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1

High Temperature Syngas Cleanup Technology Scale-up  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

RECOVERY ACT: Scale-Up of RECOVERY ACT: Scale-Up of High-Temperature Syngas Cleanup Technology Background Coal gasification generates a synthesis gas (syngas)-predominantly a mixture of carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen (H 2 )-that can be used for chemical production of hydrogen, methanol, substitute natural gas (SNG), and many other industrial chemicals, or for electric power generation. Conventional integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants use this syngas as a fuel for a combustion

2

NETL: Gasification - Recovery Act: High Temperature Syngas Cleanup  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Syngas Processing Systems Syngas Processing Systems Recovery Act: High Temperature Syngas Cleanup Technology Scale-Up and Demonstration Project Research Triangle Institute Project Number: FE0000489 Project Description Research Triangle Institute (RTI) is designing, building, and testing the Warm Temperature Desulfurization Process (WDP) at pre-commercial scale (50 megawatt electric equivalent [MWe]) to remove more than 99.9 percent of the sulfur from coal-derived synthesis gas (syngas). RTI is integrating this WDP technology with an activated methyl diethanolamine (aMDEA) solvent technology to separate 90% of the carbon dioxide (CO2) from shifted syngas. The Polk Power Station, an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant, will supply approximately 20% of its coal-derived syngas as a slipstream to feed into the pre-commercial scale technologies being scaled-up.

3

EA-1867: Scale-up of High-Temperature Syngas Cleanup Technology, Polk  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7: Scale-up of High-Temperature Syngas Cleanup Technology, 7: Scale-up of High-Temperature Syngas Cleanup Technology, Polk County, Florida EA-1867: Scale-up of High-Temperature Syngas Cleanup Technology, Polk County, Florida Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to provide cost-shared funding to RTI International (RTI) for its proposed project to demonstrate the precommercial scale-up of RTI's high-temperature syngas cleanup and carbon capture and sequestration technologies. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. Documents Available for Download October 13, 2011 EA-1867: Finding of No Significant Impact RTI International Scale-Up of High-Temperature Syngas Cleanup and Carbon Capture and Sequestration Technologies, Polk County, Florida (October 2011)

4

NETL: Gasification - Recovery Act: High Temperature Syngas Cleanup  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program Background and Project Benefits Program Background and Project Benefits Gasification is used to convert a solid feedstock, such as coal, petcoke, or biomass, into a gaseous form, referred to as synthesis gas or syngas, which is primarily hydrogen and carbon monoxide. With gasification-based technologies, pollutants can be captured and disposed of or converted to useful products. Gasification can generate clean power by adding steam to the syngas in a water-gas-shift reactor to convert the carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide (CO2) and to produce additional hydrogen. The hydrogen and CO2 are separated-the hydrogen is used to make power and the CO2 is sent to storage, converted to useful products or used for EOR. In addition to efficiently producing electric power, a wide range of transportation fuels and chemicals can be produced from the cleaned syngas, thereby providing the flexibility needed to capitalize on the changing economic market. As a result, gasification provides a flexible technology option for using domestically available resources while meeting future environmental emission standards. Polygeneration plants that produce multiple products are uniquely possible with gasification technologies. The Gasification Systems program is developing technologies in three key areas to reduce the cost and increase the efficiency of producing syngas: (1) Feed Systems, (2) Gasifier Optimization and Plant Supporting Systems, and (3) Syngas Processing Systems.

5

Progress toward Biomass and Coal-Derived Syngas Warm Cleanup...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Progress toward Biomass and Coal-Derived Syngas Warm Cleanup: Proof-of-Concept Process Demonstration of Multicontaminant Removal Progress toward Biomass and Coal-Derived Syngas...

6

DOE-Sponsored Syngas Cleanup Demonstration Project Reaches Development Milestone  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In a project sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), a demonstration-scale application of RTI International’s warm synthesis gas (syngas) cleanup process technology has achieved a key operational milestone at Tampa Electric Company’s coal gasification plant in Polk County, Fla.

7

Analysis of Membrane and Adsorbent Processes for Warm Syngas Cleanup in Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle Power with CO2 Capture and Sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Analysis of Membrane and Adsorbent Processes for Warm Syngas Cleanup in Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle Power with CO2 Capture and Sequestration ... The clean syngas is diluted with N2 from the ASU and enters the gas turbine burner. ... The amount of N2 diluent to be added is determined by the requirement of maintaining the appropriate lower heating value of the syngas feeding into the gas turbine burner to achieve sufficiently low NOx emissions (15–35 ppmv at 15% O2)(36) and to keep the temperature of the gas low enough to avoid blade failure. ...

David J. Couling; Kshitij Prakash; William H. Green

2011-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

8

Integrated Warm Gas Multicontaminant Cleanup Technologies for Coal-Derived Syngas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Integrated Warm Gas Multicontaminant Integrated Warm Gas Multicontaminant Cleanup Technologies for Coal-Derived Syngas Description Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) technology offers a means to utilize coal -the most abundant fuel in the United States-to produce a host of products, ranging from electricity to value-added chemicals like transportation fuels and hydrogen, in an efficient, environmentally friendly manner. However, the overall cost (capital, operating,

9

Task 3.3: Warm Syngas Cleanup and Catalytic Processes for Syngas Conversion to Fuels Subtask 3: Advanced Syngas Conversion to Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This collaborative joint research project is in the area of advanced gasification and conversion, within the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS)-National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)-Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Memorandum of Understanding. The goal for this subtask is the development of advanced syngas conversion technologies. Two areas of investigation were evaluated: Sorption-Enhanced Synthetic Natural Gas Production from Syngas The conversion of synthetic gas (syngas) to synthetic natural gas (SNG) is typically catalyzed by nickel catalysts performed at moderate temperatures (275 to 325°C). The reaction is highly exothermic and substantial heat is liberated, which can lead to process thermal imbalance and destruction of the catalyst. As a result, conversion per pass is typically limited, and substantial syngas recycle is employed. Commercial methanation catalysts and processes have been developed by Haldor Topsoe, and in some reports, they have indicated that there is a need and opportunity for thermally more robust methanation catalysts to allow for higher per-pass conversion in methanation units. SNG process requires the syngas feed with a higher H2/CO ratio than typically produced from gasification processes. Therefore, the water-gas shift reaction (WGS) will be required to tailor the H2/CO ratio. Integration with CO2 separation could potentially eliminate the need for a separate WGS unit, thereby integrating WGS, methanation, and CO2 capture into one single unit operation and, consequently, leading to improved process efficiency. The SNG process also has the benefit of producing a product stream with high CO2 concentrations, which makes CO2 separation more readily achievable. The use of either adsorbents or membranes that selectively separate the CO2 from the H2 and CO would shift the methanation reaction (by driving WGS for hydrogen production) and greatly improve the overall efficiency and economics of the process. The scope of this activity was to develop methods and enabling materials for syngas conversion to SNG with readily CO2 separation. Suitable methanation catalyst and CO2 sorbent materials were developed. Successful proof-of-concept for the combined reaction-sorption process was demonstrated, which culminated in a research publication. With successful demonstration, a decision was made to switch focus to an area of fuels research of more interest to all three research institutions (CAS-NETL-PNNL). Syngas-to-Hydrocarbon Fuels through Higher Alcohol Intermediates There are two types of processes in syngas conversion to fuels that are attracting R&D interest: 1) syngas conversion to mixed alcohols; and 2) syngas conversion to gasoline via the methanol-to-gasoline process developed by Exxon-Mobil in the 1970s. The focus of this task was to develop a one-step conversion technology by effectively incorporating both processes, which is expected to reduce the capital and operational cost associated with the conversion of coal-derived syngas to liquid fuels. It should be noted that this work did not further study the classic Fischer-Tropsch reaction pathway. Rather, we focused on the studies for unique catalyst pathways that involve the direct liquid fuel synthesis enabled by oxygenated intermediates. Recent advances made in the area of higher alcohol synthesis including the novel catalytic composite materials recently developed by CAS using base metal catalysts were used.

Lebarbier Dagel, Vanessa M.; Li, J.; Taylor, Charles E.; Wang, Yong; Dagle, Robert A.; Deshmane, Chinmay A.; Bao, Xinhe

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

10

Syngas Enhanced High Efficiency Low Temperature Combustion for...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Enhanced High Efficiency Low Temperature Combustion for Clean Diesel Engines Syngas Enhanced High Efficiency Low Temperature Combustion for Clean Diesel Engines A significant...

11

Development of an Integrated Multi-Contaminant Removal Process Applied to Warm Syngas Cleanup  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gasification Gasification Technologies contacts Gary J. stiegel Gasification Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412-386-4499 gary.stiegel@netl.doe.gov Jenny tennant Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-4830 jenny.tennant@netl.doe.gov Howard Meyer Principal Project Manager Gas Technology Institute 1700 South Mount Prospect Road Des Plaines, IL 60018 847-768-0955 howard.meyer@gastechnology.org Development of an IntegrateD multI-ContamInant removal proCess applIeD to Warm syngas Cleanup Description The U.S. has more coal than any other country, and through gasification this coal can be converted into electricity, liquid fuels, chemicals or hydrogen. However,

12

Development of an Integrated Multicontaminant Removal Process Applied to Warm Syngas Cleanup for Coal-Based Advanced Gasification Systems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

an Integrated an Integrated Multicontaminant Removal Process Applied to Warm Syngas Cleanup for Coal-Based Advanced Gasification Systems Background The U.S. has more coal than any other country, and it can be converted through gasification into electricity, liquid fuels, chemicals, or hydrogen. However, for coal gasification to become sufficiently competitive to benefit the U.S. economy and help reduce our dependence on foreign fuels, gasification costs must be reduced

13

High temperature electrolysis for syngas production  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Syngas components hydrogen and carbon monoxide may be formed by the decomposition of carbon dioxide and water or steam by a solid-oxide electrolysis cell to form carbon monoxide and hydrogen, a portion of which may be reacted with carbon dioxide to form carbon monoxide. One or more of the components for the process, such as steam, energy, or electricity, may be provided using a nuclear power source.

Stoots, Carl M. (Idaho Falls, ID); O'Brien, James E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Herring, James Stephen (Idaho Falls, ID); Lessing, Paul A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Hawkes, Grant L. (Sugar City, ID); Hartvigsen, Joseph J. (Kaysville, UT)

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

14

THE PRODUCTION OF SYNGAS VIA HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS AND BIO-MASS GASIFICATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process model of syngas production using high temperature electrolysis and biomass gasification is presented. Process heat from the biomass gasifier is used to improve the hydrogen production efficiency of the steam electrolysis process. Hydrogen from electrolysis allows a high utilization of the biomass carbon for syngas production. Based on the gasifier temperature, 94% to 95% of the carbon in the biomass becomes carbon monoxide in the syngas (carbon dioxide and hydrogen). Assuming the thermal efficiency of the power cycle for electricity generation is 50%, (as expected from GEN IV nuclear reactors), the syngas production efficiency ranges from 70% to 73% as the gasifier temperature decreases from 1900 K to 1500 K.

M. G. McKellar; G. L. Hawkes; J. E. O'Brien

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Effects of Inert Dilution and Preheating Temperature on Lean Flammability Limit of Syngas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Lean flammability limits (LFL) of syngas mixtures were measured at different levels of inert dilution and unburned gas preheating temperatures using a counter-flow flame burner. ... The syngas and air are then premixed within a mixing chamber before being injected into the counter-flow burners. ... (45) Multicomponent transport was used in the calculation to account for the Soret effect, which generally enhance the burning intensity of lean syngas flame. ...

Suhui Li; Yang Zhang; Xiaolong Qiu; Bo Li; Hai Zhang

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

16

Progress toward Biomass and Coal-Derived Syngas Warm Cleanup: Proof-of-Concept Process Demonstration of Multicontaminant Removal for Biomass Application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Systems comprising of multiple sorbent and catalytic beds have been developed for the warm syngas cleanup of coal- and biomass-derived syngas. Tailored specifically for biomass application the process described here consists of six primary unit operations: 1) Na2CO3 bed for HCl removal, 2) two regenerable ZnO beds for bulk H2S removal, 3) ZnO bed for H2S polishing, 4) NiCu/SBA-16 sorbent for trace metal (e.g. AsH3) removal, 5) steam reforming catalyst bed for tars and light hydrocarbons reformation and NH3 decomposition, and a 6) Cu-based LT-WGS catalyst bed. Simulated biomass-derived syngas containing a multitude of inorganic contaminants (H2S, AsH3, HCl, and NH3) and hydrocarbon additives (methane, ethylene, benzene, and naphthalene) was used to demonstrate process effectiveness. The efficiency of the process was demonstrated for a period of 175 hours, during which no signs of deactivation were observed. Post-run analysis revealed small levels of sulfur slipped through the sorbent bed train to the two downstream catalytic beds. Future improvements could be made to the trace metal polishing sorbent to ensure complete inorganic contaminant removal (to low ppb level) prior to the catalytic steps. However, dual, regenerating ZnO beds were effective for continuous removal for the vast majority of the sulfur present in the feed gas. The process was effective for complete AsH3 and HCl removal. The steam reforming catalyst completely reformed all the hydrocarbons present in the feed (methane, ethylene, benzene, and naphthalene) to additional syngas. However, post-run evaluation, under kinetically-controlled conditions, indicates deactivation of the steam reforming catalyst. Spent material characterization suggests this is attributed, in part, to coke formation, likely due to the presence of benzene and/or naphthalene in the feed. Future adaptation of this technology may require dual, regenerable steam reformers. The process and materials described in this report hold promise for a warm cleanup of a variety of contaminant species within warm syngas.

Howard, Christopher J.; Dagle, Robert A.; Lebarbier, Vanessa MC; Rainbolt, James E.; Li, Liyu; King, David L.

2013-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

17

Syngas Oxidation Mechanism  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A comprehensive analysis of synthesis gas (syngas) oxidation kinetics in wide ranges of temperature ... on the basis of the reaction mechanism of syngas ignition and combustion in air. A vast set of experimental ...

A. M. Starik; N. S. Titova; A. S. Sharipov…

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Warm Gas Cleanup  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Warm Gas Cleanup Warm Gas Cleanup NETL Office of Research and Development Project Number: FWP-2012.03.03 Task 5 Project Description The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has established strict regulations for the trace contaminant emissions from integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems. The Department of Energy (DOE) performance goals for trace contaminant removal were selected to meet or exceed EPA's standard limits for contaminants, as well as to avoid poisoning of: the catalysts utilized in making liquids from fuel gas the electrodes in fuel cells selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts The objective of the NETL's ORD Warm Gas Cleanup project is to assist in achieving both DOE and EPA targets for trace contaminant capture from coal gasification, while preserving the high thermal efficiency of the IGCC system. To achieve this, both lab and pilot-scale research is underway to develop sorbents capable of removing the following contaminants from high temperature syngas (up to 550°F):

19

Microsoft Word - 10.5.11 Markup by Hargis Final EA-RTI Syngas CCS Project.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

67 67 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT for RTI INTERNATIONAL SCALE-UP OF HIGH- TEMPERATURE SYNGAS CLEANUP AND CARBON CAPTURE AND SEQUESTRATION TECHNOLOGIES, POLK COUNTY, FLORIDA U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY National Energy Technology Laboratory October 2011 RTI Syngas Cleanup/Carbon Capture Final and Sequestration Project Environmental Assessment DOE/EA-1867 N:\MYFILES\CORRESPONDENCE\LUSK, MARK\RTI-POLK EA\FONSI FINAL EA\10.5.11 MARKUP BY HARGIS FINAL EA-RTI SYNGAS CCS PROJECT.DOCX-101411 i October 2011 COVER SHEET Responsible Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Title: Final Environmental Assessment for RTI International Scale-Up of High-Temperature Syngas Cleanup and Carbon Capture and Sequestration Technologies, Polk County, Florida (DOE/EA-1867)

20

Effect of air preheat temperature on the MILD combustion of syngas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The effect of air preheat temperature on MILD (Moderate or Intense Low-oxygen Dilution) combustion of coal-derived syngas was examined in parallel jet forward flow combustor. The results were presented on flow field using numerical simulations and on global flame signatures, OH? radicals distribution and exhaust emissions using experiments. The discrete and high speed air/fuel injections into the combustor is necessary for the establishment of MILD conditions, because they cause strong gas recirculation and form large mixing region between the air and fuel jets. The critical equivalence ratio above which MILD combustion occurred was identified. The MILD regime was established for syngas fuel under air preheating conditions with lean operational limit and suppressed \\{NOx\\} and CO emissions. In the MILD combustion regime, the air preheating resulted in higher \\{NOx\\} but lower CO emissions, while the increase of equivalence ratio led to the increase of \\{NOx\\} and the decrease of CO emissions.

Mingming Huang; Zhedian Zhang; Weiwei Shao; Yan Xiong; Yan Liu; Fulin Lei; Yunhan Xiao

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature syngas cleanup" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

HIGH-TEMPERATURE CO-ELECTROLYSIS OF H2O AND CO2 FOR SYNGAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Worldwide, the demand for light hydrocarbon fuels like gasoline and diesel oil is increasing. To satisfy this demand, oil companies have begun to utilize oil deposits of lower hydrogen content (an example is the Athabasca Oil Sands). Additionally, the higher contents of sulfur and nitrogen of these resources requires processes such as hydrotreating to meet environmental requirements. In the mean time, with the price of oil currently over $50 / barrel, synthetically-derived hydrocarbon fuels (synfuels) have become economical. Synfuels are typically produced from syngas – hydrogen (H2) and carbon monoxide (CO) -- using the Fischer-Tropsch process, discovered by Germany before World War II. South Africa has used synfuels to power a significant number of their buses, trucks, and taxicabs. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), in conjunction with Ceramatec Inc. (Salt Lake City, USA) has been researching for several years the use of solid-oxide fuel cell technology to electrolyze steam for large-scale nuclear-powered hydrogen production. Now, an experimental research project is underway at the INL to investigate the feasibility of producing syngas by simultaneously electrolyzing at high-temperature steam and carbon dioxide (CO2) using solid oxide fuel cell technology. The syngas can then be used for synthetic fuel production. This program is a combination of experimental and computational activities. Since the solid oxide electrolyte material is a conductor of oxygen ions, CO can be produced by electrolyzing CO2 sequestered from some greenhouse gas-emitting process. Under certain conditions, however, CO can further electrolyze to produce carbon, which can then deposit on cell surfaces and reduce cell performance. The understanding of the co-electrolysis of steam and CO2 is also complicated by the competing water-gas shift reaction. Results of experiments and calculations to date of CO2 and CO2/H2O electrolysis will be presented and discussed. These will include electrolysis performance at various temperatures, gas mixtures, and electrical settings. Product gas compositions, as measured via a gas analyser, and their relationship to conversion efficiencies will be presented. These measurements will be compared to predictions obtained from chemical equilibrium computer codes. Better understanding of the feasibility of producing syngas using high-temperature electrolysis will initiate the systematic investigation of nuclear-powered synfuel production as a bridge to the future hydrogen economy and ultimate independence from foreign energy resources.

Stoots, C.M.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

SYNGAS PRODUCTION VIA HIGH-TEMPERATURE COELECTROLYSIS OF STEAM AND CARBON DIOXIDE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents results of recent experiments on simultaneous high-temperature electrolysis (coelectrolysis) of steam and carbon dioxide using solid-oxide electrolysis cells. Coelectrolysis is complicated by the fact that the reverse shift reaction occurs concurrently with the electrolytic reduction reactions. All reactions must be properly accounted for when evaluating results. Electrochemical performance of the button cells and stacks were evaluated over a range of temperatures, compositions, and flow rates. The apparatus used for these tests is heavily instrumented, with precision mass-flow controllers, on-line dewpoint and CO2 sensors, and numerous pressure and temperature measurement stations. It also includes a gas chromatograph for analyzing outlet gas compositions. Comparisons of measured compositions to predictions obtained from a chemical equilibrium coelectrolysis model are presented, along with corresponding polarization curves. Results indicate excellent agreement between predicted and measured outlet compositions. Cell area-specific resistance values were found to be similar for steam electrolysis and coelectrolysis. Coelectrolysis significantly increases the yield of syngas over the reverse water gas shift reaction equilibrium composition. The process appears to be a promising technique for large-scale syngas production.

Carl M. Stoots; James E. O'Brien; J. Stephen Herring; Joseph J. Hartvigsen

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

High-Temperature Gas-Stream Cleanup Test Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In support of METC`s hot-gas filter development program, the high- temperature, gas-stream cleanup test facility was designed to: investigate conventional and novel approaches to high-temperature filtration; conduct detailed parametric studies that characterize particulate control devices under well-controlled conditions; and screen new materials for other high-temperature applications, such as heat exchanger tubes. This new facility utilizes a natural gas-fueled combustor to produce high-temperature process gas, and a screw feeder to inject ash, or other fine media, into the gas stream. The vessel that surrounds the particulate control devices has an inside diameter of roughly 0.20 meters (8 inches) and is about 3 meters (10 feet) long. Three commercial-size filter elements can be tested simultaneously, and the facility is capable of operating over a wide range of conditions. Operating temperatures can vary from 540 to 870{degrees}C (1,000 to 1,600 {degrees}F), and the operating pressure can vary from 0 to 400 kPa (0 to 60 psig).

Straub, D.; Chiang, Ta-Kuan, Schultz, J.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

24

PROCESS MODEL FOR THE PRODUCTION OF SYNGAS VIA HIGH TEMPERATURE CO-ELECTROLYSIS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process model has been developed to evaluate the potential performance of a large-scale high-temperature coelectrolysis plant for the production of syngas from steam and carbon dioxide. The coelectrolysis process allows for direct electrochemical reduction of the steam – carbon dioxide gas mixture, yielding hydrogen and carbon monoxide, or syngas. The process model has been developed using the HYSYS systems analysis code. Using this code, a detailed process flowsheet has been defined that includes all the components that would be present in an actual plant such as pumps, compressors, heat exchangers, turbines, and the electrolyzer. Since the electrolyzer is not a standard HYSYS component, a custom one-dimensional coelectrolysis model was developed for incorporation into the overall HYSYS process flowsheet. The 1-D coelectrolysis model assumes local chemical equilibrium among the four process-gas species via the shift reaction. The electrolyzer model allows for the determination of coelectrolysis outlet temperature, composition (anode and cathode sides), mean Nernst potential, operating voltage and electrolyzer power based on specified inlet gas flow rates, heat loss or gain, current density, and cell area-specific resistance. The one-dimensional electrolyzer model was validated by comparison with results obtained from a fully 3-D computational fluid dynamics model developed using FLUENT, and by comparison to experimental data. This paper provides representative results obtained from the HYSYS flowsheet model for a 300 MW coelectrolysis plant, coupled to a high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor. The coelectrolysis process, coupled to a nuclear reactor, provides a means of recycling carbon dioxide back into a useful liquid fuel. If the carbon dioxide source is based on biomass, the entire process would be climate neutral.

M. G. McKellar; J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; G. L. Hawkes

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Parametric Study Of Large-Scale Production Of Syngas Via High Temperature Co-Electrolysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process model has been developed to evaluate the potential performance of a largescale high-temperature co-electrolysis plant for the production of syngas from steam and carbon dioxide. The co-electrolysis process allows for direct electrochemical reduction of the steam – carbon dioxide gas mixture, yielding hydrogen and carbon monoxide, or syngas. The process model has been developed using the Honeywell UniSim systems analysis code. Using this code, a detailed process flow sheet has been defined that includes all the components that would be present in an actual plant such as pumps, compressors, heat exchangers, turbines, and the electrolyzer. Since the electrolyzer is not a standard UniSim component, a custom one-dimensional co-electrolysis model was developed for incorporation into the overall UniSim process flow sheet. The one dimensional co-electrolysis model assumes local chemical equilibrium among the four process-gas species via the gas shift reaction. The electrolyzer model allows for the determination of co-electrolysis outlet temperature, composition (anode and cathode sides); mean Nernst potential, operating voltage and electrolyzer power based on specified inlet gas flow rates, heat loss or gain, current density, and cell area-specific resistance. The one-dimensional electrolyzer model was validated by comparison with results obtained from a fully three dimensional computational fluid dynamics model developed using FLUENT, and by comparison to experimental data. This paper provides representative results obtained from the UniSim flow sheet model for a 300 MW co-electrolysis plant, coupled to a high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor. The coelectrolysis process, coupled to a nuclear reactor, provides a means of recycling carbon dioxide back into a useful liquid fuel. If the carbon dioxide source is based on biomass, the overall process, from production through utilization, would be climate neutral.

J. E. O'Brien; M. G. McKellar; C. M. Stoots; J. S. Herring; G. L. Hawkes

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Syngas Enhanced High Efficiency Low Temperature Combustion for Clean Diesel Engines  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A significant potential exists for clean diesel combustion by recouping exhaust energy to generate syngas either with a dedicated reformer or in-cylinder fuel reforming.

27

Idaho National Laboratory Experimental Research In High Temperature Electrolysis For Hydrogen And Syngas Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho National Laboratory (Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA), in collaboration with Ceramatec, Inc. (Salt Lake City, Utah, USA), is actively researching the application of solid oxide fuel cell technology as electrolyzers for large scale hydrogen and syngas production. This technology relies upon electricity and high temperature heat to chemically reduce a steam or steam / CO2 feedstock. Single button cell tests, multi-cell stack, as well as multi-stack testing has been conducted. Stack testing used 10 x 10 cm cells (8 x 8 cm active area) supplied by Ceramatec and ranged from 10 cell short stacks to 240 cell modules. Tests were conducted either in a bench-scale test apparatus or in a newly developed 5 kW Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) test facility. Gas composition, operating voltage, and operating temperature were varied during testing. The tests were heavily instrumented, and outlet gas compositions were monitored with a gas chromatograph. The ILS facility is currently being expanded to ~15 kW testing capacity (H2 production rate based upon lower heating value).

Carl M. Stoots; James E. O'Brien; J. Stephen Herring; Joseph J. Hartvigsen

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Designing Turbine Endwalls for Deposition Resistance with 1,400 °C Combustor Exit Temperatures and Syngas Water Vapor Levels„The Ohio State University  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Designing Turbine Endwalls for Designing Turbine Endwalls for Deposition Resistance with 1,400 °C Combustor Exit Temperatures and Syngas Water Vapor Levels-The Ohio State University Background This University Turbine Systems Research (UTSR) project will explore a critical need for innovative turbine endwall designs that could increase turbine durability and mitigate the adverse effects of residue deposition from coal-derived synthesis gas (syngas). The Ohio State University (OSU), in cooperation with Brigham Young University (BYU),

29

Manganese and Ceria Sorbents for High Temperature Sulfur Removal from Biomass-Derived Syngas -- The Impact of Steam on Capacity and Sorption Mode  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Syngas derived from biomass and coal gasification for fuel synthesis or electricity generation contains sulfur species that are detrimental to downstream catalysts or turbine operation. Sulfur removal in high temperature, high steam conditions has been known to be challenging, but experimental reports on methods to tackle the problem are not often reported. We have developed sorbents that can remove hydrogen sulfide from syngas at high temperature (700 C), both in dry and high steam conditions. The syngas composition chosen for our experiments is derived from statistical analysis of the gasification products of wood under a large variety of conditions. The two sorbents, Cu-ceria and manganese-based, were tested in a variety of conditions. In syngas containing steam, the capacity of the sorbents is much lower, and the impact of the sorbent in lowering H{sub 2}S levels is only evident in low space velocities. Spectroscopic characterization and thermodynamic consideration of the experimental results suggest that in syngas containing 45% steam, the removal of H{sub 2}S is primarily via surface chemisorptions. For the Cu-ceria sorbent, analysis of the amount of H{sub 2}S retained by the sorbent in dry syngas suggests both copper and ceria play a role in H{sub 2}S removal. For the manganese-based sorbent, in dry conditions, there is a solid state transformation of the sorbent, primarily into the sulfide form.

Cheah, S.; Parent, Y. O.; Jablonski, W. S.; Vinzant, T.; Olstad, J. L.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

SYNGAS PRODUCTION VIA HIGH-TEMPERATURE CO-ELECTROLYSIS OF STEAM AND CARBON DIOXIDE IN A SOLID-OXIDE STACK  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents results of recent experiments conducted at the INL studying coelectrolysis of steam and carbon dioxide in a 10-cell high-temperature solid-oxide electrolysis stack. Coelectrolysis is complicated by the fact that the reverse shift reaction occurs concurrently with the electrolytic reduction reactions. All reactions must be properly accounted for when evaluating results. Electrochemical performance of the stack was evaluated over a range of temperatures, compositions, and flow rates. The apparatus used for these tests is heavily instrumented, with precision mass-flow controllers, on-line dewpoint and CO2 sensors, and numerous pressure and temperature measurement stations. It also includes a gas chromatograph for analyzing outlet gas compositions. Comparisons of measured compositions to predictions obtained from a chemical equilibrium co-electrolysis model are presented, along with corresponding polarization curves. Results indicate excellent agreement between predicted and measured outlet compositions. Coelectrolysis significantly increases the yield of syngas over the reverse water gas shift reaction equilibrium composition. The process appears to be a promising technique for large-scale syngas production.

Carl M. Stoots; James E. O'Brien; Joseph J. Hartvigsen

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Energy Efficient Production of Hydrogen and Syngas from Biomass:? Development of Low-Temperature Catalytic Process for Cellulose Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Actually, the syngas production is the key step to produce such super clean liquid fuels. ... Today's corn refinery industry produces a wide range of products including starch-based ethanol fuels for transportation. ... On a catalyst with suitable reducibility, the oxidized catalyst can be reduced with the produced syngas and the reforming activity regenerates in the fluidized bed reactor. ...

Mohammad Asadullah; Shin-ichi Ito; Kimio Kunimori; Muneyoshi Yamada; Keiichi Tomishige

2002-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

32

HIGH-TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS FOR LARGE-SCALE HYDROGEN AND SYNGAS PRODUCTION FROM NUCLEAR ENERGY – SYSTEM SIMULATION AND ECONOMICS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A research and development program is under way at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to assess the technological and scale-up issues associated with the implementation of solid-oxide electrolysis cell technology for efficient high-temperature hydrogen production from steam. This work is supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, under the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. This paper will provide an overview of large-scale system modeling results and economic analyses that have been completed to date. System analysis results have been obtained using the commercial code UniSim, augmented with a custom high-temperature electrolyzer module. Economic analysis results were based on the DOE H2A analysis methodology. The process flow diagrams for the system simulations include an advanced nuclear reactor as a source of high-temperature process heat, a power cycle and a coupled steam electrolysis loop. Several reactor types and power cycles have been considered, over a range of reactor outlet temperatures. Pure steam electrolysis for hydrogen production as well as coelectrolysis for syngas production from steam/carbon dioxide mixtures have both been considered. In addition, the feasibility of coupling the high-temperature electrolysis process to biomass and coal-based synthetic fuels production has been considered. These simulations demonstrate that the addition of supplementary nuclear hydrogen to synthetic fuels production from any carbon source minimizes emissions of carbon dioxide during the production process.

J. E. O'Brien; M. G. McKellar; E. A. Harvego; C. M. Stoots

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

NETL: Gasification Systems - Integrated Warm Gas Multicontaminant Cleanup  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Integrated Warm Gas Multicontaminant Cleanup Technologies for Coal-Derived Syngas Integrated Warm Gas Multicontaminant Cleanup Technologies for Coal-Derived Syngas Project Number: DE-FC26-05NT42459 Integrated Warm Gas Multicontaminant Cleanup Technologies for Coal-Derived Syngas Project ID: DE-FC26-05NT42459 Objective: The objective is to develop a warm multi-contaminant syngas cleaning system for operation between 300 and 700° F. This project will continue development of the RTI warm syngas cleanup technology suite. Based on the field testing results with real syngas from Eastman Chemical Company's gasifier under DOE Contract DE-AC26-99FT40675, additional technical issues need to be addressed to move the technologies used in warm syngas cleaning further towards commercial deployment especially for chemical/fuels production. These issues range from evaluation of startup and standby options for the more developed desulfurization processes to integration and actual pilot plant testing with real coal-derived syngas for the technologies that were tested at bench scale during Phase I. Development shall continue of the warm gas syngas cleaning technology platform through a combination of lab-scale R&D and larger integrated pilot plant testing with real coal-derived syngas as well as process/systems analysis and simulation for optimization of integration and intensification.

34

Thermodynamic analysis of interactions between Ni-based solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) anodes and trace species in a survey of coal syngas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A thermodynamic analysis was conducted to characterize the effects of trace contaminants in syngas derived from coal gasification on solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode material. The effluents from 15 different gasification facilities were considered to assess the impact of fuel composition on anode susceptibility to contamination. For each syngas case, the study considers the magnitude of contaminant exposure resulting from operation of a warm gas cleanup unit at two different temperatures and operation of a nickel-based SOFC at three different temperatures. Contaminant elements arsenic (As), phosphorous (P), and antimony (Sb) are predicted to be present in warm gas cleanup effluent and will interact with the nickel (Ni) components of a SOFC anode. Phosphorous is the trace element found in the largest concentration of the three contaminants and is potentially the most detrimental. Poisoning was found to depend on the composition of the syngas as well as system operating conditions. Results for all trace elements tended to show invariance with cleanup operating temperature, but results were sensitive to syngas bulk composition. Synthesis gas with high steam content tended to resist poisoning.

Andrew Martinez; Kirk Gerdes; Randall Gemmen; James Postona

2010-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

35

An experimental and numerical investigation of premixed syngas combustion dynamics in mesoscale channels with controlled wall temperature profiles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The dynamics in H2/CO/O2/N2 premixed combustion was investigated experimentally and numerically in a 7-mm height mesoscale channel at atmospheric pressure, fuel–lean equivalence ratios 0.25–0.42, volumetric CO:H2 ratios 1:1 to 20:1, and wall temperatures 550–1320 K. Experiments were performed in an optically-accessible channel-flow reactor and involved high-speed (up to 1 kHz) planar laser induced fluorescence (LIF) of the OH radical and thermocouple measurements of the upper and lower channel wall temperatures. Simulations were carried out with a transient 2-D code, which included an elementary syngas reaction mechanism and detailed species transport. Demarcation of the experimentally-observed parameter space separating stationary and oscillatory combustion modes indicated that the former were favored at the higher wall temperatures and higher CO:H2 volumetric ratios, while the latter predominately appeared at the lower wall temperatures and lower CO:H2 ratios. The numerical model reproduced very well all stationary combustion modes, which included V-shaped and asymmetric (upper or lower) modes, in terms of flame shapes and flame anchoring positions. Simulations of the oscillatory flames, which appeared in the form of ignition/extinction events of varying spatial extents, were very sensitive to the specific boundary conditions and reproduced qualitatively the flame topology, the ignition sequence (including the periodic reversion from upper-asymmetric to lower-asymmetric flame propagation), and the range of measured oscillation frequencies. Predicted emissions in the stationary modes ranged from 25 to 94 ppm-mass for CO and from 0.1 to 0.3 ppm-mass for H2, while in the oscillatory modes incomplete combustion of both CO and H2 was attested during their oscillation period.

Andrea Brambilla; Marco Schultze; Christos E. Frouzakis; John Mantzaras; Rolf Bombach; Konstantinos Boulouchos

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Carbon Neutral Production Of Syngas Via High Temperature Electrolytic Reduction Of Steam And CO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the most recent results of experiments conducted at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) studying coelectrolysis of steam and carbon dioxide in solid-oxide electrolysis stacks. Two 10-cell planar stacks were tested under various gas compositions, operating voltages, and operating temperatures. The tests were heavily instrumented, and outlet gas compositions were monitored with a gas chromatograph. Measured outlet compositions, open cell potentials, and coelectrolysis thermal neutral voltages compared reasonably well with a coelectrolysis computer model developed at the INL. Stack ASRs did not change significantly when switching from electrolysis to coelectrolysis operation.

C. Stoots; J. O'Brien; J. Hartvigsen

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Simulation and optimization of hot syngas separation processes in integrated gasification combined cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IGCC with CO2 capture offers an exciting approach for cleanly using abundant coal reserves of the world to generate electricity. The present state-of-the-art synthesis gas (syngas) cleanup technologies in IGCC involve ...

Prakash, Kshitij

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Recent Progress At The Idaho National Laboratory In High Temperature Electrolysis For Hydrogen And Syngas Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the most recent results of experiments conducted at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) studying electrolysis of steam and coelectrolysis of steam / carbon dioxide in solid-oxide electrolysis stacks. Single button cell tests as well as multi-cell stack testing have been conducted. Multi-cell stack testing used 10 x 10 cm cells (8 x 8 cm active area) supplied by Ceramatec, Inc (Salt Lake City, Utah, USA) and ranged from 10 cell short stacks to 240 cell modules. Tests were conducted either in a bench-scale test apparatus or in a newly developed 5 kW Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) test facility. Gas composition, operating voltage, and operating temperature were varied during testing. The tests were heavily instrumented, and outlet gas compositions were monitored with a gas chromatograph. The ILS facility is currently being expanded to 15 kW testing capacity (H2 production rate based upon lower heating value).

C. Stoots; J. O'Brien; J. Herring; J. Hartvigsen

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Coal-Derived Warm Syngas Purification and CO2 Capture-Assisted Methane Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gasifier-derived syngas from coal has many applications in the area of catalytic transformation to fuels and chemicals. Raw syngas must be treated to remove a number of impurities that would otherwise poison the synthesis catalysts. Inorganic impurities include alkali salts, chloride, sulfur compounds, heavy metals, ammonia, and various P, As, Sb, and Se- containing compounds. Systems comprising multiple sorbent and catalytic beds have been developed for the removal of impurities from gasified coal using a warm cleanup approach. This approach has the potential to be more economic than the currently available acid gas removal (AGR) approaches and improves upon currently available processes that do not provide the level of impurity removal that is required for catalytic synthesis application. Gasification also lends itself much more readily to the capture of CO2, important in the regulation and control of greenhouse gas emissions. CO2 capture material was developed and in this study was demonstrated to assist in methane production from the purified syngas. Simultaneous CO2 sorption enhances the CO methanation reaction through relaxation of thermodynamic constraint, thus providing economic benefit rather than simply consisting of an add-on cost for carbon capture and release. Molten and pre-molten LiNaKCO3 can promote MgO and MgO-based double salts to capture CO2 with high cycling capacity. A stable cycling CO2 capacity up to 13 mmol/g was demonstrated. This capture material was specifically developed in this study to operate in the same temperature range and therefore integrate effectively with warm gas cleanup and methane synthesis. By combining syngas methanation, water-gas-shift, and CO2 sorption in a single reactor, single pass yield to methane of 99% was demonstrated at 10 bar and 330oC when using a 20 wt% Ni/MgAl2O4 catalyst and a molten-phase promoted MgO-based sorbent. Under model feed conditions both the sorbent and catalyst exhibited favorable stability after multiple test cycles. The cleanup for warm gas cleanup of inorganics was broken down into three major steps: chloride removal, sulfur removal, and the removal for a multitude of trace metal contaminants. Na2CO3 was found to optimally remove chlorides at an operating temperature of 450şC. For sulfur removal two regenerable ZnO beds are used for bulk H2S removal at 450şC (<5 ppm S) and a non-regenerable ZnO bed for H2S polishing at 300şC (<40 ppb S). It was also found that sulfur from COS could be adsorbed (to levels below our detection limit of 40 ppb) in the presence of water that leads to no detectable slip of H2S. Finally, a sorbent material comprising of Cu and Ni was found to be effective in removing trace metal impurities such as AsH3 and PH3 when operating at 300şC. Proof-of-concept of the integrated cleanup process was demonstrated with gasifier-generated syngas produced at the Western Research Institute using Wyoming Decker Coal. When operating with a ~1 SLPM feed, multiple inorganic contaminant removal sorbents and a tar-reforming bed was able to remove the vast majority of contaminants from the raw syngas. A tar-reforming catalyst was employed due to the production of tars generated from the gasifier used in this particular study. It is envisioned that in a real application a commercial scale gasifier operating at a higher temperature would produce lesser amount of tar. Continuous operation of a poison-sensitive copper-based WGS catalyst located downstream from the cleanup steps resulted in successful demonstration. ?

Dagle, Robert A.; King, David L.; Li, Xiaohong S.; Xing, Rong; Spies, Kurt A.; Zhu, Yunhua; Rainbolt, James E.; Li, Liyu; Braunberger, B.

2014-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

40

Hydrogen Production from Biomass-Derived Syngas Using a Membrane Reactor Based Process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(1) One of the benefits of adopting H2 as an energy source, in addition to reducing CO2 emissions, is that it can be produced from readily available and plentiful raw materials such as coal and renewable biomass; this then diminishes the need to use the world’s dwindling crude-oil resources. ... For that, coal must be first gasified with air or pure O2 at high temperatures(2) to produce coal-gasifier off-gas (or syngas), containing as key species H2, CO, CO2, H2O, CH4, and other byproducts such as organic vapors, tars, H2S, and NH3, etc.,(2) the exact composition depending on the operating conditions, e.g., pressure, temperature, type of coal and oxidant used and their flow rates, and gasifier configuration, etc.(2) ... A novel MR system termed as the “one-box” process, in which syngas cleanup, hydrogen production via the WGS reaction, and product separation are combined in the same unit, was successfully utilized for producing hydrogen from a feed with a simulated biomass-derived syngas containing common impurities such as H2S and NH3, a model organic vapor (toluene), and a model tar-like species (naphthalene). ...

Jiang Yu; Mingyang Tan; Paul K. T. Liu; Muhammad Sahimi; Theodore T. Tsotsis

2013-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature syngas cleanup" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

NETL: Gasification Systems - Syngas Processing Systems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Syngas Processing Systems Syngas Processing Systems Gasification Systems Syngas Processing Systems The various downstream uses of syngas require that most of the contaminants present in raw syngas be removed to very low levels prior to use. Many of these contaminants can contribute to erosion, corrosion, and loss of strength in gas turbine components, and can act as poisons to the catalysts often used in syngas conversion and utilization processes. These same contaminants include or result in regulated air pollutants such as SOx, NOx, particulates, and mercury and other trace metals, which must be removed to increasingly low levels to meet stringent regulatory limits on air emissions. Conventional methods for removing sulfur and other contaminants from syngas typically rely on chemical or physical absorption processes operating at low temperatures. However, after contaminant removal, the gas has to be reheated prior to its use in a gas turbine or other chemical synthesis process; in the case of downstream hydrogen production, additional steam needs to be added back to the syngas. These process swings adversely impact the plant's thermal efficiency and cost. Techno-economic analysis shows that gas-cleaning processes amenable to higher operating temperatures could significantly reduce this efficiency loss and improve the gasification plant's commercial viability. It is also critical that, while improving efficiency and reducing cost, the gas cleaning removes a wide variety of coal contaminants (including hydrogen sulfide, ammonia, hydrogen chloride, and carbonyl sulfide, as well as various forms of trace metals, including arsenic, mercury, selenium, and cadmium) to extremely low levels. Accordingly, the R&D approach in this area focuses on the development of high-efficiency processes that operate at moderate to high temperatures and provide multi-contaminant control to meet the highest environmental standards.

42

Deposition of Alternative (Syngas) Fuels on Turbine Blades with Film Cooling  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ACERC ACERC Dr. Jeffrey Bons and Dr. Thomas Fletcher BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY SCIES Project 05-01-SR-120 with support from General Electric, Siemens-Westinghouse, Solar Turbines, Praxair UTSR Peer Workshop III, Clemson University, SC Oct. 18-20, 2005 Deposition of Alternative ( Deposition of Alternative ( Syngas Syngas ) Fuels on ) Fuels on Turbine Blades with Film Cooling Turbine Blades with Film Cooling Alternate fuels (e.g. coal, petcoke, and biomass) are being cons Alternate fuels (e.g. coal, petcoke, and biomass) are being cons idered to idered to produce produce syngas syngas fuels to replace natural gas in power turbines fuels to replace natural gas in power turbines Despite gas cleanup, small levels of airborne particulate (e.g. Despite gas cleanup, small levels of airborne particulate (e.g. 0.1 0.1 ppmw

43

Regenerable MgO-based sorbent for high temperature CO2 removal from syngas: 3. CO2 capture and sorbent enhanced water gas shift reaction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Regenerable MgO-based sorbent, which was prepared and evaluated in the thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) in part 1, was also evaluated in high-pressure packed-bed unit in CO2/N2/H2O mixture and simulated pre-combustion syngas environment. In CO2/N2/H2O environment, the CO2 absorption capacity of the sorbent increases with increasing temperatures from 6.7% at 350 °C to 9.5% 450 °C. The sorbent is capable of achieving over 95% CO2 capture and 40% conversion in the water gas shift (WGS) reaction, which should be attributed to positive effect of WGS reaction in producing CO2 during the process. The sorbent reactivity and absorption capacity toward CO2, as well as its WGS catalytic activity decreases with increasing temperature. The maximum pre-breakthrough WGS conversion occurs at 350 °C, which diminishes as the sorbent is carbonated. The variable diffusivity shrinking core reaction model coupled with the two-fluid computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was shown to accurately predict the break-through gas compositions at different operating conditions.

Emadoddin Abbasi; Armin Hassanzadeh; Shahin Zarghami; Hamid Arastoopour; Javad Abbasian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

High-Temperature Co-electrolysis of Steam and Carbon Dioxide for Direct Production of Syngas; Equilibrium Model and Single-Cell Tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental study has been completed to assess the performance of single solid-oxide electrolysis cells operating over a temperature range of 800 to 850şC in the coelectrolysis mode, simultaneously electrolyzing steam and carbon dioxide for the direct production of syngas. The experiments were performed over a range of inlet flow rates of steam, carbon dioxide, hydrogen and nitrogen and over a range of current densities (-0.1 to 0.25 A/cm2) using single electrolyte-supported button electrolysis cells. Steam and carbon dioxide consumption rates associated with electrolysis were measured directly using inlet and outlet dewpoint instrumentation and a gas chromatograph, respectively. Cell operating potentials and cell current were varied using a programmable power supply. Measured values of open-cell potential and outlet gas composition are compared to predictions obtained from a chemical equilibrium coelectrolysis model. Model predictions of outlet gas composition based on an effective equilibrium temperature are shown to agree well with measurements. Cell area-specific resistance values were similar for steam electrolysis and coelectrolysis.

O'Brien, J. E.; Stoots, C. M.; Herring, J. S.; Hartvigsen, J. J.

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

High-Temperature Co-electrolysis of Carbon Dioxide and Steam for the Production of Syngas; Equilibrium Model and Single-Cell Tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental study has been completed to assess the performance of single solid-oxide electrolysis cells operating over a temperature range of 800 to 850şC in the coelectrolysis mode, simultaneously electrolyzing steam and carbon dioxide for the direct production of syngas. The experiments were performed over a range of inlet flow rates of steam, carbon dioxide, hydrogen and nitrogen and over a range of current densities (-0.1 to 0.25 A/cm2) using single electrolyte-supported button electrolysis cells. Steam and carbon dioxide consumption rates associated with electrolysis were measured directly using inlet and outlet dewpoint instrumentation and a gas chromatograph, respectively. Cell operating potentials and cell current were varied using a programmable power supply. Measured values of open-cell potential and outlet gas composition are compared to predictions obtained from a chemical equilibrium coelectrolysis model. Model predictions of outlet gas composition based on an effective equilibrium temperature are shown to agree well with measurements. Area-specific resistance values were similar for steam electrolysis and coelectrolysis.

J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; G. L. Hawkes; J. S. Herring; J. J. Hartvigsen

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Production of Syngas via Partial Oxidation and CO2 Reforming of Coke Oven Gas over a Ni Catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Production of Syngas via Partial Oxidation and CO2 Reforming of Coke Oven Gas over a Ni Catalyst ... The yield of produced syngas increases with an increase in temperature. ...

Jianzhong Guo; Zhaoyin Hou; Jing Gao; Xiaoming Zheng

2008-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

47

Hanford Cleanup - Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cleanup About Us Hanford Overview and History Hanford Cleanup Hanford Site Wide Programs Hanford Cleanup Email Email Page | Print Print Page |Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font...

48

Syngas Production Using Carbon Dioxide Reforming: Fundamentals and Perspectives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Syngas can be produced from a variety of different hydrocarbon molecules by the catalysed reaction with steam, carbon dioxide or oxygen (or with various combinations of these) at high temperatures. This chapte...

Julian R. H. Ross

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Syngas Generator Use for Retrofit DPF Active Regeneration on a Medium Duty Truck  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Syngas enables low temperature in-use active regeneration of DPFs based on real-world data from a vehicle tested for over 1,000 hours

50

Steam reforming of gasification-derived tar for syngas production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this study, the steam reforming of tar was catalyzed by dolomite, Ni/dolomite, and Ni/CeO2 for syngas production under different reaction temperature and weight hourly space velocity (WHSV, h?1). The tar was the major side product from the biomass gasification. Current results revealed that the nickel doped catalyst on dolomite with CO2 in the feed stream yielded the highest H2 and syngas production among all reaction conditions. Comparing to the use of dolomite, when Ni–dolomites was used as catalyst, the yield of H2 increased by 33%, the yield of syngas increased by 7%, and the yield of CH4 decreased by 59%. It was also found that the yield of syngas, H2, or CO under the Ni/dolomite catalyst were significant higher (p  CO2 concentration in the feed stream > reaction temperature > weight hourly space velocity.

Alex C.-C. Chang; Lung-Shiang Chang; Cheng-You Tsai; Yu-Chun Chan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Elevated-Temperature Corrosion of CoCrCuFeNiAl0.5Bx High-Entropy Alloys in Simulated Syngas Containing H2S  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-entropy alloys are formed by synthesizing five or more principal elements in equimolar or near equimolar concentrations. Microstructure of the CoCrCuFeNiAl{sub 0.5}B{sub x} (x = 0, 0.2, 0.6, 1) high-entropy alloys under investigation is composed of a mixture of disordered bcc and fcc phases and borides. These alloys were tested gravimetrically for their corrosion resistance in simulated syngas containing 0, 0.01, 0.1, and 1 % H{sub 2}S at 500 °C. The exposed coupons were characterized using XRD and SEM. No significant corrosion was detected at 500 °C in syngas containing 0 and 0.01 % H{sub 2}S while significant corrosion was observed in syngas containing 0.1 and 1 % H{sub 2}S. Cu{sub 1.96}S was the primary sulfide in the external corrosion scale on the low-boron high-entropy alloys, whereas FeCo{sub 4}Ni{sub 4}S{sub 8} on the high-boron high-entropy alloys. Multi-phase Cu-rich regions in the low-B high-entropy alloys were vulnerable to corrosive attack.

Dogan, Omer N.; Nielsen, Benjamin C.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Corrosion of Metallic SOFC Interconnects in Coal Syngas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With recent reductions in the operating temperature of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC), the potential of using metallic interconnect has gone up. There is also an interest in using Coal syngas as the fuel gas and thus there is a need to analyze the behavior and performance of metallic interconnects when exposed to Coal syngas. Three high temperature material alloys, Crofer 22 APU, Ebrite and Haynes 230, having the potential to be used as SOFC interconnects were studied in simulated wet coal syngas. These alloys were exposed to syngas at 800 degrees C and for 100 hours. The exposure to coal syngas led to the formation of oxides and spinels, which evidently led to an increase in electrical resistance. Oxidation in a reducing and carburizing environment leads to unique phase and morphology formations. A comparative analysis was carried out for all the three alloys, wherein the samples were characterized by using SEM, EDS, Raman and X-Ray diffraction to obtain the morphology, thickness, composition and crystal structure of the oxides and spinels

Dastane, R.R. (University of West Virginia); Liu, X. (University of West Virginia); Johnson, C., Mao, Scott (University of Pittsburgh)

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

DOE, RTI to Design and Build Gas Cleanup System for IGCC Power Plants |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE, RTI to Design and Build Gas Cleanup System for IGCC Power DOE, RTI to Design and Build Gas Cleanup System for IGCC Power Plants DOE, RTI to Design and Build Gas Cleanup System for IGCC Power Plants July 13, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announces a collaborative project with Research Triangle Institute (RTI) International to design, build, and test a warm gas cleanup system to remove multiple contaminants from coal-derived syngas. The 50-MWe system will include technologies to remove trace elements such as mercury and arsenic, capture the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide (CO2), and extract more than 99.9 percent of the sulfur from the syngas. A novel process to convert the extracted sulfur to a pure elemental sulfur product will also be tested. This project supports DOE's vision of coal power plants with near-zero

54

DOE, RTI to Design and Build Gas Cleanup System for IGCC Power Plants |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE, RTI to Design and Build Gas Cleanup System for IGCC Power DOE, RTI to Design and Build Gas Cleanup System for IGCC Power Plants DOE, RTI to Design and Build Gas Cleanup System for IGCC Power Plants July 13, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announces a collaborative project with Research Triangle Institute (RTI) International to design, build, and test a warm gas cleanup system to remove multiple contaminants from coal-derived syngas. The 50-MWe system will include technologies to remove trace elements such as mercury and arsenic, capture the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide (CO2), and extract more than 99.9 percent of the sulfur from the syngas. A novel process to convert the extracted sulfur to a pure elemental sulfur product will also be tested. This project supports DOE's vision of coal power plants with near-zero

55

Numerical investigations of combustion and emissions of syngas as compared to methane in a 200 MW package boiler  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract During the last decades, focus has been made on the use of syngas instead of conventional hydrocarbon fuels targeting \\{NOx\\} emission reduction in the exhaust gases. With advances in solar-steam methane reforming for the production of synthesis gas, the applicability of syngas at industrial scale becomes imperative. In the present work, syngas combustion and emission characteristics are numerically investigated and compared with the case of pure methane combustion in a two-burner 200 MW package boiler. A detailed reaction kinetics mechanism of 21 steps and 11 species was considered for the modeling of syngas–air combustion. Different syngas compositions were considered for combustion with air including 67% CO:33% H2, 50% CO:50% H2 and 33% CO:67% H2. The results showed a combustion delay in case of pure methane combustion as compared to syngas combustion. The case of 33% CO:67% H2 syngas composition was found to have the shortest flame as compared to that of other syngas compositions. The case of 50% CO:50% H2 syngas resulted in lowest maximum boiler temperature while 67% CO:33% H2 syngas resulted in highest maximum boiler temperature. The boiler exit temperature was found to increase with the increase of hydrogen content in the syngas. The excess air factor was found to have a significant effect on both CO and \\{NOx\\} emissions. \\{NOx\\} emission decreases by about 30% when the amount of excess air is increased from 5% to 25%, which is very promising. Among the tested syngas compositions, the 50% CO:50% H2 syngas composition had the lowest emissions with the best combustion characteristics.

Mohamed A. Habib; Esmail M.A. Mokheimer; Sofihullahi Y. Sanusi; Medhat A. Nemitallah

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Hanford Site Cleanup Before Cleanup Began  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Cleanup Work Completed (2009) 53 million gallons of waste in 177 underground tanks, 67 of which have leaked in the past * All pumpable liquids removed * Tanks integrity...

57

SYSTEM ANALYSIS OF NUCLEAR-ASSISTED SYNGAS PRODUCTION FROM COAL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A system analysis has been performed to assess the efficiency and carbon utilization of a nuclear-assisted coal gasification process. The nuclear reactor is a high-temperature helium-cooled reactor that is used primarily to provide power for hydrogen production via high-temperature electrolysis. The supplemental hydrogen is mixed with the outlet stream from an oxygen-blown coal gasifier to produce a hydrogen-rich gas mixture, allowing most of the carbon dioxide to be converted into carbon monoxide, with enough excess hydrogen to produce a syngas product stream with a hydrogen/carbon monoxide molar ratio of about 2:1. Oxygen for the gasifier is also provided by the high-temperature electrolysis process. Results of the analysis predict 90.5% carbon utilization with a syngas production efficiency (defined as the ratio of the heating value of the produced syngas to the sum of the heating value of the coal plus the high-temperature reactor heat input) of 66.1% at a gasifier temperature of 1866 K for the high-moisture-content lignite coal considered. Usage of lower moisture coals such as bituminous can yield carbon utilization approaching 100% and 70% syngas production efficiency.

E. A. Harvego; M. G. McKellar; J. E. O'Brien

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Experimental Investigations of the Lean Blowout Limit of Different Syngas Mixtures in an Atmospheric, Premixed, Variable-Swirl Burner  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experimental Investigations of the Lean Blowout Limit of Different Syngas Mixtures in an Atmospheric, Premixed, Variable-Swirl Burner ... The observed higher LBO limit of the diluted generic syngas could be due to the effect of N2 addition on the adiabatic flame temperature (Figure 18) and burning velocity of the generic syngas. ... The LSI does not need to undergo significant alteration to operate with the hydrocarbon fuels but needs further studies for adaptation to burn dild. ...

Parisa Sayad; Alessandro Schönborn; Jens Klingmann

2013-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

59

System Analysis of Nuclear-Assisted Syngas Production from Coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A system analysis has been performed to assess the efficiency and carbon utilization of a nuclear-assisted coal gasification process. The nuclear reactor is a high-temperature helium-cooled reactor that is used primarily to provide power for hydrogen production via hightemperature electrolysis. The supplemental hydrogen is mixed with the outlet stream from an oxygen-blown coal gasifier to produce a hydrogen-rich gas mixture, allowing most of the carbon dioxide to be converted into carbon monoxide, with enough excess hydrogen to produce a syngas product stream with a hydrogen/carbon monoxide molar ratio of about 2:1. Oxygen for the gasifier is also provided by the high-temperature electrolysis process. Results of the analysis predict 90.5% carbon utilization with a syngas production efficiency (defined as the ratio of the heating value of the produced syngas to the sum of the heating value of the coal plus the high-temperature reactor heat input) of 64.4% at a gasifier temperature of 1866 K for the high-moisture-content lignite coal considered. Usage of lower moisture coals such as bituminous can yield carbon utilization approaching 100% and 70% syngas production efficiency.

E. A. Harvego; M. G. McKellar; J. E. O'Brien

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Combustion and \\{NOx\\} emissions of biomass-derived syngas under various gasification conditions utilizing oxygen-enriched-air and steam  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to investigate the \\{NOx\\} emissions from combustion of syngas derived from gasification of three different biomass feedstock (i.e., pine, maple–oak mixture, and seed corn) at different oxygen-enriched-air and steam conditions. Three different oxygen-enriched-air and steam conditions were tested for each feedstock, thus resulting in nine different sets of syngas. The biomass-derived syngas was burned in an industrial burner that was integrated into the gasification system. The gasifier and burner are rated at 800 kW and 879 kW thermal, respectively. For each set of biomass-derived syngas, \\{NOx\\} emissions were measured at different burner operating conditions including various heat rates and equivalence ratios using emission analyzers with chemiluminescence technology. All the combustion test conditions are in the lean mixture ranges in order to avoid the peak temperature limitation of both the burner and combustion chamber. Results show that \\{NOx\\} emissions using syngas obtained from woody feedstock decrease almost linearly as the combustion mixture becomes leaner and the heat rate decreases. When compared to natural gas, syngas from both woody feedstock generates higher \\{NOx\\} emissions even when the heat rates are comparable, indicating that fuel \\{NOx\\} formation is highly important in biomass-derived syngas combustion. In contrast to syngas from woody feedstock, syngas from seed corn results in peak \\{NOx\\} emissions before \\{NOx\\} decreases with leaner conditions. The trend is observed for all fuel flow rates and all oxygen-enriched-air and steam conditions of seed corn-derived syngas. Among the three feedstock, seed corn has the highest nitrogen content which yields the highest ammonia concentration in syngas, which, in turn, results in the highest \\{NOx\\} emissions for all test conditions. Overall, the \\{NOx\\} emissions from seed corn-derived syngas combustion are approximately in the range of 450–900 ppm higher compared to those from wood-derived syngas combustion.

Cuong Van Huynh; Song-Charng Kong

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature syngas cleanup" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Imperium/Lanzatech Syngas Fermentation Project - Biomass Gasification and Syngas Conditioning for Fermentation Evaluation: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-12-474  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

LanzaTech and NREL will investigate the integration between biomass gasification and LanzaTech's proprietary gas fermentation process to produce ethanol and 2,3-butanediol. Using three feed materials (woody biomass, agricultural residue and herbaceous grass) NREL will produce syngas via steam indirect gasification and syngas conditioning over a range of process relevant operating conditions. The gasification temperature, steam-to-biomass ratio of the biomass feed into the gasifier, and several levels of syngas conditioning (based on temperature) will be varied to produce multiple syngas streams that will be fed directly to 10 liter seed fermenters operating with the Lanzatech organism. The NREL gasification system will then be integrated with LanzaTech's laboratory pilot unit to produce large-scale samples of ethanol and 2,3-butanediol for conversion to fuels and chemicals.

Wilcox, E.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Preparation and selection of Fe-Cu sorbent for COS removal in syngas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A series of iron-based sorbents prepared with iron trioxide hydrate, cupric oxide by a novel method was studied in a fixed-bed reactor for COS removal from syngas at moderate temperature. In addition, the sorbent...

Bowu Cheng; Zhaofei Cao; Yong Bai…

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Assessment of the SRI Gasification Process for Syngas Generation with HTGR Integration -- White Paper  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This white paper is intended to compare the technical and economic feasibility of syngas generation using the SRI gasification process coupled to several high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) with more traditional HTGR-integrated syngas generation techniques, including: (1) Gasification with high-temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE); (2) Steam methane reforming (SMR); and (3) Gasification with SMR with and without CO2 sequestration.

A.M. Gandrik

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

An assessment of chemical kinetics for bio-syngas combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The present work was devoted to assess the chemical kinetic modelling of bio-syngas combustion. Three reaction mechanisms (the Gas Research Institute-mechanism GRI 3.0, its skeletal version DRM22 and Heghes’ C1–C4 mechanism) were considered for that purpose along with series of ignition delay measurements relevant to the burning of bio-syngas. For experiments involving methane with and without considerably smaller quantities of added hydrogen, the measurements are generally overpredicted by Heghes’ mechanism but underpredicted by the GRI and DRM mechanisms. Experiments involving various blends of the bio-syngas constituents were also simulated. The strong discrepancies present for high pressures and temperatures and low pressures and temperatures could be correlated to five reactions which are only influential under those conditions, four of which involving HO 2 . The effects of variations in the bio-syngas composition on combustion were numerically investigated by using the GRI-mechanism. Globally it was found that an increase in any of the constituents goes hand in hand with higher amount of CO released. The ignition delay is either shortened or left unchanged as the initial concentration is increased except in the case of methane where it is raised. The results were in good agreement with experimental observations made elsewhere.

M. Fischer; X. Jiang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Micro-Scale Catalytic Reactor for Syngas Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Micro-Scale Catalytic Reactor for Syngas Production ... The H2 yield (?H2) was evaluated as moles of H2 produced per mole of CH4 converted in the reforming channel. ... In particular, the maximum temperature moves from a location close to the reactor center (for MCH4-sr/MCH4-co = 2) toward the reactor inlet producing in the case of MCH4-sr/MCH4-co =2.75 decreasing temperature profiles without a maximum. ...

S. Vaccaro; L. Malangone; P. Ciambelli

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Fundamental Studies in Syngas Premixed Combustion Dynamics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Studies Studies in Syngas Premixed Combustion Dynamics Ahmed F. Ghoniem, Anuradha M. Annaswamy, Raymond L. Speth, H. Murat Altay Massachusetts Institute of Technology SCIES Project 05-01-SR121 Project Awarded (08/01/2005, 36 Month Duration) Needs & Objectives Gas Turbine Needs Flexibility to operate with variable syngas compositions Ensure stable operation over a wide range of conditions Reduce emissions of CO and NO x Project Objectives Study experimentally lean premixed syngas combustion

67

Clostridium ljungdahlii represents a microbial production platform based on syngas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...represents a microbial production platform based on syngas 10.1073/pnas...novel biotechnological production platform based on syngas and CO 2 /H 2 . Results and Discussion...represents a microbial production platform based on syngas. | Clostridium...

Michael Köpke; Claudia Held; Sandra Hujer; Heiko Liesegang; Arnim Wiezer; Antje Wollherr; Armin Ehrenreich; Wolfgang Liebl; Gerhard Gottschalk; Peter Dürre

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology Pathway  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This technology pathway case investigates the upgrading of woody biomass derived synthesis gas (syngas) to hydrocarbon biofuels. While this specific discussion focuses on the conversion of syngas via a methanol intermediate to hydrocarbon blendstocks, there are a number of alternative conversion routes for production of hydrocarbons through a wide array of intermediates from syngas. Future work will also consider the variations to this pathway to determine the most economically viable and lowest risk conversion route. Technical barriers and key research needs have been identified that should be pursued for the syngas-to-hydrocarbon pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel- and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

69

Cleanup Sites | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Sites Cleanup Sites The 33,500-acre Oak Ridge Reservation, outlined in red, contains three primary cleanup areas-- the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge National...

70

High Hydrogen, Low Methane Syngas from Low-Rank Coals for Coal-to-Liquids  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

High Hydrogen, Low Methane Syngas from Low-Rank Coals for Coal-to-Liquids Production High Hydrogen, Low Methane Syngas from Low-Rank Coals for Coal-to-Liquids Production Southern Research Institute (SRI) Project Number: FE0012054 Project Description The focus of the project will be to develop, test, and optimize steam-reforming catalysts for converting tars, C2+ hydrocarbons, NH3, and CH4 in high-temperature and sulfur environments, increasing the ratio of hydrogen in syngas, as part of a modified, advanced gasification platform for the conversion of low-rank coals to syngas for coal-to-liquid and integrated gasification combined cycle applications. Project Details Program Background and Project Benefits Project Scope and Technology Readiness Level Accomplishments Contacts, Duration, and Cost Project Images Abstract Performer website: Southern Research Institute

71

Turbulent flame speed for syngas at gas turbine relevant conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Modifications of conventional natural-gas-fired burners for operation with syngas fuels using lean premixed combustion is challenging due to the different physicochemical properties of the two fuels. A key differentiating parameter is the turbulent flame velocity, ST, commonly expressed as its ratio to the laminar flame speed, SL. This paper reports an experimental investigation of premixed syngas combustion at gas turbine like conditions, with emphasis on the determination of ST/SL derived as global fuel consumption per unit time. Experiments at pressures up to 2.0 MPa, inlet temperatures and velocities up to 773 K and 150 m/s, respectively, and turbulence intensity to laminar flame speed ratios, u?/SL, exceeding 100 are presented for the first time. Comparisons between different syngas mixtures and methane clearly show much higher ST/SL for the former fuel. It is shown that ST/SL is strongly dependent on preferential diffusive-thermal (PDT) effects, co-acting with hydrodynamic effects, even for very high u?/SL. ST/SL increases with rising hydrogen content in the fuel mixture and with increasing pressure. A correlation for ST/SL valid for all investigated fuel mixtures, including methane, is proposed in terms of turbulence properties (turbulence intensity and integral length scale), combustion properties (laminar flame speed and laminar flame thickness) and operating conditions (pressure and inlet temperature). The correlation captures effects of preferential diffusive-thermal and hydrodynamic instabilities.

S. Daniele; P. Jansohn; J. Mantzaras; K. Boulouchos

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Modeling of the reburning process using sewage sludge-derived syngas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gasification provides an attractive method for sewage sludges treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gasification generates a fuel gas (syngas) which can be used as a reburning fuel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reburning potential of sewage sludge gasification gases was defined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Numerical simulation of co-combustion of syngases in coal fired boiler has been done. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Calculation shows that analysed syngases can provide higher than 80% reduction of NO{sub x}. - Abstract: Gasification of sewage sludge can provide clean and effective reburning fuel for combustion applications. The motivation of this work was to define the reburning potential of the sewage sludge gasification gas (syngas). A numerical simulation of the co-combustion process of syngas in a hard coal-fired boiler was done. All calculations were performed using the Chemkin programme and a plug-flow reactor model was used. The calculations were modelled using the GRI-Mech 2.11 mechanism. The highest conversions for nitric oxide (NO) were obtained at temperatures of approximately 1000-1200 K. The combustion of hard coal with sewage sludge-derived syngas reduces NO emissions. The highest reduction efficiency (>90%) was achieved when the molar flow ratio of the syngas was 15%. Calculations show that the analysed syngas can provide better results than advanced reburning (connected with ammonia injection), which is more complicated process.

Werle, Sebastian, E-mail: sebastian.werle@polsl.pl [Institute of Thermal Technology, Silesian University of Technology at Gliwice, 44-100 Gliwice, Konarskiego 22 (Poland)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

73

Biomass Gasification-Based Syngas Production for a Conventional Oxo Synthesis Plant—Process Modeling, Integration Opportunities, and Thermodynamic Performance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biomass Gasification-Based Syngas Production for a Conventional Oxo Synthesis Plant—Process Modeling, Integration Opportunities, and Thermodynamic Performance ... A small amount of steam (0.4 kton·y–1) is used to control the burner temperature. ...

Maria Arvidsson; Matteo Morandin; Simon Harvey

2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

74

A Hybrid Gas Cleaning Process for Production of Ultraclean Syngas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to develop technologies for cleaning/conditioning IGCC generated syngas to meet contaminant tolerance limits for fuel cell and chemical production applications. The specific goals are to develop processes for (1) removal of reduced sulfur species to sub-ppm levels using a hybrid process consisting of a polymer membrane and a regenerable ZnO-coated monolith or a mixed metal oxide sorbent; (2) removal of hydrogen chloride vapors to sub-ppm levels using an inexpensive, high-surface-area material; and (3) removal of NH3 with acidic adsorbents followed by conversion of this NH3 into nitrogen and water. Existing gasification technologies can effectively and efficiently convert a wide variety of carbonaceous feedstocks (coal, petcoke, resids, biomass, etc.) into syngas, which predominantly contains carbon monoxide and hydrogen. Unfortunately, the impurities present in these carbonaceous feedstocks are converted to gaseous contaminants such as H2S, COS, HCl, NH3, alkali macromolecules and heavy metal compounds (such as Hg) during the gasification process. Removal of these contaminants using conventional processes is thermally inefficient and capital intensive. This research and development effort is focused on investigation of modular processes for removal of sulfur, chlorine, nitrogen and mercury compounds from syngas at elevated temperature and pressures at significantly lower costs than conventional technologies.

Merkel, T.C.; Turk, B.S.; Gupta, R.P.; Cicero, D.C.; Jain, S.C.

2002-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

75

Emerging Technologies on Syngas Purification: Process Intensification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Syngas normally contains a series of contaminating gases,...2S, accompanied by COS and, also, HCl, HF, etc. Normally, purification should be performed before its combustion in the gas turbine (in the case...

Ramón Álvarez-Rodríguez; Carmen Clemente-Jul

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Experimental and theoretical study of exhaust gas fuel reforming of Diesel fuel by a non-thermal arc discharge for syngas production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-thermal arc discharge for syngas production A. Lebouvier1,2 , F. Fresnet2 , F. Fabry1 , V. Boch2 , V. Rohani1% and a conversion rate of 95% have been reached which correspond to a syngas dry molar fraction of 25%. For the most to POx reaction. To higher the temperature, more oxygen is needed but local combustion can happen

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

77

Cleanup Progress Reports | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Reports Documents Available for Download January 1, 2014 Cleanup Progress Report - 2013 Oak Ridge's cleanup accomplishments in 2013. January 1, 2013 Cleanup Progress Report - 2012...

78

2014 Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus Briefings | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

4 Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus Briefings 2014 Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus Briefings The Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus serves as a way to brief members of...

79

2013 Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus Briefings | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

3 Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus Briefings 2013 Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus Briefings The Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus serves as a way to brief members of...

80

Reactor water cleanup system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A reactor water cleanup system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core submerged in reactor water. First and second parallel cleanup trains are provided for extracting portions of the reactor water from the pressure vessel, cleaning the extracted water, and returning the cleaned water to the pressure vessel. Each of the cleanup trains includes a heat exchanger for cooling the reactor water, and a cleaner for cleaning the cooled reactor water. A return line is disposed between the cleaner and the pressure vessel for channeling the cleaned water thereto in a first mode of operation. A portion of the cooled water is bypassed around the cleaner during a second mode of operation and returned through the pressure vessel for shutdown cooling.

Gluntz, Douglas M. (San Jose, CA); Taft, William E. (Los Gatos, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature syngas cleanup" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Reactor water cleanup system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A reactor water cleanup system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core submerged in reactor water. First and second parallel cleanup trains are provided for extracting portions of the reactor water from the pressure vessel, cleaning the extracted water, and returning the cleaned water to the pressure vessel. Each of the cleanup trains includes a heat exchanger for cooling the reactor water, and a cleaner for cleaning the cooled reactor water. A return line is disposed between the cleaner and the pressure vessel for channeling the cleaned water thereto in a first mode of operation. A portion of the cooled water is bypassed around the cleaner during a second mode of operation and returned through the pressure vessel for shutdown cooling. 1 figure.

Gluntz, D.M.; Taft, W.E.

1994-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

82

Autoignition studies of Syngas and Hydrogen (SGH) Fuels The Pennsylvania State University  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Autoignition Autoignition Studies of Syngas and Hydrogen (SGH) Fuels The Pennsylvania State University Robert J. Santoro SCIES Project 05-01-SR117 Project Awarded (8/1/05 36 Month Duration) $419,036 Total Contract Value ($419,036 DOE) Motivation * Renewed interest in IGCC requires a fundamental understanding of syngas properties * Of particular importance for lean premixed gas turbine power operation are the autoignition properties of syngas * Additionally, these properties must be measured for pressure and temperature conditions representative of gas turbines The Pennsylvania State University Objectives * Parametrically determine the autoignition delay time for CO/H 2 mixtures * Vary CO concentration, equivalence ratio, pressure and temperature over a wide range * Effect of water will be investigated

83

Cleanup Sites | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Cleanup Sites Cleanup Sites Cleanup Sites Center Map As the largest environmental cleanup program in the world, EM has been charged with the responsibility of cleaning up 107 sites across the country whose area is equal to the combined area of Rhode Island and Delaware. EM has made substantial progress in nearly every area of nuclear waste cleanup and as of September 2012, completed cleanup at 90 of these sites. The "active" sites continue to have ongoing cleanup projects under EM's purview. Use the interactive map above to see states that still have cleanup activities associated with them. The tooltip in the upper-right corner shows site data for each state, and each marker gives site information as well as links to the site fact sheets here on the EM website and each site's full website.

84

Site Cleanup | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

K-25 cleanup at the East Tenneseee Technology Park. Unlike many EM cleanup sites, Oak Ridge has numerous ongoing missions aside from EM. The success and rate of progress...

85

A reburning process using sewage sludge-derived syngas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The motivation for this work was to define the reburning potential of sewage sludge (SS) gasification gas (syngas). A numerical simulation of the co-combustion process of syngas in a hard coal-fired boiler was .....

Sebastian Werle

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

SOFC Anode Interaction with Trace Coal Syngas Species U.S. Dept of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV 26507  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SOFC Anode Interaction with Trace Coal Syngas Species SOFC Anode Interaction with Trace Coal Syngas Species U.S. Dept of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV 26507 Gregory Hackett, Kirk Gerdes, Randall Gemmen Phone: (304)285-5279, Gregory.Hackett@NETL.DOE.GOV Utilization of coal as a fuel source for highly efficient integrated gasification fuel cell (IGFC) power generation facilities is technologically and environmentally attractive. IGFC plants are expected to offer the highest efficiency coal gasification processes, even when carbon capture and storage systems are included in the design. One element of IGFC research at the National Energy Technology Laboratory is the investigation of syngas cleanup processes for these integrated systems. Of particular interest are the effects of trace elements naturally contained in

87

Performance Characteristics of Fluidized Bed Syngas Methanation over Ni-Mg/Al2O3 Catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The performance characteristics of isothermal fluidized bed syngas methanation for substitute natural gas is investigated over a self-made Ni-Mg/Al2O3 catalyst. Via atmospheric methanation in a laboratory fluidized bed reactor it was clarified that the CO conversion varied in 5% when changing the space velocity in 40-120 L · g- 1 · h- 1 but the conversion increased obviously by raising the superficial gas velocity from 4 to 12.4 cm · s- 1. The temperature 823 K is suitable for syngas methanation while obvious deposition of uneasy-oxidizing C? occurs on the catalyst at temperatures around 873 K. From kinetic aspect, the lowest reaction temperature is suggested to be 750 K when the space velocity is 60 L · g- 1 · h- 1. Raising the H2/CO ratio of the syngas increased proportionally the CO conversion and CH4 selectivity, showing that at enough high H2/CO ratios the active sites on the catalyst are sufficient for CO adsorption and in turn the reaction with H2 for forming CH4. Introducing CO2 into the syngas feed increased H2 consumption but suppressed water gas shift and Boudouard reactions. The ratio of CO2/CO in syngas should be better below 0.52 because varying the ratio from 0.52 to 0.92 resulted in negligible increases in the H2 conversion and CH4 selectivity but decreased the CH4 yield. Introducing steam into the feed gas affected little the CO conversion but decreased the selectivity to CH4. The tested Ni-Mg/Al2O3 catalyst manifested good stability in structure and activity even in syngas containing water vapor.

Jiao Liu; Dianmiao Cui; Jian Yu; Fabing Su; Guangwen Xu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Gasification of Fuel Cane Bagasse in a Downdraft Gasifier: Influence of Lignocellulosic Composition and Fuel Particle Size on Syngas Composition and Yield  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The extracted syngas is then flared or fed to a 30 kW internal combustion engine. ... As expected, immediately after the start of combustion, pyrolysis zone temperatures increased by thermal radiation from the oxidation zone; however, a rapid increase in the temperature at the gasifier exit also occurred, and within 10 min of ignition, the syngas temperature at the exit had already reached 309 °C and continued to increase. ... The ER is a measure of the ratio of actual air used to the stoichiometric amount of air required for combustion and is, therefore, crucial in the development of syngas quality. ...

Galip Akay; C. Andrea Jordan

2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

89

System analysis of nuclear-assisted syngas production from coal - article no. 042901  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A system analysis has been performed to assess the efficiency and carbon utilization of a nuclear-assisted coal gasification process. The nuclear reactor is a high-temperature helium-cooled reactor that is used primarily to provide power for hydrogen production via high-temperature electrolysis. The supplemental hydrogen is mixed with the outlet stream from an oxygen-blown coal gasifier to produce a hydrogen-rich gas mixture, allowing most of the carbon dioxide to be converted into carbon monoxide, with enough excess hydrogen to produce a syngas product stream with a hydrogen/carbon monoxide molar ratio of about 2:1. Oxygen for the gasifier is also provided by the high-temperature electrolysis process. The results of the analysis predict 90.5% carbon utilization with a syngas production efficiency (defined as the ratio of the heating value of the produced syngas to the sum of the heating value of the coal plus the high-temperature reactor heat input) of 64.4% at a gasifier temperature of 1866 K for the high-moisture-content lignite coal considered. Usage of lower moisture coals such as bituminous can yield carbon utilization approaching 100% and 70% syngas production efficiency.

Harvego, E.A.; McKellar, M.G.; O'Brien, J.E. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

90

Syngas into Fuel: Optofluidic Solar Concentrators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Ohio State has developed an iron-based material and process for converting syngas—a synthetic gas mixture—into electricity, H2, and/or liquid fuel with zero CO2 emissions. Traditional carbon capture methods use chemical solvents or special membranes to separate CO2 from the gas exhaust from coal-fired power plants. Ohio State’s technology uses an iron-based oxygen carrier to generate CO2 and H2 from syngas in separate, pure product streams by means of a circulating bed reactor configuration. The end products of the system are H2, electricity, and/or liquid fuel, all of which are useful sources of power that can come from coal or syngas derived from biomass. Ohio State is developing a high-pressure pilot-scale unit to demonstrate this process at the National Carbon Capture Center.

None

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Mixed conducting membranes for syngas production  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention presents a new class of multicomponent metallic oxides which are particularly suited toward use in fabricating components used in processes for producing syngas. The non-stoichiometric, A-site rich compositions of the present invention are represented by the formula (Ln.sub.x Ca.sub.1-x).sub.y FeO.sub.3-.delta. wherein Ln is La or a mixture of lanthanides comprising La, and wherein 1.0>x>0.5, 1.1.gtoreq.y>1.0 and .delta. is a number which renders the composition of matter charge neutral. Solid-state membranes formed from these compositions provide a favorable balance of oxygen permeance and resistance to degradation when employed in processes for producing syngas. This invention also presents a process for making syngas which utilizes such membranes.

Dyer, Paul Nigel (Allentown, PA); Carolan, Michael Francis (Allentown, PA); Butt, Darryl (Gainesville, FL); Van Doorn, Rene Hendrick Elias (Neckarsulm, DE); Cutler, Raymond Ashton (Bountiful, UT)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

WIPP Accelerating Cleanup  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ACCELERATING CLEANUP: ACCELERATING CLEANUP: PATHS TO CLOSURE CARLSBAD AREA OFFICE JUNE 1998 I. Operations/Field Overview CAO Mission The mission of the Carlsbad Area Office (CAO) is to protect human health and the environment by opening and operating the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for safe disposal of transuranic (TRU) waste and by establishing an effective system for management of TRU waste from generation to disposal. It includes personnel assigned to CAO, WIPP site operations, transportation, and other activities associated with the National TRU Program (NTP). The CAO develops and directs implementation of the TRU waste program, and assesses compliance with the program guidance, as well as the commonality of activities and assumptions among all TRU waste sites. NTP Program Management

93

Cleanup at Rocky Flats  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

David L. Clark, Los Alamos National Laboratory David L. Clark, Los Alamos National Laboratory The Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) is an environmental cleanup site located about 16 miles northwest of downtown Denver (Fig 1). Two decades of routine monitoring have shown that the environment around RFETS is contaminated with actinide elements (U, Pu, Am) from site operations, [1] and RFETS has been designated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as a Superfund cleanup site. Until December 1989, the Rocky Flats Plant made components for nuclear weapons using various radioactive and hazardous materials, including plutonium, uranium and beryllium. Nearly 40 years of nuclear weapons production left behind a legacy of contaminated facilities, soils, and ground water. More than 2.5 million people live within a 50 mile radius of the site; 300,000 of those live in the Rocky Flats watershed.

94

Syngas Production from Propane using Atmospheric Non-Thermal Plasma F. Ouni, A. Khacef*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Syngas Production from Propane using Atmospheric Non-Thermal Plasma F. Ouni, A. Khacef* and J. M and low temperature (420 K). Non-thermal plasma steam reforming proceeded efficiently and hydrogen by increasing the gas fraction through the discharge. By improving the reactor design, the non-thermal plasma

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

95

NETL: Gasification Systems - Mitigation of Syngas Cooler Plugging and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mitigation of Syngas Cooler Plugging and Fouling Mitigation of Syngas Cooler Plugging and Fouling Project No.: DE-FE0007952 Reaction Engineering International (REI) is working to develop practical solutions to mitigate the plugging and fouling of syngas coolers (SC) - fire tube heat exchangers located between the coal gasifier and the combustion turbine. Syngas coolers used in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plants offer high efficiency, but their reliability is generally lower than other process equipment in the gasification island. The principle downtime events associated with syngas coolers are typically a result of ash deposits that: form on (wall) surfaces upstream of the syngas cooler, break loose, and then lodge in the tubes; or form on the fireside surface of the syngas cooler tubes that lead to fouling and reduced heat transfer. Both ash deposit mechanisms result in reduced equipment life and increased maintenance costs.

96

Syngas production from burner-stabilized methane/air flames: The effect of preheated reactants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of preheated reactants on syngas production from a methane/air flame was investigated over a range of inlet temperatures up to 630 K. In addition to experimental measurements, the results from a burner-stabilized flame and freely-propagating flame models are presented. A comparison of the modeling and experimental results in terms of flame standoff distance, stability limit conditions and species yields show excellent agreement across a broad range of equivalence ratios and preheat temperatures. Preheating of reactants increased the rich limit for stable operation from 1.26 to 1.75 for a given inlet velocity, and syngas yields were shown to increase with equivalence ratio. The preheat temperature of the reactants was shown to have little impact on syngas yields beyond extending the limits of stable operation. The results of this study are useful for the design and analysis of heat recirculating reactors and other reactors that are designed for producing syngas through the combustion of rich mixtures.

Colin H. Smith; Daniel I. Pineda; Janet L. Ellzey

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Environmental Cleanup | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Environmental Cleanup Environmental Cleanup Environmental Cleanup Learn more about the history, cleanup activities and possible future uses of the Hanford Site, a 586-square-mile government site in southeast Washington State. | Video courtesy of the Energy Department. The Energy Department is committed to a safe, complete cleanup of the environmental legacy of five decades of government-sponsored nuclear weapons development and nuclear energy research. As part of this mission, we safely and cost-effectively transport and dispose of low-level wastes; decommission and decontaminate old facilities; remediate contaminated soil and groundwater; and secure and store nuclear material in stable, secure locations to protect national security. Featured An Update on the Hanford Site and Cleanup Progress

98

Combustion of syngas in a pressurized microturbine-like combustor: Experimental results  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The different routes for power production from biomass often lead to an intermediary product such as a synthesis gas or syngas, which is typically rich in hydrogen and carbon monoxide. The simple design, fuel flexibility and size, which often matches the amount of waste energy available in industrial sites, makes microturbines an attractive solution for on-site, decentralized power generation using a limited range of alternative fuels such as synthetic gas. The properties of the synthetic fuel differ from properties of natural gas and a detailed experimental study with a separated microturbine-like pressurized combustor is therefore necessary. The present article reviews the experimental results obtained by gradually switching the fuel feed from natural gas to wet syngas in a pressurized, slightly modified lean premix microturbine combustor. Temperature profiles, pressure, emissions and flame imaging were closely monitored to detect possible problems in operability of the combustor caused by the strong difference in fuel characteristics. No problems regarding auto-ignition, dynamic or static instability were observed throughout the test-run. Temperature profiles stayed well within allowable limits and did not reveal any significant shift in flame anchoring position. The combustion of syngas during full or part load of the combustor produced remarkably low \\{NOx\\} and CO emissions. The microturbine combustor achieved stable full load combustion of syngas at the end of the test-run.

Frank Delattin; Giovanni Di Lorenzo; Sergio Rizzo; Svend Bram; Jacques De Ruyck

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Carbon Dioxide Reforming of Methane to Syngas by Thermal Plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experiments were conducted on syngas preparation from dry reforming of methane by carbon dioxide with a DC arc plasma at atmospheric pressure. In all experiments, nitrogen gas was used as the working gas for thermal plasma to generate a high-temperature jet into a horizontal tube reactor. A mixture of methane and carbon dioxide was fed vertically into the jet. In order to obtain a higher conversion rate of methane and carbon dioxide, chemical energy efficiency and fuel production efficiency, parametric screening studies were conducted, in which the volume ratio of carbon dioxide to methane in fed gases and the total flux of fed gases were taken into account. Results showed that carbon dioxide reforming of methane to syngas by thermal plasma exhibited a larger processing capacity, higher conversion of methane and carbon dioxide and higher chemical energy efficiency and fuel production efficiency. In addition, thermodynamic simulation for the reforming process was conducted. Experimental data agreed well with the thermodynamic results, indicating that high thermal efficiency can be achieved with the thermal plasma reforming process.

Sun Yanpeng (???); Nie Yong (??); Wu Angshan (???); Ji Dengxiang (???); Yu Fengwen (???); Ji Jianbing (???)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Multidimensional CFD simulation of syngas combustion in a micro-pilot-ignited dual-fuel engine using a constructed chemical kinetics mechanism  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A multidimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation of a constructed syngas chemical kinetic mechanism was performed to evaluate the combustion of syngas in a supercharged dual-fuel engine for various syngas initial compositions under lean conditions. The modelled results were validated by comparing predictions against corresponding experimental data for a supercharged dual-fuel engine. The predicted and measured in-cylinder pressure, temperature, and rate of heat release (ROHR) data were in good agreement. The effect of the hydrogen peroxide chain-propagation reaction on the progress of combustion under supercharged conditions was examined for different types of syngas using various initial H2 concentrations. The effect of the main syngas kinetic mechanism reactions on the combustion progress was analysed in terms of their contribution to the total heat of the reaction. The best results compared with experimental data were obtained in the range of equivalence ratios below about 0.8 for all types of syngas considered in this paper. As the equivalence ratio increased above 0.8, the results deviated from the experiment data. The spatial distribution of the in-cylinder temperature and OH? within this equivalence-ratio range showed the completeness of the combustion. The present CFD model captured the overall combustion process well and could be further developed into a useful tool for syngas-engine combustion simulations.

Ulugbek Azimov; Masahiro Okuno; Kazuya Tsuboi; Nobuyuki Kawahara; Eiji Tomita

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature syngas cleanup" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Cleanup Contractor Achieves 'Elite' Nuclear Material Accountability...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Cleanup Contractor Achieves 'Elite' Nuclear Material Accountability Status Cleanup Contractor Achieves 'Elite' Nuclear Material Accountability Status September 30, 2014 - 12:00pm...

102

Independent Oversight Inspection, Idaho Cleanup Project - August...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Oversight Inspection, Idaho Cleanup Project - August 2007 August 2007 Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Programs at the Idaho Cleanup Project This report provides the...

103

Syngas production from liquid fuels in a non-catalytic porous burner  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper investigates rich combustion of n-heptane, diesel oil, kerosene and rapeseed-oil methyl ester (RME) bio-diesel for the purpose of producing syngas ready for the clean-up stages for fuel-cell applications or for traditional combustor enrichment. Rich flames have been stabilised in a two-layer inert porous medium combustor and a range of equivalence ratios and porous materials have been examined. n-heptane was successfully reformed up to an equivalence ratio of 3, reaching a conversion efficiency (based on the lower heating value of H2 and CO over the fuel input) up to 75% for a packed bed of alumina beads. Similarly, diesel, kerosene and bio-diesel were reformed to syngas in a Zirconia foam burner with conversion efficiency over 60%. A preliminary attempt to reduce the content of CO and hydrocarbons in the reformate has been also conducted using commercial steam reforming and water–gas shift reaction catalysts, obtaining encouraging results. Finally, soot emission has been assessed, demonstrating particle formation for diesel oil above ? = 2, whereas bio-diesel showed the lowest soot formation tendency among all the fuels tested.

A. Pastore; E. Mastorakos

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Upper Los Alamos Canyon Cleanup  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Upper Los Alamos Canyon Cleanup Upper Los Alamos Canyon Cleanup Upper Los Alamos Canyon Cleanup The Upper Los Alamos Canyon Project involves cleaning up hazardous materials left over from some of the Laboratory's earliest activities. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Located along Los Alamos Canyon from 7th Street to the Pajarito Ski Hill, the Upper Los Alamos Canyon Project involves examining sites in present and former Laboratory technical areas to see if any further environmental cleanup actions are needed. If not, the Laboratory can apply to have these sites removed permanently from LANL's Hazardous Waste Permit, meaning that no further actions are needed at those sites. Among the 115 sites included in the Upper LA Canyon Project, 54 have been

105

Environmental Management (EM) Cleanup Projects  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The guide supports DOE O 413.3A, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, and provides guidance on environmental management cleanup projects. Canceled by DOE N 251.105.

2008-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

106

East Tennessee Technology Park Cleanup  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This fact sheet provides an update on all of the current cleanup projects at the site, and it also lists the major projects that were completed at the East Tennessee Technology Park.

107

Technology Development Advances EM Cleanup  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The unique nature of many of EM's remaining facilities will require a strong and responsive engineering and technology program to improve work and public safety, and reduce costs and environmental impacts while completing the cleanup program.

108

BURNER DEVELOPMENT AND OPERABILITY ISSUES ASSOCIATED WITH STEADY FLOWING SYNGAS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BURNER DEVELOPMENT AND OPERABILITY ISSUES ASSOCIATED WITH STEADY FLOWING SYNGAS FIRED COMBUSTORS Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia, USA 2 UCI Combustion Laboratory, University-Mu¨nchen, Garching, Germany This article addresses the impact of syngas fuel composition on combustor blowout, flash

Lieuwen, Timothy C.

109

Accelerating cleanup: Paths to closure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the status of Environmental Management`s (EM`s) cleanup program and a direction forward to complete achievement of the 2006 vision. Achieving the 2006 vision results in significant benefits related to accomplishing EM program objectives. As DOE sites accelerate cleanup activities, risks to public health, the environment, and worker safety and health are all reduced. Finding more efficient ways to conduct work can result in making compliance with applicable environmental requirements easier to achieve. Finally, as cleanup activities at sites are completed, the EM program can focus attention and resources on the small number of sites with more complex cleanup challenges. Chapter 1 describes the process by which this report has been developed and what it hopes to accomplish, its relationship to the EM decision-making process, and a general background of the EM mission and program. Chapter 2 describes how the site-by-site projections were constructed, and summarizes, for each of DOE`s 11 Operations/Field Offices, the projected costs and schedules for completing the cleanup mission. Chapter 3 presents summaries of the detailed cleanup projections from three of the 11 Operations/Field Offices: Rocky Flats (Colorado), Richland (Washington), and Savannah River (South Carolina). The remaining eight Operations/Field Office summaries are in Appendix E. Chapter 4 reviews the cost drivers, budgetary constraints, and performance enhancements underlying the detailed analysis of the 353 projects that comprise EM`s accelerated cleanup and closure effort. Chapter 5 describes a management system to support the EM program. Chapter 6 provides responses to the general comments received on the February draft of this document.

NONE

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Single-Step Syngas-to-Dimethyl Ether Processes for Optimal Productivity, Minimal Emissions, and Natural Gas-Derived Syngas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Single-step conversion of synthesis gas (syngas, H2/CO mixture) to dimethyl ether (DME, CH3OCH3) is very attractive as a route for indirect coal liquefaction, natural gas utilization, and production of synthetic liquid fuels, fuel additives, and chemicals. ... The main driving force for developing a single-step syngas-to-DME process is to produce DME at a cost lower than that from the commercially available two-step process, namely, syngas-to-methanol followed by methanol dehydration in sequential reactors. ... Furthermore, the composition of most commercially available syngas (except that produced by a CO2?methane reformer) is not the optimal composition (1:1 H2:CO) for the syngas-to-DME reactor. ...

X. D. Peng; A. W. Wang; B. A. Toseland; P. J. A. Tijm

1999-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

111

Innovative technologies for soil cleanup  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These notes provide a broad overview of current developments in innovative technologies for soil cleanup. In this context, soil cleanup technologies include site remediation methods that deal primarily with the vadose zone and with relatively shallow, near-surface contamination of soil or rock materials. This discussion attempts to emphasize approaches that may be able to achieve significant improvements in soil cleanup cost or effectiveness. However, since data for quantitative performance and cost comparisons of new cleanup methods are scarce, preliminary comparisons must be based on the scientific approach used by each method and on the sits-specific technical challenges presented by each sold contamination situation. A large number of technical alternatives that are now in research, development, and testing can be categorized by the scientific phenomena that they employ and by the site contamination situations that they treat. After cataloging a representative selection of these technologies, one of the new technologies, Dynamic Underground Stripping, is discussed in more detail to highlight a promising soil cleanup technology that is now being field tested.

Yow, J.L. Jr.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Particulate hot gas stream cleanup technical issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The analyses of hot gas stream cleanup particulate samples and descriptions of filter performance studied under this contract were designed to address problems with filter operation that have been linked to characteristics of the collected particulate matter. One objective of this work was to generate an interactive, computerized data bank of the key physical and chemical characteristics of ash and char collected from operating advanced particle filters and to relate these characteristics to the operation and performance of these filters. The interactive data bank summarizes analyses of over 160 ash and char samples from fifteen pressurized fluidized-bed combustion and gasification facilities utilizing high-temperature, high pressure barrier filters.

Pontius, D.H.; Snyder, T.R.

1999-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

113

Coal-derived syngas MILD combustion in parallel jet forward flow combustor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The effect of air-fuel momentum flux ratio on MILD (Moderate or Intense Low-oxygen Dilution) combustion of coal-derived syngas was examined in parallel jet forward flow combustor. The results were presented on flow field using non-reactive numerical simulations and on OH? radicals distribution and exhaust emissions using experiments. The predicted gas recirculation ratios in the combustor are high enough to establish the reaction condition of MILD scheme. Lower air-fuel momentum flux ratio associated with higher heat load benefits the drop of peak flame temperature and the increase of reaction zone volume. The critical air-fuel momentum flux ratios below which MILD combustion occurred were identified for three MILD configurations. The MILD configuration equipped with larger air nozzles and smaller fuel nozzles was observed to achieve MILD combustion at leaner condition. The MILD regime was established for syngas fuel with lean operational limit and ultra-low \\{NOx\\} and CO emissions.

Mingming Huang; Zhedian Zhang; Weiwei Shao; Yan Xiong; Yan Liu; Fulin Lei; Yunhan Xiao

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Chemical looping combustion of biomass-derived syngas using ceria-supported oxygen carriers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Cu, Ni and Fe oxides supported on ceria were investigated for their performance as oxygen carriers during the chemical looping combustion of biomass-derived syngas. A complex gas mixture containing CO, H2, CO2, CH4 and other hydrocarbons was used to simulate the complex fuel gas environment derived from biomass gasification. Results show that the transfer of the stored oxygen into oxidants for the supported Cu and Ni oxides at 800 °C for the combustion of syngas was effective (>85%). The unsupported Cu oxide showed high oxygen carrying capacity but particle sintering was observed at 800 °C. A reaction temperature of 950 °C was required for the supported Fe oxides to transfer the stored oxygen into oxidants effectively. Also, for the complex fuel gas environment, the supported Ni oxide was somewhat effective in reforming CH4 and other light hydrocarbons into CO, which may have benefits for the reduction of tar produced during biomass pyrolysis.

H.B. Huang; L. Aisyah; P.J. Ashman; Y.C. Leung; C.W. Kwong

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Argonne National Lab Cleanup schedule  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Takes Steps to Complete Clean-Up of Argonne by 2003; Takes Steps to Complete Clean-Up of Argonne by 2003; Schedule for Shipping Waste to WIPP is 'Good News' for Illinois CARLSBAD, N.M., May 15, 2000 - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) reinforced plans to complete the clean-up of its Argonne National Laboratory-East site in Illinois by 2003 by accelerating its schedule for shipping transuranic waste to DOE's permanent disposal site in New Mexico. Previously, the shipments were not expected to begin before 2003. Under the accelerated schedule, shipments to DOE's Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico, are expected to begin in Spring 2001 and be completed by the end of the calendar year. Characterization of the waste currently stored at Argonne will begin this October. This agreement is a major step in honoring Argonne and DOE's commitment to the community to

116

Environmental Cleanup | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

August 19, 2010 August 19, 2010 Recovery Act Progress at Idaho National Lab North Wind Services will be constructing several new structures at the INL Radioactive Waste Management Complex -- facilities that will provide important protection from the elements and minimize the spread of contamination during buried waste excavation, retrieval and packaging operations. August 18, 2010 New Contract Helps Portsmouth GDP Cleanup To accelerate the Portsmouth GDP cleanup efforts left over from the Cold War, the Department of Energy made a huge step forward in our nuclear environmental cleanup efforts. August 13, 2010 Geek-Up: K East Reactor Demolition, Retrograde Melting and Cloud Pattern Tracking Recovery Act funds help clean up the Hanford site, retrograde melting (melting as something cools) and how open-cell clouds could help predict

117

Radiological cleanup of Enewetak Atoll  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For 8 years, from 1972 until 1980, the United States planned and carried out the radiological cleanup, rehabilitation, and resettlement of Enewetak Atoll in the Marshall Islands. This documentary records, from the perspective of DOD, the background, decisions, actions, and results of this major national and international effort. The documentary is designed: First, to provide a historical document which records with accuracy this major event in the history of Enewetak Atoll, the Marshall Islands, the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands, Micronesia, the Pacific Basin, and the United States. Second, to provide a definitive record of the radiological contamination of the Atoll. Third, to provide a detailed record of the radiological exposure of the cleanup forces themselves. Fourth, to provide a useful guide for subsequent radiological cleanup efforts elsewhere.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Environmental Cleanup | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Environmental Cleanup Environmental Cleanup Environmental Cleanup August 23, 2013 EM Office of External Affairs Acting Communications Director Dave Borak talks with EM intern Valerie Edwards. | Photo courtesy of the Energy Department. Internships Help Future Energy Leaders Gain Hands-On Experience What's it like interning at the Energy Department? We interviewed one intern to find out. August 6, 2013 Oak Ridge National Laboratory The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is the nation's largest multi-program science and technology laboratory. ORNL's mission is to deliver scientific discoveries and technical breakthroughs that will accelerate the development and deployment of solutions in clean energy and global security. August 6, 2013 Y-12 National Security Complex

119

Methods and systems for producing syngas  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and systems are provided for producing syngas utilizing heat from thermochemical conversion of a carbonaceous fuel to support decomposition of at least one of water and carbon dioxide using one or more solid-oxide electrolysis cells. Simultaneous decomposition of carbon dioxide and water or steam by one or more solid-oxide electrolysis cells may be employed to produce hydrogen and carbon monoxide. A portion of oxygen produced from at least one of water and carbon dioxide using one or more solid-oxide electrolysis cells is fed at a controlled flow rate in a gasifier or combustor to oxidize the carbonaceous fuel to control the carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide ratio produced.

Hawkes, Grant L; O'Brien, James E; Stoots, Carl M; Herring, J. Stephen; McKellar, Michael G; Wood, Richard A; Carrington, Robert A; Boardman, Richard D

2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

120

Production of syngas via partial oxidation and CO{sub 2} reforming of coke oven gas over a Ni catalyst  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The partial oxidation and CO{sub 2} reforming of coke oven gas (COG) to syngas was investigated on differently sized Ni catalysts in a fluidized-bed reactor. It was found that the catalytic performance of Ni depends strongly on its particle size. The small-sized Ni catalyst exhibited higher activity and higher selectivity in the partial oxidation of COG. The conversion of CH{sub 4} was kept at 80.7% at a lower temperature (750{sup o}C) and a wide space velocity (from 8000 to 80 000 h{sup -1}). CO{sub 2} reforming of COG is also an efficient route for syngas production. The H{sub 2}/CO ratio in the COG-derived syngas could be controlled by manipulating the concentration of O{sub 2} or CO{sub 2} added in the feed. The yield of produced syngas increases with an increase in temperature. 19 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

Jianzhong Guo; Zhaoyin Hou; Jing Gao; Xiaoming Zheng [Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China). Institute of Catalysis, Department of Chemistry

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature syngas cleanup" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Superfund Cleanups and Infant Health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We are the first to examine the effect of Superfund cleanups on infant health rather than focusing on proximity to a site. We study singleton births to mothers residing within 5km of a Superfund site between 1989-2003 in ...

Currie, Janet

122

Enrichment and optimization of anaerobic bacterial mixed culture for conversion of syngas to ethanol  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The main aim of the present study was to enrich anaerobic mixed bacterial culture capable of producing ethanol from synthesis gas fermentation. Screening of thirteen anaerobic strains together with enrichment protocol helped to develop an efficient mixed culture capable of utilizing syngas for ethanol production. Physiological and operational parameters were optimized for enhanced ethanol production. The optimized value of operational parameters i.e. initial media pH, incubation temperature, initial syngas pressure, and agitation speed were 6.0 ± 0.1, 37 °C, 2 kg cm?2 and 100 rpm respectively. Under these conditions ethanol and acetic acid production by the selected mixed culture were 1.54 g L?1 and 0.8 g L?1 respectively. Furthermore, up-scaling studies in semi-continuous fermentation mode further enhanced ethanol and acetic acid production up to 2.2 g L?1 and 0.9 g L?1 respectively. Mixed culture TERI SA1 was efficient for ethanol production by syngas fermentation.

Ashish Singla; Dipti Verma; Banwari Lal; Priyangshu M. Sarma

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Recent developments in gas turbine materials and technology and their implications for syngas firing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas turbine combined-cycle systems burning natural gas represent a reliable and efficient power generation technology that is widely used. A critical factor in their development was the rapid adaptation of aero-engine technology (single crystal airfoils, sophisticated cooling techniques, and thermal barrier coatings) in order to operate at the high rotor-inlet temperatures required for high efficiency generation. Early reliability problems have been largely overcome, so that this type of power generation system is now considered to be a mature technology capable of achieving high levels of availability. Current interest in replacing natural gas with gas derived from coal (syngas or hydrogen) in these gas turbine systems focuses attention on implications for the critical turbine components. In this paper, the development requirements for materials for critical hot gas-path parts in large gas turbines burning coal-derived syngas fuels are briefly considered in the context of the state-of-the-art in materials for engines burning natural gas. It is shown that, despite some difficult design issues, many of the materials used in current engines will be applicable to units burning syngas. However, there is the potential that the durability of some components may be prejudiced because of differences in the combustion environment (especially in terms of water vapor content, and possibly sulfur compounds and particulates). Consequently, effort to develop improved coatings to resist erosion and also attack by S-containing compounds may be necessary.

I.G. Wright; T.B. Gibbons

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Pyrochlore-Based Catalysts for Syngas-Derived Alcohol Synthesis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pyrochlore-Based Catalysts for Syngas-Derived Pyrochlore-Based Catalysts for Syngas-Derived Alcohol Synthesis Contact NETL Technology Transfer Group techtransfer@netl.doe.gov PON-13-006 August 2013 Opportunity This technology provides an advantageous means to convert syngas into a class of chemicals known as higher oxygenates as well as other long-chain hydrocarbons. Research is currently active on this patent-pending technology "Method of CO and/or CO2 Hydrogenation Using Doped Mixed Metal Oxides." This technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. Significance * Improves the conversion of syngas from natural gas, coal, or biomass * Enhances the potential use of oxygenates as

125

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell System Utilizing Syngas from Coal Gasifiers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell System Utilizing Syngas from Coal Gasifiers ... The oxidizer is expected to be similar in design to a HRSG duct firing burner (at the inlet of a HRSG). ...

Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh; Stephen Jolly; Dilip Patel; David Stauffer

2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

126

Syngas and hydrogen production in a volumetric radiant burner  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The production of syngas is the most energy demanding and metal consuming stage in the conversion of gaseous hydrocarbons (GH's) into value-added products. Its complexity restrains many practical applications of chemical processing of GH's, especially for low scale of operation. The paper describes new compact and highly productive generator of syngas and hydrogen based on the combustion of GH's in volumetric permeable matrixes with locked IR radiation that can serve as a solution of this problem. It is shown that such simple devices can provide a highly efficient methane conversion into syngas and thus facilitate the utilization of low-capacity sources of GH's for economically feasible low scale syngas and hydrogen production from various local hydrocarbon sources.

V.S. Arutyunov; V.M. Shmelev; M. Yu Sinev; O.V. Shapovalova

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Storing Syngas Lowers the Carbon Price for Profitable Coal Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There are currently eight gasification facilities operating worldwide producing about 1.7 GW of electricity from coal or petcoke feedstock (10), and in all of these facilities, the syngas is used immediately after it is produced. ...

Adam Newcomer; Jay Apt

2007-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

128

Combustion of Low-Calorific Waste Biomass Syngas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The industrial combustion chamber designed for burning low-calorific syngas from gasification of waste biomass is presented. ... chips and turkey feathers the non-premixed turbulent combustion in the chamber is s...

Kamil Kwiatkowski; Marek Dudy?ski; Konrad Bajer

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Advances in ion transport membrane technology for Syngas production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Ceramic, ion transport membranes for the production of Syngas (ITM Syngas) produce high pressure synthesis gas in a single unit operation from low pressure air and pre-reformed natural gas. Oxygen transport through ITM Syngas membranes occurs through a series of processes, including solid phase oxygen anion diffusion through the dense membrane and surface reactions on the air and reducing sides of the membrane. This paper focuses on the effect of adding porous layers to the syngas side or both sides of the membrane to increase the available surface area for the surface reactions. The highest fluxes are achieved by increasing the surface area on both sides of the membrane, indicating that both surface reactions are a significant resistance to oxygen transport.

C.F. Miller; Jack Chen; M.F. Carolan; E.P. Foster

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Highly Active Steam Reforming Catalyst for Hydrogen and Syngas Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Toyo Engineering Corporation developed a steam reforming catalyst, which is four times as active as conventional catalysts, for hydrogen and syngas production from light natural gas. The catalyst has...3 plant. B...

Toru Numaguchi

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Conversion of Biomass Syngas to DME Using a Microchannel Reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Conversion of Biomass Syngas to DME Using a Microchannel Reactor ... The purpose of the research discussed here is to develop such a process capable of converting syngas generated from gasification of dispersed biomass resources. ... MeOH was converted to water and hydrocarbons, with up to 70% selectivity to C2-4 olefins, at 100% conversion, over ZSM-5 class zeolite catalysts modified with P compds. ...

Jianli Hu; Yong Wang; Chunshe Cao; Douglas C. Elliott; Don J. Stevens; James F. White

2005-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

132

Advanced Acid Gas Separation Technology for Clean Power and Syngas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Syngas Processing Systems Syngas Processing Systems Advanced Acid Gas Separation Technology for Clean Power and Syngas Applications Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. Project Number: FE0013363 Project Description In this project, Air Products will operate a two-bed mobile system at the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) facility. A slipstream of authentic, high-hydrogen syngas based on low-rank coal will be evaluated as the feedstock. Testing will be conducted for approximately eight weeks, thereby providing far longer adsorbent exposure data than demonstrated to date. By utilizing real-world, high- hydrogen syngas, information necessary to understand the utility of the system for methanol production will be made available. In addition, Air Products will also operate a multi-bed PSA process development unit (PDU), located at its Trexlertown, PA headquarters, to evaluate the impact of incorporating pressure equalization steps in the process cycle. This testing will be conducted utilizing a sulfur-free, synthetic syngas, and will improve the reliability of the prediction of the system's operating performance at commercial scale.

133

Comprehensive Environmental Cleanup and Responsibility Act (Montana) |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Comprehensive Environmental Cleanup and Responsibility Act Comprehensive Environmental Cleanup and Responsibility Act (Montana) Comprehensive Environmental Cleanup and Responsibility Act (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Institutional Fuel Distributor Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Montana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Montana Department of Environmental Quality The Comprehensive Environmental Cleanup and Responsibility Act contains general provisions (sections 705-729), along with the Voluntary Cleanup and Redevelopment Act (sections 730-738) and the Controlled Allocation of

134

Removal of H{sub 2}S using molten carbonate at high temperature  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: • The performance of molten carbonate for the removal of H{sub 2}S improves at higher temperatures. • The degree of H{sub 2}S removal is significantly affected by the CO{sub 2} concentration in syngas. • Addition of carbon elements, such as char and tar, decrease the negative effects of CO{sub 2}. • Continuous addition of carbon elements into molten carbonate enables continuous desulfurization. • Desulfurization using molten carbonate is suitable for gasification gas. - Abstract: Gasification is considered to be an effective process for energy conversion from various sources such as coal, biomass, and waste. Cleanup of the hot syngas produced by such a process may improve the thermal efficiency of the overall gasification system. Therefore, the cleanup of hot syngas from biomass gasification using molten carbonate is investigated in bench-scale tests. Molten carbonate acts as an absorbent during desulfurization and dechlorination and as a thermal catalyst for tar cracking. In this study, the performance of molten carbonate for removing H{sub 2}S was evaluated. The temperature of the molten carbonate was set within the range from 800 to 1000 °C. It is found that the removal of H{sub 2}S is significantly affected by the concentration of CO{sub 2} in the syngas. When only a small percentage of CO{sub 2} is present, desulfurization using molten carbonate is inadequate. However, when carbon elements, such as char and tar, are continuously supplied, H{sub 2}S removal can be maintained at a high level. To confirm the performance of the molten carbonate gas-cleaning system, purified biogas was used as a fuel in power generation tests with a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC). The fuel cell is a high-performance sensor for detecting gaseous impurities. When purified gas from a gas-cleaning reactor was continuously supplied to the fuel cell, the cell voltage remained stable. Thus, the molten carbonate gas-cleaning reactor was found to afford good gas-cleaning performance.

Kawase, Makoto, E-mail: kawase@criepi.denken.or.jp; Otaka, Maromu

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

135

Environmental Cleanup | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

February 11, 2013 February 11, 2013 The Office of Nuclear Energy's mission is to advance nuclear power as a resource that can meet the United State's energy, environmental and national security needs. Office of Nuclear Energy Launches New Website A new website for NE means easier access to information and more up-to-date news for users. Check it out! January 30, 2013 Legacy Management Sites January 15, 2013 Secretary Chu, Governor Gregoire Issue Statement on Hanford Cleanup U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu and Governor Chris Gregoire issued a joint statement on the cleanup efforts underway at Hanford. December 21, 2012 The Rocky Flats Plant was first established in 1951 as a nuclear weapons manufacturing facility. Today, almost 4,000 acres make up the Rocky Flats National Wildlife Refuge. Located just 16 miles northwest of Denver, Colorado, the refuge provides a habitat for migratory birds and mammals. | Photo courtesy of the U.S. Department of Energy.

136

ISOBUTANOL FROM SYNGAS IN A THREE PHASE SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With growing interest in oxygenates as octane booster for automotive fuels, various synthesis routes for these chemicals are being investigated. Among others, alternative routes to isobutene, the C4-components in MTBE-synthesis are under investigation. A promising path to isobutene is the heterogeneously catalyzed CO-hydrogenation to isobutanol with following dehydration (Fig. 1). As shown by thermodynamical studies, the heterogeneously catalyzed CO-hydrogenation to isobutanol is not expected to experience any thermodynamic constraints. However, heterogeneous hydrogenation of CO is a very exothermic process, a problem which can only be partly solved when being conducted in a plug flow reactor. When carried out in reaction vessels with moving catalyst bed (e.g. three phase stirred tank), heat transfer problems can be resolved, along with additional benefits connected with this reactor type. Several heterogeneous catalytic systems have been under investigation for their capability of isobutanol synthesis from syngas. Most promising catalysts for an active and selective isobutanol synthesis from CO are modified high temperature methanol catalysts.

Peter Tijrn

2002-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

137

Novel syngas-based process for methyl methacrylate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Eastman Chemical Company, and Bechtel are developing a novel process for synthesis of methyl methacrylate (MMA) from coal-derived syngas, under a contract from the U.S. Department of Energy, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center. This three-step process consists of synthesis of a propionate, its condensation with formaldehyde, and esterification of resulting methacrylic acid (MAA) with methanol to produce MMA. Eastman has focused on the research on propionate synthesis step. The resultant Mo catalysts work efficiently at much less severe conditions (170{degrees}C and 30 atm) than the conventional Ni catalysts (270{degrees}C and 180 atm). Bechtel has performed an extensive cost analysis, which shows that Eastman`s propionate synthesis process is competitive with other technologies to produce the anhydride. In the second step, RTI and Eastman have developed active and stable V-SI-P and Ta metal oxide catalysts for condensation reactions of propionates with formaldehyde. RTI has demonstrated a novel correlation among the catalyst acid-base properties, condensation reaction yield, and long-term catalyst activity. Current research focuses on enhancing the condensation reaction yields, acid-base properties, in situ condensation in a high- temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) slurry reactor, and alternate formaldehyde feedstocks. Based on Eastman and RTI laboratory reactor operating data, a cost estimate is also being developed for the integrated process.

Gogate, M.R.; Spivey, J.J. [Research Triangle Institute, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Zoeller, J.R. [Eastman Chemical Co., Kingsport, TN (United States); Choi, G.N. [Bechtel, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States); Tam, S.S. [Bechtel, Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Tischer, R.E. [USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States); Srivastava, R.D. [Burns and Roe Services Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

138

Accelerating cleanup: Paths to closure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document was previously referred to as the Draft 2006 Plan. As part of the DOE`s national strategy, the Richland Operations Office`s Paths to Closure summarizes an integrated path forward for environmental cleanup at the Hanford Site. The Hanford Site underwent a concerted effort between 1994 and 1996 to accelerate the cleanup of the Site. These efforts are reflected in the current Site Baseline. This document describes the current Site Baseline and suggests strategies for further improvements in scope, schedule and cost. The Environmental Management program decided to change the name of the draft strategy and the document describing it in response to a series of stakeholder concerns, including the practicality of achieving widespread cleanup by 2006. Also, EM was concerned that calling the document a plan could be misconstrued to be a proposal by DOE or a decision-making document. The change in name, however, does not diminish the 2006 vision. To that end, Paths to Closure retains a focus on 2006, which serves as a point in time around which objectives and goals are established.

Edwards, C.

1998-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

139

Correction for Köpke et al., Clostridium ljungdahlii represents a microbial production platform based on syngas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Clostridium ljungdahlii represents a microbial production platform based on syngas 10.1073/pnas.1010816107 MICROBIOLOGY...Clostridium ljungdahlii represents a microbial production platform based on syngas,” by Michael Kopke, Claudia Held...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Simulation of Bio-syngas Production from Biomass Gasification via Pressurized Interconnected Fluidized Beds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Bio-syngas production from biomass gasification via pressurized interconnected fluidized...T g), gasification pressure (p g) and steam to biomass ratio (S/B) on bio-syngas production

Fei Feng; Guohui Song; Laihong Shen…

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature syngas cleanup" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Fundamentals of Petroleum Residue Cracking Gasification for Coproduction of Oil and Syngas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fundamentals of Petroleum Residue Cracking Gasification for Coproduction of Oil and Syngas ... Thus, the terminology of heavy oil or heavy residue can be also used to indicate all such heavy petroleum oils. ... Notwithstanding, for the RCG process it is ideal to develop the catalyst that has moderate cracking activity for heavy residues or heavy oils but meanwhile good activity for catalyzing the deposited coke gasification so that the gasification can be at reasonably low temperatures to maintain the catalytic activity for cracking heavy fractions. ...

Yuming Zhang; Deping Yu; Wangliang Li; Yin Wang; Shiqiu Gao; Guangwen Xu

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

142

Production of methane-rich syngas from hydrocarbon fuels using multi-functional catalyst/capture agent  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The disclosure provides a gasification process for the production of a methane-rich syngas at temperatures exceeding 700.degree. C. through the use of an alkali hydroxide MOH, using a gasification mixture comprised of at least 0.25 moles and less than 2 moles of water for each mole of carbon, and at least 0.15 moles and less than 2 moles of alkali hydroxide MOH for each mole of carbon. These relative amounts allow the production of a methane-rich syngas at temperatures exceeding 700.degree. C. by enabling a series of reactions which generate H.sub.2 and CH.sub.4, and mitigate the reforming of methane. The process provides a methane-rich syngas comprised of roughly 20% (dry molar percentage) CH.sub.4 at temperatures above 700.degree. C., and may effectively operate within an IGFC cycle at reactor temperatures between 700-900.degree. C. and pressures in excess of 10 atmospheres.

Siefert, Nicholas S; Shekhawat, Dushyant; Berry, David A; Surdoval, Wayne A

2014-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

143

Thermal and Chemical Effects of Water Addition on Laminar Burning Velocity of Syngas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The major issue of water-diluted IGCC and IGHAT is the humid air combustion of syngas, in which, syngas combustion will be even complicated by water dilution and this is much different from that of traditional hydrocarbon fuels. ... Das, A. K.; Kumar, K.; Sung, C. J.Laminar flame speeds of moist syngas mixtures Combust. ... Chaos, M.; Dryer, F. L.Syngas combustion kinetics and applications Combust. ...

Yongliang Xie; Jinhua Wang; Nan Xu; Senbin Yu; Meng Zhang; Zuohua Huang

2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

144

Determination of Syngas Premixed Gasoline and Methanol Combustion Products at Chemical Equilibrium via Lagrange Multipliers Method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(10) Several patents for generating hydrogen-rich syngas out of methanol to combust the syngas in an automotive engine have been published. ... On the other hand, the high flame speed of hydrogen causes higher NOx emissions and combustion instability when syngas is combusted with a near-stoichiometric air/fuel ratio. ...

Osman Sinan Süslü; Ipek Becerik

2014-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

145

Syngas Production from Coal through Microwave Plasma Gasification: Influence of Oxygen, Steam, and Coal Particle Size  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Syngas Production from Coal through Microwave Plasma Gasification: Influence of Oxygen, Steam, and Coal Particle Size ... Plasma gasification is widely applied because of its clean syngas production performance and high chemical reactivity accelerated by the free radicals produced by plasma. ... The syngas composition produced from plasma gasification at same conditions is affected by the physicochemical properties of coals. ...

Sang Jun Yoon; Jae Goo Lee

2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

146

Independent Oversight Assessment, Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Bearing Waste Treatment Project - November 2012 November 2012 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project This...

147

Lab completes record year for environmental cleanup  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

now entering the heavy cleanup phase," said Michael Graham, LANL's associate director for environmental programs. "We know where our sites are and have a much better understanding...

148

2014 House Nuclear Cleanup Caucus Oak Ridge  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

2014 House Nuclear Cleanup Caucus Oak Ridge August 16, 2014 Sue Cange Acting Manager Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board Annual...

149

Tank Farm Area Cleanup Decision-Making  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Area Cleanup Decision-Making Groundwater Vadose Zone Single Shell Tank System Closure (tanks, structures and pipelines) * Washington State Hazardous Waste Management Act (Resource...

150

Sandia National Laboratories: radioactive waste solution cleanup  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in Fukushima and Worldwide On February 14, 2013, in Energy, Materials Science, Nuclear Energy, Partnership, Research & Capabilities Radiation waste cleanup was in the public eye...

151

Sandia National Laboratories: radiation waste cleanup  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

waste cleanup ECIS and UOP (a Honewell Company): CSTs Clean Radioactive Waste in Fukushima and Worldwide On February 14, 2013, in Energy, Materials Science, Nuclear Energy,...

152

Experimental study of combustion of hydrogen–syngas/methane fuel mixtures in a porous burner  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Lean premixed combustion of hydrogen–syngas/methane fuel mixtures was investigated experimentally to demonstrate fuel flexibility of a two-section porous burner. The un-insulated burner was operated at atmospheric pressure. Combustion was stabilized at the interface of silicon-carbide coated carbon foam of 26 pores per centimeter (ppcm) and 4 ppcm. Methane (CH4) content in the fuel was decreased from 100% to 0% (by volume), with the remaining amount split equally between carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen (H2), the two reactive components of the syngas. Experiments for different fuel mixtures were conducted at a fixed air flow rate, while the fuel flow rate was varied to obtain a range of adiabatic flame temperatures. The CO and nitric oxide ( NO x ) emissions were measured downstream of the porous burner, in the axial direction to identify the post-combustion zone and in the transverse direction to quantify combustion uniformity. For a given adiabatic flame temperature, increasing H2/CO content in the fuel mixture decreased both the CO and NO x emissions. Presence of H2/CO in the fuel mixture also decreased temperature near the lean blow-off limit, especially for higher percentages of CO and H2 in the fuel.

S.K. Alavandi; A.K. Agrawal

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Characterization of syngas laminar flames using the Bunsen burner configuration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Laminar flame speeds of syngas mixtures (H2/CO/Air) have been studied using the Bunsen flame configuration with both straight and nozzle burners. The flame surface area and flame cone angle methodologies, respectively based on the OH* chemiluminescence and Schlieren imaging techniques, have been performed to extract flame speeds for a wide range of equivalence ratios (0.3 syngas flames with 0.6 < ? < 1.0 and 10% < %H2 < 70% is proposed. A particular attention has been devoted to the development and validation of the OH* chemiluminescence methodology with the identification of important parameters governing the measurement accuracy.

N. Bouvet; C. Chauveau; I. Gökalp; S.-Y. Lee; R.J. Santoro

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Process Intensification in Hydrogen Production from Biomass-Derived Syngas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Process Intensification in Hydrogen Production from Biomass-Derived Syngas ... A “one-box” process has been proposed and studied in order to economically produce pure hydrogen from biomass-derived syngas in the presence of its common impurities through the use of the water gas shift (WGS) reaction. ... (1) Hydrogen burns cleanly and produces more energy on a per mass basis than any other fuel; if widely adopted for both mobile and stationary power generation, it would reduce the emissions of pollutants typically associated with power production, and would potentially diminish the prospect of global warming. ...

Mitra Abdollahi; Jiang Yu; Hyun Tae Hwang; Paul K. T. Liu; Richard Ciora; Muhammad Sahimi; Theodore T. Tsotsis

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

155

Influence of MgO in the CO2 – steam reforming of methane to syngas by NiO/MgO/ ?-Al2O3 catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Simultaneous steam and CO2 reforming of methane to syngas (H2and CO) over NiO/MgO/a-Al2O3 catalyst have been investigated at different MgO wt.%. The catalyst has been characterized by temperature-programmed reduc...

Jafar Yeganeh Mehr; Kheirolah Jafari Jozani…

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Syngas Production from Catalytic Partial Oxidation of n-Butane: Comparison between Incipient Wetness and Sol?gel Prepared Pt/Al2O3  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Syngas Production from Catalytic Partial Oxidation of n-Butane: Comparison between Incipient Wetness and Sol?gel Prepared Pt/Al2O3 ... (30, 31) To start the reaction, a Bunsen burner was used to heat the catalyst bed to its ignition temperature. ... for fuel-efficient, lean-burn vehicles, both diesel and spark-ignited. ...

Rainer J. Bass; Timothy M. Dunn; Yu-Chuan Lin; Keith L. Hohn

2008-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

157

Zero Emissions Coal Syngas Oxygen Turbo Machinery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Siemens Energy, Inc. (formerly Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation) worked with Clean Energy Systems and Florida Turbine Technologies to demonstrate the commercial feasibility of advanced turbines for oxy-fuel based power systems that discharge negligible CO{sub 2} into the atmosphere. The approach builds upon ultra supercritical steam turbine and advanced gas turbine technology with the goal of attaining plant efficiencies above 50% in the 2015 timeframe. Conceptual designs were developed for baseline, near term, and long term oxy-fuel turbine cycles, representing commercial introductions of increasingly advanced thermal conditions and increasing exposure to steam-CO{sub 2} mixtures. An economic analysis and market demand study was performed by Science Applications International Corp. (SAIC), and indicated that long-term oxy-fuel turbine cycles start to look attractive in 2025 when the CO{sub 2} tax is assumed to reach $40/ ton, and by 2030 it has a clear advantage over both IGCC with sequestration and pulverized coal with sequestration. A separate risk analysis of the oxy-fuel combustor, HP turbine, re-heater, and IP turbine of the long-term cycle identified and categorized risks and proposed mitigation measures. In 2007 the program began to focus on a potential oxy-fuel turbine power generation demonstration project in the 2012 -13 time period while still maintaining a link to the requirements of the long-term oxy-syngas cycle. The SGT-900 turbine was identified as the best fit for modification into an intermediate pressure turbine (IPT) for this application. The base metals, bond coats, thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), and rotor materials used in the SGT-900 were tested for their ability to operate in the steam- CO{sub 2} environment of the oxy-fuel OFT-900. Test results indicated that these same materials would operate satisfactorily, and the plan, is to use SGT-900materials for the OFT-900. Follow-on programs for corrosion testing and evaluation of crack growth rates in oxy-fuel environments have been proposed to build on these results and provide quantifiable assessments of the effects of oxy-fuel environments on the service lives of turbine components.

Dennis Horazak

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

158

Chlor-syngas: Coupling of Electrochemical Technologies for Production of Commodity Chemicals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes a novel electrolysis process called chlor-syngas, where synthesis gas is produced at the cathode and chlorine gas is produced at the anode. ... The process described here, chlor-syngas, produces two commodity gas streams, Cl2 and synthesis gas (syngas), using low-value chemicals, CO2 and HCl. ... The chlor-syngas process could replace two existing processes in current use: (1) chlor-alkali for the production of Cl2 and (2) gasification of fossil sources, such as natural gas or coal, to produce syngas. ...

Tedd E. Lister; Eric J. Dufek

2013-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

159

Cleanup Agreed on for Niagara Landfill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cleanup Agreed on for Niagara Landfill ... The U.S., New York state, and Occidental Chemical finally have reached agreement on how to clean up toxic liquid wastes at the Hyde Park landfill in Niagara, N.Y. ... The cleanup program is a multifaceted scheme designed to remove and destroy the most concentrated of the hazardous liquids buried in the landfill. ...

LOIS EMBER

1985-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

160

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Cleanup | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Cleanup Oak Ridge National Laboratory Cleanup This fact sheet provides an update on all of the current cleanup projects at the site, and it also lists...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature syngas cleanup" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

EM Tackles Cleanup at Tonopah Test Range | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Tackles Cleanup at Tonopah Test Range EM Tackles Cleanup at Tonopah Test Range September 30, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis Field technicians survey a shaker used in past cleanup...

162

Comparison of several glycerol reforming methods for hydrogen and syngas production using Gibbs energy minimization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper focuses on the comparison of different glycerol reforming technologies aimed to hydrogen and syngas production. The reactions of steam reforming, partial oxidation, autothermal reforming, dry reforming and supercritical water gasification were analyzed. For this, the Gibbs energy minimization approach was used in combination with the virial equation of state. The validation of the model was made between the simulations of the proposed model and both, simulated and experimental data obtained in the literature. The effects of modifications in the operational temperature, operational pressure and reactants composition were analyzed with regard to composition of the products. The effect of coke formation was discussed too. Generally, higher temperatures and lower pressures resulted in higher hydrogen and syngas production. All reforming technologies demonstrated to be feasible for use in hydrogen or synthesis gas production in respect of the products composition. The proposed model showed good predictive ability and low computational time (close to 1 s) to perform the calculation of the combined chemical and phase equilibrium for all systems analyzed.

Antonio C.D. Freitas; Reginaldo Guirardello

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Effect of fuel injection velocity on MILD combustion of syngas in axially-staged combustor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The role of fuel injection velocity on MILD (Moderate or Intense Low-oxygen Dilution) combustion of coal-derived syngas was examined in an axially staged combustor, where the secondary air was mixed with the flue gases from the gas generation zone to produce hot and diluted oxidant prior to its mixing with the secondary fuel. The global flame signatures, OH? radicals distribution, and exhaust emissions were obtained through experimental measurements, while the mixing behavior between the secondary fuel and oxidant was numerically studied. Higher secondary fuel injection velocity within 199–299 m/s facilitated the earlier entrainment of oxidizer into the secondary fuel and increased the flame lift-off height, resulting in a lower flame temperature, a more distributed reaction zone and reduced \\{NOx\\} emissions, but higher pressure loss and CO formation. The MILD regime yields lower \\{NOx\\} emissions compared to the traditional diffusion combustion mode, and the N2O-intermediate mechanism dominates the NO production in the syngas MILD flame with adiabatic flame temperature lower than 1565 K according to the prediction of the chemical reactor network model.

Ming-ming Huang; Wei-wei Shao; Yan Xiong; Yan Liu; Zhe-dian Zhang; Fu-lin Lei; Yun-han Xiao

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Syngas production from wood pellet using filtration combustion of lean natural gas–air mixtures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A common method for the production of hydrogen and syngas is solid fuel gasification. This paper discusses the experimental results obtained from the combustion of lean natural gas–air mixtures in a porous medium composed of aleatory alumina spheres and wood pellets, called hybrid bed. Temperature, velocity, and chemical products (H2, CO, CO2, CH4) of the combustion waves were recorded experimentally in an inert bed (baseline) and hybrid bed (with a volume wood fraction of 50%), for equivalence ratios (?) from 0.3 to 1.0, and a constant filtration velocity of 15 cm/s. Upstream, downstream and standing combustion waves were observed for inert and hybrid bed. The maximum hydrogen conversion in hybrid filtration combustion is found to be ?99% at ? = 0.3. Results demonstrate that wood gasification process occurs with high temperature (1188 K) and oxygen available, and the lean hybrid filtration process can be used to reform solid fuels into hydrogen and syngas.

Karina Araus; Felipe Reyes; Mario Toledo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Investigation on syngas production via biomass conversion through the integration of pyrolysis and air–steam gasification processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Fuel production from agro-waste has become an interesting alternative for energy generation due to energy policies and greater understanding of the importance of green energy. This research was carried out in a lab-scale gasifier and coconut shell was used as feedstock in the integrated process. In order to acquire the optimum condition of syngas production, the effect of the reaction temperature, equivalence ratio (ER) and steam/biomass (S/B) ratio was investigated. Under the optimized condition, H2 and syngas yield achieved to 83.3 g/kg feedstock and 485.9 g/kg feedstock respectively, while LHV of produced gases achieved to 12.54 MJ/N m3.

Reza Alipour Moghadam; Suzana Yusup; Wan Azlina; Shahab Nehzati; Ahmad Tavasoli

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Emission of a compression ignition engine fuelled by diesel and imitated syngas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biomass can be converted into a useful source of energy through gasification. The gasification product known as synthesis gas or syngas composition of syngas may fluctuate due to many factors such as operational errors of the gasifier as well as the type of feedstock used or may be due to the feeding rate fluctuation. Therefore it would be difficult to assess the effect of syngas composition and diesel replacement ratio to the emission when combusted in dual fuel syngas – diesel compression ignition engine. In order to overcome this problem controllable composition and conditions of imitated syngas was used in this study by selective three compositions of syngas close to the real conditions. The objective of this study is to determine the exhaust emissions of a compression ignition engine fuelled with diesel and imitated syngas at different compositions and diesel replacement ratios to determine the most appropriate composition of syngas and diesel replacement ratio which will give less emission. The test results on syngas emission are compared with the results of diesel. CO2 and NOX emission level was reduced on syngas dual fuel mode but there were increases in CO and THC emissions throughout all syngas compositions examined due to poor combustion efficiency of dual fuel operation.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Noise in non?premixed turbulent syngas flames  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A turbulent syngas flame may generate acoustic noise of high acoustic intensity in a combustion chamber. This may lead to the failure of construction components in a gas turbine engine in periods of the order of 1–100 hours. The research as described in the literature has almost exclusively been performed on the generation of noise in premixed methane or propane flames. Syngas fuel is a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide and the burners used are of the non?premixed type. In this research the effect of turbulence and syngas composition on noise generation is investigated. A laboratory is set up to test syngas flames of a thermal power of 50 kW in a cylindrical air?cooled combustion chamber. Experiments are performed at several fuel compositions and burner inlet conditions. The flame sound intensity is measured in the combustion chamber equipped with acoustic dampers. The paper discusses the measured sound spectra. A model is derived for the generation of sound in a turbulent non?premixed flame. In this model it is shown that the sound generation is related to the dependence of density on mixture fraction in a flame with fast chemistry. A fluctuation in mixture fraction will lead to sound generation.

Sikke A. Klein; Jim B. W. Kok

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

NOVEL SLURRY PHASE DIESEL CATALYSTS FOR COAL-DERIVED SYNGAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes research conducted to support the DOE program in novel slurry phase catalysts for converting coal-derived synthesis gas to diesel fuels. The primary objective of this research program is to develop attrition resistant catalysts that exhibit high activities for conversion of coal-derived syngas.

Dr. Dragomir B. Bukur; Dr. Ketil Hanssen; Alec Klinghoffer; Dr. Lech Nowicki; Patricia O'Dowd; Dr. Hien Pham; Jian Xu

2001-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

169

System issues and tradeoffs associated with syngas production and combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the basic technology of coal gasification for the production of syngas and the utilization of that syngas in power generation. The common gasifier types, fixed/moving bed, fluidized bed, entrained flow, and transport, are described, and accompanying typical product syngas compositions are shown for different coal ranks. Substantial variation in product gas composition is observed with changes in gasifier and coal feed type. Fuel contaminants such as sulfur, nitrogen, ash, as well as heavy metals such as mercury, arsenic, and selenium, can be removed to protect the environment and downstream processes. A variety of methods for syngas utilization for power production are discussed, including both present (gas turbine and internal combustion engines) and future technologies, including oxy-fuel, chemical looping, fuel cells, and hybrids. Goals to improve system efficiencies, further reduce NOx emissions, and provide options for CO2 sequestration require advancements in many aspects of IGCC plants, including the combustion system. Areas for improvements in combustion technology that could minimize these tradeoffs between cost, complexity, and performance are discussed.

Casleton, K.H.; Richards, G.A.; Breault, R.W.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

System Issues and Tradeoffs Associated with Syngas Production and Combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the basic technology of coal gasification for the production of syngas and the utilization of that syngas in power generation. The common gasifier types, fixed=moving bed, fluidized bed, entrained flow, and transport, are described, and accompanying typical product syngas compositions are shown for different coal ranks. Substantial variation in product gas composition is observed with changes in gasifier and coal feed type. Fuel contaminants such as sulfur, nitrogen, ash, as well as heavy metals such as mercury, arsenic, and selenium, can be removed to protect the environment and downstream processes. A variety of methods for syngas utilization for power production are discussed, including both present (gas turbine and internal combustion engines) and future technologies, including oxy-fuel, chemical looping, fuel cells, and hybrids. Goals to improve system efficiencies, further reduce NOx emissions, and provide options for CO2 sequestration require advancements in many aspects of IGCC plants, including the combustion system. Areas for improvements in combustion technology that could minimize these tradeoffs between cost, complexity, and performance are discussed.

Kent H. Casleton; Ronald W. Breault; George A. Richards

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Storing syngas lowers the carbon price for profitable coal gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) electric power generation systems with carbon capture and sequestration have desirable environmental qualities but are not profitable when the carbon dioxide price is less than approximately $50 per metric ton. We examine whether an IGCC facility that operates its gasifier continuously but stores the syngas and produces electricity only when daily prices are high may be profitable at significantly lower CO{sub 2} prices. Using a probabilistic analysis, we have calculated the plant-level return on investment (ROI) and the value of syngas storage for IGCC facilities located in the U.S. Midwest using a range of storage configurations. Adding a second turbine to use the stored syngas to generate electricity at peak hours and implementing 12 h of above-ground high-pressure syngas storage significantly increases the ROI and net present value. Storage lowers the carbon price at which IGCC enters the U.S. generation mix by approximately 25%. 36 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Adam Newcomer; Jay Apt [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (USA). Carnegie Mellon Electricity Industry Center

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

172

Combined molten salt–Ni/Al2O3 as synergistic medium for high-quality syngas production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Proposed synergistic use of a combined medium of molten salt and Ni/Al2O3 (MS-Ni) was investigated for its enhancement of cellulose pyrolysis for high-quality syngas production. Clean renewable solar energy is to be stored at a high temperature in molten salt (MS) and provides the heat of pyrolysis. The MS-Ni medium could increase H2 yield by 3-folds while CO yield slightly increased by 15%, compared to the case of only MS medium. The peak rate of H2 production nearly quadrupled while the peak rate of CO production increased 2.5 times at about 150 and 80 K lower temperatures, respectively. The ratio of selectivity of syngas to undesired CH4 was nearly doubled. Arrhenius rate expressions for pseudo-first-order pyrolytic reaction are derived from the experimental data to give activation energies of 206 and 128 kJ mol?1 for the MS and the MS-Ni mediums, respectively. The experimental results clearly validated the role of MS-Ni as a synergistic medium for high-quality syngas production from cellulosic biomass pyrolysis.

Sakhon Ratchahat; Satoshi Kodama; Wiwut Tanthapanichakoon; Hidetoshi Sekiguchi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Chemical Kinetics in Support of Syngas Turbine Combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the final report on an overall program formulated to extend our prior work in developing and validating kinetic models for the CO/hydrogen/oxygen reaction by carefully analyzing the individual and interactive behavior of specific elementary and subsets of elementary reactions at conditions of interest to syngas combustion in gas turbines. A summary of the tasks performed under this work are: 1. Determine experimentally the third body efficiencies in H+O{sub 2}+M = HO{sub 2}+M (R1) for CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. 2. Using published literature data and the results in this program, further develop the present H{sub 2}/O{sub 2}/diluent and CO/H{sub 2}/O{sub 2}/diluent mechanisms for dilution with CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O and N{sub 2} through comparisons with new experimental validation targets for H{sub 2}-CO-O{sub 2}-N{sub 2} reaction kinetics in the presence of significant diluent fractions of CO{sub 2} and/or H{sub 2}O, at high pressures. (task amplified to especially address ignition delay issues, see below). 3. Analyze and demonstrate issues related to NOx interactions with syngas combustion chemistry (task amplified to include interactions of iron pentacarbonyl with syngas combustion chemistry, see below). 4. Publish results, including updated syngas kinetic model. Results are summarized in this document and its appendices. Three archival papers which contain a majority of the research results have appeared. Those results not published elsewhere are highlighted here, and will appear as part of future publications. Portions of the work appearing in the above publications were also supported in part by the Department of Energy under Grant No. DE-FG02-86ER-13503. As a result of and during the research under the present contract, we became aware of other reported results that revealed substantial differences between experimental characterizations of ignition delays for syngas mixtures and ignition delay predictions based upon homogenous kinetic modeling. We adjusted emphasis of Task 2 to understand the source of these noted disparities because of their key importance to developing lean premixed combustion technologies of syngas turbine applications. In performing Task 3, we also suggest for the first time the very significant effect that metal carbonyls may have on syngas combustion properties. This work is fully detailed. The work on metal carbonyl effects is entirely computational in nature. Pursuit of experimental verification of these interactions was beyond the scope of the present work.

Dryer, Frederick

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

174

Environmental Cleanup | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

October 28, 2010 October 28, 2010 Obama Administration Hosts Great Lakes Offshore Wind Workshop in Chicago with Great Lakes Wind Collaborative WASHINGTON - The White House Council on Environmental Quality and the U.S. Department of Energy hosted a workshop with the Great Lakes Wind Collaborative in Chicago on October 26 - 27, 2010, focused on the siting of offshore wind power in the Great Lakes. The two day workshop brought together wind developers, Federal and state regulators, environmental advocates, and other regional stakeholders to discuss methods for ensuring greater clarity, certainty and coordination of Federal and state decision-making for offshore wind development in the Great Lakes. October 6, 2010 Agreement on New Commitments for Hanford Tank Waste Cleanup Sent to Federal

175

Environmental Cleanup | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

July 28, 2009 July 28, 2009 800 to 1000 New Jobs Coming to Piketon Department of Energy to Accelerate Cleanup Work While USEC Further Develops ACP Technology April 22, 2009 Op-Ed by Secretary of Energy Steven Chu and Secretary of Labor Hilda Solis: Building the American Clean Energy Economy To commemorate Earth Day, the op-ed below on green jobs and energy independence by Secretaries Steven Chu and Hilda Solis ran in the following papers yesterday and today: Austin American-Statesman Buffalo News Denver Post Montgomery Advertiser Omaha World Herald Pittsburgh Post-Gazette April 22, 2009 US Department of Energy Promotes Special Earth Week Feature on Energy.gov Simple Steps Will Help Consumers Save Money -- and the Planet March 27, 2009 U.S. and Portugal Sign Agreement for Climate Research Collaboration

176

DOE Awards Small Business Contract to Support Cleanup of New...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Small Business Contract to Support Cleanup of New York West Valley Demonstration Project DOE Awards Small Business Contract to Support Cleanup of New York West Valley Demonstration...

177

Liquid hydrocarbon fuels from syngas. Second annual report, March 1982-February 1983  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Initial Task 1 tests used methanol as the feed. It was found that catalysts of interest tended to make highly methylated aromatics in the Berty reactor. Although a simulated distillation showed that these products boiled in the gasoline and diesel range, most were solid at room temperature. Aromatic products frequently are desirable constituents of gasoline, but highly methylated aromatics which precipitate at the concentrations found are undesirable. Since small olefins are products and intermediates in reactions over Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, propylene was chosen as feedstock to replace methanol. Catalysts for syngas feed (task 2) have a metal component (MC) and a shape-selective component (SSC). Four techniques have been used in synthesizing our bi-functional catalysts. The data presented show that catalysts and conditions have been found which enable converting 1:1 H/sub 2//CO syngas feed at reasonable conversions in one step to motor fuel range products with quite acceptable selectivity to C/sub 5//sup +/ products. Two effects should be noted. The molecular sieves used reduced the high boiling (wax) component of the product as compared to physical mixture with the relatively inert ..cap alpha..-alumina. Also the quality of the gasoline range product with the molecular sieve is much better than with the F-T type catalyst.

Not Available

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Production of Mixed Alcohols from Bio-syngas over Mo-based Catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A series of Mo-based catalysts prepared by sol-gel method using citric acid as complexant were successfully applied in the high efficient production of mixed alcohols from bio-syngas derived from the biomass gasification. The Cu1Co1Fe1Mo1Zn0.5? 6%K catalyst exhibited a higher activity on the space-time yield of mixed alcohols compared with the other Mo-based catalysts. The carbon conversion significantly increases with rising temperature below 340 °C but the alcohol selectivity has an opposite trend. The maximum mixed alcohols yield derived from biomass gasification is 494.8 g/(kgcatal·h) with the C2+ (C2—C6 higher alcohols) alcohols of 80.4% under the tested conditions. The alcohol distributions are consistent with the Schulz-Flory plots except methanol. In the alcohols products the C2+ alcohols (higher alcohols) dominate with a weight ratio of 70%–85%. The Mo-based catalysts have been characterized by X-ray diffraction and N2 adsorption/desorption. The clean bio-fules of mixed alcohols derived from bio-syngas with higher octane values could be used as transportation fuels or petrol additives.

Song-bai Qiu; Wei-wei Huang; Yong Xu; Lu Liu; Quan-xin Li

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

IGFC response to initial fuel cell load for various syngas compositions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The system response to an initial electric load of the fuel cell during the startup of a direct-fired fuel cell turbine power system was studied using the Hybrid Performance (Hyper) project hardware-based simulation facility at the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory for a range of input fuel compositions. The facility was brought to a steady condition at a temperature deemed adequate to minimize stress on the fuel cell during the initial load transient. A 1D distributed fuel cell model operating in real-time was used to produce individual cell transient temperature profiles during the course of the load change. The process was conducted with humidified hydrogen, and then repeated with various syngas compositions representative of different gasifier technologies. The results provide insight into control strategy requirements for mitigation of expected fuel cell failure modes relevant to available gasifier technology.

Tucker, David [U.S DOE; Hughes, Dimitri O. [Georgia Institute of Technology; Haynes, Comas L. [Georgia Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Environmental Cleanup Reports | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Environmental Cleanup Reports Environmental Cleanup Reports Environmental Cleanup Reports September 8, 2010 Audit Report: OAS-L-10-10 The Audit of Precious Metals at NNSA Sites August 12, 2010 Audit Letter Report: OAS-RA-L-10-05 Decommissioning and Demolition Activities at Office of Science Sites May 25, 2010 Audit Report: OAS-RA-10-10 Waste Processing and Recovery Act Acceleration Efforts for Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste at the Hanford Site May 3, 2010 Audit Report: OAS-L-10-04 The Interim Treatment of Salt Waste at the Savannah River Site April 23, 2010 Audit Letter Report: OAS-RA-L-10-03 Audit of Moab Mill Tailings Cleanup Project April 9, 2010 Audit Report: OAS-RA-10-07 Management Alert on Environmental Management's Select Strategy for Disposition of Savannah River Site Depleted Uranium Oxides

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature syngas cleanup" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Lab completes record year for environmental cleanup  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Record year for environmental cleanup Record year for environmental cleanup Lab completes record year for environmental cleanup Personnel conducted more field investigations and cleanup campaigns than ever and completed a record number of Lab shipments to WIPP. December 16, 2010 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

182

Microsoft Word - California_cleanup.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

WIPP Completes California Sites Cleanup CARLSBAD, N.M., June 14, 2010 - The U.S. Department of Energy's Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) has successfully completed its campaign to...

183

From Cleanup to Stewardship | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

PEIS Settlement Study. Long-term stewardship was expected to be needed at more than 100 DOE sites after EM completed cleanup of the waste and contamination resulting from nuclear...

184

Y-12 National Security Complex Cleanup  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This fact sheet provides an update on all of the current cleanup projects at the site, and it also lists the major projects completed at the Y-12 National Security Complex.

185

Effect of Alkali and Alkaline Earth Metallic Species on Biochar Reactivity and Syngas Compositions during Steam Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Effect of Alkali and Alkaline Earth Metallic Species on Biochar Reactivity and Syngas Compositions during Steam Gasification† ... Briefly, a biomass or biochar sample, held in a platinum (Pt) crucible, was ashed in air following a specially designed ashing program that raised the temperature to a final temperature of 600 °C at a very slow heating rate in order to prevent the ignition of the biomass/biochar hence to avoid the loss of AAEM species from the sample during oxidation. ... Therefore, wood may be a good fuel based on the consideration that this would potentially reduce the ash-related operation problems in a gasifier. ...

Kongvui Yip; Fujun Tian; Jun-ichiro Hayashi; Hongwei Wu

2009-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

186

Long-Term Demonstration of Hydrogen Production from Coal at Elevated Temperatures Year 6 - Activity 1.12 - Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has continued the work of the National Center for Hydrogen Technology® (NCHT®) Program Year 6 Task 1.12 project to expose hydrogen separation membranes to coal-derived syngas. In this follow-on project, the EERC has exposed two membranes to coal-derived syngas produced in the pilot-scale transport reactor development unit (TRDU). Western Research Institute (WRI), with funding from the State of Wyoming Clean Coal Technology Program and the North Dakota Industrial Commission, contracted with the EERC to conduct testing of WRI’s coal-upgrading/gasification technology for subbituminous and lignite coals in the EERC’s TRDU. This gasifier fires nominally 200–500 lb/hour of fuel and is the pilot-scale version of the full-scale gasifier currently being constructed in Kemper County, Mississippi. A slipstream of the syngas was used to demonstrate warm-gas cleanup and hydrogen separation using membrane technology. Two membranes were exposed to coal-derived syngas, and the impact of coal-derived impurities was evaluated. This report summarizes the performance of WRI’s patent-pending coalupgrading/ gasification technology in the EERC’s TRDU and presents the results of the warm-gas cleanup and hydrogen separation tests. Overall, the WRI coal-upgrading/gasification technology was shown to produce a syngas significantly lower in CO2 content and significantly higher in CO content than syngas produced from the raw fuels. Warm-gas cleanup technologies were shown to be capable of reducing sulfur in the syngas to 1 ppm. Each of the membranes tested was able to produce at least 2 lb/day of hydrogen from coal-derived syngas.

Stanislowski, Joshua; Tolbert, Scott; Curran, Tyler; Swanson, Michael

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

187

Federal nuclear waste cleanup plan proposed  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Federal nuclear waste cleanup plan proposed ... The Department of Energy has asked Congress to find $19.5 billion over the next five years to finance initial cleanup of environmental contamination at its nuclear, primarily weapons, facilities. ... DOE estimates that to begin implementing the plan in 1990, it needs considerably more than the $1.3 billion originally requested for defense waste and environmental restoration activities. ...

JANICE LONG

1989-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

188

Avestar® - Syngas-Fired Combined Cycle Dynamic Simulator  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Syngas-Fired Combined Cycle Dynamic Simulator Syngas-Fired Combined Cycle Dynamic Simulator The AVESTAR® center offers courses using the Combined Cycle Simulator, focusing on the power generation process after gasification. This simulator is well-suited for concentrated training on operation and control of the gas and steam turbines; condensate, feed water, and circulating water systems; heat recovery steam generator; and selective catalytic reduction (SCR) unit. Combined cycle simulator startup operations include bringing up the gas turbine to rated speed on natural gas and then switching over to the firing of synthesis gas. Key capabilities of the Combined Cycle Simulator include: Combined Cycle Simulator Operator training station HMI display for overview of Gas Turbine - Train A Normal base load operation

189

HARVESTING EMSP RESEARCH RESULTS FOR WASTE CLEANUP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The extent of environmental contamination created by the nuclear weapons legacy combined with expensive, ineffective waste cleanup strategies at many U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites prompted Congress to pass the FY96 Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act, which directed the DOE to: ''provide sufficient attention and resources to longer-term basic science research, which needs to be done to ultimately reduce cleanup costs'', ''develop a program that takes advantage of laboratory and university expertise, and'' ''seek new and innovative cleanup methods to replace current conventional approaches which are often costly and ineffective.'' In response, the DOE initiated the Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP)-a targeted, long-term research program intended to produce solutions to DOE's most pressing environmental problems. EMSP funds basic research to lower cleanup cost and reduce risk to workers, the public, and the environment; direct the nation's scientific infrastructure towards cleanup of contaminated waste sites; and bridge the gap between fundamental research and technology development activities. EMSP research projects are competitively awarded based on the project's scientific, merit coupled with relevance to addressing DOE site needs. This paper describes selected EMSP research projects with long, mid, and short-term deployment potential and discusses the impacts, focus, and results of the research. Results of EMSP research are intended to accelerate cleanup schedules, reduce cost or risk for current baselines, provide alternatives for contingency planning, or provide solutions to problems where no solutions exist.

Guillen, Donna Post; Nielson, R. Bruce; Phillips, Ann Marie; Lebow, Scott

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

190

A novel reactor configuration for packed bed chemical-looping combustion of syngas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study reports on the application of chemical looping combustion (CLC) in pressurized packed bed reactors using syngas as a fuel. High pressure operation of CLC in packed bed has a different set of challenges in terms of material properties, cycle and reactor design compared to fluidized bed operation. However, high pressure operation allows the use of inherently more efficient power cycles than low pressure fluidized bed solutions. This paper quantifies the challenges in high pressure operation and introduces a novel reactor concept with which those challenges can be addressed. Continuous cyclic operation of a packed bed CLC system is simulated in a 1D numerical reactor model. Importantly, it is demonstrated that the temperature profiles that can occur in a packed bed reactor as a result of the different process steps do not accumulate, and have a negligible effect on the overall performance of the system. Moreover, it has been shown that an even higher energy efficiency can be achieved by feeding the syngas from the opposite direction during the reduction step (i.e. countercurrent operation). Unfortunately, in this configuration mode, more severe temperature fluctuations occur in the reactor exhaust, which is disadvantageous for the operation of a downstream gas turbine. Finally, a novel reactor configuration is introduced in which the desired temperature rise for obtained hot pressured air suitable for a gas turbine is obtained by carrying out the process with two packed bed reactor in series (two-stage CLC). This is shown to be a good alternative to the single bed configuration, and has the added advantage of decreasing the demands on both the oxygen carrier and the reactor materials and design specification.

H.P. Hamers; F. Gallucci; P.D. Cobden; E. Kimball; M. van Sint Annaland

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

The Performance of Planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cells using Hydrogen-depleted Coal Syngas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Since solid oxide fuel cells can operate on fuel containing both hydrogen and carbon monoxide, it may prove possible to remove hydrogen from syngas streams… (more)

Burnette, David D.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Performance of an Internal Combustion Engine Operating on Landfill Gas and the Effect of Syngas Addition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Performance of an Internal Combustion Engine Operating on Landfill Gas and the Effect of Syngas Addition ... The performance of a four-stroke Honda GC160E spark ignition (SI) internal combustion (IC) engine operating on landfill gas (LFG) was investigated, as well as the impact of H2 and CO (syngas) addition on emissions and engine efficiency. ... In addition, variation across both the syngas content (up to 15%) and the ratio of H2 to CO in the syngas (H2/CO = 0.5, 1, and 2) were tested. ...

McKenzie P. Kohn; Jechan Lee; Matthew L. Basinger; Marco J. Castaldi

2011-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

193

System and process for the production of syngas and fuel gasses  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The production of gasses and, more particularly, to systems and methods for the production of syngas and fuel gasses including the production of hydrogen are set forth. In one embodiment system and method includes a reactor having a molten pool of a material comprising sodium carbonate. A supply of conditioned water is in communication with the reactor. A supply of carbon containing material is also in communication with the reactor. In one particular embodiment, the carbon containing material may include vacuum residuum (VR). The water and VR may be kept at desired temperatures and pressures compatible with the process that is to take place in the reactor. When introduced into the reactor, the water, the VR and the molten pool may be homogenously mixed in an environment in which chemical reactions take place including the production of hydrogen and other gasses.

Bingham, Dennis N; Kllingler, Kerry M; Turner, Terry D; Wilding, Bruce M; Benefiel, Bradley C

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Synthesis of Methanol and Dimethyl Ether from Syngas over Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 Catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst was developed for the synthesis of methanol and dimethyl ether (DME) from syngas. Studied were temperatures of operation ranging from 250°C to 380°C. High temperatures (e.g. 380°C) are necessary when combining methanol and DME synthesis with a methanol to gasoline (MTG) process in a single reactor bed. A commercial Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst, utilized industrially for the synthesis of methanol at 220-280°C, suffers from a rapid deactivation when the reaction is conducted at high temperature (>320°C). On the contrary, a Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst was found to be highly stable for methanol and DME synthesis at 380°C. The Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst was thus further investigated for methanol and DME synthesis at P=34-69 bars, T= 250-380°C, GHSV= 5 000-18 000 h-1, and molar feeds H2/CO= 1, 2, and 3. Selectivity to DME increased with decreasing operating temperature, and increasing operating pressure. Increased GHSV’s and H2/CO syngas feed ratios also enhanced DME selectivity. Undesirable CH4 formation was observed, however, can be minimized through choice of process conditions and by catalyst design. By studying the effect of the Pd loading and the Pd:Zn molar ratio the formulation of the Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst was optimized. A catalyst with 5% Pd and a Pd:Zn molar ratio of 0.25:1 has been identified as the preferred catalyst. Results indicate that PdZn particles are more active than Pdş particles for the synthesis of methanol and less active for CH4 formation. A correlation between DME selectivity and the concentration of acid sites of the catalysts has been established. Hence, two types of sites are required for the direct conversion of syngas to DME: 1) PdZn particles are active for the synthesis of methanol from syngas, and 2) acid sites which are active for the conversion of methanol to DME. Additionally, CO2 formation was problematic as PdZn was found to be active for the water-gas-shift (WGS) reaction, under all the conditions evaluated.

Lebarbier, Vanessa MC; Dagle, Robert A.; Kovarik, Libor; Lizarazo Adarme, Jair A.; King, David L.; Palo, Daniel R.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Idaho Cleanup Contractor Surpasses Significant Safety Milestones |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Cleanup Contractor Surpasses Significant Safety Milestones Cleanup Contractor Surpasses Significant Safety Milestones Idaho Cleanup Contractor Surpasses Significant Safety Milestones April 29, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis CWI employees discuss safety procedures before they remove a spent nuclear fuel shipment from a shipping container. CWI employees discuss safety procedures before they remove a spent nuclear fuel shipment from a shipping container. IDAHO FALLS, Idaho - For the second time in a little over a year, employees with DOE contractor CH2M-WG Idaho (CWI) supporting EM at the Idaho site have achieved 1 million hours without a recordable injury. They also worked more than 1.7 million hours without a lost work-time injury. "Our focus is working with employees to keep each other safe," said CWI Environmental, Safety, and Health Vice President Kevin Daniels. "We

196

Demolition, Groundwater Cleanup Highlight Paducah's 2013 Accomplishments  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Demolition, Groundwater Cleanup Highlight Paducah's 2013 Demolition, Groundwater Cleanup Highlight Paducah's 2013 Accomplishments Demolition, Groundwater Cleanup Highlight Paducah's 2013 Accomplishments December 24, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis A high-reach shear removes debris from the tallest structure of the C-340 complex at Paducah. Watch a video of this work here. The 120-foot-high Metals Plant was the tallest building at the Paducah site and encompassed about 1.5 million cubic feet, the volume of a football field roughly three stories tall. Demolition debris filled 28 rail cars and was shipped offsite for disposal. A high-reach shear removes debris from the tallest structure of the C-340 complex at Paducah. Watch a video of this work here. The 120-foot-high Metals Plant was the tallest building at the Paducah site and encompassed

197

Los Alamos National Laboratory names cleanup subcontractors  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cleanup subcontractors named Cleanup subcontractors named Los Alamos National Laboratory names cleanup subcontractors The three companies are Los Alamos Technical Associates (LATA), Portage Inc., and ARSEC Environmental, LLC (ARSEC). August 14, 2009 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Contact Fred deSousa

198

Sorption Mechanisms for Mercury Capture in Warm Post-Gasification Gas Clean-Up Systems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sorption MechaniSMS for Mercury Sorption MechaniSMS for Mercury capture in WarM poSt-GaSification GaS clean-up SySteMS Background Power generation systems employing gasification technology must remove a variety of potential air pollutants, including mercury, from the synthetic gas steam prior to combustion. In general, efforts to remove mercury have focused on removal at lower temperatures (under 300 °F). The ability to remove mercury at warm-gas cleanup conditions (300 °F to 700 °F) or in the hot-gas cleanup range (above 1200 °F) would provide plant operators with greater flexibility to choose the treatment method best suited to conditions at their plant. The University of Arizona is investigating the use of paper waste-derived sorbents (PWDS) for the removal of mercury and other trace metals at temperatures in and

199

Debate over waste imperils 3-Mile cleanup  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cleanup is a task of extraordinary proportions. Every step in the cleanup must be taken in a highly sensitive political and regulatory environment. A demineralizer or ion exchange filtration unit was installed in order that the fission products could be removed from the water spilled in the auxiliary and fuel handling buildings. GPU later vented krypton gas. Twice now engineers have made cautions entries into the containment building as part of the effort to size up the job. Cleanup will be costly, requiring many workers. Some wastes will require special packaging in hundreds of containers with shielded overpacks, plus bulky items of hardware and equipment that cannot be easily packaged. There will be the damaged fuel assemblies from the reactor core. Removing the fuel from the reactor may be difficult. A troublesome waste disposal question has to do with the material to be generated in cleaning up the containment building's sump water. GPU's man in charge of clean-up strategy is to collect the wastes in a form that permits maximum flexibility with respect to their stage, packaging, transport, and ultimate disposal. If plans for disposal of all the wastes from the cleanup are to be completed, an early commitment by Pennsylvania and other northeastern states to establish a burial ground for low level waste generated within the region is needed. Also a speedy commitment by NRC, DOE, and Congress to a plan for disposal of the first-stage zeolites is needed. Should there be a failure to cope with the wastes that Three Mile Island cleanup generates, the whole nuclear enterprise may suffer.

Carter, L.J.

1980-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

200

NOx emission characteristics of counterflow syngas diffusion flames with airstream dilution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract Syngas is produced through a gasification process using variety of fossil fuels, including coal, biomass, organic waste, and refinery residual. Although, its composition may vary significantly emissions; Effect of diluents 1. Introduction Syngas or synthetic gas is formed through the gasification

Aggarwal, Suresh K.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature syngas cleanup" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Effect of the Catalyst Load on Syngas Production in Short Contact Time Catalytic Partial Oxidation Reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Effect of the Catalyst Load on Syngas Production in Short Contact Time Catalytic Partial Oxidation Reactors ... For safety and environmental protection reasons (to avoid syngas release into the atmosphere), after the analysis section, the reacted gas stream was completely oxidized by forced air in a catalytic honeycomb burner (Figure 2). ...

S. Specchia; L. D. Vella; B. Lorenzut; T. Montini; V. Specchia; P. Fornasiero

2009-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

202

ITM Syngas and ITM H2: Engineering Development of Ceramic Membrane Reactor Systems for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(U.S. DOE) and other members of the ITM Syngas/ITM H2 Team, is developing Ion Transport Membrane (ITM of the ITM membrane to oxygen ions, which diffuse through the membrane under a chemical potential gradientITM Syngas and ITM H2: Engineering Development of Ceramic Membrane Reactor Systems for Converting

203

Explosions of Syngas/CO2 Mixtures in Oxygen-Enriched Air  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Most of the scientific works on syngas combustion deal with dry air as oxidizer, whereas very few studies have been carried out on syngas combustion in oxygen-enriched air (i.e., oxy-combustion). In this work, the explosion behavior (peak pressure and ...

Ernesto Salzano; Anna Basco; Francesco Cammarota; Valeria Di Sarli; Almerinda Di Benedetto

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

MODELING AND ANALYSIS OF CHEMILUMINESCENCE SENSING FOR SYNGAS, METHANE AND JET-A COMBUSTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODELING AND ANALYSIS OF CHEMILUMINESCENCE SENSING FOR SYNGAS, METHANE AND JET-A COMBUSTION of Technology August 2008 #12;MODELING AND ANALYSIS OF CHEMILUMINESCENCE SENSING FOR SYNGAS, METHANE AND JET-A COMBUSTION Approved by: Dr. Jerry M. Seitzman, Advisor School of Aerospace Engineering Georgia Institute

Seitzman, Jerry M.

205

Chemical Looping Reforming for H2, CO and Syngas Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We demonstrate that the extension of CLC onto oxidants beyond air opens new, highly efficient pathways for production of ultra-pure hydrogen, activation of CO{sub 2} via reduction to CO, and are currently working on production of syngas using nanocomposite Fe-BHA. CLR hold great potential due to fuel flexibility and CO{sub 2} capture. Chemical Looping Combustion (CLC) is a novel clean combustion technology which offers an elegant and highly efficient route for fossil fuel combustion. In CLC, combustion of a fuel is broken down into two spatially separated steps. In the reducer, the oxygen carrier (typically a metal) supplies the stoichiometric oxygen required for fuel combustion. In the oxidizer, the oxygen-depleted carrier is then re-oxidized with air. After condensation of steam from the effluent of the reducer, a high-pressure, high-purity sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} stream is obtained. In the present study, we apply the CLC principle to the production of high-purity H{sub 2}, CO, and syngas streams by replacing air with steam and/or CO{sub 2} as oxidant, respectively. Using H{sub 2}O as oxidant, pure hydrogen streams can be obtained. Similarly, using CO{sub 2} as oxidant, CO is obtained, thus opening an efficient route for CO{sub 2} utilization. Using steam and CO{sub 2} mixtures for carrier oxidation should thus allow production of syngas with adjustable CO:H{sub 2} ratios. Overall, these processes result in Chemical Looping Reforming (CLR), i.e. the net overall reaction is the steam and/or dry reforming of the respective fuel.

Bhavsar,Saurabh; Najera,Michelle; Solunke,Rahul; Veser,Götz

2001-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

206

New Process Concept for H2S Capture from Syngas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this last case, the H2S concentration has been set around 1% mol, such as in syngas from coal/petcoke gasification; the sulfur content in biomass, such as wood chips, would be typically low, but a higher concentration was assumed to extend our analysis—although fictitiously—to other types of biomasses, such as urban residues, with different qualities and compositions. ... The currently proposed technology could be a competitive alternative to existing ones and a viable route to improve the energy efficiency of processes producing power or chemicals from coal, petcoke and biomass. ...

Fabio Ruggeri; Maria Sudiro; Inida Papa; Alessia Gallio; Alberto Bertucco; Marco Fontana

2011-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

207

Gasification of refinery sludge in an updraft reactor for syngas production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The study probes into the investigation on gasification of dry refinery sludge. The details of the study includes; influence of operation time oxidation temperature and equivalence ratios on carbon gas conversion rate gasification efficiency heating value and fuel gas yield are presented. The results show that the oxidation temperature increased sharply up to 858°C as the operating time increased up to 36 min then bridging occurred at 39 min which cause drop in reaction temperature up to 819 °C. This bridging was found to affect also the syngas compositions meanwhile as the temperature decreased the CO H 2 CH 4 compositions are also found to be decreases. Higher temperature catalyzed the reduction reaction ( CO 2 + C ?=?450?2 CO ) and accelerated the carbon conversion and gasification efficiencies resulted in more solid fuel is converted to a high heating value gas fuel. The equivalence ratio of 0.195 was found to be the optimum value for carbon conversion and cold gas efficiencies high heating value of gas and fuel gas yield to reach their maximum values of 96.1 % and 53.7 % 5.42 MJ Nm?3 of and 2.5 Nm3 kg?1 respectively.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Hot-gas cleanup system model development. Volume I. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This two-volume report summarizes the state of the art in performance modeling of advanced high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) gas cleanup devices. Volume I contains the culmination of the research effort carried over the past 12 months and is a summary of research achievements. Volume II is the user's manual for the computer programs developed under the present research project. In this volume, Section 2 presents background information on pressurized, fluidized-bed combustion concepts, a description of the role of the advanced gas cleanup systems, and a list of advanced gas cleanup systems that are currently in development under DOE sponsorship. Section 3 describes the methodology for the software architecture that forms the basis of the well-disciplined and structured computer programs developed under the present project. Section 4 reviews the fundamental theories that are important in analyzing the cleanup performance of HTHP gas filters. Section 5 discusses the effect of alkali agents in HTHP gas cleanup. Section 6 evaluates the advanced HTHP gas cleanup models based on their mathematical integrity, availability of supporting data, and the likelihood of commercialization. As a result of the evaluation procedure detailed in Section 6, five performance models were chosen to be incorporated into the overall system simulation code, ASPEN. These five models (the electrocyclone, ceramic bag filter, moving granular bed filter, electrostatic granular bed filter, and electrostatic precipitator) are described in Section 7. The method of cost projection for these five models is discussed in Section 8. The supporting data and validation of the computer codes are presented in Section 9, and finally the conclusions and recommendations for the HTHP gas cleanup system model development are given in Section 10. 72 references, 19 figures, 25 tables.

Ushimaru, K.; Bennett, A.; Bekowies, P.J.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Questions remain on funding for cleanup of Oak Ridge Reservation...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Questions remain on funding for cleanup of Oak Ridge Reservation Questions remain on funding for cleanup of Oak Ridge Reservation March 18, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis There is great...

210

EM's Cleanup Mission: 16 Sites in 11 States Remaining  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

At the end of fiscal year 2013, EM completed cleanup and closed 90 sites in 28 states. This included cleanup and closure of 85 smaller sites and five major nuclear sites: Rocky Flats, Fernald, Mound, Pinellas, and Weldon Spring.

211

Reformate Cleanup: The Case for Microchannel Architecture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reformate Cleanup: The Case for Microchannel Architecture DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells 2003 Annual for MicrochannelMicrochannel ArchitectureArchitecture DOE Hydrogen and Fuel CellsDOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells 2003, controls Integrated reformer/fuel cell demonstration at ~2 kWeFY 2002 WGS/PROX catalyst studies

212

Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Idaho Cleanup Project- October 2010  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Evaluation to determine whether Idaho Cleanup Project is continuing to perform at a level deserving DOE-VPP Star recognition.

213

Enterprise Assessments Review, Idaho Cleanup Project- September 2014  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Review of the Idaho Cleanup Project Integrated Waste Treatment Unit Federal Readiness Assessment at the Idaho Site

214

Liquid Fuel Production from Biomass via High Temperature Steam Electrolysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process model of syngas production using high temperature electrolysis and biomass gasification is presented. Process heat from the biomass gasifier is used to heat steam for the hydrogen production via the high temperature steam electrolysis process. Hydrogen from electrolysis allows a high utilization of the biomass carbon for syngas production. Oxygen produced form the electrolysis process is used to control the oxidation rate in the oxygen-fed biomass gasifier. Based on the gasifier temperature, 94% to 95% of the carbon in the biomass becomes carbon monoxide in the syngas (carbon monoxide and hydrogen). Assuming the thermal efficiency of the power cycle for electricity generation is 50%, (as expected from GEN IV nuclear reactors), the syngas production efficiency ranges from 70% to 73% as the gasifier temperature decreases from 1900 K to 1500 K. Parametric studies of system pressure, biomass moisture content and low temperature alkaline electrolysis are also presented.

Grant L. Hawkes; Michael G. McKellar

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

THE EFFECTS OF CHANGING FUELS ON HOT GAS PATH CONDITIONS IN SYNGAS TURBINES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas turbines in integrated gasification combined cycle power plants burn a fuel gas (syngas) in which the proportions of hydrocarbons, H2, CO, water vapor, and minor impurity levels may differ significantly from those in natural gas. Such differences can yield changes in the temperature, pressure, and corrosive species that are experienced by critical components in the hot gas path, with important implications in the design, operation, and reliability of the turbine. A new data structure and computational methodology is presented for the numerical simulation of a turbine thermodynamic cycle for various fuel types. The approach used allows efficient handling of turbine components and different variable constraints due to fuel changes. Examples are presented for a turbine with four stages. The vanes and blades were considered to be cooled in an open circuit, with air provided from the appropriate compressor stages. A constraint was placed on the maximum metal temperature and values were calculated for the fuel flow rates, airflow ratios, and coolant flow rates for cases where the turbine was fired with natural gas, NG, or syngas, SG. One NG case was conducted to assess the effect of coolant pressure matching between the compressor extraction points and corresponding turbine injection points. It was found that pressure matching is a feature that must be considered for high combustion temperatures. The first series of SG simulations was conducted using the same inlet mass flow and pressure ratios as those for the NG case. The results showed that higher coolant flow rates and a larger number of cooled turbine rows were needed for the SG case to comply with imposed temperature constraint. Thus, for this first case, the turbine size would be different for SG than for NG. In order to maintain the original turbine configuration (i.e., geometry, diameters, blade heights, angles, and cooling circuit characteristics) for the SG simulations, a second series of simulations was carried out in which the inlet mass flow was varied while keeping constant the pressure ratios and the amount of hot gas passing the first vane of the turbine. The effects of turbine matching between the NG and SG cases were increases for the SG case of approximately 7 and 13 % for total cooling flows and cooling flows for the first vane, respectively. In particular, for the SG case, the vane in the last stage of the turbine experienced inner wall temperatures that approached the maximum allowable limit.

Sabau, Adrian S [ORNL; Wright, Ian G [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Sorption-Enhanced Synthetic Natural Gas (SNG) Production from Syngas: A Novel Process Combining CO Methanation, Water-Gas Shift, and CO2 Capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Synthetic natural gas (SNG) production from syngas is under investigation again due to the desire for less dependency from imports and the opportunity for increasing coal utilization and reducing green house gas emission. CO methanation is highly exothermic and substantial heat is liberated which can lead to process thermal imbalance and deactivation of the catalyst. As a result, conversion per pass is limited and substantial syngas recycle is employed in conventional processes. Furthermore, the conversion of syngas to SNG is typically performed at moderate temperatures (275 to 325°C) to ensure high CH4 yields since this reaction is thermodynamically limited. In this study, the effectiveness of a novel integrated process for the SNG production from syngas at high temperature (i.e. 600?C) was investigated. This integrated process consists of combining a CO methanation nickel-based catalyst with a high temperature CO2 capture sorbent in a single reactor. Integration with CO2 separation eliminates the reverse-water-gas shift and the requirement for a separate water-gas shift (WGS) unit. Easing of thermodynamic constraint offers the opportunity of enhancing yield to CH4 at higher operating temperature (500-700şC) which also favors methanation kinetics and improves the overall process efficiency due to exploitation of reaction heat at higher temperatures. Furthermore, simultaneous CO2 capture eliminates green house gas emission. In this work, sorption-enhanced CO methanation was demonstrated using a mixture of a 68% CaO/32% MgAl2O4 sorbent and a CO methanation catalyst (Ni/Al2O3, Ni/MgAl2O4, or Ni/SiC) utilizing a syngas ratio (H2/CO) of 1, gas-hour-space velocity (GHSV) of 22 000 hr-1, pressure of 1 bar and a temperature of 600oC. These conditions resulted in ~90% yield to methane, which was maintained until the sorbent became saturated with CO2. By contrast, without the use of sorbent, equilibrium yield to methane is only 22%. Cyclic stability of the methanation catalyst and durability of the sorbent were also studied in the multiple carbonation-decarbonation cycle studies proving the potential of this integrated process in a practical application.

Lebarbier, Vanessa MC; Dagle, Robert A.; Kovarik, Libor; Albrecht, Karl O.; Li, Xiaohong S.; Li, Liyu; Taylor, Charles E.; Bao, Xinhe; Wang, Yong

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Effect of syngas composition and CO2-diluted oxygen on performance of a premixed swirl-stabilized combustor.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Future energy systems based on gasification of coal or biomass for co-production of electrical power and fuels may require gas turbine operation on unusual gaseous fuel mixtures. In addition, global climate change concerns may dictate the generation of a CO{sub 2} product stream for end-use or sequestration, with potential impacts on the oxidizer used in the gas turbine. In this study the operation at atmospheric pressure of a small, optically accessible swirl-stabilized premixed combustor, burning fuels ranging from pure methane to conventional and H{sub 2}-rich and H{sub 2}-lean syngas mixtures is investigated. Both air and CO{sub 2}-diluted oxygen are used as oxidizers. CO and NO{sub x} emissions for these flames have been determined from the lean blowout limit to slightly rich conditions ({phi} - 1.03). In practice, CO{sub 2}-diluted oxygen systems will likely be operated close to stoichiometric conditions to minimize oxygen consumption while achieving acceptable NO{sub x} performance. The presence of hydrogen in the syngas fuel mixtures results in more compact, higher temperature flames, resulting in increased flame stability and higher NO{sub x} emissions. Consistent with previous experience, the stoichiometry of lean blowout decreases with increasing H{sub 2} content in the syngas. Similarly, the lean stoichiometry at which CO emissions become significant decreases with increasing H{sub 2} content. For the mixtures investigated, CO emissions near the stoichiometric point do not become significant until {phi} > 0.95. At this stoichiometric limit, CO emissions rise more rapidly for combustion in O{sub 2}-CO{sub 2} mixtures than for combustion in air.

Williams, Timothy C.; Shaddix, Christopher R.; Schefer, Robert W.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Study on laminar flame speed and flame structure of syngas with varied compositions using OH-PLIF and spectrograph  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Various Bunsen flame information of premixed syngas/air mixtures was systematically collected. A CCD camera was used to capture the flame images. The OH-PLIF technique was applied to obtain the flame OH distribution and overall flame radiation spectra were measured with a spectrograph. Experiments were conducted on a temperature un-controlled burner and syngas over a wide range of H2/CO ratios (from 0.25 to 4) and equivalence ratios (from 0.5 to 1.2). Results show that increasing hydrogen fraction ( X H 2 ) extends the blow-off limit significantly. The measured laminar flame speed using cone-angle method based on CCD flame imaging and OH-PLIF images increases remarkably with the increase of X H 2 , and these measurements agrees well with kinetic modeling predictions through Li's mechanism when the temperature for computation is corrected. Kinetic study shows that as X H 2 increases, the production of H and OH radicals is accelerated. Additionally, the main H radical production reaction (or OH radical consumption reactions) changes from R29 (CO + OH = CO2 + H) to R3 (H2 + OH = H2O + H) as X H 2 increases. Sensitivity analysis was conducted to access the dominant reactions when X H 2 increases. The difference on flame color for different X H 2 mixtures is due to their difference in radiation spectrum of the intermediate radicals produced in combustion.

Jin Fu; Chenglong Tang; Wu Jin; Luong Dinh Thi; Zuohua Huang; Yang Zhang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Development of OTM Syngas Process and Testing of Syngas Derived Ultra-clean Fuels in Diesel Engines and Fuel Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final report summarizes work accomplished in the Program from January 1, 2001 through December 31, 2004. Most of the key technical objectives for this program were achieved. A breakthrough material system has lead to the development of an OTM (oxygen transport membrane) compact planar reactor design capable of producing either syngas or hydrogen. The planar reactor shows significant advantages in thermal efficiency and a step change reduction in costs compared to either autothermal reforming or steam methane reforming with CO{sub 2} recovery. Syngas derived ultra-clean transportation fuels were tested in the Nuvera fuel cell modular pressurized reactor and in International Truck and Engine single cylinder test engines. The studies compared emission and engine performance of conventional base fuels to various formulations of ultra-clean gasoline or diesel fuels. A proprietary BP oxygenate showed significant advantage in both applications for reducing emissions with minimal impact on performance. In addition, a study to evaluate new fuel formulations for an HCCI engine was completed.

E.T. Robinson; John Sirman; Prasad Apte; Xingun Gui; Tytus R. Bulicz; Dan Corgard; John Hemmings

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Reduction of Emissions from a Syngas Flame Using Micromixing and Dilution with CO2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogen-rich syngas can be burned stably in the designed combustor, and each suite of nozzles forms a flame surface. ... The smaller dilution ratio and the higher fuel heating value means the fuel can be burned quickly after it leaves the nozzles, resulting in strong heat release in the frontal section of the burner. ... There are, however, gaps in the fundamental understanding of syngas combustion and emissions, as most previous research has focused on flames burning individual fuel components such as H2 and CH4, rather than syngas mixts. ...

Yongsheng Zhang; Tianming Yang; Xueqi Liu; Long Tian; Zhongguang Fu; Kai Zhang

2012-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature syngas cleanup" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Thermodynamic Investigation of Carbon Deposition and Sulfur Evolution in Chemical Looping Combustion with Syngas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermodynamic Investigation of Carbon Deposition and Sulfur Evolution in Chemical Looping Combustion with Syngas ... Chemical looping combustion (CLC) with syngas, a synthesized gas mixture of CO, H2, CO2, H2O(g), N2, and H2S, was investigated using thermodynamic simulation, with focus on carbon deposition and sulfur evolution in CLC. ... Abad, A.; Garcia-Labiano, F.; de Diego, L. F.; Gayan, P.; Adanez, J. Reduction kinetics of Cu-,Ni-, and Fe-based oxygen carriers using syngas (CO+H2) for chemical-looping combustion Energy Fuels 2007 21 4 1854 1858 ...

Baowen Wang; Rong Yan; Dong Ho Lee; David Tee Liang; Ying Zheng; Haibo Zhao; Chuguang Zheng

2008-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

222

Stimulus Funding Will Accelerate Cleanup In Idaho  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

STIMULUS FUNDING WILL STIMULUS FUNDING WILL ACCELERATE CLEANUP IN IDAHO Funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act will do more than sustain employment at the U.S. Department of Energy's Idaho Site - it will accelerate cleanup. Click here to see larger image Inside the retrieval enclosure at Accelerated Retrieval Project-III Click on image to enlarge The Office of Environmental Management received $6 billon in additional funding under the "stimulus bill" passed earlier this year by Congress and signed by President Obama. The Idaho Site will receive $468 million of the EM funding. The funding will be used at DOE's Idaho Site to: Decontaminate and decommission buildings that have no useful mission. Accelerate removal of buried radioactive waste, which will be

223

Biogas Impurities and Cleanup for Fuel Cells  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Impurities and Cleanup for Fuel Cells Impurities and Cleanup for Fuel Cells Dennis Papadias and Shabbir Ahmed Argonne National Laboratory Presented at the Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop Golden, CO June 11-13, 2012 Biogas is the product of anaerobic decomposition of organic waste Municipal solid wastes (MSW)  For every 1 million tons of MSW: - 432,000 cubic feet per day of landfill gas (LFG) for a period of 20 years - 1 MW of electricity 1 Sewage sludge/waste water (WWTP or ADG)  A typical WWTP processes 100 gallons per day (GD) for every person served - 1 cubic foot of digester gas can be produced per 100 gallons of wastewater  100 kW of electricity 1 can be generated from 4.5 MGD of waste water Agricultural waste (i.e. dairy waste)  About 70-100 ft 3 /day of digester gas is produced

224

Effect of H2/CO ratio and N2/CO2 dilution rate on laminar burning velocity of syngas investigated by direct measurement and simulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Laminar burning velocities of syngas/air premixed flames, varying with H2/CO ratio (from 5/95 to 75/25) and N2 or CO2 dilution rate (from 0% to 60%), were accurately measured using a Teflon coated Heat Flux burner and OH-PLIF based Bunsen flame method. Experiments were carried out at atmospheric pressure and room temperature, with fuel/air equivalence ratios ranging from fuel-lean to fuel-rich. Coupled with experimental data, three chemical kinetic mechanisms, namely GRI-Mech 3.0, USC Mech II and Davis H2–CO mechanism, were validated. The Davis H2–CO and USC Mech II mechanisms appear to provide a better prediction for the laminar burning velocity. The laminar burning velocity variations with H2 and dilution gas contents were systematically investigated. For given dilution gas fraction, the laminar burning velocity reduction rate was enhanced as H2/CO ratio increasing. Effects of the syngas components and equivalence ratio variation on the concentrations of radical H and OH were also studied. It appears that there is a strong linear correlation between the laminar burning velocity and the maximum concentration of the H radical in the reaction zone for syngas. This characteristic is exclusively different from that in methane air premixed flame. These findings indicated that the high thermal diffusivity of the H radical played an important role in the laminar burning velocity enhancement and affected the laminar burning velocity reduction rate under dilution condition.

Z.H. Wang; W.B. Weng; Y. He; Z.S. Li; K.F. Cen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Ethanol synthesis from syngas over Rh-based/SiO2 catalysts: A...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

over Rh-basedSiO2 catalysts: A combined experimental and theoretical modeling study. Ethanol synthesis from syngas over Rh-basedSiO2 catalysts: A combined experimental and...

226

Investigation of the Syngas Flame Characteristics at Elevated Pressures Using Optical and Laser Diagnostic Methods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of pressure on the characteristics of syngas flames is investigated under gas turbine relevant...*...chemiluminescence imaging. An optically accessible combustor fitted with a swirl burner was operated...

Rajesh Sadanandan; Peter Kutne; Adam Steinberg…

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Bioenergy Technologies Office Conversion R&D Pathway: Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Syngas upgrading to hydrocarbon fuels is one of eight priority pathways chosen to convert biomass into hydrocarbon fuels by the Bioenergy Technologies Office. These pathways were down-selected from an initial list of 18.

228

Analysis of Hydroxide Sorbents for CO2 Capture from Warm Syngas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Analysis of Hydroxide Sorbents for CO2 Capture from Warm Syngas ... (1, 2) However, conventional coal combustion releases large amounts of the greenhouse gas CO2 into the atmosphere. ...

David J. Couling; Ujjal Das; William H. Green

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

229

Direct production of light olefins from syngas over a carbon nanotube confined iron catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Iron particles confined in carbon nanotube (CNT) channels have been used as a catalyst for the direct conversion of syngas to light olefins. Compared with iron catalysts supported on other materials such as Si...

ChuanFu Wang; XiuLian Pan; XinHe Bao

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Ce-Promoted Rh/TiO2 Heterogeneous Catalysts Towards Ethanol Production from Syngas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Direct synthesis of ethanol from syngas derived from coal, natural gas, or ... of the most promising routes for renewable energy production. In this work, Ce-promoted highly-...2...support was prepared by the dep...

Changming Li; Junmin Liu; Wa Gao; Yufei Zhao; Min Wei

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Investigation of Multistage Circulating Fast Fluidized Bed Membrane Reformers for Production of Ultraclean Hydrogen and Syngas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Investigation of Multistage Circulating Fast Fluidized Bed Membrane Reformers for Production of Ultraclean Hydrogen and Syngas ... In order to distinguish between the two catalysts employed in this study, the catalyst over which the CSRM and CPOM reactions take place is considered catalyst 1 and that over which the CDRM reaction takes place is considered catalyst 2. The physical significance of catalyst 1 is that both reaction schemes of the CSRM and CPOM are catalyzed by this catalyst to produce hydrogen and syngas and to supply the necessary energy for the heat integration, though catalyst 2 plays an important role to steer the quality of the syngas and to enhance the hydrogen yield. ... In order to check the quality of the corresponding syngas produced in the reaction side, the hydrogen to carbon monoxide feed ratio (H2/CO) profile is presented in Figure 15. ...

Mohamed E. E. Abashar; Said S. E. H. Elnashaie

2014-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

232

Catalytic Reforming of Biomass Raw Fuel Gas to Syngas for FT Liquid Fuels Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The gasification of biomass to obtain a syngas provides a competitive means for clean FT (Fischer-Tropsch) liquid fuels from renewable resources. The feasibility of the process depends on the upgrading of raw ...

Tiejun Wang; Chenguang Wang; Qi Zhang…

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

High-Stable Mesoporous Ni-Ce/Clay Catalysts for Syngas Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Delaminated-clay was synthesized from a natural smectite using polyvinyl alcohol and microwaves. Ni-Ce catalysts supported on delaminated clay achieved high stability in dry reforming of methane for syngas production

Carlos Enrique Daza; Oscar A. Gamba; Yesid Hernández…

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Cleanup of Nuclear Licensed Facility 57  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This summary describes the operations to clean up the equipment of the Nuclear Licensed Facility 57 (NLF 57). Due to the diversity of the research and development work carried out on the reprocessing of spent fuel in it, this installation is emblematic of many of the technical and organizational issues liable to be encountered in the final closure of nuclear facilities. The French atomic energy commission's center at Fontenay aux Roses (CEA-FAR) was created in 1946 to house pile ZOE. Laboratories for fuel cycle research were installed in existing buildings at the site. Work was later concentrated on spent fuel reprocessing, in a pilot workshop referred to as the 'Usine Pu'. In the early sixties, after the dismantling of these first generation facilities, a radiochemistry laboratory dedicated to research and development work on reprocessing was constructed, designated Building 18. During the same decade, more buildings were added: Building 54, storehouses and offices, Building 91, a hall and laboratories for chemical engineering research on natural and depleted uranium. Together, these three building constitute NLF 57. Building 18 architecture featured four similar modules. Each module had three levels: a sub-level consisting of technical galleries and rooms for the liquid effluent tanks, a ground floor and roof space in which the ventilation was installed. Offices, change rooms, four laboratories and a hall were situated on the ground floor. The shielded lines were installed in the laboratories and the halls. Construction of the building took place between 1959 and 1962, and its commissioning began in 1961. The research and development programs performed in NLF 57 related to studies of the reprocessing of spent fuel, including dry methods and the Purex process, techniques for the treatment of waste (vitrification, alpha waste decontamination, etc.) as well as studies and production of transuranic elements for industry and research. In addition to this work, the necessary methods of analysis for monitoring it were also developed. The research and development program finally ended on 30 June 1995. The NLF 57 cleanup program was intended to reduce the nuclear and conventional hazards and minimize the quantities of HLW and MLW during the subsequent dismantling work. To facilitate the organization of the cleanup work, it was divided into categories by type: - treatment and removal of nuclear material, - removal of radioactive sources, - treatment and removal of aqueous liquid waste, - treatment and removal of organic effluents, - treatment and removal of solid waste, - pumping out of the PETRUS tank, - flushing and decontamination of the tanks, - cleanup of Buildings 18 and 91/54. To estimate the cost of the operations and to monitor the progress of the work, an indicator system was put in place based on work units representative of the operation. The values of the work units were periodically updated on the basis of experience feedback. The cleanup progress is now 92% complete (06/12/31): - treatment and removal of nuclear material: 100%, - removal of radioactive sources: 100%, - treatment and removal of aqueous liquid waste: 64%, - treatment and removal of organic effluents: 87%, - treatment and removal of solid waste: 99%, - pumping out of the PETRUS tank: 69%, - flushing and decontamination of tank: 75%, - section cleaning of Buildings 18 and 91/: 90%. The DRSN/SAFAR is the delegated Project Owner for cleanup and dismantling operations. It is also the prime contractor for the cleanup and dismantling operations. SAFAR itself is responsible for operations relating to the CEA activity and those with technical risks (Removal of nuclear materials, Removal of radioactive sources, Pumping out plutonium and transuranic contaminated solvent and Flushing and decontamination of tanks and pipes). All other operations are sub-contracted to specialist companies. The NLF57 cleanup program as executed is capable of attaining activity levels compatible with a future dismantling operation using known and mastered techniques and producing a

Jeanjacques, Michel; Bremond, Marie Pierre; Marchand, Carole; Poyau, Cecile; Viallefont, Cecile; Gautier, Laurent; Masure, Frederic [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, Direction de l'Energie Nucleaire, Direction deleguee des Activites Nucleaires de Saclay, Departement des Reacteurs et des Services Nucleaires, Service d'Assainissement de Fontenay Aux Roses: 18, route du Panorama, BP6, 92265 Fontenay aux Roses Cedex (France)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

235

Single-Step Syngas-to-Distillates (S2D) Synthesis via Methanol and Dimethyl Ether Intermediates: Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the work was to enhance price-competitive, synthesis gas (syngas)-based production of transportation fuels that are directly compatible with the existing vehicle fleet (i.e., vehicles fueled by gasoline, diesel, jet fuel, etc.). To accomplish this, modifications to the traditional methanol-to-gasoline (MTG) process were investigated. In this study, we investigated direct conversion of syngas to distillates using methanol and dimethyl ether intermediates. For this application, a Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 (PdZnAl) catalyst previously developed for methanol steam reforming was evaluated. The PdZnAl catalyst was shown to be far superior to a conventional copper-based methanol catalyst when operated at relatively high temperatures (i.e., >300°C), which is necessary for MTG-type applications. Catalytic performance was evaluated through parametric studies. Process conditions such as temperature, pressure, gas-hour-space velocity, and syngas feed ratio (i.e., hydrogen:carbon monoxide) were investigated. PdZnAl catalyst formulation also was optimized to maximize conversion and selectivity to methanol and dimethyl ether while suppressing methane formation. Thus, a PdZn/Al2O3 catalyst optimized for methanol and dimethyl ether formation was developed through combined catalytic material and process parameter exploration. However, even after compositional optimization, a significant amount of undesirable carbon dioxide was produced (formed via the water-gas-shift reaction), and some degree of methane formation could not be completely avoided. Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 used in combination with ZSM-5 was investigated for direct syngas-to-distillates conversion. High conversion was achieved as thermodynamic constraints are alleviated when methanol and dimethyl are intermediates for hydrocarbon formation. When methanol and/or dimethyl ether are products formed separately, equilibrium restrictions occur. Thermodynamic relaxation also enables the use of lower operating pressures than what would be allowed for methanol synthesis alone. Aromatic-rich hydrocarbon liquid (C5+), containing a significant amount of methylated benzenes, was produced under these conditions. However, selectivity control to liquid hydrocarbons was difficult to achieve. Carbon dioxide and methane formation was problematic. Furthermore, saturation of the olefinic intermediates formed in the zeolite, and necessary for gasoline production, occurred over PdZnAl. Thus, yield to desirable hydrocarbon liquid product was limited. Evaluation of other oxygenate-producing catalysts could possibly lead to future advances. Potential exists with discovery of other types of catalysts that suppress carbon dioxide and light hydrocarbon formation. Comparative techno-economics for a single-step syngas-to-distillates process and a more conventional MTG-type process were investigated. Results suggest operating and capital cost savings could only modestly be achieved, given future improvements to catalyst performance. Sensitivity analysis indicated that increased single-pass yield to hydrocarbon liquid is a primary need for this process to achieve cost competiveness.

Dagle, Robert A.; Lebarbier, Vanessa MC; Lizarazo Adarme, Jair A.; King, David L.; Zhu, Yunhua; Gray, Michel J.; Jones, Susanne B.; Biddy, Mary J.; Hallen, Richard T.; Wang, Yong; White, James F.; Holladay, Johnathan E.; Palo, Daniel R.

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

236

Conversion of jet fuel and butanol to syngas by filtration combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Replacing batteries with fuel cells is a promising approach for powering portable devices; however, hydrogen fuel generation and storage are challenges to the acceptance of this technology. A potential solution to this problem is on-site fuel reforming, in which a rich fuel/air mixture is converted to a hydrogen-rich syngas. In this paper, we present experimental results of the conversion of jet fuel (Jet-A) and butanol to syngas by non-catalytic filtration combustion in a porous media reactor operating over a wide range of equivalence ratios and inlet velocities. Since the focus of this study is the production of syngas, our primary results are the hydrogen yield, the carbon monoxide yield, and the energy conversion efficiency. In addition, the production of soot that occurred during testing is discussed for both fuels. Finally, an analysis of the potential for these fuels and others to be converted to syngas based on the present experiments and data available in the literature is presented. This study is intended to increase the understanding of filtration combustion for syngas production and to illuminate the potential of these fuels for conversion to syngas by non-catalytic methods.

Colin H. Smith; Daniel I. Pineda; Casey D. Zak; Janet L. Ellzey

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Experimental study on combustion and emissions performance of a hybrid syngas–gasoline engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of syngas addition on the performance of a 1.6 L gasoline engine at lean condition was investigated in the paper. The syngas which produced by the onboard ethanol catalytic decomposition was mainly composed of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. A tube array reforming reactor was mounted on the engine tailpipe to produce syngas. During the test, the engine was run at 1800 rpm and a manifolds absolute pressure of 61.5 kPa. The spark timing for the maximum brake torque was adopted for all tests. The engine spark timing, injection timing and duration of the gasoline were controlled by a hybrid electronic control unit communicated with the engine original electronic control unit. The syngas volume fraction in the total intake gas was gradually increased from 0% to 1.84%. The gasoline flow rate was decreased to ensure that the global excess air ratio of the fuel–air mixture in cylinder at about 1.20. The test results confirmed that the syngas addition helped improve the indicated thermal efficiency and shorten the combustion duration. HC, \\{NOx\\} emissions and particle total number per cubic centimeter were reduced after the syngas addition at lean condition.

Changwei Ji; Xiaoxu Dai; Shuofeng Wang; Chen Liang; Bingjie Ju; Xiaolong Liu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

DOE Completes TRU Waste Cleanup at Bettis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

TRU Waste Cleanup at Bettis TRU Waste Cleanup at Bettis DOE Completes TRU Waste Cleanup at Bettis September 23, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Deb Gill www.wipp.energy.gov 575-234-7270 CARLSBAD, N.M. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has successfully completed cleanup of all Cold War legacy transuranic (TRU) waste at the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory (BAPL) near Pittsburgh, Pa., permanently disposing of it at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). BAPL is the 20th site to be completely cleaned of legacy TRU waste. This milestone was achieved using approximately $640,000 of a $172 million investment from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to expedite legacy waste cleanup activities across the DOE complex. This summer, TRU waste cleanup was also completed at the Nuclear Radiation Development, LLC,

239

Manhattan Project Truck Unearthed in Recovery Act Cleanup | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Manhattan Project Truck Unearthed in Recovery Act Cleanup Manhattan Project Truck Unearthed in Recovery Act Cleanup Manhattan Project Truck Unearthed in Recovery Act Cleanup A Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) excavation crew working on an American Recovery and Reinvestment Act cleanup project has uncovered the remnants of a 1940s military truck buried in a Manhattan Project landfill. The truck was unearthed inside a sealed building where digging is taking place at Material Disposal Area B (MDA-B), the Lab's first hazardous and radioactive waste landfill. MDA-B was used from 1944 to 1948. Manhattan Project Truck Unearthed in Recovery Act Cleanup More Documents & Publications Los Alamos Lab Completes Excavation of Waste Disposal Site Used in the 1940s Protecting Recovery Act Cleanup Site During Massive Wildfire

240

Recovery Act Investment Accelerates Cleanup Work at DOE's Paducah Site |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Investment Accelerates Cleanup Work at DOE's Paducah Investment Accelerates Cleanup Work at DOE's Paducah Site Recovery Act Investment Accelerates Cleanup Work at DOE's Paducah Site July 15, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis UF6 piping deactivation The black inlet hose is attached to a negative air machine that allows Feed Plant cleanup workers to safely deactivate uranium hexafluoride (UF6) piping, seen at right of the lift supporting the crew. UF6 piping deactivation The black inlet hose is attached to a negative air machine that allows Feed Plant cleanup workers to safely deactivate uranium hexafluoride (UF6) piping, seen at right of the lift supporting the crew. Heavy equipment demo Heavy equipment demolishes the last part of the eastern third of the Feed Plant at the Paducah Site. Cleanup continues to prepare the remaining part of the complex, backgroundfor demolition later.

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241

Experimental Investigation of Double-Swirled Non-premixed Syngas Flames by Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experimental measurements are carried out on a non-premixed model combustor, equipped with a double-swirled syngas burner. ... Various amounts of diluents, such as H2O, CO2, or N2, may also be added before syngas is burnt. ... Modifications of conventional natural-gas-fired burners for operation with syngas fuels using lean pre-mixed combustion is challenging due to the different physicochem. ...

Bing Ge; Shusheng Zang; Peiqing Guo; Yinsheng Tian

2012-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

242

Oversight Reports - Idaho Cleanup Project | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Project Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - November 2012 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project...

243

ORNL research reveals new challenges for mercury cleanup | ornl...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Jennifer Brouner Communications 865.241.0709 ORNL research reveals new challenges for mercury cleanup ORNL researchers are learning more about the microbial processes that convert...

244

ORISE: Supporting ARRA funded cleanup activities in Oak Ridge...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ORISE supporting Oak Ridge reservation cleanup activities through recovery funding ORISE technician performs an environmental scan Disposing of old and contaminated buildings, and...

245

Public Understanding of Cleanup Levels Discussion Public Involvement...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Discussion Public Involvement Committee Meeting - Hanford Advisory Board Wednesday, October 31, 2012 - Red Lion Hanford House, Richland Page 1 of 4 Cleanup Levels One of the...

246

Cleanup Contractor Achieves ‘Elite’ Nuclear Material Accountability Status  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

PADUCAH, Ky. – EM’s cleanup contractor at the Paducah site has received national acclaim for timeliness of reporting and promptness in reconciling nuclear material inventories.

247

FY14 Guidelines for Brownfields Cleanup Grants | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Abstract These guidelines provide instruction on obtaining a brownfields cleanup grant. Author EPA Published EPA, 2014 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:...

248

Probing Fukushima with cosmic rays should help speed cleanup...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Probing Fukushima with cosmic rays Probing Fukushima with cosmic rays should help speed cleanup of damaged plant The initiative could reduce the time required to clean up the...

249

Peer Reviewed: Hard Times for Innovative Cleanup Technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Peer Reviewed: Hard Times for Innovative Cleanup Technology ... What can be done to remove market barriers to new groundwater and soil remediation technologies? ...

Jacqueline A. MacDonald

2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

250

EM Launches First-Ever Interactive Timeline on Cleanup's History...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

waste and related topics in Phoenix this week. Featuring photos and videos, EM's Web-based chronicle, accessible here, captures hundreds of critical cleanup...

251

Detailed numerical simulation of syngas combustion under partially premixed combustion engine conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two-dimensional detailed numerical simulation is performed to study syngas/air combustion under partially premixed combustion (PPC) engine conditions. Detailed chemical kinetics and transport properties are employed in the study. The fuel, a mixture of CO and H2 with a 1:1 molar ratio, is introduced to the domain at two different instances of time, corresponding to the multiple injection strategy of fuel used in PPC engines. It is found that the ratio of the fuel mass between the second injection and the first injection affects the combustion and emission process greatly; there is a tradeoff between NO emission and CO emission when varying the fuel mass ratio. The ignition zone structures under various fuel mass ratios are examined. A premixed burn region and a diffusion burn region are identified. The premixed burn region ignites first, followed by the ignition of mixtures at the diffusion burn region, and finally a thin diffusion flame is formed to burn out the remaining fuel. NO is produced mainly in the premixed burn region, and later from the diffusion burn region in mixtures close to stoichiometry, whereas unburned CO emission is mainly from the diffusion burn region. An optimization of the fuel mass in the two regions can offer a better tradeoff between NO emission and CO emission. The effects of initial temperature and turbulence on the premixed burn and diffusion burn regions are investigated.

F. Zhang; R. Yu; X.S. Bai

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Reduction kinetics of Cu-, Ni-, and Fe-based oxygen carriers using syngas (CO + H{sub 2}) for chemical-looping combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The reactivity of three Cu-, Fe-, and Ni-based oxygen carriers to be used in a chemical-looping combustion (CLC) system using syngas as fuel has been analyzed. The oxygen carriers exhibited high reactivity during reduction with fuel gases present in syngas (H{sub 2} and CO), with average values in the range 8-30% min{sup -1}. No effect of the gas products (H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}) on the reduction reaction rate was detected. The kinetic parameters of reaction with H{sub 2} and CO have been determined by thermogravimetric analysis. The grain model with spherical or platelike geometry in the grain was used for the kinetic determination, in which the chemical reaction controlled the global reaction rate. The activation energies determined for these reactions were low, with values ranging from 14 to 33 kJ mol{sup -1}. The reaction order depended on the reacting gas, and values from 0.5 to 1 were found. Moreover, the reactivity of the oxygen carriers when both H{sub 2} and CO are simultaneously present in the reacting gases has been analyzed, both at atmospheric and pressurized conditions. For the Cu- and Fe-based oxygen carriers, the reaction rate of the oxygen carrier with syngas corresponded to the addition of the reaction rates for the individual fuel gases, H{sub 2} and CO. For the Ni-based oxygen carrier, the reaction rate was that corresponding to the fuel gas that reacted faster with the oxygen carrier at the reacting conditions (fuel concentration, temperature, and pressure). The consequences of the behavior of the reaction of syngas and the water-gas shift (WGS) equilibrium on the design of the fuel reactor of a CLC system have been analyzed. A preliminary estimation of the solids inventory for the use of syngas in the fuel reactor of a CLC system gave values in the range of 19-34 kg MW{sup -1} when the WGS equilibrium was considered to be instantaneous. 8 figs., 4 tabs.

Alberto Abad; Francisco Garcia-Labiano; Luis F. de Diego; Pilar Gayn; Juan Adnez [Instituto de Carboquimica (CSIC), Zaragoza (Spain). Department of Energy and Environment

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

253

A Hybrid Gas Cleaning Process for Production of Ultraclean Syngas  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Timothy C. Merkel (Primary Contact) Timothy C. Merkel (Primary Contact) RTI P.O. Box 12194 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 merkel@rti.org Tel (919) 485-2742 Fax (919) 541-8000 Raghubir P. Gupta RTI P.O. Box 12194 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 gupta@rti.org Tel (919) 541-8023 Fax (919) 541-8000 Suresh C. Jain U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 suresh.jain@netl.doe.gov Tel (304) 285-5431 Fax (304) 285-4403 Brian S. Turk RTI P.O. Box 12194 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 bst@rti.org Tel (919) 541-8024 Fax (919) 541-8000 Daniel C. Cicero U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 daniel.cicero@netl.doe.gov Tel (304) 285-4826 Fax (304) 285-4403 A Hybrid Gas Cleaning Process for Production of Ultraclean Syngas

254

CARBON COATED (CARBONOUS) CATALYST IN EBULLATED BED REACTOR FOR PRODUCTION OF OXYGENATED CHEMICALS FROM SYNGAS/CO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work completed under DOE's Support of Advanced Fuel Research program, Contract No. DE-FG26-99FT40681. The contract period was October 2000 through September 2002. This R&D program investigated the modification of the mechanical strength of catalyst extrudates using Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. (HTI) carbon-coated catalyst technology so that the ebullated bed technology can be utilized to produce valuable oxygenated chemicals from syngas/CO{sub 2} efficiently and economically. Exothermic chemical reactions benefit from the temperature control and freedom from catalyst fouling provided by the ebullated bed reactor technology. The carbon-coated extrudates prepared using these procedures had sufficient attrition resistance and surface area for use in ebullated bed operation. The low cost of carbon coating makes the carbon-coated catalysts highly competitive in the market of catalyst extrudates.

Peizheng Zhou

2002-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

255

Performance of solid oxide fuel cells operaated with coal syngas provided directly from a gasification process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are being developed for integrated gasification power plants that generate electricity from coal at 50% efficiency. The interaction of trace metals in coal syngas with Ni-based SOFC anodes is being investigated through thermodynamic analyses and in laboratory experiments, but test data from direct coal syngas exposure are sparsely available. This effort evaluates the significance of performance losses associated with exposure to direct coal syngas. Specimen are operated in a unique mobile test skid that is deployed to the research gasifier at NCCC in Wilsonville, AL. The test skid interfaces with a gasifier slipstream to deliver hot syngas to a parallel array of twelve SOFCs. During the 500 h test period, all twelve cells are monitored for performance at four current densities. Degradation is attributed to syngas exposure and trace material attack on the anode structure that is accelerated at increasing current densities. Cells that are operated at 0 and 125 mA cm{sup 2} degrade at 9.1 and 10.7% per 1000 h, respectively, while cells operated at 250 and 375 mA cm{sup 2} degrade at 18.9 and 16.2% per 1000 h, respectively. Spectroscopic analysis of the anodes showed carbon, sulfur, and phosphorus deposits; no secondary Ni-metal phases were found.

Hackett, G.; Gerdes, K.; Song, X.; Chen, Y.; Shutthanandan, V.; Englehard, M.; Zhu, Z.; Thevuthasan, S.; Gemmen, R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Synthesis of Aromatic-Rich Gasoline-Range Hydrocarbons from Biomass-Derived Syngas over a Pd-Promoted Fe/HZSM-5 Catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Synthesis of Aromatic-Rich Gasoline-Range Hydrocarbons from Biomass-Derived Syngas over a Pd-Promoted Fe/HZSM-5 Catalyst ... The cool syngas was then compressed to a storage tank or sent to a burner. ...

Qiangu Yan; Yongwu Lu; Caixia Wan; Jun Han; Jose Rodriguez; Jing-jing Yin; Fei Yu

2014-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

257

Final Rocky Flats Cleanup Agreement, July 19, 1996 Summary  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Rocky Flats Cleanup Agreement Rocky Flats Cleanup Agreement State Colorado Agreement Type Federal Facility Agreement Legal Driver(s) CERCLA/RCRA Scope Summary Establish the regulatory framework for achieving the ultimate cleanup of the Rocky Flats Site. Parties DOE; US EPA; The State of Colorado Date 7/19/1996 SCOPE * Establish the regulatory framework for achieving the ultimate cleanup of the Rocky Flats Site. * Ensure that the environmental impacts associated with activities at the Site will continue to be investigated and that appropriate response actions are taken. * Establish a procedural framework and schedule for developing, implementing, and monitoring appropriate response actions at the site. * Coordinate all of DOE's cleanup obligations under CERCLA, RCRA, and the Colorado

258

Secretary Chu Highlights Recovery Act Cleanup Progress | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Highlights Recovery Act Cleanup Progress Highlights Recovery Act Cleanup Progress Secretary Chu Highlights Recovery Act Cleanup Progress March 23, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis OAK RIDGE, TENN. - Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced today that the Department's Environmental Management program has spent more than $1.5 billion in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funds on cleanup projects around the country - 25 percent of the program's total - creating an estimated 14,400 jobs since the start of the Recovery Act. "Because of the Recovery Act, programs around the country have been able to expand, hire and continue our important cleanup work," said Secretary Chu. "These investments have played a key role in helping local economies recover, creating jobs and supporting small businesses in dozens of

259

Lab receives an additional $19 million for environmental cleanup  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lab receives an additional $19 million for environmental cleanup Lab receives an additional $19 million for environmental cleanup Community Connections: Our link to Northern New Mexico Communities Latest Issue:Dec. 2013 - Jan. 2014 All Issues » submit Lab receives an additional $19 million for environmental cleanup Lab also selects local businesses for five-year contracts June 1, 2013 Governor Susana Martinez visited the Lab in May to urge additional funding for cleanup Governor Susana Martinez visited the Lab in May to urge additional funding for cleanup Contact Editor Linda Anderman Email Community Programs Office Kurt Steinhaus Email Thanks to support from New Mexico Senators Tom Udall and Martin Heinrich, Representatives Ben Ray Lujan and Steve Pearce and Governor Susana Martinez, the Lab has received an additional $19 million for environmental

260

DOE Surpasses Cleanup Target Ahead of Schedule | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Surpasses Cleanup Target Ahead of Schedule Surpasses Cleanup Target Ahead of Schedule DOE Surpasses Cleanup Target Ahead of Schedule May 12, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy announced today it has surpassed one of the Obama Administration's High Priority Performance Goals five months ahead of schedule in its effort to clean up the legacy of the Cold War. Through a $6 billion American Recovery and Reinvestment Act investment, the Department's cleanup footprint has been reduced by 45 percent, from 931 square miles to 516 square miles. By achieving this reduction, the Department is on track to reduce its overall cleanup footprint by approximately 90 percent by 2015. Footprint reduction lowers costs associated with site surveillance and maintenance and helps protect the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature syngas cleanup" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

The Application of NEPA to CERCLA Cleanups | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

The Application of NEPA to CERCLA Cleanups The Application of NEPA to CERCLA Cleanups The Application of NEPA to CERCLA Cleanups On March 31, 1994, officials from the Departrnent of Energy (DOE), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) met with then Acting Assistant Attorney General Lois Schiffer and other representatives of the Department of Justice (DOJ) to discuss the issue of the relationship of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) to the cleanup of federal facilities under the CERCLA Superfund program. The meeting focused on proposals for addressing problems that have arisen from DOE's attempts to integrate the procedural and analytical approaches of NEPA into the CERCLA cleanup process. This document describes what was discussed at the meeting and the consensus reached there.

262

DOE Surpasses Cleanup Target Ahead of Schedule: Recovery Act Investment  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE Surpasses Cleanup Target Ahead of Schedule: Recovery Act DOE Surpasses Cleanup Target Ahead of Schedule: Recovery Act Investment Saves Money, Trains Workers, Creates Jobs DOE Surpasses Cleanup Target Ahead of Schedule: Recovery Act Investment Saves Money, Trains Workers, Creates Jobs May 12, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy announced today it has surpassed one of the Obama Administration's High Priority Performance Goals five months ahead of schedule in its effort to clean up the legacy of the Cold War. Through a $6 billion American Recovery and Reinvestment Act investment, the Department's cleanup footprint has been reduced by 45 percent, from 931 square miles to 516 square miles. By achieving this reduction, the Department is on track to reduce its overall cleanup footprint by

263

IDAHO OPERATIONS OFFICE NAMES NEW IDAHO CLEANUP PROJECT MANAGER |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

IDAHO OPERATIONS OFFICE NAMES NEW IDAHO CLEANUP PROJECT MANAGER IDAHO OPERATIONS OFFICE NAMES NEW IDAHO CLEANUP PROJECT MANAGER IDAHO OPERATIONS OFFICE NAMES NEW IDAHO CLEANUP PROJECT MANAGER June 29, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Brad Bugger (208) 526-0833 Idaho Falls, ID - The Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office today announced that James Cooper has been named deputy manager of its highly-successful Idaho Cleanup Project, which oversees the environmental cleanup and waste management mission at DOE's Idaho site. Cooper has more than 30 years of experience in commercial and government engineering and management, including an eight month stint as acting Deputy Manager for EM. He has extensive experience in business management associated with program planning, development and administration. His experience includes all project phases from conceptual planning, cost and

264

EM's December Newsletter Recaps Cold War Cleanup Accomplishments in 2013  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EM's December Newsletter Recaps Cold War Cleanup Accomplishments EM's December Newsletter Recaps Cold War Cleanup Accomplishments in 2013 EM's December Newsletter Recaps Cold War Cleanup Accomplishments in 2013 December 24, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - On Dec. 19, EM completed demolition of the 4.8 million-square-foot Building K-25 at Oak Ridge, a milestone that capped a busy and successful 2013 for the Cold War cleanup program. The demolition was one of EM's most significant achievements this year, and it is captured in this newsletter issue along with dozens of other notable accomplishments across the EM complex. Read about EM's productive year, including cleanup of buildings and waste sites along the Columbia River in Washington state, progress in the disposition of transuranic waste at Idaho and other sites and preparations for a major demolition at the West Valley

265

Idaho Site Advances Recovery Act Cleanup after Inventing Effective  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Site Advances Recovery Act Cleanup after Inventing Effective Site Advances Recovery Act Cleanup after Inventing Effective Treatment Idaho Site Advances Recovery Act Cleanup after Inventing Effective Treatment For the first time in history, workers at the Idaho site achieved success in the initial cleanup of potentially dangerous sodium in a decommissioned nuclear reactor using an innovative treatment process. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act invested $70 million in the project, which employs 130 workers. DOE officials cheered the outcome and praised the team that designed and implemented the innovative sodium treatment for which the DOE has filed a provisional patent application. Idaho Site Advances Recovery Act Cleanup after Inventing Effective Treatment More Documents & Publications Experimental Breeder Reactor-II Primary Tank System Wash Water Workshop

266

EM, UCOR Quickly Reconcile Oak Ridge Cleanup Contract | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EM, UCOR Quickly Reconcile Oak Ridge Cleanup Contract EM, UCOR Quickly Reconcile Oak Ridge Cleanup Contract EM, UCOR Quickly Reconcile Oak Ridge Cleanup Contract July 12, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis DOE and UCOR employees held an event today celebrating the recent contract reconciliation. DOE and UCOR employees held an event today celebrating the recent contract reconciliation. OAK RIDGE, Tenn. - At a ceremony today, Oak Ridge's Environmental Management (EM) program and its prime contractor, URS | CH2M Oak Ridge, LLC (UCOR) celebrated the completion of the site's reconciled cleanup contract. The newly aligned contract accurately specifies the projects and activities that the site's cleanup contractor will perform. "The speedy completion of this process is a testament to DOE and UCOR contract teams and managers," said Sue Cange, acting manager of the Oak

267

The Application of NEPA to CERCLA Cleanups | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

The Application of NEPA to CERCLA Cleanups The Application of NEPA to CERCLA Cleanups The Application of NEPA to CERCLA Cleanups On March 31, 1994, officials from the Departrnent of Energy (DOE), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) met with then Acting Assistant Attorney General Lois Schiffer and other representatives of the Department of Justice (DOJ) to discuss the issue of the relationship of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) to the cleanup of federal facilities under the CERCLA Superfund program. The meeting focused on proposals for addressing problems that have arisen from DOE's attempts to integrate the procedural and analytical approaches of NEPA into the CERCLA cleanup process. This document describes what was discussed at the meeting and the consensus reached there.

268

Colorado and the Accelerated Cleanup at Rocky Flats  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When the Rocky Flats closure project was declared complete in October 2005, it was the largest environmental cleanup to date. Even more impressive, it was ahead of schedule and well under budget. Several factors combined to produce this success including a performance-based contract with financial incentives, development and application of innovative technologies, and a regulator-backed accelerated approach to the cleanup process. The factor in this success in which the State of Colorado had the largest role was in developing and enforcing the Rocky Flats Cleanup Agreement. In compliance with this agreement, cleanup was accomplished by means of multiple interim actions that led to a comprehensive final decision at the end. A key element that allowed the accelerated cleanup was constant consultation among DOE, its contractor, and the regulators plus collaboration with stakeholders. (authors)

Spreng, C. [Public Health and Environment, Colorado Dept., Denver, CO (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Syngas methanation for substitute natural gas over Ni–Mg/Al2O3 catalyst in fixed and fluidized bed reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A comparative study was conducted for laboratory syngas methanation over a self-made Ni–Mg/Al2O3 catalyst to demonstrate the technical advantages of fluidized bed over fixed bed reactor. At different reaction temperatures, gas velocities and pressures, the CO conversion and selectivity to CH4 in fluidized bed were shown to be higher than in fixed bed, and much closer to the thermodynamic equilibriums. The spent catalysts from fluidized bed methanation had distinctively low and easy-oxidizing deposited carbon in comparison with that from fixed bed. The results were attributed to the bigger effective catalytic surface, better heat and mass transfer in fluidized bed reactor.

Jiao Liu; Wenlong Shen; Dianmiao Cui; Jian Yu; Fabing Su; Guangwen Xu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Effects of Combustion-Induced Vortex Breakdown on Flashback Limits of Syngas-Fueled Gas Turbine Combustors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Turbine combustors of advanced power systems have goals to achieve very low pollutants emissions, fuel variability, and fuel flexibility. Future generation gas turbine combustors should tolerate fuel compositions ranging from natural gas to a broad range of syngas without sacrificing operational advantages and low emission characteristics. Additionally, current designs of advanced turbine combustors use various degrees of swirl and lean premixing for stabilizing flames and controlling high temperature NOx formation zones. However, issues of fuel variability and NOx control through premixing also bring a number of concerns, especially combustor flashback and flame blowout. Flashback is a combustion condition at which the flame propagates upstream against the gas stream into the burner tube. Flashback is a critical issue for premixed combustor designs, because it not only causes serious hardware damages but also increases pollutant emissions. In swirl stabilized lean premixed turbine combustors onset of flashback may occur due to (i) boundary layer flame propagation (critical velocity gradient), (ii) turbulent flame propagation in core flow, (iii) combustion instabilities, and (iv) upstream flame propagation induced by combustion induced vortex breakdown (CIVB). Flashback due to first two foregoing mechanisms is a topic of classical interest and has been studied extensively. Generally, analytical theories and experimental determinations of laminar and turbulent burning velocities model these mechanisms with sufficient precision for design usages. However, the swirling flow complicates the flashback processes in premixed combustions and the first two mechanisms inadequately describe the flashback propensity of most practical combustor designs. The presence of hydrogen in syngas significantly increases the potential for flashback. Due to high laminar burning velocity and low lean flammability limit, hydrogen tends to shift the combustor operating conditions towards flashback regime. Even a small amount of hydrogen in a fuel blend triggers the onset of flashback by altering the kinetics and thermophysical characteristics of the mixture. Additionally, the presence of hydrogen in the fuel mixture modifies the response of the flame to the global effects of stretch and preferential diffusion. Despite its immense importance in fuel flexible combustor design, little is known about the magnitude of fuel effects on CIVB induced flashback mechanism. Hence, this project investigates the effects of syngas compositions on flashback resulting from combustion induced vortex breakdown. The project uses controlled experiments and parametric modeling to understand the velocity field and flame interaction leading to CIVB driven flashback.

Ahsan Choudhuri

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

271

Saudis map $450 million gulf spill cleanup  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on Saudi Arabia which has earmarked about $450 million to clean up Persian Gulf beaches polluted by history's worst oil spills, created during the Persian Gulf crisis. Details of the proposed cleanup measures were outlined by Saudi environmental officials at a seminar on the environment in Dubai, OPEC News Agency reported. The seminar was sponsored by the Gulf Area Oil Companies Mutual Aid Organization, an environmental cooperative agency set up by Persian Gulf governments. Meantime, a Saudi government report has outlined early efforts designed to contain the massive oil spills that hit the Saudi coast before oil could contaminate water intakes at the huge desalination plants serving Riyadh and cooling water facilities at Al Jubail.

Not Available

1991-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

272

Effects of Fuel-Side Nitrogen Dilution on Structure and NOx Formation of Turbulent Syngas Non-premixed Jet Flames  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this syngas non-premixed burner, the nozzle inner and outer diameters are 7.72 mm and 9.46 mm, respectively. ... Prathap, C.; Ray, A.; Ravi, M. R.Investigation of nitrogen dilution effects on laminar burning velocity and flame stability of syngas fuel at atmospheric condition Combust. ...

Jeongwon Lee; Sangwoon Park; Yongmo Kim

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Syngas chemical looping gasification process: oxygen carrier particle selection and performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The syngas chemical looping (SCL) process coproduces hydrogen and electricity. The process involves reducing metal oxides with syngas followed by regeneration of reduced metal oxides with steam and air in a cyclic manner. Iron oxide is determined to be a desired oxygen carrier for hydrogen production considering overall properties including oxygen carrying capacity, thermodynamic properties, reaction kinetics, physical strength, melting points, and environmental effects. An iron oxide based particle can maintain good reactivity for more than 100 reduction-oxidation (redox) cycles in a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). The particle exhibits a good crushing strength (>20 MPa) and low attrition rate. Fixed bed experiments are carried out which reaffirm its reactivity. More than 99.75% of syngas is converted during the reduction stage. During the regeneration stage, hydrogen with an average purity of 99.8% is produced. 23 refs., 6 figs., 10 tabs.

Fanxing Li; Hyung Ray Kim; Deepak Sridhar; Fei Wang; Liang Zeng; Joseph Chen; L.-S. Fan [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States). William G. Lowrie Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

274

Conversion of wet ethanol to syngas via filtration combustion: An experimental and computational investigation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ethanol is often promoted as the biofuel of the future, yet its acceptance as a fuel for combustion devices is limited by the cost of production. Since most combustion engines cannot tolerate high concentrations of water, the ethanol must be distilled and dehydrated, requiring large amounts of energy. Ethanol also has great potential as a feedstock for syngas consisting of hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and other species. The conversion, called reforming, of ethanol to syngas does not necessarily require dehydration or distillation, thus eliminating or reducing the costs associated with those processes. In addition, there is potential for obtaining additional hydrogen from the water in the mixture. In this paper, we investigate the conversion of wet ethanol, or ethanol that has not been fully distilled or dehydrated, to syngas in an inert porous reactor. Experimental and computational results over a range of equivalence ratios, inlet velocities, and water fractions are presented. The results indicate that wet ethanol is a promising biological source for hydrogen.

Colin H. Smith; Daniel M. Leahey; Liane E. Miller; Janet L. Ellzey

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Effect of steam injection location on syngas obtained from an air–steam gasifier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract For a fluidized-bed gasifier, reaction conditions vary along the height of the reactor. Hence, the steam injection location may have a considerable effect on the syngas quality. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of steam injection location and steam-to-biomass ratio (SBR) on the syngas quality generated from an air–steam gasification of switchgrass in a 2–5 kg/h autothermal fluidized-bed gasifier. Steam injection locations of 51, 152, and 254 mm above the distributor plate and \\{SBRs\\} of 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 were selected. Results showed that the syngas H2 and CO yields were significantly influenced by the steam injection location (p gasifier efficiencies (cold gas efficiency of 67%, hot gas efficiency of 72%, and carbon conversion efficiency of 96%) were at the steam injection location of 254 mm and SBR of 0.2.

Ashokkumar M. Sharma; Ajay Kumar; Raymond L. Huhnke

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Effect of syngas composition on combustion and exhaust emission characteristics in a pilot-ignited dual-fuel engine operated in PREMIER combustion mode  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to investigate the performance and emissions of a pilot-ignited, supercharged, dual-fuel engine powered by different types of syngas at various equivalence ratios. It was found that if certain operating conditions were maintained, conventional engine combustion could be transformed into combustion with two-stage heat release. This mode of combustion has been investigated in previous studies with natural gas, and has been given the name \\{PREmixed\\} Mixture Ignition in the End-gas Region (PREMIER) combustion. PREMIER combustion begins as premixed flame propagation, and then, because of mixture autoignition in the end-gas region, ahead of the propagating flame front, a transition occurs, with a rapid increase in the heat release rate. It was determined that the mass of fuel burned during the second stage affected the rate of maximum pressure rise. As the fuel mass fraction burned during the second stage increased, the rate of maximum pressure rise also increased, with a gradual decrease in the delay between the first increase in the heat release rate following pilot fuel injection and the point when the transition to the second stage occurred. The H2 and CO2 content of syngas affected the engine performance and emissions. Increased H2 content led to higher combustion temperatures and efficiency, lower CO and HC emissions, but higher \\{NOx\\} emissions. Increased CO2 content influenced performance and emissions only when it reached a certain level. In the most recent studies, the mean combustion temperature, indicated thermal efficiency, and \\{NOx\\} emissions decreased only when the CO2 content of the syngas increased to 34%. PREMIER combustion did not have a major effect on engine cycle-to-cycle variation. The coefficient of variation of the indicated mean effective pressure (COVIMEP) was less than 4% for all types of fuel at various equivalence ratios, indicating that the combustion was within the stability range for engine operation.

Ulugbek Azimov; Eiji Tomita; Nobuyuki Kawahara; Yuji Harada

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Syngas as an Additional Energy Carrier in the Pulp and Paper Industry: A Mill-Wide System Analysis of a Combined Drying Concept, Utilizing On-Site Generated Gas and Steam  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

syngas combusted in a burner; flue gases mixed into the impingement section drying air ... Furthermore, there is an uncertainty about the assumption that char burns in the bed, because the char from the gasification reactor that enters the boiler BFB might partly elutriate from the bed and burn in the boiler freeboard, which would further lower the bed temperature. ... 25-45% of the initial fixed carbon followed this pathway, with the remainder being directly burnt as coarse char. ...

Christer Gustavsson; Lars Nilsson; Roger Renström

2014-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

278

The Development of Warm Gas Cleanup Technologies for the Removal of Sulfur Containing Species from Steam Hydrogasification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

economic comparison of IGCC power plants with cold gas cleanup and hot gas cleanup units using Indian coals.

Luo, Qian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Combustion analysis of an equimolar mixture of methane and syngas in a surface-stabilized combustion burner for household appliances  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The primary objective of this work is to study the combustion of an equimolar mixture of methane and syngas (CH4–SG) in a ceramic surface-stabilized combustion burner. We examine the effects of the fuel composition, the air-to-fuel ratio and the thermal input on the flame stability, the radiation efficiency and the pollutant emissions (CO and NOx). In this study, we evaluate a syngas with a high hydrogen content that is similar to those obtained by coal gasification (50–60% H2) using Sasol/Lurgi gasification technology and biomass gasification, for example. To determine the effect of the air-to-fuel ratio (?), the burner performance is analyzed at ? = 1.4 and ? = 1.1. Some studies have reported optimal operating conditions for ? = 1.4, whereas for hydrocarbons, the proximity to stoichiometric conditions at the ? = 1.1 air-to-fuel ratio produces the highest possible laminar burning velocity and flame temperature. The thermal inputs evaluated in this study correspond to three values (1.0, 1.8, and 2.5 kW) found in household appliances and for cooking appliances in particular. The results for this experimental burner design indicate that the macroscopic flame shape for an equimolar CH4–SG mixture is approximately the same as that for CH4. Moreover, the pollutant concentrations in the flue gas are generally below 85 ppm for CO and 15 ppm for NOx. However, the thermal input and the air-to-fuel ratio significantly affect the flame structure, the radiation efficiency and the pollutant emissions.

Carlos E. Arrieta; Andrés A. Amell

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Conceptual design of syngas production systems with almost net-zero carbon dioxide emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This work describes three different configurations of syngas production processes using a combination of SMR (steam methane reforming) and DRM (dry reforming of methane). The ideal SMR + DRM process ensures the maximum product yield, the heat-integrated SMR + DRM process fulfills the maximum heat recovery, and the stand-alone SMR + DRM process effectively suppress net CO2 (carbon dioxide) emissions. Through specific optimization algorithms, the syngas production systems subject to almost net-zero CO2 emissions are successfully verified by simulations in Aspen Plus environment.

Wei Wu; Hsiao-Tung Yang; Jenn-Jiang Hwang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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281

Enhancing mass transfer and ethanol production in syngas fermentation of Clostridium carboxidivorans P7 through a monolithic biofilm reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Syngas fermentation is a promising process for producing fuels and chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass. Currently syngas fermentation faces several engineering challenges, with gas-to-liquid mass transfer limitation representing the major bottleneck. The aim of this work is to evaluate the performance of a monolithic biofilm reactor (MBR) as a novel reactor configuration for syngas fermentation. The volumetric mass transfer coefficient (kLa) of the MBR was evaluated in abiotic conditions within a wide range of gas flow rates (i.e., gas velocity in monolithic channels) and liquid flow rates (i.e., liquid velocity in the channels). The kLa values of the MBR were higher than those of a controlled bubble column reactor (BCR) in certain conditions, due to the slug flow pattern in the monolithic channels. A continuous syngas fermentation using Clostridium carboxidivorans P7 was conducted in the MBR system under varying operational conditions, with the variables including syngas flow rate, liquid recirculation between the monolithic column and reservoir, and dilution rate. It was found that the syngas fermentation performance – measured by such parameters as syngas utilization efficiency, ethanol concentration and productivity, and ratio of ethanol to acetic acid – depended not only on the mass transfer efficiency but also on the biofouling or abrading of the biofilm attached on the monolithic channel wall. At a condition of 300 mL/min of syngas flow rate, 500 mL/min of liquid flow rate, and 0.48 day?1 of dilution rate, the MBR produced much higher syngas (CO/H2) utilization efficiency and much greater metabolite (ethanol/acetic acid) productivity than what was obtained using a traditional bubble column reactor. The study demonstrates the great potential of MBR as a promising reactor configuration for syngas fermentation with high mass transfer efficiency, low energy consumption, and high metabolite productivity.

Yanwen Shen; Robert Brown; Zhiyou Wen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Hazardous Sites Cleanup Act (Pennsylvania) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hazardous Sites Cleanup Act (Pennsylvania) Hazardous Sites Cleanup Act (Pennsylvania) Hazardous Sites Cleanup Act (Pennsylvania) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Pennsylvania Program Type Environmental Regulations Grant Program Provider Department of Environmental Protection This Act tasks the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection with regulating hazardous waste. The department is charged with siting, review, permitting and development of hazardous waste treatment and disposal facilities in order to protect public health and safety, foster economic growth and protect the environment. Pennsylvania law establishes a fund to provide to the Department the

283

Modeling of fixed bed methanation reactor for syngas production: Operating window and performance characteristics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The present work focuses on the development of phenomenological model for the bio-syngas to methane conversion process. One dimensional heterogeneous and pseudo-homogeneous model were simulated for a typical pilot plant scale fixed bed methanator processing 55 mol/h of CO (total molar flow rate of 310 mol/h) with inlet composition of H2/CO = 3, CO2/CO = 1, CH4/CO = 0.5 at 550 K and 1 atm. Performance of the fixed bed reactor at different operating conditions like CO2/CO ratio, H2/CO ratio, effect of H2O in the feed was studied. It was found that for feeds that were not pre-enriched with hydrogen, presence of water and water gas shift activity was found to decrease the catalyst inventory substantially. CO2 in the inlet feed stream would help to decrease the temperature due to dilution effect and more importantly, can be chosen to maximize methane yield per mole of CO converted. Further, the model was simulated to predict the performance characteristics of reactor with a mixture containing two types of catalyst, one of them being specifically added to increase H2/CO ratio in feed through water gas shift reaction. The work also laid the importance of incorporating pore diffusion and external mass transfer locally in the computation of actual catalyst inventory and reactor volume. The work was useful in selection of operating window and assessing the various viable options for an industrial reactor. The model developed will serve in selection of operability window for commercialization of substitute natural gas synthesis (SNG) process.

Naren Rajan Parlikkad; Stéphane Chambrey; Pascal Fongarland; Nouria Fatah; Andrei Khodakov; Sandra Capela; Olivier Guerrini

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Single-Step Syngas-to-Distillates (S2D) Process Based on Biomass-Derived Syngas – A Techno-Economic Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study reports the comparison of biomass gasification based syngas-to-distillate (S2D) systems using techno-economic analysis (TEA). Three cases, state of technology (SOT) case, goal case, and conventional case, were compared in terms of performance and cost. The SOT case and goal case represent technology being developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for a process starting with syngas using a single-step dual-catalyst reactor for distillate generation (S2D process). The conventional case mirrors the two-step S2D process previously utilized and reported by Mobil using natural gas feedstock and consisting of separate syngas-to-methanol and methanol-to-gasoline (MTG) processes. Analysis of the three cases revealed that the goal case could indeed reduce fuel production cost over the conventional case, but that the SOT was still more expensive than the conventional. The SOT case suffers from low one-pass yield and high selectivity to light hydrocarbons, both of which drive up production cost. Sensitivity analysis indicated that light hydrocarbon yield, single pass conversion efficiency, and reactor space velocity are the key factors driving the high cost for the SOT case.

Zhu, Yunhua; Jones, Susanne B.; Biddy, Mary J.; Dagle, Robert A.; Palo, Daniel R.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Single-Step Syngas-to-Distillates (S2D) Process Based on Biomass-Derived Syngas - A Techno-Economic Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study compared biomass gasification based syngas-to-distillate (S2D) systems using techno-economic analysis (TEA). Three cases, state of technology (SOT), goal, and conventional, were compared in terms of performance and cost. The SOT case represented the best available experimental results for a process starting with syngas using a single-step dual-catalyst reactor for distillate generation. The conventional case mirrored a conventional two-step S2D process consisting of separate syngas-to-methanol and methanol-to-gasoline (MTG) processes. The goal case assumed the same performance as the conventional, but with a single-step S2D technology. TEA results revealed that the SOT was more expensive than the conventional and goal cases. The SOT case suffers from low one-pass yield and high selectivity to light hydrocarbons, both of which drive up production cost. Sensitivity analysis indicated that light hydrocarbon yield and single pass conversion efficiency were the key factors driving the high cost for the SOT case.

Zhu, Y.; Jones, S. B.; Biddy, M. J.; Dagle, R. A.; Palo, D. R.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

PARTICULATE HOT GAS STREAM CLEANUP TECHNICAL ISSUES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the fourth annual report describing the activities performed under Task 1 of Contract No. DE-AC21-94MC31160. The analyses of hot gas stream cleanup (HGCU) ashes and descriptions of filter performance studied under this contract are designed to address problems with filter operation that are apparently linked to characteristics of the collected ash. This work is designed to generate a data base of the key characteristics of ashes collected from operating advanced particle filters and to relate these ash properties to the operation and performance of these filters and their components. This report summarizes characterizations of ash and char samples from pressurized fluidized-bed combustion and gasification facilities. Efforts are under way to develop a method for preserving fragile filter cakes formed on ceramic filter elements. The HGCU data base was formatted for Microsoft Access 97 ® . Plans for the remainder of the project include characterization of additional samples collected during site visits to the Department of Energy / Southern Company Services Power Systems Development Facility and completion and delivery of the HGCU data base.

None

1999-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

287

PARTICULATE HOT GAS STREAM CLEANUP TECHNICAL ISSUES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the fourth annual report describing the activities performed under Task 1 of Contract No. DE-AC21-94MC31160. The analyses of hot gas stream cleanup (HGCU) ashes and descriptions of filter performance studied under this contract are designed to address problems with filter operation that are apparently linked to characteristics of the collected ash. This work is designed to generate a data base of the key characteristics of ashes collected from operating advanced particle filters and to relate these ash properties to the operation and performance of these filters and their components. This report summarizes characterizations of ash and char samples from pressurized fluidized-bed combustion and gasification facilities. Efforts are under way to develop a method for preserving fragile filter cakes formed on ceramic filter elements. The HGCU data base was formatted for Microsoft Access 97{reg_sign}. Plans for the remainder of the project include characterization of additional samples collected during site visits to the Department of Energy/Southern Company Services Power Systems Development Facility and completion and delivery of the HGCU data base.

NONE

1999-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

288

PARTICULATE HOT GAS STREAM CLEANUP TECHNICAL ISSUES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the fourth annual report describing the activities performed under Task 1 of Contract No. DE-AC21-94MC31160. The analyses of hot gas stream cleanup (HGCU) ashes and descriptions of filter performance studied under this contract are designed to address problems with filter operation that are apparently linked to characteristics of the collected ash. This work is designed to generate a data base of the key characteristics of ashes collected from operating advanced particle filters and to relate these ash properties to the operation and performance of these filters and their components. This report summarizes characterizations of ash and char samples from pressurized fluidized-bed combustion and gasification facilities. Efforts are under way to develop a method for preserving fragile filter cakes formed on ceramic filter elements. The HGCU data base was formatted for Microsoft Access 97 ® . Plans for the remainder of the project include characterization of additional samples collected during site visits to the Department of Energy / Southern Company Services Power Systems Development Facility and completion and delivery of the HGCU data base.

NONE

1998-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

289

SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup American Recovery and Reinvestment Act can now claim that 85 percent of the Savannah River Site (SRS) has been cleaned up with the recent completion of the Lower Three Runs (stream) Project. Twenty miles long, Lower Three Runs leaves the main body of the 310-square mile site and runs through parts of Barnwell and Allendale Counties until it flows into the Savannah River. Government property on both sides of the stream acts as a buffer as it runs through privately-owned property. Completing this project reduces the site's footprint by another 10 percent. SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup More Documents & Publications

290

EM Leads Successful Workshop Supporting Fukushima Cleanup | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Successful Workshop Supporting Fukushima Cleanup Successful Workshop Supporting Fukushima Cleanup EM Leads Successful Workshop Supporting Fukushima Cleanup August 8, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis TOKYO - An EM-led U.S. delegation conducted its third workshop last month to provide expertise to Japanese officials leading the cleanup of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant site and surrounding area, this time addressing priorities identified by Japan's government agencies. At the request of the Japanese Ministry of Environment (MOE) and Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI), the delegation's technical experts discussed their experience related to the behavior of radioactive cesium in the environment and other topics. The delegation included representatives from Savannah River, Pacific Northwest, Lawrence Berkeley, Lawrence

291

F Reactor Area Cleanup Complete | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

F Reactor Area Cleanup Complete F Reactor Area Cleanup Complete F Reactor Area Cleanup Complete September 19, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Cameron Hardy, DOE Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov 509-376-5365 RICHLAND, Wash. - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contractors have cleaned up the F Reactor Area, the first reactor area at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington state to be fully remediated. While six of Hanford's nine plutonium production reactors have been sealed up, or cocooned, the F Reactor Area is the first to have all of its associated buildings and waste sites cleaned up in addition to having its reactor sealed up. "The cleanup of the F Reactor Area shows the tremendous progress workers are making along Hanford's River Corridor," said Dave Huizenga, Senior Advisor for the DOE Office of Environmental Management. "The River

292

SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup American Recovery and Reinvestment Act can now claim that 85 percent of the Savannah River Site (SRS) has been cleaned up with the recent completion of the Lower Three Runs (stream) Project. Twenty miles long, Lower Three Runs leaves the main body of the 310-square mile site and runs through parts of Barnwell and Allendale Counties until it flows into the Savannah River. Government property on both sides of the stream acts as a buffer as it runs through privately-owned property. Completing this project reduces the site's footprint by another 10 percent. SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup More Documents & Publications

293

Independent Oversight Activity Report, Idaho Cleanup Project - November  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Independent Oversight Activity Report, Idaho Cleanup Project - Independent Oversight Activity Report, Idaho Cleanup Project - November 2013 Independent Oversight Activity Report, Idaho Cleanup Project - November 2013 November 2013 Pre-restart Visit to the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board [HIAR-ICP-2013-11-19] This Independent Activity Report documents an oversight activity conducted by the Office of Health, Safety and Security's (HSS) Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations from November 19-22, 2013, at the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit facility of the Idaho Cleanup Project. The activity consisted of the HSS Site Lead touring the newly modified IWTU facility to observe the many process and equipment modifications that have been made since the facility was shut down. In addition, the Site Lead

294

Idaho Site Completes Cleanup Milestone Ahead of Schedule  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

News Media Contact: News Media Contact: Erik Simpson (208) 360-0426 For Immediate Release Date: June 23, 2010 Idaho Site Completes Cleanup Milestone Ahead of Schedule Idaho Falls, ID � The Department of Energy�s Idaho Operations Office, through the efforts of its cleanup contractor, CH2M-WG Idaho (CWI), recently reached a key cleanup milestone three weeks ahead of schedule by completing the transfer of nearly 6.6 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel from wet to dry storage. �The transfer of spent nuclear fuel from wet to dry storage represents a major contract milestone completion by CWI, a five year endeavor,� said Jim Cooper, DOE-ID Acting Deputy Manager for the Idaho Cleanup Project. �Completion of this campaign places the spent fuel in a safer configuration for the environment, complies with DOE�s commitment to the

295

Latest 200 Area Demolition Offers Snapshot of Hanford Cleanup Progress:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Latest 200 Area Demolition Offers Snapshot of Hanford Cleanup Latest 200 Area Demolition Offers Snapshot of Hanford Cleanup Progress: Recovery Act Funding Allows Demolition of Power Houses Ahead of Schedule Latest 200 Area Demolition Offers Snapshot of Hanford Cleanup Progress: Recovery Act Funding Allows Demolition of Power Houses Ahead of Schedule March 4, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Hardy, DOE (509) 376-5365 Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov Andre Armstrong, CHPRC (509) 376-6773 andre_l_armstrong@rl.g RICHLAND, WASH. - Today's safe and successful explosive demolition at Hanford's 200 Area by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is the latest reminder of progress being made on cleanup as a result of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act investments. "Recovery Act funds allowed us to accelerate the schedule for removing

296

New Contract Helps Portsmouth GDP Cleanup | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Contract Helps Portsmouth GDP Cleanup Contract Helps Portsmouth GDP Cleanup New Contract Helps Portsmouth GDP Cleanup August 18, 2010 - 10:47am Addthis Elizabeth Meckes Elizabeth Meckes Director of User Experience & Digital Technologies, Office of Public Affairs Last week, we took a closer look at the dismantling of the final W62 warhead, a major milestone in the nation's efforts to reduce the amount of nuclear weapons in its stockpile. But after five decades of nuclear weapons production, the Cold War didn't just create a stockpile -- it left 1.5 million cubic meters of solid waste and 88 million gallons of liquid waste. This waste requires treatment and permanent safe storage in gaseous diffusion plants, like the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) in south-central Ohio. This week, the Department of Energy accelerated Portsmouth GDP cleanup

297

DOE Idaho site reaches 20-year cleanup milestone  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

IDAHO FALLS, IDAHO, 83403 IDAHO FALLS, IDAHO, 83403 Media Contact: Brad Bugger (208) 526-0833 For Immediate Release: January 19, 2012 DOE Idaho site reaches 20-year cleanup milestone IDAHO FALLS, ID- In two decades of Superfund cleanup work, the U.S. Department of Energy's Idaho site has removed hundreds of thousands of cubic yards of radioactive and hazardously contaminated soils, excavated radioactive waste buried since the 1950s, removed three nuclear reactors and hundreds of buildings, completely closed three major nuclear facilities and removed thousands of unexploded ordnance shells and fragments. Last month marked the 20-year anniversary of the signing and implementation of a cleanup agreement between DOE, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the state of Idaho. In two decades, the cleanup agreement known

298

EM's Indefinite Delivery/Indefinite Quantity Cleanup Contracts |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EM's Indefinite Delivery/Indefinite Quantity Cleanup Contracts EM's Indefinite Delivery/Indefinite Quantity Cleanup Contracts EM's Indefinite Delivery/Indefinite Quantity Cleanup Contracts The Office of Environmental Management (EM) has 23 Indefinite Delivery/Indefinite Quantity (IDIQ) contracts to provide cleanup services at EM sites across the United States. The scope of work of the IDIQ contracts includes: environmental remediation deactivation, decommissioning, demolition and removal of contaminated facilities waste management regulatory compliance These nationwide, multiple-award IDIQ contracts allow EM sites to place timely, competitive and cost-effective task orders for environmental services with either large or small businesses, as determined by the complexity of the requirements. Twelve of the IDIQ contracts were awarded

299

Protecting Recovery Act Cleanup Site During Massive Wildfire | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Protecting Recovery Act Cleanup Site During Massive Wildfire Protecting Recovery Act Cleanup Site During Massive Wildfire Protecting Recovery Act Cleanup Site During Massive Wildfire Effective safety procedures in place at Los Alamos National Laboratory would have provided protections in the event that the raging Las Conchas fire had spread to the site of an American Recovery and Reinvestment Act project. "Our procedures not only placed the waste excavation site, Materials Disposal Area B (MDA-B), into a safe posture so it was well protected during the fire, but also allowed us to resume work quickly," said Project Director Al Chaloupka. Protecting Recovery Act Cleanup Site During Massive Wildfire More Documents & Publications Los Alamos Lab Completes Excavation of Waste Disposal Site Used in the 1940s

300

Independent Oversight Activity Report, Idaho Cleanup Project - November  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Activity Report, Idaho Cleanup Project - Activity Report, Idaho Cleanup Project - November 2013 Independent Oversight Activity Report, Idaho Cleanup Project - November 2013 November 2013 Pre-restart Visit to the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board [HIAR-ICP-2013-11-19] This Independent Activity Report documents an oversight activity conducted by the Office of Health, Safety and Security's (HSS) Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations from November 19-22, 2013, at the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit facility of the Idaho Cleanup Project. The activity consisted of the HSS Site Lead touring the newly modified IWTU facility to observe the many process and equipment modifications that have been made since the facility was shut down. In addition, the Site Lead

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature syngas cleanup" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

WIMAX TECHNOLOGY AT HANFORD: UPDATING INFRASTRUCTURE, ACCELERATING CLEANUP  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

WIMAX TECHNOLOGY AT HANFORD: UPDATING INFRASTRUCTURE, ACCELERATING WIMAX TECHNOLOGY AT HANFORD: UPDATING INFRASTRUCTURE, ACCELERATING CLEANUP WIMAX TECHNOLOGY AT HANFORD: UPDATING INFRASTRUCTURE, ACCELERATING CLEANUP December 1, 2009 - 12:00pm Addthis Richland, WA - In direct support of Hanford cleanup and the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act (ARRA) accelerated cleanup initiatives, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Operations Office (RL) is teaming with the Site services contractor, Mission Support Alliance, LLC (MSA), CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company and Washington River Protection Services Company to implement a WiMAX-based communications infrastructure at Hanford to augment the existing fiber optic and Wi-Fi-based systems. Wi-Fi and WiMAX are both considered last mile technologies that carry signals from telecommunications backbones (in this case hubs or access

302

Latest 200 Area Demolition Offers Snapshot of Hanford Cleanup Progress:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Latest 200 Area Demolition Offers Snapshot of Hanford Cleanup Latest 200 Area Demolition Offers Snapshot of Hanford Cleanup Progress: Recovery Act Funding Allows Demolition of Power Houses Ahead of Schedule Latest 200 Area Demolition Offers Snapshot of Hanford Cleanup Progress: Recovery Act Funding Allows Demolition of Power Houses Ahead of Schedule March 4, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Hardy, DOE (509) 376-5365 Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov Andre Armstrong, CHPRC (509) 376-6773 andre_l_armstrong@rl.g RICHLAND, WASH. - Today's safe and successful explosive demolition at Hanford's 200 Area by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is the latest reminder of progress being made on cleanup as a result of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act investments. "Recovery Act funds allowed us to accelerate the schedule for removing

303

Independent Oversight Assessment, Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - November 2012 Independent Oversight Assessment, Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - November 2012 November 2012 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an independent assessment of nuclear safety culture at the DOE Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project (SBWTP). The primary objective of the evaluation was to provide information regarding the status of the safety culture at SBWTP. The data collection phase of the assessment occurred in April and May 2012. SBWTP is one of DOE's largest nuclear

304

Secretary Chu, Governor Gregoire Issue Statement on Hanford Cleanup |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Chu, Governor Gregoire Issue Statement on Hanford Cleanup Chu, Governor Gregoire Issue Statement on Hanford Cleanup Secretary Chu, Governor Gregoire Issue Statement on Hanford Cleanup January 15, 2013 - 7:35pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON -- U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu and Governor Chris Gregoire issued the following joint statement on the cleanup efforts underway at Hanford: "Over the past several months, the Department of Energy and the State of Washington have worked together closely to ensure the Waste Treatment Plant is on a stable path to resolving the technical issues, completing construction, and beginning to treat waste in the coming years. "Based on insight gathered from a number leading scientific experts, the Department is now confident construction activities at the High-Level Waste

305

EM SSAB Contributes Community Views to Clean-up Decisions  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

EM has made public participation a fundamental component of its cleanup mission and has found that the EM SSAB, which draws upon diverse community viewpoints to provide advice and recommendations,...

306

PPPL's Earth Week features Colloquium on NYC green plan, cleanup...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

clean up the area outside PPPL's Lyman Spitzer Building during the Earth Day cleanup at PPPL on April 22. From left to right: Virginia Finley, Julia Toth, Bill Davis, Glenn...

307

Wendy Cain named portfolio federal project director for ETTP cleanup  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management has named Wendy Cain as its new portfolio federal project director for cleanup of the East Tennessee Technology Park.

308

IMPORTANT CLEANUP PROJECT TO RESUME AT IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(208) 334-2100 For Immediate Release: June 27, 2013 IMPORTANT CLEANUP PROJECT TO RESUME AT IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY (IDAHO FALLS) - Governor C.L. "Butch" Otter joined U.S....

309

2012 Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus Briefings | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2 Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus Briefings 2 Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus Briefings 2012 Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus Briefings The Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus serves as a way to brief members of Congress and their staff on EM headquarters and site activities, including budget, safety and project progress. 02/16/2012 - FY 2013 Budget Overview 03/07/2012 - Richland Operations Office, WA 03/21/2012 - Oak Ridge, TN 03/22/2012 - Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office, OH-KY 03/27/2012 - Safety Overview with Deputy Assistant Secretary for Safety & Security Program, Matthew Moury 03/28/2012 - Idaho Operations Office, ID 04/18/2012 - Savannah River Site, SC 04/19/2012 - Office of River Protection, WA More Documents & Publications Assistant Secretary Triay's FY 2012 EM Budget Rollout Presentation

310

WIMAX TECHNOLOGY AT HANFORD: UPDATING INFRASTRUCTURE, ACCELERATING CLEANUP  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

WIMAX TECHNOLOGY AT HANFORD: UPDATING INFRASTRUCTURE, ACCELERATING WIMAX TECHNOLOGY AT HANFORD: UPDATING INFRASTRUCTURE, ACCELERATING CLEANUP WIMAX TECHNOLOGY AT HANFORD: UPDATING INFRASTRUCTURE, ACCELERATING CLEANUP December 1, 2009 - 12:00pm Addthis Richland, WA - In direct support of Hanford cleanup and the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act (ARRA) accelerated cleanup initiatives, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Operations Office (RL) is teaming with the Site services contractor, Mission Support Alliance, LLC (MSA), CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company and Washington River Protection Services Company to implement a WiMAX-based communications infrastructure at Hanford to augment the existing fiber optic and Wi-Fi-based systems. Wi-Fi and WiMAX are both considered last mile technologies that carry signals from telecommunications backbones (in this case hubs or access

311

EM SSAB Contributes Community Views to Clean-up Decisions  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Contributes Community Views to Clean-up Decisions Contributes Community Views to Clean-up Decisions 2011 Local Board Contributions The Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB) has a unique mandate to provide input regarding the cleanup of nuclear legacy sites to the Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management (EM). Chartered under the Federal Advisory Committee Act, the EM SSAB today comprises eight local boards, located in Hanford, WA; Idaho Falls, ID: Los Alamos, NM; the Nevada National Security Site; Oak Ridge, TN; Paducah, KY; Portsmouth, OH; and the Savannah River Site, SC. EM has made public participation a fundamental component of its cleanup mission and has found that the EM SSAB, which draws upon diverse community

312

DOE Selects Contractor for California Energy Technology Engineering Center Cleanup  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Cincinnati - The Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded a competitive $25.7 million task order for cleanup activities at the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC) to North Wind of Idaho Falls, Idaho.

313

Coupling of Catalytic Partial Oxidation and Steam Reforming of Methane to Syngas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Methane-to-syngas (i.e.CO and H2...) conversion reactions involving exothermic oxidative conversion of methane and endothermic steam reforming of methane have been carried simultaneously NiO-CaO (Ni...4/02 (1.8 –...

V. R. Choudhary; A. M. Rajput; B. Prabhakar

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Economic analysis and assessment of syngas production using a modeling approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Economic analysis and modeling are essential and important issues for the development of current feedstock and process technology for bio-gasification. The objective of this study was to develop an economic model and apply to predict the unit cost of syngas production from a micro-scale bio-gasification facility. An economic model was programmed in C++ computer programming language and developed using a parametric cost approach, which included processes to calculate the total capital costs and the total operating costs. The model used measured economic data from the bio-gasification facility at Mississippi State University. The modeling results showed that the unit cost of syngas production was $1.217 for a 60 Nm-3 h-1 capacity bio-gasifier. The operating cost was the major part of the total production cost. The equipment purchase cost and the labor cost were the largest part of the total capital cost and the total operating cost, respectively. Sensitivity analysis indicated that labor costs rank the top as followed by equipment cost, loan life, feedstock cost, interest rate, utility cost, and waste treatment cost. The unit cost of syngas production increased with the increase of all parameters with exception of loan life. The annual cost regarding equipment, labor, feedstock, waste treatment, and utility cost showed a linear relationship with percent changes, while loan life and annual interest rate showed a non-linear relationship. This study provides the useful information for economic analysis and assessment of the syngas production using a modeling approach.

Kim, Hakkwan; Parajuli, Prem B.; Yu, Fei; Columbus, Eugene P.

2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

315

Performance of solid oxide fuel cells operated with coal syngas provided directly from a gasification process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are presently being developed for gasification integrated power plants that generate electricity from coal at 50+% efficiency. The interaction of trace metals in coal syngas with the Ni-based SOFC anodes is being investigated through thermodynamic analyses and in laboratory experiments, but direct test data from coal syngas exposure are sparsely available. This research effort evaluates the significance of SOFC performance losses associated with exposure of a SOFC anode to direct coal syngas. SOFC specimen of industrially relevant composition are operated in a unique mobile test skid that was deployed to the research gasifier at the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) in Wilsonville, AL. The mobile test skid interfaces with a gasifier slipstream to deliver hot syngas (up to 300°C) directly to a parallel array of 12 button cell specimen, each of which possesses an active area of approximately 2 cm2. During the 500 hour test period, all twelve cells were monitored for performance at four discrete operating current densities, and all cells maintained contact with a data acquisition system. Of these twelve, nine demonstrated good performance throughout the test, while three of the cells were partially compromised. Degradation associated with the properly functioning cells was attributed to syngas exposure and trace material attack on the anode structure that was accelerated at increasing current densities. Cells that were operated at 0 and 125 mA/cm˛ degraded at 9.1 and 10.7% per 1000 hours, respectively, while cells operated at 250 and 375 mA/cm˛ degraded at 18.9 and 16.2% per 1000 hours, respectively. Post-trial spectroscopic analysis of the anodes showed carbon, sulfur, and phosphorus deposits; no secondary Ni-metal phases were found.

Hackett, Gregory A.; Gerdes, Kirk R.; Song, Xueyan; Chen, Yun; Shutthanandan, V.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Zhu, Zihua; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Gemmen, Randall

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

316

Multi-zone modeling and simulation of syngas combustion under laminar conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of laminar models has been generally accepted, as quench distances in engines and the distances obtained for laminar flame quench calculations could be well correlated. In this work a multi-zone model is presented in order to derive the quenching distance and heat flux in laminar syngas–air flames based on recent developments in the science of combustion. Three typical mixtures of H2, CO, CH4, CO2 and N2 have been considered as representative of the syngas coming from wood gasification, and its laminar combustion is made in a static spherical vessel. The model is validated for the methane–air case and then applied to syngas–air mixtures in order to estimate the heat flux to the walls and quenching distances. Two wall heat transfer models are implemented and compared. The classical Woschni model based on the hypotheses of forced convection and the Rivčre model based on kinetic theory of gases. Conclusion could be drawn that the Rivčre heat transfer model is capable to better reproduce the heat flux to the walls. Heat flux through the walls is higher for stoichiometric syngas–air mixtures which follows the same behavior of the pressure inside the combustion vessel. Quenching distance of syngas–air mixtures decreases with the heat flux increase, which is consistent with earlier studies. This model could be very useful in predicting the physical conditions of quenching especially for estimation of the quenching distance where the measurement is not possible such as in engines. However, the estimation given should be understood as an order of magnitude, because in turbulent conditions the flame–wall interaction results in lower Peclet numbers than in the laminar case.

Eliseu Monteiro; Abel Rouboa; Marc Bellenoue; Bastien Boust; Julien Sotton

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Thermodynamic Analysis of Syngas Production via the Solar Thermochemical Cerium Oxide Redox Cycle with Methane-Driven Reduction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermodynamic Analysis of Syngas Production via the Solar Thermochemical Cerium Oxide Redox Cycle with Methane-Driven Reduction ... Of particular interest is the storage of solar energy in chemical bonds via the splitting of water and carbon dioxide to produce hydrogen and carbon monoxide, referred to collectively as syngas. ... The coupled cycle produces high-quality syngas by the partial oxidation of methane in the ceria reduction step in addition to the carbon monoxide and hydrogen produced by splitting carbon dioxide and water in the oxidation step. ...

Peter T. Krenzke; Jane H. Davidson

2014-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

318

Simulation of Syngas Production from Municipal Solid Waste Gasification in a Bubbling Fluidized Bed Using Aspen Plus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Simulation of Syngas Production from Municipal Solid Waste Gasification in a Bubbling Fluidized Bed Using Aspen Plus ... When the reaction kinetics is not known, a rigorous reactor and multiphase equilibrium based on the minimization of the total Gibbs free energy of the product mixture (an RGibbs block) is preferred to predict the equilibrium composition of the produced syngas. ... Catalytic steam gasification of municipal solid waste (MSW) to produce hydrogen-rich gas or syngas (H2 + CO) with calcined dolomite as a catalyst in a bench-scale downstream fixed bed reactor was investigated. ...

Miaomiao Niu; Yaji Huang; Baosheng Jin; Xinye Wang

2013-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

319

Simulated investigation of chemical looping combustion with coal-derived syngas and CaSO4 oxygen carrier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Compared to metal oxides, CaSO4 adopted as oxygen carrier (OC) in chemical looping combustion (CLC) presents several advantages such as low cost, easy availability and superior oxygen transfer capacity, whilst the SO2 emission and solid sulfur deposit in the process could be a big concern. In this study, thermodynamic simulations were conducted to investigate the sulfur distribution in a CLC system with CaSO4 as OC and syngas derived from coal as the fuel. Several findings were attained: (i) On the main products and reaction pathways in the fuel reactor (FR), at the low temperature of 100°C–400°C, the main sulfur species and carbon deposit were H2S and CaCO3 via the methanation of CO with H2 coupled with both the shift reaction of CO with H2O(g) and the ensuing thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR). Then at 400°C–915°C, CaS and CO2 were the main products through the reaction of CaSO4 with H2 or CO, and both products increased with increasing FR temperature. Furthermore, at the FR temperature higher than 915°C, due to the initiation of the solid side reaction between CaS and CaSO4, the percentage of CaS declined. In contrary, the percentages of CaO, H2 and CO increased possibly due to the consumption of part of CaSO4 in the side reaction and thus not enough lattice oxygen available. In the air reactor (AR), the oxidization of CaS by air into CaSO4 was always dominant. Besides at ?AR below 0.8, both the solid side reaction of CaSO4 with CaS and the oxidization of CaS into CaO were simultaneously in effect. (ii) In the FR, the optimized condition was suggested as at around 915°C, atmospheric condition and carefully controlled ?FR around unity. (iii) In the AR, sufficient supply of air was important for the oxidization of CaS, and ?AR ? 1 would ensure the full oxidization of CaS into CaSO4 and prevent the emission of SO2 and formation of CaO as well. Overall, this study provided the most suitable conditions of using CaSO4 as OC in CLC of syngas with minimal SO2 emissions and CaO formation.

Bao-wen WANG; Rong YAN; Ying ZHENG; Hai-bo ZHAO; Chu-guang ZHENG

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Poisoning of a silica-supported cobalt catalyst due to presence of sulfur impurities in syngas during Fischer-Tropsch: Effects of chelating agent  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of sulfur impurities on the performance of cobalt-based Fischer?Tropsch catalysts are evaluated under industrially relevant operating conditions of temperature, pressure, and impurity levels. Chelating agents (CAs) were used to modify the SiO2 support, and the performances of the CA-modified catalysts are compared with conventional Co/SiO2 catalysts. For both the Co/SiO2 and CA-modified catalysts, the presence of sulfur in the inlet syngas results in a notable drop in the CO conversion, an undesired shift in the hydrocarbon selectivity toward short-chain hydrocarbons, more olefins in the products, and lower product yields. In the post-poisoning stage, i.e., after termination of sulfur introduction in the inlet syngas, the CA-modified catalysts recover activity and selectivity (to some extent at least), whereas such trends are not observed for the base-case, i.e., unmodified Co/SiO2 catalyst. The improved performance of the CA-modified catalysts in the presence of sulfur is attributed to higher densities of active sites.

Bambal, Ashish S. [WVU; Guggilla, Vidya S. [WVU; Kugler, Edwin L. [WVU; Gardner, Todd H. [U.S. DOE; Dadyburjor, Dady B. [WVU

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature syngas cleanup" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Comparison of a new micaceous iron oxide and ilmenite as oxygen carrier for Chemical looping combustion with respect to syngas conversion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is a promising carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology. One of the challenges is to find the most suitable oxygen carrier (OC). Using solid fuels makes it important to use cheap and natural oxygen carriers, since there will probably be some loss of bed material while discharging ash from the system. Therefore ilmenite and a new micaceous iron oxide (MIOX ME 400) are compared with respect to syngas conversion in a 10 kWth bubbling fluidized bed (BFB) reactor. The OC was alternatively reduced with either CO + H2 or CH4 + H2 and oxidized with air at 900 °C. The conversion of syngas with MIOX ME 400 is always higher (XCO, XH2 > 98%) than that with ilmenite. Conversion of CH4 is also better for MIOX ME 400, even though it is still low. It can be raised by increasing fuel reactor temperature from 900 °C to 950 °C which results in a CH4 conversion of 85–60% instead of 60–40%.

Florian Mayer; Ajay R. Bidwe; Alexander Schopf; Kamran Taheri; Mariusz Zieba; Günter Scheffknecht

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Syngas combustion characteristics of four oxygen carrier particles for chemical-looping combustion in a batch fluidized bed reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Syngas combustion characteristics of oxygen carrier particles have been...2 selectivity, and low CO concentration in the reducer and very low NOx (NO, NO2, N2O) emissions in the oxidizer. Moreover, all particles ...

Ho-Jung Ryu; Dowon Shun; Dal-Hee Bae…

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Chemical-looping combustion of syngas by means of spray-dried NiO oxygen carrier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) of syngas has a potential...2 and CO) appeared to be approximately the sum of the reaction rate of each fuel gas. The experimental results indicated that the spray-dried NiO oxyg...

Jeom-In Baek; Chong Kul Ryu; Tae Hyoung Eom…

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Experimental forward and reverse in situ combustion gasification of lignite with production of hydrogen-rich syngas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This research focused on the feasibility of applying the forward and reverse combustion approach to the in situ gasification of lignite with the production of hydrogen-rich syngas (H2 and CO). The so-called forwa...

Yong Cui; Jie Liang; Zhangqing Wang…

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Single-stage conversion of associated petroleum gas and natural gas to syngas in combustion and auto-ignition processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Single-stage conversion of alkane mixtures simulating associated petroleum gas (APG) to syngas is studied in a static installation and ... in a flow reactor based on the rocket combustion chamber. Yields of the d...

Yu. A. Kolbanovskii; I. V. Bilera; I. V. Rossikhin…

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Mevalonate production by engineered acetogen biocatalyst during continuous fermentation of syngas or CO2/H2 blend  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Naturally mevalonate-resistant acetogen Clostridium...sp. MT1243 produced only 425 mM acetate during syngas fermentation. Using Clostridium sp. MT1243 we engineered biocatalyst selectively producing mevalonate fr...

Michael Kiriukhin; Michael Tyurin

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Scale-out of Microreactor Stacks for Portable and Distributed Processing: Coupling of Exothermic and Endothermic Processes for Syngas Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations are used to simulate stacks of different sizes, to understand nonlinear effects that arise in scaleout of microchemical systems. As an example process, syngas production from methane is studied using a ...

Matthew S. Mettler; Georgios D. Stefanidis; Dionisios G. Vlachos

2010-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

328

Simultaneous carbon dioxide and steam reforming of methane to syngas over NiO-CaO catalyst  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Steam reforming, Co{sub 2} reforming, and simultaneous steam and CO{sub 2} reforming of methane to CO and H{sub 2} over NiO-CaO catalyst (without any prereduction treatment) at different temperatures (700--850 C) and space velocities (5000--70,000 cm{sup 3}/g{center_dot}h) are investigated. The catalyst is characterized by XRD, XPS, and temperature-programmed reduction (TPR). The catalyst showed high activity/selectivity in both the steam and CO{sub 2} reforming reactions and the simultaneous steam and CO{sub 2} reforming. In the CO{sup 2} reforming, the coke deposition on the catalyst is found to be very fast. However, when the CO{sub 2} reforming is carried out simultaneously with the steam reforming, the coke deposition on the catalyst is drastically reduced. By the simultaneous CO{sub 2} and steam reforming (at {ge} 800 C and space velocity of about 20,000--30,000 cm{sup 3}/g{center_dot}h)m methane can be converted almost completely to syngas with 100% selectivity for both CO and H{sub 2}. The H{sub 2}/CO ratio in products can be varied between 1.5 and 2.5 quite conveniently by manipulating the relative concentration of steam and CO{sub 2} in the feed.

Choudhary, V.R.; Rajput, A.M. [National Chemical Lab., Pune (India). Chemical Engineering Div.] [National Chemical Lab., Pune (India). Chemical Engineering Div.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Richland Operations Office Completes Cleanup in Hanford's 300 Area North  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Richland Operations Office Completes Cleanup in Hanford's 300 Richland Operations Office Completes Cleanup in Hanford's 300 Area North Section Richland Operations Office Completes Cleanup in Hanford's 300 Area North Section March 28, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis An aerial view of Hanford’s 300 Area North Section following completion of cleanup. An aerial view of Hanford's 300 Area North Section following completion of cleanup. Workers demolish the 384 Building, known as the Power House and Heating Plant, in the north portion of the 300 Area. Workers demolish the 384 Building, known as the Power House and Heating Plant, in the north portion of the 300 Area. More than 8,000 feet of pipe — part of the 300 Area’s process sewer system — was removed from the 300-15 Waste Site in the north section. More than 8,000 feet of pipe - part of the 300 Area's process sewer

330

Idaho Site's Cold War Cleanup Takes Center Stage in Publication |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Site's Cold War Cleanup Takes Center Stage in Publication Site's Cold War Cleanup Takes Center Stage in Publication Idaho Site's Cold War Cleanup Takes Center Stage in Publication January 22, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The Society of American Military Engineers focuses on the Idaho site’s environmental cleanup in the latest issue of its publication, The Military Engineer. This photo of the Engineering Test Reactor, which was decommissioned and demolished at the Idaho site, is featured in the story. The Society of American Military Engineers focuses on the Idaho site's environmental cleanup in the latest issue of its publication, The Military Engineer. This photo of the Engineering Test Reactor, which was decommissioned and demolished at the Idaho site, is featured in the story. The Society of American Military Engineers highlights this Idaho site photo on the cover of the latest issue of its publication, The Military Engineer. In the photo, work is under way to move spent nuclear fuel from wet storage to the safer, more permanent alternative of dry storage.

331

Idaho Site's Cold War Cleanup Takes Center Stage in Publication |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Idaho Site's Cold War Cleanup Takes Center Stage in Publication Idaho Site's Cold War Cleanup Takes Center Stage in Publication Idaho Site's Cold War Cleanup Takes Center Stage in Publication January 22, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The Society of American Military Engineers focuses on the Idaho site’s environmental cleanup in the latest issue of its publication, The Military Engineer. This photo of the Engineering Test Reactor, which was decommissioned and demolished at the Idaho site, is featured in the story. The Society of American Military Engineers focuses on the Idaho site's environmental cleanup in the latest issue of its publication, The Military Engineer. This photo of the Engineering Test Reactor, which was decommissioned and demolished at the Idaho site, is featured in the story. The Society of American Military Engineers highlights this Idaho site photo on the cover of the latest issue of its publication, The Military Engineer. In the photo, work is under way to move spent nuclear fuel from wet storage to the safer, more permanent alternative of dry storage.

332

Richland Operations Office Completes Cleanup in Hanford's 300 Area North  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Richland Operations Office Completes Cleanup in Hanford's 300 Richland Operations Office Completes Cleanup in Hanford's 300 Area North Section Richland Operations Office Completes Cleanup in Hanford's 300 Area North Section March 28, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis An aerial view of Hanford’s 300 Area North Section following completion of cleanup. An aerial view of Hanford's 300 Area North Section following completion of cleanup. Workers demolish the 384 Building, known as the Power House and Heating Plant, in the north portion of the 300 Area. Workers demolish the 384 Building, known as the Power House and Heating Plant, in the north portion of the 300 Area. More than 8,000 feet of pipe — part of the 300 Area’s process sewer system — was removed from the 300-15 Waste Site in the north section. More than 8,000 feet of pipe - part of the 300 Area's process sewer

333

Syngas Conversion to Gasoline-Range Hydrocarbons over Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 and ZSM-5 Composite Catalyst System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A composite Pd/ZnO/Al2O3-HZSM-5 (Si/Al=40) catalytic system was evaluated for the synthesis of gasoline-range hydrocarbons directly from synthesis gas. Bifunctional catalyst comprising PdZn metal and acid sites present the required catalytically active sites necessary for the methanol synthesis, methanol dehydration, and methanol-to-gasoline reactions. This system provides a unique catalytic pathway for the production of liquid hydrocarbons directly from syngas. However, selectivity control is difficult and poses many challenges. The composite catalytic system was evaluated under various process conditions. Investigated were the effects of temperature (310-375oC), pressure (300-1000 psig), time-on-stream (50 hrs), and gas-hour space velocity (740-2970 hr-1), using a H2/CO molar syngas ratio of 2.0. By operating at the lower end of the temperature range investigated, liquid hydrocarbon formation was favored, as was decreased amounts of undesirable light hydrocarbons. However, lower operating temperatures also facilitated undesirable CO2 formation via the water-gas shift reaction. Higher operating pressures slightly favored liquid synthesis. Operating at relatively low pressures (e.g. 300 psig) was made possible, whereas for methanol synthesis alone higher pressure are usually required to achieve similar conversion levels (e.g. 1000 psig). Thermodynamic constraints on methanol synthesis are eased by pushing the equilibrium through hydrocarbon formation. Catalytic performance was also evaluated by altering Pd and Zn composition of the Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst. Of the catalysts and conditions tested, selectivity toward liquid hydrocarbon was highest when using a 5% Pd metal loading and Pd/Zn molar ratio of 0.25 and mixed with HZMS-5, operating at 310oC and 300 psig, CO conversion was 43 % and selectivity (carbon weight basis) to hydrocarbons was 49 wt. %. Of the hydrocarbon fraction, 44wt. % was in the C5-C12 liquid product range and consisted primarily of aromatic polymethylbenzenes. However, as syngas conversion increases with increasing temperature, selectivity to liquid product diminished. This is attributed, in large part, to increased saturation of the olefinic intermediates over PdZn metal sites. Under all the conditions and catalysts evaluated in this study, generating liquid product in high yield was challenging (<10 wt. % C5+ yield).

Dagle, Robert A.; Lizarazo Adarme, Jair A.; Lebarbier, Vanessa MC; Gray, Michel J.; White, James F.; King, David L.; Palo, Daniel R.

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Advisory Board Meets to Discuss EM Cleanup's Future | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Advisory Board Meets to Discuss EM Cleanup's Future Advisory Board Meets to Discuss EM Cleanup's Future Advisory Board Meets to Discuss EM Cleanup's Future December 6, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis EM Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary Tracy Mustin, second from right, speaks with members of the Environmental Management Advisory Board this week as EM Deputy Assistant Secretary, Safety, Security and Quality Programs, Matthew Moury, second from left, listens. EM Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary Tracy Mustin, second from right, speaks with members of the Environmental Management Advisory Board this week as EM Deputy Assistant Secretary, Safety, Security and Quality Programs, Matthew Moury, second from left, listens. WASHINGTON, D.C. - EM Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary Tracy Mustin this week sought guidance from the Environmental Management Advisory Board

335

Oak Ridge Moves Forward in Mercury Cleanup | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Oak Ridge Moves Forward in Mercury Cleanup Oak Ridge Moves Forward in Mercury Cleanup Oak Ridge Moves Forward in Mercury Cleanup March 28, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Workers recently removed five large mercury-contaminated tanks from Y-12. Workers recently removed five large mercury-contaminated tanks from Y-12. Removing these tanks is part of the steps to reduce potential risk from mercury at Y-12. Removing these tanks is part of the steps to reduce potential risk from mercury at Y-12. Workers recently removed five large mercury-contaminated tanks from Y-12. Removing these tanks is part of the steps to reduce potential risk from mercury at Y-12. OAK RIDGE, Tenn. - Oak Ridge's EM program is making significant progress to reduce environmental mercury releases from the Y-12 National Security Complex. Mercury is one of the greatest environmental concerns facing the Oak Ridge

336

Surface and Soil Cleanup at Brookhaven National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Surface and Soil Projects Surface and Soil Projects placeholder Aerial view of capped landfills A major part of the overall site cleanup involved addressing contaminated soils, underground tanks, and waste storage areas. All of the major soil projects have now been completed, with the exception of some soils that will need to be cleaned up during the decommissioning of the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor and High Flux Beam Reactor. Following are a list of major surface and soil cleanup projects that have been completed since 1994: Three out-of-service 100,000 gallon aboveground waste tanks were removed and disposed of at a licensed off-site disposal facility. Sixteen underground storage tanks (USTs) were removed between 1988 and 2005 under the cleanup program. The project included the removal, transportation, and disposal of the tanks and approximately 4,000 cubic yards of soil and debris.

337

DOE Achieves Second TRU Waste Cleanup | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Achieves Second TRU Waste Cleanup Achieves Second TRU Waste Cleanup DOE Achieves Second TRU Waste Cleanup October 6, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Deb Gill www.wipp.energy.gov 575-234-7270 CARLSBAD, N.M. -The U.S. Department of Energy has successfully removed all legacy contact-handled transuranic (TRU) waste from the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), near Chicago, Illinois. In September, all legacy TRU waste was removed from the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory (BAPL), near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Maintained by the DOE, ANL is the country's first science and engineering research national laboratory. This milestone was supported by $83,000 provided to the National Transuranic Waste Program as part of a $172 million American Recovery and Reinvestment Act investment to expedite legacy TRU waste disposal activities across the DOE complex.

338

Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Cleanup Project Steps into Spotlight at  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Uranium Mill Tailings Cleanup Project Steps into Spotlight at Uranium Mill Tailings Cleanup Project Steps into Spotlight at International Meeting in Vienna Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Cleanup Project Steps into Spotlight at International Meeting in Vienna October 22, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Moab Federal Project Director Donald Metzler presents at the Uranium Mining Remediation Exchange Group meeting in Germany in September 2011. Moab Federal Project Director Donald Metzler presents at the Uranium Mining Remediation Exchange Group meeting in Germany in September 2011. Moab Federal Project Director Donald Metzler Moab Federal Project Director Donald Metzler Moab Federal Project Director Donald Metzler presents at the Uranium Mining Remediation Exchange Group meeting in Germany in September 2011. Moab Federal Project Director Donald Metzler

339

Exemplary Hurricane Damage Cleanup Earns Petroleum Reserve Coveted  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exemplary Hurricane Damage Cleanup Earns Petroleum Reserve Coveted Exemplary Hurricane Damage Cleanup Earns Petroleum Reserve Coveted Environmental Award Exemplary Hurricane Damage Cleanup Earns Petroleum Reserve Coveted Environmental Award April 22, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - An exceptional waste management project at a Texas Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) site following Hurricane Ike in 2008 has won a DOE Environmental Sustainability (EStar) Award for Waste/Pollution Prevention. The award recognizes the SPR Storm Recovery Debris Waste Management Project at the Big Hill storage complex near Beaumont, Texas, which was heavily impacted by Hurricane Ike in September 2008. Selected annually by an independent panel of judges, EStar awards recognize environmental sustainability projects and programs that reduce risks and impacts, protect

340

Idaho Site Obtains Patent for Nuclear Reactor Sodium Cleanup Treatment |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Obtains Patent for Nuclear Reactor Sodium Cleanup Obtains Patent for Nuclear Reactor Sodium Cleanup Treatment Idaho Site Obtains Patent for Nuclear Reactor Sodium Cleanup Treatment March 28, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis CWI engineers Jeff Jones, David Tolman, right, and Kirk Dooley (seated) developed a treatment to safely dissolve a bicarbonate crust and treat and remove the sodium in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II at the Idaho site. CWI engineers Jeff Jones, David Tolman, right, and Kirk Dooley (seated) developed a treatment to safely dissolve a bicarbonate crust and treat and remove the sodium in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II at the Idaho site. Piping in the east boiler basement of the sodium processing building was color coded for easy identification. Orange indicates sodium and green identifies cooling water.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature syngas cleanup" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Recovery Act Invests in Cleanup, Preservation of Hanford Site Locomotives,  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Invests in Cleanup, Preservation of Hanford Site Invests in Cleanup, Preservation of Hanford Site Locomotives, Railcars Recovery Act Invests in Cleanup, Preservation of Hanford Site Locomotives, Railcars With the help of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, the Hanford Site is preserving the history of its locomotives and railcars as workers clean up the legacy of the Cold War. In the recently completed railcar project – a $5.5 million effort funded by the Recovery Act – the Richland Operations Office and its contractors moved two locomotives and two cask cars onto reclaimed track at the B Reactor for permanent public display. Designated a National Historic Landmark in August 2008, the B Reactor is slated to become part of the national park system commemorating the Manhattan Project and is open for

342

Hanford Achieves a Cleanup First | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Achieves a Cleanup First Achieves a Cleanup First Hanford Achieves a Cleanup First September 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis F Reactor during operations in 1956. F Reactor during operations in 1956. F Reactor Area in July 2012. F Reactor Area in July 2012. A worker cuts and drains pipe at a waste site in F Area. The pipe contained sodium dichromate, which was used as an anti-corrosion agent. A worker cuts and drains pipe at a waste site in F Area. The pipe contained sodium dichromate, which was used as an anti-corrosion agent. An excavator scoops out a section of river outfall pipeline at an F Area waste site. The pipeline was used to discharge effluent into the Columbia River. An excavator scoops out a section of river outfall pipeline at an F Area waste site. The pipeline was used to discharge effluent into the Columbia

343

Hanford Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds Cleanup Goals  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds Cleanup Goals Hanford Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds Cleanup Goals June 26, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The 200 West Pump and Treat System is Hanford’s largest facility for treating contaminated groundwater. The 200 West Pump and Treat System is Hanford's largest facility for treating contaminated groundwater. A graphic showing the 200 West Pump and Treat plumes and well network. A graphic showing the 200 West Pump and Treat plumes and well network. The 200 West Pump and Treat System is Hanford's largest facility for treating contaminated groundwater. A graphic showing the 200 West Pump and Treat plumes and well network. RICHLAND, Wash. - Workers supporting groundwater cleanup for EM's

344

Massive Soil Cleanup Effort Concludes at Hanford - Recovery Act Funding  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Massive Soil Cleanup Effort Concludes at Hanford - Recovery Act Massive Soil Cleanup Effort Concludes at Hanford - Recovery Act Funding Pays for Safe Disposal of 20,000 Truckloads of Soil Massive Soil Cleanup Effort Concludes at Hanford - Recovery Act Funding Pays for Safe Disposal of 20,000 Truckloads of Soil August 11, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Andre Armstrong, CH2M HILL Andre_L_Armstrong@rl.gov 509-376-6773 Geoff Tyree, DOE Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov 509-376-4171 RICHLAND, Wash. - U.S. Department of Energy contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company removed nearly half a million tons of contaminated soil over the last two years using American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington State. Workers shipped more than 20,000 truckloads of contaminated soil excavated

345

Mercury cleanup efforts intensify | Y-12 National Security Complex  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mercury cleanup efforts ... Mercury cleanup efforts ... Mercury cleanup efforts intensify Posted: February 11, 2013 - 3:31pm | Y-12 Report | Volume 9, Issue 2 | 2013 Millions of pounds of mercury were required to support Y-12's post-World War II mission of separating lithium isotopes. Cleaning up the toxic heavy metal poses many challenges, but what Y-12 is learning could help conquer mercury pollution worldwide. There's a reason you won't find mercury in many thermometers these days. Mercury is a heavy metal that occurs in several chemical forms, all of which can produce toxic effects in high enough doses. Mercury was used in the column exchange process, which Y-12 employed to produce lithium-6 from 1953 to 1962. Through process spills, system leaks and surface runoff, some 700,000 pounds of mercury have been lost to the

346

Report for EM-Initiated Program Supporting Cleanup is Available |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Report for EM-Initiated Program Supporting Cleanup is Available Report for EM-Initiated Program Supporting Cleanup is Available Report for EM-Initiated Program Supporting Cleanup is Available September 4, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis An Akuna-generated figure of the Savannah River F-Basin site showing the distribution of surface structures, well, contaminate plume and lithofacies. An Akuna-generated figure of the Savannah River F-Basin site showing the distribution of surface structures, well, contaminate plume and lithofacies. Modeled spatial distribution of technicium-99 after the releases from the BC cribs on the Hanford Central Plateau using VisIt software. Modeled spatial distribution of technicium-99 after the releases from the BC cribs on the Hanford Central Plateau using VisIt software. An Akuna-generated figure of the Savannah River F-Basin site showing the distribution of surface structures, well, contaminate plume and lithofacies.

347

EM Delegation Tours UK Cleanup Program's Sellafield Site | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EM Delegation Tours UK Cleanup Program's Sellafield Site EM Delegation Tours UK Cleanup Program's Sellafield Site EM Delegation Tours UK Cleanup Program's Sellafield Site May 13, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Front row, left to right, NuVision Engineering Vice President Laurie Judd, EM Lead International Affairs Specialist Ana Han, EM Associate Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary Alice Williams and United Kingdom Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) Head of International Relations John Mathieson; back row, left to right, NDA Sellafield Site Deputy Head Graham Jonsson and EM Deputy Assistant Secretary for Tank Waste and Nuclear Material Management Ken Picha. Front row, left to right, NuVision Engineering Vice President Laurie Judd, EM Lead International Affairs Specialist Ana Han, EM Associate Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary Alice Williams and United Kingdom Nuclear

348

DOE Achieves Second TRU Waste Cleanup | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Achieves Second TRU Waste Cleanup Achieves Second TRU Waste Cleanup DOE Achieves Second TRU Waste Cleanup October 6, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Deb Gill www.wipp.energy.gov 575-234-7270 CARLSBAD, N.M. -The U.S. Department of Energy has successfully removed all legacy contact-handled transuranic (TRU) waste from the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), near Chicago, Illinois. In September, all legacy TRU waste was removed from the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory (BAPL), near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Maintained by the DOE, ANL is the country's first science and engineering research national laboratory. This milestone was supported by $83,000 provided to the National Transuranic Waste Program as part of a $172 million American Recovery and Reinvestment Act investment to expedite legacy TRU waste disposal activities across the DOE complex.

349

Paducah Site Undergoing Steady Groundwater Cleanup with Variety of Methods  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Site Undergoing Steady Groundwater Cleanup with Variety of Site Undergoing Steady Groundwater Cleanup with Variety of Methods Paducah Site Undergoing Steady Groundwater Cleanup with Variety of Methods June 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis The yellow outline depicts an area southeast of the C-400 Cleaning Building, background, where electrical resistance heating will be used to remove trichloroethene (TCE) down to 60 feet below ground. Electrodes will heat the chemical into a vapor that can be pumped to the surface and treated in the white structure, center. The yellow outline depicts an area southeast of the C-400 Cleaning Building, background, where electrical resistance heating will be used to remove trichloroethene (TCE) down to 60 feet below ground. Electrodes will heat the chemical into a vapor that can be pumped to the surface and

350

EM Delegation Tours UK Cleanup Program's Sellafield Site | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Tours UK Cleanup Program's Sellafield Site Tours UK Cleanup Program's Sellafield Site EM Delegation Tours UK Cleanup Program's Sellafield Site May 13, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Front row, left to right, NuVision Engineering Vice President Laurie Judd, EM Lead International Affairs Specialist Ana Han, EM Associate Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary Alice Williams and United Kingdom Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) Head of International Relations John Mathieson; back row, left to right, NDA Sellafield Site Deputy Head Graham Jonsson and EM Deputy Assistant Secretary for Tank Waste and Nuclear Material Management Ken Picha. Front row, left to right, NuVision Engineering Vice President Laurie Judd, EM Lead International Affairs Specialist Ana Han, EM Associate Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary Alice Williams and United Kingdom Nuclear

351

Groundwater Cleanup Progresses at Paducah Site | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Cleanup Progresses at Paducah Site Cleanup Progresses at Paducah Site Groundwater Cleanup Progresses at Paducah Site October 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Workers drill holes for installation of electrodes as part of a heating system to help clean up contamination. Workers drill holes for installation of electrodes as part of a heating system to help clean up contamination. A crane lifts the carbon treatment system into place. This technology treats vapor pumped to the surface by the belowground heating system. A crane lifts the carbon treatment system into place. This technology treats vapor pumped to the surface by the belowground heating system. The belowground heating system operates in front of the C-400 Cleaning Building. The belowground heating system operates in front of the C-400 Cleaning

352

Summer Fellow Explores EM's Cold War Cleanup | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Summer Fellow Explores EM's Cold War Cleanup Summer Fellow Explores EM's Cold War Cleanup Summer Fellow Explores EM's Cold War Cleanup November 26, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Maine Maritime Academy senior Jared Woods learned about nuclear waste management issues at EM. Maine Maritime Academy senior Jared Woods learned about nuclear waste management issues at EM. WASHINGTON, D.C. - Jared Woods graduates from the Maine Maritime Academy (MMA) next month with the experience of an adventurous summer as a fellow in the DOE Scholars Program, an opportunity to explore the agency's careers and learn about its mission and operations. Assigned to EM's Washington, D.C. headquarters, Woods gained knowledge about nuclear safety and waste treatment under the guidance of EM Office of Safety Management Director Todd Lapointe, who graduated from MMA in 1987.

353

Implications of the KONVERGENCE Model for Difficult Cleanup Decisions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract—Some cleanup decisions, such as cleanup of intractable contaminated sites or disposal of spent nuclear fuel, have proven difficult to make. Such decisions face high resistance to agreement from stakeholders possibly because they do not trust the decision makers, view the consequences of being wrong as too high, etc. Our project’s goal is to improve sciencebased cleanup decision-making. This includes diagnosing intractable situations, as a step to identifying a path toward sustainable solutions. Companion papers describe the underlying philosophy of the KONVERGENCE Model for Sustainable Decisions,1 and the overall framework and process steps.2 Where knowledge, values, and resources converge (the K, V, and R in KONVERGENCE), you will find a sustainable decision – a decision that works over time. For intractable cases, serious consideration of the adaptable class of alternatives is warranted – if properly implemented and packaged.

Piet, Steven James; Dakins, Maxine Ellen; Gibson, Patrick Lavern; Joe, Jeffrey Clark; Kerr, Thomas A; Nitschke, Robert Leon

2002-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

354

Highly Radioactive Sludge Removal Complete: Historic Cleanup Effort Reduces  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Highly Radioactive Sludge Removal Complete: Historic Cleanup Effort Highly Radioactive Sludge Removal Complete: Historic Cleanup Effort Reduces the Risk along the Columbia River Highly Radioactive Sludge Removal Complete: Historic Cleanup Effort Reduces the Risk along the Columbia River September 13, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Salony, DOE Cameron.Salony@rl.doe.gov 509-376-0402 Dee Millikin, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company Dee_Millikin@rl.gov 509-376-1297 RICHLAND, WASH. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) announced today the removal of the first phase of highly radioactive sludge from under water storage in the K West Basin about 400 yards away from the Columbia River. "This is a major step forward in protecting the river and a historic

355

Highly Radioactive Sludge Removal Complete: Historic Cleanup Effort Reduces  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Highly Radioactive Sludge Removal Complete: Historic Cleanup Effort Highly Radioactive Sludge Removal Complete: Historic Cleanup Effort Reduces the Risk along the Columbia River Highly Radioactive Sludge Removal Complete: Historic Cleanup Effort Reduces the Risk along the Columbia River September 13, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Salony, DOE Cameron.Salony@rl.doe.gov 509-376-0402 Dee Millikin, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company Dee_Millikin@rl.gov 509-376-1297 RICHLAND, WASH. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) announced today the removal of the first phase of highly radioactive sludge from under water storage in the K West Basin about 400 yards away from the Columbia River. "This is a major step forward in protecting the river and a historic

356

Summer Fellow Explores EM's Cold War Cleanup | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Summer Fellow Explores EM's Cold War Cleanup Summer Fellow Explores EM's Cold War Cleanup Summer Fellow Explores EM's Cold War Cleanup November 26, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Maine Maritime Academy senior Jared Woods learned about nuclear waste management issues at EM. Maine Maritime Academy senior Jared Woods learned about nuclear waste management issues at EM. WASHINGTON, D.C. - Jared Woods graduates from the Maine Maritime Academy (MMA) next month with the experience of an adventurous summer as a fellow in the DOE Scholars Program, an opportunity to explore the agency's careers and learn about its mission and operations. Assigned to EM's Washington, D.C. headquarters, Woods gained knowledge about nuclear safety and waste treatment under the guidance of EM Office of Safety Management Director Todd Lapointe, who graduated from MMA in 1987.

357

Oak Ridge Moves Forward in Mercury Cleanup | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Moves Forward in Mercury Cleanup Moves Forward in Mercury Cleanup Oak Ridge Moves Forward in Mercury Cleanup March 28, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Workers recently removed five large mercury-contaminated tanks from Y-12. Workers recently removed five large mercury-contaminated tanks from Y-12. Removing these tanks is part of the steps to reduce potential risk from mercury at Y-12. Removing these tanks is part of the steps to reduce potential risk from mercury at Y-12. Workers recently removed five large mercury-contaminated tanks from Y-12. Removing these tanks is part of the steps to reduce potential risk from mercury at Y-12. OAK RIDGE, Tenn. - Oak Ridge's EM program is making significant progress to reduce environmental mercury releases from the Y-12 National Security Complex. Mercury is one of the greatest environmental concerns facing the Oak Ridge

358

Idaho Site Obtains Patent for Nuclear Reactor Sodium Cleanup Treatment |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Idaho Site Obtains Patent for Nuclear Reactor Sodium Cleanup Idaho Site Obtains Patent for Nuclear Reactor Sodium Cleanup Treatment Idaho Site Obtains Patent for Nuclear Reactor Sodium Cleanup Treatment March 28, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis CWI engineers Jeff Jones, David Tolman, right, and Kirk Dooley (seated) developed a treatment to safely dissolve a bicarbonate crust and treat and remove the sodium in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II at the Idaho site. CWI engineers Jeff Jones, David Tolman, right, and Kirk Dooley (seated) developed a treatment to safely dissolve a bicarbonate crust and treat and remove the sodium in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II at the Idaho site. Piping in the east boiler basement of the sodium processing building was color coded for easy identification. Orange indicates sodium and green identifies cooling water.

359

Burning syngas in a high swirl burner: Effects of fuel composition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Flame characteristics of swirling non-premixed H2/CO syngas fuel mixtures have been simulated using large eddy simulation and detailed chemistry. The selected combustor configuration is the TECFLAM burner which has been used for extensive experimental investigations for natural gas combustion. The large eddy simulation (LES) solves the governing equations on a structured Cartesian grid using a finite volume method, with turbulence and combustion modelling based on the localised dynamic Smagorinsky model and the steady laminar flamelet model respectively. The predictions for H2-rich and CO-rich flames show considerable differences between them for velocity and scalar fields and this demonstrates the effects of fuel variability on the flame characteristics in swirling environment. In general, the higher diffusivity of hydrogen in H2-rich fuel is largely responsible for forming a much thicker flame with a larger vortex breakdown bubble (VBB) in a swirling flame compare to the H2-lean but CO-rich syngas flames.

K.K.J. Ranga Dinesh; K.H. Luo; M.P. Kirkpatrick; W. Malalasekera

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Development of Model-Based Controls for GE's Gasifier and Syngas Cooler  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Model-Based Controls Model-Based Controls for GE's Gasifier and Syngas Cooler Background The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) develops affordable and clean energy from coal and other fossil fuels to secure a sustainable energy economy. To further this mission, NETL funds research and development of advanced sensor and control technologies that can function under the extreme operating conditions often found in advanced power systems, particularly

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature syngas cleanup" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

3D Matrix Burners: A Method for Small-Scale Syngas Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

3D Matrix Burners: A Method for Small-Scale Syngas Production ... After passing the mixer, a homogeneous fuel–oxidizer mixture of specified composition is fed through permeable walls and bottom of the 3D matrix burner into its inner cavity, where it burns near the surface. ... However, as is well-known from methane combustion studies,(12) the normal burning velocity decreases with increasing pressure, for both rich and lean methane–air mixtures. ...

Vladimir S. Arutyunov; Vladimir M. Shmelev; Ayan N. Rakhmetov; Oksana V. Shapovalova

2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

362

Mechanism for Inhibition of Atmospheric-Pressure Syngas/Air Flames by Trimethylphosphate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gasification processes allow for a wide range of solid combustibles, including coal, biomass, and municipal solid wastes, to be converted into syngas mixtures that can be burned in gas turbines to generate electricity. ... Burning velocity was measured using a Mache–Hebra nozzle burner(22) and the total area method(23) from flame images, as was performed by Linteris and Truett. ... Recommendations are made as to the most suitable methods of measuring burning velocity for both closed vessels and burners. ...

Vladimir M. Shvartsberg; Andrey G. Shmakov; Tatyana A. Bolshova; Oleg P. Korobeinichev

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

363

Multiobjective Optimization of Industrial Autothermal Reformer for Syngas Production Using Nonsorting Genetic Algorithm II  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Multiobjective Optimization of Industrial Autothermal Reformer for Syngas Production Using Nonsorting Genetic Algorithm II ... In this reactor the preheated feed streams (CH4, H2O, and O2) are mixed in a burner placed at the top where the methane partial oxidation reactions occur (Figure 1). ... burners (which provide a large amt. of heat by fuel combustion) and tubes packed with supported nickel catalyst. ...

Alireza Behroozsarand; Hadi Ebrahimi; Akbar Zamaniyan

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

364

Flame front structure of turbulent premixed flames of syngas oxyfuel mixtures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In order to investigate oxyfuel combustion characteristics of typical composition of coal gasification syngas connected to CCS systems. Instantaneous flame front structure of turbulent premixed flames of CO/H2/O2/CO2 mixtures which represent syngas oxyfuel combustion was quantitatively studied comparing with CH4/air and syngas/air flames by using a nozzle-type Bunsen burner. Hot-wire anemometer and OH-PLIF were used to measure the turbulent flow and detect the instantaneous flame front structure, respectively. Image processing and statistical analyzing were performed using the Matlab Software. Flame surface density, mean progress variable, local curvature radius, mean flame volume, and flame thickness, were obtained. Results show that turbulent premixed flames of syngas possess wrinkled flame front structure which is a general feature of turbulent premixed flames. Flame surface density for the CO/H2/O2/CO2 flame is much larger than that of CO/H2/O2/air and CH4/air flames. This is mainly caused by the smaller flame intrinsic instability scale, which would lead to smaller scales and less flame passivity response to turbulence presented by Markstain length, which reduce the local flame stretch against turbulence vortex. Peak value of Possibility Density Function (PDF) distribution of local curvature radius, R, for CO/H2/O2/CO2 flames is larger than those of CO/H2/O2/air and CH4/air flames at both positive and negative side and the corresponding R of absolute peak PDF is the smallest. This demonstrates that the most frequent scale is the smallest for CO/H2/O2/CO2 flames. Mean flame volume of CO/H2/O2/CO2 flame is smaller than that of CH4/air flame even smaller than that of CO/H2/O2/air flame. This would be due to the lower flame height and smaller flame wrinkles.

Meng Zhang; Jinhua Wang; Jin Wu; Zhilong Wei; Zuohua Huang; Hideaki Kobayashi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Acoustic characterization of a partially-premixed gas turbine model combustor: Syngas and hydrocarbon fuel comparisons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this work, the acoustic behavior of a combustion instability in a gas turbine model combustor was investigated as fuel properties, air flow rates, and burner geometry were varied. The dual-swirl burner, developed at DLR Stuttgart by Meier, was operated using syngas (H2/CO), ethylene, propane, and methane. The frequency of the instability was found to vary significantly from 250 to 480 Hz. When the plenum volume and the exhaust pipe length and diameter were changed, the frequencies followed trends similar to a Helmholtz resonator. The variation of fuel type, flame speed, and air flow rate greatly altered the instability frequency and amplitude. These effects are not predicted by Helmholtz or organ tone acoustic theory. Higher frequencies were correlated with larger laminar burning velocities and higher air flow rates. The burner is a forced resonator, in which the flame oscillations couple with the flowfield to create convectively altered Helmholtz resonances. This suggests the need for an improved model of a forced Helmholtz resonator that includes flame properties. Alkane fuels displayed similar acoustic trends, but ethylene varied greatly from methane and propane. Syngas displayed different behavior than hydrocarbon fuels, even when the laminar flame speeds of the fuels were matched between ethylene and a syngas mixture. Flame characteristics such as anchoring, liftoff height, and shape appear to play a major role in the determination of instability strength and presence. With increasing hydrogen-content in the syngas-mixture, the flame transitions from a lifted to a fully anchored flame, resulting in a drastic decrease in the acoustic amplitude associated with non-resonating flames. Rayleigh indices show that flat flames create strong regions of thermo-acoustic coupling compared to axially extended V-shape flames. It is concluded that, in the current burner configuration, integrated-acoustics occur that involve a combination of Helmholtz and convective-mechanisms.

Patton M. Allison; James F. Driscoll; Matthias Ihme

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Analysis of Syngas Quality from Portuguese Biomasses: An Experimental and Numerical Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

On the other hand, the use of gasifiers instead of combustors shows clear advantages, namely, the generation of a syngas with improved quality to be used in the production of Fischer-tropsch liquids, fuel cells, clean fuel combustion, and cheaper CO2 underground sequestration. ... Field, M. A.Rate of combustion of size-graded fractions of char from a low rank coal between 1200K-2000K Combust. ...

Valter Silva; Eliseu Monteiro; Nuno Couto; Paulo Brito; Abel Rouboa

2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

367

Syngas Production from Propane Using Atmospheric Non-thermal Plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Propane steam reforming using a sliding discharge reactor was investigated under atmospheric pressure and low temperature (420 K). Non-thermal plasma steam reforming proceeded efficiently and hydrogen was...2 con...

F. Ouni; A. Khacef; J. M. Cormier

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Role of Background in the CERCLA Cleanup Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Background in the CERCLA Cleanup Program Background in the CERCLA Cleanup Program U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response Office of Emergency and Remedial Response April 26, 2002 OSWER 9285.6-07P OSWER 9285.6-07P page 2 of 13 Table of Contents Purpose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 3 of 13 History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 4 of 13 Definitions of Terms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 5 of 13 Consideration of Background in Risk Assessment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 6 of 13 Consideration of Background in Risk Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 7 of 13 Consideration of Background in Risk Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 8 of 13 Hypothetical Case Examples .

369

Reduction Kinetics of Cu-, Ni-, and Fe-Based Oxygen Carriers Using Syngas (CO + H2) for Chemical-Looping Combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Reduction Kinetics of Cu-, Ni-, and Fe-Based Oxygen Carriers Using Syngas (CO + H2) for Chemical-Looping Combustion ... The reactivity of three Cu-, Fe-, and Ni-based oxygen carriers to be used in a chemical-looping combustion (CLC) system using syngas as fuel has been analyzed. ... In general, the three oxygen carriers were very reactive and suitable to be used for syngas combustion in a CLC system. ...

Alberto Abad; Francisco García-Labiano; Luis F. de Diego; Pilar Gayán; Juan Adánez

2007-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

370

Numerical and experimental study on laminar burning velocity of syngas produced from biomass gasification in sub-atmospheric pressures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The laminar burning velocity of syngas mixtures has been studied by various researches. However, most of these studies have been conducted in atmospheric conditions at sea level. In the present study, the effect of sub atmospheric pressure was evaluated on the laminar burning velocity for a mixture of H2, CO and N2 (20:20:60 vol%) in real sub atmospheric condition. The measurements was conducted in an altitude of 2130 m.a.s.l (0.766 atm) and 21 m.a.s.l (0.994 atm) to evaluate the effect of pressure, the temperature and relative humidity were controlled using an air conditioning unit and was maintained in 295 ± 1 K and 62.6 ± 2.7% respectively. The Flames were generated using contoured slot-type nozzle burner, and an ICCD camera was used to capture chemiluminescence emitted by OH?-CH? radicals present in the flame and thus obtain the flame front and determinate the laminar burning velocity using the angle method. The experimental results were compared with numerical calculations, conducted using the detailed mechanisms of Li et al. and the GRI-Mech 3.0. It was found that the laminar burning velocity increases at lower pressure, for an equivalence ratio of 1.1, the laminar burning velocity increases by almost 23% respect to the sea level conditions.

Andres A. Amell; Hernando A. Yepes; Francisco J. Cadavid

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Experimental and modeling study of the effect of elevated pressure on lean high-hydrogen syngas flames  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract New laminar burning velocity measurements of 85:15% (by volume) H2–CO and H2–N2 mixtures with O2–He oxidizer are reported at lean conditions and elevated pressures (1–10 atm). Experiments are conducted using the heat flux method at initial temperature of 298 K. In this technique a near adiabatic flame is stabilized by balancing the heat loss from the flame to the burner with heat gain to the unburnt gas mixture such that no net heat loss to the burner is observed. A new facility was designed for such high pressure burner stabilized flame experiments. The results obtained are compared with five chemical kinetic schemes from literature for syngas mixtures at elevated pressures. Large differences are observed between the kinetic schemes and the experiments which can be attributed to certain key chemical reactions. A study of the kinetics is performed through reaction rate and sensitivity analysis which indicate that a high uncertainty still remains in important reactions that drive the production and consumption of species such as H, HO2 and OH. For lean mixtures the reaction H + O2(+M) = HO2(+M) contributes significantly to the deviation of models from the experiments. The present analysis in the lean mixture regime suggests the need for further studies in assessment and modification of rate constants for this reaction.

M. Goswami; J.G.H. van Griensven; R.J.M. Bastiaans; A.A. Konnov; L.P.H. de Goey

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Syngas production from glycerol-dry(CO2) reforming over La-promoted Ni/Al2O3 catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A 3 wt% La-promoted Ni/Al2O3 catalyst was prepared via wet co-impregnation technique and physicochemically-characterized. Lanthanum was responsible for better metal dispersion; hence higher BET specific surface area (96.0 m2 g?1) as compared to the unpromoted Ni/Al2O3 catalyst (85.0 m2 g?1). In addition, the La-promoted catalyst possessed finer crystallite size (9.1 nm) whilst the unpromoted catalyst measured 12.8 nm. Subsequently, glycerol dry reforming was performed at atmospheric pressure and temperatures ranging from 923 to 1123 K employing CO2-to-glycerol ratio from zero to five. Significantly, the reaction results have yielded syngas as main gaseous products with H2:CO ratios always below than 2.0 with concomitant maximum 96% glycerol conversion obtained at the CO2-to-glycerol ratio of 1.67. In addition, the glycerol consumption rate can be adequately captured using power law modelling with the order of reactions equal 0.72 and 0.14 with respect to glycerol and CO2 whilst the activation energy was 35.0 kJ mol?1. A 72 h longevity run moreover revealed that the catalyst gave a stable catalytic performance.

Kah Weng Siew; Hua Chyn Lee; Jolius Gimbun; Sim Yee Chin; Maksudur R. Khan; Yun Hin Taufiq-Yap; Chin Kui Cheng

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Biomass gasification: Influence of torrefaction on syngas production and tar formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The paper contains results of comparative gasification of standard wood biomass pellets, torrefied pellets and sawdust in a robust industrial fixed-bed gasifier. Parameters such as process stability, operating difficulties, gas parameters and tar content in syngas were analysed. The operating conditions were optimised to maximise production of liquid hydrocarbons, which can be both a problematic by-product and a valuable component. In order to collect the data concerning quantity and composition of the tars, the experimental set-up was equipped with a syngas cooler. The test runs conducted with sawdust and ordinary pellets did not cause any operational problems. The most complicated part of the experiment was maintaining process stability during gasification of torrefied pellets. The stabilisation effect of grinding of torrefied pellets and blending these pellets with wet sawdust were tested. It was concluded that effective and stable gasification of torrefied pellets in the tested type of fixed-bed gasifier is possible, but this type of fuel is much more suitable for co-gasification. The cleaned syngas from standard pellets had a relatively stable composition and calorific values in the range of 4.8–5.6 MJ/Nm3. Cold gas efficiencies of the process were in the range of 0.72–0.77 MJ/Nm3. Using torrefied pellets as a feedstock led to a higher calorific value of syngas, but the cold gas efficiency remained similar (0.75). For sawdust both the calorific value of syngas (LHV = 3.0 MJ/Nm3) and cold gas efficiency (0.57) were significantly lower than for pellets. The collected condensates contained a water fraction with dissolved organic compounds and thick viscous organic substances tar. It was observed that tar production from torrefied pellets is slower, characterised by lower yield, and technically more difficult in comparison to untreated biomass. The effectiveness of liquid hydrocarbon collection (tar to fuel ratio) varied between 0.0138 [kg tar/kg fuel] for torrefied pellets and 0.0213 [kg/kg] for sawdust. The main component of water fractions were organic acids. The content of organic acids in these fractions was as follows: 79.5% from South African pellets, 67% from Polish pellets, 64% from Polish sawdust and 59% from torrefied pellets respectively. The main organic species in tar from torrefied biomass remained acids, whereas in other cases tars were composed of alkylophenols, linear and cyclic aliphatic oxygenates and polyfunctional aromatic oxygenates.

Marek Dudy?ski; Johan C. van Dyk; Kamil Kwiatkowski; Marta Sosnowska

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Site Transition Process upon Completion of the Cleanup Mission: Fact Sheet  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Process upon Completion of the Cleanup Mission: Process upon Completion of the Cleanup Mission: Fact Sheet (September 2013) Site Transition Process upon Completion of the Cleanup Mission: Fact Sheet (September 2013) DOE's internal site transition process for Cleanup to long-term stewardship, post-cleanup, and post-closure has been established in transition guidance for sites that will transfer to a Landlord Program Secretarial Office or to Legacy Management for long-term stewardship. Site Transition Process upon Completion of the Cleanup Mission: Fact Sheet (September 2013) More Documents & Publications Site Transition Summary: Cleanup Completion to Long-Term Stewardship at Department of Energy On-going Mission Sites Site Transition Process Upon Cleanup Completion EM SSAB Conference Calls - January 27, 2011

375

UK Nuclear Cleanup and Research Experts Visit DOE to Expand Collaborat...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

UK Nuclear Cleanup and Research Experts Visit DOE to Expand Collaboration UK Nuclear Cleanup and Research Experts Visit DOE to Expand Collaboration September 30, 2014 - 12:00pm...

376

Microsoft Word - DOE News Release-DOE Completes Cleanup at New...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DOE Completes Cleanup at New York, California Sites Recovery Act funds accelerate cleanup; support job creation and footprint reduction WASHINGTON, D.C. - Last month, the U.S....

377

Recovery Cleanup Project at Y-12 Leaves Alpha 5 with an Empty...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Office NPO News Releases Recovery Cleanup Project at Y-12 Leaves Alpha ... Recovery Cleanup Project at Y-12 Leaves Alpha 5 with an Empty Feeling applicationmsword icon R-10-21...

378

Technical papers presented at a DOE meeting on criteria for cleanup of transuranium elements in soil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transuranium element soil contamination cleanup experience gained from nuclear weapons accidents and cleanup at Eniwetok Atoll was reviewed. Presentations have been individually abstracted for inclusion in the data base. (ACR)

Not Available

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Production of Syngas by Direct Catalytic Oxidation of Methane  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...DESORPTION AT HIGH-TEMPERATURES...of abundant natural gas into liquid...a 50-mI high-pressure Autoclave...atmospheric pressure, and the...with very high CH4 yields...Contact times of gases within the...catalytic combustors and reactors...

D. A. Hickman; L. D. Schmidt

1993-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

380

Idaho Governor Praises DOE, Contractor Effort for Resuming Critical Cleanup  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Governor Praises DOE, Contractor Effort for Resuming Critical Governor Praises DOE, Contractor Effort for Resuming Critical Cleanup Project Idaho Governor Praises DOE, Contractor Effort for Resuming Critical Cleanup Project July 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Idaho Governor C.L. “Butch” Otter discusses the importance of completing the cleanup mission at the Idaho site. Idaho Governor C.L. "Butch" Otter discusses the importance of completing the cleanup mission at the Idaho site. An exterior view of the recently constructed Accelerated Retrieval Project-VIII facility. An exterior view of the recently constructed Accelerated Retrieval Project-VIII facility. The Accelerated Retrieval Project-VIII building spans a 1.72-acre footprint. More than 2 million pounds of structural steel went into building. The eastern and largest portion of the structure is 250 feet long by 290 feet wide and 70 feet tall. The one-of-a-kind design consists of a center column-supported space frame connecting each side of the facility’s roof trusses.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature syngas cleanup" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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381

Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-F-6 Burial Ground  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 118-F-6 Burial Ground located in the 100-FR-2 Operable Unit of the 100-F Area on the Hanford Site. The trenches received waste from the 100-F Experimental Animal Farm, including animal manure, animal carcasses, laboratory waste, plastic, cardboard, metal, and concrete debris as well as a railroad tank car.

H. M. Sulloway

2008-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

382

Cleanup Verification Package for the 300 VTS Waste Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 300 Area Vitrification Test Site, also known as the 300 VTS site. The site was used by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory as a field demonstration site for in situ vitrification of soils containing simulated waste.

S. W. Clark and T. H. Mitchell

2006-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

383

LOVE CANAL CLEANUP: EPA revamps plan, safety decision  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

LOVE CANAL CLEANUP: EPA revamps plan, safety decision ... EPA's announcement of a revised plan for handling the remaining contamination at Love Canal was prompted by a contractor's finding of "significant migration of chemicals beyond the proposed wall location," and by a close review of a recent Office of Technology Assessment study. ...

1983-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

384

NUCLEAR ARMS COMPLEX: Huge problems beset cleanup, redesign  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

NUCLEAR ARMS COMPLEX: Huge problems beset cleanup, redesign ... Two documents issued during the past week and a half paint a dismaying picture of the horrendous legacy of the Department of Energy's nuclear weapons complex and the massive task that lies ahead. ...

1991-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

385

Cleanup at Los Alamos National Laboratory - the challenges - 9493  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of environmental cleanup at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and some of the unique aspects and challenges. Cleanup of the 65-year old Department of Energy Laboratory is being conducted under a RCRA Consent Order with the State of New Mexico. This agreement is one of the most recent cleanup agreements signed in the DOE complex and was based on lessons learned at other DOE sites. A number of attributes create unique challenges for LANL cleanup -- the proximity to the community and pueblos, the site's topography and geology, and the nature of LANL's on-going missions. This overview paper will set the stage for other papers in this session, including papers that present: Plans to retrieve buried waste at Material Disposal Area B, across the street from oen of Los Alamos' commercial districts and the local newspaper; Progress to date and joint plans with WIPP for disposal of the remaining inventory of legacy transuranic waste; Reviews of both groundwater and surface water contamination and the factors complicating both characterization and remediation; Optimizing the disposal of low-level radioactive waste from ongoing LANL missions; A stakeholder environmental data transparency project (RACER), with full public access to all available information on contamination at LANL, and A description of the approach to waste processing cost recovery from the programs that generate hazardous and radioactive waste at LANL.

Stiger, Susan G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hargis, Kenneth M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Graham, Michael J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rael, George J [NNSL/LASO

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Enewetak fact book (a resume of pre-cleanup information)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The book contains a group of short treatises on the precleanup condition of the islands in Enewetak Atoll. Their purpose was to provide brief guidance to the radiological history and radiological condition of the islands for use in cleanup of the atoll. (ACR)

Bliss, W. (comp.)

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Idaho Governor Praises DOE, Contractor Effort for Resuming Critical Cleanup  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Idaho Governor Praises DOE, Contractor Effort for Resuming Critical Idaho Governor Praises DOE, Contractor Effort for Resuming Critical Cleanup Project Idaho Governor Praises DOE, Contractor Effort for Resuming Critical Cleanup Project July 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Idaho Governor C.L. “Butch” Otter discusses the importance of completing the cleanup mission at the Idaho site. Idaho Governor C.L. "Butch" Otter discusses the importance of completing the cleanup mission at the Idaho site. An exterior view of the recently constructed Accelerated Retrieval Project-VIII facility. An exterior view of the recently constructed Accelerated Retrieval Project-VIII facility. The Accelerated Retrieval Project-VIII building spans a 1.72-acre footprint. More than 2 million pounds of structural steel went into building. The eastern and largest portion of the structure is 250 feet long by 290 feet wide and 70 feet tall. The one-of-a-kind design consists of a center column-supported space frame connecting each side of the facility’s roof trusses.

388

Workers at Hanford Site Achieve Recovery Act Legacy Cleanup Goals Ahead of Schedule  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Hanford Site recently surpassed American Recovery and Reinvestment Act goals to accelerate the cleanup of legacy waste and fuels.

389

Fabrication and Performance of Ni-YSZ Anode Supported Cell for Coal Derived Syngas Application by Tape Casting and Spin Coating  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ni-YSZ anode supported cell has been developed for direct utilization of coal derived syngas as fuel in the temperature range of 700-850° C. The porous Ni-YSZ anode substrate was prepared based on processes of slip casting and lamination of anode tape. Then thin-film YSZ electrolyte was deposited on pre-sintered anode substrate via a colloidal spin coating technique and an optimized final sintering route. Dense and crackfree YSZ electrolyte was successfully obtained after sintering at 1440C for 4hrs. Processing factors like pre-sintering of anode, solvent, coating cycles and sintering route on the final properties of YSZ film was studied. A power density of 0.62W/cm2 has been achieved for the anode supported cell tested in 97%H2/3%H2O at 800°C. EIS test results indicated the cell performance was essentially influenced by interfacial resistance and charge transfer process.

Gong, Mingyang (West Virginia U., Morgantown WV); Jiang, Yinglu (West Virginia U., Morgantown WV); Johnson, C.D.; Xingbo, Liu (West Virginia U., Morgantown WV)

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

NETL: Gasifipedia  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Syngas Cleanup: Syngas Contaminant Removal and Conditioning Syngas Cleanup: Syngas Contaminant Removal and Conditioning Particulate Removal Raw synthesis gas (syngas) leaving the gasifier contains fine ash and/or slag that needs to be removed prior to sending the gas downstream for further processing. The bulk of the particulates are removed using dry particulate removal systems such as filters and/or cyclones. High temperature ceramic filters have been developed for gasification applications and are currently commercially available. The recovered fly ash/slag can either be recycled to the gasifier or purged from the system as a byproduct. The syngas leaving the dry particulate removal system is then further purified by passing through a wet scrubber where any residual solids can be removed down to a 1 ppm level.

391

Experimental Study on Co-Firing of Syngas as a Reburn/Alternative Fuel in a Commercial Water-Tube Boiler and a Pilot-Scale Vertical Furnace  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The second was a vertical furnace with 4 heavy oil burners, for various heat replacements by syngas cofiring at various heating values. ... The cleaned syngas is then introduced to the host boiler through a gas burner or nozzles. ... The combustible species in the mixed gas are completely burnt-out by overfire air in the burn-out zone. ...

Won Yang; Dong Jin Yang; Sin Young Choi; Jong Soo Kim

2011-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

392

Syngas production by plasma treatments of alcohols, bio-oils and wood This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Syngas production by plasma treatments of alcohols, bio-oils and wood This article has been Contact us My IOPscience #12;Syngas production by plasma treatments of alcohols, bio-oils and wood K conversion of biomass provide a great variety of products: oils, alcohols and gases. After treatment

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

393

CO2 conversion for syngas production in methane catalytic partial oxidation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The catalytic partial oxidation of methane (CPOM) involves the interaction among methane combustion (MC), steam reforming (SR), and dry reforming (DR), and CO2 generated from MC is utilized for syngas production in DR. To evaluate the potential of CO2 utilization in CPOM for syngas production, a numerical study is carried out where CO2 is added into the feed gas and CPOM is triggered in a rhodium-based catalyst bed. Two important parameters of CO2/O2 ratio and O2/CH4 ratio (or O/C ratio) in the feed gas are taken into account. The predictions suggest that CO2 addition plays no part in MC, but it retards SR and intensifies DR. The CO2 consumption increases with CO2/O2 ratio; however, the CO2 conversion goes down. As a whole, increasing CO2 addition enhances CO formation but reduces H2 formation. The maximum syngas production is exhibited at CO2/O2 = 0.2 when the O/C ratio is 1. At a fixed CO2/O2 ratio, the maximum H2 yield and CO2 consumption are located at O/C = 1.8 and 1.0, respectively. However, the CO2 conversion monotonically decreases with increasing O/C ratio. Within the investigated range of CO2/O2 and O/C ratios, the H2 yield and CO2 conversion in CPOM are in the ranges of approximately 0.42–1.34 mol(mol CH4)?1 and 10–41%, respectively.

Wei-Hsin Chen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Conducting oxide formation and mechanical endurance of potential solid-oxide fuel cell interconnects in coal syngas environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The oxidation properties of potential SOFCs materials Crofer 22 APU, Ebrite and Haynes 230 exposed in coal syngas at 800 °C for 100 h were studied. The phases and surface morphology of the oxide scales were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). The mechanical endurance and electrical resistance of the conducting oxides were characterized by indentation and electrical impedance, respectively. It was found that the syngas exposure caused the alloys to form porous oxide scales, which increased the electrical resistant and decreased the mechanical stability. As for short-term exposure in syngas, neither carbide nor metal dusting was found in the scales of all samples.

Liu, Kejia; Luo, Junhang; Johnson, Christopher; Liu, Xingbo; Lang, J.; Mao, S.X.

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

395

Dynamic control of a stand-alone syngas production system with near-zero CO2 emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A series combination of steam methane reforming (SMR) and dry reforming of methane (DRM) is developed as a stand-alone syngas production (SASP) system in which the heat recovery mechanism can fully replace the hot/cold utilities. The optimum operating conditions can be found by using the optimization algorithm to maximize the syngas yield subject to near-zero CO2 emission constraints. Since the syngas yield and CO2 emissions are strongly affected by process interactions and unknown perturbations, the process control method is utilized to stabilize the SASP system. Through the Hammerstein model identification, nonlinear inversion and model-based control methods, it is verified that the multi-loop nonlinear control strategy can ensure satisfactory control performance.

Wei Wu; Hsiao-Tung Yang; Jenn-Jiang Hwang

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

DOE ACHIEVES MAJOR COLD WAR LEGACY WASTE CLEANUP MILESTONE: Waste Isolation  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ACHIEVES MAJOR COLD WAR LEGACY WASTE CLEANUP MILESTONE: Waste ACHIEVES MAJOR COLD WAR LEGACY WASTE CLEANUP MILESTONE: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Receives 10,000th Shipment DOE ACHIEVES MAJOR COLD WAR LEGACY WASTE CLEANUP MILESTONE: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Receives 10,000th Shipment October 3, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis DOE ACHIEVES MAJOR COLD WAR LEGACY WASTE CLEANUP MILESTONE: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Receives 10,000th Shipment DOE ACHIEVES MAJOR COLD WAR LEGACY WASTE CLEANUP MILESTONE: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Receives 10,000th Shipment DOE ACHIEVES MAJOR COLD WAR LEGACY WASTE CLEANUP MILESTONE: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Receives 10,000th Shipment DOE ACHIEVES MAJOR COLD WAR LEGACY WASTE CLEANUP MILESTONE: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Receives 10,000th Shipment CARLSBAD, N.M. - The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) received its

397

DOE Completes Cleanup at New York, California Sites - Recovery Act funds  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Completes Cleanup at New York, California Sites - Recovery Act Completes Cleanup at New York, California Sites - Recovery Act funds accelerate cleanup; support job creation and footprint reduction DOE Completes Cleanup at New York, California Sites - Recovery Act funds accelerate cleanup; support job creation and footprint reduction July 1, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact 202-586-4940 WASHINGTON, D.C. - Last month, the U.S. Department of Energy completed the cleanup of Cold War legacy waste at the Nuclear Radiation Development, LLC (NRD) site near Grand Island, New York, and at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California. The two locations became the 18th and 19th sites to be completely cleaned of legacy waste. This milestone was achieved as part of a $172 million investment from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to expedite legacy waste cleanup

398

RECOVERY ACT LEADS TO CLEANUP OF TRANSURANIC WASTE SITES | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

RECOVERY ACT LEADS TO CLEANUP OF TRANSURANIC WASTE SITES RECOVERY ACT LEADS TO CLEANUP OF TRANSURANIC WASTE SITES RECOVERY ACT LEADS TO CLEANUP OF TRANSURANIC WASTE SITES October 1, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis RECOVERY ACT LEADS TO CLEANUP OF TRANSURANIC WASTE SITES Carlsbad, NM - The recent completion of transuranic (TRU) waste cleanup at Vallecitos Nuclear Center (VNC) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Site 300 in California brings the total number of sites cleared of TRU waste to 17. "Recovery Act funding has made this possible," Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) Recovery Act Federal Project Director Casey Gadbury said of the VNC and LLNL cleanups funded with about $1.6 million in Recovery Act funds. "The cleanup of these and other small-quantity sites has been and will be accelerated because of the available Recovery Act funds."

399

RECOVERY ACT LEADS TO CLEANUP OF TRANSURANIC WASTE SITES | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

RECOVERY ACT LEADS TO CLEANUP OF TRANSURANIC WASTE SITES RECOVERY ACT LEADS TO CLEANUP OF TRANSURANIC WASTE SITES RECOVERY ACT LEADS TO CLEANUP OF TRANSURANIC WASTE SITES October 1, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis RECOVERY ACT LEADS TO CLEANUP OF TRANSURANIC WASTE SITES Carlsbad, NM - The recent completion of transuranic (TRU) waste cleanup at Vallecitos Nuclear Center (VNC) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Site 300 in California brings the total number of sites cleared of TRU waste to 17. "Recovery Act funding has made this possible," Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) Recovery Act Federal Project Director Casey Gadbury said of the VNC and LLNL cleanups funded with about $1.6 million in Recovery Act funds. "The cleanup of these and other small-quantity sites has been and will be accelerated because of the available Recovery Act funds."

400

DOE ACHIEVES MAJOR COLD WAR LEGACY WASTE CLEANUP MILESTONE: Waste Isolation  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE ACHIEVES MAJOR COLD WAR LEGACY WASTE CLEANUP MILESTONE: Waste DOE ACHIEVES MAJOR COLD WAR LEGACY WASTE CLEANUP MILESTONE: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Receives 10,000th Shipment DOE ACHIEVES MAJOR COLD WAR LEGACY WASTE CLEANUP MILESTONE: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Receives 10,000th Shipment October 3, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis DOE ACHIEVES MAJOR COLD WAR LEGACY WASTE CLEANUP MILESTONE: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Receives 10,000th Shipment DOE ACHIEVES MAJOR COLD WAR LEGACY WASTE CLEANUP MILESTONE: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Receives 10,000th Shipment DOE ACHIEVES MAJOR COLD WAR LEGACY WASTE CLEANUP MILESTONE: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Receives 10,000th Shipment DOE ACHIEVES MAJOR COLD WAR LEGACY WASTE CLEANUP MILESTONE: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Receives 10,000th Shipment CARLSBAD, N.M. - The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) received its

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature syngas cleanup" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

EM Updates Congress on Nuclear Cleanup Progress in 18th Annual Caucus |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EM Updates Congress on Nuclear Cleanup Progress in 18th Annual EM Updates Congress on Nuclear Cleanup Progress in 18th Annual Caucus EM Updates Congress on Nuclear Cleanup Progress in 18th Annual Caucus March 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - EM and its cleanup contractors present briefings each year to the U.S. House Nuclear Cleanup Caucus on remediation operations at its major sites across the DOE complex. The briefings are organized by Rep. Doc Hastings (R-Wash.), who chairs the bipartisan caucus. For nearly two decades, the briefings have offered members of Congress and their staff, news media and other interested individuals insight into the progress of cleanup of the environmental legacy of the Cold War. EM site managers and their contractor counterparts provide updates on cleanup accomplishments, safety performance, budget scopes, cost savings and plans

402

Flame Stability of Methane and Syngas Oxy-fuel Steam Flames  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The scaling relation [gF = c(SL2/?)] for different burner diameters was obtained for various diameter burners. ... The fuels used for these experiments were methane and syngas (CO–H2), which were burned with oxidants O2 and recirculated CO2 and H2O. Research-grade fuel and oxidant were delivered to the burners from pressurized tanks. ... Narrower flammable regimes and lower laminar burning velocity under oxy-fuel combustion conditions may lead to new stability challenges in operating oxy-coal burners. ...

B. K. Dam; N. D. Love; A. R. Choudhuri

2012-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

403

Effect of Syngas Addition on Lower Alkene Production by the Oxidative Cracking of Hexane  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For the COC of C6 with added syngas, the mechanism of exothermic heterogeneous combustion reactions (e.g., H2?O2 catalytic combustion), followed by endothermic homogeneous pyrolysis reaction of C6, is supposed, in which lower alkenes are produced in the gas-phase cracking of C6, using the heat generated from heterogeneously catalytic combustion reactions. ... Both Sn/SiO2 and PtSn/SiO2 seem to be able to selectively combust hydrogen in a gas mixt. ...

Haiou Zhu; Xuebin Liu; Wenzhao Li; Qingjie Ge; Hengyong Xu

2005-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

404

ENGINEERING A NEW MATERIAL FOR HOT GAS CLEANUP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall purpose of this project was to develop a superior, regenerable, calcium-based sorbent for desulfurizing hot coal gas with the sorbent being in the form of small pellets made with a layered structure such that each pellet consists of a highly reactive lime core enclosed within a porous protective shell of strong but relatively inert material. The sorbent can be very useful for hot gas cleanup in advanced power generation systems where problems have been encountered with presently available materials. An economical method of preparing the desired material was demonstrated with a laboratory-scale revolving drum pelletizer. Core-in-shell pellets were produced by first pelletizing powdered limestone or other calcium-bearing material to make the pellet cores, and then the cores were coated with a mixture of powdered alumina and limestone to make the shells. The core-in-shell pellets were subsequently calcined at 1373 K (1100 C) to sinter the shell material and convert CaCO{sub 3} to CaO. The resulting product was shown to be highly reactive and a very good sorbent for H{sub 2}S at temperatures in the range of 1113 to 1193 K (840 to 920 C) which corresponds well with the outlet temperatures of some coal gasifiers. The product was also shown to be both strong and attrition resistant, and that it can be regenerated by a cyclic oxidation and reduction process. A preliminary evaluation of the material showed that while it was capable of withstanding repeated sulfidation and regeneration, the reactivity of the sorbent tended to decline with usage due to CaO sintering. Also it was found that the compressive strength of the shell material depends on the relative proportions of alumina and limestone as well as their particle size distributions. Therefore, an extensive study of formulation and preparation conditions was conducted to improve the performance of both the core and shell materials. It was subsequently determined that MgO tends to stabilize the high-temperature reactivity of CaO. Therefore, a sorbent prepared from dolomite withstands the effects of repeated sulfidation and regeneration better than one prepared from limestone. It was also determined that both the compressive strength and attrition resistance of core-in-shell pellets depend on shell thickness and that the compressive strength can be improved by reducing both the particle size and amount of limestone in the shell preparation mixture. A semiempirical model was also found which seems to adequately represent the absorption process. This model can be used for analyzing and predicting sorbent performance, and, therefore, it can provide guidance for any additional development which may be required. In conclusion, the overall objective of developing an economical, reusable, and practical material was largely achieved. The material appears suitable for removing CO{sub 2} from fuel combustion products as well as for desulfurizing hot coal gas.

T.D. Wheelock; L.K. Doraiswamy; K.P. Constant

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

EM Risk and Cleanup Decision Making Presentation by Mark Gilbertson  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AND CLEANUP DECISION MAKING AND CLEANUP DECISION MAKING www.em.doe.gov 1 Mark Gilbertson Deputy Assistant Secretary for Site Restoration Office of Environmental Management May 31, 2012 Presented to Environmental Management Advisory Board Topics * How we got to where we are * Existing environment and health risk www.em.doe.gov 2 * Existing environment and health risk analysis to support decision-making * Considerations going forward The Past Five Years * FY2008 budget assumed ~$6 billion escalated for inflation over the following four years * Re-baselined the program and in some cases renegotiated milestones and contracts to align with the budget profile * Milestones were negotiated in good faith (~40 agreements/~200 major milestones/year) * Recognition that approximately 50% of the EM budget is "min safe"

406

Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater Cleanup -  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater Cleanup - Efficiency delivered more than $6 million in cost savings, $3 million in annual savings Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater Cleanup - Efficiency delivered more than $6 million in cost savings, $3 million in annual savings June 4, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Geoff Tyree, DOE Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov (509) 376-4171 Dee Millikin, CHPRC Dee_Millikin@rl.gov (509) 376-1297 RICHLAND, Wash. - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company is using a treatment material that has delivered more than $6 million in cost savings to date and is delivering more than $3 million in annual cost savings and efficiencies in treatment

407

DOE Awards Technical Assistance Contract for Moab Mill Tailings Cleanup |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Technical Assistance Contract for Moab Mill Tailings Technical Assistance Contract for Moab Mill Tailings Cleanup DOE Awards Technical Assistance Contract for Moab Mill Tailings Cleanup May 31, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Bill Taylor bill.taylor@srs.gov 803-952-8564 Cincinnati-The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced the award of an $18 million small disadvantaged business contract with S&K Aerospace, LLC, of St. Ignatius, Montana to continue to provide technical assistance services for the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project in Moab, Utah. The basic contract is for three years with two one-year options to extend, for a total of up to five years. S&K Aerospace, LLC, a tribal organization 8(a) small business, will assist in the Department's removal of uranium tailings at the former Atlas

408

New Groundwater Treatment Facility Begins Operation: Boost in Cleanup  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

New Groundwater Treatment Facility Begins Operation: Boost in New Groundwater Treatment Facility Begins Operation: Boost in Cleanup Accelerated by Recovery Act Funding New Groundwater Treatment Facility Begins Operation: Boost in Cleanup Accelerated by Recovery Act Funding January 19, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Andre Armstrong, CH2M HILL (509)376-6773 Andre_L_Armstrong@rl.gov Geoff Tyree, DOE (509) 376-4171 Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov RICHLAND, WASH. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is boosting its capacity for treating groundwater to remove chromium near the Columbia River by 40 percent with the recent completion of a new treatment facility. Contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) finished building and started operating the new 100-DX groundwater treatment facility in December. The facility is located near the D and DR Reactors on

409

Renewable Natural Gas Clean-up Challenges and Applications  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Renewable Natural Gas Clean-up Renewable Natural Gas Clean-up p Challenges and Applications Renewable Resource Webinar July 13, 2011 Brian Weeks, Gas Technology Institute 281 235 7993, brian.weeks@gastechnology.org Kristine Wiley, Gas Technology Institute 847 768 0910 kristine wiley@gastechnology org 847 768 0910, kristine.wiley@gastechnology.org 2 Today's Talk Today s Talk >Who is GTI Who is GTI >What is Renewable Natural Gas (RNG) Ch ll f R bl N t l G >Challenges for Renewable Natural Gas >How do we clean up RNG? >Recommendations and Summary 2 - - 3 GTI at a Glance... > Not-for-profit research > Not for profit research, with 65+ year history > Facilities 18 Chi ─ 18 acre campus near Chicago ─ 200,000 ft 2 , 28 specialized labs $60 illi > $60 + million i in revenue

410

Idaho Site Advances Recovery Act Cleanup after Inventing Effective Treatment  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

April 14, 2011 April 14, 2011 IDAHO FALLS, Idaho - For the first time in history, workers at the Idaho site achieved success in the initial cleanup of potentially dangerous sodium in a de- commissioned nuclear reactor using an innovative treatment process. The Ameri- can Recovery and Reinvestment Act invested $70 million in the project, which employs 130 workers. DOE officials cheered the outcome and praised the team that designed and imple- mented the innovative sodium treatment for which the DOE has filed a provisional patent application. "We're proud of our team for creating a unique solution to safely rid the Experi- mental Breeder Reactor-II of this highly reactive sodium before we demolish it," DOE Idaho Cleanup Project Assistant Manager Jim Cooper said. "Our workers

411

DOE Announces Strategic Engineering and Technology Roadmap for Cleanup of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Strategic Engineering and Technology Roadmap for Strategic Engineering and Technology Roadmap for Cleanup of Cold War Era Nuclear Waste DOE Announces Strategic Engineering and Technology Roadmap for Cleanup of Cold War Era Nuclear Waste March 18, 2008 - 10:52am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today released an Engineering and Technology Roadmap (Roadmap), which details initiatives aimed at reducing the technical risks and uncertainties associated with cleaning up Cold War era nuclear waste over the next ten years. The Roadmap also outlines strategies to minimize such risks and proposes how these strategies would be implemented, furthering the Department's goal of protecting the environment by providing a responsible resolution to the environmental legacy of nuclear weapons production.

412

Cleanup Verification Package for the 618-8 Burial Ground  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 618-8 Burial Ground, also referred to as the Solid Waste Burial Ground No. 8, 318-8, and the Early Solid Waste Burial Ground. During its period of operation, the 618-8 site is speculated to have been used to bury uranium-contaminated waste derived from fuel manufacturing, and construction debris from the remodeling of the 313 Building.

M. J. Appel

2006-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

413

Superfund Chief Outlines Strategy On Hazardous Waste Cleanups  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

William N. Hedeman Jr. has been director of the Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Emergency & Remedial Response, also known as the Superfund office, for four years. ... Given this interest, we think that at least 40% and probably closer to 50% of the cleanup of sites in the short term will be assumed by them, not only in terms of constructing the remedy but also in terms of doing the remedial investigation and feasibility studies (RI/FS) and designs leading to that remedy. ...

1985-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

414

Rocky Flats Cleanup Agreement implementation successes and challenges  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On July 19, 1996 the US Department of Energy (DOE), State of Colorado (CDPHE), and US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) entered into an agreement called the Rocky Flats Cleanup Agreement (RFCA) for the cleanup and closure of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS or Rocky Flats). Major elements of the agreement include: an Integrated Site-Wide Baseline; up to twelve significant enforceable milestones per year; agreed upon soil and water action levels and standards for cleanup; open space as the likely foreseeable land use; the plutonium and TRU waste removed by 2015; streamlined regulatory process; agreement with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) to coordinate activities; and a risk reduction focus. Successful implementation of RFCA requires a substantial effort by the parties to change their way of thinking about RFETS and meet the deliverables and commitments. Substantial progress toward Site closure through the implementation of RFCA has been accomplished in the short time since the signing, yet much remains to be done. Much can be learned from the Rocky Flats experience by other facilities in similar situations.

Shelton, D.C.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Clean-up of Nuclear Licensed Facility 57  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: In the early sixties a radiochemistry laboratory dedicated to Research and Development was built at the French Atomic Energy Commission's centre at Fontenay aux Roses (CEA-FAR); it was named Building 18. More buildings were added during the decade: Building 54, storehouses and offices and Building 91, a hall and laboratories for chemical engineering research into natural and depleted uranium. These three buildings together constitute NLF57. Construction work took place between 1959 and 1962 and the buildings entered operation in 1961. The research and development programs performed in NLF57 involved spent fuel reprocessing studies, waste treatment processes and studies and production of transuranic elements with the related analytical methods development. The research and development program ended on 30 June 1995. The NLF57 clean-up program was launched to reduce the nuclear and conventional hazards and minimise HLW and MLW production during the dismantling work. The clean-up work was divided into categories by type to facilitate its organisation: treatment and removal of nuclear material, removal of radioactive sources, treatment and removal of organic and aqueous effluents, treatment and removal of solid waste, pumping out of the PETRUS tank, flushing and decontamination of the tanks and clean-up of buildings. (authors)

Jeanjacques, Michel; Bremond, Marie Pierre; Marchand, Carole; Poyau, Cecile; Viallefont, Cecile; Gautier, Laurent; Masure, Frederic [CEA, DANS-DRSN-SAFAR (France)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Integrated Process Configuration for High-Temperature Sulfur Mitigation during Biomass Conversion via Indirect Gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sulfur present in biomass often causes catalyst deactivation during downstream operations after gasification. Early removal of sulfur from the syngas stream post-gasification is possible via process rearrangements and can be beneficial for maintaining a low-sulfur environment for all downstream operations. High-temperature sulfur sorbents have superior performance and capacity under drier syngas conditions. The reconfigured process discussed in this paper is comprised of indirect biomass gasification using dry recycled gas from downstream operations, which produces a drier syngas stream and, consequently, more-efficient sulfur removal at high temperatures using regenerable sorbents. A combination of experimental results from NREL's fluidizable Ni-based reforming catalyst, fluidizable Mn-based sulfur sorbent, and process modeling information show that using a coupled process of dry gasification with high-temperature sulfur removal can improve the performance of Ni-based reforming catalysts significantly.

Dutta. A.; Cheah, S.; Bain, R.; Feik, C.; Magrini-Bair, K.; Phillips, S.

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

417

Evaluation of syngas production unit cost of bio-gasification facility using regression analysis techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Evaluation of economic feasibility of a bio-gasification facility needs understanding of its unit cost under different production capacities. The objective of this study was to evaluate the unit cost of syngas production at capacities from 60 through 1800Nm 3/h using an economic model with three regression analysis techniques (simple regression, reciprocal regression, and log-log regression). The preliminary result of this study showed that reciprocal regression analysis technique had the best fit curve between per unit cost and production capacity, with sum of error squares (SES) lower than 0.001 and coefficient of determination of (R 2) 0.996. The regression analysis techniques determined the minimum unit cost of syngas production for micro-scale bio-gasification facilities of $0.052/Nm 3, under the capacity of 2,880 Nm 3/h. The results of this study suggest that to reduce cost, facilities should run at a high production capacity. In addition, the contribution of this technique could be the new categorical criterion to evaluate micro-scale bio-gasification facility from the perspective of economic analysis.

Deng, Yangyang; Parajuli, Prem B.

2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

418

Laminar burning velocity with oxygen-enriched air of syngas produced from biomass gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Several studies on the laminar burning velocity of syngas mixtures have been conducted by various researchers. However, in most of these studies, dry air was used as the oxidizer, whereas very few studies have been conducted on syngas combustion in oxygen – enriched air. In this work, a numerical and experimental study on the laminar burning velocity of a mixture of H2, CO and N2 (20:20:60 vol%) was performed using air enriched with oxygen as the oxidizer, varying the oxygen content from 21% up to 35% for different equivalence ratios. Numerical calculations were conducted using three detailed reaction mechanisms and transport properties. Flames were generated using contoured slot-type nozzle burners, and Schlieren images were used to determine the laminar burning velocity with the angle method. The experiments were performed under the conditions of Medellin (1550 m.a.s.l.), 0.838 atm and 298 K. The laminar burning velocity increases with the concentration of the oxygen in the mixture due to the increase of the reaction rate; for a stoichiometric mixture, the laminar burning velocity increases by almost 25% with an increment of 4% of oxygen in the oxidant. However, the flammability limits also increase, allowing stable flames to exist in a wider range of equivalence ratios.

Hernando A. Yepes; Andres A. Amell

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Continuous syngas fermentation for the production of ethanol, n-propanol and n-butanol  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Syngas fermentation to fuels is a technology on the verge of commercialization. Low cost of fermentation medium is important for process feasibility. The use of corn steep liquor (CSL) instead of yeast extract (YE) in Alkalibaculum bacchi strain CP15 bottle fermentations reduced the medium cost by 27% and produced 78% more ethanol. When continuous fermentation was performed in a 7-L fermentor, 6 g/L ethanol was obtained in the YE and YE-free media. When CSL medium was used in continuous fermentation, the maximum produced concentrations of ethanol, n-propanol and n-butanol were 8 g/L, 6 g/L and 1 g/L, respectively. n-Propanol and n-butanol were not typical products of strain CP15. A 16S rRNA gene-based survey revealed a mixed culture in the fermentor dominated by A. bacchi strain CP15 (56%) and Clostridium propionicum (34%). The mixed culture presents an opportunity for higher alcohols production from syngas.

Kan Liu; Hasan K. Atiyeh; Bradley S. Stevenson; Ralph S. Tanner; Mark R. Wilkins; Raymond L. Huhnke

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Elementary Steps of Syngas Reactions on Mo2C(001): Adsorption Thermochemistry and Bond Dissociation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Density functional theory (DFT) and ab initio thermodynamics are applied in order to investigate the most stable surface and subsurface terminations of Mo{sub 2}C(001) as a function of chemical potential and in the presence of syngas. The Mo-terminated (001) surface is then used as a model surface to evaluate the thermochemistry and energetic barriers for key elementary steps in syngas reactions. Adsorption energy scaling relations and Broensted-Evans-Polanyi relationships are established and used to place Mo{sub 2}C into the context of transition metal surfaces. The results indicate that the surface termination is a complex function of reaction conditions and kinetics. It is predicted that the surface will be covered by either C{sub 2}H{sub 2} or O depending on conditions. Comparisons to transition metals indicate that the Mo-terminated Mo{sub 2}C(001) surface exhibits carbon reactivity similar to transition metals such as Ru and Ir, but is significantly more reactive towards oxygen.

Medford, Andrew

2012-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature syngas cleanup" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Development of OTM Syngas Process and Testing of Syngas Derived Ultra-clean Fuels in Diesel Engines and Fuel Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This topical report summarizes work accomplished for the Program from November 1, 2001 to December 31, 2002 in the following task areas: Task 1: Materials Development; Task 2: Composite Development; Task 4: Reactor Design and Process Optimization; Task 8: Fuels and Engine Testing; 8.1 International Diesel Engine Program; 8.2 Nuvera Fuel Cell Program; and Task 10: Program Management. Major progress has been made towards developing high temperature, high performance, robust, oxygen transport elements. In addition, a novel reactor design has been proposed that co-produces hydrogen, lowers cost and improves system operability. Fuel and engine testing is progressing well, but was delayed somewhat due to the hiatus in program funding in 2002. The Nuvera fuel cell portion of the program was completed on schedule and delivered promising results regarding low emission fuels for transportation fuel cells. The evaluation of ultra-clean diesel fuels continues in single cylinder (SCTE) and multiple cylinder (MCTE) test rigs at International Truck and Engine. FT diesel and a BP oxygenate showed significant emissions reductions in comparison to baseline petroleum diesel fuels. Overall through the end of 2002 the program remains under budget, but behind schedule in some areas.

E.T. (Skip) Robinson; James P. Meagher; Prasad Apte; Xingun Gui; Tytus R. Bulicz; Siv Aasland; Charles Besecker; Jack Chen Bart A. van Hassel; Olga Polevaya; Rafey Khan; Piyush Pilaniwalla

2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

422

Novel Syngas Production Techniques for GTL-FT Synthesis of Gasoline Using Reverse Flow Catalytic Membrane Reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Novel Syngas Production Techniques for GTL-FT Synthesis of Gasoline Using Reverse Flow Catalytic Membrane Reactors ... Catalytic partial oxidation (CPO, or also CPOX) is different from noncatalytic partial oxidation (POX) in that chemical conversion takes place over a catalyst bed, but it does not use a burner. ...

C. Dillerop; H. van den Berg; A. G. J. van der Ham

2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

423

Stability characteristics of non-premixed turbulent jet flames of hydrogen and syngas blends with coaxial air  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The stability characteristics of attached hydrogen (H2) and syngas (H2/CO) turbulent jet flames with coaxial air were studied experimentally. The flame stability was investigated by varying the fuel and air stream velocities. Effects of the coaxial nozzle diameter, fuel nozzle lip thickness and syngas fuel composition are addressed in detail. The detachment stability limit of the syngas single jet flame was found to decrease with increasing amount of carbon monoxide in the fuel. For jet flames with coaxial air, the critical coaxial air velocity leading to flame detachment first increases with increasing fuel jet velocity and subsequently decreases. This non-monotonic trend appears for all syngas composition herein investigated (50/50 ? 100/0% H2/CO). OH? chemiluminescence imaging was performed to qualitatively identify the mechanisms responsible for the flame detachment. For all fuel compositions, local extinction close to the burner rim is observed at lower fuel velocities (ascending stability limit), while local flame extinction downstream of the burner rim is observed at higher fuel velocities (descending stability limit). Extrema of the non-monotonic trends appear to be identical when the nozzle fuel velocity is normalized by the critical fuel velocity obtained for the single jet cases.

Jeongjae Hwang; Nicolas Bouvet; Kitae Sohn; Youngbin Yoon

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Investigation of syngas interaction in alcohol synthesis catalysts. Quartery technical progress report, July 1, 1995--September 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the work done on {open_quotes}Investigation of Syngas Interaction in Alcohol Synthesis Catalysts{close_quotes} during the last three months. In this report the results of the work done on the effect of CO adsorption on the magnetic character of cobalt in the Cu/Co/Cr catalysts is discussed.

Akundi, M.A.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

CONSTRUCTION OF KEY CLEANUP PROJECT GAINS GOOD GROUND AT SRS | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CONSTRUCTION OF KEY CLEANUP PROJECT GAINS GOOD GROUND AT SRS CONSTRUCTION OF KEY CLEANUP PROJECT GAINS GOOD GROUND AT SRS CONSTRUCTION OF KEY CLEANUP PROJECT GAINS GOOD GROUND AT SRS June 1, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis CONSTRUCTION OF KEY CLEANUP PROJECT GAINS GOOD GROUND AT SRS Aiken, SC - Construction of a key cleanup facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is gaining some serious ground given the remarkable building progress since Fall 2009. Construction and operation of the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) is among the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) highest cleanup priorities. When operational, SWPF will treat millions of gallons of salt waste currently stored in 49 underground tanks at SRS by removing radioactive constituents for vitrification at the nearby Defense Waste Processing Facility. Disposition of the salt waste inventory is a

426

GRR/Elements/18-FD-a.16 - Post-Construction Completion: Review of Cleanup  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Construction Completion: Review of Cleanup Construction Completion: Review of Cleanup Effort to Determine Mitigation Effect < GRR‎ | Elements Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections 18-FD-a.16 - Post-Construction Completion: Review of Cleanup Effort to Determine Mitigation Effect After final cleanup is achieved, the EPA ensures that Superfund response actions provide for the long-term protection of human health and the environment. Logic Chain No Parents \V/ GRR/Elements/18-FD-a.16 - Post-Construction Completion: Review of Cleanup Effort to Determine Mitigation Effect (this page) \V/ No Dependents Under Development Add.png Add an Element Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=GRR/Elements/18-FD-a.16_-_Post-Construction_Completion:_Review_of_Cleanup_Effort_to_Determine_Mitigation_Effect&oldid=453770

427

CONSTRUCTION OF KEY CLEANUP PROJECT GAINS GOOD GROUND AT SRS | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CONSTRUCTION OF KEY CLEANUP PROJECT GAINS GOOD GROUND AT SRS CONSTRUCTION OF KEY CLEANUP PROJECT GAINS GOOD GROUND AT SRS CONSTRUCTION OF KEY CLEANUP PROJECT GAINS GOOD GROUND AT SRS June 1, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis CONSTRUCTION OF KEY CLEANUP PROJECT GAINS GOOD GROUND AT SRS Aiken, SC - Construction of a key cleanup facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is gaining some serious ground given the remarkable building progress since Fall 2009. Construction and operation of the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) is among the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) highest cleanup priorities. When operational, SWPF will treat millions of gallons of salt waste currently stored in 49 underground tanks at SRS by removing radioactive constituents for vitrification at the nearby Defense Waste Processing Facility. Disposition of the salt waste inventory is a

428

DOE Completes Cleanup at New York, California Sites | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Cleanup at New York, California Sites Cleanup at New York, California Sites DOE Completes Cleanup at New York, California Sites July 1, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - Last month, the U.S. Department of Energy completed the cleanup of Cold War legacy waste at the Nuclear Radiation Development, LLC (NRD) site near Grand Island, New York, and at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California. The two locations became the 18th and 19th sites to be completely cleaned of legacy waste. This milestone was achieved as part of a $172 million investment from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to expedite legacy waste cleanup activities across the DOE complex. "Cleanup of these two sites represents important and continued progress in the Department of Energy's commitment to reducing the nation's nuclear

429

Recovery Act Workers Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Basin |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Basin Recovery Act Workers Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Basin American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers recently cleaned up a second basin containing coal ash residues from Cold War operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS). About $24 million from the Recovery Act funded the environmental restoration project, allowing SRS to complete the project at least five years ahead of schedule. The work is part of a larger Recovery Act cleanup of the P Area scheduled for completion by the end of September 2011. Recovery Act Workers Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Basin More Documents & Publications Recovery Act Workers Complete Environmental Cleanup of Coal Ash Basin Recovery Act Workers Add Time Capsule Before Sealing Reactor for Hundreds

430

DOE Certifies Rocky Flats Cleanup "Complete" | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Certifies Rocky Flats Cleanup "Complete" Certifies Rocky Flats Cleanup "Complete" DOE Certifies Rocky Flats Cleanup "Complete" December 8, 2005 - 4:45pm Addthis Golden, CO - Deputy Secretary of Energy Clay Sell announced today that the environmental cleanup of the former Rocky Flats site has been certified complete by the U.S. Department of Energy. Certification marks the final step in the DOE's successful effort to clean up and eventually turn over the former weapons production site for use as a National Wildlife Refuge. "With today's announcement, the cleanup chapter of Rocky Flats' history is closed, while another equally important chapter is just being opened," said Deputy Secretary Sell. "This successful cleanup represents a triumph of determination and spirit of cooperation that stands as an example for

431

Second Site-Wide Five-Year Review of Cleanup at DOE's Idaho Site  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Site-Wide Five-Year Review of Cleanup at DOE's Idaho Site Site-Wide Five-Year Review of Cleanup at DOE's Idaho Site Completed; Report Now Available Online Second Site-Wide Five-Year Review of Cleanup at DOE's Idaho Site Completed; Report Now Available Online February 3, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Danielle Miller (DOE-ID) 208-526-5709 An Idaho Cleanup Project team has completed work on the site-wide five-year review of cleanup at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Idaho site. "This report verifies that the performance of cleanup actions at the Idaho Site continues to be protective of human health and the environment," said Nicole Hernandez, DOE's project manager for the five-year review. "The findings in the report demonstrate a strong collaborative effort by CH2M-WG Idaho (CWI), DOE, the Environmental

432

Development of OTM Syngas Process and Testing of Syngas Derived Ulta-clean Fuels in Diesel Engines and Fuel Cells Budget Period 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This topical report summarizes work accomplished for the Program from January 1, 2003 through December 31,2004 in the following task areas: Task 1--Materials Development; Task 2--Composite Development; Task 4--Reactor Design and Process Optimization; Task 8--Fuels and Engine Testing; 8.1 International Diesel Engine Program; and Task IO: Program Management. Most of the key technical objectives for this budget period were achieved. Only partial success was achieved relative to cycle testing under pressure Major improvements in material performance and element reliability have been achieved. A breakthrough material system has driven the development of a compact planar reactor design capable of producing either hydrogen or syngas. The planar reactor shows significant advantages in thermal efficiency and costs compared to either steam methane reforming with CO{sub 2} recovery or autothermal reforming. The fuel and engine testing program is complete The single cylinder test engine evaluation of UCTF fuels begun in Budget Period 2 was finished this budget period. In addition, a study to evaluate new fuel formulations for an HCCl engine was completed.

E.T. Robinson; John Sirman; Prasad Apte; Xingun Gui; Tytus R. Bulicz; Dan Corgard; Siv Aasland; Kjersti Kleveland; Ann Hooper; Leo Bonnell; John Hemmings; Jack Chen; Bart A. Van Hassel

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

433

Thyroid nodularity and cancer among Chernobyl cleanup workers from Estonia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thyroid examinations, including palpation, ultrasound and, selectively, fine-needle aspiration biopsy, were conducted on nearly 2,000 Chernobyl cleanup workers from Estonia to evaluate the occurrence of thyroid cancer and nodular thyroid disease among men with protracted exposure to ionizing radiation. The examinations were conducted in four cities in Estonia during March-April 1995, 9 years after the reactor accident. The study population was selected from a predefined cohort of 4,833 cleanup workers from Estonia under surveillance for cancer incidence. These men had been sent to Chernobyl between 1986 and 1991 to entomb the damaged reactor, remove radioactive debris and perform related cleanup activities. A total of 2,997 men were invited for thyroid screening and 1,984 (66%) were examined. Estimates of radiation dose from external sources were obtained from military or other institutional records, and details about service dates and types of work performed while at Chernobyl were obtained from a self-administered questionnaire. Blood samples were collected for assay of chromosomal translocations in circulating lymphocytes and loss of expression of the glycophorin A (GPA) gene in erythrocytes. The primary outcome measure was the presence or absence of thyroid nodules as determined by the ultrasound examination. Of the screened workers, 1,247 (63%) were sent to Chernobyl in 1986, including 603 (30%) sent in April or May, soon after the accident. Workers served at Chernobyl for an average of 3 months. The average age was 32 years at the time of arrival at Chernobyl and 40 years at the time of thyroid examination. The mean documented radiation dose from external sources was 10.8 cGy. Biological indicators of exposure showed low correlations with documented dose, but did not indicate that the mean dose for the population was higher than the average documented dose. 47 refs., 1 fig., 9 tabs.

Inskip, P.D.; Boice, J.D. Jr. [National Cancer Inst., Rockville, MD (United States); Tekkel, M. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

EBR-II cover-gas cleanup system upgrade  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Technology advances in the past few years have prompted an effort at Argonne National Laboratory to replace existing equipment with high-performance digital computers and color-graphic displays. Improved operation of process systems can be achieved by utilizing state-of-the-art computer technology in the areas of process control and process monitoring. The cover-gas cleanup system (CGCS) at the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) is the first system to be upgraded with high-performance digital equipment. The upgrade consisted of a main control computer, a distributed control computer, a front-end input/output computer, a main graphics interface terminal, and a remote graphics interface terminal. This paper describes the main control computer and the operator interface control software. Argonne National Laboratory's EBR-II is a pool-type nuclear reactor demonstration facility that uses liquid sodium as the primary system and secondary system coolant. The primary system tank contains [approximately]330000 [ell] of liquid sodium blanketed with an argon cover gas. Despite this inert atmosphere, the primary system requires a cover-gas monitoring and cleanup system, the CGCS. The CGCS maintains low levels of impurities in the cover gas so that even small levels of impurities can be detected to flag a failed fuel element and to support mass spectrometer analysis to identify a failed fuel element. Impurities can be introduced to the argon cover gas by the failure of fuel element cladding and the subsequent release of gaseous fission products or xenon [open quotes]tag gas[close quotes] placed in the fuel elements for the purpose of signaling a fuel element breach. The CGCS consists of a main cleanup loop and a gas analysis system.

Staffon, J.D.; Carlson, R.B. (Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-F-1 Burial Ground  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 118-F-1 Burial Ground on the Hanford Site. This burial ground is a combination of two locations formerly called Minor Construction Burial Ground No. 2 and Solid Waste Burial Ground No. 2. This waste site received radioactive equipment and other miscellaneous waste from 105-F Reactor operations, including dummy elements and irradiated process tubing; gun barrel tips, steel sleeves, and metal chips removed from the reactor; filter boxes containing reactor graphite chips; and miscellaneous construction solid waste.

E. J. Farris and H. M. Sulloway

2008-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

436

FUSRAP - 45 DOE cleanup projects across the country  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) program designed to address radiological contamination exceeding acceptable cleanup standards at 45 sites throughout the United States. The DOE and its predecessor agencies, the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), used many of these sites for processing and storing uranium and thorium ores as part of the nation`s early nuclear production activities. While some of the sites are owned by the federal government, most of the sites were, and are, privately owned.

Price, L.K. [Dept. of Energy, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Harbert, R.R.; Palau, G.L.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

437

Reverse osmosis reverses conventional wisdom with Superfund cleanup success  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although widely recognized as the most efficient means of water purification, reverse osmosis has not been considered effective for remediating hazardous wastewater. Scaling and fouling, which can cause overruns and downtime, and require membrane replacement, have inhibited success in high-volume wastewater applications. Despite this background, a reverse osmosis technology developed in Europe recently was used successfully to treat large volumes of contaminated water at a major Superfund site in Texas. The technology's success there may increase the chances for reverse osmosis to find wider use in future cleanups and other waste treatment applications.

Collins, M. (French Ltd. Task Group, Crosby, TX (United States)); Miller, K. (Rochem Environmental Inc., Houston, TX (United States))

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Cleanup Verification Package for the 116-K-2 Effluent Trench  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 116-K-2 effluent trench, also referred to as the 116-K-2 mile-long trench and the 116-K-2 site. During its period of operation, the 116-K-2 site was used to dispose of cooling water effluent from the 105-KE and 105-KW Reactors by percolation into the soil. This site also received mixed liquid wastes from the 105-KW and 105-KE fuel storage basins, reactor floor drains, and miscellaneous decontamination activities.

J. M. Capron

2006-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

439

Computational and Experimental Development of Novel High-Temperature Alloys  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Development of Novel High-Temperature Alloys Background The need for fossil-fueled power plants to run cleaner and more efficiently leads toward ever-higher operating temperatures and pressures. Gas turbines, which can be fueled by natural gas, synthetic gas (syngas), or a high-hydrogen stream derived from coal, are critical components in this development. High-temperature operation of turbines is generally achieved by using nickel-chrome superalloys with coatings

440

Petroleum cleanup in the United States: A historical review and comparison of state programs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Cleanup of leaking underground storage tank (LUST) sites has been a priority for the United States of America (USA) for more than 20 years due… (more)

Terwilliger, Timothy A

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature syngas cleanup" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

LANL selects local small business for post-Recovery Act cleanup...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

up where the Recovery Act leaves off," said Michael Graham, LANL's associate director for Environmental Programs. "The Recovery Act was a huge boost to our cleanup efforts, and...

442

Microsoft Word - Final Report- Engineering-Economic Analysis of Syngas Storage.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering-Economic Analysis Engineering-Economic Analysis of Syngas Storage DOE/NETL-2008/1331 Final Report July 31, 2008 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States

443

Effects of syngas composition on combustion induced vortex breakdown (CIVB) flashback in a swirl stabilized combustor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Flame flashback attributed to combustion induced vortex breakdown (CIVB) is a major design challenge for swirl stabilized burner combustors. This paper presents an experimental investigation of combustion induced vortex breakdown (CIVB) flashback propensity for flames yielded from Hydrogen (H2)–Carbon Monoxide (CO) fuel blends and actual synthesized gas (syngas) mixtures. A two-fold experimental approach, consisting of a high definition digital imaging system and a high speed PIV system, was employed. The main emphasis was on the effect of concentration of different constituents in fuel mixtures on flashback limit. In addition, the effect of Swirl Number on flashback propensity was discussed. The percentage of H2 in fuel mixtures played the dominant role when CIVB flashback occurred. For a given air mass flow rate, the mixture containing a higher percentage of H2 underwent flashback at much leaner conditions. Flashback maps for actual syngas fuel compositions showed a distinct behavior when various concentrations of diluents were introduced in the mixture. For the two major diluents tested, carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2), CO2 was more dominant. The effect of Swirl Number on the flashback propensity was also tested and showed a decrease with an increase in Swirl Number. The final portion of this paper also provides an analysis of flow field of reacting flames which revealed complex vortex–chemistry interactions leading to vortex breakdown and flashback. Based on the experimental results a parametric model similar to Peclet Number approach was developed employing a flame quenching concept. A value of the quench parameter, Cquench was obtained from the correlation of flow Peclet Number and flame Peclet Number, which was observed to be dominated by the fuel composition rather than Swirl Number.

Bidhan Dam; Gilberto Corona; Mir Hayder; Ahsan Choudhuri

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

A computer program for deriving soil cleanup criteria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has issued a new order, DOE Order 5400.5, for Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment. In this order, the DOE sets forth radiological protection guidelines for the cleanup of residual radioactive materials. Radionuclide concentrations and radioactivity levels have been established that are acceptable if a site is to be used without radiological restrictions. The guidelines can be categorized as either generic (site independent), that is, taken from existing radiation protection standards, or site specific, that is, derived from the basic dose limit using site-specific data and models. The generic guidelines for soil concentrations of [sup 226]Ra, [sup 228]Ra, [sup 230]Th, and [sup 232]Th adopted in DOE Order 5400.5 are generally consistent with US Environmental Protection Agency standards in Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 192. Procedures and data for deriving site-specific guidelines for other radionuclides in soil have been coded in a microcomputer program called RESRAD. The RESRAD code has been used by the DOE and its contractors to calculate postremediation doses and cleanup guidelines. The RESRAD code is a useful, easy to run, and very user-friendly tool.

Yu, C. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Integrated Sensing and Controls for Coal Gasification - Development of Model-Based Controls for GE's Gasifier and Syngas Cooler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the achievements and final results of this program. The objective of this program is to develop a comprehensive systems approach to integrated design of sensing and control systems for an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plant, using advanced model-based techniques. In particular, this program is focused on the model-based sensing and control system design for the core gasification section of an IGCC plant. The overall approach consists of (i) developing a first-principles physics-based dynamic model of the gasification section, (ii) performing model-reduction where needed to derive low-order models suitable for controls analysis and design, (iii) developing a sensing system solution combining online sensors with model-based estimation for important process variables not measured directly, and (iv) optimizing the steady-state and transient operation of the plant for normal operation as well as for startup using model predictive controls (MPC). Initially, available process unit models were implemented in a common platform using Matlab/Simulink{reg_sign}, and appropriate model reduction and model updates were performed to obtain the overall gasification section dynamic model. Also, a set of sensor packages were developed through extensive lab testing and implemented in the Tampa Electric Company IGCC plant at Polk power station in 2009, to measure temperature and strain in the radiant syngas cooler (RSC). Plant operation data was also used to validate the overall gasification section model. The overall dynamic model was then used to develop a sensing solution including a set of online sensors coupled with model-based estimation using nonlinear extended Kalman filter (EKF). Its performance in terms of estimating key unmeasured variables like gasifier temperature, carbon conversion, etc., was studied through extensive simulations in the presence sensing errors (noise and bias) and modeling errors (e.g. unknown gasifier kinetics, RSC fouling). In parallel, an MPC solution was initially developed using ideal sensing to optimize the plant operation during startup pre-heating as well as steady state and transient operation under normal high-pressure conditions, e.g. part-load, base-load, load transition and fuel changes. The MPC simulation studies showed significant improvements both for startup pre-heating and for normal operation. Finally, the EKF and MPC solutions were coupled to achieve the integrated sensing and control solution and its performance was studied through extensive steady state and transient simulations in the presence of sensor and modeling errors. The results of each task in the program and overall conclusions are summarized in this final report.

Aditya Kumar

2010-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

446

A model-based understanding of solid-oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) for syngas production by H2O/CO2 co-electrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract High temperature co-electrolysis of H2O and CO2 offers a promising route for syngas (H2, CO) production via efficient use of heat and electricity. The performance of a SOEC during co-electrolysis is investigated by focusing on the interactions between transport processes and electrochemical parameters. Electrochemistry at the three-phase boundary is modeled by a modified Butler–Volmer approach that considers H2O electrolysis and CO2 electrolysis, individually, as electrochemically active charge transfer pathways. The model is independent of the geometrical structure. A 42-step elementary heterogeneous reaction mechanism for the thermo-catalytic chemistry in the fuel electrode, the dusty gas model (DGM) to account for multi-component diffusion through porous media, and a plug flow model for flow through the channels are used in the model. Two sets of experimental data are reproduced by the simulations, in order to deduce parameters of the electrochemical model. The influence of micro-structural properties, inlet cathode gas velocity, and temperature are discussed. Reaction flow analysis is performed, at OCV, to study methane production characteristics and kinetics during co-electrolysis. Simulations are carried out for configurations ranging from simple one-dimensional electrochemical button cells to quasi-two-dimensional co-flow planar cells, to demonstrate the effectiveness of the computational tool for performance and design optimization.

Vikram Menon; Qingxi Fu; Vinod M. Janardhanan; Olaf Deutschmann

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Syngas production by CO2 reforming of coke oven gas over Ni/La2O3–ZrO2 catalysts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Syngas production by CO2 reforming of coke oven gas (COG) was studied in a fixed-bed reactor over Ni/La2O3–ZrO2 catalysts. The catalysts were prepared by sol–gel technique and tested by XRF, BET, XRD, H2-TPR, TEM and TG–DSC. The influence of nickel loadings and calcination temperature of the catalysts on reforming reaction was measured. The characterization results revealed that all of the catalysts present excellent resistance to coking. The catalyst with appropriate nickel content and calcination temperature has better dispersion of active metal and higher conversion. It is found that the Ni/La2O3–ZrO2 catalyst with 10 wt% nickel loading provides the best catalytic activity with the conversions of CH4 and CO2 both more than 95% at 800 °C under the atmospheric pressure. The Ni/La2O3–ZrO2 catalysts show excellent catalytic performance and anti-carbon property, which will be of great prospects for catalytic CO2 reforming of COG in the future.

Wei Tao; Hongwei Cheng; Weilin Yao; Xionggang Lu; Qiuhua Zhu; Guangshi Li; Zhongfu Zhou

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Pressure Swing Absorption Device and Process for Separating CO{sub 2} from Shifted Syngas and its Capture for Subsequent Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using the ionic liquid (IL) 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide ([bmim][DCA]) as the absorbent on the shell side of a membrane module containing either a porous hydrophobized ceramic tubule or porous hydrophobized polyether ether ketone (PEEK) hollow fiber membranes, studies for CO{sub 2} removal from hot simulated pre-combustion shifted syngas were carried out by a novel pressure swing membrane absorption (PSMAB) process. Helium was used as a surrogate for H{sub 2} in a simulated shifted syngas with CO{sub 2} around 40% (dry gas basis). In this cyclic separation process, the membrane module was used to achieve non-dispersive gas absorption from a high-pressure feed gas (689-1724 kPag; 100-250 psig) at temperatures between 25-1000C into a stationary absorbent liquid on the module shell side during a certain part of the cycle followed by among other cycle steps controlled desorption of the absorbed gases from the liquid in the rest of the cycle. Two product streams were obtained, one He-rich and the other CO{sub 2}-rich. Addition of polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer of generation 0 to IL [bmim][DCA] improved the system performance at higher temperatures. The solubilities of CO{sub 2} and He were determined in the ionic liquid with or without the dendrimer in solution as well as in the presence or absence of moisture; polyethylene glycol (PEG) 400 was also studied as a replacement for the IL. The solubility selectivity of the ionic liquid containing the dendrimer for CO{sub 2} over helium was considerably larger than that for the pure ionic liquid. The solubility of CO{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}-He solubility selectivity of PEG 400 and a solution of the dendrimer in PEG 400 were higher than the corresponding ones in the IL, [bmim][DCA]. A mathematical model was developed to describe the PSMAB process; a numerical solution of the governing equations described successfully the observed performance of the PSMAB process for the pure ionic liquid-based system.

Sirkar, Kamalesh; Jie, Xingming; Chau, John; Obuskovic, Gordana

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

449

Experimental and Kinetic Study of NOx Reduction by Reburning Using Syngas from Updraft Biomass Gasification with Phenol As a Model Compound for Tar  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The reburning syngas was injected through a horizontal three-hole probe at a distance of 0.9 m from the burner exit. ... The burn-out air (OFA) was injected at a distance of 1.8 m from the burner. ... The syngas was either co-fired with coal at the burners or injected downstream as a reburning fuel under both fuel lean and conventional (fuel rich) reburning configurations. ...

Chun-yuan Liu; Ren-hao Yin; Rui-zhi Zhang; Yong-hao Luo

2012-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

450

Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-F-5 PNL Sawdust Pit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action, sampling activities, and compliance with cleanup criteria for the 118-F-5 Burial Ground, the PNL (Pacific Northwest Laboratory) Sawdust Pit. The 118-F-5 Burial Ground was an unlined trench that received radioactive sawdust from the floors of animal pens in the 100-F Experimental Animal Farm.

L. D. Habel

2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

451

Syngas (H2/CO) in a spark-ignition direct-injection engine. Part 1: Combustion, performance and emissions comparison with CNG  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The combustion, performance, and emissions of syngas (H2/CO) in a four-stroke, direct-injection, spark-ignition engine were experimentally investigated. The engine was operated at various speeds, ranging from 1500 to 2400 rev/min, with the throttle being held in the wide-open position. The start of fuel injection was fixed at 180° before the top dead center, and the ignition advance was set at the maximal brake torque. The air/fuel ratio was varied from the technically possible lowest excess air ratio (?) to lean operation limits. The results indicated that a wider air/fuel operating ratio is possible with syngas with a very low coefficient of variation. The syngas produced a higher in-cylinder peak pressure and heat-release rate peak and faster combustion than for CNG. However, CNG produced a higher brake thermal efficiency (BTE) and lower brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC). The BTE and BSFC of the syngas were on par to those of CNG at higher speeds. For the syngas, the total hydrocarbon emission was negligible at all load conditions, and the carbon monoxide emission was negligible at higher loads and increased under lower load conditions. However, the emission of nitrogen oxides was higher at higher loads with syngas.

Ftwi Yohaness Hagos; A. Rashid A. Aziz; Shaharin A. Sulaiman

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Oak Ridge EM Program Increases Focus on Mercury Cleanup | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Increases Focus on Mercury Cleanup Increases Focus on Mercury Cleanup Oak Ridge EM Program Increases Focus on Mercury Cleanup May 7, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation Commissioner Robert Martineau, left to right, U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.), Oak Ridge EM Manager Mark Whitney, EM Senior Advisor Dave Huizenga and EPA Deputy Regional Administrator for Region 4 Stan Meiburg gathered for the announcement on mercury cleanup. Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation Commissioner Robert Martineau, left to right, U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.), Oak Ridge EM Manager Mark Whitney, EM Senior Advisor Dave Huizenga and EPA Deputy Regional Administrator for Region 4 Stan Meiburg gathered for the announcement on mercury cleanup. OAK RIDGE, Tenn. - EM Senior Advisor Dave Huizenga recently joined local

453

Agreement on New Commitments for Hanford Tank Waste Cleanup Sent to Federal  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Agreement on New Commitments for Hanford Tank Waste Cleanup Sent to Agreement on New Commitments for Hanford Tank Waste Cleanup Sent to Federal Judge Agreement on New Commitments for Hanford Tank Waste Cleanup Sent to Federal Judge October 6, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis RICHLAND, Wash. - The U.S. Department of Energy and Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) jointly filed a motion today in U.S. District Court asking the court to approve and enter a judicial consent decree that imposes a new, enforceable, and achievable schedule for cleaning up waste from Hanford's underground tanks. The settlement also includes new milestones in the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), an administrative order between DOE, Ecology, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, which governs cleanup at DOE's Hanford Site. "Today's agreement represents an important milestone in the ongoing cleanup

454

Head of EM to Kick Off Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Head of EM to Kick Off Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus Head of EM to Kick Off Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus Head of EM to Kick Off Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus April 22, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - EM Senior Advisor Dave Huizenga will provide an overview of EM's proposed fiscal year 2014 budget Thursday in the first of six briefings for the 19th annual U.S. House Nuclear Cleanup Caucus. Huizenga rolled out the $5.622 billion budget request earlier this month. The proposal, which requires approval by Congress, enables EM progress in all areas of the nuclear cleanup program while maintaining safety and compliance across the complex. The briefings are organized by Rep. Doc Hastings (R-Wash.), who chairs the bipartisan caucus. "These briefings provide valuable insight and help educate my colleagues

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DOE and NASA Reach Cleanup Agreements with the State of California for the  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NASA Reach Cleanup Agreements with the State of California NASA Reach Cleanup Agreements with the State of California for the Santa Susana Field Laboratory DOE and NASA Reach Cleanup Agreements with the State of California for the Santa Susana Field Laboratory December 6, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - The Department of Energy and NASA both signed Administrative Orders on Consent (AOC) with the California Environmental Protection Agency (Cal EPA) today that define the process for characterization and the cleanup end-state for portions of the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). The agreements come after more than 10 months of negotiations and extensive public comment on the conceptual framework for cleanup outlined in the Agreement in Principle and additional public comment on the legally enforceable process and procedures in the draft Administrative Order on

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An Update on the Hanford Site and Cleanup Progress | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

An Update on the Hanford Site and Cleanup Progress An Update on the Hanford Site and Cleanup Progress An Update on the Hanford Site and Cleanup Progress September 24, 2013 - 6:45pm Addthis An Update on the Hanford Site and Cleanup Progress Dr. Ernest Moniz Dr. Ernest Moniz Secretary of Energy What are the key facts? For 40 years, the Hanford Site in Washington state was involved in the production of plutonium as part of our national defense efforts. Legacy cleanup progress at the Hanford site has been significant, including 100 percent of the site's spent fuel having been removed from areas around the Columbia River and placed in safe, secure dry storage. But there is more work to do. A new Framework will aid discussions with the state of Washington as the Energy Department works to resolve concerns about completion of the

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Site Transition Summary: Cleanup Completion to Long-Term Stewardship at  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Summary: Cleanup Completion to Long-Term Summary: Cleanup Completion to Long-Term Stewardship at Department of Energy On-going Mission Sites Site Transition Summary: Cleanup Completion to Long-Term Stewardship at Department of Energy On-going Mission Sites Long-term stewardship (LTS) includes the physical controls, institutions, information, and other mechanisms needed to ensure protection of people and the environment at sites where the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has completed or plans to complete cleanup (e.g., landfill closures, remedial actions, removal actions, and facility stabilization). This concept includes land-use controls, information management, monitoring and maintenance. Site Transition Summary: Cleanup Completion to Long-Term Stewardship at Department of Energy On-going Mission Sites

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Idaho Site Completes Cleanup with Help from Workers who Shipped Waste  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Site Completes Cleanup with Help from Workers who Shipped Site Completes Cleanup with Help from Workers who Shipped Waste Decades Ago Idaho Site Completes Cleanup with Help from Workers who Shipped Waste Decades Ago From the 1950s until the 1980s, workers at the former Rocky Flats Plant near Denver, Colo., sent hundreds of thousands of barrels and boxes of radioactive and hazardous waste to the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for disposal both above and below ground. Now, some of those who sent the Cold War weapons waste to Idaho are helping identify the waste in pits dug up for the first time in more than 40 years. Idaho Site Completes Cleanup with Help from Workers who Shipped Waste Decades Ago More Documents & Publications Sound Project Management, Safe and Efficient Work Lead to Savings for More Recovery Act Cleanup

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Idaho Site Completes Cleanup with Help from Workers who Shipped Waste  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Site Completes Cleanup with Help from Workers who Shipped Site Completes Cleanup with Help from Workers who Shipped Waste Decades Ago Idaho Site Completes Cleanup with Help from Workers who Shipped Waste Decades Ago From the 1950s until the 1980s, workers at the former Rocky Flats Plant near Denver, Colo., sent hundreds of thousands of barrels and boxes of radioactive and hazardous waste to the