National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for temperature syngas cleanup

  1. EA-1867: Scale-up of High-Temperature Syngas Cleanup Technology, Polk County, Florida

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to provide cost-shared funding to RTI International (RTI) for its proposed project to demonstrate the precommercial scale-up of RTIs high-temperature syngas cleanup and carbon capture and sequestration technologies.

  2. DOE-Sponsored Syngas Cleanup Demonstration Project Reaches Development Milestone

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In a project sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), a demonstration-scale application of RTI International’s warm synthesis gas (syngas) cleanup process technology has achieved a key operational milestone at Tampa Electric Company’s coal gasification plant in Polk County, Fla.

  3. Microsoft PowerPoint - DFT Syngas Cleanup_3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Density Functional Theory Study of Syngas Cleanup with Ceria-Based Rare Earth Oxides Matthew D. Krcha 1 , Adam D. Mayernick 1 , Michael J. Janik 1 , Kerry M. Dooley 2 1 Department of Chemical Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 2 Department of Chemical Engineering, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA Goal & Motivation H 2 S Adsorption Methane Conversion References Acknowledgements 1. Nolan et al. Surface Science 595 (2005) 223 2. K.M. Dooley, S.

  4. Cleanup

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cleanup

  5. DOE-Sponsored Syngas Cleanup Demonstration Project Reaches Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    resulting in more than 99.99 percent total sulfur removal. The new innovation is a lower-cost way to clean the syngas from coal to levels below EPA requirements and enable the...

  6. Syngas Enhanced High Efficiency Low Temperature Combustion for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Enhanced High Efficiency Low Temperature Combustion for Clean Diesel Engines Syngas Enhanced High Efficiency Low Temperature Combustion for Clean Diesel Engines A significant ...

  7. Task 3.3: Warm Syngas Cleanup and Catalytic Processes for Syngas Conversion to Fuels Subtask 3: Advanced Syngas Conversion to Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lebarbier Dagel, Vanessa M.; Li, J.; Taylor, Charles E.; Wang, Yong; Dagle, Robert A.; Deshmane, Chinmay A.; Bao, Xinhe

    2014-03-31

    This collaborative joint research project is in the area of advanced gasification and conversion, within the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS)-National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)-Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Memorandum of Understanding. The goal for this subtask is the development of advanced syngas conversion technologies. Two areas of investigation were evaluated: Sorption-Enhanced Synthetic Natural Gas Production from Syngas The conversion of synthetic gas (syngas) to synthetic natural gas (SNG) is typically catalyzed by nickel catalysts performed at moderate temperatures (275 to 325C). The reaction is highly exothermic and substantial heat is liberated, which can lead to process thermal imbalance and destruction of the catalyst. As a result, conversion per pass is typically limited, and substantial syngas recycle is employed. Commercial methanation catalysts and processes have been developed by Haldor Topsoe, and in some reports, they have indicated that there is a need and opportunity for thermally more robust methanation catalysts to allow for higher per-pass conversion in methanation units. SNG process requires the syngas feed with a higher H2/CO ratio than typically produced from gasification processes. Therefore, the water-gas shift reaction (WGS) will be required to tailor the H2/CO ratio. Integration with CO2 separation could potentially eliminate the need for a separate WGS unit, thereby integrating WGS, methanation, and CO2 capture into one single unit operation and, consequently, leading to improved process efficiency. The SNG process also has the benefit of producing a product stream with high CO2 concentrations, which makes CO2 separation more readily achievable. The use of either adsorbents or membranes that selectively separate the CO2 from the H2 and CO would shift the methanation reaction (by driving WGS for hydrogen production) and greatly improve the overall efficiency and economics of the process. The scope of this activity was to develop methods and enabling materials for syngas conversion to SNG with readily CO2 separation. Suitable methanation catalyst and CO2 sorbent materials were developed. Successful proof-of-concept for the combined reaction-sorption process was demonstrated, which culminated in a research publication. With successful demonstration, a decision was made to switch focus to an area of fuels research of more interest to all three research institutions (CAS-NETL-PNNL). Syngas-to-Hydrocarbon Fuels through Higher Alcohol Intermediates There are two types of processes in syngas conversion to fuels that are attracting R&D interest: 1) syngas conversion to mixed alcohols; and 2) syngas conversion to gasoline via the methanol-to-gasoline process developed by Exxon-Mobil in the 1970s. The focus of this task was to develop a one-step conversion technology by effectively incorporating both processes, which is expected to reduce the capital and operational cost associated with the conversion of coal-derived syngas to liquid fuels. It should be noted that this work did not further study the classic Fischer-Tropsch reaction pathway. Rather, we focused on the studies for unique catalyst pathways that involve the direct liquid fuel synthesis enabled by oxygenated intermediates. Recent advances made in the area of higher alcohol synthesis including the novel catalytic composite materials recently developed by CAS using base metal catalysts were used.

  8. Syngas Enhanced High Efficiency Low Temperature Combustion for Clean Diesel

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Engines | Department of Energy Enhanced High Efficiency Low Temperature Combustion for Clean Diesel Engines Syngas Enhanced High Efficiency Low Temperature Combustion for Clean Diesel Engines A significant potential exists for clean diesel combustion by recouping exhaust energy to generate syngas either with a dedicated reformer or in-cylinder fuel reforming. PDF icon p-10_hou.pdf More Documents & Publications Adaptive PCCI with Variable Orifice Injector for Low Cost High Efficiency

  9. High temperature electrolysis for syngas production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stoots, Carl M.; O'Brien, James E.; Herring, James Stephen; Lessing, Paul A.; Hawkes, Grant L.; Hartvigsen, Joseph J.

    2011-05-31

    Syngas components hydrogen and carbon monoxide may be formed by the decomposition of carbon dioxide and water or steam by a solid-oxide electrolysis cell to form carbon monoxide and hydrogen, a portion of which may be reacted with carbon dioxide to form carbon monoxide. One or more of the components for the process, such as steam, energy, or electricity, may be provided using a nuclear power source.

  10. Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup, and Oxygen Separation Equipment; Task 9: Mixed Alcohols From Syngas -- State of Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nexant Inc.

    2006-05-01

    This deliverable is for Task 9, Mixed Alcohols from Syngas: State of Technology, as part of National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Award ACO-5-44027, ''Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup and Oxygen Separation Equipment''. Task 9 supplements the work previously done by NREL in the mixed alcohols section of the 2003 technical report Preliminary Screening--Technical and Economic Assessment of Synthesis Gas to Fuels and Chemicals with Emphasis on the Potential for Biomass-Derived Syngas.

  11. Direct Utilization of Coal Syngas in High Temperature Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Celik, Ismail B.

    2014-10-30

    This EPSCoR project had two primary goals: (i) to build infrastructure and work force at WVU to support long-term research in the area of fuel cells and related sciences; (ii) study effects of various impurities found in coal-syngas on performance of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC). As detailed in this report the WVU research team has made significant accomplishments in both of these areas. What follows is a brief summary of these accomplishments: State-of-the-art test facilities and diagnostic tools have been built and put into use. These include cell manufacturing, half-cell and full-cell test benches, XPS, XRD, TEM, Raman, EDAX, SEM, EIS, and ESEM equipment, unique in-situ measurement techniques and test benches (Environmental EM, Transient Mass-Spectrometer-MS, and IR Optical Temperature measurements). In addition, computational capabilities have been developed culminating in a multi-scale multi-physics fuel cell simulation code, DREAM-SOFC, as well as a Beowulf cluster with 64 CPU units. We have trained 16 graduate students, 10 postdoctoral fellows, and recruited 4 new young faculty members who have actively participated in the EPSCoR project. All four of these faculty members have already been promoted to the tenured associate professor level. With the help of these faculty and students, we were able to secure 14 research awards/contracts amounting to a total of circa $5.0 Million external funding in closely related areas of research. Using the facilities mentioned above, the effects of PH3, HCl, Cl2, and H2S on cell performance have been studied in detail, mechanisms have been identified, and also remedies have been proposed and demonstrated in the laboratory. For example, it has been determined that PH3 reacts rapidly with Ni to from secondary compounds which may become softer or even melt at high temperature and then induce Ni migration to the surface of the cell changing the material and micro-structural properties of the cell drastically. It is found that the extent of steam and current load accelerate the degradation caused by PH3. A unique filtering technique has been proposed to reduce the effect of PH3. In addition, various cell materials have been proposed to reduce the rate of degradation caused by H2S. Furthermore, a three-dimensional, transient multi-physics model has been formulated to describe primary transport processes and electro-chemical reactions occurring within the cell. This model has been validated using data gathered from accelerated tests. The validated model then has been used to study the degradation rates under a range of operating conditions and impurity levels. This has resulted in a procedure that uses both experiments and simulations to predict the life-time of a cell operating with syngas with known concentration of trace impurities. Finally all the experience and knowledge gained has been disseminated via 39 journal papers and 43 presentations/posters/conference papers.

  12. Progress toward Biomass and Coal-Derived Syngas Warm Cleanup: Proof-of-Concept Process Demonstration of Multicontaminant Removal for Biomass Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard, Christopher J.; Dagle, Robert A.; Lebarbier, Vanessa MC; Rainbolt, James E.; Li, Liyu; King, David L.

    2013-06-19

    Systems comprising of multiple sorbent and catalytic beds have been developed for the warm syngas cleanup of coal- and biomass-derived syngas. Tailored specifically for biomass application the process described here consists of six primary unit operations: 1) Na2CO3 bed for HCl removal, 2) two regenerable ZnO beds for bulk H2S removal, 3) ZnO bed for H2S polishing, 4) NiCu/SBA-16 sorbent for trace metal (e.g. AsH3) removal, 5) steam reforming catalyst bed for tars and light hydrocarbons reformation and NH3 decomposition, and a 6) Cu-based LT-WGS catalyst bed. Simulated biomass-derived syngas containing a multitude of inorganic contaminants (H2S, AsH3, HCl, and NH3) and hydrocarbon additives (methane, ethylene, benzene, and naphthalene) was used to demonstrate process effectiveness. The efficiency of the process was demonstrated for a period of 175 hours, during which no signs of deactivation were observed. Post-run analysis revealed small levels of sulfur slipped through the sorbent bed train to the two downstream catalytic beds. Future improvements could be made to the trace metal polishing sorbent to ensure complete inorganic contaminant removal (to low ppb level) prior to the catalytic steps. However, dual, regenerating ZnO beds were effective for continuous removal for the vast majority of the sulfur present in the feed gas. The process was effective for complete AsH3 and HCl removal. The steam reforming catalyst completely reformed all the hydrocarbons present in the feed (methane, ethylene, benzene, and naphthalene) to additional syngas. However, post-run evaluation, under kinetically-controlled conditions, indicates deactivation of the steam reforming catalyst. Spent material characterization suggests this is attributed, in part, to coke formation, likely due to the presence of benzene and/or naphthalene in the feed. Future adaptation of this technology may require dual, regenerable steam reformers. The process and materials described in this report hold promise for a warm cleanup of a variety of contaminant species within warm syngas.

  13. HIGH-TEMPERATURE CO-ELECTROLYSIS OF H2O AND CO2 FOR SYNGAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoots, C.M.

    2006-11-01

    Worldwide, the demand for light hydrocarbon fuels like gasoline and diesel oil is increasing. To satisfy this demand, oil companies have begun to utilize oil deposits of lower hydrogen content (an example is the Athabasca Oil Sands). Additionally, the higher contents of sulfur and nitrogen of these resources requires processes such as hydrotreating to meet environmental requirements. In the mean time, with the price of oil currently over $50 / barrel, synthetically-derived hydrocarbon fuels (synfuels) have become economical. Synfuels are typically produced from syngas hydrogen (H2) and carbon monoxide (CO) -- using the Fischer-Tropsch process, discovered by Germany before World War II. South Africa has used synfuels to power a significant number of their buses, trucks, and taxicabs. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), in conjunction with Ceramatec Inc. (Salt Lake City, USA) has been researching for several years the use of solid-oxide fuel cell technology to electrolyze steam for large-scale nuclear-powered hydrogen production. Now, an experimental research project is underway at the INL to investigate the feasibility of producing syngas by simultaneously electrolyzing at high-temperature steam and carbon dioxide (CO2) using solid oxide fuel cell technology. The syngas can then be used for synthetic fuel production. This program is a combination of experimental and computational activities. Since the solid oxide electrolyte material is a conductor of oxygen ions, CO can be produced by electrolyzing CO2 sequestered from some greenhouse gas-emitting process. Under certain conditions, however, CO can further electrolyze to produce carbon, which can then deposit on cell surfaces and reduce cell performance. The understanding of the co-electrolysis of steam and CO2 is also complicated by the competing water-gas shift reaction. Results of experiments and calculations to date of CO2 and CO2/H2O electrolysis will be presented and discussed. These will include electrolysis performance at various temperatures, gas mixtures, and electrical settings. Product gas compositions, as measured via a gas analyser, and their relationship to conversion efficiencies will be presented. These measurements will be compared to predictions obtained from chemical equilibrium computer codes. Better understanding of the feasibility of producing syngas using high-temperature electrolysis will initiate the systematic investigation of nuclear-powered synfuel production as a bridge to the future hydrogen economy and ultimate independence from foreign energy resources.

  14. Manganese and Ceria Sorbents for High Temperature Sulfur Removal from Biomass-Derived Syngas -- The Impact of Steam on Capacity and Sorption Mode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheah, S.; Parent, Y. O.; Jablonski, W. S.; Vinzant, T.; Olstad, J. L.

    2012-07-01

    Syngas derived from biomass and coal gasification for fuel synthesis or electricity generation contains sulfur species that are detrimental to downstream catalysts or turbine operation. Sulfur removal in high temperature, high steam conditions has been known to be challenging, but experimental reports on methods to tackle the problem are not often reported. We have developed sorbents that can remove hydrogen sulfide from syngas at high temperature (700 C), both in dry and high steam conditions. The syngas composition chosen for our experiments is derived from statistical analysis of the gasification products of wood under a large variety of conditions. The two sorbents, Cu-ceria and manganese-based, were tested in a variety of conditions. In syngas containing steam, the capacity of the sorbents is much lower, and the impact of the sorbent in lowering H{sub 2}S levels is only evident in low space velocities. Spectroscopic characterization and thermodynamic consideration of the experimental results suggest that in syngas containing 45% steam, the removal of H{sub 2}S is primarily via surface chemisorptions. For the Cu-ceria sorbent, analysis of the amount of H{sub 2}S retained by the sorbent in dry syngas suggests both copper and ceria play a role in H{sub 2}S removal. For the manganese-based sorbent, in dry conditions, there is a solid state transformation of the sorbent, primarily into the sulfide form.

  15. Development of an Integrated Multi-Contaminant Removal Process Applied to Warm Syngas Cleanup for Coal-Based Advanced Gasification Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard Meyer

    2010-11-30

    This project met the objective to further the development of an integrated multi-contaminant removal process in which H2S, NH3, HCl and heavy metals including Hg, As, Se and Cd present in the coal-derived syngas can be removed to specified levels in a single/integrated process step. The process supports the mission and goals of the Department of Energy’s Gasification Technologies Program, namely to enhance the performance of gasification systems, thus enabling U.S. industry to improve the competitiveness of gasification-based processes. The gasification program will reduce equipment costs, improve process environmental performance, and increase process reliability and flexibility. Two sulfur conversion concepts were tested in the laboratory under this project, i.e., the solventbased, high-pressure University of California Sulfur Recovery Process – High Pressure (UCSRP-HP) and the catalytic-based, direct oxidation (DO) section of the CrystaSulf-DO process. Each process required a polishing unit to meet the ultra-clean sulfur content goals of <50 ppbv (parts per billion by volume) as may be necessary for fuel cells or chemical production applications. UCSRP-HP was also tested for the removal of trace, non-sulfur contaminants, including ammonia, hydrogen chloride, and heavy metals. A bench-scale unit was commissioned and limited testing was performed with simulated syngas. Aspen-Plus®-based computer simulation models were prepared and the economics of the UCSRP-HP and CrystaSulf-DO processes were evaluated for a nominal 500 MWe, coal-based, IGCC power plant with carbon capture. This report covers the progress on the UCSRP-HP technology development and the CrystaSulf-DO technology.

  16. HIGH-TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS FOR LARGE-SCALE HYDROGEN AND SYNGAS PRODUCTION FROM NUCLEAR ENERGY SYSTEM SIMULATION AND ECONOMICS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. E. O'Brien; M. G. McKellar; E. A. Harvego; C. M. Stoots

    2009-05-01

    A research and development program is under way at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to assess the technological and scale-up issues associated with the implementation of solid-oxide electrolysis cell technology for efficient high-temperature hydrogen production from steam. This work is supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, under the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. This paper will provide an overview of large-scale system modeling results and economic analyses that have been completed to date. System analysis results have been obtained using the commercial code UniSim, augmented with a custom high-temperature electrolyzer module. Economic analysis results were based on the DOE H2A analysis methodology. The process flow diagrams for the system simulations include an advanced nuclear reactor as a source of high-temperature process heat, a power cycle and a coupled steam electrolysis loop. Several reactor types and power cycles have been considered, over a range of reactor outlet temperatures. Pure steam electrolysis for hydrogen production as well as coelectrolysis for syngas production from steam/carbon dioxide mixtures have both been considered. In addition, the feasibility of coupling the high-temperature electrolysis process to biomass and coal-based synthetic fuels production has been considered. These simulations demonstrate that the addition of supplementary nuclear hydrogen to synthetic fuels production from any carbon source minimizes emissions of carbon dioxide during the production process.

  17. Process for producing ethanol from syngas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krause, Theodore R; Rathke, Jerome W; Chen, Michael J

    2013-05-14

    The invention provides a method for producing ethanol, the method comprising establishing an atmosphere containing methanol forming catalyst and ethanol forming catalyst; injecting syngas into the atmosphere at a temperature and for a time sufficient to produce methanol; and contacting the produced methanol with additional syngas at a temperature and for a time sufficient to produce ethanol. The invention also provides an integrated system for producing methanol and ethanol from syngas, the system comprising an atmosphere isolated from the ambient environment; a first catalyst to produce methanol from syngas wherein the first catalyst resides in the atmosphere; a second catalyst to product ethanol from methanol and syngas, wherein the second catalyst resides in the atmosphere; a conduit for introducing syngas to the atmosphere; and a device for removing ethanol from the atmosphere. The exothermicity of the method and system obviates the need for input of additional heat from outside the atmosphere.

  18. A perspective on syngas from coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rath, L.K.; Longanbach, J.R. )

    1991-01-01

    Syngas, a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide, has been produced from coal for more than 100 years. But today most syngas is produced from noncoal feedstocks, by catalytic steam reforming of natural gas and naphtha or partial oxidation of heavy hydrocarbons such as petroleum resid. Three types of syngas, characterized by their H{sub 2}/CO ratio, are needed. Low ratio, H{sub 2}/CO = 0.4-0.8, syngas can be used in recently developed processes such as the Liquid Phase Methanol synthesis and the Shell Fischer-Tropsch wax synthesis; moderate ratio, H{sub 2}/CO = 0.8-1.5, syngas is used in the Tennessee Eastman coal based synthesis of methanol and acetic anhydride; high ratio, H{sub 2}/CO = 1.8-2.5, syngas is used in traditional methanol synthesis and the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis at Sasol. Different types of gasifiers are available for the production of syngas. These include Lurgi fixed-bed dry bottom and slagging gasifiers, agglomerating fluidized-bed gasifiers, single and two-stage entrained slurry feed gasifiers, and single-stage entrained dry feed gasifiers. The cost of syngas from subbituminous coal is shown to be relatively insensitive to the H{sub 2}/CO ratio produced and may soon be competitive with natural gas-based syngas in some parts of the country due to the increasing demand for and cost of natural gas. Recent in this paper, DOE sponsored research on three topics on the production of syngas from coal, coal gasifiers for the direct production of high hydrogen content syngas, advanced methods to separate hydrogen from syngas at elevated temperatures and biological conversion of coal to syngas, are also discussed.

  19. Thermodynamic analysis of interactions between Ni-based solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) anodes and trace species in a survey of coal syngas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrew Martinez; Kirk Gerdes; Randall Gemmen; James Postona

    2010-03-20

    A thermodynamic analysis was conducted to characterize the effects of trace contaminants in syngas derived from coal gasification on solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode material. The effluents from 15 different gasification facilities were considered to assess the impact of fuel composition on anode susceptibility to contamination. For each syngas case, the study considers the magnitude of contaminant exposure resulting from operation of a warm gas cleanup unit at two different temperatures and operation of a nickel-based SOFC at three different temperatures. Contaminant elements arsenic (As), phosphorous (P), and antimony (Sb) are predicted to be present in warm gas cleanup effluent and will interact with the nickel (Ni) components of a SOFC anode. Phosphorous is the trace element found in the largest concentration of the three contaminants and is potentially the most detrimental. Poisoning was found to depend on the composition of the syngas as well as system operating conditions. Results for all trace elements tended to show invariance with cleanup operating temperature, but results were sensitive to syngas bulk composition. Synthesis gas with high steam content tended to resist poisoning.

  20. Coal-Derived Warm Syngas Purification and CO2 Capture-Assisted Methane Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dagle, Robert A.; King, David L.; Li, Xiaohong S.; Xing, Rong; Spies, Kurt A.; Zhu, Yunhua; Rainbolt, James E.; Li, Liyu; Braunberger, B.

    2014-10-31

    Gasifier-derived syngas from coal has many applications in the area of catalytic transformation to fuels and chemicals. Raw syngas must be treated to remove a number of impurities that would otherwise poison the synthesis catalysts. Inorganic impurities include alkali salts, chloride, sulfur compounds, heavy metals, ammonia, and various P, As, Sb, and Se- containing compounds. Systems comprising multiple sorbent and catalytic beds have been developed for the removal of impurities from gasified coal using a warm cleanup approach. This approach has the potential to be more economic than the currently available acid gas removal (AGR) approaches and improves upon currently available processes that do not provide the level of impurity removal that is required for catalytic synthesis application. Gasification also lends itself much more readily to the capture of CO2, important in the regulation and control of greenhouse gas emissions. CO2 capture material was developed and in this study was demonstrated to assist in methane production from the purified syngas. Simultaneous CO2 sorption enhances the CO methanation reaction through relaxation of thermodynamic constraint, thus providing economic benefit rather than simply consisting of an add-on cost for carbon capture and release. Molten and pre-molten LiNaKCO3 can promote MgO and MgO-based double salts to capture CO2 with high cycling capacity. A stable cycling CO2 capacity up to 13 mmol/g was demonstrated. This capture material was specifically developed in this study to operate in the same temperature range and therefore integrate effectively with warm gas cleanup and methane synthesis. By combining syngas methanation, water-gas-shift, and CO2 sorption in a single reactor, single pass yield to methane of 99% was demonstrated at 10 bar and 330oC when using a 20 wt% Ni/MgAl2O4 catalyst and a molten-phase promoted MgO-based sorbent. Under model feed conditions both the sorbent and catalyst exhibited favorable stability after multiple test cycles. The cleanup for warm gas cleanup of inorganics was broken down into three major steps: chloride removal, sulfur removal, and the removal for a multitude of trace metal contaminants. Na2CO3 was found to optimally remove chlorides at an operating temperature of 450C. For sulfur removal two regenerable ZnO beds are used for bulk H2S removal at 450C (<5 ppm S) and a non-regenerable ZnO bed for H2S polishing at 300C (<40 ppb S). It was also found that sulfur from COS could be adsorbed (to levels below our detection limit of 40 ppb) in the presence of water that leads to no detectable slip of H2S. Finally, a sorbent material comprising of Cu and Ni was found to be effective in removing trace metal impurities such as AsH3 and PH3 when operating at 300C. Proof-of-concept of the integrated cleanup process was demonstrated with gasifier-generated syngas produced at the Western Research Institute using Wyoming Decker Coal. When operating with a ~1 SLPM feed, multiple inorganic contaminant removal sorbents and a tar-reforming bed was able to remove the vast majority of contaminants from the raw syngas. A tar-reforming catalyst was employed due to the production of tars generated from the gasifier used in this particular study. It is envisioned that in a real application a commercial scale gasifier operating at a higher temperature would produce lesser amount of tar. Continuous operation of a poison-sensitive copper-based WGS catalyst located downstream from the cleanup steps resulted in successful demonstration. ?

  1. Overview of Contaminant Removal From Coal-Derived Syngas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Layne, A.W.; Alvin, M.A.; Granite, E.; Pennline, H.W.; Siriwardane, R.V.; Keairns, D.; Newby, R.A.

    2007-11-01

    Gasification is an important strategy for increasing the utilization of abundant domestic coal reserves. DOE envisions increased use of gasification in the United States during the next 20 years. As such, the DOE Gasification Technologies Program, including the FutureGen initiative, will strive to approach a near-zero emissions goal, with respect to multiple pollutants, such as sulfur, mercury, and nitrogen oxides. Since nearly one-third of anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions are produced by coal-powered generation facilities, conventional coal-burning power plants, and advanced power generation plants, such as IGCC, present opportunities in which carbon can be removed and then permanently stored.
    Gas cleaning systems for IGCC power generation facilities have been effectively demonstrated and used in commercial operations for many years. These systems can reduce sulfur, mercury, and other contaminants in synthesis gas produced by gasifiers to the lowest level achievable in coal-based energy systems. Currently, DOE Fossil Energy's goals set for 2010 direct completion of R&D for advanced gasification combined cycle technology to produce electricity from coal at 4550% plant efficiency. By 2012, completion of R&D to integrate this technology with carbon dioxide separation, capture, and sequestration into a zero-emissions configuration is targeted with a goal to provide electricity with less than a 10% increase in cost of electricity. By 2020, goals are set to develop zero-emissions plants that are fuel-flexible and capable of multi-product output and thermal efficiencies of over 60% with coal. These objectives dictate that it is essential to not only reduce contaminant emissions into the generated synthesis gas, but also to increase the process or system operating temperature to that of humid gas cleaning criteria conditions (150 to 370 C), thus reducing the energy penalties that currently exist as a result of lowering process temperatures (?40 to 38 C) with subsequent reheat to the required higher temperatures.
    From a historical perspective, the evolution of advanced syngas cleaning systems applied in IGCC and chemical and fuel synthesis plants has followed a path of configuring a series of individual cleaning steps, one for each syngas contaminant, each step controlled to its individual temperature and sorbent and catalyst needs. As the number of syngas contaminants of interest has increased (particulates, hydrogen sulfide, carbonyl sulfide, halides such as hydrogen chloride, ammonia, hydrogen cyanide, alkali metals, metal carbonyls, mercury, arsenic, selenium, and cadmium) and the degree of syngas cleaning has become more severe, the potential feasibility of advanced humid gas cleaning has diminished. A focus on multi-contaminant syngas cleaning is needed to enhance the potential cost savings, and performance of humid gas cleaning will focus on multi-contaminant syngas cleaning. Groups of several syngas contaminants to be removed simultaneously need to be considered, resulting in significant gas cleaning system intensification. Intensified, multi-contaminant cleaning processes need to be devised and their potential performance characteristics understood through small-scale testing, conceptual design evaluation, and scale-up assessment with integration into the power generation system. Results of a 1-year study undertaken by DOE/NETL are presented to define improved power plant configurations and technology for advanced multi-contaminant cleanup options.

  2. Environmental Cleanup

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environmental Cleanup Tour Environmental Cleanup See how LANL is cleaning up the environmental legacy of the Manhattan Project and Cold War

  3. Environmental Cleanup

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environmental Cleanup Tour Environmental Cleanup See how LANL is cleaning up the environmental legacy of the Manhattan Project and Cold War Open full screen to view more You are...

  4. Cleanup 101

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cleanup 101 Cleanup 101 The Compliance Order on Consent agreement with State of New Mexico dictates cleanup on an appropriate schedule. August 1, 2013 Workers sort through waste for processing at TA-21 Workers sort through waste for processing at TA-21 Historical operations discontinued in the Los Alamos townsite in the 1950s. 2,123 potential release sites (PRS) were investigated for possible cleanup. Sites ranged in size and severity from suspected quarts of oil to a 63-acre material disposal

  5. Syngas Generator Use for Retrofit DPF Active Regeneration on...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    a Medium Duty Truck Syngas enables low temperature in-use active regeneration of DPFs ... Clean Diesel Campaign On-board Measurement of NO and NO2 using Non-dispersive ...

  6. Syngas Generator Use for Retrofit DPF Active Regeneration on a Medium Duty Truck

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Syngas enables low temperature in-use active regeneration of DPFs based on real-world data from a vehicle tested for over 1,000 hours

  7. Evaluation of Sulfur in Syngas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2006-04-01

    This project will define the options and costs at different scales of technology that can be used to remove sulfur from syngas.

  8. Bioenergy Technologies Office Conversion R&D Pathway: Syngas...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Bioenergy Technologies Office Conversion R&D Pathway: Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Syngas upgrading to hydrocarbon fuels is one of...

  9. HIGH EFFICIENCY SYNGAS GENERATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert J. Copeland; Yevgenia Gershanovich; Brian Windecker

    2005-02-01

    This project investigated an efficient and low cost method of auto-thermally reforming natural gas to hydrogen and carbon monoxide. Reforming is the highest cost step in producing products such as methanol and Fisher Tropsch liquids (i.e., gas to liquids); and reducing the cost of reforming is the key to reducing the cost of these products. Steam reforming is expensive because of the high cost of the high nickel alloy reforming tubes (i.e., indirectly fired reforming tubes). Conventional auto-thermal or Partial Oxidation (POX) reforming minimizes the size and cost of the reformers and provides a near optimum mixture of CO and hydrogen. However POX requires pure oxygen, which consumes power and significantly increases the cost to reforming. Our high efficiency process extracts oxygen from low-pressure air with novel oxygen sorbent and transfers the oxygen to a nickel-catalyzed reformer. The syngas is generated at process pressure (typically 20 to 40 bar) without nitrogen dilution and has a 1CO to 2H{sub 2} ratio that is near optimum for the subsequent production of Fisher-Tropsch liquid to liquids and other chemicals (i.e., Gas to Liquids, GTL). Our high process efficiency comes from the way we transfer the oxygen into the reformer. All of the components of the process, except for the oxygen sorbent, are commonly used in commercial practice. A process based on a longlived, regenerable, oxygen transfer sorbent could substantially reduce the cost of natural gas reforming to syngas. Lower cost syngas (CO + 2H{sub 2}) that is the feedstock for GTL would reduce the cost of GTL and for other commercial applications (e.g., methanol, other organic chemicals). The vast gas resources of Alaska's North Slope (ANS) offer more than 22 Tcf of gas and GTL production in this application alone, and could account for as much as 300,000 to 700,000 bpd for 20 to 30+ years. We developed a new sorbent, which is an essential part of the High Efficiency Oxygen Process (HOP). We tested the sorbent and observed that it has both a good oxygen capacity and operates as a highly effective reforming catalyst. We conducted a long duration tests of the sorbent (1,500 hours of continuous operation in the HOP cycle). Although the sorbent lost some oxygen capacity with cycling, the sorbent oxygen capacity stabilized after 1,000 hours and remained constant to the end of the test, 1,500 hour. The activity of the catalyst to reform methane to a hydrogen and carbon monoxide mixture was unchanged through the oxidation/reduction cycling. Our cost and performance analyses indicated a significant reduction in the cost of GTL production when using the HOP process integrated into a GTL plant.

  10. Environmental Cleanup Stories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cleanup Feature Stories community-environmentassetsimagesicon-environment.jpg Environmental Cleanup Stories Our environmental stewardship commitment: clean up the past,...

  11. Dimethyl ether production from methanol and/or syngas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dagle, Robert A; Wang, Yong; Baker, Eddie G; Hu, Jianli

    2015-02-17

    Disclosed are methods for producing dimethyl ether (DME) from methanol and for producing DME directly from syngas, such as syngas from biomass. Also disclosed are apparatus for DME production. The disclosed processes generally function at higher temperatures with lower contact times and at lower pressures than conventional processes so as to produce higher DME yields than do conventional processes. Certain embodiments of the processes are carried out in reactors providing greater surface to volume ratios than the presently used DME reactors. Certain embodiments of the processes are carried out in systems comprising multiple microchannel reactors.

  12. Cooling Strategies for Vane Leading Edges in a Syngas Environment Including Effects of Deposition and Turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ames, Forrest; Bons, Jeffrey

    2014-09-30

    The Department of Energy has goals to move land based gas turbine systems to alternate fuels including coal derived synthetic gas and hydrogen. Coal is the most abundant energy resource in the US and in the world and it is economically advantageous to develop power systems which can use coal. Integrated gasification combined cycles are (IGCC) expected to allow the clean use of coal derived fuels while improving the ability to capture and sequester carbon dioxide. These cycles will need to maintain or increase turbine entry temperatures to develop competitive efficiencies. The use of coal derived syngas introduces a range of potential contaminants into the hot section of the gas turbine including sulfur, iron, calcium, and various alkali metals. Depending on the effectiveness of the gas clean up processes, there exists significant likelihood that the remaining materials will become molten in the combustion process and potentially deposit on downstream turbine surfaces. Past evidence suggests that deposition will be a strong function of increasing temperature. Currently, even with the best gas cleanup processes a small level of particulate matter in the syngas is expected. Consequently, particulate deposition is expected to be an important consideration in the design of turbine components. The leading edge region of first stage vanes most often have higher deposition rates than other areas due to strong fluid acceleration and streamline curvature in the vicinity of the surface. This region remains one of the most difficult areas in a turbine nozzle to cool due to high inlet temperatures and only a small pressure ratio for cooling. The leading edge of a vane often has relatively high heat transfer coefficients and is often cooled using showerhead film cooling arrays. The throat of the first stage nozzle is another area where deposition potentially has a strongly adverse effect on turbine performance as this region meters the turbine inlet flow. Based on roughness levels found on in service vanes (Bons, et al., 2001, up to 300 microns) flow blockage in first stage turbine nozzles can easily reach 1 to 2 percent in conventional turbines. Deposition levels in syngas fueled gas turbines are expected to be even more problematic. The likelihood of significant deposition to the leading edge of vanes in a syngas environment indicates the need to examine this effect on the leading edge cooling problem. It is critical to understand the influence of leading edge geometry and turbulence on deposition rates for both internally and showerhead cooled leading edge regions. The expected level of deposition in a vane stagnation region not only significantly changes the heat transfer problem but also suggests that cooling arrays may clog. Addressing the cooling issue suggests a need to better understand stagnation region heat transfer with realistic roughness as well as the other variables affecting transport near the leading edge. Also, the question of whether leading edge regions can be cooled internally with modern cooling approaches should also be raised, thus avoiding the clogging issue. Addressing deposition in the pressure side throat region of the nozzle is another critical issue for this environment. Issues such as examining the protective effect of slot and full coverage discrete-hole film cooling on limiting deposition as well as the influence of roughness and turbulence on effectiveness should be raised. The objective of this present study is to address these technical challenges to help enable the development of high efficiency syngas tolerant gas turbine engines.

  13. Imperium/Lanzatech Syngas Fermentation Project - Biomass Gasification and Syngas Conditioning for Fermentation Evaluation: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-12-474

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, E.

    2014-09-01

    LanzaTech and NREL will investigate the integration between biomass gasification and LanzaTech's proprietary gas fermentation process to produce ethanol and 2,3-butanediol. Using three feed materials (woody biomass, agricultural residue and herbaceous grass) NREL will produce syngas via steam indirect gasification and syngas conditioning over a range of process relevant operating conditions. The gasification temperature, steam-to-biomass ratio of the biomass feed into the gasifier, and several levels of syngas conditioning (based on temperature) will be varied to produce multiple syngas streams that will be fed directly to 10 liter seed fermenters operating with the Lanzatech organism. The NREL gasification system will then be integrated with LanzaTech's laboratory pilot unit to produce large-scale samples of ethanol and 2,3-butanediol for conversion to fuels and chemicals.

  14. Assessment of the SRI Gasification Process for Syngas Generation with HTGR Integration -- White Paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.M. Gandrik

    2012-04-01

    This white paper is intended to compare the technical and economic feasibility of syngas generation using the SRI gasification process coupled to several high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) with more traditional HTGR-integrated syngas generation techniques, including: (1) Gasification with high-temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE); (2) Steam methane reforming (SMR); and (3) Gasification with SMR with and without CO2 sequestration.

  15. Syngas Mixed Alcohol Cost Validation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1, 2013 DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office: Project Peer Review Syngas Mixed Alcohol Cost Validation Abhijit Dutta, NREL This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information Goal Statement Enable research and development of cost-competitive biomass to liquid fuels by providing: - Techno-economic analysis (TEA) - Feedback to the research efforts Specific objective in 2012: Provide TEA and validate DOE BETO's goal to demonstrate technologies capable

  16. Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology Pathway (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the upgrading of woody biomass derived synthesis gas (syngas) to hydrocarbon biofuels. While this specific discussion focuses on the conversion of syngas via a methanol...

  17. Dimethyl ether synthesis from syngas in slurry phase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Y.Z.; Fujimoto, K.; Shikata, T.

    1997-12-31

    Dimethyl ether (DME) is one of the important chemicals derived from synthesis gas. It can be widely used in syngas conversion, production of olefins, or MTG gasoline. Recently, is has been noticed as a substitute of LPG used as home fuel. In the present study, dimethyl ether was effectively synthesized from CO rich syngas (H{sub 2}/CO=1/1) over hybrid catalyst containing a Cu-Zn-Al(O) based methanol synthesis catalyst and {gamma}-alumina in an agitated slurry reactor under relatively mild reaction conditions: temperature 230--300 C, pressure 2.0--5.0 MPa, contact time 2.0--10 gram-cat.-h/mol. The catalysts used as the methanol active components were commercially available Cu-Zn-Al(O) based catalysts, BASF S385 and ICI 51-2. Two kinds of {gamma}-alumina ALO4 (standard catalyst of the Catalysis Society of Japan) and N612N (NIKKI Co., Japan) were used as the methanol dehydration components. The slurry was prepared by mixing the fine powder (<100 mesh) of catalyst components with purified n-hexadecane. The catalysts were reduced by a mixing gas containing 20% syngas and 80% nitrogen with a three-hour programmed temperature raising from room temperature to the final temperature. All products were analyzed by gas chromatographs. Results are given and discussed.

  18. Laminar flame speeds of moist syngas mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Apurba K. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Kumar, Kamal; Sung, Chih-Jen [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    This work experimentally investigates the effect of the presence of water vapor on the laminar flame speeds of moist syngas/air mixtures using the counterflow twin-flame configuration. The experimental results presented here are for fuel lean syngas mixtures with molar percentage of hydrogen in the hydrogen and carbon monoxide mixture varying from 5% to 100%, for an unburned mixture temperature of 323 K, and under atmospheric pressure. At a given equivalence ratio, the effect of varying amount of water vapor addition on the measured laminar flame speed is demonstrated. The experimental laminar flame speeds are also compared with computed values using chemical kinetic mechanisms reported in the literature. It is found that laminar flame speed varies non-monotonically with addition of water for the carbon monoxide rich mixtures. It first increases with increasing amount of water addition, reaches a maximum value, and then decreases. An integrated reaction path analysis is further conducted to understand the controlling mechanism responsible for the non-monotonic variation in laminar flame speed due to water addition. On the other hand, for higher values of H{sub 2}/CO ratio the laminar flame speed monotonically decreases with increasing water addition. It is shown that the competition between the chemical and thermal effects of water addition leads to the observed response. Furthermore, reaction rate sensitivity analysis as well as binary diffusion coefficient sensitivity analysis are conducted to identify the possible sources of discrepancy between the experimental and predicted values. The sensitivity results indicate that the reaction rate constant of H{sub 2}+OH = H{sub 2}O+H is worth revisiting and refinement of binary diffusion coefficient data of N{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O, N{sub 2}-H{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O pairs can be considered. (author)

  19. Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup, and Oxygen Separation Equipment; Task 2: Gas Cleanup Design and Cost Estimates -- Wood Feedstock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nexant Inc.

    2006-05-01

    As part of Task 2, Gas Cleanup and Cost Estimates, Nexant investigated the appropriate process scheme for treatment of wood-derived syngas for use in the synthesis of liquid fuels. Two different 2,000 metric tonne per day gasification schemes, a low-pressure, indirect system using the gasifier, and a high-pressure, direct system using gasification technology were evaluated. Initial syngas conditions from each of the gasifiers was provided to the team by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Nexant was the prime contractor and principal investigator during this task; technical assistance was provided by both GTI and Emery Energy.

  20. DOE, RTI to Design and Build Gas Cleanup System for IGCC Power Plants |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy DOE, RTI to Design and Build Gas Cleanup System for IGCC Power Plants DOE, RTI to Design and Build Gas Cleanup System for IGCC Power Plants July 13, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announces a collaborative project with Research Triangle Institute (RTI) International to design, build, and test a warm gas cleanup system to remove multiple contaminants from coal-derived syngas. The 50-MWe system will include technologies to remove

  1. Legacy Cleanup Completion Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation from the 2015 DOE National Cleanup Workshop by Christine Gelles, Associate Deputy Assistant Secretary, Waste Management EM HQ.

  2. Syngas Conversion to Hydrocarbon Fuels through Mixed Alcohol Intermediates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dagle, Robert A.; Lebarbier, Vanessa M.; Albrecht, Karl O.; Li, Jinjing; Taylor, Charles E.; Bao, Xinhe; Wang, Yong

    2013-05-13

    Synthesis gas (syngas) can be used to synthesize a variety of fuels and chemicals. Domestic transportation and military operational interests have driven continued focus on domestic syngas-based fuels production. Liquid transportation fuels may be made from syngas via four basic processes: 1) higher alcohols, 2) Fischer-Tropsch (FT), 3) methanol-to-gasoline (MTG), and 4) methanol-to-olefins (MTO) and olefins-to-gasoline/distillate (MOGD). Compared to FT and higher alcohols, MTG and MTO-MOGD have received less attention in recent years. Due to the high capital cost of these synthetic fuel plants, the production cost of the finished fuel cannot compete with petroleum-derived fuel. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has recently evaluated one way to potentially reduce capital cost and overall production cost for MTG by combining the methanol and MTG syntheses in a single reactor. The concept consists of mixing the conventional MTG catalyst (i.e. HZSM-5) with an alcohol synthesis catalyst. It was found that a methanol synthesis catalyst, stable at high temperature (i.e. Pd/ZnO/Al2O3) [1], when mixed with ZSM-5, was active for syngas conversion. Relatively high syngas conversion can be achieved as the equilibrium-driven conversion limitations for methanol and dimethyl ether are removed as they are intermediates to the final hydrocarbon product. However, selectivity control was difficult to achieve as formation of undesirable durene and light hydrocarbons was problematic [2]. The objective of the present study was thus to evaluate other potential composite catalyst systems and optimize the reactions conditions for the conversion of syngas to hydrocarbon fuels, through the use of mixed alcohol intermediates. Mixed alcohols are of interest as they have recently been reported to produce higher yields of gasoline compared to methanol [3]. 1. Lebarbier, V.M., Dagle, R.A., Kovarik, L., Lizarazo-Adarme, J.A., King, D.L., Palo, D.R., Catalyst Science & Technology, 2012, 2, 2116-2127. 2. Zhu, Y., Jones, S.B., Biddy, M.J., Dagle, R.A., Palo, D.P., Bioresource Technology, 2012, 117, 341-351. 3. Gujar, A.C., Guda, V.K., Nolan, M., Yan W., Toghiani, H., White, M.G., Applied Catalysis A: General, 2009, 363, 115-121.

  3. Syngas treating options for IGCC power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wen, H.; Mohammad-zadeh, Y.

    1996-12-31

    Increased environmental awareness, lower cost of gas turbine based combined cycle power plants, and advances in gasification processes have made the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) a viable technology to convert solid fuel to useful energy. The raw solid fuel derived synthesis gas (syngas) contains contaminants that should be removed before combustion in a gas turbine. Therefore, an important process in a gasification based plant is the cleaning of syngas. This paper provides information about various syngas treating technologies and describes their optimal selections for power generation or cogeneration of steam for industrial applications.

  4. A Study of Advanced Materials for Gas Turbine Coatings at Elevated Temperatures Using Selected Microstructures and Characteristic Environments for Syngas Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ravinder Diwan; Patrick Mensah; Guoqiang Li; Nalini Uppu; Strphen Akwaboa; Monica Silva; Ebubekir Beyazoglu; Ogad Agu; Naresh Polasa; Lawrence Bazille; Douglas Wolfe; Purush Sahoo

    2011-02-10

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) that can be suitable for use in industrial gas turbine engines have been processed and compared with electron beam physical vapor deposition (EBPVD) microstructures for applications in advanced gas turbines that use coal-derived synthesis gas. Thermo-physical properties have been evaluated of the processed air plasma sprayed TBCs with standard APS-STD and vertically cracked APS-VC coatings samples up to 1300 C. Porosity of these selected coatings with related microstructural effects have been analyzed in this study. Wet and dry thermal cycling studies at 1125 C and spalling resistance thermal cycling studies to 1200 C have also been carried out. Type I and Type II hot corrosion tests were carried out to investigate the effects of microstructure variations and additions of alumina in YSZ top coats in multi-layered TBC structures. The thermal modeling of turbine blade has also been carried out that gives the capability to predict in-service performance temperature gradients. In addition to isothermal high temperature oxidation kinetics analysis in YSZ thermal barrier coatings of NiCoCrAlY bond coats with 0.25% Hf. This can affect the failure behavior depending on the control of the thermally grown oxide (TGO) growth at the interface. The TGO growth kinetics is seen to be parabolic and the activation energies correspond to interfacial growth kinetics that is controlled by the diffusion of O{sub 2} in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The difference between oxidation behavior of the VC and STD structures are attributed to the effects of microstructure morphology and porosity on oxygen ingression into the zirconia and TGO layers. The isothermal oxidation resistance of the STD and VC microstructures is similar at temperatures up to 1200 C. However, the generally thicker TGO layer thicknesses and the slightly faster oxidation rates in the VC microstructures are attributed to the increased ingression of oxygen through the grain boundaries of the vertically cracked microstructures. The plasma sprayed TBC microstructure (VC and STD) with NiCoCrAlY-Hf bond coat are stable up to 1100 C. However, as with other TBC structures, a considerable amount of interdiffusion was observed in the different layers, although the TBC growth was self-limiting and parabolic. The addition of Hf to the VC microstructure appears to have some potential for the future development of robust TBCs with improved isothermal and service temperatures in advanced gas turbines.

  5. A Review of Materials for Gas Turbines Firing Syngas Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibbons, Thomas; Wright, Ian G

    2009-05-01

    Following the extensive development work carried out in the 1990's, gas turbine combined-cycle (GTCC) systems burning natural gas represent a reliable and efficient power generation technology widely used in many parts of the world. A critical factor was that, in order to operate at the high turbine entry temperatures required for high efficiency operation, aero-engine technology, i.e., single-crystal blades, thermal barrier coatings, and sophisticated cooling techniques had to be rapidly scaled up and introduced into these large gas turbines. The problems with reliability that resulted have been largely overcome, so that the high-efficiency GTCC power generation system is now a mature technology, capable of achieving high levels of availability. The high price of natural gas and concern about emission of greenhouse gases has focused attention on the desirability of replacing natural gas with gas derived from coal (syngas) in these gas turbine systems, since typical systems analyses indicate that IGCC plants have some potential to fulfil the requirement for a zero-emissions power generation system. In this review, the current status of materials for the critical hot gas path parts in large gas turbines is briefly considered in the context of the need to burn syngas. A critical factor is that the syngas is a low-Btu fuel, and the higher mass flow compared to natural gas will tend to increase the power output of the engine. However, modifications to the turbine and to the combustion system also will be necessary. It will be shown that many of the materials used in current engines will also be applicable to units burning syngas but, since the combustion environment will contain a greater level of impurities (especially sulfur, water vapor, and particulates), the durability of some components may be prejudiced. Consequently, some effort will be needed to develop improved coatings to resist attack by sulfur-containing compounds, and also erosion.

  6. Mitigation of Syngas Cooler Plugging and Fouling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bockelie, Michael J.

    2015-06-29

    This Final Report summarizes research performed to develop a technology to mitigate the plugging and fouling that occurs in the syngas cooler used in many Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plants. The syngas cooler is a firetube heat exchanger located downstream of the gasifier. It offers high thermal efficiency, but its’ reliability has generally been lower than other process equipment in the gasification island. The buildup of ash deposits that form on the fireside surfaces in the syngas cooler (i.e., fouling) lead to reduced equipment life and increased maintenance costs. Our approach to address this problem is that fouling of the syngas cooler cannot be eliminated, but it can be better managed. The research program was funded by DOE using two budget periods: Budget Period 1 (BP1) and Budget Period 2 (BP2). The project used a combination of laboratory scale experiments, analysis of syngas cooler deposits, modeling and guidance from industry to develop a better understanding of fouling mechanisms and to develop and evaluate strategies to mitigate syngas cooler fouling and thereby improve syngas cooler performance. The work effort in BP 1 and BP 2 focused on developing a better understanding of the mechanisms that lead to syngas cooler plugging and fouling and investigating promising concepts to mitigate syngas cooler plugging and fouling. The work effort focused on the following: • analysis of syngas cooler deposits and fuels provided by an IGCC plant collaborating with this project; • performing Jet cleaning tests in the University of Utah Laminar Entrained Flow Reactor to determine the bond strength between an ash deposit to a metal plate, as well as implementing planned equipment modifications to the University of Utah Laminar Entrained Flow Reactor and the one ton per day, pressurized Pilot Scale Gasifier; • performing Computational Fluid Dynamic modeling of industrially relevant syngas cooler configurations to develop a better understanding of deposit formation mechanisms; • performing Techno-Economic-Analysis for a representative IGCC plant to investigate the impact on plant economics, in particular the impacts on the Cost of Electricity (COE), due to plant shutdowns caused by syngas cooler plugging and fouling and potential benefits to plant economics of developing strategies to mitigate syngas cooler fouling; and • performing modeling and pilot scale tests to investigate the potential benefits of using a sorbent (fuel additive) to capture the vaporized metals that result in syngas cooler fouling. All project milestones for BP 1 and BP 2 were achieved. DOE was provided a briefing on our accomplishments in BP1 and BP2 and our proposed plans for Budget Period 3 (BP 3). Based on our research the mitigation technology selected to investigate in BP 3 was the use of a sorbent that can be injected into the gasifier with the fuel slurry to capture vaporized metals that lead to the deposit formation in the syngas cooler. The work effort proposed for BP 3 would have focused on addressing concerns raised by gasification industry personnel for the impacts on gasifier performance of sorbent injection, so that at the end of BP 3 the use of sorbent injection would be at “pre-commercial” stage and ready for use in a Field Demonstration that could be funded by industry or DOE. A Budget Continuation Application (BCA) was submitted to obtain funding for BP3 DOE but DOE chose to not fund the proposed BP3 effort.

  7. Environmental Cleanup and Remediation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cleanup /environment/_assets/images/icon_earthday.jpg Environmental Cleanup: Cleaning the Past Our goal is to clean up legacy waste sites and contaminated areas to protect human health and the environment, now and for years to come. WIPP Accident Investigation Board Report» Feature Stories» What We Clean Up & Why» TOP STORIES - highlights of our science, people, technologies close Environmental Remediation program completes legacy mercury cleanup near Smith's Marketplace To reduce its

  8. DOE National Cleanup Workshops

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE, in cooperation with the Energy Communities Alliance and the Energy Facility Contractors Group, held the first DOE National Cleanup Workshop Sept. 29 and 30, 2015, in the Washington, D.C. area. The workshop brought together senior DOE executives, officials from DOE sites, industry executives, and other stakeholders to discuss EMs progress in the cleanup of the environmental legacy of the nations Manhattan Project and Cold War nuclear weapons program. The workshop focused on major cleanup successes planned for the next two years, contract and project management improvement, efforts to develop new cleanup technologies, and more.

  9. National Cleanup Workshops

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Communities Alliance (ECA), in cooperation with the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Energy Facility Contractors Group (EFCOG), held the first National Cleanup Workshop Sept. 29 and 30, 2015, in the Washington, D.C. area. The workshop brought together senior DOE executives, officials from DOE sites, industry executives, and other stakeholders to discuss EM’s progress in the cleanup of the environmental legacy of the nation’s Manhattan Project and Cold War nuclear weapons program. The workshop focused on major cleanup successes planned for the next two years, contract and project management improvement, efforts to develop new cleanup technologies, and more.

  10. Feedstock Pathways for Bio-oil and Syngas Conversi (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Feedstock Pathways for Bio-oil and Syngas Conversi Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Feedstock Pathways for Bio-oil and Syngas Conversi The goal of this technical ...

  11. Feedstock Pathways for Bio-oil and Syngas Conversi (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Feedstock Pathways for Bio-oil and Syngas Conversi Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Feedstock Pathways for Bio-oil and Syngas Conversi You are accessing a document ...

  12. Peer Review 2013 Dutta Syngas | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Demonstration Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology Pathway Thermochemical Ethanol via Indirect Gasification and Mixed Alcohol Synthesis of Lignocellulosic Biomass

  13. Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology Pathway | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology Pathway Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology Pathway This technology pathway case investigates the upgrading of woody biomass derived synthesis gas (syngas) to hydrocarbon biofuels. While this specific discussion focuses on the conversion of syngas via a methanol intermediate to hydrocarbon blendstocks, there are a number of alternative conversion routes for production of hydrocarbons through a wide array of intermediates

  14. Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology Pathway (Technical Report)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    | SciTech Connect Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology Pathway Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology Pathway This technology pathway case investigates the upgrading of woody biomass derived synthesis gas (syngas) to hydrocarbon biofuels. While this specific discussion focuses on the conversion of syngas via a methanol intermediate to hydrocarbon blendstocks, there are a number of alternative conversion routes for production of

  15. Cleanup Progress Reports | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    News » Cleanup Progress Reports Cleanup Progress Reports Documents Available for Download January 1, 2015 Cleanup Progress Report - 2014 Oak Ridge's cleanup accomplishments during 2014 January 1, 2014 Cleanup Progress Report - 2013 Oak Ridge's cleanup accomplishments in 2013. January 1, 2013 Cleanup Progress Report - 2012 Oak Ridge's cleanup accomplishments during 2012. January 2, 2012 Cleanup Progress Report - 2011 Oak Ridge's cleanup accomplishments during 2011. January 3, 2011 Cleanup

  16. Syngas into Fuel: Optofluidic Solar Concentrators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-10-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Ohio State has developed an iron-based material and process for converting syngasa synthetic gas mixtureinto electricity, H2, and/or liquid fuel with zero CO2 emissions. Traditional carbon capture methods use chemical solvents or special membranes to separate CO2 from the gas exhaust from coal-fired power plants. Ohio States technology uses an iron-based oxygen carrier to generate CO2 and H2 from syngas in separate, pure product streams by means of a circulating bed reactor configuration. The end products of the system are H2, electricity, and/or liquid fuel, all of which are useful sources of power that can come from coal or syngas derived from biomass. Ohio State is developing a high-pressure pilot-scale unit to demonstrate this process at the National Carbon Capture Center.

  17. Mixed conducting membranes for syngas production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dyer, Paul Nigel (Allentown, PA); Carolan, Michael Francis (Allentown, PA); Butt, Darryl (Gainesville, FL); Van Doorn, Rene Hendrick Elias (Neckarsulm, DE); Cutler, Raymond Ashton (Bountiful, UT)

    2002-01-01

    This invention presents a new class of multicomponent metallic oxides which are particularly suited toward use in fabricating components used in processes for producing syngas. The non-stoichiometric, A-site rich compositions of the present invention are represented by the formula (Ln.sub.x Ca.sub.1-x).sub.y FeO.sub.3-.delta. wherein Ln is La or a mixture of lanthanides comprising La, and wherein 1.0>x>0.5, 1.1.gtoreq.y>1.0 and .delta. is a number which renders the composition of matter charge neutral. Solid-state membranes formed from these compositions provide a favorable balance of oxygen permeance and resistance to degradation when employed in processes for producing syngas. This invention also presents a process for making syngas which utilizes such membranes.

  18. Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology Pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Talmadge, M.; Biddy, Mary J.; Dutta, Abhijit; Jones, Susanne B.; Meyer, Pimphan A.

    2013-03-31

    In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This pathway case investigates the upgrading of biomass derived synthesis gas (syngas) to hydrocarbon biofuels. While this specific discussion focuses on the conversion of syngas via a methanol intermediate to hydrocarbon blendstocks, there are a number of alternative conversion routes for production of hydrocarbons through a wide array of intermediates from syngas. Future work will also consider the variations to this pathway to determine the most economically viable and risk adverse conversion route. Technical barriers and key research needs have been identified that should be pursued for the syngas to hydrocarbon pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range blendstocks.

  19. WIPP - CBFO Accelerating Cleanup

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    more information, access DOE Environmental Management site at: http://www.em.doe.gov/closure/ For more information regarding the Accelerating Cleanup: Paths to Closure, contact Freida Huckeba at (505) 234-7315. Accelerating Cleanup: Paths to Closure (PtC) This document has been provided to you in PDF format. Please install Adobe Acrobat Reader before accessing these documents. For your convenience, each section of this document contains a Table of Contents complete with internal links. Just

  20. 2014 Cleanup Progress

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    96 Annual Report to the Oak Ridge Regional Community 2014 Cleanup Progress 2 1 Message from the EM Manager Department of Energy Oak Ridge Office To the Oak Ridge Regional Community: Reflecting on 2014, I am extremely proud of the Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Office's accomplishments. We completed the Department of Energy's larg- est-ever demolition project, transferred unneeded land to the community to bolster economic development opportunities, and progressed on cleanup projects at the

  1. Environmental Cleanup Stories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stories /environment/_assets/images/icon-environment.jpg Environmental Cleanup Stories Our environmental stewardship commitment: clean up the past, minimize environmental impacts, and create a sustainable future. A telescoping crane hoists a spider excavator over Los Alamos Canyon before placing it on the canyon slope to excavate historically contaminated soil. Environmental Remediation program completes legacy mercury cleanup near Smith's Marketplace Los Alamos National Laboratory performed a

  2. Cleanup at Rocky Flats

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    David L. Clark, Los Alamos National Laboratory The Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) is an environmental cleanup site located about 16 miles northwest of downtown Denver (Fig 1). Two decades of routine monitoring have shown that the environment around RFETS is contaminated with actinide elements (U, Pu, Am) from site operations, [1] and RFETS has been designated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as a Superfund cleanup site. Until December 1989, the Rocky Flats

  3. SIMULTANEOUS PRODUCTION OF HIGH-PURITY HYDROGEN AND SEQUESTRATION-READY CO2 FROM SYNGAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linda Denton; Hana Lorethova; Tomasz Wiltowski; Court Moorefield; Parag Kulkarni; Vladimir Zamansky; Ravi Kumar

    2003-12-01

    This final report summarizes the progress made on the program ''Simultaneous Production of High-Purity Hydrogen and Sequestration-Ready CO{sub 2} from Syngas (contract number DE-FG26-99FT40682)'', during October 2000 through September of 2003. GE Energy and Environmental Research (GE-EER) and Southern Illinois University (SIU) at Carbondale conducted the research work for this program. This program addresses improved methods to efficiently produce simultaneous streams of high-purity hydrogen and separated carbon dioxide from synthesis gas (syngas). The syngas may be produced through either gasification of coal or reforming of natural gas. The process of production of H{sub 2} and separated CO{sub 2} utilizes a dual-bed reactor and regenerator system. The reactor produces hydrogen and the regenerator produces separated CO{sub 2}. The dual-bed system can be operated under either a circulating fluidized-bed configuration or a cyclic fixed-bed configuration. Both configurations were evaluated in this project. The experimental effort was divided into lab-scale work at SIU and bench-scale work at GE-EER. Tests in a lab-scale fluidized bed system demonstrated the process for the conversion of syngas to high purity H{sub 2} and separated CO{sub 2}. The lab-scale system generated up to 95% H{sub 2} (on a dry basis). Extensive thermodynamic analysis of chemical reactions between the syngas and the fluidized solids determined an optimum range of temperature and pressure operation, where the extent of the undesirable reactions is minimum. The cycling of the process between hydrogen generation and oxygen regeneration has been demonstrated. The fluidized solids did not regenerate completely and the hydrogen purity in the reuse cycle dropped to 70% from 95% (on a dry basis). Changes in morphology and particle size may be the most dominant factor affecting the efficiency of the repeated cycling between hydrogen production and oxygen regeneration. The concept of simultaneous production of hydrogen and separated stream of CO{sub 2} was proved using a fixed bed 2 reactor system at GE-EER. This bench-scale cyclic fixed-bed reactor system designed to reform natural gas to syngas has been fabricated in another coordinated DOE project. This system was modified to reform natural gas to syngas and then convert syngas to H{sub 2} and separated CO{sub 2}. The system produced 85% hydrogen (dry basis).

  4. Cleanup Fact Sheets | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Services » Site Cleanup » Cleanup Fact Sheets Cleanup Fact Sheets Fact Sheets Available for Download East Tennessee Technology Park Cleanup Y-12 National Security Complex Cleanup Oak Ridge National Laboratory Cleanup OREM Accomplishments Timeline Environmental Laws and Regulations Site Cleanup Risk Removal Modernization Reindustrialization Waste Management Program Management Community Engagement

  5. Idaho Cleanup Project Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Cleanup Program April 30, 2014 Thomas J. Dieter, CH2M-WG Idaho Danny Nichols, Idaho Treatment Group 2 www.energy.gov/EM The Idaho Site Background * 890 Square Miles * Remote location in the southeast region of Idaho * Established in 1949 as the Naval Gunnery Range * Currently referred to as the Idaho National Laboratory * Provided an isolated location where 52 first-of-a-kind test reactors could be designed, built and tested with one still in operation (Advanced Test Reactor) * EM's Idaho

  6. EA-1867: Final Environmental Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    RTI International Scale-Up of High-Temperature Syngas Cleanup and Carbon Capture and Sequestration Technologies, Polk County, Florida

  7. Reactor water cleanup system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gluntz, D.M.; Taft, W.E.

    1994-12-20

    A reactor water cleanup system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core submerged in reactor water. First and second parallel cleanup trains are provided for extracting portions of the reactor water from the pressure vessel, cleaning the extracted water, and returning the cleaned water to the pressure vessel. Each of the cleanup trains includes a heat exchanger for cooling the reactor water, and a cleaner for cleaning the cooled reactor water. A return line is disposed between the cleaner and the pressure vessel for channeling the cleaned water thereto in a first mode of operation. A portion of the cooled water is bypassed around the cleaner during a second mode of operation and returned through the pressure vessel for shutdown cooling. 1 figure.

  8. Reactor water cleanup system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gluntz, Douglas M.; Taft, William E.

    1994-01-01

    A reactor water cleanup system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core submerged in reactor water. First and second parallel cleanup trains are provided for extracting portions of the reactor water from the pressure vessel, cleaning the extracted water, and returning the cleaned water to the pressure vessel. Each of the cleanup trains includes a heat exchanger for cooling the reactor water, and a cleaner for cleaning the cooled reactor water. A return line is disposed between the cleaner and the pressure vessel for channeling the cleaned water thereto in a first mode of operation. A portion of the cooled water is bypassed around the cleaner during a second mode of operation and returned through the pressure vessel for shutdown cooling.

  9. Cleanup Sites | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cleanup Sites Cleanup Sites Center Map As the largest environmental cleanup program in the world, EM has been charged with the responsibility of cleaning up 107 sites across the country whose area is equal to the combined area of Rhode Island and Delaware. To date, EM has made substantial progress in nearly every area of nuclear waste cleanup and completed cleanup at 91 of these sites. The "active" sites continue to have ongoing cleanup projects under EM's purview. Use the interactive

  10. Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology Pathway

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology Pathway Michael Talmadge, Mary Biddy, and Abhijit Dutta National Renewable Energy Laboratory Susanne Jones and Aye Meyer Pacific Northwest National Laboratory NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC, under contract DE-AC36-08GO28308. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the United States

  11. Biomass-derived Syngas Utilization for Fuels and Chemicals - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David C. Dayton

    2010-03-24

    Executive Summary The growing gap between petroleum production and demand, mounting environmental concerns, and increasing fuel prices have stimulated intense interest in research and development (R&D) of alternative fuels, both synthetic and bio-derived. Currently, the most technically defined thermochemical route for producing alternative fuels from lignocellulosic biomass involves gasification/reforming of biomass to produce syngas (carbon monoxide [CO] + hydrogen [H2]), followed by syngas cleaning, Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) or mixed alcohol synthesis, and some product upgrading via hydroprocessing or separation. A detailed techno-economic analysis of this type of process has recently been published [1] and it highlights the need for technical breakthroughs and technology demonstration for gas cleanup and fuel synthesis. The latter two technical barrier areas contribute 40% of the total thermochemical ethanol cost and 70% of the production cost, if feedstock costs are factored out. Developing and validating technologies that reduce the capital and operating costs of these unit operations will greatly reduce the risk for commercializing integrated biomass gasification/fuel synthesis processes for biofuel production. The objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate new catalysts and catalytic processes that can efficiently convert biomass-derived syngas into diesel fuel and C2-C4 alcohols. The goal is to improve the economics of the processes by improving the catalytic activity and product selectivity, which could lead to commercialization. The project was divided into 4 tasks: Task 1: Reactor Systems: Construction of three reactor systems was a project milestone. Construction of a fixed-bed microreactor (FBR), a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR), and a slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR) were completed to meet this milestone. Task 2: Iron Fischer-Tropsch (FT) Catalyst: An attrition resistant iron FT catalyst will be developed and tested. Task 3: Chemical Synthesis: Promising process routes will be identified for synthesis of selected chemicals from biomass-derived syngas. A project milestone was to select promising mixed alcohol catalysts and screen productivity and performance in a fixed bed micro-reactor using bottled syngas. This milestone was successfully completed in collaboration withour catalyst development partner. Task 4: Modeling, Engineering Evaluation, and Commercial Assessment: Mass and energy balances of conceptual commercial embodiment for FT and chemical synthesis were completed.

  12. FEEDSTOCK-FLEXIBLE REFORMER SYSTEM (FFRS) FOR SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL (SOFC)- QUALITY SYNGAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly Jezierski; Andrew Tadd; Johannes Schwank; Roland Kibler; David McLean; Mahesh Samineni; Ryan Smith; Sameer Parvathikar; Joe Mayne; Tom Westrich; Jerry Mader; F. Michael Faubert

    2010-07-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory funded this research collaboration effort between NextEnergy and the University of Michigan, who successfully designed, built, and tested a reformer system, which produced highquality syngas for use in SOFC and other applications, and a novel reactor system, which allowed for facile illumination of photocatalysts. Carbon and raw biomass gasification, sulfur tolerance of non-Platinum Group Metals (PGM) based (Ni/CeZrO2) reforming catalysts, photocatalysis reactions based on TiO2, and mild pyrolysis of biomass in ionic liquids (ILs) were investigated at low and medium temperatures (primarily 450 to 850 C) in an attempt to retain some structural value of the starting biomass. Despite a wide range of processes and feedstock composition, a literature survey showed that, gasifier products had narrow variation in composition, a restriction used to develop operating schemes for syngas cleanup. Three distinct reaction conditions were investigated: equilibrium, autothermal reforming of hydrocarbons, and the addition of O2 and steam to match the final (C/H/O) composition. Initial results showed rapid and significant deactivation of Ni/CeZrO2 catalysts upon introduction of thiophene, but both stable and unstable performance in the presence of sulfur were obtained. The key linkage appeared to be the hydrodesulfurization activity of the Ni reforming catalysts. For feed stoichiometries where high H2 production was thermodynamically favored, stable, albeit lower, H2 and CO production were obtained; but lower thermodynamic H2 concentrations resulted in continued catalyst deactivation and eventual poisoning. High H2 levels resulted in thiophene converting to H2S and S surface desorption, leading to stable performance; low H2 levels resulted in unconverted S and loss in H2 and CO production, as well as loss in thiophene conversion. Bimetallic catalysts did not outperform Ni-only catalysts, and small Ni particles were found to have lower activities under S-free conditions, but did show less effect of S on performance, in this study. Imidazolium-based ILs, choline chloride compounds and low-melting eutectics of metal nitrates were evaluated, and it was found that, ILs have some capacity to dissolve cellulose and show thermal stability to temperatures where pyrolysis begins, have no vapor pressure, (simplifying product recoveries), and can dissolve ionic metal salts, allowing for the potential of catalytic reactions on breakdown intermediates. Clear evidence of photoactive commercial TiO2 was obtained, but in-house synthesis of photoactive TiO2 proved difficult, as did fixed-bed gasification, primarily due to the challenge of removing the condensable products from the reaction zone quickly enough to prevent additional reaction. Further investigation into additional non-PGM catalysts and ILs is recommended as a follow-up to this work.

  13. Catalysts for Syngas-Derived Alcohol Synthesis - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vehicles and Fuels Vehicles and Fuels Biomass and Biofuels Biomass and Biofuels Find More Like This Return to Search Catalysts for Syngas-Derived Alcohol Synthesis Improves the conversion of syngas from natural gas, coal, or biomass National Energy Technology Laboratory Contact NETL About This Technology Publications: PDF Document Publication Pyrochlore-Based Catalysts for Syngas-Derived Alcohol Synthesis (294 KB) Technology Marketing Summary This technology provides an advantageous means to

  14. Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology Pathway | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pathway This technology pathway case investigates the upgrading of woody biomass derived synthesis gas (syngas) to hydrocarbon biofuels. While this specific discussion...

  15. 2016 National Cleanup Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Communities Alliance (ECA) will be holding the 2016 National Cleanup Workshop Sept. 14-15, 2016, at the Hilton Alexandria Mark Center in Alexandria, Va. Cooperating organizations for the event include the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Energy Facility Contractors Group (EFCOG).

  16. About Hanford Cleanup - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Us About Hanford Cleanup About Us About Hanford Cleanup Regulators, Boards, Councils Hanford History Hanford Site Wide Programs Contact Us About Hanford Cleanup Email Email Page | Print Print Page |Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size Hanford Cleanup For more than forty years, reactors located at Hanford produced plutonium for America's defense program. The process of making plutonium is extremely "inefficient" in that a massive amount of liquid and solid waste is generated while

  17. Cleanup Sites | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sites Cleanup Sites The 33,500-acre Oak Ridge Reservation, outlined in red, contains three primary cleanup areas-- the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Y-12 National Security Complex. The 33,500-acre Oak Ridge Reservation, outlined in red, contains three primary cleanup areas-- the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Y-12 National Security Complex. Oak Ridge has three primary cleanup sites within the Oak Ridge Reservation-the Oak

  18. Environmental Cleanup | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environmental Cleanup Environmental Cleanup Learn more about the history, cleanup activities and possible future uses of the Hanford Site, a 586-square-mile government site in southeast Washington State. | Video courtesy of the Energy Department. The Energy Department is committed to a safe, complete cleanup of the environmental legacy of five decades of government-sponsored nuclear weapons development and nuclear energy research. As part of this mission, we safely and cost-effectively transport

  19. Site Cleanup | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cleanup Site Cleanup A view of Building K-25 cleanup at the East Tenneseee Technology Park. A view of Building K-25 cleanup at the East Tenneseee Technology Park. Unlike many EM cleanup sites, Oak Ridge has numerous ongoing missions aside from EM. The success and rate of progress often depends on the amount of work the organization achieves at the site. At the East Tennessee Technology Park, EM is tasked with removing facilities associated with 40 years of uranium enrichment and production to

  20. Polk power station syngas cooling system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenkins, S.D.

    1995-01-01

    Tampa Electric Company (TEC) is in the site development and construction phase of the new Polk Power Station Unit No. 1. This will be the first unit at a new site and will use Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Technology. The unit will utilize Texaco`s oxygen-blown, entrained-flow coal gasification, along with combined cycle power generation, to produce nominal 260MW. Integral to the gasification process is the syngas cooling system. The design, integration, fabrication, transportation, and erection of this equipment have provided and continue to provide major challenges for this project.

  1. Chromium Groundwater Cleanup

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Los Alamos National Laboratory | UNCLASSIFIED | 1 Chromium Groundwater Cleanup in Mortandad Canyon for the Northern New Mexico Citizens' Advisory Board Los Alamos National Laboratory September 24, 2014 Operated by Los Alamos Security, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy's NNSA LA-UR-14-27280 | Los Alamos National Laboratory | UNCLASSIFIED | 2 Presentation Overview § History, location and background - refresher § Nature and extent of Cr plume § Overall remediation strategy §

  2. WIPP Accelerating Cleanup

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ACCELERATING CLEANUP: PATHS TO CLOSURE CARLSBAD AREA OFFICE JUNE 1998 I. Operations/Field Overview CAO Mission The mission of the Carlsbad Area Office (CAO) is to protect human health and the environment by opening and operating the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for safe disposal of transuranic (TRU) waste and by establishing an effective system for management of TRU waste from generation to disposal. It includes personnel assigned to CAO, WIPP site operations, transportation, and other

  3. Petrochemicals from coal-derived syngas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sardesai, A.; Lee, S.

    1996-12-31

    The development of the Liquid Phase Dimethyl Ether (LPDME) process has established a means to effectively convert CO-rich syngas to dimethyl ether (DME) in a mechanically agitated slurry reactor. By operating in a dual catalyst mode, in-situ produced methanol may be converted to DME, thereby alleviating the chemical equilibrium limitation imposed on the methanol synthesis reaction. As a result, higher syngas conversions and methyl productivities are seen over methanol synthesis alone. This effective route to DME production over methanol has led to the development of conversion technologies based on a DME feedstock. Oxygenates, in particular, ethers and their precursors, are very important as potential clean fuel additives and have been postulated through vinylation/hydrogenation and oxidative coupling reactions. Specialty chemicals such as methyl acetate and acetic acid have widescale industrial importance in the conversion to ethanol from a non-agricultural feedstock. Vapor phase oxidative dimerization of DME over tin based catalysts produced precursors of ethylene glycol. Finally, DME has been extensively used as a feedstock for hydrocarbon synthesis including olefins, paraffins and gasoline range hydrocarbons, over zeolite based catalysts with a 46% increase in product selectivity over methanol. The efficient production of DME in the liquid phase has given it widescale industrial significance as a potential replacement for methanol and as a keystone for more important petrochemicals.

  4. he Hanford Story Tank Waste Cleanup | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    he Hanford Story Tank Waste Cleanup he Hanford Story Tank Waste Cleanup Addthis Description The Hanford Story Tank Waste Cleanup

  5. 2015 DOE National Cleanup Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE, in cooperation with the Energy Communities Alliance and the Energy Facility Contractors Group, held the first DOE National Cleanup Workshop on Sept. 29 and 30, 2015 in the Washington, D.C. area. The workshop brought together senior DOE executives, officials from DOE sites, industry executives, and other stakeholders to discuss EM’s progress in the cleanup of the environmental legacy of the nation’s Manhattan Project and Cold War nuclear weapons program. The workshop focused on major cleanup successes planned for the next two years, contract and project management improvement, efforts to develop new cleanup technologies, and more.

  6. Methods and systems for producing syngas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hawkes, Grant L; O'Brien, James E; Stoots, Carl M; Herring, J. Stephen; McKellar, Michael G; Wood, Richard A; Carrington, Robert A; Boardman, Richard D

    2013-02-05

    Methods and systems are provided for producing syngas utilizing heat from thermochemical conversion of a carbonaceous fuel to support decomposition of at least one of water and carbon dioxide using one or more solid-oxide electrolysis cells. Simultaneous decomposition of carbon dioxide and water or steam by one or more solid-oxide electrolysis cells may be employed to produce hydrogen and carbon monoxide. A portion of oxygen produced from at least one of water and carbon dioxide using one or more solid-oxide electrolysis cells is fed at a controlled flow rate in a gasifier or combustor to oxidize the carbonaceous fuel to control the carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide ratio produced.

  7. Material Testing of Coated Alloys in a Syngas Combustion Environment...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Material Testing of Coated Alloys in a Syngas Combustion Environment Year 6 - Activity 1.13 - Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology Citation Details In-Document ...

  8. Pyrochlore-Based Catalysts for Syngas-Derived Alcohol Synthesis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pyrochlore-Based Catalysts for Syngas-Derived Alcohol Synthesis Contact NETL Technology Transfer Group techtransfer@netl.doe.gov May 2013 Opportunity This technology provides an advantageous means to convert syngas into a class of chemicals known as higher oxygenates as well as other long-chain hydrocarbons. Research is currently active on this patent-pending technology "Synthesis, Characterization, and Catalytic Activity of Rh-based Lanthanum Zirconate Pyrochlores for Higher Alcohol

  9. Nuclear radiation cleanup and uranium prospecting (Patent) |...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nuclear radiation cleanup and uranium prospecting Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nuclear radiation cleanup and uranium prospecting Apparatus, systems, and methods for...

  10. Nuclear radiation cleanup and uranium prospecting (Patent) |...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nuclear radiation cleanup and uranium prospecting Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nuclear radiation cleanup and uranium prospecting You are accessing a document from...

  11. Independent Oversight Activity Report, Idaho Cleanup Project...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Idaho Cleanup Project - November 2013 Independent Oversight Activity Report, Idaho Cleanup Project - November 2013 November 2013 Pre-restart Visit to the Integrated Waste Treatment...

  12. New Contract Helps Portsmouth GDP Cleanup

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To accelerate the Portsmouth GDP cleanup efforts left over from the Cold War, the Department of Energy made a huge step forward in our nuclear environmental cleanup efforts.

  13. Environmental Remediation program completes legacy mercury cleanup...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stories Legacy slope-side cleanup Environmental Remediation program completes legacy mercury cleanup near Smith's Marketplace Los Alamos National Laboratory performed a ...

  14. Nanoparticle scaffolds for syngas-fed solid oxide fuel cells

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Boldrin, Paul; Ruiz-Trejo, Enrique; Yu, Jingwen; Gruar, Robert I.; Tighe, Christopher J.; Chang, Kee-Chul; Ilavsky, Jan; Darr, Jawwad A.; Brandon, Nigel

    2014-12-17

    Incorporation of nanoparticles into devices such as solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) may provide benefits such as higher surface areas or finer control over microstructure. However, their use with traditional fabrication techniques such as screen-printing is problematic. Here, we show that mixing larger commercial particles with nanoparticles allows traditional ink formulation and screen-printing to be used while still providing benefits of nanoparticles such as increased porosity and lower sintering temperatures. SOFC anodes were produced by impregnating ceria–gadolinia (CGO) scaffolds with nickel nitrate solution. The scaffolds were produced from inks containing a mixture of hydrothermally-synthesised nanoparticle CGO, commercial CGO and polymericmore » pore formers. The scaffolds were heat-treated at either 1000 or 1300 °C, and were mechanically stable. In situ ultra-small X-ray scattering (USAXS) shows that the nanoparticles begin sintering around 900–1000 °C. Analysis by USAXS and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that the low temperature heat-treated scaffolds possessed higher porosity. Impregnated scaffolds were used to produce symmetrical cells, with the lower temperature heat-treated scaffolds showing improved gas diffusion, but poorer charge transfer. Using these scaffolds, lower temperature heat-treated cells of Ni–CGO/200 μm YSZ/CGO-LSCF performed better at 700 °C (and below) in hydrogen, and performed better at all temperatures using syngas, with power densities of up to 0.15 W cm-2 at 800 °C. This approach has the potential to allow the use of a wider range of materials and finer control over microstructure.« less

  15. Nanoparticle scaffolds for syngas-fed solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boldrin, Paul; Ruiz-Trejo, Enrique; Yu, Jingwen; Gruar, Robert I.; Tighe, Christopher J.; Chang, Kee-Chul; Ilavsky, Jan; Darr, Jawwad A.; Brandon, Nigel

    2014-12-17

    Incorporation of nanoparticles into devices such as solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) may provide benefits such as higher surface areas or finer control over microstructure. However, their use with traditional fabrication techniques such as screen-printing is problematic. Here, we show that mixing larger commercial particles with nanoparticles allows traditional ink formulation and screen-printing to be used while still providing benefits of nanoparticles such as increased porosity and lower sintering temperatures. SOFC anodes were produced by impregnating ceriagadolinia (CGO) scaffolds with nickel nitrate solution. The scaffolds were produced from inks containing a mixture of hydrothermally-synthesised nanoparticle CGO, commercial CGO and polymeric pore formers. The scaffolds were heat-treated at either 1000 or 1300 C, and were mechanically stable. In situ ultra-small X-ray scattering (USAXS) shows that the nanoparticles begin sintering around 9001000 C. Analysis by USAXS and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that the low temperature heat-treated scaffolds possessed higher porosity. Impregnated scaffolds were used to produce symmetrical cells, with the lower temperature heat-treated scaffolds showing improved gas diffusion, but poorer charge transfer. Using these scaffolds, lower temperature heat-treated cells of NiCGO/200 ?m YSZ/CGO-LSCF performed better at 700 C (and below) in hydrogen, and performed better at all temperatures using syngas, with power densities of up to 0.15 W cm-2 at 800 C. This approach has the potential to allow the use of a wider range of materials and finer control over microstructure.

  16. Environmental Management (EM) Cleanup Projects

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2008-09-24

    The guide supports DOE O 413.3A, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, and provides guidance on environmental management cleanup projects. Canceled by DOE N 251.105.

  17. Upper Los Alamos Canyon Cleanup

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Upper Los Alamos Canyon Cleanup Upper Los Alamos Canyon Cleanup The Upper Los Alamos Canyon Project involves cleaning up hazardous materials left over from some of the Laboratory's earliest activities. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Located along Los Alamos Canyon from 7th Street to the Pajarito Ski Hill, the Upper Los Alamos Canyon Project involves examining sites in present and former Laboratory

  18. Paducah Cleanup Milestones | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cleanup Milestones Paducah Cleanup Milestones The Paducah Site Management Plan sets forth enforceable milestones for cleanup activities. These activities include a series of prioritized cleanup actions, ongoing analysis to support future cleanup decisions, and eventual D&D of the gaseous diffusion plant. FY 2015 - Key Milestones/Outlook Issue Federal Facility Agreement Annual Site Management Plan (D1) Issue Burial Grounds Solid Waste Management Unit 5 and 6 Record of Decision (D1) C-400 -

  19. Central Plateau Inner Area Cleanup Principles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Inner Area Cleanup Principles * Cleanup Principles are the initial conditions and approaches to developing cleanup decisions in the Inner Area * These Principles will guide the development of the Remedial Investigations and Feasibility Studies (RI/FS) * These Principles will help DOE produce RI/FS documents to better meet regulator expectations * Formal agreement on cleanup, as influenced by these Principles, does not happen until the Record of Decision What are Cleanup Principles? 2 * The Inner

  20. Production of methane-rich syngas from hydrocarbon fuels using multi-functional catalyst/capture agent

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siefert, Nicholas S; Shekhawat, Dushyant; Berry, David A; Surdoval, Wayne A

    2014-12-30

    The disclosure provides a gasification process for the production of a methane-rich syngas at temperatures exceeding 700.degree. C. through the use of an alkali hydroxide MOH, using a gasification mixture comprised of at least 0.25 moles and less than 2 moles of water for each mole of carbon, and at least 0.15 moles and less than 2 moles of alkali hydroxide MOH for each mole of carbon. These relative amounts allow the production of a methane-rich syngas at temperatures exceeding 700.degree. C. by enabling a series of reactions which generate H.sub.2 and CH.sub.4, and mitigate the reforming of methane. The process provides a methane-rich syngas comprised of roughly 20% (dry molar percentage) CH.sub.4 at temperatures above 700.degree. C., and may effectively operate within an IGFC cycle at reactor temperatures between 700-900.degree. C. and pressures in excess of 10 atmospheres.

  1. Method for regeneration and activity improvement of syngas conversion catalyst

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lucki, Stanley J. (Runnemede, NJ); Brennan, James A. (Cherry Hill, NJ)

    1980-01-01

    A method is disclosed for the treatment of single particle iron-containing syngas (synthes.s gas) conversion catalysts comprising iron, a crystalline acidic aluminosilicate zeolite having a silica to alumina ratio of at least 12, a pore size greater than about 5 Angstrom units and a constraint index of about 1-12 and a matrix. The catalyst does not contain promoters and the treatment is applicable to either the regeneration of said spent single particle iron-containing catalyst or for the initial activation of fresh catalyst. The treatment involves air oxidation, hydrogen reduction, followed by a second air oxidation and contact of the iron-containing single particle catalyst with syngas prior to its use for the catalytic conversion of said syngas. The single particle iron-containing catalysts are prepared from a water insoluble organic iron compound.

  2. Accelerating cleanup: Paths to closure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-06-01

    This report describes the status of Environmental Management`s (EM`s) cleanup program and a direction forward to complete achievement of the 2006 vision. Achieving the 2006 vision results in significant benefits related to accomplishing EM program objectives. As DOE sites accelerate cleanup activities, risks to public health, the environment, and worker safety and health are all reduced. Finding more efficient ways to conduct work can result in making compliance with applicable environmental requirements easier to achieve. Finally, as cleanup activities at sites are completed, the EM program can focus attention and resources on the small number of sites with more complex cleanup challenges. Chapter 1 describes the process by which this report has been developed and what it hopes to accomplish, its relationship to the EM decision-making process, and a general background of the EM mission and program. Chapter 2 describes how the site-by-site projections were constructed, and summarizes, for each of DOE`s 11 Operations/Field Offices, the projected costs and schedules for completing the cleanup mission. Chapter 3 presents summaries of the detailed cleanup projections from three of the 11 Operations/Field Offices: Rocky Flats (Colorado), Richland (Washington), and Savannah River (South Carolina). The remaining eight Operations/Field Office summaries are in Appendix E. Chapter 4 reviews the cost drivers, budgetary constraints, and performance enhancements underlying the detailed analysis of the 353 projects that comprise EM`s accelerated cleanup and closure effort. Chapter 5 describes a management system to support the EM program. Chapter 6 provides responses to the general comments received on the February draft of this document.

  3. Particulate hot gas stream cleanup technical issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pontius, D.H.; Snyder, T.R.

    1999-09-30

    The analyses of hot gas stream cleanup particulate samples and descriptions of filter performance studied under this contract were designed to address problems with filter operation that have been linked to characteristics of the collected particulate matter. One objective of this work was to generate an interactive, computerized data bank of the key physical and chemical characteristics of ash and char collected from operating advanced particle filters and to relate these characteristics to the operation and performance of these filters. The interactive data bank summarizes analyses of over 160 ash and char samples from fifteen pressurized fluidized-bed combustion and gasification facilities utilizing high-temperature, high pressure barrier filters.

  4. Radiological cleanup of Enewetak Atoll

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    For 8 years, from 1972 until 1980, the United States planned and carried out the radiological cleanup, rehabilitation, and resettlement of Enewetak Atoll in the Marshall Islands. This documentary records, from the perspective of DOD, the background, decisions, actions, and results of this major national and international effort. The documentary is designed: First, to provide a historical document which records with accuracy this major event in the history of Enewetak Atoll, the Marshall Islands, the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands, Micronesia, the Pacific Basin, and the United States. Second, to provide a definitive record of the radiological contamination of the Atoll. Third, to provide a detailed record of the radiological exposure of the cleanup forces themselves. Fourth, to provide a useful guide for subsequent radiological cleanup efforts elsewhere.

  5. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Idaho Cleanup Project...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Idaho Cleanup Project- June 2007 Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Idaho Cleanup Project- June 2007 June 2007 Evaluation to determine whether the Idaho Cleanup Project is...

  6. Zero Emissions Coal Syngas Oxygen Turbo Machinery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis Horazak

    2010-12-31

    Siemens Energy, Inc. (formerly Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation) worked with Clean Energy Systems and Florida Turbine Technologies to demonstrate the commercial feasibility of advanced turbines for oxy-fuel based power systems that discharge negligible CO{sub 2} into the atmosphere. The approach builds upon ultra supercritical steam turbine and advanced gas turbine technology with the goal of attaining plant efficiencies above 50% in the 2015 timeframe. Conceptual designs were developed for baseline, near term, and long term oxy-fuel turbine cycles, representing commercial introductions of increasingly advanced thermal conditions and increasing exposure to steam-CO{sub 2} mixtures. An economic analysis and market demand study was performed by Science Applications International Corp. (SAIC), and indicated that long-term oxy-fuel turbine cycles start to look attractive in 2025 when the CO{sub 2} tax is assumed to reach $40/ ton, and by 2030 it has a clear advantage over both IGCC with sequestration and pulverized coal with sequestration. A separate risk analysis of the oxy-fuel combustor, HP turbine, re-heater, and IP turbine of the long-term cycle identified and categorized risks and proposed mitigation measures. In 2007 the program began to focus on a potential oxy-fuel turbine power generation demonstration project in the 2012 -13 time period while still maintaining a link to the requirements of the long-term oxy-syngas cycle. The SGT-900 turbine was identified as the best fit for modification into an intermediate pressure turbine (IPT) for this application. The base metals, bond coats, thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), and rotor materials used in the SGT-900 were tested for their ability to operate in the steam- CO{sub 2} environment of the oxy-fuel OFT-900. Test results indicated that these same materials would operate satisfactorily, and the plan, is to use SGT-900materials for the OFT-900. Follow-on programs for corrosion testing and evaluation of crack growth rates in oxy-fuel environments have been proposed to build on these results and provide quantifiable assessments of the effects of oxy-fuel environments on the service lives of turbine components.

  7. NOVEL SLURRY PHASE DIESEL CATALYSTS FOR COAL-DERIVED SYNGAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Dragomir B. Bukur; Dr. Ketil Hanssen; Alec Klinghoffer; Dr. Lech Nowicki; Patricia O'Dowd; Dr. Hien Pham; Jian Xu

    2001-01-07

    This report describes research conducted to support the DOE program in novel slurry phase catalysts for converting coal-derived synthesis gas to diesel fuels. The primary objective of this research program is to develop attrition resistant catalysts that exhibit high activities for conversion of coal-derived syngas.

  8. Chemical Kinetics in Support of Syngas Turbine Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dryer, Frederick

    2007-07-31

    This document is the final report on an overall program formulated to extend our prior work in developing and validating kinetic models for the CO/hydrogen/oxygen reaction by carefully analyzing the individual and interactive behavior of specific elementary and subsets of elementary reactions at conditions of interest to syngas combustion in gas turbines. A summary of the tasks performed under this work are: 1. Determine experimentally the third body efficiencies in H+O{sub 2}+M = HO{sub 2}+M (R1) for CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. 2. Using published literature data and the results in this program, further develop the present H{sub 2}/O{sub 2}/diluent and CO/H{sub 2}/O{sub 2}/diluent mechanisms for dilution with CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O and N{sub 2} through comparisons with new experimental validation targets for H{sub 2}-CO-O{sub 2}-N{sub 2} reaction kinetics in the presence of significant diluent fractions of CO{sub 2} and/or H{sub 2}O, at high pressures. (task amplified to especially address ignition delay issues, see below). 3. Analyze and demonstrate issues related to NOx interactions with syngas combustion chemistry (task amplified to include interactions of iron pentacarbonyl with syngas combustion chemistry, see below). 4. Publish results, including updated syngas kinetic model. Results are summarized in this document and its appendices. Three archival papers which contain a majority of the research results have appeared. Those results not published elsewhere are highlighted here, and will appear as part of future publications. Portions of the work appearing in the above publications were also supported in part by the Department of Energy under Grant No. DE-FG02-86ER-13503. As a result of and during the research under the present contract, we became aware of other reported results that revealed substantial differences between experimental characterizations of ignition delays for syngas mixtures and ignition delay predictions based upon homogenous kinetic modeling. We adjusted emphasis of Task 2 to understand the source of these noted disparities because of their key importance to developing lean premixed combustion technologies of syngas turbine applications. In performing Task 3, we also suggest for the first time the very significant effect that metal carbonyls may have on syngas combustion properties. This work is fully detailed. The work on metal carbonyl effects is entirely computational in nature. Pursuit of experimental verification of these interactions was beyond the scope of the present work.

  9. Stimulus Funding Will Accelerate Cleanup In Idaho

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CLEANUP PROJECT ARRA FACT SHEET 1119 Kb Energy Secretary Chu Announces 6 Billion in Recovery Act Funding for Environmental Cleanup 88 Kb Editorial Date March 31, 2008 By Bradley...

  10. Oak Ridge Cleanup Areas | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program Management » Environmental Stewardship » Oak Ridge Cleanup Areas Oak Ridge Cleanup Areas Employees conduct soil and water samples to determine which areas require cleanup. Employees conduct soil and water samples to determine which areas require cleanup. On November 21, 1989, the Environmental Protection Agency placed the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge site on its National Prioritization List (NPL). The list names national priorities where there are known or threatened releases of

  11. 2016 National Cleanup Workshop | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2016 National Cleanup Workshop 2016 National Cleanup Workshop 2016 National Cleanup Workshop The Energy Communities Alliance (ECA) will be holding the 2016 National Cleanup Workshop Sept. 14-15, 2016, at the Hilton Alexandria Mark Center in Alexandria, Va. Cooperating organizations for the event include the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Energy Facility Contractors Group (EFCOG). The workshop will bring together senior DOE executives, officials from DOE sites, industry executives, and other

  12. Washington Closure Hanford: Cleanup Progress Along Hanford's...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Sax, President, Washington Closure Hanford. Washington Closure Hanford: Cleanup Progress Along Hanford's River Corridor More Documents & Publications 2014 Congressional Nuclear...

  13. Paducah Cleanup Progress | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Progress Paducah Cleanup Progress Since 1990, DOE has invested $1.9 billion in successful Paducah site cleanup projects to protect human health and the environment. The Environmental Management (EM) cleanup mission will continue through GDP transition and decontamination and decommissioning. Significant Paducah Site Cleanup Progress since 1990: Paducah leanup Progress graphic Recent Progress A panoramic view of the east end of the C-410 complex shows a rainbow forming as sunlight passes through

  14. DRAFT Central Plateau Cleanup Strategy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    J.D. Dowell: DOE-RL John Price: Ecology Dennis Faulk: EPA October 9, 2012 2 River Corridor * 100 Area interim actions extended to - Incorporate 154 additional waste sites - Address prior extensive deep excavation of hexavalent chromium contamination * 100 Area decision documents - Extend 100 B/C decision documents schedule to enable collection of additional groundwater data for cleanup decision - Delay 100-N document several months to avoid overlap of public comment 3 River Corridor * 100 Area -

  15. Accelerated cleanup risk reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, R.B.; Aines, R.M.; Blake, R.G.; Copeland, A.B.; Newmark, R.L.; Tompson, A.F.B.

    1998-02-01

    There is no proven technology for remediating contaminant plume source regions in a heterogeneous subsurface. This project is an interdisciplinary effort to develop the requisite new technologies so that will be rapidly accepted by the remediation community. Our technology focus is hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation (HPO) which is a novel in situ thermal technique. We have expanded this core technology to leverage the action of steam injection and place an in situ microbial filter downstream to intercept and destroy the accelerated movement of contaminated groundwater. Most contaminant plume source regions, including the chlorinated solvent plume at LLNL, are in subsurface media characterized by a wide range in hydraulic conductivity. At LLNL, the main conduits for contaminant transport are buried stream channels composed of gravels and sands; these have a hydraulic conductivity in the range of 10{sup -1} to 10{sup -2} cm/s. Clay and silt units with a hydraulic conductivity of 10{sup -1} to 10{sup -6} cm/s bound these buried channels; these are barriers to groundwater movement and contain the highest contaminant concentrations in the source region. New remediation technologies are required because the current ones preferentially access the high conductivity units. HPO is an innovative process for the in situ destruction of contaminants in the entire subsurface. It operates by the injection of steam. We have demonstrated in laboratory experiments that many contaminants rapidly oxidize to harmless compounds at temperatures easily achieved by injecting steam, provided sufficient dissolved oxygen is present. One important challenge in a heterogeneous source region is getting heat, contaminants, and an oxidizing agent in the same place at the same time. We have used the NUFT computer program to simulate the cyclic injection of steam into a contaminated aquifer for design of a field demonstration. We used an 8 hour, steam/oxygen injection cycle followed by a 56 hour relaxation period in which the well was `capped`. Our results show the formation of an inclined gas phase during injection and a fast collapse of the steam zone within an hour of terminating steam injection. The majority of destruction occurs during the collapse phase, when contaminant laden water is drawn back towards the well. Little to no noncondensible gasses are created in this process, removing any possibility of sparging processes interfering with contaminant destruction. Our models suggest that the thermal region should be as hot and as large as possible. To have HPO accepted, we need to demonstrate the in situ destruction of contaminants. This requires the ability to inexpensively sample at depth and under high temperatures. We proved the ability to implies monitoring points at depths exceeding 150 feet in highly heterogeneous soils by use of cone penetrometry. In addition, an extractive system has been developed for sampling fluids and measuring their chemistry under the range of extreme conditions expected. We conducted a collaborative field test of HPO at a Superfund site in southern California where the contaminant is mainly creosote and pentachlorophenol. Field results confirm the destruction of contaminants by HPO, validate our field design from simulations, demonstrate that accurate field measurements of the critical fluid parameters can be obtained using existing monitoring wells (and minimal capital cost) and yield reliable cost estimates for future commercial application. We also tested the in situ microbial filter technology as a means to intercept and destroy the accelerated flow of contaminants caused by the injection of steam. A series of laboratory and field tests revealed that the selected bacterial species effectively degrades trichloroethene in LLNL Groundwater and under LLNL site conditions. In addition, it was demonstrated that the bacteria effectively attach to the LLNL subsurface media. An in-well treatability study indicated that the bacteria initially degrade greater than 99% of the contaminant, to concentrations less than regulatory limit

  16. EA-1867: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    No Significant Impact RTI International Scale-Up of High-Temperature Syngas Cleanup and Carbon Capture and Sequestration Technologies, Polk County, Florida (October 2011) DOE...

  17. EA-1867: Draft Environmental Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    RTI International Scale-Up of High-Temperature Syngas Cleanup and Carbon Capture and Sequestration Technologies, Polk County, Florida (October 2011)

  18. A Hybrid Catalytic Route to Fuels from Biomass Syngas Presentation for BETO 2015 Project Peer Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    LanzaTech. All rights reserved. 1 A Hybrid Catalytic Route to Fuels from Biomass Syngas BETO's Project Peer Review, March 2015 Alexandria, VA Alice Havill Senior Process Engineer Project Principle Investigator Hybrid Catalytic Route to Fuels from Biomass Syngas Project Objective: develop a hybrid conversion technology for catalytic upgrading of biomass- derived syngas to jet fuel and chemicals while ensure the cost, quality and environmental requirements of the aviation industry are met System

  19. Bioenergy Technologies Office Conversion R&D Pathway: Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    preprocessed into two-inch chips and dried to about 10 percent weight (wt%) moisture content to produce an accept- able biomass gasifcation feedstock. * Indirect gasifcation of biomass in a fuidized bed reactor (the fuidizing media is usually an olivine or sand-like in nature) through rapid heating typically above around 750ºC produces a syngas, which needs to be conditioned for further utilization. * Syngas conditioning (tar cracking to produce additional syngas, quenching to remove

  20. Washington: When Life Gives You Solar, Make Syngas | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    When Life Gives You Solar, Make Syngas Washington: When Life Gives You Solar, Make Syngas November 8, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing a new method for combining solar energy with modified natural gas power plants. This concentrating solar power (CSP) system harnesses sunlight to produce syngas, which is a fuel capable of driving a standard heat engine to produce electricity. In addition to offsetting the need for fossil fuels in traditional power

  1. EERE Success Story-Washington: When Life Gives You Solar, Make Syngas |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy When Life Gives You Solar, Make Syngas EERE Success Story-Washington: When Life Gives You Solar, Make Syngas November 8, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing a new method for combining solar energy with modified natural gas power plants. This concentrating solar power (CSP) system harnesses sunlight to produce syngas, which is a fuel capable of driving a standard heat engine to produce electricity. In addition to offsetting

  2. 2014 Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus Briefings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4 Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus Briefings 2014 Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus Briefings The Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus serves as a way to brief members of Congress and their staff on EM headquarters and site activities, including budget, safety and project progress. PDF icon FY15 Budget Overview for Cleanup Caucus PDF icon Idaho Cleanup Project PDF icon Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project PDF icon Richland Operations Office Cleanup Strategy, Scope PDF icon Idaho Cleanup

  3. 2014 Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus Briefings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4 Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus Briefings 2014 Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus Briefings The Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus serves as a way to brief members of Congress and their staff on EM headquarters and site activities, including budget, safety and project progress. PDF icon FY15 Budget Overview for Cleanup Caucus PDF icon Idaho Cleanup Project PDF icon Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project PDF icon Richland Operations Office Cleanup Strategy, Scope PDF icon Idaho Cleanup

  4. Novel polymer membrane process for pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture from coal-fired syngas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merkel, Tim

    2011-09-14

    This final report describes work conducted for the Department of Energy (DOE NETL) on development of a novel polymer membrane process for pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture from coalfired syngas (award number DE-FE0001124). The work was conducted by Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) from September 15, 2009, through December 14, 2011. Tetramer Technologies, LLC (Tetramer) was our subcontract partner on this project. The National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) at Wilsonville, AL, provided access to syngas gasifier test facilities. The main objective of this project was to develop a cost-effective membrane process that could be used in the relatively near-term to capture CO{sub 2} from shifted syngas generated by a coal-fired Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant. In this project, novel polymeric membranes (designated as Proteus membranes) with separation properties superior to conventional polymeric membranes were developed. Hydrogen permeance of up to 800 gpu and H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity of >12 was achieved using a simulated syngas mixture at 150C and 50 psig, which exceeds the original project targets of 200 gpu for hydrogen permeance and 10 for H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity. Lab-scale Proteus membrane modules (with a membrane area of 0.13 m{sup 2}) were also developed using scaled-up Proteus membranes and high temperature stable module components identified during this project. A mixed-gas hydrogen permeance of about 160 gpu and H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity of >12 was achieved using a simulated syngas mixture at 150C and 100 psig. We believe that a significant improvement in the membrane and module performance is likely with additional development work. Both Proteus membranes and lab-scale Proteus membrane modules were further evaluated using coal-derived syngas streams at the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC). The results indicate that all module components, including the Proteus membrane, were stable under the field conditions (feed pressures: 150-175 psig and feed temperatures: 120-135C) for over 600 hours. The field performance of both Proteus membrane stamps and Proteus membrane modules is consistent with the results obtained in the lab, suggesting that the presence of sulfur-containing compounds (up to 780 ppm hydrogen sulfide), saturated water vapor, carbon monoxide and heavy hydrocarbons in the syngas feed stream has no adverse effect on the Proteus membrane or module performance. We also performed an economic analysis for a number of membrane process designs developed in this project (using hydrogen-selective membranes, alone or in the combination with CO{sub 2}- selective membranes). The current field performance for Proteus membranes was used in the design analysis. The study showed the current best design has the potential to reduce the increase in Levelized Cost of Electricity (LCOE) caused by 90% CO{sub 2} capture to about 15% if co-sequestration of H{sub 2}S is viable. This value is still higher than the DOE target for increase in LCOE (10%); however, compared to the base-case Selexol process that gives a 30% increase in LCOE at 90% CO2 capture, the membrane-based process appears promising. We believe future improvements in membrane performance have the potential to reach the DOE target.

  5. DOE National Cleanup Workshop | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Assistant Secretary Regalbuto Lays out Vision, Priorities to Advance Cleanup for EM Program Assistant Secretary Regalbuto Lays out Vision, Priorities to Advance Cleanup for EM Program DOE Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management Monica Regalbuto speaks to more than 350 people at the National Cleanup Workshop just outside Washington, D.C. Read more Panelists Update Workshop Participants on Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Recovery Panelists Update Workshop Participants on Waste Isolation

  6. Lab completes record year for environmental cleanup

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Record year for environmental cleanup Lab completes record year for environmental cleanup Personnel conducted more field investigations and cleanup campaigns than ever and completed a record number of Lab shipments to WIPP. December 16, 2010 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new

  7. DRAFT Central Plateau Cleanup Strategy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Doug Shoop: DOE-RL John Price: Ecology Dave Einan: EPA November 2, 2012 2 River Corridor * 100 Area interim actions extended to 3/31/17 - Incorporate 154 additional waste sites - Address prior extensive deep excavation of hexavalent chromium contamination * 100 Area decision documents - Extend 100 B/C decision documents schedule to 12/15/16 to enable collection of additional groundwater data for cleanup decision - Delay 100-N document to 6/30/13 to avoid too many documents out for public comment

  8. System and process for the production of syngas and fuel gasses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bingham, Dennis N; Kllingler, Kerry M; Turner, Terry D; Wilding, Bruce M; Benefiel, Bradley C

    2014-04-01

    The production of gasses and, more particularly, to systems and methods for the production of syngas and fuel gasses including the production of hydrogen are set forth. In one embodiment system and method includes a reactor having a molten pool of a material comprising sodium carbonate. A supply of conditioned water is in communication with the reactor. A supply of carbon containing material is also in communication with the reactor. In one particular embodiment, the carbon containing material may include vacuum residuum (VR). The water and VR may be kept at desired temperatures and pressures compatible with the process that is to take place in the reactor. When introduced into the reactor, the water, the VR and the molten pool may be homogenously mixed in an environment in which chemical reactions take place including the production of hydrogen and other gasses.

  9. System and process for the production of syngas and fuel gasses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bingham, Dennis N; Klingler, Kerry M; Turner, Terry D; Wilding, Bruce M; Benefiel, Bradley C

    2015-04-21

    The production of gasses and, more particularly, to systems and methods for the production of syngas and fuel gasses including the production of hydrogen are set forth. In one embodiment system and method includes a reactor having a molten pool of a material comprising sodium carbonate. A supply of conditioned water is in communication with the reactor. A supply of carbon containing material is also in communication with the reactor. In one particular embodiment, the carbon containing material may include vacuum residuum (VR). The water and VR may be kept at desired temperatures and pressures compatible with the process that is to take place in the reactor. When introduced into the reactor, the water, the VR and the molten pool may be homogenously mixed in an environment in which chemical reactions take place including the production of hydrogen and other gasses.

  10. The ABCs of Hanford Cleanup

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ABC's of Hanford Cleanup A B C ARRA Budget Community Relations Plan Asbestos Branching Out Columbia River Workshops Baton Chromium Badgers

  11. Independent Oversight Assessment, Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Waste Treatment Project - November 2012 November 2012 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project This report...

  12. Tank Farm Area Cleanup Decision-Making

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Area Cleanup Decision-Making Groundwater Vadose Zone Single Shell Tank System Closure (tanks, structures and pipelines) * Washington State Hazardous Waste Management Act (Resource...

  13. Hanford Site Cleanup Completion Framework - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plan Single-Shell Tank Evaluations Deep Vadose Zone 100-F RIFS Sitewide Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis Environmental Hanford Site Cleanup Completion Framework Email Email...

  14. Bench- and Pilot-Scale Studies of Reaction and Regeneration of Ni-Mg-K/Al2O3 for Catalytic Conditioning of Biomass-Derived Syngas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magrini-Bair, K. A.; Jablonski, W. S.; Parent, Y. O.; Yung, M. M.

    2012-05-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is collaborating with both industrial and academic partners to develop technologies to help enable commercialization of biofuels produced from lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks. The focus of this paper is to report how various operating processes, utilized in-house and by collaborators, influence the catalytic activity during conditioning of biomass-derived syngas. Efficient cleaning and conditioning of biomass-derived syngas for use in fuel synthesis continues to be a significant technical barrier to commercialization. Multifunctional, fluidizable catalysts are being developed to reform undesired tars and light hydrocarbons, especially methane, to additional syngas, which can improve utilization of biomass carbon. This approach also eliminates both the need for downstream methane reforming and the production of an aqueous waste stream from tar scrubbing. This work was conducted with NiMgK/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts. These catalysts were assessed for methane reforming performance in (i) fixed-bed, bench-scale tests with model syngas simulating that produced by oak gasification, and in pilot-scale, (ii) fluidized tests with actual oak-derived syngas, and (iii) recirculating/regenerating tests using model syngas. Bench-scale tests showed that the catalyst could be completely regenerated over several reforming reaction cycles. Pilot-scale tests using raw syngas showed that the catalyst lost activity from cycle to cycle when it was regenerated, though it was shown that bench-scale regeneration by steam oxidation and H{sub 2} reduction did not cause this deactivation. Characterization by TPR indicates that the loss of a low temperature nickel oxide reduction feature is related to the catalyst deactivation, which is ascribed to nickel being incorporated into a spinel nickel aluminate that is not reduced with the given activation protocol. Results for 100 h time-on-stream using a recirculating/regenerating reactor suggest that this type of process could be employed to keep a high level of steady-state reforming activity, without permanent deactivation of the catalyst. Additionally, the differences in catalyst performance using a simulated and real, biomass-derived syngas stream indicate that there are components present in the real stream that are not adequately modeled in the syngas stream. Heavy tars and polycyclic aromatics are known to be present in real syngas, and the use of benzene and naphthalene as surrogates may be insufficient. In addition, some inorganics found in biomass, which become concentrated in the ash following biomass gasification, may be transported to the reforming reactor where they can interact with catalysts. Therefore, in order to gain more representative results for how a catalyst would perform on an industrially-relevant scale, with real contaminants, appropriate small-scale biomass solids feeders or slip-streams of real process gas should be employed.

  15. Synthesis of methanol and dimethyl ether from syngas over Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lebarbier, Vanessa M.; Dagle, Robert A.; Kovarik, Libor; Lizarazo-Adarme, Jair A.; King, David L.; Palo, Daniel R.

    2012-01-01

    A Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst was developed for the synthesis of methanol and dimethyl ether (DME) from syngas. Studied were temperatures of operation ranging from 250C to 380C. High temperatures (e.g. 380C) are necessary when combining methanol and DME synthesis with a methanol to gasoline (MTG) process in a single reactor bed. A commercial Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst, utilized industrially for the synthesis of methanol at 220-280C, suffers from a rapid deactivation when the reaction is conducted at high temperature (>320C). On the contrary, a Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst was found to be highly stable for methanol and DME synthesis at 380C. The Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst was thus further investigated for methanol and DME synthesis at P=34-69 bars, T= 250-380C, GHSV= 5 000-18 000 h-1, and molar feeds H2/CO= 1, 2, and 3. Selectivity to DME increased with decreasing operating temperature, and increasing operating pressure. Increased GHSVs and H2/CO syngas feed ratios also enhanced DME selectivity. Undesirable CH4 formation was observed, however, can be minimized through choice of process conditions and by catalyst design. By studying the effect of the Pd loading and the Pd:Zn molar ratio the formulation of the Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst was optimized. A catalyst with 5% Pd and a Pd:Zn molar ratio of 0.25:1 has been identified as the preferred catalyst. Results indicate that PdZn particles are more active than Pd particles for the synthesis of methanol and less active for CH4 formation. A correlation between DME selectivity and the concentration of acid sites of the catalysts has been established. Hence, two types of sites are required for the direct conversion of syngas to DME: 1) PdZn particles are active for the synthesis of methanol from syngas, and 2) acid sites which are active for the conversion of methanol to DME. Additionally, CO2 formation was problematic as PdZn was found to be active for the water-gas-shift (WGS) reaction, under all the conditions evaluated.

  16. Durable Zinc Oxide-Based Regenerable Sorbents for Desulfurization of Syngas in a Fixed-Bed Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V.; Cicero, Daniel C. (U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown); Stiegel, Gary J.; Gupta, Raghubir P. (U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Pittsburgh); Turk, Brian S. (Research Triangle Institute)

    2001-11-06

    A fixed-bed regenerable desulfurization sorbent, identified as RVS-land developed by researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, was awarded the R&D 100 award in 2000 and is currently offered as a commercial product by Sued-Chemie Inc. An extensive testing program for this sorbent was undertaken which included tests at a wide range of temperatures, pressures and gas compositions both simulated and generated in an actual gasifier for sulfidation and regeneration. This testing has demonstrated that during these desulfurization tests, the RVS-1 sorbent maintained an effluent H2S concentration of <5 ppmv at temperatures from 260 to 600 C (500-1100 F) and pressures of 203-2026 kPa(2 to 20 atm) with a feed containing 1.2 vol% H{sub 2}S. The types of syngas tested ranged from an oxygen-blown Texaco gasifier to biomass-generated syngas. The RVS-1 sorbent has high crush strength and attrition resistance, which, unlike past sorbent formulations, does not decrease with extended testing at actual at operating conditions. The sulfur capacity of the sorbent is roughly 17 to 20 wt.% and also remains constant during extended testing (>25 cycles). In addition to H{sub 2}S, the RVS-1 sorbent has also demonstrated the ability to remove dimethyl sulfide and carbonyl sulfide from syngas. During regeneration, the RVS-1 sorbent has been regenerated with dilute oxygen streams (1 to 7 vol% O{sub 2}) at temperatures as low as 370 C (700 F) and pressures of 304-709 kPa(3 to 7 atm). Although regeneration can be initiated at 370 C (700 F), regeneration temperatures in excess of 538 C (1000 F) were found to be optimal. The presence of steam, carbon dioxide or sulfur dioxide (up to 6 vol%) did not have any visible effect on regeneration or sorbent performance during either sulfidation or regeneration. A number of commercial tests involving RVS-1 have been either conducted or are planned in the near future. The RVS-1 sorbent has been tested by Epyx, Aspen Systems and McDermott Technology (MTI), Inc for desulfurization of syngas produced by reforming of hydrocarbon liquid feedstocks for fuel cell applications. The RVS-1 sorbent was selected by MTI over other candidate sorbents for demonstration testing in their 500-kW ship service fuel cell program. It was also possible to obtain sulfur levels in the ppbv range with the modified RVS-1 sorbent.

  17. Syngas Production By Thermochemical Conversion Of H2o And Co2 Mixtures Using A Novel Reactor Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearlman, Howard; Chen, Chien-Hua

    2014-08-27

    The Department of Energy awarded Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc. (ACT) an SBIR Phase II contract (#DE-SC0004729) to develop a high-temperature solar thermochemical reactor for syngas production using water and/or carbon dioxide as feedstocks. The technology aims to provide a renewable and sustainable alternative to fossil fuels, promote energy independence and mitigate adverse issues associated with climate change by essentially recycling carbon from carbon dioxide emitted by the combustion of hydrocarbon fuels. To commercialize the technology and drive down the cost of solar fuels, new advances are needed in materials development and reactor design, both of which are integral elements in this program.

  18. Task 4.9 -- Value-added products from syngas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, E.S.; Sharma, R.K.

    1997-02-01

    The work on advanced fuel forms in 1996 focused on the synthesis of higher alcohols from mixtures of hydrogen and carbon dioxide (syngas) from coal gasification. The conversion of coal gasification products to commercially valuable alcohols will provide an important new market for current and future gasification plants. Initial work in this project utilized a novel molybdenum sulfide catalyst previously shown to be active for hydrodesulfurization reactions of coal liquids. The support for the active metal sulfide is a layered mixed oxide (hydrotalcite) capable of interaction with the metal sites for catalysis of carbon monoxide reductions. These catalysts have a high surface area, are highly porous, and have basic and acidic functionality. A pressurized fixed-bed flow-through reactor was constructed, and the MoS{sub 2} catalysts were tested with syngas under a variety of conditions. Unfortunately, the catalysts, even with higher molybdenum loading and addition of promoters, failed to give alcohol products. A batch reactor test of the catalyst was also conducted, but did not produce alcohol products. Group 8 metals have been used previously in catalysts for syngas reactions. Ruthenium and rhodium catalysts were prepared by impregnation of a hydrotalcite support. Tests with these catalysts in flow-through reactors also did not produce the desired alcohol products. The formation of higher alcohols from smaller ones, such as methanol and ethanol, could be commercially important if high selectivity could be achieved. The methanol and ethanol would be derived from syngas and fermentation, respectively. Based on previous work in other laboratories, it was hypothesized that the hydrotalcite supported MoS{sub 2} or Ru or Rh catalysts could catalyze the formation of butyl alcohols. Although the desired 1-butanol was obtained in batch reactions with the promoted Ru catalyst, the reaction was not as selective as desired. Product suitable for a lower-vapor-pressure gasoline oxygenate additive was obtained, but it may not be economical to market such products in competition with methyl tertiary-butyl-ether. Flow-through catalytic bed reactions were not successful.

  19. EM Tackles Cleanup at Tonopah Test Range | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    EM Tackles Cleanup at Tonopah Test Range EM Tackles Cleanup at Tonopah Test Range September 30, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis Field technicians survey a shaker used in past cleanup ...

  20. Executing Legacy Clean-up at LANL | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Executing Legacy Clean-up at LANL Executing Legacy Clean-up at LANL Topic: DOE presented on the proposed new campaign approach to clean-up at Los Alamos National Laboratory, and ...

  1. HANFORD SITE RIVER CORRIDOR CLEANUP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BAZZELL, K.D.

    2006-02-01

    In 2005, the US Department of Energy (DOE) launched the third generation of closure contracts, including the River Corridor Closure (RCC) Contract at Hanford. Over the past decade, significant progress has been made on cleaning up the river shore that bordes Hanford. However, the most important cleanup challenges lie ahead. In March 2005, DOE awarded the Hanford River Corridor Closure Contract to Washington Closure Hanford (WCH), a limited liability company owned by Washington Group International, Bechtel National and CH2M HILL. It is a single-purpose company whose goal is to safely and efficiently accelerate cleanup in the 544 km{sup 2} Hanford river corridor and reduce or eliminate future obligations to DOE for maintaining long-term stewardship over the site. The RCC Contract is a cost-plus-incentive-fee closure contract, which incentivizes the contractor to reduce cost and accelerate the schedule. At $1.9 billion and seven years, WCH has accelerated cleaning up Hanford's river corridor significantly compared to the $3.2 billion and 10 years originally estimated by the US Army Corps of Engineers. Predictable funding is one of the key features of the new contract, with funding set by contract at $183 million in fiscal year (FY) 2006 and peaking at $387 million in FY2012. Another feature of the contract allows for Washington Closure to perform up to 40% of the value of the contract and subcontract the balance. One of the major challenges in the next few years will be to identify and qualify sufficient subcontractors to meet the goal.

  2. NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF THE EFFECTS OF CHANGING FUEL FOR TURBINES FIRED BY NATURAL GAS AND SYNGAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabau, Adrian S; Wright, Ian G

    2007-01-01

    Gas turbines in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants burn a fuel gas (syngas) in which the proportions of hydrocarbons, H2, CO, water vapor, and minor impurity levels may vary significantly from those in natural gas, depending on the input feed to the gasifier and the gasification process. A data structure and computational methodology is presented for the numerical simulation of a turbine thermodynamic cycle for various fuel types, air/fuel ratios, and coolant flow rates. The approach used allowed efficient handling of turbine components and different variable constraints due to fuel changes. Examples are presented for a turbine with four stages and cooled blades. The blades were considered to be cooled in an open circuit, with air provided from appropriate compressor stages. Results are presented for the temperatures of the hot gas, alloy surface (coating-superalloy interface), and coolant, as well as for cooling flow rates. Based on the results of the numerical simulations, values were calculated for the fuel flow rates, airflow ratios, and coolant flow rates required to maintain the superalloy in the first stage blade at the desired temperature when the fuel was changed from natural gas (NG) to syngas (SG). One NG case was conducted to assess the effect of coolant pressure matching between the compressor extraction points and corresponding turbine injection points. It was found that pressure matching is a feature that must be considered for high combustion temperatures. The first series of SG simulations was conducted using the same inlet mass flow and pressure ratios as those for the NG case. The results showed that higher coolant flow rates and a larger number of cooled turbine rows were needed for the SG case. Thus, for this first case, the turbine size would be different for SG than for NG. In order to maintain the original turbine configuration (i.e., geometry, diameters, blade heights, angles, and cooling circuit characteristics) for the SG simulations, a second series of simulations was carried out by varying the inlet mass flow while keeping constant the pressure ratios and the amount of hot gas passing the first vane of the turbine. The effect of turbine matching between the NG and SG cases was approximately 10 C, and 8 to 14% for rotor inlet temperature and total cooling flows, respectively. These results indicate that turbine-compressor matching, before and after fuel change, must be included in turbine models. The last stage of the turbine, for the SG case, experienced higher inner wall temperatures than the corresponding case for NG, with the temperature of the vane approaching the maximum allowable limit. This paper was published by ASME as paper no. GT2007-27530.

  3. Recovery Act Workers Complete Environmental Cleanup of Coal Ash...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Complete Environmental Cleanup of Coal Ash Basin Recovery Act Workers Complete Environmental Cleanup of Coal Ash Basin The Savannah River Site (SRS) recently cleaned up a 17-acre ...

  4. Site Transition Process upon Completion of the Cleanup Mission...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Site Transition Process upon Completion of the Cleanup Mission: Fact Sheet (September 2013) DOE's internal site transition process for Cleanup to long-term stewardship, ...

  5. Probing Fukushima with cosmic rays should speed cleanup

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Probing Fukushima with cosmic rays should speed cleanup Probing Fukushima with cosmic rays should speed cleanup The initiative could reduce the time required to clean up the ...

  6. Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Idaho Cleanup Project...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing Waste ... Independent Oversight Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Idaho Cleanup ...

  7. EM's Defense Waste Processing Facility Achieves Waste Cleanup...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Defense Waste Processing Facility Achieves Waste Cleanup Milestone EM's Defense Waste Processing Facility Achieves Waste Cleanup Milestone January 14, 2016 - 12:10pm Addthis The...

  8. 2015 DOE National Cleanup Workshop | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2015 DOE National Cleanup Workshop 2015 DOE National Cleanup Workshop Addthis 1 of 5 2 of 5 3 of 5 4 of 5 5 of 5

  9. Determination of the Effect of Coal/Biomass-Derived Syngas Contaminants on the Performance of Fischer-Tropsch and Water-Gas-Shift Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trembly, Jason; Cooper, Matthew; Farmer, Justin; Turk, Brian; Gupta, Raghubir

    2010-12-31

    Today, nearly all liquid fuels and commodity chemicals are produced from non-renewable resources such as crude oil and natural gas. Because of increasing scrutiny of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions produced using traditional fossil-fuel resources, the utilization of alternative feedstocks for the production of power, hydrogen, value-added chemicals, and high-quality hydrocarbon fuels such as diesel and substitute natural gas (SNG) is critical to meeting the rapidly growing energy needs of modern society. Coal and biomass are particularly attractive as alternative feedstocks because of the abundant reserves of these resources worldwide. The strategy of co-gasification of coal/biomass (CB) mixtures to produce syngas for synthesis of Fischer-Tropsch (FT) fuels offers distinct advantages over gasification of either coal or biomass alone. Co-feeding coal with biomass offers the opportunity to exploit economies of scale that are difficult to achieve in biomass gasification, while the addition of biomass to the coal gasifier feed leverages proven coal gasification technology and allows CO{sub 2} credit benefits. Syngas generated from CB mixtures will have a unique contaminant composition because coal and biomass possess different concentrations and types of contaminants, and the final syngas composition is also strongly influenced by the gasification technology used. Syngas cleanup for gasification of CB mixtures will need to address this unique contaminant composition to support downstream processing and equipment. To investigate the impact of CB gasification on the production of transportation fuels by FT synthesis, RTI International conducted thermodynamic studies to identify trace contaminants that will react with water-gas-shift and FT catalysts and built several automated microreactor systems to investigate the effect of single components and the synergistic effects of multiple contaminants on water-gas-shift and FT catalyst performance. The contaminants investigated were sodium chloride (NaCl), potassium chloride (KCl), hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), carbonyl sulfide (COS), ammonia (NH{sub 3}), and combinations thereof. This report details the thermodynamic studies and the individual and multi-contaminant results from this testing program.

  10. Micro-Mixing Lean-Premix System for Ultra-Low Emission Hydrogen/Syngas Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erlendur Steinthorsson; Brian Hollon; Adel Mansour

    2010-06-30

    The focus of this project was to develop the next generation of fuel injection technologies for environmentally friendly, hydrogen syngas combustion in gas turbine engines that satisfy DOE's objectives of reducing NOx emissions to 3 ppm. Building on Parker Hannifin's proven Macrolamination technology for liquid fuels, Parker developed a scalable high-performing multi-point injector that utilizes multiple, small mixing cups in place of a single conventional large-scale premixer. Due to the small size, fuel and air mix rapidly within the cups, providing a well-premixed fuel-air mixture at the cup exit in a short time. Detailed studies and experimentation with single-cup micro-mixing injectors were conducted to elucidate the effects of various injector design attributes and operating conditions on combustion efficiency, lean stability and emissions and strategies were developed to mitigate the impact of flashback. In the final phase of the program, a full-scale 1.3-MWth multi-cup injector was built and tested at pressures from 6.9bar (100psi) to 12.4bar (180psi) and flame temperatures up to 2000K (3150 F) using mixtures of hydrogen and natural gas as fuel with nitrogen and carbon dioxide as diluents. The injector operated without flash back on fuel mixtures ranging from 100% natural gas to 100% hydrogen and emissions were shown to be insensitive to combustor pressure. NOx emissions of 3-ppm were achieved at a flame temperature of 1750K (2690 F) when operating on a fuel mixture containing 50% hydrogen and 50% natural gas by volume with 40% nitrogen dilution and 1.5-ppm NOx was achieved at a flame temperature of 1680K (2564 F) using only 10% nitrogen dilution. NOx emissions of 3.5-ppm were demonstrated at a flame temperature of 1730K (2650 F) with only 10% carbon dioxide dilution. Finally, 3.6-ppm NOx emissions were demonstrated at a flame temperature over 1600K (2420 F) when operating on 100% hydrogen fuel with 30% carbon dioxide dilution. Superior operability was demonstrated for the hydrogen-natural gas fuel. The micro-mixing fuel injectors show great promise for use in future gas turbine engines operating on hydrogen, syngas or other fuel mixtures of various compositions, supporting the Department of Energy goals related to increased energy diversity while reducing greenhouse gases.

  11. Development of OTM Syngas Process and Testing of Syngas Derived Ultra-clean Fuels in Diesel Engines and Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.T. Robinson; John Sirman; Prasad Apte; Xingun Gui; Tytus R. Bulicz; Dan Corgard; John Hemmings

    2005-05-01

    This final report summarizes work accomplished in the Program from January 1, 2001 through December 31, 2004. Most of the key technical objectives for this program were achieved. A breakthrough material system has lead to the development of an OTM (oxygen transport membrane) compact planar reactor design capable of producing either syngas or hydrogen. The planar reactor shows significant advantages in thermal efficiency and a step change reduction in costs compared to either autothermal reforming or steam methane reforming with CO{sub 2} recovery. Syngas derived ultra-clean transportation fuels were tested in the Nuvera fuel cell modular pressurized reactor and in International Truck and Engine single cylinder test engines. The studies compared emission and engine performance of conventional base fuels to various formulations of ultra-clean gasoline or diesel fuels. A proprietary BP oxygenate showed significant advantage in both applications for reducing emissions with minimal impact on performance. In addition, a study to evaluate new fuel formulations for an HCCI engine was completed.

  12. Sorption-Enhanced Synthetic Natural Gas (SNG) Production from Syngas. A Novel Process Combining CO Methanation, Water-Gas Shift, and CO2 Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lebarbier, Vanessa M.C.; Dagle, Robert A.; Kovarik, Libor; Albrecht, Karl O.; Li, Xiaohong S.; Li, Liyu; Taylor, Charles E.; Bao, Xinhe; Wang, Yong

    2013-07-08

    Synthetic natural gas (SNG) production from syngas is under investigation again due to the desire for less dependency from imports and the opportunity for increasing coal utilization and reducing green house gas emission. CO methanation is highly exothermic and substantial heat is liberated which can lead to process thermal imbalance and deactivation of the catalyst. As a result, conversion per pass is limited and substantial syngas recycle is employed in conventional processes. Furthermore, the conversion of syngas to SNG is typically performed at moderate temperatures (275 to 325C) to ensure high CH4 yields since this reaction is thermodynamically limited. In this study, the effectiveness of a novel integrated process for the SNG production from syngas at high temperature (i.e. 600?C) was investigated. This integrated process consists of combining a CO methanation nickel-based catalyst with a high temperature CO2 capture sorbent in a single reactor. Integration with CO2 separation eliminates the reverse-water-gas shift and the requirement for a separate water-gas shift (WGS) unit. Easing of thermodynamic constraint offers the opportunity of enhancing yield to CH4 at higher operating temperature (500-700C) which also favors methanation kinetics and improves the overall process efficiency due to exploitation of reaction heat at higher temperatures. Furthermore, simultaneous CO2 capture eliminates green house gas emission. In this work, sorption-enhanced CO methanation was demonstrated using a mixture of a 68% CaO/32% MgAl2O4 sorbent and a CO methanation catalyst (Ni/Al2O3, Ni/MgAl2O4, or Ni/SiC) utilizing a syngas ratio (H2/CO) of 1, gas-hour-space velocity (GHSV) of 22 000 hr-1, pressure of 1 bar and a temperature of 600oC. These conditions resulted in ~90% yield to methane, which was maintained until the sorbent became saturated with CO2. By contrast, without the use of sorbent, equilibrium yield to methane is only 22%. Cyclic stability of the methanation catalyst and durability of the sorbent were also studied in the multiple carbonation-decarbonation cycle studies proving the potential of this integrated process in a practical application.

  13. Environmental Cleanup Reports | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environmental Cleanup Reports Environmental Cleanup Reports June 2, 2015 Audit Report: DOE/IG-0937 The Status of Cleanup at the Department of Energy's Paducah Site September 18, 2014 Audit Report: OAS-M-14-11 Follow-Up on the Management of the Plutonium Finishing Plant Project September 26, 2013 Audit Report: OAS-L-13-15 The Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility Replacement Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory August 8, 2013 Audit Report: OAS-M-13-03 Cost Transfers at the Department's

  14. Investigation of nitrogen dilution effects on the laminar burning velocity and flame stability of syngas fuel at atmospheric condition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prathap, C.; Ray, Anjan; Ravi, M.R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2008-10-15

    The objective of this investigation was to study the effect of dilution with nitrogen on the laminar burning velocity and flame stability of syngas fuel (50% H{sub 2}-50% CO by volume)-air (21% O{sub 2}-79% N{sub 2} by volume) mixtures. The syngas fuel composition considered in this work comprised x% N{sub 2} by volume and (100-x)% an equimolar mixture of CO and H{sub 2}. The proportion x (i.e., %N{sub 2}) was varied from 0 to 60% while the H{sub 2}/CO ratio was always kept as unity. Spherically expanding flames were generated by centrally igniting homogeneous fuel-air gas mixtures in a 40-L cylindrical combustion chamber fitted with optical windows. Shadowgraphy technique with a high-speed imaging camera was used to record the propagating spherical flames. Unstretched burning velocity was calculated following the Karlovitz theory for weakly stretched flames. Also, Markstein length was calculated to investigate the flame stability conditions for the fuel-air mixtures under consideration. Experiments were conducted for syngas fuel with different nitrogen proportions (0-60%) at 0.1 MPa (absolute), 302{+-}3K, and equivalence ratios ranging from 0.6 to 3.5. All the measurements were compared with the numerical predictions obtained using RUN-1DL and PREMIX with a contemporary chemical kinetic scheme. Dilution with nitrogen in different proportions in syngas resulted in (a) decrease in laminar burning velocity due to reduction in heat release and increase in heat capacity of unburned gas mixture and hence the flame temperature, (b) shift in occurrence of peak laminar burning velocity from {phi}=2.0 for 0% N{sub 2} dilution to {phi}=1.4 for 60% N{sub 2} dilution, (c) augmentation of the coupled effect of flame stretch and preferential diffusion on laminar burning velocity, and (d) shift in the equivalence ratio for transition from stable to unstable flames from {phi}=0.6 for 0% N{sub 2} dilution to {phi}=1.0 for 60% N{sub 2} dilution. The present work also indicated that if the fuel mole fraction in the wide range of fuel-air mixtures investigated is less than 22%, then those fuel mixtures are in the unstable regime with regard to preferential diffusion. (author)

  15. Hazardous waste cleanup: the preliminaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amos, K.

    1985-08-01

    This article describes the lengthiness and cost of the preliminary steps in a hazardous waste cleanup. The article describes the S-Area lawsuit, an area near Niagara Falls, New York which was an inactive chemical dump. Contaminated sludge was found at a nearby water treatment plant and was traced back to S-Area. In the past five years, S-Area negotiations have cost the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency two million dollars for advice on how work should proceed for the plant and the landfill. This lawsuit was one of the first in the U.S. against a chemical company for endangering the public through unsound waste disposal practices. Negotiation was selected instead of a trial for several reasons which are outlined. S-Area may serve as a model for other such settlements, as it provides for a flexible plan, open to consideration of alternate technologies that may be developed in the future. It contains a phased approach to both defining and evaluating existing problems, then suggesting remedies. It also requires monitoring for at least 35 years or until no danger remains.

  16. Biogas Impurities and Cleanup for Fuel Cells

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Biogas Impurities and Cleanup for Fuel Cells Dennis Papadias and Shabbir Ahmed Argonne National Laboratory Presented at the Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop Golden, CO June 11-13,...

  17. Environmental Cleanup Reports | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Audit of Moab Mill Tailings Cleanup Project April 9, 2010 Audit Report: OAS-RA-10-07 Management Alert on Environmental Management's Select Strategy for Disposition of Savannah...

  18. Site Transition Process Upon Cleanup Completion | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Process Upon Cleanup Completion Site Transition Process Upon Cleanup Completion Site Transition Process Upon Cleanup Completion PDF icon Site Transition Process Upon Cleanup Completion More Documents & Publications Recommendation 198: Establish a site transition process Recommendation 218: Develop a Fact Sheet on Site Transition at On-going Mission Sites EM SSAB Conference Calls - January 27, 2011

  19. Washington Closure Hanford: Cleanup Progress Along Hanford's River Corridor

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    | Department of Energy from the 2015 DOE National Cleanup Workshop by Scott Sax, President, Washington Closure Hanford. PDF icon Washington Closure Hanford: Cleanup Progress Along Hanford's River Corridor More Documents & Publications 2014 Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus Briefings 2013 Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus Briefings Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, River Corridor Closure Project - June 2012

  20. SYNTHESIS OF METHACRYLATES FROM COAL-DERIVED SYNGAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jang, B.W.L.; Spivey, J.J.; Gogate, M.R.; Zoeller, J.R.; Colberg, R.D.; Choi, G.N.

    1999-12-01

    Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Eastman Chemical Company, and Bechtel have developed a novel process for synthesis of methyl methacrylate (MMA) from coal-derived syngas, under a contract from the US Department of Energy/Fossil Energy Technology Center (DOE/FETC). This project has resulted in five US patents (four already published and one pending publication). It has served as the basis for the technical and economic assessment of the production of this high-volume intermediate from coal-derived synthesis gas. The three-step process consists of the synthesis of a propionate from ethylene carbonylation using coal-derived CO, condensation of the propionate with formaldehyde to form methacrylic acid (MAA); and esterification of MAA with methanol to yield MMA. The first two steps, propionate synthesis and condensation catalysis, are the key technical challenges and the focus of the research presented here.

  1. 2014 House Nuclear Cleanup Caucus Oak Ridge

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    August 16, 2014 Sue Cange Acting Manager Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board Annual Planning Meeting www.energy.gov/EM 2 Complete the cleanup of the Oak Ridge Reservation to: * Protect the region's health and environment * Make clean land available for future use * Ensure Department of Energy's ongoing vital missions OREM Mission www.energy.gov/EM 3 Work is organized by Cleanup Portfolios: * East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) * Oak Ridge

  2. Cleanup Progress Report - 2011 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1 Cleanup Progress Report - 2011 In this issue, learn about EM's accomplishments in 2011 across the Oak Ridge Reservation. There are many more stories contained within the issue, but here are some of the highlights from each site. East Tennessee Technology Park DOE Selects New Cleanup Contractor K-25 East Wing Demolition Begins K-33 Building Demolished Oak Ridge National Laboratory 2000 Complex Demolition Completed Bethel Valley Burial Ground Remediation Completed Bethel Valley Groundwater

  3. Lab completes first Recovery Act cleanup project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LANL Recovery Act cleanup Lab completes first Recovery Act cleanup project The $13 million project involved demolition of an 18,000-square-foot former nuclear fusion research facility. August 4, 2010 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits

  4. Los Alamos National Laboratory names cleanup subcontractors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cleanup subcontractors named Los Alamos National Laboratory names cleanup subcontractors The three companies are Los Alamos Technical Associates (LATA), Portage Inc., and ARSEC Environmental, LLC (ARSEC). August 14, 2009 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos

  5. Paducah Cleanup Scope | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Scope Paducah Cleanup Scope This graphic illustrates the organization of the Media/Activity-Specific OUs and Primary Projects. Check marks indicate completed projects and gradient boxes indicate projects in progress. This graphic illustrates the organization of the Media/Activity-Specific OUs and Primary Projects. Check marks indicate completed projects and gradient boxes indicate projects in progress. The overall environmental cleanup strategy at Paducah is based on taking near-term actions to

  6. Portsmouth Cleanup Progress | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cleanup Progress Portsmouth Cleanup Progress Environmental impacts occurred at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant during operations from 1954-2001. Remediation efforts began well before the uranium enrichment operations ceased in 2001. In 1989 the U.S. Department of Energy established the Office of Environmental Management for the purpose of remediating facilities within the nation's nuclear weapons complex. Various remediation efforts have taken place at the Portsmouth Site since 1989, to

  7. Portsmouth Environmental Cleanup | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cleanup Portsmouth Environmental Cleanup As part of deactivation efforts, process gas equipment is being removed from gaseous diffusion plant buildings. As part of deactivation efforts, process gas equipment is being removed from gaseous diffusion plant buildings. Decades of uranium enrichment and support activities at Portsmouth required the use of a number of typical and special industrial chemicals and materials. Gaseous Diffusion Plant operations generated hazardous, radioactive, mixed (both

  8. Demolition, Groundwater Cleanup Highlight Paducah's 2013 Accomplishments

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    | Department of Energy Demolition, Groundwater Cleanup Highlight Paducah's 2013 Accomplishments Demolition, Groundwater Cleanup Highlight Paducah's 2013 Accomplishments December 24, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis A high-reach shear removes debris from the tallest structure of the C-340 complex at Paducah. Watch a video of this work here. The 120-foot-high Metals Plant was the tallest building at the Paducah site and encompassed about 1.5 million cubic feet, the volume of a football field roughly

  9. Credibility and trust in federal facility cleanups

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raynes, D.B.

    1995-12-01

    The most important indicator of a well-managed site cleanup effort may no longer be funding or scientific expertise. While support for federal facility cleanup has included appropriations of more than $10 billion annually, these expenditures alone are unlikely to assure progress toward environmental remediation. {open_quotes}Trust{close_quotes} is now overwhelmingly mentioned as a prerequisite for progress with site cleanup in DOE`s weapons complex. In part, federal budget deficits are forcing participants to focus on factors that build consensus and lead to cost-effective cleanup actions. In some cases, the stakeholders at cleanup sites are making efforts to work cooperatively with federal agencies. A report by 40 representatives of federal agencies, tribal and state governments, associations, and others developed recommendations to create a {open_quotes}new era of trust and consensus-building that allows all parties to get on with the job of cleaning up federal facilities in a manner that reflects the priorities and concerns of all stakeholders.{close_quotes} Changes are underway affecting how federal agencies work with federal and state regulators reflecting this concept of shared responsibility for conducting cleanup. This paper addresses these changes and provides examples of the successes and failures underway.

  10. Bioenergy Technologies Office Conversion R&D Pathway: Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Syngas upgrading to hydrocarbon fuels is one of eight priority pathways chosen to convert biomass into hydrocarbon fuels by the Bioenergy Technologies Office. These pathways were down-selected from an initial list of 18.

  11. NREL Patents a Catalyst that Removes Syngas Tar, Boosting the Economics of Biofuels (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-08-01

    NREL has patented a catalyst that reforms tar into syngas, a breakthrough that can accelerate the process of getting biomass ready for fuel synthesis and use as a drop-in fuel.

  12. Material Testing of Coated Alloys in a Syngas Combustion Environment Year 6

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    - Activity 1.13 - Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Material Testing of Coated Alloys in a Syngas Combustion Environment Year 6 - Activity 1.13 - Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Material Testing of Coated Alloys in a Syngas Combustion Environment Year 6 - Activity 1.13 - Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology Modifications were made to the inlet of

  13. Durable Zinc Oxide-Based Regenerable Sorbents for Desulfurization of Syngas in a Fixed-Bed Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siriwardane, R.V.; Cicero, D.C.; Jain, S.; Gupta, R.P.; Turk, B.S.

    2002-09-19

    A fixed-bed regenerable desulfurization sorbent, identified as RVS-1 and developed by researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, was awarded the R&D 100 award in 2000 and is currently offered as a commercial product by Sued- Chemie Inc. An extensive testing program for this sorbent was undertaken which included tests at a wide range of temperatures, pressures and gas compositions both simulated and generated in an actual gasifier for sulfidation and regeneration. During these desulfurization tests, the RVS-1 sorbent maintained an effluent H{sub 2}S concentration of <5 ppmv at temperatures from 260 to 600 C (500-1100 F) and pressures of 203-2026 kPa(2 to 20 atm) with a feed containing 1.2 vol% H{sub 2}S. The types of syngas tested ranged from an oxygen-blown Texaco gasifier to biomass-generated syngas. The RVS-1 sorbent has demonstrated high crush strength and attrition resistance, which, unlike past sorbent formulations, does not decrease with extended testing at actual operating conditions. The sulfur capacity of the sorbent is roughly 17 to 20 wt.% which has been shown to remain constant during extended testing (>25 cycles). In addition to H{sub 2}S, the RVS-1 sorbent has also demonstrated the ability to remove dimethyl sulfide and carbonyl sulfide from syngas. It was also possible to obtain sulfur levels in the parts per billion by volume range with the modified RVS-1 sorbent. During regeneration, the RVS-1 sorbent has been regenerated with dilute oxygen streams (1 to 7 vol% O{sub 2}) at temperatures as low as 370 C (700 F) and pressures of 304-709 kPa(3 to 7 atm). Although regeneration can be initiated at 370 C (700 F), regeneration temperatures in excess of 538 C (1000 F) were found to be optimal. The presence of steam, carbon dioxide or sulfur dioxide (up to 6 vol%) did not have any visible effect on regeneration or sorbent performance during either sulfidation or regeneration.

  14. Single-Step Syngas-to-Distillates (S2D) Synthesis via Methanol and Dimethyl Ether Intermediates: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dagle, Robert A.; Lebarbier, Vanessa MC; Lizarazo Adarme, Jair A.; King, David L.; Zhu, Yunhua; Gray, Michel J.; Jones, Susanne B.; Biddy, Mary J.; Hallen, Richard T.; Wang, Yong; White, James F.; Holladay, Johnathan E.; Palo, Daniel R.

    2013-11-26

    The objective of the work was to enhance price-competitive, synthesis gas (syngas)-based production of transportation fuels that are directly compatible with the existing vehicle fleet (i.e., vehicles fueled by gasoline, diesel, jet fuel, etc.). To accomplish this, modifications to the traditional methanol-to-gasoline (MTG) process were investigated. In this study, we investigated direct conversion of syngas to distillates using methanol and dimethyl ether intermediates. For this application, a Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 (PdZnAl) catalyst previously developed for methanol steam reforming was evaluated. The PdZnAl catalyst was shown to be far superior to a conventional copper-based methanol catalyst when operated at relatively high temperatures (i.e., >300°C), which is necessary for MTG-type applications. Catalytic performance was evaluated through parametric studies. Process conditions such as temperature, pressure, gas-hour-space velocity, and syngas feed ratio (i.e., hydrogen:carbon monoxide) were investigated. PdZnAl catalyst formulation also was optimized to maximize conversion and selectivity to methanol and dimethyl ether while suppressing methane formation. Thus, a PdZn/Al2O3 catalyst optimized for methanol and dimethyl ether formation was developed through combined catalytic material and process parameter exploration. However, even after compositional optimization, a significant amount of undesirable carbon dioxide was produced (formed via the water-gas-shift reaction), and some degree of methane formation could not be completely avoided. Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 used in combination with ZSM-5 was investigated for direct syngas-to-distillates conversion. High conversion was achieved as thermodynamic constraints are alleviated when methanol and dimethyl are intermediates for hydrocarbon formation. When methanol and/or dimethyl ether are products formed separately, equilibrium restrictions occur. Thermodynamic relaxation also enables the use of lower operating pressures than what would be allowed for methanol synthesis alone. Aromatic-rich hydrocarbon liquid (C5+), containing a significant amount of methylated benzenes, was produced under these conditions. However, selectivity control to liquid hydrocarbons was difficult to achieve. Carbon dioxide and methane formation was problematic. Furthermore, saturation of the olefinic intermediates formed in the zeolite, and necessary for gasoline production, occurred over PdZnAl. Thus, yield to desirable hydrocarbon liquid product was limited. Evaluation of other oxygenate-producing catalysts could possibly lead to future advances. Potential exists with discovery of other types of catalysts that suppress carbon dioxide and light hydrocarbon formation. Comparative techno-economics for a single-step syngas-to-distillates process and a more conventional MTG-type process were investigated. Results suggest operating and capital cost savings could only modestly be achieved, given future improvements to catalyst performance. Sensitivity analysis indicated that increased single-pass yield to hydrocarbon liquid is a primary need for this process to achieve cost competiveness.

  15. Synthesis of Methyl Methacrylate from Coal-Derived Syngas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerald N. Choi; James J. Spivey; Jospeh R. Zoeller; Makarand R. Gogate; Richard D. Colberg; Samuel S. Tam

    1998-04-17

    Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Eastman Chemical Company, and Bechtel collectively are developing a novel three-step process for the synthesis of methyl methacrylate (MMA) from coal-derived syngas that consists of the steps of synthesis of a propionate, its condensation with formaldehyde to form methacrylic acid (MAA), and esterification of MAA with methanol to produce MMA. RTI has completed the research on the three-step methanol-based route to MMA. Under an extension to the original contract, RTI is currently evaluating a new DME-based process for MMA. The key research need for DME route is to develop catalysts for DME partial oxidation reactions and DME condensation reactions. Over the last month, RTI has finalized the design of a fixed-bed microreactor system for DME partial oxidation reactions. RTI incorporated some design changes to the feed blending system, so as to be able to blend varying proportions of DME and oxygen. RTI has also examined the flammability limits of DME-air mixtures. Since the lower flammability limit of DME in air is 3.6 volume percent, RTI will use a nominal feed composition of 1.6 percent in air, which is less than half the lower explosion limit for DME-air mixtures. This nominal feed composition is thus considered operationally safe, for DME partial oxidation reactions. RTI is also currently developing an analytical system for DME partial oxidation reaction system.

  16. DOE Completes Cleanup at New York, California Sites | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Completes Cleanup at New York, California Sites DOE Completes Cleanup at New York, California Sites July 1, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - Last month, the U.S....

  17. Hanford Progresses in Burial Ground Cleanup

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash. – EM’s Richland Operations Office (RL) and cleanup contractor Washington Closure Hanford (WCH) are making tremendous progress cleaning up Hanford’s 618-10 Burial Ground, one of the most hazardous burial grounds in the EM complex.

  18. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Idaho Cleanup Project- October 2010

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Evaluation to determine whether Idaho Cleanup Project is continuing to perform at a level deserving DOE-VPP Star recognition.

  19. Risk Informing Environmental Cleanup Priorities | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Informing Environmental Cleanup Priorities Risk Informing Environmental Cleanup Priorities Presentation from the 2015 Annual Performance and Risk Assessment (P&RA) Community of Practice (CoP) Technical Exchange Meeting held in Richland, Washington on December 15-16, 2015. PDF icon Risk Informing Environmental Cleanup Priorities More Documents & Publications 2014 Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus Briefings OREM Hosts Community Workshop Status Updates on the Performance and Risk

  20. 2013 Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus Briefings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus Briefings 2013 Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus Briefings The Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus serves as a way to brief members of Congress and their staff on EM headquarters and site activities, including budget, safety and project progress. PDF icon 04/24/2013 - FY14 Budget Overview for Clean Up Caucus PDF icon 05/07/2013 - Office of River Protection PDF icon 05/16/2013 - Oak Ridge Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus PDF icon 05/21/2013 -

  1. Richland Operations Office Completes Cleanup in Hanford's 300 Area North

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Section | Department of Energy Richland Operations Office Completes Cleanup in Hanford's 300 Area North Section Richland Operations Office Completes Cleanup in Hanford's 300 Area North Section March 28, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis An aerial view of Hanford’s 300 Area North Section following completion of cleanup. An aerial view of Hanford's 300 Area North Section following completion of cleanup. Workers demolish the 384 Building, known as the Power House and Heating Plant, in the north

  2. EM Releases Supporting Materials From DOE's First National Cleanup

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Workshop | Department of Energy Supporting Materials From DOE's First National Cleanup Workshop EM Releases Supporting Materials From DOE's First National Cleanup Workshop November 9, 2015 - 10:00am Addthis EM Releases Supporting Materials From DOE’s First National Cleanup Workshop WASHINGTON, D.C. - EM is making available support materials from the first-ever DOE National Cleanup Workshop. The materials include links to 15 videos that capture addresses by Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz

  3. ETTP Cleanup and Reindustrialization Finishing What We Started | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy ETTP Cleanup and Reindustrialization Finishing What We Started ETTP Cleanup and Reindustrialization Finishing What We Started Presentation from the 2015 DOE National Cleanup Workshop by Ken Rueter, President, URS-CH2M Oak Ridge (UCOR). PDF icon ETTP Cleanup and Reindustrialization Finishing What We Started More Documents & Publications OREM Hosts Community Workshop Charting the Course for Major EM Successes in 2016-2017 OREM hosts annual community budget workshop

  4. 2013 Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus Briefings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus Briefings 2013 Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus Briefings The Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus serves as a way to brief members of Congress and their staff on EM headquarters and site activities, including budget, safety and project progress. PDF icon 04/24/2013 - FY14 Budget Overview for Clean Up Caucus PDF icon 05/07/2013 - Office of River Protection PDF icon 05/16/2013 - Oak Ridge Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus PDF icon 05/21/2013 -

  5. East Tennessee Technology Park Cleanup | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Cleanup East Tennessee Technology Park Cleanup This fact sheet provides an update on all of the current cleanup projects at the site, and it also lists the major projects that were completed at the East Tennessee Technology Park. Projects include: K-1070-A and B Burial Ground Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Container Removal Scrap Removal Project Ponds Remediation Groundwater Treatability Study Buildings K-25, K-27, K-29, K-31, and K-33 PDF icon ETTP cleanup fact sheet More Documents &

  6. Technology Development Advances EM Cleanup | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Development Advances EM Cleanup Technology Development Advances EM Cleanup The unique nature of many of EM's remaining facilities will require a strong and responsive engineering and technology program to improve work and public safety, and reduce costs and environmental impacts while completing the cleanup program. A Ceramic membrane to Recycle Caustic Waste Processing Annual Technology Development Report 2007

  7. The Office of Environmental Management Non-Defense Environmental Cleanup |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Non-Defense Environmental Cleanup The Office of Environmental Management Non-Defense Environmental Cleanup PDF icon Microsoft Word - 8E2A4440.doc More Documents & Publications Microsoft Word - PSRP Updates 6-25-10_v2 The Office of Environmental Management (EM) Defense Environmental Cleanup The Office of Environmental Management Uranium Enrichment D&D

  8. Protocol_for_Environmental_Management_Cleanup_Projects_(clean).pdf |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Protocol_for_Environmental_Management_Cleanup_Projects_(clean).pdf Protocol_for_Environmental_Management_Cleanup_Projects_(clean).pdf PDF icon Protocol_for_Environmental_Management_Cleanup_Projects_(clean).pdf More Documents & Publications External Independent Review (EIR) Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) October 2008 DOE EIR FM.doc External Independent Review (EIR) Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) September 2010

  9. Effects of Combustion-Induced Vortex Breakdown on Flashback Limits of Syngas-Fueled Gas Turbine Combustors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahsan Choudhuri

    2011-03-31

    Turbine combustors of advanced power systems have goals to achieve very low pollutants emissions, fuel variability, and fuel flexibility. Future generation gas turbine combustors should tolerate fuel compositions ranging from natural gas to a broad range of syngas without sacrificing operational advantages and low emission characteristics. Additionally, current designs of advanced turbine combustors use various degrees of swirl and lean premixing for stabilizing flames and controlling high temperature NOx formation zones. However, issues of fuel variability and NOx control through premixing also bring a number of concerns, especially combustor flashback and flame blowout. Flashback is a combustion condition at which the flame propagates upstream against the gas stream into the burner tube. Flashback is a critical issue for premixed combustor designs, because it not only causes serious hardware damages but also increases pollutant emissions. In swirl stabilized lean premixed turbine combustors onset of flashback may occur due to (i) boundary layer flame propagation (critical velocity gradient), (ii) turbulent flame propagation in core flow, (iii) combustion instabilities, and (iv) upstream flame propagation induced by combustion induced vortex breakdown (CIVB). Flashback due to first two foregoing mechanisms is a topic of classical interest and has been studied extensively. Generally, analytical theories and experimental determinations of laminar and turbulent burning velocities model these mechanisms with sufficient precision for design usages. However, the swirling flow complicates the flashback processes in premixed combustions and the first two mechanisms inadequately describe the flashback propensity of most practical combustor designs. The presence of hydrogen in syngas significantly increases the potential for flashback. Due to high laminar burning velocity and low lean flammability limit, hydrogen tends to shift the combustor operating conditions towards flashback regime. Even a small amount of hydrogen in a fuel blend triggers the onset of flashback by altering the kinetics and thermophysical characteristics of the mixture. Additionally, the presence of hydrogen in the fuel mixture modifies the response of the flame to the global effects of stretch and preferential diffusion. Despite its immense importance in fuel flexible combustor design, little is known about the magnitude of fuel effects on CIVB induced flashback mechanism. Hence, this project investigates the effects of syngas compositions on flashback resulting from combustion induced vortex breakdown. The project uses controlled experiments and parametric modeling to understand the velocity field and flame interaction leading to CIVB driven flashback.

  10. Top EM Leadership to Participate in 2016 National Cleanup Workshop |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Top EM Leadership to Participate in 2016 National Cleanup Workshop Top EM Leadership to Participate in 2016 National Cleanup Workshop March 9, 2016 - 12:00pm Addthis Top EM Leadership to Participate in 2016 National Cleanup Workshop WASHINGTON, D.C. - EM's senior leaders are set to join the 2016 National Cleanup Workshop in mid-September in the Washington, D.C.-area. The nuclear cleanup program's leaders scheduled to take part in the workshop include Assistant Secretary

  11. Cleanup Progress Report - 2010 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    0 Cleanup Progress Report - 2010 In this issue, learn about EM's accomplishments in 2010 across the Oak Ridge Reservation. There are many more stories contained within the issue, but here are some of the highlights from each site. East Tennessee Technology Park K-25 Building West Wing Demolished Contaminated Surface Water, Groundwater at ETTP Addressed Reindustrialization Program Continues Effort to Privatize ETTP Oak Ridge National Laboratory Demolition Completed at 3026 C&D Six Facilities

  12. Cleanup Progress Report - 2013 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    3 Cleanup Progress Report - 2013 Read about EM's accomplishments across the Oak Ridge Reservation in 2013. Some of the stories include: East Tennessee Technology Park Last standing section of K-25 Building being demolished K-27 Building being prepared for demolition Iconic ETTP Fire Water Tower demolished Efforts under way to commemorate the K-25 site Oak Ridge National Laboratory 3026 hot cells facility downgraded and maintained in surveillance and maintenance mode Upgrade of 4500 Area Gaseous

  13. Cleanup Progress Report - 2015 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    5 Cleanup Progress Report - 2015 Read about EM's accomplishments across the Oak Ridge Reservation in 2015. Some of the stories include: East Tennessee Technology Park K-31 Building demolition completed K-27 Building demolition will eliminate final ETTP gaseous diffusion facility K-1037 demo prep begins K-25 historic preservation efforts progress Reindustrialization Program continues land reuse efforts Oak Ridge National Laboratory Components removed from Oak Ridge Research Reactor Prep work

  14. Microsoft Word - California_cleanup.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WIPP Completes California Sites Cleanup CARLSBAD, N.M., June 14, 2010 - The U.S. Department of Energy's Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) has successfully completed its campaign to clean up all defense- related transuranic (TRU) waste at California's Vallecitos Nuclear Center (VNC) near Sunol and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Site 300, east of Livermore. The last shipment of defense related TRU waste from VNC was shipped to Idaho National Laboratory on June 7. Following the

  15. Richland Operations Office Cleanup Strategy, Scope

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Richland Operations Office Cleanup Strategy, Scope Matt McCormick Manager Richland Operations Office May 1, 2014 John Ciucci Chief Operating Officer CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company Scott Sax President and Project Manager Washington Closure Hanford Frank Armijo President and General Manager Mission Support Alliance www.energy.gov/EM 2 Richland Operations Office Hanford Site History Hanford * Hanford began in 1943 as part of the Manhattan Project * Production of plutonium increased during

  16. Cleanup of Nuclear Licensed Facility 57

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeanjacques, Michel; Bremond, Marie Pierre; Marchand, Carole; Poyau, Cecile; Viallefont, Cecile; Gautier, Laurent; Masure, Frederic

    2008-01-15

    This summary describes the operations to clean up the equipment of the Nuclear Licensed Facility 57 (NLF 57). Due to the diversity of the research and development work carried out on the reprocessing of spent fuel in it, this installation is emblematic of many of the technical and organizational issues liable to be encountered in the final closure of nuclear facilities. The French atomic energy commission's center at Fontenay aux Roses (CEA-FAR) was created in 1946 to house pile ZOE. Laboratories for fuel cycle research were installed in existing buildings at the site. Work was later concentrated on spent fuel reprocessing, in a pilot workshop referred to as the 'Usine Pu'. In the early sixties, after the dismantling of these first generation facilities, a radiochemistry laboratory dedicated to research and development work on reprocessing was constructed, designated Building 18. During the same decade, more buildings were added: Building 54, storehouses and offices, Building 91, a hall and laboratories for chemical engineering research on natural and depleted uranium. Together, these three building constitute NLF 57. Building 18 architecture featured four similar modules. Each module had three levels: a sub-level consisting of technical galleries and rooms for the liquid effluent tanks, a ground floor and roof space in which the ventilation was installed. Offices, change rooms, four laboratories and a hall were situated on the ground floor. The shielded lines were installed in the laboratories and the halls. Construction of the building took place between 1959 and 1962, and its commissioning began in 1961. The research and development programs performed in NLF 57 related to studies of the reprocessing of spent fuel, including dry methods and the Purex process, techniques for the treatment of waste (vitrification, alpha waste decontamination, etc.) as well as studies and production of transuranic elements for industry and research. In addition to this work, the necessary methods of analysis for monitoring it were also developed. The research and development program finally ended on 30 June 1995. The NLF 57 cleanup program was intended to reduce the nuclear and conventional hazards and minimize the quantities of HLW and MLW during the subsequent dismantling work. To facilitate the organization of the cleanup work, it was divided into categories by type: - treatment and removal of nuclear material, - removal of radioactive sources, - treatment and removal of aqueous liquid waste, - treatment and removal of organic effluents, - treatment and removal of solid waste, - pumping out of the PETRUS tank, - flushing and decontamination of the tanks, - cleanup of Buildings 18 and 91/54. To estimate the cost of the operations and to monitor the progress of the work, an indicator system was put in place based on work units representative of the operation. The values of the work units were periodically updated on the basis of experience feedback. The cleanup progress is now 92% complete (06/12/31): - treatment and removal of nuclear material: 100%, - removal of radioactive sources: 100%, - treatment and removal of aqueous liquid waste: 64%, - treatment and removal of organic effluents: 87%, - treatment and removal of solid waste: 99%, - pumping out of the PETRUS tank: 69%, - flushing and decontamination of tank: 75%, - section cleaning of Buildings 18 and 91/: 90%. The DRSN/SAFAR is the delegated Project Owner for cleanup and dismantling operations. It is also the prime contractor for the cleanup and dismantling operations. SAFAR itself is responsible for operations relating to the CEA activity and those with technical risks (Removal of nuclear materials, Removal of radioactive sources, Pumping out plutonium and transuranic contaminated solvent and Flushing and decontamination of tanks and pipes). All other operations are sub-contracted to specialist companies. The NLF57 cleanup program as executed is capable of attaining activity levels compatible with a future dismantling operation using known and mastered techniques and producing a

  17. Economic analysis and assessment of syngas production using a modeling approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Hakkwan; Parajuli, Prem B.; Yu, Fei; Columbus, Eugene P.

    2011-08-10

    Economic analysis and modeling are essential and important issues for the development of current feedstock and process technology for bio-gasification. The objective of this study was to develop an economic model and apply to predict the unit cost of syngas production from a micro-scale bio-gasification facility. An economic model was programmed in C++ computer programming language and developed using a parametric cost approach, which included processes to calculate the total capital costs and the total operating costs. The model used measured economic data from the bio-gasification facility at Mississippi State University. The modeling results showed that the unit cost of syngas production was $1.217 for a 60 Nm-3 h-1 capacity bio-gasifier. The operating cost was the major part of the total production cost. The equipment purchase cost and the labor cost were the largest part of the total capital cost and the total operating cost, respectively. Sensitivity analysis indicated that labor costs rank the top as followed by equipment cost, loan life, feedstock cost, interest rate, utility cost, and waste treatment cost. The unit cost of syngas production increased with the increase of all parameters with exception of loan life. The annual cost regarding equipment, labor, feedstock, waste treatment, and utility cost showed a linear relationship with percent changes, while loan life and annual interest rate showed a non-linear relationship. This study provides the useful information for economic analysis and assessment of the syngas production using a modeling approach.

  18. Heterogeneous catalytic process for alcohol fuels from syngas. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dombek, B.D.

    1996-03-01

    The primary objective of this project has been the pursuit of a catalyst system which would allow the selective production from syngas of methanol and isobutanol. It is desirable to develop a process in which the methanol to isobutanol weight ratio could be varied from 70/30 to 30/70. The 70/30 mixture could be used directly as a fuel additive, while, with the appropriate downstream processing, the 30/70 mixture could be utilized for methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) synthesis. The indirect manufacture of MTBE from a coal derived syngas to methanol and isobutanol process would appear to be a viable solution to MTBE feedstock limitations. To become economically attractive, a process fro producing oxygenates from coal-derived syngas must form these products with high selectivity and good rates, and must be capable of operating with a low-hydrogen-content syngas. This was to be accomplished through extensions of known catalyst systems and by the rational design of novel catalyst systems.

  19. Performance of solid oxide fuel cells operated with coal syngas provided directly from a gasification process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hackett, Gregory A.; Gerdes, Kirk R.; Song, Xueyan; Chen, Yun; Shutthanandan, V.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Zhu, Zihua; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Gemmen, Randall

    2012-09-15

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are presently being developed for gasification integrated power plants that generate electricity from coal at 50+% efficiency. The interaction of trace metals in coal syngas with the Ni-based SOFC anodes is being investigated through thermodynamic analyses and in laboratory experiments, but direct test data from coal syngas exposure are sparsely available. This research effort evaluates the significance of SOFC performance losses associated with exposure of a SOFC anode to direct coal syngas. SOFC specimen of industrially relevant composition are operated in a unique mobile test skid that was deployed to the research gasifier at the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) in Wilsonville, AL. The mobile test skid interfaces with a gasifier slipstream to deliver hot syngas (up to 300C) directly to a parallel array of 12 button cell specimen, each of which possesses an active area of approximately 2 cm2. During the 500 hour test period, all twelve cells were monitored for performance at four discrete operating current densities, and all cells maintained contact with a data acquisition system. Of these twelve, nine demonstrated good performance throughout the test, while three of the cells were partially compromised. Degradation associated with the properly functioning cells was attributed to syngas exposure and trace material attack on the anode structure that was accelerated at increasing current densities. Cells that were operated at 0 and 125 mA/cm degraded at 9.1 and 10.7% per 1000 hours, respectively, while cells operated at 250 and 375 mA/cm degraded at 18.9 and 16.2% per 1000 hours, respectively. Post-trial spectroscopic analysis of the anodes showed carbon, sulfur, and phosphorus deposits; no secondary Ni-metal phases were found.

  20. Biomass Gas Cleanup Using a Therminator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David C. Dayton; Atish Kataria; Rabhubir Gupta

    2012-03-06

    The objective of the project is to develop and demonstrate a novel fluidized-bed process module called a ?¢????Therminator?¢??? to simultaneously destroy and/or remove tar, NH3 and H2S from raw syngas produced by a fluidized-bed biomass gasifier. The raw syngas contains as much as 10 g/m3 of tar, 4,000 ppmv of NH3 and 100 ppmv of H2S. The goal of the Therminator module would be to use promising regenerable catalysts developed for removing tar, ammonia, and H2S down to low levels (around 10 ppm). Tars are cracked to a non-condensable gas and coke that would deposit on the acid catalyst. We will deposit coke, much like a fluid catalytic cracker (FCC) in a petroleum refinery. The deposited coke fouls the catalyst, much like FCC, but the coke would be burned off in the regenerator and the regenerated catalyst would be returned to the cracker. The rapid circulation between the cracker and regenerator would ensure the availability of the required amount of regenerated catalyst to accomplish our goal. Also, by removing sulfur down to less than 10 ppmv, NH3 decomposition would also be possible in the cracker at 600-700???°C. In the cracker, tar decomposes and lays down coke on the acid sites of the catalyst, NH3 is decomposed using a small amount of metal (e.g., nickel or iron) catalyst incorporated into the catalyst matrix, and H2S is removed by a small amount of a metal oxide (e.g. zinc oxide or zinc titanate) by the H2S-metal oxide reaction to form metal sulfide. After a tolerable decline in activity for these reactions, the catalyst particles (and additives) are transported to the regenerator where they are exposed to air to remove the coke and to regenerate the metal sulfide back to metal oxide. Sulfate formation is avoided by running the regeneration with slightly sub-stoichiometric quantity of oxygen. Following regeneration, the catalyst is transported back to the cracker and the cycling continues. Analogous to an FCC reactor system, rapid cycling will allow the use of very active cracking catalysts that lose activity due to coking within the order of several seconds.

  1. Near-zero emissions combustor system for syngas and biofuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yongho, Kim; Rosocha, Louis

    2010-01-01

    A multi-institutional plasma combustion team was awarded a research project from the DOE/NNSA GIPP (Global Initiative for Prolifereation Prevention) office. The Institute of High Current Electronics (Tomsk, Russia); Leonardo Technologies, Inc. (an American-based industrial partner), in conjunction with the Los Alamos National Laboratory are participating in the project to develop novel plasma assisted combustion technologies. The purpose of this project is to develop prototypes of marketable systems for more stable and cleaner combustion of syngas/biofuels and to demonstrate that this technology can be used for a variety of combustion applications - with a major focus on contemporary gas turbines. In this paper, an overview of the project, along with descriptions of the plasma-based combustors and associated power supplies will be presented. Worldwide, it is recognized that a variety of combustion fuels will be required to meet the needs for supplying gas-turbine engines (electricity generation, propulsion), internal combustion engines (propulsion, transportation), and burners (heat and electricity generation) in the 21st Century. Biofuels and biofuel blends have already been applied to these needs, but experience difficulties in modifications to combustion processes and combustor design and the need for flame stabilization techniques to address current and future environmental and energy-efficiency challenges. In addition, municipal solid waste (MSW) has shown promise as a feedstock for heat and/or electricity-generating plants. However, current combustion techniques that use such fuels have problems with achieving environmentally-acceptable air/exhaust emissions and can also benefit from increased combustion efficiency. This project involves a novel technology (a form of plasma-assisted combustion) that can address the above issues. Plasma-assisted combustion (PAC) is a growing field that is receiving worldwide attention at present. The project is focused on research necessary to develop a novel, high-efficiency, low-emissions (near-zero, or as low as reasonably achievable), advanced combustion technology for electricity and heat production from biofuels and fuels derived from MSW. For any type of combustion technology, including the advanced technology of this project, two problems of special interest must be addressed: developing and optimizing the combustion chambers and the systems for igniting and sustaining the fuel-burning process. For MSW in particular, there are new challenges over gaseous or liquid fuels because solid fuels must be ground into fine particulates ({approx} 10 {micro}m diameter), fed into the advanced combustor, and combusted under plasma-assisted conditions that are quite different than gaseous or liquid fuels. The principal idea of the combustion chamber design is to use so-called reverse vortex gas flow, which allows efficient cooling of the chamber wall and flame stabilization in the central area of the combustor (Tornado chamber). Considerable progress has been made in design ing an advanced, reverse vortex flow combustion chamber for biofuels, although it was not tested on biofuels and a system that could be fully commercialized has never been completed.

  2. Technical and economic assessment of producing hydrogen by reforming syngas from the Battelle indirectly heated biomass gasifier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, M.K.

    1995-08-01

    The technical and economic feasibility of producing hydrogen from biomass by means of indirectly heated gasification and steam reforming was studied. A detailed process model was developed in ASPEN Plus{trademark} to perform material and energy balances. The results of this simulation were used to size and cost major pieces of equipment from which the determination of the necessary selling price of hydrogen was made. A sensitivity analysis was conducted on the process to study hydrogen price as a function of biomass feedstock cost and hydrogen production efficiency. The gasification system used for this study was the Battelle Columbus Laboratory (BCL) indirectly heated gasifier. The heat necessary for the endothermic gasification reactions is supplied by circulating sand from a char combustor to the gasification vessel. Hydrogen production was accomplished by steam reforming the product synthesis gas (syngas) in a process based on that used for natural gas reforming. Three process configurations were studied. Scheme 1 is the full reforming process, with a primary reformer similar to a process furnace, followed by a high temperature shift reactor and a low temperature shift reactor. Scheme 2 uses only the primary reformer, and Scheme 3 uses the primary reformer and the high temperature shift reactor. A pressure swing adsorption (PSA) system is used in all three schemes to produce a hydrogen product pure enough to be used in fuel cells. Steam is produced through detailed heat integration and is intended to be sold as a by-product.

  3. Independent Oversight Assessment, Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Waste Treatment Project - November 2012 | Department of Energy Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - November 2012 Independent Oversight Assessment, Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - November 2012 November 2012 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project This report provides the results of an independent assessment of nuclear safety culture at the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment

  4. OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT NAMES NEW IDAHO CLEANUP MANAGER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Danielle Miller (208) 526-5709 For Immediate Release May 30, 2014 OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT NAMES NEW IDAHO CLEANUP MANAGER Idaho Falls, ID - The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management today announced that John (Jack) Zimmerman has been named Deputy Manager of its highly-successful Idaho Cleanup program, which oversees the environmental cleanup and waste management mission at DOE's Idaho site. Mr. Zimmerman has more than 25 years of experience in nuclear

  5. Secretary Chu Highlights Recovery Act Cleanup Progress | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Cleanup Progress Secretary Chu Highlights Recovery Act Cleanup Progress March 23, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis OAK RIDGE, TENN. - Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced today that the Department's Environmental Management program has spent more than $1.5 billion in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funds on cleanup projects around the country - 25 percent of the program's total - creating an estimated 14,400 jobs since the start of the Recovery Act. "Because of the Recovery Act,

  6. Environmental Remediation program completes legacy mercury cleanup near

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Smith's Marketplace Stories » Legacy slope-side cleanup Environmental Remediation program completes legacy mercury cleanup near Smith's Marketplace Los Alamos National Laboratory performed a high-angle canyon-side cleanup on U.S. Department of Energy property just south of Smith's Marketplace. May 1, 2015 A telescoping crane hoists a spider excavator over Los Alamos Canyon before placing it on the canyon slope to excavate historically contaminated soil. In ongoing efforts to reduce the

  7. IDAHO OPERATIONS OFFICE NAMES NEW IDAHO CLEANUP PROJECT MANAGER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    doe logo Media Contact: Brad Bugger (208) 526-0833 For Immediate Release: Wednesday, June 29, 2011 IDAHO OPERATIONS OFFICE NAMES NEW IDAHO CLEANUP PROJECT MANAGER Idaho Falls, ID � The Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office today announced that James Cooper has been named deputy manager of its highly-successful Idaho Cleanup Project, which oversees the environmental cleanup and waste management mission at DOE's Idaho site. Cooper has more than 30 years of experience in commercial and

  8. Energy Department Announces Achievement of Major Cleanup Milestone at

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Savannah River Site | Department of Energy Achievement of Major Cleanup Milestone at Savannah River Site Energy Department Announces Achievement of Major Cleanup Milestone at Savannah River Site December 19, 2014 - 3:30pm Addthis News Media Contact 202-586-4940 Energy Department Announces Achievement of Major Cleanup Milestone at Savannah River Site Department Issues Path Forward for Closing Additional Radioactive Waste Storage Tanks in H Tank Farm WASHINGTON - Today, the Department of

  9. Final Rocky Flats Cleanup Agreement, July 19, 1996 Summary

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Rocky Flats Cleanup Agreement State Colorado Agreement Type Federal Facility Agreement Legal Driver(s) CERCLA/RCRA Scope Summary Establish the regulatory framework for achieving the ultimate cleanup of the Rocky Flats Site. Parties DOE; US EPA; The State of Colorado Date 7/19/1996 SCOPE * Establish the regulatory framework for achieving the ultimate cleanup of the Rocky Flats Site. * Ensure that the environmental impacts associated with activities at the Site will continue to be investigated and

  10. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Idaho Cleanup Project- June

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2007 | Department of Energy Idaho Cleanup Project- June 2007 Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Idaho Cleanup Project- June 2007 June 2007 Evaluation to determine whether the Idaho Cleanup Project is continuing to perform at a level deserving DOE-VPP Star recognition. This report summarizes the results of the HSS DOE-VPP Team's evaluation of Facilities Engineering Services KCP, LLC during the period of June 4-15, 2007, and provides the Chief Health, Safety and Security Officer with

  11. EM's Richland Operations Office Completes Chromium Cleanup along Columbia

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    River | Department of Energy Richland Operations Office Completes Chromium Cleanup along Columbia River EM's Richland Operations Office Completes Chromium Cleanup along Columbia River September 24, 2015 - 12:25pm Addthis The inset photo shows Hanford's D and DR Reactor area during operations in the 1950s, and the larger photo shows how the site looked during final backfill activities earlier this year after a chromium contamination cleanup project. The inset photo shows Hanford's D and DR

  12. The Application of NEPA to CERCLA Cleanups | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    The Application of NEPA to CERCLA Cleanups The Application of NEPA to CERCLA Cleanups On March 31, 1994, officials from the Departrnent of Energy (DOE), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) met with then Acting Assistant Attorney General Lois Schiffer and other representatives of the Department of Justice (DOJ) to discuss the issue of the relationship of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) to the cleanup of federal facilities under

  13. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Cleanup | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory Cleanup Oak Ridge National Laboratory Cleanup This fact sheet provides an update on all of the current cleanup projects at the site, and it also lists the major projects that were completed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This document dicusses the following projects: Tank W-1A Removal Action Project Building 3026 Hot Cells Facility Non-Reactor Facilities Removal Action 2000 Complex D&D Project Bethel Valley Burial Grounds Project U-233 Material

  14. Washington Closure Hanford: Ten Years of River Corridor Cleanup |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Washington Closure Hanford: Ten Years of River Corridor Cleanup Washington Closure Hanford: Ten Years of River Corridor Cleanup December 17, 2015 - 12:30pm Addthis Contract-Timeline-E1511010_4-B_756px.jpg This timeline shows contractor Washington Closure Hanford's accomplishments over the past 10 years through its River Corridor Closure Contract. Addthis Related Articles EM Update Newsletter Spotlights River Corridor Cleanup at Hanford Site River Corridor Achievements

  15. Enterprise Assessments Review, Idaho Cleanup Project - September 2014 |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Idaho Cleanup Project - September 2014 Enterprise Assessments Review, Idaho Cleanup Project - September 2014 September 2014 Review of the Idaho Cleanup Project Integrated Waste Treatment Unit Federal Readiness Assessment at the Idaho Site The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) independent Office of Enterprise Assessments (EA) was established in May 2014 and assumed responsibility for managing the Department's Independent Oversight Program for the Department's former Office

  16. Manhattan Project Truck Unearthed in Recovery Act Cleanup | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Manhattan Project Truck Unearthed in Recovery Act Cleanup Manhattan Project Truck Unearthed in Recovery Act Cleanup A Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) excavation crew working on an American Recovery and Reinvestment Act cleanup project has uncovered the remnants of a 1940s military truck buried in a Manhattan Project landfill. The truck was unearthed inside a sealed building where digging is taking place at Material Disposal Area B (MDA-B), the Lab's first hazardous and

  17. Idaho Cleanup Project Clearance Limits for Personal Property | Department

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of Energy Idaho Cleanup Project Clearance Limits for Personal Property Idaho Cleanup Project Clearance Limits for Personal Property Kevin Konzen*, CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC ; Craig Nesshoefer, Idaho Cleanup Project Abstract: CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC (CWI) had sought alternative surface clearance limits for personal property from those referenced in DOE Order 458.1, which were approved September 2013 by the Department of Energy. Because much of the property would remain within DOE control, implementation

  18. Chromium Groundwater Cleanup in Mortandad Canyon | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Cleanup in Mortandad Canyon Chromium Groundwater Cleanup in Mortandad Canyon Topic: Cheryl Rodriguez DOE and Danny Katzman LANL, Provided Information on the Status of the Characterization of the Chromium Groundwater Plume in Mortandad Canyon. Possible Clean-up Strategies were also covered in the Information Provided. PDF icon Chromium Update - September 24, 2014 More Documents & Publications Chromium Interim Measures Project and Ongoing Plume Investigation Chromium Groundwater Remediation

  19. EM Leads Successful Workshop Supporting Fukushima Cleanup | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Leads Successful Workshop Supporting Fukushima Cleanup EM Leads Successful Workshop Supporting Fukushima Cleanup August 8, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis TOKYO - An EM-led U.S. delegation conducted its third workshop last month to provide expertise to Japanese officials leading the cleanup of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant site and surrounding area, this time addressing priorities identified by Japan's government agencies. At the request of the Japanese Ministry of Environment

  20. Cleanup Contractor at Paducah Site Receives Performance Excellence Award

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    PADUCAH, Ky. – The environmental cleanup contractor at EM’s Paducah site has been honored for demonstrating serious commitment to performance improvement principles.

  1. Probing Fukushima with cosmic rays should help speed cleanup...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Probing Fukushima with cosmic rays Probing Fukushima with cosmic rays should help speed cleanup of damaged plant The initiative could reduce the time required to clean up the ...

  2. Cleanup Contractor Achieves ‘Elite’ Nuclear Material Accountability Status

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    PADUCAH, Ky. – EM’s cleanup contractor at the Paducah site has received national acclaim for timeliness of reporting and promptness in reconciling nuclear material inventories.

  3. DOE Issues Draft RFP for Idaho Cleanup Project Core

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cincinnati – The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today issued a Draft Request for Proposal (DRFP) for the Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP) Core procurement.

  4. Draft Public Involvement Advice for Central Plateau Cleanup

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    V0, 12914 Draft Public Involvement Advice for Central Plateau Cleanup Principles Issue managers: Pollet, Mattson, Vanni, Plahuta, Catrell Background The Tri-Party Agencies are...

  5. Lab receives an additional $19 million for environmental cleanup

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2016 all issues All Issues submit Lab receives an additional 19 million for environmental cleanup Lab also selects local businesses for five-year contracts June 1, 2013...

  6. Recovery Act funds advance cleanup efforts at Cold War site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    historic Technical Area 21. "These buildings served their purpose during a difficult time in American history," said LANL Recovery Act cleanup director Bruce Schappell. "It's...

  7. Abandoned Uranium Mine Technical Services and Cleanup Industry...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Abandoned Uranium Mine Technical Services and Cleanup Industry Day In January 2015, the United States (U.S.) and the Anadarko Litigation Trust ("Litigation Trust") entered into a...

  8. Energy Secretary Moniz to Speak at DOE National Cleanup Workshop |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Moniz to Speak at DOE National Cleanup Workshop Energy Secretary Moniz to Speak at DOE National Cleanup Workshop September 2, 2015 - 10:30am Addthis Energy Secretary Moniz to Speak at DOE National Cleanup Workshop U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz Energy Secretary Moniz to Speak at DOE National Cleanup Workshop U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz WASHINGTON, D.C. - U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz is set to provide opening remarks at

  9. DNFSB Chairman Connery to Speak at DOE National Cleanup Workshop |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy DNFSB Chairman Connery to Speak at DOE National Cleanup Workshop DNFSB Chairman Connery to Speak at DOE National Cleanup Workshop September 15, 2015 - 12:00pm Addthis DNFSB Chairman Connery to Speak at DOE National Cleanup Workshop WASHINGTON, D.C. - Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Chairman Joyce Connery is set to speak at the first DOE National Cleanup Workshop, scheduled to be held Sept. 29-30 in the Washington, D.C. area. Connery joins a list of

  10. FY14 Guidelines for Brownfields Cleanup Grants | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: FY14 Guidelines for Brownfields Cleanup GrantsPermittingRegulatory...

  11. DOE Announces Start of Recovery Act Funded Cleanup Projects at...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office announced that cleanup of the Old Salvage Yard at the Y-12 National Security Complex, has started with funding received from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act...

  12. IMPORTANT CLEANUP PROJECT TO RESUME AT IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Department of Energy for other cleanup work at the INL, including decontaminating and decommissioning three nuclear reactors - started in 2005 and completed last year. That...

  13. Catalysis for Mixed Alcohol Synthesis from Biomass Derived Syngas: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-292

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hensley, J.

    2013-04-01

    The Dow Chemical Company (Dow) developed and tested catalysts for production of mixed alcohols from synthesis gas (syngas), under research and development (R&D) projects that were discontinued a number of years ago. Dow possesses detailed laboratory notebooks, catalyst samples, and technical expertise related to this past work. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is conducting R&D in support of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) to develop methods for economically producing ethanol from gasified biomass. NREL is currently conducting biomass gasification research at an existing 1/2 ton/day thermochemical test platform. Both Dow and NREL believe that the ability to economically produce ethanol from biomass-derived syngas can be enhanced through collaborative testing, refinement, and development of Dow's mixed-alcohol catalysts at NREL's and/or Dow's bench- and pilot-scale facilities. Dow and NREL further agree that collaboration on improvements in catalysts as well as gasifier operating conditions (e.g., time, temperature, upstream gas treatment) will be necessary to achieve technical and economic goals for production of ethanol and other alcohols.

  14. Production of High-Quality Syngas via Biomass Gasification for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Work -Research activities (b) Process experimentation: To investigate the effect of temperature and pressure on the bed hydrodynamics using a laboratory scaled fluid-bed column. ...

  15. Syngas Conversion to Gasoline-Range Hydrocarbons over Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 and ZSM-5 Composite Catalyst System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dagle, Robert A.; Lizarazo Adarme, Jair A.; Lebarbier, Vanessa MC; Gray, Michel J.; White, James F.; King, David L.; Palo, Daniel R.

    2014-07-01

    A composite Pd/ZnO/Al2O3-HZSM-5 (Si/Al=40) catalytic system was evaluated for the synthesis of gasoline-range hydrocarbons directly from synthesis gas. Bifunctional catalyst comprising PdZn metal and acid sites present the required catalytically active sites necessary for the methanol synthesis, methanol dehydration, and methanol-to-gasoline reactions. This system provides a unique catalytic pathway for the production of liquid hydrocarbons directly from syngas. However, selectivity control is difficult and poses many challenges. The composite catalytic system was evaluated under various process conditions. Investigated were the effects of temperature (310-375oC), pressure (300-1000 psig), time-on-stream (50 hrs), and gas-hour space velocity (740-2970 hr-1), using a H2/CO molar syngas ratio of 2.0. By operating at the lower end of the temperature range investigated, liquid hydrocarbon formation was favored, as was decreased amounts of undesirable light hydrocarbons. However, lower operating temperatures also facilitated undesirable CO2 formation via the water-gas shift reaction. Higher operating pressures slightly favored liquid synthesis. Operating at relatively low pressures (e.g. 300 psig) was made possible, whereas for methanol synthesis alone higher pressure are usually required to achieve similar conversion levels (e.g. 1000 psig). Thermodynamic constraints on methanol synthesis are eased by pushing the equilibrium through hydrocarbon formation. Catalytic performance was also evaluated by altering Pd and Zn composition of the Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst. Of the catalysts and conditions tested, selectivity toward liquid hydrocarbon was highest when using a 5% Pd metal loading and Pd/Zn molar ratio of 0.25 and mixed with HZMS-5, operating at 310oC and 300 psig, CO conversion was 43 % and selectivity (carbon weight basis) to hydrocarbons was 49 wt. %. Of the hydrocarbon fraction, 44wt. % was in the C5-C12 liquid product range and consisted primarily of aromatic polymethylbenzenes. However, as syngas conversion increases with increasing temperature, selectivity to liquid product diminished. This is attributed, in large part, to increased saturation of the olefinic intermediates over PdZn metal sites. Under all the conditions and catalysts evaluated in this study, generating liquid product in high yield was challenging (<10 wt. % C5+ yield).

  16. Los Alamos Field Office Legacy Cleanup Summary November 2015 | Department

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of Energy Topics: Safety Contracts Acquisition Transition Key Events PDF icon EM-LA Cleanup Summary - November 2015 More Documents & Publications Department of Energy Accomplishments NNMCAB Board Minutes: September 30, 2015 Legacy Clean-up Completion Project Overview

  17. IDAHO OPERATIONS OFFICE NAMES NEW IDAHO CLEANUP PROJECT MANAGER

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Idaho Falls, ID The Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office today announced that James Cooper has been named deputy manager of its highly-successful Idaho Cleanup Project, which oversees the environmental cleanup and waste management mission at DOEs Idaho site.

  18. Advanced Acid Gas Separation Technology for Clean Power and Syngas Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amy, Fabrice; Hufton, Jeffrey; Bhadra, Shubhra; Weist, Edward; Lau, Garret; Jonas, Gordon

    2015-06-30

    Air Products has developed an acid gas removal technology based on adsorption (Sour PSA) that favorably compares with incumbent AGR technologies. During this DOE-sponsored study, Air Products has been able to increase the Sour PSA technology readiness level by successfully operating a two-bed test system on coal-derived sour syngas at the NCCC, validating the lifetime and performance of the adsorbent material. Both proprietary simulation and data obtained during the testing at NCCC were used to further refine the estimate of the performance of the Sour PSA technology when expanded to a commercial scale. In-house experiments on sweet syngas combined with simulation work allowed Air Products to develop new PSA cycles that allowed for further reduction in capital expenditure. Finally our techno economic analysis of the use the Sour PSA technology for both IGCC and coal-to-methanol applications suggests significant improvement of the unit cost of electricity and methanol compared to incumbent AGR technologies.

  19. A message of appreciation from ORP to its cleanup partners | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy A message of appreciation from ORP to its cleanup partners A message of appreciation from ORP to its cleanup partners Addthis Description A message of appreciation from ORP to its cleanup partners

  20. Colorado and the Accelerated Cleanup at Rocky Flats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spreng, C.

    2007-07-01

    When the Rocky Flats closure project was declared complete in October 2005, it was the largest environmental cleanup to date. Even more impressive, it was ahead of schedule and well under budget. Several factors combined to produce this success including a performance-based contract with financial incentives, development and application of innovative technologies, and a regulator-backed accelerated approach to the cleanup process. The factor in this success in which the State of Colorado had the largest role was in developing and enforcing the Rocky Flats Cleanup Agreement. In compliance with this agreement, cleanup was accomplished by means of multiple interim actions that led to a comprehensive final decision at the end. A key element that allowed the accelerated cleanup was constant consultation among DOE, its contractor, and the regulators plus collaboration with stakeholders. (authors)

  1. Rapid Solar-Thermal Conversion of Biomass to Syngas - Energy Innovation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Portal Biomass and Biofuels Biomass and Biofuels Find More Like This Return to Search Rapid Solar-Thermal Conversion of Biomass to Syngas Production of synthesis gas or hydrogen by gasification or pyrolysis of biological feedstocks using solar-thermal energy. University of Colorado Contact CU About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary The invention provides processes that perform biomass gasification or pyrolysis for production of hydrogen, synthesis gas, liquid fuels, or other

  2. Liquid Fuels via Upgrading of Syngas Intermediates Presentation for BETO 2015 Project Peer Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    11.2.13 Liquid Fuels via Upgrading of Syngas Intermediates March 26 th , 2015 Indirect Liquefaction Technology Area Review Robert A. Dagle, Karthi Ramasamy, Michel J. Gray Pacific Northwest National Laboratory This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information Goal Statement  Problem: Conventional synthetic fuel synthesis processes (e.g., FT, MTG, MTOGD) have drawbacks, specifically for the scale of biomass.  FT provides diesel blend but

  3. Public Understanding of Cleanup Levels Discussion Public Involvement Committee Meeting - Hanford Advisory Board

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Discussion Public Involvement Committee Meeting - Hanford Advisory Board Wednesday, October 31, 2012 - Red Lion Hanford House, Richland Page 1 of 4 Cleanup Levels One of the reasons we want public involvement on cleanup decisions is to gather input about what kind of cleanup end-state the public wants, how clean is clean, or put another way, how dirty is acceptable. Cleanup decisions are complicated. Cleanup levels necessary to be protective dictate which cleanup actions are viable to consider.

  4. Soil and Groundwater Cleanup - In-Situ Grouting, Lessons Learned (Post

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CD-4), Environmental Management Cleanup, May 2011 | Department of Energy Soil and Groundwater Cleanup - In-Situ Grouting, Lessons Learned (Post CD-4), Environmental Management Cleanup, May 2011 Soil and Groundwater Cleanup - In-Situ Grouting, Lessons Learned (Post CD-4), Environmental Management Cleanup, May 2011 PDF icon 000646_EM-C_Soil_and_Groundwater_Cleanup_-_In-Situ_Grouting_Lessons_Learned_Post_CD-4_15_Jun_11.pdf More Documents & Publications Type B Accident Investigation Board

  5. DOE Completes Cleanup at New York, California Sites - Recovery Act funds

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    accelerate cleanup; support job creation and footprint reduction | Department of Energy Cleanup at New York, California Sites - Recovery Act funds accelerate cleanup; support job creation and footprint reduction DOE Completes Cleanup at New York, California Sites - Recovery Act funds accelerate cleanup; support job creation and footprint reduction July 1, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact 202-586-4940 WASHINGTON, D.C. - Last month, the U.S. Department of Energy completed the cleanup of

  6. Improving oiled shoreline cleanup with COREXIT 9580

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiocco, R.J.; Lessard, R.R.; Canevari, G.P.

    1996-08-01

    The cleanup of oiled shorelines has generally been by mechanical, labor-intensive means. The use of a chemical shoreline cleaner to assist in water-flushing oil from the surfaces can result in more complete and more rapid cleaning. Not only is the cleaning process more efficient, but it can also be less environmentally damaging since there is potentially much less human intrusion and stress on the biological community. This paper describes research and applications of COREXIT 9580 shoreline cleaner for treatment of oiled shorelines, including four recent applications in Puerto Rico, Bermuda, Texas and Nova Scotia. Research work on shoreline vegetation, such as mangroves, has also demonstrated the potential use of this product to save and restore oiled vegetation.

  7. Preliminary screening: Technical and economic assessment of synthesis gas to fuels and chemicals with emphasis on the potential for biomass-derived syngas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spath, P. L.; Dayton, D. C.

    2003-12-01

    This report reviews the many syngas to products processes and summarizes the technology status and description, chemistry, catalysts, reactors, gas cleanliness requirements, process and environmental performances, and economics.

  8. Tritium research laboratory cleanup and transition project final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, A.J.

    1997-02-01

    This Tritium Research Laboratory Cleanup and Transition Project Final Report provides a high-level summary of this project`s multidimensional accomplishments. Throughout this report references are provided for in-depth information concerning the various topical areas. Project related records also offer solutions to many of the technical and or administrative challenges that such a cleanup effort requires. These documents and the experience obtained during this effort are valuable resources to the DOE, which has more than 1200 other process contaminated facilities awaiting cleanup and reapplication or demolition.

  9. DOE Issues Final RFP for Idaho Cleanup Project Core

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environmental Management Consolidated Business Center 250 E. 5th Street, Suite 500, Cincinnati, Ohio 45202 Lynette Chafin, 513-246-0461 Lynette.Chafin@emcbc.doe.gov Danielle Miller, 208-526-5709 millerdc@id.doe.gov March 16, 2015 DOE Issues Final RFP for Idaho Cleanup Project Core Cincinnati - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today issued the final Request for Proposal (RFP) for the Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP) Core procurement. At the end of this contract the majority of cleanup will be

  10. Idaho Site Completes Cleanup Milestone Ahead of Schedule

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News Media Contact: Erik Simpson (208) 360-0426 For Immediate Release Date: June 23, 2010 Idaho Site Completes Cleanup Milestone Ahead of Schedule Idaho Falls, ID � The Department of Energy�s Idaho Operations Office, through the efforts of its cleanup contractor, CH2M-WG Idaho (CWI), recently reached a key cleanup milestone three weeks ahead of schedule by completing the transfer of nearly 6.6 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel from wet to dry storage. �The transfer of spent nuclear fuel

  11. Recovery Act Investment Accelerates Cleanup Work at DOE's Paducah Site |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Investment Accelerates Cleanup Work at DOE's Paducah Site Recovery Act Investment Accelerates Cleanup Work at DOE's Paducah Site July 15, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis UF6 piping deactivation The black inlet hose is attached to a negative air machine that allows Feed Plant cleanup workers to safely deactivate uranium hexafluoride (UF6) piping, seen at right of the lift supporting the crew. UF6 piping deactivation The black inlet hose is attached to a negative air machine that

  12. DOE Awards Legacy Cleanup Contract | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Legacy Cleanup Contract DOE Awards Legacy Cleanup Contract September 23, 2015 - 6:00pm Addthis Media Contact Lynette Chafin, 513-246-0461, Lynette.Chafin@emcbc.doe.gov Cincinnati - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced the award of a Cost-Plus-Award Fee contract to Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS) of Los Alamos, NM. This bridge contract is for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) funded legacy cleanup activities at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). LANS is

  13. DOE Completes TRU Waste Cleanup at Bettis | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    TRU Waste Cleanup at Bettis DOE Completes TRU Waste Cleanup at Bettis September 23, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Deb Gill www.wipp.energy.gov 575-234-7270 CARLSBAD, N.M. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has successfully completed cleanup of all Cold War legacy transuranic (TRU) waste at the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory (BAPL) near Pittsburgh, Pa., permanently disposing of it at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). BAPL is the 20th site to be completely cleaned of legacy TRU

  14. DOE Extends Idaho Cleanup Project Contract | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Idaho Cleanup Project Contract DOE Extends Idaho Cleanup Project Contract September 29, 2015 - 6:00pm Addthis Media Contact Danielle Miller, 208-526-5709 Idaho Falls, ID - The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management (EM) today announced it is extending its contract for the Idaho Cleanup Project at the Idaho Site for a period of 6 months. The contract period for the current contractor, CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC, had been scheduled to expire on September 30, 2015. Today's contract

  15. 2012 Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus Briefings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus Briefings 2012 Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus Briefings The Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus serves as a way to brief members of Congress and their staff on EM headquarters and site activities, including budget, safety and project progress. PDF icon 02/16/2012 - FY 2013 Budget Overview PDF icon 03/07/2012 - Richland Operations Office, WA PDF icon 03/21/2012 - Oak Ridge, TN PDF icon 03/22/2012 - Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office, OH-KY PDF icon

  16. RECOVERY ACT LEADS TO CLEANUP OF TRANSURANIC WASTE SITES

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Carlsbad, NM - The recent completion of transuranic (TRU) waste cleanup at Vallecitos Nuclear Center (VNC) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Site 300 in California brings the total number of sites cleared of TRU waste to 17.

  17. DOE Selects Contractor for California Energy Technology Engineering Center Cleanup

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cincinnati - The Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded a competitive $25.7 million task order for cleanup activities at the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC) to North Wind of Idaho Falls, Idaho.

  18. EM SSAB Contributes Community Views to Clean-up Decisions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    EM has made public participation a fundamental component of its cleanup mission and has found that the EM SSAB, which draws upon diverse community viewpoints to provide advice and recommendations,...

  19. Department of Energy Idaho - Idaho Cleanup Project Contract

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Solicitations > ICP Contract Idaho Cleanup Project Contract Basic Contract Contract Modifications Documents Related to the ICP Contract Last Updated: 11/04/2015 Privacy Statement and Disclaimer Contact Aaron S Nebeker

  20. EM, UCOR Quickly Reconcile Oak Ridge Cleanup Contract

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    OAK RIDGE, Tenn. – At a ceremony today, Oak Ridge’s Environmental Management (EM) program and its prime contractor, URS | CH2M Oak Ridge, LLC (UCOR) celebrated the completion of the site’s reconciled cleanup contract.

  1. Passive Groundwater Cleanup Measures Save Savannah River Site...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    In recent years, increased use of simple, multi-phased passive cleanup measures - a move away from the highly mechanized pump-and-treat facilities - has reduced the migration of ...

  2. NNSA Product Aids in Anthrax Clean-up

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Product Aids in Anthrax Clean-up WASHINGTON, D.C. - A decontamination formulation developed at a U.S. Department of EnergyNational Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) ...

  3. Oak Ridge Reflects on 30 Years of Cleanup

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    OAK RIDGE, Tenn. – Oak Ridge’s EM program hosted an event this month that documented the site’s environmental cleanup efforts since 1983, six years before the official founding of the Department’s EM.

  4. Idaho Site Advances Recovery Act Cleanup after Inventing Effective Treatment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For the first time in history, workers at the Idaho site achieved success in the initial cleanup of potentially dangerous sodium in a decommissioned nuclear reactor using an innovative treatment...

  5. Agreement on New Commitments for Hanford Tank Waste Cleanup Sent...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... And when we needed them to help clean up the contamination left behind, they stepped up again. So we not only have a legal obligation to meet cleanup milestones, we have a moral ...

  6. Legacy Clean-up Completion Project Overview | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Bob Pfaff provided the members with information regarding the status of the Fiscal Year 2016 Budget request. Information included in the presentation also covered strategic planning and the remaining workscope in the Los Alamos National Laboratory Legacy Clean-up Project. PDF icon FY'16 Overview - July 29, 2015 More Documents & Publications Executing Legacy Clean-up at LANL NNMCAB Board Minutes: July 29, 2015 Taos Department of Energy Accomplishments

  7. EM Update Newsletter Spotlights River Corridor Cleanup at Hanford Site |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy RICHLAND, Wash. - In this issue of the EM Update newsletter, EM marks the many accomplishments the Richland Operations Office and its contractors have achieved in cleanup along the Columbia River corridor at the Hanford Site. This year marked the 10th anniversary of the River Corridor Closure Contract, the nation's largest environmental cleanup closure project, managed by Washington Closure Hanford. The work has involved projects to clean up existing contamination and

  8. Probing Fukushima with cosmic rays should speed cleanup

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Probing Fukushima with cosmic rays should speed cleanup Alumni Link: Opportunities, News and Resources for Former Employees Latest Issue:September 2015 all issues All Issues » submit Probing Fukushima with cosmic rays should speed cleanup The initiative could reduce the time required to clean up the disabled complex by at least a decade and greatly reduce radiation exposure to personnel working at the plant September 2, 2014 New insights to changing the atomic structure of metals Los Alamos

  9. Warehouse Cleanup Project Completed at DOE's Paducah Site | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Warehouse Cleanup Project Completed at DOE's Paducah Site Warehouse Cleanup Project Completed at DOE's Paducah Site January 27, 2015 - 3:06pm Addthis Herb Tyler, David Cassibry, and Roger Nelson review items for characterization. (Photo by Dylan Nichols, LATA Kentucky) Herb Tyler, David Cassibry, and Roger Nelson review items for characterization. (Photo by Dylan Nichols, LATA Kentucky) A crane loads a high‐side railcar for transport to a commercial waste disposal facility after

  10. Recovery Act Creates Jobs, Accelerates Cleanup at DOE's Paducah Site |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Recovery Act Creates Jobs, Accelerates Cleanup at DOE's Paducah Site Recovery Act Creates Jobs, Accelerates Cleanup at DOE's Paducah Site October 26, 2011 - 8:14am Addthis Brandon Henderson checks a pump in the water treatment facility at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The former Recovery Act engineer now works for the U.S. Enrichment Corp. Brandon Henderson checks a pump in the water treatment facility at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The former Recovery

  11. Paducah Site Undergoing Steady Groundwater Cleanup with Variety of Methods

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Undergoing Steady Groundwater Cleanup with Variety of Methods Paducah Site Undergoing Steady Groundwater Cleanup with Variety of Methods June 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis The yellow outline depicts an area southeast of the C-400 Cleaning Building, background, where electrical resistance heating will be used to remove trichloroethene (TCE) down to 60 feet below ground. Electrodes will heat the chemical into a vapor that can be pumped to the surface and treated in the white

  12. DOE Announces Strategic Engineering and Technology Roadmap for Cleanup of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Cold War Era Nuclear Waste | Department of Energy Strategic Engineering and Technology Roadmap for Cleanup of Cold War Era Nuclear Waste DOE Announces Strategic Engineering and Technology Roadmap for Cleanup of Cold War Era Nuclear Waste March 18, 2008 - 10:52am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today released an Engineering and Technology Roadmap (Roadmap), which details initiatives aimed at reducing the technical risks and uncertainties associated with cleaning

  13. Sue Cange Provides Insight on Oak Ridge's Cleanup Progress, Partnerships

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Sue Cange Provides Insight on Oak Ridge's Cleanup Progress, Partnerships Sue Cange Provides Insight on Oak Ridge's Cleanup Progress, Partnerships August 31, 2015 - 12:45pm Addthis Sue Cange, manager for the Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management Sue Cange, manager for the Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management OAK RIDGE, Tenn. - Sue Cange, manager for the Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management, is responsible for safely executing the environmental

  14. Probing Fukushima with cosmic rays should speed cleanup

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Probing Fukushima with cosmic rays should speed cleanup Probing Fukushima with cosmic rays should speed cleanup The initiative could reduce the time required to clean up the disabled complex by at least a decade and greatly reduce radiation exposure to personnel working at the plant. June 18, 2014 Los Alamos National Laboratory postdoctoral researcher Elena Guardincerri, right, and undergraduate research assistant Shelby Fellows prepare a lead hemisphere inside a muon tomography machine, which

  15. DOE Idaho site reaches 20-year cleanup milestone

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IDAHO FALLS, IDAHO, 83403 Media Contact: Brad Bugger (208) 526-0833 For Immediate Release: January 19, 2012 DOE Idaho site reaches 20-year cleanup milestone IDAHO FALLS, ID- In two decades of Superfund cleanup work, the U.S. Department of Energy's Idaho site has removed hundreds of thousands of cubic yards of radioactive and hazardously contaminated soils, excavated radioactive waste buried since the 1950s, removed three nuclear reactors and hundreds of buildings, completely closed three major

  16. Cleanup Chief Visits Portsmouth, Paducah Sites | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cleanup Chief Visits Portsmouth, Paducah Sites Cleanup Chief Visits Portsmouth, Paducah Sites February 11, 2016 - 12:45pm Addthis EM Assistant Secretary Dr. Monica Regalbuto sits in on a procedure review with facility operator Jim Burnett (left) of Fluor Paducah Deactivation Project at C-337, where a former uranium enrichment process building will be the first facility to undergo deposit removal by in-situ chemical treatment. EM Assistant Secretary Dr. Monica Regalbuto sits in on a procedure

  17. Example Cleanup: Removal of Polychlorinated Biphenyls from Hillside 140

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Example Cleanup Removal of Polychlorinated Biphenyls from Hillside 140 Removing the source is one of three defenses in depth, as illustrated at the PCB removal from Hillside 140. August 1, 2013 Men vacuuming PCB contamination from Hillside 140 using large pipes and pullies Vacuuming PCB contamination from Hillside 140 Water and sediment is sampled periodically for contaminants. If PCB waste is present, it is shipped to licensed disposal facilities. Two cleanups of radioactive materials were

  18. Draft Public Involvement Advice for Central Plateau Cleanup

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    V0, 12/9/14 Draft Public Involvement Advice for Central Plateau Cleanup Principles Issue managers: Pollet, Mattson, Vanni, Plahuta, Catrell Background The Tri-Party Agencies are developing principles that will guide the cleanup of Hanford's Central Plateau. The Hanford Advisory Board (HAB) believes that the broader public should be involved in the development of these principles. Hanford's Central Plateau is planned to be the final footprint of the Hanford Site. The Central Plateau contains

  19. Groundwater Cleanup Operational Changes Are Being Implemented at Fernald

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Preserve | Department of Energy Groundwater Cleanup Operational Changes Are Being Implemented at Fernald Preserve Groundwater Cleanup Operational Changes Are Being Implemented at Fernald Preserve October 13, 2014 - 6:38pm Addthis What does this project do? Goal 1. Protect human health and the environment. Uranium contamination in the Great Miami Aquifer-at the Fernald Preserve, Ohio, Site-is being removed from the groundwater through a pump-and-treatment operation, which until this year,

  20. EM Delegation Tours UK Cleanup Program's Sellafield Site | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Delegation Tours UK Cleanup Program's Sellafield Site EM Delegation Tours UK Cleanup Program's Sellafield Site May 13, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Front row, left to right, NuVision Engineering Vice President Laurie Judd, EM Lead International Affairs Specialist Ana Han, EM Associate Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary Alice Williams and United Kingdom Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) Head of International Relations John Mathieson; back row, left to right, NDA Sellafield Site

  1. Biogas Impurities and Cleanup for Fuel Cells | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Impurities and Cleanup for Fuel Cells Biogas Impurities and Cleanup for Fuel Cells Presentation about biogas technologies and integration with fuel cells. Presented by Shabbir Ahmed, Argonne National Laboratory, at the NREL/DOE Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop held June 11-13, 2012, in Golden, Colorado. PDF icon june2012_biogas_workshop_ahmed.pdf More Documents & Publications Fuel Quality Issues in Stationary Fuel Cell Systems Expanding the Use of Biogas with Fuel Cell Technologies CHP and

  2. Secretary's Honor Awards Recognize EM's Tank Cleanup, Closure |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Secretary's Honor Awards Recognize EM's Tank Cleanup, Closure Secretary's Honor Awards Recognize EM's Tank Cleanup, Closure April 8, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz, fourth from left, and Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman, third from right, present the Secretary's Achievement Award to members of the Savannah River Site F-Tank Farm Closure Team. Team members pictured, left to right, are James Rush, William Levitan, Kathleen Martin, Linda Suttora, James

  3. Los Alamos Demolition Work Progresses Toward Goal of Completing Cleanup |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Demolition Work Progresses Toward Goal of Completing Cleanup Los Alamos Demolition Work Progresses Toward Goal of Completing Cleanup January 14, 2016 - 12:20pm Addthis The sewage treatment facility before demolition. The sewage treatment facility before demolition. Debris from the sewage treatment facility. Debris from the sewage treatment facility. Site of the demolished sewage treatment facility. Site of the demolished sewage treatment facility. The sewage treatment

  4. Glass Science Could Boost Hanford Cleanup | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Glass Science Could Boost Hanford Cleanup Glass Science Could Boost Hanford Cleanup October 29, 2015 - 12:30pm Addthis A canister filled with nonradioactive glass sits on display. A canister filled with nonradioactive glass sits on display. A sample of vitrified glass at EM's Office of River Protection. A sample of vitrified glass at EM's Office of River Protection. A glass scientist works with molten glass. A glass scientist works with molten glass. A canister filled with nonradioactive glass

  5. Grand Challenge Winning Entry Proposes Efficiencies to Tank Waste Cleanup |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Grand Challenge Winning Entry Proposes Efficiencies to Tank Waste Cleanup Grand Challenge Winning Entry Proposes Efficiencies to Tank Waste Cleanup December 29, 2015 - 12:55pm Addthis From left, Elaine Diaz, Office of River Protection (ORP) acting chief engineer; John Vienna, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientist; Albert Kruger, ORP glass scientist; and Kevin Smith, ORP manager. From left, Elaine Diaz, Office of River Protection (ORP) acting chief engineer;

  6. Passive Groundwater Cleanup Measures Save Savannah River Site Millions of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Dollars | Department of Energy Passive Groundwater Cleanup Measures Save Savannah River Site Millions of Dollars Passive Groundwater Cleanup Measures Save Savannah River Site Millions of Dollars November 25, 2015 - 12:20pm Addthis SRNS operators Stanley Creech (left) and Paul Dobson monitor the injection of silver chloride into an aquifer at SRS. SRNS operators Stanley Creech (left) and Paul Dobson monitor the injection of silver chloride into an aquifer at SRS. AIKEN, S.C. - The EM program

  7. Latest 200 Area Demolition Offers Snapshot of Hanford Cleanup Progress:

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Recovery Act Funding Allows Demolition of Power Houses Ahead of Schedule | Department of Energy Latest 200 Area Demolition Offers Snapshot of Hanford Cleanup Progress: Recovery Act Funding Allows Demolition of Power Houses Ahead of Schedule Latest 200 Area Demolition Offers Snapshot of Hanford Cleanup Progress: Recovery Act Funding Allows Demolition of Power Houses Ahead of Schedule March 4, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Hardy, DOE (509) 376-5365 Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov

  8. Hanford Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds Cleanup Goals

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    | Department of Energy Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds Cleanup Goals Hanford Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds Cleanup Goals June 26, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The 200 West Pump and Treat System is Hanford’s largest facility for treating contaminated groundwater. The 200 West Pump and Treat System is Hanford's largest facility for treating contaminated groundwater. A graphic showing the 200 West Pump and Treat plumes and well network. A graphic

  9. Independent Oversight Review, Idaho Cleanup Project - August 2014 |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Cleanup Project - August 2014 Independent Oversight Review, Idaho Cleanup Project - August 2014 August 2014 The U.S. Department of Energy?s (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety and Health Assessments, within the DOE Office of Independent Enterprise Assessments (IEA) (formerly the Office of Health, Safety and Security), conducted an independent oversight review of the Integrated Waste Treatment facility contractor readiness assessment (C-RA) at the Idaho Site from January

  10. Wendy Cain named portfolio federal project director for ETTP cleanup |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management (OREM) has named Wendy Cain as its new portfolio federal project director for cleanup of the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP). As the portfolio federal project director, Ms. Cain oversees all of the cleanup, demolition, waste disposal, and land transfers at the site. At the forefront, Cain is directing the removal of the K-31 and K-27 buildings, which are the final uranium enrichment facilities at ETTP. In this position,

  11. DOE Surpasses Cleanup Target Ahead of Schedule: Recovery Act Investment

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Saves Money, Trains Workers, Creates Jobs | Department of Energy Surpasses Cleanup Target Ahead of Schedule: Recovery Act Investment Saves Money, Trains Workers, Creates Jobs DOE Surpasses Cleanup Target Ahead of Schedule: Recovery Act Investment Saves Money, Trains Workers, Creates Jobs May 12, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy announced today it has surpassed one of the Obama Administration's High Priority Performance Goals

  12. EM Launches First-Ever Interactive Timeline on Cleanup's History |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Launches First-Ever Interactive Timeline on Cleanup's History EM Launches First-Ever Interactive Timeline on Cleanup's History March 5, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis Visitors to EM's booth at the annual Waste Management Symposia international conference participate in demonstrations of the new timeline. Visitors to EM's booth at the annual Waste Management Symposia international conference participate in demonstrations of the new timeline. The timeline details EM’s key

  13. Gasification of high ash, high ash fusion temperature bituminous coals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Guohai; Vimalchand, Pannalal; Peng, WanWang

    2015-11-13

    This invention relates to gasification of high ash bituminous coals that have high ash fusion temperatures. The ash content can be in 15 to 45 weight percent range and ash fusion temperatures can be in 1150.degree. C. to 1500.degree. C. range as well as in excess of 1500.degree. C. In a preferred embodiment, such coals are dealt with a two stage gasification process--a relatively low temperature primary gasification step in a circulating fluidized bed transport gasifier followed by a high temperature partial oxidation step of residual char carbon and small quantities of tar. The system to process such coals further includes an internally circulating fluidized bed to effectively cool the high temperature syngas with the aid of an inert media and without the syngas contacting the heat transfer surfaces. A cyclone downstream of the syngas cooler, operating at relatively low temperatures, effectively reduces loading to a dust filtration unit. Nearly dust- and tar-free syngas for chemicals production or power generation and with over 90%, and preferably over about 98%, overall carbon conversion can be achieved with the preferred process, apparatus and methods outlined in this invention.

  14. Liquid Fuels via Uprading of Syngas Intermediates Presentation for BETO 2015 Project Peer Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2015 Project Peer Review March 26, 2015 Liquid Fuels via Upgrading of Syngas Intermediates 2.3.1.305/2.3.1.306 Jesse Hensley - NREL Ted Krause - ANL This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information 2 | Bioenergy Technologies Office 2.3.1.305/2.3.1.306 Goal Statement Project Goal - To develop and demonstrate catalyst technologies that convert biomass-derived synthesis gas to drop-in hydrocarbon fuels and to reduce total cost from the FY14 SOT

  15. High-Pressure Turbulent Flame Speeds and Chemical Kinetics of Syngas Blends with and without Impurities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Eric; Mathieu, Olivier; Morones, Anibal; Ravi, Sankar; Keesee, Charles; Hargis, Joshua; Vivanco, Jose

    2014-12-01

    This Topical Report documents the first year of the project, from October 1, 2013 through September 30, 2014. Efforts for this project included experiments to characterize the atmospheric-pressure turbulent flame speed vessel over a range of operating conditions (fan speeds and turbulent length scales). To this end, a new LDV system was acquired and set up for the detailed characterization of the turbulence field. Much progress was made in the area of impurity kinetics, which included a numerical study of the effect of impurities such as NO2, NO, H2S, and NH3 on ignition delay times and laminar flame speeds of syngas blends at engine conditions. Experiments included a series of laminar flame speed measurements for syngas (CO/H2) blends with various levels of CH4 and C2H6 addition, and the results were compared to the chemical kinetics model of NUI Galway. Also, a final NOx kinetics mechanism including ammonia was assembled, and a journal paper was written and is now in press. Overall, three journal papers and six conference papers related to this project were published this year. Finally, much progress was made on the design of the new high-pressure turbulent flame speed facility. An overall design that includes a venting system was decided upon, and the detailed design is in progress.

  16. Slurry phase synthesis of dimethyl ether from syngas -- A reactor model simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mizuguchi, Masatsugu; Ogawa, Takashi; Ono, Masami,; Tomura, Keiji; Shikada, Tsutomu; Ohno, Yotaro; Fujimoto, Kaoru

    1998-12-31

    Dimethyl ether (DME) would be an attractive alternative fuel for diesel, domestic use, and power generation, if it is economically synthesized directly from syngas (derived from coal gasification or natural gas reforming). DME, which is a colorless gas with a boiling point of {minus}25 C, is chemically stable and easily liquefied under pressure. Since the properties of DME are similar to LPG, it can be handled and stored with the same manner as LPG. The authors have performed the slurry phase DME synthesis by using the 50 kg/day bench-scale unit. DME was synthesized at high yield from syngas (H{sub 2}+CO) with the newly developed catalyst system. To establish the scale-up methodology, the reactor simulation technique is essential. The authors developed a mathematical model of the slurry phase bubble column reactor for DME synthesis, which is based on their experimental results. The performance of a commercial-scale DME reactor was simulated by this model, and the results were discussed.

  17. Method for sustaining microorganism culture in syngas fermentation process in decreased concentration or absence of various substrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adams, Stephen S.; Scott, Syrona; Ko, Ching-Whan

    2015-05-19

    The present invention relates to methods for sustaining microorganism culture in a syngas fermentation reactor in decreased concentration or absence of various substrates comprising: adding carbon dioxide and optionally alcohol; maintaining free acetic acid concentrations; and performing the above mentioned steps within specified time.

  18. Deriving cleanup guidelines for radionuclides at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meinhold, A.F.; Morris, S.C.; Dionne, B.; Moskowitz, P.D.

    1997-01-01

    Past activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) resulted in soil and groundwater contamination. As a result, BNL was designated a Superfund site under the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). BNL`s Office of Environmental Restoration (OER) is overseeing environmental restoration activities at the Laboratory. With the exception of radium, there are no regulations or guidelines to establish cleanup guidelines for radionuclides in soils at BNL. BNL must derive radionuclide soil cleanup guidelines for a number of Operable Units (OUs) and Areas of Concern (AOCs). These guidelines are required by DOE under a proposed regulation for radiation protection of public health and the environment as well as to satisfy the requirements of CERCLA. The objective of this report is to propose a standard approach to deriving risk-based cleanup guidelines for radionuclides in soil at BNL. Implementation of the approach is briefly discussed.

  19. Needs for Risk Informing Environmental Cleanup Decision Making - 13613

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Ming; Moorer, Richard

    2013-07-01

    This paper discusses the needs for risk informing decision making by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM). The mission of the DOE EM is to complete the safe cleanup of the environmental legacy brought about from the nation's five decades of nuclear weapons development and production and nuclear energy research. This work represents some of the most technically challenging and complex cleanup efforts in the world and is projected to require the investment of billions of dollars and several decades to complete. Quantitative assessments of health and environmental risks play an important role in work prioritization and cleanup decisions of these challenging environmental cleanup and closure projects. The risk assessments often involve evaluation of performance of integrated engineered barriers and natural systems over a period of hundreds to thousands of years, when subject to complex geo-environmental transformation processes resulting from remediation and disposal actions. The requirement of resource investments for the cleanup efforts and the associated technical challenges have subjected the EM program to continuous scrutiny by oversight entities. Recent DOE reviews recommended application of a risk-informed approach throughout the EM complex for improved targeting of resources. The idea behind this recommendation is that by using risk-informed approaches to prioritize work scope, the available resources can be best utilized to reduce environmental and health risks across the EM complex, while maintaining the momentum of the overall EM cleanup program at a sustainable level. In response to these recommendations, EM is re-examining its work portfolio and key decision making with risk insights for the major sites. This paper summarizes the review findings and recommendations from the DOE internal reviews, discusses the needs for risk informing the EM portfolio and makes an attempt to identify topics for R and D in integrated risk assessment that could assist in the EM prioritization efforts. (authors)

  20. U.S. Department of Energy Keeps Its Cleanup Commitments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    U.S. Department of Energy Keeps Its Cleanup Commitments By ELIZABETH SELLERS As significant progress continues on cleanup of legacy environmental challenges at the Idaho National Laboratory, there are two points I'd like to emphasize: Workers sort previously-buried waste. Inside of underground waste storage tank after cleaning was completed ready for grouting to begin. The U.S. Department of Energy is keeping its promises to Idahoans. In the last 20 years, DOE has met, on time or ahead of

  1. Hanford Story: Tank Waste Cleanup - Questions - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Hanford Story Hanford Story: Tank Waste Cleanup - Questions The Hanford Story Hanford Story: Tank Waste Cleanup - Questions Email Email Page | Print Print Page |Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size Why is the Waste Treatment Plant being built? Where did the waste in the Tank Farms come from? How many gallons of waste are contained in the tanks? Why is removing the waste from the tanks so challenging? What is the Mobile Arm Retrieval System (MARS)? How will the tank waste be delivered

  2. Hanford Achieves a Cleanup First | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Achieves a Cleanup First Hanford Achieves a Cleanup First September 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis F Reactor during operations in 1956. F Reactor during operations in 1956. F Reactor Area in July 2012. F Reactor Area in July 2012. A worker cuts and drains pipe at a waste site in F Area. The pipe contained sodium dichromate, which was used as an anti-corrosion agent. A worker cuts and drains pipe at a waste site in F Area. The pipe contained sodium dichromate, which was used as an anti-corrosion

  3. Hanford Employee Returns to Finish Glovebox Cleanup as Team Lead |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Employee Returns to Finish Glovebox Cleanup as Team Lead Hanford Employee Returns to Finish Glovebox Cleanup as Team Lead March 16, 2016 - 12:20pm Addthis Hix, right, discusses a work assignment with a team member. Hix, right, discusses a work assignment with a team member. The crew that cut up and removed the two most hazardous gloveboxes in PFP. The crew that cut up and removed the two most hazardous gloveboxes in PFP. Due to the airborne radiological contamination

  4. Recovery Act funds advance cleanup efforts at Cold War site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cleanup efforts at Cold War site Recovery Act funds advance cleanup efforts at Cold War site A local small business, ARSEC Environmental, LLC, of White Rock, NM, won a $2 million task order in April to perform this work. June 29, 2010 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

  5. DOE Awards Technical Assistance Contract for Moab Mill Tailings Cleanup |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Department of Energy Technical Assistance Contract for Moab Mill Tailings Cleanup DOE Awards Technical Assistance Contract for Moab Mill Tailings Cleanup May 31, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Bill Taylor bill.taylor@srs.gov 803-952-8564 Cincinnati-The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced the award of an $18 million small disadvantaged business contract with S&K Aerospace, LLC, of St. Ignatius, Montana to continue to provide technical assistance services for the Moab

  6. Manhattan Project truck unearthed at landfill cleanup site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Manhattan project truck Manhattan Project truck unearthed at landfill cleanup site A LANL excavation crew working on a Recovery Act cleanup project has uncovered the remnants of a 1940s military truck buried in a Manhattan Project-era landfill. April 8, 2011 image description Excavator operator Kevin Miller looks at the remnants of a 1940s military truck buried in a Manhattan Project-era landfill. Contact Fred deSousa Communications Office (505) 665-3430 Email Remnants of a 1940s military truck

  7. Idaho Cleanup Project grows its workforce to complete ARRA work

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Idaho Cleanup Project grows its workforce to complete ARRA work CWI President and CEO John Fulton greets newly hired ICP employees at a June orientation session in Idaho Falls. Over a hundred new faces have already joined the Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP) workforce, both in offices and at work sites across DOE's Idaho Site. The ICP is ramping up its workforce to complete new work scope assigned to the ICP under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). As of June 27, 143 new workers have

  8. F Reactor Area Cleanup Complete | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    F Reactor Area Cleanup Complete F Reactor Area Cleanup Complete September 19, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Cameron Hardy, DOE Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov 509-376-5365 RICHLAND, Wash. - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contractors have cleaned up the F Reactor Area, the first reactor area at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington state to be fully remediated. While six of Hanford's nine plutonium production reactors have been sealed up, or cocooned, the F Reactor Area is the first to

  9. Mercury cleanup efforts intensify | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mercury cleanup efforts ... Mercury cleanup efforts intensify Posted: February 11, 2013 - 3:31pm | Y-12 Report | Volume 9, Issue 2 | 2013 Millions of pounds of mercury were required to support Y-12's post-World War II mission of separating lithium isotopes. Cleaning up the toxic heavy metal poses many challenges, but what Y-12 is learning could help conquer mercury pollution worldwide. There's a reason you won't find mercury in many thermometers these days. Mercury is a heavy metal that occurs

  10. The Office of Environmental Management (EM) Defense Environmental Cleanup |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy (EM) Defense Environmental Cleanup The Office of Environmental Management (EM) Defense Environmental Cleanup PDF icon Microsoft Word - 271C2C7B.doc More Documents & Publications Microsoft Word - PSRP Updates 6-25-10_v2 Above on the left is K-25, at Oak Ridge before and after the 844,000 sq-ft demolition. In addition, on the right: K Cooling Tower at Savannah River Site demolition. Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) Program Map Microsoft Word - PSRP Updates

  11. Highly Radioactive Sludge Removal Complete: Historic Cleanup Effort Reduces

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    the Risk along the Columbia River | Department of Energy Highly Radioactive Sludge Removal Complete: Historic Cleanup Effort Reduces the Risk along the Columbia River Highly Radioactive Sludge Removal Complete: Historic Cleanup Effort Reduces the Risk along the Columbia River September 13, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Salony, DOE Cameron.Salony@rl.doe.gov 509-376-0402 Dee Millikin, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company Dee_Millikin@rl.gov 509-376-1297 RICHLAND, WASH. - The

  12. DOE's Top Environmental Cleanup Official Visits Paducah Site | Department

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of Energy DOE's Top Environmental Cleanup Official Visits Paducah Site DOE's Top Environmental Cleanup Official Visits Paducah Site April 26, 2012 - 2:00pm Addthis DOE-EM Senior Advisor Dave Huizenga, right, and DOE Paducah Site Lead Reinhard Knerr look at a three-dimensional model of the Paducah Site’s groundwater system. University of Kentucky College of Design students assembled the model for the Paducah Citizens Advisory Board. The model was displayed at the Site-Specific Advisory

  13. EM's Los Alamos Site Completes Canyon-Side Cleanup of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Mercury-Contaminated Soil | Department of Energy Los Alamos Site Completes Canyon-Side Cleanup of Mercury-Contaminated Soil EM's Los Alamos Site Completes Canyon-Side Cleanup of Mercury-Contaminated Soil July 28, 2015 - 12:00pm Addthis A spider excavator extracts mercury-contaminated soil. A spider excavator extracts mercury-contaminated soil. Workers position a crane above the project site. Workers position a crane above the project site. A waste container is loaded for off-site disposal. A

  14. West Valley Site History, Cleanup Status, and Role of the West...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Site History, Cleanup Status, and Role of the West Valley Citizen Task Force West Valley Site History, Cleanup Status, and Role of the West Valley Citizen Task Force Presentation...

  15. Agencies announce third site-wide five-year review of cleanup...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    five-year review of cleanup at the U.S. Department of Energy's Idaho Site. Five-year reviews evaluate the protectiveness of completed and ongoing cleanup actions as required...

  16. EM's Los Alamos Site Completes Canyon-Side Cleanup ofMercury...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Site Completes Canyon-Side Cleanup of Mercury-Contaminated Soil EM's Los Alamos Site Completes Canyon-Side Cleanup of Mercury-Contaminated Soil July 28, 2015 - 12:00pm Addthis A...

  17. Assistant Secretary Regalbuto Lays out Vision, Priorities to Advance Cleanup for EM Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management Monica Regalbuto shared her vision for EM, laid out cleanup priorities, and emphasized the need to better leverage technology development to reduce costs in her address at DOE’s first National Cleanup Workshop.

  18. Los Alamos Lab to perform slope-side cleanup near Smith's Marketplace

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Los Alamos Lab to perform slope-side cleanup near Smith's Marketplace Los Alamos National Laboratory to perform slope-side cleanup near Smith's Marketplace The Lab is performing a ...

  19. Technical papers presented at a DOE meeting on criteria for cleanup of transuranium elements in soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-09-01

    Transuranium element soil contamination cleanup experience gained from nuclear weapons accidents and cleanup at Eniwetok Atoll was reviewed. Presentations have been individually abstracted for inclusion in the data base. (ACR)

  20. Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-F-6 Burial Ground

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H. M. Sulloway

    2008-10-02

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 118-F-6 Burial Ground located in the 100-FR-2 Operable Unit of the 100-F Area on the Hanford Site. The trenches received waste from the 100-F Experimental Animal Farm, including animal manure, animal carcasses, laboratory waste, plastic, cardboard, metal, and concrete debris as well as a railroad tank car.

  1. Oak Ridge EM Program Increases Focus on Mercury Cleanup

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    OAK RIDGE, Tenn. – EM Senior Advisor Dave Huizenga recently joined local lawmakers and state and federal officials to announce their partnership to increase focus on cleanup of mercury — one of Oak Ridge’s greatest environmental threats — at the Y-12 National Security Complex.

  2. Enewetak fact book (a resume of pre-cleanup information)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bliss, W.

    1982-09-01

    The book contains a group of short treatises on the precleanup condition of the islands in Enewetak Atoll. Their purpose was to provide brief guidance to the radiological history and radiological condition of the islands for use in cleanup of the atoll. (ACR)

  3. 2015 U.S. Department of Energy National Cleanup Workshop Registration List

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy National Cleanup Workshop Registration List 2015 U.S. Department of Energy National Cleanup Workshop Registration List List of registered attendees to the 2015 U.S. Department of Energy National Cleanup Workshop. PDF icon 2015 U.S. Department of Energy National Cleanup Workshop Registration List More Documents & Publications Business Opportunity Forum Attendees Contractor Earned Value Management System Certification Status EM Major

  4. EM Assistant Secretary Monica Regalbuto to Speak at DOE National Cleanup

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Workshop | Department of Energy Assistant Secretary Monica Regalbuto to Speak at DOE National Cleanup Workshop EM Assistant Secretary Monica Regalbuto to Speak at DOE National Cleanup Workshop August 20, 2015 - 5:00pm Addthis EM Assistant Secretary Monica Regalbuto to Speak at DOE National Cleanup Workshop WASHINGTON, D.C. - DOE's new Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management Monica Regalbuto is set to speak at the first DOE National Cleanup Workshop, scheduled to be held Sept. 29-30

  5. EM's Cleanup Mission: 16 Sites in 11 States Remaining | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy EM's Cleanup Mission: 16 Sites in 11 States Remaining EM's Cleanup Mission: 16 Sites in 11 States Remaining At the end of fiscal year 2013, EM completed cleanup and closed 90 sites in 28 states. This included cleanup and closure of 85 smaller sites and five major nuclear sites: Rocky Flats, Fernald, Mound, Pinellas, and Weldon Spring. PDF icon Small Site Closures More Documents & Publications Completed Sites Listing Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1998 Report

  6. Site Transition Process upon Completion of the Cleanup Mission: Fact Sheet

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    (September 2013) | Department of Energy Process upon Completion of the Cleanup Mission: Fact Sheet (September 2013) Site Transition Process upon Completion of the Cleanup Mission: Fact Sheet (September 2013) DOE's internal site transition process for Cleanup to long-term stewardship, post-cleanup, and post-closure has been established in transition guidance for sites that will transfer to a Landlord Program Secretarial Office or to Legacy Management for long-term stewardship. PDF icon Site

  7. Workers at Hanford Site Achieve Recovery Act Legacy Cleanup Goals Ahead of Schedule

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Hanford Site recently surpassed American Recovery and Reinvestment Act goals to accelerate the cleanup of legacy waste and fuels.

  8. Integrated Sensing and Controls for Coal Gasification - Development of Model-Based Controls for GE's Gasifier and Syngas Cooler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aditya Kumar

    2010-12-30

    This report summarizes the achievements and final results of this program. The objective of this program is to develop a comprehensive systems approach to integrated design of sensing and control systems for an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plant, using advanced model-based techniques. In particular, this program is focused on the model-based sensing and control system design for the core gasification section of an IGCC plant. The overall approach consists of (i) developing a first-principles physics-based dynamic model of the gasification section, (ii) performing model-reduction where needed to derive low-order models suitable for controls analysis and design, (iii) developing a sensing system solution combining online sensors with model-based estimation for important process variables not measured directly, and (iv) optimizing the steady-state and transient operation of the plant for normal operation as well as for startup using model predictive controls (MPC). Initially, available process unit models were implemented in a common platform using Matlab/Simulink{reg_sign}, and appropriate model reduction and model updates were performed to obtain the overall gasification section dynamic model. Also, a set of sensor packages were developed through extensive lab testing and implemented in the Tampa Electric Company IGCC plant at Polk power station in 2009, to measure temperature and strain in the radiant syngas cooler (RSC). Plant operation data was also used to validate the overall gasification section model. The overall dynamic model was then used to develop a sensing solution including a set of online sensors coupled with model-based estimation using nonlinear extended Kalman filter (EKF). Its performance in terms of estimating key unmeasured variables like gasifier temperature, carbon conversion, etc., was studied through extensive simulations in the presence sensing errors (noise and bias) and modeling errors (e.g. unknown gasifier kinetics, RSC fouling). In parallel, an MPC solution was initially developed using ideal sensing to optimize the plant operation during startup pre-heating as well as steady state and transient operation under normal high-pressure conditions, e.g. part-load, base-load, load transition and fuel changes. The MPC simulation studies showed significant improvements both for startup pre-heating and for normal operation. Finally, the EKF and MPC solutions were coupled to achieve the integrated sensing and control solution and its performance was studied through extensive steady state and transient simulations in the presence of sensor and modeling errors. The results of each task in the program and overall conclusions are summarized in this final report.

  9. Pressure Swing Absorption Device and Process for Separating CO{sub 2} from Shifted Syngas and its Capture for Subsequent Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sirkar, Kamalesh; Jie, Xingming; Chau, John; Obuskovic, Gordana

    2013-03-31

    Using the ionic liquid (IL) 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide ([bmim][DCA]) as the absorbent on the shell side of a membrane module containing either a porous hydrophobized ceramic tubule or porous hydrophobized polyether ether ketone (PEEK) hollow fiber membranes, studies for CO{sub 2} removal from hot simulated pre-combustion shifted syngas were carried out by a novel pressure swing membrane absorption (PSMAB) process. Helium was used as a surrogate for H{sub 2} in a simulated shifted syngas with CO{sub 2} around 40% (dry gas basis). In this cyclic separation process, the membrane module was used to achieve non-dispersive gas absorption from a high-pressure feed gas (689-1724 kPag; 100-250 psig) at temperatures between 25-1000C into a stationary absorbent liquid on the module shell side during a certain part of the cycle followed by among other cycle steps controlled desorption of the absorbed gases from the liquid in the rest of the cycle. Two product streams were obtained, one He-rich and the other CO{sub 2}-rich. Addition of polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer of generation 0 to IL [bmim][DCA] improved the system performance at higher temperatures. The solubilities of CO{sub 2} and He were determined in the ionic liquid with or without the dendrimer in solution as well as in the presence or absence of moisture; polyethylene glycol (PEG) 400 was also studied as a replacement for the IL. The solubility selectivity of the ionic liquid containing the dendrimer for CO{sub 2} over helium was considerably larger than that for the pure ionic liquid. The solubility of CO{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}-He solubility selectivity of PEG 400 and a solution of the dendrimer in PEG 400 were higher than the corresponding ones in the IL, [bmim][DCA]. A mathematical model was developed to describe the PSMAB process; a numerical solution of the governing equations described successfully the observed performance of the PSMAB process for the pure ionic liquid-based system.

  10. DOE's First National Cleanup Workshop Set for Sept. 29-30 | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy First National Cleanup Workshop Set for Sept. 29-30 DOE's First National Cleanup Workshop Set for Sept. 29-30 July 31, 2015 - 3:00pm Addthis DOE National Cleanup Workshop DOE National Cleanup Workshop WASHINGTON, D.C. - DOE, in cooperation with the Energy Communities Alliance, Energy Facility Contractors Group, and Nuclear Energy Institute, will hold the first DOE National Cleanup Workshop Sept. 29 and 30 this year in the Washington, D.C. area. The workshop brings together senior DOE

  11. Task 4.9 -- Value-added products from syngas. Semi-annual report, July 1--December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, E.S.; Sharma, R.K.

    1997-08-01

    The work on advanced fuel forms in 1996 focused on the synthesis of higher alcohols from mixtures of hydrogen and carbon dioxide (syngas) from coal gasification. Initial work in this project utilized a novel molybdenum sulfide catalyst previously shown to be active for hydrodesulfurization reactions of coal liquids. A pressurized fixed-bed flow-through reactor was constructed, and the MoS{sub 2} catalysts were tested with syngas under a variety of conditions. Unfortunately, the catalysts, even with higher molybdenum loading and addition of promoters, failed to give alcohol products. A batch reactor test of the catalyst was also conducted, but did not produce alcohol products. Group VIII metals have been used previously in catalysts for syngas reactions. Ruthenium and rhodium catalysts were prepared by impregnation of a hydrotalcite support. Tests with these catalysts in flow-through reactors also did not produce the desired alcohol products. The formation of higher alcohols from smaller ones, such as methanol and ethanol, could be commercially important if high selectivity could be achieved. The methanol and ethanol would be derived from syngas and fermentation, respectively. Based on previous work in other laboratories, it was hypothesized that the hydrotalcite-supported MoS{sub 2} or Ru or Rh catalysts could catalyze the formation of butyl alcohols. Although the desired 1-butanol was obtained in batch reactions with the promoted ruthenium catalyst, the reaction was not as selective as desired. Product suitable for a lower-vapor-pressure gasoline oxygenate additive was obtained, but it may not be economical to market such products in competition with methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE). Flow-through catalytic bed reactions were not successful.

  12. Lurgi's MPG gasification plus Rectisol{reg_sign} gas purification - advanced process combination for reliable syngas production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-07-01

    Lurgi's Multi Purpose Gasification Process (MPG) is the reliable partial oxidation process to convert hydrocarbon liquids, slurries and natural gas into valuable syngas. The MPG burner has once again proven its capabilities in an ammonia plant based on asphalt gasification. Lurgi is operating the HP-POX demonstration plant together with the University of Freiberg, Germany. Gasification tests at pressures of up to 100 bar have shown that syngas for high pressure synthesis such as methanol and ammonia can be produced more economically. The Rectisol{reg_sign} gas purification process yields ultra clean synthesis gas which is required to avoid problems in the downstream synthesis. Pure carbon dioxide is produced as a separate stream and is readily available for sequestration, enhanced oil recovery or other uses. The reliability of the Rectisol{reg_sign} process and the confidence of plant operators in this process are acknowledged by the fact that more than 75% of the syngas produced world wide by coal, oil and waste gasification is purified in Rectisol{reg_sign} units. Virtually all coal gasification plants currently under construction rely on Rectisol{reg_sign}. The new, large GTL plants and hydrogen production facilities require effective CO{sub 2} removal. New developments make Rectisol{reg_sign} attractive for this task. 10 figs., 3 tabs., 2 photos.

  13. KINETIC UNDERSTANDING OF THE SYNGAS-TO-DME REACTION SYSTEM AND ITS IMPLICATIONS TO PROCESS AND ECONOMICS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiang-Dong Peng

    2002-12-01

    In a single-step synthesis gas-to-dimethyl ether process, synthesis gas (or syngas, a mixture of H{sub 2} and CO) is converted into dimethyl ether (DME) in a single reactor. The three reactions involved in this process, methanol synthesis, methanol dehydration and water gas shift, form an interesting reaction network. The interplay among these three reactions results in excellent syngas conversion or reactor productivity. A fundamental understanding of this interplay helps to explain many experimental and simulation observations, to identify optimal reaction conditions, and to provide guidelines for process development. The higher syngas conversion or reactor productivity in the syngas-to-DME reaction system, compared to that in the syngas-to-methanol reaction system, is referred to as chemical synergy. This synergy exhibits a strong dependence on the composition of the reactor feed. To demonstrate the extent of this dependence, simulations with adjusted activity for each reaction were performed to reveal the relative rate of each reaction. The results show that the water gas shift reaction is the most rapid, being practically controlled by the equilibrium. Both methanol synthesis and methanol dehydration reactions are kinetically controlled. The kinetics of the dehydration reactions is greater than that of the methanol synthesis reaction in the CO-rich regime. However, the rates of these two reactions come closer as the H{sub 2} concentration in the reactor feed increases. The role of the dehydration reaction is to remove the equilibrium barrier for the methanol synthesis reaction. The role of the water gas shift reaction is more complex; it helps the kinetics of methanol dehydration by keeping the water concentration low, which in turn enhances methanol synthesis. It also readjusts the H{sub 2}:CO ratio in the reactor as the reactions proceed. In the CO-rich regime, the water gas shift reaction supplements the limiting reactant, H{sub 2}, by reacting water with CO. This enhances both the kinetics and thermodynamic driving force of the methanol synthesis reaction. In the H{sub 2}-rich regime, water gas shift consumes the limiting reactant, CO, which harms both the kinetics and thermodynamics of methanol synthesis. An understanding of these complex roles of the methanol dehydration and water gas shift reactions and of their dependence on the syngas composition explains why the synergy is high in the CO-rich regime, but decreases with increasing H{sub 2} or CO{sub 2} content in the reactor feed. The methanol equivalent productivity of the syngas-to-DME reactor is also a strong function of the reactor feed. A mathematical approach was developed to understand this dependence. The approach divides a power law type of rate equation into two terms, the kinetic term (the rate of the forward reaction) and the thermodynamics or driving force term (1- approach to equilibrium). The equations for the best feed composition for each term were derived. The approach was developed for the single reaction system, and then extended to the syngas-to-DME reaction system. The equations provide insights into why and how the methanol synthesis in the syngasto-DME system depends on the other two reactions. They can also be used to calculate the best feed composition for a given conversion. The analysis shows that for typical commercial syngas conversion, the optimal H{sub 2}:CO ratio for the LPDME{trademark} reactor is around 1-to-1, in good agreement with the results from the simulation. While the 1-to-1 feed provides a good foundation for some process configurations, it does not match the composition of natural gas-derived syngas, which typically has a H{sub 2}:CO ratio of 2:1 or greater. The process would also produce one CO{sub 2} molecule for every DME product, both a materials utilization and an environmental problem. However, recycling CO{sub 2} to the syngas generation unit can solve all of these problems. Integration schemes with different syngas generation technologies (dry reforming, steam methane reforming and partial oxidation) were

  14. Combining innovative technology demonstrations with dense nonaqueous phase liquids cleanup

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagood, M.C.; Koegler, K.J.; Rohay, V.J.; Trent, S.J.; Stein, S.L.; Brouns, T.M.; McCabe, G.H.; Tomich, S.

    1993-05-01

    Radioactively contaminated acidic aqueous wastes and organic liquids were discharged to the soil column at three disposal sites within the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site, Washington. As a result, a portion of the underlying groundwater is contaminated with carbon tetrachloride several orders of magnitude above the maximum contaminant level accepted for a drinking water supply. Treatability testing and cleanup actions have been initiated to remove the contamination from both the unsaturated soils to minimize further groundwater contamination and the groundwater itself. To expedite cleanup, innovative technologies for (1) drilling, (2) site characterization, (3) monitoring, (4) well field development, and (5) contaminant treatment are being demonstrated and subsequently used where possible to improve the rates and cost savings associated with the removal of carbon tetrachloride from the soils and groundwater.

  15. Catalytic Process for the Conversion of Coal-derived Syngas to Ethanol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Spivery; Doug Harrison; John Earle; James Goodwin; David Bruce; Xunhau Mo; Walter Torres; Joe Allison Vis Viswanathan; Rick Sadok; Steve Overbury; Viviana Schwartz

    2011-07-29

    The catalytic conversion of coal-derived syngas to C{sub 2+} alcohols and oxygenates has attracted great attention due to their potential as chemical intermediates and fuel components. This is particularly true of ethanol, which can serve as a transportation fuel blending agent, as well as a hydrogen carrier. A thermodynamic analysis of CO hydrogenation to ethanol that does not allow for byproducts such as methane or methanol shows that the reaction: 2 CO + 4 H{sub 2} {yields} C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH + H{sub 2}O is thermodynamically favorable at conditions of practical interest (e.g,30 bar, {approx}< 250 C). However, when methane is included in the equilibrium analysis, no ethanol is formed at any conditions even approximating those that would be industrially practical. This means that undesired products (primarily methane and/or CO{sub 2}) must be kinetically limited. This is the job of a catalyst. The mechanism of CO hydrogenation leading to ethanol is complex. The key step is the formation of the initial C-C bond. Catalysts that are selective for EtOH can be divided into four classes: (a) Rh-based catalysts, (b) promoted Cu catalysts, (c) modified Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, or (d) Mo-sulfides and phosphides. This project focuses on Rh- and Cu-based catalysts. The logic was that (a) Rh-based catalysts are clearly the most selective for EtOH (but these catalysts can be costly), and (b) Cu-based catalysts appear to be the most selective of the non-Rh catalysts (and are less costly). In addition, Pd-based catalysts were studied since Pd is known for catalyzing CO hydrogenation to produce methanol, similar to copper. Approach. The overall approach of this project was based on (a) computational catalysis to identify optimum surfaces for the selective conversion of syngas to ethanol; (b) synthesis of surfaces approaching these ideal atomic structures, (c) specialized characterization to determine the extent to which the actual catalyst has these structures, and (d) testing at realistic conditions (e.g., elevated pressures) and differential conversions (to measure true kinetics, to avoid deactivation, and to avoid condensable concentrations of products in the outlet gas).

  16. EM Risk and Cleanup Decision Making Presentation by Mark Gilbertson

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    RISK AND CLEANUP DECISION MAKING www.em.doe.gov 1 Mark Gilbertson Deputy Assistant Secretary for Site Restoration Office of Environmental Management May 31, 2012 Presented to Environmental Management Advisory Board Topics * How we got to where we are * Existing environment and health risk www.em.doe.gov 2 * Existing environment and health risk analysis to support decision-making * Considerations going forward The Past Five Years * FY2008 budget assumed ~$6 billion escalated for inflation over

  17. Cleanup Verification Package for the 618-3 Burial Ground

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. J. Appel

    2006-09-12

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 618-3 Solid Waste Burial Ground, also referred to as Burial Ground Number 3 and the Dry Waste Burial Ground Number 3. During its period of operation, the 618-3 site was used to dispose of uranium-contaminated construction debris from the 311 Building and construction/demolition debris from remodeling of the 313, 303-J and 303-K Buildings.

  18. Cleanup Performance Prompts Contract Changes at Hanford's River Corridor

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Performance Prompts Contract Changes at Hanford's River Corridor Cleanup Performance Prompts Contract Changes at Hanford's River Corridor June 30, 2015 - 12:00pm Addthis RICHLAND, Wash. - EM's Richland Operations Office has added an additional year to the current River Corridor Closure contract held by Washington Closure Hanford (WCH). The contract will now run to Sept. 30, 2016, focusing primarily on completing the trench work at the 618-10 Burial Ground and placing

  19. Idaho Site Advances Recovery Act Cleanup after Inventing Effective Treatment

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    April 14, 2011 IDAHO FALLS, Idaho - For the first time in history, workers at the Idaho site achieved success in the initial cleanup of potentially dangerous sodium in a de- commissioned nuclear reactor using an innovative treatment process. The Ameri- can Recovery and Reinvestment Act invested $70 million in the project, which employs 130 workers. DOE officials cheered the outcome and praised the team that designed and imple- mented the innovative sodium treatment for which the DOE has filed a

  20. Y-12 National Security Complex Cleanup | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    fact sheet provides an update on all of the current cleanup projects at the site, and it also lists the major projects completed at the Y-12 National Security Complex. This document discusses the following projects: Old Salvage Yard Scrap Removal Building 9735 Demolition Alpha 5 Project Beta 3 (9204-3) Legacy Material Disposition Project Beta 4 Legacy Material Disposition Project Biology Complex and Building 9769 Deactivation and Demolition Project Outfall 200 Conceptual Design Project Mercury

  1. Home I Qoehannn Site Facility Cleanup yroject Histow Cleanun

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Home I Qoehannn Site Facility Cleanup yroject Histow Cleanun Progress Media PowerPoint Robotics Gallem Contacts A view of the Permagrain building from the e Located in northwestern Clearfield County, Quehanna many businesses that have used radiation in their man facility contains residual radioactivity left over from \I for the federal government. Under an approved plan by the federal Nuclear Reeul: responsible regulatory agency, the Commonwealth be; The site now includes operations for

  2. Rocky Flats Cleanup Agreement implementation successes and challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shelton, D.C.

    1997-02-01

    On July 19, 1996 the US Department of Energy (DOE), State of Colorado (CDPHE), and US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) entered into an agreement called the Rocky Flats Cleanup Agreement (RFCA) for the cleanup and closure of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS or Rocky Flats). Major elements of the agreement include: an Integrated Site-Wide Baseline; up to twelve significant enforceable milestones per year; agreed upon soil and water action levels and standards for cleanup; open space as the likely foreseeable land use; the plutonium and TRU waste removed by 2015; streamlined regulatory process; agreement with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) to coordinate activities; and a risk reduction focus. Successful implementation of RFCA requires a substantial effort by the parties to change their way of thinking about RFETS and meet the deliverables and commitments. Substantial progress toward Site closure through the implementation of RFCA has been accomplished in the short time since the signing, yet much remains to be done. Much can be learned from the Rocky Flats experience by other facilities in similar situations.

  3. Development of Comprehensive Detailed and Reduced Reaction Mechanisms for Syngas and Hydrogen Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chih-Jen Sung; Hai Wang; Angela Violi

    2009-02-28

    The collaborative research initiative culminated in amassing a substantial combustion database of experimental results for dry and moist mixtures of syngas and hydrogen (SGH), including autoignition times using a rapid compression machine as well as laminar flame speeds using a counterflow twin-flame configuration. These experimental data provided the basis for assessment of the kinetics of SGH combustion at elevated pressures using global uncertainty analysis methods. A review of the fundamental combustion characteristics of H{sub 2}/CO mixtures, with emphasis on ignition and flame propagation at high pressures was also conducted to understand the state of the art in SGH combustion. Investigation of the reaction kinetics of CO+HO{sub 2}{center_dot} {yields} CO{sub 2} + {center_dot}OH and HO{sub 2}+OH {yields} H{sub 2}O+O{sub 2} by ab initio calculations and master equation modeling was further carried out in order to look into the discrepancies between the experimental data and the results predicted by the mechanisms.

  4. Synthesis of methyl methacrylate from coal-derived syngas: Quarterly report,, October 1-December 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-09-01

    Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Eastman Chemical Company, and Bechtel collectively are developing a novel process for the synthesis of methyl methacrylate (MMA) from coal-derived syngas that consists of three steps of synthesis of a propionate, its condensation with formaldehyde, and esterification of resulting methacrylic acid (MAA) with methanol to produce MMA. Over the last quarter, Eastman developed two new processes which have resulted in two new invention reports. One process deals with carbonylation of benzyl ether which represents a model for coal liquefaction and the second focuses on the acceleration of carbonylation rates for propionic acid synthesis, via use of polar aprotic solvents. These two inventions are major improvements in the novel Mo-catalyzed homogeneous process for propionic acid synthesis technology, developed by Eastman. Over the last quarter, RTI completed three reaction cycles and two regeneration cycles as a part of long-term reaction regeneration cycle study on a 10% Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}/Si0{sub 2} catalyst, for vapor phase condensation reaction of formaldehyde with propionic acid.

  5. 3D CFD Model of High Temperature H2O/CO2 Co-electrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant Hawkes; James O'Brien; Carl Stoots; Stephen Herring; Joe Hartvigsen

    2007-06-01

    3D CFD Model of High Temperature H2O/CO2 Co-Electrolysis Grant Hawkes1, James OBrien1, Carl Stoots1, Stephen Herring1 Joe Hartvigsen2 1 Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho, grant.hawkes@inl.gov 2 Ceramatec Inc, Salt Lake City, Utah INTRODUCTION A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model has been created to model high temperature co-electrolysis of steam and carbon dioxide in a planar solid oxide electrolyzer (SOE) using solid oxide fuel cell technology. A research program is under way at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to simultaneously address the research and scale-up issues associated with the implementation of planar solid-oxide electrolysis cell technology for syn-gas production from CO2 and steam. Various runs have been performed under different run conditions to help assess the performance of the SOE. This paper presents CFD results of this model compared with experimental results. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), in conjunction with Ceramatec Inc. (Salt Lake City, USA) has been researching for several years the use of solid-oxide fuel cell technology to electrolyze steam for large-scale nuclear-powered hydrogen production. Now, an experimental research project is underway at the INL to produce syngas by simultaneously electrolyzing at high-temperature steam and carbon dioxide (CO2) using solid oxide fuel cell technology. A strong interest exists in the large-scale production of syn-gas from CO2 and steam to be reformed into a usable transportation fuel. If biomass is used as the carbon source, the overall process is climate neutral. Consequently, there is a high level of interest in production of syn-gas from CO2 and steam electrolysis. With the price of oil currently around $60 / barrel, synthetically-derived hydrocarbon fuels (synfuels) have become economical. Synfuels are typically produced from syngas hydrogen (H2) and carbon monoxide (CO) -- using the Fischer-Tropsch process, discovered by Germany before World War II. High-temperature nuclear reactors have the potential for substantially increasing the efficiency of syn-gas production from CO2 and water, with no consumption of fossil fuels, and no production of greenhouse gases. Thermal CO2-splitting and water splitting for syn-gas production can be accomplished via high-temperature electrolysis, using high-temperature nuclear process heat and electricity. A high-temperature advanced nuclear reactor coupled with a high-efficiency high-temperature electrolyzer could achieve a competitive thermal-to-syn-gas conversion efficiency of 45 to 55%.

  6. Site Transition Summary: Clean-up Completion to Long Term Stewardship |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Site Transition Summary: Clean-up Completion to Long Term Stewardship Site Transition Summary: Clean-up Completion to Long Term Stewardship Topic: Tom Longo DOE, Provided Information on the Long Term Stewardship Process that the Office of Legacy Management is Responsible for. PDF icon Site Transition - August 13, 2014 More Documents & Publications Site Transition Summary: Cleanup Completion to Long-Term Stewardship at Department of Energy On-going Mission Sites

  7. LANL selects local small business for post-Recovery Act cleanup contract

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Post-Recovery Act cleanup contract LANL selects local small business for post-Recovery Act cleanup contract Los Alamos Technical Associates to perform follow-on cleanup work through 2014 at the site of the world's first large-scale plutonium processing lab. December 14, 2010 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy

  8. Microsoft Word - DOE News Release-DOE Completes Cleanup at New York California Sites

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE Completes Cleanup at New York, California Sites Recovery Act funds accelerate cleanup; support job creation and footprint reduction WASHINGTON, D.C. - Last month, the U.S. Department of Energy completed the cleanup of Cold War legacy waste at the Nuclear Radiation Development, LLC (NRD) site near Grand Island, New York, and at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California. The two locations became the 18 th and 19 th sites to be completely cleaned of legacy waste. This

  9. Direct Conversion of Syngas-to-Hydrocarbons over Higher Alcohols Synthesis Catalysts Mixed with HZSM-5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lebarbier Dagel, Vanessa M.; Dagle, Robert A.; Li, Jinjing; Deshmane, Chinmay A.; Taylor, Charles E.; Bao, Xinhe; Wang, Yong

    2014-09-10

    The synthesis of hydrocarbon fuels directly from synthesis gas (i.e. one step process) was investigated with a catalytic system comprised of HZSM-5 physically mixed with either a methanol synthesis catalyst or a higher alcohols synthesis (HAS) catalyst. The metal sites of the methanol or HAS synthesis catalyst enable the conversion of syngas to alcohols, whereas HZSM-5 provides acid sites required for methanol dehydration, and dimethyl ether-to-hydrocarbons reactions. Catalytic performance for HZSM-5 when mixed with either a 5 wt.% Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 methanol synthesis catalyst or a HAS catalyst was evaluated at 300C, 70 bars, GHSV=700 h-1 and H2/CO=1 using a HZSM-5: alcohols synthesis catalyst weight ratio of 3:1. The major difference observed between the methanol synthesis and HAS catalyst mixtures was found in the production of durene which is an undesirable byproduct. While durene formation is negligible with any of the HAS catalysts mixed with the HZSM-5 evaluated in this study, it represents almost 50% of the C5+ fraction for the methanol synthesis catalyst (5 wt.% Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 ) mixed with HZSM-5. This presents an advantage for using HAS catalysts over the methanol synthesis catalyst to minimize the durene by-product. The yield toward the desired C5+ hydrocarbons is thus twice higher with selected HAS catalysts as compared to when HZSM-5 is mixed with 5 wt.% Pd/ZnO/Al2O3. Among all the HAS catalysts evaluated in this study, a catalyst with 0.5 wt.% Pd/FeCoCu catalyst was found the most promising due to higher production of C5+ hydrocarbons and low durene formation. The efficiency of the one-step process was thus further evaluated using the HZSM-5: 0.5 wt.% Pd/FeCoCu catalyst mixture under a number of process conditions to maximize liquid hydrocarbons product yield. At 300oC, 70 bars, GHSV = 700 h-1 and HZSM-5: 0.5 wt.% Pd/FeCoCu = 3:1 (wt.), the C5+ fraction represents 48.5% of the hydrocarbons. Unfortunately, it is more difficult to achieve higher selectivity to desired C5+ hydrocarbons as the formation of CO2, CH4, and other light hydrocarbons is challenging to suppress in the presence of mixed metal and acid sites. When the 0.5 wt.% Pd/FeCoCu and HZSM-5 are operated sequentially by way of a two-step process the C5+ hydrocarbons fraction is lower and represents 30.4% of the hydrocarbons under comparable conditions. The yield toward the C5+ hydrocarbons is twice higher for the one-step process due to an improved CO conversion and higher C5+ hydrocarbons fraction. The main advantage of the one-step process is that higher syngas conversion can be achieved as the equilibrium-driven conversion limitations for methanol and dimethyl ether are removed since they are intermediates to the final hydrocarbons product.

  10. Union job fight boiling at DOE cleanup sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Setzer, S.W.

    1993-11-15

    The US DOE is facing a growing jurisdictional dispute over which unions will perform the majority of clean-up work at its facilities. Unions affiliated with the AFL-CIO Metal Trades Council representing operations employees at the sites believe they have a fundamental right to work. Unions in the AFL-CIO's Building and Construction Trades Dept. insist that they have a clear mandate under federal labor law and the Davis-Bacon Act. The issue has heated up in recent weeks at the policy level and is boiling in a contentious dispute at DOE's Fernald site in Ohio.

  11. Cleanup Verification Package for the 116-K-2 Effluent Trench

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. M. Capron

    2006-04-04

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 116-K-2 effluent trench, also referred to as the 116-K-2 mile-long trench and the 116-K-2 site. During its period of operation, the 116-K-2 site was used to dispose of cooling water effluent from the 105-KE and 105-KW Reactors by percolation into the soil. This site also received mixed liquid wastes from the 105-KW and 105-KE fuel storage basins, reactor floor drains, and miscellaneous decontamination activities.

  12. Protecting Recovery Act Cleanup Site During Massive Wildfire

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    July 13, 2011 Protecting Recovery Act Cleanup Site During Massive Wildfire LOS ALAMOS, N.M. - Effective safety procedures in place at Los Alamos National Laboratory would have provided protections in the event that the raging Las Conchas fire had spread to the site of an American Recovery and Reinvestment Act project. "Our procedures not only placed the waste excavation site, Materials Disposal Area B (MDA-B), into a safe posture so it was well protected during the fire, but also allowed us

  13. NNSA Product Aids in Anthrax Clean-up

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    N N E E W W S S National Nuclear Security Administration NEWS MEDIA CONTACT: FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Jonathan Kiell, 202/586-7371 October 26, 2001 NNSA Product Aids in Anthrax Clean-up WASHINGTON, D.C. - A decontamination formulation developed at a U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) laboratory promises to be a key element in the battle to limit the spread of Anthrax. The formulation, developed at Sandia National Laboratories in New Mexico, is a mixture that

  14. DOE/ORO-2467 Cleanup Progress Annual Report

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    67 Cleanup Progress Annual Report to the Oak Ridge Community 2013 2 This report was produced by URS | CH2M Oak Ridge LLC, DOE's Environmental Management contractor for the Oak Ridge Reservation. UCOR URS | CH2M Oak Ridge LLC 1 Message from the EM Manager Department of Energy Oak Ridge Office To the Oak Ridge Community: As the U.S. Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Manage- ment (OREM) begins another year, we reflect on last year's progress and look forward to our goal of

  15. Syngas to Synfuels Process Development Unit Final Scientific/Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Robert C.

    2012-03-30

    The process described is for the gasification of 20 kg/h of biomass (switchgrass) to produce a syngas suitable for upgrading to Fischer-Tropsch (FT) liquid fuels (gas, diesel, waxes, etc.). The gas stream generated from gasification is primarily composed of carbon monoxide (CO), hydrogen (H2), carbon dioxide (CO2), steam (H2O), and methane (CH4), but also includes tars, particulate matter, ammonia (NH3), hydrogen cyanide (HCN), hydrogen chloride (HCl), hydrogen sulfide ( H2S), carbonyl sulfide (COS), etc. as contaminants. The gas stream passes through an array of cleaning devices to remove the contaminants to levels suitable for FT synthesis of fuels/chemicals. These devices consist primarily of an oil scrubber (to remove tars and remaining particulates), sulfur scrubber (to remove sulfur compounds), and a wet scrubber (to remove NH3, HCl and remaining water soluble contaminants). The ammonia and oil scrubbers are absorption columns with a combination of random and structured packing materials, using water and oil as the adsorption liquids respectively. The ammonia scrubber performed very well, while operating the oil scrubber proved to be more difficult due to the nature of tar compounds. The sulfur scrubber is a packed bed absorption device with solid extrudates of adsorbent material, primarily composed of ZnO and CuO. It performed well, but over a limited amount of time due to fouling created by excess tar/particulate matter and oil aerosols. Overall gas contaminants were reduced to below 1 ppm NH3, and less than 1 ppm collective sulfur compounds.

  16. Oak Ridge’s EM Program Seeks Public Input on Cleanup

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    OAK RIDGE, Tenn. – Oak Ridge's EM office held a public meeting this week to discuss the program’s upcoming budget and cleanup priorities.

  17. Second Site-Wide Five-Year Review of Cleanup at DOE's Idaho Site

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Completed; Report Now Available Online | Department of Energy Second Site-Wide Five-Year Review of Cleanup at DOE's Idaho Site Completed; Report Now Available Online Second Site-Wide Five-Year Review of Cleanup at DOE's Idaho Site Completed; Report Now Available Online February 3, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Danielle Miller (DOE-ID) 208-526-5709 An Idaho Cleanup Project team has completed work on the site-wide five-year review of cleanup at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE)

  18. Microsoft PowerPoint - DOE_Central Plateau approach to cleanup...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CERCLA guidance, the National Contingency Plan, and the State of Washington Model Toxics Control Act (MTCA). * Purpose: To define an approach for consistent cleanup decisions...

  19. Flue gas cleanup using the Moving-Bed Copper Oxide Process (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Flue gas cleanup using the Moving-Bed Copper Oxide Process Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Flue gas cleanup using the Moving-Bed Copper Oxide Process The use of copper oxide on a support had been envisioned as a gas cleanup technique to remove sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitric oxides (NO{sub x}) from flue gas produced by the combustion of coal for electric power generation. In general, dry, regenerable flue gas cleanup techniques

  20. Recovery Cleanup Project at Y-12 Leaves Alpha 5 with an Empty...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Cleanup Project at Y-12 Leaves Alpha 5 with an Empty Feeling | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile...

  1. Recovery Act Helps Y-12 Exceed Cleanup Goal at Manhattan Project...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Helps Y-12 Exceed Cleanup Goal at Manhattan Project-Era Building | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the...

  2. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, CH2M WG LLC, Idaho Cleanup Project March 2014

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Evaluation to determine whether CH2M WG LLC, Idaho Cleanup Project is performing at a level deserving DOE-VPP Star recognition.

  3. Los Alamos Lab to perform slope-side cleanup near Smith's Marketplace

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Los Alamos Lab to perform slope-side cleanup near Smith's Marketplace Los Alamos National Laboratory to perform slope-side cleanup near Smith's Marketplace The Lab is performing a high-angle canyon-side cleanup on U.S. Department of Energy property just south of the new Smith's Marketplace. May 1, 2015 Los Alamos National Laboratory To complete cleanup activities at one of the few remaining legacy sites along Los Alamos Canyon, crews are using a specialized spider excavator to remove a small

  4. River Corridor Cleanup Contract Fiscal Year 2006 Detailed Work Plan: DWP Summary, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Project Integration

    2005-09-26

    This detailed work plan provides the scope, cost, and schedule for the Fiscal Year 2006 activities required to support River Corridor cleanup objectives within the directed guidance.

  5. DOE Issues Final RFP for Idaho Cleanup Project Core | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Final RFP for Idaho Cleanup Project Core DOE Issues Final RFP for Idaho Cleanup Project Core March 13, 2015 - 2:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Lynette Chafin, 513-246-0461 Lynette.Chafin@emcbc.doe.gov Danielle Miller, 208-526-5709, millerdc@id.doe.gov Cincinnati - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today issued the final Request for Proposal (RFP) for the Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP) Core procurement. At the end of this contract the majority of cleanup will be complete in Idaho and remaining

  6. Bill McMillan named federal project director for ORNL cleanup | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Bill McMillan named federal project director for ORNL cleanup Bill McMillan named federal project director for ORNL cleanup September 20, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis OAK RIDGE, Tenn. - The U.S. Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management (EM) has named Bill McMillan as its new federal project director for cleanup at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). As federal project director, McMillan oversees all cleanup, decontamination, decommissioning, waste storage

  7. CONSTRUCTION OF KEY CLEANUP PROJECT GAINS GOOD GROUND AT SRS | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy CONSTRUCTION OF KEY CLEANUP PROJECT GAINS GOOD GROUND AT SRS CONSTRUCTION OF KEY CLEANUP PROJECT GAINS GOOD GROUND AT SRS June 1, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis CONSTRUCTION OF KEY CLEANUP PROJECT GAINS GOOD GROUND AT SRS Aiken, SC - Construction of a key cleanup facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is gaining some serious ground given the remarkable building progress since Fall 2009. Construction and operation of the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) is among the U.S. Department

  8. An Update on the Hanford Site and Cleanup Progress | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Hanford Site and Cleanup Progress An Update on the Hanford Site and Cleanup Progress September 24, 2013 - 6:45pm Addthis An Update on the Hanford Site and Cleanup Progress Dr. Ernest Moniz Dr. Ernest Moniz Secretary of Energy What are the key facts? For 40 years, the Hanford Site in Washington state was involved in the production of plutonium as part of our national defense efforts. Legacy cleanup progress at the Hanford site has been significant, including 100 percent of the site's spent fuel

  9. DOE ACHIEVES MAJOR COLD WAR LEGACY WASTE CLEANUP MILESTONE: Waste Isolation

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Pilot Plant Receives 10,000th Shipment | Department of Energy ACHIEVES MAJOR COLD WAR LEGACY WASTE CLEANUP MILESTONE: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Receives 10,000th Shipment DOE ACHIEVES MAJOR COLD WAR LEGACY WASTE CLEANUP MILESTONE: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Receives 10,000th Shipment October 3, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis DOE ACHIEVES MAJOR COLD WAR LEGACY WASTE CLEANUP MILESTONE: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Receives 10,000th Shipment DOE ACHIEVES MAJOR COLD WAR LEGACY WASTE CLEANUP MILESTONE:

  10. EM Contractor’s Success in Addressing Challenging Waste Leads to More Cleanup Work

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    IDAHO FALLS, Idaho – The EM program’s Idaho Site cleanup contractor CH2M-WG Idaho’s (CWI) success last year in treating and packaging 6,000 drums of radioactive and hazardous waste left over from the Cold War weapons program has spawned additional cleanup work for the company.

  11. EM Updates Congress on Nuclear Cleanup Progress in 18th Annual Caucus

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, D.C. EM and its cleanup contractors present briefings each year to the U.S. House Nuclear Cleanup Caucus on remediation operations at its major sites across the DOE complex. The briefings are organized by Rep. Doc Hastings (R-Wash.), who chairs the bipartisan caucus.

  12. DOE Awards Contract for Idaho Clean-up Project (ICP) Core

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cincinnati -- The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced the award of a contract to Fluor Idaho, LLC, for the performance of ongoing Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) and Idaho Clean-up Project (ICP) work scopes in support of the DOE Office of Environmental Management’s cleanup mission at the Idaho Site.

  13. Renewable Natural Gas Clean-up Challenges and Applications | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy at Waste-to-Energy using Fues Cells Webinar, July 13, 2011. PDF icon wte_dod-doe_wkshp71311_weeks.pdf More Documents & Publications Renewable Natural Gas Clean-up Challenges and Applications Renewable Natural Gas Clean-up Challenges and Applications Blending Hydrogen into Natural Gas Pipeline Networks: A Review of Key Issues

  14. Dumping pump and treat: rapid cleanups using thermal technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newmark, R.L.; Aines, R.D.

    1997-03-11

    Underground spills of volatile hydrocarbons are often difficult to clean up, especially if the contaminants are present in or below the water table as a separate liquid-organic phase. Excavating and treating the contaminated soil may not be practical or even possible if the affected zone is relatively deep. Merely pumping groundwater has proven to be ineffective because huge amounts of water must be flushed through the contaminated area to clean it; even then the contaminants may not be completely removed. Due to the low solubility of most common contaminants, such pump and treat systems can be expected to take decades to centuries to actually clean a site. Today, many sites are required to pump and treat contaminated groundwater even though there is no expectation that the site will be cleaned. In these cases, the pumps simply control the spread of the contaminant, while requiring a continuous flow of money, paperwork, and management attention. Although pump and treat systems are relatively inexpensive to operate, they represent along term cost. Most importantly, they rarely remove enough contaminant to change the property`s status. Although a pump and treat system can offer compliance in a regulatory sense, it doesn`t solve the site`s liability problem. Thermal methods promise to solve this dilemma by actually cleaning a property in a short time period, thus limiting the period of liability. This may involve cleaning a site to closure during the initial contaminant-removal phase, or removal of the majority of the contaminant so that natural processes such as bioremediation can return the site to pristine condition over a period of years, without further owner intervention. Today`s regulatory environment encourages this approach through efforts such as the brownfields initiatives. In either case, this requires a strong commitment on the part of the site owner. Most if not all the cleanup occurs within the first year or so, and nearly all the cost. In our experience, the total cleanup cost is still significantly smaller than with conventional methods. The real benefit is the cleanup and thus the removal of liability within a realistic time frame.

  15. Waste Cleanup: Status and Implications of Compliance Agreements Between DOE and Its Regulators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, G. L.; Swick, W. R.; Perry, T. C.; Kintner-Meyer, N.K.; Abraham, C. R.; Pollack, I. M.

    2003-02-26

    This paper discusses compliance agreements that affect the Department of Energy's (DOE) cleanup program. Compliance agreements are legally enforceable documents between DOE and its regulators, specifying cleanup activities and milestones that DOE has agreed to achieve. Over the years, these compliance agreements have been used to implement much of the cleanup activity at DOE sites, which is carried our primarily under two federal laws - the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980, as amended (CERCLA) and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 0f 1976, as amended (RCRA). Our objectives were to determine the types of compliance agreements in effect at DOE cleanup sites, DOE's progress in achieving the milestones contained in the agreements, whether the agreements allowed DOE to prioritize work across sites according to relative risk, and possible implications the agreements have on DOE's efforts to improve the cleanup program.

  16. Secretary Moniz Kicks Off Inaugural National Cleanup Workshop with Call for Collaboration to Address EM’s Challenges

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz commenced DOE’s first-ever National Cleanup Workshop last week by highlighting recent major EM accomplishments and emphasizing the importance of working together to overcome remaining challenges in the cleanup program.

  17. 2009-04 "Priorities for ARRA Stimulus Funding for Environmental Clean-up at

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    LANL" | Department of Energy 9-04 "Priorities for ARRA Stimulus Funding for Environmental Clean-up at LANL" 2009-04 "Priorities for ARRA Stimulus Funding for Environmental Clean-up at LANL" The intent of this recommendation is to encourage LASO and the DOE Office of Environmental Management to shoe immediate and beneficial acceleration of the clean-up of legacy waste at LANL and to encourage additional ARRA funding be provided for the use at LANL. Further, the intent

  18. Energy Department Announces $2.9 Billion Contract for Idaho Site Cleanup |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy 9 Billion Contract for Idaho Site Cleanup Energy Department Announces $2.9 Billion Contract for Idaho Site Cleanup March 23, 2005 - 11:07am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - The United States Department of Energy today announced the selection of CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC as the contractor responsible for the Idaho Cleanup Project through the year 2012 at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). "We are pleased to announce this selection to ensure a seamless transition and continued

  19. DOE Completes Cleanup at New York, California Sites | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Cleanup at New York, California Sites DOE Completes Cleanup at New York, California Sites July 1, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - Last month, the U.S. Department of Energy completed the cleanup of Cold War legacy waste at the Nuclear Radiation Development, LLC (NRD) site near Grand Island, New York, and at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California. The two locations became the 18th and 19th sites to be completely cleaned of legacy waste. This milestone was

  20. UCOR Assumes Role as Primary Cleanup Contractor for ETTP | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy UCOR Assumes Role as Primary Cleanup Contractor for ETTP UCOR Assumes Role as Primary Cleanup Contractor for ETTP August 1, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis OAK RIDGE, Tenn. - Following the successful completion of transition, URS | CH2M Oak Ridge LLC (UCOR) has assumed its role as the primary contractor for remediation and cleanup of the Department of Energy's (DOE) East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP). "We are extremely pleased to have UCOR on board," said John Eschenberg, the DOE

  1. DOE extends the Idaho Cleanup Project Contract for Three Years | Department

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Energy extends the Idaho Cleanup Project Contract for Three Years DOE extends the Idaho Cleanup Project Contract for Three Years September 25, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Brad Bugger 208-526-0833 Danielle Miller 208-526-5709 Idaho Falls, ID - The U.S. Department of Energy has extended by three years its contract with the company currently operating the Idaho Cleanup Project at the department's Idaho Site. CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC's (CWI) period of performance on the current contract

  2. Head of EM to Kick Off Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy to Kick Off Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus Head of EM to Kick Off Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus April 22, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - EM Senior Advisor Dave Huizenga will provide an overview of EM's proposed fiscal year 2014 budget Thursday in the first of six briefings for the 19th annual U.S. House Nuclear Cleanup Caucus. Huizenga rolled out the $5.622 billion budget request earlier this month. The proposal, which requires approval by Congress, enables EM

  3. DOE Awards More than $16 Million for Recovery Act Cleanup at ORNL |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy More than $16 Million for Recovery Act Cleanup at ORNL DOE Awards More than $16 Million for Recovery Act Cleanup at ORNL March 31, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis OAK RIDGE, Tenn. - As a part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, the Department of Energy has awarded a $16.8 million contract to Safety and Ecology Corporation (SEC) for environmental cleanup operations at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Under this contract, SEC will demolish and dispose (D&D)

  4. DOE Reaches Recovery Act Goal With Cleanup of All Legacy Transuranic Waste

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    at Sandia National Laboratories | Department of Energy Reaches Recovery Act Goal With Cleanup of All Legacy Transuranic Waste at Sandia National Laboratories DOE Reaches Recovery Act Goal With Cleanup of All Legacy Transuranic Waste at Sandia National Laboratories May 3, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Deb Gill, U.S. DOE Carlsbad Field Office, (575) 234-7270 CARLSBAD, N.M., May 3, 2012 -The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) completed cleanup of the Cold War legacy transuranic (TRU) waste

  5. Task 4.9 -- Value-added products from syngas. Semi-annual report, January 1--June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-08-01

    The work on advanced fuel forms in 1996 is focused in part on the synthesis of higher alcohols from mixtures of hydrogen and carbon monoxide (syngas) from coal gasification. This art has been practiced for many years in Germany, South Africa, and the US. The conversion of coal gasification products to commercially valuable alcohols will provide an important new market for current and future gasification plants. Initial work in this project utilized a novel molybdenum catalyst previously shown to be active for hydrodesulfurization reactions of coal liquids. This support for the active metal is a mixed oxide capable of interaction with the metal sites for catalysis of carbon monoxide reductions. A pressurized fixed-bed flow-through reactor was constructed and one catalyst was tested under a variety of conditions. Unfortunately, this catalyst with low metal loading was inactive. Therefore, a catalyst with a high metal loading and additional metal sites (cobalt, potassium) is now being tested.

  6. From Cleanup to Stewardship. A companion report to Accelerating Cleanup: Paths to Closure and background information to support the scoping process required for the 1998 PEIS Settlement Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-10-01

    Long-term stewardship is expected to be needed at more than 100 DOE sites after DOE's Environmental Management program completes disposal, stabilization, and restoration operations to address waste and contamination resulting from nuclear research and nuclear weapons production conducted over the past 50 years. From Cleanup to stewardship provides background information on the Department of Energy (DOE) long-term stewardship obligations and activities. This document begins to examine the transition from cleanup to long-term stewardship, and it fulfills the Secretary's commitment to the President in the 1999 Performance Agreement to provide a companion report to the Department's Accelerating Cleanup: Paths to Closure report. It also provides background information to support the scoping process required for a study on long-term stewardship required by a 1998 Settlement Agreement.

  7. Thermal cleanups using dynamic underground stripping and hydrous pyrolysis oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aines, R D; Knauss, K; Leif, R; Newmark, R L

    1999-05-01

    In the early 1990s, in collaboration with the School of Engineering at the University of California, Berkeley, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory developed dynamic underground stripping (DUS), a method for treating subsurface contaminants with heat that is much faster and more effective than traditional treatment methods. more recently, Livermore scientists developed hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation (HPO), which introduces both heat and oxygen to the subsurface to convert contaminants in the ground to such benign products as carbon dioxide, chloride ion, and water. This process has effectively destroyed all contaminants it encountered in laboratory tests. With dynamic underground stripping, the contaminants are vaporized and vacuumed out of the ground, leaving them still to be destroyed elsewhere. Hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation technology takes the cleanup process one step further by eliminating the treatment, handling, and disposal requirements and destroying the contamination in the ground. When used in combination, HPO is especially useful in the final polishing of a site containing significant free-product contaminant, once the majority of the contaminant has been removed.

  8. Microsoft Word - DOE News Release-DOE Completes Cleanup at New...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the U.S. Department of Energy completed the cleanup of Cold War legacy waste at the Nuclear Radiation Development, LLC (NRD) site near Grand Island, New York, and at the...

  9. EM’s December Newsletter Recaps Cold War Cleanup Accomplishments in 2013

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On Dec. 19, EM completed demolition of the 4.8 million-square-foot Building K-25 at Oak Ridge, a milestone that capped a busy and successful 2013 for the Cold War cleanup program.

  10. EM Develops Database for Efficient Solutions to Nuclear Cleanup Challenges Across Complex

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, D.C. – Many deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) projects across the EM complex require robotic and remote handling systems to protect workers during nuclear cleanup operations.

  11. Second site-wide five-year review of cleanup at DOE?s Idaho...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NEWS MEDIA CONTACT: Danielle Miller (DOE-ID) 208-526-5709 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Thursday, February 3, 2011 Second site-wide five-year review of cleanup at DOEs Idaho site...

  12. EM Discusses Five-Year Planning Effort at National Cleanup Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    At a key roundtable session of the National Cleanup Workshop, Mark Whitney, Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for EM, described the program’s initiative to develop and execute a five-year planning effort.

  13. High School Students Engage EM Program, Teach Classmates about Nuclear Cleanup

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    LAS VEGAS – Two high school students are aspiring to educate their classmates on the Nevada National Security Site’s (NNSS) environmental cleanup program after surveying them to gauge their knowledge of it.

  14. Secretary Chu Announces Determination of No Adverse Material Impact for Uranium Transfer to Fund Portsmouth Cleanup

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Secretary of Energy Steven Chu announced a determination and market impact analysis authorizing uranium transfers to fund accelerated cleanup activities at the Portsmouth Site in Piketon, Ohio, through the third quarter of calendar year 2013.

  15. EM Richland Operations Office Manager Reflects on River Corridor's Safe, Successful Cleanup

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash. – This month, Stacy L. Charboneau marks her first year as manager of EM’s Richland Operations Office (RL), responsible for management and oversight of cleanup of the 586-square-mile Hanford Site.

  16. EA-1345: Cleanup and Closure of the Energy Technology Engineering Center

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE prepared an EA and finding of no significant impact (FONSI) for cleanup and closure of DOE’s Energy Technology Engineering Center at the Santa Susana Field Laboratory in 2003. However, DOE’s...

  17. Probing Fukushima with cosmic rays should help speed cleanup of damaged

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    plant Probing Fukushima with cosmic rays Probing Fukushima with cosmic rays should help speed cleanup of damaged plant The initiative could reduce the time required to clean up the disabled complex by at least a decade and greatly reduce radiation exposure to personnel working at the plant. December 22, 2014 Probing Fukushima with cosmic rays should help speed cleanup of damaged plant Los Alamos-generated computer animation of the Fukushima Diachi powerplant. Contact James Rickman

  18. Recovery Act Workers Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Basin |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Basin Recovery Act Workers Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Basin American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers recently cleaned up a second basin containing coal ash residues from Cold War operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS). About $24 million from the Recovery Act funded the environmental restoration project, allowing SRS to complete the project at least five years ahead of schedule. The work is part

  19. DOE and NASA Reach Cleanup Agreements with the State of California for the

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Santa Susana Field Laboratory | Department of Energy NASA Reach Cleanup Agreements with the State of California for the Santa Susana Field Laboratory DOE and NASA Reach Cleanup Agreements with the State of California for the Santa Susana Field Laboratory December 6, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - The Department of Energy and NASA both signed Administrative Orders on Consent (AOC) with the California Environmental Protection Agency (Cal EPA) today that define the process for

  20. In the OSTI Collections: Microbes for Production and Cleanup | OSTI, US

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information Microbes for Production and Cleanup View Past"In the OSTI Collections"Articles. Article Acknowledgement: Dr. William N. Watson, Physicist DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information Environmental cleanup Fuel production References Reports available through DOepatents Reports available through SciTech Reports available through DOE PAGESBeta Like all of our planet's organisms, microbes, in the process of living,

  1. Nevada National Security Site Cleanup Information Is Just a Click Away with

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Computer Map, Database - New Interactive Map Makes NNSS Data More Accessible to the Public | Department of Energy National Security Site Cleanup Information Is Just a Click Away with Computer Map, Database - New Interactive Map Makes NNSS Data More Accessible to the Public Nevada National Security Site Cleanup Information Is Just a Click Away with Computer Map, Database - New Interactive Map Makes NNSS Data More Accessible to the Public December 27, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Shown here is a

  2. Major Cold War Cleanup Milestone Reached at the Savannah River Site |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Department of Energy Major Cold War Cleanup Milestone Reached at the Savannah River Site Major Cold War Cleanup Milestone Reached at the Savannah River Site March 29, 2012 - 10:37am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Today, the Energy Department announced it has reached a major milestone in the Department's efforts to clean up the Cold War legacy at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina, laying the groundwork for closing two underground storage tanks that previously held radioactive liquid

  3. Microsoft PowerPoint - DOE_Central Plateau approach to cleanup decisions.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Approach to Cleanup Decisions Introduction * This approach was previously called the Inner Area Principles. * DOE, EPA, and Ecology prepared the Central Plateau Approach to Cleanup Decisions as a communication tool * This document tries to explain the approach, including the assumptions DOE would like to use. 2 Introduction (continued) * The approach is consistent with CERCLA guidance, the National Contingency Plan, and the State of Washington Model Toxics Control Act (MTCA). * Purpose: To

  4. Seventh Chapter of Hanford Story Released to Public: Chapter Covers Cleanup

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    along Columbia River - Breathtaking river views...nice graphics...glimpses of the future of Hanford | Department of Energy Seventh Chapter of Hanford Story Released to Public: Chapter Covers Cleanup along Columbia River - Breathtaking river views...nice graphics...glimpses of the future of Hanford Seventh Chapter of Hanford Story Released to Public: Chapter Covers Cleanup along Columbia River - Breathtaking river views...nice graphics...glimpses of the future of Hanford June 20, 2012 -

  5. Site Transition Summary: Cleanup Completion to Long-Term Stewardship at

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy On-going Mission Sites | Department of Energy Summary: Cleanup Completion to Long-Term Stewardship at Department of Energy On-going Mission Sites Site Transition Summary: Cleanup Completion to Long-Term Stewardship at Department of Energy On-going Mission Sites Long-term stewardship (LTS) includes the physical controls, institutions, information, and other mechanisms needed to ensure protection of people and the environment at sites where the U.S. Department of Energy

  6. Recovery Act Exceeds Major Cleanup Milestone, DOE Complex Now 74 Percent

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Remediated | Department of Energy Recovery Act Exceeds Major Cleanup Milestone, DOE Complex Now 74 Percent Remediated Recovery Act Exceeds Major Cleanup Milestone, DOE Complex Now 74 Percent Remediated The Office of Environmental Management's (EM) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Program recently achieved 74 percent footprint reduction, exceeding the originally established goal of 40 percent. EM has reduced its pre-Recovery Act footprint of 931 square miles, established in 2009, by 688

  7. PPPO Cleanup Projects - Portsmouth, Paducah, & DUF6 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Services » PPPO Cleanup Projects - Portsmouth, Paducah, & DUF6 PPPO Cleanup Projects - Portsmouth, Paducah, & DUF6 Paducah site uses in-ground heating to remove groundwater contamination Paducah site uses in-ground heating to remove groundwater contamination Read more Portsmouth Site shipped plant components to an approved offsite disposal facility Portsmouth Site shipped plant components to an approved offsite disposal facility Read more DUF6 Project converts DUF6 into a more stable

  8. Material Disposal Area G Clean-up Overview and Status | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Material Disposal Area G Clean-up Overview and Status Material Disposal Area G Clean-up Overview and Status Topic: Jeff Mousseau LANL, Provided Information on the Strategy for Closing of Technical Area 54 MDA G. Information Included the Process for Site Characterization, Remediation and the Path Forward. PDF icon MDA G Closure - January 29, 2014 More Documents & Publications Overview of Environmental Programs Proposed Process: NNMCAB Input on Campaigns Associate Directorate for

  9. Meeting Offers Opportunity to Discuss EM Cleanup with China | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Meeting Offers Opportunity to Discuss EM Cleanup with China Meeting Offers Opportunity to Discuss EM Cleanup with China April 29, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Members of the Environment and Waste Management Working Group of the Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Technology Joint Coordinated Committee from DOE include, front row, EM Technical Advisor for Foreign Affairs Rosa Elmetti (center) and EM Office of Tank Waste Management Director Steve Schneider (right); middle row, Lawrence Livermore

  10. PROGRESS & CHALLENGES IN CLEANUP OF HANFORDS TANK WASTES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HEWITT, W.M.; SCHEPENS, R.

    2006-01-23

    The River Protection Project (RPP), which is managed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of River Protection (ORP), is highly complex from technical, regulatory, legal, political, and logistical perspectives and is the largest ongoing environmental cleanup project in the world. Over the past three years, ORP has made significant advances in its planning and execution of the cleanup of the Hartford tank wastes. The 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs), 28 double-shell tanks (DSTs), and 60 miscellaneous underground storage tanks (MUSTs) at Hanford contain approximately 200,000 m{sup 3} (53 million gallons) of mixed radioactive wastes, some of which dates back to the first days of the Manhattan Project. The plan for treating and disposing of the waste stored in large underground tanks is to: (1) retrieve the waste, (2) treat the waste to separate it into high-level (sludge) and low-activity (supernatant) fractions, (3) remove key radionuclides (e.g., Cs-137, Sr-90, actinides) from the low-activity fraction to the maximum extent technically and economically practical, (4) immobilize both the high-level and low-activity waste fractions by vitrification, (5) interim store the high-level waste fraction for ultimate disposal off-site at the federal HLW repository, (6) dispose the low-activity fraction on-site in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF), and (7) close the waste management areas consisting of tanks, ancillary equipment, soils, and facilities. Design and construction of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), the cornerstone of the RPP, has progressed substantially despite challenges arising from new seismic information for the WTP site. We have looked closely at the waste and aligned our treatment and disposal approaches with the waste characteristics. For example, approximately 11,000 m{sup 3} (2-3 million gallons) of metal sludges in twenty tanks were not created during spent nuclear fuel reprocessing and have low fission product concentrations. We plan to treat these wastes as transuranic waste (TRU) for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), which will reduce the WTP system processing time by three years. We are also developing and testing bulk vitrification as a technology to supplement the WTP LAW vitrification facility for immobilizing the massive volume of LAW. We will conduct a full-scale demonstration of the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System by immobilizing up to 1,100 m{sup 3} (300,000 gallons) of tank S-109 low-curie soluble waste from which Cs-137 had previously been removed. This past year has been marked by both progress and new challenges. The focus of our tank farm work has been retrieving waste from the old single-shell tanks (SSTs). We have completed waste retrieval from three SSTs and are conducting retrieval operations on an additional three SSTs. While most waste retrievals have gone about as expected, we have faced challenges with some recalcitrant tank heel wastes that required enhanced approaches. Those enhanced approaches ranged from oxalic acid additions to deploying a remote high-pressure water lance. As with all large, long-term projects that employ first of a kind technologies, we continue to be challenged to control costs and maintain schedule. However, it is most important to work safely and to provide facilities that will do the job they are intended to do.

  11. North Slope (Wahluke Slope) expedited response action cleanup plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The purpose of this action is to mitigate any threat to public health and the environment from hazards on the North Slope and meet the expedited response action (ERA) objective of cleanup to a degree requiring no further action. The ERA may be the final remediation of the 100-I-3 Operable Unit. A No Action record of decision (ROD) may be issued after remediation completion. The US Department of Energy (DOE) currently owns or administers approximately 140 mi{sup 2} (about 90,000 acres) of land north and east of the Columbia River (referred to as the North Slope) that is part of the Hanford Site. The North Slope, also commonly known as the Wahluke Slope, was not used for plutonium production or support facilities; it was used for military air defense of the Hanford Site and vicinity. The North Slope contained seven antiaircraft gun emplacements and three Nike-Ajax missile positions. These military positions were vacated in 1960--1961 as the defense requirements at Hanford changed. They were demolished in 1974. Prior to government control in 1943, the North Slope was homesteaded. Since the initiation of this ERA in the summer of 1992, DOE signed the modified Hanford Federal Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) with the Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in which a milestone was set to complete remediation activities and a draft closeout report by October 1994. Remediation activities will make the North Slope area available for future non-DOE uses. Thirty-nine sites have undergone limited characterization to determine if significant environmental hazards exist. This plan documents the results of that characterization and evaluates the potential remediation alternatives.

  12. Robust Low-Cost Water-Gas Shift Membrane Reactor for High-Purity Hydrogen Production form Coal-Derived Syngas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Torkelson; Neng Ye; Zhijiang Li; Decio Coutinho; Mark Fokema

    2008-05-31

    This report details work performed in an effort to develop a low-cost, robust water gas shift membrane reactor to convert coal-derived syngas into high purity hydrogen. A sulfur- and halide-tolerant water gas shift catalyst and a sulfur-tolerant dense metallic hydrogen-permeable membrane were developed. The materials were integrated into a water gas shift membrane reactor in order to demonstrate the production of >99.97% pure hydrogen from a simulated coal-derived syngas stream containing 2000 ppm hydrogen sulfide. The objectives of the program were to (1) develop a contaminant-tolerant water gas shift catalyst that is able to achieve equilibrium carbon monoxide conversion at high space velocity and low steam to carbon monoxide ratio, (2) develop a contaminant-tolerant hydrogen-permeable membrane with a higher permeability than palladium, (3) demonstrate 1 L/h purified hydrogen production from coal-derived syngas in an integrated catalytic membrane reactor, and (4) conduct a cost analysis of the developed technology.

  13. Method for high temperature mercury capture from gas streams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Granite, E.J.; Pennline, H.W.

    2006-04-25

    A process to facilitate mercury extraction from high temperature flue/fuel gas via the use of metal sorbents which capture mercury at ambient and high temperatures. The spent sorbents can be regenerated after exposure to mercury. The metal sorbents can be used as pure metals (or combinations of metals) or dispersed on an inert support to increase surface area per gram of metal sorbent. Iridium and ruthenium are effective for mercury removal from flue and smelter gases. Palladium and platinum are effective for mercury removal from fuel gas (syngas). An iridium-platinum alloy is suitable for metal capture in many industrial effluent gas streams including highly corrosive gas streams.

  14. Surface and subsurface cleanup protocol for radionuclides, Gunnison, Colorado, UMTRA project processing site. Final [report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    Surface and subsurface soil cleanup protocols for the Gunnison, Colorado, processing sits are summarized as follows: In accordance with EPA-promulgated land cleanup standards (40 CFR 192), in situ Ra-226 is to be cleaned up based on bulk concentrations not exceeding 5 and 15 pCi/g in 15-cm surface and subsurface depth increments, averaged over 100-m{sup 2} grid blocks, where the parent Ra-226 concentrations are greater than, or in secular equilibrium with, the Th-230 parent. A bulk interpretation of these EPA standards has been accepted by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and while the concentration of the finer-sized soil fraction less than a No. 4 mesh sieve contains the higher concentration of radioactivity, the bulk approach in effect integrates the total sample radioactivity over the entire sample mass. In locations where Th-230 has differentially migrated in subsoil relative to Ra-226, a Th-230 cleanup protocol has been developed in accordance with Supplemental Standard provisions of 40 CFR 192 for NRC/Colorado Department of Health (CDH) approval for timely implementation. Detailed elements of the protocol are contained in Appendix A, Generic Protocol from Thorium-230 Cleanup/Verification at UMTRA Project Processing Sites. The cleanup of other radionuclides or nonradiological hazards that pose a significant threat to the public and the environment will be determined and implemented in accordance with pathway analysis to assess impacts and the implications of ALARA specified in 40 CFR 192 relative to supplemental standards.

  15. New Generation Dresden NPP Demineralizer Vault Cleanup Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denton, M.S.; CET, Ph.D.; Forrester, K.; Azar, M.

    2008-07-01

    Electro-coagulation (EC) is a technique that facilitates rapid destabilization and flocculation of colloidal suspensions to cause the suspended solids to separate from slurry phase. It is generally accepted that coagulation is brought about primarily by the reduction of the net surface charge to a point where the colloidal particles, previously stabilized by electrostatic repulsion, can approach closely enough for van der Waals forces to hold them together and allow aggregation. In the EC process, the coagulant is generated in situ by electrolytic oxidation of an appropriate anode material (aluminum in this case). In this process, charged ionic species, metals or otherwise, and suspended solids are removed from wastewater by allowing them to interact with an ion having opposite charge, or with floc of metallic hydroxides generated electrochemically within the effluent. Typically, no supplementary organic polymer coagulant addition is required. Thus, electro-coagulation (EC) was found to be an attractive treatment option to rapidly destabilize the colloidal particulate phase, allowing more facile particulate removal by decantation and/or coarse filtration. However, the liquid medium must have some conductivity (> 100 {mu}mho is preferred), in order to allow effective electrical coupling with the EC electrodes. A very small amount of aluminum or sodium sulfate salts can be added to the feed slurry, adjusting the water quality parameters to a conductivity of >100 {mu}mho and a pH value near 6.0-7.0. The EC-treated vault slurry had a pH value near 6.5 (within the pH range for minimal solubility of amphoteric aluminum hydroxide). In contrast to untreated wastewater, the agglomerated particles in the EC-treated aliquot could be filtered relatively rapidly, yielding a clear filtrate, indicating that the flocs that have been formed are now > 20- {mu}m in size, are pumpable (high shear strength), and filterable/dewaterable with ease (low water content). Final waste volumes also show that the actual volumetric fraction of solids produced are relatively small. In order to estimate the amount of material (Al or Fe depending on the electrode material) added by the EC process, a rough rule of thumb has been found to be {approx}15 ppm per amp-minute. It was found with most wastewaters that Cs seeding (if that step is required) added {approx} 100 ppm Cs Seed and 10-15 ppm/amp minute additional floc from the electrodes. In a typical BWR wastewater case, where the TSS represented {<=} 0.15 wt% ({approx}1500 ppm). At 1.5 amp-min., the Al (III) added by the EC process would be {approx} 20 ppm, or {approx} 60 ppm as Al(OH){sub 3}. It was found the relatively low floc [{approx} 40 ppm as dried Al(OH){sub 3}] worked quite well for the high colloid level present ({approx}1500 ppm), and would be even more enhanced with the use of recycle. Even at that relatively low treatment dose, the colloidal TSS in the wastewater was effectively flocculated to yield agglomerates that were easily filtered and dewatered. Another rule of thumb is that, empirically, TDS (in mg/l) is typically {approx}0.5 X conductivity (in umho/cm). For instance, a conductivity reading of 100 umho/cm corresponds to about 50 ppm of TDS. As can be seen, the amount of material actually added in this vault cleanup of {approx}15 ppm per amp-min compared to the existing {approx}1500 ppm of TDS present (0.5 X conductivity of 3000 {mu}mho/cm) is minimal. In this vault cleanup, as a precautionary measure, the HIC was a specially designed Press-Pak with internal sheet filters, final dewatering leg, and a expandable, outer bladder if needed for final dewatering. It was found after filling the first HIC, of two, that the material dewatered and passed final dewatering tests without the need for the precautionary Press-Pak feature. Original estimates by the evaluation team estimated it would take some 11 to 12 HICs to remove the vault contents to a remote location for treatment, dewatering and final shipment. With the use of the SAFE{sup TM} Solution, the project was completed dur

  16. 2020 Vision for Tank Waste Cleanup (One System Integration) - 12506

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harp, Benton; Charboneau, Stacy; Olds, Erik

    2012-07-01

    The mission of the Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (ORP) is to safely retrieve and treat the 56 million gallons of Hanford's tank waste and close the Tank Farms to protect the Columbia River. The millions of gallons of waste are a by-product of decades of plutonium production. After irradiated fuel rods were taken from the nuclear reactors to the processing facilities at Hanford they were exposed to a series of chemicals designed to dissolve away the rod, which enabled workers to retrieve the plutonium. Once those chemicals were exposed to the fuel rods they became radioactive and extremely hot. They also couldn't be used in this process more than once. Because the chemicals are caustic and extremely hazardous to humans and the environment, underground storage tanks were built to hold these chemicals until a more permanent solution could be found. The Cleanup of Hanford's 56 million gallons of radioactive and chemical waste stored in 177 large underground tanks represents the Department's largest and most complex environmental remediation project. Sixty percent by volume of the nation's high-level radioactive waste is stored in the underground tanks grouped into 18 'tank farms' on Hanford's central plateau. Hanford's mission to safely remove, treat and dispose of this waste includes the construction of a first-of-its-kind Waste Treatment Plant (WTP), ongoing retrieval of waste from single-shell tanks, and building or upgrading the waste feed delivery infrastructure that will deliver the waste to and support operations of the WTP beginning in 2019. Our discussion of the 2020 Vision for Hanford tank waste cleanup will address the significant progress made to date and ongoing activities to manage the operations of the tank farms and WTP as a single system capable of retrieving, delivering, treating and disposing Hanford's tank waste. The initiation of hot operations and subsequent full operations of the WTP are not only dependent upon the successful design and construction of the WTP, but also on appropriately preparing the tank farms and waste feed delivery infrastructure to reliably and consistently deliver waste feed to the WTP for many decades. The key components of the 2020 vision are: all WTP facilities are commissioned, turned-over and operational, achieving the earliest possible hot operations of completed WTP facilities, and supplying low-activity waste (LAW) feed directly to the LAW Facility using in-tank/near tank supplemental treatment technologies. A One System Integrated Project Team (IPT) was recently formed to focus on developing and executing the programs that will be critical to successful waste feed delivery and WTP startup. The team is comprised of members from Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI), Washington River Protection Solutions LLC (WRPS), and DOE-ORP and DOE-WTP. The IPT will combine WTP and WRPS capabilities in a mission-focused model that is clearly defined, empowered and cost efficient. The genesis for this new team and much of the 2020 vision is based on the work of an earlier team that was tasked with identifying the optimum approach to startup, commissioning, and turnover of WTP facilities for operations. This team worked backwards from 2020 - a date when the project will be completed and steady-state operations will be underway - and identified success criteria to achieving safe and efficient operations of the WTP. The team was not constrained by any existing contract work scope, labor, or funding parameters. Several essential strategies were identified to effectively realize the one-system model of integrated feed stream delivery, WTP operations, and product delivery, and to accomplish the team's vision of hot operations beginning in 2016: - Use a phased startup and turnover approach that will allow WTP facilities to be transitioned to an operational state on as short a timeline as credible. - Align Tank Farm (TF) and WTP objectives such that feed can be supplied to the WTP when it is required for hot operations. - Ensure immobilized waste and waste recycle streams can be recei

  17. Chemical Looping Gasification for Hydrogen Enhanced Syngas Production with In-Situ CO2 Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathe, Mandar; Xu, Dikai; Hsieh, Tien-Lin; Simpson, James; Statnick, Robert; Tong, Andrew; Fan, Liang-Shih

    2014-12-31

    This document is the final report for the project titled “Chemical Looping Gasification for Hydrogen Enhanced Syngas Production with In-Situ CO2 Capture” under award number FE0012136 for the performance period 10/01/2013 to 12/31/2014.This project investigates the novel Ohio State chemical looping gasification technology for high efficiency, cost efficiency coal gasification for IGCC and methanol production application. The project developed an optimized oxygen carrier composition, demonstrated the feasibility of the concept and completed cold-flow model studies. WorleyParsons completed a techno-economic analysis which showed that for a coal only feed with carbon capture, the OSU CLG technology reduced the methanol required selling price by 21%, lowered the capital costs by 28%, increased coal consumption efficiency by 14%. Further, using the Ohio State Chemical Looping Gasification technology resulted in a methanol required selling price which was lower than the reference non-capture case.

  18. LIQUID BIO-FUEL PRODUCTION FROM NON-FOOD BIOMASS VIA HIGH TEMPERATURE STEAM ELECTROLYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. L. Hawkes; J. E. O'Brien; M. G. McKellar

    2011-11-01

    Bio-Syntrolysis is a hybrid energy process that enables production of synthetic liquid fuels that are compatible with the existing conventional liquid transportation fuels infrastructure. Using biomass as a renewable carbon source, and supplemental hydrogen from high-temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE), bio-syntrolysis has the potential to provide a significant alternative petroleum source that could reduce US dependence on imported oil. Combining hydrogen from HTSE with CO from an oxygen-blown biomass gasifier yields syngas to be used as a feedstock for synthesis of liquid transportation fuels via a Fischer-Tropsch process. Conversion of syngas to liquid hydrocarbon fuels, using a biomass-based carbon source, expands the application of renewable energy beyond the grid to include transportation fuels. It can also contribute to grid stability associated with non-dispatchable power generation. The use of supplemental hydrogen from HTSE enables greater than 90% utilization of the biomass carbon content which is about 2.5 times higher than carbon utilization associated with traditional cellulosic ethanol production. If the electrical power source needed for HTSE is based on nuclear or renewable energy, the process is carbon neutral. INL has demonstrated improved biomass processing prior to gasification. Recyclable biomass in the form of crop residue or energy crops would serve as the feedstock for this process. A process model of syngas production using high temperature electrolysis and biomass gasification is presented. Process heat from the biomass gasifier is used to heat steam for the hydrogen production via the high temperature steam electrolysis process. Oxygen produced form the electrolysis process is used to control the oxidation rate in the oxygen-blown biomass gasifier. Based on the gasifier temperature, 94% to 95% of the carbon in the biomass becomes carbon monoxide in the syngas (carbon monoxide and hydrogen). Assuming the thermal efficiency of the power cycle for electricity generation is 50%, (as expected from GEN IV nuclear reactors), the syngas production efficiency ranges from 70% to 73% as the gasifier temperature decreases from 1900 K to 1500 K. Parametric studies of system pressure, biomass moisture content and low temperature alkaline electrolysis are also presented.

  19. Stimulus Funding Creating Cleanup Jobs At DOE�s Idaho Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stimulus Funding Creating Cleanup Jobs At DOE�s Idaho Site Arimo resident Jeff Johnson did something this week he hasn�t done since January. He reported to his new job. Funding for Johnson�s position is part of the $468 million in additional funding that the U.S. Department of Energy�s (DOE) Idaho Site received under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. The additional funding will help accelerate work on both the Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP) and the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment

  20. Hanford Site Cleanup Challenges and Opportunities for Science and Technology--A Strategic Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, Thomas W.; Johnson, Wayne L.; Kreid, Dennis K.; Walton, Terry L.

    2001-02-01

    The sheer expanse of the Hanford Site, the inherent hazards associated with the significant inventory of nuclear materials and wastes, the large number of aging contaminated facilities, the diverse nature and extent of environmental contamination, and the proximity to the Columbia River make Hanford perhaps the world's largest and most complex environmental cleanup project. It is not possible to address the more complex elements of this enormous challenge in a cost-effective manner without strategic investments in science and technology. Success requires vigorous and sustained efforts to enhance the science and technology basis, develop and deploy innovative solutions, and provide firm scientific bases to support site cleanup and closure decisions at Hanford.

  1. Preliminary design of a fusion reactor fuel cleanup system by the palladium-alloy membrane method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshida, H.; Konishi, S.; Naruse, Y.

    1983-05-01

    A design for a palladium diffuser and fuel cleanup system for a deuterium-tritium fusion reactor is proposed. The feasibility of the palladium-alloy membrane method is discussed based on early studies by the authors. Operating conditions of the palladium diffuser are determined experimentally. Dimensions of the diffuser are estimated from computer simulation. A fuel cleanup system is designed under the feed conditions of the Tritium Systems Test Assembly at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The system is composed of palladium diffusers, catalytic oxidizer, freezer, and zinc beds and has some advantages in system layout and operation. This design can readily be extended to other conditions of plasma exhaust gases.

  2. DOE Awards Contract for Moab Mill Tailings Cleanup | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Moab Mill Tailings Cleanup DOE Awards Contract for Moab Mill Tailings Cleanup November 4, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Bill Taylor bill.taylor@srs.gov 803-952-8564 Cincinnati- The Department of Energy (DOE) announced today that it has awarded a competitive small business contract worth $121.2 million over the next five years as part of the Department's continued efforts to protect the Colorado River and downstream water users by removing uranium tailings at the former Atlas uranium-ore

  3. PPPL's Earth Week features Colloquium on NYC green plan, cleanup and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    awards | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab PPPL's Earth Week features Colloquium on NYC green plan, cleanup and awards By Jeanne Jackson DeVoe April 28, 2014 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Volunteers clean up the area outside PPPL's Lyman Spitzer Building during the Earth Day cleanup at PPPL on April 22. From left to right: Virginia Finley, Julia Toth, Bill Davis, Glenn Anderson and Shannon Greco. (Photo by Elle Starkman/PPPL Office of Communications) Volunteers clean up the area

  4. A Decade of Cleanup Progress at EM's Idaho Site | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Decade of Cleanup Progress at EM's Idaho Site A Decade of Cleanup Progress at EM's Idaho Site July 29, 2015 - 12:00pm Addthis Workers demolish the CPP 601-602 Spent Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Complex at the Idaho Site. Workers demolish the CPP 601-602 Spent Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Complex at the Idaho Site. Workers exhume targeted buried waste from Pit 9 in the Subsurface Disposal Area. Workers exhume targeted buried waste from Pit 9 in the Subsurface Disposal Area. An employee swipes a

  5. Department of Energy reaches an agreement in principle on the cleanup of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    the Santa Susana Field Lab site in Simi Valley | Department of Energy reaches an agreement in principle on the cleanup of the Santa Susana Field Lab site in Simi Valley Department of Energy reaches an agreement in principle on the cleanup of the Santa Susana Field Lab site in Simi Valley September 3, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - The Department of Energy announced today that it has reached an agreement in principle with California's Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC)

  6. DOE Update on USEC Cleanup, R&D, and Loan Guarantee Application |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Update on USEC Cleanup, R&D, and Loan Guarantee Application DOE Update on USEC Cleanup, R&D, and Loan Guarantee Application October 15, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Over the course of this year, the Department of Energy has worked closely with USEC on its loan guarantee application. This summer, the Department made several announcements related to USEC and its application, and is providing an update on those announcements at this time. At the end of

  7. Oak Ridge Commemorates Past, Moves Forward with Cleanup of Historic K-25

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Site | Department of Energy Commemorates Past, Moves Forward with Cleanup of Historic K-25 Site Oak Ridge Commemorates Past, Moves Forward with Cleanup of Historic K-25 Site August 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Workers near completion of the non-technetium area of K-25’s east wing (left). Oak Ridge anticipates beginning demolition on the North Tower (right) by October. Workers near completion of the non-technetium area of K-25's east wing (left). Oak Ridge anticipates beginning demolition

  8. The Department of Energy Announces Major Cold War Legacy Waste Cleanup

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Milestone | Department of Energy The Department of Energy Announces Major Cold War Legacy Waste Cleanup Milestone The Department of Energy Announces Major Cold War Legacy Waste Cleanup Milestone September 28, 2011 - 8:54am Addthis CARLSBAD, NM - The U.S. Department of Energy today announced that the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) received its 10,000th shipment of transuranic (TRU) waste over the weekend. This marks an important milestone in DOE's mission to clean up the country's Cold

  9. Idaho Cleanup Project completes work at Test Area North complex at DOE�s

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Idaho site Idaho Cleanup Project completes work at Test Area North complex at DOE�s Idaho site Loss-Of-Fluid Test Reactor Facility (before) Idaho Cleanup Project workers have completed all the original contract work scope at the U.S. Department of Energy�s Idaho Site�s Test Area North (TAN) complex. The work involved close cooperation among the Department of Energy, the Environmental Protection Agency and the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality, with public input incorporated

  10. Idaho Cleanup Project ships first Recovery Act-funded remote-handled

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    transuranic waste out of Idaho THE IDAHO SITE NEWS MEDIA CONTACT: Danielle Miller (DOE-ID) 208-526-5709 Joseph Campbell (CWI) 208-360-0142 For Immediate Release March 18, 2010 Idaho Cleanup Project ships first Recovery Act- funded remote-handled transuranic waste out of Idaho DATELINE - The Idaho Cleanup Project made its first shipment of remote-handled transuranic waste funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act on March 11, 2010. This is the first of approximately 150 shipments

  11. The Application of NEPA to CERCLA Cleanups (Department of Justice, 1995)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On March 31, 1994, officials from the Departrnent of Energy (DOE), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) met with then Acting Assistant Attorney General Lois Schiffer and other representatives of the Department of Justice (DOJ) to discuss the issue of the relationship of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) to the cleanup of federal facilities under the CERCLA Superfund program. The meeting focused on proposals for addressing problems that have arisen from DOE's attempts to integrate the procedural and analytical approaches of NEPA into the CERCLA cleanup process. This document describes what was discussed at the meeting and the consensus reached there.

  12. SUBTASK 3.12 - GASIFICATION, WARM-GAS CLEANUP, AND LIQUID FUELS

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    PRODUCTION WITH ILLINOIS COAL (Other) | SciTech Connect Other: SUBTASK 3.12 - GASIFICATION, WARM-GAS CLEANUP, AND LIQUID FUELS PRODUCTION WITH ILLINOIS COAL Citation Details In-Document Search Title: SUBTASK 3.12 - GASIFICATION, WARM-GAS CLEANUP, AND LIQUID FUELS PRODUCTION WITH ILLINOIS COAL The goal of this project was to evaluate the performance of Illinois No. 6 coal blended with biomass in a small-scale entrained-flow gasifier and demonstrate the production of liquid fuels under three

  13. Microsoft Word - Final_DOE_Cleanup_of_Legacy_TRU_at_SNL_Release.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reaches Recovery Act Goal With Cleanup of All Legacy Transuranic Waste at Sandia National Laboratories CARLSBAD, N.M., May 3, 2012 -The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) completed cleanup of the Cold War legacy transuranic (TRU) waste at Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) in Albuquerque, New Mexico when four shipments of remote-handled (RH) TRU waste from Sandia arrived at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, N.M. for permanent disposal on May 2, 2012. The DOE Carlsbad Field

  14. Task 6.5 - Gas Separation and Hot-Gas Cleanup (Technical Report) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect Task 6.5 - Gas Separation and Hot-Gas Cleanup Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Task 6.5 - Gas Separation and Hot-Gas Cleanup Catalytic gasification of coal to produce H{sub 2}- and CH{sub 4}-rich gases for consumption in molten carbonate fuel cells is currently under development; however, to optimize the fuel cell performance and extend its operating life, it is desired to separate as much of the inerts (i.e., CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}) and impurities (i.e., H{sub 2}S and

  15. Task 6.5 - Gas Separation and Hot-Gas Cleanup (Technical Report) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect Task 6.5 - Gas Separation and Hot-Gas Cleanup Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Task 6.5 - Gas Separation and Hot-Gas Cleanup × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A paper copy of this document is also available for

  16. Savannah River Site Makes Progress on Recovery Act-funded Cleanup |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Makes Progress on Recovery Act-funded Cleanup Savannah River Site Makes Progress on Recovery Act-funded Cleanup February 9, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis SRS loaded 14 standard waste boxes containing mixed and low-level waste that previously was classified as transuranic TRU waste. This shipment to a Florida treatment site marks the 1,000 cubic meter milestone of the 5,000 cubic meters in the Site’s TRU program that will be dispositioned through the Recovery Act. SRS

  17. U.K. Officials Visit DOE Headquarters to Collaborate on Nuclear Cleanup

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Issues | Department of Energy U.K. Officials Visit DOE Headquarters to Collaborate on Nuclear Cleanup Issues U.K. Officials Visit DOE Headquarters to Collaborate on Nuclear Cleanup Issues October 29, 2015 - 12:35pm Addthis The U.K. delegation is pictured with EM and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) officials at DOE headquarters. From left to right: Andy Worrall, the U.S. and U.K. Lab Coordinator, ORNL; Steve Thomson, Waste Management, Business Lead, NNL; John Mathieson, Head of

  18. Southwest Plume Cleanup at Paducah Site to Start by Summer 2013 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Southwest Plume Cleanup at Paducah Site to Start by Summer 2013 Southwest Plume Cleanup at Paducah Site to Start by Summer 2013 April 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Deep soil mixing at the Paducah site will involve a large-diameter auger like this one. Deep soil mixing at the Paducah site will involve a large-diameter auger like this one. Senior Advisor for Environmental Management David Huizenga (right) and Paducah Site Lead Reinhard Knerr look at a three-dimensional model

  19. Experts Explore Opportunities to Advance Use of Robotics in EM Cleanup |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Experts Explore Opportunities to Advance Use of Robotics in EM Cleanup Experts Explore Opportunities to Advance Use of Robotics in EM Cleanup December 17, 2015 - 5:00pm Addthis Mitch Pryor with the University of Texas-Austin is coached by Babb Attaway of Savannah River National Laboratory as he tries his hand using a manipulator. Mitch Pryor with the University of Texas-Austin is coached by Babb Attaway of Savannah River National Laboratory as he tries his hand using a

  20. Cleanup of 77 Waste Sites Meets Two TPA Milestones: 1.2 million tons of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    soil and debris disposed of from D, H Reactor Areas | Department of Energy Cleanup of 77 Waste Sites Meets Two TPA Milestones: 1.2 million tons of soil and debris disposed of from D, H Reactor Areas Cleanup of 77 Waste Sites Meets Two TPA Milestones: 1.2 million tons of soil and debris disposed of from D, H Reactor Areas January 11, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Hardy, DOE (509) 376-5365, Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov Dieter Bohrmann, Ecology (509) 372-7954,

  1. DOE Announces Acquisition Strategy for Post Fiscal Year 2016 Legacy Cleanup

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    at Los Alamos | Department of Energy Announces Acquisition Strategy for Post Fiscal Year 2016 Legacy Cleanup at Los Alamos DOE Announces Acquisition Strategy for Post Fiscal Year 2016 Legacy Cleanup at Los Alamos October 2, 2015 - 2:30pm Addthis Media Contact Lynette Chafin, 513-246-0461, Lynette.Chafin@emcbc.doe.gov Cincinnati - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management Consolidated Business Center announced it intends to solicit by means of full and open competition for

  2. DOE Awards $10 Million in Recovery Act Funding for Soil Cleanup at ORNL |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy $10 Million in Recovery Act Funding for Soil Cleanup at ORNL DOE Awards $10 Million in Recovery Act Funding for Soil Cleanup at ORNL September 22, 2009 - 12:00pm Addthis OAK RIDGE, Tenn. - The U.S. Department of Energy has awarded $10.1 million to an Ohio-based small business to contain and cap contaminated soil in the Bethel Valley area near the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Starting in October, LATA-Sharp Remediation Services, LLC of Westerville, Ohio is expected to

  3. Moab Marks 6-Million-Ton Cleanup Milestone | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Moab Marks 6-Million-Ton Cleanup Milestone Moab Marks 6-Million-Ton Cleanup Milestone June 20, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis At Tuesday's Grand County Council meeting in Utah, Moab Federal Project Director Donald Metzler, center, moves a piece from a plaque representing Moab’s uranium mill tailings pile to a plaque representing the disposal cell in recognition of the site achieving a milestone by shipping 6 million tons of the tailings. Grand County Council Chair Gene Ciarus is on the left and

  4. EM Cleanup Crew Nears Finish at Idaho Transuranic Waste Storage Facility |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Cleanup Crew Nears Finish at Idaho Transuranic Waste Storage Facility EM Cleanup Crew Nears Finish at Idaho Transuranic Waste Storage Facility October 29, 2015 - 12:25pm Addthis Workers stand atop newly placed drums and boxes of transuranic waste, circa. 1971. The drums and boxes would soon be covered with soil to form a protective berm. Workers stand atop newly placed drums and boxes of transuranic waste, circa. 1971. The drums and boxes would soon be covered with soil

  5. Thermal plasma pyrolysis of used old tires for production of syngas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, J.S.; Gu, B.W.; Looy, P.C.; Chu, F.Y.; Simpson, C.J.

    1996-08-01

    Thermal plasma pyrolysis of used tires for the production of syngaswas investigated experimentally and the following conclusions wereobtained: 1. A series of experiments have shown that tire waste can bepyrolyzed in a plasma reactor to produce combustible gas, such asC{sub 2}H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, H{sub 2}, CO. The combustion heat value of the produced gas is about 4-7 MJ/m{sup 3}, which is higher than that of blast furnace gas and reforming gas from coals. 2. Zinc oxidecan be captured during pyrolysis by both high temperature filters andlow temperature filters in the quenching chamber. The pollution gases,such as SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}, are at relatively low levels, about 100-300ppm. 3. Increasing the tire injection quantity will increase theconcentration of hydrocarbons, increase the combustion heat of thepyrolysis product, and decrease the concentration of metal oxide. Withsteam injection, it produced a large quantity of hydrogen and carbonmonoxide with lower concentrations of C{sub 2}H{sub 2}. The combustion heatis slightly lower with steam injection than that without it. 4. Neitherpolychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) nor p-aminohippuric acid (PAH) weredetected in the ashes. 8 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Los Alamos Legacy Clean-up Completion Project Bridge Contract | Department

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of Energy Jack Craig DOE HQ, Provided Information on the Bridge Contract for the Shift from NNSA Oversight to EM Oversight for LANL Environmental Clean-up. PDF icon Bridge Contract - December 10, 2014 More Documents & Publications Los Alamos National Laboratory TRU Waste Update Accident Investigation Report - Radiological Release

  7. Groundwater, Legacy Soil Cleanup and Flood Recovery Top Lab’s Accomplishments

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    LOS ALAMOS, N.M. – Top 2014 accomplishments of the Los Alamos National Laboratory’s EM-supported Environmental Programs included remediation of chromium in groundwater, completion of a legacy contaminant soil cleanup project, and rapid recovery from a 1,000-year rain event that caused widespread flooding.

  8. Recovery Act Helps Y-12 Exceed Cleanup Goal at Manhattan Project-Era Building

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Beta 4, one of the oldest and largest buildings at the Y-12 National Security Complex, recently reached a significant cleanup milestone. The second floor of the building, more than 82,000 square feet, has been cleared of large equipment and waste from Cold War operations.

  9. Idaho Site’s Cold War Cleanup Takes Center Stage in Publication

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    IDAHO FALLS, Idaho – An association with more than 29,000 members featured an in-depth article on EM’s extensive Cold War legacy cleanup at the Idaho site in the current issue of its publication, The Military Engineer.

  10. Secretary Chu Announces Determination of No Adverse Material Impact for Uranium Transfer to Fund Portsmouth Cleanup

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Secretary Chu announced today that the Department of Energy has issued a final determination and market impact study for the proposed uranium transfer to fund accelerated cleanup activities at the Portsmouth Site in Piketon, Ohio, which will create between 800 to 1,000 new jobs for the community.

  11. UK Nuclear Cleanup and Research Experts Visit DOE to Expand Collaboration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, D.C. – The United Kingdom’s National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) and the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) met with senior members of EM and DOE’s Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) recently to amend a landmark Statement of Intent to include the NNL in collaborations on radioactive waste and nuclear materials cleanup and management.

  12. DOE Issues Request for Information on Gas Clean-Up for Fuel Cell Applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Fuel Cell Technologies Office has issued a request for information (RFI) to obtain feedback and opinions from industry, academia, research laboratories, government agencies, and other stakeholders on the report findings from the Gas Clean-up for Fuel Cell Applications Workshop.

  13. DOE Awards Small Business Contract to Support Cleanup of New York West Valley Demonstration Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cincinnati - The Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded a contract to Enviro Compliance Solutions Inc. of Tustin, California to perform environmental sampling, monitoring services and analysis of ongoing cleanup activities being performed at the West Valley Demonstration Project in western New York.

  14. System Study of Rich Catalytic/Lean burn (RCL) Catalytic Combustion for Natural Gas and Coal-Derived Syngas Combustion Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shahrokh Etemad; Lance Smith; Kevin Burns

    2004-12-01

    Rich Catalytic/Lean burn (RCL{reg_sign}) technology has been successfully developed to provide improvement in Dry Low Emission gas turbine technology for coal derived syngas and natural gas delivering near zero NOx emissions, improved efficiency, extending component lifetime and the ability to have fuel flexibility. The present report shows substantial net cost saving using RCL{reg_sign} technology as compared to other technologies both for new and retrofit applications, thus eliminating the need for Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) in combined or simple cycle for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and natural gas fired combustion turbines.

  15. Fiber optic temperature sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabold, D.

    1995-12-01

    Our fiber optic temperature measurement sensor and system is a major improvement over methods currently in use in most industrial processes, and it delivers all of the attributes required simplicity, accuracy, and cost efficiency-to help improve all of these processes. Because temperature is a basic physical attribute of nearly every industrial and commercial process, our system can eventually result in significant improvements in nearly every industrial and commercial process. Many finished goods, and the materials that go into them, are critically dependent on the temperature. The better the temperature measurement, the better quality the goods will be and the more economically they can be produced. The production and transmission of energy requires the monitoring of temperature in motors, circuit breakers, power generating plants, and transmission line equipment. The more reliable and robust the methods for measuring these temperature, the more available, stable, and affordable the supply of energy will become. The world is increasingly realizing the threats to health and safety of toxic or otherwise undesirable by products of the industrial economy in the environment. Cleanup of such contamination often depends on techniques that require the constant monitoring of temperature in extremely hazardous environments, which can damage most conventional temperature sensors and which are dangerous for operating personnel. Our system makes such monitoring safer and more economical.

  16. Theoretical study of syngas hydrogenation to methanol on the polar Zn-terminated ZnO(0001) surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Ya-Fan; Rousseau, Roger J.; Li, Jun; Mei, Donghai

    2012-08-02

    Methanol synthesis from syngas (CO/CO2/H2) hydrogenation on the perfect Znterminated polar ZnO(0001) surface have been investigated using periodic density functional theory calculations. Our results show that direct CO2 hydrogenation to methanol on the perfect ZnO(0001) surface is unlikely because in the presence of surface atomic H and O the highly stable formate (HCOO) and carbonate (CO3) readily produced from CO2 with low barriers 0.11 and 0.09 eV will eventually accumulate and block the active sites of the ZnO(0001) surface. In contrast, methanol synthesis from CO hydrogenation is thermodynamically and kinetically feasible on the perfect ZnO(0001) surface. CO can be consecutively hydrogenated into formyl (HCO), formaldehyde (H2CO), methoxy (H3CO) intermediates, leading to the final formation of methanol (H3COH). The reaction route via hydroxymethyl (H2COH) intermediate, a previously proposed species on the defected Oterminated ZnO( ) surface, is kinetically inhibited on the perfect ZnO(0001) surface. The rate-determining step in the consecutive CO hydrogenation route is the hydrogenation of H3CO to H3COH. We also note that this last hydrogenation step is pronouncedly facilitated in the presence of water by lowering the activation barrier from 1.02 to 0.55 eV. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Biosciences and Geosciences, and performed at EMSL, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energys Office of Biological and Environmental Research located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Computational resources were provided at EMSL and the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. J. Li and Y.-F. Zhao were also financially supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 20933003 and 91026003) and the National Basic Research Program of China (No. 2011CB932400). Y.-F. Zhao acknowledges the fellowship from PNNL.

  17. US Department of Energy Environmental Cleanup Technology Development program: Business and research opportunities guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) is charged with overseeing a multi-billion dollar environmental cleanup effort. EM leads an aggressive national research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation program to provide environmental restoration and waste management technologies to DOE sites, and to manage DOE-generated waste. DOE is firmly committed to working with industry to effectuate this cleanup effort. We recognize that private industry, university, and other research and development programs are valuable sources of technology innovation. The primary purpose of this document is to provide you with information on potential business opportunities in the following technical program areas: Remediation of High-Level Waste Tanks; Characterization, Treatment, and Disposal of Mixed Waste; Migration of Contaminants; Containment of Existing Landfills; Decommissioning and Final Disposition, and Robotics.

  18. Microsoft Word - DOE Exceeds TRU Waste Cleanup Goal at LANL.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE Exceeds 2012 TRU Waste Cleanup Goal at Los Alamos National Laboratory CARLSBAD, N.M., October 3, 2012 -The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Central Characterization Project (CCP) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) exceeded a fiscal year 2012 goal of characterizing and shipping 800 cubic meters of transuranic (TRU) waste, fulfilling a commitment to the state of New Mexico. The 800 cubic meters goal was exceeded by more than 100 cubic meters, with the vast majority of the TRU waste

  19. Idaho Site Workers Continue to Finish D&D Cleanup Projects Under Budget

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    IDAHO FALLS, Idaho – CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC, (CWI) the main cleanup contractor for the EM program at the Idaho Site, took on additional work scope at the site’s Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) after completing grouting work at the decommissioned Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBF-II) three months ahead of schedule and $110,000 under budget this year.

  20. This fact sheet describes the environmental cleanup activities the U.S. Departme

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    environmental cleanup activities the U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Projects Office is conducting at the Monticello Mill Tailings Site in Monticello, Utah. These activities are being performed in accordance with Federal and State environmental laws. Background The original Monticello mill was built in 1942 to provide an additional supply of vanadium during World War II. Vanadium, an element used to strengthen steel, and uranium were milled intermittently until 1960. Mill tailings are

  1. National Nuclear Security Administration Product Aids in Anthrax Clean-up |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration Product Aids in Anthrax Clean-up | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases

  2. Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-F-3, Minor Construction Burial Ground

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. J. Appel

    2007-01-04

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 118-F-3, Minor Construction Burial Ground waste site. This site was an open field covered with cobbles, with no vegetation growing on the surface. The site received irradiated reactor parts that were removed during conversion of the 105-F Reactor from the Liquid 3X to the Ball 3X Project safety systems and received mostly vertical safety rod thimbles and step plugs.

  3. Recovery Act Helps Y-12 Exceed Cleanup Goal at Manhattan Project-Era

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Building | National Nuclear Security Administration Helps Y-12 Exceed Cleanup Goal at Manhattan Project-Era Building | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony

  4. Recovery Cleanup Project at Y-12 Leaves Alpha 5 with an Empty Feeling |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration Cleanup Project at Y-12 Leaves Alpha 5 with an Empty Feeling | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets

  5. Proceedings of the seventh annual gasification and gas stream cleanup systems contractors review meeting: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghate, M.R.; Markel, K.E. Jr.; Jarr, L.A.; Bossart, S.J.

    1987-08-01

    On June 16 through 19, 1987, METC sponsored the Seventh Annual Gasification and Gas Stream Cleanup Systems Contractors Review Meeting which was held at the Sheraton Lakeview Conference Center in Morgantown, West Virginia. The primary purpose of the meeting was threefold: to review the technical progress and current status of the gasification and gas stream cleanup projects sponsored by the Department of Energy; to foster technology exchange among participating researchers and other technical communities; to facilitate interactive dialogues which would identify research needs that would make coal-based gasification systems more attractive economically and environmentally. More than 310 representatives of Government, academia, industry, and foreign energy research organizations attended the 4-day meeting. Fifty-three papers and thirty poster displays were presented summarizing recent developments in the gasification and gas stream cleanup programs. Volume I covers information presented at sessions 1 through 4 on systems for the production of Co-products and industrial fuel gas, environmental projects, and components and materials. Individual papers have been processed for the Energy Data Base.

  6. Systems engineering functions and requirements for the Hanford cleanup mission: First issue. Addendum 3, Draft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holmes, J.J.; Bailey, K.B.; Collings, J.L.; Hubbard, A.B.; Niepke, T.M.

    1994-05-01

    This addendum provides additional information, in the form of Functional Flow Block Diagrams (FFBD), concerning the system engineering functional analysis for the Hanford cleanup mission. Details of the mission analysis including mission statement, scope, problem statement, initial state definition, and final state definition are provided in the parent document. The results of the functional analysis as depicted in Integrated Definition language notation (IDEFO) diagrams are provided in Addendum 2 to the parent document. The FFBDs provided herein cover the total Hanford cleanup mission and depict the decomposition of functions to a reasonable level for understanding (generally level 3 or 4). Functional definitions are contained in Section 3.0 of Addendum 2 to the parent document. Specific programs such as the Tank Waste Remediation System and Environmental Restoration, whose IDEFO diagrams were presented as part of their specific baseline documentation and not included in Addendum 2, have their FFBDs included in this addendum. The information contained in this addendum will remain tied to the overall Hanford cleanup mission through the top-level (``Capstone``) functional analysis so that a complete, top-to-bottom functional documentation set always exists for all mission activities. This linkage is accomplished through the use of the Requirements Driven Design (RDD-100{reg_sign}) design tool. Through the use of RDD-100{reg_sign}, this addendum supports and is traceable to the information presented in Addendum 2 to the parent document.

  7. Proceedings of the seventh annual gasification and gas stream cleanup systems contractors review meeting: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghate, M.R.; Markel, K.E. Jr.; Jarr, L.A.; Bossart, S.J.

    1987-08-01

    On June 16 through 19, 1987, METC sponsored the Seventh Annual Gasification and Gas Stream Cleanup Systems Contractors Review Meeting which was held at the Sheraton Lakeview Conference Center in Morgantown, West Virginia. The primary purpose of the meeting was threefold: to review the technical progress and current status of the gasification and gas stream cleanup projects sponsored by the Department of Energy; to foster technology exchange among participating researchers and other technical communities; to facilitate interactive dialogues which would identify research needs that would make coal-based gasification systems more attractive economically and environmentally. More than 310 representatives of Government, academia, industry, and foreign energy research organizations attended the 4-day meeting. Fifty-three papers and thirty poster dsplays were presented summarizing recent developments in the gasification and gas stream cleanup programs. Volume II covers papers presented at sessions 5 and 6 on system for the production of synthesis gas, and on system for the production of power. All papers have been processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  8. Transport Reactor Development Unit Modification to Provide a Syngas Slipstream at Elevated Conditions to Enable Separation of 100 LB/D of Hydrogen by Hydrogen Separation Membranes Year - 6 Activity 1.15 - Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlasner, Steven

    2012-03-01

    Gasification of coal when associated with carbon dioxide capture and sequestration has the potential to provide low-cost as well as low-carbon hydrogen for electric power, fuels or chemicals production. The key element to the success of this concept is inexpensive, effective separation of hydrogen from carbon dioxide in synthesis gas. Many studies indicate that membrane technology is one of the most, if not the most, economical means of accomplishing separation; however, the advancement of hydrogen separation membrane technology is hampered by the absence of experience or demonstration that the technology is effective economically and environmentally at larger scales. While encouraging performance has been observed at bench scale (less than 12 lb/d hydrogen), it would be imprudent to pursue a largescale demonstration without testing at least one intermediate scale, such as 100 lb/d hydrogen. Among its many gasifiers, the Energy & Environmental Research Center is home to the transport reactor demonstration unit (TRDU), a unit capable of firing 200—500 lb/hr of coal to produce 400 scfm of synthesis gas containing more than 200 lb/d of hydrogen. The TRDU and associated downstream processing equipment has demonstrated the capability of producing a syngas over a wide range of temperatures and contaminant levels — some of which approximate conditions of commercial-scale gasifiers. Until this activity, however, the maximum pressure of the TRDU’ s product syngas was 120 psig, well below the 400+ psig pressures of existing large gasifiers. This activity installed a high-temperature compressor capable of accepting the range of TRDU products up to 450°F and compressing them to 500 psig, a pressure comparable to some large scale gasifiers. Thus, with heating or cooling downstream of the TRDU compressor, the unit is now able to present a near-raw to clean gasifier synthesis gas containing more than 100 lb/d of hydrogen at up to 500 psig over a wide range of temperatures to hydrogen separation membranes or other equipment for development and demonstration.

  9. High Temperature BOP and Fuel Processing | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BOP and Fuel Processing High Temperature BOP and Fuel Processing Presented at the NREL Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Manufacturing R&D Workshop in Washington, DC, August 11-12, 2011. PDF icon High Temperature BOP and Fuel Processing More Documents & Publications Biogas Impurities and Cleanup for Fuel Cells Fuel Quality Issues in Stationary Fuel Cell Systems Advanced Fuel Reformer Development: Putting the 'Fuel' in Fuel Cells

  10. [Tampa Electric Company IGCC project]. 1996 DOE annual technical report, January--December 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-31

    Tampa Electric Company`s Polk Power Station Unit 1 (PPS-1) Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) demonstration project uses a Texaco pressurized, oxygen-blown, entrained-flow coal gasifier to convert approximately 2,000 tons per day of coal to syngas. The gasification plant is coupled with a combined cycle power block to produce a net 250 MW electrical power output. Coal is slurried in water, combined with 95% pure oxygen from an air separation unit, and sent to the gasifier to produce a high temperature, high pressure, medium-Btu syngas with a heat content of about 250 BTUs/cf (HHV). The syngas then flows through a high temperature heat recovery unit which cools the syngas prior to its entering the cleanup systems. Molten coal ash flows from the bottom of the high temperature heat recovery unit into a water-filled quench chamber where it solidifies into a marketable slag by-product. Approximately 10% of the raw, hot syngas at 900 F is designed to pass through an intermittently moving bed of metal-oxide sorbent which removes sulfur-bearing compounds from the syngas. PPS-1 will be the first unit in the world to demonstrate this advanced metal oxide hot gas desulfurization technology on a commercial unit. The emphasis during 1996 centered around start-up activities.

  11. EM's West Valley Cleanup Finds Success in History-Making Waste Relocation

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    | Department of Energy Workers load an overpack container into a vertical storage cask. Workers load an overpack container into a vertical storage cask. WEST VALLEY, N.Y. - For the first time in U.S. history, high-level waste (HLW) was placed in long-term, outdoor storage. The unprecedented accomplishment occurred in EM's cleanup at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP). The liquid waste, which had been immobilized in glass in the vitrification process, is being relocated from the

  12. FLUOR HANFORD (FH) MAKES CLEANUP A REALITY IN NEARLY 11 YEARS AT HANFORD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GERBER, M.S.

    2007-05-24

    For nearly 11 years, Fluor Hanford has been busy cleaning up the legacy of nuclear weapons production at one of the Department of Energy's (DOE'S) major sites in the United States. As prime nuclear waste cleanup contractor at the vast Hanford Site in southeastern Washington state, Fluor Hanford has changed the face of cleanup. Fluor beginning on October 1, 1996, Hanford Site cleanup was primarily a ''paper exercise.'' The Tri-Party Agreement, officially called the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order - the edict governing cleanup among the DOE, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Washington state - was just seven years old. Milestones mandated in the agreement up until then had required mainly waste characterization, reporting, and planning, with actual waste remediation activities off in the future. Real work, accessing waste ''in the field'' - or more literally in huge underground tanks, decaying spent fuel POO{approx}{approx}S, groundwater, hundreds of contaminated facilities, solid waste burial grounds, and liquid waste disposal sites -began in earnest under Fluor Hanford. The fruits of labors initiated, completed and/or underway by Fluor Hanford can today be seen across the site. Spent nuclear fuel is buttoned up in secure, dry containers stored away from regional water resources, reactive plutonium scraps are packaged in approved containers, transuranic (TRU) solid waste is being retrieved from burial trenches and shipped offsite for permanent disposal, contaminated facilities are being demolished, contaminated groundwater is being pumped out of aquifers at record rates, and many other inventive solutions are being applied to Hanford's most intransigent nuclear wastes. (TRU) waste contains more than 100 nanocuries per gram, and contains isotopes higher than uranium on the Periodic Table of the Elements. (A nanocurie is one-billionth of a curie.) At the same time, Fluor Hanford has dramatically improved safety records, and cost effectively maintained and streamlined infrastructure and equipment that is impossibly old and in many cases ''extinct'' in terms of spare parts and vendor support. The story of Fluor's achievements at the Hanford Site - the oldest and most productive plutonium site in the world - is both inspiring and instructive.

  13. Recovery Act funding accelerates cleanup of Idaho Site, Creates jobs in

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    community Recovery Act funding accelerates cleanup of Idaho Site, Creates jobs in community IDAHO FALLS � American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funding has accelerated a project to ship decades-old remote-handled transuranic waste out of Idaho. The project is one of several ARRA-funded projects at the U.S. Department of Energy�s Idaho Site that has contributed to the creation of 652 additional jobs. �Recovery Act funding allowed us to accelerate the disposal of this waste by

  14. Agencies sign last record of decision for DOE Idaho cleanup program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Agencies sign last record of decision for DOE Idaho cleanup program The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the State of Idaho have signed the last of 25 Superfund records of decision (RODs) at DOE�s Idaho Site. These three agencies have been implementing an agreement to clean up the 890 square-mile, eastern Idaho site since 1991. Last year, the agencies completed a multi-year environmental study of the Snake River Plain Aquifer beneath the site

  15. DOE Awards Small Business Contracts for Recovery Act Cleanup Work at

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE�s Idaho Site DOE Awards Small Business Contracts for Recovery Act Cleanup Work at DOE�s Idaho Site August 2, 2010 Media contact: Brad Bugger, (208) 526-0833 Cincinnati � The Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (EM) has awarded two small business contracts for work at the Department of Energy�s Idaho Site funded under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. North Wind Services, LLC, Idaho Falls, Idaho, was awarded a $14 million construction contract and

  16. PIT 9: From "Black Eye" to Part of DOE Cleanup Success

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PIT 9: From "Black Eye" to Part of DOE Cleanup Success There was a time back in the late 1990s and early 2000s when the words "Pit 9" were synonymous with failure. Failure on the part of a large company to execute its contract to clean up Pit 9. Failure on the part of the Federal government to meet the deadlines to clean up nuclear waste. And failure of a new approach to government contracting - "privatization" - that was supposed to make contractors more

  17. The Department of Energy Announces Major Cold War Legacy Waste Cleanup

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Milestone Media Contact: (208) 586-4940 For Immediate Release: September 28, 2011 The Department of Energy Announces Major Cold War Legacy Waste Cleanup Milestone Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Receives 10,000th Shipment CARLSBAD, NM - The U.S. Department of Energy today announced that the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) received its 10,000th shipment of transuranic (TRU) waste over the weekend. This marks an important milestone in DOE�s mission to clean up the country�s Cold War

  18. Cleanup Progresses at the Office of River Protection | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Progresses at the Office of River Protection Cleanup Progresses at the Office of River Protection December 24, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The concrete “core” is removed from Tank C-105 after workers cut a 55-inch hole in the tank dome. The concrete "core" is removed from Tank C-105 after workers cut a 55-inch hole in the tank dome. A composite image of dozens of individual-frame photos taken inside Tank C-110 provides a rare panoramic view of its interior. Portions of the tank

  19. Action Memorandum for the Engineering Test Reactor under the Idaho Cleanup Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. B. Culp

    2007-01-26

    This Action Memorandum documents the selected alternative for decommissioning of the Engineering Test Reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory under the Idaho Cleanup Project. Since the missions of the Engineering Test Reactor Complex have been completed, an engineering evaluation/cost analysis that evaluated alternatives to accomplish the decommissioning of the Engineering Test Reactor Complex was prepared adn released for public comment. The scope of this Action Memorandum is to encompass the final end state of the Complex and disposal of the Engineering Test Reactor vessol. The selected removal action includes removing and disposing of the vessel at the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility and demolishing the reactor building to ground surface.

  20. Superfund at work: Hazardous waste cleanup efforts nationwide, Spring 1993 (Powersville site profile, Peach County, Georgia)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) encountered much more than a municipal landfill at the Powersville site in Peach County, Georgia. Contamination from improperly dumped hazardous wastes and pesticides tainted an old quarry used for household garbage. Chemicals migrating into area ground water threatened local drinking water supplies. To address these issues, EPA's Superfund program designed a cleanup strategy that included: negotiating with the county and chemical companies to contain the hazardous wastes on site underneath a protective cover; investigating reports of drinking water contamination and extending municipal water lines to affected residents; and conducting a tailored community relations program to inform and educate residents about the site.

  1. Idaho Site Completes Cleanup with Help from Workers who Shipped Waste Decades Ago

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    October 6, 2011 Idaho Site Completes Cleanup with Help from Workers who Shipped Waste Decades Ago IDAHO FALLS, Idaho - From the 1950s until the 1980s, workers at the former Rocky Flats Plant near Denver, Colo., sent hundreds of thousands of barrels and boxes of radioactive and hazardous waste to the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for disposal both above and below ground. Now, some of those who sent the Cold War weapons waste to Idaho are helping identify the waste in pits dug up for the first

  2. Conversion of CH{sub 4}/CO{sub 2} to syngas over Ni-Co/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2} nanocatalyst synthesized via plasma assisted co-impregnation method: Surface properties and catalytic performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rahemi, Nader; Haghighi, Mohammad; Reactor and Catalysis Research Center , Sahand University of Technology, P.O. Box 51335-1996, Sahand New Town, Tabriz ; Akbar Babaluo, Ali; Nanostructure Material Research Center , Sahand University of Technology, P.O. Box 51335-1996, Sahand New Town, Tabriz ; Fallah Jafari, Mahdi; Khorram, Sirous

    2013-09-07

    Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst promoted by Co and ZrO{sub 2} was prepared by co-impregnation method and treated with glow discharge plasma. The catalytic activity of the synthesized nanocatalysts has been tested toward conversion of CH{sub 4}/CO{sub 2} to syngas. The physicochemical characterizations like XRD, EDX, FESEM, TEM, BET, FTIR, and XPS show that plasma treatment results in smaller particle size, more surface concentration, and uniform morphology. The dispersion of nickel in plasma-treated nanocatalyst was also significantly improved, which was helpful for controlling the ensemble size of active phase atoms on the support surface. Improved physicochemical properties caused 20%30% enhancement in activity of plasma-treated nanocatalyst that means to achieve the same H{sub 2} or CO yield, the plasma-treated nanocatalyst needed about 100 C lower reaction temperature. The H{sub 2}/CO ratio got closer to 1 at higher temperatures and finally at 850 C H{sub 2}/CO = 1 is attained for plasma-treated nanocatalyst. Plasma-treated nanocatalyst due to smaller Ni particles and strong interaction between active phase and support has lower tendency to keep carbon species on its structure and hence excellent stability can be observed for this catalyst.

  3. Gas cleanup for combined cycle power generation using a hot gas conditioning catalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paisley, M.A.; Gebhard, S.C.

    1995-11-01

    Biomass gasification provides the potential to efficiently and economically produce a renewable source of a clean gaseous fuel suitable for power generation or synthesis gas (syngas) applications. Biomass as the feedstock for the process is uniquely suited to this application because it provides the means to increase the nation`s energy security, and also, to potentially provide a more stable agricultural industry. An important side benefit of the use of biomass is the effective minimization of the primary greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), by providing a means to close-loop the CO{sub 2} cycle. However, high molecular weight hydrocarbon constituents (tar) in the product gas from gasification can complicate the downstream uses of the gas. This paper discusses both the development of a low cost, disposable catalyst system that can eliminate these heavy hydrocarbons from the gas and the use of the catalyst in conjunction with the Battelle high-throughput gasification process for power generation systems.

  4. Continuing Clean-up at Oak Ridge, Portsmouth and Paducah-Successes and Near-Term Plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fritz, L. L.; Houser, S. M.; Starling, D. A.

    2002-02-26

    This paper describes the complexities and challenges associated with the Oak Ridge Environmental Management (EM) cleanup program and the steps that DOE and Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (the Oak Ridge EM team) have collaboratively taken to make significant physical progress and get the job done. Maintaining significant environmental cleanup progress is a daunting challenge for the Oak Ridge EM Team. The scale and span of the Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) cleanup is immense-five major half-century-old installations in three states (three installations are complete gaseous diffusion plants), with concurrent cleanup at the fully operational Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Y-12 National Security Complex, and with regulatory oversight from three states and two United States (US) Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Regions. Potential distractions arising from funding fluctuations and color-of-money constraints, regulatory negotiations, stakeholder issues, or any one of a number of other potential delay phenomena can not reduce the focus on safely achieving project objectives to maintain cleanup momentum.

  5. Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) demonstration project, Polk Power Station -- Unit No. 1. Annual report, October 1993--September 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-05-01

    This describes the Tampa Electric Company`s Polk Power Station Unit 1 (PPS-1) Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) demonstration project which will use a Texaco pressurized, oxygen-blown, entrained-flow coal gasifier to convert approximately 2,300 tons per day of coal (dry basis) coupled with a combined cycle power block to produce a net 250 MW electrical power output. Coal is slurried in water, combined with 95% pure oxygen from an air separation unit, and sent to the gasifier to produce a high temperature, high pressure, medium-Btu syngas with a heat content of about 250 Btu/scf (LHV). The syngas then flows through a high temperature heat recovery unit which cools the syngas prior to its entering the cleanup systems. Molten coal ash flows from the bottom of the high temperature heat recovery unit into a water-filled quench chamber where it solidifies into a marketable slag by-product.

  6. They all like it hot: faster cleanup of contaminated soil and groundwater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newmark, R., LLNL

    1998-03-01

    Clean up a greasy kitchen spill with cold water and the going is slow. Us hot water instead and progress improves markedly. So it makes sense that cleanup of greasy underground contaminants such as gasoline might go faster if hot water or steam were somehow added to the process. The Environmental Protection Agency named hundreds of sites to the Superfund list - sites that have been contaminated with petroleum products or petroleum products or solvents. Elsewhere across the country, thousands of properties not identified on federal cleanup lists are contaminated as well. Given that under current regulations, underground accumulations of solvent and hydrocarbon contaminants (the most serious cause of groundwater pollution) must be cleaned up, finding a rapid and effective method of removing them is imperative. In the early 1990`s, in collaboration with the School of Engineering at the University of California at Berkeley, Lawrence Livermore developed dynamic underground stripping. This method for treating underground contaminants with heat is much faster and more effective than traditional treatment methods.

  7. EA-1642-S1: Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal-Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis, Lexington, KY

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This draft Supplemental Environmental Assessment (SEA) analyzes the potential environmental impacts of DOE’s proposed action of providing cost-shared funding for the University of Kentucky (UK) Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal-Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis project and of the No-Action Alternative.

  8. Sorbents for High Temperature Removal of Arsenic from Coal-Derived Synthesis Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alptekin, G.O.; Copeland, R.; Dubovik, M.; Gershanovich, Y.

    2002-09-20

    Gasification technologies convert coal and other heavy feedstocks into synthesis gas feed streams that can be used in the production of a wide variety of chemicals, ranging from hydrogen through methanol, ammonia, acetic anhydride, dimethyl ether (DME), methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), high molecular weight liquid hydrocarbons and waxes. Syngas can also be burned directly as a fuel in advanced power cycles to generate electricity with very high efficiency. However, the coal-derived synthesis gas contains a myriad of trace contaminants that may poison the catalysts that are used in the downstream manufacturing processes and may also be regulated in power plant emissions. Particularly, the catalysts used in the conversion of synthesis gas to methanol and other liquid fuels (Fischer-Tropsch liquids) have been found to be very sensitive to the low levels of poisons, especially arsenic, that are present in the synthesis gas from coal. TDA Research, Inc. (TDA) is developing an expendable high capacity, low-cost chemical absorbent to remove arsenic from coal-derived syngas. Unlike most of the commercially available sorbents that physically adsorb arsenic, TDA's sorbent operates at elevated temperatures and removes the arsenic through chemical reaction. The arsenic content in the coal gas stream is reduced to ppb levels with the sorbent by capturing and stabilizing the arsenic gas (As4) and arsenic hydrides (referred to as arsine, AsH3) in the solid state. To demonstrate the concept of high temperature arsenic removal from coal-derived syngas, we carried out bench-scale experiments to test the absorption capacity of a variety of sorbent formulations under representative conditions. Using on-line analysis techniques, we monitored the pre- and post-breakthrough arsine concentrations over different sorbent samples. Some of these samples exhibited pre-breakthrough arsine absorption capacity over 40% wt. (capacity is defined as lb of arsenic absorbed/lb of sorbent), while maintaining an arsine outlet concentration at less than 10 ppb.

  9. Bio-Fuel Production Assisted with High Temperature Steam Electrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant Hawkes; James O'Brien; Michael McKellar

    2012-06-01

    Two hybrid energy processes that enable production of synthetic liquid fuels that are compatible with the existing conventional liquid transportation fuels infrastructure are presented. Using biomass as a renewable carbon source, and supplemental hydrogen from high-temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE), these two hybrid energy processes have the potential to provide a significant alternative petroleum source that could reduce dependence on imported oil. The first process discusses a hydropyrolysis unit with hydrogen addition from HTSE. Non-food biomass is pyrolyzed and converted to pyrolysis oil. The pyrolysis oil is upgraded with hydrogen addition from HTSE. This addition of hydrogen deoxygenates the pyrolysis oil and increases the pH to a tolerable level for transportation. The final product is synthetic crude that could then be transported to a refinery and input into the already used transportation fuel infrastructure. The second process discusses a process named Bio-Syntrolysis. The Bio-Syntrolysis process combines hydrogen from HTSE with CO from an oxygen-blown biomass gasifier that yields syngas to be used as a feedstock for synthesis of liquid synthetic crude. Conversion of syngas to liquid synthetic crude, using a biomass-based carbon source, expands the application of renewable energy beyond the grid to include transportation fuels. It can also contribute to grid stability associated with non-dispatchable power generation. The use of supplemental hydrogen from HTSE enables greater than 90% utilization of the biomass carbon content which is about 2.5 times higher than carbon utilization associated with traditional cellulosic ethanol production. If the electrical power source needed for HTSE is based on nuclear or renewable energy, the process is carbon neutral. INL has demonstrated improved biomass processing prior to gasification. Recyclable biomass in the form of crop residue or energy crops would serve as the feedstock for this process. A process model of syngas production using high temperature electrolysis and biomass gasification is presented. Process heat from the biomass gasifier is used to heat steam for the hydrogen production via the high temperature steam electrolysis process. Oxygen produced form the electrolysis process is used to control the oxidation rate in the oxygen-blown biomass gasifier.

  10. Options To Cleanup Site-wide Vadose Zone Contamination At The Hanford Site, WA, State

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goswami, D. [Ph.D, and John Price, Nuclear Waste Program, Washington State Department of Ecology, Richland, WA (United States)

    2008-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site in south central Washington State lies along the Columbia River and is one of DOE's largest legacy waste management sites. Enormous radionuclide and chemical inventories exist below-ground. These include Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) storage facilities where hazardous and radioactive contaminants were discharged and leaked to the soil surface and to the deep vadose zone and groundwater. The vadose zone is also contaminated from facilities regulated by the RCRA and Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Act. Hanford now contains as much as 28,300 cubic meters of soil contaminated with radionuclides from liquid wastes released near processing facilities. The Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) has set the completion of the cleanup of these sites by 2024. There are numerous technical and regulatory challenges to cleanup of the vadose zone at the Hanford site. This paper attempts to identify the categories of deep vadose zone problem and identifies a few possible regulatory options to clean up the site under the mix of state and federal regulatory authorities. There are four major categories of vadose contamination areas at the Hanford Site. The first is laterally extensive with intermediate depth (ground surface to about 45 meters depth) mostly related to high volume effluent discharge into cribs, ponds and ditches of designated CERCLA facilities. The second is dominated by laterally less extensive mostly related to leaks from RCRA tank farms. The later contamination is often commingled at depth with wastes from adjacent CERCLA facilities. The third category is from the high volume CERCLA facilities extending from the surface to more than 60 meters below ground. Contamination from the later category crosses the entire thickness of the vadose zone and reached groundwater. The fourth category is the lower volume waste sites. There are multiple management options to clean up the above four categories of vadose zones sites. The following are some of the options considered for detailed evaluation: - Maintain separate decision processes for each RCRA and CERCLA units/waste sites with a more accommodating schedule. - Create new vadose zone operable units with limited geographical boundaries regardless of site category/origin and make an integrated decision. - Expand the existing CERCLA groundwater operable units to include the deep vadose zone - Use a combination of the above. Each option has pros and cons and regulatory limitations. Detailed evaluation of these options is required to support a cost effective expedited cleanup. (authors)

  11. Turning the Corner on Hanford Tank Waste Cleanup from Safe Storage to Closure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CRUZ, E.J.; BOSTON, H.L.

    2002-02-04

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) is leading the River Protection Project (RPP) which is responsible for the disposition of 204,000 cubic meters (54 million gallons) of high-level radioactive waste that have accumulated in large underground tanks at the Hanford Site since 1944. ORP continues to make good progress on improving the capability to treat Hanford tank waste. Design of the waste vitrification facilities is proceeding well and construction will begin within the next year. Progress is also being made in reducing risk to the worker and the environment from the waste currently stored in the tank farms. Removal of liquids from single-shell tanks (SSTs) is on schedule and we will begin removing solids (salt cake) from a tank (241-U-107) in 2002. There is a sound technical foundation for the waste vitrification facilities. These initial facilities will be capable of treating (vitrifying) the bulk of Hanford tank waste and are the cornerstone of the clean-up strategy. ORP recognizes that as the near-term work is performed, it is vital that there be an equally strong and defensible plan for completing the mission. ORP is proceeding on a three-pronged approach for moving the mission forward. First, ORP will continue to work aggressively to complete the waste vitrification facilities. ORP intends to provide the most capable and robust facilities to maximize the amount of waste treated by these Initial facilities by 2028 (regulatory commitment for completion of waste treatment). Second, and in parallel with completing the waste vitrification facilities, ORP is beginning to consider how best to match the hazard of the waste to the disposal strategy. The final piece of our strategy is to continue to move forward with actions to reduce risk in the tank farms and complete cleanup. The goal of these efforts is to keep the RPP on a success path for completing cleanup of Hanford tank waste. While all parties are aggressively moving forward to provide vitrification facilities with enhanced capabilities, work continues toward a credible plan for completing waste treatment and accelerating risk reduction. In all of these efforts two principles are paramount; (1) all actions are focused on protecting worker health and the environment and complying with laws and regulations, and (2) open discussion, involvement, and cooperation of regulators and stakeholders is fundamental to any decision making.

  12. Development of alternative fuels from coal derived syngas. Topical report: Task 2.2, Demonstration of a one-step slurry-phase process for the production of dimethyl ether/methanol mixtures at the LaPorte Alternative Fuels Development Unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    This report documents engineering, modification, and operations efforts of demonstration of dimethyl-ether/methanol coproduction in a slurry-phase reactor, carried out in a 2-ft diameter bubble column reactor. Equipment modifications made it possible to remove the product DME and by-product CO{sub 2} from the reactor effluent. Coproduction of dimethyl-ether (DME) and methanol (MeOH) was accomplished in the slurry reactor by physically mixing two different catalysts. The catalyst used to produce MeOH from syngas was manufactured by BASF (type S3-86); the catalyst used to convert MeOH to DME was Catapal {gamma}-alumina. Ratio of MeOH to DME catalysts determined the selectivity towards DME. The demonstration sought to study effect of cocatalyst ratio on product selectivity. Three different proportions of DME catalyst were examined: 0, 6.6, and 19.3 wt % alumina. At each catalyst proportion, the plant was operated at two different gas space velocities. Some process variables were maintained at fixed conditions; most important variables included: reactor temperature (482F), reactor pressure (750 psig), and reactor feed gas composition (35% H{sub 2}, 51% CO,13% CO{sub 2} 1% other, nominal-molar basis).

  13. Development of a catalyst for conversion of syngas-derived materials to isobutylene. Quarterly report number 19, October 1--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spehlmann, B.C.

    1996-07-01

    The goals of this project are to develop a catalyst and process for the conversion of syngas to isobutanol. After identification and optimization of key catalyst and process characteristics, the commercial potential of the process is to be evaluated by an economic analysis. From independent process variable studies to investigate the conversion of a methanol/ethanol feed to isobutanol, the best performance to date has been achieved with the 2% Pt on Zn/Mn/Zr oxide catalyst. Using Hyprotech Hysim v2.5 process simulation software, and considering both gas and liquid recycle loops in the process flow diagram, the overall carbon conversion is 98% with 22% selectivity to isobutanol. The expected production of isobutanol is 92 MT/day from 500 MT/day of methanol and 172 MT/day of ethanol feed. An additional 13 MT/day of isobutryaldehyde intermediate is recovered in the liquid product and vent streams. Because of the low selectivity (22%) of the methanol conversion catalyst to isobutanol, the process is uneconomical, even if the isobutanol is valued as a solvent ($903/MT) and not as isobutylene for MTBE production ($352/MT).

  14. Environmental cleanup privatization, products and services directory, January 1997. Second edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-01-01

    The US Department of Energy has undertaken an ambitious ``Ten Year Plan`` for the Weapons Complex, an initiative to complete cleanup at most nuclear sites within a decade. This Second Edition of the Directory is designed to facilitate privatization which is key to the success of the Plan. The Directory is patterned after the telephone Yellow Pages. Like the Yellow Pages, it provides the user with points of contact for inquiring further into the capabilities of the listed companies. This edition retains the original format of three major sections under the broad headings: Treatment, Characterization, and Extraction/Deliver/Materials Handling. Within each section, companies are listed alphabetically. Also, ``company name`` and ``process type`` indices are provided at the beginning of each section to allow the user quick access to listings of particular interest.

  15. From Pushing Paper to Pushing Dirt - Canada's Largest LLRW Cleanup Gets Underway - 13111

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veen, Walter van; Lawrence, Dave

    2013-07-01

    The Port Hope Project is the larger of the two projects in the Port Hope Area Initiative (PHAI), Canada's largest low level radioactive waste (LLRW) cleanup. With a budget of approximately $1 billion, the Port Hope Project includes a broad and complex range of remedial elements from a state of the art water treatment plant, an engineered waste management facility, municipal solid waste removal, remediation of 18 major sites within the Municipality of Port Hope (MPH), sediment dredging and dewatering, an investigation of 4,800 properties (many of these homes) to identify LLRW and remediation of approximately 450 of these properties. This paper discusses the status of the Port Hope Project in terms of designs completed and regulatory approvals received, and sets out the scope and schedule for the remaining studies, engineering designs and remediation contracts. (authors)

  16. An innovative approach to multimedia waste reduction measuring performance for environmental cleanup programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phifer, B.E. Jr.

    1993-05-01

    One of the greatest challenges we now face in environmental clean up is measuring the progress of minimizing multimedia transfer releases and achieving waste reduction. Briefly, multimedia transfer refers to the air, land, and water where pollution is not just controlled, concentrated, and moved from one media to another. An example of multimedia transfer would be heavy metals in waste water sludges moved from water to land disposal. Over two billion dollars has been budgeted for environmental restoration site cleanups by the Department of Energy for fiscal year 1994. Unless we reduce the huge waste volumes projected to be generated in the near future, then we will devote more and more resources to manage and dispose of these wastes.

  17. DOE’s Second National Cleanup Workshop Set for Sept. 14-15 in the Washington, D.C. Area

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, D.C. – DOE, in cooperation with the Energy Communities Alliance and Energy Facility Contractors Group, is set to hold the second DOE National Cleanup Workshop on Sept. 14-15, 2016, at the Hilton Alexandria Mark Center in Alexandria, Va.

  18. Turning the Corner on Hanford Tank Waste Cleanup-From Safe Storage to Closure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boston, H. L.; Cruz, E. J.; Coleman, S. J.

    2002-02-25

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) is leading the River Protection Project (RPP) which is responsible for the disposition of 204,000 cubic meters (54 million gallons) of high-level radioactive waste that have accumulated in large underground tanks at the Hanford Site since 1944. ORP continues to make good progress on improving the capability to treat Hanford tank waste. Design of the waste vitrification facilities is proceeding well and construction will begin within the next year. Progress is also being made in reducing risk to the worker and the environment from the waste currently stored in the tank farms. Removal of liquids from single-shell tanks (SSTs) is on schedule and we will begin removing solids (salt cake) from a tank (241-U-107) in 2002. There is a sound technical foundation for the waste vitrification facilities. These initial facilities will be capable of treating (vitrifying) the bulk of Hanford tank waste and are the corners tone of the clean-up strategy. ORP recognizes that as the near-term work is performed, it is vital that there be an equally strong and defensible plan for completing the mission. ORP is proceeding on a three-pronged approach for moving the mission forward. First, ORP will continue to work aggressively to complete the waste vitrification facilities. ORP intends to provide the most capable and robust facilities to maximize the amount of waste treated by these initial facilities by 2028 (regulatory commitment for completion of waste treatment). Second, and in parallel with completing the waste vitrification facilities, ORP is beginning to consider how best to match the hazard of the waste to the disposal strategy. The final piece of our strategy is to continue to move forward with actions to reduce risk in the tank farms and complete cleanup.

  19. An innovative approach to multimedia waste reduction: Measuring performance for environmental cleanup projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phifer, B.E. Jr.; George, S.M.

    1993-04-01

    One of the greatest challenges we now face in environmental cleanup is measuring the progress of minimizing multimedia transfer releases and achieving waste reduction. Briefly, multimedia transfer refers to the air, land, and water where pollution is not controlled, concentrated, and moved from one medium to another. An example of multimedia transfer would be heavy metals in wastewater sludges moved from water to land disposal. Over $2 billion has been budgeted for environmental restoration site cleanups by the Department of Energy (DOE) for FY 1994. Unless we reduce the huge waste volumes projected to be generated in the near future, then we will devote more and more resources to the management and disposal of these wastes. To meet this challenge, the Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge Environmental Restoration (ER) Program has explored the value of a multimedia approach by designing an innovative Pollution Prevention Life-Cycle Model. The model consists of several fundamental elements (Fig. 1) and addresses the two major objectives of data gathering and establishing performance measures. Because the majority of projects are in the remedial investigation phase, the focus is on the prevention of unnecessary generation of investigation-derived waste and multimedia transfers at the source. A state-of-the-art tool developed to support the life-cycle model for meeting these objectives is the Numerical Scoring System (NSS), which is a computerized, user-friendly data base system for information management, designed to measure the effectiveness of pollution prevention activities in each phase of the ER Program. This report contains a discussion of the development of the Pollution Prevention Life-Cycle Model and the role the NSS will play in the pollution prevention programs in the remedial investigation phase of the ER Program at facilities managed by Energy Systems for DOE.

  20. Micro-structural optimization of polybenzimidazole-based membranes for H2/CO2 separation at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Rajinder P; Li, Xin; Dudeck, Kevin W; Benicewicz, Brian C; Berchtold, Kathryn A

    2012-06-12

    There is compelling need to develop novel separation methods to improve the energy efficiency of synthesis (syn) gas processing operations including H{sub 2} and H{sub 2}/CO production to meet power, chemicals, and fuel producer needs, as well as carbon capture and removal of other undesirable syngas impurities. To be technically and economically viable, a successful separation method must be applicable to industrially relevant gas streams at realistic process conditions and compatible with large gas volumes. H{sub 2} selective membrane technology is a promising method for syngas separations at elevated temperatures (>150 C) that could be positioned upstream or downstream of one or more of the water-gas-shift reactors (WGSRs) or integrated with a WGSR depending on application specific syngas processing. Polybenzimidazole (PBI)-based polymer chemistries are exceptional candidates for H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} separations at elevated temperatures. In general, these materials possess excellent chemical resistance, very high glass transition temperatures (> 400 C), good mechanical properties, and an appropriate level of processability. Although commercially available PBI polymers have demonstrated commercially attractive H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity, their H{sub 2} permeability is low. Our team s employing structural and chemical manipulations to tailor the polymer free-volume achitecture with the ultimate goal of enhancing H{sub 2} permselectivity while retaining the inherent hermochemical stability characteristics of PBI. We will discuss our synthetic approaches and their influences on the gas transport behavior of these PBI-based materials. In general, a decrease in H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity was observed with an increase in H{sub 2} permeability. H{sub 2} permeability and H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity at 250 C ranged from 50 to 1000 barrer and 5 to 45, respectively.