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Sample records for temperature survey stress

  1. Category:Static Temperature Survey | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Static Temperature Survey Jump to: navigation, search Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Static Temperature Survey page? For detailed information on Static Temperature Survey,...

  2. High temperature aqueous stress corrosion testing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bornstein, A.N.; Indig, M.E.

    1975-12-01

    A description is given of a device for stressing tensile samples contained within a high temperature, high pressure aqueous environment, thereby permitting determination of stress corrosion susceptibility of materials in a simple way. The stressing device couples an external piston to an internal tensile sample via a pull rod, with stresses being applied to the sample by pressurizing the piston. The device contains a fitting/seal arrangement including Teflon and weld seals which allow sealing of the internal system pressure and the external piston pressure. The fitting/seal arrangement allows free movement of the pull rod and the piston.

  3. Line Focus Receiver Infrared Temperature Survey System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2010-06-01

    For ongoing maintenance and performance purposes, solar parabolic trough field operators desire to know that the Heat Collection Elements (HCEs) are performing properly. Measuring their temperature is one way of doing this One 30MW field can contain approximately 10,000 HCE's. This software interfaces with a GPS receiver and an infrared camera. It takes global positioning data from the GPS and uses this information to automate the infrared image capture and temperature analysis of individual solarmore » parabolic HCEs in a solar parabolic trough field With this software system an entire 30MW field can be surveyed in 2-3 days.« less

  4. Shallow (2-meter) temperature surveys in Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zehner, Richard E.

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno, Nevada Publication Date: 2012 Title: Colorado 2m Survey Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Reno Nevada Publisher: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno, Nevada Description: Shallow temperature surveys are useful in early-stage geothermal exploration to delineate surface outflow zones, with the intent to identify the source of upwelling, usually a fault. Detailed descriptions of the 2-meter survey method and equipment design can be found in Coolbaugh et al. (2007) and Sladek et al. (2007), and are summarized here. The survey method was devised to measure temperature as far below the zone of solar influence as possible, have minimal equilibration time, and yet be portable enough to fit on the back of an all-terrain vehicle (ATV); Figure 2). This method utilizes a direct push technology (DPT) technique where 2.3 m long, 0.54 outer diameter hollow steel rods are pounded into the ground using a demolition hammer. Resistance temperature devices (RTD) are then inserted into the rods at 2-meter depths, and allowed to equilibrate for one hour. The temperatures are then measured and recorded, the rods pulled out of the ground, and re-used at future sites. Usually multiple rods are planted over the course of an hour, and then the sampler returns back to the first station, measures the temperatures, pulls the rods, and so on, to eliminate waiting time. At Wagon Wheel Gap, 32 rods were planted around the hot springs between June 20 and July 1, 2012. The purpose was to determine the direction of a possible upflow fault or other structure. Temperatures at 1.5m and 2m depths were measured and recorded in the attribute table of this point shapefile. Several anomalous temperatures suggest that outflow is coming from a ~N60W striking fault or shear zone that contains the quartz-fluorite-barite veins of the adjacent patented mining claims. It should be noted that temperatures at 2m depth vary according to the amount of solar heating from above, as well as possible geothermal heating from below. Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4490310.560635 m Left: 150307.008238 m Right: 433163.213617 m Bottom: 4009565.915398 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno, Nevada Contact Person: Richard Rick Zehner Address: 3740 Barron Way City: Reno State: NV Postal Code: 89511 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 775-737-7806 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS 1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  5. Static Temperature Survey At Rio Grande Rift Region (Morgan,...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Temperature Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes San Luis Basin (south-central CO) regional study. References Paul Morgan, Peter Barkmann,...

  6. Static Temperature Survey At San Andreas Region (Williams, Et...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    San Andreas Region (Williams, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Static Temperature Survey At San Andreas Region...

  7. Effectiveness of Shallow Temperatures Surveys to Target a Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Effectiveness of Shallow Temperatures Surveys to Target a Geothermal Reservoir at Previously Explored Site at Mcgee Mountain, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

  8. Static Temperature Survey At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Static Temperature Survey At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Glass...

  9. Static Temperature Survey At Medicine Lake Area (Warpinski, Et...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Static Temperature Survey At Medicine Lake Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Medicine...

  10. Static Temperature Survey At Chena Area (Erkan, Et. Al., 2008...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Static Temperature Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Once a hole is drilled the natural-state pressure distribution with depth is essentially...

  11. Static Temperature Survey At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank Engineering Ltd, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Static Temperature Survey At Blue...

  12. Static Temperature Survey At Maui Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Maui Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Static Temperature Survey At Maui Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details...

  13. Static Temperature Survey At Wister Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wister Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Static Temperature Survey At Wister Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity...

  14. Static Temperature Survey At Medicine Lake Area (Warpinski, Et...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Static Temperature Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Update to Warpinski, et al., 2002 References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattler, R. Fortuna, D....

  15. Static Temperature Survey At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Static Temperature Survey At Fish Lake Valley Area...

  16. First high-temperature electronics products survey 2005.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Normann, Randy Allen

    2006-04-01

    On April 4-5, 2005, a High-Temperature Electronics Products Workshop was held. This workshop engaged a number of governmental and private industry organizations sharing a common interest in the development of commercially available, high-temperature electronics. One of the outcomes of this meeting was an agreement to conduct an industry survey of high-temperature applications. This report covers the basic results of this survey.

  17. Static Temperature Survey | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2003. Estimation of static formation temperatures in geothermal wells. Energy conversion and management. 44(8):1343-1355. Page Area Activity Start Date Activity...

  18. Maine Geological Survey Borehole Temperature Profiles

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Marvinney, Robert

    2013-11-06

    This dataset includes temperature profiles from 30 boreholes throughout Maine that were selected for their depth, location, and lithologies encountered. Depths range from about 300 feet to 2,200 feet. Most of the boreholes selected for measurement were completed in granite because this lithology can be assumed to be nearly homogeneous over the depth of the borehole. Boreholes were also selected to address gaps in existing geothermal datasets. Temperature profiles were collected in October and November, 2012.

  19. Maine Geological Survey Borehole Temperature Profiles

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Marvinney, Robert

    This dataset includes temperature profiles from 30 boreholes throughout Maine that were selected for their depth, location, and lithologies encountered. Depths range from about 300 feet to 2,200 feet. Most of the boreholes selected for measurement were completed in granite because this lithology can be assumed to be nearly homogeneous over the depth of the borehole. Boreholes were also selected to address gaps in existing geothermal datasets. Temperature profiles were collected in October and November, 2012.

  20. Thermal-stress modeling of an optical microphone at high temperature.

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Thermal-stress modeling of an optical microphone at high temperature. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Thermal-stress modeling of an optical microphone at high temperature. To help determine the capability range of a MEMS optical microphone design in harsh conditions computer simulations were carried out. Thermal stress modeling was performed up to temperatures of 1000 C. Particular concern was over stress and strain profiles due to the

  1. Static Temperature Survey At Vale Hot Springs Area (Combs, Et...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    temperature gradient. After the hole reached TD, a pressure-temperature storage ("memory") tool was also used to compare temperature data with that previously taken by the PRT...

  2. Stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 in high temperature water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Congleton, J.; Parkins, R.N.; Hemsworth, B.

    1987-01-01

    Slow strain rate stress corrosion tests have been performed on specimens cut from four separate heats of alloy 600 steam generator tubing. Material was tested in the mill annealed and thermally stabilized conditions and after various low temperature aging treatments. Only limited cracking was observed, even for tests at 340/sup 0/C, but the initiation of intergranular cracking was easier on the inner than on the outer surfaces of the tubing. Polarization data has been obtained in high temperature water and in saturated boric acid and saturated lithium hydroxide at the atmospheric boiling points, and slow strain tests were performed at controlled potentials in these environments. Again, only very short cracks formed during the slow strain rate tests which were performed at a strain rate of about 10/sup -6/ s/sup -1/. The data is discussed in terms of the probable crack tip strain rates that would exist in these tests and at other strain rates. It is argued that if cracking occurs, the main role of very low strain rate tests is to provide time for initiation and crack growth, so that cyclic loading or intermittent loading long tests are likely to be more successful in sustaining crack growth in this alloy.

  3. Static Temperature Survey At Hot Pot Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hot Pot Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Static Temperature Survey At Hot Pot Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity...

  4. Static Temperature Survey At U.S. South Region (Smith & Dees...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    U.S. South Region (Smith & Dees, 1982) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Static Temperature Survey At U.S. South Region (Smith &...

  5. Assessing Cumulative Thermal Stress in Fish During Chronic Exposure to High Temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bevelhimer, M.S.; Bennett, W.R.

    1999-11-14

    As environmental laws become increasingly protective, and with possible future changes in global climate, thermal effects on aquatic resources are likely to receive increasing attention. Lethal temperatures for a variety of species have been determined for situations where temperatures rise rapidly resulting in lethal effects. However, less is known about the effects of chronic exposure to high (but not immediately lethal) temperatures and even less about stress accumulation during periods of fluctuating temperatures. In this paper we present a modeling framework for assessing cumulative thermal stress in fish. The model assumes that stress accumulation occurs above a threshold temperature at a rate depending on the degree to which the threshold is exceeded. The model also includes stress recovery (or alleviation) when temperatures drop below the threshold temperature as in systems with large daily variation. In addition to non-specific physiological stress, the model also simulates thermal effects on growth.

  6. Static Temperature Survey At Newberry Caldera Area (Combs, Et...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    temperature measurements. These temperature logs were taken with Sandia's platinum-resistance-thermometer (PRT) tool which along with a Sandia logging truck remained on-site for...

  7. Static Temperature Survey At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    beneath the resurgent dome. References Christopher Farrar, Jacob DeAngelo, Colin Williams, Frederick Grubb, Shaul Hurwitz (2010) Temperature Data From Wells in Long Valley...

  8. Static Temperature Survey At Coso Geothermal Area (1977) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and 2775 feet. Temperature logs indicate a negative thermal gradient below 3000 feet. Water chemistry indicates that this geothermal resource is a hot-water rather than a...

  9. Static Temperature Survey At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Long Valley caldera groundwater system based on detailed integration of results from pump tests, fluid level monitoring, temperature logging, and fluid samplinganalysis of the...

  10. Static Temperature Survey At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    create computer simulations of the heat flow patterns in the East Rift Zone References Albert J. Rudman, David Epp (1983) Conduction Models Of The Temperature Distribution In The...

  11. Static Temperature Survey At Reese River Area (Henkle & Ronne...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Temperature logs were run on well 56-4 on March 22, April 28 and Nov. 9, 2007. The respective maximum bottom hole...

  12. Static Temperature Survey At Steamboat Springs Area (Combs, Et...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    DOE-funding Unknown Notes Numerous temperature logs were taken with Sandia'splatinum-resistance-thermometer (PRT) tool which along with a Sandia logging truck remained on-site for...

  13. Boom And Bust With The Latest 2M Temperature Surveys- Dead Horse...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of the use of two-meter temperature (2m) surveys to quickly and inexpensively reveal blind geothermal systems were documented at Dead Horse Wells, the Hawthorne Army Depot, and...

  14. Thermal-stress modeling of an optical microphone at high temperature.

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Thermal-stress modeling of an optical microphone at high temperature. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Thermal-stress modeling of an optical microphone at high temperature. × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy

  15. Strain rate, temperature and representative length scale influence on plasticity and yield stress in copper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dupont, Virginie; Germann, Timothy C

    2011-01-18

    Shock compression of materials constitutes a complex process involving high strain rates, elevated temperatures and compression of the lattice. Materials properties are greatly affected by temperature, the representative length scale and the strain rate of the deformation. Experimentally, it is difficult to study the dynamic microscopic mechanisms that affect materials properties following high intensity shock loading, but they can be investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Moreover, MD allows a better control over some parameters. We are using MD simulations to study the effect of the strain rate, representative length scale and temperature on the properties of metals during compression. A half-million-atom Cu sample is subjected to strain rates ranging from 10{sup 7} s{sup -1} to 10{sup 12} s{sup -1} at different temperatures ranging from 50K to 1500K. Single crystals as well as polycrystals are investigated. Plasticity mechanisms as well as the evolution of the micro- and macro-yield stress are observed. Our results show that the yield stress increases with increasing strain rate and decreasing temperature. We also show that the strain rate at which the transition between constant and increasing yield stress as a function of the temperature occurs increases with increasing temperature. Calculations at different grain sizes will give an insight into the grain size effect on the plasticity mechanisms and the yield stress.

  16. Stress-corrosion cracking of Inconel alloy 600 in high-temperature water - an update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bandy, R.; Van Rooyen, D.

    1984-08-01

    An experimental program on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) aimed at the development of a quantitative model for predicting the behavior of Inconel 600 tubing in high temperature water is described. Empirical data are gathered to relate factors that influence SCC. Work involves U-bends, constant extension rate tests (CERT), and constant load. Plots are made of failure time and crack velocity vs temperature, and also of SCC time vs stress, using a variety of environments related to the ingredients of primary or secondary water. Cold work of Alloy 600 is also included. The effect of temperature is found to yield-semi-log (Arrhenius) curves, and log-log plots of failure time vs stress are presented. Curves of this type are being evaluated for use in extrapolating accelerated test data to operating conditions for predictive purposes. 5 references, 8 figures, 3 tables.

  17. Thermal input control and enhancement for laser based residual stress measurements using liquid temperature indicating coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pechersky, Martin J.

    1999-01-01

    An improved method for measuring residual stress in a material comprising the steps of applying a spot of temperature indicating coating to the surface to be studied, establishing a speckle pattern surrounds the spot of coating with a first laser then heating the spot of coating with a far infrared laser until the surface plastically deforms. Comparing the speckle patterns before and after deformation by subtracting one pattern from the other will produce a fringe pattern that serves as a visual and quantitative indication of the degree to which the plasticized surface responded to the stress during heating and enables calculation of the stress.

  18. Thermal input control and enhancement for laser based residual stress measurements using liquid temperature indicating coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pechersky, M.J.

    1999-07-06

    An improved method for measuring residual stress in a material is disclosed comprising the steps of applying a spot of temperature indicating coating to the surface to be studied, establishing a speckle pattern surrounds the spot of coating with a first laser then heating the spot of coating with a far infrared laser until the surface plastically deforms. Comparing the speckle patterns before and after deformation by subtracting one pattern from the other will produce a fringe pattern that serves as a visual and quantitative indication of the degree to which the plasticized surface responded to the stress during heating and enables calculation of the stress. 3 figs.

  19. Electrodeposition of nickel from low temperature sulfamate electrolytes.Part 1 :Electrochemistry and film stress.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hachman, John T.; Kelly, J.J. (IBM Talin, Albert Alec; Goods, Steven Howard

    2005-11-01

    The film stress of Ni films deposited at near-ambient temperatures from sulfamate electrolytes was studied. The particulate filtering of the electrolyte, a routine industrial practice, becomes an important deposition parameter at lower bath temperatures. At 28 C, elevated tensile film stress develops at low current densities (<10 mA/cm{sup 2}) if the electrolyte is filtered. Filtering at higher current densities has a negligible effect on film stress. A similar though less pronounced trend is observed at 32 C. Sulfate-based Ni plating baths display similar film stress sensitivity to filtering, suggesting that this is a general effect for Ni electrodeposition. It is shown that filtering does not significantly change the current efficiency or the pH near the surface during deposition. The observed changes in film stress are thus attributed not to adsorbed hydrogen but instead to the effects of filtering on the formation and concentration of polyborate species due to the decreased solubility of boric acid at near-ambient temperatures.

  20. Mechanisms of stress corrosion cracking for iron-based alloys in high-temperature water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, X.Y.; Congleton, J.; Bahraloloom, A.

    1998-11-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibilities of a series of iron-based alloys (IBA), including some high-purity irons, were evaluated in lithiated water at temperatures up to 300 C. Inclusion distributions in each material were established using quantitative metallography and energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDX). Electrochemical measurements were performed to investigate film formation kinetics. Results showed the minimum potential for SCC was a function of the inclusion content. Reducing the inclusion content in IBA moved the minimum potential for SCC in the anodic direction and/or increased the temperature for the onset of cracking but did not eliminate SCC.

  1. Mechanisms of High Temperature/Low Stress Creep of Ni-Based Superalloy Single Crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael J. Mills

    2009-03-05

    Cast nickel-based superalloys are used for blades in land-based, energy conversion and powerplant applications, as well as in aircraft gas turbines operating at temperatures up to 1100 C, where creep is one of the life-limiting factors. Creep of superalloy single crystals has been extensively studied over the last several decades. Surprisingly, only recently has work focused specifically on the dislocation mechanisms that govern high temperature and low stress creep. Nevertheless, the perpetual goal of better engine efficiency demands that the creep mechanisms operative in this regime be fully understood in order to develop alloys and microstructures with improved high temperature capability. At present, the micro-mechanisms controlling creep before and after rafting (the microstructure evolution typical of high temperature creep) has occurred have yet to be identified and modeled, particularly for [001] oriented single crystals. This crystal orientation is most interesting technologically since it exhibits the highest creep strength. The major goal of the program entitled ''Mechanisms of High Temperature/Low Stress Creep of Ni-Based Superalloy Single Crystals'' (DOE Grant DE-FG02-04ER46137) has been to elucidate these creep mechanisms in cast nickel-based superalloys. We have utilized a combination of detailed microstructure and dislocation substructure analysis combined with the development of a novel phase-field model for microstructure evolution.

  2. Intergranular attack and stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 in high-temperature caustic solutions containing contaminants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bandy, R.; Roberge, R.; van Rooyen, D.

    1985-06-01

    Concentrated caustic is a primary cause of stress corrosion cracking and intergranular attack of Alloy 600 tubing in PWRs. However, temperature, electrochemical potential, stress, and metallurgical state all play a role. This study provides the quantitative evidence needed to develop models of crack growth and to devise effective countermeasures.

  3. Lead-induced stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 and 690 in high temperature water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakai, T.; Senjuh, T.; Aoki, K.; Shigemitsu, T.; Kishi, Y.

    1992-12-31

    Lead is one of the potential contributing impurities to the degradation of PWR steam generator tubing. Recent laboratory testing has shown that lead is a corrosive material for Alloy 600 steam generator tubing. However, it is still unknown how lead influences the corrosion of steam generator tubing, including the effect of lead concentration, solution pH, stress level and material characteristics. In this study, two kinds of experiments were performed. One was to investigate the thin film characteristic and selectively dissolved base metal elements of Alloy 600MA in high temperature solutions of different lead concentrations and pH. The other investigated the dependency of degradation of Alloy 600MA and Alloy 690TT on lead concentration and stress level in mild acidic environment, at 340{degrees}C for 2500 hrs. It was firstly demonstrated that lead-enhanced selective dissolution of nickel from alloy base metal, as a result of electrochemical reaction between lead and nickel, might cause the initiation and propagation of corrosion. Secondly, we showed that Alloy 690TT, generally very corrosion resistant material, also suffered from Pb-induced corrosion. The difference of the lead-induced stress corrosion morphology of Alloy 600MA and Alloy 690TT was also clarified.

  4. Surveys

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Surveys can be a useful way to gauge the opinions of your readers and learn more about your website's audiences, but you'll often need approval from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) to run...

  5. Thermally activated low temperature creep and primary water stress corrosion cracking of NiCrFe alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, M.M. Jr.

    1993-10-01

    A phenomenological SCC-CGR model is developed based on an apriori assumption that the SCC-CGR is controlled by low temperature creep (LTC). This mode of low temperature time dependent deformation occurs at stress levels above the athermal flow stress by a dislocation glide mechanism that is thermally activated and may be environmentally assisted. The SCC-CGR model equations developed contain thermal activation parameters descriptive of the dislocation creep mechanism. Thermal activation parameters are obtained by fitting the CGR model to SCC-CGR data obtained on Alloy 600 and Alloy X-750. These SCC-CGR activation parameters are compared to LTC activation parameters obtained from stress relaxation tests. When the high concentration of hydrogen at the tip of an SCC crack is considered, the SCC-CGR activation energies and rate sensitivities are shown to be quantitatively consistent with hydrogen reducing the activation energy and increasing the strain rate sensitivity in LTC stress relaxation tests. Stress dependence of SCC-CGR activation energy consistent with that found for the LTC activation energy. Comparisons between temperature dependence of the SCC-CGR stress sensitivity and LTC stress sensitivity provide a basis for speculation on effects of hydrogen and solute carbon on SCC crack growth rates.

  6. About the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 in high temperature water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rebak, R.B.; Szklarska-Smialowska, Z.

    1995-12-31

    Alloy 600 is a material commonly used to construct the tubing in the steam generators (SG) of pressurized light water reactors (PWR) and of CANDU heavy water reactors. It is well established which variables and to which extent they influence the crack growth rate (CGR) in Alloy 600 exposed to high temperature (deaerated) water (HTW), especially in very aggressive conditions. There is evidence that the same variables that influence CGR also control the crack induction time. However, there are only a few data on crack induction time and no detailed explanation of the events that lead to the nucleation of a crack on an apparent smooth tube surface. In this paper, a critical review of the mechanisms of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is given and, an interpretation of the events occurring during the long ({approx} 15 y) induction times observed in plant is postulated.

  7. Fractured rock stress-permeability relationships from in situ data and effects of temperature and chemical-mechanical couplings

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rutqvist, J.

    2014-09-19

    The purpose of this paper is to (i) review field data on stress-induced permeability changes in fractured rock; (ii) describe estimation of fractured rock stress-permeability relationships through model calibration against such field data; and (iii) discuss observations of temperature and chemically mediated fracture closure and its effect on fractured rock permeability. The field data that are reviewed include in situ block experiments, excavation-induced changes in permeability around tunnels, borehole injection experiments, depth (and stress) dependent permeability, and permeability changes associated with a large-scale rock-mass heating experiment. Data show how the stress-permeability relationship of fractured rock very much depends on localmore » in situ conditions, such as fracture shear offset and fracture infilling by mineral precipitation. Field and laboratory experiments involving temperature have shown significant temperature-driven fracture closure even under constant stress. Such temperature-driven fracture closure has been described as thermal overclosure and relates to better fitting of opposing fracture surfaces at high temperatures, or is attributed to chemically mediated fracture closure related to pressure solution (and compaction) of stressed fracture surface asperities. Back-calculated stress-permeability relationships from field data may implicitly account for such effects, but the relative contribution of purely thermal-mechanical and chemically mediated changes is difficult to isolate. Therefore, it is concluded that further laboratory and in situ experiments are needed to increase the knowledge of the true mechanisms behind thermally driven fracture closure, and to further assess the importance of chemical-mechanical coupling for the long-term evolution of fractured rock permeability.« less

  8. Fractured rock stress-permeability relationships from in situ data and effects of temperature and chemical-mechanical couplings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutqvist, J.

    2014-09-19

    The purpose of this paper is to (i) review field data on stress-induced permeability changes in fractured rock; (ii) describe estimation of fractured rock stress-permeability relationships through model calibration against such field data; and (iii) discuss observations of temperature and chemically mediated fracture closure and its effect on fractured rock permeability. The field data that are reviewed include in situ block experiments, excavation-induced changes in permeability around tunnels, borehole injection experiments, depth (and stress) dependent permeability, and permeability changes associated with a large-scale rock-mass heating experiment. Data show how the stress-permeability relationship of fractured rock very much depends on local in situ conditions, such as fracture shear offset and fracture infilling by mineral precipitation. Field and laboratory experiments involving temperature have shown significant temperature-driven fracture closure even under constant stress. Such temperature-driven fracture closure has been described as thermal overclosure and relates to better fitting of opposing fracture surfaces at high temperatures, or is attributed to chemically mediated fracture closure related to pressure solution (and compaction) of stressed fracture surface asperities. Back-calculated stress-permeability relationships from field data may implicitly account for such effects, but the relative contribution of purely thermal-mechanical and chemically mediated changes is difficult to isolate. Therefore, it is concluded that further laboratory and in situ experiments are needed to increase the knowledge of the true mechanisms behind thermally driven fracture closure, and to further assess the importance of chemical-mechanical coupling for the long-term evolution of fractured rock permeability.

  9. Temperature Dependent Tensile Fracture Stress of n- and p-Type Filled-Skutterudite Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salvador, James R.; Yang, Jihui; Wereszczak, Andrew A; Wang, Hsin; Cho, Jung Y

    2011-01-01

    While materials with excellent thermoelectric performance are most desirable for higher heat to electrical energy conversion efficiency, thermoelectric materials must also be sufficiently mechanically robust to withstand the large number of thermal cycles and vibrational stresses likely to be encountered while in service, particularly in automotive applications. Further these TE materials should be composed of non-toxic and naturally abundant constituent elements and be available as both n- and p-type varieties. Skutterudite based thermoelectric materials seemingly fit this list of criteria. In this contribution we report on the synthesis, tensile fracture strengths, low temperature electrical and thermal transport properties, and coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE), of the n-type skutterudite La{sub 0.05({+-}0.01)}Ba{sub 0.07({+-}0.04)}Yb{sub 0.08({+-}0.02)}Co{sub 4.00({+-}0.01)}Sb{sub 12.02({+-}0.03)} and the p-type Ce{sub 0.30({+-}0.02)}Co{sub 2.57({+-}0.02)}Fe{sub 1.43({+-}0.02)}Sb{sub 11.98({+-}0.03)}. Both materials have tensile fracture strengths that are temperature independent up to 500 C, and are in the range of {approx}140 MPa as measured by a three point bend flexure test fixture described herein. The CTE's were measured by dual rod dilatometry and were determined to be 10.3 ppm/C for the n-type material and 11.5 ppm/C for p-type up to 450 C.

  10. Improved austenitic stainless steel for high temperature applications. [Improved stress-rupture properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Not Available

    This invention describes a composition for an austenitic stainless steel which has been found to exhibit improved high temperature stress rupture properties. The composition of this alloy is about (in wt. %): 12.5 to 14.5 Cr; 14.5 to 16.5 Ni; 1.5 to 2.5 Mo; 1.5 to 2.5 Mn; 0.1 to 0.4 Ti; 0.02 to 0.08 C; 0.5 to 1.0 Si; 0.01 maximum, N; 0.02 to 0.08 P; 0.002 to 0.008 B; 0.004-0.010 S; 0.02-0.05 Nb; .01-.05 V; 0.005-0.02 Ta; 0.02-0.05 Al; 0.01-0.04 Cu; 0.02-0.05 Co; .03 maximum, As; 0.01 maximum, 0; 0.01 maximum, Zr; and with the balance of the alloy being essentially iron. The carbon content of the alloy is adjusted such that wt. % Ti/(wt. % C+wt. % N) is between 4 and 6, and most preferably about 5. In addition the sum of the wt. % P + wt. % B + wt. % S is at least 0.03 wt. %. This alloy is believed to be particularly well suited for use as fast breeder reactor fuel element cladding.

  11. Stress corrosion cracking of alloy 600 in high temperature aqueous solutions: Influencing factors, mechanisms and models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szklarska-Smialowska, Z.; Rebak, R.B.

    1996-12-31

    A detailed critical review of the multiple variables affecting stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of in high temperature (deaerated) aqueous solutions is given. Most of the data in the literature deals with the cracking susceptibility in the primary side; however, it is clear that similar factors and to a similar extent influence the SCC susceptibility in both primary and secondary sides. Some factors such as alkalinity of the solution or presence of lead (Pb) may be more in the secondary side and others such as partial pressure of hydrogen (H{sub 2}) in the primary side. Even though the effect of the variables on SCC susceptibility is more or less established, in models, in most of the cases there is a lack of fundamental understanding of the mechanisms involved. The different mechanisms and models proposed to explain the SCC of alloy 600 are briefly reviewed and their validity to explain the influence of the variables and to predict the crack growth rate (CGR), is assessed. It is concluded that several of the proposed models seem to give a fair estimate of the CGR values under certain conditions; however, it appears that a single mechanism cannot explain in detail the complex case of alloy 600 SCC. 113 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Influence of substrate properties and annealing temperature on the stress state of magnetron sputtered tungsten thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliveira, J. C.; Cavaleiro, A.

    2006-11-15

    The influence of substrate properties and annealing temperature on the stress state of tungsten thin films deposited by dc reactive magnetron sputtering was studied using 310 steel (AISI), Fecralloy registered and Invar registered substrates. Besides elemental tungsten, only residual amounts of contamination elements (O, C, Ar, etc.) were detected by electron probe microanalysis. Only the {alpha}-W crystalline structure, with a preferential <110> orientation, was detected in all the films by x-ray diffraction. The highest lattice parameters were measured for the films deposited on 310 steel substrates, while the smallest values were obtained for the films deposited on Invar registered substrates. These results are closely related to the thermal expansion coefficients of the substrates. All the as-deposited films were in a compressive stress state independent of the substrate type (-3 GPa for 310 steel and Fecralloy registered substrates and -2 GPa for Invar registered substrates). The residual compressive stresses of the films deposited on Fecralloy registered substrates strongly decrease with annealing temperatures up to {approx_equal}-8 GPa at 1175 K. This result shows that the measured compressive stresses are not real, and they are a direct consequence of plastic deformation of the substrate. On the contrary, the compressive stresses measured in the films deposited on Invar registered and 310 steel substrates are real as plastic deformation of the substrates is not observed.

  13. Thermal-stress modeling of an optical microphone at high temperature...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    To help determine the capability range of a MEMS optical microphone design in harsh conditions computer simulations were carried out. Thermal stress modeling was performed up to ...

  14. Stress corrosion of alloys 600 and 690 in acidic sulfate solutions at elevated temperatures. Final report. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newman, J.F.

    1983-10-01

    EPRI project RP 1171-1 demonstrated that alloy 600 was susceptible to stress corrosion cracking in sulfate environments during constant extension rate testing. The current project has extended that investigation to determine the influence of alloy grain size, sensitization, solution pH and temperature. Stress corrosion in very dilute sulfate solutions and the susceptibility of alloy 690 have also been studied. Data have been obtained chiefly by constant extension rate testing using tensile specimens, and by the constant displacement testing of C-rings.

  15. Stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 and Alloy 690 in all volatile treated water at elevated temperatures. Final report. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theus, G.J.; Emanuelson, R.H.

    1983-05-01

    This report describes a continuing study of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of Inconel alloys 600 and 690 in all-volatile treated (AVT) water. Specimens of alloys 600 and 690 are being exposed to AVT water at 288/sup 0/, 332/sup 0/, 343/sup 0/, and 360/sup 0/C. Alloy 600 generally resists SCC in high-purity water under normal service conditions but is susceptible under other specific conditions. In general, mill-annealed alloy 600 is more susceptible than stress-relieved material. Susceptibility to SCC increases rapidly with increasing exposure temperature. Very high stresses (near or above yield) are required to induce cracking in AVT or other high-purity waters. Most of the data presented in this report are for alloy 600; alloy 690 has not yet cracked. However, the program is being continued and will subsequently characterize the high-purity water cracking behavior, if any, of alloy 690.

  16. Mechanisms of stress corrosion cracking and intergranular attack in Alloy 600 in high temperature caustic and pure water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bandy, R.; van Rooyen, D.

    1984-01-01

    In recent years, several studies have been conducted on the intergranular stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and intergranular attack (IGA) of Alloy 600. A combination of SCC and IGA has been observed in Alloy 600 tubing on the hot leg of some operating steam generators in pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plants, and sodium hydroxide along with several other chemical species have been implicated in the tube degradations. SCC has been observed above and within the tube sheet, whereas IGA is generally localized within the tube sheet. Alloy 600 is also susceptible to SCC in pure and primary water. Various factors that influence SCC and IGA include metallurgical conditions of the alloy, concentrations of alkaline species, impurity content of the environment, temperature and stress. The mechanisms of these intergranular failures, however, are not well understood. Some of the possible mechanisms of the SCC and IGA in high temperature water and caustic are described in this paper.

  17. Effects of carbides on susceptibility of alloy 600 to stress corrosion cracking in high-temperature water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rebak, R.B.; Xia, Z.; Szklarska-Smialowska, Z. . Fontana Corrosion Center)

    1993-11-01

    The electrochemical behavior of sensitized, carburized, and mill-annealed alloy 600 (UNS N06600) was studied in hydrogenated, aerated, and high-temperature (250 to 350 C) dilute aqueous solutions. In high-temperature water at high anodic potentials, the current density (DC) from carbide dissolution was higher than DC from matrix dissolution. In oxidizing environments, intergranular stress corrosion cracking propagated in alloy 600 by dissolution of continuous or semicontinuous carbides at the grain boundary, in sensitized and non-sensitized materials. These studies have been conducted in environments similar to those in the steam generators of pressurized water reactors (PWR) in nuclear power plants.

  18. An In-Cylinder Imaging Survey of Low-Temperature, High-Efficiency...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    High speed imaging of in-cylinder spray and combustion luminosity of low temperature combustion strategies are contrasted to conventional gasoline and diesel engine combustion PDF ...

  19. An In-Cylinder Imaging Survey of Low-Temperature, High-Efficiency Combustion Strategies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    High speed imaging of in-cylinder spray and combustion luminosity of low temperature combustion strategies are contrasted to conventional gasoline and diesel engine combustion

  20. A SYSTEMATIC SURVEY OF HIGH-TEMPERATURE EMISSION IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Harry P.; Winebarger, Amy R.; Brooks, David H.

    2012-11-10

    The recent analysis of observations taken with the EUV Imaging Spectrometer and X-Ray Telescope instruments on Hinode suggests that well-constrained measurements of the temperature distribution in solar active regions can finally be made. Such measurements are critical for constraining theories of coronal heating. Past analysis, however, has suffered from limited sample sizes and large uncertainties at temperatures between 5 and 10 MK. Here we present a systematic study of the differential emission measure distribution in 15 active region cores. We focus on measurements in the 'inter-moss' region, that is, the region between the loop footpoints, where the observations are easier to interpret. To reduce the uncertainties at the highest temperatures we present a new method for isolating the Fe XVIII emission in the AIA/SDO 94 A channel. The resulting differential emission measure distributions confirm our previous analysis showing that the temperature distribution in an active region core is often strongly peaked near 4 MK. We characterize the properties of the emission distribution as a function of the total unsigned magnetic flux. We find that the amount of high-temperature emission in the active region core is correlated with the total unsigned magnetic flux, while the emission at lower temperatures, in contrast, is inversely related. These results provide compelling evidence that high-temperature active region emission is often close to equilibrium, although weaker active regions may be dominated by evolving million degree loops in the core.

  1. Stress corrosion crack detection in alloy 600 in high temperature caustic. Master`s thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brisson, B.W.

    1996-06-01

    Alloy 600, the material used for pressurized water reactor steam generator tubing, is susceptible to environmentally assisted stress corrosion cracking. Intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) attacks the tubes in areas of high residual stress, and in crevice regions. No method has been successfully developed to monitor steam generator tubing in-situ for crack initiation and growth. Essentially all available published IGSCC crack growth data for alloy 600 is based on non-tubing material. Although it is very likely that the current data base is applicable to tubing processing, differences between tube and other geometries make a comparison between tubing and other data important for verification purposes. However, obtaining crack initiation and growth data from tubing is difficult due to the geometry and the thin wall thickness.

  2. Mechanisms of intergranular attack and stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 by high-temperature caustic solutions containing impurities: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Rooyen, D.; Bandy, R.

    1987-07-01

    The mechanisms of intergranular attack (IGA) and intergranular stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of Alloy 600 are investigated in high temperature sodium hydroxide environments contaminated with impurities such as carbonate, sulfate, silicate, magnetite, and chromic oxide. Results show that caustic alone can cause both IGA and SCC. The effects of electrochemical potential, stress, time, temperature and the metallurgical state of Alloy 600 on the IGA and SCC are discussed. It appears that both IGA and SCC are manifestations of a general intergranular failure process. In the presence of adverse potential, stress, strain rate and temperature, the slower IGA process is generally replaced by the faster SCC process.

  3. Grain Boundary Character Along Intergranular Stress Corrosion Crack Paths in Austenitic Stainless Alloys Removed from High-Temperature Water Service

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gertsman, Valerii Y.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2002-01-01

    Stress-corrosion cracks produced in high-temperature water environments were examined in alloy 600 and stainless steel samples. The alloy 600 samples were removed from pressurized-water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubing after exhibiting cracking in service or after model-boiler stress corrosion cracking tests. The 304 and 316 stainless steel samples also experienced intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in high-temperature-water environments similar to a PWR steam generator. Grain boundary misorientations were measured along IG crack paths as well as in the bulk. In general, only twin Sigma 3 boundaries exhibited improved resistance to crack propagation. If the Sigma 3 were factored out, the fractions of grain boundary types of cracked boundaries corresponded to their frequency of occurrence in the bulk alloy. Other boundaries with coincident site lattice misorientations, including Sigma 9 and Sigma 27, were observed to crack. The cracks were often (but not always) arrested at grain boundary junctions containing Sigma 3 boundaries. The results obtained indicate that grain boundary crystallography does not fully determine its susceptibility to IGSCC in typical commercial alloys. Other factors must be taken into account when assessing material?s propensity to IG failure.

  4. Initiation and propagation of stress-corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 in high-temperature water. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bandy, R.; van Rooyen, D.

    1983-01-01

    Results of stress-corrosion cracking data are presented for Inconel 600 steam-generator tubing. U-bend, constant-load, and slow extension-rate tests are included. Arrhenius plots are presented for failure times vs inverse temperature for crack initiation and propagation. Effect of applied load is expressed in terms of log-log curves for failure times vs stress, and variations in environment and cold work are included. Microstructure and composition of oxide films on Inconel 600 surfaces were examined after exposure to pure water at 365/sup 0/C, and stripping with the bromine-methanol method. Results are discussed in terms of transient creep, film rupture and a mass-transport-limited anodic process.

  5. Stress-corrosion cracking of Inconel alloy 600 in high-temperature water: an update. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bandy, R.; van Rooyen, D.

    1983-01-01

    Inconel 600 has been tested in high-temperature aqueous media (without oxygen) in several tests. Data are presented to relate failure times to periods of crack initiation and propagation. Quantitative relationships have been developed from tests in which variations were made in temperature, applied load, strain rate, water chemistry, and the condition of the test alloy.

  6. In-situ neutron scattering studies of magnetic shape memory alloys under stress, temperature, and magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Donald W; Sisneros, Thomas A; Kabra, Saurabh; Schlagel, Deborah

    2010-01-01

    We have utilized the SMARTS engineering neutron diffractometer to study the crystallographic orientation and phase transformations in the ferromagnetic shape memory alloy Ni 2MnGa under conditions of temperature (200-600K), stress (500MPa), and magnetic field (2T). Neutrons are uniquely suited to probe the crystallographic response of materials to external stimuli because of their high penetration, which allows them to sample the bulk of the material (as opposed to the surface) as well as pass through environmental chambers. A single crystal of Ni{sub 5}MnGa was repeatedly thermally cycled through the Austenitic-Martensitic phase transformation under varying conditions of applied stress, magnetic field or both. In-situ neutron diffraction was used to quantitatively monitor the population of the crystallographic variants in the martensitic phase as a function of the external stimuli during cooling. Neutron diffraction was used to monitor variant selection in the Ferromagnetic Shape Memory Alloy Ni{sub 2}Mn Ga during austenitic to martensitic transformation under varying conditions of externally applied stress and magnetic field. Qualitatively, the results were to be expected in this simple example. The shorter and magnetically soft c-axis of the tetragonal martensitic phase aligned with the compressive stress or magnetic field. However, neutron diffraction proved useful in directly quantifying the selection of the preferred variant by external influence. For instance, by quantifying the variant selection, the neutron diffraction results made apparent that the sample 'remembered' a loading cycle following a 'reset' cycle with no external applied stress. Moreover, the power of in-situ neutron diffraction will become more apparent when applied to more complex, less understood, samples such as polycrystalline samples or composite samples.

  7. Stress corrosion cracking behavior of Alloy 600 in high temperature water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, G.L.; Burke, M.G.

    1995-07-01

    SCC susceptibility of Alloy 600 in deaerated water at 360 C (statically loaded U-bend specimens) is dependent on microstructure and whether the material was cold-worked and annealed (CWA) or hot-worked and annealed (HWA). All cracking was intergranular, and materials lacking grain boundary carbides were most susceptible to SCC initiation. CWA tubing materials are more susceptible to SCC initiation than HWA ring-rolled forging materials with similar microstructures (optical metallography). In CWA tubing materials, one crack dominated and grew to a visible size. HWA materials with a low hot-working finishing temperature (<925 C) and final anneals at 1010-1065 C developed both large cracks (similar to those in CWA materials) and small intergranular microcracks detectable only by destructive metallography. HWA materials with a high hot-working finishing temperature (>980 C) and a high-temperature final anneal (>1040 C), with grain boundaries that are fully decorated, developed only microcracks in all specimens. These materials did not develop large, visually detectable cracks, even after more than 300 weeks exposure. A low-temperature thermal treatment (610 C for 7h), which reduces or eliminates SCC in Alloy 600, did not eliminate microcrack formation in high temperature processed HWA materials. Conventional metallographic and analytical electron microscopy (AEM) were done on selected materials to identify the factors responsible for the observed differences in cracking behavior. Major difference between high-temperature HWA and low-temperature HWA and CWA materials was that the high temperature processing and final annealing produced predominantly ``semi-continuous`` dendritic M{sub 7}C{sub 3} carbides along grain boundaries with a minimal amount of intragranular carbides. Lower temperature processing produced intragranular M7C3 carbides, with less intergranular carbides.

  8. Employee Surveys

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Employee Surveys

  9. Stress corrosion cracking of alloys 600 and 690 in all-volatile-treated water at elevated temperatures: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miglin, B.P.; Theus, G.J.

    1988-05-01

    This report describes stress corrosion (SCC) tests of Inconnel alloys 600 and 690 in all-volatile treated (AVT) water. Specimens of alloys 600 and 690 were exposed to AVT water at 288/degree/, 332/degree/, 343/degree/, and 360/degree/C. Alloy 660 generally resists SCC in high-purity water at normal sevice temperatures, but is susceptible to SCC at higher temperatures. In general, mill-annealed alloy 600 is more susceptible than high-treated material with fine lacy grain boundary carbides. Very high stresses (near or above yield) are required to induce cracking of alloy 600 in AVT or other high-purity waters. For alloy 600, 78 of 520 alloy 600 specimens eventually cracked. Although exposed for less total time than alloy 600 specimens, no alloy 690 specimens cracked. Three alloy 600 specimens cracked in the same autoclave tests in less time than those accumulated by the alloy 690 specimens. Longitudinally-oriented ID cracks became evident on alloy 690 split-tube U-bend specimens after autoclave exposures. These cracks on the 690 specimens were from three to ten times longer after exposure than similar defects found on unexposed alloy 690 specimens. The longitudinal crack lengthening on the alloy 690 split-tube U-bend specimens may have been a stress relaxation process or possibly a crack opening process of pre-existing, partially closed, longitudinal defects. Similar cracks were present in alloy 600 specimens, but in at least one case SCC did initiate from these shallow, blunt cracks.

  10. Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Survey of Materials Research and Development Needs to Support Early Deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric Shaber; G. Baccaglini; S. Ball; T. Burchell; B. Corwin; T. Fewell; M. Labar; P. MacDonald; P. Rittenhouse; Russ Vollam; F. Southworth

    2003-01-01

    The VHTR reference concept is a helium-cooled, graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor with an outlet temperature of 1000 C or higher. It is expected that the VHTR will be purchased in the future as either an electricity producing plant with a direct cycle gas turbine or a hydrogen producing (or other process heat application) plant. The process heat version of the VHTR will require that an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) and primary gas circulator be located in an adjoining power conversion vessel. A third VHTR mission - actinide burning - can be accomplished with either the hydrogen-production or gas turbine designs. The first ''demonstration'' VHTR will produce both electricity and hydrogen using the IHX to transfer the heat to either a hydrogen production plant or the gas turbine. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will be designed to assure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage during accidents. The fuel cycle will be a once-through very high burnup low-enriched uranium fuel cycle. The purpose of this report is to identify the materials research and development needs for the VHTR. To do this, we focused on the plant design described in Section 2, which is similar to the GT-MHR plant design (850 C core outlet temperature). For system or component designs that present significant material challenges (or far greater expense) there may be some viable design alternatives or options that can reduce development needs or allow use of available (cheaper) materials. Nevertheless, we were not able to assess those alternatives in the time allotted for this report and, to move forward with this material research and development assessment, the authors of this report felt that it was necessary to use a GT-MHR type design as the baseline design.

  11. Lead induced stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 690 in high temperature water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, K.K.; Lim, J.K.; Moriya, Shinichi; Watanabe, Yutaka; Shoji, Tetsuo

    1995-12-31

    Recent investigations of cracked steam generator tubes at nuclear power plants concluded that lead significantly contributed to cracking the Alloy 600 materials. In order to investigate the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of Alloy 690, slow strain rate tests (SSRT) and anodic polarization measurements were performed. The SSRTs were conducted in a lead-chloride solution (PbCl{sub 2}) and in a chloride but lead free solution (NaCl) at pH of 3 and 4.5 at 288 C. The anodic polarization measurements were carried out at 30 C using the same solutions as in SSRT. The SSRT results showed that Alloy 690 was susceptible to SCC in both solutions. In the lead chloride solution, cracking had slight dependence on lead concentration and pH. Cracking tend to increase with a higher lead concentration and a lower pH and was mainly intergranular and was to be a few tens to hundreds micrometers in length. In the chloride only solution, cracking was similar to the lead induced SCC. The results of anodic polarization measurement and electron probe micro analysis (EPMA) helped to understand lead induced SCC. Lead was a stronger active corrosive element but had a minor affect on cracking susceptibility of the alloy. While, chloride was quite different from lead effect to SCC. A possible mechanism of lead induced SCC of Alloy 690 was also discussed based on the test results.

  12. Anomalous temperature dependence of flow stress in a Fe{sub 3}Al alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, J.H.; Ha, T.K.; Chang, Y.W.

    2000-01-01

    Iron aluminides have attracted much interest since 1930s when the excellent corrosion resistance was noted in alloys with the composition of more than about 18 at.% Al. These alloys have relatively low material cost, due to the reduced usage of strategic elements like Cr, Mo and Ni, and a lower density than stainless steels. Their tensile strength is also comparable to those of ferritic and austenitic steels. These advantages have led the iron aluminide alloys being considered for many applications in industries needing sulfidation and oxidation resistance (1). However, the poor ductility at ambient temperatures and an abrupt drop in strength above 600 C have limited these alloys for structural applications. In the past years, extensive efforts have been devoted to understanding and improving the metallurgical properties of iron aluminides with the aim of producing more strong, ductile, and corrosion-resistant materials for structural applications. These studies have resulted in significant contributions to the understanding of the fabrication and mechanical properties of iron aluminides. Deformation behavior in iron aluminides is now known to depend on composition, temperature, and the presence or absence of ordered structures. Recent studies have demonstrated that improved engineering ductility of 10--15% can be achieved in wrought Fe{sub 3}Al-based iron aluminide alloys, through the control of composition and microstructure. The effect of strain rate on the deformation behavior of Fe{sub 3}Al alloys, especially on the anomalous temperature dependence of strength is of interest recently and more systematic investigation is now necessitated. Load relaxation test has been generally regarded as a very effective technique to measure the strain rate sensitivity over a wider range of strain rates with very little microstructural changes and has been applied to the plasticity of various rate-sensitive materials. In the present study, the iron aluminide alloys with 27.6 at.% Al having the various single-phase field, i.e. the disordered solid solution ({alpha}), an Fe{sub 3}Al with an imperfectly ordered B2 structure, and an ordered Fe{sub 3}Al with the D0{sub 3} structure were first prepared. A series of load relaxation tests was then carried out at the various temperatures ranging from 300 to 800 C to investigate the effect of the tensile strain rate on the anomalous flow behavior.

  13. Enhanced stability against bias-stress of metal-oxide thin film transistors deposited at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fakhri, M.; Goerrn, P.; Riedl, T. [Institute of Electronic Devices, University of Wuppertal, Rainer-Gruenter-St. 21, 42119 Wuppertal (Germany); Weimann, T.; Hinze, P. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt Braunschweig, Bundesallee 100, 38116 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2011-09-19

    Transparent zinc-tin-oxide (ZTO) thin film transistors (TFTs) have been prepared by DC magnetron sputtering. Compared to reference devices with a channel deposited at room temperature and subsequently annealing at 400 deg. C, a substantially enhanced stability against bias stress is evidenced for devices with in-situ substrate heating during deposition (400 deg. C). A reduced density of sub-gap defect states in TFT channels prepared with in-situ substrate heating is found. Concomitantly, a reduced sensitivity to the adsorption of ambient gases is evidenced for the in-situ heated devices. This finding is of particular importance for an application as driver electronics for organic light emitting diode displays.

  14. The influence of dissolved hydrogen on primary water stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 at PWR steam generator operating temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacko, R.J.; Economy, G.; Pement, F.W.

    1992-12-31

    PWR primary coolant chemistry uses an intentional dissolved hydrogen concentration of 20 to 50 ml (STP)/kg of water to effect a net suppression of oxygen-producing radiolysis, to minimize corrosion in primary loop materials and to maintain a low redox potential. Speculation has attended a possible influence of dissolved hydrogen on the kinetics of initiation of Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking (PWSCC) behavior of Alloy 600 steam generator tubing. Three series of experiments are presented for conditions in which the level of dissolved hydrogen was intentionally varied over the hydrogen and temperature ranges of interest for steam generator operation. No significant effect of dissolved hydrogen was found on PWSCC of Alloy 600.

  15. Mechanisms of hydrogen-induced intergranular stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 in high-temperature water/steam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, C.H.

    1989-01-01

    Intergranular stress-corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of Alloy 600 in high-temperature deaerated water or steam has been termed Hydrogen Induced IGSCC. It is suggested here that these cracks are initiated by the nucleation of a high density of bubbles on the grain boundary under the combined action of the applied stress and high-pressure methane formed from carbon in solution reacting with hydrogen injected by corrosion. The bubbles then grow together by grain-boundary diffusion to give local failure. This agrees with the observations made using the electron microscope and two-stage replicas, namely the subsurface formation of closely spaced (0.2 {mu}m) bubbles along boundaries, and the growth of these into fine cracks before they open up to communicate with the corroding atmosphere. The kinetics of this process are examined and shown to be in quantitative agreement with several experimental observations. This mechanism involves no dissolution of the metal, the only role of corrosion being the injection of hydrogen at a high fugacity. It also predicts an activation energy essentially equal to that for grain-boundary diffusion of nickel in the Alloy 600 grain boundary. The activation energy for grain-boundary self-diffusion in nickel is 115 kJ/mol.

  16. Process for the deposition of high temperature stress and oxidation resistant coatings on silicon-based substrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sarin, V.K.

    1991-07-30

    A process is disclosed for depositing a high temperature stress and oxidation resistant coating on a silicon nitride- or silicon carbide-based substrate body. A gas mixture is passed over the substrate at about 900--1500 C and about 1 torr to about ambient pressure. The gas mixture includes one or more halide vapors with other suitable reactant gases. The partial pressure ratios, flow rates, and process times are sufficient to deposit a continuous, fully dense, adherent coating. The halide and other reactant gases are gradually varied during deposition so that the coating is a graded coating of at least two layers. Each layer is a graded layer changing in composition from the material over which it is deposited to the material of the layer and further to the material, if any, deposited thereon, so that no clearly defined compositional interfaces exist. The gases and their partial pressures are varied according to a predetermined time schedule and the halide and other reactant gases are selected so that the layers include (a) an adherent, continuous intermediate layer about 0.5-20 microns thick of an aluminum nitride or an aluminum oxynitride material, over and chemically bonded to the substrate body, and (b) an adherent, continuous first outer layer about 0.5-900 microns thick including an oxide of aluminum or zirconium over and chemically bonded to the intermediate layer.

  17. Process for the deposition of high temperature stress and oxidation resistant coatings on silicon-based substrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sarin, Vinod K.

    1991-01-01

    A process for depositing a high temperature stress and oxidation resistant coating on a silicon nitride- or silicon carbide-based substrate body. A gas mixture is passed over the substrate at about 900.degree.-1500.degree. C. and about 1 torr to about ambient pressure. The gas mixture includes one or more halide vapors with other suitable reactant gases. The partial pressure ratios, flow rates, and process times are sufficient to deposit a continuous, fully dense, adherent coating. The halide and other reactant gases are gradually varied during deposition so that the coating is a graded coating of at least two layers. Each layer is a graded layer changing in composition from the material over which it is deposited to the material of the layer and further to the material, if any, deposited thereon, so that no clearly defined compositional interfaces exist. The gases and their partial pressures are varied according to a predetermined time schedule and the halide and other reactant gases are selected so that the layers include (a) an adherent, continuous intermediate layer about 0.5-20 microns thick of an aluminum nitride or an aluminum oxynitride material, over and chemically bonded to the substrate body, and (b) an adherent, continuous first outer layer about 0.5-900 microns thick including an oxide of aluminum or zirconium over and chemically bonded to the intermediate layer.

  18. Intergranular stress corrosion cracking initiation and growth in mill-annealed Alloy 600 tubing in high-temperature caustic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brisson, B.W.; Ballinger, R.G.; McIlree, A.R.

    1998-07-01

    Historically, pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator (SG) reliability has been dominated by degradation of alloy 600 (UNS N06600) tubing material. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) crack initiation and crack growth rates (CGR) were measured in mill-annealed alloy 600 (UNS N06600) tubing as a function of the stress intensity factor (K) in 10% caustic at 315 C. Tests were conducted using internally pressurized smooth and precracked tubing. Samples were polarized to 150 mV (precracked tube test) or 225 mV (initiation test) with respect to a nickel electrode. Crack initiation and growth from the external tube surface were monitored using a multifrequency alternating current (AC) potential drop system. The AC potential drop system allowed detection of initiation from a smooth surface as well as the monitoring of crack extension in real time. In the case of precracked sample tests, the sample was precracked in fatigue from a sharp v-notch. CGR were obtained over the K range between 4 MPa{radical}m and 18 MPa{radical}m. Values for K were estimated based upon fractographic analysis of samples after testing and an estimate of the K-solution for a thin-walled tube. Average CGR ranged from 2 mm/y to 14 mm/y. CGR determined in this investigation represent the first SCC CGR data obtained in high-temperature caustic using actual steam generator tubing. Growth rates obtained fell within the overall range of the existing database for CGR (da/dt) in alloy 600. The data and analysis suggested a threshold value of K for K-driven crack growth of {approx} 4 MPa{radical}m. However, since the scatter in existing data is very large and the conditions for most of the data are poorly known or not known at all, this was surprising. More importantly, from the standpoint of life prediction, it was observed that da/dt responded to and was a function of K for cracks as small as 0.2 mm in depth, and probably smaller.

  19. Effectiveness of Shallow Temperatures Surveys to Target a Geothermal Reservoir at Previously Explored Sites at McGee Mountain, Nevada

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project Objectives: To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of two innovative technologies in early-stage geothermal exploration:a) shallow (2m) survey; b) hydroprobe; and Identify a geothermal resource at the project site.

  20. Strain rate and temperature effects on the stress corrosion cracking of Inconel 600 steam generator tubing in the primary water conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, U.C.; van Rooyen, D.

    1985-01-01

    A single heat of Inconel Alloy 600 was examined in this work, using slow strain rate tests (SSRT) in simulated primary water at temperatures of 325/sup 0/-345/sup 0/-365/sup 0/C. The best measure of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) was percent SCC present on the fracture surface. Strain rate did not seem to affect crack growth rate significantly, but there is some question about the accuracy of calculating these values in the absence of a direct indication of when a crack initiates. Demarcation was determined between domains of temperature/strain rate where SCC either did, or did not, occur. Slower extension rates were needed to produce SCC as the temperature was lowered. 10 figs.

  1. Inhibitory effect of boric acid on intergranular attack and stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 in high temperature water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawamura, H.; Hirano, H.; Koike, M.; Suda, M.

    1995-09-01

    The inhibitory effect of boric acid on the Intergranular Attack and Stress Corrosion Cracking (IGA/SCC) propagation behavior of steam generator (SG) tubing was studied under accelerated test conditions. Based on the analysis results of stress intensity factors at IGA/SCC crack tips, the notched C-ring tests were carried out to evaluate the effect of stress intensity and boric acid on the IGA/SCC crack propagation. The A.C. impedance measurement and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) were also conducted to clarify the inhibitory effect of boric acid. Notched C-ring test results indicated that IGA/SCC crack velocity of alloy 600 increased gradually with increasing stress intensity factor in the range 4 to about 26 MPa{center_dot}m{sup 1/2}, which might be loaded on the IGA/SCC crack tips of actual SG tubes under PWR secondary conditions. Adding boric acid slightly retarded the crack velocity in both all volatile treatment (AVT) water and caustic solutions. IGA/SCC crack velocities were lower in nearly neutral solutions than in alkali or acidic solutions. Furthermore, A.C. impedance studies showed that the polarization resistances of oxide films formed in boric acid solutions were higher than those of films formed in acidic and alkali solutions. AES analysis revealed that boron content in the oxide films formed in acidic solution containing boric acid was lowest. Good agreement was obtained between the IGA/SCC inhibitory effect of boric acid and the formation of the stable oxide films containing boron.

  2. Intergranular attack and stress corrosion cracking propagation behavior of alloy 600 in high-temperature caustic solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawamura, H.; Hirano, H. . Komae Research Lab.)

    1999-06-01

    The effect of stress intensity factors (K) at the intergranular attack and stress corrosion crack (IGA/SCC) tips on the IGA/SCC propagation behavior of steam generator (SG) tubing was studied under accelerated test conditions. Values of K at the IGA/SCC crack tips were calculated using the statically indeterminate model. Based upon analysis of those factors, the double-cantilever beam (DCB) and SG model boiler tests were carried out to evaluate the effect of stress intensity on IGA/SCC crack propagation. K at the crack tips increased with increasing crack length. For a long crack, K decreased with an increasing number of cracks. However, for a short crack, K decreased slightly with an increasing number of cracks. DCB test results showed the IGA/SCC crack velocity of alloy 600 (UNS N06600) increased gradually with increasing K in the range from 15 MPa[radical]m to [approximately]60 MPa[radical]m. This is the range relevant to IGA/SCC crack tips of typical SG tubes under operating conditions of Pressurized-water reactors. Metallographic examination of tubes removed from the SG model boiler, fouled with 10 ppm sodium hydroxide (NaOH), showed IGA/SCC propagation rates were almost constant in the tested range of K.

  3. Stress-induced large Curie temperature enhancement in Fe(sub 64)Ni(sub 36) Invar alloy.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorria, P.; Martinez-Blanco, D.; Perez, M. J.; Blanco, J. A.; Hernando, A.; Laguna-Marco, M. A.; Haskel, D.; Souza-Neto, N. M.; Xmith, R. I.; Marshall, W. G.; Garbarino, G.; Mezouar, M.; Fernandez-Martinez, A.; Chaboy, J.; Fernandez Barquin, L.; Rodriguez Castrillon, J. A.; Moldovan, M.; Garcia Alonso, J. I.; Zhang, J.; Llobet, A.; Jiang, J. S.; Univ. de Oviedo; Inst. de Magnetismo Aplicado; ISIS Facility; ESRF; Univ.Grenoble and CNRS; CSIC-Univ. de Zaragoza; Univ. de Cantabria; LANL

    2009-01-01

    We have succeeded in increasing up to 150 K the Curie temperature in the Fe{sub 64}N{sub 36}6 invar alloy by means of a severe mechanical treatment followed by a heating up to 1073 K. The invar behavior is still present as revealed by the combination of magnetic measurements with neutron and x-ray techniques under extreme conditions, such as high temperature and high pressure. The proposed explanation is based in a selective induced microstrain around the Fe atoms, which causes a slight increase in the Fe-Fe interatomic distances, thus reinforcing ferromagnetic interactions due to the strong magnetoelastic coupling in these invar compounds.

  4. High-Resolution Characterization of Intergranular Attack and Stress Corrosion Cracking of Alloy 600 in High-Temperature Primary Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, Larry E.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2000-06-01

    Intergranular (IG) attack regions and stress-corrosion cracks in alloy 600 U-bend samples tested in 330C, pressurized-water-reactor water have been characterized by analytical transmission electron microscopy (ATEM). Observations of cross-sectional samples revealed short oxidized zones preceding crack tips and narrow (10-nm wide), deeply penetrated, oxidized zones along grain boundaries exposed along open cracks. High-resolution TEM imaging and fine-probe analysis were used to determine the local chemistries and structures in these corrosion-affected zones. Matrix areas surrounding the crack tips appeared highly strained, whereas the IG penetrations generally did not. The predominant oxide structure found along crack walls and just ahead of crack tips was NiO with metal-atom ratios similar to the alloy. The attacked grain boundaries off open cracks contained similar fine-grained NiO-structure oxide together with local areas of Cr-rich oxide and Ni-rich metal. In contrast, Cr-rich oxide identified as Cr2O3 predominated at the leading edges of the IG attack. Stereoscopic imaging of these tip structures revealed nm-scale porosity and tunnels within the oxide and pores along the grain-boundary plane ahead of the oxide. The general interpretation of these results is that IG attack and cracking follows local dissolution or oxidation and the formation of pores at grain boundaries. This degradation occurs at the nanometer scale and therefore requires high-resolution ATEM methods to reveal detailed characteristics. Experimental support for several possible IG degradation mechanisms is considered.

  5. An Investigation into the Effects of Interface Stress and Interfacial Arrangement on Temperature Dependent Thermal Properties of a Biological and a Biomimetic Material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tomar, Vikas

    2015-01-13

    A significant effort in the biomimetic materials research is on developing materials that can mimic and function in the same way as biological tissues, on bio-inspired electronic circuits, on bio-inspired flight structures, on bio-mimetic materials processing, and on structural biomimetic materials, etc. Most structural biological and biomimetic material properties are affected by two primary factors: (1) interfacial interactions between an organic and an inorganic phase usually in the form of interactions between an inorganic mineral phase and organic protein network; and (2) structural arrangement of the constituents. Examples are exoskeleton structures such as spicule, nacre, and crustacean exoskeletons. A significant effort is being directed towards making synthetic biomimetic materials based on a manipulation of the above two primary factors. The proposed research is based on a hypothesis that in synthetic materials with biomimetic morphology thermal conductivity, k, (how fast heat is carried away) and thermal diffusivity, D, (how fast a material’s temperature rises: proportional to the ratio of k and heat capacity) can be engineered to be either significantly low or significantly high based on a combination of chosen interface orientation and interfacial arrangement in comparison to conventional material microstructures with the same phases and phase volume fractions. METHOD DEVELOPMENT 1. We have established a combined Raman spectroscopy and nanomechanical loading based experimental framework to perform environment (liquid vs. air vs. vacuum) dependent and temperature dependent (~1000 degree-C) in-situ thermal diffusivity measurements in biomaterials at nanoscale to micron scale along with the corresponding analytical theoretic calculations. (Zhang and Tomar, 2013) 2. We have also established a new classical molecular simulation based framework to measure thermal diffusivity in biomolecular interfaces. We are writing a publication currently (Qu and Tomar, 2013) to report the framework and findings in tropocollagen-hydroxyapatite based idealized biomaterial interfaces. PHYSICAL FINDINGS 1. Analyses using experiments have revealed that in the case of bone thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity at micron scale shows significant dependence on compressive stress and temperature. Overall, there is a decrease with respect to increase in temperature and increase with respect to increase in compressive stress. Bio-molecular simulations on idealized tropocollagen-hydroxyapatite interfaces confirm such findings. However, simulations also reveal that thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity can be significantly tailored by interfacial orientation. More importantly, in inorganic materials, interfaces contribute to reduce thermal conductivity and diffusivity. However, analyses here reveal that both can be increased despite presence of a lot of interfaces. 2. Based on significant role played by interfaces in affecting bone thermal properties, a crustacean-exoskeleton system is examined for thermal diffusivity using the newly developed setup. Special emphasis here is on this system since such arrangement is found to be common in fresh water shrimp as well as in some deep water organisms surviving in environment extremes. Experiments reveal that in such system thermal diffusivity is highly tailorable. 3. Overall, experiments and models have established that in biomaterial interfaces a counterintuitive role of interfaces in mediating thermal conduction as a function of stress and temperature is possible in contrast to inorganic materials where interfaces almost always lead to reduction of thermal conductivity as a function of such factors. More investigations are underway to reveal physical origins of such counter-physical characteristics. Such principles can be significantly useful in developing new and innovative bioenergy and inorganic energy systems where heat dissipation significantly affects system performance.

  6. On the effect of deep-rolling and laser-peening on the stress-controlled low- and high-cycle fatigue behavior of Ti-6Al-4V at elevated temperatures up to 550?C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritchie, IAltenberger, RKNalla, YSano LWagner, RO

    2012-04-01

    The effect of surface treatment on the stress/life fatigue behavior of a titanium Ti-6Al-4V turbine fan blade alloy is investigated in the regime of 102 to 106 cycles to failure under fully reversed stress-controlled isothermal push-pull loading between 25? and 550?C at a frequency of 5 Hz. Specifically, the fatigue behavior was examined in specimens in the deep-rolled and laser-shock peened surface conditions, and compared to results on samples in the untreated (machined and stress annealed) condition. Although the fatigue resistance of the Ti-6Al-4V alloy declined with increasing test temperature regardless of surface condition, deep-rolling and laser-shock peening surface treatments were found to extend the fatigue lives by factors of more than 30 and 5-10, respectively, in the high-cycle and low-cycle fatigue regimes at temperatures as high as 550?C. At these temperatures, compressive residual stresses are essentially relaxed; however, it is the presence of near-surface work hardened layers, with a nanocystalline structure in the case of deep-rolling and dense dislocation tangles in the case of laser-shock peening, which remain fairly stable even after cycling at 450?-550?C, that provide the basis for the beneficial role of mechanical surface treatments on the fatigue strength of Ti-6Al-4V at elevated temperatures.

  7. Ch. VII, Temperature, heat flow maps and temperature gradient...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Report: Ch. VII, Temperature, heat flow maps and temperature gradient holes Author T. G. Zacharakis Editor T. G. Zacharakis Published Colorado Geological Survey in Cooperation...

  8. Temperature, heat flow maps and temperature gradient holes |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to library Report: Temperature, heat flow maps and temperature gradient holes Author T. G. Zacharakis Organization Colorado Geological Survey in Cooperation with the U.S....

  9. Group 3: Humidity, Temperature, and Voltage (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wohlgemuth, J.

    2013-05-01

    Group 3 is chartered to develop accelerated stress tests that can be used as comparative predictors of module lifetime versus stresses associated with humidity, temperature and voltage.

  10. Selected data for low-temperature (less than 90{sup 0}C) geothermal systems in the United States: reference data for US Geological Survey Circular 892

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed, M.J.; Mariner, R.H.; Brook, C.A.; Sorey, M.L.

    1983-12-15

    Supporting data are presented for the 1982 low-temperature geothermal resource assessment of the United States. Data are presented for 2072 geothermal sites which are representative of 1168 low-temperature geothermal systems identified in 26 States. The low-temperature geothermal systems consist of 978 isolated hydrothermal-convection systems, 148 delineated-area hydrothermal-convection systems, and 42 delineated-area conduction-dominated systems. The basic data and estimates of reservoir conditions are presented for each geothermal system, and energy estimates are given for the accessible resource base, resource, and beneficial heat for each isolated system.

  11. Effects of pH and stress intensity on crack growth rate in Alloy 600 in lithiated + borated water at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rebak, R.B.; Szklarska-Smialowska, Z.; McIlree, A.R.

    1992-12-31

    Primary water stress corrosion cracking studies were performed on Alloy 600. Constant load tests were conducted at 330 and 350{degrees}C in solutions containing dissolved hydrogen, boric acid (0 < B < 1200 ppm) and lithium hydroxide (0 < Li < 10 ppm). In the PWR working conditions range, that is, 6.9 < pH < 7.4 (or 0.5 ppm < Li < 3.5), there is little effect of the solution pH on the intergranular crack growth rate (IGSCC). However, there is a strong influence of the stress intensity on the IGSCC. K{sub ISCC} {approx} 5-10 MPa{radical}m. Dissolution plays an important role in the IGSCC process.

  12. Beowawe geothermal-resource assessment. Final report. Shallow-hole temperature survey geophysics and deep test hole Collins 76-17

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, N.O.

    1983-03-01

    Geothermal resource investigation field efforts in the Beowawe Geysers Area, Eureka County, Nevada are described. The objectives included acquisition of geotechnical data for understanding the nature and extent of the geothermal resource boundaries south of the known resource area. Fourteen shallow (<500 feet) temperature-gradient holes plus geophysics were used to select the site for a deep exploratory well, the Collins 76-17, which was completed to a total depth of 9005 feet. Maximum downhole recorded temperature was 311/sup 0/F, but no flow could be induced.

  13. High temperature furnace

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Borkowski, Casimer J.

    1976-08-03

    A high temperature furnace for use above 2000.degree.C is provided that features fast initial heating and low power consumption at the operating temperature. The cathode is initially heated by joule heating followed by electron emission heating at the operating temperature. The cathode is designed for routine large temperature excursions without being subjected to high thermal stresses. A further characteristic of the device is the elimination of any ceramic components from the high temperature zone of the furnace.

  14. Digital Surveying Directional Surveying Specialists | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Surveying Specialists Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Digital Surveying Directional Surveying Specialists Author Directional Surveying...

  15. Stress-corrosion cracking of Alloys 600 and 690 and weld metals No. 82 and No. 182 in high-temperature water. Interim report. [BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Page, R.A.

    1982-09-01

    The relative susceptibilities of Alloys 600 and 690 base metals and I-82 and 182 weld metals to intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in pure water at 288/sup 0/C were evaluated. A combination of creviced and non-creviced slow-strain-rate, smooth sustained-load, and precracked fracture mechanics tests were employed in the evaluation. Susceptibility was determined as a function of dissolved oxygen content, degree of sensitization, and crevice condition. The results indicated that Alloy 600, and I-182 and I-82 weld metals were susceptible to various degrees of IGSCC in oxygen containing pure water when creviced, and immune to IGSCC when uncreviced. Alloy 690 was immune to IGSCC under all conditions examined. No correlation was found between the location of IGSCC and the location of maximum grain boundary corrosion in a boiling 25% nitric acid test.

  16. Monument Survey

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Photographs from the WIPP Permanent Marker Monument Survey John Hart & Associates, 2000 Photograph of the Gnome Marker located about 10 miles SW of the WIPP site For more...

  17. radiological. survey

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    7%2A en NNSA to Conduct Aerial Radiological Surveys Over San Francisco, Pacifica, Berkeley, And Oakland, CA Areas http:nnsa.energy.govmediaroompressreleasesamsca

  18. Survey Consumption

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    purchase diaries from a subset of respondents composing a Household Transportation Panel and is reported separately. Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Consumption and...

  19. Membrane and MEA Accelerated Stress Test Protocols

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation on fuel cell membrane and MEA stress test protocols was given by T. Benjamin at the High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting in May 2007.

  20. 2-M Probe Survey | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Techniques A modified version of the 2 m temperature probe survey was tested at the Salt Wells Geothermal Area in 2005.2 This technique was used to measure temperatures at...

  1. 2-M Probe Survey At Chena Geothermal Area (Wescott & Turner,...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Basis Masters thesis Norma Biggar, Geophysical Institute University of Alaska Notes Ground temperature survey performed with a 0.5 m probe. This survey yielded a SE-trending...

  2. 2012 NERSC User Survey Text

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2012 User Survey Text 2010/2011 User Survey Results 2009/2010 User Survey Results 2008/2009 User Survey Results 2007/2008 User Survey Results 2006 User Survey Results 2005 User Survey Results 2004 User Survey Results 2003 User Survey Results 2002 User Survey Results 2001 User Survey Results 2000 User Survey Results 1999 User Survey Results 1998 User Survey Results HPC Requirements for Science HPC Workshop Reports NERSC Staff Publications & Presentations Journal Cover Stories Galleries

  3. Borehole Imaging of In Situ Stress Tests at Mirror Lake Research...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    at Mirror Lake Research Site Citation U.S. Geological Survey. Borehole Imaging of In Situ Stress Tests at Mirror Lake Research Site Internet. 2013. U.S. Geological Survey. cited...

  4. Residual stresses and stress corrosion cracking in pipe fittings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parrington, R.J.; Scott, J.J.; Torres, F.

    1994-06-01

    Residual stresses can play a key role in the SCC performance of susceptible materials in PWR primary water applications. Residual stresses are stresses stored within the metal that develop during deformation and persist in the absence of external forces or temperature gradients. Sources of residual stresses in pipe fittings include fabrication processes, installation and welding. There are a number of methods to characterize the magnitude and orientation of residual stresses. These include numerical analysis, chemical cracking tests, and measurement (e.g., X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction, strain gage/hole drilling, strain gage/trepanning, strain gage/section and layer removal, and acoustics). This paper presents 400 C steam SCC test results demonstrating that residual stresses in as-fabricated Alloy 600 pipe fittings are sufficient to induce SCC. Residual stresses present in as-fabricated pipe fittings are characterized by chemical cracking tests (stainless steel fittings tested in boiling magnesium chloride solution) and by the sectioning and layer removal (SLR) technique.

  5. Fractured rock stress-permeability relationships from in situ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fractured rock stress-permeability relationships from in situ data and effects of temperature and chemical-mechanical couplings Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Fractured...

  6. Residual Stresses for Structural Analysis and Fatigue Life Prediction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Life Prediction in Vehicle Components: Success stories from the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program Residual Stresses for Structural Analysis and Fatigue Life ...

  7. Robotic Surveying

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suzy Cantor-McKinney; Michael Kruzic

    2007-03-01

    ZAPATA ENGINEERING challenged our engineers and scientists, which included robotics expertise from Carnegie Mellon University, to design a solution to meet our client's requirements for rapid digital geophysical and radiological data collection of a munitions test range with no down-range personnel. A prime concern of the project was to minimize exposure of personnel to unexploded ordnance and radiation. The field season was limited by extreme heat, cold and snow. Geographical Information System (GIS) tools were used throughout this project to accurately define the limits of mapped areas, build a common mapping platform from various client products, track production progress, allocate resources and relate subsurface geophysical information to geographical features for use in rapidly reacquiring targets for investigation. We were hopeful that our platform could meet the proposed 35 acres per day, towing both a geophysical package and a radiological monitoring trailer. We held our breath and crossed our fingers as the autonomous Speedrower began to crawl across the playa lakebed. We met our proposed production rate, and we averaged just less than 50 acres per 12-hour day using the autonomous platform with a path tracking error of less than +/- 4 inches. Our project team mapped over 1,800 acres in an 8-week (4 days per week) timeframe. The expertise of our partner, Carnegie Mellon University, was recently demonstrated when their two autonomous vehicle entries finished second and third at the 2005 Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Grand Challenge. 'The Grand Challenge program was established to help foster the development of autonomous vehicle technology that will some day help save the lives of Americans who are protecting our country on the battlefield', said DARPA Grand Challenge Program Manager, Ron Kurjanowicz. Our autonomous remote-controlled vehicle (ARCV) was a modified New Holland 2550 Speedrower retrofitted to allow the machine-actuated functions to be controlled by an onboard computer. The computer-controlled Speedrower was developed at Carnegie Mellon University to automate agricultural harvesting. Harvesting tasks require the vehicle to cover a field using minimally overlapping rows at slow speeds in a similar manner to geophysical data acquisition. The Speedrower had demonstrated its ability to perform as it had already logged hundreds of acres of autonomous harvesting. This project is the first use of autonomous robotic technology on a large-scale for geophysical surveying.

  8. STEP Participant Survey Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    STEP Participant Survey Report, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

  9. NEPA Litigation Surveys

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    CEQ publishes surveys on NEPA litigation on an annual basis. These surveys identify the number of cases involving a NEPA based cause of action, Federal agencies that were identified as a lead...

  10. 2002 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey - User Needs Survey

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2002 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey: User-Needs Survey View current results. We need your help in designing the next Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) As our valued...

  11. Improvements in Shallow (Two-Meter) Temperature Measurements...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Center for Geothermal Energy has been working on improvements in shallow (two-meter) temperature surveys in two areas: overcoming limitations posed by difficult ground...

  12. AASG State Geological Survey

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.Contributions to the NGDSAASG State Geological Survey

  13. ORISE: Characterization surveys

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Characterization surveys An ORISE technicians performs a characterization survey The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) performs independent, objective characterization surveys to define the extent of radiological contamination at sites scheduled for decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). A fundamental aspect of all D&D projects, characterization surveys provide guidance to determine the best remediation procedures and are a cost-effective method of ensuring a site

  14. Group 3: Humidity, Temperature and Voltage (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wohlgemuth, J.

    2013-09-01

    This is a summary of the work of Group 3 of the International PV QA Task Force. Group 3 is chartered to develop accelerated stress tests that can be used as comparative predictors of module lifetime versus stresses associated with humidity, temperature and voltage.

  15. Anisotropic stress correlations in two-dimensional liquids

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wu, Bin; Iwashita, Takuya; Egami, Takeshi

    2015-03-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the presence of anisotropic stress correlations in the simulated 2D liquids. Whereas the temporal correlation of macroscopic shear stress is known to contribute to viscosity via the Green-Kubo formula, the general question regarding angular dependence of the spatial correlation among atomic level stresses in liquids without external shear has not been explored. Besides the apparent anisotropicity with well-defined symmetry, we found that the characteristic length of shear stress correlation depends on temperature and follows the power law, suggesting divergence around the glass transition temperature. The anisotropy of the stress correlations can be explained in termsmore » of the inclusion model by Eshelby, based upon which we suggest that the mismatch between the atom and its nearest neighbor cage produces the atomic level stress as well as the long-range stress fields.« less

  16. Room-temperature creep of tantalum tritides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schober, T.; Trinkaus, H. )

    1990-06-15

    We report on long-term creep experiments on dilute tantalum tritides at room temperature. Significant deviations of the recorded strain rates from isotropic swelling are found above approximately 30 MPa. We attribute this room-temperature creep to a stress-induced preferential dislocation loop punching by bubbles in crystallographic directions close the stress axis. Quantitative estimates show that this mechanism can indeed account for the observed creep rates.

  17. Temperature System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Soil Water and Temperature System  SWATS In the realm of global climate modeling, numerous variables affect the state of the atmosphere and climate. One important area is soil moisture and temperature. The ARM Program uses several types of instruments to gather soil moisture information. An example is the soil water and temperature system (SWATS) (Figure 1). A SWATS is located at each of 21 extended facility sites within the CART site boundary. Each system is configured to measure soil

  18. Environmental Survey preliminary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-04-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Sandia National Laboratories conducted August 17 through September 4, 1987. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with Sandia National Laboratories-Albuquerque (SNLA). The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at SNLA, and interviews with site personnel. 85 refs., 49 figs., 48 tabs.

  19. 2014 NERSC User Survey

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    User Survey 2014 NERSC User Survey December 17, 2014 by Francesca Verdier Please take a few minutes to fill out NERSC's annual user survey. Your feedback is important because it allows us to judge the quality of our services, give DOE information on how we are doing, and point us to areas in which we can improve. The survey is on the web at the URL: https://www.nersc.gov/news-publications/publications-reports/user-surveys/2014/ and covers the allocation year 2014. Subscribe via RSS Subscribe

  20. Development Of 2-Meter Soil Temperature Probes And Results Of...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    obtains accurate temperatures within an hour of emplacing hollow steel probes into the ground, making it possible to map results on a daily basis so that temperature surveys can...

  1. Temperature and electrical memory of polymer fibers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuan, Jinkai; Zakri, Ccile; Grillard, Fabienne; Neri, Wilfrid; Poulin, Philippe

    2014-05-15

    We report in this work studies of the shape memory behavior of polymer fibers loaded with carbon nanotubes or graphene flakes. These materials exhibit enhanced shape memory properties with the generation of a giant stress upon shape recovery. In addition, they exhibit a surprising temperature memory with a peak of generated stress at a temperature nearly equal to the temperature of programming. This temperature memory is ascribed to the presence of dynamical heterogeneities and to the intrinsic broadness of the glass transition. We present recent experiments related to observables other than mechanical properties. In particular nanocomposite fibers exhibit variations of electrical conductivity with an accurate memory. Indeed, the rate of conductivity variations during temperature changes reaches a well defined maximum at a temperature equal to the temperature of programming. Such materials are promising for future actuators that couple dimensional changes with sensing electronic functionalities.

  2. behavioral-survey

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Evacuation Behavior Survey for No-Notice Emergency Scenarios" Presentation at the 93rd TRB Annual Meeting at the Traveler Behavior and Values Committee (ADB10) - Behavioral Process subcommittee; January 13, 2014 Joshua Auld, Vadim Sokolov, Rene Bautista, Angela Fontes Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center Argonne National Laboratory Biography The presentation details a survey on evacuation response behavior that was conducted as a part of the RTSTEP project. The survey was

  3. tracc-evacuation-survey

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Survey Announcement SURVEY: The Transportation Research and Analysis computing center is conducting a survey to help with improvement of emergency evacuation planning in Chicago TRACC researchers under a contract with the City of Chicago are developing a model which predicts a response of a transportation network to an evacuation event. Emergency responders from OEMC and other local emergency management personal are to use the model results for "intuition training" purposes and

  4. Community Leaders Survey

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Community Leaders Survey Community Leaders Survey This survey is a tracking study commissioned by the Lab that helps measure perceived progress in maintaining community relationships and listening and responding to the needs of Northern New Mexico communities. Results help shape and direct the Lab's contributions to the region's future. Latest results show nine-in-ten of the community leaders express satisfaction with LANL's economic impact on the region. Study measures changes in leaders'

  5. 2004 User Survey Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    13 | Next 2004 User Survey Results Table of Contents Response Summary Respondent Demographics Overall Satisfaction and Importance All Satisfaction, Importance and Usefulness...

  6. 2006 User Survey Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to provide overall comments about NERSC: Here are the survey results: Respondent Demographics Overall Satisfaction and Importance All Satisfaction, Importance and Usefulness...

  7. 2005 User Survey Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10 | Next 2005 User Survey Results Table of Contents Response Summary Respondent Demographics All Satisfaction, Importance and Usefulness Ratings Hardware Resources Software...

  8. 2003 User Survey Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10 | Next 2003 User Survey Results Table of Contents Response Summary Respondent Demographics Overall Satisfaction and Importance All Satisfaction Topics and Changes from...

  9. Homeowner and Contractor Surveys

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Data and Evaluation Peer Exchange Call: Homeowner and Contractor Surveys, Call Slides and Discussion Summary, January 19, 2012.

  10. ORISE: Characterization surveys

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    objective characterization surveys to define the extent of radiological contamination at sites scheduled for decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). A fundamental...

  11. TPA Public Involvement Survey

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hanford Tri-Party Agencies' Annual Public Involvement Survey Activities for Calendar Year 2008 Nolan Curtis Washington State Department of Ecology Nuclear Waste Program August 5,...

  12. 2011 NERSC User Survey (Read Only)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2010/2011 User Survey Results Survey Text 2009/2010 User Survey Results 2008/2009 User Survey Results 2007/2008 User Survey Results 2006 User Survey Results 2005 User Survey Results 2004 User Survey Results 2003 User Survey Results 2002 User Survey Results 2001 User Survey Results 2000 User Survey Results 1999 User Survey Results 1998 User Survey Results HPC Requirements for Science HPC Workshop Reports NERSC Staff Publications & Presentations Journal Cover Stories Galleries facebook icon

  13. Temperature for Spent Fuel Dry Storage

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1992-07-13

    DATING (Determining Allowable Temperatures in Inert and Nitrogen Gases) calculates allowable initial temperatures for dry storage of light-water-reactor spent fuel and the cumulative damage fraction of Zircaloy cladding for specified initial storage temperature and stress and cooling histories. It is made available to ensure compliance with NUREG 10CFR Part 72, Licensing Requirements for the Storage of Spent Fuel in an Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI). Although the program''s principal purpose is to calculate estimatesmore » of allowable temperature limits, estimates for creep strain, annealing fraction, and life fraction as a function of storage time are also provided. Equations for the temperature of spent fuel in inert and nitrogen gas storage are included explicitly in the code; in addition, an option is included for a user-specified cooling history in tabular form, and tables of the temperature and stress dependencies of creep-strain rate and creep-rupture time for Zircaloy at constant temperature and constant stress or constant ratio of stress/modulus can be created. DATING includes the GEAR package for the numerical solution of the rate equations and DPLOT for plotting the time-dependence of the calculated cumulative damage-fraction, creep strain, radiation damage recovery, and temperature decay.« less

  14. Temperature for Spent Fuel Dry Storage

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1992-07-13

    DATING (Determining Allowable Temperatures in Inert and Nitrogen Gases) calculates allowable initial temperatures for dry storage of light-water-reactor spent fuel and the cumulative damage fraction of Zircaloy cladding for specified initial storage temperature and stress and cooling histories. It is made available to ensure compliance with NUREG 10CFR Part 72, Licensing Requirements for the Storage of Spent Fuel in an Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI). Although the program''s principal purpose is to calculate estimatesmore »of allowable temperature limits, estimates for creep strain, annealing fraction, and life fraction as a function of storage time are also provided. Equations for the temperature of spent fuel in inert and nitrogen gas storage are included explicitly in the code; in addition, an option is included for a user-specified cooling history in tabular form, and tables of the temperature and stress dependencies of creep-strain rate and creep-rupture time for Zircaloy at constant temperature and constant stress or constant ratio of stress/modulus can be created. DATING includes the GEAR package for the numerical solution of the rate equations and DPLOT for plotting the time-dependence of the calculated cumulative damage-fraction, creep strain, radiation damage recovery, and temperature decay.« less

  15. Method for residual stress relief and retained austenite destabilization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ludtka, Gerard M.

    2004-08-10

    A method using of a magnetic field to affect residual stress relief or phase transformations in a metallic material is disclosed. In a first aspect of the method, residual stress relief of a material is achieved at ambient temperatures by placing the material in a magnetic field. In a second aspect of the method, retained austenite stabilization is reversed in a ferrous alloy by applying a magnetic field to the alloy at ambient temperatures.

  16. Dark Energy Survey

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Roodman, Aaron; Nord, Brian; Elliot, Ann

    2014-08-12

    Members of the Dark Energy Survey collaboration explain what they hope to learn by studying the southern sky with the world's most advanced digital camera, mounted on a telescope in Chile.

  17. 2000 User Survey Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    "NERSC has been the most stable supercomputer center in the country particularly with the migration from the T3E to the IBM SP". "Makes supercomputing easy." Below are the survey...

  18. Dark Energy Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roodman, Aaron; Nord, Brian; Elliot, Ann

    2012-12-06

    Members of the Dark Energy Survey collaboration explain what they hope to learn by studying the southern sky with the world's most advanced digital camera, mounted on a telescope in Chile.

  19. Benchmarking survey for recycling.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marley, Margie Charlotte; Mizner, Jack Harry

    2005-06-01

    This report describes the methodology, analysis and conclusions of a comparison survey of recycling programs at ten Department of Energy sites including Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM). The goal of the survey was to compare SNL/NM's recycling performance with that of other federal facilities, and to identify activities and programs that could be implemented at SNL/NM to improve recycling performance.

  20. Static Temperature Survey At Kilauea Summit Area (Keller, Et...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    L. Trowbridge Grose, John C. Murray, Catherine K. Skokan (1979) Results Of An Experimental Drill Hole At The Summit Of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Additional References Retrieved...

  1. Static Temperature Survey At Chena Area (Benoit, Et Al., 2007...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References Dick Benoit, Gwen Holdmann, David Blackwell (2007) Low Cost Exploration, Testing, And Development Of The Chena...

  2. Geology and Temperature Gradient Surveys Blue Mountain Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    N50-60E,N50-60W, and N-S intersect in the geothermal zone providing deep permeability over a wide area. Extensive silicification andhydro brecciation accompanied...

  3. Static Temperature Survey At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Benoit...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Notes Two deeper wells encountered temps of 327 and 329 oF References Dick Benoit, Joe Moore, Colin Goranson, David Blackwell (2005) Core Hole Drilling And Testing At The Lake...

  4. Static Temperature Survey (Cull, 1981) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Although absolute values of heat flow may not be accurately determined with conventional techniques even at depths of 1000 m,...

  5. Static Temperature Survey At Molokai Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Due to the very small potential market on the island of Molokai for geothermal energy, only a limited effort was made to...

  6. Static Temperature Survey At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    indicate that the well has penetrated a lateral outflow plume of thermal water (Goff et al., 1988). References Cathy J. Janik, Marcia K. McLaren (2010) Seismicity And Fluid...

  7. Static Temperature Survey At Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al.,...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    well. A suite of geophysical logs (gamma ray, neutron, sonic, and resistivity) was also run after completion of drilling. References Jim Combs, John T. Finger, Colin Goranson,...

  8. Two-Meter Temperature Surveys for Geothermal Exploration Project...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    years the Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy has made progress toward developing methods and corrections aimed at eliminating these effects. Seasonal drift, albedo,...

  9. 2014 ALCF User Survey Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    survey, improved questions, and a representative user response to the survey. Demographics ALCF users are located around the world and are representative across different...

  10. Stress-enhanced swelling of metal during irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garner, F.A.; Gilbert, E.R.; Porter, D.L.

    1980-04-01

    Data are available which show that stress plays a major role in the development of radiation-induced void growth in AISI 316 and many other alloys. Earlier experiments came to the opposite conclusion and are shown to have investigated stress levels which inadvertantly cold-worked the material. Stress-affected swelling spans the entire temperature range in fast reactor irradiations and accelerates with increasing irradiatin temperature. It also appears to operate in all alloy starting conditions investigated. Two major microstructural mechanisms appear to be causing the enhancement of swelling, which for tensile stresses is manifested primarily as a decrease in the incubation period. These mechanisms are stress-induced changes in the interstitial capture efficiency of voids and stress-induced changes in the vacancy emission rate of various microstructural components. There also appears to be an enhancement of intermetallic phase formation with applied stress and this is shown to increase swelling by accelerating the microchemical evolution that precedes void growth at high temperature. This latter consideration complicates the extrapolation of these data to compressive stress states.

  11. NEPA Litigation Surveys | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NEPA Litigation Surveys NEPA Litigation Surveys CEQ publishes surveys on NEPA litigation on an annual basis. These surveys identify the number of cases involving a NEPA based cause...

  12. Using Uncertainty Analysis to Guide the Development of Accelerated Stress Tests (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kempe, M.

    2014-03-01

    Extrapolation of accelerated testing to the long-term results expected in the field has uncertainty associated with the acceleration factors and the range of possible stresses in the field. When multiple stresses (such as temperature and humidity) can be used to increase the acceleration, the uncertainty may be reduced according to which stress factors are used to accelerate the degradation.

  13. Beamline Temperatures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Temperatures Energy: 3.0000 GeV Current: 497.0950 mA Date: 16-May-2016 02:53:04 Beamline Temperatures Energy 3.0000 GeV Current 497.1 mA 16-May-2016 02:53:04 LN:MainTankLevel 168.9 in LN:MainTankPress 60.0 psi SPEAR-BL:B120HeFlow 13.4 l/min SPEAR-BL:B131HeFlow 22.7 l/min BL 2 BL02:M0_LCW 31.5 ℃ BL 4-1 BL04-1:BasePlate -13.0 ℃ BL04-1:Bottom1 54.0 ℃ BL04-1:Bottom2 55.0 ℃ BL04-1:Lower 32.0 ℃ BL04-1:Moly 64.0 ℃ BL04-1:ChinGuard1 31.0 ℃ BL04-1:ChinGuard2 31.0 ℃ BL04-1:FirstXtalA

  14. Method to reduce dislocation density in silicon using stress

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buonassisi, Anthony; Bertoni, Mariana; Argon, Ali; Castellanos, Sergio; Fecych, Alexandria; Powell, Douglas; Vogl, Michelle

    2013-03-05

    A crystalline material structure with reduced dislocation density and method of producing same is provided. The crystalline material structure is annealed at temperatures above the brittle-to-ductile transition temperature of the crystalline material structure. One or more stress elements are formed on the crystalline material structure so as to annihilate dislocations or to move them into less harmful locations.

  15. User Survey | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Survey User Survey Results The ALCF conducts yearly surveys to gain a better understanding of how we can improve the user experience at ALCF. Below are the numeric results of these surveys. 2014 ALCF User Survey Results 2013 ALCF User Survey Results 2012 ALCF User Survey Results 2011 ALCF User Survey Results 2010 ALCF User Survey Results 2009 ALCF User Survey Results 2008 ALCF User Survey Results

  16. Hundred-Fold Improvement in Temperature Mapping Reveals the Stresses...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    ... Data presented in this article were acquired at the Center for Electron Microscopy and Microanalysis at the University of Southern California. Work at the Molecular Foundry was ...

  17. 2001 FEMP Customer Survey Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-01-18

    Appendix A: Survey Instrument; Appendix B: Detailed Responses; Appendix C: Adoption and Diffusion of Innovations

  18. STEP Participant Survey Executive Summary

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    STEP Participant Survey Executive Summary, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

  19. Stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serra, E.

    1981-11-01

    The stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 tubing has affected the performance of several pressurized water reactor steam generators. The purpose of this report is to summarize the research which has followed that reviewed by D. van Rooyen in 1975. Although several papers and reports have been published there still is not a general model that can explain the stress corrosion cracking behavior of Alloy 600 in deaerated or aerated high-temperature pure water or in the environments that might exist in the primary and secondary coolant of a steam generator. Such a model, if it exists, must cover the complex interaction of the environmental, metallurgical, and mechanical variables which control the susceptibility of Alloy 600 to stress corrosion cracking. Each of these classes of variables is discussed in the text.

  20. Stress Test | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Stress Test Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Stress Test Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration...

  1. Comparison of residual stresses ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... The majority of the resulting residual stresses in metal builds are due to the inherent melt-solidification-state transformation or solid-melt-quench-solid process that occurs on a ...

  2. The 1986 residential occupant survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivey, D.L.; Alley, P.K.

    1987-04-01

    In 1986, Pacific Northwest Laboratory developed the Residential Occupant Survey-Spring '86, which was implemented. The overall purpose of the study was to collect demographic, attitudinal, and behavioral data related to the use and conservation of electricity in dwellings participating in the Bonneville Power Administration's End-Use Load and Conservation Assessment Program (ELCAP). Information was collected on the respondents' perceptions of the energy efficiency of their dwelling, temperature the dwelling was kept when people were at home and awake during the last heating season, which rooms, if any, were not heated during the last heating season, number of times the dwelling was unoccupied for at least one week, number of times pets were let out of the dwelling per day, attitudes toward energy use and conservation and several socio-demographic variables such as age, sex, and total household income. The results of the data analyses showed age to be an important factor for reported indoor temperature and perceived energy efficiency of the dwelling. The results also showed that almost 60% of the ELCAP occupants do not heat one or more rooms during the heating season, and almost 45% of the ELCAP dwellings were unoccupied for at least one week during the reporting period. In terms of the reported allocation of household income for household energy expenses, the results showed that the reported dollar amount spent for the expenses remained relatively constant over income levels.

  3. Solar Site Survey Toolkit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    After a couple outings, a principal technologist at Sandia National Laboratories saw a need for a travel kit that would have the necessary tools to make the task of site surveys more manageable and safer. They have had great success using the kit in the field already.

  4. ARM User Survey Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roeder, LR

    2010-06-22

    The objective of this survey was to obtain user feedback to, among other things, determine how to organize the exponentially growing data within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility, and identify users’ preferred data analysis system. The survey findings appear to have met this objective, having received approximately 300 responses that give insight into the type of work users perform, usage of the data, percentage of data analysis users might perform on an ARM-hosted computing resource, downloading volume level where users begin having reservations, opinion about usage if given more powerful computing resources (including ability to manipulate data), types of tools that would be most beneficial to them, preferred programming language and data analysis system, level of importance for certain types of capabilities, and finally, level of interest in participating in a code-sharing community.

  5. Sloan digital sky survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kent, S.M.; Stoughton, C.; Newberg, H.; Loveday, J.; Petravick, D.; Gurbani, V.; Berman, E.; Sergey, G.; Lupton, R.

    1994-04-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey will produce a detailed digital photometric map of half the northern sky to about 23 magnitude using a special purpose wide field 2.5 meter telescope. From this map we will select {approximately} 10{sup 6} galaxies and 10{sup 5} quasars, and obtain high resolution spectra using the same telescope. The imaging catalog will contain 10{sup 8} galaxies, a similar number of stars, and 10{sup 6} quasar candidates.

  6. Use of Rapid Temperature Measurements at a 2-Meter Depth to Augment...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    obtains accurate temperatures within an hour of emplacing hollow steel probes into the ground, making it possible to map results on a daily basis so that temperature surveys can...

  7. Tensile-stressed microelectromechanical apparatus and tiltable micromirrors formed therefrom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fleming, James G.

    2007-01-09

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) apparatus is disclosed which includes a pair of tensile-stressed actuators suspending a platform above a substrate to tilt the platform relative to the substrate. A tensile stress built into the actuators initially tilts the platform when a sacrificial material used in fabrication of the MEM apparatus is removed. Further tilting of the platform can occur with a change in the ambient temperature about the MEM apparatus, or by applying a voltage to one or both of the tensile-stressed actuators. The MEM apparatus can be used to form a tiltable micromirror or an array of such devices, and also has applications for thermal management within satellites.

  8. Chinese Geological Survey | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Chinese Geological Survey Jump to: navigation, search Name: Chinese Geological Survey Place: China Sector: Geothermal energy Product: Chinese body which is involved in surveys of...

  9. Commercial Grade Dedication Survey and Training | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Survey and Training Commercial Grade Dedication Survey and Training The following is a sample plan to perform a CGD survey. The checklist items are included. In addition to,...

  10. Design Code Survey Form | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Design Code Survey Form Design Code Survey Form Survey of Safety Software Used in Design of Structures, Systems, and Components 1. Introduction The Department's Implementation Plan ...

  11. ZPPR FUEL ELEMENT THERMAL STRESS-STRAIN ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles W. Solbrig; Jason Andrus; Chad Pope

    2014-04-01

    The design temperature of high plutonium concentration ZPPR fuel assemblies is 600 degrees C. Cladding integrity of the 304L stainless steel cladding is a significant concern with this fuel since even small holes can lead to substantial fuel degradation. Since the fuel has a higher coefficient of thermal expansion than the cladding, an investigation of the stress induced in the cladding due to the differential thermal expansion of fuel and cladding up to the design temperature was conducted. Small holes in the cladding envelope would be expected to lead to the fuel hydriding and oxidizing into a powder over a long period of time. This is the same type of chemical reaction chain that exists in the degradion of the high uranium concentration ZPPR fuel. Unfortunately, the uranium fuel was designed with vents which allowed this degradation to occur. The Pu cladding is sealed so only fuel with damaged cladding would be subject to this damage. The thermal stresses that can be developed in the fuel cladding have been calculated in in this paper and compared to the ultimate tensile stress of the cladding. The conclusion is drawn that thermal stresses cannot induce holes in the cladding even for the highest storage temperatures predicted in calculations (292C). In fact, thermal stress can not cause cladding failure as long as the fuel temperatures are below the design limit of 600 degrees C (1,112 degrees F).

  12. Structural transformations in Mn{sub 2}NiGa due to residual stress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Sanjay; Maniraj, M.; D'Souza, S. W.; Barman, S. R.; Ranjan, R.

    2010-02-22

    Powder x-ray diffraction study of Mn{sub 2}NiGa ferromagnetic shape memory alloy shows the existence of a 7M monoclinic modulated structure at room temperature (RT). The structure of Mn{sub 2}NiGa is found to be highly dependent on residual stress. For higher stress, the structure is tetragonal at RT, and for intermediate stress it is 7M monoclinic. However, only when the stress is considerably relaxed, the structure is cubic, as is expected at RT since the martensitic transition temperature is 230 K.

  13. ORNL-5680 Radiological Surveys

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    DOVEV-0005/l (Supplement) ORNL-5680 Radiological Surveys of Properties in the Middlesex, New Jersey, Area R. W. Leggett D. L. Anderson F. F. Haywood D. J. Christian W. D. Cottrell R. W. Doane D. J. Crawford W. H. Shinpaugh E. B. Wagner T. E. Myrick W. A. Goldsmith Printed in the United States of America. Available from National Technical Information Service U.S. Department of Commerce 5285 Port Royal Road, Springfield, Virginia 22161 NTIS price codes-Printed Copy: A07 Microfiche ,401 I I This

  14. Materials for coal gasification. Effect of environment on stress rupture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horton, R.M.

    1980-01-01

    The biaxial stress rupture behavior for two of the alloys, Type 310 stainless steel and Haynes 188, is shown in figures. The other two alloys show similar behavior. The rupture parameter, P, is an empirical quantity which reflects the simultaneous effects of both temperature and duration of applied stress on stress rupture. Based on these results, several trends are apparent: (1) the biaxial stress rupture tests show the same trends and approximately the same stress rupture values as uniaxial data obtained from the literature for each alloy tested; (2) only for the Haynes 188 may the stress rupture strength/life in CGA have been significantly less than in air. But further testing has indicated there is probably no reduction of biaxial stress rupture strength/life in CGA even for this alloy; (3) the biaxial strain at rupture was small, typically only a few percent. It is appropriate to mention that in the uniaxial stress rupture testing at SwRI, exposure to CGA generally resulted in a shorter rupture life than with testing in air. No explanation is yet available for the observed difference in behavior between SwRI and INEL test specimens.

  15. Liquid salt environment stress-rupture testing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ren, Weiju; Holcomb, David E.; Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Wilson, Dane F.

    2016-03-22

    Disclosed herein are systems, devices and methods for stress-rupture testing selected materials within a high-temperature liquid salt environment. Exemplary testing systems include a load train for holding a test specimen within a heated inert gas vessel. A thermal break included in the load train can thermally insulate a load cell positioned along the load train within the inert gas vessel. The test specimen can include a cylindrical gage portion having an internal void filled with a molten salt during stress-rupture testing. The gage portion can have an inner surface area to volume ratio of greater than 20 to maximize the corrosive effect of the molten salt on the specimen material during testing. Also disclosed are methods of making a salt ingot for placement within the test specimen.

  16. Contact stress sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kotovsky, Jack

    2012-02-07

    A contact stress sensor includes one or more MEMS fabricated sensor elements, where each sensor element of includes a thin non-recessed portion, a recessed portion and a pressure sensitive element adjacent to the recessed portion. An electric circuit is connected to the pressure sensitive element. The circuit includes a thermal compensator and a pressure signal circuit element configured to provide a signal upon movement of the pressure sensitive element.

  17. Contact stress sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kotovsky, Jack

    2014-02-11

    A method for producing a contact stress sensor that includes one or more MEMS fabricated sensor elements, where each sensor element of includes a thin non-recessed portion, a recessed portion and a pressure sensitive element adjacent to the recessed portion. An electric circuit is connected to the pressure sensitive element. The circuit includes a pressure signal circuit element configured to provide a signal upon movement of the pressure sensitive element.

  18. Stress relief of transition zones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodward, J.; van Rooyen, D.

    1984-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of intergranular stress corrosion cracking, initiated on the primary side, in the expansion transition region of roller expanded Alloy 600 tubing. In general it is believed that residual stresses, arising from the expansion process, are the cause of the problem. The work reported here concentrated on the identification of an optimal, in-situ stress relief treatment.

  19. Subterranean stress engineering experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, J.R.; Colgate, S.A.; Wheat, B.M.

    1980-01-01

    The state of stress in a subterranean rock mass has classically been assumed to be constant at best. In soil with a high clay content, preconsolidation and drainage methods can lead to more stable foundation material, but methods for engineering the stresses in large masses of rock are not well known. This paper shows the results from an experiment designed to alter the in situ rock stress field in an oil shale mine. This was done by hydrofracturing the rock by use of a packed-well injection system and then propping the crack open with a thixotropic gel, which slowly hardened to the consistency of cement. Successive hydrofracture and high-pressure grouting resulted in an overstressed region. Well-head injection pressures, surface tilts, injection rates, and subterranean strains were measured and recorded on floppy disk by a Z-80 microprocessor. The results were then transmitted to the large computer system at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL). To put the data in a more useful form, computer-generated movies of the tilts and strains were made by use of computer graphics developed at LASL. The purpose of this paper is to present results from the Single Large Instrumented Test conducted in the Colony Oil Shale Mine near Rifle, Colorado. 13 figures.

  20. 2015 Uranium Marketing Annual Survey

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-858 ""Uranium Marketing Annual Survey"" (2015)." " U.S. Energy Information Administration 2015 Uranium Marketing Annual Report 15

  1. Reflection Survey | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (Gritto, Et Al.) Rye Patch Area Integrated Seismic Studies At The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir, Nevada Reflection Survey At Rye Patch Area (Laney, 2005) Rye Patch Area Federal...

  2. Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey -- Overview

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Buildings The Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey 1993 provides building-level energy-related characteristics for a special sample of commercial buildings owned by the...

  3. IRT Surveys | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    consulting in building thermographers and thermal imaging allowing to detect energy loss and increase of energy efficiency. References: IRT Surveys1 This article is a stub....

  4. Idaho Geological Survey and University of Idaho Explore for Geothermal Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The University of Idaho's Idaho Geological Survey recently drilled new wells in southeastern Idaho to provide the most accurate assessment of high-temperature geothermal energy potential in the region.

  5. DC Resistivity Survey (Mise-A-La-Masse) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature Dictionary.png DC Resistivity Survey (Mise-A-La-Masse): No definition has been...

  6. Category:Stress Test | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Stress Test Jump to: navigation, search Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Stress Test page? For detailed information on Stress Test, click here. Category:Stress Test Add.png Add...

  7. Residual stress within nanoscale metallic multilayer systems during thermal cycling

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Economy, David Ross; Cordill, Megan Jo; Payzant, E. Andrew; Kennedy, Marian S.

    2015-09-21

    Projected applications for nanoscale metallic multilayers will include wide temperature ranges. Since film residual stress has been known to alter system reliability, stress development within new film structures with high interfacial densities should be characterized to identify potential long-term performance barriers. To understand factors contributing to thermal stress evolution within nanoscale metallic multilayers, stress in Cu/Nb systems adhered to Si substrates was calculated from curvature measurements collected during cycling between 25 °C and 400 °C. Additionally, stress within each type of component layers was calculated from shifts in the primary peak position from in-situ heated X-ray diffraction. The effects ofmore » both film architecture (layer thickness) and layer order in metallic multilayers were tracked and compared with monolithic Cu and Nb films. Analysis indicated that the thermoelastic slope of nanoscale metallic multilayer films depends on thermal expansion mismatch, elastic modulus of the components, and also interfacial density. The layer thickness (i.e. interfacial density) affected thermoelastic slope magnitude while layer order had minimal impact on stress responses after the initial thermal cycle. When comparing stress responses of monolithic Cu and Nb films to those of the Cu/Nb systems, the nanoscale metallic multilayers show a similar increase in stress above 200 °C to the Nb monolithic films, indicating that Nb components play a larger role in stress development than Cu. Local stress calculations from X-ray diffraction peak shifts collected during heating reveal that the component layers within a multilayer film respond similarly to their monolithic counterparts.« less

  8. Residual stress within nanoscale metallic multilayer systems during thermal cycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Economy, David Ross; Cordill, Megan Jo; Payzant, E. Andrew; Kennedy, Marian S.

    2015-09-21

    Projected applications for nanoscale metallic multilayers will include wide temperature ranges. Since film residual stress has been known to alter system reliability, stress development within new film structures with high interfacial densities should be characterized to identify potential long-term performance barriers. To understand factors contributing to thermal stress evolution within nanoscale metallic multilayers, stress in Cu/Nb systems adhered to Si substrates was calculated from curvature measurements collected during cycling between 25 °C and 400 °C. Additionally, stress within each type of component layers was calculated from shifts in the primary peak position from in-situ heated X-ray diffraction. The effects of both film architecture (layer thickness) and layer order in metallic multilayers were tracked and compared with monolithic Cu and Nb films. Analysis indicated that the thermoelastic slope of nanoscale metallic multilayer films depends on thermal expansion mismatch, elastic modulus of the components, and also interfacial density. The layer thickness (i.e. interfacial density) affected thermoelastic slope magnitude while layer order had minimal impact on stress responses after the initial thermal cycle. When comparing stress responses of monolithic Cu and Nb films to those of the Cu/Nb systems, the nanoscale metallic multilayers show a similar increase in stress above 200 °C to the Nb monolithic films, indicating that Nb components play a larger role in stress development than Cu. Local stress calculations from X-ray diffraction peak shifts collected during heating reveal that the component layers within a multilayer film respond similarly to their monolithic counterparts.

  9. Therml & Gravitational Stress in Si Wafers; Lim. on Process Htg & Cool. Rates

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1997-01-14

    The MacWafer code determines maximum allowable processing temperatures and maximum heating and cooling rates for thermal processing of silicon semiconductor wafers in single and multiple wafer furnaces. The program runs interactively on Macintosh, PC, and workstation computers. Execution time is typically 20 seconds on a Macintosh 68040 processor operating at 33 MHz. Gravitational stresses and displacements are first calculated based on the user''s input of a support system consisting of a ring beneath the wafermore » and/or arbitrarily placed point supports. The maximum operating temperature is then deduced by comparing the calculated gravitational stresses with the temperature-dependent wafer strength. At lower temperatures, the difference between wafer strength and gravitational stress is used to determine the allowable thermal stress, and hence the allowable radial temperature difference across the wafer. Finally, an analytical model of radial heat transfer in a batch furnace yields the maximum heating or cooling rate as a function of the allowable temperature difference based on the user''s inputs of wafer spacing and furnace power. Outputs to the screen include plots of stress components and vertical displacement, as well as tables of maximum stresses and maximum heating and cooling rates as a function of temperature. All inputs and outputs may be directed to user-named files for further processing or graphical display.« less

  10. Therml & Gravitational Stress in Si Wafers; Lim. on Process Htg & Cool. Rates

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1997-01-14

    The MacWafer code determines maximum allowable processing temperatures and maximum heating and cooling rates for thermal processing of silicon semiconductor wafers in single and multiple wafer furnaces. The program runs interactively on Macintosh, PC, and workstation computers. Execution time is typically 20 seconds on a Macintosh 68040 processor operating at 33 MHz. Gravitational stresses and displacements are first calculated based on the user''s input of a support system consisting of a ring beneath the wafermoreand/or arbitrarily placed point supports. The maximum operating temperature is then deduced by comparing the calculated gravitational stresses with the temperature-dependent wafer strength. At lower temperatures, the difference between wafer strength and gravitational stress is used to determine the allowable thermal stress, and hence the allowable radial temperature difference across the wafer. Finally, an analytical model of radial heat transfer in a batch furnace yields the maximum heating or cooling rate as a function of the allowable temperature difference based on the user''s inputs of wafer spacing and furnace power. Outputs to the screen include plots of stress components and vertical displacement, as well as tables of maximum stresses and maximum heating and cooling rates as a function of temperature. All inputs and outputs may be directed to user-named files for further processing or graphical display.less

  11. Telemetric heat stress monitor (THSM) spin-offs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berkbigler, L.; Bradley, O.; Lopez, R.; Martinez, D.; Stampfer, J.

    1996-07-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This project sought to investigate spin-offs of the telemetric heat stress monitoring system (THSM) developed at LANL. Hazardous-materials workers and firefighters wear clothing that protects them from external hazards, but the sealed environment of a protective suit makes its wearer susceptible to heat stress. Heat stress occurs when the body`s natural cooling mechanisms fail: it can cause collapse and death. The THSM warns both workers and remote monitoring personnel of incipient heat stress by monitoring and responding to elevations of workers` skin temperatures and heart rates. The technology won a 1994 R & D 100 award.

  12. Lipocalin 2 regulation by thermal stresses: Protective role of Lcn2/NGAL against cold and heat stresses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roudkenar, Mehryar Habibi, E-mail: roudkenar@ibto.ir [Research Center, Iranian Blood Transfusion Organization, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Halabian, Raheleh [Research Center, Iranian Blood Transfusion Organization, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Research Center, Iranian Blood Transfusion Organization, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Roushandeh, Amaneh Mohammadi [Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, Medical University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, Medical University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nourani, Mohammad Reza [Chemical Injury Research Center, Baqiyatallah Medical Science University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Chemical Injury Research Center, Baqiyatallah Medical Science University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Masroori, Nasser [Research Center, Iranian Blood Transfusion Organization, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Research Center, Iranian Blood Transfusion Organization, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ebrahimi, Majid [Research Center, Iranian Blood Transfusion Organization, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of) [Research Center, Iranian Blood Transfusion Organization, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Chemical Injury Research Center, Baqiyatallah Medical Science University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nikogoftar, Mahin; Rouhbakhsh, Mehdi; Bahmani, Parisa [Research Center, Iranian Blood Transfusion Organization, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Research Center, Iranian Blood Transfusion Organization, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Najafabadi, Ali Jahanian [Department of Molecular Biology, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Molecular Biology, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali [National Cell Bank of Iran, Pasteur institute of Iran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [National Cell Bank of Iran, Pasteur institute of Iran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-11-01

    Environmental temperature variations are the most common stresses experienced by a wide range of organisms. Lipocalin 2 (Lcn2/NGAL) is expressed in various normal and pathologic conditions. However, its precise functions have not been fully determined. Here we report the induction of Lcn2 by thermal stresses in vivo, and its role following exposure to cold and heat stresses in vitro. Induction of Lcn2 in liver, heart and kidney was detected by RT-PCR, Western blot and immunohistochemistry following exposure of mice to heat and cold stresses. When CHO and HEK293T cells overexpressing NGAL were exposed to cold stress, cell proliferation was higher compared to controls. Down-regulatrion of NGAL by siRNA in A549 cells resulted in less proliferation when exposed to cold stress compared to control cells. The number of apoptotic cells and expression of pro-apoptotic proteins were lower in the NGAL overexpressing CHO and HEK293T cells, but were higher in the siRNA-transfected A549 cells compared to controls, indicating that NGAL protects cells against cold stress. Following exposure of the cells to heat stress, ectopic expression of NGAL protected cells while addition of exogenous recombinant NGAL to the cell culture medium exacerbated the toxicity of heat stress specially when there was low or no endogenous expression of NGAL. It had a dual effect on apoptosis following heat stress. NGAL also increased the expression of HO-1. Lcn2/NGAL may have the potential to improve cell proliferation and preservation particularly to prevent cold ischemia injury of transplanted organs or for treatment of some cancers by hyperthermia.

  13. Coupled thermal stress simulations of ductile tearing

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Neilsen, Michael K.; Dion, Kristin

    2016-03-01

    Predictions for ductile tearing of a geometrically complex Ti-6Al-4V plate were generated using a Unified Creep Plasticity Damage model in fully coupled thermal stress simulations. Uniaxial tension and butterfly shear tests performed at displacement rates of 0.0254 and 25.4 mm/s were also simulated. Results from these simulations revealed that the material temperature increase due to plastic work can have a dramatic effect on material ductility predictions in materials that exhibit little strain hardening. Furthermore, this occurs because the temperature increase causes the apparent hardening of the material to decrease which leads to the initiation of deformation localization and subsequent ductilemore » tearing earlier in the loading process.« less

  14. Method of forming a stress relieved amorphous tetrahedrally-coordinated carbon film

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Friedmann, Thomas A.; Sullivan, John P.

    2000-01-01

    A stress-relieved amorphous-diamond film is formed by depositing an amorphous diamond film with specific atomic structure and bonding on to a substrate, and annealing the film at sufficiently high temperature to relieve the compressive stress in said film without significantly softening said film. The maximum annealing temperature is preferably on the order of 650.degree. C., a much lower value than is expected from the annealing behavior of other materials.

  15. A luminescent nanocrystal stress gauge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Charina; Koski, Kristie; Olson, Andrew; Alivisatos, Paul

    2010-10-25

    Microscale mechanical forces can determine important outcomes ranging from the site of material fracture to stem cell fate. However, local stresses in a vast majority of systems cannot be measured due to the limitations of current techniques. In this work, we present the design and implementation of the CdSe/CdS core/shell tetrapod nanocrystal, a local stress sensor with bright luminescence readout. We calibrate the tetrapod luminescence response to stress, and use the luminescence signal to report the spatial distribution of local stresses in single polyester fibers under uniaxial strain. The bright stress-dependent emission of the tetrapod, its nanoscale size, and its colloidal nature provide a unique tool that may be incorporated into a variety of micromechanical systems including materials and biological samples to quantify local stresses with high spatial resolution.

  16. High Temperature ESP Monitoring

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of the High Temperature ESP Monitoring project is to develop a down-hole monitoring system to be used in wells with bottom hole temperature up to 300 °C for measuring motor temperature; pump discharge pressure; and formation temperature and pressure.

  17. Cooled, temperature controlled electrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morgan, John P.

    1992-08-04

    A cooled, temperature controlled electrometer for the measurement of small currents. The device employs a thermal transfer system to remove heat from the electrometer circuit and its environment and dissipate it to the external environment by means of a heat sink. The operation of the thermal transfer system is governed by a temperature regulation circuit which activates the thermal transfer system when the temperature of the electrometer circuit and its environment exceeds a level previously inputted to the external variable temperature control circuit. The variable temperature control circuit functions as subpart of the temperature control circuit. To provide temperature stability and uniformity, the electrometer circuit is enclosed by an insulated housing.

  18. Cooled, temperature controlled electrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morgan, John P.

    1992-01-01

    A cooled, temperature controlled electrometer for the measurement of small currents. The device employs a thermal transfer system to remove heat from the electrometer circuit and its environment and dissipate it to the external environment by means of a heat sink. The operation of the thermal transfer system is governed by a temperature regulation circuit which activates the thermal transfer system when the temperature of the electrometer circuit and its environment exceeds a level previously inputted to the external variable temperature control circuit. The variable temperature control circuit functions as subpart of the temperature control circuit. To provide temperature stability and uniformity, the electrometer circuit is enclosed by an insulated housing.

  19. Thick, low-stress films, and coated substrates formed therefrom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Henager, Jr., Charles H.; Knoll, Robert W.

    1991-01-01

    Stress-induced deformation, and the damage resulting therefrom, increases with film thickness. The overcoming of excessive stress by the use of the film material of the present invention, permits the formation of thick films that are necessary for certain of the above described applications. The most likely use for the subject film materials, other than their specialized views as an optical film, is for microelectronic packaging of components on silicon substrates. In general, the subject Si-Al-O-N films have excellent adherence to the underlying substrate, a high degree of hardness and durability, and are excellent insulators. Prior art elevated temperature deposition processes cannot meet the microelectronic packaging temperature formation constraints. The process of the present invention is conducted under non-elevated temperature conditions, typically 500# C. or less.

  20. Progress Report on Alloy 617 Isochronous Stress-Strain Curves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jill K. Wright; Richard N. Wright; Nancy J. Lybeck

    2014-03-01

    Isochronous stress-strain curves for Alloy 617 up to a temperature of 1000°C will be required to qualify the material for elevated temperature design in Section III, Division 1, Subsection NH of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. Several potential methods for developing these curves are reviewed in this report. It is shown that in general power-law creep is the rate controlling deformation mechanism for a wide range of alloy heats, test temperatures and stresses. Measurement of the strain rate sensitivity of Alloy 617 indicates that the material is highly strain rate sensitive in the tensile deformation range above about 750°C. This suggests that the concept of a hot tensile curve as a bounding case on the isochronous stress-strain diagrams is problematic. The impact of strain rate on the hot tensile curves is examined and it is concluded that incorporating such a curve is only meaningful if a single tensile strain rate (typically the ASTM standard rate of 0.5%/min) is arbitrarily defined. Current experimentally determined creep data are compared to isochronous stress-strain curves proposed previously by the German programs in the 1980s and by the 1990 draft ASME Code Case. Variability in how well the experimental data are represented by the proposed design curves that suggests further analysis is necessary prior to completing a new draft Code Case.

  1. Geodetic Survey | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    At Kilauea Summit Area (Keller, Et Al., 1979) Kilauea Summit Area Results Of An Experimental Drill Hole At The Summit Of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Geodetic Survey At Long Valley...

  2. 2014 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    U S C E N S U S B U R E A U 2014 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey Sponsored by the Energy Information Administration U.S. Department of Energy Administered and Compiled by ...

  3. 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Completed forms are due by March 4, 2006. If you have any questions, please call (toll-free) 1-NNN-NNN-NNNN. Ask for the Supplier Survey Specialist. This report is mandatory under ...

  4. 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Completed forms are due by March 4, 2006. If you have any questions, please call (toll-free) 1-NNN-NNN-NNNN. Ask for the Supplier Survey Specialist.. This report is mandatory under ...

  5. I COMPREHENSIVE RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    im I COMPREHENSIVE RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY I Prepared by Oak Ridge Associated Universities Prprd* OFF-SITE PROPERTY H' | Prepared for Office of Operational FORMER LAKE ONTARIO ORDNANCE WORKS SITE Safety U.S. Department LEWISTON, NEW YORK I of Energy i J.D. BERGER i Radiological Site Assessment Program Manpower Education, Research, and Training Division I l*~~~~~~ ~~~~DRAFT REPORT January 1983 I I I ------- COMPREHENSIVE RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OFF-SITE PROPERTY H' FORMER LAKE ONTARIO ORDNANCE WORKS SITE

  6. Enzymatic temperature change indicator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klibanov, Alexander M.; Dordick, Jonathan S.

    1989-01-21

    A temperature change indicator is described which is composed of an enzyme and a substrate for that enzyme suspended in a solid organic solvent or mixture of solvents as a support medium. The organic solvent or solvents are chosen so as to melt at a specific temperature or in a specific temperature range. When the temperature of the indicator is elevated above the chosen, or critical temperature, the solid organic solvent support will melt, and the enzymatic reaction will occur, producing a visually detectable product which is stable to further temperature variation.

  7. Modeling of residual stresses by HY-100 weldments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zacharia, T.; Taljat, B.; Radhakrishnan, B.

    1997-02-01

    Residual stress distribution in a HY-100 steel disk, induced by GTA spot welding, was analyzed by finite element (FE) formulations and measured by neutron diffraction (ND). Computations used temperature- dependent thermophysical and mechanical properties. FE model predictions are in good agreement with ND data in far heat affected zone (HAZ) and in base metal. Predicted residual stresses in fusion zone and near HAZ were higher than those measured by ND. This discrepancy was attributed to microstructural changes and associated material properties in the HAZ and fusion zone due to phase transformations during the weld thermal cycle.

  8. Method to adjust multilayer film stress induced deformation of optics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mirkarimi, Paul B.; Montcalm, Claude

    2000-01-01

    A buffer-layer located between a substrate and a multilayer for counteracting stress in the multilayer. Depositing a buffer-layer having a stress of sufficient magnitude and opposite in sign reduces or cancels out deformation in the substrate due to the stress in the multilayer. By providing a buffer-layer between the substrate and the multilayer, a tunable, near-zero net stress results, and hence results in little or no deformation of the substrate, such as an optic for an extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography tool. Buffer-layers have been deposited, for example, between Mo/Si and Mo/Be multilayer films and their associated substrate reducing significantly the stress, wherein the magnitude of the stress is less than 100 MPa and respectively near-normal incidence (5.degree.) reflectance of over 60% is obtained at 13.4 nm and 11.4 nm. The present invention is applicable to crystalline and non-crystalline materials, and can be used at ambient temperatures.

  9. Geophex Airborne Unmanned Survey System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Won, I.L.; Keiswetter, D.

    1995-12-31

    Ground-based surveys place personnel at risk due to the proximity of buried unexploded ordnance (UXO) items or by exposure to radioactive materials and hazardous chemicals. The purpose of this effort is to design, construct, and evaluate a portable, remotely-piloted, airborne, geophysical survey system. This non-intrusive system will provide stand-off capability to conduct surveys and detect buried objects, structures, and conditions of interest at hazardous locations. During a survey, the operators remain remote from, but within visual distance of, the site. The sensor system never contacts the Earth, but can be positioned near the ground so that weak geophysical anomalies can be detected. The Geophex Airborne Unmanned Survey System (GAUSS) is designed to detect and locate small-scale anomalies at hazardous sites using magnetic and electromagnetic survey techniques. The system consists of a remotely-piloted, radio-controlled, model helicopter (RCH) with flight computer, light-weight geophysical sensors, an electronic positioning system, a data telemetry system, and a computer base-station. The report describes GAUSS and its test results.

  10. 2008/2009 User Survey Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Next 20082009 User Survey Results Table of Contents Response Survey Respondent Demographics Overall Satisfaction and Importance All Satisfaction and Importance Ratings...

  11. Idaho Geological Survey | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    The Idaho Geological Survey is located in Boise, Idaho. About Information on past oil and gas exploration wells in Idaho was transferred to the Idaho Geological Survey in...

  12. radiological. survey | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    survey NNSA to Conduct Aerial Radiological Surveys Over San Francisco, Pacifica, Berkeley, And Oakland, CA Areas A U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security...

  13. FAQs for Survey Forms 804 and 814

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    intended for cracking into olefins. EIA-804 Survey form & instructions Contact: Robert Merriam, (202) 586-4615 EIA-814 Survey form & instructions Contact: Chris Buckner, (202)...

  14. Aftertreatment Research Prioritization: A CLEERS Industrial Survey...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Research Prioritization: A CLEERS Industrial Survey Aftertreatment Research Prioritization: A CLEERS Industrial Survey Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency &...

  15. Category:Telluric Survey | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Pages in category "Telluric Survey" This category contains only the following page. T Telluric Survey Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleCategory:Telluric...

  16. High temperature measuring device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tokarz, Richard D.

    1983-01-01

    A temperature measuring device for very high design temperatures (to 2,000.degree. C.). The device comprises a homogenous base structure preferably in the form of a sphere or cylinder. The base structure contains a large number of individual walled cells. The base structure has a decreasing coefficient of elasticity within the temperature range being monitored. A predetermined quantity of inert gas is confined within each cell. The cells are dimensionally stable at the normal working temperature of the device. Increases in gaseous pressure within the cells will permanently deform the cell walls at temperatures within the high temperature range to be measured. Such deformation can be correlated to temperature by calibrating similarly constructed devices under known time and temperature conditions.

  17. ARM - Measurement - Virtual temperature

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Virtual temperature The virtual temperature Tv T(1 + rvepsilon), where rv is...

  18. Temperature-profile detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Not Available

    1981-01-29

    Temperature profiles at elevated temperature conditions are monitored by use of an elongated device having two conductors spaced by the minimum distance required to normally maintain an open circuit between them. The melting point of one conductor is selected at the elevated temperature being detected, while the melting point of the other is higher. As the preselected temperature is reached, liquid metal will flow between the conductors creating short circuits which are detectable as to location.

  19. Temperature profile detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tokarz, Richard D.

    1983-01-01

    Temperature profiles at elevated temperature conditions are monitored by use of an elongated device having two conductors spaced by the minimum distance required to normally maintain an open circuit between them. The melting point of one conductor is selected at the elevated temperature being detected, while the melting point of the other is higher. As the preselected temperature is reached, liquid metal will flow between the conductors, creating short circuits which are detectable as to location.

  20. High temperature sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tokarz, Richard D.

    1982-01-01

    A high temperature sensor includes a pair of electrical conductors separated by a mass of electrical insulating material. The insulating material has a measurable resistivity within the sensor that changes in relation to the temperature of the insulating material within a high temperature range (1,000 to 2,000 K.). When required, the sensor can be encased within a ceramic protective coating.

  1. RESIDUAL STRESSES IN 3013 CONTAINERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mickalonis, J.; Dunn, K.

    2009-11-10

    The DOE Complex is packaging plutonium-bearing materials for storage and eventual disposition or disposal. The materials are handled according to the DOE-STD-3013 which outlines general requirements for stabilization, packaging and long-term storage. The storage vessels for the plutonium-bearing materials are termed 3013 containers. Stress corrosion cracking has been identified as a potential container degradation mode and this work determined that the residual stresses in the containers are sufficient to support such cracking. Sections of the 3013 outer, inner, and convenience containers, in both the as-fabricated condition and the closure welded condition, were evaluated per ASTM standard G-36. The standard requires exposure to a boiling magnesium chloride solution, which is an aggressive testing solution. Tests in a less aggressive 40% calcium chloride solution were also conducted. These tests were used to reveal the relative stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of the as fabricated 3013 containers. Significant cracking was observed in all containers in areas near welds and transitions in the container diameter. Stress corrosion cracks developed in both the lid and the body of gas tungsten arc welded and laser closure welded containers. The development of stress corrosion cracks in the as-fabricated and in the closure welded container samples demonstrates that the residual stresses in the 3013 containers are sufficient to support stress corrosion cracking if the environmental conditions inside the containers do not preclude the cracking process.

  2. Elevated Temperature Primary Load Design Method Using Pseudo Elastic-Perfectly Plastic Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, Peter; Sham, Sam; Jetter, Robert I

    2012-01-01

    A new primary load design method for elevated temperature service has been developed. Codification of the procedure in an ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section III Code Case is being pursued. The proposed primary load design method is intended to provide the same margins on creep rupture, yielding and creep deformation for a component or structure that are implicit in the allowable stress data. It provides a methodology that does not require stress classification and is also applicable to a full range of temperature above and below the creep regime. Use of elastic-perfectly plastic analysis based on allowable stress with corrections for constraint, steady state stress and creep ductility is described. This approach is intended to ensure that traditional primary stresses are the basis for design, taking into account ductility limits to stress re-distribution and multiaxial rupture criteria.

  3. Compliant high temperature seals for dissimilar materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rynders, Steven Walton; Minford, Eric; Tressler, Richard Ernest; Taylor, Dale M.

    2001-01-01

    A high temperature, gas-tight seal is formed by utilizing one or more compliant metallic toroidal ring sealing elements, where the applied pressure serves to activate the seal, thus improving the quality of the seal. The compliant nature of the sealing element compensates for differences in thermal expansion between the materials to be sealed, and is particularly useful in sealing a metallic member and a ceramic tube art elevated temperatures. The performance of the seal may be improved by coating the sealing element with a soft or flowable coating such as silver or gold and/or by backing the sealing element with a bed of fine powder. The material of the sealing element is chosen such that the element responds to stress elastically, even at elevated temperatures, permitting the seal to operate through multiple thermal cycles.

  4. Temperature compensated photovoltaic array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mosher, Dan Michael

    1997-11-18

    A temperature compensated photovoltaic module (20) comprised of a series of solar cells (22) having a thermally activated switch (24) connected in parallel with several of the cells (22). The photovoltaic module (20) is adapted to charge conventional batteries having a temperature coefficient (TC) differing from the temperature coefficient (TC) of the module (20). The calibration temperatures of the switches (24) are chosen whereby the colder the ambient temperature for the module (20), the more switches that are on and form a closed circuit to short the associated solar cells (22). By shorting some of the solar cells (22) as the ambient temperature decreases, the battery being charged by the module (20) is not excessively overcharged at lower temperatures. PV module (20) is an integrated solution that is reliable and inexpensive.

  5. Temperature compensated photovoltaic array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mosher, D.M.

    1997-11-18

    A temperature compensated photovoltaic module comprises a series of solar cells having a thermally activated switch connected in parallel with several of the cells. The photovoltaic module is adapted to charge conventional batteries having a temperature coefficient differing from the temperature coefficient of the module. The calibration temperatures of the switches are chosen whereby the colder the ambient temperature for the module, the more switches that are on and form a closed circuit to short the associated solar cells. By shorting some of the solar cells as the ambient temperature decreases, the battery being charged by the module is not excessively overcharged at lower temperatures. PV module is an integrated solution that is reliable and inexpensive. 2 figs.

  6. REMS Webinar Survey | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    REMS Webinar Survey REMS Webinar Survey Survey for the inaugural DOE REMS Webinar that was held on Tuesday, March 8, 2016 at 1:00 pm EST. PDF icon REMS Webinar Survey More Documents & Publications Radiation Exposure Monitoring Systems Data Submittal Notification EERE's Usability and Analysis Techniques Guidebook

  7. Sample Employee Survey for Workplace Charging Planning

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Survey to determine employee interest in the benefits of employer installed charging infrastructure for their PEVs.

  8. Accelerated Stress Testing, Qualification Testing, HAST, Field...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Accelerated Stress Testing, Qualification Testing, HAST, Field Experience Accelerated Stress Testing, Qualification Testing, HAST, Field Experience This presentation, which was the ...

  9. Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Quality Profile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-03-01

    The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) is a periodic national survey that provides timely information about energy consumption and expenditures of U.S. households and about energy-related characteristics of housing units. The survey was first conducted in 1978 as the National Interim Energy Consumption Survey (NIECS), and the 1979 survey was called the Household Screener Survey. From 1980 through 1982 RECS was conducted annually. The next RECS was fielded in 1984, and since then, the survey has been undertaken at 3-year intervals. The most recent RECS was conducted in 1993.

  10. Sealed glass coating of high temperature ceramic superconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wu, Weite; Chu, Cha Y.; Goretta, Kenneth C.; Routbort, Jules L.

    1995-01-01

    A method and article of manufacture of a lead oxide based glass coating on a high temperature superconductor. The method includes preparing a dispersion of glass powders in a solution, applying the dispersion to the superconductor, drying the dispersion before applying another coating and heating the glass powder dispersion at temperatures below oxygen diffusion onset and above the glass melting point to form a continuous glass coating on the superconductor to establish compressive stresses which enhance the fracture strength of the superconductor.

  11. Geothermal fracture stimulation technology. Volume II. High-temperature proppant testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-07-01

    Data were obtained from a newly built proppant tester, operated at actual geothermal temperatures. The short term test results show that most proppants are temperature sensitive, particularly at the higher closure stresses. Many materials have been tested using a standard short-term test, i.e., fracture-free sand, bauxite, and a resin-coated sand retained good permeability at the high fluid temperatures in brine over a range of closure stresses. The tests were designed to simulate normal closure stress ranges for geothermal wells which are estimated to be from 2000 to 6000 psi. Although the ultra high closure stresses in oil and gas wells need not be considered with present geothermal resources, there is a definite need for chemically inert proppants that will retain high permeability for long time periods in the high temperature formations.

  12. Facility Approvals, Security Surveys, and Nuclear Materials Surveys

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1992-09-15

    To establish Department of Energy (DOE) requirements for granting facility approvals prior to permitting safeguards and security interests on the premises and the conduct of insite security and/or nuclear material surveys of facilities with safeguards and security interests. Cancels DOE 5634.1A. Canceled by DOE O 470.1 dated 9-28-95.

  13. Facility Approvals, Security Surveys, and Nuclear Materials Surveys

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1988-02-03

    To establish the Department of Energy (DOE) requirements for granting facility approvals prior to permitting safeguards and security interests on the premises and the conduct of on-site security and/or nuclear material surveys of facilities with safeguards and security interests. Cancels DOE O 5630.7 and DOE O 5634.1. Canceled by DOE 5634.1B.

  14. 2001 FEMP Customer Survey Appendices

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Appendices A Report Prepared for the US Department of Energy February 2002 By TecMRKT Works and Sandia National Laboratories TecMRKT Works Nicholas P. Hall John H. Reed Ph.D Thomas P. Talerico Jeff Riggert Andrew Oh And Sandia National Laboratories Gretchen Jordan FEMP Customer Survey Appendices Table of Contents Table of Contents TABLE OF CONTENTS I LIST OF FIGURES II LIST OF TABLES III APPENDIX A: SURVEY INSTRUMENT 1 APPENDIX B: DETAILED REPONSES 42 1. Participant and Nonparticipant Profiles

  15. NERSC-8 Vendor Market Survey

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NERSC-8 Project Lead NERSC-8 Market Survey --- 1 --- November 15, 2012 * Seek v endor i nput t o o p6mize 6 ming, r equirements and business prac6ces * Opportunity f or v endors t o p rovide i nput p rior t o formal p rocurement p rocess We are starting our next procurement, NERSC-8, with a round of market surveys Vendor B riefing --- 2 --- NERSC's mission is to enable science NERSC Mission: To accelerate the pace of scientific discovery by providing high-performance computing, data systems and

  16. Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Policy and Guidance » Human Capital Management » Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey The Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey (FedView survey) is a tool that measures employees' perceptions of whether, and to what extent, conditions characterizing successful organizations are present in their agencies. Survey results provide valuable insight into the challenges agency leaders face in ensuring the Federal Government has an effective civilian workforce and how well

  17. Accelerated stress rupture lifetime assessment for fiber composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Groves, S.E.; DeTeresa, S.J.; Sanchez, R.J.; Zocher, M.A.; Christensen, R.M.

    1997-02-01

    Objective was to develop a theoretical and experimental framework for predicting stress rupture lifetime for fiber polymer composites based on short-term accelerated testing. Originally a 3-year project, it was terminated after the first year, which included stress rupture experiments and viscoelastic material characterization. In principle, higher temperature, stress, and saturated environmental conditions are used to accelerate stress rupture. Two types of specimens were to be subjected to long-term and accelerated static tensile loading at various temperatures, loads in order to quantify both fiber and matrix dominated failures. Also, we were to apply state-of-the-art analytical and experimental characterization techniques developed under a previous DOE/DP CRADA for capturing and tracking incipient degradation mechanisms associated with mechanical performance. Focus was increase our confidence to design, analyze, and build long-term composite structures such as flywheels and hydrogen gas storage vessels; other applications include advanced conventional weapons, infrastructures, marine and offshore systems, and stockpile stewardship and surveillance. Capabilities developed under this project, though not completed or verified, are being applied to NIF, AVLIS, and SSMP programs.

  18. Deep Geothermal Reservoir Temperatures in the Eastern Snake River Plain,

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Idaho using Multicomponent Geothermometry (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Deep Geothermal Reservoir Temperatures in the Eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho using Multicomponent Geothermometry Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Deep Geothermal Reservoir Temperatures in the Eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho using Multicomponent Geothermometry The U.S. Geological survey has estimated that there are up to 4,900 MWe of undiscovered geothermal resources and 92,000 MWe of enhanced

  19. FEA stress analysis for SAFKEG 2863B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puckett, A.

    1997-07-15

    This report covers the evaluation of the structural design of the two stainless steel containment vessels in CROFT SAFKEG Model Number 2863B, for conformance to the design criteria of the NRC Regulatory Guide 7.6, NRC Regulatory Guide 7.8, and the applicable requirements of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section 3, and Section 8. The two containment vessels are designated Cans 2870 and 2871. Each of these containment vessels was analyzed for the loadings specified in chapter 2, Section 2.1.2 of the SARP. Structural assessment of Cans 2870 and 2871 due to loading considerations beyond the evaluation of pressure and temperature are presented. This report is organized as follows: (1) overview of the design of each containment vessel and pressure boundary; (2) brief description of both containment vessels; (3) discussion of normal and accident conditions; (4) analysis assumptions; (5) detailed structural evaluation of each component of each containment vessel; (6) demonstration of compliance to Regulatory Guide 7.6 stress evaluations; (7) demonstration of compliance to Regulatory Guide 7.8 loading combinations; and (8) summary of the calculated stresses, comparison with design allowables, estimates of margins of safety and a summary of results and conclusions.

  20. Magnetic nanoparticle temperature estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weaver, John B.; Rauwerdink, Adam M.; Hansen, Eric W.

    2009-05-15

    The authors present a method of measuring the temperature of magnetic nanoparticles that can be adapted to provide in vivo temperature maps. Many of the minimally invasive therapies that promise to reduce health care costs and improve patient outcomes heat tissue to very specific temperatures to be effective. Measurements are required because physiological cooling, primarily blood flow, makes the temperature difficult to predict a priori. The ratio of the fifth and third harmonics of the magnetization generated by magnetic nanoparticles in a sinusoidal field is used to generate a calibration curve and to subsequently estimate the temperature. The calibration curve is obtained by varying the amplitude of the sinusoidal field. The temperature can then be estimated from any subsequent measurement of the ratio. The accuracy was 0.3 deg. K between 20 and 50 deg. C using the current apparatus and half-second measurements. The method is independent of nanoparticle concentration and nanoparticle size distribution.

  1. Stress relief to prevent stress corrosion in the transition region of expanded Alloy 600 steam-generator tubing. Final report. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodward, J.; van Rooyen, D.

    1983-05-01

    The feasibility of preventing primary side roll transition cracking has been investigated, using induction heating to attain stress relief of expanded Ni-Cr-Fe Alloy 600 steam generator tubing. Work on rolled tubing and U-bends has shown that temperatures with which stress relief can be obtained range from 700 to 850/sup 0/C, with lower temperatures in this range requiring longer times at temperature to provide the requisite reduction in residual stresses. No work has yet been done outside this range. Preliminary tests, using induction heating, have been carried out on a mock tube sheet assembly, designed to the dimensions of a typical steam generator, and have identified the type of heating/cooling cycle that would occur in the tube sheet during a stress relief operation. Preliminary results show that the times to reach the higher temperatures in the range observed to give stress relief, of the order of 850/sup 0/C, can be as short as 8 seconds, and less with optimum coil design and power control.

  2. High-temperature sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Not Available

    1981-01-29

    A high temperature sensor is described which includes a pair of electrical conductors separated by a mass of electrical insulating material. The insulating material has a measurable resistivity within the sensor that changes in relation to the temperature of the insulating material within a high temperature range (1000 to 2000/sup 0/K). When required, the sensor can be encased within a ceramic protective coating.

  3. High temperature refrigerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steyert, Jr., William A.

    1978-01-01

    A high temperature magnetic refrigerator which uses a Stirling-like cycle in which rotating magnetic working material is heated in zero field and adiabatically magnetized, cooled in high field, then adiabatically demagnetized. During this cycle said working material is in heat exchange with a pumped fluid which absorbs heat from a low temperature heat source and deposits heat in a high temperature reservoir. The magnetic refrigeration cycle operates at an efficiency 70% of Carnot.

  4. Automatic temperature adjustment apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaplin, James E.

    1985-01-01

    An apparatus for increasing the efficiency of a conventional central space heating system is disclosed. The temperature of a fluid heating medium is adjusted based on a measurement of the external temperature, and a system parameter. The system parameter is periodically modified based on a closed loop process that monitors the operation of the heating system. This closed loop process provides a heating medium temperature value that is very near the optimum for energy efficiency.

  5. Temperature and RH Targets

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presented by Vishal O Mittal of the Florida Solar Energy Center at the High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting, San Francisco, September 14, 2006.

  6. High-Temperature Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Software Computations Uncertainty Quantification Stochastic About CRF Transportation Energy Consortiums Engine Combustion Heavy Duty Heavy Duty Low-Temperature & Diesel Combustion ...

  7. Low temperature cryoprobe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sungaila, Zenon F.

    1989-01-01

    A portable, hand held probe usable within a small confine to produce a point source of nitrogen or helium at a relatively constant temperature of 77 degrees Kelvin.

  8. Temperature and productivity

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... and performance of office work under combined exposure to temperature, noise and air pollution. PhD Thesis. International Centre for Indoor Environment and Energy, Department of ...

  9. Low Temperature Proton Conductivity

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation by Tom Zawodzinski to DOE's Fuel Cell Operations at Sub-Freezing Temperatures Workshop held February 1-5, 2005 in Phoenix, Arizona.

  10. Hazards Survey and Hazards Assessments

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-08-21

    This volume is to assist DOE Operations/Field Offices and operating contractors in complying with the DOE O 151.1 requirement that Hazards Surveys and facility-specific Hazards Assessments be prepared, maintained, and used for emergency planning purposes. Canceled by DOE G 151.1-2.

  11. Microcantilever heater-thermometer with integrated temperature-compensated strain sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    King, William P.; Lee, Jungchul; Goericke, Fabian T.

    2011-04-19

    The present invention provides microcantilever hotplate devices which incorporate temperature compensating strain sensors. The microcantilever hotplate devices of the present invention comprise microcantilevers having temperature compensating strain sensors and resistive heaters. The present invention also provides methods for using a microcantilever hotplate for temperature compensated surface stress measurements, chemical/biochemical sensing, measuring various properties of compounds adhered to the microcantilever hotplate surface, or for temperature compensated deflection measurements.

  12. System and method for glass processing and temperature sensing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shepard, Chester L.; Cannon, Bret D.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2004-09-28

    Techniques for measuring the temperature at various locations through the thickness of glass products and to control the glass processing operation with the sensed temperature information are disclosed. Fluorescence emission of iron or cerium in glass is excited and imaged onto segmented detectors. Spatially resolved temperature data are obtained through correlation of the detected photoluminescence signal with location within the glass. In one form the detected photoluminescence is compared to detected scattered excitation light to determine temperature. Stress information is obtained from the time history of the temperature profile data and used to evaluate the quality of processed glass. A heating or cooling rate of the glass is also controlled to maintain a predetermined desired temperature profile in the glass.

  13. ARM - Word Seek: Temperature

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Temperature Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Word Seek: Temperature

  14. Fiber optic temperature sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabold, D.

    1995-12-01

    Our fiber optic temperature measurement sensor and system is a major improvement over methods currently in use in most industrial processes, and it delivers all of the attributes required simplicity, accuracy, and cost efficiency-to help improve all of these processes. Because temperature is a basic physical attribute of nearly every industrial and commercial process, our system can eventually result in significant improvements in nearly every industrial and commercial process. Many finished goods, and the materials that go into them, are critically dependent on the temperature. The better the temperature measurement, the better quality the goods will be and the more economically they can be produced. The production and transmission of energy requires the monitoring of temperature in motors, circuit breakers, power generating plants, and transmission line equipment. The more reliable and robust the methods for measuring these temperature, the more available, stable, and affordable the supply of energy will become. The world is increasingly realizing the threats to health and safety of toxic or otherwise undesirable by products of the industrial economy in the environment. Cleanup of such contamination often depends on techniques that require the constant monitoring of temperature in extremely hazardous environments, which can damage most conventional temperature sensors and which are dangerous for operating personnel. Our system makes such monitoring safer and more economical.

  15. Dynamic high-temperature characterization of an iridium alloy in tension

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Bo; Nelson, Kevin; Jin, Helena; Lipinski, Ronald J.; Bignell, John; Ulrich, G. B.; George, E. P.

    2015-09-01

    Iridium alloys have been utilized as structural materials for certain high-temperature applications, due to their superior strength and ductility at elevated temperatures. The mechanical properties, including failure response at high strain rates and elevated temperatures of the iridium alloys need to be characterized to better understand high-speed impacts at elevated temperatures. A DOP-26 iridium alloy has been dynamically characterized in compression at elevated temperatures with high-temperature Kolsky compression bar techniques. However, the dynamic high-temperature compression tests were not able to provide sufficient dynamic high-temperature failure information of the iridium alloy. In this study, we modified current room-temperature Kolsky tension bar techniques for obtaining dynamic tensile stress-strain curves of the DOP-26 iridium alloy at two different strain rates (~1000 and ~3000 s-1) and temperatures (~750°C and ~1030°C). The effects of strain rate and temperature on the tensile stress-strain response of the iridium alloy were determined. The DOP-26 iridium alloy exhibited high ductility in stress-strain response that strongly depended on both strain rate and temperature.

  16. High Temperature ESP Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jack Booker; Brindesh Dhruva

    2011-06-20

    The objective of the High Temperature ESP Monitoring project was to develop a downhole monitoring system to be used in wells with bottom hole well temperatures up to 300C for measuring motor temperature, formation pressure, and formation temperature. These measurements are used to monitor the health of the ESP motor, to track the downhole operating conditions, and to optimize the pump operation. A 220 C based High Temperature ESP Monitoring system was commercially released for sale with Schlumberger ESP motors April of 2011 and a 250 C system with will be commercially released at the end of Q2 2011. The measurement system is now fully qualified, except for the sensor, at 300 C.

  17. High temperature probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swan, Raymond A.

    1994-01-01

    A high temperature probe for sampling, for example, smokestack fumes, and is able to withstand temperatures of 3000.degree. F. The probe is constructed so as to prevent leakage via the seal by placing the seal inside the water jacket whereby the seal is not exposed to high temperature, which destroys the seal. The sample inlet of the probe is also provided with cooling fins about the area of the seal to provide additional cooling to prevent the seal from being destroyed. Also, a heated jacket is provided for maintaining the temperature of the gas being tested as it passes through the probe. The probe includes pressure sensing means for determining the flow velocity of an efficient being sampled. In addition, thermocouples are located in various places on the probe to monitor the temperature of the gas passing there through.

  18. Evaluation of crystallinity and film stress in yttria-stabilized zirconia

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    thin films (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Evaluation of crystallinity and film stress in yttria-stabilized zirconia thin films Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Evaluation of crystallinity and film stress in yttria-stabilized zirconia thin films Yttria (3 mol %)-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thin films were deposited using radio frequency (rf) magnetron sputtering. The YSZ thin films were deposited over a range of temperatures (22-300 deg. C), pressures (5-25

  19. Thermal-stress analysis of a Fort St. Vrain core-support block under accident conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carruthers, L.M.; Butler, T.A.; Anderson, C.A.

    1982-01-01

    A thermoelastic stress analysis of a graphite core support block in the Fort St. Vrain High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor is described. The support block is subjected to thermal stresses caused by a loss of forced circulation accident of the reactor system. Two- and three-dimensional finite element models of the core support block are analyzed using the ADINAT and ADINA codes, and results are given that verify the integrity of this structural component under the given accident condition.

  20. Rural electric cooperatives IRP survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrick, C.

    1995-11-01

    This report summarizes the integrated resource planning (IRP) practices of US rural electric cooperatives and the IRP policies which influence these practices. It was prepared by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and its subcontractor Garrick and Associates to assist the US Department of Energy (DOE) in satisfying the reporting requirements of Title 1, Subtitle B, Section 111(e)(3) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct), which states: (e) Report--Not later than 2 years after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary (of the US Department of Energy) shall transmit a report to the President and to the Congress containing--(the findings from several surveys and evaluations, including:); (3) a survey of practices and policies under which electric cooperatives prepare IRPs, submit such plans to REA, and the extent to which such integrated resource planning is reflected in rates charged to customers.

  1. PRELIMINARY SURVEY OF VITRO CORPORATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    PRELIMINARY SURVEY OF VITRO CORPORATION (VITRO LABORATORIES) WEST ORANGE, NEW JERSEY Work performed by the Health and Safety Research Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 March 1980 OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY operated by UNION CARBIDE CORPORATION for the DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites-- Remedial Actton Program VITRO CORPORATION (VITRO LABORATORIES) WEST ORANGE, NEW JERSEY At the request of the Department of Energy (DOE), a preliminary

  2. Temperature-sensitive optrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hirschfeld, Tomas B.

    1985-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for measuring temperature and for generating optical signals related to temperature. Light from a fiber optic is directed to a material whose fluorescent response varies with ambient temperature. The same fiber optic delivering the excitation beam also collects a portion of the fluorescent emission for analysis. Signal collection efficiency of the fiber optic is enhanced by requiring that the fluorescent probe material be in the shape of an oblong parabolically tapered solid. Reproducibility is enhanced by using Raman backscatter to monitor excitation beam fluctuations, and by using measurements of fluorescence lifetime.

  3. Temperature-sensitive optrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hirschfeld, T.B.

    1985-09-24

    Method and apparatus are provided for measuring temperature and for generating optical signals related to temperature. Light from a fiber optic is directed to a material whose fluorescent response varies with ambient temperature. The same fiber optic delivering the excitation beam also collects a portion of the fluorescent emission for analysis. Signal collection efficiency of the fiber optic is enhanced by requiring that the fluorescent probe material be in the shape of an oblong parabolically tapered solid. Reproducibility is enhanced by using Raman backscatter to monitor excitation beam fluctuations, and by using measurements of fluorescence lifetime. 10 figs.

  4. "Speak Up" Survey Results - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the survey. The goal is to use the results to continuously improve Hanford's safety culture and work environment. Results for the "Speak Up" Survey An Organizational Climate and...

  5. Utah Geological Survey | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Logo: Utah Geological Survey Name: Utah Geological Survey Address: 1594 W. North Temple Place: Salt Lake City, Utah Zip: 84114-6100 Phone Number: 801.537.3300 Website:...

  6. STEP Non-Participant Survey Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    STEP Non-Participant Survey Report, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

  7. DC Survey 2013 | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Management / Aerial Measuring System DC Survey 2013 DC Background Survey (.zip) DC 2013 survey Related Topics ams Emergency Response Related News Department of Energy's chief risk officer visits Nevada National Security Site NNSA sites prepared for disasters using real-time response management system NNSA emergency response assets highlighted NNSA displays helicopter in Baltimore NNSA to Conduct Aerial Radiation Monitoring Survey over Boston April 17-20

  8. Graphite having improved thermal stress resistance and method of preparation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kennedy, Charles R.

    1980-01-01

    An improved method for fabricating a graphite article comprises the steps of impregnating a coke article by first heating the coke article in contact with a thermoplastic pitch at a temperature within the range of 250.degree.-300.degree. C. at a pressure within the range of 200-2000 psig for at least 4-10 hours and then heating said article at a temperature within the range of 450.degree.-485.degree. C. at a pressure of 200-2000 psig for about 16-24 hours to provide an impregnated article; heating the impregnated article for sufficient time to carbonize the impregnant to provide a second coke article, and graphitizing the second coke article. A graphite having improved thermal stress resistance results when the coke to be impregnated contains 1-3 wt.% sulfur and no added puffing inhibitors. An additional improvement in thermal stress resistance is achieved when the second coke article is heated above about 1400.degree. C. at a rate of at least 10.degree. C./minute to a temperature above the puffing temperature.

  9. Stress dependent oxidation of sputtered niobium and effects on superconductivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Henry, M. Wolfley, Steve; Monson, Todd; Clark, Blythe G.; Shaner, Eric; Jarecki, Robert

    2014-02-28

    We report on the suppression of room temperature oxidation of DC sputtered niobium films and the effects upon the superconductive transition temperature, T{sub c}. Niobium was sputter-deposited on silicon dioxide coated 150?mm wafers and permitted to oxidize at room temperature and pressure for up to two years. Resistivity and stress measurements indicate that tensile films greater than 400?MPa resist bulk oxidation with measurements using transmission electron microscope, electron dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectric spectroscopy, and secondary ion mass spectrometry confirming this result. Although a surface oxide, Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}, consumed the top 610?nm, we measure less than 1 at.% oxygen and nitrogen in the bulk of the films after the oxidation period. T{sub c} measurements using a SQUID magnetometer indicate that the tensile films maintained a T{sub c} approaching the dirty superconductive limit of 8.4?K after two years of oxidation while maintaining room temperature sheet resistance. This work demonstrates that control over niobium film stress during deposition can prevent bulk oxidation by limiting the vertical grain boundaries ability to oxidize, prolonging the superconductive properties of sputtered niobium when exposed to atmosphere.

  10. Shallow Flaws Under Biaxial Loading Conditions, Part II: Application of a Weibull Stress Analysis of the Cruciform Bend Specimen Using a Hydrostatic Stress Criterion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bass, B.R.; McAfee, W.J.; Williams, P.T.

    1999-08-01

    Cruciform beam fracture mechanics specimensl have been developed in the Heavy Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to introduce a prototypic, far- field, out-of-plane biaxird bending stress component in the test section that approximates the nonlinear biaxial stresses resulting from pressurized-thernxd-shock or pressure-temperature loading of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel (RPV). Matrices of cruciform beam tests were developed to investigate and quantify the effects of temperature, biaxial loading, and specimen size on fracture initiation toughness of two-dimensional (constant depth), shtdlow, surface flaws. Tests were conducted under biaxial load ratios ranging from uniaxial to equibiaxial. These tests demonstrated that biaxial loading can have a pronounced effect on shallow-flaw fracture toughness in the lower transition temperature region for RPV materials. Two and three- parameter Weibull models have been calibrated using a new scheme (developed at the University of Illinois) that maps toughness data from test specimens with distinctly different levels of crack-tip constraint to a small scale yielding (SSY) Weibull stress space. These models, using the new hydrostatic stress criterion in place of the more commonly used maximum principal stress in the kernel of the OW integral definition, have been shown to correlate the experimentally observed biaxiaI effect in cruciform specimens, thereby providing a scaling mechanism between uniaxial and biaxial loading states.

  11. 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... foot at a pressure base of 14.73 pounds standard per square inch absolute and a temperature base of 60 degrees Fahrenheit; Cubic meter is a unit of measure which equals 35.314 ...

  12. Temperature | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    C Property:Combustion Intake Air Temperature F Property:FirstWellTemp G Property:GeochemReservoirTemp Property:GeofluidTemp M Property:MeanReservoirTemp R...

  13. Penrose Well Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christopherson, Karen

    2013-03-15

    Penrose Well Temperatures Geothermal waters have been encountered in several wells near Penrose in Fremont County, Colorado. Most of the wells were drilled for oil and gas exploration and, in a few cases, production. This ESRI point shapefile utilizes data from 95 wells in and around the Penrose area provided by the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) database at http://cogcc.state.co.us/ . Temperature data from the database were used to calculate a temperature gradient for each well. This information was then used to estimate temperatures at various depths. Projection: UTM Zone 13 NAD27 Extent: West -105.224871 East -105.027633 North 38.486269 South 38.259507 Originators: Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) Karen Christopherson

  14. Low temperature cryoprobe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sungaila, Z.F.

    1988-04-12

    A portable, hand held probe usable within a small confine to produce a point source of nitrogen or helium at a relatively constant temperatures of 77 degrees Kelvin, is discussed. 3 figs.

  15. High-Temperature Superconductivity

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Peter Johnson

    2010-01-08

    Like astronomers tweaking images to gain a more detailed glimpse of distant stars, physicists at Brookhaven National Laboratory have found ways to sharpen images of the energy spectra in high-temperature superconductors ? materials that carry electrical c

  16. High temperature pressure gauge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Echtler, J. Paul (Pittsburgh, PA); Scandrol, Roy O. (Library, PA)

    1981-01-01

    A high temperature pressure gauge comprising a pressure gauge positioned in fluid communication with one end of a conduit which has a diaphragm mounted in its other end. The conduit is filled with a low melting metal alloy above the diaphragm for a portion of its length with a high temperature fluid being positioned in the remaining length of the conduit and in the pressure gauge.

  17. Low temperature reactive bonding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA); Bionta, Richard M. (Livermore, CA)

    1995-01-01

    The joining technique requires no external heat source and generates very little heat during joining. It involves the reaction of thin multilayered films deposited on faying surfaces to create a stable compound that functions as an intermediate or braze material in order to create a high strength bond. While high temperatures are reached in the reaction of the multilayer film, very little heat is generated because the films are very thin. It is essentially a room temperature joining process.

  18. Temperature measuring device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauf, Robert J.; Bible, Don W.; Sohns, Carl W.

    1999-01-01

    Systems and methods are described for a wireless instrumented silicon wafer that can measure temperatures at various points and transmit those temperature readings to an external receiver. The device has particular utility in the processing of semiconductor wafers, where it can be used to map thermal uniformity on hot plates, cold plates, spin bowl chucks, etc. without the inconvenience of wires or the inevitable thermal perturbations attendant with them.

  19. High Temperature Aqueous Chemistry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Accurate knowledge of aqueous chemistry at high temperatures and pressures is important in many applications including nuclear waste disposal and energy extraction. Sandia's Defense Waste Management Programs is equipped with a state-of-the-art hydrothermal experimental system that allows us to obtain high quality kinetic and equilibrium data at temperatures and pressures of interest up to 600 o C and 1,000 bars (100 MPa). This state-of-the-art hydrothermal experimental system includes the

  20. ARM - Temperature Converter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CalculatorsTemperature Converter Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Temperature Converter The Fahrenheit scale, invented by German physicist Daniel Gabriel Fahrenheit (1686-1736), is based on 32 °F for the freezing point of water and 212 °F for the boiling point of water. The

  1. Microelectromechanical systems contact stress sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kotovsky, Jack

    2007-12-25

    A microelectromechanical systems stress sensor comprising a microelectromechanical systems silicon body. A recess is formed in the silicon body. A silicon element extends into the recess. The silicon element has limited freedom of movement within the recess. An electrical circuit in the silicon element includes a piezoresistor material that allows for sensing changes in resistance that is proportional to bending of the silicon element.

  2. Residual stress analysis of alloy 600 U-bends, reverse U-bends, and C-rings: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudd, C.O.

    1994-11-01

    Over the last several years, one of the leading causes of alloy 600 steam generator tubing leaks has been the primary-side-initiated, intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in heavily cold-worked regions of the U-bends or tubesheet expansion transitions. Field and laboratory experiences have demonstrated that high residual stresses contribute significantly to the initiation of primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC). EPRI initiated this project to measure and quantify the magnitude of these residual stresses in steam generator tubes as well as in various laboratory tests specimens. the objectives were: To measure the residual stresses in steam generator tube U-bends; To measure residual stresses in reverse U-bend (RUB) specimens as well as residual stresses and X-ray diffraction peak broadening in C-ring specimens used in laboratory tests; and To determine whether residual stress occurs as a result of exposure to steam generator operating temperature. Using an advanced X-ray instrument, investigators measured residual stresses on both the outside diameter (OD) and inside diameter (ID) surfaces and subsurfaces of steam generator U-bends and on the test surfaces of laboratory RUB and C-ring specimens. They measured these residual stresses in the hoop and axial directions and also calculated equivalent stresses. Results are discussed. 25 refs., 92 figs., 6 tabs.

  3. Survey of the Economics of Hydrogen Technologies | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Survey of the Economics of Hydrogen Technologies Survey of the Economics of Hydrogen Technologies Survey of the Economics of Hydrogen Technologies PDF icon 27079.pdf More Documents ...

  4. Gamma Survey of a Permeable Reactive Barrier at Monticello, Utah...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Gamma Survey of a Permeable Reactive Barrier at Monticello, Utah Gamma Survey of a Permeable Reactive Barrier at Monticello, Utah Gamma Survey of a Permeable Reactive Barrier at...

  5. Department of Energy Earned Value Management Survey Results ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Earned Value Management Survey Results Department of Energy Earned Value Management Survey Results Humphreys & Associates, Inc. (H&A) conducted a survey of ...

  6. Development of High-Temperature Ferritic Alloys and Performance Prediction Methods for Advanced Fission Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. RObert Odette; Takuya Yamamoto

    2009-08-14

    Reports the results of a comprehensive development and analysis of a database on irradiation hardening and embrittlement of tempered martensitic steels (TMS). Alloy specific quantitative semi-empirical models were derived for the dpa dose, irradiation temperature (ti) and test (Tt) temperature of yield stress hardening (or softening) .

  7. EXTENDING SODIUM FAST REACTOR DRIVER FUEL USE TO HIGHER TEMPERATURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas L. Porter

    2011-02-01

    Calculations of potential sodium-cooled fast reactor fuel temperatures were performed to estimate the effects of increasing the outlet temperature of a given fast reactor design by increasing pin power, decreasing assembly flow, or increasing inlet temperature. Based upon experience in the U.S., both metal and mixed oxide (MOX) fuel types are discussed in terms of potential performance effects created by the increased operating temperatures. Assembly outlet temperatures of 600, 650 and 700 C were used as goal temperatures. Fuel/cladding chemical interaction (FCCI) and fuel melting, as well as challenges to the mechanical integrity of the cladding material, were identified as the limiting phenomena. For example, starting with a recent 1000 MWth fast reactor design, raising the outlet temperature to 650 C through pin power increase increased the MOX centerline temperature to more than 3300 C and the metal fuel peak cladding temperature to more than 700 C. These exceeded limitations to fuel performance; fuel melting was limiting for MOX and FCCI for metal fuel. Both could be alleviated by design fixes, such as using a barrier inside the cladding to minimize FCCI in the metal fuel, or using annular fuel in the case of MOX. Both would also require an advanced cladding material with improved stress rupture properties. While some of these are costly, the benefits of having a high-temperature reactor which can support hydrogen production, or other missions requiring high process heat may make the extra costs justified.

  8. Housing characteristics, 1987: Residential Energy Consumption Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-05-26

    This report is the first of a series of reports based on data from the 1987 RECS. The 1987 RECS is the seventh in the series of national surveys of households and their energy suppliers. These surveys provide baseline information on how households in the United States use energy. A cross section of housing types such as single-family detached homes, townhouses, large and small apartment buildings, condominiums, and mobile homes were included in the survey. Data from the RECS and a companion survey, the Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS), are available to the public in published reports such as this one and on public use tapes. 10 figs., 69 tabs.

  9. Finite element analyses of tool stresses in metal cutting processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kistler, B.L.

    1997-01-01

    In this report, we analytically predict and examine stresses in tool tips used in high speed orthogonal machining operations. Specifically, one analysis was compared to an existing experimental measurement of stresses in a sapphire tool tip cutting 1020 steel at slow speeds. In addition, two analyses were done of a carbide tool tip in a machining process at higher cutting speeds, in order to compare to experimental results produced as part of this study. The metal being cut was simulated using a Sandia developed damage plasticity material model, which allowed the cutting to occur analytically without prespecifying the line of cutting/failure. The latter analyses incorporated temperature effects on the tool tip. Calculated tool forces and peak stresses matched experimental data to within 20%. Stress contours generally agreed between analysis and experiment. This work could be extended to investigate/predict failures in the tool tip, which would be of great interest to machining shops in understanding how to optimize cost/retooling time.

  10. Primary side stress corrosion cracking and remedial measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theus, G.J.

    1986-01-01

    Primary side stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of Alloy 600 stream generator tubing in some recirculating pressurized water reactor steam generators has usually occurred in two locations: at the roll transition and expansion locations within the tube-sheets and at the apex and tangent areas of the tight radius U bends. Occasionally, other highly stressed areas have also suffered primary side SCC: at support plate tube intersections where secondary side denting has occurred and at the steam generator tube transition areas of explosively installed mini-sleeves. Laboratory data and operating performances of Alloy 600 tubing indicate that the factors affecting the susceptibility to this type of SSC, in decreasing order of importance, are high stresses, material microstructures, and operating temperatures. Remedial measures to correct these problems in newer plants include changing design and fabrication procedures, thus avoiding highly stressed areas of tubing, and changing tube manufacturing heat treating requirements, thus improving the microstructures. Alternate tube materials, such as Alloy 800, Monel 400, or austenitic stainless steels, have not suffered this type of failure.

  11. Stress corrosion crack tip microstructure in nickel-based alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shei, S.A.; Yang, W.J.

    1994-04-01

    Stress corrosion cracking behavior of several nickel-base alloys in high temperature caustic environments has been evaluated. The crack tip and fracture surfaces were examined using Auger/ESCA and Analytical Electron Microscopy (AEM) to determine the near crack tip microstructure and microchemistry. Results showed formation of chromium-rich oxides at or near the crack tip and nickel-rich de-alloying layers away from the crack tip. The stress corrosion resistance of different nickel-base alloys in caustic may be explained by the preferential oxidation and dissolution of different alloying elements at the crack tip. Alloy 600 (UNS N06600) shows good general corrosion and intergranular attack resistance in caustic because of its high nickel content. Thermally treated Alloy 690 (UNS N06690) and Alloy 600 provide good stress corrosion cracking resistance because of high chromium contents along grain boundaries. Alloy 625 (UNS N06625) does not show as good stress corrosion cracking resistance as Alloy 690 or Alloy 600 because of its high molybdenum content.

  12. Helicopter magnetic survey conducted to locate wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veloski, G.A.; Hammack, R.W.; Stamp, V.; Hall, R.; Colina, K.

    2008-07-01

    A helicopter magnetic survey was conducted in August 2007 over 15.6 sq mi at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3s (NPR-3) Teapot Dome Field near Casper, Wyoming. The surveys purpose was to accurately locate wells drilled there during more than 90 years of continuous oilfield operation. The survey was conducted at low altitude and with closely spaced flight lines to improve the detection of wells with weak magnetic response and to increase the resolution of closely spaced wells. The survey was in preparation for a planned CO2 flood for EOR, which requires a complete well inventory with accurate locations for all existing wells. The magnetic survey was intended to locate wells missing from the well database and to provide accurate locations for all wells. The ability of the helicopter magnetic survey to accurately locate wells was accomplished by comparing airborne well picks with well locations from an intense ground search of a small test area.

  13. Site survey method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oldham, James G.; Spencer, Charles R.; Begley, Carl L.; Meyer, H. Robert

    1991-06-18

    The disclosure of the invention is directed to a site survey ground vehicle based apparatus and method for automatically detecting source materials, such as radioactivity, marking the location of the source materials, such as with paint, and mapping the location of the source materials on a site. The apparatus of the invention is also useful for collecting and analyzing samples. The apparatus includes a ground vehicle, detectors mounted at the front of the ground vehicle, and individual detector supports which follow somewhat irregular terrain to allow consistent and accurate detection, and autolocation equipment.

  14. Site survey method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oldham, J.G.; Spencer, C.R.; Begley, C.L.; Meyer, H.R.

    1991-06-18

    The disclosure of the invention is directed to a site survey ground vehicle based apparatus and method for automatically detecting source materials, such as radioactivity, marking the location of the source materials, such as with paint, and mapping the location of the source materials on a site. The apparatus of the invention is also useful for collecting and analyzing samples. The apparatus includes a ground vehicle, detectors mounted at the front of the ground vehicle, and individual detector supports which follow somewhat irregular terrain to allow consistent and accurate detection, and autolocation equipment. 19 figures.

  15. High temperature thermometric phosphors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allison, S.W.; Cates, M.R.; Boatner, L.A.; Gillies, G.T.

    1999-03-23

    A high temperature phosphor consists essentially of a material having the general formula LuPO{sub 4}:Dy{sub x},Eu{sub y} wherein: 0.1 wt % {<=} x {<=} 20 wt % and 0.1 wt % {<=} y {<=} 20 wt %. The high temperature phosphor is in contact with an article whose temperature is to be determined. The article having the phosphor in contact with it is placed in the environment for which the temperature of the article is to be determined. The phosphor is excited by a laser causing the phosphor to fluoresce. The emission from the phosphor is optically focused into a beam-splitting mirror which separates the emission into two separate emissions, the emission caused by the dysprosium dopant and the emission caused by the europium dopant. The separated emissions are optically filtered and the intensities of the emission are detected and measured. The ratio of the intensity of each emission is determined and the temperature of the article is calculated from the ratio of the intensities of the separate emissions. 2 figs.

  16. High temperature thermometric phosphors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allison, Stephen W.; Cates, Michael R.; Boatner, Lynn A.; Gillies, George T.

    1999-03-23

    A high temperature phosphor consists essentially of a material having the general formula LuPO.sub.4 :Dy.sub.(x),Eu.sub.y) wherein: 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.20 wt % and 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.20 wt %. The high temperature phosphor is in contact with an article whose temperature is to be determined. The article having the phosphor in contact with it is placed in the environment for which the temperature of the article is to be determined. The phosphor is excited by a laser causing the phosphor to fluoresce. The emission from the phosphor is optically focused into a beam-splitting mirror which separates the emission into two separate emissions, the emission caused by the dysprosium dopant and the emission caused by the europium dopent. The separated emissions are optically filtered and the intensities of the emission are detected and measured. The ratio of the intensity of each emission is determined and the temperature of the article is calculated from the ratio of the intensities of the separate emissions.

  17. Temperature profile detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tokarz, R.D.

    1983-10-11

    Disclosed is a temperature profile detector shown as a tubular enclosure surrounding an elongated electrical conductor having a plurality of meltable conductive segments surrounding it. Duplicative meltable segments are spaced apart from one another along the length of the enclosure. Electrical insulators surround these elements to confine molten material from the segments in bridging contact between the conductor and a second electrical conductor, which might be the confining tube. The location and rate of growth of the resulting short circuits between the two conductors can be monitored by measuring changes in electrical resistance between terminals at both ends of the two conductors. Additional conductors and separate sets of meltable segments operational at differing temperatures can be monitored simultaneously for measuring different temperature profiles. 8 figs.

  18. High temperature lubricating process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taylor, R.W.; Shell, T.E.

    1979-10-04

    It has been difficult to provide adequate lubrication for load bearing, engine components when such engines are operating in excess of about 475/sup 0/C. The present invention is a process for providing a solid lubricant on a load bearing, solid surface, such as in an engine being operated at temperatures in excess of about 475/sup 0/C. The process comprises contacting and maintaining the following steps: a gas phase is provided which includes at least one component reactable in a temperature dependent reaction to form a solid lubricant; the gas phase is contacted with the load bearing surface; the load bearing surface is maintained at a temperature which causes reaction of the gas phase component and the formation of the solid lubricant; and the solid lubricant is formed directly on the load bearing surface. The method is particularly suitable for use with ceramic engines.

  19. High temperature lubricating process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taylor, Robert W.; Shell, Thomas E.

    1982-01-01

    It has been difficult to provide adaquate lubrication for load bearing, engine components when such engines are operating in excess of about 475.degree. C. The present invention is a process for providing a solid lubricant on a load bearing, solid surface (14), such as in an engine (10) being operated at temperatures in excess of about 475.degree. C. The process comprises contacting and maintaining steps. A gas phase (42) is provided which includes at least one component reactable in a temperature dependent reaction to form a solid lubricant. The gas phase is contacted with the load bearing surface. The load bearing surface is maintained at a temperature which causes reaction of the gas phase component and the formation of the solid lubricant. The solid lubricant is formed directly on the load bearing surface. The method is particularly suitable for use with ceramic engines.

  20. Temperature initiated passive cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, Charles W.

    1994-01-01

    A passive cooling system for cooling an enclosure only when the enclosure temperature exceeds a maximum standby temperature comprises a passive heat transfer loop containing heat transfer fluid having a particular thermodynamic critical point temperature just above the maximum standby temperature. An upper portion of the heat transfer loop is insulated to prevent two phase operation below the maximum standby temperature.

  1. Temperature initiated passive cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1994-11-01

    A passive cooling system for cooling an enclosure only when the enclosure temperature exceeds a maximum standby temperature comprises a passive heat transfer loop containing heat transfer fluid having a particular thermodynamic critical point temperature just above the maximum standby temperature. An upper portion of the heat transfer loop is insulated to prevent two phase operation below the maximum standby temperature. 1 fig.

  2. Reservoir Temperature Estimator

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-12-08

    The Reservoir Temperature Estimator (RTEst) is a program that can be used to estimate deep geothermal reservoir temperature and chemical parameters such as CO2 fugacity based on the water chemistry of shallower, cooler reservoir fluids. This code uses the plugin features provided in The Geochemist’s Workbench (Bethke and Yeakel, 2011) and interfaces with the model-independent parameter estimation code Pest (Doherty, 2005) to provide for optimization of the estimated parameters based on the minimization of themore » weighted sum of squares of a set of saturation indexes from a user-provided mineral assemblage.« less

  3. Fluorescent temperature sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, Gary A [Los Alamos, NM; Baker, Sheila N [Los Alamos, NM; McCleskey, T Mark [Los Alamos, NM

    2009-03-03

    The present invention is a fluorescent temperature sensor or optical thermometer. The sensor includes a solution of 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane within a 1-butyl-1-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid solvent. The 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane remains unassociated when in the ground state while in solution. When subjected to UV light, an excited state is produced that exists in equilibrium with an excimer. The position of the equilibrium between the two excited states is temperature dependent.

  4. Temperature determination using pyrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Breiland, William G.; Gurary, Alexander I.; Boguslavskiy, Vadim

    2002-01-01

    A method for determining the temperature of a surface upon which a coating is grown using optical pyrometry by correcting Kirchhoff's law for errors in the emissivity or reflectance measurements associated with the growth of the coating and subsequent changes in the surface thermal emission and heat transfer characteristics. By a calibration process that can be carried out in situ in the chamber where the coating process occurs, an error calibration parameter can be determined that allows more precise determination of the temperature of the surface using optical pyrometry systems. The calibration process needs only to be carried out when the physical characteristics of the coating chamber change.

  5. Low temperature reactive bonding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, D.M.; Bionta, R.M.

    1995-01-17

    The joining technique is disclosed that requires no external heat source and generates very little heat during joining. It involves the reaction of thin multilayered films deposited on faying surfaces to create a stable compound that functions as an intermediate or braze material in order to create a high strength bond. While high temperatures are reached in the reaction of the multilayer film, very little heat is generated because the films are very thin. It is essentially a room temperature joining process. 5 figures.

  6. Wellbore inertial directional surveying system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Andreas, Ronald D.; Heck, G. Michael; Kohler, Stewart M.; Watts, Alfred C.

    1991-01-01

    A wellbore inertial directional surveying system for providing a complete directional survey of an oil or gas well borehole to determine the displacement in all three directions of the borehole path relative to the well head at the surface. The information generated by the present invention is especially useful when numerous wells are drilled to different geographical targets from a single off-shore platform. Accurate knowledge of the path of the borehole allows proper well spacing and provides assurance that target formations are reached. The tool is lowered down into a borehole on the electrical cable. A computer positioned on the surface communicates with the tool via the cable. The tool contains a sensor block which is supported on a single gimbal, the rotation axis of which is aligned with the cylinder axis of the tool and, correspondingly, the borehole. The gyroscope measurement of the sensor block rotation is used in a null-seeking servo loop which essentially prevents rotation of the sensor block aboutthe gimbal axis. Angular rates of the sensor block about axes which are perpendicular to the gimbal axis are measured by gyroscopes in a manner similar to a strapped-down arrangement. Three accelerometers provide acceleration information as the tool is lowered within the borehole. The uphole computer derives position information based upon acceleration information and anular rate information. Kalman estimation techniques are used to compensate for system errors.

  7. Wellbore inertial directional surveying system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Andreas, R.D.; Heck, G.M.; Kohler, S.M.; Watts, A.C.

    1982-09-08

    A wellbore inertial directional surveying system for providing a complete directional survey of an oil or gas well borehole to determine the displacement in all three directions of the borehole path relative to the well head at the surface. The information generated by the present invention is especially useful when numerous wells are drilled to different geographical targets from a single offshore platform. Accurate knowledge of the path of the borehole allows proper well spacing and provides assurance that target formations are reached. The tool is lowered down into a borehole on an electrical cable. A computer positioned on the surface communicates with the tool via the cable. The tool contains a sensor block which is supported on a single gimbal, the rotation axis of which is aligned with the cylinder axis of the tool and, correspondingly, the borehole. The gyroscope measurement of the sensor block rotation is used in a null-seeking servo loop which essentially prevents rotation of the sensor block about the gimbal axis. Angular rates of the sensor block about axes which are perpendicular to te gimbal axis are measured by gyroscopes in a manner similar to a strapped-down arrangement. Three accelerometers provide acceleration information as the tool is lowered within the borehole. The uphole computer derives position information based upon acceleration information and angular rate information. Kalman estimation techniques are used to compensate for system errors. 25 figures.

  8. Effect of time and temperature on transformation-toughened zirconias. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schioler, L.J.

    1987-06-01

    The effects of exposure to elevated temperatures (900 to 1300 C) for times ranging from 50 to 500 hours on toughened oxide ceramics intended for use in heat engines were examined. The materials were magnesia-stabilized transformation-toughened zirconia, yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal, and zirconia-toughened alumina, as well as untoughened zirconias for comparison. The materials were heat treated, and physical and mechanical properties were then measured at room temperature. High-temperature mechanical tests performed were stress rupture and stepped temperature stress rupture. The results of the tests indicate that the mechanical properties of magnesia-stabilized transformation-toughened zirconia degrade substantially after relatively short times at the moderate temperatures expected in low-heat-rejection diesel engines. The yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal and the untoughened partially stabilized zirconia materials appear to be more stable against the effects of time and temperature.

  9. Stress analysis of closure bolts for shipping casks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mok, G.C.; Fischer, L.E. ); Hsu, S.T. )

    1993-01-01

    This report specifies the requirements and criteria for stress analysis of closure bolts for shipping casks containing nuclear spent fuels or high level radioactive materials. The specification is based on existing information conceming the structural behavior, analysis, and design of bolted joints. The approach taken was to extend the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code requirements and criteria for bolting analysis of nuclear piping and pressure vessels to include the appropriate design and load characteristics of the shipping cask. The characteristics considered are large, flat, closure lids with metal-to-metal contact within the bolted joint; significant temperature and impact loads; and possible prying and bending effects. Specific formulas and procedures developed apply to the bolt stress analysis of a circular, flat, bolted closure. The report also includes critical load cases and desirable design practices for the bolted closure, an in-depth review of the structural behavior of bolted joints, and a comprehensive bibliography of current information on bolted joints.

  10. 1992--1993 low-temperature geothermal assessment program, Colorada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cappa, J.A.; Hemborg, H.T.

    1995-01-01

    Previous assessments of Colorado`s low-temperature geothermal resources were completed by the Colorado Geological Survey in 1920 and in the mid- to late-1970s. The purpose of the 1992--1993 low-temperature geothermal resource assessment is to update the earlier physical, geochemical, and utilization data and compile computerized databases of the location, chemistry, and general information of the low-temperature geothermal resources in Colorado. The main sources of the data included published data from the Colorado Geological Survey, the US Geological Survey WATSTOR database, and the files of the State Division of Water Resources. The staff of the Colorado Geological Survey in 1992 and 1993 visited most of the known geothermal sources that were recorded as having temperatures greater than 30{degrees}C. Physical measurements of the conductivity, pH, temperature, flow rate, and notes on the current geothermal source utilization were taken. Ten new geochemical analyses were completed on selected geothermal sites. The results of the compilation and field investigations are compiled into the four enclosed Quattro Pro 4 databases. For the purposes of this report a geothermal area is defined as a broad area, usually less than 3 sq mi in size, that may have several wells or springs. A geothermal site is an individual well or spring within a geothermal area. The 1992-1993 assessment reports that there are 93 geothermal areas in the Colorado, up from the 56 reported in 1978; there are 157 geothermal sites up from the 125 reported in 1978; and a total of 382 geochemical analyses are compiled, up from the 236 reported in 1978. Six geothermal areas are recommended for further investigation: Trimble Hot Springs, Orvis Hot Springs, an area southeast of Pagosa Springs, the eastern San Luis Valley, Rico and Dunton area, and Cottonwood Hot Springs.

  11. Temperature differential detection device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Girling, Peter M.

    1986-01-01

    A temperature differential detection device for detecting the temperature differential between predetermined portions of a container wall is disclosed as comprising a Wheatstone bridge circuit for detecting resistance imbalance with a first circuit branch having a first elongated wire element mounted in thermal contact with a predetermined portion of the container wall, a second circuit branch having a second elongated wire element mounted in thermal contact with a second predetermined portion of a container wall with the wire elements having a predetermined temperature-resistant coefficient, an indicator interconnected between the first and second branches remote from the container wall for detecting and indicating resistance imbalance between the first and second wire elements, and connector leads for electrically connecting the wire elements to the remote indicator in order to maintain the respective resistance value relationship between the first and second wire elements. The indicator is calibrated to indicate the detected resistance imbalance in terms of a temperature differential between the first and second wall portions.

  12. Temperature differential detection device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Girling, P.M.

    1986-04-22

    A temperature differential detection device for detecting the temperature differential between predetermined portions of a container wall is disclosed as comprising a Wheatstone bridge circuit for detecting resistance imbalance with a first circuit branch having a first elongated wire element mounted in thermal contact with a predetermined portion of the container wall, a second circuit branch having a second elongated wire element mounted in thermal contact with a second predetermined portion of a container wall with the wire elements having a predetermined temperature-resistant coefficient, an indicator interconnected between the first and second branches remote from the container wall for detecting and indicating resistance imbalance between the first and second wire elements, and connector leads for electrically connecting the wire elements to the remote indicator in order to maintain the respective resistance value relationship between the first and second wire elements. The indicator is calibrated to indicate the detected resistance imbalance in terms of a temperature differential between the first and second wall portions. 2 figs.

  13. Creep Effects on Design below the Temperature Limits of ASME Section III Subsection NB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sham, Sam; Jetter, Robert I; Eno, D.R.

    2010-01-01

    Some recent studies of material response have identified an issue that crosses over and blurs the boundary between ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Section III Subsection NB and Subsection NH. For very long design lives, the effects of creep show up at lower and lower temperature as the design life increases. Although true for the temperature at which the allowable stress is governed by creep properties, the effect is more apparent, e.g. creep effects show up sooner, at local structural discontinuities and peak thermal stress locations. This is because creep is a function of time, temperature and stress and the higher the localized stress, the lower in temperature creep begins to cause damage. If the threshold is below the Subsection NB to NH temperature boundary, 700 F for ferritic steels and 800 F for austenitic materials, then this potential failure mode will not be considered. Unfortunately, there is no experience base with very long lives at temperatures close to but under the Subsection NB to NH boundary to draw upon. This issue is of particular interest in the application of Subsection NB rules of construction to some High Temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) concepts. The purpose of this paper is, thus, twofold; one part is about statistical treatment and extrapolation of sparse data for a specific material of interest, A533B; the other part is about how these results could impact current design procedures in Subsection NB.

  14. Design method addresses subsea pipeline thermal stresses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suman, J.C.; Karpathy, S.A. )

    1993-08-30

    Managing thermal stresses in subsea pipelines carrying heated petroleum requires extensive thermal-stress analysis to predict trouble spots and to ensure a design flexible enough to anticipate stresses and expansions. Explored here are various methods for resolving predicaments posed by thermal loads and resulting deformations by keeping the stresses and deformations in the pipeline system within allowable limits. The problems posed by thermal stresses are not unique; the solutions proposed here are. These methods are based on recent work performed for a major Asian subsea pipeline project currently under construction.

  15. Heat treatment of NiCrFe alloy to optimize resistance to intergrannular stress corrosion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steeves, Arthur F.; Bibb, Albert E.

    1984-01-01

    A process of producing a NiCrFe alloy having a high resistance to stress corrosion cracking comprising heating a NiCrFe alloy to a temperature sufficient to enable the carbon present in the alloy body in the form of carbide deposits to enter into solution, rapidly cool the alloy body, and heat the cooled body to a temperature between 1100.degree. to 1500.degree. F. for about 1 to 30 hours.

  16. Heat treatment of NiCrFe alloy 600 to optimize resistance to intergranular stress corrosion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steeves, A.F.; Bibb, A.E.

    A process of producing a NiCrFe alloy having a high resistance to stress corrosion cracking comprises heating a NiCrFe alloy to a temperature sufficient to enable the carbon present in the alloy body in the form of carbide deposits to enter into solution, rapidly cooling the alloy body, and heating the cooled body to a temperature between 1100 to 1500/sup 0/F for about 1 to 30 hours.

  17. ARM - Measurement - Sea surface temperature

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sea surface temperature The temperature of sea water near the surface. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the...

  18. High Temperature Membrane Working Group

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The High Temperature Membrane Working Group consists of government, industry, and university researchers interested in developing high temperature membranes for fuel cells.

  19. ARM - Measurement - Surface skin temperature

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    surface skin temperature, from an IR thermometer measuring the narrowband radiating temperature of the ground surface in its field of view. Categories Radiometric, Surface...

  20. Influence of stress intensity and loading mode on intergranular stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 in primary waters of pressurized water reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rebak, R.B.; Szklarska-Smialowska, Z. . Fontana Corrosion Center)

    1994-05-01

    The steam generator in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) of a nuclear power plant consists mainly of a shell made of carbon (C) steel and tubes made of alloy 600 (UNS N06600). However, alloy 600 suffers environmentally induced cracking with exposure to high-temperature primary water. The susceptibility of alloy 600 to integranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) was investigated as a function of the level of applied stresses and mode of loading. Constant load tests were conducted with specimens prepared from thin wall tubes, and constant deformation tests were conducted using specimens prepared from plates. With tubes exposed to primary water at 330 C, the crack propagation rate (CPR) was found to increase from 1 [times] 10[sup [minus]11] m/s at a stress intensity (K[sub i]) of 10 MPa[radical]m to 1 [times] 10[sup [minus]9] at K[sub i] = 60 MPa[radical]m. CPR obtained using compact specimens prepared from plates were 1 order of magnitude lower than values measured in tubes at the same temperature and in the same solution at each stress intensity. The corollary was that values of crack propagation and threshold stress intensities obtained using compact specimens could not be extrapolated to the behavior of thin wall tubes.

  1. High Temperature Materials Interim Data Qualification Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nancy Lybeck

    2010-08-01

    ABSTRACT Projects for the very high temperature reactor (VHTR) Technology Development Office provide data in support of Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing of the VHTR. Fuel and materials to be used in the reactor are tested and characterized to quantify performance in high temperature and high fluence environments. The VHTR program has established the NGNP Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS) to ensure that VHTR data are qualified for use, stored in a readily accessible electronic form, and analyzed to extract useful results. This document focuses on the first NDMAS objective. It describes the High Temperature Materials characterization data stream, the processing of these data within NDMAS, and reports the interim FY2010 qualification status of the data. Data qualification activities within NDMAS for specific types of data are determined by the data qualification category assigned by the data generator. The High Temperature Materials data are being collected under NQA-1 guidelines, and will be qualified data. For NQA-1 qualified data, the qualification activities include: (1) capture testing, to confirm that the data stored within NDMAS are identical to the raw data supplied, (2) accuracy testing to confirm that the data are an accurate representation of the system or object being measured, and (3) documenting that the data were collected under an NQA-1 or equivalent Quality Assurance program. Currently, data from two test series within the High Temperature Materials data stream have been entered into the NDMAS vault: 1. Tensile Tests for Sm (i.e., Allowable Stress) Confirmatory Testing 1,403,994 records have been inserted into the NDMAS database. Capture testing is in process. 2. Creep-Fatigue Testing to Support Determination of Creep-Fatigue Interaction Diagram 918,854 records have been processed and inserted into the NDMAS database. Capture testing is in process.

  2. Method for deriving information regarding stress from a stressed ferromagnetic material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jiles, D.C.

    1991-04-30

    A nondestructive evaluation technique is disclosed for deriving stress in ferromagnetic materials including deriving anhysteretic and hysteresis magnetization curves for the material in both unstressed and stressed states. The anhysteretic curve is expressed as a Langevin function. The stress is expressed as an equivalent magnetic field dependent on stress and change of magnetostriction with magnetization. By measurement of these bulk magnetic properties, stress can be derived.

  3. Method for deriving information regarding stress from a stressed ferromagnetic material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jiles, David C.

    1991-04-30

    A non-destructive evaluation technique for deriving stress in ferromagnetic materials including deriving anhysteretic and hysteresis magnetization curves for the material in both unstressed and stressed states. The anhysteretic curve is expressed as a Langevin function. The stress is expressed as an equivalent magnetic field dependent on stress and change of magnetostriction with magnetization. By measurement of these bulk magnetic properties, stress can be derived.

  4. Zero Temperature Hope Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rozsnyai, B F

    2002-07-26

    The primary purpose of the HOPE code is to calculate opacities over a wide temperature and density range. It can also produce equation of state (EOS) data. Since the experimental data at the high temperature region are scarce, comparisons of predictions with the ample zero temperature data provide a valuable physics check of the code. In this report we show a selected few examples across the periodic table. Below we give a brief general information about the physics of the HOPE code. The HOPE code is an ''average atom'' (AA) Dirac-Slater self-consistent code. The AA label in the case of finite temperature means that the one-electron levels are populated according to the Fermi statistics, at zero temperature it means that the ''aufbau'' principle works, i.e. no a priory electronic configuration is set, although it can be done. As such, it is a one-particle model (any Hartree-Fock model is a one particle model). The code is an ''ion-sphere'' model, meaning that the atom under investigation is neutral within the ion-sphere radius. Furthermore, the boundary conditions for the bound states are also set at the ion-sphere radius, which distinguishes the code from the INFERNO, OPAL and STA codes. Once the self-consistent AA state is obtained, the code proceeds to generate many-electron configurations and proceeds to calculate photoabsorption in the ''detailed configuration accounting'' (DCA) scheme. However, this last feature is meaningless at zero temperature. There is one important feature in the HOPE code which should be noted; any self-consistent model is self-consistent in the space of the occupied orbitals. The unoccupied orbitals, where electrons are lifted via photoexcitation, are unphysical. The rigorous way to deal with that problem is to carry out complete self-consistent calculations both in the initial and final states connecting photoexcitations, an enormous computational task. The Amaldi correction is an attempt to address this problem by distorting the outer part of the self-consistent potential in such a way that in the final state after photoexcitation or photoionization the newly occupied orbital sees the hole left in the initial state. This is very important to account for the large number of Rydberg states in the case of low densities. In the next Section we show calculated photoabsorptions compared with experimental data in figures with some rudimentary explanations.

  5. Localized temperature stability of low temperature cofired ceramics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dai, Steven Xunhu

    2013-11-26

    The present invention is directed to low temperature cofired ceramic modules having localized temperature stability by incorporating temperature coefficient of resonant frequency compensating materials locally into a multilayer LTCC module. Chemical interactions can be minimized and physical compatibility between the compensating materials and the host LTCC dielectrics can be achieved. The invention enables embedded resonators with nearly temperature-independent resonance frequency.

  6. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis & Projections...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    EIA has conducted the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) since 1978 to provide data on home energy characteristics, end uses of energy, and expenses for the four Census ...

  7. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis & Projections...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    As a part of the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), trained interviewers measure the square footage of each housing unit. RECS square footage data allow comparison of ...

  8. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - Analysis...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Release Date: July 12, 2012 | Revised Date: June 19, 2014 The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) project cycle spans at least four years, beginning with ...

  9. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - Analysis...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Pick a date range: From: To: Go Commercial Buildings Available formats 2012 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Energy Usage Summary Released: March 18, 2016 EIA has ...

  10. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - How...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Energy Usage Information Collected in the 2012 CBECS? CBECS 2012 - Release date: March 18, 2016 The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) project cycle spans at ...

  11. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis & Projections...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    RECS 2009 - Release date: March 28, 2011 First results from EIA's 2009 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) The 2009 RECS collected home energy characteristics data from ...

  12. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - Analysis...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Data collection for the 2012 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) took place between April and November 2013, collecting data for reference year 2012. The goal of ...

  13. Wyoming State Geological Survey | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search Name: Wyoming State Geological Survey Abbreviation: WSGS Address: P.O. Box 1347 Place: Laramie, Wyoming Zip: 82073 Year Founded: 1933 Phone Number:...

  14. 2007/2008 User Survey Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    all six DOE Science Offices and a variety of home institutions: see Respondent Demographics. The survey responses provide feedback about every aspect of NERSC's operation,...

  15. 2009/2010 User Survey Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Next 20092010 User Survey Results Table of Contents Response Summary Respondent Demographics Overall Satisfaction All Satisfaction and Importance Ratings HPC Resources NERSC...

  16. 2010/2011 User Survey Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Next 20102011 User Survey Results Table of Contents Response Summary Respondent Demographics Score Legend Satisfaction and Importance Scores HPC Resources Software Services...

  17. LANSCE | User Resources | User Satisfaction Survey

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    User Satisfaction Survey We hope that your research at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center was productive and successful. Your feedback is important to the Department of Energy...

  18. radiological survey | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    San Francisco Bay Area Aerial Radiation Assessment Survey (SAN JOSE and SAN FRANCISCO, California) - A helicopter may be seen flying at low altitudes over portions of the San ...

  19. Ground Gravity Survey | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Et Al., 2000) Dixie Valley Geothermal Area 1999 2000 Precise Gravimetry and Geothermal Reservoir Management Ground Gravity Survey At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Blackwell, Et...

  20. Aeromagnetic Survey And Interpretation, Ascention Island, South...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    And Interpretation, Ascention Island, South Atlantic Ocean Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Aeromagnetic Survey And...

  1. FAQs for Survey Form EIA-7A

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... See the EIA Glossary for other coal definitions. How does EIA classify coal rank? Rank ... Form(Includes Instructions). Calculator Conversion calculator Who can I contact? Survey ...

  2. FAQs for Survey Form EIA-8A

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... See the EIA Glossary for other coal definitions. How does EIA classify coal rank? Rank ... Form (Includes Instructions) Calculator Conversion calculator Who can I contact? Survey ...

  3. FAQs for Survey Form EIA-3

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... See the EIA Glossary for coal definitions. How does EIA classify coal rank? Rank types ... Forms (Includes Instructions) Calculator Conversion calculator Who can I contact? Survey ...

  4. Geothermal resistivity resource evaluation survey Waunita Hot...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    resistivity resource evaluation survey Waunita Hot Springs project, Gunnison County, Colorado Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geothermal...

  5. Pre-Award Accounting System Survey

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PRE-AWARD ACCOUNTING SYSTEM SURVEY Applicant: Funding Opportunity AnnouncementSolicitation No.: This accounting system review is designed to determine the adequacy and suitability...

  6. FAQs for Survey Form EIA-14

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    These prices are published in the following tables of the Petroleum Marketing Monthly ... If you are interested in receiving this free software, contact the Survey Respondent ...

  7. FAQs for Survey Form EIA-182

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    price(s) are published in the Petroleum Marketing Monthly, the Monthly Energy Review, the ... If you are interested in receiving this free software, contact the Survey Respondent ...

  8. Aeromagnetic Survey (Nannini, 1986) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    These surveys are based on the magnetic susceptibility contrast between magmatic rocks at depth and the sedimentary formations above. References Raffaello Nannini (1986)...

  9. Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey - Index Page

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Buildings 1993 Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey Overview Full Report Tables Energy usage and energy costs, by building characteristics, for federally-owned buildings in...

  10. Engine Cylinder Temperature Control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kilkenny, Jonathan Patrick; Duffy, Kevin Patrick

    2005-09-27

    A method and apparatus for controlling a temperature in a combustion cylinder in an internal combustion engine. The cylinder is fluidly connected to an intake manifold and an exhaust manifold. The method and apparatus includes increasing a back pressure associated with the exhaust manifold to a level sufficient to maintain a desired quantity of residual exhaust gas in the cylinder, and varying operation of an intake valve located between the intake manifold and the cylinder to an open duration sufficient to maintain a desired quantity of fresh air from the intake manifold to the cylinder, wherein controlling the quantities of residual exhaust gas and fresh air are performed to maintain the temperature in the cylinder at a desired level.

  11. Sealed glass coating of high temperature ceramic superconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wu, W.; Chu, C.Y.; Goretta, K.C.; Routbort, J.L.

    1995-05-02

    A method and article of manufacture of a lead oxide based glass coating on a high temperature superconductor is disclosed. The method includes preparing a dispersion of glass powders in a solution, applying the dispersion to the superconductor, drying the dispersion before applying another coating and heating the glass powder dispersion at temperatures below oxygen diffusion onset and above the glass melting point to form a continuous glass coating on the superconductor to establish compressive stresses which enhance the fracture strength of the superconductor. 8 figs.

  12. HIGH TEMPERATURE THERMOCOUPLE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eshayu, A.M.

    1963-02-12

    This invention contemplates a high temperature thermocouple for use in an inert or a reducing atmosphere. The thermocouple limbs are made of rhenium and graphite and these limbs are connected at their hot ends in compressed removable contact. The rhenium and graphite are of high purity and are substantially stable and free from diffusion into each other even without shielding. Also, the graphite may be thick enough to support the thermocouple in a gas stream. (AEC)

  13. High-Temperature Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Temperature Materials - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced

  14. INNOVATIVE INSTRUMENTATION AND ANALYSIS OF THE TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT FOR HIGH TEMPERATURE GASIFICATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seong W. Lee

    2003-09-01

    During this reporting period, the literature survey including the gasifier temperature measurement literature, the ultrasonic application and its background study in cleaning application, and spray coating process are completed. The gasifier simulator (cold model) testing has been successfully conducted. Four factors (blower voltage, ultrasonic application, injection time intervals, particle weight) were considered as significant factors that affect the temperature measurement. The Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) was applied to analyze the test data. The analysis shows that all four factors are significant to the temperature measurements in the gasifier simulator (cold model). The regression analysis for the case with the normalized room temperature shows that linear model fits the temperature data with 82% accuracy (18% error). The regression analysis for the case without the normalized room temperature shows 72.5% accuracy (27.5% error). The nonlinear regression analysis indicates a better fit than that of the linear regression. The nonlinear regression model's accuracy is 88.7% (11.3% error) for normalized room temperature case, which is better than the linear regression analysis. The hot model thermocouple sleeve design and fabrication are completed. The gasifier simulator (hot model) design and the fabrication are completed. The system tests of the gasifier simulator (hot model) have been conducted and some modifications have been made. Based on the system tests and results analysis, the gasifier simulator (hot model) has met the proposed design requirement and the ready for system test. The ultrasonic cleaning method is under evaluation and will be further studied for the gasifier simulator (hot model) application. The progress of this project has been on schedule.

  15. A Review & Assessment of Current Operating Conditions Allowable Stresses in ASME Section III Subsection NH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. W. Swindeman

    2009-12-14

    The current operating condition allowable stresses provided in ASME Section III, Subsection NH were reviewed for consistency with the criteria used to establish the stress allowables and with the allowable stresses provided in ASME Section II, Part D. It was found that the S{sub o} values in ASME III-NH were consistent with the S values in ASME IID for the five materials of interest. However, it was found that 0.80 S{sub r} was less than S{sub o} for some temperatures for four of the materials. Only values for alloy 800H appeared to be consistent with the criteria on which S{sub o} values are established. With the intent of undertaking a more detailed evaluation of issues related to the allowable stresses in ASME III-NH, the availabilities of databases for the five materials were reviewed and augmented databases were assembled.

  16. Corrosion test qualification for in situ stress relief of recirculating steam generators' U-bends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monter, J.V.; Miglin, B.P.; Lauer, J.A.

    1989-02-01

    Highly stressed alloy 600 is susceptible to intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in high-purity water at nuclear steam generator (NSG) operating temperatures. Two regions in recirculating steam generators (RSG) are particularly prone to primary-side-initiated SCC: tube expansion transitions of the tube in the tubesheet and tight radii tube bends. One remedial measure to improve IGSCC in these regions is to heat the tubes and thus relieve the residual stresses that contribute significantly to the cracking problem. This article describes a corrosion test program using the accelerated SCC environments of sodium tetrathionate and sodium hydroxide to qualify an in situ stress-relief process for the most SCC-susceptible U-bends in an RSG.

  17. Report 20.3: Stress Testing of LED PAR38 Lamps

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A small sample of each of the Application Summary Report 20 PAR38 lamp types underwent stress testing that included substantial temperature and humidity changes, electrical variation, and vibration. The results do not directly address expected lifetime, but can be compared with one another, as well as with benchmark conventional products, to assess the relative robustness of the product designs. (24 pages, December 2014)

  18. High Temperature Membrane Working Group

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation provides an overview of the High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting in May 2007.

  19. Cold stress on Russian territory during last global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinogradov, V.V.

    1996-12-31

    A great part of Russian territory is characterized by climate discomfort of life. In winter cold stress covers nearly all territory. The purpose of this work is to learn how the climatic discomfort of life is affected by climate change. The effect of global warming for the period 1981--1990 on geographical distribution of bioclimatic indexes by seasons (compared with average figures) is analyzed. Indexes of enthalpy, dry cooling, wind chill, wet cooling, effective temperature, physiological deficit index for monthly average figures were calculated and the data bank for the period 1981--1990 was made up. The indexes of enthalpy, wet cooling, and dry cooling according to Bodman were chosen as the most informative and independent. Maps of the climatic indexes taking into account temperature, humidity and wind speed were made up on the basis of the calculated figures.

  20. Plant stress analysis technology deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebadian, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    Monitoring vegetation is an active area of laser-induced fluorescence imaging (LIFI) research. The Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) at Florida International University (FIU) is assisting in the transfer of the LIFI technology to the agricultural private sector through a market survey. The market survey will help identify the key eco-agricultural issues of the nations that could benefit from the use of sensor technologies developed by the Office of Science and Technology (OST). The principal region of interest is the Western Hemisphere, particularly, the rapidly growing countries of Latin America and the Caribbean. The analysis of needs will assure that the focus of present and future research will center on economically important issues facing both hemispheres. The application of the technology will be useful to the agriculture industry for airborne crop analysis as well as in the detection and characterization of contaminated sites by monitoring vegetation. LIFI airborne and close-proximity systems will be evaluated as stand-alone technologies and additions to existing sensor technologies that have been used to monitor crops in the field and in storage.

  1. 2006 XSD Scientific Software User Survey.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jemian, P. R.

    2007-01-22

    In preparation for the 2006 XSD Scientific Software workshop, our committee sent a survey on June 16 to 100 users in the APS user community. This report contains the survey and the responses we received. The responses are presented in the order received.

  2. Alkaline intergranular corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagano, N.

    1996-12-31

    Intergranular corrosion (IGC), often termed IGA, and intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) have continued to occur on mill-annealed (MA) Alloy 600 tubing in the secondary side of steam generators, which are still serious corrosion instances in operating pressurized water reactors. The IGC and IGSCC phenomena have occurred on MA Alloy 600 at the crevice between the tube and tube support plate, in which a high concentration of caustic solution is formed under dry and wet conditions at high temperature. A review of technical articles has been performed concerning environmental and metallurgical factors affecting the IGC and IGSCC, and their mechanistic aspects. A combination of IGC and IGSCC, one of the most common modes of corrosion on the secondary side of steam generators, occurs in a specific potential region, at the active-passive transition potential, in a concentrated caustic solution at elevated temperature. The anodic dissolution of Alloy 600 increases as the temperature of caustic solutions is increased. The corrosion rate for each constituent of Alloy 600 such as nickel, chromium, iron or chromium carbide is influenced differently by temperature, resulting in various effects on the characteristics of corrosion protective surface films. Increase in chromium content and thermal treatment at 700 C are beneficial for IGC and IGSCC resistance. IGC is intergranular corrosion, and IGSCC is initiated above a critical applied stress. Grain boundary chromium carbides such as Cr{sub 7}C{sub 3} and Cr{sub 23}C{sub 6} have been formed to increase resistance to IGC and IGSCC. Several theories have been proposed concerning the roles of chromium carbides at grain boundaries. Some specific theories are focused on in this paper with supporting data.

  3. High temperature detonator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, James O. (Los Alamos, NM); Dinegar, Robert H. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1988-01-01

    A detonator assembly is provided which is usable at high temperatures about 300.degree. C. A detonator body is provided with an internal volume defining an anvil surface. A first acceptor explosive is disposed on the anvil surface. A donor assembly having an ignition element, an explosive material, and a flying plate, are placed in the body effective to accelerate the flying plate to impact the first acceptor explosive on the anvil for detonating the first acceptor explosive. A second acceptor explosive is eccentrically located in detonation relationship with the first acceptor explosive to thereafter effect detonation of a main charge.

  4. Drexel University Temperature Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. L. Davis; D. L. Knudson; J. L. Rempe; B. M. Chase

    2014-09-01

    This document summarizes background information and presents results related to temperature measurements in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) Drexel University Project 31091 irradiation. The objective of this test was to assess the radiation performance of new ceramic materials for advanced reactor applications. Accordingly, irradiations of transition metal carbides and nitrides were performed using the Hydraulic Shuttle Irradiation System (HSIS) in the B-7 position and in static capsules inserted into the A-3 and East Flux Trap Position 5 locations of the ATR.

  5. Thermionic converter temperature controller

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shaner, Benjamin J. (McMurray, PA); Wolf, Joseph H. (Pittsburgh, PA); Johnson, Robert G. R. (Trafford, PA)

    2001-04-24

    A method and apparatus for controlling the temperature of a thermionic reactor over a wide range of operating power, including a thermionic reactor having a plurality of integral cesium reservoirs, a honeycomb material disposed about the reactor which has a plurality of separated cavities, a solid sheath disposed about the honeycomb material and having an opening therein communicating with the honeycomb material and cavities thereof, and a shell disposed about the sheath for creating a coolant annulus therewith so that the coolant in the annulus may fill the cavities and permit nucleate boiling during the operation of the reactor.

  6. Residual stress and damage-induced critical fracture on CO2 laser treated fused silica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, M; Stolken, J; Vignes, R; Norton, M

    2009-11-02

    Localized damage repair and polishing of silica-based optics using mid- and far-IR CO{sub 2} lasers has been shown to be an effective method for increasing optical damage threshold in the UV. However, it is known that CO{sub 2} laser heating of silicate surfaces can lead to a level of residual stress capable of causing critical fracture either during or after laser treatment. Sufficient control of the surface temperature as a function of time and position is therefore required to limit this residual stress to an acceptable level to avoid critical fracture. In this work they present the results of 351 nm, 3 ns Gaussian damage growth experiments within regions of varying residual stress caused by prior CO{sub 2} laser exposures. Thermally stressed regions were non-destructively characterized using polarimetry and confocal Raman microscopy to measure the stress induced birefringence and fictive temperature respectively. For 1 {approx} 40s square pulse CO{sub 2} laser exposures created over 0.5-1.25 kW/cm{sup 2} with a 1-3 mm 1/e{sup 2} diameter beam (T{sub max} {approx} 1500-3000 K), the critical damage site size leading to fracture increases weakly with peak temperature, but shows a stronger dependence on cooling rate, as predicted by finite element hydrodynamics simulations. Confocal micro-Raman was used to probe structural changes to the glass over different thermal histories and indicated a maximum fictive temperature of 1900K for T{sub max} {ge} 2000 K. The effect of cooling rate on fictive temperature caused by CO{sub 2} laser heating are consistent with finite element calculations based on a Tool-Narayanaswamy relaxation model.

  7. A Benchmark Study on Casting Residual Stress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Eric M. [John Deere -- Moline Tech Center; Watkins, Thomas R [ORNL; Schmidlin, Joshua E [ORNL; Dutler, S. A. [MAGMA Foundry Technologies, Inc.

    2012-01-01

    Stringent regulatory requirements, such as Tier IV norms, have pushed the cast iron for automotive applications to its limit. The castings need to be designed with closer tolerances by incorporating hitherto unknowns, such as residual stresses arising due to thermal gradients, phase and microstructural changes during solidification phenomenon. Residual stresses were earlier neglected in the casting designs by incorporating large factors of safety. Experimental measurement of residual stress in a casting through neutron or X-ray diffraction, sectioning or hole drilling, magnetic, electric or photoelastic measurements is very difficult and time consuming exercise. A detailed multi-physics model, incorporating thermo-mechanical and phase transformation phenomenon, provides an attractive alternative to assess the residual stresses generated during casting. However, before relying on the simulation methodology, it is important to rigorously validate the prediction capability by comparing it to experimental measurements. In the present work, a benchmark study was undertaken for casting residual stress measurements through neutron diffraction, which was subsequently used to validate the accuracy of simulation prediction. The stress lattice specimen geometry was designed such that subsequent castings would generate adequate residual stresses during solidification and cooling, without any cracks. The residual stresses in the cast specimen were measured using neutron diffraction. Considering the difficulty in accessing the neutron diffraction facility, these measurements can be considered as benchmark for casting simulation validations. Simulations were performed using the identical specimen geometry and casting conditions for predictions of residual stresses. The simulation predictions were found to agree well with the experimentally measured residual stresses. The experimentally validated model can be subsequently used to predict residual stresses in different cast components. This enables incorporation of the residual stresses at the design phase along with external loads for accurate predictions of fatigue and fracture performance of the cast components.

  8. Stress in shaped glass evacuated collectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrison, J.D.; Fischer-Cripps, A.

    1997-02-01

    Shaped glass evacuated collectors have the lower vacuum envelope formed with a CPC shape. The internal surface is silvered. This surface concentrates solar radiation onto an internal absorbing tube. The upper part of the vacuum envelope is a window to pass the solar radiation in to the absorbing tube. A computer program using analytical equations is used to design these collectors while keeping the glass tensile stress arising from evacuation below acceptable limits. A finite element computer program is used to test the accuracy of the stress calculated analytically. The calculations agree within about 1 MPa. Wind and thermal stresses in the glass are lower than the stresses caused by evacuation.

  9. Over Core Stress | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Analysis- Rock Over Core Stress Paleomagnetic Measurements Petrography Analysis Rock Density X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) References Page Area Activity Start...

  10. Primary water stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600: Effects of processing parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seman, D.J.; Webb, G.L.; Parrington, R.J.

    1993-10-22

    Correlations of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) data in deaerated water with temperature, stress, metallography, and processing for laboratory test specimens are presented. Initiation time data show that a low temperature anneal and resulting absence of grain boundary carbides result in a material having increased susceptibility to SCC. Data also show that hot worked and annealed Alloy 600 is more resistant than cold worked and annealed material, both having carbide decorated grain boundaries. In absence of grain boundary carbides, both materials are equally susceptible. Low temperature thermal treatment (1100F) reduces SCC susceptibility with or without grain boundary decoration. Weld metal data and data correlations developed from 700 double U-bends are presented. Data demonstrate the effect of increased carbon content to improve SCC resistance. The data shows that the general relation of time, temperature and strain for wrought material is followed for the weld metal. The weld process used did not affect the SCC susceptibility of EN-82 which showed a greater resistance to SCC than EN-62. Stress relief of weld deposits showed an improvement for wrought material. Heat affected zone resistance was improved if the starting material received a high temperature anneal (1850 to 2000F). Range of SCC initiation times for weld metal is comparable to the range of initiation times for wrought material.

  11. Optical stress generator and detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maris, Humphrey J.; Stoner, Robert J

    1999-01-01

    Disclosed is a system for the characterization of thin films and interfaces between thin films through measurements of their mechanical and thermal properties. In the system light is absorbed in a thin film or in a structure made up of several thin films, and the change in optical transmission or reflection is measured and analyzed. The change in reflection or transmission is used to give information about the ultrasonic waves that are produced in the structure. The information that is obtained from the use of the measurement methods and apparatus of this invention can include: (a) a determination of the thickness of thin films with a speed and accuracy that is improved compared to earlier methods; (b) a determination of the thermal, elastic, and optical properties of thin films; (c) a determination of the stress in thin films; and (d) a characterization of the properties of interfaces, including the presence of roughness and defects.

  12. Optical stress generator and detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maris, Humphrey J.; Stoner, Robert J

    2001-01-01

    Disclosed is a system for the characterization of thin films and interfaces between thin films through measurements of their mechanical and thermal properties. In the system light is absorbed in a thin film or in a structure made up of several thin films, and the change in optical transmission or reflection is measured and analyzed. The change in reflection or transmission is used to give information about the ultrasonic waves that are produced in the structure. The information that is obtained from the use of the measurement methods and apparatus of this invention can include: (a) a determination of the thickness of thin films with a speed and accuracy that is improved compared to earlier methods; (b) a determination of the thermal, elastic, and optical properties of thin films; (c) a determination of the stress in thin films; and (d) a characterization of the properties of interfaces, including the presence of roughness and defects.

  13. Optical stress generator and detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maris, Humphrey J.; Stoner, Robert J.

    1998-01-01

    Disclosed is a system for the characterization of thin films and interfaces between thin films through measurements of their mechanical and thermal properties. In the system light is absorbed in a thin film or in a structure made up of several thin films, and the change in optical transmission or reflection is measured and analyzed. The change in reflection or transmission is used to give information about the ultrasonic waves that are produced in the structure. The information that is obtained from the use of the measurement methods and apparatus of this invention can include: (a) a determination of the thickness of thin films with a speed and accuracy that is improved compared to earlier methods; (b) a determination of the thermal, elastic, and optical properties of thin films; (c) a determination of the stress in thin films; and (d) a characterization of the properties of interfaces, including the presence of roughness and defects.

  14. Optical stress generator and detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maris, H.J.; Stoner, R.J.

    1998-05-05

    Disclosed is a system for the characterization of thin films and interfaces between thin films through measurements of their mechanical and thermal properties. In the system light is absorbed in a thin film or in a structure made up of several thin films, and the change in optical transmission or reflection is measured and analyzed. The change in reflection or transmission is used to give information about the ultrasonic waves that are produced in the structure. The information that is obtained from the use of the measurement methods and apparatus of this invention can include: (a) a determination of the thickness of thin films with a speed and accuracy that is improved compared to earlier methods; (b) a determination of the thermal, elastic, and optical properties of thin films; (c) a determination of the stress in thin films; and (d) a characterization of the properties of interfaces, including the presence of roughness and defects. 32 figs.

  15. Optical stress generator and detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maris, Humphrey J.; Stoner, Robert J

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed is a system for the characterization of thin films and interfaces between thin films through measurements of their mechanical and thermal properties. In the system light is absorbed in a thin film or in a structure made up of several thin films, and the change in optical transmission or reflection is measured and analyzed. The change in reflection or transmission is used to give information about the ultrasonic waves that are produced in the structure. The information that is obtained from the use of the measurement methods and apparatus of this invention can include: (a) a determination of the thickness of thin films with a speed and accuracy that is improved compared to earlier methods; (b) a determination of the thermal, elastic, and optical properties of thin films; (c) a determination of the stress in thin films; and (d) a characterization of the properties of interfaces, including the presence of roughness and defects.

  16. Thick, low-stress films, and coated substrates formed therefrom, and methods for making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Henager, Jr., Charles H.; Knoll, Robert W.

    1992-01-01

    Stress-induced deformation, and the damage resulting therefrom, increases with film thickness. The overcoming of excessive stress by the use of the Si-Al-N film material of the present invention, permits the formation of thick films that are necessary for certain of the above described applications. The most likely use for the subject film materials, other than their specialized views as an optical film, is for microelectronic packaging of components on silicon substrates. In general, the subject films have excellent adherence to the underlying substrate, a high degree of hardness and durability, and are excellent insulators. Prior art elevated temperature deposition processes cannot meet the microelectronic packaging temperature formation constraints. The process of the present invention is conducted under non-elevated temperature conditions, typically 500.degree. C. or less.

  17. Innovative Instrumentation and Analysis of the Temperature Measurement for High Temperature Gasification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seong W. Lee

    2006-09-30

    The project entitled, ''Innovative Instrumentation and Analysis of the Temperature Measurement for High Temperature Gasification'', was successfully completed by the Principal Investigator, Dr. S. Lee and his research team in the Center for Advanced Energy Systems and Environmental Control Technologies at Morgan State University. The major results and outcomes were presented in semi-annual progress reports and annual project review meetings/presentations. Specifically, the literature survey including the gasifier temperature measurement, the ultrasonic application in cleaning application, and spray coating process and the gasifier simulator (cold model) testing has been successfully conducted during the first year. The results show that four factors (blower voltage, ultrasonic application, injection time intervals, particle weight) were considered as significant factors that affect the temperature measurement. Then the gasifier simulator (hot model) design and the fabrication as well as the systematic tests on hot model were completed to test the significant factors on temperature measurement in the second year. The advanced Industrial analytic methods such as statistics-based experimental design, analysis of variance (ANOVA) and regression methods were applied in the hot model tests. The results show that operational parameters (i.e. air flow rate, water flow rate, fine dust particle amount, ammonia addition) presented significant impact on the temperature measurement inside the gasifier simulator. The experimental design and ANOVA are very efficient way to design and analyze the experiments. The results show that the air flow rate and fine dust particle amount are statistically significant to the temperature measurement. The regression model provided the functional relation between the temperature and these factors with substantial accuracy. In the last year of the project period, the ultrasonic and subsonic cleaning methods and coating materials were tested/applied on the thermocouple cleaning according to the proposed approach. Different frequency, application time and power of the ultrasonic/subsonic output were tested. The results show that the ultrasonic approach is one of the best methods to clean the thermocouple tips during the routine operation of the gasifier. In addition, the real time data acquisition system was also designed and applied in the experiments. This advanced instrumentation provided the efficient and accurate data acquisition for this project. In summary, the accomplishment of the project provided useful information of the ultrasonic cleaning method applied in thermocouple tip cleaning. The temperature measurement could be much improved both in accuracy and duration provided that the proposed approach is widely used in the gasification facilities.

  18. Low temperature methanol process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Hare, T.E.; Sapienza, R.S.; Mahajan, D.; Skaperdas, G.T.

    1986-06-01

    The world's abundant natural gas resources could provide methanol in fuel quantities to the utility system. Natural gas liquefaction is the current major option available for international export transport of natural gas. Gas production is on the increase and international trade even more so, with LNG making most progress. The further penetration of natural gas into distant markets can be substantially increased by a new methanol synthesis process under development. The new methanol process is made possible by the discovery of a catalyst that drops synthesis temperatures from about 275/sup 0/C to about 100/sup 0/C. Furthermore, the new catalyst is a liquid phase system, which permits the synthesis reaction to proceed at fully isothermal conditions. Therefore, the new low temperature liquid catalyst can convert synthesis gas completely to methanol in a single pass through the methanol synthesis reactor. This characteristic leads to a further major improvement in the methanol plant. Atmospheric nitrogen can be tolerated in the synthesis gas, and still the volume of gas fed to the reactor can be smaller than the volume of gas that must be fed to the reactor when accommodating the very low conversions furnished by the best of currently available catalysts. The energy disadvantage of the methanol option must be balanced against the advantage of a much lower capital investment requirement made possible by the new BNL synthesis. Preliminary estimates show that methanol conversion and shipping require an investment for liquefaction to methanol, and shipping liquefied methanol that can range from 35 to 50% of that needed for the LNG plant and LNG shipping fleet.

  19. Stress-corrosion cracking and surface-pitting tests of NiCrFe alloy bolts (LWBR development program)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, K.L.

    1983-02-01

    Accelerated corrosion tests confirmed the adequate resistance to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of the specific heats of NiCrFe X-750 and NiCrFe 600 used as bolts in the LWBR. SCC acceleration was achieved by running autoclave corrosion tests at 680/sup 0/F (well above the LWBR core operating temperatures of approximately 525/sup 0/F to 560/sup 0/F). Component stress levels were representative of maximum service stresses. No specimens from heats of either alloy suffered SCC.

  20. Please take the 2011 user survey

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    take the 2011 user survey Please take the 2011 user survey June 6, 2011 by Francesca Verdier You are encouraged to take the 2011 user survey. Your answers are important to us and to our program sponsors in DOE. Subscribe via RSS Subscribe Browse by Date May 2016 April 2016 January 2016 December 2015 November 2015 October 2015 September 2015 August 2015 July 2015 April 2015 March 2015 January 2015 December 2014 November 2014 October 2014 August 2014 June 2014 May 2014 April 2014 March 2014

  1. High-temperature-measuring device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Not Available

    1981-01-27

    A temperature measuring device for very high design temperatures (to 2000/sup 0/C) is described. The device comprises a homogenous base structure preferably in the form of a sphere or cylinder. The base structure contains a large number of individual walled cells. The base structure has a decreasing coefficient of elasticity within the temperature range being monitored. A predetermined quantity of inert gas is confined within each cell. The cells are dimensonally stable at the normal working temperature of the device. Increases in gaseous pressure within the cells will permanently deform the cell walls at temperatures within the high temperature range to be measured. Such deformation can be correlated to temperature by calibrating similarly constructed devices under known time and temperature conditions.

  2. Bimetallic strip for low temperature use

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bussiere, Jean F.; Welch, David O.; Suenaga, Masaki

    1981-01-01

    There is provided a class of mechanically pre-stressed structures, suitably bi-layer strips comprising a layer of group 5 transition metals in intimate contact with a layer of an intermetallic compound of said transition metals with certain group 3A, 4A or 5A metals or metalloids suitably gallium, indium, silicon, germanium, tin, arsenic or antimony. The changes of Young's modulus of these bi-layered combinations at temperatures in the region of but somewhat above absolute zero provides a useful means of sensing temperature changes. Such bi-metallic strips may be used as control strips in thermostats, in direct dial reading instruments, or the like. The structures are made by preparing a sandwich of a group 5B transition metal strip between the substantially thicker strips of an alloy between copper and a predetermined group 3A, 4A or 5A metal or metalloid, holding the three layers of the sandwich in intimate contact heating the same, cooling the same and removing the copper alloy and then removing one of the two thus formed interlayer alloys between said transition metal and the metal previously alloyed with copper.

  3. Gravity Survey of the Carson Sink - Data and Maps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31

    A detailed gravity survey was carried out for the entire Carson Sink in western Nevada (Figure 1) through a subcontract to Zonge Engineering, Inc. The Carson Sink is a large composite basin containing three known, blind high‐temperature geothermal systems (Fallon Airbase, Stillwater, and Soda Lake). This area was chosen for a detailed gravity survey in order to characterize the gravity signature of the known geothermal systems and to identify other potential blind systems based on the structural setting indicated by the gravity data. Data: Data were acquired at approximately 400, 800, and 1600 meter intervals for a total of 1,243 stations. The project location and station location points are presented in Figure 14. The station distribution for this survey was designed to complete regional gravity coverage in the Carson Sink area without duplication of available public and private gravity coverage. Gravity data were acquired using a Scintrex CG‐5 gravimeter and a LaCoste and Romberg (L&R) Model‐G gravimeter. The CG‐5 gravity meter has a reading resolution of 0.001 milligals and a typical repeatability of less than 0.005 milligals. The L&R gravity meter has a reading resolution of 0.01 milligals and a typical repeatability of 0.02 milligals. The basic processing of gravimeter readings to calculate through to the Complete Bouguer Anomaly was made using the Gravity and Terrain Correction software version 7.1 for Oasis Montaj by Geosoft LTD. Results: The gravity survey of the Carson Sink yielded the following products. Project location and station location map (Figure 14). Complete Bouguer Anomaly @ 2.67 gm/cc reduction density. Gravity Complete Bouguer Anomaly at 2.50 g/cc Contour Map (Figure 15). Gravity Horizontal Gradient Magnitude Shaded Color Contour Map. Gravity 1st Vertical Derivative Color Contour Map. Interpreted Depth to Mesozoic Basement (Figure 16), incorporating drill‐hole intercept values. Preliminary Interpretation of Results: The Carson Sink is a complex composite basin with several major depocenters (Figures 15 and 16). Major depocenters are present in the south‐central, east‐central, and northeastern parts of the basin. The distribution of gravity anomalies suggests a complex pattern of faulting in the subsurface of the basin, with many fault terminations, step‐overs, and accommodation zones. The pattern of faulting implies that other, previously undiscovered blind geothermal systems are likely in the Carson Sink. The gravity survey was completed near the end of this project. Thus, more thorough analysis of the data and potential locations of blind geothermal systems is planned for future work.

  4. Temperature-dependent phase-specific deformation mechanisms in a directionally solidified NiAl-Cr(Mo) lamellar composite

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yu, Dunji; An, Ke; Chen, Xu; Bei, Hongbin

    2015-10-09

    Phase-specific thermal expansion and mechanical deformation behaviors of a directionally solidified NiAl–Cr(Mo) lamellar in situ composite were investigated by using real-time in situ neutron diffraction during compression at elevated temperatures up to 800 °C. Tensile and compressive thermal residual stresses were found to exist in the NiAl phase and Crss (solid solution) phase, respectively. Then, based on the evolution of lattice spacings and phase stresses, the phase-specific deformation behavior was analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively. Moreover, estimates of phase stresses were derived by Hooke's law on the basis of a simple method for the determination of stress-free lattice spacing in inmore » situ composites. During compressive loading, the NiAl phase yields earlier than the Crss phase. The Crss phase carries much higher stress than the NiAl phase, and displays consistent strain hardening at all temperatures. The NiAl phase exhibits strain hardening at relatively low temperatures and softening at high temperatures. During unloading, the NiAl phase yields in tension whereas the Crss phase unloads elastically. Additionally, post-test microstructural observations show phase-through cracks at room temperature, micro cracks along phase interfaces at 600 °C and intact lamellae kinks at 800 °C, which is due to the increasing deformability of both phases as temperature rises.« less

  5. STRESS CORROSION CRACKING IN TEAR DROP SPECIMENS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lam, P; Philip Zapp, P; Jonathan Duffey, J; Kerry Dunn, K

    2009-05-01

    Laboratory tests were conducted to investigate the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of 304L stainless steel used to construct the containment vessels for the storage of plutonium-bearing materials. The tear drop corrosion specimens each with an autogenous weld in the center were placed in contact with moist plutonium oxide and chloride salt mixtures. Cracking was found in two of the specimens in the heat affected zone (HAZ) at the apex area. Finite element analysis was performed to simulate the specimen fabrication for determining the internal stress which caused SCC to occur. It was found that the tensile stress at the crack initiation site was about 30% lower than the highest stress which had been shifted to the shoulders of the specimen due to the specimen fabrication process. This finding appears to indicate that the SCC initiation took place in favor of the possibly weaker weld/base metal interface at a sufficiently high level of background stress. The base material, even subject to a higher tensile stress, was not cracked. The relieving of tensile stress due to SCC initiation and growth in the HAZ and the weld might have foreclosed the potential for cracking at the specimen shoulders where higher stress was found.

  6. Battery system with temperature sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, Steven J.; Trester, Dale B.

    2012-11-13

    A battery system to monitor temperature includes at least one cell with a temperature sensing device proximate the at least one cell. The battery system also includes a flexible member that holds the temperature sensor proximate to the at least one cell.

  7. PbTe/TAGS RTG Mars Environmental Survey (MESUR) mission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schock, A. )

    1993-01-10

    The paper describes the results of studies on an RTG option for powering the global network of unmanned landers for NASA's Mars Environmental Survey (MESUR) mission. RTGs are essentially unaffected by diurnal and seasonal variations, Martian sandstorms, and landing site latitudes, and their waste heat can stabilize the temperatures of the landers and their payload. The RTG designs described in this paper are based on PbTe/TAGS thermoelectric elements, in contast to the SiGe-based RTGs the author described in previous publications. The presently described RTGs differ not only in the choice of thermoelectric materials but also in the use of much lower operating temperatures, conductive rather than radiative heat transfer, an inert cover gas instead of vacuum in the RTG's converter, and fibrous instead of multifoil thermal insulation. As in a previous Teledyne design, the Fairchild designs described in this paper employ flight-proven General Purpose Source modules and Close-Pack Arrays of thermoelectric converter modules. Illustrative point designs of RTGs producing 41 and 51 watts(e) at 28 volts are presented. The presented performance parameters were derived by detailed thermal, thermoelectric, and electrical analyses (including radiator geometry optimization) described in the paper. The Fairchild study showed that, with appropriate modifications, the Teledyne design can be scaled up to higher power levels, and it identified solutions to ensure adequate fuel clad ductility at launch temperatures and adequate thermal conductance from the thermoelectric cold ends to the RTG housing.

  8. Effect of heat treatment temperature on nitinol wire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai, S.; Schaffer, J. E.; Daymond, M. R.; Yu, C.; Ren, Y.

    2014-08-18

    In-situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction has been used to study the influence of the heat treatment temperature on the subsequent micromechanical behavior of nitinol wire. It was found that increase in the heat treatment temperature rotated the austenite texture from the (332){sub B2} fiber towards the (111){sub B2} fiber, and the texture of the Stress-Induced Martensite phase changed from the (1{sup ¯}40){sub B19'} to the (1{sup ¯}20){sub B19'} fiber accordingly. Heat treatment at a low temperature reduces the internal residual strains in the austenite during super-elastic deformation and therefore improves the materials fatigue performance. The development of internal residual strains in austenite is controlled by transformation induced plasticity and the reversal martensite to austenite transformation.

  9. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis & Projections...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    How does EIA estimate energy consumption and end uses in U.S. homes? RECS 2009 - Release date: March 28, 2011 EIA administers the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) to a ...

  10. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - Data...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    What is an RSE? The estimates in the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are based on data reported by representatives of a statistically-designed subset of the ...

  11. Geothermal Energy Growth Continues, Industry Survey Reports

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A survey released by the Geothermal Energy Association (GEA) shows continued growth in the number of new geothermal power projects under development in the United States, a 20% increase since January of this year.

  12. 2008 B20 Survey Results (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alleman, T. L.; McCormick, R. L.

    2009-02-02

    Describes results of a sample survey of the quality of B20, a biodiesel blend, collected from U.S. public pumps and fleets as part of a joint effort by NREL, the NBB, and engine manufacturers.

  13. Mediation Survey Form | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PDF icon Mediation Survey Form More Documents & Publications Microsoft Word - GC Mediation Evaluation 2-06-09.doc Mediation Brochure FIA-12-0044 - In the Matter of Cynthia Brown...

  14. FAQs for Survey Form EIA-782C

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... software, contact the Survey Respondent Service Team at 202-586-9659. Where can I find published data from the EIA-782C? These data are published in the Petroleum Marketing ...

  15. FAQs for Survey Form EIA-821

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    of your email. Should I report biodiesel on the EIA-821 survey? Report B2, B5, or B20 biodiesel under the primary fuel type with which it was blended and the type of customer...

  16. LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY COMMUNITY LEADERS SURVEY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY COMMUNITY LEADERS SURVEY SEPTEMBER 2013 LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY-COMMUNITY LEADERS STUDY SEPTEMBER 2013 PAGE 2 RESEARCH & POLLING, INC. TABLE OF CONTENTS I. INTRODUCTION ....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 3 METHODOLOGY

  17. Commercial Grade Dedication Survey and Training

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This survey was conducted to obtain input from EM contractors on processes used to perform Commercial Grade Item (CGI) dedication.  The intended use of this information is to form the basis for...

  18. 2012 Hanford Climate Survey Report - ATL Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ATL Report Prepared by EurekaFacts LLC 1 Table of Contents Introduction.................................................................................................................................................... 2 Safety Culture and Climate Focus Areas and Factors .................................................................................. 3 Interpreting the Survey Results Presented in this Report ............................................................................. 4 Key

  19. 2012 Hanford Climate Survey Report - CHPRC Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CHPRC Report Prepared by EurekaFacts LLC 1 Table of Contents Introduction.................................................................................................................................................... 2 Safety Culture and Climate Focus Areas and Factors .................................................................................. 3 Interpreting the Survey Results Presented in this Report ............................................................................. 4 Key

  20. 2012 Hanford Climate Survey Report - MSA Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MSA Report Prepared by EurekaFacts LLC 1 Table of Contents Introduction.................................................................................................................................................... 2 Safety Culture and Climate Focus Areas and Factors .................................................................................. 3 Interpreting the Survey Results Presented in this Report ............................................................................. 4 Key

  1. 2012 Hanford Climate Survey Report - WCH Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WCH Report Prepared by EurekaFacts LLC 1 Table of Contents Introduction.................................................................................................................................................... 2 Safety Culture and Climate Focus Areas and Factors .................................................................................. 3 Interpreting the Survey Results Presented in this Report ............................................................................. 4 Key

  2. 2012 Hanford Climate Survey Report - WRPS Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WRPS Report Prepared by EurekaFacts LLC 1 Table of Contents Introduction.................................................................................................................................................... 2 Safety Culture and Climate Focus Areas and Factors .................................................................................. 3 Interpreting the Survey Results Presented in this Report ............................................................................. 4 Key

  3. NEPA effectiveness -- a survey of academics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canter, L.; Clark, R.

    1997-09-01

    The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) went into effect in the United States on January 1, 1970, just over 25 years ago. In light of this milestone, a survey of academics on the effectiveness of NEPA has been conducted regarding the preparation of environmental assessments (EAs) or environmental impact statements (EISs). This paper summarizes the results of a survey of 31 academics in 12 disciplines from 21 states. Several strengths of NEPA were identified, most importantly that NEPA encourages agencies and decision makers: (1) to acknowledge potential environmental consequences to the public, thus opening up the decision process; and (2) to think about environmental consequences before resources are committed. Surveyed participants also prioritized needs for improvement. While this survey was focused on the NEPA process in the United States, the identified issues have implications for the worldwide practice of environmental impact assessment. Finally, recommendations are described that are primarily associated with guidance, possible modifications in the NEPA process and follow-on training.

  4. Characteristic on the thermal stresses near apex in dissimilar materials (Relation between the intensity of stress field and the bonded wedge angle)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Inoue, T.; Koguchi, H.

    1995-11-01

    The characteristic of thermal stresses near the apex in dissimilar materials under a uniform temperature change is theoretically and numerically investigated. The materials are composed of two isotropic homogeneous wedges with arbitrary angles. The dominant factor of thermal stresses near the apex is represented by Kr{sup p{minus}1}, where p{minus}1 is the order of the stress singularity and K indicates the intensity of the stress field. For the bonded structures of Cu/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, the relationship between the wedge angle {var_phi}{sub 1} of material 1 and the total angle {var_phi}{sub 1} + {var_phi}{sub 2} of the bonded wedge, in which K becomes zero, is clarified theoretically. Also, it is shown that the distribution of the intensity K for each root p is divided into two forms. Finally, a relation between the distribution of the thermal stresses near apex and characteristic length of the bonded structure is examined by FEM.

  5. Survey Says: Workplace Charging is Growing in Popularity and Impact |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Survey Says: Workplace Charging is Growing in Popularity and Impact Survey Says: Workplace Charging is Growing in Popularity and Impact November 18, 2014 - 3:54pm Addthis Survey Says: Workplace Charging is Growing in Popularity and Impact Survey Says: Workplace Charging is Growing in Popularity and Impact Survey Says: Workplace Charging is Growing in Popularity and Impact Survey Says: Workplace Charging is Growing in Popularity and Impact Sarah Olexsak Workplace Charging

  6. 2009 - Federal Viewpoint Survey Reports | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    09 - Federal Viewpoint Survey Reports 2009 - Federal Viewpoint Survey Reports The 2009 Trend report provides summary results for the Department or Energy's portion of the Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey. The report also shows how the 2009 results compare to the results of previous years. PDF icon 2009 Annual Employee Survey Results PDF icon 2009 Annual Employee Survey Comparison Report PDF icon 2009 Annual Employee Survey Trend Report Responsible Contacts Thomasina Mathews PROGRAM MANAGER

  7. Department of Energy Earned Value Management Survey Results | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Department of Energy Earned Value Management Survey Results Department of Energy Earned Value Management Survey Results Humphreys & Associates, Inc. (H&A) conducted a survey of Department of Energy (DOE) Earned Value Management (EVM) and Project Management (PM) stakeholders. Two versions of the survey were distributed: DOE Federal Staff Survey (inclusive of DOE employees and contracted staff support) and the Capital Asset Project Contractors Survey (inclusive of DOE prime

  8. Directory and survey of particle physicists

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-04-01

    In order to develop a clearer understanding of the demographics of the U.S. particle physics workforce, the US Department of Energy, the National Science Foundation, and the Division of Particles and Fields of the American Physical Society commissioned a survey and census of particle physicists employed in the United States. This survey and census were conducted in 1995, with an update of the census in April 1997. The agencies and the scientific community were represented for the 1995 efforts by Dr. Robert Woods (DOE), Dr. William Chinowsky (NSF), and Prof. Uriel Nauenberg (DPF); for the current census, by Dr. Robert Diebold (DOE), Dr. Marvin Goldberg (NSF), and Dr. Patricia Rankin (NSF). The survey/census were carried out with the assistance of the Particle Data Group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. In order to obtain an accurate study of the current workforce and of future needs, we requested that all HEP physicists fill out and return the 1995 survey. There were 2494 respondents. For the 1997 census, a representative of each university and laboratory was asked to provide information on all persons at that institution who spend at least 50% of their research time on particle physics. In some cases this includes accelerator physicists. The total number of physicists in the 1997 census is 3492 from 155 institutions in the United States. The full survey questionnaires are shown. The primary one was addressed to individual particle physicists, while the secondary one was addressed to principal investigators and sought information about people leaving the field. There are many possible tables and plots from this survey, with a variety of correlations. Those chosen are representative of a cross-section of the demographic results. It should be emphasized that this survey was a snapshot in time, and does not have the same capabilities as would a series of surveys that are periodic in time. Care should be taken in interpreting the results of the tables and plots.

  9. Technetium Immobilization Forms Literature Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westsik, Joseph H.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Qafoku, Nikolla

    2014-05-01

    Of the many radionuclides and contaminants in the tank wastes stored at the Hanford site, technetium-99 (99Tc) is one of the most challenging to effectively immobilize in a waste form for ultimate disposal. Within the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), the Tc will partition between both the high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions of the tank waste. The HLW fraction will be converted to a glass waste form in the HLW vitrification facility and the LAW fraction will be converted to another glass waste form in the LAW vitrification facility. In both vitrification facilities, the Tc is incorporated into the glass waste form but a significant fraction of the Tc volatilizes at the high glass-melting temperatures and is captured in the off-gas treatment systems at both facilities. The aqueous off-gas condensate solution containing the volatilized Tc is recycled and is added to the LAW glass melter feed. This recycle process is effective in increasing the loading of Tc in the LAW glass but it also disproportionally increases the sulfur and halides in the LAW melter feed which increases both the amount of LAW glass and either the duration of the LAW vitrification mission or the required supplemental LAW treatment capacity.

  10. High temperature interfacial superconductivity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bozovic, Ivan; Logvenov, Gennady; Gozar, Adrian Mihai

    2012-06-19

    High-temperature superconductivity confined to nanometer-scale interfaces has been a long standing goal because of potential applications in electronic devices. The spontaneous formation of a superconducting interface in bilayers consisting of an insulator (La.sub.2CuO.sub.4) and a metal (La.sub.1-xSr.sub.xCuO.sub.4), neither of which is superconducting per se, is described. Depending upon the layering sequence of the bilayers, T.sub.c may be either .about.15 K or .about.30 K. This highly robust phenomenon is confined to within 2-3 nm around the interface. After exposing the bilayer to ozone, T.sub.c exceeds 50 K and this enhanced superconductivity is also shown to originate from a 1 to 2 unit cell thick interfacial layer. The results demonstrate that engineering artificial heterostructures provides a novel, unconventional way to fabricate stable, quasi two-dimensional high T.sub.c phases and to significantly enhance superconducting properties in other superconductors. The superconducting interface may be implemented, for example, in SIS tunnel junctions or a SuFET.

  11. Corrosion and Creep of Candidate Alloys in High Temperature Helium and Steam Environments for the NGNP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Was, Gary; Jones, J. W.

    2013-06-21

    This project aims to understand the processes by which candidate materials degrade in He and supercritical water/steam environments characteristic of the current NGNP design. We will focus on understanding the roles of temperature, and carbon and oxygen potential in the 750-850 degree C range on both uniform oxidation and selective internal oxidation along grain boundaries in alloys 617 and 800H in supercritical water in the temperature range 500-600 degree C; and examining the application of static and cyclic stresses in combination with impure He environments in the temperature rang 750-850 degree C; and examining the application of static and cyclic stresses in combination with impure He environments in the temperature range 750-850 degree C over a range of oxygen and carbon potentials in helium. Combined, these studies wil elucidate the potential high damage rate processes in environments and alloys relevant to the NGNP.

  12. Hot Pot Contoured Temperature Gradient Map

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    Temperature gradient contours derived from Oski temperature gradient hole program and from earlier published information.

  13. Hot Pot Contoured Temperature Gradient Map

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    2013-06-28

    Temperature gradient contours derived from Oski temperature gradient hole program and from earlier published information.

  14. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Monitor Telescope Pipeline (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Monitor Telescope Pipeline Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Monitor Telescope Pipeline You are accessing a...

  15. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - U.S...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) is a national-level sample survey of commercial buildings and their energy suppliers conducted quadrennially (previously ...

  16. Hubei Electric Power Survey Design Institute | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Survey Design Institute Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hubei Electric Power Survey&Design Institute Place: Hubei Province, China Product: Wuhan-based power project design and...

  17. Airborne Electromagnetic Survey At Chena Geothermal Area (Kolker...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Phase I) Notes Fugro, Inc. performed an airborne geophysical survey using the DIGHEM (Digital Helicopter ElectroMagnetics) aircraft over a 937 km2 survey grid. An coplanar...

  18. Category:Near Infrared Surveys | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Infrared Surveys Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleCategory:NearInfraredSurveys&oldid794164" Feedback Contact needs updating Image needs updating...

  19. Idaho Geological Survey and University of Idaho Explore for Geothermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Idaho Geological Survey and University of Idaho Explore for Geothermal Energy Idaho Geological Survey and University of Idaho Explore for Geothermal Energy January 11, 2013 -...

  20. Headquarters Facilities Master Security Plan - Chapter 7, Surveys...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    First, survey team members assist HQ program elements in establishing, maintaining, and deactivating their LAs, VTRs, and TLAs. Second, the survey team conducts an annual ...

  1. Ground Gravity Survey At Clear Lake Area (Skokan, 1993) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ground Gravity Survey At Clear Lake Area (Skokan, 1993) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Clear Lake Area...

  2. Ground Gravity Survey At Coso Geothermal Area (1980) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ground Gravity Survey At Coso Geothermal Area (1980) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Coso Geothermal...

  3. Ground Gravity Survey At Crump's Hot Springs Area (DOE GTP) ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ground Gravity Survey At Crump's Hot Springs Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Crump's Hot...

  4. Category:Airborne Gravity Survey | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Category Edit History Category:Airborne Gravity Survey Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Airborne Gravity Survey...

  5. Ground Gravity Survey At North Brawley Geothermal Area (Biehler...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ground Gravity Survey At North Brawley Geothermal Area (Biehler, 1964) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At...

  6. Ground Gravity Survey At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Warpinski, Et...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ground Gravity Survey At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey...

  7. Ground Gravity Survey At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (FURUMOTO...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ground Gravity Survey At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (FURUMOTO, 1976) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey...

  8. Ground Gravity Survey At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ground Gravity Survey At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Snake River...

  9. Ground Gravity Survey At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (Thomas...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ground Gravity Survey At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey...

  10. Title Preactivity Survey Report for Five Tonopah Test Range Explosive...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Preactivity Survey Report for Five Tonopah Test Range Explosive Ordnance Disposal Sites ... PREACTIVITY AND RECLAMATION SURVEY REPORTS FOR FIVE TONOPAH TEST RANGE EXPLOSIVE ORDNANCE ...

  11. DOE Initiative to Improve PM and EVM, Integration Survey Results...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Initiative to Improve PM and EVM, Integration Survey Results DOE Initiative to Improve PM and EVM, Integration Survey Results DOE Initiative to Improve PM and EVM, Integration ...

  12. Refraction Survey At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (Broyles...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    East Rift Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Refraction Survey Activity Date 1976 - 1977 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis This survey was done as...

  13. Literature Survey of Crude Oil Properties Relevant to Handling...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Literature Survey of Crude Oil Properties Relevant to Handling and Fire Safety in Transport. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Literature Survey of Crude Oil Properties ...

  14. Geodetic Survey At Yellowstone Region (Hellman & Ramsey, 2004...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geodetic Survey At Yellowstone Region (Hellman & Ramsey, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geodetic Survey At Yellowstone...

  15. Confirmatory Survey Report for the Quehanna Decommissioning Project, Karthaus, PA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. C. Adams

    2007-10-30

    The survey activities consisted of visual inspections and radiological surveys including beta and gamma surface scans and surface beta activity measurements.

  16. Geodetic Survey At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Blewitt...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geodetic Survey At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Blewitt Et Al, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geodetic Survey At...

  17. Manufacturing-Industrial Energy Consumption Survey(MECS) Historical...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    reports, data tables and questionnaires Released: May 2008 The Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) is a periodic national sample survey devoted to measuring...

  18. Oregon National Register and Survey Program Webpage | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    National Register and Survey Program Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Oregon National Register and Survey Program Webpage...

  19. Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the findings from the other resistivity surveys conducted in the area. References James Kauahikaua, Douglas Klein (1978) Results of Electric Survey in the Area of Hawaii...

  20. Temperature-dependent elastic anisotropy and mesoscale deformation in a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stoica, G. M.; Stoica, A. D.; Miller, M. K.; Ma, D.

    2014-10-10

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFA) are a new class of ultrafine-grained oxide dispersion-strengthened steels, promising for service in extreme environments of high temperature and high irradiation in the next-generation of nuclear reactors. This is owing to the remarkable stability of their complex microstructures containing a high density of Y-Ti-O nanoclusters within grains and along the grain boundaries. While nanoclusters have been recognized to be the primary contributor to the exceptional resistance to irradiation and high-temperature creep, very little is known about the mechanical roles of the polycrystalline grains that constitute the bulk ferritic matrix. Here we report the mesoscale characterization ofmore » anisotropic responses of the ultrafine NFA grains to tensile stresses at various temperatures using the state-of-the-art in situ neutron diffraction. We show the first experimental determination of temperature-dependent single-crystal elastic constants for the NFA, and reveal a strong temperature-dependent elastic anisotropy due to a sharp decrease in the shear stiffness constant [c'=(c_11-c_12)/2] when a critical temperature ( T_c ) is approached, indicative of elastic softening and instability of the ferritic matrix. We also show, from anisotropy-induced intergranular strain/stress accumulations, that a common dislocation slip mechanism operates at the onset of yielding for low temperatures, while there is a deformation crossover from low-temperature lattice hardening to high temperature lattice softening in response to extensive plastic deformation.« less

  1. Temperature-dependent elastic anisotropy and mesoscale deformation in a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoica, Grigoreta M [ORNL; Stoica, Alexandru Dan [ORNL; Miller, Michael K [ORNL; Ma, Dong [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFA) are a new class of ultrafine-grained oxide dispersion-strengthened steels, promising for service in extreme environments of high temperature and high irradiation in the next-generation of nuclear reactors. This is owing to the remarkable stability of their complex microstructures containing a high density of Y-Ti-O nanoclusters within grains and along the grain boundaries. While nanoclusters have been recognized to be the primary contributor to the exceptional resistance to irradiation and high-temperature creep, very little is known about the mechanical roles of the polycrystalline grains that constitute the bulk ferritic matrix. Here we report the mesoscale characterization of anisotropic responses of the ultrafine NFA grains to tensile stresses at various temperatures using the state-of-the-art in situ neutron diffraction. We show the first experimental determination of temperature-dependent single-crystal elastic constants for the NFA, and reveal a strong temperature-dependent elastic anisotropy due to a sharp decrease in the shear stiffness constant [c'=(c_11-c_12)/2] when a critical temperature ( T_c ) is approached, indicative of elastic softening and instability of the ferritic matrix. We also show, from anisotropy-induced intergranular strain/stress accumulations, that a common dislocation slip mechanism operates at the onset of yielding for low temperatures, while there is a deformation crossover from low-temperature lattice hardening to high temperature lattice softening in response to extensive plastic deformation.

  2. 70 DA WHITE DWARFS IDENTIFIED IN LAMOST PILOT SURVEY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, J. K.; Luo, A. L.; Zhao, G. [Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Oswalt, T. D., E-mail: zjk@bao.ac.cn, E-mail: gzhao@bao.ac.cn, E-mail: lal@bao.ac.cn, E-mail: toswalt@fit.edu [Physics and Space Science Department, Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, FL 32901 (United States)

    2013-06-01

    We present a spectroscopically identified catalog of 70 DA white dwarfs (WDs) from the LAMOST pilot survey. Thirty-five are found to be new identifications after cross-correlation with the Eisenstein et al. and Villanova catalogs. The effective temperature and gravity of these WDs are estimated by Balmer lines fitting. Most of them are hot WDs. The cooling times and masses of these WDs are estimated by interpolation in theoretical evolution tracks. The peak of the mass distribution is found to be {approx}0.6 M {sub Sun }, which is consistent with prior work in the literature. The distances of these WDs are estimated using the method of synthetic spectral distances. All of these WDs are found to be in the Galactic disk from our analysis of space motions. Our sample supports the expectation that WDs with high mass are concentrated near the plane of the Galactic disk.

  3. INVESTIGATION OF THE POTENTIAL FOR CAUSTIC STRESS CORROSION CRACKING OF A537 CARBON STEEL NUCLEAR WASTE TANKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lam, P.

    2009-10-15

    The evaporator recycle streams contain waste in a chemistry and temperature regime that may be outside of the current waste tank corrosion control program, which imposes temperature limits to mitigate caustic stress corrosion cracking (CSCC). A review of the recent service history (1998-2008) of Tanks 30 and 32 showed that these tanks were operated in highly concentrated hydroxide solution at high temperature. Visual inspections, experimental testing, and a review of the tank service history have shown that CSCC has occurred in uncooled/un-stress relieved F-Area tanks. Therefore, for the Type III/IIIA waste tanks the efficacy of the stress relief of welding residual stress is the only corrosion-limiting mechanism. The objective of this experimental program is to test carbon steel small scale welded U-bend specimens and large welded plates (12 x 12 x 1 in.) in a caustic solution with upper bound chemistry (12 M hydroxide and 1 M each of nitrate, nitrite, and aluminate) and temperature (125 C). These conditions simulate worst-case situations in Tanks 30 and 32. Both as-welded and stress-relieved specimens have been tested. No evidence of stress corrosion cracking was found in the U-bend specimens after 21 days of testing. The large plate test is currently in progress, but no cracking has been observed after 9 weeks of immersion. Based on the preliminary results, it appears that the environmental conditions of the tests are unable to develop stress corrosion cracking within the duration of these tests.

  4. Measurement of thermodynamic temperature of high temperature fixed points

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gavrilov, V. R.; Khlevnoy, B. B.; Otryaskin, D. A.; Grigorieva, I. A.; Samoylov, M. L.; Sapritsky, V. I.

    2013-09-11

    The paper is devoted to VNIIOFI's measurements of thermodynamic temperature of the high temperature fixed points Co-C, Pt-C and Re-C within the scope of the international project coordinated by the Consultative Committee for Thermometry working group 5 'Radiation Thermometry'. The melting temperatures of the fixed points were measured by a radiance mode radiation thermometer calibrated against a filter radiometer with known irradiance spectral responsivity via a high temperature black body. This paper describes the facility used for the measurements, the results and estimated uncertainties.

  5. Understanding diesel engine lubrication at low temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, M.F. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on oil pumpability in passenger car gasoline engines that was well-characterized by an ASTM program and by individual researchers in the 1970's and early 1980's. oil pumpability in diesel engines however, was not investigated to any significant extent until the mid-1980's. This study was initiated to define the performance of several commercial viscosity modifiers in different formulations containing 3 detergent-inhibitor (DI) additive packages and 4 basestock types. The test oils were run at {minus}18{degrees} C (0{degrees} F) in a Cummins NTC-400 diesel engine. The results, when statistically analyzed, indicated that a new, second generation olefin copolymer (OCP) viscosity modifier has better performance that a first generation OCP and, furthermore, had performance equal to a polymethacrylate (PMA) viscosity modifier. The analysis also showed that one DI/base stock combination had a significant effect on performance. The apparent shear rate of the oil in the pump inlet tube was calculated from the oil pump flow rate measured at idle speed at low temperature and the pump inlet tube diameter. The shear rate and oil viscosity were used to estimate the shear stress in the pump inlet tube. The shear stress level of the engine is 56% higher than the Mini-Rotary Viscometer (MRV). Hence, the current MRV procedure is rheologically unsuitable to predict pumpability in a large diesel engine. A new device was developed for measuring the oil film thickness in the turbocharge bearing and noting the time when a full oil film is formed. Results indicate that a full oil film occurs almost immediately, well before any oil pressure is observed at the turbocharge inlet. Residual oil remaining in the bearing after shutdown may account of this observation. The oil film maintained its thickness both before, and after the first indication of oil pressure. More work is needed to study this effect.

  6. Effect of internal heating during hot compression testing on the stress-strain behavior and hot working characteristics of Alloy 304L

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mataya, M.C.; Sackschewsky, V.E.

    1993-05-01

    Temperature change from conversion of deformation to internal heat, and its effect on stress-strain behavior of alloy 304L was investigated by initially isothermal (temperature of specimen, compression dies, environment equilibrated at initiation of test) uniaxial compression. Strain rate was varied 0.01 s{sup {minus}1} to 1 s{sup {minus}1} (thermal state of specimen varied from nearly isothermal to nearly adiabatic). Specimens were deformed at 750 to 1150 to a strain of 1. Change in temperature with strain was calculated via finite element analysis from measured stress-strain data and predictions were confirmed with thermocouples to verify the model. Temperature increased nearly linearly at the highest strain rate, consistent with temperature rise being a linear function of strain (adiabatic). As strain rate was lowered, heat transfer from superheated specimen to cooler dies caused sample temperature to increase and then decrease with strain as the sample thinned and specimen-die contact area increased. As-measured stress was corrected. Resulting isothermal flow curves were compared to predictions of a simplified method suggested by Thomas and Shrinivasan and differences are discussed. Strain rate sensitivity, activation energy for deformation, and flow curve peak associated with onset of dynamic recrystallization were determined from both as-measured and isothermal stress-strain data and found to vary widely. The impact of utilizing as-measured stress-strain data, not corrected for internal heating, on results of a number of published investigations is discussed.

  7. High reflectance-low stress Mo-Si multilayer reflective coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Montcalm, Claude; Mirkarimi, Paul B.

    2000-01-01

    A high reflectance-low stress Mo-Si multilayer reflective coating particularly useful for the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wavelength region. While the multilayer reflective coating has particular application for EUV lithography, it has numerous other applications where high reflectance and low stress multilayer coatings are utilized. Multilayer coatings having high near-normal incidence reflectance (R.gtoreq.65%) and low residual stress (.ltoreq.100 MPa) have been produced using thermal and non-thermal approaches. The thermal approach involves heating the multilayer coating to a given temperature for a given time after deposition in order to induce structural changes in the multilayer coating that will have an overall "relaxation" effect without reducing the reflectance significantly.

  8. Process for fabricating high reflectance-low stress Mo--Si multilayer reflective coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Montcalm, Claude; Mirkarimi, Paul B.

    2001-01-01

    A high reflectance-low stress Mo--Si multilayer reflective coating particularly useful for the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wavelength region. While the multilayer reflective coating has particular application for EUV lithography, it has numerous other applications where high reflectance and low stress multilayer coatings are utilized. Multilayer coatings having high near-normal incidence reflectance (R.gtoreq.65%) and low residual stress (.ltoreq.100 MPa) have been produced using thermal and non-thermal approaches. The thermal approach involves heating the multilayer coating to a given temperature for a given time after deposition in order to induce structural changes in the multilayer coating that will have an overall "relaxation" effect without reducing the reflectance significantly.

  9. Partial Shade Stress Test for Thin-Film Photovoltaic Modules: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silverman, Timothy J.; Deceglie, Michael G.; Deline, Chris; Kurtz, Sarah

    2015-09-02

    Partial shade of monolithic thin-film PV modules can cause reverse-bias conditions leading to permanent damage. In this work, we propose a partial shade stress test for thin-film PV modules that quantifies permanent performance loss. We designed the test with the aid of a computer model that predicts the local voltage, current and temperature stress that result from partial shade. The model predicts the module-scale interactions among the illumination pattern, the electrical properties of the photovoltaic material and the thermal properties of the module package. The test reproduces shading and loading conditions that may occur in the field. It accounts for reversible light-induced performance changes and for additional stress that may be introduced by light-enhanced reverse breakdown. We present simulated and experimental results from the application of the proposed test.

  10. Sensors for low temperature application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Henderson, Timothy M.; Wuttke, Gilbert H.

    1977-01-01

    A method and apparatus for low temperature sensing which uses gas filled micro-size hollow glass spheres that are exposed in a confined observation area to a low temperature range (Kelvin) and observed microscopically to determine change of state, i.e., change from gaseous state of the contained gas to condensed state. By suitable indicia and classification of the spheres in the observation area, the temperature can be determined very accurately.

  11. Partial Shade Stress Test for Thin-Film Photovoltaic Modules...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Partial Shade Stress Test for Thin-Film Photovoltaic Modules Preprint Timothy J. ... Partial shade stress test for thin-film photovoltaic modules Timothy J Silverman , ...

  12. Status Report: Characterization of Weld Residual Stresses on...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Status Report: Characterization of Weld Residual Stresses on Full Diameter SNF Interim Storage Canister Mockup Status Report: Characterization of Weld Residual Stresses on Full ...

  13. Predicting Thermal Stress in Diesel Particulate Filters | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thermal Stress in Diesel Particulate Filters Predicting Thermal Stress in Diesel Particulate Filters 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Corning ...

  14. Enhancing Plant Growth and Stress Tolerance through Use of Fungi...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Enhancing Plant Growth and Stress Tolerance through Use of Fungi and Bacteria that Comprise Plant Microbiomes Enhancing Plant Growth and Stress Tolerance through Use of Fungi and ...

  15. Sandia Energy - BES Highlight: Stress-Induced NanoparticleCrystalliza...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Highlight: Stress-Induced Nanoparticle Crystallization Home Highlights - Energy Research BES Highlight: Stress-Induced Nanoparticle Crystallization Previous Next BES Highlight:...

  16. Fuel Cell Tech Team Accelerated Stress Test and Polarization...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tech Team Accelerated Stress Test and Polarization Curve Protocols for PEM Fuel Cells Fuel Cell Tech Team Accelerated Stress Test and Polarization Curve Protocols for PEM Fuel ...

  17. Establishment of Stress-Permeabilty relationship of fractured...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... This study presents a systematic research on the stress-dependent permeability based on ... The more sensitive permeability change at lower stress levels was captured due to the ...

  18. Systems biology analysis of Zymomonas mobilis ZM4 ethanol stress...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    However, the molecular mechanisms of ethanol stress response have not been elucidated fully. In this study, ethanol stress responses were investigated using systems biology tools. ...

  19. Stress evolution during electrodeposition of Ni thin films. ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Stress evolution during electrodeposition of Ni thin films. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Stress evolution during electrodeposition of Ni thin films. ...

  20. Stress evolution during growth in direct-current-sputtered zinc...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Stress evolution during growth in direct-current-sputtered zinc oxide films at various oxygen flows Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Stress evolution during growth in ...

  1. Actinide Thermodynamics at Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friese, Judah I.; Rao, Linfeng; Xia, Yuanxian; Bachelor, Paula P.; Tian, Guoxin

    2007-11-16

    The postclosure chemical environment in the proposed Yucca Mountain repository is expected to experience elevated temperatures. Predicting migration of actinides is possible if sufficient, reliable thermodynamic data on hydrolysis and complexation are available for these temperatures. Data are scarce and scattered for 25 degrees C, and nonexistent for elevated temperatures. This collaborative project between LBNL and PNNL collects thermodynamic data at elevated temperatures on actinide complexes with inorganic ligands that may be present in Yucca Mountain. The ligands include hydroxide, fluoride, sulfate, phosphate and carbonate. Thermodynamic parameters of complexation, including stability constants, enthalpy, entropy and heat capacity of complexation, are measured with a variety of techniques including solvent extraction, potentiometry, spectrophotometry and calorimetry

  2. ARM - Measurement - Soil surface temperature

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Systems SOIL : Soil Measurement from the SGP SWATS : Soil Water and Temperature System MET : Surface Meteorological Instrumentation External Instruments ETA : Eta Model Runs...

  3. Low temperature material bonding technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramsey, J. Michael (Knoxville, TN); Foote, Robert S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2002-02-12

    A method of performing a lower temperature bonding technique to bond together two mating pieces of glass includes applying a sodium silicate aqueous solution between the two pieces.

  4. Low-Temperature Diesel Combustion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EnergyWater History Water Monitoring & Treatment Technology Decision Models for ... Twitter Google + Vimeo GovDelivery SlideShare Low-Temperature Diesel Combustion Home...

  5. Low Temperature Material Bonding Technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramsey, J. Michael (Knoxville, TN); Foote, Robert S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2000-10-10

    A method of performing a lower temperature bonding technique to bond together two mating pieces of glass includes applying a sodium silicate aqueous solution between the two pieces.

  6. The variable sky of deep synoptic surveys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ridgway, Stephen T.; Matheson, Thomas; Mighell, Kenneth J.; Olsen, Knut A. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85725 (United States); Howell, Steve B., E-mail: ridgway@noao.edu [NASA Ames Research Center, P.O. Box 1, M/S 244-30, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

    2014-11-20

    The discovery of variable and transient sources is an essential product of synoptic surveys. The alert stream will require filtering for personalized criteriaa process managed by a functionality commonly described as a Broker. In order to understand quantitatively the magnitude of the alert generation and Broker tasks, we have undertaken an analysis of the most numerous types of variable targets in the skyGalactic stars, quasi-stellar objects (QSOs), active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and asteroids. It is found that the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will be capable of discovering ?10{sup 5} high latitude (|b| > 20) variable stars per night at the beginning of the survey. (The corresponding number for |b| < 20 is orders of magnitude larger, but subject to caveats concerning extinction and crowding.) However, the number of new discoveries may well drop below 100 per night within less than one year. The same analysis applied to GAIA clarifies the complementarity of the GAIA and LSST surveys. Discovery of AGNs and QSOs are each predicted to begin at ?3000 per night and decrease by 50 times over four years. Supernovae are expected at ?1100 per night, and after several survey years will dominate the new variable discovery rate. LSST asteroid discoveries will start at >10{sup 5} per night, and if orbital determination has a 50% success rate per epoch, they will drop below 1000 per night within two years.

  7. Geothermal industry employment: Survey results & analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-09-01

    The Geothermal Energy Association (GEA) is ofteh asked about the socioeconomic and employment impact of the industry. Since available literature dealing with employment involved in the geothermal sector appeared relatively outdated, unduly focused on certain activities of the industry (e.g. operation and maintenance of geothermal power plants) or poorly reliable, GEA, in consultation with the DOE, decided to conduct a new employment survey to provide better answers to these questions. The main objective of this survey is to assess and characterize the current workforce involved in geothermal activities in the US. Several initiatives have therefore been undertaken to reach as many organizations involved in geothermal activities as possible and assess their current workforce. The first section of this document describes the methodology used to contact the companies involved in the geothermal sector. The second section presents the survey results and analyzes them. This analysis includes two major parts. The first part analyzes the survey responses, presents employment numbers that were captured and describes the major characteristics of the industry that have been identified. The second part of the analysis estimates the number of workers involved in companies that are active in the geothermal business but did not respond to the survey or could not be reached. Preliminary conclusions and the study limits and restrictions are then presented. The third section addresses the potential employment impact related to manufacturing and construction of new geothermal power facilities. Indirect and induced economic impacts related with such investment are also investigated.

  8. 2001 FEMP Customer Survey Report (Appendices) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Appendices) 2001 FEMP Customer Survey Report (Appendices) Appendix A: Survey Instrument Appendix B: Detailed Responses Appendix C: Adoption and Diffusion of Innovations PDF icon Appendices More Documents & Publications 2001 FEMP Customer Survey Report (Summary Report) 2001 FEMP Customer Survey Report (Main Report

  9. Forging of compressor blades: Temperature and ram velocity effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saigal, A.; Zhen, K.; Chan, T.S.

    1995-07-01

    Forging is one of the most widely used manufacturing process for making high-strength, structurally integrated, impact and creep-resistant Ti-6Al-4V compressor blades for jet engines. In addition, in modern metal forming technology, finite element analysis method and computer modeling are being extensively employed for initial evaluation and optimization of various processes, including forging. In this study, DEFORM, a rigid viscoplastic two-dimensional finite element code was used to study the effects of initial die temperature and initial ram velocity on the forging process. For a given billet, die temperature and ram velocity influence the strain rate, temperature distribution,and thus the flow stress of the material. The die temperature and the ram velocity were varied over the range 300 to 700 F and 15--25 in./sec, respectively, to estimate the maximum forging load and the total energy required to forge compressor blades. The ram velocity was assumed to vary linearly as a function of stroke. Based on the analysis,it was found the increasing the die temperature from 300 to 700 F decreases the forging loads by 19.9 percent and increases the average temperature of the workpiece by 43 F. Similarly, increasing the initial ram velocity from 15 to 25 in./sec decreases the forging loads by 25.2 percent and increases the average temperature of the workpiece by 36 F. The nodal temperature distribution is bimodal in each case. The forging energy required to forge the blades is approximately 18 kips *in./in.

  10. Industry survey for horizontal wells. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, D.D.; Kaback, D.S. [CDM Federal Programs Corp., Denver, CO (United States); Denhan, M.E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Watkins, D. [CDM Federal Programs Corp., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1993-07-01

    An international survey of horizontal environmental wells was performed during May and June of 1993. The purpose of the survey was to provide the environmental industry with an inventory of horizontal environmental wells and information pertaining to the extent of the use of horizontal environmental wells, the variety of horizontal environmental well applications, the types of geologic and hydrogeologic conditions within which horizontal environmental wells have been installed, and the companies that perform horizontal environmental well installations. Other information, such as the cost of horizontal environmental well installations and the results of tests performed on the wells, is not complete but is provided as general information with the caveat that the information should not be used to compare drilling companies. The result of the survey is a catalogue of horizontal environmental wells that are categorized by the objective or use of the wells, the vertical depth of the wells, and the drilling company contracted to install the wells.

  11. Ultra High Temperature | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ultra High Temperature Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Sanyal Temperature Classification: Ultra High Temperature Dictionary.png Ultra High...

  12. Low Temperature/Coproduced/Geopressured Subprogram Overview ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low TemperatureCoproducedGeopressured Subprogram Overview Low TemperatureCoproducedGeopressured Subprogram Overview This overview of GTP's Low TemperatureCoproduced...

  13. High Temperature Thermoelectric Materials Characterization for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program High Temperature ... the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program ...

  14. Low Temperature Geothermal Energy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low Temperature Geothermal Energy Low Temperature Geothermal Energy Presented at the Technology Planning Workshop for Low-Temperature, Coproduced, and Geopressured Geothermal ...

  15. Degradation mode survey of titanium-base alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gdowski, G.E.; Ahluwalia, H.S.

    1995-01-30

    Of the materials reviewed, commercially pure titanium, Ti Gr 2, is the most susceptible to crevice corrosion. Ti Gr 7, 12, and 16 are likely to be resistant to crevice corrosion under the current expected Yucca Mountain repository conditions. Although Grade 7 has the greatest resistance to crevice corrosion it is also the most expensive. Although the possibility of sustained loads cracking exists, it has not yet been observed in a Ti alloys. For hydride precipitation to occur 100{degrees}C, the hydrogen concentration would need to be relatively high, much higher than the maximum amount of hydrogen allowed during the manufacture of ({alpha} Ti alloys (0.0 15 wt%). A large amount of (SCC) stress corrosion cracking data accumulated at SNL and BNL for the WIPP program and by the Canadian Waste Management Program on titanium grades 2 and 12 indicates that there is no SCC at naturally occurring potentials in various brines. Hydride-induced cracking of titanium is a possibility and therefore, further investigation of this phenomenon under credible repository conditions is warranted. One disadvantage of titanium and its alloys is that their strengths decrease rather rapidly with temperature. This is due to the strong temperature dependence of interstitial solute strengthening mechanisms. Ti Gr 12 and 16 are recommended for further consideration as candidate materials for high level nuclear waste containers.

  16. Multilayer compressive seal for sealing in high temperature devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chou, Yeong-Shyung; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2007-08-21

    A mica based compressive seal has been developed exhibiting superior thermal cycle stability when compared to other compressive seals known in the art. The seal is composed of compliant glass or metal interlayers and a sealing (gasket) member layer composed of mica that is infiltrated with a glass forming material, which effectively reduces leaks within the seal. The compressive seal shows approximately a 100-fold reduction in leak rates compared with previously developed hybrid seals after from 10 to about 40 thermal cycles under a compressive stress of from 50 psi to 100 psi at temperatures in the range from 600.degree. C. to about 850.degree. C.

  17. Utility FGD Survey, January--December 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hance, S.L.; McKibben, R.S.; Jones, F.M. )

    1992-03-01

    The Utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) Survey report, which is generated by a computerized data base management system, represents a survey of operational and planned domestic utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. It summarizes information contributed by the utility industry, system and equipment suppliers, system designers, research organizations, and regulatory agencies. The data cover system design, fuel characteristics, operating history, and actual system performance. Also included is a unit-by-unit discussion of problems and solutions associated with the boilers, scrubbers, and FGD systems. The development status (operational, under construction, or in the planning stages), system supplier, process, waste disposal practice, and regulatory class are tabulated alphabetically by utility company.

  18. Pion dynamics at finite temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toublan, D.

    1997-11-01

    The pion decay constant and mass are computed at low temperature within chiral perturbation theory to two loops. The effects of the breaking of Lorentz symmetry by the thermal equilibrium state are discussed. The validity of the Gell-Mann{endash}Oakes{endash}Renner relation at finite temperature is examined. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  19. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boyd, Gary L.

    1990-01-01

    A high temperature turbine engine includes a hybrid ceramic/metallic rotor member having ceramic/metal joint structure. The disclosed joint is able to endure higher temperatures than previously possible, and aids in controlling heat transfer in the rotor member.

  20. The SDSS-III APOGEE radial velocity survey of M dwarfs. I. Description of the survey and science goals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deshpande, R.; Bender, C. F.; Mahadevan, S.; Terrien, R. C.; Schneider, D. P.; Fleming, S. W.; Blake, C. H.; Carlberg, J. K.; Zasowski, G.; Hearty, F.; Crepp, J.; Rajpurohit, A. S.; Reyl, C.; Nidever, D. L.; Prieto, C. Allende; Hernndez, J.; Bizyaev, D.; Ebelke, G.; Frinchaboy, P. M.; Ge, J.; and others

    2013-12-01

    We are carrying out a large ancillary program with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, SDSS-III, using the fiber-fed multi-object near-infrared APOGEE spectrograph, to obtain high-resolution H-band spectra of more than 1200 M dwarfs. These observations will be used to measure spectroscopic rotational velocities, radial velocities, physical stellar parameters, and variability of the target stars. Here, we describe the target selection for this survey, as well as results from the first year of scientific observations based on spectra that will be publicly available in the SDSS-III DR10 data release. As part of this paper we present radial velocities and rotational velocities of over 200 M dwarfs, with a vsin i precision of ?2 km s{sup 1} and a measurement floor at vsin i = 4 km s{sup 1}. This survey significantly increases the number of M dwarfs studied for rotational velocities and radial velocity variability (at ?100-200 m s{sup 1}), and will inform and advance the target selection for planned radial velocity and photometric searches for low-mass exoplanets around M dwarfs, such as the Habitable Zone Planet Finder, CARMENES, and TESS. Multiple epochs of radial velocity observations enable us to identify short period binaries, and adaptive optics imaging of a subset of stars enables the detection of possible stellar companions at larger separations. The high-resolution APOGEE spectra, covering the entire H band, provide the opportunity to measure physical stellar parameters such as effective temperatures and metallicities for many of these stars. At the culmination of this survey, we will have obtained multi-epoch spectra and radial velocities for over 1400 stars spanning the spectral range M0-L0, providing the largest set of near-infrared M dwarf spectra at high resolution, and more than doubling the number of known spectroscopic vsin i values for M dwarfs. Furthermore, by modeling telluric lines to correct for small instrumental radial velocity shifts, we hope to achieve a relative velocity precision floor of 50 m s{sup 1} for bright M dwarfs. With three or more epochs, this precision is adequate to detect substellar companions, including giant planets with short orbital periods, and flag them for higher-cadence followup. We present preliminary, and promising, results of this telluric modeling technique in this paper.

  1. 2014-Federal Viewpoint Survey Reports | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4-Federal Viewpoint Survey Reports 2014-Federal Viewpoint Survey Reports The following highlight report focuses on the Department of Energy's areas of strengths and challenges, identifies areas of progress and opportunities for improvement. The Departments 2014 results are compared with the 2013 Government wide results. PDF icon 2014 Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey Results: Annual Employee Survey (AES) Report PDF icon 2014 Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey Results: Agency Management Report

  2. Solar Survey of PV System Owners: San Diego

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of the survey was to understand the motivation, challenges and benefits perceived by individuals who decided to install solar systems in the City of San Diego. Approximately 2000 surveys were sent, and 641 surveys were completed. The primary response was from the residential sector. Individuals had the option to reply electronically, using Survey Monkey, or to complete a paper survey. All responses were combined and checked to ensure that there were no duplicates.

  3. NITRATE DESTRUCTION LITERATURE SURVEY AND EVALUATION CRITERIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steimke, J.

    2011-02-01

    This report satisfies the initial phase of Task WP-2.3.4 Alternative Sodium Recovery Technology, Subtask 1; Develop Near-Tank Nitrate/Nitrite Destruction Technology. Some of the more common anions in carbon steel waste tanks at SRS and Hanford Site are nitrate which is corrosive, and nitrite and hydroxide which are corrosion inhibitors. At present it is necessary to periodically add large quantities of 50 wt% caustic to waste tanks. There are three primary reasons for this addition. First, when the contents of salt tanks are dissolved, sodium hydroxide preferentially dissolves and is removed. During the dissolution process the concentration of free hydroxide in the tank liquid can decrease from 9 M to less than 0.2 M. As a result, roughly half way through the dissolution process large quantities of sodium hydroxide must be added to the tank to comply with requirements for corrosion control. Second, hydroxide is continuously consumed by reaction with carbon dioxide which occurs naturally in purge air used to prevent buildup of hydrogen gas inside the tanks. The hydrogen is generated by radiolysis of water. Third, increasing the concentration of hydroxide increases solubility of some aluminum compounds, which is desirable in processing waste. A process that converts nitrate and nitrite to hydroxide would reduce certain costs. (1) Less caustic would be purchased. (2) Some of the aluminum solid compounds in the waste tanks would become more soluble so less mass of solids would be sent to High Level Vitrification and therefore it would be not be necessary to make as much expensive high level vitrified product. (3) Less mass of sodium would be fed to Saltstone at SRS or Low Level Vitrification at Hanford Site so it would not be necessary to make as much low level product. (4) At SRS less nitrite and nitrate would be sent to Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) so less formic acid would be consumed there and less hydrogen gas would be generated. This task involves literature survey of technologies to perform the nitrate to hydroxide conversion, selection of the most promising technologies, preparation of a flowsheet and design of a system. The most promising technologies are electrochemical reduction of nitrates and chemical reduction with hydrogen or ammonia. The primary reviewed technologies are listed and they aredescribed in more detail later in the report: (1) Electrochemical destruction; (2) Chemical reduction with agents such as ammonia, hydrazine or hydrogen; (3) Hydrothermal reduction process; and (4) Calcination. Only three of the technologies on the list have been demonstrated to generate usable amounts of caustic; electrochemical reduction and chemical reduction with ammonia, hydrazine or hydrogen and hydrothermal reduction. Chemical reduction with an organic reactant such as formic acid generates carbon dioxide which reacts with caustic and is thus counterproductive. Treatment of nitrate with aluminum or other active metals generates a solid product. High temperature calcination has the potential to generate sodium oxide which may be hydrated to sodium hydroxide, but this is unproven. The following criteria were developed to evaluate the most suitable option. The numbers in brackets after the criteria are relative weighting factors to account for importance: (1) Personnel exposure to radiation for installation, routine operation and maintenance; (2) Non-radioactive safety issues; (3) Whether the technology generates caustic and how many moles of caustic are generated per mole of nitrate plus nitrite decomposed; (4) Whether the technology can handle nitrate and nitrite at the concentrations encountered in waste; (5) Maturity of technology; (6) Estimated annual cost of operation (labor, depreciation, materials, utilities); (7) Capital cost; (8) Selectivity to nitrogen as decomposition product (other products are flammable and/or toxic); (9) Impact of introduced species; (10) Selectivity for destruction of nitrate vs. nitrite; and (11) Cost of deactivation and demolition. Each technology was given a score from one

  4. Stress influenced trapping processes in Si based multi-quantum well structures and heavy ions implanted Si

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciurea, Magdalena Lidia Lazanu, Sorina

    2014-10-06

    Multi-quantum well structures and Si wafers implanted with heavy iodine and bismuth ions are studied in order to evaluate the influence of stress on the parameters of trapping centers. The experimental method of thermostimullatedcurrents without applied bias is used, and the trapping centers are filled by illumination. By modeling the discharge curves, we found in multilayered structures the parameters of both 'normal' traps and 'stress-induced' ones, the last having a Gaussian-shaped temperature dependence of the cross section. The stress field due to the presence of stopped heavy ions implanted into Si was modeled by a permanent electric field. The increase of the strain from the neighborhood of I ions to the neighborhood of Bi ions produces the broadening of some energy levels and also a temperature dependence of the cross sections for all levels.

  5. System developed to predict waxy crude`s breakaway yield stress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, T.M.; Hsu, J.J.C.; Patterson, H.L.

    1996-12-16

    Breakaway yield stress (BAYS) was measured on waxy crude oil from the South China Sea to help develop appropriate design specifications for the HZ field subsea production system there. The measured BAYS at seabed temperature indicated that if production were interrupted and the crude in the pipeline cooled to seabed temperature, restart pressure would exceed the pressure rating of the originally planned pipeline. Texaco Inc. has designed a system to measure the BAYS of stock tank and live crude oils at selected temperatures. The cooling rate of the oil can be controlled and measurement of BAYS at the selected temperatures delayed to best model field conditions. The paper describes the measurement apparatus, pressure equation, results of the measurement of HZ 32 oils, rate of cooling, special field design, and implications.

  6. Cooling rate and stress relaxation in silica melts and glasses via microsecond molecular dyanmics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lane, J. Matthew D.

    2015-07-22

    We have conducted extremely long molecular dynamics simulations of glasses to microsecond times, which close the gap between experimental and atomistic simulation time scales by two to three orders of magnitude. The static, thermal, and structural properties of silica glass are reported for glass cooling rates down to 5×109 K/s and viscoelastic response in silica melts and glasses are studied over nine decades of time. We finally present results from relaxation of hydrostatic compressive stress in silica and show that time-temperature superposition holds in these systems for temperatures from 3500 to 1000 K.

  7. Cooling rate and stress relaxation in silica melts and glasses via microsecond molecular dyanmics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lane, J. Matthew D.

    2015-07-22

    We have conducted extremely long molecular dynamics simulations of glasses to microsecond times, which close the gap between experimental and atomistic simulation time scales by two to three orders of magnitude. The static, thermal, and structural properties of silica glass are reported for glass cooling rates down to 5×109 K/s and viscoelastic response in silica melts and glasses are studied over nine decades of time. We finally present results from relaxation of hydrostatic compressive stress in silica and show that time-temperature superposition holds in these systems for temperatures from 3500 to 1000 K.

  8. Transferring 2001 National Household Travel Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Patricia S; Reuscher, Tim; Schmoyer, Richard L; Chin, Shih-Miao

    2007-05-01

    Policy makers rely on transportation statistics, including data on personal travel behavior, to formulate strategic transportation policies, and to improve the safety and efficiency of the U.S. transportation system. Data on personal travel trends are needed to examine the reliability, efficiency, capacity, and flexibility of the Nation's transportation system to meet current demands and to accommodate future demand. These data are also needed to assess the feasibility and efficiency of alternative congestion-mitigating technologies (e.g., high-speed rail, magnetically levitated trains, and intelligent vehicle and highway systems); to evaluate the merits of alternative transportation investment programs; and to assess the energy-use and air-quality impacts of various policies. To address these data needs, the U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT) initiated an effort in 1969 to collect detailed data on personal travel. The 1969 survey was the first Nationwide Personal Transportation Survey (NPTS). The survey was conducted again in 1977, 1983, 1990, 1995, and 2001. Data on daily travel were collected in 1969, 1977, 1983, 1990 and 1995. In 2001, the survey was renamed the National Household Travel Survey (NHTS) and it collected both daily and long-distance trips. The 2001 survey was sponsored by three USDOT agencies: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), and National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). The primary objective of the survey was to collect trip-based data on the nature and characteristics of personal travel so that the relationships between the characteristics of personal travel and the demographics of the traveler can be established. Commercial and institutional travel were not part of the survey. Due to the survey's design, data in the NHTS survey series were not recommended for estimating travel statistics for categories smaller than the combination of Census division (e.g., New England, Middle Atlantic, and Pacific), MSA size, and the availability of rail. Extrapolating NHTS data within small geographic areas could risk developing and subsequently using unreliable estimates. For example, if a planning agency in City X of State Y estimates travel rates and other travel characteristics based on survey data collected from NHTS sample households that were located in City X of State Y, then the agency could risk developing and using unreliable estimates for their planning process. Typically, this limitation significantly increases as the size of an area decreases. That said, the NHTS contains a wealth of information that could allow statistical inferences about small geographic areas, with a pre-determined level of statistical certainty. The question then becomes whether a method can be developed that integrates the NHTS data and other data to estimate key travel characteristics for small geographic areas such as Census tract and transportation analysis zone, and whether this method can outperform other, competing methods.

  9. Yield stress and plasticity of nanostructured titanium of different purity at 300, 77, and 4.2 K

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tabachnikova, E. D. Bengus, V. Z.; Podol'skii, A. V.; Smirnov, S. N.; Valiev, R. Z.

    2009-11-15

    Specimens of nanostructured titanium with different dopant concentrations were prepared by intense plastic deformation via equal-channel-angular pressing. The low-temperature mechanical characteristics of the specimens subjected to active deformation under uniaxial tension and compression were studied. The yield stress and the limit uniform deformation of nanostructured and coarse-grained polycrystalline titanium were compared.

  10. Gyrokinetic simulation of momentum transport with residual stress from diamagnetic level velocity shears

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waltz, R. E.; Staebler, G. M.; Solomon, W. M.

    2011-04-15

    Residual stress refers to the remaining toroidal angular momentum (TAM) flux (divided by major radius) when the shear in the equilibrium fluid toroidal velocity (and the velocity itself) vanishes. Previously [Waltz et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 122507 (2007); errata 16, 079902 (2009)], we demonstrated with GYRO [Candy and Waltz, J. Comp. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] gyrokinetic simulations that TAM pinching from (ion pressure gradient supported or diamagnetic level) equilibrium ExB velocity shear could provide some of the residual stress needed to support spontaneous toroidal rotation against normal diffusive loss. Here we show that diamagnetic level shear in the intrinsic drift wave velocities (or ''profile shear'' in the ion and electron density and temperature gradients) provides a comparable residual stress. The individual signed contributions of these small (rho-star level) ExB and profile velocity shear rates to the turbulence level and (rho-star squared) ion energy transport stabilization are additive if the rates are of the same sign. However because of the additive stabilization effect, the contributions to the small (rho-star cubed) residual stress is not always simply additive. If the rates differ in sign, the residual stress from one can buck out that from the other (and in some cases reduce the stabilization.) The residual stress from these diamagnetic velocity shear rates is quantified by the ratio of TAM flow to ion energy (power) flow (M/P) in a global GYRO core simulation of a ''null'' toroidal rotation DIII-D [Mahdavi and Luxon, Fusion Sci. Technol. 48, 2 (2005)] discharge by matching M/P profiles within experimental uncertainty. Comparison of global GYRO (ion and electron energy as well as particle) transport flow balance simulations of TAM transport flow in a high-rotation DIII-D L-mode quantifies and isolates the ExB shear and parallel velocity (Coriolis force) pinching components from the larger ''diffusive'' parallel velocity shear driven component and the much smaller profile shear residual stress component.

  11. Austenitic stainless steel for high temperature applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Gerald D.; Powell, Roger W.

    1985-01-01

    This invention describes a composition for an austenitic stainless steel which has been found to exhibit improved high temperature stress rupture properties. The composition of this alloy is about (in wt. %): 12.5 to 14.5 Cr; 14.5 to 16.5 Ni; 1.5 to 2.5 Mo; 1.5 to 2.5 Mn; 0.1 to 0.4 Ti; 0.02 to 0.08 C; 0.5 to 1.0 Si; 0.01 maximum, N; 0.02 to 0.08 P; 0.002 to 0.008 B; 0.004-0.010 S; 0.02-0.05 Nb; 0.01-0.05 V; 0.005-0.02 Ta; 0.02-0.05 Al; 0.01-0.04 Cu; 0.02-0.05 Co; 0.03 maximum, As; 0.01 maximum, O; 0.01 maximum, Zr; and with the balance of the alloy being essentially iron. The carbon content of the alloy is adjusted such that wt. % Ti/(wt. % C+wt. % N) is between 4 and 6, and most preferably about 5. In addition the sum of the wt. % P+wt. % B+wt. % S is at least 0.03 wt. %. This alloy is believed to be particularly well suited for use as fast breeder reactor fuel element cladding.

  12. Energy conservation by hyperfiltration: food industry background literature survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-04-15

    The application of hyperfiltration to selected food product streams and food processing wastewaters for energy conservation was examined. This literature survey had led to the following conclusions: no research has been conducted in the food industry using membranes with hot process streams due to the temperature limitation (< 40/sup 0/C) of the typically studied cellulose acetate membranes; based on the bench-scale research reviewed, concentration of fruit and vegetable juices with membranes appears to be technically feasible; pretreatment and product recovery research was conducted with membranes on citrus peel oil, potato processing and brine wastewaters and wheys. The experiments demonstrated that these applications are feasible; many of the problems that have been identified with membranes are associated with either the suspended solids or the high osmotic pressure and viscosity of many foods; research using dynamic membranes has been conducted with various effluents, at temperatures to approx. 100/sup 0/C, at pressures to 1200 psi and with suspended solids to approx. 2%; and, the dynamic membrane is being prototype tested by NASA for high temperature processing of shower water. The literature review substantiates potential for dynamic membrane on porous stainless tubes to process a number of hot process and effluent streams in the food processing industry. Hot water for recycle and product concentrations are major areas with potential for economic application. The two plants involved in the first phase of the project should be reviewed to identify potential energy conservation applications. As many as possible of the conservation applications should be tested during the screening phase at each site. The most promising applications at each site should be evaluated more intensively to establish engineering estimates of the economics of this technology for the canned fruit and vegetable segment of the food industry.

  13. Electromagnetic Isolation Solutions in Low Temperature Cofired Ceramic (LTCC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krueger, Daniel; Peterson, Ken; Euler, Laurie

    2011-10-09

    Low Temperature Cofired Ceramic (LTCC) is a commercial ceramic-glass multilayer technology with compelling advantages for microelectronics, microsystems and sensors. High frequency applications require good electrical properties such as low dielectric loss and newer applications require extreme isolation from electromagnetic interference (EMI) that is even difficult to measure (-150db). Approaches to providing this isolation, once provided by via fences, have included sidewall coating and full tape thickness features (FTTF) that have been introduced by the filling of slots with via-fill compositions. Several techniques for creating these structures have been modeled for stress and temperature effects in the face of other necessary attachments, such as metallic seal frames. The relative effects of attachment media, FTTF geometry, and alternative measures will be reported. Approaches for thick film and thin film implementations are described.

  14. Research Initiative Will Demonstrate Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Research Initiative Will Demonstrate Low Temperature Geothermal Electrical Power Generation Systems Using Oilfield Fluids Research Initiative Will Demonstrate Low Temperature ...

  15. Aqua Farms International Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Farms International Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Aqua Farms International Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

  16. Flint Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Flint Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Flint...

  17. Sunnybrook Farms Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sunnybrook Farms Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Sunnybrook Farms Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility...

  18. Bigfork Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bigfork Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Bigfork Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility...

  19. Crook's Greenhouse Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Crook's Greenhouse Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Crook's Greenhouse Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility...

  20. Duckwater Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Duckwater Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Duckwater Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Duckwater Sector...