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1

High Temperature Syngas Cleanup Technology Scale-up  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RECOVERY ACT: Scale-Up of RECOVERY ACT: Scale-Up of High-Temperature Syngas Cleanup Technology Background Coal gasification generates a synthesis gas (syngas)-predominantly a mixture of carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen (H 2 )-that can be used for chemical production of hydrogen, methanol, substitute natural gas (SNG), and many other industrial chemicals, or for electric power generation. Conventional integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants use this syngas as a fuel for a combustion

2

NETL: Gasification - Recovery Act: High Temperature Syngas Cleanup  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Syngas Processing Systems Syngas Processing Systems Recovery Act: High Temperature Syngas Cleanup Technology Scale-Up and Demonstration Project Research Triangle Institute Project Number: FE0000489 Project Description Research Triangle Institute (RTI) is designing, building, and testing the Warm Temperature Desulfurization Process (WDP) at pre-commercial scale (50 megawatt electric equivalent [MWe]) to remove more than 99.9 percent of the sulfur from coal-derived synthesis gas (syngas). RTI is integrating this WDP technology with an activated methyl diethanolamine (aMDEA) solvent technology to separate 90% of the carbon dioxide (CO2) from shifted syngas. The Polk Power Station, an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant, will supply approximately 20% of its coal-derived syngas as a slipstream to feed into the pre-commercial scale technologies being scaled-up.

3

NETL: Gasification Systems - High Temperature Syngas Cleanup...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

construct the project and sequester the CO2. The Polk Power Station, an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant, will supply a portion of its coal-derived syngas...

4

NETL: Gasification Systems - High Temperature Syngas Cleanup...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hornick, Tampa Electric Company, Ben Gardner, RTI International, presented at the Gasification Technologies Conference, San Francisco, CA Oct 9-12, 2011. Warm Gas Clean-up and...

5

EA-1867: Scale-up of High-Temperature Syngas Cleanup Technology, Polk  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Scale-up of High-Temperature Syngas Cleanup Technology, 7: Scale-up of High-Temperature Syngas Cleanup Technology, Polk County, Florida EA-1867: Scale-up of High-Temperature Syngas Cleanup Technology, Polk County, Florida Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to provide cost-shared funding to RTI International (RTI) for its proposed project to demonstrate the precommercial scale-up of RTI's high-temperature syngas cleanup and carbon capture and sequestration technologies. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. Documents Available for Download October 13, 2011 EA-1867: Finding of No Significant Impact RTI International Scale-Up of High-Temperature Syngas Cleanup and Carbon Capture and Sequestration Technologies, Polk County, Florida (October 2011)

6

NETL: Gasification - Recovery Act: High Temperature Syngas Cleanup  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Background and Project Benefits Program Background and Project Benefits Gasification is used to convert a solid feedstock, such as coal, petcoke, or biomass, into a gaseous form, referred to as synthesis gas or syngas, which is primarily hydrogen and carbon monoxide. With gasification-based technologies, pollutants can be captured and disposed of or converted to useful products. Gasification can generate clean power by adding steam to the syngas in a water-gas-shift reactor to convert the carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide (CO2) and to produce additional hydrogen. The hydrogen and CO2 are separated-the hydrogen is used to make power and the CO2 is sent to storage, converted to useful products or used for EOR. In addition to efficiently producing electric power, a wide range of transportation fuels and chemicals can be produced from the cleaned syngas, thereby providing the flexibility needed to capitalize on the changing economic market. As a result, gasification provides a flexible technology option for using domestically available resources while meeting future environmental emission standards. Polygeneration plants that produce multiple products are uniquely possible with gasification technologies. The Gasification Systems program is developing technologies in three key areas to reduce the cost and increase the efficiency of producing syngas: (1) Feed Systems, (2) Gasifier Optimization and Plant Supporting Systems, and (3) Syngas Processing Systems.

7

Integrated Warm Gas Multicontaminant Cleanup Technologies for Coal-Derived Syngas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Warm Gas Multicontaminant Integrated Warm Gas Multicontaminant Cleanup Technologies for Coal-Derived Syngas Description Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) technology offers a means to utilize coal -the most abundant fuel in the United States-to produce a host of products, ranging from electricity to value-added chemicals like transportation fuels and hydrogen, in an efficient, environmentally friendly manner. However, the overall cost (capital, operating,

8

Development of an Integrated Multi-Contaminant Removal Process Applied to Warm Syngas Cleanup  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasification Gasification Technologies contacts Gary J. stiegel Gasification Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412-386-4499 gary.stiegel@netl.doe.gov Jenny tennant Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-4830 jenny.tennant@netl.doe.gov Howard Meyer Principal Project Manager Gas Technology Institute 1700 South Mount Prospect Road Des Plaines, IL 60018 847-768-0955 howard.meyer@gastechnology.org Development of an IntegrateD multI-ContamInant removal proCess applIeD to Warm syngas Cleanup Description The U.S. has more coal than any other country, and through gasification this coal can be converted into electricity, liquid fuels, chemicals or hydrogen. However,

9

Development of an Integrated Multicontaminant Removal Process Applied to Warm Syngas Cleanup for Coal-Based Advanced Gasification Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

an Integrated an Integrated Multicontaminant Removal Process Applied to Warm Syngas Cleanup for Coal-Based Advanced Gasification Systems Background The U.S. has more coal than any other country, and it can be converted through gasification into electricity, liquid fuels, chemicals, or hydrogen. However, for coal gasification to become sufficiently competitive to benefit the U.S. economy and help reduce our dependence on foreign fuels, gasification costs must be reduced

10

High temperature electrolysis for syngas production  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Syngas components hydrogen and carbon monoxide may be formed by the decomposition of carbon dioxide and water or steam by a solid-oxide electrolysis cell to form carbon monoxide and hydrogen, a portion of which may be reacted with carbon dioxide to form carbon monoxide. One or more of the components for the process, such as steam, energy, or electricity, may be provided using a nuclear power source.

Stoots, Carl M. (Idaho Falls, ID); O' Brien, James E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Herring, James Stephen (Idaho Falls, ID); Lessing, Paul A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Hawkes, Grant L. (Sugar City, ID); Hartvigsen, Joseph J. (Kaysville, UT)

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

11

Integrated Warm Gas Multicontaminant Cleanup Technologies for Coal-Derived Syngas  

SciTech Connect

One of the key obstacles for the introduction of commercial gasification technology for the production of power with Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plants or the production of value added chemicals, transportation fuels, and hydrogen has been the cost of these systems. This situation is particularly challenging because the United States has ample coal resources available as raw materials and effective use of these raw materials could help us meet our energy and transportation fuel needs while significantly reducing our need to import oil. One component of the cost of these systems that faces strong challenges for continuous improvement is removing the undesirable components present in the syngas. The need to limit the increase in cost of electricity to < 35% for new coal-based power plants which include CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration addresses both the growing social concern for global climate change resulting from the emission of greenhouse gas and in particular CO{sub 2} and the need to control cost increases to power production necessary to meet this social objective. Similar improvements to technologies for trace contaminants are getting similar pressure to reduce environmental emissions and reduce production costs for the syngas to enable production of chemicals from coal that is cost competitive with oil and natural gas. RTI, with DOE/NETL support, has been developing sorbent technologies that enable capture of trace contaminants and CO{sub 2} at temperatures above 400 °F that achieve better capture performance, lower costs and higher thermal efficiency. This report describes the specific work of sorbent development for mercury (Hg), arsenic (As), selenium (Se), cadmium (Cd), and phosphorous (P) and CO{sub 2} removal. Because the typical concentrations of Hg, As, Se, Cd, and P are less than 10 ppmv, the focus has been on single-use sorbents with sufficient capacity to ensure replacement costs are cost effective. The research in this report describes the development efforts which expand this sorbent development effort to include Se, Cd, and P as well as Hg and As. Additional research has focused on improving removal performance with the goal of achieving effluent concentrations that are suitable for chemical production applications. By contrast, sorbent development for CO{sub 2} capture has focused on regenerable sorbents that capture the CO{sub 2} byproduct at higher CO{sub 2} pressures. Previous research on CO{sub 2} sorbents has demonstrated that the most challenging aspect of developing CO{sub 2} sorbents is regeneration. The research documented in this report investigates options to improve regeneration of the CO{sub 2} capture sorbents. This research includes effort on addressing existing regeneration limitations for sorbents previously developed and new approaches that focus initially on the regeneration performance of the sorbent.

Turk, Brian; Gupta, Raghubir; Sharma, Pradeepkumar; Albritton, Johnny; Jamal, Aqil

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

12

Integrated Warm Gas Multicontaminant Cleanup Technologies for Coal-Derived Syngas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the key obstacles for the introduction of commercial gasification technology for the production of power with Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plants or the production of value added chemicals, transportation fuels, and hydrogen has been the cost of these systems. This situation is particularly challenging because the United States has ample coal resources available as raw materials and effective use of these raw materials could help us meet our energy and transportation fuel needs while significantly reducing our need to import oil. One component of the cost of these systems that faces strong challenges for continuous improvement is removing the undesirable components present in the syngas. The need to limit the increase in cost of electricity to oil and natural gas. RTI, with DOE/NETL support, has been developing sorbent technologies that enable capture of trace contaminants and CO{sub 2} at temperatures above 400 °F that achieve better capture performance, lower costs and higher thermal efficiency. This report describes the specific work of sorbent development for mercury (Hg), arsenic (As), selenium (Se), cadmium (Cd), and phosphorous (P) and CO{sub 2} removal. Because the typical concentrations of Hg, As, Se, Cd, and P are less than 10 ppmv, the focus has been on single-use sorbents with sufficient capacity to ensure replacement costs are cost effective. The research in this report describes the development efforts which expand this sorbent development effort to include Se, Cd, and P as well as Hg and As. Additional research has focused on improving removal performance with the goal of achieving effluent concentrations that are suitable for chemical production applications. By contrast, sorbent development for CO{sub 2} capture has focused on regenerable sorbents that capture the CO{sub 2} byproduct at higher CO{sub 2} pressures. Previous research on CO{sub 2} sorbents has demonstrated that the most challenging aspect of developing CO{sub 2} sorbents is regeneration. The research documented in this report investigates options to improve regeneration of the CO{sub 2} capture sorbents. This research includes effort on addressing existing regeneration limitations for sorbents previously developed and new approaches that focus initially on the regeneration performance of the sorbent.

Turk, Brian; Gupta, Raghubir; Sharma, Pradeepkumar; Albritton, Johnny; Jamal, Aqil

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

13

Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup, and Oxygen Separation Equipment; Task 9: Mixed Alcohols From Syngas -- State of Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This deliverable is for Task 9, Mixed Alcohols from Syngas: State of Technology, as part of National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Award ACO-5-44027, ''Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup and Oxygen Separation Equipment''. Task 9 supplements the work previously done by NREL in the mixed alcohols section of the 2003 technical report Preliminary Screening--Technical and Economic Assessment of Synthesis Gas to Fuels and Chemicals with Emphasis on the Potential for Biomass-Derived Syngas.

Nexant Inc.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Trace-Metal Scavenging from Biomass Syngas with Novel High-Temperature Sorbents  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Effective syngas cleanup is one of the remaining major technical challenges yet to be resolved and one that will provide the most benefit to the suite of bio-thermochemical process technologies. Beyond tars and acid gases, which are themselves a significant detriment to reforming catalysts and associated equipment, semi-volatile metals can also damage cleanup systems, catalysts, and contaminate the fungible products. Metals are a difficult challenge to deal with whether using hot-gas filtration or low-temperature processing. Even though most of the metal tends to condense before the barrier filter of hot-gas cleanup systems, some small percentage of the metal (large enough to damage syngas-reforming catalysts, the candle filters themselves, and gas turbine blades) does pass through these barrier filters along with the clean syngas. Low-temperature processing requires expensive measures to remove metals from the process stream. Significant costs are required to remove these metals and if they are not removed before contacting the catalyst, they will significantly reduce the life of the catalyst. One approach to solving the metals problem is to use high-temperature sorbents to capture all of the semi-volatile metals upstream of the barrier filter, which would prevent even small amounts of metal from passing through the filter with the clean syngas. High Temperature sorbents have already been developed that have been shown to be effective at capturing semi-volatile metals from vitiated combustion effluent, i.e., high-temperature flue gas. The objective on this project was to evaluate these same sorbents for their ability to scavenge metals from inert, reducing, and real syngas environments. Subsequently, it was the objective of this project to develop designer sorbents and an injection technology that would optimize the effectiveness of these sorbents at capturing metals from syngas, protecting the barrier filters from damage, and protecting the catalysts and other downstream equipment from damage. Finally, the high-temperature sorbent technology would be expanded to look at the role that these sorbents play in relation to tars and acid gases, which are the other significant pollutants within syngas. In addition to the technology development work described above, all of the information obtained in this work was to be incorporated into a syngas speciation model, which would allow direct prediction of transformations that occur in syngas as it passes from the gasifier and the sorbent-injection section and through the barrier filters. Unfortunately, Congressional budget cuts prevented most of this work from being accomplished. Hopefully, additional funds will be provided to this work in the future, which will allow its completion. However, at the halting point of this project, the following has been accomplished. A major initial objective of the project was accomplished, which was to determine whether or not high-temperature sorbents found to work within vitiated air might also work in an inert environment. Kaolinite, one of the sorbents previously investigated as a high-temperature sorbent for incinerators, was found to effectively capture potassium. In addition, while previous work on short-time (i.e., 1 to 2 seconds) dispersed-phase reactions found that sorbent utilization was limited to two metal oxide species captured for every one aluminosilicate crystal structure, the present investigation found that many times higher insoluble metal/sorbent capture ratios were obtained. This result not only suggests that small additions of sorbent might be highly effective, but the fact that the products were insoluble (in part due to the temperature of sorbent injection, i.e., < 1500 ?F) may be an indication that the products are unlikely to react with, corrode, or otherwise damage the candle-filter elements. There has been little work on the capture of potassium metal vapor by high-temperature sorbents, prior to this work. The fact that potassium can be effectively captured by kaolinite clay powder is a significant finding of th

Gale, Thomas K.; Walsh, Pete M.

2007-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

15

THE PRODUCTION OF SYNGAS VIA HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS AND BIO-MASS GASIFICATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A process model of syngas production using high temperature electrolysis and biomass gasification is presented. Process heat from the biomass gasifier is used to improve the hydrogen production efficiency of the steam electrolysis process. Hydrogen from electrolysis allows a high utilization of the biomass carbon for syngas production. Based on the gasifier temperature, 94% to 95% of the carbon in the biomass becomes carbon monoxide in the syngas (carbon dioxide and hydrogen). Assuming the thermal efficiency of the power cycle for electricity generation is 50%, (as expected from GEN IV nuclear reactors), the syngas production efficiency ranges from 70% to 73% as the gasifier temperature decreases from 1900 K to 1500 K.

M. G. McKellar; G. L. Hawkes; J. E. O'Brien

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

An experimental and kinetic study of syngas/air combustion at elevated temperatures and the effect of water addition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental and kinetic study of syngas/air combustion at elevated temperatures and the effect 20 December 2011 Keywords: Syngas combustion Elevated temperatures Water addition Laminar flame speed a b s t r a c t Laminar flame speeds of premixed syngas/air mixtures were measured at various fuel

Qiao, Li

17

Progress toward Biomass and Coal-Derived Syngas Warm Cleanup: Proof-of-Concept Process Demonstration of Multicontaminant Removal for Biomass Application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Systems comprising of multiple sorbent and catalytic beds have been developed for the warm syngas cleanup of coal- and biomass-derived syngas. Tailored specifically for biomass application the process described here consists of six primary unit operations: 1) Na2CO3 bed for HCl removal, 2) two regenerable ZnO beds for bulk H2S removal, 3) ZnO bed for H2S polishing, 4) NiCu/SBA-16 sorbent for trace metal (e.g. AsH3) removal, 5) steam reforming catalyst bed for tars and light hydrocarbons reformation and NH3 decomposition, and a 6) Cu-based LT-WGS catalyst bed. Simulated biomass-derived syngas containing a multitude of inorganic contaminants (H2S, AsH3, HCl, and NH3) and hydrocarbon additives (methane, ethylene, benzene, and naphthalene) was used to demonstrate process effectiveness. The efficiency of the process was demonstrated for a period of 175 hours, during which no signs of deactivation were observed. Post-run analysis revealed small levels of sulfur slipped through the sorbent bed train to the two downstream catalytic beds. Future improvements could be made to the trace metal polishing sorbent to ensure complete inorganic contaminant removal (to low ppb level) prior to the catalytic steps. However, dual, regenerating ZnO beds were effective for continuous removal for the vast majority of the sulfur present in the feed gas. The process was effective for complete AsH3 and HCl removal. The steam reforming catalyst completely reformed all the hydrocarbons present in the feed (methane, ethylene, benzene, and naphthalene) to additional syngas. However, post-run evaluation, under kinetically-controlled conditions, indicates deactivation of the steam reforming catalyst. Spent material characterization suggests this is attributed, in part, to coke formation, likely due to the presence of benzene and/or naphthalene in the feed. Future adaptation of this technology may require dual, regenerable steam reformers. The process and materials described in this report hold promise for a warm cleanup of a variety of contaminant species within warm syngas.

Howard, Christopher J.; Dagle, Robert A.; Lebarbier, Vanessa MC; Rainbolt, James E.; Li, Liyu; King, David L.

2013-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

18

Biomass Gasification Syngas Cleanup  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In December 2012, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) published report 1023994, Engineering and Economic Evaluation of Biomass Gasification, prepared by CH2M HILL Engineers, Inc. (CH2M HILL). It provided a global overview of commercially available biomass gasification technologies that can be used for power production in the 25- to 50-MWe range. The report provided detailed descriptions of biomass gasification technologies, typical operational parameters, emissions information, and ...

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

19

Program on Technology Innovation: Thermodynamic Data to Support High-Temperature Syngas Quench Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the development of a method for predicting water content in synthesis gas (syngas) quenched at high temperature by water. The method, generated by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), is presented in detail along with further analysis performed by EPRI.

2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

20

Warm Gas Cleanup  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Warm Gas Cleanup Warm Gas Cleanup NETL Office of Research and Development Project Number: FWP-2012.03.03 Task 5 Project Description The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has established strict regulations for the trace contaminant emissions from integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems. The Department of Energy (DOE) performance goals for trace contaminant removal were selected to meet or exceed EPA's standard limits for contaminants, as well as to avoid poisoning of: the catalysts utilized in making liquids from fuel gas the electrodes in fuel cells selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts The objective of the NETL's ORD Warm Gas Cleanup project is to assist in achieving both DOE and EPA targets for trace contaminant capture from coal gasification, while preserving the high thermal efficiency of the IGCC system. To achieve this, both lab and pilot-scale research is underway to develop sorbents capable of removing the following contaminants from high temperature syngas (up to 550°F):

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature syngas cleanup" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Microsoft Word - 10.5.11 Markup by Hargis Final EA-RTI Syngas CCS Project.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

67 67 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT for RTI INTERNATIONAL SCALE-UP OF HIGH- TEMPERATURE SYNGAS CLEANUP AND CARBON CAPTURE AND SEQUESTRATION TECHNOLOGIES, POLK COUNTY, FLORIDA U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY National Energy Technology Laboratory October 2011 RTI Syngas Cleanup/Carbon Capture Final and Sequestration Project Environmental Assessment DOE/EA-1867 N:\MYFILES\CORRESPONDENCE\LUSK, MARK\RTI-POLK EA\FONSI FINAL EA\10.5.11 MARKUP BY HARGIS FINAL EA-RTI SYNGAS CCS PROJECT.DOCX-101411 i October 2011 COVER SHEET Responsible Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Title: Final Environmental Assessment for RTI International Scale-Up of High-Temperature Syngas Cleanup and Carbon Capture and Sequestration Technologies, Polk County, Florida (DOE/EA-1867)

22

HIGH-TEMPERATURE CO-ELECTROLYSIS OF H2O AND CO2 FOR SYNGAS PRODUCTION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Worldwide, the demand for light hydrocarbon fuels like gasoline and diesel oil is increasing. To satisfy this demand, oil companies have begun to utilize oil deposits of lower hydrogen content (an example is the Athabasca Oil Sands). Additionally, the higher contents of sulfur and nitrogen of these resources requires processes such as hydrotreating to meet environmental requirements. In the mean time, with the price of oil currently over $50 / barrel, synthetically-derived hydrocarbon fuels (synfuels) have become economical. Synfuels are typically produced from syngas hydrogen (H2) and carbon monoxide (CO) -- using the Fischer-Tropsch process, discovered by Germany before World War II. South Africa has used synfuels to power a significant number of their buses, trucks, and taxicabs. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), in conjunction with Ceramatec Inc. (Salt Lake City, USA) has been researching for several years the use of solid-oxide fuel cell technology to electrolyze steam for large-scale nuclear-powered hydrogen production. Now, an experimental research project is underway at the INL to investigate the feasibility of producing syngas by simultaneously electrolyzing at high-temperature steam and carbon dioxide (CO2) using solid oxide fuel cell technology. The syngas can then be used for synthetic fuel production. This program is a combination of experimental and computational activities. Since the solid oxide electrolyte material is a conductor of oxygen ions, CO can be produced by electrolyzing CO2 sequestered from some greenhouse gas-emitting process. Under certain conditions, however, CO can further electrolyze to produce carbon, which can then deposit on cell surfaces and reduce cell performance. The understanding of the co-electrolysis of steam and CO2 is also complicated by the competing water-gas shift reaction. Results of experiments and calculations to date of CO2 and CO2/H2O electrolysis will be presented and discussed. These will include electrolysis performance at various temperatures, gas mixtures, and electrical settings. Product gas compositions, as measured via a gas analyser, and their relationship to conversion efficiencies will be presented. These measurements will be compared to predictions obtained from chemical equilibrium computer codes. Better understanding of the feasibility of producing syngas using high-temperature electrolysis will initiate the systematic investigation of nuclear-powered synfuel production as a bridge to the future hydrogen economy and ultimate independence from foreign energy resources.

Stoots, C.M.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

A High Temperature Planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Operating on Phosphine Contaminated Coal Syngas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Solid oxide fuel cells that operate on phosphine contaminated coal syngas are subject to performance degradation due to alterations of the anode microstructure. Theoretical investigations (more)

De Silva, Kandaudage Channa R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

PROCESS MODEL FOR THE PRODUCTION OF SYNGAS VIA HIGH TEMPERATURE CO-ELECTROLYSIS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A process model has been developed to evaluate the potential performance of a large-scale high-temperature coelectrolysis plant for the production of syngas from steam and carbon dioxide. The coelectrolysis process allows for direct electrochemical reduction of the steam carbon dioxide gas mixture, yielding hydrogen and carbon monoxide, or syngas. The process model has been developed using the HYSYS systems analysis code. Using this code, a detailed process flowsheet has been defined that includes all the components that would be present in an actual plant such as pumps, compressors, heat exchangers, turbines, and the electrolyzer. Since the electrolyzer is not a standard HYSYS component, a custom one-dimensional coelectrolysis model was developed for incorporation into the overall HYSYS process flowsheet. The 1-D coelectrolysis model assumes local chemical equilibrium among the four process-gas species via the shift reaction. The electrolyzer model allows for the determination of coelectrolysis outlet temperature, composition (anode and cathode sides), mean Nernst potential, operating voltage and electrolyzer power based on specified inlet gas flow rates, heat loss or gain, current density, and cell area-specific resistance. The one-dimensional electrolyzer model was validated by comparison with results obtained from a fully 3-D computational fluid dynamics model developed using FLUENT, and by comparison to experimental data. This paper provides representative results obtained from the HYSYS flowsheet model for a 300 MW coelectrolysis plant, coupled to a high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor. The coelectrolysis process, coupled to a nuclear reactor, provides a means of recycling carbon dioxide back into a useful liquid fuel. If the carbon dioxide source is based on biomass, the entire process would be climate neutral.

M. G. McKellar; J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; G. L. Hawkes

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Parametric Study Of Large-Scale Production Of Syngas Via High Temperature Co-Electrolysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A process model has been developed to evaluate the potential performance of a largescale high-temperature co-electrolysis plant for the production of syngas from steam and carbon dioxide. The co-electrolysis process allows for direct electrochemical reduction of the steam carbon dioxide gas mixture, yielding hydrogen and carbon monoxide, or syngas. The process model has been developed using the Honeywell UniSim systems analysis code. Using this code, a detailed process flow sheet has been defined that includes all the components that would be present in an actual plant such as pumps, compressors, heat exchangers, turbines, and the electrolyzer. Since the electrolyzer is not a standard UniSim component, a custom one-dimensional co-electrolysis model was developed for incorporation into the overall UniSim process flow sheet. The one dimensional co-electrolysis model assumes local chemical equilibrium among the four process-gas species via the gas shift reaction. The electrolyzer model allows for the determination of co-electrolysis outlet temperature, composition (anode and cathode sides); mean Nernst potential, operating voltage and electrolyzer power based on specified inlet gas flow rates, heat loss or gain, current density, and cell area-specific resistance. The one-dimensional electrolyzer model was validated by comparison with results obtained from a fully three dimensional computational fluid dynamics model developed using FLUENT, and by comparison to experimental data. This paper provides representative results obtained from the UniSim flow sheet model for a 300 MW co-electrolysis plant, coupled to a high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor. The coelectrolysis process, coupled to a nuclear reactor, provides a means of recycling carbon dioxide back into a useful liquid fuel. If the carbon dioxide source is based on biomass, the overall process, from production through utilization, would be climate neutral.

J. E. O'Brien; M. G. McKellar; C. M. Stoots; J. S. Herring; G. L. Hawkes

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Idaho National Laboratory Experimental Research In High Temperature Electrolysis For Hydrogen And Syngas Production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Idaho National Laboratory (Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA), in collaboration with Ceramatec, Inc. (Salt Lake City, Utah, USA), is actively researching the application of solid oxide fuel cell technology as electrolyzers for large scale hydrogen and syngas production. This technology relies upon electricity and high temperature heat to chemically reduce a steam or steam / CO2 feedstock. Single button cell tests, multi-cell stack, as well as multi-stack testing has been conducted. Stack testing used 10 x 10 cm cells (8 x 8 cm active area) supplied by Ceramatec and ranged from 10 cell short stacks to 240 cell modules. Tests were conducted either in a bench-scale test apparatus or in a newly developed 5 kW Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) test facility. Gas composition, operating voltage, and operating temperature were varied during testing. The tests were heavily instrumented, and outlet gas compositions were monitored with a gas chromatograph. The ILS facility is currently being expanded to ~15 kW testing capacity (H2 production rate based upon lower heating value).

Carl M. Stoots; James E. O'Brien; J. Stephen Herring; Joseph J. Hartvigsen

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

The Development of Warm Gas Cleanup Technologies for the Removal of Sulfur Containing Species from Steam Hydrogasification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for biomas-derived syngas. National Renewable EnergyM. Lesemann. RTI/Eastman warm syngas clean-up technology:v the composition of syngas from steam hydrogasification

Luo, Qian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Designing Turbine Endwalls for Deposition Resistance with 1,400 °C Combustor Exit Temperatures and Syngas Water Vapor Levels„The Ohio State University  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Designing Turbine Endwalls for Designing Turbine Endwalls for Deposition Resistance with 1,400 °C Combustor Exit Temperatures and Syngas Water Vapor Levels-The Ohio State University Background This University Turbine Systems Research (UTSR) project will explore a critical need for innovative turbine endwall designs that could increase turbine durability and mitigate the adverse effects of residue deposition from coal-derived synthesis gas (syngas). The Ohio State University (OSU), in cooperation with Brigham Young University (BYU),

29

Development of an Integrated Multi-Contaminant Removal Process Applied to Warm Syngas Cleanup for Coal-Based Advanced Gasification Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project met the objective to further the development of an integrated multi-contaminant removal process in which H2S, NH3, HCl and heavy metals including Hg, As, Se and Cd present in the coal-derived syngas can be removed to specified levels in a single/integrated process step. The process supports the mission and goals of the Department of Energy??s Gasification Technologies Program, namely to enhance the performance of gasification systems, thus enabling U.S. industry to improve the competitiveness of gasification-based processes. The gasification program will reduce equipment costs, improve process environmental performance, and increase process reliability and flexibility. Two sulfur conversion concepts were tested in the laboratory under this project, i.e., the solventbased, high-pressure University of California Sulfur Recovery Process ?? High Pressure (UCSRP-HP) and the catalytic-based, direct oxidation (DO) section of the CrystaSulf-DO process. Each process required a polishing unit to meet the ultra-clean sulfur content goals of <50 ppbv (parts per billion by volume) as may be necessary for fuel cells or chemical production applications. UCSRP-HP was also tested for the removal of trace, non-sulfur contaminants, including ammonia, hydrogen chloride, and heavy metals. A bench-scale unit was commissioned and limited testing was performed with simulated syngas. Aspen-Plus®-based computer simulation models were prepared and the economics of the UCSRP-HP and CrystaSulf-DO processes were evaluated for a nominal 500 MWe, coal-based, IGCC power plant with carbon capture. This report covers the progress on the UCSRP-HP technology development and the CrystaSulf-DO technology.

Howard Meyer

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

30

Manganese and Ceria Sorbents for High Temperature Sulfur Removal from Biomass-Derived Syngas -- The Impact of Steam on Capacity and Sorption Mode  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Syngas derived from biomass and coal gasification for fuel synthesis or electricity generation contains sulfur species that are detrimental to downstream catalysts or turbine operation. Sulfur removal in high temperature, high steam conditions has been known to be challenging, but experimental reports on methods to tackle the problem are not often reported. We have developed sorbents that can remove hydrogen sulfide from syngas at high temperature (700 C), both in dry and high steam conditions. The syngas composition chosen for our experiments is derived from statistical analysis of the gasification products of wood under a large variety of conditions. The two sorbents, Cu-ceria and manganese-based, were tested in a variety of conditions. In syngas containing steam, the capacity of the sorbents is much lower, and the impact of the sorbent in lowering H{sub 2}S levels is only evident in low space velocities. Spectroscopic characterization and thermodynamic consideration of the experimental results suggest that in syngas containing 45% steam, the removal of H{sub 2}S is primarily via surface chemisorptions. For the Cu-ceria sorbent, analysis of the amount of H{sub 2}S retained by the sorbent in dry syngas suggests both copper and ceria play a role in H{sub 2}S removal. For the manganese-based sorbent, in dry conditions, there is a solid state transformation of the sorbent, primarily into the sulfide form.

Cheah, S.; Parent, Y. O.; Jablonski, W. S.; Vinzant, T.; Olstad, J. L.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup, and Oxygen Separation Equipment; Task 2: Gas Cleanup Design and Cost Estimates -- Black Liquor Gasification  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of Task 2, Gas Cleanup and Cost Estimates, Nexant investigated the appropriate process scheme for removal of acid gases from black liquor-derived syngas for use in both power and liquid fuels synthesis. Two 3,200 metric tonne per day gasification schemes, both low-temperature/low-pressure (1100 deg F, 40 psi) and high-temperature/high-pressure (1800 deg F, 500 psi) were used for syngas production. Initial syngas conditions from each of the gasifiers was provided to the team by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Princeton University. Nexant was the prime contractor and principal investigator during this task; technical assistance was provided by both GTI and Emery Energy.

Nexant Inc.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

HIGH-TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS FOR LARGE-SCALE HYDROGEN AND SYNGAS PRODUCTION FROM NUCLEAR ENERGY SYSTEM SIMULATION AND ECONOMICS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A research and development program is under way at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to assess the technological and scale-up issues associated with the implementation of solid-oxide electrolysis cell technology for efficient high-temperature hydrogen production from steam. This work is supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, under the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. This paper will provide an overview of large-scale system modeling results and economic analyses that have been completed to date. System analysis results have been obtained using the commercial code UniSim, augmented with a custom high-temperature electrolyzer module. Economic analysis results were based on the DOE H2A analysis methodology. The process flow diagrams for the system simulations include an advanced nuclear reactor as a source of high-temperature process heat, a power cycle and a coupled steam electrolysis loop. Several reactor types and power cycles have been considered, over a range of reactor outlet temperatures. Pure steam electrolysis for hydrogen production as well as coelectrolysis for syngas production from steam/carbon dioxide mixtures have both been considered. In addition, the feasibility of coupling the high-temperature electrolysis process to biomass and coal-based synthetic fuels production has been considered. These simulations demonstrate that the addition of supplementary nuclear hydrogen to synthetic fuels production from any carbon source minimizes emissions of carbon dioxide during the production process.

J. E. O'Brien; M. G. McKellar; E. A. Harvego; C. M. Stoots

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

NETL: Gasification Systems - Integrated Warm Gas Multicontaminant Cleanup  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Warm Gas Multicontaminant Cleanup Technologies for Coal-Derived Syngas Integrated Warm Gas Multicontaminant Cleanup Technologies for Coal-Derived Syngas Project Number: DE-FC26-05NT42459 Integrated Warm Gas Multicontaminant Cleanup Technologies for Coal-Derived Syngas Project ID: DE-FC26-05NT42459 Objective: The objective is to develop a warm multi-contaminant syngas cleaning system for operation between 300 and 700° F. This project will continue development of the RTI warm syngas cleanup technology suite. Based on the field testing results with real syngas from Eastman Chemical Company's gasifier under DOE Contract DE-AC26-99FT40675, additional technical issues need to be addressed to move the technologies used in warm syngas cleaning further towards commercial deployment especially for chemical/fuels production. These issues range from evaluation of startup and standby options for the more developed desulfurization processes to integration and actual pilot plant testing with real coal-derived syngas for the technologies that were tested at bench scale during Phase I. Development shall continue of the warm gas syngas cleaning technology platform through a combination of lab-scale R&D and larger integrated pilot plant testing with real coal-derived syngas as well as process/systems analysis and simulation for optimization of integration and intensification.

34

Process for producing ethanol from syngas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides a method for producing ethanol, the method comprising establishing an atmosphere containing methanol forming catalyst and ethanol forming catalyst; injecting syngas into the atmosphere at a temperature and for a time sufficient to produce methanol; and contacting the produced methanol with additional syngas at a temperature and for a time sufficient to produce ethanol. The invention also provides an integrated system for producing methanol and ethanol from syngas, the system comprising an atmosphere isolated from the ambient environment; a first catalyst to produce methanol from syngas wherein the first catalyst resides in the atmosphere; a second catalyst to product ethanol from methanol and syngas, wherein the second catalyst resides in the atmosphere; a conduit for introducing syngas to the atmosphere; and a device for removing ethanol from the atmosphere. The exothermicity of the method and system obviates the need for input of additional heat from outside the atmosphere.

Krause, Theodore R; Rathke, Jerome W; Chen, Michael J

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

35

Thermodynamic analysis of interactions between Ni-based solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) anodes and trace species in a survey of coal syngas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A thermodynamic analysis was conducted to characterize the effects of trace contaminants in syngas derived from coal gasification on solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode material. The effluents from 15 different gasification facilities were considered to assess the impact of fuel composition on anode susceptibility to contamination. For each syngas case, the study considers the magnitude of contaminant exposure resulting from operation of a warm gas cleanup unit at two different temperatures and operation of a nickel-based SOFC at three different temperatures. Contaminant elements arsenic (As), phosphorous (P), and antimony (Sb) are predicted to be present in warm gas cleanup effluent and will interact with the nickel (Ni) components of a SOFC anode. Phosphorous is the trace element found in the largest concentration of the three contaminants and is potentially the most detrimental. Poisoning was found to depend on the composition of the syngas as well as system operating conditions. Results for all trace elements tended to show invariance with cleanup operating temperature, but results were sensitive to syngas bulk composition. Synthesis gas with high steam content tended to resist poisoning.

Andrew Martinez; Kirk Gerdes; Randall Gemmen; James Postona

2010-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

36

Process synthesis and design of low temperature Fischer-Tropsch crude production from biomass derived syngas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The production of biofuels via a low temperature Fischer-Tropsch synthesis could potentially increase the utilization of biofuels without having to change the currently used combustion (more)

Pondini, Maddalena

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Development of a New Flame Speed Vessel to Measure the Effect of Steam Dilution on Laminar Flame Speeds of Syngas Fuel Blends at Elevated Pressures and Temperatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Synthetic gas, syngas, is a popular alternative fuel for the gas turbine industry, but the composition of syngas can contain different types and amounts of contaminants, such as carbon dioxide, methane, moisture, and nitrogen, depending on the industrial process involved in its manufacturing. The presence of steam in syngas blends is of particular interest from a thermo-chemical perspective as there is limited information available in the literature. This study investigates the effect of moisture content (0 ? 15% by volume), temperature (323 ? 423 K), and pressure (1 ? 10 atm) on syngas mixtures by measuring the laminar flame speed in a newly developed constant-volume, heated experimental facility. This heated vessel also broadens the experimental field of study in the authors? laboratory to low vapor pressure fuels and other vaporized liquids. The new facility is capable of performing flame speed experiments at an initial pressure as high as 30 atm and an initial temperature up to 600 K. Several validation experiments were performed to demonstrate the complete functionality of the flame speed facility. Additionally, a design-of-experiments methodology was used to study the mentioned syngas conditions that are relevant to the gas turbine industry. The design-of-experiments methodology provided the capability to identify the most influential factor on the laminar flame speed of the conditions studied. The experimental flame speed data are compared to the most up-to-date C4 mechanism developed through collaboration between Texas A&M and the National University of Ireland Galway. Along with good model agreement shown with all presented data, a rigorous uncertainty analysis of the flame speed has been performed showing an extensive range of values from 4.0 cm/s to 16.7 cm/s. The amount of carbon monoxide dilution in the fuel was shown to be the most influential factor on the laminar flame speed from fuel lean to fuel rich. This is verified by comparing the laminar flame speed of the atmospheric mixtures. Also, the measured Markstein lengths of the atmospheric mixtures are compared and do not demonstrate a strong impact from any one factor but the ratio of hydrogen and carbon monoxide plays a key role. Mixtures with high levels of CO appear to stabilize the flame structure of thermal-diffusive instability. The increase of steam dilution has only a small effect on the laminar flame speed of high-CO mixtures, while more hydrogen-dominated mixtures demonstrate a much larger and negative effect of increasing water content on the laminar flame speed.

Krejci, Michael

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Carbon Neutral Production Of Syngas Via High Temperature Electrolytic Reduction Of Steam And CO2  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the most recent results of experiments conducted at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) studying coelectrolysis of steam and carbon dioxide in solid-oxide electrolysis stacks. Two 10-cell planar stacks were tested under various gas compositions, operating voltages, and operating temperatures. The tests were heavily instrumented, and outlet gas compositions were monitored with a gas chromatograph. Measured outlet compositions, open cell potentials, and coelectrolysis thermal neutral voltages compared reasonably well with a coelectrolysis computer model developed at the INL. Stack ASRs did not change significantly when switching from electrolysis to coelectrolysis operation.

C. Stoots; J. O' Brien; J. Hartvigsen

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Recent Progress At The Idaho National Laboratory In High Temperature Electrolysis For Hydrogen And Syngas Production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents the most recent results of experiments conducted at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) studying electrolysis of steam and coelectrolysis of steam / carbon dioxide in solid-oxide electrolysis stacks. Single button cell tests as well as multi-cell stack testing have been conducted. Multi-cell stack testing used 10 x 10 cm cells (8 x 8 cm active area) supplied by Ceramatec, Inc (Salt Lake City, Utah, USA) and ranged from 10 cell short stacks to 240 cell modules. Tests were conducted either in a bench-scale test apparatus or in a newly developed 5 kW Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) test facility. Gas composition, operating voltage, and operating temperature were varied during testing. The tests were heavily instrumented, and outlet gas compositions were monitored with a gas chromatograph. The ILS facility is currently being expanded to 15 kW testing capacity (H2 production rate based upon lower heating value).

C. Stoots; J. O'Brien; J. Herring; J. Hartvigsen

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Simulation and optimization of hot syngas separation processes in integrated gasification combined cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IGCC with CO2 capture offers an exciting approach for cleanly using abundant coal reserves of the world to generate electricity. The present state-of-the-art synthesis gas (syngas) cleanup technologies in IGCC involve ...

Prakash, Kshitij

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature syngas cleanup" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Development of hollow-fiber catalytic-membrane reactors for high-temperature gas cleanup  

SciTech Connect

The project consist of the following main activities: (1) Design of catalytic hollow fiber membrane reactors. Single and multiple hollow-fiber membranes were studied in reactor/permeation cells made from stainless steel or quartz tubes. Modification of the hollow fiber membrane with catalysts was performed by aqueous impregnation, vapor deposition, and utilization of packed-bed reactors. (2) Investigation of gas separations and catalytic reactions in membrane reactors. Permeation of pure gases and gas mixtures was studied as a function of temperature. Pure component catalytic studies on the decomposition of H{sub 2}S was typically studied using 10% H{sub 2}S diluted in He. The H{sub 2}S and H{sub 2} concentrations were measured in both the tube and shell sides of the membrane reactor to determine the degree of chemical equilibrium shift. (3) Process development of the cleanup system using a simulated gas stream with a composition similar to that from an IGCC system. Catalytic studies using the IGCC gas composition will be performed according to the procedure used in the H{sub 2}S experiments. The conditions for optimum conversion in a gas mixture will be investigated.

Ma, Yi H.; Moser, M.R.; Pien, S.M.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Development of hollow-fiber catalytic-membrane reactors for high-temperature gas cleanup  

SciTech Connect

The project consist of the following main activities: (1) Design of catalytic hollow fiber membrane reactors. Single and multiple hollow-fiber membranes were studied in reactor/permeation cells made from stainless steel or quartz tubes. Modification of the hollow fiber membrane with catalysts was performed by aqueous impregnation, vapor deposition, and utilization of packed-bed reactors. (2) Investigation of gas separations and catalytic reactions in membrane reactors. Permeation of pure gases and gas mixtures was studied as a function of temperature. Pure component catalytic studies on the decomposition of H[sub 2]S was typically studied using 10% H[sub 2]S diluted in He. The H[sub 2]S and H[sub 2] concentrations were measured in both the tube and shell sides of the membrane reactor to determine the degree of chemical equilibrium shift. (3) Process development of the cleanup system using a simulated gas stream with a composition similar to that from an IGCC system. Catalytic studies using the IGCC gas composition will be performed according to the procedure used in the H[sub 2]S experiments. The conditions for optimum conversion in a gas mixture will be investigated.

Ma, Yi H.; Moser, M.R.; Pien, S.M.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

NETL: Gasification Systems - Syngas Processing Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Syngas Processing Systems Syngas Processing Systems Gasification Systems Syngas Processing Systems The various downstream uses of syngas require that most of the contaminants present in raw syngas be removed to very low levels prior to use. Many of these contaminants can contribute to erosion, corrosion, and loss of strength in gas turbine components, and can act as poisons to the catalysts often used in syngas conversion and utilization processes. These same contaminants include or result in regulated air pollutants such as SOx, NOx, particulates, and mercury and other trace metals, which must be removed to increasingly low levels to meet stringent regulatory limits on air emissions. Conventional methods for removing sulfur and other contaminants from syngas typically rely on chemical or physical absorption processes operating at low temperatures. However, after contaminant removal, the gas has to be reheated prior to its use in a gas turbine or other chemical synthesis process; in the case of downstream hydrogen production, additional steam needs to be added back to the syngas. These process swings adversely impact the plant's thermal efficiency and cost. Techno-economic analysis shows that gas-cleaning processes amenable to higher operating temperatures could significantly reduce this efficiency loss and improve the gasification plant's commercial viability. It is also critical that, while improving efficiency and reducing cost, the gas cleaning removes a wide variety of coal contaminants (including hydrogen sulfide, ammonia, hydrogen chloride, and carbonyl sulfide, as well as various forms of trace metals, including arsenic, mercury, selenium, and cadmium) to extremely low levels. Accordingly, the R&D approach in this area focuses on the development of high-efficiency processes that operate at moderate to high temperatures and provide multi-contaminant control to meet the highest environmental standards.

44

Design of an electrochemical cell making syngas (CO+H-2) from...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Design of an electrochemical cell making syngas (CO+H-2) from C02 and H20 reduction at room temperature Title Design of an electrochemical cell making syngas (CO+H-2) from C02 and...

45

Deposition of Alternative (Syngas) Fuels on Turbine Blades with Film Cooling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ACERC ACERC Dr. Jeffrey Bons and Dr. Thomas Fletcher BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY SCIES Project 05-01-SR-120 with support from General Electric, Siemens-Westinghouse, Solar Turbines, Praxair UTSR Peer Workshop III, Clemson University, SC Oct. 18-20, 2005 Deposition of Alternative ( Deposition of Alternative ( Syngas Syngas ) Fuels on ) Fuels on Turbine Blades with Film Cooling Turbine Blades with Film Cooling Alternate fuels (e.g. coal, petcoke, and biomass) are being cons Alternate fuels (e.g. coal, petcoke, and biomass) are being cons idered to idered to produce produce syngas syngas fuels to replace natural gas in power turbines fuels to replace natural gas in power turbines Despite gas cleanup, small levels of airborne particulate (e.g. Despite gas cleanup, small levels of airborne particulate (e.g. 0.1 0.1 ppmw

46

High-Temperature Co-electrolysis of Steam and Carbon Dioxide for Direct Production of Syngas; Equilibrium Model and Single-Cell Tests  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An experimental study has been completed to assess the performance of single solid-oxide electrolysis cells operating over a temperature range of 800 to 850C in the coelectrolysis mode, simultaneously electrolyzing steam and carbon dioxide for the direct production of syngas. The experiments were performed over a range of inlet flow rates of steam, carbon dioxide, hydrogen and nitrogen and over a range of current densities (-0.1 to 0.25 A/cm2) using single electrolyte-supported button electrolysis cells. Steam and carbon dioxide consumption rates associated with electrolysis were measured directly using inlet and outlet dewpoint instrumentation and a gas chromatograph, respectively. Cell operating potentials and cell current were varied using a programmable power supply. Measured values of open-cell potential and outlet gas composition are compared to predictions obtained from a chemical equilibrium coelectrolysis model. Model predictions of outlet gas composition based on an effective equilibrium temperature are shown to agree well with measurements. Cell area-specific resistance values were similar for steam electrolysis and coelectrolysis.

O'Brien, J. E.; Stoots, C. M.; Herring, J. S.; Hartvigsen, J. J.

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

High-Temperature Co-electrolysis of Carbon Dioxide and Steam for the Production of Syngas; Equilibrium Model and Single-Cell Tests  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An experimental study has been completed to assess the performance of single solid-oxide electrolysis cells operating over a temperature range of 800 to 850C in the coelectrolysis mode, simultaneously electrolyzing steam and carbon dioxide for the direct production of syngas. The experiments were performed over a range of inlet flow rates of steam, carbon dioxide, hydrogen and nitrogen and over a range of current densities (-0.1 to 0.25 A/cm2) using single electrolyte-supported button electrolysis cells. Steam and carbon dioxide consumption rates associated with electrolysis were measured directly using inlet and outlet dewpoint instrumentation and a gas chromatograph, respectively. Cell operating potentials and cell current were varied using a programmable power supply. Measured values of open-cell potential and outlet gas composition are compared to predictions obtained from a chemical equilibrium coelectrolysis model. Model predictions of outlet gas composition based on an effective equilibrium temperature are shown to agree well with measurements. Area-specific resistance values were similar for steam electrolysis and coelectrolysis.

J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; G. L. Hawkes; J. S. Herring; J. J. Hartvigsen

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

The Development of Warm Gas Cleanup Technologies for the Removal of Sulfur Containing Species from Steam Hydrogasification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gupta, B. Turk, M. Lesemann. RTI/Eastman warm syngas clean-feasibility analysis of RTI warm gas cleanup(WGCU)reactor was constructed by RTI from DOE-Morgantown gasifier,

Luo, Qian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Development of hollow fiber catalytic membrane reactors for high temperature gas cleanup  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The technology employed in the Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) permits burning coals with a wide range of sulfur concentrations. Emissions from the process should be reduced by an order of magnitude below stringent federal air quality regulations for coal-fired plants. The maximum thermal efficiency of this type of process can be achieved by removing sulfur and particulates from the high temperature gas. The objective of this project was to develop economically and technically viable catalytic membrane reactors for high temperature, high pressure gaseous contaminant control in IGCC systems. These catalytic membrane reactors were used to decompose H{sub 2}S and separate the reaction products. The reactors were designed to operate in the hostile process environment of the IGCC systems, and at temperatures ranging from 500 to 1,000. Feasibility of the membrane reactor process for decomposition of hydrogen sulfide was demonstrated; permeability and selectivity of molecular-sieve and Vycor glass membranes were studied at temperatures up to 1,000 C; experimental study of hydrogen sulfide in the membrane reactor was completed; and a generalized mathematical model was developed for the simulation of the high temperature membrane reactor.

Ma, Y.H.; Moser, W.R.; Pien, S.; Shelekhin, A.B.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Effects of Soret diffusion on the laminar flame speed and Markstein length of syngas/air mixtures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effects of Soret diffusion on the laminar flame speed and Markstein length of syngas/air mixtures syngas/air flames at normal and elevated temperatures and pressures are investigated numerically of syngas/air mixtures. The laminar flame speed and Markstein length are obtained by simulating

Chen, Zheng

51

Facilitated transport ceramic membranes for high-temperature gas cleanup. Final report, February 1990--April 1994  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this program was to demonstrate the feasibility of developing high temperature, high pressure, facilitated transport ceramic membranes to control gaseous contaminants in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power generation systems. Meeting this objective requires that the contaminant gas H{sub 2}S be removed from an IGCC gas mixture without a substantial loss of the other gaseous components, specifically H{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}. As described above this requires consideration of other, nonconventional types of membranes. The solution evaluated in this program involved the use of facilitated transport membranes consisting of molten mixtures of alkali and alkaline earth carbonate salts immobilized in a microporous ceramic support. To accomplish this objective, Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Golden Technologies Company Inc., and Research Triangle Institute worked together to develop and test high temperature facilitated membranes for the removal of H{sub 2}S from IGCC gas mixtures. Three basic experimental activities were pursued: (1) evaluation of the H{sub 2}S chemistry of a variety of alkali and alkaline earth carbonate salt mixtures; (2) development of microporous ceramic materials which were chemically and physically compatible with molten carbonate salt mixtures under IGCC conditions and which could function as a host to support a molten carbonate mixture and; (3) fabrication of molten carbonate/ceramic immobilized liquid membranes and evaluation of these membranes under conditions approximating those found in the intended application. Results of these activities are presented.

Quinn, R.; Minford, E.; Damle, A.S.; Gangwal, S.K.; Hart, B.A.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Development of ceramic membrane reactors for high temperature gas cleanup. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to develop high temperature, high pressure catalytic ceramic membrane reactors and to demonstrate the feasibility of using these membrane reactors to control gaseous contaminants (hydrogen sulfide and ammonia) in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems. Our strategy was to first develop catalysts and membranes suitable for the IGCC application and then combine these two components as a complete membrane reactor system. We also developed a computer model of the membrane reactor and used it, along with experimental data, to perform an economic analysis of the IGCC application. Our results have demonstrated the concept of using a membrane reactor to remove trace contaminants from an IGCC process. Experiments showed that NH{sub 3} decomposition efficiencies of 95% can be achieved. Our economic evaluation predicts ammonia decomposition costs of less than 1% of the total cost of electricity; improved membranes would give even higher conversions and lower costs.

Roberts, D.L.; Abraham, I.C.; Blum, Y.; Gottschlich, D.E.; Hirschon, A.; Way, J.D.; Collins, J.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Mitigation of Syngas Cooler Plugging and Fouling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

process equipment used in the gasification island. The syngas cooler (SC) is a fire tube heat exchanger located after the coal gasifier before the syngas combustion turbine. The...

54

HIGH EFFICIENCY SYNGAS GENERATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project investigated an efficient and low cost method of auto-thermally reforming natural gas to hydrogen and carbon monoxide. Reforming is the highest cost step in producing products such as methanol and Fisher Tropsch liquids (i.e., gas to liquids); and reducing the cost of reforming is the key to reducing the cost of these products. Steam reforming is expensive because of the high cost of the high nickel alloy reforming tubes (i.e., indirectly fired reforming tubes). Conventional auto-thermal or Partial Oxidation (POX) reforming minimizes the size and cost of the reformers and provides a near optimum mixture of CO and hydrogen. However POX requires pure oxygen, which consumes power and significantly increases the cost to reforming. Our high efficiency process extracts oxygen from low-pressure air with novel oxygen sorbent and transfers the oxygen to a nickel-catalyzed reformer. The syngas is generated at process pressure (typically 20 to 40 bar) without nitrogen dilution and has a 1CO to 2H{sub 2} ratio that is near optimum for the subsequent production of Fisher-Tropsch liquid to liquids and other chemicals (i.e., Gas to Liquids, GTL). Our high process efficiency comes from the way we transfer the oxygen into the reformer. All of the components of the process, except for the oxygen sorbent, are commonly used in commercial practice. A process based on a longlived, regenerable, oxygen transfer sorbent could substantially reduce the cost of natural gas reforming to syngas. Lower cost syngas (CO + 2H{sub 2}) that is the feedstock for GTL would reduce the cost of GTL and for other commercial applications (e.g., methanol, other organic chemicals). The vast gas resources of Alaska's North Slope (ANS) offer more than 22 Tcf of gas and GTL production in this application alone, and could account for as much as 300,000 to 700,000 bpd for 20 to 30+ years. We developed a new sorbent, which is an essential part of the High Efficiency Oxygen Process (HOP). We tested the sorbent and observed that it has both a good oxygen capacity and operates as a highly effective reforming catalyst. We conducted a long duration tests of the sorbent (1,500 hours of continuous operation in the HOP cycle). Although the sorbent lost some oxygen capacity with cycling, the sorbent oxygen capacity stabilized after 1,000 hours and remained constant to the end of the test, 1,500 hour. The activity of the catalyst to reform methane to a hydrogen and carbon monoxide mixture was unchanged through the oxidation/reduction cycling. Our cost and performance analyses indicated a significant reduction in the cost of GTL production when using the HOP process integrated into a GTL plant.

Robert J. Copeland; Yevgenia Gershanovich; Brian Windecker

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

DOE, RTI to Design and Build Gas Cleanup System for IGCC Power Plants |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE, RTI to Design and Build Gas Cleanup System for IGCC Power DOE, RTI to Design and Build Gas Cleanup System for IGCC Power Plants DOE, RTI to Design and Build Gas Cleanup System for IGCC Power Plants July 13, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announces a collaborative project with Research Triangle Institute (RTI) International to design, build, and test a warm gas cleanup system to remove multiple contaminants from coal-derived syngas. The 50-MWe system will include technologies to remove trace elements such as mercury and arsenic, capture the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide (CO2), and extract more than 99.9 percent of the sulfur from the syngas. A novel process to convert the extracted sulfur to a pure elemental sulfur product will also be tested. This project supports DOE's vision of coal power plants with near-zero

56

DOE, RTI to Design and Build Gas Cleanup System for IGCC Power Plants |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE, RTI to Design and Build Gas Cleanup System for IGCC Power DOE, RTI to Design and Build Gas Cleanup System for IGCC Power Plants DOE, RTI to Design and Build Gas Cleanup System for IGCC Power Plants July 13, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announces a collaborative project with Research Triangle Institute (RTI) International to design, build, and test a warm gas cleanup system to remove multiple contaminants from coal-derived syngas. The 50-MWe system will include technologies to remove trace elements such as mercury and arsenic, capture the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide (CO2), and extract more than 99.9 percent of the sulfur from the syngas. A novel process to convert the extracted sulfur to a pure elemental sulfur product will also be tested. This project supports DOE's vision of coal power plants with near-zero

57

Corrosion of Metallic SOFC Interconnects in Coal Syngas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With recent reductions in the operating temperature of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC), the potential of using metallic interconnect has gone up. There is also an interest in using Coal syngas as the fuel gas and thus there is a need to analyze the behavior and performance of metallic interconnects when exposed to Coal syngas. Three high temperature material alloys, Crofer 22 APU, Ebrite and Haynes 230, having the potential to be used as SOFC interconnects were studied in simulated wet coal syngas. These alloys were exposed to syngas at 800 degrees C and for 100 hours. The exposure to coal syngas led to the formation of oxides and spinels, which evidently led to an increase in electrical resistance. Oxidation in a reducing and carburizing environment leads to unique phase and morphology formations. A comparative analysis was carried out for all the three alloys, wherein the samples were characterized by using SEM, EDS, Raman and X-Ray diffraction to obtain the morphology, thickness, composition and crystal structure of the oxides and spinels

Dastane, R.R. (University of West Virginia); Liu, X. (University of West Virginia); Johnson, C., Mao, Scott (University of Pittsburgh)

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

SYSTEM ANALYSIS OF NUCLEAR-ASSISTED SYNGAS PRODUCTION FROM COAL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A system analysis has been performed to assess the efficiency and carbon utilization of a nuclear-assisted coal gasification process. The nuclear reactor is a high-temperature helium-cooled reactor that is used primarily to provide power for hydrogen production via high-temperature electrolysis. The supplemental hydrogen is mixed with the outlet stream from an oxygen-blown coal gasifier to produce a hydrogen-rich gas mixture, allowing most of the carbon dioxide to be converted into carbon monoxide, with enough excess hydrogen to produce a syngas product stream with a hydrogen/carbon monoxide molar ratio of about 2:1. Oxygen for the gasifier is also provided by the high-temperature electrolysis process. Results of the analysis predict 90.5% carbon utilization with a syngas production efficiency (defined as the ratio of the heating value of the produced syngas to the sum of the heating value of the coal plus the high-temperature reactor heat input) of 66.1% at a gasifier temperature of 1866 K for the high-moisture-content lignite coal considered. Usage of lower moisture coals such as bituminous can yield carbon utilization approaching 100% and 70% syngas production efficiency.

E. A. Harvego; M. G. McKellar; J. E. O'Brien

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

US Department of Energy`s high-temperature and high-pressure particulate cleanup for advanced coal-based power systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The availability of reliable, low-cost electricity is a cornerstone for the United States` ability to compete in the world market. The Department of Energy (DOE) projects the total consumption of electricity in the US to rise from 2.7 trillion kilowatt-hours in 1990 to 3.5 trillion in 2010. Although energy sources are diversifying, fossil fuel still produces 90 percent of the nation`s energy. Coal is our most abundant fossil fuel resource and the source of 56 percent of our electricity. It has been the fuel of choice because of its availability and low cost. A new generation of high-efficiency power systems has made it possible to continue the use of coal while still protecting the environment. Such power systems greatly reduce the pollutants associated with cola-fired plants built before the 1970s. To realize this high efficiency and superior environmental performance, advanced coal-based power systems will require gas stream cleanup under high-temperature and high-pressure (HTHP) process conditions. Presented in this paper are the HTHP particulate capture requirements for the Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Combustion (PFBC) power systems, the HTHP particulate cleanup systems being implemented in the PFBC and IGCC Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Projects, and the currently available particulate capture performance results.

Dennis, R.A.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

System Analysis of Nuclear-Assisted Syngas Production from Coal  

SciTech Connect

A system analysis has been performed to assess the efficiency and carbon utilization of a nuclear-assisted coal gasification process. The nuclear reactor is a high-temperature helium-cooled reactor that is used primarily to provide power for hydrogen production via hightemperature electrolysis. The supplemental hydrogen is mixed with the outlet stream from an oxygen-blown coal gasifier to produce a hydrogen-rich gas mixture, allowing most of the carbon dioxide to be converted into carbon monoxide, with enough excess hydrogen to produce a syngas product stream with a hydrogen/carbon monoxide molar ratio of about 2:1. Oxygen for the gasifier is also provided by the high-temperature electrolysis process. Results of the analysis predict 90.5% carbon utilization with a syngas production efficiency (defined as the ratio of the heating value of the produced syngas to the sum of the heating value of the coal plus the high-temperature reactor heat input) of 64.4% at a gasifier temperature of 1866 K for the high-moisture-content lignite coal considered. Usage of lower moisture coals such as bituminous can yield carbon utilization approaching 100% and 70% syngas production efficiency.

E. A. Harvego; M. G. McKellar; J. E. O'Brien

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature syngas cleanup" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Gas stream cleanup  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the current status and recent accomplishments of gas stream cleanup (GSCU) projects sponsored by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The primary goal of the Gas Stream Cleanup Program is to develop contaminant control strategies that meet environmental regulations and protect equipment in advanced coal conversion systems. Contaminant control systems are being developed for integration into seven advanced coal conversion processes: Pressurized fludized-bed combustion (PFBC), Direct coal-fueled turbine (DCFT), Intergrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC), Gasification/molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC), Gasification/solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), Coal-fueled diesel (CFD), and Mild gasification (MG). These advanced coal conversion systems present a significant challenge for development of contaminant control systems because they generate multi-contaminant gas streams at high-pressures and high temperatures. Each of the seven advanced coal conversion systems incorporates distinct contaminant control strategies because each has different contaminant tolerance limits and operating conditions. 59 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

Bossart, S.J.; Cicero, D.C.; Zeh, C.M.; Bedick, R.C.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup, and Oxygen Separation Equipment; Task 2: Gas Cleanup Design and Cost Estimates -- Wood Feedstock  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of Task 2, Gas Cleanup and Cost Estimates, Nexant investigated the appropriate process scheme for treatment of wood-derived syngas for use in the synthesis of liquid fuels. Two different 2,000 metric tonne per day gasification schemes, a low-pressure, indirect system using the gasifier, and a high-pressure, direct system using gasification technology were evaluated. Initial syngas conditions from each of the gasifiers was provided to the team by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Nexant was the prime contractor and principal investigator during this task; technical assistance was provided by both GTI and Emery Energy.

Nexant Inc.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Assessment of the SRI Gasification Process for Syngas Generation with HTGR Integration -- White Paper  

SciTech Connect

This white paper is intended to compare the technical and economic feasibility of syngas generation using the SRI gasification process coupled to several high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) with more traditional HTGR-integrated syngas generation techniques, including: (1) Gasification with high-temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE); (2) Steam methane reforming (SMR); and (3) Gasification with SMR with and without CO2 sequestration.

A.M. Gandrik

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

WIPP - CBFO Accelerating Cleanup  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

more information, access DOE Environmental Management site at: http:www.em.doe.govclosure For more information regarding the Accelerating Cleanup: Paths to Closure, contact...

65

Superfund accelerated cleanup model  

SciTech Connect

In an effort to speed and maximize cleanup of the worst sites first, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) developed the Superfund Accelerated Cleanup Model (SACM). SACM streamlines the Superfund process so hazardous waste sites can be addressed quicker and in a more cost effective manner. EPA Regional offices developed a number of pilot projects to test the principles of SACM. Although many pilots are underway in the Regions, the pilots described here involve four areas: accelerating cleanup through early actions; integrating site assessments; using Regional Decision Teams to establish priorities; and accelerating cleanup through the use of new technology.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Fundamental Studies in Syngas Premixed Combustion Dynamics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Studies Studies in Syngas Premixed Combustion Dynamics Ahmed F. Ghoniem, Anuradha M. Annaswamy, Raymond L. Speth, H. Murat Altay Massachusetts Institute of Technology SCIES Project 05-01-SR121 Project Awarded (08/01/2005, 36 Month Duration) Needs & Objectives Gas Turbine Needs Flexibility to operate with variable syngas compositions Ensure stable operation over a wide range of conditions Reduce emissions of CO and NO x Project Objectives Study experimentally lean premixed syngas combustion

67

Site Transition Process Upon Cleanup Completion | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Process Upon Cleanup Completion Site Transition Process Upon Cleanup Completion Site Transition Process Upon Cleanup Completion Site Transition Process Upon Cleanup Completion More...

68

Site Transition Process Upon Cleanup Completion | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site Transition Process Upon Cleanup Completion Site Transition Process Upon Cleanup Completion Site Transition Process Upon Cleanup Completion Site Transition Process Upon Cleanup...

69

Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology Pathway  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This technology pathway case investigates the upgrading of woody biomass derived synthesis gas (syngas) to hydrocarbon biofuels. While this specific discussion focuses on the conversion of syngas via a methanol intermediate to hydrocarbon blendstocks, there are a number of alternative conversion routes for production of hydrocarbons through a wide array of intermediates from syngas. Future work will also consider the variations to this pathway to determine the most economically viable and lowest risk conversion route. Technical barriers and key research needs have been identified that should be pursued for the syngas-to-hydrocarbon pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel- and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

Talmadge, M.; Biddy, M.; Dutta, A.; Jones, S.; Meyer, A.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Catalysts for Syngas-Derived Alcohol Synthesis  

This technology provides an advantageous means to convert syngas into a class of chemicals known as higher oxygenates as well as other long-chain ...

71

SYNGAS PRODUCTION SYSTEMS - Energy Innovation Portal  

Syngas components hydrogen and carbon monoxide may be formed by the decomposition of carbon dioxide and water or steam by a solid-oxide electrolysis cell to form ...

72

Cost Analysis and Evaluation of Syngas Synthesis through Anaerobic Digestion.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Synthetic fuel, which is generated from syngas via Fischer Tropsch synthesis, provides the world with an alternative for conventional fossil energy resources. Generating syngas (more)

Tong, Yun

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Development of hollow fiber catalytic membrane reactors for high temperature gas cleanup. Final report, September 1989--March 1994  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to develop economically and technically viable catalytic membrane reactors for high temperature, high pressure gaseous contaminant control in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems. These catalytic membrane reactors decompose H{sub 2}S and separate the reaction products. The reactors were designed to operate in the hostile process environment of the IGCC systems, and at temperatures ranging from 500 to 1000{degrees}C. Severe conditions encountered in the IGCC process (e.g., 900{degrees}C, containing of H{sub 2}S, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O) make it impossible to use polymeric membranes in the process. A list of inorganic membranes that can be employed in the membrane reactor includes Pd metallic membranes, molecular-sieve glass membranes (PPG Industries), porous Vycor glass membranes and porous sol-gel derived membranes such as alumina, zirconia. Alumina and zirconia membranes, however, cannot withstand for a long time at high temperatures in the presence of water vapors. Palladium membranes are a very promising class of inorganic membranes for gas separations that is currently under development. In this project two different types of membranes were used in the design of the membrane reactor -- molecular-sieve glass membrane and Vycor glass porous membrane.

Ma, Yi Hua; Moser, W.R.; Pien, S.; Shelekhin, A.B.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

High Hydrogen, Low Methane Syngas from Low-Rank Coals for Coal-to-Liquids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Hydrogen, Low Methane Syngas from Low-Rank Coals for Coal-to-Liquids Production High Hydrogen, Low Methane Syngas from Low-Rank Coals for Coal-to-Liquids Production Southern Research Institute (SRI) Project Number: FE0012054 Project Description The focus of the project will be to develop, test, and optimize steam-reforming catalysts for converting tars, C2+ hydrocarbons, NH3, and CH4 in high-temperature and sulfur environments, increasing the ratio of hydrogen in syngas, as part of a modified, advanced gasification platform for the conversion of low-rank coals to syngas for coal-to-liquid and integrated gasification combined cycle applications. Project Details Program Background and Project Benefits Project Scope and Technology Readiness Level Accomplishments Contacts, Duration, and Cost Project Images Abstract Performer website: Southern Research Institute

75

Laminar flame speeds of moist syngas mixtures  

SciTech Connect

This work experimentally investigates the effect of the presence of water vapor on the laminar flame speeds of moist syngas/air mixtures using the counterflow twin-flame configuration. The experimental results presented here are for fuel lean syngas mixtures with molar percentage of hydrogen in the hydrogen and carbon monoxide mixture varying from 5% to 100%, for an unburned mixture temperature of 323 K, and under atmospheric pressure. At a given equivalence ratio, the effect of varying amount of water vapor addition on the measured laminar flame speed is demonstrated. The experimental laminar flame speeds are also compared with computed values using chemical kinetic mechanisms reported in the literature. It is found that laminar flame speed varies non-monotonically with addition of water for the carbon monoxide rich mixtures. It first increases with increasing amount of water addition, reaches a maximum value, and then decreases. An integrated reaction path analysis is further conducted to understand the controlling mechanism responsible for the non-monotonic variation in laminar flame speed due to water addition. On the other hand, for higher values of H{sub 2}/CO ratio the laminar flame speed monotonically decreases with increasing water addition. It is shown that the competition between the chemical and thermal effects of water addition leads to the observed response. Furthermore, reaction rate sensitivity analysis as well as binary diffusion coefficient sensitivity analysis are conducted to identify the possible sources of discrepancy between the experimental and predicted values. The sensitivity results indicate that the reaction rate constant of H{sub 2}+OH = H{sub 2}O+H is worth revisiting and refinement of binary diffusion coefficient data of N{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O, N{sub 2}-H{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O pairs can be considered. (author)

Das, Apurba K. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Kumar, Kamal; Sung, Chih-Jen [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

76

Regeneration of Sulfur Deactivated Ni-based Biomass Syngas Cleaning Catalysts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nickel-based catalysts have been widely tested in decomposing tar and methane in hot biomass syngas cleanup researches. However these catalysts can be easily deactivated by the sulfur compounds in syngas due to the strong sulfur adsorption effect on the Ni surface. Here we report on a new regeneration process, which can effectively and efficiently regenerate the sulfur-poisoned Ni reforming catalysts. This process consists of four sequential treatments: 1) controlled oxidation at 750oC in 1% O2, 2) decomposition at 900oC in Ar, 3) reduction at 900oC in 2% H2, and 4) reaction at 900oC under reforming condition. The duration of this 4-step regeneration process is only about 8 hours, which is shorter than that of the conventional steaming regeneration treatment.

Li, Liyu; Howard, Christopher J.; King, David L.; Gerber, Mark A.; Dagle, Robert A.; Stevens, Don J.

2010-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

77

Fischer-Tropsch Database Calculations Conversions: CO, H2, and Syngas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fischer-Tropsch Database Calculations Conversions: CO, H2, and Syngas f in out in n n n = - 100 n contraction (%) #12;Syngas ratio (H2:CO): sr H in CO in n n = 2 _ _ n: (mols per hour) sr: Syngas ratio Rates active metal (g) r: Rate (mols / hr / g metal) #12;Rate Syngas: syngas H COr r r= +2 r syngas: Syngas

Kentucky, University of

78

A Study of Advanced Materials for Gas Turbine Coatings at Elevated Temperatures Using Selected Microstructures and Characteristic Environments for Syngas Combustion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) that can be suitable for use in industrial gas turbine engines have been processed and compared with electron beam physical vapor deposition (EBPVD) microstructures for applications in advanced gas turbines that use coal-derived synthesis gas. Thermo-physical properties have been evaluated of the processed air plasma sprayed TBCs with standard APS-STD and vertically cracked APS-VC coatings samples up to 1300 C. Porosity of these selected coatings with related microstructural effects have been analyzed in this study. Wet and dry thermal cycling studies at 1125 C and spalling resistance thermal cycling studies to 1200 C have also been carried out. Type I and Type II hot corrosion tests were carried out to investigate the effects of microstructure variations and additions of alumina in YSZ top coats in multi-layered TBC structures. The thermal modeling of turbine blade has also been carried out that gives the capability to predict in-service performance temperature gradients. In addition to isothermal high temperature oxidation kinetics analysis in YSZ thermal barrier coatings of NiCoCrAlY bond coats with 0.25% Hf. This can affect the failure behavior depending on the control of the thermally grown oxide (TGO) growth at the interface. The TGO growth kinetics is seen to be parabolic and the activation energies correspond to interfacial growth kinetics that is controlled by the diffusion of O{sub 2} in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The difference between oxidation behavior of the VC and STD structures are attributed to the effects of microstructure morphology and porosity on oxygen ingression into the zirconia and TGO layers. The isothermal oxidation resistance of the STD and VC microstructures is similar at temperatures up to 1200 C. However, the generally thicker TGO layer thicknesses and the slightly faster oxidation rates in the VC microstructures are attributed to the increased ingression of oxygen through the grain boundaries of the vertically cracked microstructures. The plasma sprayed TBC microstructure (VC and STD) with NiCoCrAlY-Hf bond coat are stable up to 1100 C. However, as with other TBC structures, a considerable amount of interdiffusion was observed in the different layers, although the TBC growth was self-limiting and parabolic. The addition of Hf to the VC microstructure appears to have some potential for the future development of robust TBCs with improved isothermal and service temperatures in advanced gas turbines.

Ravinder Diwan; Patrick Mensah; Guoqiang Li; Nalini Uppu; Strphen Akwaboa; Monica Silva; Ebubekir Beyazoglu; Ogad Agu; Naresh Polasa; Lawrence Bazille; Douglas Wolfe; Purush Sahoo

2011-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

79

Modeling of the reburning process using sewage sludge-derived syngas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gasification provides an attractive method for sewage sludges treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gasification generates a fuel gas (syngas) which can be used as a reburning fuel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reburning potential of sewage sludge gasification gases was defined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Numerical simulation of co-combustion of syngases in coal fired boiler has been done. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Calculation shows that analysed syngases can provide higher than 80% reduction of NO{sub x}. - Abstract: Gasification of sewage sludge can provide clean and effective reburning fuel for combustion applications. The motivation of this work was to define the reburning potential of the sewage sludge gasification gas (syngas). A numerical simulation of the co-combustion process of syngas in a hard coal-fired boiler was done. All calculations were performed using the Chemkin programme and a plug-flow reactor model was used. The calculations were modelled using the GRI-Mech 2.11 mechanism. The highest conversions for nitric oxide (NO) were obtained at temperatures of approximately 1000-1200 K. The combustion of hard coal with sewage sludge-derived syngas reduces NO emissions. The highest reduction efficiency (>90%) was achieved when the molar flow ratio of the syngas was 15%. Calculations show that the analysed syngas can provide better results than advanced reburning (connected with ammonia injection), which is more complicated process.

Werle, Sebastian, E-mail: sebastian.werle@polsl.pl [Institute of Thermal Technology, Silesian University of Technology at Gliwice, 44-100 Gliwice, Konarskiego 22 (Poland)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

80

Experimental Study on Direct-Fired Characteristics about Biomass Derived Crude Syngas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to solve the problem of slagging in biomass direct-fired and high tar content in biomass gasification, the method of using low-temperature gasification and crudesyn gas high temperature direct combustion for biomass is proposed. By changing ... Keywords: Biomass, Rice Husk, Direct-Fired, Temperature, Syngas, Gas Composition, Equivalence Ratio, Steam team to Air

Li Hong-tao; Li Bing-xi; Zhang Ya-ning; Xu You-ning

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature syngas cleanup" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

A Hybrid Gas Cleaning Process for Production of Ultraclean Syngas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to develop technologies for cleaning/conditioning IGCC generated syngas to meet contaminant tolerance limits for fuel cell and chemical production applications. The specific goals are to develop processes for (1) removal of reduced sulfur species to sub-ppm levels using a hybrid process consisting of a polymer membrane and a regenerable ZnO-coated monolith or a mixed metal oxide sorbent; (2) removal of hydrogen chloride vapors to sub-ppm levels using an inexpensive, high-surface-area material; and (3) removal of NH3 with acidic adsorbents followed by conversion of this NH3 into nitrogen and water. Existing gasification technologies can effectively and efficiently convert a wide variety of carbonaceous feedstocks (coal, petcoke, resids, biomass, etc.) into syngas, which predominantly contains carbon monoxide and hydrogen. Unfortunately, the impurities present in these carbonaceous feedstocks are converted to gaseous contaminants such as H2S, COS, HCl, NH3, alkali macromolecules and heavy metal compounds (such as Hg) during the gasification process. Removal of these contaminants using conventional processes is thermally inefficient and capital intensive. This research and development effort is focused on investigation of modular processes for removal of sulfur, chlorine, nitrogen and mercury compounds from syngas at elevated temperature and pressures at significantly lower costs than conventional technologies.

Merkel, T.C.; Turk, B.S.; Gupta, R.P.; Cicero, D.C.; Jain, S.C.

2002-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

82

A Review of Materials for Gas Turbines Firing Syngas Fuels  

SciTech Connect

Following the extensive development work carried out in the 1990's, gas turbine combined-cycle (GTCC) systems burning natural gas represent a reliable and efficient power generation technology widely used in many parts of the world. A critical factor was that, in order to operate at the high turbine entry temperatures required for high efficiency operation, aero-engine technology, i.e., single-crystal blades, thermal barrier coatings, and sophisticated cooling techniques had to be rapidly scaled up and introduced into these large gas turbines. The problems with reliability that resulted have been largely overcome, so that the high-efficiency GTCC power generation system is now a mature technology, capable of achieving high levels of availability. The high price of natural gas and concern about emission of greenhouse gases has focused attention on the desirability of replacing natural gas with gas derived from coal (syngas) in these gas turbine systems, since typical systems analyses indicate that IGCC plants have some potential to fulfil the requirement for a zero-emissions power generation system. In this review, the current status of materials for the critical hot gas path parts in large gas turbines is briefly considered in the context of the need to burn syngas. A critical factor is that the syngas is a low-Btu fuel, and the higher mass flow compared to natural gas will tend to increase the power output of the engine. However, modifications to the turbine and to the combustion system also will be necessary. It will be shown that many of the materials used in current engines will also be applicable to units burning syngas but, since the combustion environment will contain a greater level of impurities (especially sulfur, water vapor, and particulates), the durability of some components may be prejudiced. Consequently, some effort will be needed to develop improved coatings to resist attack by sulfur-containing compounds, and also erosion.

Gibbons, Thomas [ORNL; Wright, Ian G [ORNL

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

A Review of Materials for Gas Turbines Firing Syngas Fuels  

SciTech Connect

Following the extensive development work carried out in the 1990's, gas turbine combined-cycle (GTCC) systems burning natural gas represent a reliable and efficient power generation technology widely used in many parts of the world. A critical factor was that, in order to operate at the high turbine entry temperatures required for high efficiency operation, aero-engine technology, i.e., single-crystal blades, thermal barrier coatings, and sophisticated cooling techniques had to be rapidly scaled up and introduced into these large gas turbines. The problems with reliability that resulted have been largely overcome, so that the high-efficiency GTCC power generation system is now a mature technology, capable of achieving high levels of availability. The high price of natural gas and concern about emission of greenhouse gases has focused attention on the desirability of replacing natural gas with gas derived from coal (syngas) in these gas turbine systems, since typical systems analyses indicate that IGCC plants have some potential to fulfil the requirement for a zero-emissions power generation system. In this review, the current status of materials for the critical hot gas path parts in large gas turbines is briefly considered in the context of the need to burn syngas. A critical factor is that the syngas is a low-Btu fuel, and the higher mass flow compared to natural gas will tend to increase the power output of the engine. However, modifications to the turbine and to the combustion system also will be necessary. It will be shown that many of the materials used in current engines will also be applicable to units burning syngas but, since the combustion environment will contain a greater level of impurities (especially sulfur, water vapor, and particulates), the durability of some components may be prejudiced. Consequently, some effort will be needed to develop improved coatings to resist attack by sulfur-containing compounds, and also erosion.

Gibbons, Thomas [ORNL; Wright, Ian G [ORNL

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Integrated High Temperature Coal-to-Hydrogen System with CO2 Separation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A significant barrier to the commercialization of coal-to-hydrogen technologies is high capital cost. The purity requirements for H{sub 2} fuels are generally met by using a series of unit clean-up operations for residual CO removal, sulfur removal, CO{sub 2} removal and final gas polishing to achieve pure H{sub 2}. A substantial reduction in cost can be attained by reducing the number of process operations for H{sub 2} cleanup, and process efficiency can be increased by conducting syngas cleanup at higher temperatures. The objective of this program was to develop the scientific basis for a single high-temperature syngas-cleanup module to produce a pure stream of H{sub 2} from a coal-based system. The approach was to evaluate the feasibility of a 'one box' process that combines a shift reactor with a high-temperature CO{sub 2}-selective membrane to convert CO to CO{sub 2}, remove sulfur compounds, and remove CO{sub 2} in a simple, compact, fully integrated system. A system-level design was produced for a shift reactor that incorporates a high-temperature membrane. The membrane performance targets were determined. System level benefits were evaluated for a coal-to-hydrogen system that would incorporate membranes with properties that would meet the performance targets. The scientific basis for high temperature CO{sub 2}-selective membranes was evaluated by developing and validating a model for high temperature surface flow membranes. Synthesis approaches were pursued for producing membranes that integrated control of pore size with materials adsorption properties. Room temperature reverse-selectivity for CO{sub 2} was observed and performance at higher temperatures was evaluated. Implications for future membrane development are discussed.

James A. Ruud; Anthony Ku; Vidya Ramaswamy; Wei Wei; Patrick Willson

2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

85

Reactor water cleanup system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor water cleanup system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core submerged in reactor water. First and second parallel cleanup trains are provided for extracting portions of the reactor water from the pressure vessel, cleaning the extracted water, and returning the cleaned water to the pressure vessel. Each of the cleanup trains includes a heat exchanger for cooling the reactor water, and a cleaner for cleaning the cooled reactor water. A return line is disposed between the cleaner and the pressure vessel for channeling the cleaned water thereto in a first mode of operation. A portion of the cooled water is bypassed around the cleaner during a second mode of operation and returned through the pressure vessel for shutdown cooling.

Gluntz, Douglas M. (San Jose, CA); Taft, William E. (Los Gatos, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

2013 Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus Briefings | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2013 Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus Briefings 2013 Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus Briefings The Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus serves as a way to brief members of...

87

HANFORD SITE CLEANUP OBJECTIVES INCONSISTENTWITH PROJECTED LAND...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HANFORD SITE CLEANUP OBJECTIVES INCONSISTENTWITH PROJECTED LAND USES, IG-0446 HANFORD SITE CLEANUP OBJECTIVES INCONSISTENTWITH PROJECTED LAND USES, IG-0446 The cleanup of the...

88

Production and high temperature treatment of syngas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Gas cleaning is an essential step in many chemical processes. The reason for cleaning is to remove components that can damage equipment or inhibit further (more)

Botha, Martin Francis.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Cleanup Sites | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cleanup Sites Cleanup Sites Cleanup Sites Center Map As the largest environmental cleanup program in the world, EM has been charged with the responsibility of cleaning up 107 sites across the country whose area is equal to the combined area of Rhode Island and Delaware. EM has made substantial progress in nearly every area of nuclear waste cleanup and as of September 2012, completed cleanup at 90 of these sites. The "active" sites continue to have ongoing cleanup projects under EM's purview. Use the interactive map above to see states that still have cleanup activities associated with them. The tooltip in the upper-right corner shows site data for each state, and each marker gives site information as well as links to the site fact sheets here on the EM website and each site's full website.

90

Autoignition studies of Syngas and Hydrogen (SGH) Fuels The Pennsylvania State University  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Autoignition Autoignition Studies of Syngas and Hydrogen (SGH) Fuels The Pennsylvania State University Robert J. Santoro SCIES Project 05-01-SR117 Project Awarded (8/1/05 36 Month Duration) $419,036 Total Contract Value ($419,036 DOE) Motivation * Renewed interest in IGCC requires a fundamental understanding of syngas properties * Of particular importance for lean premixed gas turbine power operation are the autoignition properties of syngas * Additionally, these properties must be measured for pressure and temperature conditions representative of gas turbines The Pennsylvania State University Objectives * Parametrically determine the autoignition delay time for CO/H 2 mixtures * Vary CO concentration, equivalence ratio, pressure and temperature over a wide range * Effect of water will be investigated

91

SOFC Anode Interaction with Trace Coal Syngas Species U.S. Dept of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV 26507  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SOFC Anode Interaction with Trace Coal Syngas Species SOFC Anode Interaction with Trace Coal Syngas Species U.S. Dept of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV 26507 Gregory Hackett, Kirk Gerdes, Randall Gemmen Phone: (304)285-5279, Gregory.Hackett@NETL.DOE.GOV Utilization of coal as a fuel source for highly efficient integrated gasification fuel cell (IGFC) power generation facilities is technologically and environmentally attractive. IGFC plants are expected to offer the highest efficiency coal gasification processes, even when carbon capture and storage systems are included in the design. One element of IGFC research at the National Energy Technology Laboratory is the investigation of syngas cleanup processes for these integrated systems. Of particular interest are the effects of trace elements naturally contained in

92

Syngas into Fuel: Optofluidic Solar Concentrators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Ohio State has developed an iron-based material and process for converting syngasa synthetic gas mixtureinto electricity, H2, and/or liquid fuel with zero CO2 emissions. Traditional carbon capture methods use chemical solvents or special membranes to separate CO2 from the gas exhaust from coal-fired power plants. Ohio States technology uses an iron-based oxygen carrier to generate CO2 and H2 from syngas in separate, pure product streams by means of a circulating bed reactor configuration. The end products of the system are H2, electricity, and/or liquid fuel, all of which are useful sources of power that can come from coal or syngas derived from biomass. Ohio State is developing a high-pressure pilot-scale unit to demonstrate this process at the National Carbon Capture Center.

None

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Mixed conducting membranes for syngas production  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention presents a new class of multicomponent metallic oxides which are particularly suited toward use in fabricating components used in processes for producing syngas. The non-stoichiometric, A-site rich compositions of the present invention are represented by the formula (Ln.sub.x Ca.sub.1-x).sub.y FeO.sub.3-.delta. wherein Ln is La or a mixture of lanthanides comprising La, and wherein 1.0>x>0.5, 1.1.gtoreq.y>1.0 and .delta. is a number which renders the composition of matter charge neutral. Solid-state membranes formed from these compositions provide a favorable balance of oxygen permeance and resistance to degradation when employed in processes for producing syngas. This invention also presents a process for making syngas which utilizes such membranes.

Dyer, Paul Nigel (Allentown, PA); Carolan, Michael Francis (Allentown, PA); Butt, Darryl (Gainesville, FL); Van Doorn, Rene Hendrick Elias (Neckarsulm, DE); Cutler, Raymond Ashton (Bountiful, UT)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

WIPP Accelerating Cleanup  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ACCELERATING CLEANUP: ACCELERATING CLEANUP: PATHS TO CLOSURE CARLSBAD AREA OFFICE JUNE 1998 I. Operations/Field Overview CAO Mission The mission of the Carlsbad Area Office (CAO) is to protect human health and the environment by opening and operating the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for safe disposal of transuranic (TRU) waste and by establishing an effective system for management of TRU waste from generation to disposal. It includes personnel assigned to CAO, WIPP site operations, transportation, and other activities associated with the National TRU Program (NTP). The CAO develops and directs implementation of the TRU waste program, and assesses compliance with the program guidance, as well as the commonality of activities and assumptions among all TRU waste sites. NTP Program Management

95

Cleanup at Rocky Flats  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

David L. Clark, Los Alamos National Laboratory David L. Clark, Los Alamos National Laboratory The Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) is an environmental cleanup site located about 16 miles northwest of downtown Denver (Fig 1). Two decades of routine monitoring have shown that the environment around RFETS is contaminated with actinide elements (U, Pu, Am) from site operations, [1] and RFETS has been designated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as a Superfund cleanup site. Until December 1989, the Rocky Flats Plant made components for nuclear weapons using various radioactive and hazardous materials, including plutonium, uranium and beryllium. Nearly 40 years of nuclear weapons production left behind a legacy of contaminated facilities, soils, and ground water. More than 2.5 million people live within a 50 mile radius of the site; 300,000 of those live in the Rocky Flats watershed.

96

BURNER DEVELOPMENT AND OPERABILITY ISSUES ASSOCIATED WITH STEADY FLOWING SYNGAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BURNER DEVELOPMENT AND OPERABILITY ISSUES ASSOCIATED WITH STEADY FLOWING SYNGAS FIRED COMBUSTORS-Mu¨nchen, Garching, Germany This article addresses the impact of syngas fuel composition on combustor blowout, flash flashback mechanisms are present in swirling flows, and the key thermophysical properties of a syngas

Lieuwen, Timothy C.

97

System analysis of nuclear-assisted syngas production from coal - article no. 042901  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A system analysis has been performed to assess the efficiency and carbon utilization of a nuclear-assisted coal gasification process. The nuclear reactor is a high-temperature helium-cooled reactor that is used primarily to provide power for hydrogen production via high-temperature electrolysis. The supplemental hydrogen is mixed with the outlet stream from an oxygen-blown coal gasifier to produce a hydrogen-rich gas mixture, allowing most of the carbon dioxide to be converted into carbon monoxide, with enough excess hydrogen to produce a syngas product stream with a hydrogen/carbon monoxide molar ratio of about 2:1. Oxygen for the gasifier is also provided by the high-temperature electrolysis process. The results of the analysis predict 90.5% carbon utilization with a syngas production efficiency (defined as the ratio of the heating value of the produced syngas to the sum of the heating value of the coal plus the high-temperature reactor heat input) of 64.4% at a gasifier temperature of 1866 K for the high-moisture-content lignite coal considered. Usage of lower moisture coals such as bituminous can yield carbon utilization approaching 100% and 70% syngas production efficiency.

Harvego, E.A.; McKellar, M.G.; O'Brien, J.E. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

98

Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology Pathway  

SciTech Connect

In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This pathway case investigates the upgrading of biomass derived synthesis gas (syngas) to hydrocarbon biofuels. While this specific discussion focuses on the conversion of syngas via a methanol intermediate to hydrocarbon blendstocks, there are a number of alternative conversion routes for production of hydrocarbons through a wide array of intermediates from syngas. Future work will also consider the variations to this pathway to determine the most economically viable and risk adverse conversion route. Technical barriers and key research needs have been identified that should be pursued for the syngas to hydrocarbon pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range blendstocks.

Talmadge, M.; Biddy, Mary J.; Dutta, Abhijit; Jones, Susanne B.; Meyer, Pimphan A.

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

99

NETL: Gasification Systems - Mitigation of Syngas Cooler Plugging and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mitigation of Syngas Cooler Plugging and Fouling Mitigation of Syngas Cooler Plugging and Fouling Project No.: DE-FE0007952 Reaction Engineering International (REI) is working to develop practical solutions to mitigate the plugging and fouling of syngas coolers (SC) - fire tube heat exchangers located between the coal gasifier and the combustion turbine. Syngas coolers used in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plants offer high efficiency, but their reliability is generally lower than other process equipment in the gasification island. The principle downtime events associated with syngas coolers are typically a result of ash deposits that: form on (wall) surfaces upstream of the syngas cooler, break loose, and then lodge in the tubes; or form on the fireside surface of the syngas cooler tubes that lead to fouling and reduced heat transfer. Both ash deposit mechanisms result in reduced equipment life and increased maintenance costs.

100

Producing Clean Syngas via Catalytic Reforming for Fuels Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermochemical biomass conversion to fuels and chemicals can be achieved through gasification to syngas. The biomass derived raw syngas contains the building blocks of carbon monoxide and hydrogen as well as impurities such as tars, light hydrocarbons, and hydrogen sulfide. These impurities must be removed prior to fuel synthesis. We used catalytic reforming to convert tars and hydrocarbons to additional syngas, which increases biomass carbon utilization. In this work, nickel based, fluidizable tar reforming catalysts were synthesized and evaluated for tar and methane reforming performance with oak and model syngas in two types of pilot scale fluidized reactors (recirculating and recirculating regenerating). Because hydrogen sulfide (present in raw syngas and added to model syngas) reacts with the active nickel surface, regeneration with steam and hydrogen was required. Pre and post catalyst characterization showed changes specific to the syngas type used. Results of this work will be discussed in the context of selecting the best process for pilot scale demonstration.

Magrini, K. A.; Parent, Y.; Jablonski, W.; Yung, M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature syngas cleanup" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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101

Environmental Cleanup | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Cleanup Environmental Cleanup Environmental Cleanup Learn more about the history, cleanup activities and possible future uses of the Hanford Site, a 586-square-mile government site in southeast Washington State. | Video courtesy of the Energy Department. The Energy Department is committed to a safe, complete cleanup of the environmental legacy of five decades of government-sponsored nuclear weapons development and nuclear energy research. As part of this mission, we safely and cost-effectively transport and dispose of low-level wastes; decommission and decontaminate old facilities; remediate contaminated soil and groundwater; and secure and store nuclear material in stable, secure locations to protect national security. Featured An Update on the Hanford Site and Cleanup Progress

102

Hanford Achieves a Cleanup First  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

RICHLAND, Wash. DOE contractors have completed cleanup of F Area, the first reactor area at the 586-square-mile Hanford site to be fully remediated.

103

Environmental Cleanup, Brookhaven National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lab campus Cleanup Project Details Groundwater Peconic River Surface and Soil Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor High Flux Beam Reactor Brookhaven Medical Reactor...

104

SIMULTANEOUS PRODUCTION OF HIGH-PURITY HYDROGEN AND SEQUESTRATION-READY CO2 FROM SYNGAS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This final report summarizes the progress made on the program ''Simultaneous Production of High-Purity Hydrogen and Sequestration-Ready CO{sub 2} from Syngas (contract number DE-FG26-99FT40682)'', during October 2000 through September of 2003. GE Energy and Environmental Research (GE-EER) and Southern Illinois University (SIU) at Carbondale conducted the research work for this program. This program addresses improved methods to efficiently produce simultaneous streams of high-purity hydrogen and separated carbon dioxide from synthesis gas (syngas). The syngas may be produced through either gasification of coal or reforming of natural gas. The process of production of H{sub 2} and separated CO{sub 2} utilizes a dual-bed reactor and regenerator system. The reactor produces hydrogen and the regenerator produces separated CO{sub 2}. The dual-bed system can be operated under either a circulating fluidized-bed configuration or a cyclic fixed-bed configuration. Both configurations were evaluated in this project. The experimental effort was divided into lab-scale work at SIU and bench-scale work at GE-EER. Tests in a lab-scale fluidized bed system demonstrated the process for the conversion of syngas to high purity H{sub 2} and separated CO{sub 2}. The lab-scale system generated up to 95% H{sub 2} (on a dry basis). Extensive thermodynamic analysis of chemical reactions between the syngas and the fluidized solids determined an optimum range of temperature and pressure operation, where the extent of the undesirable reactions is minimum. The cycling of the process between hydrogen generation and oxygen regeneration has been demonstrated. The fluidized solids did not regenerate completely and the hydrogen purity in the reuse cycle dropped to 70% from 95% (on a dry basis). Changes in morphology and particle size may be the most dominant factor affecting the efficiency of the repeated cycling between hydrogen production and oxygen regeneration. The concept of simultaneous production of hydrogen and separated stream of CO{sub 2} was proved using a fixed bed 2 reactor system at GE-EER. This bench-scale cyclic fixed-bed reactor system designed to reform natural gas to syngas has been fabricated in another coordinated DOE project. This system was modified to reform natural gas to syngas and then convert syngas to H{sub 2} and separated CO{sub 2}. The system produced 85% hydrogen (dry basis).

Linda Denton; Hana Lorethova; Tomasz Wiltowski; Court Moorefield; Parag Kulkarni; Vladimir Zamansky; Ravi Kumar

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Heterogeneous catalytic process for alcohol fuels from syngas. Thirteenth quarterly technical progress report, January--March 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The principal objectives of this project are to discover and evaluate novel heterogeneous catalysts for conversion of syngas to oxygenates having use as fuel enhancers, to explore novel reactor and process concepts applicable in this process, and to develop the best total process for converting syngas to liquid fuels. The authors have tested a number of K/Pd promoted Zn/Mn/Cr spinel oxide catalysts within an experimental design to determine the effect of K, Pd, temperature and pressure on catalyst performance. High temperature operation (at 440 C) results in drastic loss in selectivities to total alcohols (down to 18--30%), and this obscures the effect of the catalyst formulation variables. It appears that at higher temperatures, the tube walls can also catalyze syngas conversion with a more hydrogen-rich syngas mix. Comparison with tests in a copper-lined tube with 1:1 syngas confirm this hypothesis. The design suggested that higher Pd loadings would be beneficial for isobutanol synthesis. The 6 wt% and a 9 wt% Pd formulation were tested with 1:2 syngas in copper-lined tubes. The 6 wt% Pd catalyst, at 440 C and 1,500 psi, produced 71 g/kg-hr of isobutanol with a methanol/isobutanol product mole ratio < 1. Under the same conditions, the 9 wt% Pd catalyst is again inferior, producing 52 g/kg-hr of isobutanol with a methanol/isobutanol product mole ratio = 1.7. Of particular interest here is that the 6 wt% Pd catalyst produces more higher alcohols than methanol on a molar basis at good rates using a syngas mix that could be derived from a Shell gasifier.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

106

FEEDSTOCK-FLEXIBLE REFORMER SYSTEM (FFRS) FOR SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL (SOFC)- QUALITY SYNGAS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory funded this research collaboration effort between NextEnergy and the University of Michigan, who successfully designed, built, and tested a reformer system, which produced highquality syngas for use in SOFC and other applications, and a novel reactor system, which allowed for facile illumination of photocatalysts. Carbon and raw biomass gasification, sulfur tolerance of non-Platinum Group Metals (PGM) based (Ni/CeZrO2) reforming catalysts, photocatalysis reactions based on TiO2, and mild pyrolysis of biomass in ionic liquids (ILs) were investigated at low and medium temperatures (primarily 450 to 850 C) in an attempt to retain some structural value of the starting biomass. Despite a wide range of processes and feedstock composition, a literature survey showed that, gasifier products had narrow variation in composition, a restriction used to develop operating schemes for syngas cleanup. Three distinct reaction conditions were investigated: equilibrium, autothermal reforming of hydrocarbons, and the addition of O2 and steam to match the final (C/H/O) composition. Initial results showed rapid and significant deactivation of Ni/CeZrO2 catalysts upon introduction of thiophene, but both stable and unstable performance in the presence of sulfur were obtained. The key linkage appeared to be the hydrodesulfurization activity of the Ni reforming catalysts. For feed stoichiometries where high H2 production was thermodynamically favored, stable, albeit lower, H2 and CO production were obtained; but lower thermodynamic H2 concentrations resulted in continued catalyst deactivation and eventual poisoning. High H2 levels resulted in thiophene converting to H2S and S surface desorption, leading to stable performance; low H2 levels resulted in unconverted S and loss in H2 and CO production, as well as loss in thiophene conversion. Bimetallic catalysts did not outperform Ni-only catalysts, and small Ni particles were found to have lower activities under S-free conditions, but did show less effect of S on performance, in this study. Imidazolium-based ILs, choline chloride compounds and low-melting eutectics of metal nitrates were evaluated, and it was found that, ILs have some capacity to dissolve cellulose and show thermal stability to temperatures where pyrolysis begins, have no vapor pressure, (simplifying product recoveries), and can dissolve ionic metal salts, allowing for the potential of catalytic reactions on breakdown intermediates. Clear evidence of photoactive commercial TiO2 was obtained, but in-house synthesis of photoactive TiO2 proved difficult, as did fixed-bed gasification, primarily due to the challenge of removing the condensable products from the reaction zone quickly enough to prevent additional reaction. Further investigation into additional non-PGM catalysts and ILs is recommended as a follow-up to this work.

Kelly Jezierski; Andrew Tadd; Johannes Schwank; Roland Kibler; David McLean; Mahesh Samineni; Ryan Smith; Sameer Parvathikar; Joe Mayne; Tom Westrich; Jerry Mader; F. Michael Faubert

2010-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

107

Biomass-derived Syngas Utilization for Fuels and Chemicals - Final Report  

SciTech Connect

Executive Summary The growing gap between petroleum production and demand, mounting environmental concerns, and increasing fuel prices have stimulated intense interest in research and development (R&D) of alternative fuels, both synthetic and bio-derived. Currently, the most technically defined thermochemical route for producing alternative fuels from lignocellulosic biomass involves gasification/reforming of biomass to produce syngas (carbon monoxide [CO] + hydrogen [H2]), followed by syngas cleaning, Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) or mixed alcohol synthesis, and some product upgrading via hydroprocessing or separation. A detailed techno-economic analysis of this type of process has recently been published [1] and it highlights the need for technical breakthroughs and technology demonstration for gas cleanup and fuel synthesis. The latter two technical barrier areas contribute 40% of the total thermochemical ethanol cost and 70% of the production cost, if feedstock costs are factored out. Developing and validating technologies that reduce the capital and operating costs of these unit operations will greatly reduce the risk for commercializing integrated biomass gasification/fuel synthesis processes for biofuel production. The objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate new catalysts and catalytic processes that can efficiently convert biomass-derived syngas into diesel fuel and C2-C4 alcohols. The goal is to improve the economics of the processes by improving the catalytic activity and product selectivity, which could lead to commercialization. The project was divided into 4 tasks: Task 1: Reactor Systems: Construction of three reactor systems was a project milestone. Construction of a fixed-bed microreactor (FBR), a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR), and a slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR) were completed to meet this milestone. Task 2: Iron Fischer-Tropsch (FT) Catalyst: An attrition resistant iron FT catalyst will be developed and tested. Task 3: Chemical Synthesis: Promising process routes will be identified for synthesis of selected chemicals from biomass-derived syngas. A project milestone was to select promising mixed alcohol catalysts and screen productivity and performance in a fixed bed micro-reactor using bottled syngas. This milestone was successfully completed in collaboration withour catalyst development partner. Task 4: Modeling, Engineering Evaluation, and Commercial Assessment: Mass and energy balances of conceptual commercial embodiment for FT and chemical synthesis were completed.

David C. Dayton

2010-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

108

Integrated Warm Gas Multicontaminant Cleanup Technologies for Coal-Derived Syngas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

By contrast, sorbent development for CO{sub 2} capture has focused on regenerable sorbents that capture the CO{sub 2} byproduct at higher CO{sub 2} pressures. Previous research on CO{sub 2} sorbents has demonstrated that the most challenging aspect of developing CO{sub 2} sorbents is regeneration. The research documented in this report investigates options to improve regeneration of the CO{sub 2} capture sorbents. This research includes effort on addressing existing regeneration limitations for sorbents previously developed and new approaches that focus initially on the regeneration performance of the sorbent.

Turk, Brian; Gupta, Raghubir; Sharma, Pradeepkumar; Albritton, Johnny; Jamal, Aqil

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

109

NETL: Gasification - Mitigation of Syngas Cooler Plugging and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the coal gasifier and the combustion turbine. Syngas coolers used in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plants offer high efficiency, but their reliability is...

110

Chemical Looping Gasification for Hydrogen Enhanced Syngas Production...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Looping Gasification for Hydrogen Enhanced Syngas Production with In-Situ CO2 Capture The Ohio State University (OSU) Project Number: FE0012136 Project Description The...

111

Hybrid Molten Bed Gasifier for High Hydrogen Syngas Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hybrid Molten Bed Gasifier for High Hydrogen (H2) Syngas Production Gas Technology Institute (GTI) Project Number: FE0012122 Project Description The research team will evaluate and...

112

Scale Formation of SOFC Metallic Interconnects in Coal Syngas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Planar solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) which can use coal syngas as the fuel and stainless steels in their construction have attracted considerable interesting, due (more)

Wang, Jingpeng

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

SYNGAS FROM BIOMASS GASIFICATION AS FUEL FOR GENERATOR.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The emergence of biomass based energy warrants the evaluation of syngas from biomass gasification as a fuel for personal power systems. The objectives of this (more)

Shah, Ajay

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

ITM Syngas: Ceramic Membrane Technology for Lower Cost Conversion...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ASU water use - Less Plot Area required - approx. 50% less - Fuel flexibility - natural gas, syngas, liquid fuels - Excellent integration capability with existing high...

115

Thermodynamic, Sulfide, Redox Potential, and pH Effects on Syngas Fermentation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Recently, work in ethanol production is exploring the fermentation of syngas (primarily CO, CO2, and H2) following gasification of cellulosic biomass. The syngas fermentation by (more)

Hu, Peng

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Autoignition of Hydrogen and Syngas with Air in a Turbulent Flow Reactor.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A good deal of attention has been given recently to combustion of syngas in gas turbines used for power generation. Syngas is a mixture of (more)

Elies, Daniel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Upper Los Alamos Canyon Cleanup  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Upper Los Alamos Canyon Cleanup Upper Los Alamos Canyon Cleanup Upper Los Alamos Canyon Cleanup The Upper Los Alamos Canyon Project involves cleaning up hazardous materials left over from some of the Laboratory's earliest activities. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Located along Los Alamos Canyon from 7th Street to the Pajarito Ski Hill, the Upper Los Alamos Canyon Project involves examining sites in present and former Laboratory technical areas to see if any further environmental cleanup actions are needed. If not, the Laboratory can apply to have these sites removed permanently from LANL's Hazardous Waste Permit, meaning that no further actions are needed at those sites. Among the 115 sites included in the Upper LA Canyon Project, 54 have been

118

Technology Development Advances EM Cleanup  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The unique nature of many of EM's remaining facilities will require a strong and responsive engineering and technology program to improve work and public safety, and reduce costs and environmental impacts while completing the cleanup program.

119

Superfund Cleanups and Infant Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We are the first to examine the effect of Superfund cleanups on infant health rather than focusing on proximity to a site. We study singleton births to mothers residing within 5km of a Superfund site between 1989 and 2003 ...

Currie, Janet

2011-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

120

U-PLANT GEOGRAPHIC ZONE CLEANUP PROTOTYPE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U Plant geographic zone (UPZ) occupies 0.83 square kilometers on the Hanford Site Central Plateau (200 Area). It encompasses the U Plant canyon (221-U Facility), ancillary facilities that supported the canyon, soil waste sites, and underground pipelines. The UPZ cleanup initiative coordinates the cleanup of the major facilities, ancillary facilities, waste sites, and contaminated pipelines (collectively identified as ''cleanup items'') within the geographic zone. The UPZ was selected as a geographic cleanup zone prototype for resolving regulatory, technical, and stakeholder issues and demonstrating cleanup methods for several reasons: most of the area is inactive, sufficient characterization information is available to support decisions, cleanup of the high-risk waste sites will help protect the groundwater, and the zone contains a representative cross-section of the types of cleanup actions that will be required in other geographic zones. The UPZ cleanup demonstrates the first of 22 integrated zone cleanup actions on the Hanford Site Central Plateau to address threats to groundwater, the environment, and human health. The UPZ contains more than 100 individual cleanup items. Cleanup actions in the zone will be undertaken using multiple regulatory processes and decision documents. Cleanup actions will include building demolition, waste site and pipeline excavation, and the construction of multiple, large engineered barriers. In some cases, different cleanup actions may be taken at item locations that are immediately adjacent to each other. The cleanup planning and field activities for each cleanup item must be undertaken in a coordinated and cohesive manner to ensure effective execution of the UPZ cleanup initiative. The UPZ zone cleanup implementation plan (ZCIP) was developed to address the need for a fundamental integration tool for UPZ cleanup. As UPZ cleanup planning and implementation moves forward, the ZCIP is intended to be a living document that will provide a focal point for integrating UPZ actions, including field cleanup activities, waste staging and handling, and post-cleanup monitoring and institutional controls.

ROMINE, L.D.

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature syngas cleanup" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Program on Technology Innovation: Impact of Syngas on F-Class Turbine Component Durability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project simulated the potential impact of operating the most advanced F-class components with a syngas fuel mixture. The durability analysis of an F-Class 1st stage rotating gas turbine bucket, which features the most recent cooling and coating strategies used to protect the design from overheating during operation, indicated there is a potential to increase the firing temperature limits applied in these simulations, without significantly affecting the present durability limits of the 1st stage bucket.

2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

122

Materials Testing in a Syngas Cooler of a Coal Gasification Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of an ongoing study of the corrosion of metallic alloys, several steels and protective coatings were exposed for up to 17,000 hrs in a syngas cooler of a coal-slurry-fed, entrained slagging gasifier. The materials suffered from corrosion during high-temperature service as well as during shutdown. Stainless steels containing molybdenum and low-alloy steels protected by a silicon-carbide refractory showed promising low corrosion rates, which decreased with increasing service time.

1996-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

123

Accelerating cleanup: Paths to closure  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the status of Environmental Management`s (EM`s) cleanup program and a direction forward to complete achievement of the 2006 vision. Achieving the 2006 vision results in significant benefits related to accomplishing EM program objectives. As DOE sites accelerate cleanup activities, risks to public health, the environment, and worker safety and health are all reduced. Finding more efficient ways to conduct work can result in making compliance with applicable environmental requirements easier to achieve. Finally, as cleanup activities at sites are completed, the EM program can focus attention and resources on the small number of sites with more complex cleanup challenges. Chapter 1 describes the process by which this report has been developed and what it hopes to accomplish, its relationship to the EM decision-making process, and a general background of the EM mission and program. Chapter 2 describes how the site-by-site projections were constructed, and summarizes, for each of DOE`s 11 Operations/Field Offices, the projected costs and schedules for completing the cleanup mission. Chapter 3 presents summaries of the detailed cleanup projections from three of the 11 Operations/Field Offices: Rocky Flats (Colorado), Richland (Washington), and Savannah River (South Carolina). The remaining eight Operations/Field Office summaries are in Appendix E. Chapter 4 reviews the cost drivers, budgetary constraints, and performance enhancements underlying the detailed analysis of the 353 projects that comprise EM`s accelerated cleanup and closure effort. Chapter 5 describes a management system to support the EM program. Chapter 6 provides responses to the general comments received on the February draft of this document.

NONE

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Particulate hot gas stream cleanup technical issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The analyses of hot gas stream cleanup particulate samples and descriptions of filter performance studied under this contract were designed to address problems with filter operation that have been linked to characteristics of the collected particulate matter. One objective of this work was to generate an interactive, computerized data bank of the key physical and chemical characteristics of ash and char collected from operating advanced particle filters and to relate these characteristics to the operation and performance of these filters. The interactive data bank summarizes analyses of over 160 ash and char samples from fifteen pressurized fluidized-bed combustion and gasification facilities utilizing high-temperature, high pressure barrier filters.

Pontius, D.H.; Snyder, T.R.

1999-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

125

Argonne National Lab Cleanup schedule  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Takes Steps to Complete Clean-Up of Argonne by 2003; Takes Steps to Complete Clean-Up of Argonne by 2003; Schedule for Shipping Waste to WIPP is 'Good News' for Illinois CARLSBAD, N.M., May 15, 2000 - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) reinforced plans to complete the clean-up of its Argonne National Laboratory-East site in Illinois by 2003 by accelerating its schedule for shipping transuranic waste to DOE's permanent disposal site in New Mexico. Previously, the shipments were not expected to begin before 2003. Under the accelerated schedule, shipments to DOE's Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico, are expected to begin in Spring 2001 and be completed by the end of the calendar year. Characterization of the waste currently stored at Argonne will begin this October. This agreement is a major step in honoring Argonne and DOE's commitment to the community to

126

Environmental Cleanup | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 19, 2010 August 19, 2010 Recovery Act Progress at Idaho National Lab North Wind Services will be constructing several new structures at the INL Radioactive Waste Management Complex -- facilities that will provide important protection from the elements and minimize the spread of contamination during buried waste excavation, retrieval and packaging operations. August 18, 2010 New Contract Helps Portsmouth GDP Cleanup To accelerate the Portsmouth GDP cleanup efforts left over from the Cold War, the Department of Energy made a huge step forward in our nuclear environmental cleanup efforts. August 13, 2010 Geek-Up: K East Reactor Demolition, Retrograde Melting and Cloud Pattern Tracking Recovery Act funds help clean up the Hanford site, retrograde melting (melting as something cools) and how open-cell clouds could help predict

127

Environmental Cleanup | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Cleanup Environmental Cleanup Environmental Cleanup August 23, 2013 EM Office of External Affairs Acting Communications Director Dave Borak talks with EM intern Valerie Edwards. | Photo courtesy of the Energy Department. Internships Help Future Energy Leaders Gain Hands-On Experience What's it like interning at the Energy Department? We interviewed one intern to find out. August 6, 2013 Oak Ridge National Laboratory The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is the nation's largest multi-program science and technology laboratory. ORNL's mission is to deliver scientific discoveries and technical breakthroughs that will accelerate the development and deployment of solutions in clean energy and global security. August 6, 2013 Y-12 National Security Complex

128

Protocol_for_Environmental_Management_Cleanup_Projects_(clean...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ProtocolforEnvironmentalManagementCleanupProjects(clean).pdf ProtocolforEnvironmentalManagementCleanupProjects(clean).pdf ProtocolforEnvironmentalManagementCleanup...

129

Accelerating Clean-up at Savannah River | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Accelerating Clean-up at Savannah River Accelerating Clean-up at Savannah River Accelerating Clean-up at Savannah River More Documents & Publications Integrated Project Team RM...

130

Optimum catalytic process for alcohol fuels from syngas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this contract are to discover and evaluate the catalytic properties of novel homogeneous, heterogeneous, or combination catalytic systems for the production of alcohol fuel extenders from syngas, to evaluate analytically and on the bench scale novel reactor concepts for use in converting syngas to liquid fuel products, and to develop on the bench scale the best combination of chemistry, reactor, and total process configuration to achieve the minimum product cost for conversion of syngas to liquid fuel products. Methanol production and heterogeneous catalysis utilizing transition elements supported on metal oxides with spinel structure are discussed. 12 figs., 16 tabs.

Not Available

1990-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

131

Methods and systems for producing syngas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and systems are provided for producing syngas utilizing heat from thermochemical conversion of a carbonaceous fuel to support decomposition of at least one of water and carbon dioxide using one or more solid-oxide electrolysis cells. Simultaneous decomposition of carbon dioxide and water or steam by one or more solid-oxide electrolysis cells may be employed to produce hydrogen and carbon monoxide. A portion of oxygen produced from at least one of water and carbon dioxide using one or more solid-oxide electrolysis cells is fed at a controlled flow rate in a gasifier or combustor to oxidize the carbonaceous fuel to control the carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide ratio produced.

Hawkes, Grant L; O& #x27; Brien, James E; Stoots, Carl M; Herring, J. Stephen; McKellar, Michael G; Wood, Richard A; Carrington, Robert A; Boardman, Richard D

2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

132

Superfund Cleanups and Infant Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We are the first to examine the effect of Superfund cleanups on infant health rather than focusing on proximity to a site. We study singleton births to mothers residing within 5km of a Superfund site between 1989-2003 in ...

Currie, Janet

133

Accelerating Clean-up at Savannah River | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Accelerating Clean-up at Savannah River Accelerating Clean-up at Savannah River Accelerating Clean-up at Savannah River More Documents & Publications Accelerating Clean-up at...

134

Pyrochlore-Based Catalysts for Syngas-Derived Alcohol Synthesis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pyrochlore-Based Catalysts for Syngas-Derived Pyrochlore-Based Catalysts for Syngas-Derived Alcohol Synthesis Contact NETL Technology Transfer Group techtransfer@netl.doe.gov PON-13-006 August 2013 Opportunity This technology provides an advantageous means to convert syngas into a class of chemicals known as higher oxygenates as well as other long-chain hydrocarbons. Research is currently active on this patent-pending technology "Method of CO and/or CO2 Hydrogenation Using Doped Mixed Metal Oxides." This technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. Significance * Improves the conversion of syngas from natural gas, coal, or biomass * Enhances the potential use of oxygenates as

135

NETL: Gasification Systems - A Technology to Mitigate Syngas...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the coal gasification process depositing on the inner walls of the tubes in the fire tube heat exchanger used in the syngas cooler. Current project plans include the development of...

136

NETL: Gasification - A Technology to Mitigate Syngas Cooler Fouling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the coal gasification process depositing on the inner walls of the tubes in the fire tube heat exchanger used in the syngas cooler. Current project plans include the development of...

137

Improved Gas Turbines for LBTU Syngas Fuel Operation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas turbine engines running on syngas can take advantage of that fuel's high mass flow per BTU. Optimizing performance while keeping all operating parameters within acceptable limits was the result of a G.E. project.

1997-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

138

Development of mixed-conducting ceramic membranes for converting methane to syngas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The abundantly available natural gas (mostly methane) discovered in remote areas has stimulated considerable research on upgrading this gas to high-value-added clean-burning fuels such as dimethyl ether and alcohols and to pollution-fighting additives. Of the two routes to convert methane to valuable products direct and indirect, the direct route involving partial oxidation of methane to syngas (CO + H{sub 2}) by air is preferred. Syngas is the key intermediate product used to form a variety of petrochemicals and transportation fuels. This paper is concerned with the selective transport of oxygen from air for converting methane to syngas by means of a mixed-conducting ceramic oxide membrane prepared from Sr-Fe-Co-O oxide. While both perovskite and nonperovskite type Sr-Fe-Co-O oxides permeate large amounts of oxygen when the membrane tube is subjected to oxygen pressure gradients, the work shows that the nonperovskite SrFeCo{sub 0.5}O{sub x} exhibits remarkable stability during oxygen permeation. More particularly, extruded and sintered tubes from SrFeCo{sub 0.5}O{sub x} have been evaluated in a reactor operating at {approx} 850 C for conversion of methane into syngas in the presence of a reforming catalyst. Methane conversion efficiencies of {approx} 99% were observed. In addition, oxygen permeability of SrFeCo{sub 0.5}O{sub x} was measured as a function of oxygen partial pressure gradient and temperature in a gas-tight electrochemical cell. Oxygen permeability has also been calculated from conductivity data and the results are compared and discussed.

Balachandran, U.; Maiya, P.S.; Ma, B.; Dusek, J.T.; Mieville, R.L.; Picciolo, J.J.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Advanced Acid Gas Separation Technology for Clean Power and Syngas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Syngas Processing Systems Syngas Processing Systems Advanced Acid Gas Separation Technology for Clean Power and Syngas Applications Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. Project Number: FE0013363 Project Description In this project, Air Products will operate a two-bed mobile system at the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) facility. A slipstream of authentic, high-hydrogen syngas based on low-rank coal will be evaluated as the feedstock. Testing will be conducted for approximately eight weeks, thereby providing far longer adsorbent exposure data than demonstrated to date. By utilizing real-world, high- hydrogen syngas, information necessary to understand the utility of the system for methanol production will be made available. In addition, Air Products will also operate a multi-bed PSA process development unit (PDU), located at its Trexlertown, PA headquarters, to evaluate the impact of incorporating pressure equalization steps in the process cycle. This testing will be conducted utilizing a sulfur-free, synthetic syngas, and will improve the reliability of the prediction of the system's operating performance at commercial scale.

140

Comprehensive Environmental Cleanup and Responsibility Act (Montana) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Comprehensive Environmental Cleanup and Responsibility Act Comprehensive Environmental Cleanup and Responsibility Act (Montana) Comprehensive Environmental Cleanup and Responsibility Act (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Institutional Fuel Distributor Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Montana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Montana Department of Environmental Quality The Comprehensive Environmental Cleanup and Responsibility Act contains general provisions (sections 705-729), along with the Voluntary Cleanup and Redevelopment Act (sections 730-738) and the Controlled Allocation of

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141

Physical gas stream cleanup: Technology status report  

SciTech Connect

This report is a summary of the status of particulate control technologies for use at high temperatures and high pressures. The technologies are being developed under the Physical Gas Stream Cleanup Program that is administered by the US Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center. The intended uses of the particulate control technologies are to protect components in advanced coal systems, such as integrated gasification combined cycles, pressurized fluidized-bed combustion combined cycles, gasification molten carbonate fuel cells, and direct coal-fueled turbines. The use of particulate control technologies for these advanced energy conversion systems requires separation and collection of particles at temperatures in excess of 1000/sup 0/F and at pressures in excess of 7 atmospheres. These temperature and pressure regimes represent a drastic departure from those of conventional technologies. The Physical Gas Stream Cleanup Program seeks to establish a technical and economic data base that will demonstrate the feasibility of high-temperature, high-pressure particulate control. Particulate control concepts and their corresponding research and development projects are described in this report. These projects include subpilot-scale tests of an electrostatic precipitator, a ceramic cross-flow filter, and a screenless granular-bed filter on a 30-inch diameter pressurized fluidized-bed combustor. Bench-scale tests will also be conducted using a ceramic cross-flow filter, a ceramic bag filter, and an electrostatic precipitator on a 6-inch diameter fluidized-bed gasifier. Additional research involves laboratory evaluation of acoustic agglomeration, turbulence characterization and suppression in cyclones and characterization of ceramic fabrics for bag filters. Each project and significant accomplishments in FY 85 are described. 14 refs., 25 figs., 5 tabs.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Environmental Cleanup | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 11, 2013 February 11, 2013 The Office of Nuclear Energy's mission is to advance nuclear power as a resource that can meet the United State's energy, environmental and national security needs. Office of Nuclear Energy Launches New Website A new website for NE means easier access to information and more up-to-date news for users. Check it out! January 30, 2013 Legacy Management Sites January 15, 2013 Secretary Chu, Governor Gregoire Issue Statement on Hanford Cleanup U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu and Governor Chris Gregoire issued a joint statement on the cleanup efforts underway at Hanford. December 21, 2012 The Rocky Flats Plant was first established in 1951 as a nuclear weapons manufacturing facility. Today, almost 4,000 acres make up the Rocky Flats National Wildlife Refuge. Located just 16 miles northwest of Denver, Colorado, the refuge provides a habitat for migratory birds and mammals. | Photo courtesy of the U.S. Department of Energy.

143

Accelerating cleanup: Paths to closure  

SciTech Connect

This document was previously referred to as the Draft 2006 Plan. As part of the DOE`s national strategy, the Richland Operations Office`s Paths to Closure summarizes an integrated path forward for environmental cleanup at the Hanford Site. The Hanford Site underwent a concerted effort between 1994 and 1996 to accelerate the cleanup of the Site. These efforts are reflected in the current Site Baseline. This document describes the current Site Baseline and suggests strategies for further improvements in scope, schedule and cost. The Environmental Management program decided to change the name of the draft strategy and the document describing it in response to a series of stakeholder concerns, including the practicality of achieving widespread cleanup by 2006. Also, EM was concerned that calling the document a plan could be misconstrued to be a proposal by DOE or a decision-making document. The change in name, however, does not diminish the 2006 vision. To that end, Paths to Closure retains a focus on 2006, which serves as a point in time around which objectives and goals are established.

Edwards, C.

1998-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

144

Accelerated cleanup risk reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is no proven technology for remediating contaminant plume source regions in a heterogeneous subsurface. This project is an interdisciplinary effort to develop the requisite new technologies so that will be rapidly accepted by the remediation community. Our technology focus is hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation (HPO) which is a novel in situ thermal technique. We have expanded this core technology to leverage the action of steam injection and place an in situ microbial filter downstream to intercept and destroy the accelerated movement of contaminated groundwater. Most contaminant plume source regions, including the chlorinated solvent plume at LLNL, are in subsurface media characterized by a wide range in hydraulic conductivity. At LLNL, the main conduits for contaminant transport are buried stream channels composed of gravels and sands; these have a hydraulic conductivity in the range of 10{sup -1} to 10{sup -2} cm/s. Clay and silt units with a hydraulic conductivity of 10{sup -1} to 10{sup -6} cm/s bound these buried channels; these are barriers to groundwater movement and contain the highest contaminant concentrations in the source region. New remediation technologies are required because the current ones preferentially access the high conductivity units. HPO is an innovative process for the in situ destruction of contaminants in the entire subsurface. It operates by the injection of steam. We have demonstrated in laboratory experiments that many contaminants rapidly oxidize to harmless compounds at temperatures easily achieved by injecting steam, provided sufficient dissolved oxygen is present. One important challenge in a heterogeneous source region is getting heat, contaminants, and an oxidizing agent in the same place at the same time. We have used the NUFT computer program to simulate the cyclic injection of steam into a contaminated aquifer for design of a field demonstration. We used an 8 hour, steam/oxygen injection cycle followed by a 56 hour relaxation period in which the well was `capped`. Our results show the formation of an inclined gas phase during injection and a fast collapse of the steam zone within an hour of terminating steam injection. The majority of destruction occurs during the collapse phase, when contaminant laden water is drawn back towards the well. Little to no noncondensible gasses are created in this process, removing any possibility of sparging processes interfering with contaminant destruction. Our models suggest that the thermal region should be as hot and as large as possible. To have HPO accepted, we need to demonstrate the in situ destruction of contaminants. This requires the ability to inexpensively sample at depth and under high temperatures. We proved the ability to implies monitoring points at depths exceeding 150 feet in highly heterogeneous soils by use of cone penetrometry. In addition, an extractive system has been developed for sampling fluids and measuring their chemistry under the range of extreme conditions expected. We conducted a collaborative field test of HPO at a Superfund site in southern California where the contaminant is mainly creosote and pentachlorophenol. Field results confirm the destruction of contaminants by HPO, validate our field design from simulations, demonstrate that accurate field measurements of the critical fluid parameters can be obtained using existing monitoring wells (and minimal capital cost) and yield reliable cost estimates for future commercial application. We also tested the in situ microbial filter technology as a means to intercept and destroy the accelerated flow of contaminants caused by the injection of steam. A series of laboratory and field tests revealed that the selected bacterial species effectively degrades trichloroethene in LLNL Groundwater and under LLNL site conditions. In addition, it was demonstrated that the bacteria effectively attach to the LLNL subsurface media. An in-well treatability study indicated that the bacteria initially degrade greater than 99% of the contaminant, to concentrations less than regulatory limit

Knapp, R.B.; Aines, R.M.; Blake, R.G.; Copeland, A.B.; Newmark, R.L.; Tompson, A.F.B.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Novel syngas-based process for methyl methacrylate  

SciTech Connect

Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Eastman Chemical Company, and Bechtel are developing a novel process for synthesis of methyl methacrylate (MMA) from coal-derived syngas, under a contract from the U.S. Department of Energy, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center. This three-step process consists of synthesis of a propionate, its condensation with formaldehyde, and esterification of resulting methacrylic acid (MAA) with methanol to produce MMA. Eastman has focused on the research on propionate synthesis step. The resultant Mo catalysts work efficiently at much less severe conditions (170{degrees}C and 30 atm) than the conventional Ni catalysts (270{degrees}C and 180 atm). Bechtel has performed an extensive cost analysis, which shows that Eastman`s propionate synthesis process is competitive with other technologies to produce the anhydride. In the second step, RTI and Eastman have developed active and stable V-SI-P and Ta metal oxide catalysts for condensation reactions of propionates with formaldehyde. RTI has demonstrated a novel correlation among the catalyst acid-base properties, condensation reaction yield, and long-term catalyst activity. Current research focuses on enhancing the condensation reaction yields, acid-base properties, in situ condensation in a high- temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) slurry reactor, and alternate formaldehyde feedstocks. Based on Eastman and RTI laboratory reactor operating data, a cost estimate is also being developed for the integrated process.

Gogate, M.R.; Spivey, J.J. [Research Triangle Institute, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Zoeller, J.R. [Eastman Chemical Co., Kingsport, TN (United States); Choi, G.N. [Bechtel, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States); Tam, S.S. [Bechtel, Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Tischer, R.E. [USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States); Srivastava, R.D. [Burns and Roe Services Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

146

ISOBUTANOL FROM SYNGAS IN A THREE PHASE SYSTEM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

With growing interest in oxygenates as octane booster for automotive fuels, various synthesis routes for these chemicals are being investigated. Among others, alternative routes to isobutene, the C4-components in MTBE-synthesis are under investigation. A promising path to isobutene is the heterogeneously catalyzed CO-hydrogenation to isobutanol with following dehydration (Fig. 1). As shown by thermodynamical studies, the heterogeneously catalyzed CO-hydrogenation to isobutanol is not expected to experience any thermodynamic constraints. However, heterogeneous hydrogenation of CO is a very exothermic process, a problem which can only be partly solved when being conducted in a plug flow reactor. When carried out in reaction vessels with moving catalyst bed (e.g. three phase stirred tank), heat transfer problems can be resolved, along with additional benefits connected with this reactor type. Several heterogeneous catalytic systems have been under investigation for their capability of isobutanol synthesis from syngas. Most promising catalysts for an active and selective isobutanol synthesis from CO are modified high temperature methanol catalysts.

Peter Tijrn

2002-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

147

Heterogeneous catalytic process for alcohol fuels from syngas. Twelfth quarterly technical progress report, October--December 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The principal objectives of this project are to discover and evaluate novel heterogeneous catalysts for conversion of syngas to oxygenates having use as fuel enhancers, to explore novel reactor and process concepts applicable in this process, and to develop the best total process for converting syngas to liquid fuels. The authors have prepared an improved version of 10-DAN-54, a Zn/Cr/Mn spinel oxide promoted with Pd and K. This material (16-DMM-68) has acceptable elemental analysis for the expected composition and possesses the desired high surface area of >80 m{sup 2}/g. The catalyst has extra added potassium vs. the standard catalyst, 10-DAN-54, as previous work had indicated that more potassium is required for optimal performance. In tests under standard conditions (400 C, 1,000 psi, GHSV = 12,000, syngas ratio = 1), this catalyst shows a selectivity to total alcohols of 84% and produces > 100 g/kg/hr of isobutanol with a MeOH/i-BuOH mole ratio = 4.7. The authors have tested 16-DMM-68 at temperatures above 400 C and pressures up to 1,500 psi (GHSV = 12,000, syngas ratio = 1). At 440 C and 1500 psi, this catalyst shows a selectivity to total alcohols of 64% and produces 179 g/kg/hr of isobutanol with a MeOH/i-BuOH mole ratio = 2.2. This is their best overall performance to data. The catalyst operates at syngas conversions up to 28% with good selectivity to total alcohols due to the extra added alkali. This performance can be compared with 10-DAN-54, which could only operate up to 20% conversion before hydrocarbon formation became a serious inefficiency.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

148

MODELING AND ANALYSIS OF CHEMILUMINESCENCE SENSING FOR SYNGAS, METHANE AND JET-A COMBUSTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MODELING AND ANALYSIS OF CHEMILUMINESCENCE SENSING FOR SYNGAS, METHANE AND JET-A COMBUSTION of Technology August 2008 #12;MODELING AND ANALYSIS OF CHEMILUMINESCENCE SENSING FOR SYNGAS, METHANE AND JET

Seitzman, Jerry M.

149

Getting reimbursed for UST cleanup  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To accelerate the pace of underground storage tank (UST) cleanup, many states now have programs that reimburse UST owners for money spent on various phases of soil and groundwater remediation. Many other states are enacting these programs. At their best, these programs have provided an incentive for those who operate USTs of all sizes to report and clean up contamination problems. Many states were surprised at the numbers of UST owners who came forward. This was certainly the case in Florida. In 1987, Florida's Department of Environmental Regulation (DER), in order to obtain rapid disclosure and meet remediation of leaking USTs, developed its Early Detection Incentive (EDI) program, which is now becoming a model for other states. Two important provisions of the program are amnesty from prosecution for not having previously reported leaking tanks and nearly full funding from the state for tank removal and cleanup. Prior to EDI, less than 1,000 petroleum USTs had been reported. As of May 1992, the number had reached 9,444 - about five times more sites than had been anticipated. While EDI has removed the threat of prosecution by the state for non-disclosure of leaking tanks, it does not absolve the responsible parties from potential liabilities due to underground plumes of contamination migrating off-site onto other properties. If the responsible parties wan to take charge of their own cleanup projects, they must advance the money for each stage of the operation. The cost of assessment and remediation of these sites can amount to several hundred thousand dollars. Consequently, swift negotiation in receiving state agency approval for various remediation phases, as well as site closure, can significantly shorten the amount of time it takes to get reimbursement from the state. Therefore, there is considerable incentive for the responsible parties to get their sites cleaned up as quickly as possible.

Dunn, B. (Groundwater Technology, Inc., Tampa, FL (United States))

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

HANFORD SITE CENTRAL PLATEAU CLEANUP COMPLETION STRATEGY  

SciTech Connect

Cleanup of the Hanford Site is a complex and challenging undertaking. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a comprehensive vision for completing Hanford's cleanup mission including transition to post-cleanup activities. This vision includes 3 principle components of cleanup: the {approx}200 square miles ofland adjacent to the Columbia River, known as the River Corridor; the 75 square miles of land in the center of the Hanford Site, where the majority of the reprocessing and waste management activities have occurred, known as the Central Plateau; and the stored reprocessing wastes in the Central Plateau, the Tank Wastes. Cleanup of the River Corridor is well underway and is progressing towards completion of most cleanup actions by 2015. Tank waste cleanup is progressing on a longer schedule due to the complexity of the mission, with construction of the largest nuclear construction project in the United States, the Waste Treatment Plant, over 50% complete. With the progress on the River Corridor and Tank Waste, it is time to place increased emphasis on moving forward with cleanup of the Central Plateau. Cleanup of the Hanford Site has been proceeding under a framework defmed in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement). In early 2009, the DOE, the State of Washington Department of Ecology, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency signed an Agreement in Principle in which the parties recognized the need to develop a more comprehensive strategy for cleanup of the Central Plateau. DOE agreed to develop a Central Plateau Cleanup Completion Strategy as a starting point for discussions. This DOE Strategy was the basis for negotiations between the Parties, discussions with the State of Oregon, the Hanford Advisory Board, and other Stakeholder groups (including open public meetings), and consultation with the Tribal Nations. The change packages to incorporate the Central Plateau Cleanup Completion Strategy were signed by the Parties on October 26,2010, and are now in the process of being implemented.

BERGMAN TB

2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

151

Monitoring Environmental Cleanup at Brookhaven National Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compensation, and Liability Act environmental cleanup activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory comply with the Record of Decision (ROD) for each project. (A ROD...

152

Peconic River Cleanup at Brookhaven National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a study of potential health impacts and developed various cleanup strategies. When the Lab and the Department of Energy (DOE) released a proposed plan for comment, the plan...

153

Method for regeneration and activity improvement of syngas conversion catalyst  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is disclosed for the treatment of single particle iron-containing syngas (synthes.s gas) conversion catalysts comprising iron, a crystalline acidic aluminosilicate zeolite having a silica to alumina ratio of at least 12, a pore size greater than about 5 Angstrom units and a constraint index of about 1-12 and a matrix. The catalyst does not contain promoters and the treatment is applicable to either the regeneration of said spent single particle iron-containing catalyst or for the initial activation of fresh catalyst. The treatment involves air oxidation, hydrogen reduction, followed by a second air oxidation and contact of the iron-containing single particle catalyst with syngas prior to its use for the catalytic conversion of said syngas. The single particle iron-containing catalysts are prepared from a water insoluble organic iron compound.

Lucki, Stanley J. (Runnemede, NJ); Brennan, James A. (Cherry Hill, NJ)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Dense ceramic membranes for converting methane to syngas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Dense mixed-oxide ceramics capable of conducting both electrons and oxygen ions are promising materials for partial oxygenation of methane to syngas. We are particularly interested in an oxide based on the Sr-Fe-Co-O system. Dense ceramic membrane tubes have been fabricated by a plastic extrusion technique. The sintered tubes were then used to selectively transport oxygen from air through the membrane to make syngas without the use of external electrodes. The sintered tubes have operated for >1000 h, and methane conversion efficiencies of >98% have been observed. Mechanical properties, structural integrity of the tubes during reactor operation, results of methane conversion, selectivity of methane conversion products, oxygen permeation, and fabrication of multichannel configurations for large-scale production of syngas will be presented.

Balachandran, U.; Dusek, J.T.; Picciolo, J.J.; Ma, B.; Maiya, P.S.; Mieville, R.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Kleefisch, M.S.; Udovich, C.A. [Amoco Exploration/Production, Naperville, IL (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

ITM Syngas and ITM H2: Engineering Development of Ceramic Membrane Reactor Systems for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ITM Syngas and ITM H2: Engineering Development of Ceramic Membrane Reactor Systems for Converting (U.S. DOE) and other members of the ITM Syngas/ITM H2 Team, is developing Ion Transport Membrane (ITM-scale centralized hydrogen production facilities with CO2 capture. The major goals of the ITM Syngas and ITM H2

156

Bayesian methods for the quantification of uncertainties in syngas chemistry models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bayesian methods for the quantification of uncertainties in syngas chemistry models Kalen Braman, Todd Oliver and Venkat Raman, The University of Texas, Austin, Texas, 78712 Syngas chemistry modeling is an integral step toward the development of safe and ef- ficient syngas combustors. Although substantial effort

Raman, Venkat

157

Syngas Production from Propane using Atmospheric Non-Thermal Plasma F. Ouni, A. Khacef*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Syngas Production from Propane using Atmospheric Non-Thermal Plasma F. Ouni, A. Khacef* and J. M applications (1, 2) . Synthesis gas or syngas (mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide) are used as a major. The conventional reformers allowing syngas production are based on steam reforming of hydrocarbons (3) following

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

158

Zero Emissions Coal Syngas Oxygen Turbo Machinery  

SciTech Connect

Siemens Energy, Inc. (formerly Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation) worked with Clean Energy Systems and Florida Turbine Technologies to demonstrate the commercial feasibility of advanced turbines for oxy-fuel based power systems that discharge negligible CO{sub 2} into the atmosphere. The approach builds upon ultra supercritical steam turbine and advanced gas turbine technology with the goal of attaining plant efficiencies above 50% in the 2015 timeframe. Conceptual designs were developed for baseline, near term, and long term oxy-fuel turbine cycles, representing commercial introductions of increasingly advanced thermal conditions and increasing exposure to steam-CO{sub 2} mixtures. An economic analysis and market demand study was performed by Science Applications International Corp. (SAIC), and indicated that long-term oxy-fuel turbine cycles start to look attractive in 2025 when the CO{sub 2} tax is assumed to reach $40/ ton, and by 2030 it has a clear advantage over both IGCC with sequestration and pulverized coal with sequestration. A separate risk analysis of the oxy-fuel combustor, HP turbine, re-heater, and IP turbine of the long-term cycle identified and categorized risks and proposed mitigation measures. In 2007 the program began to focus on a potential oxy-fuel turbine power generation demonstration project in the 2012 -13 time period while still maintaining a link to the requirements of the long-term oxy-syngas cycle. The SGT-900 turbine was identified as the best fit for modification into an intermediate pressure turbine (IPT) for this application. The base metals, bond coats, thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), and rotor materials used in the SGT-900 were tested for their ability to operate in the steam- CO{sub 2} environment of the oxy-fuel OFT-900. Test results indicated that these same materials would operate satisfactorily, and the plan, is to use SGT-900materials for the OFT-900. Follow-on programs for corrosion testing and evaluation of crack growth rates in oxy-fuel environments have been proposed to build on these results and provide quantifiable assessments of the effects of oxy-fuel environments on the service lives of turbine components.

Dennis Horazak

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

159

Synthesis of Methyl Methacrylate From Coal-Derived Syngas  

SciTech Connect

Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Eastman Chemical Company, and Bechtel collectively are developing a novel three-step process for the synthesis of methyl methacrylate (MMA) from coal-derived syngas that consists of the steps of synthesis of a propionate, its condensation with formaldehyde to form methacrylic acid (MAA), and esterification of MAA with methanol to produce MMA. RTI has completed the research on the three-step methanol-based route to MMA. Under an extension to the original contract, RTI is currently evaluating a new DME-based process for MMA. The key research need for DME route is to develop catalysts for DME partial oxidation reactions and DME condensation reactions. Over the last quarter(April-June, 1998), RTI has modified the reactor system including a new preheater and new temperature settings for the preheater. Continuous condensation of formaldehyde with propionic acid were carried out over 10% Nb O /SiO at 300C without 2 5 2 interruption. Five activity and four regeneration cycles have been completed without plugging or material balance problems. The results show that 10% Nb O /SiO deactivates slowly with time 2 5 2 but can be regenerated, at least four times, to 100% of its original activity with 2% O in nitrogen 2 at 400C. The cycles continue with consistent 90-95% of carbon balance. The reaction is scheduled to complete with 6 activity cycles and 5 regenerations. Used catalysts will be analyzed with TGA and XPS to determine bulk and surface coke content and coke properties. RTI will start the investigation of effects of propionic acid/formaldehyde ratio on reaction activity and product selectivity over 20% Nb O /SiO catalysts.

Ben W.-L. Jang; Gerald N. Choi; James J. Spivey; Jospeh R. Zoeller; Richard D. Colberg; Samuel S. Tam

1998-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

160

A Novel Sorbent-Based Process for High Temperature Trace Metals...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sorbent-Based Process for High Temperature Trace Metals Removal from Coal-Derived Syngas Description Gasification converts coal and other heavy feedstocks into synthesis gas...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature syngas cleanup" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Catalytic conversion of syngas into C2 oxygenates over Rh-based catalysts--Effect of carbon supports  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Catalytic conversion of syngas into C2 oxygenates over Rh-based catalysts--Effect of carbon synthesis other than grain fermentation, e.g. from syngas, because syngas can be conveniently manufactured we first undertake a brief overview of the catalyst development for syngas conversion to C2

Bao, Xinhe

162

Collusion Through Insurance: Sharing the Costs of Oil Spill Cleanups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Insurance: Sharing the Costs of Oil Spill Cleanups." EddieInsurance: Sharing the Costs of Oil Spill Cleanups EddieINSURANCE: SHARING THE COSTS OF OIL SPILL CLEANUPS Eddie

Dekel, Eddie; Scothmer, Suzanne

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Accelerating Clean-up at Savannah River | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Accelerating Clean-up at Savannah River Accelerating Clean-up at Savannah River Accelerating Clean-up at Savannah River More Documents & Publications Project NameDescription Slide...

164

Environmental Cleanup | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 28, 2010 October 28, 2010 Obama Administration Hosts Great Lakes Offshore Wind Workshop in Chicago with Great Lakes Wind Collaborative WASHINGTON - The White House Council on Environmental Quality and the U.S. Department of Energy hosted a workshop with the Great Lakes Wind Collaborative in Chicago on October 26 - 27, 2010, focused on the siting of offshore wind power in the Great Lakes. The two day workshop brought together wind developers, Federal and state regulators, environmental advocates, and other regional stakeholders to discuss methods for ensuring greater clarity, certainty and coordination of Federal and state decision-making for offshore wind development in the Great Lakes. October 6, 2010 Agreement on New Commitments for Hanford Tank Waste Cleanup Sent to Federal

165

Environmental Cleanup | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 28, 2009 July 28, 2009 800 to 1000 New Jobs Coming to Piketon Department of Energy to Accelerate Cleanup Work While USEC Further Develops ACP Technology April 22, 2009 Op-Ed by Secretary of Energy Steven Chu and Secretary of Labor Hilda Solis: Building the American Clean Energy Economy To commemorate Earth Day, the op-ed below on green jobs and energy independence by Secretaries Steven Chu and Hilda Solis ran in the following papers yesterday and today: Austin American-Statesman Buffalo News Denver Post Montgomery Advertiser Omaha World Herald Pittsburgh Post-Gazette April 22, 2009 US Department of Energy Promotes Special Earth Week Feature on Energy.gov Simple Steps Will Help Consumers Save Money -- and the Planet March 27, 2009 U.S. and Portugal Sign Agreement for Climate Research Collaboration

166

System issues and tradeoffs associated with syngas production and combustion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the basic technology of coal gasification for the production of syngas and the utilization of that syngas in power generation. The common gasifier types, fixed/moving bed, fluidized bed, entrained flow, and transport, are described, and accompanying typical product syngas compositions are shown for different coal ranks. Substantial variation in product gas composition is observed with changes in gasifier and coal feed type. Fuel contaminants such as sulfur, nitrogen, ash, as well as heavy metals such as mercury, arsenic, and selenium, can be removed to protect the environment and downstream processes. A variety of methods for syngas utilization for power production are discussed, including both present (gas turbine and internal combustion engines) and future technologies, including oxy-fuel, chemical looping, fuel cells, and hybrids. Goals to improve system efficiencies, further reduce NOx emissions, and provide options for CO2 sequestration require advancements in many aspects of IGCC plants, including the combustion system. Areas for improvements in combustion technology that could minimize these tradeoffs between cost, complexity, and performance are discussed.

Casleton, K.H.; Richards, G.A.; Breault, R.W.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Study on Catalytic Experiments of Methanol Synthesis from Cornstalk Syngas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass energy is a renewable and potential resource. In order to research the conversion of cornstalk biomass (the agricultural residues) into the fuel methanol and the effective utilization of biomass energy, the low-heat-value cornstalk gas was produced ... Keywords: Cornstalk, Syngas, Catalyst, Methanol, Synthesis

Zhu Lingfeng; Gao Ruqin; Liu Lili; Wang Yan; Wang Yangyang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

NOVEL SLURRY PHASE DIESEL CATALYSTS FOR COAL-DERIVED SYNGAS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes research conducted to support the DOE program in novel slurry phase catalysts for converting coal-derived synthesis gas to diesel fuels. The primary objective of this research program is to develop attrition resistant catalysts that exhibit high activities for conversion of coal-derived syngas.

Dr. Dragomir B. Bukur; Dr. Ketil Hanssen; Alec Klinghoffer; Dr. Lech Nowicki; Patricia O'Dowd; Dr. Hien Pham; Jian Xu

2001-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

169

Storing syngas lowers the carbon price for profitable coal gasification  

SciTech Connect

Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) electric power generation systems with carbon capture and sequestration have desirable environmental qualities but are not profitable when the carbon dioxide price is less than approximately $50 per metric ton. We examine whether an IGCC facility that operates its gasifier continuously but stores the syngas and produces electricity only when daily prices are high may be profitable at significantly lower CO{sub 2} prices. Using a probabilistic analysis, we have calculated the plant-level return on investment (ROI) and the value of syngas storage for IGCC facilities located in the U.S. Midwest using a range of storage configurations. Adding a second turbine to use the stored syngas to generate electricity at peak hours and implementing 12 h of above-ground high-pressure syngas storage significantly increases the ROI and net present value. Storage lowers the carbon price at which IGCC enters the U.S. generation mix by approximately 25%. 36 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Adam Newcomer; Jay Apt [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (USA). Carnegie Mellon Electricity Industry Center

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

170

Direct synthesis of dimethyl ether (DME) from syngas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have developed appropriate and excellent catalysts for direct DME synthesis. The catalysts, Cu-Zn/Al2O3 catalysts prepared by the sol-gel method, produce DME with high DME activity and high DME selectivity under milder reaction ... Keywords: DME, alumina, catalyst, clean fuel, copper, dimethyl ether, direct synthesis, hydrogen, sol-gel method, syngas

Kaoru Takeishi; Yoshimi Akaike

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

The Equilibrium Compositions of Methanol Synthesis System by Cornstalk Syngas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methanol can be used as a promising alternative for conventional gasoline and Diesel fuel. It is necessary to decompose biomass such as cornstalks in order to produce methanol which is a raw material from agricultural residues. A promising route for processing cornstalks is firstly to gasify cornstalks with thermo?chemical method to prepare the syngas

Ling?feng Zhu; Qing?ling Zhao; Yang?yang Wang; Jing Chen; Le Zhang; Run?tao Zhang; Li?li Liu; Zhao?yue Zhang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

HANFORD SITE RIVER CORRIDOR CLEANUP  

SciTech Connect

In 2005, the US Department of Energy (DOE) launched the third generation of closure contracts, including the River Corridor Closure (RCC) Contract at Hanford. Over the past decade, significant progress has been made on cleaning up the river shore that bordes Hanford. However, the most important cleanup challenges lie ahead. In March 2005, DOE awarded the Hanford River Corridor Closure Contract to Washington Closure Hanford (WCH), a limited liability company owned by Washington Group International, Bechtel National and CH2M HILL. It is a single-purpose company whose goal is to safely and efficiently accelerate cleanup in the 544 km{sup 2} Hanford river corridor and reduce or eliminate future obligations to DOE for maintaining long-term stewardship over the site. The RCC Contract is a cost-plus-incentive-fee closure contract, which incentivizes the contractor to reduce cost and accelerate the schedule. At $1.9 billion and seven years, WCH has accelerated cleaning up Hanford's river corridor significantly compared to the $3.2 billion and 10 years originally estimated by the US Army Corps of Engineers. Predictable funding is one of the key features of the new contract, with funding set by contract at $183 million in fiscal year (FY) 2006 and peaking at $387 million in FY2012. Another feature of the contract allows for Washington Closure to perform up to 40% of the value of the contract and subcontract the balance. One of the major challenges in the next few years will be to identify and qualify sufficient subcontractors to meet the goal.

BAZZELL, K.D.

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

DOE Awards Small Business Contract to Support Cleanup of New...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to Support Cleanup of New York West Valley Demonstration Project DOE Awards Small Business Contract to Support Cleanup of New York West Valley Demonstration Project March 1, 2013 -...

174

Recovery Act Workers Complete Environmental Cleanup of Coal Ash...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Complete Environmental Cleanup of Coal Ash Basin Recovery Act Workers Complete Environmental Cleanup of Coal Ash Basin The Savannah River Site (SRS) recently cleaned up a 17-acre...

175

Site Transition Process upon Completion of the Cleanup Mission...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Process upon Completion of the Cleanup Mission: Fact Sheet (September 2013) Site Transition Process upon Completion of the Cleanup Mission: Fact Sheet (September 2013) DOE's...

176

Recovery Act Workers Complete Environmental Cleanup of Coal Ash...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Workers Complete Environmental Cleanup of Coal Ash Basin Recovery Act Workers Complete Environmental Cleanup of Coal Ash Basin The Savannah River Site (SRS) recently cleaned up a...

177

Workers at Hanford Site Achieve Recovery Act Legacy Cleanup Goals...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

at Hanford Site Achieve Recovery Act Legacy Cleanup Goals Ahead of Schedule Workers at Hanford Site Achieve Recovery Act Legacy Cleanup Goals Ahead of Schedule The Hanford Site...

178

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1867: Draft Environmental Assessment RTI International Scale-Up of High-Temperature Syngas Cleanup and Carbon Capture and Sequestration Technologies, Polk County, Florida...

179

CX-008281: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Determination CX-008281: Categorical Exclusion Determination High Temperature Syngas Cleanup Technology Scale-Up Demonstration Project CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 05012012...

180

SYNTHESIS OF METHYL METHACRYLATE FROM COAL-DERIVED SYNGAS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Eastman Chemical Company, and Bechtel collectively are developing a novel three-step process for the synthesis of methyl methacrylate (MMA) from coal-derived syngas that consists of the steps of synthesis of a propionate, its condensation with formaldehyde to form methacrylic acid (MAA), and esterification of MAA with methanol to produce MMA. RTI has completed the research on the three-step methanol-based route to MMA. Under an extension to the original contract, RTI is currently evaluating a new DME-based process for MMA. The key research need for DME route is to develop catalysts for DME partial oxidation reactions and DME condensation reactions. Over the last quarter (July-September, 1998), the project team has completed the continuous condensation of formaldehyde with propionic acid over 10% Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}/SiO{sub 2} at 300 C. Six activity and five regeneration cycles have been completed. The results show that 10% Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}/SiO{sub 2} deactivates slowly with time but can be regenerated to its original activity with 2% O{sub 2} in nitrogen over night at 400 C. We have investigated the effects of regeneration, propionic acid/formaldehyde ratio (PA/HCHO = 4.5/1 to 1.5/1) and reaction temperature(280-300 C) on reaction activity and product selectivity over 20% Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}/SiO{sub 2} catalysts. The regeneration effect on 20% Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}/SiO{sub 2} is similar to the effect on 10% Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}/SiO{sub 2}. The regeneration can bring the deactivated catalyst to its original activity. However, the selectivity to MAA decreases with regeneration while the selectivity to DEK and CO{sub 2} increases. When PA/HCHO ratio is decreased from 4.5/1 to 2.25/1 then to 1.5/1 at 300 C the MAA yield decreases but the MAA selectivity first increases then decreases. Decreasing the reaction temperature from 300 C to 280 C decreases the MAA yield from 39.5% to 30.7% but increases the MAA selectivity from 73.7% to 82.2%. The results indicate that both temperature and PA/HCHO ratio are important parameters to optimize the economic of the condensation between propionic acid and formaldehyde.

BEN W.-L. JANG; GERALD N. CHOI; JAMES J. SPIVEY; JOSPEH R. ZOELLER; RICHARD D. COLBERG

1998-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature syngas cleanup" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Researching Fe catalyst suitable for CO{sub 2}-containing syngas for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis is a technology to produce liquid fuels from coal, natural gas, and biomass as an alternate to crude oil. However, the quantity of emitted CO{sub 2} from the FT process consisting of syngas preparation, FT synthesis, and product workup is one of the serious disadvantages of FT process. The conversion of CO{sub 2} into hydrocarbons is one of the promising methods to decrease CO{sub 2} emissions. Effects of promoter addition on the activity of precipitated Fe catalysts for the conversion of CO{sub 2} were studied using pure CO{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}-containing syngas feeds. The results suggested that CO{sub 2} can be activated by suitable promoter(s) for hydrocarbon synthesis at low temperature. Low K content is suitable for increasing hydrocarbon yield. The Fe catalysts promoted by equal Zn and Cu have higher CO and CO{sub 2} conversion and decreased CH{sub 4} selectivity. 36 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

Wensheng Ning; Naoto Koizumi; Muneyoshi Yamada [Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou (China). College of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

182

Bench-Scale Electrochemical System for Generation of CO and Syn-Gas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A bench-scale system for the electrochemical reduction of CO2 has been developed which produces CO and H2 (syn-gas) mixtures. The system is equipped with a gas-diffusion electrode which partially alleviates some of the mass-transport issues associated with CO2 delivery to the cathode. The positive effect of temperature was discovered where at 70C a reduction in cell voltage of 1.57 V (compared to ambient) was observed at 70 mA cm-2. Controlling the flow of CO2 made it possible to maintain set H2:CO ratios with CO accounting for 25-90% of the product and H2 accounting for 10-75%. The cell, after an initial stabilization period of 40 min, displays reproducible, stable behavior. The current cell design brings the current densities for CO2 reduction closer to what is currently achieved in industrial alkaline electrolysis cells. This report discusses the electrolyte, electrode materials and variables which have been found to be significant in the production of CO and syn-gas mixtures.

Eric J. Dufek; Tedd E. Lister; Michael E. McIlwain

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Lab completes record year for environmental cleanup  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Record year for environmental cleanup Record year for environmental cleanup Lab completes record year for environmental cleanup Personnel conducted more field investigations and cleanup campaigns than ever and completed a record number of Lab shipments to WIPP. December 16, 2010 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

184

Environmental Cleanup Reports | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Cleanup Reports Environmental Cleanup Reports Environmental Cleanup Reports September 8, 2010 Audit Report: OAS-L-10-10 The Audit of Precious Metals at NNSA Sites August 12, 2010 Audit Letter Report: OAS-RA-L-10-05 Decommissioning and Demolition Activities at Office of Science Sites May 25, 2010 Audit Report: OAS-RA-10-10 Waste Processing and Recovery Act Acceleration Efforts for Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste at the Hanford Site May 3, 2010 Audit Report: OAS-L-10-04 The Interim Treatment of Salt Waste at the Savannah River Site April 23, 2010 Audit Letter Report: OAS-RA-L-10-03 Audit of Moab Mill Tailings Cleanup Project April 9, 2010 Audit Report: OAS-RA-10-07 Management Alert on Environmental Management's Select Strategy for Disposition of Savannah River Site Depleted Uranium Oxides

185

Microsoft Word - California_cleanup.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Completes California Sites Cleanup CARLSBAD, N.M., June 14, 2010 - The U.S. Department of Energy's Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) has successfully completed its campaign to clean up...

186

Lab completes first Recovery Act cleanup project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

facility began in May and proceeded quickly. As part of the cleanup, a nearly new backup diesel generator was removed from the building and later donated to a nonprofit hospital...

187

2013 Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus Briefings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus serves as a way to brief members of Congress and their staff on EM headquarters and site activities, including budget, safety and project progress.

188

SNG or syn-gas from wet solid waste and low grade fuels  

SciTech Connect

The substitute natural gas (SNG) or a synthesis gas (syngas) is prepared by partly oxidizing wastes and low-grade fuels (peat, lignite, many forms of biomass) containing 0.5-30 times as much water as the dry solids with O or air at 240-300/sup 0/C and 70-100 atmospheres. Sulfur in high S coal is oxidized selectively to SO/sub 4//sup -2/, and the heat to bring the combustible to the necessary temperature is supplied by burning part of the combustible itself. The residual solids (now 70-95% of the original fuel) are mechanically separated from all but 0.5-2 lb water. These solids come from the dewatering unit at a high pressure and may be passed, without loss of pressure or temperature to be gasified in conventional processes and gasifiers by partial oxidation.

Othmer, D.F.

1981-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

189

HARVESTING EMSP RESEARCH RESULTS FOR WASTE CLEANUP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The extent of environmental contamination created by the nuclear weapons legacy combined with expensive, ineffective waste cleanup strategies at many U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites prompted Congress to pass the FY96 Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act, which directed the DOE to: ''provide sufficient attention and resources to longer-term basic science research, which needs to be done to ultimately reduce cleanup costs'', ''develop a program that takes advantage of laboratory and university expertise, and'' ''seek new and innovative cleanup methods to replace current conventional approaches which are often costly and ineffective.'' In response, the DOE initiated the Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP)-a targeted, long-term research program intended to produce solutions to DOE's most pressing environmental problems. EMSP funds basic research to lower cleanup cost and reduce risk to workers, the public, and the environment; direct the nation's scientific infrastructure towards cleanup of contaminated waste sites; and bridge the gap between fundamental research and technology development activities. EMSP research projects are competitively awarded based on the project's scientific, merit coupled with relevance to addressing DOE site needs. This paper describes selected EMSP research projects with long, mid, and short-term deployment potential and discusses the impacts, focus, and results of the research. Results of EMSP research are intended to accelerate cleanup schedules, reduce cost or risk for current baselines, provide alternatives for contingency planning, or provide solutions to problems where no solutions exist.

Guillen, Donna Post; Nielson, R. Bruce; Phillips, Ann Marie; Lebow, Scott

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

190

Avestar® - Syngas-Fired Combined Cycle Dynamic Simulator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Syngas-Fired Combined Cycle Dynamic Simulator Syngas-Fired Combined Cycle Dynamic Simulator The AVESTAR® center offers courses using the Combined Cycle Simulator, focusing on the power generation process after gasification. This simulator is well-suited for concentrated training on operation and control of the gas and steam turbines; condensate, feed water, and circulating water systems; heat recovery steam generator; and selective catalytic reduction (SCR) unit. Combined cycle simulator startup operations include bringing up the gas turbine to rated speed on natural gas and then switching over to the firing of synthesis gas. Key capabilities of the Combined Cycle Simulator include: Combined Cycle Simulator Operator training station HMI display for overview of Gas Turbine - Train A Normal base load operation

191

Atmospheric Pressure Low Current Plasma for Syngas Production from Alcohol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Atmospheric pressure low current arc discharge between graphite electrodes with conical geometry in liquid ethanol/water mixture was investigated. Syngas production was demonstrated over large experimental conditions. In this paper we focus on discharge aspects. It is shown from pictures that the behavior of low current arc discharge with consumable electrodes represents non-stationary plasma. The energetic properties of plasmas can be used to carry out many applications, particularly in discharge based systems. Recently, research interest focuses on the Non Thermal Plasma (NTP) treatment of hydrocarbons, alcohol, or biomass aimed to improve the yield of synthetic gas (syngas: H2+CO) production at low cost [1, 4]. Experiments were performed on a plasma reactor consisting of two graphite electrodes with conical shape

Ahmed Khacef; Khadija Arabi; Olivier Aubry; Jean Marie Cormier

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Long-Term Demonstration of Hydrogen Production from Coal at Elevated Temperatures Year 6 - Activity 1.12 - Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has continued the work of the National Center for Hydrogen Technology (NCHT) Program Year 6 Task 1.12 project to expose hydrogen separation membranes to coal-derived syngas. In this follow-on project, the EERC has exposed two membranes to coal-derived syngas produced in the pilot-scale transport reactor development unit (TRDU). Western Research Institute (WRI), with funding from the State of Wyoming Clean Coal Technology Program and the North Dakota Industrial Commission, contracted with the EERC to conduct testing of WRIs coal-upgrading/gasification technology for subbituminous and lignite coals in the EERCs TRDU. This gasifier fires nominally 200500 lb/hour of fuel and is the pilot-scale version of the full-scale gasifier currently being constructed in Kemper County, Mississippi. A slipstream of the syngas was used to demonstrate warm-gas cleanup and hydrogen separation using membrane technology. Two membranes were exposed to coal-derived syngas, and the impact of coal-derived impurities was evaluated. This report summarizes the performance of WRIs patent-pending coalupgrading/ gasification technology in the EERCs TRDU and presents the results of the warm-gas cleanup and hydrogen separation tests. Overall, the WRI coal-upgrading/gasification technology was shown to produce a syngas significantly lower in CO2 content and significantly higher in CO content than syngas produced from the raw fuels. Warm-gas cleanup technologies were shown to be capable of reducing sulfur in the syngas to 1 ppm. Each of the membranes tested was able to produce at least 2 lb/day of hydrogen from coal-derived syngas.

Stanislowski, Joshua; Tolbert, Scott; Curran, Tyler; Swanson, Michael

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

193

Noise in non?premixed turbulent syngas flames  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A turbulentsyngasflame may generateacoustic noise of high acoustic intensity in a combustion chamber. This may lead to the failure of construction components in a gas turbine engine in periods of the order of 1100 hours. The research as described in the literature has almost exclusively been performed on the generation of noise in premixed methane or propane flames.Syngas fuel is a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide

Sikke A. Klein; Jim B. W. Kok

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Co-Production of Pure Hydrogen and Electricity from Coal Syngas ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Co-Production of Pure Hydrogen and Electricity from Coal Syngas via the Steam-Iron Process Using Promoted Iron-Based Catalysts Sub-

195

The Performance of Planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cells using Hydrogen-depleted Coal Syngas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Since solid oxide fuel cells can operate on fuel containing both hydrogen and carbon monoxide, it may prove possible to remove hydrogen from syngas streams (more)

Burnette, David D.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

The Effect of HCl in Syngas on Ni-YSZ Anode-Supported Solid ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

However, trace impurities, such as PH3 and HCl in coal-derived syngas can cause degradation in cell performance. In this research, SOFCs were exposed to a...

197

Effect of Impurities in Coal-Derived Syngas on Hydrogen Separation ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy has established a set of performance targets for hydrogen separation membranes for the syngas applications in its Hydrogen...

198

Studio sull'utilizzo di syngas come combustibile in cicli combinati.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Nel presente lavoro si valutata la possibilit di utilizzare combustibili gassosi (syngas) derivanti dalla gassificazione del carbone o delle biomasse negli impianti a ciclo (more)

D'Erasmo, Daniele

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Numerical Analysis of Use of Syngas for Combustion Systems and in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??As the world energy demand and environmental concern continue to grow, there is increasing interest in developing renewable and cleaner energy sources. Syngas is a (more)

Cipriani, Francesco

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Syngas, mixed alcohol and diesel synthesis from forest residues via gasification - an economic analysis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Liquid transportation fuels can be produced by gasification of carbon containing biomass to syngas( a gaseous mixture of CO and H2) with subsequent conversion of (more)

Koch, David

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature syngas cleanup" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Gas Shift & Hydrogen Production Slag High-temperatureWarm Sygas Cleanup & DOE R&D Other DOE R&D Supporting Syngas Cleanup Technology Emissions Advantages of Gasification...

202

Novel polymer membrane process for pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture from coal-fired syngas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This final report describes work conducted for the Department of Energy (DOE NETL) on development of a novel polymer membrane process for pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture from coalfired syngas (award number DE-FE0001124). The work was conducted by Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) from September 15, 2009, through December 14, 2011. Tetramer Technologies, LLC (Tetramer) was our subcontract partner on this project. The National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) at Wilsonville, AL, provided access to syngas gasifier test facilities. The main objective of this project was to develop a cost-effective membrane process that could be used in the relatively near-term to capture CO{sub 2} from shifted syngas generated by a coal-fired Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant. In this project, novel polymeric membranes (designated as Proteus membranes) with separation properties superior to conventional polymeric membranes were developed. Hydrogen permeance of up to 800 gpu and H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity of >12 was achieved using a simulated syngas mixture at 150C and 50 psig, which exceeds the original project targets of 200 gpu for hydrogen permeance and 10 for H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity. Lab-scale Proteus membrane modules (with a membrane area of 0.13 m{sup 2}) were also developed using scaled-up Proteus membranes and high temperature stable module components identified during this project. A mixed-gas hydrogen permeance of about 160 gpu and H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity of >12 was achieved using a simulated syngas mixture at 150C and 100 psig. We believe that a significant improvement in the membrane and module performance is likely with additional development work. Both Proteus membranes and lab-scale Proteus membrane modules were further evaluated using coal-derived syngas streams at the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC). The results indicate that all module components, including the Proteus membrane, were stable under the field conditions (feed pressures: 150-175 psig and feed temperatures: 120-135C) for over 600 hours. The field performance of both Proteus membrane stamps and Proteus membrane modules is consistent with the results obtained in the lab, suggesting that the presence of sulfur-containing compounds (up to 780 ppm hydrogen sulfide), saturated water vapor, carbon monoxide and heavy hydrocarbons in the syngas feed stream has no adverse effect on the Proteus membrane or module performance. We also performed an economic analysis for a number of membrane process designs developed in this project (using hydrogen-selective membranes, alone or in the combination with CO{sub 2}- selective membranes). The current field performance for Proteus membranes was used in the design analysis. The study showed the current best design has the potential to reduce the increase in Levelized Cost of Electricity (LCOE) caused by 90% CO{sub 2} capture to about 15% if co-sequestration of H{sub 2}S is viable. This value is still higher than the DOE target for increase in LCOE (10%); however, compared to the base-case Selexol process that gives a 30% increase in LCOE at 90% CO2 capture, the membrane-based process appears promising. We believe future improvements in membrane performance have the potential to reach the DOE target.

Merkel, Tim [MTR Inc., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

2011-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

203

Idaho Cleanup Contractor Surpasses Significant Safety Milestones |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cleanup Contractor Surpasses Significant Safety Milestones Cleanup Contractor Surpasses Significant Safety Milestones Idaho Cleanup Contractor Surpasses Significant Safety Milestones April 29, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis CWI employees discuss safety procedures before they remove a spent nuclear fuel shipment from a shipping container. CWI employees discuss safety procedures before they remove a spent nuclear fuel shipment from a shipping container. IDAHO FALLS, Idaho - For the second time in a little over a year, employees with DOE contractor CH2M-WG Idaho (CWI) supporting EM at the Idaho site have achieved 1 million hours without a recordable injury. They also worked more than 1.7 million hours without a lost work-time injury. "Our focus is working with employees to keep each other safe," said CWI Environmental, Safety, and Health Vice President Kevin Daniels. "We

204

Demolition, Groundwater Cleanup Highlight Paducah's 2013 Accomplishments  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Demolition, Groundwater Cleanup Highlight Paducah's 2013 Demolition, Groundwater Cleanup Highlight Paducah's 2013 Accomplishments Demolition, Groundwater Cleanup Highlight Paducah's 2013 Accomplishments December 24, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis A high-reach shear removes debris from the tallest structure of the C-340 complex at Paducah. Watch a video of this work here. The 120-foot-high Metals Plant was the tallest building at the Paducah site and encompassed about 1.5 million cubic feet, the volume of a football field roughly three stories tall. Demolition debris filled 28 rail cars and was shipped offsite for disposal. A high-reach shear removes debris from the tallest structure of the C-340 complex at Paducah. Watch a video of this work here. The 120-foot-high Metals Plant was the tallest building at the Paducah site and encompassed

205

Los Alamos National Laboratory names cleanup subcontractors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cleanup subcontractors named Cleanup subcontractors named Los Alamos National Laboratory names cleanup subcontractors The three companies are Los Alamos Technical Associates (LATA), Portage Inc., and ARSEC Environmental, LLC (ARSEC). August 14, 2009 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Contact Fred deSousa

206

Gas separation and hot-gas cleanup  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Catalytic gasification of coal to produce H{sub 2}-, CO-, and CH{sub 4}-rich mixtures of gases for consumption in molten carbonate fuel cells is currently under development; however, to optimize the fuel cell performance and extend its operating life,it is desired to separate as much of the inert components (i.e., CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}) and impurities (i.e., H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3}) as possible from the fuel gas before it enters the fuel cell. In addition, the economics of the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) can be improved by separating as much of the hydrogen as possible from the fuel, since hydrogen is a high-value product. Researchers at the Energy & Environmental Research Center and Bend Research, Inc., investigated pressure-driven membranes as a method for accomplishing this gas separation and hot-gas cleanup. These membranes are operated at temperatures as high as 800{degrees}C and at pressures up to 300 psig. They have very small pore sizes that separate the undesirable gases by operating in the Knudsen diffusion region of mass transport (30 -50{Angstrom}) or in the molecular sieving region of mass transport phenomena (<5{Angstrom}). In addition, H{sub 2} separation through a palladium metal membrane proceeds via a solution-diffusion mechanism for atomic hydrogen. This allows the membranes to exhibit extremely high selectivity for hydrogen separation. The objective of this study was to determine the selectivity of the ceramic membranes for removing undesirable gases while allowing the desired gases to be concentrated in the permeate stream.

Swanson, M.L.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Bench- and Pilot-Scale Studies of Reaction and Regeneration of Ni-Mg-K/Al2O3 for Catalytic Conditioning of Biomass-Derived Syngas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is collaborating with both industrial and academic partners to develop technologies to help enable commercialization of biofuels produced from lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks. The focus of this paper is to report how various operating processes, utilized in-house and by collaborators, influence the catalytic activity during conditioning of biomass-derived syngas. Efficient cleaning and conditioning of biomass-derived syngas for use in fuel synthesis continues to be a significant technical barrier to commercialization. Multifunctional, fluidizable catalysts are being developed to reform undesired tars and light hydrocarbons, especially methane, to additional syngas, which can improve utilization of biomass carbon. This approach also eliminates both the need for downstream methane reforming and the production of an aqueous waste stream from tar scrubbing. This work was conducted with NiMgK/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts. These catalysts were assessed for methane reforming performance in (i) fixed-bed, bench-scale tests with model syngas simulating that produced by oak gasification, and in pilot-scale, (ii) fluidized tests with actual oak-derived syngas, and (iii) recirculating/regenerating tests using model syngas. Bench-scale tests showed that the catalyst could be completely regenerated over several reforming reaction cycles. Pilot-scale tests using raw syngas showed that the catalyst lost activity from cycle to cycle when it was regenerated, though it was shown that bench-scale regeneration by steam oxidation and H{sub 2} reduction did not cause this deactivation. Characterization by TPR indicates that the loss of a low temperature nickel oxide reduction feature is related to the catalyst deactivation, which is ascribed to nickel being incorporated into a spinel nickel aluminate that is not reduced with the given activation protocol. Results for 100 h time-on-stream using a recirculating/regenerating reactor suggest that this type of process could be employed to keep a high level of steady-state reforming activity, without permanent deactivation of the catalyst. Additionally, the differences in catalyst performance using a simulated and real, biomass-derived syngas stream indicate that there are components present in the real stream that are not adequately modeled in the syngas stream. Heavy tars and polycyclic aromatics are known to be present in real syngas, and the use of benzene and naphthalene as surrogates may be insufficient. In addition, some inorganics found in biomass, which become concentrated in the ash following biomass gasification, may be transported to the reforming reactor where they can interact with catalysts. Therefore, in order to gain more representative results for how a catalyst would perform on an industrially-relevant scale, with real contaminants, appropriate small-scale biomass solids feeders or slip-streams of real process gas should be employed.

Magrini-Bair, K. A.; Jablonski, W. S.; Parent, Y. O.; Yung, M. M.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Durable Zinc Oxide-Based Regenerable Sorbents for Desulfurization of Syngas in a Fixed-Bed Reactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A fixed-bed regenerable desulfurization sorbent, identified as RVS-land developed by researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, was awarded the R&D 100 award in 2000 and is currently offered as a commercial product by Sued-Chemie Inc. An extensive testing program for this sorbent was undertaken which included tests at a wide range of temperatures, pressures and gas compositions both simulated and generated in an actual gasifier for sulfidation and regeneration. This testing has demonstrated that during these desulfurization tests, the RVS-1 sorbent maintained an effluent H2S concentration of <5 ppmv at temperatures from 260 to 600 C (500-1100 F) and pressures of 203-2026 kPa(2 to 20 atm) with a feed containing 1.2 vol% H{sub 2}S. The types of syngas tested ranged from an oxygen-blown Texaco gasifier to biomass-generated syngas. The RVS-1 sorbent has high crush strength and attrition resistance, which, unlike past sorbent formulations, does not decrease with extended testing at actual at operating conditions. The sulfur capacity of the sorbent is roughly 17 to 20 wt.% and also remains constant during extended testing (>25 cycles). In addition to H{sub 2}S, the RVS-1 sorbent has also demonstrated the ability to remove dimethyl sulfide and carbonyl sulfide from syngas. During regeneration, the RVS-1 sorbent has been regenerated with dilute oxygen streams (1 to 7 vol% O{sub 2}) at temperatures as low as 370 C (700 F) and pressures of 304-709 kPa(3 to 7 atm). Although regeneration can be initiated at 370 C (700 F), regeneration temperatures in excess of 538 C (1000 F) were found to be optimal. The presence of steam, carbon dioxide or sulfur dioxide (up to 6 vol%) did not have any visible effect on regeneration or sorbent performance during either sulfidation or regeneration. A number of commercial tests involving RVS-1 have been either conducted or are planned in the near future. The RVS-1 sorbent has been tested by Epyx, Aspen Systems and McDermott Technology (MTI), Inc for desulfurization of syngas produced by reforming of hydrocarbon liquid feedstocks for fuel cell applications. The RVS-1 sorbent was selected by MTI over other candidate sorbents for demonstration testing in their 500-kW ship service fuel cell program. It was also possible to obtain sulfur levels in the ppbv range with the modified RVS-1 sorbent.

Siriwardane, Ranjani V.; Cicero, Daniel C. (U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown); Stiegel, Gary J.; Gupta, Raghubir P. (U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Pittsburgh); Turk, Brian S. (Research Triangle Institute)

2001-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

209

Synthesis of Methanol and Dimethyl Ether from Syngas over Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 Catalysts  

SciTech Connect

A Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst was developed for the synthesis of methanol and dimethyl ether (DME) from syngas. Studied were temperatures of operation ranging from 250C to 380C. High temperatures (e.g. 380C) are necessary when combining methanol and DME synthesis with a methanol to gasoline (MTG) process in a single reactor bed. A commercial Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst, utilized industrially for the synthesis of methanol at 220-280C, suffers from a rapid deactivation when the reaction is conducted at high temperature (>320C). On the contrary, a Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst was found to be highly stable for methanol and DME synthesis at 380C. The Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst was thus further investigated for methanol and DME synthesis at P=34-69 bars, T= 250-380C, GHSV= 5 000-18 000 h-1, and molar feeds H2/CO= 1, 2, and 3. Selectivity to DME increased with decreasing operating temperature, and increasing operating pressure. Increased GHSVs and H2/CO syngas feed ratios also enhanced DME selectivity. Undesirable CH4 formation was observed, however, can be minimized through choice of process conditions and by catalyst design. By studying the effect of the Pd loading and the Pd:Zn molar ratio the formulation of the Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst was optimized. A catalyst with 5% Pd and a Pd:Zn molar ratio of 0.25:1 has been identified as the preferred catalyst. Results indicate that PdZn particles are more active than Pd particles for the synthesis of methanol and less active for CH4 formation. A correlation between DME selectivity and the concentration of acid sites of the catalysts has been established. Hence, two types of sites are required for the direct conversion of syngas to DME: 1) PdZn particles are active for the synthesis of methanol from syngas, and 2) acid sites which are active for the conversion of methanol to DME. Additionally, CO2 formation was problematic as PdZn was found to be active for the water-gas-shift (WGS) reaction, under all the conditions evaluated.

Lebarbier, Vanessa MC; Dagle, Robert A.; Kovarik, Libor; Lizarazo Adarme, Jair A.; King, David L.; Palo, Daniel R.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Sorption Mechanisms for Mercury Capture in Warm Post-Gasification Gas Clean-Up Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sorption MechaniSMS for Mercury Sorption MechaniSMS for Mercury capture in WarM poSt-GaSification GaS clean-up SySteMS Background Power generation systems employing gasification technology must remove a variety of potential air pollutants, including mercury, from the synthetic gas steam prior to combustion. In general, efforts to remove mercury have focused on removal at lower temperatures (under 300 °F). The ability to remove mercury at warm-gas cleanup conditions (300 °F to 700 °F) or in the hot-gas cleanup range (above 1200 °F) would provide plant operators with greater flexibility to choose the treatment method best suited to conditions at their plant. The University of Arizona is investigating the use of paper waste-derived sorbents (PWDS) for the removal of mercury and other trace metals at temperatures in and

211

Direct synthesis of dimethyl ether (DME) from syngas containing oxygen gas considering of biomass gasfication gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have developed appropriate and excellent catalysts for direct DME synthesis from syngas. The catalysts, Cu-Zn/Al2O3 catalysts prepared by the sol-gel method, produce DME with high DME activity and high DME selectivity with long ... Keywords: DME, biomass, catalyst, clean fuel, dimethyl ether, direct synthesis, gasification gas, hydrogen, sol-gel method, syngas

Kaoru Takeishi; Akane Arase

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Chemical Looping Reforming for H2, CO and Syngas Production  

SciTech Connect

We demonstrate that the extension of CLC onto oxidants beyond air opens new, highly efficient pathways for production of ultra-pure hydrogen, activation of CO{sub 2} via reduction to CO, and are currently working on production of syngas using nanocomposite Fe-BHA. CLR hold great potential due to fuel flexibility and CO{sub 2} capture. Chemical Looping Combustion (CLC) is a novel clean combustion technology which offers an elegant and highly efficient route for fossil fuel combustion. In CLC, combustion of a fuel is broken down into two spatially separated steps. In the reducer, the oxygen carrier (typically a metal) supplies the stoichiometric oxygen required for fuel combustion. In the oxidizer, the oxygen-depleted carrier is then re-oxidized with air. After condensation of steam from the effluent of the reducer, a high-pressure, high-purity sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} stream is obtained. In the present study, we apply the CLC principle to the production of high-purity H{sub 2}, CO, and syngas streams by replacing air with steam and/or CO{sub 2} as oxidant, respectively. Using H{sub 2}O as oxidant, pure hydrogen streams can be obtained. Similarly, using CO{sub 2} as oxidant, CO is obtained, thus opening an efficient route for CO{sub 2} utilization. Using steam and CO{sub 2} mixtures for carrier oxidation should thus allow production of syngas with adjustable CO:H{sub 2} ratios. Overall, these processes result in Chemical Looping Reforming (CLR), i.e. the net overall reaction is the steam and/or dry reforming of the respective fuel.

Bhavsar,Saurabh; Najera,Michelle; Solunke,Rahul; Veser,Gtz

2001-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

213

Task 4.9 -- Value-added products from syngas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The work on advanced fuel forms in 1996 focused on the synthesis of higher alcohols from mixtures of hydrogen and carbon dioxide (syngas) from coal gasification. The conversion of coal gasification products to commercially valuable alcohols will provide an important new market for current and future gasification plants. Initial work in this project utilized a novel molybdenum sulfide catalyst previously shown to be active for hydrodesulfurization reactions of coal liquids. The support for the active metal sulfide is a layered mixed oxide (hydrotalcite) capable of interaction with the metal sites for catalysis of carbon monoxide reductions. These catalysts have a high surface area, are highly porous, and have basic and acidic functionality. A pressurized fixed-bed flow-through reactor was constructed, and the MoS{sub 2} catalysts were tested with syngas under a variety of conditions. Unfortunately, the catalysts, even with higher molybdenum loading and addition of promoters, failed to give alcohol products. A batch reactor test of the catalyst was also conducted, but did not produce alcohol products. Group 8 metals have been used previously in catalysts for syngas reactions. Ruthenium and rhodium catalysts were prepared by impregnation of a hydrotalcite support. Tests with these catalysts in flow-through reactors also did not produce the desired alcohol products. The formation of higher alcohols from smaller ones, such as methanol and ethanol, could be commercially important if high selectivity could be achieved. The methanol and ethanol would be derived from syngas and fermentation, respectively. Based on previous work in other laboratories, it was hypothesized that the hydrotalcite supported MoS{sub 2} or Ru or Rh catalysts could catalyze the formation of butyl alcohols. Although the desired 1-butanol was obtained in batch reactions with the promoted Ru catalyst, the reaction was not as selective as desired. Product suitable for a lower-vapor-pressure gasoline oxygenate additive was obtained, but it may not be economical to market such products in competition with methyl tertiary-butyl-ether. Flow-through catalytic bed reactions were not successful.

Olson, E.S.; Sharma, R.K.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Effects of Soret diffusion on the laminar flame speed and Markstein length of syngas/air mixtures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effects of Soret diffusion on the laminar flame speed and Markstein length of syngas/air mixtures, Beijing 100084, China Abstract The effects of Soret diffusion on premixed syngas/air flames at normal and stretched laminar flame speed and Markstein length of syngas/air mixtures. The laminar flame speed

Chen, Zheng

215

Effects of Soret diffusion on the laminar flame speed and Markstein length of syngas/air mixtures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effects of Soret diffusion on the laminar flame speed and Markstein length of syngas/air mixtures, China Abstract The effects of Soret diffusion on premixed syngas/air flames at normal and elevated and stretched flame speed and Markstein length of syngas/air mixtures. The laminar flame speed and Markstein

Chen, Zheng

216

Syngas Segregation Induced by Confinement in Carbon Nanotubes: A Combined First-Principles and Monte Carlo Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Syngas Segregation Induced by Confinement in Carbon Nanotubes: A Combined First of the concave and convex surfaces of CNTs formed by graphene layers. As a result, syngas molecules are enriched of CO/H2 inside CNTs increases with respect to the composition of syngas in the exterior gas phase

Bao, Xinhe

217

Investigation on the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis with nitrogen-containing syngas over CoPtZrO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fischer-Tropsch synthesis with nitrogen-containing syngas derived from combined air partial oxidation and CO{sub 2} reforming of methane has been performed in a fixed-bed reactor. The effects of key factors including reaction temperature, pressure, and nitrogen content of the syngas on the performance of CoPtZrO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst were mainly investigated. The results indicate that the syngas containing a high content of nitrogen is suitable for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis and that a high initial catalytic activity can be achieved under typical operating conditions. The decreasing of catalytic activity with time on stream before reaching steady state was observed, which is mainly due to the blockage of catalyst pores by heavy hydrocarbons. 22 refs., 7 figs.

Dongyan Xu; Hongmin Duan; Wenzhao Li; Hengyong Xu [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian (China). Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

218

Determination of the Effect of Coal/Biomass-Derived Syngas Contaminants on the Performance of Fischer-Tropsch and Water-Gas-Shift Catalysts  

SciTech Connect

Today, nearly all liquid fuels and commodity chemicals are produced from non-renewable resources such as crude oil and natural gas. Because of increasing scrutiny of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions produced using traditional fossil-fuel resources, the utilization of alternative feedstocks for the production of power, hydrogen, value-added chemicals, and high-quality hydrocarbon fuels such as diesel and substitute natural gas (SNG) is critical to meeting the rapidly growing energy needs of modern society. Coal and biomass are particularly attractive as alternative feedstocks because of the abundant reserves of these resources worldwide. The strategy of co-gasification of coal/biomass (CB) mixtures to produce syngas for synthesis of Fischer-Tropsch (FT) fuels offers distinct advantages over gasification of either coal or biomass alone. Co-feeding coal with biomass offers the opportunity to exploit economies of scale that are difficult to achieve in biomass gasification, while the addition of biomass to the coal gasifier feed leverages proven coal gasification technology and allows CO{sub 2} credit benefits. Syngas generated from CB mixtures will have a unique contaminant composition because coal and biomass possess different concentrations and types of contaminants, and the final syngas composition is also strongly influenced by the gasification technology used. Syngas cleanup for gasification of CB mixtures will need to address this unique contaminant composition to support downstream processing and equipment. To investigate the impact of CB gasification on the production of transportation fuels by FT synthesis, RTI International conducted thermodynamic studies to identify trace contaminants that will react with water-gas-shift and FT catalysts and built several automated microreactor systems to investigate the effect of single components and the synergistic effects of multiple contaminants on water-gas-shift and FT catalyst performance. The contaminants investigated were sodium chloride (NaCl), potassium chloride (KCl), hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), carbonyl sulfide (COS), ammonia (NH{sub 3}), and combinations thereof. This report details the thermodynamic studies and the individual and multi-contaminant results from this testing program.

Trembly, Jason; Cooper, Matthew; Farmer, Justin; Turk, Brian; Gupta, Raghubir

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

219

Idaho Cleanup Project completes work at Test Area North complex...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Idaho Cleanup Project completes work at Test Area North complex at DOEs Idaho site Loss-Of-Fluid Test Reactor Facility (before) Idaho Cleanup Project workers have completed all...

220

FIXED-PRICE CONTRACTING FOR DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CLEANUP ACTIVITIES...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FIXED-PRICE CONTRACTING FOR DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CLEANUP ACTIVITIES, CR-B-02-01 FIXED-PRICE CONTRACTING FOR DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CLEANUP ACTIVITIES, CR-B-02-01 As part of its...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature syngas cleanup" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Assessment of synfuel spill cleanup options  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Existing petroleum-spill cleanup technologies are reviewed and their limitations, should they be used to mitigate the effects of synfuels spills, are discussed. The six subsections of this report address the following program goals: synfuels production estimates to the year 2000; possible sources of synfuel spills and volumes of spilled fuel to the year 2000; hazards of synfuels spills; assessment of existing spill cleanup technologies for oil spills; assessment of cleanup technologies for synfuel spills; and disposal of residue from synfuel spill cleanup operations. The first goal of the program was to obtain the most current estimates on synfuel production. These estimates were then used to determine the amount of synfuels and synfuel products likely to be spilled, by location and by method of transportation. A review of existing toxicological studies and existing spill mitigation technologies was then completed to determine the potential impacts of synthetic fuel spills on the environment. Data are presented in the four appendixes on the following subjects: synfuel production estimates; acute toxicity of synfuel; acute toxicity of alcohols.

Petty, S.E.; Wakamiya, W.; English, C.J.; Strand, J.A.; Mahlum, D.D.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Materials for Nuclear Waste Disposal and Environmental Cleanup  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Materials for Nuclear Waste Disposal and Environmental Cleanup ... Secure and Certify Studies to Work on Production of Spiked Plutonium.

223

Idaho Cleanup Project CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Idaho Cleanup Project CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC Idaho Cleanup Project CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC Idaho Cleanup Project Idaho Cleanup Project CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC More Documents & Publications...

224

Micro-Mixing Lean-Premix System for Ultra-Low Emission Hydrogen/Syngas Combustion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The focus of this project was to develop the next generation of fuel injection technologies for environmentally friendly, hydrogen syngas combustion in gas turbine engines that satisfy DOE's objectives of reducing NOx emissions to 3 ppm. Building on Parker Hannifin's proven Macrolamination technology for liquid fuels, Parker developed a scalable high-performing multi-point injector that utilizes multiple, small mixing cups in place of a single conventional large-scale premixer. Due to the small size, fuel and air mix rapidly within the cups, providing a well-premixed fuel-air mixture at the cup exit in a short time. Detailed studies and experimentation with single-cup micro-mixing injectors were conducted to elucidate the effects of various injector design attributes and operating conditions on combustion efficiency, lean stability and emissions and strategies were developed to mitigate the impact of flashback. In the final phase of the program, a full-scale 1.3-MWth multi-cup injector was built and tested at pressures from 6.9bar (100psi) to 12.4bar (180psi) and flame temperatures up to 2000K (3150 F) using mixtures of hydrogen and natural gas as fuel with nitrogen and carbon dioxide as diluents. The injector operated without flash back on fuel mixtures ranging from 100% natural gas to 100% hydrogen and emissions were shown to be insensitive to combustor pressure. NOx emissions of 3-ppm were achieved at a flame temperature of 1750K (2690 F) when operating on a fuel mixture containing 50% hydrogen and 50% natural gas by volume with 40% nitrogen dilution and 1.5-ppm NOx was achieved at a flame temperature of 1680K (2564 F) using only 10% nitrogen dilution. NOx emissions of 3.5-ppm were demonstrated at a flame temperature of 1730K (2650 F) with only 10% carbon dioxide dilution. Finally, 3.6-ppm NOx emissions were demonstrated at a flame temperature over 1600K (2420 F) when operating on 100% hydrogen fuel with 30% carbon dioxide dilution. Superior operability was demonstrated for the hydrogen-natural gas fuel. The micro-mixing fuel injectors show great promise for use in future gas turbine engines operating on hydrogen, syngas or other fuel mixtures of various compositions, supporting the Department of Energy goals related to increased energy diversity while reducing greenhouse gases.

Erlendur Steinthorsson; Brian Hollon; Adel Mansour

2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

225

Liquid Fuel Production from Biomass via High Temperature Steam Electrolysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A process model of syngas production using high temperature electrolysis and biomass gasification is presented. Process heat from the biomass gasifier is used to heat steam for the hydrogen production via the high temperature steam electrolysis process. Hydrogen from electrolysis allows a high utilization of the biomass carbon for syngas production. Oxygen produced form the electrolysis process is used to control the oxidation rate in the oxygen-fed biomass gasifier. Based on the gasifier temperature, 94% to 95% of the carbon in the biomass becomes carbon monoxide in the syngas (carbon monoxide and hydrogen). Assuming the thermal efficiency of the power cycle for electricity generation is 50%, (as expected from GEN IV nuclear reactors), the syngas production efficiency ranges from 70% to 73% as the gasifier temperature decreases from 1900 K to 1500 K. Parametric studies of system pressure, biomass moisture content and low temperature alkaline electrolysis are also presented.

Grant L. Hawkes; Michael G. McKellar

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Development of OTM Syngas Process and Testing of Syngas Derived Ultra-clean Fuels in Diesel Engines and Fuel Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This final report summarizes work accomplished in the Program from January 1, 2001 through December 31, 2004. Most of the key technical objectives for this program were achieved. A breakthrough material system has lead to the development of an OTM (oxygen transport membrane) compact planar reactor design capable of producing either syngas or hydrogen. The planar reactor shows significant advantages in thermal efficiency and a step change reduction in costs compared to either autothermal reforming or steam methane reforming with CO{sub 2} recovery. Syngas derived ultra-clean transportation fuels were tested in the Nuvera fuel cell modular pressurized reactor and in International Truck and Engine single cylinder test engines. The studies compared emission and engine performance of conventional base fuels to various formulations of ultra-clean gasoline or diesel fuels. A proprietary BP oxygenate showed significant advantage in both applications for reducing emissions with minimal impact on performance. In addition, a study to evaluate new fuel formulations for an HCCI engine was completed.

E.T. Robinson; John Sirman; Prasad Apte; Xingun Gui; Tytus R. Bulicz; Dan Corgard; John Hemmings

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Stimulus Funding Will Accelerate Cleanup In Idaho  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

STIMULUS FUNDING WILL STIMULUS FUNDING WILL ACCELERATE CLEANUP IN IDAHO Funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act will do more than sustain employment at the U.S. Department of Energy's Idaho Site - it will accelerate cleanup. Click here to see larger image Inside the retrieval enclosure at Accelerated Retrieval Project-III Click on image to enlarge The Office of Environmental Management received $6 billon in additional funding under the "stimulus bill" passed earlier this year by Congress and signed by President Obama. The Idaho Site will receive $468 million of the EM funding. The funding will be used at DOE's Idaho Site to: Decontaminate and decommission buildings that have no useful mission. Accelerate removal of buried radioactive waste, which will be

228

Biogas Impurities and Cleanup for Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impurities and Cleanup for Fuel Cells Impurities and Cleanup for Fuel Cells Dennis Papadias and Shabbir Ahmed Argonne National Laboratory Presented at the Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop Golden, CO June 11-13, 2012 Biogas is the product of anaerobic decomposition of organic waste Municipal solid wastes (MSW)  For every 1 million tons of MSW: - 432,000 cubic feet per day of landfill gas (LFG) for a period of 20 years - 1 MW of electricity 1 Sewage sludge/waste water (WWTP or ADG)  A typical WWTP processes 100 gallons per day (GD) for every person served - 1 cubic foot of digester gas can be produced per 100 gallons of wastewater  100 kW of electricity 1 can be generated from 4.5 MGD of waste water Agricultural waste (i.e. dairy waste)  About 70-100 ft 3 /day of digester gas is produced

229

Dual-phase membrane for High temperature CO2 separation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 CO 2 High temp. membrane for CO 2 removal High Temperature CO 2 Selective Membranes Syngas gas CO 2 enriched gas CO 2 High pressure H 2 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 1 10 100...

230

SYNTHESIS OF METHYL METHACRYLATE FROM COAL-DERIVED SYNGAS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Eastman Chemical Company, and Bechtel collectively are developing a novel three-step process for the synthesis of methyl methacrylate (MMA) from coal-derived syngas that consists of the steps of synthesis of a propionate, its condensation with formaldehyde to form methacrylic acid (MAA), and esterification of MAA with methanol to produce MMA. The research team has completed the research on the three-step methanol-based route to MMA. Under an extension to the original contract, we are currently evaluating a new DME-based process for MMA. The key research need for DME route is to develop catalysts for DME partial oxidation reactions and DME condensation reactions. Over the last quarter (January-March/99), in-situ formaldehyde generation and condensation with methyl propionate were tested over various catalysts and reaction conditions. The patent application is in preparation and the results are retained for future reports.

Makarand R. Gogate; James J. Spivey; Joseph R. Zoeller; Richard D. Colberg; Gerald N. Choi; Samuel S. Tam

1999-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

231

NREL Patents a Catalyst that Removes Syngas Tar, Boosting the Economics of Biofuels (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NREL has patented a catalyst that reforms tar into syngas, a breakthrough that can accelerate the process of getting biomass ready for fuel synthesis and use as a drop-in fuel.

Not Available

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Low Cost High-H2 Syngas Production for Power and Liquid Fuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low Cost High-H2 Syngas Production for Power and Liquid Fuels Gas Technology Institute (GTI) Project Number: FE0011958 Project Description Proof-of-concept of a metal-polymeric...

233

Experimental and Computational Study of Catalytic Combustion of Methane-Air and Syngas-Air Mixtures.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Catalytic combustion and conversion of methane (CH4) and Syngas (in our case, a gas mixture of H2, CO, CO2 and CH4) is characterized by the (more)

Pathak, Saurav

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Production of Mixed Alcohols from Bio-syngas over Mo-based Catalyst  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of Mo-based catalysts prepared by sol-gel method using citric acid as complexant were successfully applied in the high efficient production of mixed alcohols from bio-syngas

Song-bai Qiu; Wei-wei Huang; Yong Xu; Lu Liu; Quan-xin Li

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Single-Step Syngas-to-Distillates (S2D) Synthesis via Methanol and Dimethyl Ether Intermediates: Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the work was to enhance price-competitive, synthesis gas (syngas)-based production of transportation fuels that are directly compatible with the existing vehicle fleet (i.e., vehicles fueled by gasoline, diesel, jet fuel, etc.). To accomplish this, modifications to the traditional methanol-to-gasoline (MTG) process were investigated. In this study, we investigated direct conversion of syngas to distillates using methanol and dimethyl ether intermediates. For this application, a Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 (PdZnAl) catalyst previously developed for methanol steam reforming was evaluated. The PdZnAl catalyst was shown to be far superior to a conventional copper-based methanol catalyst when operated at relatively high temperatures (i.e., >300C), which is necessary for MTG-type applications. Catalytic performance was evaluated through parametric studies. Process conditions such as temperature, pressure, gas-hour-space velocity, and syngas feed ratio (i.e., hydrogen:carbon monoxide) were investigated. PdZnAl catalyst formulation also was optimized to maximize conversion and selectivity to methanol and dimethyl ether while suppressing methane formation. Thus, a PdZn/Al2O3 catalyst optimized for methanol and dimethyl ether formation was developed through combined catalytic material and process parameter exploration. However, even after compositional optimization, a significant amount of undesirable carbon dioxide was produced (formed via the water-gas-shift reaction), and some degree of methane formation could not be completely avoided. Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 used in combination with ZSM-5 was investigated for direct syngas-to-distillates conversion. High conversion was achieved as thermodynamic constraints are alleviated when methanol and dimethyl are intermediates for hydrocarbon formation. When methanol and/or dimethyl ether are products formed separately, equilibrium restrictions occur. Thermodynamic relaxation also enables the use of lower operating pressures than what would be allowed for methanol synthesis alone. Aromatic-rich hydrocarbon liquid (C5+), containing a significant amount of methylated benzenes, was produced under these conditions. However, selectivity control to liquid hydrocarbons was difficult to achieve. Carbon dioxide and methane formation was problematic. Furthermore, saturation of the olefinic intermediates formed in the zeolite, and necessary for gasoline production, occurred over PdZnAl. Thus, yield to desirable hydrocarbon liquid product was limited. Evaluation of other oxygenate-producing catalysts could possibly lead to future advances. Potential exists with discovery of other types of catalysts that suppress carbon dioxide and light hydrocarbon formation. Comparative techno-economics for a single-step syngas-to-distillates process and a more conventional MTG-type process were investigated. Results suggest operating and capital cost savings could only modestly be achieved, given future improvements to catalyst performance. Sensitivity analysis indicated that increased single-pass yield to hydrocarbon liquid is a primary need for this process to achieve cost competiveness.

Dagle, Robert A.; Lebarbier, Vanessa MC; Lizarazo Adarme, Jair A.; King, David L.; Zhu, Yunhua; Gray, Michel J.; Jones, Susanne B.; Biddy, Mary J.; Hallen, Richard T.; Wang, Yong; White, James F.; Holladay, Johnathan E.; Palo, Daniel R.

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

236

Manhattan Project Truck Unearthed in Recovery Act Cleanup | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Manhattan Project Truck Unearthed in Recovery Act Cleanup Manhattan Project Truck Unearthed in Recovery Act Cleanup Manhattan Project Truck Unearthed in Recovery Act Cleanup A Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) excavation crew working on an American Recovery and Reinvestment Act cleanup project has uncovered the remnants of a 1940s military truck buried in a Manhattan Project landfill. The truck was unearthed inside a sealed building where digging is taking place at Material Disposal Area B (MDA-B), the Lab's first hazardous and radioactive waste landfill. MDA-B was used from 1944 to 1948. Manhattan Project Truck Unearthed in Recovery Act Cleanup More Documents & Publications Los Alamos Lab Completes Excavation of Waste Disposal Site Used in the 1940s Protecting Recovery Act Cleanup Site During Massive Wildfire

237

Recovery Act Investment Accelerates Cleanup Work at DOE's Paducah Site |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Investment Accelerates Cleanup Work at DOE's Paducah Investment Accelerates Cleanup Work at DOE's Paducah Site Recovery Act Investment Accelerates Cleanup Work at DOE's Paducah Site July 15, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis UF6 piping deactivation The black inlet hose is attached to a negative air machine that allows Feed Plant cleanup workers to safely deactivate uranium hexafluoride (UF6) piping, seen at right of the lift supporting the crew. UF6 piping deactivation The black inlet hose is attached to a negative air machine that allows Feed Plant cleanup workers to safely deactivate uranium hexafluoride (UF6) piping, seen at right of the lift supporting the crew. Heavy equipment demo Heavy equipment demolishes the last part of the eastern third of the Feed Plant at the Paducah Site. Cleanup continues to prepare the remaining part of the complex, backgroundfor demolition later.

238

DOE Completes TRU Waste Cleanup at Bettis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TRU Waste Cleanup at Bettis TRU Waste Cleanup at Bettis DOE Completes TRU Waste Cleanup at Bettis September 23, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Deb Gill www.wipp.energy.gov 575-234-7270 CARLSBAD, N.M. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has successfully completed cleanup of all Cold War legacy transuranic (TRU) waste at the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory (BAPL) near Pittsburgh, Pa., permanently disposing of it at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). BAPL is the 20th site to be completely cleaned of legacy TRU waste. This milestone was achieved using approximately $640,000 of a $172 million investment from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to expedite legacy waste cleanup activities across the DOE complex. This summer, TRU waste cleanup was also completed at the Nuclear Radiation Development, LLC,

239

TRUEX process solvent cleanup with solid sorbents  

SciTech Connect

Solid sorbents, alumina, silica gel, and Amberlyst A-26 have been tested for the cleanup of degraded TRUEX-NPH solvent. A sodium carbonate scrub alone does not completely remove acidic degradation products from highly degraded solvent and cannot restore the stripping performance of the solvent. By following the carbonate scrub with either neutral alumina or Amberlyst A-26 anion exchange resin, the performance of the TRUEX-NPH is substantially restored. The degraded TRUEX-NPH was characterized before and after treatment by supercritical fluid chromatography. Its performance was evaluated by americium distribution ratios, phase-separation times, and lauric acid distribution coefficients. 17 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

Tse, Pui-Kwan; Reichley-Yinger, L.; Vandegrift, G.F.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Cyclone Performance for Reducing Biochar Concentrations in Syngas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cotton gins have a readily available supply of biomass that is a by-product of cotton ginning. A 40 bph - cotton gin processing stripped cotton must manage 2,600 to 20,000 tonnes of cotton gin trash (CGT) annually. CGT contains approximately 16.3 MJ/kg (7000 Btu/lb.). CGT has the potential to serve as a renewable energy source. Gasification of biomasses such as CGT can offer processing facilities the opportunity to transform their waste biomass into electricity. The gasification of CGT yields 80% synthesis gas (syngas) and 20% biochar. The concentration of biochar in the syngas needs to be reduced prior to the direct fueling of an internal combustion engine driving a generator for electricity production. It was estimated that direct fueling of an internal combustion engine with syngas to drive the generator to produce electricity would cost $1M per megawatt (MW). In contrast, a 1MW system that consists of a boiler and steam turbine would cost $2M/MW. The current provisional patent for the TAMU fluidized bed gasification (FBG) unit uses a 1D2D and 1D3D cyclone for the removal of biochar. A cyclone test stand was designed and constructed to evaluate cyclone capture efficiencies of biochar. A statistical experiment design was used to evaluate cyclone performances for varying concentrations of biochar. A total of 24 tests for the 1D2D and 36 tests for the 1D3D cyclone were conducted at ambient conditions. Average collection efficiency for the 1D2D cyclone was 96.6% and 96.9% for the 1D3D cyclone. An analysis on the cyclones pressure drop was performed to compare the change in pressure drop from air only passing through the cyclone and when the cyclones are loaded with biochar. The average change in pressure drop for the 1D2D cyclone was a decrease of 74%, and the average change in pressure drop for the 1D3D cyclone was a decrease of 36%. An economic feasibility study was conducted to determine the price per kWh to produce electricity for a CGT fueled internal combustion engine power plant (ICPP) and a boiler and steam turbine power plant (SPP). The simulated cotton gin is a 40 bph rated facility operating for 2,000 hours a season (200% utilization) processing stripped cotton that yields approximately 180 kg/bale (400 lbs/bale) of CGT. Revenues consist of the electricity and natural gas expenses incurred during the ginning season, along with the extra electricity produced and sold back to the utility company at the whole price. Loan payments and operating costs include labor, maintenance, taxes, and insurance. Labor costs, the selling price of electricity and biochar are varied in the economic model. The ICPP has a NPV of $1,480,000, and the SPP has a NPV of -$160,000, under the base assumptions. The sensitivity analysis resulted in the selling price of electricity as having the largest change on the NPV for both of the power plants. The average predicted purchase price of electricity is $0.10/kWh for the twenty year simulation. The average price to produce electricity, with no source of revenue generation for the ICPP is $0.20/kWh and $0.26/kWh for the SPP.

Saucier, David Shane

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature syngas cleanup" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Idaho Cleanup Project...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oversight Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project May 2011 November 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency...

242

EM Risk and Cleanup Decision Making Presentation by Mark Gilbertson...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AND CLEANUP DECISION MAKING www.em.doe.gov 1 Mark Gilbertson Deputy Assistant Secretary for Site Restoration Office of Environmental Management May 31, 2012 Presented to...

243

Recovery Act funding accelerates cleanup of Idaho Site, Creates...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recovery Act funding accelerates cleanup of Idaho Site, Creates jobs in community IDAHO FALLS American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funding has accelerated a project...

244

IDAHO OPERATIONS OFFICE NAMES NEW IDAHO CLEANUP PROJECT MANAGER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contact: Brad Bugger (208) 526-0833 For Immediate Release: Wednesday, June 29, 2011 IDAHO OPERATIONS OFFICE NAMES NEW IDAHO CLEANUP PROJECT MANAGER Idaho Falls, ID The...

245

IMPORTANT CLEANUP PROJECT TO RESUME AT IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Department of Energy for other cleanup work at the INL, including decontaminating and decommissioning three nuclear reactors - started in 2005 and completed last year. That...

246

Manhattan Project truck unearthed at landfill cleanup site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Phonebook Calendar Video Newsroom News Releases News Releases - 2011 April Manhattan project truck Manhattan Project truck unearthed at landfill cleanup site A LANL...

247

ORNL research reveals new challenges for mercury cleanup | ornl...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jennifer Brouner Communications 865.241.0709 ORNL research reveals new challenges for mercury cleanup ORNL researchers are learning more about the microbial processes that convert...

248

Biomass Gas Cleanup Using a Therminator  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the project is to develop and demonstrate a novel fluidized-bed process module called a ?¢????Therminator?¢??? to simultaneously destroy and/or remove tar, NH3 and H2S from raw syngas produced by a fluidized-bed biomass gasifier. The raw syngas contains as much as 10 g/m3 of tar, 4,000 ppmv of NH3 and 100 ppmv of H2S. The goal of the Therminator module would be to use promising regenerable catalysts developed for removing tar, ammonia, and H2S down to low levels (around 10 ppm). Tars are cracked to a non-condensable gas and coke that would deposit on the acid catalyst. We will deposit coke, much like a fluid catalytic cracker (FCC) in a petroleum refinery. The deposited coke fouls the catalyst, much like FCC, but the coke would be burned off in the regenerator and the regenerated catalyst would be returned to the cracker. The rapid circulation between the cracker and regenerator would ensure the availability of the required amount of regenerated catalyst to accomplish our goal. Also, by removing sulfur down to less than 10 ppmv, NH3 decomposition would also be possible in the cracker at 600-700???°C. In the cracker, tar decomposes and lays down coke on the acid sites of the catalyst, NH3 is decomposed using a small amount of metal (e.g., nickel or iron) catalyst incorporated into the catalyst matrix, and H2S is removed by a small amount of a metal oxide (e.g. zinc oxide or zinc titanate) by the H2S-metal oxide reaction to form metal sulfide. After a tolerable decline in activity for these reactions, the catalyst particles (and additives) are transported to the regenerator where they are exposed to air to remove the coke and to regenerate the metal sulfide back to metal oxide. Sulfate formation is avoided by running the regeneration with slightly sub-stoichiometric quantity of oxygen. Following regeneration, the catalyst is transported back to the cracker and the cycling continues. Analogous to an FCC reactor system, rapid cycling will allow the use of very active cracking catalysts that lose activity due to coking within the order of several seconds.

David C. Dayton; Atish Kataria; Rabhubir Gupta

2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

249

The Effect of Operational Voltage on a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Operating on Coal Syngas Containing Trace Amounts of Phosphine.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Electrolyte-supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cells have been proven capable of generating usable electricity when supplied with various fuels, including a synthetic fuel (syngas) generated from (more)

Kaufman, Brian A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Catalytic Tri-reforming of Biomass-Derived Syngas to Produce Desired H2:CO Ratios for Fuel Applications.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study focuses on upgrading biomass derived syngas for the synthesis of liquid fuels using Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS). The process includes novel gasification of biomass (more)

Walker, Devin Mason

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Synthesis of acrylates and methacrylates from coal-derived syngas. Quarterly report, October--December 1996  

SciTech Connect

Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Eastman Chemical Company, and Bechtel collectively are developing a novel process for the synthesis of methyl methacrylate (MMA) from coal-derived syngas, under a contract from the US Department of Energy, Federal Energy Technology Center. This three-step process consists of synthesis of a propionate, its condensation with formaldehyde, and esterification of resulting methacrylic acid (MAA) with methanol to produce MMA. Eastman has focused on the propionate synthesis step. the resultant Mo catalysts work efficiently at much less severe conditions (170{degrees}C and 30 atm) than the conventional Ni catalysts (270{degrees}C and 180 atm). Bechtel has performed an extensive cost analysis which shows that Eastman`s propionate synthesis step is competitive with other technologies to produce the anhydride. In the second step, RTI and Eastman have developed active and stable V-Si-P ternary metal oxide catalysts Nb/SiO{sub 2} and Ta/SiO{sub 2} catalysts for the condensation of propionic anhydride and acid with formaldehyde. RTI has demonstrated a novel correlation among the catalyst acid-base properties, condensation reaction yield, and long-term catalyst activity. Current research focuses on enhancing the condensation reaction yields by better understanding of the acid-base property correlation, in situ condensation in a high-temperature, high- pressure (HTHP) slurry reactor, and alternate formaldehyde feedstocks. Based on Eastman and RTI laboratory data, a cost estimate is also being developed for the integrated process.

NONE

1997-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

252

A Hybrid Gas Cleaning Process for Production of Ultraclean Syngas  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Timothy C. Merkel (Primary Contact) Timothy C. Merkel (Primary Contact) RTI P.O. Box 12194 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 merkel@rti.org Tel (919) 485-2742 Fax (919) 541-8000 Raghubir P. Gupta RTI P.O. Box 12194 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 gupta@rti.org Tel (919) 541-8023 Fax (919) 541-8000 Suresh C. Jain U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 suresh.jain@netl.doe.gov Tel (304) 285-5431 Fax (304) 285-4403 Brian S. Turk RTI P.O. Box 12194 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 bst@rti.org Tel (919) 541-8024 Fax (919) 541-8000 Daniel C. Cicero U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 daniel.cicero@netl.doe.gov Tel (304) 285-4826 Fax (304) 285-4403 A Hybrid Gas Cleaning Process for Production of Ultraclean Syngas

253

Synthesis of Methyl Methacrylate from Coal-Derived Syngas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Eastman Chemical Company, and Bechtel collectively are developing a novel three-step process for the synthesis of methyl methacrylate (MMA) from coal-derived syngas that consists of the steps of synthesis of a propionate, its condensation with formaldehyde to form methacrylic acid (MAA), and esterification of MAA with methanol to produce MMA. RTI has completed the research on the three-step methanol-based route to MMA. Under an extension to the original contract, RTI is currently evaluating a new DME-based process for MMA. The key research need for DME route is to develop catalysts for DME partial oxidation reactions and DME condensation reactions. Over the last month, RTI has finalized the design of a fixed-bed microreactor system for DME partial oxidation reactions. RTI incorporated some design changes to the feed blending system, so as to be able to blend varying proportions of DME and oxygen. RTI has also examined the flammability limits of DME-air mixtures. Since the lower flammability limit of DME in air is 3.6 volume percent, RTI will use a nominal feed composition of 1.6 percent in air, which is less than half the lower explosion limit for DME-air mixtures. This nominal feed composition is thus considered operationally safe, for DME partial oxidation reactions. RTI is also currently developing an analytical system for DME partial oxidation reaction system.

Gerald N. Choi; James J. Spivey; Jospeh R. Zoeller; Makarand R. Gogate; Richard D. Colberg; Samuel S. Tam

1998-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

254

Architecture synthesis basis for the Hanford Cleanup system: First issue  

SciTech Connect

This document describes a set of candidate alternatives proposed to accomplish the Hanford Cleanup system functions defined in a previous work. Development of alternatives is part of a sequence of system engineering activities which lead to definition of all the products which, when completed, accomplish the cleanup mission. The alternative set is developed to functional level four or higher depending on need.

Holmes, J.J. [comp.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Performance of solid oxide fuel cells operaated with coal syngas provided directly from a gasification process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are being developed for integrated gasification power plants that generate electricity from coal at 50% efficiency. The interaction of trace metals in coal syngas with Ni-based SOFC anodes is being investigated through thermodynamic analyses and in laboratory experiments, but test data from direct coal syngas exposure are sparsely available. This effort evaluates the significance of performance losses associated with exposure to direct coal syngas. Specimen are operated in a unique mobile test skid that is deployed to the research gasifier at NCCC in Wilsonville, AL. The test skid interfaces with a gasifier slipstream to deliver hot syngas to a parallel array of twelve SOFCs. During the 500 h test period, all twelve cells are monitored for performance at four current densities. Degradation is attributed to syngas exposure and trace material attack on the anode structure that is accelerated at increasing current densities. Cells that are operated at 0 and 125 mA cm{sup 2} degrade at 9.1 and 10.7% per 1000 h, respectively, while cells operated at 250 and 375 mA cm{sup 2} degrade at 18.9 and 16.2% per 1000 h, respectively. Spectroscopic analysis of the anodes showed carbon, sulfur, and phosphorus deposits; no secondary Ni-metal phases were found.

Hackett, G.; Gerdes, K.; Song, X.; Chen, Y.; Shutthanandan, V.; Englehard, M.; Zhu, Z.; Thevuthasan, S.; Gemmen, R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Idaho Site Advances Recovery Act Cleanup after Inventing Effective  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site Advances Recovery Act Cleanup after Inventing Effective Site Advances Recovery Act Cleanup after Inventing Effective Treatment Idaho Site Advances Recovery Act Cleanup after Inventing Effective Treatment For the first time in history, workers at the Idaho site achieved success in the initial cleanup of potentially dangerous sodium in a decommissioned nuclear reactor using an innovative treatment process. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act invested $70 million in the project, which employs 130 workers. DOE officials cheered the outcome and praised the team that designed and implemented the innovative sodium treatment for which the DOE has filed a provisional patent application. Idaho Site Advances Recovery Act Cleanup after Inventing Effective Treatment More Documents & Publications Experimental Breeder Reactor-II Primary Tank System Wash Water Workshop

257

EM, UCOR Quickly Reconcile Oak Ridge Cleanup Contract | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EM, UCOR Quickly Reconcile Oak Ridge Cleanup Contract EM, UCOR Quickly Reconcile Oak Ridge Cleanup Contract EM, UCOR Quickly Reconcile Oak Ridge Cleanup Contract July 12, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis DOE and UCOR employees held an event today celebrating the recent contract reconciliation. DOE and UCOR employees held an event today celebrating the recent contract reconciliation. OAK RIDGE, Tenn. - At a ceremony today, Oak Ridge's Environmental Management (EM) program and its prime contractor, URS | CH2M Oak Ridge, LLC (UCOR) celebrated the completion of the site's reconciled cleanup contract. The newly aligned contract accurately specifies the projects and activities that the site's cleanup contractor will perform. "The speedy completion of this process is a testament to DOE and UCOR contract teams and managers," said Sue Cange, acting manager of the Oak

258

The Application of NEPA to CERCLA Cleanups | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Application of NEPA to CERCLA Cleanups The Application of NEPA to CERCLA Cleanups The Application of NEPA to CERCLA Cleanups On March 31, 1994, officials from the Departrnent of Energy (DOE), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) met with then Acting Assistant Attorney General Lois Schiffer and other representatives of the Department of Justice (DOJ) to discuss the issue of the relationship of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) to the cleanup of federal facilities under the CERCLA Superfund program. The meeting focused on proposals for addressing problems that have arisen from DOE's attempts to integrate the procedural and analytical approaches of NEPA into the CERCLA cleanup process. This document describes what was discussed at the meeting and the consensus reached there.

259

Final Rocky Flats Cleanup Agreement, July 19, 1996 Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rocky Flats Cleanup Agreement Rocky Flats Cleanup Agreement State Colorado Agreement Type Federal Facility Agreement Legal Driver(s) CERCLA/RCRA Scope Summary Establish the regulatory framework for achieving the ultimate cleanup of the Rocky Flats Site. Parties DOE; US EPA; The State of Colorado Date 7/19/1996 SCOPE * Establish the regulatory framework for achieving the ultimate cleanup of the Rocky Flats Site. * Ensure that the environmental impacts associated with activities at the Site will continue to be investigated and that appropriate response actions are taken. * Establish a procedural framework and schedule for developing, implementing, and monitoring appropriate response actions at the site. * Coordinate all of DOE's cleanup obligations under CERCLA, RCRA, and the Colorado

260

Secretary Chu Highlights Recovery Act Cleanup Progress | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Highlights Recovery Act Cleanup Progress Highlights Recovery Act Cleanup Progress Secretary Chu Highlights Recovery Act Cleanup Progress March 23, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis OAK RIDGE, TENN. - Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced today that the Department's Environmental Management program has spent more than $1.5 billion in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funds on cleanup projects around the country - 25 percent of the program's total - creating an estimated 14,400 jobs since the start of the Recovery Act. "Because of the Recovery Act, programs around the country have been able to expand, hire and continue our important cleanup work," said Secretary Chu. "These investments have played a key role in helping local economies recover, creating jobs and supporting small businesses in dozens of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature syngas cleanup" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Lab receives an additional $19 million for environmental cleanup  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lab receives an additional $19 million for environmental cleanup Lab receives an additional $19 million for environmental cleanup Community Connections: Our link to Northern New Mexico Communities Latest Issue:Dec. 2013 - Jan. 2014 All Issues » submit Lab receives an additional $19 million for environmental cleanup Lab also selects local businesses for five-year contracts June 1, 2013 Governor Susana Martinez visited the Lab in May to urge additional funding for cleanup Governor Susana Martinez visited the Lab in May to urge additional funding for cleanup Contact Editor Linda Anderman Email Community Programs Office Kurt Steinhaus Email Thanks to support from New Mexico Senators Tom Udall and Martin Heinrich, Representatives Ben Ray Lujan and Steve Pearce and Governor Susana Martinez, the Lab has received an additional $19 million for environmental

262

DOE Surpasses Cleanup Target Ahead of Schedule | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Surpasses Cleanup Target Ahead of Schedule Surpasses Cleanup Target Ahead of Schedule DOE Surpasses Cleanup Target Ahead of Schedule May 12, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy announced today it has surpassed one of the Obama Administration's High Priority Performance Goals five months ahead of schedule in its effort to clean up the legacy of the Cold War. Through a $6 billion American Recovery and Reinvestment Act investment, the Department's cleanup footprint has been reduced by 45 percent, from 931 square miles to 516 square miles. By achieving this reduction, the Department is on track to reduce its overall cleanup footprint by approximately 90 percent by 2015. Footprint reduction lowers costs associated with site surveillance and maintenance and helps protect the

263

The Application of NEPA to CERCLA Cleanups | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Application of NEPA to CERCLA Cleanups The Application of NEPA to CERCLA Cleanups The Application of NEPA to CERCLA Cleanups On March 31, 1994, officials from the Departrnent of Energy (DOE), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) met with then Acting Assistant Attorney General Lois Schiffer and other representatives of the Department of Justice (DOJ) to discuss the issue of the relationship of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) to the cleanup of federal facilities under the CERCLA Superfund program. The meeting focused on proposals for addressing problems that have arisen from DOE's attempts to integrate the procedural and analytical approaches of NEPA into the CERCLA cleanup process. This document describes what was discussed at the meeting and the consensus reached there.

264

DOE Surpasses Cleanup Target Ahead of Schedule: Recovery Act Investment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Surpasses Cleanup Target Ahead of Schedule: Recovery Act DOE Surpasses Cleanup Target Ahead of Schedule: Recovery Act Investment Saves Money, Trains Workers, Creates Jobs DOE Surpasses Cleanup Target Ahead of Schedule: Recovery Act Investment Saves Money, Trains Workers, Creates Jobs May 12, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy announced today it has surpassed one of the Obama Administration's High Priority Performance Goals five months ahead of schedule in its effort to clean up the legacy of the Cold War. Through a $6 billion American Recovery and Reinvestment Act investment, the Department's cleanup footprint has been reduced by 45 percent, from 931 square miles to 516 square miles. By achieving this reduction, the Department is on track to reduce its overall cleanup footprint by

265

IDAHO OPERATIONS OFFICE NAMES NEW IDAHO CLEANUP PROJECT MANAGER |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IDAHO OPERATIONS OFFICE NAMES NEW IDAHO CLEANUP PROJECT MANAGER IDAHO OPERATIONS OFFICE NAMES NEW IDAHO CLEANUP PROJECT MANAGER IDAHO OPERATIONS OFFICE NAMES NEW IDAHO CLEANUP PROJECT MANAGER June 29, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Brad Bugger (208) 526-0833 Idaho Falls, ID - The Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office today announced that James Cooper has been named deputy manager of its highly-successful Idaho Cleanup Project, which oversees the environmental cleanup and waste management mission at DOE's Idaho site. Cooper has more than 30 years of experience in commercial and government engineering and management, including an eight month stint as acting Deputy Manager for EM. He has extensive experience in business management associated with program planning, development and administration. His experience includes all project phases from conceptual planning, cost and

266

EM's December Newsletter Recaps Cold War Cleanup Accomplishments in 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EM's December Newsletter Recaps Cold War Cleanup Accomplishments EM's December Newsletter Recaps Cold War Cleanup Accomplishments in 2013 EM's December Newsletter Recaps Cold War Cleanup Accomplishments in 2013 December 24, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - On Dec. 19, EM completed demolition of the 4.8 million-square-foot Building K-25 at Oak Ridge, a milestone that capped a busy and successful 2013 for the Cold War cleanup program. The demolition was one of EM's most significant achievements this year, and it is captured in this newsletter issue along with dozens of other notable accomplishments across the EM complex. Read about EM's productive year, including cleanup of buildings and waste sites along the Columbia River in Washington state, progress in the disposition of transuranic waste at Idaho and other sites and preparations for a major demolition at the West Valley

267

Colorado and the Accelerated Cleanup at Rocky Flats  

SciTech Connect

When the Rocky Flats closure project was declared complete in October 2005, it was the largest environmental cleanup to date. Even more impressive, it was ahead of schedule and well under budget. Several factors combined to produce this success including a performance-based contract with financial incentives, development and application of innovative technologies, and a regulator-backed accelerated approach to the cleanup process. The factor in this success in which the State of Colorado had the largest role was in developing and enforcing the Rocky Flats Cleanup Agreement. In compliance with this agreement, cleanup was accomplished by means of multiple interim actions that led to a comprehensive final decision at the end. A key element that allowed the accelerated cleanup was constant consultation among DOE, its contractor, and the regulators plus collaboration with stakeholders. (authors)

Spreng, C. [Public Health and Environment, Colorado Dept., Denver, CO (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

NETL: Gasifipedia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Syngas Cleanup: DOE R&D in Syngas Cleanup Warm Gas Cleanup In any gasification process, the production of clean synthesis gas (syngas)-free of contaminants such as particulates,...

269

Effects of Combustion-Induced Vortex Breakdown on Flashback Limits of Syngas-Fueled Gas Turbine Combustors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Turbine combustors of advanced power systems have goals to achieve very low pollutants emissions, fuel variability, and fuel flexibility. Future generation gas turbine combustors should tolerate fuel compositions ranging from natural gas to a broad range of syngas without sacrificing operational advantages and low emission characteristics. Additionally, current designs of advanced turbine combustors use various degrees of swirl and lean premixing for stabilizing flames and controlling high temperature NOx formation zones. However, issues of fuel variability and NOx control through premixing also bring a number of concerns, especially combustor flashback and flame blowout. Flashback is a combustion condition at which the flame propagates upstream against the gas stream into the burner tube. Flashback is a critical issue for premixed combustor designs, because it not only causes serious hardware damages but also increases pollutant emissions. In swirl stabilized lean premixed turbine combustors onset of flashback may occur due to (i) boundary layer flame propagation (critical velocity gradient), (ii) turbulent flame propagation in core flow, (iii) combustion instabilities, and (iv) upstream flame propagation induced by combustion induced vortex breakdown (CIVB). Flashback due to first two foregoing mechanisms is a topic of classical interest and has been studied extensively. Generally, analytical theories and experimental determinations of laminar and turbulent burning velocities model these mechanisms with sufficient precision for design usages. However, the swirling flow complicates the flashback processes in premixed combustions and the first two mechanisms inadequately describe the flashback propensity of most practical combustor designs. The presence of hydrogen in syngas significantly increases the potential for flashback. Due to high laminar burning velocity and low lean flammability limit, hydrogen tends to shift the combustor operating conditions towards flashback regime. Even a small amount of hydrogen in a fuel blend triggers the onset of flashback by altering the kinetics and thermophysical characteristics of the mixture. Additionally, the presence of hydrogen in the fuel mixture modifies the response of the flame to the global effects of stretch and preferential diffusion. Despite its immense importance in fuel flexible combustor design, little is known about the magnitude of fuel effects on CIVB induced flashback mechanism. Hence, this project investigates the effects of syngas compositions on flashback resulting from combustion induced vortex breakdown. The project uses controlled experiments and parametric modeling to understand the velocity field and flame interaction leading to CIVB driven flashback.

Ahsan Choudhuri

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

270

Synthesis of acrylates and Methacrylates from Coal-Derived Syngas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Eastman Chemical Company, and Bechtel collectively are developing a novel process for the synthesis of methyl methacrylate (MMA) from coal-derived syngas, under a contract from the U.S. Department of Energy, Federal Energy Technology Center. This three-step process consists of synthesis of a propionate, its condensation with formaldehyde, and esterification of resulting methacrylic acid (MAA) with methanol to produce MMA. Eastman has focused on the propionate synthesis step. The resultant Mo catalysts work efficiently at much less severe conditions (170{degrees}C and 30 atm) than the conventional Ni catalysts (270{degrees} C and 180 atm). Bechtel has performed an extensive cost analysis which shows that Eastman`s propionate synthesis step is competitive with other technologies to produce the anhydride. Eastman and Bechtel have also compared the RTI- Eastman-Bechtel three-step methanol route to five other process routes to MMA. The results show that the product MMA can be produced at 520/lb, for a 250 Mlb/year MMA plant, and this product cost is competitive to all other process routes to MMA, except propyne carbonylation. In the second step, RTI and Eastman have developed active and stable V-SI-P tertiary metal oxide catalysts, Nb/Si0{sub 2}, and Ta/Si0{sub 2} catalysts for condensation of propionic anhydride or propionic acid with formaldehyde. RTI has demonstrated a novel correlation among the catalyst acid-base properties, condensation reaction yield, and long-term catalyst performance. Eastman and Bechtel have used the RTI experimental results of a 20 percent Nb/Si0{sub 2} catalyst, in terms of reactant conversions, MAA selectivities, and MAA yield, for their economic analysis. Recent research focuses on enhancing the condensation reaction yields, a better understanding of the acid-base property correlation and enhancing the catalyst lifetime.

NONE

1997-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

271

Heterogeneous catalytic process for alcohol fuels from syngas. Fifth quarterly technical progress report, January--March, 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Objective is to evaluate heterogeneous catalysts for converting syngas to oxygenates for use as fuel enhancers, and to develop the best total process for converting syngas to liquid fuels. Two tasks are being pursued: Catalyst R and D, and engineering studies. Initial work will be on the isobutanol catalyst system. A microreactor has been prepared for screening heterogeneous catalysts.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

GREENHOUSE GAS CATALYTIC REFORMING TO SYNGAS A thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GREENHOUSE GAS CATALYTIC REFORMING TO SYNGAS A thesis submitted in partial fulfillment've missed over the past two years. #12;4 TABLE OF CONTENTS GREENHOUSE GAS CATALYTIC REFORMING TO SYNGAS 1.083 moles CH4, 0.083 moles CO2, and 0.834 moles Ar which are the inlet conditions for many of the catalytic

Columbia University

273

Syngas formation in methane flames and carbon monoxide release during quenching  

SciTech Connect

Following a recent investigation into chemi-ionization and chemiluminescence during gradual aeration of small, laminar methane flames, we proposed that partial oxidation products, or syngas constituents, formed in the pre-flame zone well below the luminous region, were responsible for the observed effects. We therefore map temperature, CO, and H{sub 2} for geometries and conditions relevant to burners in domestic boiler systems, to assess the potential hazard of CO release into the ambient atmosphere, should any partial quenching occur. CO concentrations peaks of 5.5 volume % are recorded in the core surrounding the axis. Appreciable CO concentrations are also found in the absence of added air. Experiments on various burner port geometries and temperatures suggest that this is not due to air entrainment at the flame base but to diffusion from zones closer to the flame. Next, quenching surfaces such as grids, perforated plates and flame trap matrices of different metals are progressively lowered into the flame. To avoid flow line distortion, suction aspirates the quenched products. The highest emission rate occurs with the quenching plane some 4 mm above the burner; further lowering of the quenching surface causes flame extinction. The maximum CO release is close to converting 10% of the CH{sub 4} feed, with some variation with quenching material. Expressing this potential release in terms of, e.g. boiler power, predicts a potentially serious hazard. Results of numerical simulations adequately parallel the experimental sampling profiles and provide insights into local concentrations, as well as the spatially resolved CO flux, which is calculated for a parabolic inlet flow profile. Integration across the stream implies, on the basis of the simulation, a possible tripling of the experimental CO release, were quenching simply to release the local gas composition into the atmosphere. Comparison with experiment suggests some chemical interaction with the quenching surface. (author)

Weinberg, Felix; Carleton, Fred; Houdmont, Raphael [Department of Chemical Engineering, Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Dunn-Rankin, Derek; Karnani, Sunny [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, Irvine (United States)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

274

Mn Monolayer Modified Rh for Syngas-to-Ethanol Conversion: A First-Principles Study  

SciTech Connect

Rh is unique in its ability to convert syngas to ethanol with the help of promoters. We performed systematic first-principles computations to examine the catalytic performance of pure and Mn modified Rh(100) surfaces for ethanol formation from syngas. CO dissociation on the surface as well as CO insertion between the chemisorbed CH{sub 3} and the surface are the two key steps. The CO dissociation barrier on the Mn monolayer modified Rh(100) surface is remarkably lowered by {approx}1.5 eV compared to that on Rh(100). Moreover, the reaction barrier of CO insertion into the chemisorbed CH{sub 3} group on the Mn monolayer modified Rh(100) surface is 0.34 eV lower than that of methane formation. Thus the present work provides new mechanistic insight into the role of Mn promoters in improving Rh's selectivity to convert syngas to ethanol.

Li, Fengyu [University of Puerto Rico; Jiang, Deen [ORNL; Zeng, X.C. [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Chen, Zhongfang [University of Puerto Rico

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Syngas production by plasma treatments of alcohols, bio-oils and wood This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Syngas production by plasma treatments of alcohols, bio-oils and wood This article has been Contact us My IOPscience #12;Syngas production by plasma treatments of alcohols, bio-oils and wood K to recover energy from biomass. The Syngas produced from biomass can be used to power internal combustion

276

Experimental and theoretical study of exhaust gas fuel reforming of Diesel fuel by a non-thermal arc discharge for syngas production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-thermal arc discharge for syngas production A. Lebouvier1,2 , F. Fresnet2 , F. Fabry1 , V. Boch2 , V. Rohani1% and a conversion rate of 95% have been reached which correspond to a syngas dry molar fraction of 25%. For the most and promote H2O and CO2 production. Keywords: Plasma reformer, syngas, diesel fuel reforming, NOx trap. 1

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

277

Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup system for direct coal fueled turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States Department of.Energy, Morgantown Energy Research Center (DOE/METC), is sponsoring the development of coal-fired turbine technology in the areas of Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion, Integrated Gasification Combined Cycles, and Direct Coal-Fired Turbines. A major technical challenge remaining for the development of coal-fired turbine systems is high-temperature gas cleaning to meet environmental standards for sulfur oxides and particulate emissions, as well as to provide acceptable turbine life. The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Science & Technology Center, is evaluating an Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup (ILEC) concept that has been configured to meet this technical challenge. This ceramic barrier filter, ILEC concept simultaneously controls sulfur, particulate, and alkali contaminants in high-pressure fuel gases or combustion gases, and is considering cleaning temperatures up to 2100{degrees}F. This document describes Phase II of the program, the design, construction, and shakedown of a bench-scale facility to test and confirm the feasibility of this ILEC technology.

Newby, R.A.; Alvin, M.A.; Bachovchin, D.M.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Lippert, T.E.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

NETL: Gasifipedia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Syngas Cleanup: Syngas Contaminant Removal and Conditioning: Water Gas Shift & Hydrogen Production Water Gas Shift In applications where scrubbed syngas H2CO ratio must be...

279

Hazardous Sites Cleanup Act (Pennsylvania) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous Sites Cleanup Act (Pennsylvania) Hazardous Sites Cleanup Act (Pennsylvania) Hazardous Sites Cleanup Act (Pennsylvania) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Pennsylvania Program Type Environmental Regulations Grant Program Provider Department of Environmental Protection This Act tasks the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection with regulating hazardous waste. The department is charged with siting, review, permitting and development of hazardous waste treatment and disposal facilities in order to protect public health and safety, foster economic growth and protect the environment. Pennsylvania law establishes a fund to provide to the Department the

280

Tritium research laboratory cleanup and transition project final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Tritium Research Laboratory Cleanup and Transition Project Final Report provides a high-level summary of this project`s multidimensional accomplishments. Throughout this report references are provided for in-depth information concerning the various topical areas. Project related records also offer solutions to many of the technical and or administrative challenges that such a cleanup effort requires. These documents and the experience obtained during this effort are valuable resources to the DOE, which has more than 1200 other process contaminated facilities awaiting cleanup and reapplication or demolition.

Johnson, A.J.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature syngas cleanup" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Synthesis of Acrylates and Methacrylates from Coal-Derived Syngas.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Eastman Chemical Company, and Bechtel collectively are developing a novel process for the synthesis of methyl methacrylate (MMA) from coal-derived syngas, under a contract from the U.S. Department of Energy/Federal Energy Technology Center (DOE/FETC). This three-step process consists of synthesis of a propionate, its condensation with formaldehyde, and esterification of resulting methacrylic acid (MAA) with methanol to produce MMA. Over the last quarter, RTI carried out activity tests on a pure (99 percent) Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} catalyst, received from Alfa Aesar, under the following experimental conditions: T=300 C; P=4 atm, 72:38:16:4:220 mmol/h, PA:H{sub 2}0:HCHO:CH{sub 3}0H:N{sub 2}; 5-g catalyst charge. For the pure material, the MAA yields (based on HCHO and PA) were at 8.8 and 1.5 percent, clearly inferior compared to those for a 10-percent Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}/Si0{sub 2} catalyst (20.1 and 4.5 percent). The X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of pure Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} and 20-percent Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}/Si0{sub 2} that while pure Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} is very highly crystalline, Si0{sub 2} support for an amorphous nature of the 20 percent Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}/Si0{sub 2} catalyst the last quarter, RTI also began research on the use of dimethyl ether (DME), product of methanol dehydrocondensation, as an alternate feedstock in MMA synthesis. As a result, formaldehyde is generated either externally or in situ, from DME, in the process envisaged in the contract extension. The initial work on the DME extension of the contract focuses on a tradeoff analysis that will include a preliminary economic analysis of the DME and formaldehyde routes and catalyst synthesis and testing for DME partial oxidation and condensation reactions. Literature guides exist for DME partial oxidation catalysts; however, there are no precedent studies on catalyst development for DME-methyl propionate (MP) condensation reactions, thereby making DME-MP reaction studies a challenge. The design of a fixed-bed microreactor system for DME feedstock studies was also finalized over the last quarter. The system is designed to be operated either in DME partial oxidation mode (for formaldehyde synthesis) or DME-MP condensation mode (for MMA synthesis).

Gogate, M.R.; Spivey, J.J.; Zoeller, J.R.; Colberg, R.D.; Choi, G.N.; Tam, S.S.

1997-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

282

Single-Step Syngas-to-Distillates (S2D) Process Based on Biomass-Derived Syngas - A Techno-Economic Analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study compared biomass gasification based syngas-to-distillate (S2D) systems using techno-economic analysis (TEA). Three cases, state of technology (SOT), goal, and conventional, were compared in terms of performance and cost. The SOT case represented the best available experimental results for a process starting with syngas using a single-step dual-catalyst reactor for distillate generation. The conventional case mirrored a conventional two-step S2D process consisting of separate syngas-to-methanol and methanol-to-gasoline (MTG) processes. The goal case assumed the same performance as the conventional, but with a single-step S2D technology. TEA results revealed that the SOT was more expensive than the conventional and goal cases. The SOT case suffers from low one-pass yield and high selectivity to light hydrocarbons, both of which drive up production cost. Sensitivity analysis indicated that light hydrocarbon yield and single pass conversion efficiency were the key factors driving the high cost for the SOT case.

Zhu, Y.; Jones, S. B.; Biddy, M. J.; Dagle, R. A.; Palo, D. R.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Single-Step Syngas-to-Distillates (S2D) Process Based on Biomass-Derived Syngas A Techno-Economic Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study reports the comparison of biomass gasification based syngas-to-distillate (S2D) systems using techno-economic analysis (TEA). Three cases, state of technology (SOT) case, goal case, and conventional case, were compared in terms of performance and cost. The SOT case and goal case represent technology being developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for a process starting with syngas using a single-step dual-catalyst reactor for distillate generation (S2D process). The conventional case mirrors the two-step S2D process previously utilized and reported by Mobil using natural gas feedstock and consisting of separate syngas-to-methanol and methanol-to-gasoline (MTG) processes. Analysis of the three cases revealed that the goal case could indeed reduce fuel production cost over the conventional case, but that the SOT was still more expensive than the conventional. The SOT case suffers from low one-pass yield and high selectivity to light hydrocarbons, both of which drive up production cost. Sensitivity analysis indicated that light hydrocarbon yield, single pass conversion efficiency, and reactor space velocity are the key factors driving the high cost for the SOT case.

Zhu, Yunhua; Jones, Susanne B.; Biddy, Mary J.; Dagle, Robert A.; Palo, Daniel R.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

PARTICULATE HOT GAS STREAM CLEANUP TECHNICAL ISSUES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the fourth annual report describing the activities performed under Task 1 of Contract No. DE-AC21-94MC31160. The analyses of hot gas stream cleanup (HGCU) ashes and descriptions of filter performance studied under this contract are designed to address problems with filter operation that are apparently linked to characteristics of the collected ash. This work is designed to generate a data base of the key characteristics of ashes collected from operating advanced particle filters and to relate these ash properties to the operation and performance of these filters and their components. This report summarizes characterizations of ash and char samples from pressurized fluidized-bed combustion and gasification facilities. Efforts are under way to develop a method for preserving fragile filter cakes formed on ceramic filter elements. The HGCU data base was formatted for Microsoft Access 97 . Plans for the remainder of the project include characterization of additional samples collected during site visits to the Department of Energy / Southern Company Services Power Systems Development Facility and completion and delivery of the HGCU data base.

None

1999-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

285

PARTICULATE HOT GAS STREAM CLEANUP TECHNICAL ISSUES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the fourth annual report describing the activities performed under Task 1 of Contract No. DE-AC21-94MC31160. The analyses of hot gas stream cleanup (HGCU) ashes and descriptions of filter performance studied under this contract are designed to address problems with filter operation that are apparently linked to characteristics of the collected ash. This work is designed to generate a data base of the key characteristics of ashes collected from operating advanced particle filters and to relate these ash properties to the operation and performance of these filters and their components. This report summarizes characterizations of ash and char samples from pressurized fluidized-bed combustion and gasification facilities. Efforts are under way to develop a method for preserving fragile filter cakes formed on ceramic filter elements. The HGCU data base was formatted for Microsoft Access 97 . Plans for the remainder of the project include characterization of additional samples collected during site visits to the Department of Energy / Southern Company Services Power Systems Development Facility and completion and delivery of the HGCU data base.

NONE

1998-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

286

PARTICULATE HOT GAS STREAM CLEANUP TECHNICAL ISSUES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the fourth annual report describing the activities performed under Task 1 of Contract No. DE-AC21-94MC31160. The analyses of hot gas stream cleanup (HGCU) ashes and descriptions of filter performance studied under this contract are designed to address problems with filter operation that are apparently linked to characteristics of the collected ash. This work is designed to generate a data base of the key characteristics of ashes collected from operating advanced particle filters and to relate these ash properties to the operation and performance of these filters and their components. This report summarizes characterizations of ash and char samples from pressurized fluidized-bed combustion and gasification facilities. Efforts are under way to develop a method for preserving fragile filter cakes formed on ceramic filter elements. The HGCU data base was formatted for Microsoft Access 97{reg_sign}. Plans for the remainder of the project include characterization of additional samples collected during site visits to the Department of Energy/Southern Company Services Power Systems Development Facility and completion and delivery of the HGCU data base.

NONE

1999-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

287

Independent Oversight Activity Report, Idaho Cleanup Project - November  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Activity Report, Idaho Cleanup Project - Activity Report, Idaho Cleanup Project - November 2013 Independent Oversight Activity Report, Idaho Cleanup Project - November 2013 November 2013 Pre-restart Visit to the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board [HIAR-ICP-2013-11-19] This Independent Activity Report documents an oversight activity conducted by the Office of Health, Safety and Security's (HSS) Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations from November 19-22, 2013, at the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit facility of the Idaho Cleanup Project. The activity consisted of the HSS Site Lead touring the newly modified IWTU facility to observe the many process and equipment modifications that have been made since the facility was shut down. In addition, the Site Lead

288

WIMAX TECHNOLOGY AT HANFORD: UPDATING INFRASTRUCTURE, ACCELERATING CLEANUP  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WIMAX TECHNOLOGY AT HANFORD: UPDATING INFRASTRUCTURE, ACCELERATING WIMAX TECHNOLOGY AT HANFORD: UPDATING INFRASTRUCTURE, ACCELERATING CLEANUP WIMAX TECHNOLOGY AT HANFORD: UPDATING INFRASTRUCTURE, ACCELERATING CLEANUP December 1, 2009 - 12:00pm Addthis Richland, WA - In direct support of Hanford cleanup and the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act (ARRA) accelerated cleanup initiatives, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Operations Office (RL) is teaming with the Site services contractor, Mission Support Alliance, LLC (MSA), CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company and Washington River Protection Services Company to implement a WiMAX-based communications infrastructure at Hanford to augment the existing fiber optic and Wi-Fi-based systems. Wi-Fi and WiMAX are both considered last mile technologies that carry signals from telecommunications backbones (in this case hubs or access

289

Latest 200 Area Demolition Offers Snapshot of Hanford Cleanup Progress:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Latest 200 Area Demolition Offers Snapshot of Hanford Cleanup Latest 200 Area Demolition Offers Snapshot of Hanford Cleanup Progress: Recovery Act Funding Allows Demolition of Power Houses Ahead of Schedule Latest 200 Area Demolition Offers Snapshot of Hanford Cleanup Progress: Recovery Act Funding Allows Demolition of Power Houses Ahead of Schedule March 4, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Hardy, DOE (509) 376-5365 Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov Andre Armstrong, CHPRC (509) 376-6773 andre_l_armstrong@rl.g RICHLAND, WASH. - Today's safe and successful explosive demolition at Hanford's 200 Area by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is the latest reminder of progress being made on cleanup as a result of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act investments. "Recovery Act funds allowed us to accelerate the schedule for removing

290

Independent Oversight Assessment, Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - November 2012 Independent Oversight Assessment, Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - November 2012 November 2012 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an independent assessment of nuclear safety culture at the DOE Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project (SBWTP). The primary objective of the evaluation was to provide information regarding the status of the safety culture at SBWTP. The data collection phase of the assessment occurred in April and May 2012. SBWTP is one of DOE's largest nuclear

291

Secretary Chu, Governor Gregoire Issue Statement on Hanford Cleanup |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chu, Governor Gregoire Issue Statement on Hanford Cleanup Chu, Governor Gregoire Issue Statement on Hanford Cleanup Secretary Chu, Governor Gregoire Issue Statement on Hanford Cleanup January 15, 2013 - 7:35pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON -- U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu and Governor Chris Gregoire issued the following joint statement on the cleanup efforts underway at Hanford: "Over the past several months, the Department of Energy and the State of Washington have worked together closely to ensure the Waste Treatment Plant is on a stable path to resolving the technical issues, completing construction, and beginning to treat waste in the coming years. "Based on insight gathered from a number leading scientific experts, the Department is now confident construction activities at the High-Level Waste

292

SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup American Recovery and Reinvestment Act can now claim that 85 percent of the Savannah River Site (SRS) has been cleaned up with the recent completion of the Lower Three Runs (stream) Project. Twenty miles long, Lower Three Runs leaves the main body of the 310-square mile site and runs through parts of Barnwell and Allendale Counties until it flows into the Savannah River. Government property on both sides of the stream acts as a buffer as it runs through privately-owned property. Completing this project reduces the site's footprint by another 10 percent. SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup More Documents & Publications

293

EM Leads Successful Workshop Supporting Fukushima Cleanup | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Successful Workshop Supporting Fukushima Cleanup Successful Workshop Supporting Fukushima Cleanup EM Leads Successful Workshop Supporting Fukushima Cleanup August 8, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis TOKYO - An EM-led U.S. delegation conducted its third workshop last month to provide expertise to Japanese officials leading the cleanup of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant site and surrounding area, this time addressing priorities identified by Japan's government agencies. At the request of the Japanese Ministry of Environment (MOE) and Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI), the delegation's technical experts discussed their experience related to the behavior of radioactive cesium in the environment and other topics. The delegation included representatives from Savannah River, Pacific Northwest, Lawrence Berkeley, Lawrence

294

F Reactor Area Cleanup Complete | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

F Reactor Area Cleanup Complete F Reactor Area Cleanup Complete F Reactor Area Cleanup Complete September 19, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Cameron Hardy, DOE Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov 509-376-5365 RICHLAND, Wash. - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contractors have cleaned up the F Reactor Area, the first reactor area at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington state to be fully remediated. While six of Hanford's nine plutonium production reactors have been sealed up, or cocooned, the F Reactor Area is the first to have all of its associated buildings and waste sites cleaned up in addition to having its reactor sealed up. "The cleanup of the F Reactor Area shows the tremendous progress workers are making along Hanford's River Corridor," said Dave Huizenga, Senior Advisor for the DOE Office of Environmental Management. "The River

295

SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup American Recovery and Reinvestment Act can now claim that 85 percent of the Savannah River Site (SRS) has been cleaned up with the recent completion of the Lower Three Runs (stream) Project. Twenty miles long, Lower Three Runs leaves the main body of the 310-square mile site and runs through parts of Barnwell and Allendale Counties until it flows into the Savannah River. Government property on both sides of the stream acts as a buffer as it runs through privately-owned property. Completing this project reduces the site's footprint by another 10 percent. SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup More Documents & Publications

296

Independent Oversight Activity Report, Idaho Cleanup Project - November  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Oversight Activity Report, Idaho Cleanup Project - Independent Oversight Activity Report, Idaho Cleanup Project - November 2013 Independent Oversight Activity Report, Idaho Cleanup Project - November 2013 November 2013 Pre-restart Visit to the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board [HIAR-ICP-2013-11-19] This Independent Activity Report documents an oversight activity conducted by the Office of Health, Safety and Security's (HSS) Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations from November 19-22, 2013, at the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit facility of the Idaho Cleanup Project. The activity consisted of the HSS Site Lead touring the newly modified IWTU facility to observe the many process and equipment modifications that have been made since the facility was shut down. In addition, the Site Lead

297

Idaho Site Completes Cleanup Milestone Ahead of Schedule  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News Media Contact: News Media Contact: Erik Simpson (208) 360-0426 For Immediate Release Date: June 23, 2010 Idaho Site Completes Cleanup Milestone Ahead of Schedule Idaho Falls, ID � The Department of Energy�s Idaho Operations Office, through the efforts of its cleanup contractor, CH2M-WG Idaho (CWI), recently reached a key cleanup milestone three weeks ahead of schedule by completing the transfer of nearly 6.6 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel from wet to dry storage. �The transfer of spent nuclear fuel from wet to dry storage represents a major contract milestone completion by CWI, a five year endeavor,� said Jim Cooper, DOE-ID Acting Deputy Manager for the Idaho Cleanup Project. �Completion of this campaign places the spent fuel in a safer configuration for the environment, complies with DOE�s commitment to the

298

Latest 200 Area Demolition Offers Snapshot of Hanford Cleanup Progress:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Latest 200 Area Demolition Offers Snapshot of Hanford Cleanup Latest 200 Area Demolition Offers Snapshot of Hanford Cleanup Progress: Recovery Act Funding Allows Demolition of Power Houses Ahead of Schedule Latest 200 Area Demolition Offers Snapshot of Hanford Cleanup Progress: Recovery Act Funding Allows Demolition of Power Houses Ahead of Schedule March 4, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Hardy, DOE (509) 376-5365 Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov Andre Armstrong, CHPRC (509) 376-6773 andre_l_armstrong@rl.g RICHLAND, WASH. - Today's safe and successful explosive demolition at Hanford's 200 Area by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is the latest reminder of progress being made on cleanup as a result of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act investments. "Recovery Act funds allowed us to accelerate the schedule for removing

299

New Contract Helps Portsmouth GDP Cleanup | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Contract Helps Portsmouth GDP Cleanup Contract Helps Portsmouth GDP Cleanup New Contract Helps Portsmouth GDP Cleanup August 18, 2010 - 10:47am Addthis Elizabeth Meckes Elizabeth Meckes Director of User Experience & Digital Technologies, Office of Public Affairs Last week, we took a closer look at the dismantling of the final W62 warhead, a major milestone in the nation's efforts to reduce the amount of nuclear weapons in its stockpile. But after five decades of nuclear weapons production, the Cold War didn't just create a stockpile -- it left 1.5 million cubic meters of solid waste and 88 million gallons of liquid waste. This waste requires treatment and permanent safe storage in gaseous diffusion plants, like the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) in south-central Ohio. This week, the Department of Energy accelerated Portsmouth GDP cleanup

300

DOE Idaho site reaches 20-year cleanup milestone  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IDAHO FALLS, IDAHO, 83403 IDAHO FALLS, IDAHO, 83403 Media Contact: Brad Bugger (208) 526-0833 For Immediate Release: January 19, 2012 DOE Idaho site reaches 20-year cleanup milestone IDAHO FALLS, ID- In two decades of Superfund cleanup work, the U.S. Department of Energy's Idaho site has removed hundreds of thousands of cubic yards of radioactive and hazardously contaminated soils, excavated radioactive waste buried since the 1950s, removed three nuclear reactors and hundreds of buildings, completely closed three major nuclear facilities and removed thousands of unexploded ordnance shells and fragments. Last month marked the 20-year anniversary of the signing and implementation of a cleanup agreement between DOE, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the state of Idaho. In two decades, the cleanup agreement known

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature syngas cleanup" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

EM's Indefinite Delivery/Indefinite Quantity Cleanup Contracts |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EM's Indefinite Delivery/Indefinite Quantity Cleanup Contracts EM's Indefinite Delivery/Indefinite Quantity Cleanup Contracts EM's Indefinite Delivery/Indefinite Quantity Cleanup Contracts The Office of Environmental Management (EM) has 23 Indefinite Delivery/Indefinite Quantity (IDIQ) contracts to provide cleanup services at EM sites across the United States. The scope of work of the IDIQ contracts includes: environmental remediation deactivation, decommissioning, demolition and removal of contaminated facilities waste management regulatory compliance These nationwide, multiple-award IDIQ contracts allow EM sites to place timely, competitive and cost-effective task orders for environmental services with either large or small businesses, as determined by the complexity of the requirements. Twelve of the IDIQ contracts were awarded

302

Protecting Recovery Act Cleanup Site During Massive Wildfire | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Protecting Recovery Act Cleanup Site During Massive Wildfire Protecting Recovery Act Cleanup Site During Massive Wildfire Protecting Recovery Act Cleanup Site During Massive Wildfire Effective safety procedures in place at Los Alamos National Laboratory would have provided protections in the event that the raging Las Conchas fire had spread to the site of an American Recovery and Reinvestment Act project. "Our procedures not only placed the waste excavation site, Materials Disposal Area B (MDA-B), into a safe posture so it was well protected during the fire, but also allowed us to resume work quickly," said Project Director Al Chaloupka. Protecting Recovery Act Cleanup Site During Massive Wildfire More Documents & Publications Los Alamos Lab Completes Excavation of Waste Disposal Site Used in the 1940s

303

Richland Operations Office Completes Cleanup in Hanford's 300...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

sewer system - was removed from the 300-15 Waste Site in the north section. RICHLAND, Wash. - EM met a Tri-Party Agreement milestone by completing cleanup of the north portion of...

304

Renewable Natural Gas Clean-up Challenges and Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

pipeline tariffs don't typically address all components Methods for treating "raw" biogas can be costly Methods for treating raw biogas can be costly 7 *Post clean-up. Methane...

305

EM SSAB Contributes Community Views to Clean-up Decisions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

EM has made public participation a fundamental component of its cleanup mission and has found that the EM SSAB, which draws upon diverse community viewpoints to provide advice and recommendations,...

306

Idaho Cleanup Project ships first Recovery Act-funded remote...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to clean up the Idaho Site." The Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP) has reactivated a large hot cell, or shielded enclosure, which had been dormant since 1988 at the Idaho Nuclear...

307

Idaho Cleanup Project grows its workforce to complete ARRA work  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Idaho Cleanup Project grows its workforce to complete ARRA work CWI President and CEO John Fulton greets newly hired ICP employees at a June orientation session in Idaho Falls....

308

2012 Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus Briefings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus Briefings 2 Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus Briefings 2012 Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus Briefings The Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus serves as a way to brief members of Congress and their staff on EM headquarters and site activities, including budget, safety and project progress. 02/16/2012 - FY 2013 Budget Overview 03/07/2012 - Richland Operations Office, WA 03/21/2012 - Oak Ridge, TN 03/22/2012 - Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office, OH-KY 03/27/2012 - Safety Overview with Deputy Assistant Secretary for Safety & Security Program, Matthew Moury 03/28/2012 - Idaho Operations Office, ID 04/18/2012 - Savannah River Site, SC 04/19/2012 - Office of River Protection, WA More Documents & Publications Assistant Secretary Triay's FY 2012 EM Budget Rollout Presentation

309

WIMAX TECHNOLOGY AT HANFORD: UPDATING INFRASTRUCTURE, ACCELERATING CLEANUP  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WIMAX TECHNOLOGY AT HANFORD: UPDATING INFRASTRUCTURE, ACCELERATING WIMAX TECHNOLOGY AT HANFORD: UPDATING INFRASTRUCTURE, ACCELERATING CLEANUP WIMAX TECHNOLOGY AT HANFORD: UPDATING INFRASTRUCTURE, ACCELERATING CLEANUP December 1, 2009 - 12:00pm Addthis Richland, WA - In direct support of Hanford cleanup and the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act (ARRA) accelerated cleanup initiatives, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Operations Office (RL) is teaming with the Site services contractor, Mission Support Alliance, LLC (MSA), CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company and Washington River Protection Services Company to implement a WiMAX-based communications infrastructure at Hanford to augment the existing fiber optic and Wi-Fi-based systems. Wi-Fi and WiMAX are both considered last mile technologies that carry signals from telecommunications backbones (in this case hubs or access

310

EM SSAB Contributes Community Views to Clean-up Decisions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Contributes Community Views to Clean-up Decisions Contributes Community Views to Clean-up Decisions 2011 Local Board Contributions The Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB) has a unique mandate to provide input regarding the cleanup of nuclear legacy sites to the Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management (EM). Chartered under the Federal Advisory Committee Act, the EM SSAB today comprises eight local boards, located in Hanford, WA; Idaho Falls, ID: Los Alamos, NM; the Nevada National Security Site; Oak Ridge, TN; Paducah, KY; Portsmouth, OH; and the Savannah River Site, SC. EM has made public participation a fundamental component of its cleanup mission and has found that the EM SSAB, which draws upon diverse community

311

Independent Oversight Assessment, Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project- November 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project

312

Study of factors affecting syngas quality and their interactions in fluidized bed gasification of lignite coal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of lignite coal Shayan Karimipour a , Regan Gerspacher b , Rajender Gupta a , Raymond J. Spiteri c. " The syngas quality was defined based on conversion, H2/CO, CH4/H2, yield, and gasifier efficiency. " Low coal 2012 Keywords: Lignite coal Gasification Fluidized bed Design of experiments a b s t r a c t A series

Spiteri, Raymond J.

313

Heterogeneous catalytic process for alcohol fuels from syngas. Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary objective of this project has been the pursuit of a catalyst system which would allow the selective production from syngas of methanol and isobutanol. It is desirable to develop a process in which the methanol to isobutanol weight ratio could be varied from 70/30 to 30/70. The 70/30 mixture could be used directly as a fuel additive, while, with the appropriate downstream processing, the 30/70 mixture could be utilized for methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) synthesis. The indirect manufacture of MTBE from a coal derived syngas to methanol and isobutanol process would appear to be a viable solution to MTBE feedstock limitations. To become economically attractive, a process fro producing oxygenates from coal-derived syngas must form these products with high selectivity and good rates, and must be capable of operating with a low-hydrogen-content syngas. This was to be accomplished through extensions of known catalyst systems and by the rational design of novel catalyst systems.

Dombek, B.D.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

LSCF Synthesis and Syngas Reactivity over LSCF-modified Ni/YSZ Anode.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Simulated coal syngas reactivity over Ni/YSZ and LSCF (La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8)-modified Ni/YSZ anode of SOFC (solid oxide fuel cell) was investigated in this study. The contribution of (more)

Mirzababaei, Jelvehnaz

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Performance of solid oxide fuel cells operated with coal syngas provided directly from a gasification process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are presently being developed for gasification integrated power plants that generate electricity from coal at 50+% efficiency. The interaction of trace metals in coal syngas with the Ni-based SOFC anodes is being investigated through thermodynamic analyses and in laboratory experiments, but direct test data from coal syngas exposure are sparsely available. This research effort evaluates the significance of SOFC performance losses associated with exposure of a SOFC anode to direct coal syngas. SOFC specimen of industrially relevant composition are operated in a unique mobile test skid that was deployed to the research gasifier at the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) in Wilsonville, AL. The mobile test skid interfaces with a gasifier slipstream to deliver hot syngas (up to 300C) directly to a parallel array of 12 button cell specimen, each of which possesses an active area of approximately 2 cm2. During the 500 hour test period, all twelve cells were monitored for performance at four discrete operating current densities, and all cells maintained contact with a data acquisition system. Of these twelve, nine demonstrated good performance throughout the test, while three of the cells were partially compromised. Degradation associated with the properly functioning cells was attributed to syngas exposure and trace material attack on the anode structure that was accelerated at increasing current densities. Cells that were operated at 0 and 125 mA/cm degraded at 9.1 and 10.7% per 1000 hours, respectively, while cells operated at 250 and 375 mA/cm degraded at 18.9 and 16.2% per 1000 hours, respectively. Post-trial spectroscopic analysis of the anodes showed carbon, sulfur, and phosphorus deposits; no secondary Ni-metal phases were found.

Hackett, Gregory A.; Gerdes, Kirk R.; Song, Xueyan; Chen, Yun; Shutthanandan, V.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Zhu, Zihua; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Gemmen, Randall

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

316

Near-zero emissions combustor system for syngas and biofuels  

SciTech Connect

A multi-institutional plasma combustion team was awarded a research project from the DOE/NNSA GIPP (Global Initiative for Prolifereation Prevention) office. The Institute of High Current Electronics (Tomsk, Russia); Leonardo Technologies, Inc. (an American-based industrial partner), in conjunction with the Los Alamos National Laboratory are participating in the project to develop novel plasma assisted combustion technologies. The purpose of this project is to develop prototypes of marketable systems for more stable and cleaner combustion of syngas/biofuels and to demonstrate that this technology can be used for a variety of combustion applications - with a major focus on contemporary gas turbines. In this paper, an overview of the project, along with descriptions of the plasma-based combustors and associated power supplies will be presented. Worldwide, it is recognized that a variety of combustion fuels will be required to meet the needs for supplying gas-turbine engines (electricity generation, propulsion), internal combustion engines (propulsion, transportation), and burners (heat and electricity generation) in the 21st Century. Biofuels and biofuel blends have already been applied to these needs, but experience difficulties in modifications to combustion processes and combustor design and the need for flame stabilization techniques to address current and future environmental and energy-efficiency challenges. In addition, municipal solid waste (MSW) has shown promise as a feedstock for heat and/or electricity-generating plants. However, current combustion techniques that use such fuels have problems with achieving environmentally-acceptable air/exhaust emissions and can also benefit from increased combustion efficiency. This project involves a novel technology (a form of plasma-assisted combustion) that can address the above issues. Plasma-assisted combustion (PAC) is a growing field that is receiving worldwide attention at present. The project is focused on research necessary to develop a novel, high-efficiency, low-emissions (near-zero, or as low as reasonably achievable), advanced combustion technology for electricity and heat production from biofuels and fuels derived from MSW. For any type of combustion technology, including the advanced technology of this project, two problems of special interest must be addressed: developing and optimizing the combustion chambers and the systems for igniting and sustaining the fuel-burning process. For MSW in particular, there are new challenges over gaseous or liquid fuels because solid fuels must be ground into fine particulates ({approx} 10 {micro}m diameter), fed into the advanced combustor, and combusted under plasma-assisted conditions that are quite different than gaseous or liquid fuels. The principal idea of the combustion chamber design is to use so-called reverse vortex gas flow, which allows efficient cooling of the chamber wall and flame stabilization in the central area of the combustor (Tornado chamber). Considerable progress has been made in design ing an advanced, reverse vortex flow combustion chamber for biofuels, although it was not tested on biofuels and a system that could be fully commercialized has never been completed.

Yongho, Kim [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rosocha, Louis [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Technical and economic assessment of producing hydrogen by reforming syngas from the Battelle indirectly heated biomass gasifier  

SciTech Connect

The technical and economic feasibility of producing hydrogen from biomass by means of indirectly heated gasification and steam reforming was studied. A detailed process model was developed in ASPEN Plus{trademark} to perform material and energy balances. The results of this simulation were used to size and cost major pieces of equipment from which the determination of the necessary selling price of hydrogen was made. A sensitivity analysis was conducted on the process to study hydrogen price as a function of biomass feedstock cost and hydrogen production efficiency. The gasification system used for this study was the Battelle Columbus Laboratory (BCL) indirectly heated gasifier. The heat necessary for the endothermic gasification reactions is supplied by circulating sand from a char combustor to the gasification vessel. Hydrogen production was accomplished by steam reforming the product synthesis gas (syngas) in a process based on that used for natural gas reforming. Three process configurations were studied. Scheme 1 is the full reforming process, with a primary reformer similar to a process furnace, followed by a high temperature shift reactor and a low temperature shift reactor. Scheme 2 uses only the primary reformer, and Scheme 3 uses the primary reformer and the high temperature shift reactor. A pressure swing adsorption (PSA) system is used in all three schemes to produce a hydrogen product pure enough to be used in fuel cells. Steam is produced through detailed heat integration and is intended to be sold as a by-product.

Mann, M.K. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States). Industrial Technologies Div.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Catalysis for Mixed Alcohol Synthesis from Biomass Derived Syngas: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-292  

SciTech Connect

The Dow Chemical Company (Dow) developed and tested catalysts for production of mixed alcohols from synthesis gas (syngas), under research and development (R&D) projects that were discontinued a number of years ago. Dow possesses detailed laboratory notebooks, catalyst samples, and technical expertise related to this past work. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is conducting R&D in support of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) to develop methods for economically producing ethanol from gasified biomass. NREL is currently conducting biomass gasification research at an existing 1/2 ton/day thermochemical test platform. Both Dow and NREL believe that the ability to economically produce ethanol from biomass-derived syngas can be enhanced through collaborative testing, refinement, and development of Dow's mixed-alcohol catalysts at NREL's and/or Dow's bench- and pilot-scale facilities. Dow and NREL further agree that collaboration on improvements in catalysts as well as gasifier operating conditions (e.g., time, temperature, upstream gas treatment) will be necessary to achieve technical and economic goals for production of ethanol and other alcohols.

Hensley, J.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

a single module for hot gas cleanup and production of pure hydrogen from coal-derived syngas. Development of high-temperature membrane materials is at the core of the design. The...

320

Idaho Site's Cold War Cleanup Takes Center Stage in Publication |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site's Cold War Cleanup Takes Center Stage in Publication Site's Cold War Cleanup Takes Center Stage in Publication Idaho Site's Cold War Cleanup Takes Center Stage in Publication January 22, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The Society of American Military Engineers focuses on the Idaho site’s environmental cleanup in the latest issue of its publication, The Military Engineer. This photo of the Engineering Test Reactor, which was decommissioned and demolished at the Idaho site, is featured in the story. The Society of American Military Engineers focuses on the Idaho site's environmental cleanup in the latest issue of its publication, The Military Engineer. This photo of the Engineering Test Reactor, which was decommissioned and demolished at the Idaho site, is featured in the story. The Society of American Military Engineers highlights this Idaho site photo on the cover of the latest issue of its publication, The Military Engineer. In the photo, work is under way to move spent nuclear fuel from wet storage to the safer, more permanent alternative of dry storage.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature syngas cleanup" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Idaho Site's Cold War Cleanup Takes Center Stage in Publication |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Idaho Site's Cold War Cleanup Takes Center Stage in Publication Idaho Site's Cold War Cleanup Takes Center Stage in Publication Idaho Site's Cold War Cleanup Takes Center Stage in Publication January 22, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The Society of American Military Engineers focuses on the Idaho site’s environmental cleanup in the latest issue of its publication, The Military Engineer. This photo of the Engineering Test Reactor, which was decommissioned and demolished at the Idaho site, is featured in the story. The Society of American Military Engineers focuses on the Idaho site's environmental cleanup in the latest issue of its publication, The Military Engineer. This photo of the Engineering Test Reactor, which was decommissioned and demolished at the Idaho site, is featured in the story. The Society of American Military Engineers highlights this Idaho site photo on the cover of the latest issue of its publication, The Military Engineer. In the photo, work is under way to move spent nuclear fuel from wet storage to the safer, more permanent alternative of dry storage.

322

Richland Operations Office Completes Cleanup in Hanford's 300 Area North  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Richland Operations Office Completes Cleanup in Hanford's 300 Richland Operations Office Completes Cleanup in Hanford's 300 Area North Section Richland Operations Office Completes Cleanup in Hanford's 300 Area North Section March 28, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis An aerial view of Hanford’s 300 Area North Section following completion of cleanup. An aerial view of Hanford's 300 Area North Section following completion of cleanup. Workers demolish the 384 Building, known as the Power House and Heating Plant, in the north portion of the 300 Area. Workers demolish the 384 Building, known as the Power House and Heating Plant, in the north portion of the 300 Area. More than 8,000 feet of pipe — part of the 300 Area’s process sewer system — was removed from the 300-15 Waste Site in the north section. More than 8,000 feet of pipe - part of the 300 Area's process sewer

323

Richland Operations Office Completes Cleanup in Hanford's 300 Area North  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Richland Operations Office Completes Cleanup in Hanford's 300 Richland Operations Office Completes Cleanup in Hanford's 300 Area North Section Richland Operations Office Completes Cleanup in Hanford's 300 Area North Section March 28, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis An aerial view of Hanford’s 300 Area North Section following completion of cleanup. An aerial view of Hanford's 300 Area North Section following completion of cleanup. Workers demolish the 384 Building, known as the Power House and Heating Plant, in the north portion of the 300 Area. Workers demolish the 384 Building, known as the Power House and Heating Plant, in the north portion of the 300 Area. More than 8,000 feet of pipe — part of the 300 Area’s process sewer system — was removed from the 300-15 Waste Site in the north section. More than 8,000 feet of pipe - part of the 300 Area's process sewer

324

DOE Achieves Second TRU Waste Cleanup | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Achieves Second TRU Waste Cleanup Achieves Second TRU Waste Cleanup DOE Achieves Second TRU Waste Cleanup October 6, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Deb Gill www.wipp.energy.gov 575-234-7270 CARLSBAD, N.M. -The U.S. Department of Energy has successfully removed all legacy contact-handled transuranic (TRU) waste from the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), near Chicago, Illinois. In September, all legacy TRU waste was removed from the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory (BAPL), near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Maintained by the DOE, ANL is the country's first science and engineering research national laboratory. This milestone was supported by $83,000 provided to the National Transuranic Waste Program as part of a $172 million American Recovery and Reinvestment Act investment to expedite legacy TRU waste disposal activities across the DOE complex.

325

Paducah Site Undergoing Steady Groundwater Cleanup with Variety of Methods  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site Undergoing Steady Groundwater Cleanup with Variety of Site Undergoing Steady Groundwater Cleanup with Variety of Methods Paducah Site Undergoing Steady Groundwater Cleanup with Variety of Methods June 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis The yellow outline depicts an area southeast of the C-400 Cleaning Building, background, where electrical resistance heating will be used to remove trichloroethene (TCE) down to 60 feet below ground. Electrodes will heat the chemical into a vapor that can be pumped to the surface and treated in the white structure, center. The yellow outline depicts an area southeast of the C-400 Cleaning Building, background, where electrical resistance heating will be used to remove trichloroethene (TCE) down to 60 feet below ground. Electrodes will heat the chemical into a vapor that can be pumped to the surface and

326

EM Delegation Tours UK Cleanup Program's Sellafield Site | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tours UK Cleanup Program's Sellafield Site Tours UK Cleanup Program's Sellafield Site EM Delegation Tours UK Cleanup Program's Sellafield Site May 13, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Front row, left to right, NuVision Engineering Vice President Laurie Judd, EM Lead International Affairs Specialist Ana Han, EM Associate Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary Alice Williams and United Kingdom Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) Head of International Relations John Mathieson; back row, left to right, NDA Sellafield Site Deputy Head Graham Jonsson and EM Deputy Assistant Secretary for Tank Waste and Nuclear Material Management Ken Picha. Front row, left to right, NuVision Engineering Vice President Laurie Judd, EM Lead International Affairs Specialist Ana Han, EM Associate Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary Alice Williams and United Kingdom Nuclear

327

Groundwater Cleanup Progresses at Paducah Site | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cleanup Progresses at Paducah Site Cleanup Progresses at Paducah Site Groundwater Cleanup Progresses at Paducah Site October 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Workers drill holes for installation of electrodes as part of a heating system to help clean up contamination. Workers drill holes for installation of electrodes as part of a heating system to help clean up contamination. A crane lifts the carbon treatment system into place. This technology treats vapor pumped to the surface by the belowground heating system. A crane lifts the carbon treatment system into place. This technology treats vapor pumped to the surface by the belowground heating system. The belowground heating system operates in front of the C-400 Cleaning Building. The belowground heating system operates in front of the C-400 Cleaning

328

Summer Fellow Explores EM's Cold War Cleanup | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Summer Fellow Explores EM's Cold War Cleanup Summer Fellow Explores EM's Cold War Cleanup Summer Fellow Explores EM's Cold War Cleanup November 26, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Maine Maritime Academy senior Jared Woods learned about nuclear waste management issues at EM. Maine Maritime Academy senior Jared Woods learned about nuclear waste management issues at EM. WASHINGTON, D.C. - Jared Woods graduates from the Maine Maritime Academy (MMA) next month with the experience of an adventurous summer as a fellow in the DOE Scholars Program, an opportunity to explore the agency's careers and learn about its mission and operations. Assigned to EM's Washington, D.C. headquarters, Woods gained knowledge about nuclear safety and waste treatment under the guidance of EM Office of Safety Management Director Todd Lapointe, who graduated from MMA in 1987.

329

Advisory Board Meets to Discuss EM Cleanup's Future | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advisory Board Meets to Discuss EM Cleanup's Future Advisory Board Meets to Discuss EM Cleanup's Future Advisory Board Meets to Discuss EM Cleanup's Future December 6, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis EM Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary Tracy Mustin, second from right, speaks with members of the Environmental Management Advisory Board this week as EM Deputy Assistant Secretary, Safety, Security and Quality Programs, Matthew Moury, second from left, listens. EM Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary Tracy Mustin, second from right, speaks with members of the Environmental Management Advisory Board this week as EM Deputy Assistant Secretary, Safety, Security and Quality Programs, Matthew Moury, second from left, listens. WASHINGTON, D.C. - EM Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary Tracy Mustin this week sought guidance from the Environmental Management Advisory Board

330

Oak Ridge Moves Forward in Mercury Cleanup | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge Moves Forward in Mercury Cleanup Oak Ridge Moves Forward in Mercury Cleanup Oak Ridge Moves Forward in Mercury Cleanup March 28, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Workers recently removed five large mercury-contaminated tanks from Y-12. Workers recently removed five large mercury-contaminated tanks from Y-12. Removing these tanks is part of the steps to reduce potential risk from mercury at Y-12. Removing these tanks is part of the steps to reduce potential risk from mercury at Y-12. Workers recently removed five large mercury-contaminated tanks from Y-12. Removing these tanks is part of the steps to reduce potential risk from mercury at Y-12. OAK RIDGE, Tenn. - Oak Ridge's EM program is making significant progress to reduce environmental mercury releases from the Y-12 National Security Complex. Mercury is one of the greatest environmental concerns facing the Oak Ridge

331

Surface and Soil Cleanup at Brookhaven National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Surface and Soil Projects Surface and Soil Projects placeholder Aerial view of capped landfills A major part of the overall site cleanup involved addressing contaminated soils, underground tanks, and waste storage areas. All of the major soil projects have now been completed, with the exception of some soils that will need to be cleaned up during the decommissioning of the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor and High Flux Beam Reactor. Following are a list of major surface and soil cleanup projects that have been completed since 1994: Three out-of-service 100,000 gallon aboveground waste tanks were removed and disposed of at a licensed off-site disposal facility. Sixteen underground storage tanks (USTs) were removed between 1988 and 2005 under the cleanup program. The project included the removal, transportation, and disposal of the tanks and approximately 4,000 cubic yards of soil and debris.

332

DOE Achieves Second TRU Waste Cleanup | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Achieves Second TRU Waste Cleanup Achieves Second TRU Waste Cleanup DOE Achieves Second TRU Waste Cleanup October 6, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Deb Gill www.wipp.energy.gov 575-234-7270 CARLSBAD, N.M. -The U.S. Department of Energy has successfully removed all legacy contact-handled transuranic (TRU) waste from the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), near Chicago, Illinois. In September, all legacy TRU waste was removed from the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory (BAPL), near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Maintained by the DOE, ANL is the country's first science and engineering research national laboratory. This milestone was supported by $83,000 provided to the National Transuranic Waste Program as part of a $172 million American Recovery and Reinvestment Act investment to expedite legacy TRU waste disposal activities across the DOE complex.

333

Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Cleanup Project Steps into Spotlight at  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Uranium Mill Tailings Cleanup Project Steps into Spotlight at Uranium Mill Tailings Cleanup Project Steps into Spotlight at International Meeting in Vienna Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Cleanup Project Steps into Spotlight at International Meeting in Vienna October 22, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Moab Federal Project Director Donald Metzler presents at the Uranium Mining Remediation Exchange Group meeting in Germany in September 2011. Moab Federal Project Director Donald Metzler presents at the Uranium Mining Remediation Exchange Group meeting in Germany in September 2011. Moab Federal Project Director Donald Metzler Moab Federal Project Director Donald Metzler Moab Federal Project Director Donald Metzler presents at the Uranium Mining Remediation Exchange Group meeting in Germany in September 2011. Moab Federal Project Director Donald Metzler

334

Exemplary Hurricane Damage Cleanup Earns Petroleum Reserve Coveted  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exemplary Hurricane Damage Cleanup Earns Petroleum Reserve Coveted Exemplary Hurricane Damage Cleanup Earns Petroleum Reserve Coveted Environmental Award Exemplary Hurricane Damage Cleanup Earns Petroleum Reserve Coveted Environmental Award April 22, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - An exceptional waste management project at a Texas Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) site following Hurricane Ike in 2008 has won a DOE Environmental Sustainability (EStar) Award for Waste/Pollution Prevention. The award recognizes the SPR Storm Recovery Debris Waste Management Project at the Big Hill storage complex near Beaumont, Texas, which was heavily impacted by Hurricane Ike in September 2008. Selected annually by an independent panel of judges, EStar awards recognize environmental sustainability projects and programs that reduce risks and impacts, protect

335

Idaho Site Obtains Patent for Nuclear Reactor Sodium Cleanup Treatment |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Obtains Patent for Nuclear Reactor Sodium Cleanup Obtains Patent for Nuclear Reactor Sodium Cleanup Treatment Idaho Site Obtains Patent for Nuclear Reactor Sodium Cleanup Treatment March 28, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis CWI engineers Jeff Jones, David Tolman, right, and Kirk Dooley (seated) developed a treatment to safely dissolve a bicarbonate crust and treat and remove the sodium in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II at the Idaho site. CWI engineers Jeff Jones, David Tolman, right, and Kirk Dooley (seated) developed a treatment to safely dissolve a bicarbonate crust and treat and remove the sodium in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II at the Idaho site. Piping in the east boiler basement of the sodium processing building was color coded for easy identification. Orange indicates sodium and green identifies cooling water.

336

Recovery Act Invests in Cleanup, Preservation of Hanford Site Locomotives,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Invests in Cleanup, Preservation of Hanford Site Invests in Cleanup, Preservation of Hanford Site Locomotives, Railcars Recovery Act Invests in Cleanup, Preservation of Hanford Site Locomotives, Railcars With the help of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, the Hanford Site is preserving the history of its locomotives and railcars as workers clean up the legacy of the Cold War. In the recently completed railcar project – a $5.5 million effort funded by the Recovery Act – the Richland Operations Office and its contractors moved two locomotives and two cask cars onto reclaimed track at the B Reactor for permanent public display. Designated a National Historic Landmark in August 2008, the B Reactor is slated to become part of the national park system commemorating the Manhattan Project and is open for

337

Hanford Achieves a Cleanup First | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Achieves a Cleanup First Achieves a Cleanup First Hanford Achieves a Cleanup First September 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis F Reactor during operations in 1956. F Reactor during operations in 1956. F Reactor Area in July 2012. F Reactor Area in July 2012. A worker cuts and drains pipe at a waste site in F Area. The pipe contained sodium dichromate, which was used as an anti-corrosion agent. A worker cuts and drains pipe at a waste site in F Area. The pipe contained sodium dichromate, which was used as an anti-corrosion agent. An excavator scoops out a section of river outfall pipeline at an F Area waste site. The pipeline was used to discharge effluent into the Columbia River. An excavator scoops out a section of river outfall pipeline at an F Area waste site. The pipeline was used to discharge effluent into the Columbia

338

Hanford Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds Cleanup Goals  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds Cleanup Goals Hanford Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds Cleanup Goals June 26, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The 200 West Pump and Treat System is Hanford’s largest facility for treating contaminated groundwater. The 200 West Pump and Treat System is Hanford's largest facility for treating contaminated groundwater. A graphic showing the 200 West Pump and Treat plumes and well network. A graphic showing the 200 West Pump and Treat plumes and well network. The 200 West Pump and Treat System is Hanford's largest facility for treating contaminated groundwater. A graphic showing the 200 West Pump and Treat plumes and well network. RICHLAND, Wash. - Workers supporting groundwater cleanup for EM's

339

Massive Soil Cleanup Effort Concludes at Hanford - Recovery Act Funding  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Massive Soil Cleanup Effort Concludes at Hanford - Recovery Act Massive Soil Cleanup Effort Concludes at Hanford - Recovery Act Funding Pays for Safe Disposal of 20,000 Truckloads of Soil Massive Soil Cleanup Effort Concludes at Hanford - Recovery Act Funding Pays for Safe Disposal of 20,000 Truckloads of Soil August 11, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Andre Armstrong, CH2M HILL Andre_L_Armstrong@rl.gov 509-376-6773 Geoff Tyree, DOE Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov 509-376-4171 RICHLAND, Wash. - U.S. Department of Energy contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company removed nearly half a million tons of contaminated soil over the last two years using American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington State. Workers shipped more than 20,000 truckloads of contaminated soil excavated

340

Mercury cleanup efforts intensify | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mercury cleanup efforts ... Mercury cleanup efforts ... Mercury cleanup efforts intensify Posted: February 11, 2013 - 3:31pm | Y-12 Report | Volume 9, Issue 2 | 2013 Millions of pounds of mercury were required to support Y-12's post-World War II mission of separating lithium isotopes. Cleaning up the toxic heavy metal poses many challenges, but what Y-12 is learning could help conquer mercury pollution worldwide. There's a reason you won't find mercury in many thermometers these days. Mercury is a heavy metal that occurs in several chemical forms, all of which can produce toxic effects in high enough doses. Mercury was used in the column exchange process, which Y-12 employed to produce lithium-6 from 1953 to 1962. Through process spills, system leaks and surface runoff, some 700,000 pounds of mercury have been lost to the

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341

Report for EM-Initiated Program Supporting Cleanup is Available |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report for EM-Initiated Program Supporting Cleanup is Available Report for EM-Initiated Program Supporting Cleanup is Available Report for EM-Initiated Program Supporting Cleanup is Available September 4, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis An Akuna-generated figure of the Savannah River F-Basin site showing the distribution of surface structures, well, contaminate plume and lithofacies. An Akuna-generated figure of the Savannah River F-Basin site showing the distribution of surface structures, well, contaminate plume and lithofacies. Modeled spatial distribution of technicium-99 after the releases from the BC cribs on the Hanford Central Plateau using VisIt software. Modeled spatial distribution of technicium-99 after the releases from the BC cribs on the Hanford Central Plateau using VisIt software. An Akuna-generated figure of the Savannah River F-Basin site showing the distribution of surface structures, well, contaminate plume and lithofacies.

342

EM Delegation Tours UK Cleanup Program's Sellafield Site | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EM Delegation Tours UK Cleanup Program's Sellafield Site EM Delegation Tours UK Cleanup Program's Sellafield Site EM Delegation Tours UK Cleanup Program's Sellafield Site May 13, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Front row, left to right, NuVision Engineering Vice President Laurie Judd, EM Lead International Affairs Specialist Ana Han, EM Associate Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary Alice Williams and United Kingdom Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) Head of International Relations John Mathieson; back row, left to right, NDA Sellafield Site Deputy Head Graham Jonsson and EM Deputy Assistant Secretary for Tank Waste and Nuclear Material Management Ken Picha. Front row, left to right, NuVision Engineering Vice President Laurie Judd, EM Lead International Affairs Specialist Ana Han, EM Associate Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary Alice Williams and United Kingdom Nuclear

343

Deriving cleanup guidelines for radionuclides at Brookhaven National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Past activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) resulted in soil and groundwater contamination. As a result, BNL was designated a Superfund site under the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). BNL`s Office of Environmental Restoration (OER) is overseeing environmental restoration activities at the Laboratory. With the exception of radium, there are no regulations or guidelines to establish cleanup guidelines for radionuclides in soils at BNL. BNL must derive radionuclide soil cleanup guidelines for a number of Operable Units (OUs) and Areas of Concern (AOCs). These guidelines are required by DOE under a proposed regulation for radiation protection of public health and the environment as well as to satisfy the requirements of CERCLA. The objective of this report is to propose a standard approach to deriving risk-based cleanup guidelines for radionuclides in soil at BNL. Implementation of the approach is briefly discussed.

Meinhold, A.F.; Morris, S.C.; Dionne, B.; Moskowitz, P.D.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Highly Radioactive Sludge Removal Complete: Historic Cleanup Effort Reduces  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Highly Radioactive Sludge Removal Complete: Historic Cleanup Effort Highly Radioactive Sludge Removal Complete: Historic Cleanup Effort Reduces the Risk along the Columbia River Highly Radioactive Sludge Removal Complete: Historic Cleanup Effort Reduces the Risk along the Columbia River September 13, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Salony, DOE Cameron.Salony@rl.doe.gov 509-376-0402 Dee Millikin, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company Dee_Millikin@rl.gov 509-376-1297 RICHLAND, WASH. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) announced today the removal of the first phase of highly radioactive sludge from under water storage in the K West Basin about 400 yards away from the Columbia River. "This is a major step forward in protecting the river and a historic

345

Highly Radioactive Sludge Removal Complete: Historic Cleanup Effort Reduces  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Highly Radioactive Sludge Removal Complete: Historic Cleanup Effort Highly Radioactive Sludge Removal Complete: Historic Cleanup Effort Reduces the Risk along the Columbia River Highly Radioactive Sludge Removal Complete: Historic Cleanup Effort Reduces the Risk along the Columbia River September 13, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Salony, DOE Cameron.Salony@rl.doe.gov 509-376-0402 Dee Millikin, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company Dee_Millikin@rl.gov 509-376-1297 RICHLAND, WASH. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) announced today the removal of the first phase of highly radioactive sludge from under water storage in the K West Basin about 400 yards away from the Columbia River. "This is a major step forward in protecting the river and a historic

346

Summer Fellow Explores EM's Cold War Cleanup | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Summer Fellow Explores EM's Cold War Cleanup Summer Fellow Explores EM's Cold War Cleanup Summer Fellow Explores EM's Cold War Cleanup November 26, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Maine Maritime Academy senior Jared Woods learned about nuclear waste management issues at EM. Maine Maritime Academy senior Jared Woods learned about nuclear waste management issues at EM. WASHINGTON, D.C. - Jared Woods graduates from the Maine Maritime Academy (MMA) next month with the experience of an adventurous summer as a fellow in the DOE Scholars Program, an opportunity to explore the agency's careers and learn about its mission and operations. Assigned to EM's Washington, D.C. headquarters, Woods gained knowledge about nuclear safety and waste treatment under the guidance of EM Office of Safety Management Director Todd Lapointe, who graduated from MMA in 1987.

347

Oak Ridge Moves Forward in Mercury Cleanup | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Moves Forward in Mercury Cleanup Moves Forward in Mercury Cleanup Oak Ridge Moves Forward in Mercury Cleanup March 28, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Workers recently removed five large mercury-contaminated tanks from Y-12. Workers recently removed five large mercury-contaminated tanks from Y-12. Removing these tanks is part of the steps to reduce potential risk from mercury at Y-12. Removing these tanks is part of the steps to reduce potential risk from mercury at Y-12. Workers recently removed five large mercury-contaminated tanks from Y-12. Removing these tanks is part of the steps to reduce potential risk from mercury at Y-12. OAK RIDGE, Tenn. - Oak Ridge's EM program is making significant progress to reduce environmental mercury releases from the Y-12 National Security Complex. Mercury is one of the greatest environmental concerns facing the Oak Ridge

348

Idaho Site Obtains Patent for Nuclear Reactor Sodium Cleanup Treatment |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Idaho Site Obtains Patent for Nuclear Reactor Sodium Cleanup Idaho Site Obtains Patent for Nuclear Reactor Sodium Cleanup Treatment Idaho Site Obtains Patent for Nuclear Reactor Sodium Cleanup Treatment March 28, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis CWI engineers Jeff Jones, David Tolman, right, and Kirk Dooley (seated) developed a treatment to safely dissolve a bicarbonate crust and treat and remove the sodium in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II at the Idaho site. CWI engineers Jeff Jones, David Tolman, right, and Kirk Dooley (seated) developed a treatment to safely dissolve a bicarbonate crust and treat and remove the sodium in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II at the Idaho site. Piping in the east boiler basement of the sodium processing building was color coded for easy identification. Orange indicates sodium and green identifies cooling water.

349

UTILIZING THE RIGHT MIX OF ENVIRONMENTAL CLEANUP TECHNOLOGIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) Figure 1 is a 310-square-mile United States Department of Energy nuclear facility located along the Savannah River near Aiken, South Carolina. During operations, which started in 1951, hazardous substances (chemicals and radionuclides) were released to the environment. The releases occurred as a result of inadvertent spills and waste disposal in unlined pits and basins which was common practice before environmental regulations existed. The hazardous substances have migrated to the vadose zone and groundwater in many areas of the SRS, resulting in 515 waste units that are required by environmental regulations, to undergo characterization and, if needed, remediation. In the initial years of the SRS environmental cleanup program (early 1990s), the focus was to use common technologies (such as pump and treat, air stripping, excavation and removal) that actively and tangibly removed contamination. Exclusive use of these technologies required continued and significant funding while often failing to meet acceptable clean-up goals and objectives. Recognizing that a more cost-effective approach was needed, SRS implemented new and complementary remediation methods focused on active and passive technologies targeted to solve specific remediation problems. Today, SRS uses technologies such as chemical/pH-adjusting injection, phytoremediation, underground cutoff walls, dynamic underground stripping, soil fracturing, microbial degradation, baroballs, electrical resistance heating, soil vapor extraction, and microblowers to more effectively treat contamination at lower costs. Additionally, SRS's remediation approach cost effectively maximizes cleanup as SRS works proactively with multiple regulatory agencies. Using GIS, video, animation, and graphics, SRS is able to provide an accurate depiction of the evolution of SRS groundwater and vadose zone cleanup activities to convince stakeholders and regulators of the effectiveness of various cleanup technologies. Remediating large, complex groundwater plumes using state of-the art technologies and approaches is a hallmark of years of experience and progress. Environmental restoration at SRS continues to be a challenging and dynamic process as new cleanup technologies and approaches are adopted.

Bergren, C; Wade Whitaker, W; Mary Flora, M

2007-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

350

Role of Background in the CERCLA Cleanup Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Background in the CERCLA Cleanup Program Background in the CERCLA Cleanup Program U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response Office of Emergency and Remedial Response April 26, 2002 OSWER 9285.6-07P OSWER 9285.6-07P page 2 of 13 Table of Contents Purpose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 3 of 13 History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 4 of 13 Definitions of Terms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 5 of 13 Consideration of Background in Risk Assessment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 6 of 13 Consideration of Background in Risk Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 7 of 13 Consideration of Background in Risk Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 8 of 13 Hypothetical Case Examples .

351

Development of Model-Based Controls for GE's Gasifier and Syngas Cooler  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Model-Based Controls Model-Based Controls for GE's Gasifier and Syngas Cooler Background The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) develops affordable and clean energy from coal and other fossil fuels to secure a sustainable energy economy. To further this mission, NETL funds research and development of advanced sensor and control technologies that can function under the extreme operating conditions often found in advanced power systems, particularly

352

Preliminary Screening -- Technical and Economic Assessment of Synthesis Gas to Fuels and Chemicals with Emphasis on the Potential for Biomass-Derived Syngas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In principle, syngas (primarily consisting of CO and H2) can be produced from any hydrocarbon feedstock, including: natural gas, naphtha, residual oil, petroleum coke, coal, and biomass. The lowest cost routes for syngas production, however, are based on natural gas, the cheapest option being remote or stranded reserves. Economic considerations dictate that the current production of liquid fuels from syngas translates into the use of natural gas as the hydrocarbon source. Nevertheless, the syngas production operation in a gas-to-liquids plant amounts to greater than half of the capital cost of the plant. The choice of technology for syngas production also depends on the scale of the synthesis operation. Syngas production from solid fuels can require an even greater capital investment with the addition of feedstock handling and more complex syngas purification operations. The greatest impact on improving the economics of gas-to liquids plants is through (1) decreasing capital costs associated with syngas production and (2) improving the thermal efficiency with better heat integration and utilization. Improved thermal efficiency can be obtained by combining the gas-to-liquids plant with a power generation plant to take advantage of the availability of low-pressure steam. The extensive research and development efforts devoted to syngas conversion to fuels and chemicals are documented in a vast amount of literature that tracks the scientific and technological advancements in syngas chemistry. The purpose of this report is to review the many syngas to products processes and summarize the salient points regarding the technology status and description, chemistry, catalysts, reactors, gas cleanliness requirements, process and environmental performances, and economics. Table 1 lists the products examined in this study and gives some facts about the technology as well as advantages and disadvantages. Table 2 summarizes the catalysts, process conditions, conversions, and selectivities for the various syngas to products processes. Table 3 presents catalyst poisons for the various products.

Spath, P. L.; Dayton, D. C.

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

CARBON COATED (CARBONOUS) CATALYST IN EBULLATED BED REACTOR FOR PRODUCTION OF OXYGENATED CHEMICALS FROM SYNGAS/CO2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There are a number of exothermic chemical reactions which might benefit from the temperature control and freedom from catalyst fouling provided by the ebullated bed reactor technology. A particularly promising area is production of oxygenated chemicals, such as alcohols and ethers, from synthesis gas, which can be economically produced from coal or biomass. The ebullated bed operation requires that the small-diameter ({approx}1/32 inch) catalyst particles have enough mechanical strength to avoid loss by attrition. However, all of the State Of The Art (SOTA) catalysts and advanced catalysts for the purpose are low in mechanical strength. The patented carbon-coated catalyst technology developed in our laboratory converts catalyst particles with low mechanical strength to strong catalysts suitable for ebullated bed application. This R&D program is concerned with the modification on the mechanical strength of the SOTA and advanced catalysts so that the ebullated bed technology can be utilized to produce valuable oxygenated chemicals from syngas/CO{sub 2} efficiently and economically. The objective of this R&D program is to study the technical and economic feasibility of selective production of high-value oxygenated chemicals from synthesis gas and CO{sub 2} mixed feed in an ebullated bed reactor using carbon-coated catalyst particles.

Peizheng Zhou

2001-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

354

CARBON COATED (CARBONOUS) CATALYST IN EBULLATED BED REACTOR FOR PRODUCTION OF OXYGENATED CHEMICALS FROM SYNGAS/CO2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There are a number of exothermic chemical reactions which might benefit from the temperature control and freedom from catalyst fouling provided by the ebullated bed reactor technology. A particularly promising area is production of oxygenated chemicals, such as alcohols and ethers, from synthesis gas, which can be economically produced from coal or biomass. The ebullated bed operation requires that the small-diameter ({approx} 1/32 inch) catalyst particles have enough mechanical strength to avoid loss by attrition. However, all of the State Of The Art (SOTA) catalysts and advanced catalysts for the purpose are low in mechanical strength. The patented carbon-coated catalyst technology developed in our laboratory converts catalyst particles with low mechanical strength to strong catalysts suitable for ebullated bed application. This R&D program is concerned with the modification on the mechanical strength of the SOTA and advanced catalysts so that the ebullated bed technology can be utilized to produce valuable oxygenated chemicals from syngas/CO{sub 2} efficiently and economically. The objective of this R&D program is to study the technical and economic feasibility of selective production of high-value oxygenated chemicals from synthesis gas and CO{sub 2} mixed feed in an ebullated bed reactor using carbon-coated catalyst particles.

Peizheng Zhou

2000-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

355

Site Transition Process upon Completion of the Cleanup Mission: Fact Sheet  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Process upon Completion of the Cleanup Mission: Process upon Completion of the Cleanup Mission: Fact Sheet (September 2013) Site Transition Process upon Completion of the Cleanup Mission: Fact Sheet (September 2013) DOE's internal site transition process for Cleanup to long-term stewardship, post-cleanup, and post-closure has been established in transition guidance for sites that will transfer to a Landlord Program Secretarial Office or to Legacy Management for long-term stewardship. Site Transition Process upon Completion of the Cleanup Mission: Fact Sheet (September 2013) More Documents & Publications Site Transition Summary: Cleanup Completion to Long-Term Stewardship at Department of Energy On-going Mission Sites Site Transition Process Upon Cleanup Completion EM SSAB Conference Calls - January 27, 2011

356

West Valley Site History, Cleanup Status, and Role of the West...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

West Valley Site History, Cleanup Status, and Role of the West Valley Citizen Task Force West Valley Site History, Cleanup Status, and Role of the West Valley Citizen Task Force...

357

DOE Update on USEC Cleanup, R&D, and Loan Guarantee Application...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Update on USEC Cleanup, R&D, and Loan Guarantee Application DOE Update on USEC Cleanup, R&D, and Loan Guarantee Application October 15, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -...

358

Idaho Governor Praises DOE, Contractor Effort for Resuming Critical Cleanup  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Governor Praises DOE, Contractor Effort for Resuming Critical Governor Praises DOE, Contractor Effort for Resuming Critical Cleanup Project Idaho Governor Praises DOE, Contractor Effort for Resuming Critical Cleanup Project July 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Idaho Governor C.L. “Butch” Otter discusses the importance of completing the cleanup mission at the Idaho site. Idaho Governor C.L. "Butch" Otter discusses the importance of completing the cleanup mission at the Idaho site. An exterior view of the recently constructed Accelerated Retrieval Project-VIII facility. An exterior view of the recently constructed Accelerated Retrieval Project-VIII facility. The Accelerated Retrieval Project-VIII building spans a 1.72-acre footprint. More than 2 million pounds of structural steel went into building. The eastern and largest portion of the structure is 250 feet long by 290 feet wide and 70 feet tall. The one-of-a-kind design consists of a center column-supported space frame connecting each side of the facility’s roof trusses.

359

Cleanup at Los Alamos National Laboratory - the challenges - 9493  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides an overview of environmental cleanup at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and some of the unique aspects and challenges. Cleanup of the 65-year old Department of Energy Laboratory is being conducted under a RCRA Consent Order with the State of New Mexico. This agreement is one of the most recent cleanup agreements signed in the DOE complex and was based on lessons learned at other DOE sites. A number of attributes create unique challenges for LANL cleanup -- the proximity to the community and pueblos, the site's topography and geology, and the nature of LANL's on-going missions. This overview paper will set the stage for other papers in this session, including papers that present: Plans to retrieve buried waste at Material Disposal Area B, across the street from oen of Los Alamos' commercial districts and the local newspaper; Progress to date and joint plans with WIPP for disposal of the remaining inventory of legacy transuranic waste; Reviews of both groundwater and surface water contamination and the factors complicating both characterization and remediation; Optimizing the disposal of low-level radioactive waste from ongoing LANL missions; A stakeholder environmental data transparency project (RACER), with full public access to all available information on contamination at LANL, and A description of the approach to waste processing cost recovery from the programs that generate hazardous and radioactive waste at LANL.

Stiger, Susan G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hargis, Kenneth M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Graham, Michael J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rael, George J [NNSL/LASO

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Idaho Governor Praises DOE, Contractor Effort for Resuming Critical Cleanup  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Idaho Governor Praises DOE, Contractor Effort for Resuming Critical Idaho Governor Praises DOE, Contractor Effort for Resuming Critical Cleanup Project Idaho Governor Praises DOE, Contractor Effort for Resuming Critical Cleanup Project July 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Idaho Governor C.L. “Butch” Otter discusses the importance of completing the cleanup mission at the Idaho site. Idaho Governor C.L. "Butch" Otter discusses the importance of completing the cleanup mission at the Idaho site. An exterior view of the recently constructed Accelerated Retrieval Project-VIII facility. An exterior view of the recently constructed Accelerated Retrieval Project-VIII facility. The Accelerated Retrieval Project-VIII building spans a 1.72-acre footprint. More than 2 million pounds of structural steel went into building. The eastern and largest portion of the structure is 250 feet long by 290 feet wide and 70 feet tall. The one-of-a-kind design consists of a center column-supported space frame connecting each side of the facility’s roof trusses.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature syngas cleanup" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Sorption Mechanisms for Mercury Capture in Warm Post-Gasification Gas Clean-Up Systems  

SciTech Connect

The research was directed towards a sorbent injection/particle removal process where a sorbent may be injected upstream of the warm gas cleanup system to scavenge Hg and other trace metals, and removed (with the metals) within the warm gas cleanup process. The specific objectives of this project were to understand and quantify, through fundamentally based models, mechanisms of interaction between mercury vapor compounds and novel paper waste derived (kaolinite + calcium based) sorbents (currently marketed under the trade name MinPlus). The portion of the research described first is the experimental portion, in which sorbent effectiveness to scavenge metallic mercury (Hg{sup 0}) at high temperatures (>600 C) is determined as a function of temperature, sorbent loading, gas composition, and other important parameters. Levels of Hg{sup 0} investigated were in an industrially relevant range ({approx} 25 {micro}g/m{sup 3}) although contaminants were contained in synthetic gases and not in actual flue gases. A later section of this report contains the results of the complementary computational results.

Jost Wendt; Sung Jun Lee; Paul Blowers

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

362

NETL: Gasifipedia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Syngas Cleanup: Syngas Contaminant Removal and Conditioning Syngas Cleanup: Syngas Contaminant Removal and Conditioning Particulate Removal Raw synthesis gas (syngas) leaving the gasifier contains fine ash and/or slag that needs to be removed prior to sending the gas downstream for further processing. The bulk of the particulates are removed using dry particulate removal systems such as filters and/or cyclones. High temperature ceramic filters have been developed for gasification applications and are currently commercially available. The recovered fly ash/slag can either be recycled to the gasifier or purged from the system as a byproduct. The syngas leaving the dry particulate removal system is then further purified by passing through a wet scrubber where any residual solids can be removed down to a 1 ppm level.

363

RECOVERY ACT LEADS TO CLEANUP OF TRANSURANIC WASTE SITES | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RECOVERY ACT LEADS TO CLEANUP OF TRANSURANIC WASTE SITES RECOVERY ACT LEADS TO CLEANUP OF TRANSURANIC WASTE SITES RECOVERY ACT LEADS TO CLEANUP OF TRANSURANIC WASTE SITES October 1, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis RECOVERY ACT LEADS TO CLEANUP OF TRANSURANIC WASTE SITES Carlsbad, NM - The recent completion of transuranic (TRU) waste cleanup at Vallecitos Nuclear Center (VNC) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Site 300 in California brings the total number of sites cleared of TRU waste to 17. "Recovery Act funding has made this possible," Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) Recovery Act Federal Project Director Casey Gadbury said of the VNC and LLNL cleanups funded with about $1.6 million in Recovery Act funds. "The cleanup of these and other small-quantity sites has been and will be accelerated because of the available Recovery Act funds."

364

RECOVERY ACT LEADS TO CLEANUP OF TRANSURANIC WASTE SITES | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RECOVERY ACT LEADS TO CLEANUP OF TRANSURANIC WASTE SITES RECOVERY ACT LEADS TO CLEANUP OF TRANSURANIC WASTE SITES RECOVERY ACT LEADS TO CLEANUP OF TRANSURANIC WASTE SITES October 1, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis RECOVERY ACT LEADS TO CLEANUP OF TRANSURANIC WASTE SITES Carlsbad, NM - The recent completion of transuranic (TRU) waste cleanup at Vallecitos Nuclear Center (VNC) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Site 300 in California brings the total number of sites cleared of TRU waste to 17. "Recovery Act funding has made this possible," Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) Recovery Act Federal Project Director Casey Gadbury said of the VNC and LLNL cleanups funded with about $1.6 million in Recovery Act funds. "The cleanup of these and other small-quantity sites has been and will be accelerated because of the available Recovery Act funds."

365

DOE ACHIEVES MAJOR COLD WAR LEGACY WASTE CLEANUP MILESTONE: Waste Isolation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ACHIEVES MAJOR COLD WAR LEGACY WASTE CLEANUP MILESTONE: Waste ACHIEVES MAJOR COLD WAR LEGACY WASTE CLEANUP MILESTONE: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Receives 10,000th Shipment DOE ACHIEVES MAJOR COLD WAR LEGACY WASTE CLEANUP MILESTONE: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Receives 10,000th Shipment October 3, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis DOE ACHIEVES MAJOR COLD WAR LEGACY WASTE CLEANUP MILESTONE: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Receives 10,000th Shipment DOE ACHIEVES MAJOR COLD WAR LEGACY WASTE CLEANUP MILESTONE: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Receives 10,000th Shipment DOE ACHIEVES MAJOR COLD WAR LEGACY WASTE CLEANUP MILESTONE: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Receives 10,000th Shipment DOE ACHIEVES MAJOR COLD WAR LEGACY WASTE CLEANUP MILESTONE: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Receives 10,000th Shipment CARLSBAD, N.M. - The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) received its

366

DOE Completes Cleanup at New York, California Sites - Recovery Act funds  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Completes Cleanup at New York, California Sites - Recovery Act Completes Cleanup at New York, California Sites - Recovery Act funds accelerate cleanup; support job creation and footprint reduction DOE Completes Cleanup at New York, California Sites - Recovery Act funds accelerate cleanup; support job creation and footprint reduction July 1, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact 202-586-4940 WASHINGTON, D.C. - Last month, the U.S. Department of Energy completed the cleanup of Cold War legacy waste at the Nuclear Radiation Development, LLC (NRD) site near Grand Island, New York, and at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California. The two locations became the 18th and 19th sites to be completely cleaned of legacy waste. This milestone was achieved as part of a $172 million investment from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to expedite legacy waste cleanup

367

DOE ACHIEVES MAJOR COLD WAR LEGACY WASTE CLEANUP MILESTONE: Waste Isolation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE ACHIEVES MAJOR COLD WAR LEGACY WASTE CLEANUP MILESTONE: Waste DOE ACHIEVES MAJOR COLD WAR LEGACY WASTE CLEANUP MILESTONE: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Receives 10,000th Shipment DOE ACHIEVES MAJOR COLD WAR LEGACY WASTE CLEANUP MILESTONE: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Receives 10,000th Shipment October 3, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis DOE ACHIEVES MAJOR COLD WAR LEGACY WASTE CLEANUP MILESTONE: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Receives 10,000th Shipment DOE ACHIEVES MAJOR COLD WAR LEGACY WASTE CLEANUP MILESTONE: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Receives 10,000th Shipment DOE ACHIEVES MAJOR COLD WAR LEGACY WASTE CLEANUP MILESTONE: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Receives 10,000th Shipment DOE ACHIEVES MAJOR COLD WAR LEGACY WASTE CLEANUP MILESTONE: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Receives 10,000th Shipment CARLSBAD, N.M. - The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) received its

368

EM Updates Congress on Nuclear Cleanup Progress in 18th Annual Caucus |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EM Updates Congress on Nuclear Cleanup Progress in 18th Annual EM Updates Congress on Nuclear Cleanup Progress in 18th Annual Caucus EM Updates Congress on Nuclear Cleanup Progress in 18th Annual Caucus March 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - EM and its cleanup contractors present briefings each year to the U.S. House Nuclear Cleanup Caucus on remediation operations at its major sites across the DOE complex. The briefings are organized by Rep. Doc Hastings (R-Wash.), who chairs the bipartisan caucus. For nearly two decades, the briefings have offered members of Congress and their staff, news media and other interested individuals insight into the progress of cleanup of the environmental legacy of the Cold War. EM site managers and their contractor counterparts provide updates on cleanup accomplishments, safety performance, budget scopes, cost savings and plans

369

Idaho Site Advances Recovery Act Cleanup after Inventing Effective Treatment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

April 14, 2011 April 14, 2011 IDAHO FALLS, Idaho - For the first time in history, workers at the Idaho site achieved success in the initial cleanup of potentially dangerous sodium in a de- commissioned nuclear reactor using an innovative treatment process. The Ameri- can Recovery and Reinvestment Act invested $70 million in the project, which employs 130 workers. DOE officials cheered the outcome and praised the team that designed and imple- mented the innovative sodium treatment for which the DOE has filed a provisional patent application. "We're proud of our team for creating a unique solution to safely rid the Experi- mental Breeder Reactor-II of this highly reactive sodium before we demolish it," DOE Idaho Cleanup Project Assistant Manager Jim Cooper said. "Our workers

370

EM Risk and Cleanup Decision Making Presentation by Mark Gilbertson  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AND CLEANUP DECISION MAKING AND CLEANUP DECISION MAKING www.em.doe.gov 1 Mark Gilbertson Deputy Assistant Secretary for Site Restoration Office of Environmental Management May 31, 2012 Presented to Environmental Management Advisory Board Topics * How we got to where we are * Existing environment and health risk www.em.doe.gov 2 * Existing environment and health risk analysis to support decision-making * Considerations going forward The Past Five Years * FY2008 budget assumed ~$6 billion escalated for inflation over the following four years * Re-baselined the program and in some cases renegotiated milestones and contracts to align with the budget profile * Milestones were negotiated in good faith (~40 agreements/~200 major milestones/year) * Recognition that approximately 50% of the EM budget is "min safe"

371

Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater Cleanup -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater Cleanup - Efficiency delivered more than $6 million in cost savings, $3 million in annual savings Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater Cleanup - Efficiency delivered more than $6 million in cost savings, $3 million in annual savings June 4, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Geoff Tyree, DOE Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov (509) 376-4171 Dee Millikin, CHPRC Dee_Millikin@rl.gov (509) 376-1297 RICHLAND, Wash. - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company is using a treatment material that has delivered more than $6 million in cost savings to date and is delivering more than $3 million in annual cost savings and efficiencies in treatment

372

DOE Awards Technical Assistance Contract for Moab Mill Tailings Cleanup |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technical Assistance Contract for Moab Mill Tailings Technical Assistance Contract for Moab Mill Tailings Cleanup DOE Awards Technical Assistance Contract for Moab Mill Tailings Cleanup May 31, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Bill Taylor bill.taylor@srs.gov 803-952-8564 Cincinnati-The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced the award of an $18 million small disadvantaged business contract with S&K Aerospace, LLC, of St. Ignatius, Montana to continue to provide technical assistance services for the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project in Moab, Utah. The basic contract is for three years with two one-year options to extend, for a total of up to five years. S&K Aerospace, LLC, a tribal organization 8(a) small business, will assist in the Department's removal of uranium tailings at the former Atlas

373

New Groundwater Treatment Facility Begins Operation: Boost in Cleanup  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Groundwater Treatment Facility Begins Operation: Boost in New Groundwater Treatment Facility Begins Operation: Boost in Cleanup Accelerated by Recovery Act Funding New Groundwater Treatment Facility Begins Operation: Boost in Cleanup Accelerated by Recovery Act Funding January 19, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Andre Armstrong, CH2M HILL (509)376-6773 Andre_L_Armstrong@rl.gov Geoff Tyree, DOE (509) 376-4171 Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov RICHLAND, WASH. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is boosting its capacity for treating groundwater to remove chromium near the Columbia River by 40 percent with the recent completion of a new treatment facility. Contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) finished building and started operating the new 100-DX groundwater treatment facility in December. The facility is located near the D and DR Reactors on

374

Renewable Natural Gas Clean-up Challenges and Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Renewable Natural Gas Clean-up Renewable Natural Gas Clean-up p Challenges and Applications Renewable Resource Webinar July 13, 2011 Brian Weeks, Gas Technology Institute 281 235 7993, brian.weeks@gastechnology.org Kristine Wiley, Gas Technology Institute 847 768 0910 kristine wiley@gastechnology org 847 768 0910, kristine.wiley@gastechnology.org 2 Today's Talk Today s Talk >Who is GTI Who is GTI >What is Renewable Natural Gas (RNG) Ch ll f R bl N t l G >Challenges for Renewable Natural Gas >How do we clean up RNG? >Recommendations and Summary 2 - - 3 GTI at a Glance... > Not-for-profit research > Not for profit research, with 65+ year history > Facilities 18 Chi ─ 18 acre campus near Chicago ─ 200,000 ft 2 , 28 specialized labs $60 illi > $60 + million i in revenue

375

Criticality safety evaluation for K Area Disassembly Basin cleanup  

SciTech Connect

Preparations are currently being made to remove sludge from the Disassembly Basin in all reactor areas. Because this sludge contains fissile isotopes, it is necessary to perform a criticality safety evaluation for the planned activities. A previous evaluation examined the criticality safety aspects of the sludge removal process for L Area. This document addresses the criticality safety aspects of the K Area Disassembly Basin cleanup work. The K Area Disassembly Basin cleanup will involve, as a first step, pumping the basin sludge into the Monitor Basin portion of the Disassembly Basin. From the Monitor Basin, the sludge will be pumped into tanks or containers for permanent disposition. The criticality safety evaluation discussed in this document covers the transfer of the sludge to the Monitor Basin.

Rosser, M.A.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

DOE Announces Strategic Engineering and Technology Roadmap for Cleanup of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Strategic Engineering and Technology Roadmap for Strategic Engineering and Technology Roadmap for Cleanup of Cold War Era Nuclear Waste DOE Announces Strategic Engineering and Technology Roadmap for Cleanup of Cold War Era Nuclear Waste March 18, 2008 - 10:52am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today released an Engineering and Technology Roadmap (Roadmap), which details initiatives aimed at reducing the technical risks and uncertainties associated with cleaning up Cold War era nuclear waste over the next ten years. The Roadmap also outlines strategies to minimize such risks and proposes how these strategies would be implemented, furthering the Department's goal of protecting the environment by providing a responsible resolution to the environmental legacy of nuclear weapons production.

377

The search for the average person - implications for site cleanup  

SciTech Connect

The Yankee Nuclear Power Station is located in Rowe, Massachusetts, on a 2000 acre site. Approximately 10 acres of the site are developed for plant use. Commercial power operation at the 185-MW (electric) plant began in 1961. In February 1992, the decision was made to permanently cease power operations. Decommissioning activities were initiated immediately and are continuing today. Initial dose assessments have been completed to determine the potential extent of the cleanup effort.

Littlefield, P.S.; Cumming, E.R.; Bellini, F.X.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

378

Syngas Production from Propane Using Atmospheric Non-thermal Plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Propane steam reforming using a sliding discharge reactor was investigated under atmospheric pressure and low temperature (420 K). Non-thermal plasma steam reforming proceeded efficiently and hydrogen was formed as a main product (H2 concentration up to 50%). By-products (C2-hydrocarbons, methane, carbon dioxide) were measured with concentrations lower than 6%. The mean electrical power injected in the discharge is less than 2 kW. The process efficiency is described in terms of propane conversion rate, steam reforming and cracking selectivity, as well as by-products production. Chemical processes modelling based on classical thermodynamic equilibrium reactor is also proposed. Calculated data fit quiet well experimental results and indicate that the improvement of C3H8 conversion and then H2 production can be achieved by increasing the gas fraction through the discharge. By improving the reactor design, the non-thermal plasma has a potential for being an effective way for supplying hydrogen or synthesis gas.

Ouni, Fakhreddine; Cormier, Jean Marie; 10.1007/s11090-009-9166-2

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Rocky Flats Cleanup Agreement implementation successes and challenges  

SciTech Connect

On July 19, 1996 the US Department of Energy (DOE), State of Colorado (CDPHE), and US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) entered into an agreement called the Rocky Flats Cleanup Agreement (RFCA) for the cleanup and closure of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS or Rocky Flats). Major elements of the agreement include: an Integrated Site-Wide Baseline; up to twelve significant enforceable milestones per year; agreed upon soil and water action levels and standards for cleanup; open space as the likely foreseeable land use; the plutonium and TRU waste removed by 2015; streamlined regulatory process; agreement with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) to coordinate activities; and a risk reduction focus. Successful implementation of RFCA requires a substantial effort by the parties to change their way of thinking about RFETS and meet the deliverables and commitments. Substantial progress toward Site closure through the implementation of RFCA has been accomplished in the short time since the signing, yet much remains to be done. Much can be learned from the Rocky Flats experience by other facilities in similar situations.

Shelton, D.C.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Elementary Steps of Syngas Reactions on Mo2C(001): Adsorption Thermochemistry and Bond Dissociation  

SciTech Connect

Density functional theory (DFT) and ab initio thermodynamics are applied in order to investigate the most stable surface and subsurface terminations of Mo{sub 2}C(001) as a function of chemical potential and in the presence of syngas. The Mo-terminated (001) surface is then used as a model surface to evaluate the thermochemistry and energetic barriers for key elementary steps in syngas reactions. Adsorption energy scaling relations and Broensted-Evans-Polanyi relationships are established and used to place Mo{sub 2}C into the context of transition metal surfaces. The results indicate that the surface termination is a complex function of reaction conditions and kinetics. It is predicted that the surface will be covered by either C{sub 2}H{sub 2} or O depending on conditions. Comparisons to transition metals indicate that the Mo-terminated Mo{sub 2}C(001) surface exhibits carbon reactivity similar to transition metals such as Ru and Ir, but is significantly more reactive towards oxygen.

Medford, Andrew

2012-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature syngas cleanup" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Development of OTM Syngas Process and Testing of Syngas Derived Ultra-clean Fuels in Diesel Engines and Fuel Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This topical report summarizes work accomplished for the Program from November 1, 2001 to December 31, 2002 in the following task areas: Task 1: Materials Development; Task 2: Composite Development; Task 4: Reactor Design and Process Optimization; Task 8: Fuels and Engine Testing; 8.1 International Diesel Engine Program; 8.2 Nuvera Fuel Cell Program; and Task 10: Program Management. Major progress has been made towards developing high temperature, high performance, robust, oxygen transport elements. In addition, a novel reactor design has been proposed that co-produces hydrogen, lowers cost and improves system operability. Fuel and engine testing is progressing well, but was delayed somewhat due to the hiatus in program funding in 2002. The Nuvera fuel cell portion of the program was completed on schedule and delivered promising results regarding low emission fuels for transportation fuel cells. The evaluation of ultra-clean diesel fuels continues in single cylinder (SCTE) and multiple cylinder (MCTE) test rigs at International Truck and Engine. FT diesel and a BP oxygenate showed significant emissions reductions in comparison to baseline petroleum diesel fuels. Overall through the end of 2002 the program remains under budget, but behind schedule in some areas.

E.T. (Skip) Robinson; James P. Meagher; Prasad Apte; Xingun Gui; Tytus R. Bulicz; Siv Aasland; Charles Besecker; Jack Chen Bart A. van Hassel; Olga Polevaya; Rafey Khan; Piyush Pilaniwalla

2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

382

Integrated Process Configuration for High-Temperature Sulfur Mitigation during Biomass Conversion via Indirect Gasification  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sulfur present in biomass often causes catalyst deactivation during downstream operations after gasification. Early removal of sulfur from the syngas stream post-gasification is possible via process rearrangements and can be beneficial for maintaining a low-sulfur environment for all downstream operations. High-temperature sulfur sorbents have superior performance and capacity under drier syngas conditions. The reconfigured process discussed in this paper is comprised of indirect biomass gasification using dry recycled gas from downstream operations, which produces a drier syngas stream and, consequently, more-efficient sulfur removal at high temperatures using regenerable sorbents. A combination of experimental results from NREL's fluidizable Ni-based reforming catalyst, fluidizable Mn-based sulfur sorbent, and process modeling information show that using a coupled process of dry gasification with high-temperature sulfur removal can improve the performance of Ni-based reforming catalysts significantly.

Dutta. A.; Cheah, S.; Bain, R.; Feik, C.; Magrini-Bair, K.; Phillips, S.

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

383

Gridley Ethanol Demonstration Project Utilizing Biomass Gasification Technology: Pilot Plant Gasifier and Syngas Conversion Testing; August 2002 -- June 2004  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is part of an overall evaluation of using a modified Pearson Pilot Plant for processing rice straw into syngas and ethanol and the application of the Pearson technology for building a Demonstration Plant at Gridley. This report also includes information on the feedstock preparation, feedstock handling, feedstock performance, catalyst performance, ethanol yields and potential problems identified from the pilot scale experiments.

Not Available

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Syn-Gas Production from Catalytic Steam Gasification of Municipal Solid Wastes in a Combined Fixed Bed Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The catalytic steam gasi?cation of municipal solid wastes (MSW) for syn-gas production was experimentally investigated in a combined fixed bed reactor using the newly developed tri-metallic catalyst. A series of experiments have been performed to explore ... Keywords: Biomass gasification, municipal solid wastes, catalyst, hydrogen production, energy recovery

Jianfen Li; Jianjun Liu; Shiyan Liao; Xiaorong Zhou; Rong Yan

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

[Oxygenated octane enhancers: Syngas to isobutylene]. Technical progress report No. 8, January 1, 1993--March 31, 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this program is to develop a catalyst and a process for the conversion of syngas to isobutylene. However, due to the low conversion and selectivity generally experienced by the industry in direct conversion of syngas to isobutylene, indirect conversion via branched C{sub 4} alcohol intermediates is being explored. The objectives of the current program are to develop a catalyst and process for the conversion of syngas to isobutanol and to evaluate the commercial potential of the new process. The research program underway at UOP will identify and optimize key catalyst and process characteristics. This report covers the modification and shake-down of a fixed-bed pilot plant (No. 700) for the testing of catalysts and catalyst combinations. A separate syngas feed system has been added to an existing fixed bed Fischer-Tropsch pilot plant and new reactors are constructed to avoid catalyst cross contamination. Shake-down testing with a commercial Cu/Zn/Al oxide catalyst alone and in combination with a basic Mg/Al MOSS (Metal Oxide Solid Solution) catalyst have demonstrated good CO and H{sub 2} conversion. However, contamination of the product by residual Fischer-Tropsch product in the exit lines and the liquid gas chromatograph (GC) has prevented accurate product analyses. A separate exit system and liquid GC have been added to the plant for use by the higher alcohols synthesis project.

Barger, P.T.

1993-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

386

Investigation of syngas interaction in alcohol synthesis catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work is described on the investigations of the interaction of syngas in the preparation of alcohols. The analysis of work performed on copper/cobalt/chromium catalysts and the effect of the method of preparation on magnetic properties of the catalysts is discussed.

Akundi, M.A.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Investigation of syngas interaction in alcohol synthesis catalysts. Quartery technical progress report, July 1, 1995--September 31, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the work done on {open_quotes}Investigation of Syngas Interaction in Alcohol Synthesis Catalysts{close_quotes} during the last three months. In this report the results of the work done on the effect of CO adsorption on the magnetic character of cobalt in the Cu/Co/Cr catalysts is discussed.

Akundi, M.A.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

CONSTRUCTION OF KEY CLEANUP PROJECT GAINS GOOD GROUND AT SRS | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CONSTRUCTION OF KEY CLEANUP PROJECT GAINS GOOD GROUND AT SRS CONSTRUCTION OF KEY CLEANUP PROJECT GAINS GOOD GROUND AT SRS CONSTRUCTION OF KEY CLEANUP PROJECT GAINS GOOD GROUND AT SRS June 1, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis CONSTRUCTION OF KEY CLEANUP PROJECT GAINS GOOD GROUND AT SRS Aiken, SC - Construction of a key cleanup facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is gaining some serious ground given the remarkable building progress since Fall 2009. Construction and operation of the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) is among the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) highest cleanup priorities. When operational, SWPF will treat millions of gallons of salt waste currently stored in 49 underground tanks at SRS by removing radioactive constituents for vitrification at the nearby Defense Waste Processing Facility. Disposition of the salt waste inventory is a

389

GRR/Elements/18-FD-a.16 - Post-Construction Completion: Review of Cleanup  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Construction Completion: Review of Cleanup Construction Completion: Review of Cleanup Effort to Determine Mitigation Effect < GRR‎ | Elements Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections 18-FD-a.16 - Post-Construction Completion: Review of Cleanup Effort to Determine Mitigation Effect After final cleanup is achieved, the EPA ensures that Superfund response actions provide for the long-term protection of human health and the environment. Logic Chain No Parents \V/ GRR/Elements/18-FD-a.16 - Post-Construction Completion: Review of Cleanup Effort to Determine Mitigation Effect (this page) \V/ No Dependents Under Development Add.png Add an Element Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=GRR/Elements/18-FD-a.16_-_Post-Construction_Completion:_Review_of_Cleanup_Effort_to_Determine_Mitigation_Effect&oldid=453770

390

CONSTRUCTION OF KEY CLEANUP PROJECT GAINS GOOD GROUND AT SRS | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CONSTRUCTION OF KEY CLEANUP PROJECT GAINS GOOD GROUND AT SRS CONSTRUCTION OF KEY CLEANUP PROJECT GAINS GOOD GROUND AT SRS CONSTRUCTION OF KEY CLEANUP PROJECT GAINS GOOD GROUND AT SRS June 1, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis CONSTRUCTION OF KEY CLEANUP PROJECT GAINS GOOD GROUND AT SRS Aiken, SC - Construction of a key cleanup facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is gaining some serious ground given the remarkable building progress since Fall 2009. Construction and operation of the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) is among the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) highest cleanup priorities. When operational, SWPF will treat millions of gallons of salt waste currently stored in 49 underground tanks at SRS by removing radioactive constituents for vitrification at the nearby Defense Waste Processing Facility. Disposition of the salt waste inventory is a

391

DOE Completes Cleanup at New York, California Sites | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cleanup at New York, California Sites Cleanup at New York, California Sites DOE Completes Cleanup at New York, California Sites July 1, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - Last month, the U.S. Department of Energy completed the cleanup of Cold War legacy waste at the Nuclear Radiation Development, LLC (NRD) site near Grand Island, New York, and at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California. The two locations became the 18th and 19th sites to be completely cleaned of legacy waste. This milestone was achieved as part of a $172 million investment from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to expedite legacy waste cleanup activities across the DOE complex. "Cleanup of these two sites represents important and continued progress in the Department of Energy's commitment to reducing the nation's nuclear

392

Recovery Act Workers Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Basin |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Basin Recovery Act Workers Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Basin American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers recently cleaned up a second basin containing coal ash residues from Cold War operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS). About $24 million from the Recovery Act funded the environmental restoration project, allowing SRS to complete the project at least five years ahead of schedule. The work is part of a larger Recovery Act cleanup of the P Area scheduled for completion by the end of September 2011. Recovery Act Workers Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Basin More Documents & Publications Recovery Act Workers Complete Environmental Cleanup of Coal Ash Basin Recovery Act Workers Add Time Capsule Before Sealing Reactor for Hundreds

393

DOE Certifies Rocky Flats Cleanup "Complete" | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Certifies Rocky Flats Cleanup "Complete" Certifies Rocky Flats Cleanup "Complete" DOE Certifies Rocky Flats Cleanup "Complete" December 8, 2005 - 4:45pm Addthis Golden, CO - Deputy Secretary of Energy Clay Sell announced today that the environmental cleanup of the former Rocky Flats site has been certified complete by the U.S. Department of Energy. Certification marks the final step in the DOE's successful effort to clean up and eventually turn over the former weapons production site for use as a National Wildlife Refuge. "With today's announcement, the cleanup chapter of Rocky Flats' history is closed, while another equally important chapter is just being opened," said Deputy Secretary Sell. "This successful cleanup represents a triumph of determination and spirit of cooperation that stands as an example for

394

Second Site-Wide Five-Year Review of Cleanup at DOE's Idaho Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site-Wide Five-Year Review of Cleanup at DOE's Idaho Site Site-Wide Five-Year Review of Cleanup at DOE's Idaho Site Completed; Report Now Available Online Second Site-Wide Five-Year Review of Cleanup at DOE's Idaho Site Completed; Report Now Available Online February 3, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Danielle Miller (DOE-ID) 208-526-5709 An Idaho Cleanup Project team has completed work on the site-wide five-year review of cleanup at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Idaho site. "This report verifies that the performance of cleanup actions at the Idaho Site continues to be protective of human health and the environment," said Nicole Hernandez, DOE's project manager for the five-year review. "The findings in the report demonstrate a strong collaborative effort by CH2M-WG Idaho (CWI), DOE, the Environmental

395

Development of OTM Syngas Process and Testing of Syngas Derived Ulta-clean Fuels in Diesel Engines and Fuel Cells Budget Period 3  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This topical report summarizes work accomplished for the Program from January 1, 2003 through December 31,2004 in the following task areas: Task 1--Materials Development; Task 2--Composite Development; Task 4--Reactor Design and Process Optimization; Task 8--Fuels and Engine Testing; 8.1 International Diesel Engine Program; and Task IO: Program Management. Most of the key technical objectives for this budget period were achieved. Only partial success was achieved relative to cycle testing under pressure Major improvements in material performance and element reliability have been achieved. A breakthrough material system has driven the development of a compact planar reactor design capable of producing either hydrogen or syngas. The planar reactor shows significant advantages in thermal efficiency and costs compared to either steam methane reforming with CO{sub 2} recovery or autothermal reforming. The fuel and engine testing program is complete The single cylinder test engine evaluation of UCTF fuels begun in Budget Period 2 was finished this budget period. In addition, a study to evaluate new fuel formulations for an HCCl engine was completed.

E.T. Robinson; John Sirman; Prasad Apte; Xingun Gui; Tytus R. Bulicz; Dan Corgard; Siv Aasland; Kjersti Kleveland; Ann Hooper; Leo Bonnell; John Hemmings; Jack Chen; Bart A. Van Hassel

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

396

Thyroid nodularity and cancer among Chernobyl cleanup workers from Estonia  

SciTech Connect

Thyroid examinations, including palpation, ultrasound and, selectively, fine-needle aspiration biopsy, were conducted on nearly 2,000 Chernobyl cleanup workers from Estonia to evaluate the occurrence of thyroid cancer and nodular thyroid disease among men with protracted exposure to ionizing radiation. The examinations were conducted in four cities in Estonia during March-April 1995, 9 years after the reactor accident. The study population was selected from a predefined cohort of 4,833 cleanup workers from Estonia under surveillance for cancer incidence. These men had been sent to Chernobyl between 1986 and 1991 to entomb the damaged reactor, remove radioactive debris and perform related cleanup activities. A total of 2,997 men were invited for thyroid screening and 1,984 (66%) were examined. Estimates of radiation dose from external sources were obtained from military or other institutional records, and details about service dates and types of work performed while at Chernobyl were obtained from a self-administered questionnaire. Blood samples were collected for assay of chromosomal translocations in circulating lymphocytes and loss of expression of the glycophorin A (GPA) gene in erythrocytes. The primary outcome measure was the presence or absence of thyroid nodules as determined by the ultrasound examination. Of the screened workers, 1,247 (63%) were sent to Chernobyl in 1986, including 603 (30%) sent in April or May, soon after the accident. Workers served at Chernobyl for an average of 3 months. The average age was 32 years at the time of arrival at Chernobyl and 40 years at the time of thyroid examination. The mean documented radiation dose from external sources was 10.8 cGy. Biological indicators of exposure showed low correlations with documented dose, but did not indicate that the mean dose for the population was higher than the average documented dose. 47 refs., 1 fig., 9 tabs.

Inskip, P.D.; Boice, J.D. Jr. [National Cancer Inst., Rockville, MD (United States); Tekkel, M. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Environmental Cleanup Best Management Practices: Effective Use of the Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

supports the use of best management practices (BMPs) * as a mechanism for maximizing technical effectiveness and resource efficiency in the execution of site assessment and cleanup projects. This fact sheet is the first in a series of documents that address conceptual site models (CSMs). A more comprehensive document is planned that will detail techniques to develop and maintain an accurate CSM as a primary planning and decision making tool used to identify and manage site uncertainty that can inhibit effective project decision making. This fact sheet summarizes how environmental practitioners can use CSMs to achieve, communicate, and maintain stakeholder consensus on site understanding, while satisfying the technical and

unknown authors

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Pilot scale experience on IGCC hot gas cleanup  

SciTech Connect

In September 1993 Enviropower Inc. entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with the Department of Energy in order to develop and demonstrate the major components of an IGCC process such as hot gas cleanup systems. The objectives of the project are to develop and demonstrate: (1) hydrogen sulfide removal using regenerable metal oxide sorbent in pressurized fluidized bed reactors, (2) recovery of elemental sulfur from the tail-gas of the sorbent regenerator, and (3) hot gas particulate removal using ceramic candle filters.

Salo, K.; Ghazanfari, R.; Feher, G. [and others

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Development of a catalyst for conversion of syngas-derived materials to isobutylene. Quarterly report No. 7, October 1, 1992--December 31, 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The main goal of this contract is to develop a catalyst and technology that will produce iC{sub 4}= directly from coal-derived syngas and that is capable of utilizing a lower (0.5 to 1.0) H{sub 2}:CO ratio. The research will identify and optimize the key catalyst and process characteristics that give improved performance for CO conversion by a non-Fischer-Tropsch process. This report, which is the seventh quarterly report covers the testing of various ZrO{sub 2}-based catalyst systems designed to examine the effects of catalyst preparation and process variables, especially low calcination temperature and mild reaction conditions (low temperatures, low pressure and low space velocity). Testing of solvent-extracted sol-gel ZrO{sub 2} catalysts indicate a decrease in isobutene yield. Lowering the reaction temperature, pressure and space velocity resulted in a small improvement in isobutene yield. Three extended runs demonstrated reasonable catalyst stability. In view of the generally poor isobutene yields, the emphasis in this project will shift to isoalcohol production.

Gajda, G.J.

1993-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

400

Computational and Experimental Development of Novel High-Temperature Alloys  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development of Novel High-Temperature Alloys Background The need for fossil-fueled power plants to run cleaner and more efficiently leads toward ever-higher operating temperatures and pressures. Gas turbines, which can be fueled by natural gas, synthetic gas (syngas), or a high-hydrogen stream derived from coal, are critical components in this development. High-temperature operation of turbines is generally achieved by using nickel-chrome superalloys with coatings

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature syngas cleanup" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Roles of double salt formation and NaNO{sub 3} in Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-promoted MgO absorbent for intermediate temperature CO{sub 2} removal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Absorption and desorption of carbon dioxide on Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-promoted MgO have been studied at temperatures compatible with warm gas cleanup (300470 ?C) from a pre-combustion syngas. The absorbents are synthesized through the formation and activation of the precipitate resulting from the addition of sodium carbonate to an aqueous solution of magnesium nitrate. The absorbent, which comprises MgO, Na{sub 2CO{sub 3} and residual NaNO{sub 3} after activation, forms the double salt Na{sub 2}Mg(CO{sub 3}){sub 2} on exposure to CO{sub 2}. The thermodynamic properties of the double salt, obtained through computational calculation, predict that the preferred temperature range for absorption of CO{sub 2} with the double salt is significantly higher compared with MgO. Faster CO{sub 2} uptake can be achieved as a result of this higher temperature absorption window. Absorption tests indicate that the double salt absorbent as prepared has a capacity toward CO{sub 2} of 15 wt.% (3.4 mmol CO{sub 2}/g absorbent) and can be easily regenerated through both pressure swing and temperature swing absorption in multiple-cycle tests. Thermodynamic calculations also predict an important effect of CO{sub 2} partial pressure on the absorption capacity in the warm temperature range. The impurity phase, NaNO{sub 3}, is identified as a key component in facilitating CO{sub 2} absorption by these materials. The reason for reported difficulties in reproducing the performance of these materials can be traced to specific details of the synthesis method, which are reviewed in some detail.

Keling Zhanga,b, Xiaohong S. Li c, Yuhua Duand, David L. Kingc,?, Prabhakar Singha,b, Liyu Li

2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

402

Microsoft Word - Final Report- Engineering-Economic Analysis of Syngas Storage.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering-Economic Analysis Engineering-Economic Analysis of Syngas Storage DOE/NETL-2008/1331 Final Report July 31, 2008 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States

403

Catalytic Process for the Conversion of Coal-derived Syngas to Ethanol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The catalytic conversion of coal-derived syngas to C{sub 2+} alcohols and oxygenates has attracted great attention due to their potential as chemical intermediates and fuel components. This is particularly true of ethanol, which can serve as a transportation fuel blending agent, as well as a hydrogen carrier. A thermodynamic analysis of CO hydrogenation to ethanol that does not allow for byproducts such as methane or methanol shows that the reaction: 2 CO + 4 H{sub 2} {yields} C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH + H{sub 2}O is thermodynamically favorable at conditions of practical interest (e.g,30 bar, {approx}Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, or (d) Mo-sulfides and phosphides. This project focuses on Rh- and Cu-based catalysts. The logic was that (a) Rh-based catalysts are clearly the most selective for EtOH (but these catalysts can be costly), and (b) Cu-based catalysts appear to be the most selective of the non-Rh catalysts (and are less costly). In addition, Pd-based catalysts were studied since Pd is known for catalyzing CO hydrogenation to produce methanol, similar to copper. Approach. The overall approach of this project was based on (a) computational catalysis to identify optimum surfaces for the selective conversion of syngas to ethanol; (b) synthesis of surfaces approaching these ideal atomic structures, (c) specialized characterization to determine the extent to which the actual catalyst has these structures, and (d) testing at realistic conditions (e.g., elevated pressures) and differential conversions (to measure true kinetics, to avoid deactivation, and to avoid condensable concentrations of products in the outlet gas).

James Spivery; Doug Harrison; John Earle; James Goodwin; David Bruce; Xunhau Mo; Walter Torres; Joe Allison Vis Viswanathan; Rick Sadok; Steve Overbury; Viviana Schwartz

2011-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

404

Integrated Sensing and Controls for Coal Gasification - Development of Model-Based Controls for GE's Gasifier and Syngas Cooler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the achievements and final results of this program. The objective of this program is to develop a comprehensive systems approach to integrated design of sensing and control systems for an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plant, using advanced model-based techniques. In particular, this program is focused on the model-based sensing and control system design for the core gasification section of an IGCC plant. The overall approach consists of (i) developing a first-principles physics-based dynamic model of the gasification section, (ii) performing model-reduction where needed to derive low-order models suitable for controls analysis and design, (iii) developing a sensing system solution combining online sensors with model-based estimation for important process variables not measured directly, and (iv) optimizing the steady-state and transient operation of the plant for normal operation as well as for startup using model predictive controls (MPC). Initially, available process unit models were implemented in a common platform using Matlab/Simulink{reg_sign}, and appropriate model reduction and model updates were performed to obtain the overall gasification section dynamic model. Also, a set of sensor packages were developed through extensive lab testing and implemented in the Tampa Electric Company IGCC plant at Polk power station in 2009, to measure temperature and strain in the radiant syngas cooler (RSC). Plant operation data was also used to validate the overall gasification section model. The overall dynamic model was then used to develop a sensing solution including a set of online sensors coupled with model-based estimation using nonlinear extended Kalman filter (EKF). Its performance in terms of estimating key unmeasured variables like gasifier temperature, carbon conversion, etc., was studied through extensive simulations in the presence sensing errors (noise and bias) and modeling errors (e.g. unknown gasifier kinetics, RSC fouling). In parallel, an MPC solution was initially developed using ideal sensing to optimize the plant operation during startup pre-heating as well as steady state and transient operation under normal high-pressure conditions, e.g. part-load, base-load, load transition and fuel changes. The MPC simulation studies showed significant improvements both for startup pre-heating and for normal operation. Finally, the EKF and MPC solutions were coupled to achieve the integrated sensing and control solution and its performance was studied through extensive steady state and transient simulations in the presence of sensor and modeling errors. The results of each task in the program and overall conclusions are summarized in this final report.

Aditya Kumar

2010-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

405

Pressure Swing Absorption Device and Process for Separating CO{sub 2} from Shifted Syngas and its Capture for Subsequent Storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Using the ionic liquid (IL) 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide ([bmim][DCA]) as the absorbent on the shell side of a membrane module containing either a porous hydrophobized ceramic tubule or porous hydrophobized polyether ether ketone (PEEK) hollow fiber membranes, studies for CO{sub 2} removal from hot simulated pre-combustion shifted syngas were carried out by a novel pressure swing membrane absorption (PSMAB) process. Helium was used as a surrogate for H{sub 2} in a simulated shifted syngas with CO{sub 2} around 40% (dry gas basis). In this cyclic separation process, the membrane module was used to achieve non-dispersive gas absorption from a high-pressure feed gas (689-1724 kPag; 100-250 psig) at temperatures between 25-1000C into a stationary absorbent liquid on the module shell side during a certain part of the cycle followed by among other cycle steps controlled desorption of the absorbed gases from the liquid in the rest of the cycle. Two product streams were obtained, one He-rich and the other CO{sub 2}-rich. Addition of polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer of generation 0 to IL [bmim][DCA] improved the system performance at higher temperatures. The solubilities of CO{sub 2} and He were determined in the ionic liquid with or without the dendrimer in solution as well as in the presence or absence of moisture; polyethylene glycol (PEG) 400 was also studied as a replacement for the IL. The solubility selectivity of the ionic liquid containing the dendrimer for CO{sub 2} over helium was considerably larger than that for the pure ionic liquid. The solubility of CO{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}-He solubility selectivity of PEG 400 and a solution of the dendrimer in PEG 400 were higher than the corresponding ones in the IL, [bmim][DCA]. A mathematical model was developed to describe the PSMAB process; a numerical solution of the governing equations described successfully the observed performance of the PSMAB process for the pure ionic liquid-based system.

Sirkar, Kamalesh; Jie, Xingming; Chau, John; Obuskovic, Gordana

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

406

NETL: Gasifipedia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Syngas Cleanup: Syngas Contaminant Removal and Conditioning COS Hydrolysis Most of the sulfur in the coal is converted to H2S during gasification. However, depending on the...

407

An Update on the Hanford Site and Cleanup Progress | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

An Update on the Hanford Site and Cleanup Progress An Update on the Hanford Site and Cleanup Progress An Update on the Hanford Site and Cleanup Progress September 24, 2013 - 6:45pm Addthis An Update on the Hanford Site and Cleanup Progress Dr. Ernest Moniz Dr. Ernest Moniz Secretary of Energy What are the key facts? For 40 years, the Hanford Site in Washington state was involved in the production of plutonium as part of our national defense efforts. Legacy cleanup progress at the Hanford site has been significant, including 100 percent of the site's spent fuel having been removed from areas around the Columbia River and placed in safe, secure dry storage. But there is more work to do. A new Framework will aid discussions with the state of Washington as the Energy Department works to resolve concerns about completion of the

408

Site Transition Summary: Cleanup Completion to Long-Term Stewardship at  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Summary: Cleanup Completion to Long-Term Summary: Cleanup Completion to Long-Term Stewardship at Department of Energy On-going Mission Sites Site Transition Summary: Cleanup Completion to Long-Term Stewardship at Department of Energy On-going Mission Sites Long-term stewardship (LTS) includes the physical controls, institutions, information, and other mechanisms needed to ensure protection of people and the environment at sites where the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has completed or plans to complete cleanup (e.g., landfill closures, remedial actions, removal actions, and facility stabilization). This concept includes land-use controls, information management, monitoring and maintenance. Site Transition Summary: Cleanup Completion to Long-Term Stewardship at Department of Energy On-going Mission Sites

409

Idaho Site Completes Cleanup with Help from Workers who Shipped Waste  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site Completes Cleanup with Help from Workers who Shipped Site Completes Cleanup with Help from Workers who Shipped Waste Decades Ago Idaho Site Completes Cleanup with Help from Workers who Shipped Waste Decades Ago From the 1950s until the 1980s, workers at the former Rocky Flats Plant near Denver, Colo., sent hundreds of thousands of barrels and boxes of radioactive and hazardous waste to the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for disposal both above and below ground. Now, some of those who sent the Cold War weapons waste to Idaho are helping identify the waste in pits dug up for the first time in more than 40 years. Idaho Site Completes Cleanup with Help from Workers who Shipped Waste Decades Ago More Documents & Publications Sound Project Management, Safe and Efficient Work Lead to Savings for More Recovery Act Cleanup

410

Idaho Site Completes Cleanup with Help from Workers who Shipped Waste  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site Completes Cleanup with Help from Workers who Shipped Site Completes Cleanup with Help from Workers who Shipped Waste Decades Ago Idaho Site Completes Cleanup with Help from Workers who Shipped Waste Decades Ago From the 1950s until the 1980s, workers at the former Rocky Flats Plant near Denver, Colo., sent hundreds of thousands of barrels and boxes of radioactive and hazardous waste to the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for disposal both above and below ground. Now, some of those who sent the Cold War weapons waste to Idaho are helping identify the waste in pits dug up for the first time in more than 40 years. Idaho Site Completes Cleanup with Help from Workers who Shipped Waste Decades Ago More Documents & Publications Sound Project Management, Safe and Efficient Work Lead to Savings for More Recovery Act Cleanup

411

Waste Cleanup: Status and Implications of Compliance Agreements Between DOE and Its Regulators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses compliance agreements that affect the Department of Energy's (DOE) cleanup program. Compliance agreements are legally enforceable documents between DOE and its regulators, specifying cleanup activities and milestones that DOE has agreed to achieve. Over the years, these compliance agreements have been used to implement much of the cleanup activity at DOE sites, which is carried our primarily under two federal laws - the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980, as amended (CERCLA) and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 0f 1976, as amended (RCRA). Our objectives were to determine the types of compliance agreements in effect at DOE cleanup sites, DOE's progress in achieving the milestones contained in the agreements, whether the agreements allowed DOE to prioritize work across sites according to relative risk, and possible implications the agreements have on DOE's efforts to improve the cleanup program.

Jones, G. L.; Swick, W. R.; Perry, T. C.; Kintner-Meyer, N.K.; Abraham, C. R.; Pollack, I. M.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

412

Oak Ridge EM Program Increases Focus on Mercury Cleanup | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Increases Focus on Mercury Cleanup Increases Focus on Mercury Cleanup Oak Ridge EM Program Increases Focus on Mercury Cleanup May 7, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation Commissioner Robert Martineau, left to right, U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.), Oak Ridge EM Manager Mark Whitney, EM Senior Advisor Dave Huizenga and EPA Deputy Regional Administrator for Region 4 Stan Meiburg gathered for the announcement on mercury cleanup. Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation Commissioner Robert Martineau, left to right, U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.), Oak Ridge EM Manager Mark Whitney, EM Senior Advisor Dave Huizenga and EPA Deputy Regional Administrator for Region 4 Stan Meiburg gathered for the announcement on mercury cleanup. OAK RIDGE, Tenn. - EM Senior Advisor Dave Huizenga recently joined local

413

Agreement on New Commitments for Hanford Tank Waste Cleanup Sent to Federal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Agreement on New Commitments for Hanford Tank Waste Cleanup Sent to Agreement on New Commitments for Hanford Tank Waste Cleanup Sent to Federal Judge Agreement on New Commitments for Hanford Tank Waste Cleanup Sent to Federal Judge October 6, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis RICHLAND, Wash. - The U.S. Department of Energy and Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) jointly filed a motion today in U.S. District Court asking the court to approve and enter a judicial consent decree that imposes a new, enforceable, and achievable schedule for cleaning up waste from Hanford's underground tanks. The settlement also includes new milestones in the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), an administrative order between DOE, Ecology, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, which governs cleanup at DOE's Hanford Site. "Today's agreement represents an important milestone in the ongoing cleanup

414

Head of EM to Kick Off Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Head of EM to Kick Off Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus Head of EM to Kick Off Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus Head of EM to Kick Off Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus April 22, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - EM Senior Advisor Dave Huizenga will provide an overview of EM's proposed fiscal year 2014 budget Thursday in the first of six briefings for the 19th annual U.S. House Nuclear Cleanup Caucus. Huizenga rolled out the $5.622 billion budget request earlier this month. The proposal, which requires approval by Congress, enables EM progress in all areas of the nuclear cleanup program while maintaining safety and compliance across the complex. The briefings are organized by Rep. Doc Hastings (R-Wash.), who chairs the bipartisan caucus. "These briefings provide valuable insight and help educate my colleagues

415

DOE and NASA Reach Cleanup Agreements with the State of California for the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NASA Reach Cleanup Agreements with the State of California NASA Reach Cleanup Agreements with the State of California for the Santa Susana Field Laboratory DOE and NASA Reach Cleanup Agreements with the State of California for the Santa Susana Field Laboratory December 6, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - The Department of Energy and NASA both signed Administrative Orders on Consent (AOC) with the California Environmental Protection Agency (Cal EPA) today that define the process for characterization and the cleanup end-state for portions of the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). The agreements come after more than 10 months of negotiations and extensive public comment on the conceptual framework for cleanup outlined in the Agreement in Principle and additional public comment on the legally enforceable process and procedures in the draft Administrative Order on

416

Evaluation of secondary-system layup and cleanup practices and processes. Final report. [PWR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study of PWR secondary system layup and cleanup practices was undertaken to evaluate current and proposed methods of corrosion product control associated with extended plant outages. The overall goal was to evaluate means for significantly minimizing the steam generator sludge burden. The study included a field survey of 14 representative PWR plants, an extensive literature search and an evaluation of corrosion product transport data. Recommendations for layup and cleanup system processes were derived from these practices and related information. Estimates of the potential benefits to be expected in the control of corrosion products by controlled layup environments during extended outages and by cleanup following such outages are provided. Cleanup during all, or most, phases of operation is indicated as being most beneficial. Layup and cleanup system process design information is also provided.

Cleary, W.F.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Recovery Act Workers Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Basin |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recovery Act Workers Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Recovery Act Workers Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Basin Recovery Act Workers Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Basin American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers recently cleaned up a second basin containing coal ash residues from Cold War operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS). About $24 million from the Recovery Act funded the environmental restoration project, allowing SRS to complete the project at least five years ahead of schedule. The work is part of a larger Recovery Act cleanup of the P Area scheduled for completion by the end of September 2011. Recovery Act Workers Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Basin More Documents & Publications EIS-0220: Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0220: Final Environmental Impact Statement

418

Microsoft Word - cleanup projects at Idaho.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audit Operations Audit Report Major Clean-Up Projects at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory DOE/IG-0649 May 2004 well after its scheduled July 1, 2003, completion date - in fact, it is currently estimated to be sometime in 2005 or 2006. The Department also did not meet its original completion goal for the Three Mile Island Project and later reduced the scope of the project to compensate for schedule slippages. Although events outside of the Department's control contributed to these schedule delays, enhancements to contract and project management practices could improve the way the Department and its contractors react to these events and ultimately the projects' outcomes.

419

Home I Qoehannn Site Facility Cleanup yroject Histow Cleanun  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Home Home I Qoehannn Site Facility Cleanup yroject Histow Cleanun Progress Media PowerPoint Robotics Gallem Contacts A view of the Permagrain building from the e Located in northwestern Clearfield County, Quehanna many businesses that have used radiation in their man facility contains residual radioactivity left over from \I for the federal government. Under an approved plan by the federal Nuclear Reeul: responsible regulatory agency, the Commonwealth be; The site now includes operations for PermaGrain Prod manufacturer of specialty wood tile and flooring. 1 Home 1 Histow 1 Cleanun 1 Progress I ( Media 1 PowerPoint I Robotics ( Gallerv 1 Contacts ( Contact Webmaster Last Modified ( I ofl 3s been the location of lcturing processes. The .k conducted decades ag

420

Recovery Act Workers Complete Environmental Cleanup of Coal Ash Basin  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site (SRS) recently cleaned up a 17- Site (SRS) recently cleaned up a 17- acre basin containing coal ash residues from Cold War operations. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act project was safely completed at a cost of $8.9 million, $2.9 million under budget. The manmade earthen basin received ash from the former R Area Pow- erhouse operations, which ended in 1964. The first of five reactors con- structed at SRS, the R Reactor produced nuclear materials for national defense. Recovery Act funding allowed SRS to accelerate cleanup of the basin and complete the project five years earlier than the target set in a regu- latory schedule. In late 2010, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control determined the closure met all regulatory requirements after inspection

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421

Protecting Recovery Act Cleanup Site During Massive Wildfire  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 13, 2011 July 13, 2011 Protecting Recovery Act Cleanup Site During Massive Wildfire LOS ALAMOS, N.M. - Effective safety procedures in place at Los Alamos National Laboratory would have provided protections in the event that the raging Las Conchas fire had spread to the site of an American Recovery and Reinvestment Act project. "Our procedures not only placed the waste excavation site, Materials Disposal Area B (MDA-B), into a safe posture so it was well protected during the fire, but also allowed us to resume work quickly," said Project Director Al Chaloupka. The largest wildfire in New Mexico history forced the Lab to close for more than a week. While firefighters battled the fire, Recovery Act project officials were making plans to re-start the Recovery Act excavation of MDA-B when it was safe to return to

422

Technologies for environmental cleanup: Toxic and hazardous waste management  

SciTech Connect

This is the second in a series of EUROCOURSES conducted under the title, ``Technologies for Environmental Cleanup.`` To date, the series consist of the following courses: 1992, soils and groundwater; 1993, Toxic and Hazardous Waste Management. The 1993 course focuses on recent technological developments in the United States and Europe in the areas of waste management policies and regulations, characterization and monitoring of waste, waste minimization and recycling strategies, thermal treatment technologies, photolytic degradation processes, bioremediation processes, medical waste treatment, waste stabilization processes, catalytic organic destruction technologies, risk analyses, and data bases and information networks. It is intended that this course ill serve as a resource of state-of-the-art technologies and methodologies for the environmental protection manager involved in decisions concerning the management of toxic and hazardous waste.

Ragaini, R.C.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Laboratory tests, statistical analysis and correlations for regained permeability and breakthrough time in unconsolidated sands for improved drill-in fluid cleanup practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Empirical models for estimating the breakthrough time and regained permeability for selected nondamaging drill-in fluids (DIF's) give a clear indication of formation damage and proper cleanup treatments for reservoir conditions analyzed in this study. We determined values of breakthrough time and regained permeability for common polymer-carbonate and sized-salt/saturated brine DIF's for a range at reservoir properties including temperature, drill solids content, and percent of acid in the cleanup treatment. We chose these DIF's because they form tight, thin filtercakes that control fluid leakoff and afford more complete wellbore cleanup properties than standard drilling muds, and we chose reservoir properties that could be varied and measured. Beginning with a large database of 101 tests with 8 independent variables such as type of drill-in fluid, temperature, screen type, presence of gravel pack, formation type, type of drill solids, concentration of drill solids, and cleanup treatments, we analyzed the importance of each variable. After that, we identified the independent variables we were taking into account during this research. Those variables were temperature, drill solids content, and concentration of hydrochloric acid in the cleanup treatment. Then we generated a matrix for each set of experiments that allowed us to organize and measure the conditions we were looking for, regained permeability and breakthrough time. In measuring the regained permeability, we used a linear-flow cell apparatus. In measuring the breakthrough time that particular cleaning procedures take to flow across the filter cake, we used a ceramic disc cell apparatus. We used statistical software to select properties, formation, and diagnostics of the models and to develop relationships among the properties of the DIF's. We developed four new empirical models for estimating the breakthrough time and regained permeability in polymer carbonate and sized salt. High correlations resulted with R values between 0.851 and 0.986 corroborated by close values of adjusted R-square and low P-values give validity to the correlations found. This technique gives a broad overview of the formation damage as well as the proper cleanup treatment for similar conditions presented in the field.

Serrano, Gerardo Enrique

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Pressure Swing Absorption Device and Process for Separating CO2 from Shifted Syngas and its Capture for Subsequent Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pressure Swing Absorption Device and Pressure Swing Absorption Device and Process for Separating CO 2 from Shifted Syngas and its Capture for Subsequent Storage Background Pulverized coal-fired power plants provide more than 50 percent of electricity needs while accounting for a third of the total carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions in the United States. However, capturing CO 2 from the flue gas stream in coal-fired power plants using current commercial CO 2 capture technology could consume up

425

Task 4.9 -- Value-added products from syngas. Semi-annual report, July 1--December 31, 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The work on advanced fuel forms in 1996 focused on the synthesis of higher alcohols from mixtures of hydrogen and carbon dioxide (syngas) from coal gasification. Initial work in this project utilized a novel molybdenum sulfide catalyst previously shown to be active for hydrodesulfurization reactions of coal liquids. A pressurized fixed-bed flow-through reactor was constructed, and the MoS{sub 2} catalysts were tested with syngas under a variety of conditions. Unfortunately, the catalysts, even with higher molybdenum loading and addition of promoters, failed to give alcohol products. A batch reactor test of the catalyst was also conducted, but did not produce alcohol products. Group VIII metals have been used previously in catalysts for syngas reactions. Ruthenium and rhodium catalysts were prepared by impregnation of a hydrotalcite support. Tests with these catalysts in flow-through reactors also did not produce the desired alcohol products. The formation of higher alcohols from smaller ones, such as methanol and ethanol, could be commercially important if high selectivity could be achieved. The methanol and ethanol would be derived from syngas and fermentation, respectively. Based on previous work in other laboratories, it was hypothesized that the hydrotalcite-supported MoS{sub 2} or Ru or Rh catalysts could catalyze the formation of butyl alcohols. Although the desired 1-butanol was obtained in batch reactions with the promoted ruthenium catalyst, the reaction was not as selective as desired. Product suitable for a lower-vapor-pressure gasoline oxygenate additive was obtained, but it may not be economical to market such products in competition with methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE). Flow-through catalytic bed reactions were not successful.

Olson, E.S.; Sharma, R.K.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

KINETIC UNDERSTANDING OF THE SYNGAS-TO-DME REACTION SYSTEM AND ITS IMPLICATIONS TO PROCESS AND ECONOMICS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In a single-step synthesis gas-to-dimethyl ether process, synthesis gas (or syngas, a mixture of H{sub 2} and CO) is converted into dimethyl ether (DME) in a single reactor. The three reactions involved in this process, methanol synthesis, methanol dehydration and water gas shift, form an interesting reaction network. The interplay among these three reactions results in excellent syngas conversion or reactor productivity. A fundamental understanding of this interplay helps to explain many experimental and simulation observations, to identify optimal reaction conditions, and to provide guidelines for process development. The higher syngas conversion or reactor productivity in the syngas-to-DME reaction system, compared to that in the syngas-to-methanol reaction system, is referred to as chemical synergy. This synergy exhibits a strong dependence on the composition of the reactor feed. To demonstrate the extent of this dependence, simulations with adjusted activity for each reaction were performed to reveal the relative rate of each reaction. The results show that the water gas shift reaction is the most rapid, being practically controlled by the equilibrium. Both methanol synthesis and methanol dehydration reactions are kinetically controlled. The kinetics of the dehydration reactions is greater than that of the methanol synthesis reaction in the CO-rich regime. However, the rates of these two reactions come closer as the H{sub 2} concentration in the reactor feed increases. The role of the dehydration reaction is to remove the equilibrium barrier for the methanol synthesis reaction. The role of the water gas shift reaction is more complex; it helps the kinetics of methanol dehydration by keeping the water concentration low, which in turn enhances methanol synthesis. It also readjusts the H{sub 2}:CO ratio in the reactor as the reactions proceed. In the CO-rich regime, the water gas shift reaction supplements the limiting reactant, H{sub 2}, by reacting water with CO. This enhances both the kinetics and thermodynamic driving force of the methanol synthesis reaction. In the H{sub 2}-rich regime, water gas shift consumes the limiting reactant, CO, which harms both the kinetics and thermodynamics of methanol synthesis. An understanding of these complex roles of the methanol dehydration and water gas shift reactions and of their dependence on the syngas composition explains why the synergy is high in the CO-rich regime, but decreases with increasing H{sub 2} or CO{sub 2} content in the reactor feed. The methanol equivalent productivity of the syngas-to-DME reactor is also a strong function of the reactor feed. A mathematical approach was developed to understand this dependence. The approach divides a power law type of rate equation into two terms, the kinetic term (the rate of the forward reaction) and the thermodynamics or driving force term (1- approach to equilibrium). The equations for the best feed composition for each term were derived. The approach was developed for the single reaction system, and then extended to the syngas-to-DME reaction system. The equations provide insights into why and how the methanol synthesis in the syngasto-DME system depends on the other two reactions. They can also be used to calculate the best feed composition for a given conversion. The analysis shows that for typical commercial syngas conversion, the optimal H{sub 2}:CO ratio for the LPDME{trademark} reactor is around 1-to-1, in good agreement with the results from the simulation. While the 1-to-1 feed provides a good foundation for some process configurations, it does not match the composition of natural gas-derived syngas, which typically has a H{sub 2}:CO ratio of 2:1 or greater. The process would also produce one CO{sub 2} molecule for every DME product, both a materials utilization and an environmental problem. However, recycling CO{sub 2} to the syngas generation unit can solve all of these problems. Integration schemes with different syngas generation technologies (dry reforming, steam methane reforming and partial oxidation) were

Xiang-Dong Peng

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Catalytic Process for the Conversion of Coal-derived Syngas to Ethanol  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The catalytic conversion of coal-derived syngas to C{sub 2+} alcohols and oxygenates has attracted great attention due to their potential as chemical intermediates and fuel components. This is particularly true of ethanol, which can serve as a transportation fuel blending agent, as well as a hydrogen carrier. A thermodynamic analysis of CO hydrogenation to ethanol that does not allow for byproducts such as methane or methanol shows that the reaction: 2 CO + 4 H{sub 2} {yields} C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH + H{sub 2}O is thermodynamically favorable at conditions of practical interest (e.g,30 bar, {approx}< 250 C). However, when methane is included in the equilibrium analysis, no ethanol is formed at any conditions even approximating those that would be industrially practical. This means that undesired products (primarily methane and/or CO{sub 2}) must be kinetically limited. This is the job of a catalyst. The mechanism of CO hydrogenation leading to ethanol is complex. The key step is the formation of the initial C-C bond. Catalysts that are selective for EtOH can be divided into four classes: (a) Rh-based catalysts, (b) promoted Cu catalysts, (c) modified Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, or (d) Mo-sulfides and phosphides. This project focuses on Rh- and Cu-based catalysts. The logic was that (a) Rh-based catalysts are clearly the most selective for EtOH (but these catalysts can be costly), and (b) Cu-based catalysts appear to be the most selective of the non-Rh catalysts (and are less costly). In addition, Pd-based catalysts were studied since Pd is known for catalyzing CO hydrogenation to produce methanol, similar to copper. Approach. The overall approach of this project was based on (a) computational catalysis to identify optimum surfaces for the selective conversion of syngas to ethanol; (b) synthesis of surfaces approaching these ideal atomic structures, (c) specialized characterization to determine the extent to which the actual catalyst has these structures, and (d) testing at realistic conditions (e.g., elevated pressures) and differential conversions (to measure true kinetics, to avoid deactivation, and to avoid condensable concentrations of products in the outlet gas).

James Spivery; Doug Harrison; John Earle; James Goodwin; David Bruce; Xunhau Mo; Walter Torres; Joe Allison Vis Viswanathan; Rick Sadok; Steve Overbury; Viviana Schwartz

2011-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

428

Integrated low emissions cleanup system for direct coal-fueled turbines  

SciTech Connect

The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Science Technology Center (W-STC) is developing an Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup (ILEC) concept for high-temperature gas cleaning to meet environmental standards, as well as to economical gas turbine life. The ILEC concept simultaneously controls sulfur, particulate, and alkali contaminants in high-pressure fuel gases or combustion gases at temperatures up to 1850[degrees]F for advanced power generation systems (PFBC, APFBC, IGCC, DCF7). The objective of this program is to demonstrate, at a bench scale, the conceptual, technical feasibility of the REC concept. The ELEC development program has a 3 phase structure: Phase 1 - laboratory-scale testing; phase 2 - bench-scale equipment; design and fabrication; and phase 3 - bench-scale testing. Phase 1 laboratory testing has been completed. In Phase 1, entrained sulfur and alkali sorbent kinetics were measured and evaluated, and commercial-scale performance was projected. Related cold flow model testing has shown that gas-particle contacting within the ceramic barrier filter vessel will provide a good reactor environment. The Phase 1 test results and the commercial evaluation conducted in the Phase 1 program support the bench-scale facility testing to be performed in Phase 3. Phase 2 is nearing completion with the design and assembly of a modified, bench-scale test facility to demonstrate the technical feasibility of the ILEC features. This feasibility testing will be conducted in Phase 3.

Lippert, T.E.; Newby, R.A.; Alvin, M.A.; Bachovchin, D.M.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Yang, W.C.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Integrated low emissions cleanup system for direct coal-fueled turbines  

SciTech Connect

The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Science & Technology Center (W-STC) is developing an Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup (ILEC) concept for high-temperature gas cleaning to meet environmental standards, as well as to economical gas turbine life. The ILEC concept simultaneously controls sulfur, particulate, and alkali contaminants in high-pressure fuel gases or combustion gases at temperatures up to 1850{degrees}F for advanced power generation systems (PFBC, APFBC, IGCC, DCF7). The objective of this program is to demonstrate, at a bench scale, the conceptual, technical feasibility of the REC concept. The ELEC development program has a 3 phase structure: Phase 1 - laboratory-scale testing; phase 2 - bench-scale equipment; design and fabrication; and phase 3 - bench-scale testing. Phase 1 laboratory testing has been completed. In Phase 1, entrained sulfur and alkali sorbent kinetics were measured and evaluated, and commercial-scale performance was projected. Related cold flow model testing has shown that gas-particle contacting within the ceramic barrier filter vessel will provide a good reactor environment. The Phase 1 test results and the commercial evaluation conducted in the Phase 1 program support the bench-scale facility testing to be performed in Phase 3. Phase 2 is nearing completion with the design and assembly of a modified, bench-scale test facility to demonstrate the technical feasibility of the ILEC features. This feasibility testing will be conducted in Phase 3.

Lippert, T.E.; Newby, R.A.; Alvin, M.A.; Bachovchin, D.M.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Yang, W.C.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

430

Alkali compounds catalyzed low temperature methanol synthesis over Cu-based catalyst  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel mixed catalyst system containing alkali compounds over Cu/MgO-Na catalyst was developed to synthesize methanol from syngas via ethyl formate in a slurry reactor. The results exhibited that among the used alkali formates (HCOOM, M=Li, Na, Cs, ... Keywords: CuMgO-Na/HCOONa/catalysis system, low temperature methanol synthesis, slurry phase

Baoshan Hu

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

An Act Relative to Environmental Cleanup and Promoting the Redevelopment of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

An Act Relative to Environmental Cleanup and Promoting the An Act Relative to Environmental Cleanup and Promoting the Redevelopment of Contaminated Property - The "Brownfields" Act (Massachusetts) An Act Relative to Environmental Cleanup and Promoting the Redevelopment of Contaminated Property - The "Brownfields" Act (Massachusetts) < Back Eligibility Construction Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Home Weatherization Water Buying & Making Electricity Solar Wind Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Corporate Tax Incentive Provider Mass. Department of Environmental Proection The Commonwealth of Massachusetts provides liability relief and financial

432

Synthesis of methyl methacrylate from coal-derived syngas: Quarterly report,, October 1-December 31, 1997  

SciTech Connect

Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Eastman Chemical Company, and Bechtel collectively are developing a novel process for the synthesis of methyl methacrylate (MMA) from coal-derived syngas that consists of three steps of synthesis of a propionate, its condensation with formaldehyde, and esterification of resulting methacrylic acid (MAA) with methanol to produce MMA. Over the last quarter, Eastman developed two new processes which have resulted in two new invention reports. One process deals with carbonylation of benzyl ether which represents a model for coal liquefaction and the second focuses on the acceleration of carbonylation rates for propionic acid synthesis, via use of polar aprotic solvents. These two inventions are major improvements in the novel Mo-catalyzed homogeneous process for propionic acid synthesis technology, developed by Eastman. Over the last quarter, RTI completed three reaction cycles and two regeneration cycles as a part of long-term reaction regeneration cycle study on a 10% Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}/Si0{sub 2} catalyst, for vapor phase condensation reaction of formaldehyde with propionic acid.

NONE

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Development of Comprehensive Detailed and Reduced Reaction Mechanisms for Syngas and Hydrogen Combustion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The collaborative research initiative culminated in amassing a substantial combustion database of experimental results for dry and moist mixtures of syngas and hydrogen (SGH), including autoignition times using a rapid compression machine as well as laminar flame speeds using a counterflow twin-flame configuration. These experimental data provided the basis for assessment of the kinetics of SGH combustion at elevated pressures using global uncertainty analysis methods. A review of the fundamental combustion characteristics of H{sub 2}/CO mixtures, with emphasis on ignition and flame propagation at high pressures was also conducted to understand the state of the art in SGH combustion. Investigation of the reaction kinetics of CO+HO{sub 2}{center_dot} {yields} CO{sub 2} + {center_dot}OH and HO{sub 2}+OH {yields} H{sub 2}O+O{sub 2} by ab initio calculations and master equation modeling was further carried out in order to look into the discrepancies between the experimental data and the results predicted by the mechanisms.

Chih-Jen Sung; Hai Wang; Angela Violi

2009-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

434

Computer Control of a Syngas Complex at LaPorte, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air Products and Chemicals has successfully implemented a mini-computer monitoring and control system at its LaPorte Syngas Complex as an integral part of its energy management strategy. The production complex consists of two separate plants at LaPorte, producing hydrogen and carbon monoxide, and a hydrogen producing plant at Battleground, six miles away. The combined facilities have a capacity of over 8 MMSCF/D of carbon monoxide and over 34 MMSCF/D of hydrogen product. The products are supplied to approximately fifteen customers via a pipeline system. The overall complexity of the multi-plant facility necessitated the implementation of a computerized control system to achieve maximum energy efficiency. The paper describes a computer system based upon a DEC PDP 11-34 mini-computer with a software package developed specifically for Air Products' application. The monitoring, direct digital control, and optimization strategy which was developed and written by Air Products personnel is reviewed. More than 250 process signals are measured and plant and equipment performance are calculated on-line for continuous logging, alarming and operator reference. In order to obtain 'rock steady' operation, over forty loops are under direct digital control and all- product ion changes are implemented on a feed forward basis. The total installed cost of the system was $950,000 and savings in excess of $750,000 have been achieved in the first year of operation in energy consumption improvement alone.

Chatterjee, N.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z