCTION, OPERATION AND CLEANUP OF THE NUCLEAR WEAPONS COMPLEX  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There were three major projects undertaken at the outset of the DOE/EM 22 Cooperative Agreement back in September 1995. There was a project relating to Tribal oral histories. Another project of the Cooperative Agreement related to technology and Tribal values and needs. This project by analogy could apply to issues of technology, environmental cleanup and other indigenous peoples internationally. How can Indian Tribes participate in defining the need for technology development rather than merely learning to adapt themselves and their situations and values to technology developed by others with differing needs, values and economic resources? And the third project was the placement of a Tribal intern in EM-22.

Cristann Gibson; Mervyn L. Tano; Albert Wing

1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

365

Evaluation of gasification and gas cleanup processes for use in molten carbonate fuel cell power plants. Final report. [Contains lists and evaluations of coal gasification and fuel gas desulfurization processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report satisfies the requirements for DOE Contract AC21-81MC16220 to: List coal gasifiers and gas cleanup systems suitable for supplying fuel to molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) in industrial and utility power plants; extensively characterize those coal gas cleanup systems rejected by DOE's MCFC contractors for their power plant systems by virtue of the resources required for those systems to be commercially developed; develop an analytical model to predict MCFC tolerance for particulates on the anode (fuel gas) side of the MCFC; develop an analytical model to predict MCFC anode side tolerance for chemical species, including sulfides, halogens, and trace heavy metals; choose from the candidate gasifier/cleanup systems those most suitable for MCFC-based power plants; choose a reference wet cleanup system; provide parametric analyses of the coal gasifiers and gas cleanup systems when integrated into a power plant incorporating MCFC units with suitable gas expansion turbines, steam turbines, heat exchangers, and heat recovery steam generators, using the Westinghouse proprietary AHEAD computer model; provide efficiency, investment, cost of electricity, operability, and environmental effect rankings of the system; and provide a final report incorporating the results of all of the above tasks. Section 7 of this final report provides general conclusions.

Jablonski, G.; Hamm, J.R.; Alvin, M.A.; Wenglarz, R.A.; Patel, P.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

AOI [3] High-Temperature Nano-Derived Micro-H2 and - H2S Sensors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The emissions from coal-fired power plants remain a significant concern for air quality. This environmental challenge must be overcome by controlling the emission of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) throughout the entire coal combustion process. One of the processes which could specifically benefit from robust, low cost, and high temperature compatible gas sensors is the coal gasification process which converts coal and/or biomass into syngas. Hydrogen (H2), carbon monoxide (CO) and sulfur compounds make up 33%, 43% and 2% of syngas, respectively. Therefore, development of a high temperature (>500°C) chemical sensor for in-situ monitoring of H2, H2S and SO2 levels during coal gasification is strongly desired. The selective detection of SO2/H2S in the presence of H2, is a formidable task for a sensor designer. In order to ensure effective operation of these chemical sensors, the sensor system must inexpensively function within harsh temperature and chemical environment. Currently available sensing approaches, which are based on gas chromatography, electrochemistry, and IR-spectroscopy, do not satisfy the required cost and performance targets. This work focused on the development microsensors that can be applied to this application. In order to develop the high- temperature compatible microsensor, this work addressed various issues related to sensor stability, selectivity, and miniaturization. In the research project entitled “High-Temperature Nano-Derived Micro-H2 and -H2S Sensors”, the team worked to develop micro-scale, chemical sensors and sensor arrays composed of nano-derived, metal-oxide composite materials to detect gases like H2, SO2, and H2S within high-temperature environments (>500?C). The research was completed in collaboration with NexTech Materials, Ltd. (Lewis Center, Ohio). NexTech assisted in the testing of the sensors in syngas with contaminate levels of H2S. The idea of including nanomaterials as the sensing material within resistive-type chemical sensor platforms was to increase the sensitivity (as shown for room temperature applications). Unfortunately, nanomaterials are not stable at high temperatures due to sintering and coarsening processes that are driven by their high surface to volume ratio. Therefore, new hydrogen and sulfur selective nanomaterial systems with high selectivity and stability properties in the proposed harsh environment were investigated. Different nano-morphologies of zirconate, molybdate, and tungstate compounds were investigated. The fabrication of the microsensors consisted of the deposition of the selective nanomaterial systems over metal based interconnects on an inert substrate. This work utilized the chemi-resistive (resistive- type) microsensor architecture where the chemically and structurally stable, high temperature compatible electrodes were sputtered onto a ceramic substrate. The nanomaterial sensing systems were deposited over the electrodes using a lost mold method patterned by conventional optical lithography. The microsensor configuration with optimized nanomaterial system was tested and compared to a millimeter-size sensor e outcomes of this research will contribute to the economical application of sensor arrays for simultaneous sensing of H2, H2S, and SO2.

Perepezko, John; Lu-Steffes, Otto

2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

367

DOE Hanford Network Upgrades and Disaster Recovery Exercise Support the Cleanup Mission Now and into the Future  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2013, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site, located in Washington State, funded an update to the critical network infrastructure supporting the Hanford Federal Cloud (HFC). The project, called ET-50, was the final step in a plan that was initiated five years ago called "Hanford's IT Vision, 2015 and Beyond." The ET-50 project upgraded Hanford's core data center switches and routers along with a majority of the distribution layer switches. The upgrades allowed HFC the network intelligence to provide Hanford with a more reliable and resilient network architecture. The culmination of the five year plan improved network intelligence and high performance computing as well as helped to provide 10 Gbps capable links between core backbone devices (10 times the previous bandwidth). These improvements allow Hanford the ability to further support bandwidth intense applications, such as video teleconferencing. The ET-50 switch upgrade, along with other upgrades implemented from the five year plan, have prepared Hanford's network for the next evolution of technology in voice, video, and data. Hand-in-hand with ET-50's major data center outage, Mission Support Alliance's (MSA) Information Management (IM) organization executed a disaster recovery (DR) exercise to perform a true integration test and capability study. The DR scope was planned within the constraints of ET-50's 14 hour datacenter outage window. This DR exercise tested Hanford's Continuity of Operations (COOP) capability and failover plans for safety and business critical Hanford Federal Cloud applications. The planned suite of services to be tested was identified prior to the outage and plans were prepared to test the services ability to failover from the primary Hanford data center to the backup data center. The services tested were: Core Network (backbone, firewall, load balancers); Voicemail; Voice over IP (VoIP); Emergency Notification; Virtual desktops; and, Select set of production applications and data. The primary objective of the exercise was to test COOP around the emergency operations at Hanford to provide information on capabilities and dependencies of the current system to insure improved focus of emergency, safety and security capacity in a disaster situation. The integration of the DR test into the ET-50 project allowed the testing of COOP at Hanford and allowed the lessons learned to be defined. These lessons learned have helped improve the understanding of Hanford's COOP capabilities and will be critical for future planning. With the completion of the Hanford Federal Cloud network upgrades and the disaster recovery exercise, the MSA has a clearer path forward for future technology implementations as well as network improvements to help shape the usability and reliability of the Hanford network in support of the cleanup mission.

Eckman, Todd J. [Mission Support Alliance, Richland, WA (United States); Hertzel, Ali K. [Lockheed Martin Services, Inc. (United States); Lane, James J. [Lockheed Martin - Information Systems and Global Solutions (United States)

2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

368

HANFORD TANK CLEANUP UPDATE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Access to Hanford's single-shell radioactive waste storage tank C-107 was significantly improved when workers completed the cut of a 55-inch diameter hole in the top of the tank. The core and its associated cutting equipment were removed from the tank and encased in a plastic sleeve to prevent any potential spread of contamination. The larger tank opening allows use of a new more efficient robotic arm to complete tank retrieval.

BERRIOCHOA MV

2011-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

369

Environmental Cleanup Stories  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of March 2013. - 11112 Jeffrey Mousseau has been hired as the new associate director for Environmental Programs. Los Alamos National Laboratory names Jeffrey Mousseau Associate...

370

Hanford Tank Cleanup Update  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Bigfront.jpgcommunity200cell 9 Hanford Traffic Safety144 December Tank

371

2014 Cleanup Progress  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment(October-December 2013 issue ofOffice | Department of Energy96

372

Idaho Cleanup Project Contract  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinementEtching. | EMSLtheIndustry | Department ofT.Ian

373

Environmental Cleanup Stories  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series toESnet4: NetworkingEnvironment Environment EventsAssessments

374

Hanford Cleanup - Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Region service area. TheEPSCIResearchGulf of Mexico FactCalendars

375

Environmental Cleanup and Remediation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Region service area. TheEPSCI Home It isGas Environmental Management

376

Cleanup at Rocky Flats  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New SubstationClean Communities of WesternVail Global Energy Forum Dr.2Sites

377

Weldon Spring Quarry Cleanup.  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545 OCTTO:March 20,Since dewatering at

378

Biomass Gasification Research Facility Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While thermochemical syngas production facilities for biomass utilization are already employed worldwide, exploitation of their potential has been inhibited by technical limitations encountered when attempting to obtain real-time syngas compositional data required for process optimization, reliability, and syngas quality assurance. To address these limitations, the Gas Technology Institute (GTI) carried out two companion projects (under US DOE Cooperative Agreements DE-FC36-03GO13175 and DE-FC36-02GO12024) to develop and demonstrate the equipment and methods required to reliably and continuously obtain accurate and representative on-line syngas compositional data. These objectives were proven through a stepwise series of field tests of biomass and coal gasification process streams. GTI developed the methods and hardware for extractive syngas sample stream delivery and distribution, necessary to make use of state-of-the-art on-line analyzers to evaluate and optimize syngas cleanup and conditioning. This multi-year effort to develop methods to effectively monitor gaseous species produced in thermochemical process streams resulted in a sampling and analysis approach that is continuous, sensitive, comprehensive, accurate, reliable, economical, and safe. The improved approach for sampling thermochemical processes that GTI developed and demonstrated in its series of field demonstrations successfully provides continuous transport of vapor-phase syngas streams extracted from the main gasification process stream to multiple, commercially available analyzers. The syngas stream is carefully managed through multiple steps to successfully convey it to the analyzers, while at the same time bringing the stream to temperature and pressure conditions that are compatible with the analyzers. The primary principle that guides the sample transport is that throughout the entire sampling train, the temperature of the syngas stream is maintained above the maximum condensation temperature of the vapor phase components of the conveyed sample gas. In addition, to minimize adsorption or chemical changes in the syngas components prior to analysis, the temperature of the transported stream is maintained as hot as is practical, while still being cooled only as much necessary prior to entering the analyzer(s). The successful transport of the sample gas stream to the analyzer(s) is accomplished through the managed combination of four basic gas conditioning methods that are applied as specifically called for by the process conditions, the gas constituent concentrations, the analyzer requirements, and the objectives of the syngas analyses: 1) removing entrained particulate matter from the sample stream; 2) maintaining the temperature of the sample gas stream; 3) lowering the pressure of the sample gas stream to decrease the vapor pressures of all the component vapor species in the sample stream; and 4) diluting the gas stream with a metered, inert gas, such as nitrogen. Proof-of-concept field demonstrations of the sampling approach were conducted for gasification process streams from a black liquor gasifier, and from the gasification of biomass and coal feedstocks at GTI’s Flex-Fuel Test Facility. In addition to the descriptions and data included in this Final Report, GTI produced a Special Topical Report, Design and Protocol for Monitoring Gaseous Species in Thermochemical Processes, that explains and describes in detail the objectives, principles, design, hardware, installation, operation and representative data produced during this successful developmental effort. Although the specific analyzers used under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC36-02GO12024 were referenced in the Topical Report and this Final Report, the sampling interface design they present is generic enough to adapt to other analyzers that may be more appropriate to alternate process streams or facilities.

Snyder, Todd R.; Bush, Vann; Felix, Larry G.; Farthing, William E.; Irvin, James H.

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

379

Beamline Temperatures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1 PrintTemperatures Energy: 3.0000 GeV

380

Regulatory and institutional issues impending cleanup at US Department of Energy sites: Perspectives gained from an office of environmental restoration workshop  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy's (DOE) nuclear weapons and energy operations are conducted across a nation-wide industrial complex engaged in a variety of manufacturing, processing, testing, and research and development activities. The overall mission of DOE Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) is to protect workers, the public, and the environment from waste materials generated by past, current, and future DOE activities and to bring the DOE complex into compliance with all applicable laws, regulations, and agreements related to health, safety, and the environment. EM addresses this broad mandate through related and interdependent programs that include corrective actions, waste operations, environmental restoration, and technology development. The EM Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40) recognizes the importance of implementing a complex-wide process to identify and resolve those issues that may impede progress towards site cleanup. As a first step in this process, FM-40 sponsored an exercise to identify and characterize major regulatory and institutional issues and to formulate integrated action steps towards their resolution. This report is the first product of that exercise. It is intended that the exercise described here will mark the beginning of an ongoing process of issue identification, tracking, and resolution that will benefit cleanup activities across the DOE complex.

Fallon, W E; Gephart, J M; Gephart, R E; Quinn, R D; Stevenson, L A

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature syngas cleanup" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Amorphous Alloy Membranes for High Temperature Hydrogen Separation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the beginning of this project, thin film amorphous alloy membranes were considered a nascent but promising new technology for industrial-scale hydrogen gas separations from coal- derived syngas. This project used a combination of theoretical modeling, advanced physical vapor deposition fabricating, and laboratory and gasifier testing to develop amorphous alloy membranes that had the potential to meet Department of Energy (DOE) targets in the testing strategies outlined in the NETL Membrane Test Protocol. The project is complete with Southwest Research Institute® (SwRI®), Georgia Institute of Technology (GT), and Western Research Institute (WRI) having all operated independently and concurrently. GT studied the hydrogen transport properties of several amorphous alloys and found that ZrCu and ZrCuTi were the most promising candidates. GT also evaluated the hydrogen transport properties of V, Nb and Ta membranes coated with different transition-metal carbides (TMCs) (TM = Ti, Hf, Zr) catalytic layers by employing first-principles calculations together with statistical mechanics methods and determined that TiC was the most promising material to provide catalytic hydrogen dissociation. SwRI developed magnetron coating techniques to deposit a range of amorphous alloys onto both porous discs and tubular substrates. Unfortunately none of the amorphous alloys could be deposited without pinhole defects that undermined the selectivity of the membranes. WRI tested the thermal properties of the ZrCu and ZrNi alloys and found that under reducing environments the upper temperature limit of operation without recrystallization is ~250 °C. There were four publications generated from this project with two additional manuscripts in progress and six presentations were made at national and international technical conferences. The combination of the pinhole defects and the lack of high temperature stability make the theoretically identified most promising candidate amorphous alloys unsuitable for application as hydrogen separation membranes in coal fire systems.

Coulter, K

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

382

Tampa Electric Company, Polk Power Station Unit No. 1. Annual report, January--December 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the Tampa Electric Polk Power Unit No. 1, a Texaco pressurized, oxygen-blown entrained-flow coal gasifier will convert approximately 2300 tons per day of coal (dry basis) into a medium-BTU fuel gas with a heat content of about 250 BTU/scf (LHV). Syngas produced in the gasifier flows through a high-temperature heat recovery unit which cools the gases prior to entering two parallel clean-up areas. A portion (up to 50%) of the hot syngas is cooled to 1000{degrees}F and passed through a moving bed of zinc titanate sorbent which removed sulfur containing components of the fuel gas. The project will be the first in the world to demonstrate this advanced metal oxide hot gas desulfurization technology at a commercial scale. The remaining portion of the syngas is cooled to 400{degrees}F for conventional acid gas removal. This portion of the plant is capable of processing between 50% and 100% of the dirty syngas. The cleaned low-BTU syngas is then routed to the combined cycle power generation system where it is mixed with air and burned in the gas turbine combustor. Heat is extracted from the expanded exhaust gases by a heat recovery steam generator to produce high pressure steam. This steam, along with the steam generated in the gasification process, drives a steam turbine to generate an additional 132MW of power. Internal process power consumption is approximately 62MW, and includes power for coal grinding, air separation, and feed pumps. Net output from the IGCC demonstration plant will be 260MW.

none,

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Material Testing of Coated Alloys in a Syngas Combustion Environment Year 6 - Activity 1.13 - Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Modifications were made to the inlet of the existing Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) thermal oxidizer to accommodate side-by-side coupon holders for exposure testing. Two 5-day tests with over 200 hours of total exposure time were completed. The first week of testing was conducted in enriched air-blown mode, with coupon temperatures ranging from 128° to 272°F. Carbonyl sampling was conducted, but it was discovered after the fact that the methodology used was producing very low recoveries of iron and nickel carbonyl. Therefore, the data generated during this week of testing were not considered accurate. The second week of testing was conducted in oxygen-blown mode, with coupon temperatures ranging from 220° to 265°F. Two improved methods were used to measure carbonyl concentration during this week of testing. These methods produced results closer to equilibrium calculations. Since both weeks of testing mostly produced a product gas with approximately 15%–18% carbon monoxide, it was felt that actual carbonyl concentrations for Week 1 should be very similar to those measured during Week 2. The revised carbonyl sampling methodology used during the second week of testing greatly improved the recovery of iron and nickel carbonyl in the sample. Even though the sampling results obtained from the first week were inaccurate, the results from the second week can be used as an estimate for the periods during which the gasifier was operating under similar conditions and producing similar product gas compositions. Specifically, Test Periods 2 and 3 from the first week were similar to the conditions run during the second week. For a product gas containing roughly 15%–18% CO and a coupon temperature of approximately 220°–270°F, the nickel carbonyl concentration should be about 0.05–0.1 ppm and the iron carbonyl concentration should be about 0.1–0.4 ppm. After each week of testing the coupons were recovered from the coupon holder, weighed, and shipped back to Siemens for analysis.

Swanson, Michael

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Chemical and Oil Spill/Release Clean-Up and Reporting Requirements Chemicals and oils are used throughout Penn State University. Chemicals may be loosely defined as any material  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemical and Oil Spill/Release Clean-Up and Reporting Requirements Chemicals and oils are used, reactive, flammable, or toxic. This can include, for example, oil-based paints, alcohol, WD-40, and any number of laboratory materials. Oils include petroleum products, vegetable oils, hydraulic and mineral

Maroncelli, Mark

385

Cleanup Verification Package for the 100-K-55:1 and 100-K-56:1 Pipelines and the 116-KW-4 and 116-KE-5 Heat Recovery Stations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 100-K-55:1 and 100-K-56:1 reactor cooling effluent underground pipelines and for the 116-KW-4 and 116-KE-5 heat recovery stations. The 100-K-55 and 100-K-56 sites consisted of those process effluent pipelines that serviced the 105-KW and 105-KE Reactors.

J. M. Capron

2005-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

386

High Temperatures & Electricity Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High Temperatures & Electricity Demand An Assessment of Supply Adequacy in California Trends.......................................................................................................1 HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND.....................................................................................................................7 SECTION I: HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND ..........................9 BACKGROUND

387

Surface characterizatin of palladium-alumina sorbents for high-temperature capture of mercury and arsenic from fuel gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coal gasification with subsequent cleanup of the resulting fuel gas is a way to reduce the impact of mercury and arsenic in the environment during power generation and on downstream catalytic processes in chemical production, The interactions of mercury and arsenic with PdlAl2D3 model thin film sorbents and PdlAh03 powders have been studied to determine the relative affinities of palladium for mercury and arsenic, and how they are affected by temperature and the presence of hydrogen sulfide in the fuel gas. The implications of the results on strategies for capturing the toxic metals using a sorbent bed are discussed.

Baltrus, J.P.; Granite, E.J.; Pennline, H.W.; Stanko, D.; Hamilton, H.; Rowsell, L.; Poulston, S.; Smith, A.; Chu, W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Advanced High-Temperature, High-Pressure Transport Reactor Gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Coal and Environmental Systems has as its mission to develop advanced gasification-based technologies for affordable, efficient, zero-emission power generation. These advanced power systems, which are expected to produce near-zero pollutants, are an integral part of DOE's Vision 21 Program. DOE has also been developing advanced gasification systems that lower the capital and operating costs of producing syngas for chemical production. A transport reactor has shown potential to be a low-cost syngas producer compared to other gasification systems since its high-throughput-per-unit cross-sectional area reduces capital costs. This work directly supports the Power Systems Development Facility utilizing the KBR transport reactor located at the Southern Company Services Wilsonville, Alabama, site. Over 2800 hours of operation on 11 different coals ranging from bituminous to lignite along with a petroleum coke has been completed to date in the pilot-scale transport reactor development unit (TRDU) at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC). The EERC has established an extensive database on the operation of these various fuels in both air-blown and oxygen-blown modes utilizing a pilot-scale transport reactor gasifier. This database has been useful in determining the effectiveness of design changes on an advanced transport reactor gasifier and for determining the performance of various feedstocks in a transport reactor. The effects of different fuel types on both gasifier performance and the operation of the hot-gas filter system have been determined. It has been demonstrated that corrected fuel gas heating values ranging from 90 to 130 Btu/scf have been achieved in air-blown mode, while heating values up to 230 Btu/scf on a dry basis have been achieved in oxygen-blown mode. Carbon conversions up to 95% have also been obtained and are highly dependent on the oxygen-coal ratio. Higher-reactivity (low-rank) coals appear to perform better in a transport reactor than the less reactive bituminous coals. Factors that affect TRDU product gas quality appear to be coal type, temperature, and air/coal ratios. Testing with a higher-ash, high-moisture, low-rank coal from the Red Hills Mine of the Mississippi Lignite Mining Company has recently been completed. Testing with the lignite coal generated a fuel gas with acceptable heating value and a high carbon conversion, although some drying of the high-moisture lignite was required before coal-feeding problems were resolved. No ash deposition or bed material agglomeration issues were encountered with this fuel. In order to better understand the coal devolatilization and cracking chemistry occurring in the riser of the transport reactor, gas and solid sampling directly from the riser and the filter outlet has been accomplished. This was done using a baseline Powder River Basin subbituminous coal from the Peabody Energy North Antelope Rochelle Mine near Gillette, Wyoming.

Michael Swanson; Daniel Laudal

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

389

Integrated Operation of INL HYTEST System and High-Temperature Steam Electrolysis for Synthetic Natural Gas Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary feedstock for synthetic fuel production is syngas, a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen. Current hydrogen production technologies rely upon fossil fuels and produce significant quantities of greenhouse gases as a byproduct. This is not a sustainable means of satisfying future hydrogen demands, given the current projections for conventional world oil production and future targets for carbon emissions. For the past six years, the Idaho National Laboratory has been investigating the use of high-temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE) to produce the hydrogen feedstock required for synthetic fuel production. High-temperature electrolysis water-splitting technology, combined with non-carbon-emitting energy sources, can provide a sustainable, environmentally-friendly means of large-scale hydrogen production. Additionally, laboratory facilities are being developed at the INL for testing hybrid energy systems composed of several tightly-coupled chemical processes (HYTEST program). The first such test involved the coupling of HTSE, CO2 separation membrane, reverse shift reaction, and methanation reaction to demonstrate synthetic natural gas production from a feedstock of water and either CO or a simulated flue gas containing CO2. This paper will introduce the initial HTSE and HYTEST testing facilities, overall coupling of the technologies, testing results, and future plans.

Carl Marcel Stoots; Lee Shunn; James O'Brien

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

2003 U.S. Department of Energy Strategic Plan: Protecting National, Energy, and Economic Security with Advanced Science and Technology and Ensuring Environmental Cleanup  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy contributes to the future of the Nation by ensuring energy security, maintaining the safety, security and reliability of the nuclear weapons stockpile, cleaning up the environment from the legacy of the Cold War, and developing innovations in science and technology. After 25 years in existence, the Department now operates 24 preeminent research laboratories and facilities and four power marketing administrations, and manages the environmental cleanup from 50 years of nuclear defense activities that impacted two million acres in communities across the country. The Department has an annual budget of about $23 billion and employs about 14,500 Federal and 100,000 contractor employees. The Department of Energy is principally a national security agency and all of its missions flow from this core mission to support national security. That is true not just today, but throughout the history of the agency. The origins of the Department can be traced to the Manhattan Project and the race to develop the atomic bomb during World War II. Following the war, Congress engaged in a vigorous and contentious debate over civilian versus military control of the atom. The Atomic Energy Act of 1946 settled the debate by creating the Atomic Energy Commission, which took over the Manhattan Project’s sprawling scientific and industrial complex.

None,

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

391

A systematic assessment of the state of hazardous waste clean-up technologies. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1--June 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

West Virginia University (WVU) and the US DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) entered into a Cooperative Agreement on August 29, 1992 entitled ``Decontamination Systems Information and Research Programs.`` Stipulated within the Agreement is the requirement that WVU submit to METC a series of Technical Progress Report for Year 1 of the Agreement. This report reflects the progress and/or efforts performed on the following nine technical projects encompassed by the Year 1 Agreement for the period of April 1 through June 30, 1993: Systematic assessment of the state of hazardous waste clean-up technologies; site remediation technologies -- drain-enhanced soil flushing (DESF) for organic contaminants removal; site remediation technologies -- in situ bioremediation of organic contaminants; excavation systems for hazardous waste sites; chemical destruction of polychlorinated biphenyls; development of organic sensors -- monolayer and multilayer self-assembled films for chemical sensors; Winfield lock and dam remediation; Assessments of Technologies for hazardous waste site remediation -- non-treatment technologies and pilot scale test facility implementation; and remediation of hazardous sites with stream reforming.

Berg, M.T.; Reed, B.E.; Gabr, M.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup, and Oxygen Separation Equipment; Task 1: Cost Estimates of Small Modular Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This deliverable is the Final Report for Task 1, Cost Estimates of Small Modular Systems, as part of NREL Award ACO-5-44027, ''Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup and Oxygen Separation Equipment''. Subtask 1.1 looked into processes and technologies that have been commercially built at both large and small scales, with three technologies, Fluidized Catalytic Cracking (FCC) of refinery gas oil, Steam Methane Reforming (SMR) of Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids (NGL) Expanders, chosen for further investigation. These technologies were chosen due to their applicability relative to other technologies being considered by NREL for future commercial applications, such as indirect gasification and fluidized bed tar cracking. Research in this subject is driven by an interest in the impact that scaling has on the cost and major process unit designs for commercial technologies. Conclusions from the evaluations performed could be applied to other technologies being considered for modular or skid-mounted applications.

Nexant Inc.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

PFB coal fired combined cycle development program. Advanced hot gas cleanup concept evaluation (Task 4. 3). Volume A. Aerodyne cyclone evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of testing of a rotary flow cyclone, manufactured by Aerodyne Development Corporation under license by Siemens Kraftwerk Union. This cyclone was selected for evaluation due to the unusually high separative efficiencies claimed by the manufacturer (based on developer data), and relative lack of open literature data. The most significant finding of this work was the observation that electrostatic forces could enhance or, in fact, dominate the separation process. Separative efficiencies, with electrostatic forces present, were found to be substantially independent of flow rate and, by inference, could be independent of unit size. This finding suggests that large cyclones with natural or augmented electrostatic forces employed in the hot gas cleanup train of the CFCC system may not suffer the performance degradation compared to small cyclones, as projected from conventional inertial theory. This is of special importance since the use of many small cyclones in parallel, or multicyclones, commonly suffers from fouling and this approach is not recommended in the CFCC application. The original objective of this investigation was to assess the relative merits of the Aerodyne cyclone separator. It was found from both the cold flow and the hot flow tests that its separative efficiencies are disappointingly poorer than expectations (in agreement with Westinghouse results), and even poorer than conventional cyclones.

Not Available

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

PFB Coal Fired Combined Cycle Development Program. Advanced hot gas cleanup concept evaluation (Task 4. 3). Volume A. Aerodyne cyclone evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of testing of a rotary flow cyclone, manufactured by Aerodyne Development Corporation under license by Siemens Kraftwerk Union. This cyclone was selected for evaluation due to the unusually high separative efficiencies claimed by the manufacturer (based on developer data), and relative lack of open literature data. The most significant finding of this work was the observation that electrostatic forces could enhance or, in fact, dominate the separation process. Separative efficiencies, with electrostatic forces present, were found to be substantially independent of flow rate and, by inference, could be independent of unit size. Hence this finding offers a major hope that large cyclones employed in the hot gas cleanup train of the CFCC system may not suffer the performance degradation compared to small cyclones, as projected from conventional inertial theory. The separative efficiencies of the Aerodyne cyclone separator were found from both the cold flow and the hot flow tests to be disappointingly poorer than expectations (in agreement with Westinghouse results), and even poorer than conventional cyclones. (LTN)

Not Available

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Syngas combustor for fluidized bed applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Siemens Westinghouse Multi-Annular Swirl Burner (MASB) is a rich-quench-lean gas turbine combustor for use primarily on synthetic fuel gases made by gasifying solid fuels (coal or biomass). These fuels contain high amounts of fuel bound nitrogen, primarily as ammonia, which are converted to molecular nitrogen rather than to nitrogen oxides in the rich zone of this combustor. The combustor can operate in many modes. In second-generation pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) applications, the fuel gas is burned in a hot, depleted oxygen air stream generated in a fluid bed coal combustor. In 1-1/2 generation PFBC applications, natural gas is burned in this vitiated air stream. In an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) application, the synthetic fuel gas is burned in turbine compressor air. In this paper, the MASB technology is described. Recent results of tests at the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) for these various operation modes on a full scale basket are summarized. The start-up and simple cycle operating experience on propane at the Wilsonville Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) are also described. In addition, the design issues related to the integration of the MASB in the City of Lakeland PCFB Clean Coal Demonstration Project is summarized.

Brushwood, J.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Campaign TC24  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In support of technology development to utilize coal for efficient, affordable, and environmentally clean power generation, the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF), located in Wilsonville, Alabama, routinely demonstrates gasification technologies using various types of coals. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key features of advanced coal-fired power systems, including a KBR Transport Gasifier, a hot gas particulate control device, advanced syngas cleanup systems, and high-pressure solids handling systems. This report summarizes the results of TC24, the first test campaign using a bituminous coal as the feedstock in the modified Transport Gasifier configuration. TC24 was conducted from February 16, 2008, through March 19, 2008. The PSDF gasification process operated for about 230 hours in air-blown gasification mode with about 225 tons of Utah bituminous coal feed. Operational challenges in gasifier operation were related to particle agglomeration, a large percentage of oversize coal particles, low overall gasifier solids collection efficiency, and refractory degradation in the gasifier solids collection unit. The carbon conversion and syngas heating values varied widely, with low values obtained during periods of low gasifier operating temperature. Despite the operating difficulties, several periods of steady state operation were achieved, which provided useful data for future testing. TC24 operation afforded the opportunity for testing of various types of technologies, including dry coal feeding with a developmental feeder, the Pressure Decoupled Advanced Coal (PDAC) feeder; evaluating a new hot gas filter element media configuration; and enhancing syngas cleanup with water-gas shift catalysts. During TC24, the PSDF site was also made available for testing of the National Energy Technology Laboratory's fuel cell module and Media Process Technology's hydrogen selective membrane.

Southern Company Services

2008-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

397

Product Characterization for Entrained Flow Coal/Biomass Co-Gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energyâ??s National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) is exploring affordable technologies and processes to convert domestic coal and biomass resources to high-quality liquid hydrocarbon fuels. This interest is primarily motivated by the need to increase energy security and reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the United States. Gasification technologies represent clean, flexible and efficient conversion pathways to utilize coal and biomass resources. Substantial experience and knowledge had been developed worldwide on gasification of either coal or biomass. However, reliable data on effects of blending various biomass fuels with coal during gasification process and resulting syngas composition are lacking. In this project, GE Global Research performed a complete characterization of the gas, liquid and solid products that result from the co-gasification of coal/biomass mixtures. This work was performed using a bench-scale gasifier (BSG) and a pilot-scale entrained flow gasifier (EFG). This project focused on comprehensive characterization of the products from gasifying coal/biomass mixtures in a high-temperature, high-pressure entrained flow gasifier. Results from this project provide guidance on appropriate gas clean-up systems and optimization of operating parameters needed to develop and commercialize gasification technologies. GEâ??s bench-scale test facility provided the bulk of high-fidelity quantitative data under temperature, heating rate, and residence time conditions closely matching those of commercial oxygen-blown entrained flow gasifiers. Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) pilot-scale test facility provided focused high temperature and pressure tests at entrained flow gasifier conditions. Accurate matching of syngas time-temperature history during cooling ensured that complex species interactions including homogeneous and heterogeneous processes such as particle nucleation, coagulation, surface condensation, and gas-phase reactions were properly reproduced and lead to representative syngas composition at the syngas cooler outlet. The experimental work leveraged other ongoing GE R&D efforts such as biomass gasification and dry feeding systems projects. Experimental data obtained under this project were used to provide guidance on the appropriate clean-up system(s) and operating parameters to coal and biomass combinations beyond those evaluated under this project.

Shawn Maghzi; Ramanathan Subramanian; George Rizeq; Surinder Singh; John McDermott; Boris Eiteneer; David Ladd; Arturo Vazquez; Denise Anderson; Noel Bates

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

398

Product Characterization for Entrained Flow Coal/Biomass Co-Gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy‘s National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) is exploring affordable technologies and processes to convert domestic coal and biomass resources to high-quality liquid hydrocarbon fuels. This interest is primarily motivated by the need to increase energy security and reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the United States. Gasification technologies represent clean, flexible and efficient conversion pathways to utilize coal and biomass resources. Substantial experience and knowledge had been developed worldwide on gasification of either coal or biomass. However, reliable data on effects of blending various biomass fuels with coal during gasification process and resulting syngas composition are lacking. In this project, GE Global Research performed a complete characterization of the gas, liquid and solid products that result from the co-gasification of coal/biomass mixtures. This work was performed using a bench-scale gasifier (BSG) and a pilot-scale entrained flow gasifier (EFG). This project focused on comprehensive characterization of the products from gasifying coal/biomass mixtures in a high-temperature, high-pressure entrained flow gasifier. Results from this project provide guidance on appropriate gas clean-up systems and optimization of operating parameters needed to develop and commercialize gasification technologies. GE‘s bench-scale test facility provided the bulk of high-fidelity quantitative data under temperature, heating rate, and residence time conditions closely matching those of commercial oxygen-blown entrained flow gasifiers. Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) pilot-scale test facility provided focused high temperature and pressure tests at entrained flow gasifier conditions. Accurate matching of syngas time-temperature history during cooling ensured that complex species interactions including homogeneous and heterogeneous processes such as particle nucleation, coagulation, surface condensation, and gas-phase reactions were properly reproduced and lead to representative syngas composition at the syngas cooler outlet. The experimental work leveraged other ongoing GE R&D efforts such as biomass gasification and dry feeding systems projects. Experimental data obtained under this project were used to provide guidance on the appropriate clean-up system(s) and operating parameters to coal and biomass combinations beyond those evaluated under this project.

Maghzi, Shawn; Subramanian, Ramanathan; Rizeq, George; Singh, Surinder; McDermott, John; Eiteneer, Boris; Ladd, David; Vazquez, Arturo; Anderson, Denise; Bates, Noel

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

399

Strings at finite temperature  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We obtain a semiclassical evaluation of the temperature for which the free energy of the strings of spontaneously broken scalar electrodynamics vanishes. We argue that, above this temperature, these objects should play a significant physical role.

Arago C. de; Bazeia, D.; Eboli, O.J.P.; Marques, G.C.

1985-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

400

6, 13011320, 2006 Temperature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 6, 1301­1320, 2006 Temperature climatology and trend estimates over Durban, South Africa H and Physics Discussions Temperature climatology and trend estimates in the UTLS region as observed over Commons License. 1301 #12;ACPD 6, 1301­1320, 2006 Temperature climatology and trend estimates over Durban

Boyer, Edmond

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature syngas cleanup" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Advisory Board Meets to Discuss EM Cleanup’s Future  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

WASHINGTON, D.C. – EM Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary Tracy Mustin this week sought guidance from the Environmental Management Advisory Board (EMAB) on several topics, including optimizing resources for EM’s technology challenges.

402

Temperature compensated photovoltaic array  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A temperature compensated photovoltaic module comprises a series of solar cells having a thermally activated switch connected in parallel with several of the cells. The photovoltaic module is adapted to charge conventional batteries having a temperature coefficient differing from the temperature coefficient of the module. The calibration temperatures of the switches are chosen whereby the colder the ambient temperature for the module, the more switches that are on and form a closed circuit to short the associated solar cells. By shorting some of the solar cells as the ambient temperature decreases, the battery being charged by the module is not excessively overcharged at lower temperatures. PV module is an integrated solution that is reliable and inexpensive. 2 figs.

Mosher, D.M.

1997-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

403

Temperature compensated photovoltaic array  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A temperature compensated photovoltaic module (20) comprised of a series of solar cells (22) having a thermally activated switch (24) connected in parallel with several of the cells (22). The photovoltaic module (20) is adapted to charge conventional batteries having a temperature coefficient (TC) differing from the temperature coefficient (TC) of the module (20). The calibration temperatures of the switches (24) are chosen whereby the colder the ambient temperature for the module (20), the more switches that are on and form a closed circuit to short the associated solar cells (22). By shorting some of the solar cells (22) as the ambient temperature decreases, the battery being charged by the module (20) is not excessively overcharged at lower temperatures. PV module (20) is an integrated solution that is reliable and inexpensive.

Mosher, Dan Michael (Plano, TX)

1997-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

404

Revegetation Plan for Areas of the Fitzner-Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve Affected by Decommissioning of Buildings and Infrastructure and Debris Clean-up Actions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office is working to remove a number of facilities on the Fitzner Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve (ALE), which is part of the Hanford Reach National Monument. Decommissioning and removal of buildings and debris on ALE will leave bare soils and excavated areas that need to be revegetated to prevent erosion and weed invasion. Four main areas within ALE are affected by these activities (DOE 2009;DOE/EA-1660F): 1) facilities along the ridgeline of Rattlesnake Mountain, 2) the former Nike missile base and ALE HQ laboratory buildings, 3) the aquatic research laboratory at Rattlesnake Springs area, and 4) a number of small sites across ALE where various types of debris remain from previous uses. This revegetation plan addresses the revegetation and restoration of those land areas disturbed by decommissioning and removal of buildings, facilities and associated infrastructure or debris removal. The primary objective of the revegetation efforts on ALE is to establish native vegetation at each of the sites that will enhance and accelerate the recovery of the native plant community that naturally persists at that location. Revegetation is intended to meet the direction specified by the Environmental Assessment (DOE 2009; DOE/EA-1660F) and by Stipulation C.7 of the Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) for the Rattlesnake Mountain Combined Community Communication Facility and InfrastructureCleanup on the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve, Hanford Site, Richland Washington(DOE 2009; Appendix B). Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under contract with CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CPRC) and in consultation with the tribes and DOE-RL developed a site-specific strategy for each of the revegetation units identified within this document. The strategy and implementation approach for each revegetation unit identifies an appropriate native species mix and outlines the necessary site preparation activities and specific methods for seeding and planting at each area. evegetation work is scheduled to commence during the first quarter of FY 2011 to minimize the amount of time that sites are unvegetated and more susceptible to invasion by non-native weedy annual species.

Downs, Janelle L.; Durham, Robin E.; Larson, Kyle B.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Environmental Cleanup | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

As a result of these operations, ETTP has a legacy of contaminated buildings, soil, sediment, and groundwater that require remediation for the protection of human health and the...

406

Celebrating DOE'sCleanup  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Health Suffolk County Departments of Health Services and Parks On October 14, 2005, the U.S. Department Response, Compensation & Liability Act of 1980. In 1992, DOE entered into a formal tri- party interagency

Ohta, Shigemi

407

Upper Los Alamos Canyon Cleanup  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500II Field Emission SEM with EDAXUpdated

408

DRAFT Central Plateau Cleanup Strategy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganizationElectronic2005-2007 Budget Dear Ms.1

409

DRAFT Central Plateau Cleanup Strategy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels