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1

Static Temperature Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Static Temperature Survey Static Temperature Survey Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Static Temperature Survey Details Activities (28) Areas (24) Regions (2) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Testing Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Well Testing Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Extrapolate the true temperature of the formation the well penetrates Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 0.2525 centUSD 2.5e-4 kUSD 2.5e-7 MUSD 2.5e-10 TUSD / foot Median Estimate (USD): 0.3535 centUSD 3.5e-4 kUSD 3.5e-7 MUSD 3.5e-10 TUSD / foot High-End Estimate (USD): 0.7575 centUSD 7.5e-4 kUSD 7.5e-7 MUSD

2

Static Temperature Survey At Wister Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Static Temperature Survey At Wister Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Static Temperature Survey At Wister Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Wister Area Exploration Technique Static Temperature Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References (1 January 2011) GTP ARRA Spreadsheet Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Static_Temperature_Survey_At_Wister_Area_(DOE_GTP)&oldid=511165" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded Activities

3

Effectiveness of Shallow Temperatures Surveys to Target a Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy, 2010 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Effectiveness of Shallow Temperatures Surveys to Target a Geothermal...

4

Effectiveness of Shallow Temperatures Surveys to Target a Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Effectiveness of Shallow Temperatures Surveys to Target a Geothermal Effectiveness of Shallow Temperatures Surveys to Target a Geothermal Reservoir at Previously Explored Site at Mcgee Mountain, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Effectiveness of Shallow Temperatures Surveys to Target a Geothermal Reservoir at Previously Explored Site at Mcgee Mountain, Nevada Author Richard Zehner Organization U.S. Department of Energy Published U.S. Department of Energy, 2010 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Effectiveness of Shallow Temperatures Surveys to Target a Geothermal Reservoir at Previously Explored Site at Mcgee Mountain, Nevada Citation Richard Zehner (U.S. Department of Energy). 2010. Effectiveness of Shallow Temperatures Surveys to Target a Geothermal Reservoir at Previously

5

First high-temperature electronics products survey 2005.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On April 4-5, 2005, a High-Temperature Electronics Products Workshop was held. This workshop engaged a number of governmental and private industry organizations sharing a common interest in the development of commercially available, high-temperature electronics. One of the outcomes of this meeting was an agreement to conduct an industry survey of high-temperature applications. This report covers the basic results of this survey.

Normann, Randy Allen

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Static Temperature Survey At Blue Mountain Area (Fairbank Engineering,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Static Temperature Survey At Blue Mountain Area (Fairbank Engineering, Static Temperature Survey At Blue Mountain Area (Fairbank Engineering, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Static Temperature Survey At Blue Mountain Area (Fairbank Engineering, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Blue Mountain Area Exploration Technique Static Temperature Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Using a precision thermistor probe, EGI, University of Utah, obtained detailed temperature logs of eleven new mineral exploration holes drilled at Blue Mountain. The holes, ranging in depth from 99 to 244 meters (325 to 800 feet), were drilled in areas to the northeast, northwest and southwest of, and up to distances of two kilometers from, the earlier mineral exploration drill holes that encountered hot artesian flows. Unfortunately,

7

High-Temperature Stress Relaxation Cracking and Stress Rupture ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An incident occurred that resulted in the cracking of gasifier internals, bulging and stress rupture of the shell and the escape of hot syngas, causing a fire.

8

Static Temperature Survey At Coso Geothermal Area (1977) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Static Temperature Survey At Coso Geothermal Area Static Temperature Survey At Coso Geothermal Area (1977) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Static Temperature Survey Activity Date 1977 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Temperature logs were taken during and after drilling: Results: Convective heat flow and temperatures greater than 350 F appear to occur only along an open fracture system encountered between depths of 1850 and 2775 feet. Temperature logs indicate a negative thermal gradient below 3000 feet. Water chemistry indicates that this geothermal resource is a hot-water rather than a vapor-dominated system. References Galbraith, R. M. (1 May 1978) Geological and geophysical analysis of Coso Geothermal Exploration Hole No. 1 (CGEH-1), Coso Hot Springs KGRA,

9

Static Temperature Survey At Hot Pot Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Static Temperature Survey At Hot Pot Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Static Temperature Survey At Hot Pot Area...

10

Geology and Temperature Gradient Surveys Blue Mountain Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geology and Temperature Gradient Surveys Blue Mountain Geothermal Geology and Temperature Gradient Surveys Blue Mountain Geothermal Discovery, Humboldt County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Geology and Temperature Gradient Surveys Blue Mountain Geothermal Discovery, Humboldt County, Nevada Abstract Triassic argillite and sandstone of the Grass Valley Formation and phyllitic mudstone of the overlying Raspberry Formation, also of Triassic age, host a blind geothermal system under exploration by Blue Mountain Power Company Inc. with assistance from the Energy & Geoscience Institute. Geologically young, steeply dipping, open fault sets, striking N50-60°E,N50-60°W, and N-S intersect in the geothermal zone providing deep permeability over a wide area. Extensive silicification andhydro

11

Fluid injection profiles: modern analysis of wellbore temperature survey  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Exact and approximate solutions for heat flow in a fluid injection well are presented. By using the approximate results, temperature surveys can be quickly analyzed in the field, and the well depths where fluids leave and the departing flow rates at these depths can be precisely determined. Although this method eliminates the need for indigenous and post injection shut-in temperatures, several surveys must be taken just before and during the injection period which can be as short as several hours. In the application described the method was used to locate the depths where hydraulic fractures were initiated in a hot dry rock geothermal well.

Murphy, H.D.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Static Temperature Survey At Molokai Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Molokai Area (Thomas, 1986) Molokai Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Static Temperature Survey At Molokai Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Molokai Area Exploration Technique Static Temperature Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Due to the very small potential market on the island of Molokai for geothermal energy, only a limited effort was made to confirm a resource in the identified PGRA. An attempt was made to locate the (now abandoned) water well that was reported to have encountered warm saline fluids. The well was located but had caved in above the water table and thus no water sampling was possible. Temperature measurements in the open portion of the well were performed, but no temperatures significantly above ambient were

13

Static Temperature Survey (Cull, 1981) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Cull, 1981) (Cull, 1981) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Static Temperature Survey (Cull, 1981) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration Technique Static Temperature Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Although absolute values of heat flow may not be accurately determined with conventional techniques even at depths of 1000 m, data useful for exploration can be obtained in shallower holes at a suitably chosen standard depth; constant corrections are then applicable but they need not be specified for relative heat flow. These values can then be used in modeling the local thermal structure which may then indicate a geothermal resource. For geothermal exploration it is preferable to measure heat flow

14

Stress versus temperature dependent activation energies in creep  

SciTech Connect

The activation energy for creep at low stresses and elevated temperatures is lattice diffusion, where the rate controlling mechanism for deformation is dislocation climb. At higher stresses and intermediate temperatures, the rate controlling mechanism changes from that of dislocation climb to one of obstacle-controlled dislocation glide. Along with this change, there occurs a change in the activation energy. It is shown that a temperature-dependent Gibbs free energy does a good job of correlating steady-state creep data, while a stress-dependent Gibbs free energy does a less desirable job of correlating the same data. Applications are made to copper and a LiF-22 mol. percent CaF2 hypereutectic salt.

Freed, A.D.; Raj, S.V.; Walker, K.P.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Airborne-temperature-survey maps of heat-flow anomalies for exploration geology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Airborne temperature surveys were used to depict the small surface temperature differences related to heat flow anomalies. Zones with conductive heat flow differences of 45 +- 16 ..mu..cal/cm/sup 2/(s) had predawn surface temperature differences of 1.4 +- 0.3/sup 0/C. Airborne temperature surveys were coordinated with field temperature surveys at Long Valley, California, the site of a known geothermal resource area. The airborne temperature surveys recorded redundant, predawn temperatures at two wavelengths and at two elevations. Overall temperature corrections were determined by calibrating dry soil surface temperatures with thermistor probes. The probes measured air and soil temperatures within 2 cm of the surface, every twenty minutes, during the survey overflights.

Del Grande, N.K.

1982-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

16

Borehole temperature survey analysis hot dry rock geothermal reservoir  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) has been actively investigating the potential for extracting geothermal energy from hot dry rock. A man-made geothermal reservoir has been formed at the Fenton Hill Test Site in northern New Mexico. The 10-MW (thermal) prototype energy extraction circulation loop has been completed and has been continuously operating since January 28 of this year. The performance of the Phase I 1000-h circulation experiment would establish technological assessment of the particular hot dry rock geothermal reservoir. The major parameters of interest include equipment operations, geochemistry, water loss, and reservoir thermal drawdown. Temperature measurements were used extensively as one method to study the man-made geothermal reservoir. The temperature probe is one of the less complex wellbore survey tools that is readily fielded to allow on-line analysis of changing conditions in the hydraulic-fracture system. Several downhole temperature instruments have been designed and fabricated for use in the GT-2/EE-1 wellbores.

Dennis, B.R.; Murphy, H.D.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

SURVEY AND SUMMARY RNA helicases and abiotic stress  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RNA helicases function as molecular motors that rearrange RNA secondary structure, potentially performing roles in any cellular process involving RNA metabolism. Although RNA helicase association with a range of cellular functions is well documented, their importance in response to abiotic stress is only beginning to emerge. This review summarizes the available data on the expression, biochemistry and physiological function(s) of RNA helicases regulated by abiotic stress. Examples originate primarily from non-mammalian organisms while instances from mammalian sources are restricted to post-translational regulation of helicase biochemical activity. Common emerging themes include the requirement of a cold-induced helicase in non-homeothermic organisms, association and regulation of helicase activity by stress-induced phosphorylation cascades, altered nuclear cytoplasmic shuttling in eukaryotes, association with the transcriptional apparatus and the diversity of biochemical activities catalyzed by a subgroup of stress-induced helicases. The data are placed in the context of a mechanism for RNA helicase involvement in cellular response to abiotic stress. It is proposed that stress-regulated helicases can catalyze a nonlinear, reversible sequence of RNA secondary structure rearrangements which function in RNA maturation or RNA proofreading, providing a mechanism by which helicase activity alters the activation state of target RNAs through regulation of the reaction equilibrium.

George W. Owttrim

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Mid-Latitude Mesoscale Temperature Variability in Six Multiship XBT Surveys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We discuss the spatial character of mesoscale temperature variability as observed in six midlatitude multiship expendable bathythermograph (XBT) surveys, two from the North Pacific and four from the North Atlantic. These surveys sample mid-ocean ...

D. E. Harrison; W. J. Emergy; J. P. Dugan; Bo-Cheng Li

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Static Temperature Survey At U.S. South Region (Smith & Dees, 1982) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Static Temperature Survey At U.S. South Region (Smith & Dees, 1982) Static Temperature Survey At U.S. South Region (Smith & Dees, 1982) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Static Temperature Survey At U.S. South Region (Smith & Dees, 1982) Exploration Activity Details Location U.S. South Region Exploration Technique Static Temperature Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes (Louisiana & Mississippi): "cased, non-flowing boreholes at least 150 m deep were sought on an opportunistic basis through state geological surveys and U.S. Geological Survey offices. Representative samples of drill cuttings were used for laboratory measurements of thermal conductivity. A total of 38 new heat flow values, ranging from less than 1 heat flow unit (hfu) (41.8 mW/m 2) to more than 2 hfu, were determined (Smith and Dees, in

20

Static Temperature Survey At Kilauea East Rift Area (Rudman & Epp, 1983) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Static Temperature Survey At Kilauea East Rift Area (Rudman & Epp, 1983) Static Temperature Survey At Kilauea East Rift Area (Rudman & Epp, 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Static Temperature Survey At Kilauea East Rift Area (Rudman & Epp, 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Kilauea East Rift Area Exploration Technique Static Temperature Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Drilling of HGP-A was completed on April 28, 1976. An equilibrium temperature was not measured in HGP-A; the well was flashed before the drilling disturbance was dissipated. However, before the mud was pumped out, temperatures in the well were measured at 15, 75, 97,145, and 193 hours, and at 13, 21, and 22 days after circulation of the drilling mud stopped. These temperature data are shown in Fig. 2. Between 305 m and 914

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature survey stress" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Static Temperature Survey At Maui Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Static Temperature Survey At Maui Area (DOE GTP) Static Temperature Survey At Maui Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Static Temperature Survey At Maui Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Maui Area Exploration Technique Static Temperature Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References (1 January 2011) GTP ARRA Spreadsheet Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Static_Temperature_Survey_At_Maui_Area_(DOE_GTP)&oldid=511154" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded Activities ARRA Funded Activities What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation:

22

Static Temperature Survey At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Static Temperature Survey At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008) Static Temperature Survey At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Static Temperature Survey At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Fish Lake Valley Area Exploration Technique Static Temperature Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes While drilling, maximum reading thermometers will be used to monitor formation temperatures as discussed above. Upon completion of the drilling a temperature log will be run inside the drill rods to K943TD. References John Deymonaz, Jeffrey G. Hulen, Gregory D. Nash, Alex Schriener (2008) Esmeralda Energy Company Final Scientific Technical Report, January

23

Static Temperature Survey At Chena Area (Erkan, Et. Al., 2008) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Static Temperature Survey At Chena Area (Erkan, Et. Al., 2008) Static Temperature Survey At Chena Area (Erkan, Et. Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Static Temperature Survey At Chena Area (Erkan, Et. Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Chena Area Exploration Technique Static Temperature Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Once a hole is drilled the natural-state pressure distribution with depth is essentially unrecoverable (Grant et al., 1982). One of the best ways to mitigate this effect is to use multi-stage drilling (White et al., 1975; Grant et al., 1982). This type of drilling was applied at Chena and its usefulness in understanding the natural flow regimes is demonstrated. Here, we illustrate how high-quality equilibrium temperature logs can often be

24

Static Temperature Survey At Medicine Lake Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4) 4) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Static Temperature Survey At Medicine Lake Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Medicine Lake Area Exploration Technique Static Temperature Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Update to Warpinski, et al., 2002 References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattler, R. Fortuna, D. A. Sanchez, J. Nathwani (2004) Geothermal Resource Exploration And Definition Projects Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Static_Temperature_Survey_At_Medicine_Lake_Area_(Warpinski,_Et_Al.,_2004)&oldid=511156" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded Activities What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version

25

Temporal Variations in Tucson, Arizona Summertime Atmospheric Moisture, Temperature and Weather Stress Levels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Summertime temperature, dewpoint, relative humidity, apparent temperature and weather stress levels have not changed significantly over the past 37 years at the Tucson, Arizona Municipal Airport. However, several of these variables show ...

Robert C. Balling Jr.; Sandra W. Brazel

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Static Temperature Survey At Kilauea Summit Area (Keller, Et Al., 1979) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Static Temperature Survey At Kilauea Summit Area (Keller, Et Al., 1979) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Static Temperature Survey At Kilauea Summit Area (Keller, Et Al., 1979) Exploration Activity Details Location Kilauea Summit Area Exploration Technique Static Temperature Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References George V. Keller, L. Trowbridge Grose, John C. Murray, Catherine K. Skokan (1979) Results Of An Experimental Drill Hole At The Summit Of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Static_Temperature_Survey_At_Kilauea_Summit_Area_(Keller,_Et_Al.,_1979)&oldid=511148"

27

Boom And Bust With The Latest 2M Temperature Surveys- Dead Horse Wells,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Boom And Bust With The Latest 2M Temperature Surveys- Dead Horse Wells, Boom And Bust With The Latest 2M Temperature Surveys- Dead Horse Wells, Hawthorne Army Depot, Terraced Hills, And Other Areas In Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Boom And Bust With The Latest 2M Temperature Surveys- Dead Horse Wells, Hawthorne Army Depot, Terraced Hills, And Other Areas In Nevada Details Activities (7) Areas (7) Regions (0) Abstract: New examples of the use of two-meter temperature (2m) surveys to quickly and inexpensively reveal blind geothermal systems were documented at Dead Horse Wells, the Hawthorne Army Depot, and Emerson Pass, all located in Nevada. In addition, more than 100 new 2m measurements at Astor Pass, Nevada resolved additional details of near-surface thermal outflow in this blind geothermal system. And at Columbus Salt Marsh, Nevada,

28

Static Temperature Survey At Reese River Area (Henkle & Ronne, 2008) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reese River Area (Henkle & Ronne, 2008) Reese River Area (Henkle & Ronne, 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Static Temperature Survey At Reese River Area (Henkle & Ronne, 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Reese River Area Exploration Technique Static Temperature Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Temperature logs were run on well 56-4 on March 22, April 28 and Nov. 9, 2007. The respective maximum bottom hole temperatures of 121.9°C, 121.2°C and 124.5°C were recorded for each of the three logging runs. References William R. Henkle, Joel Ronne (2008) Phase 2 Reese River Geothermal Project Slim Well 56-4 Drilling And Testing Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Static_Temperature_Survey_At_Reese_River_Area_(Henkle_%26_Ronne,_2008)&oldid=511159"

29

Airborne and field-temperature surveys compared at Long Valley KGRA, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An airborne predawn radiometric temperature survey was flown over the Long Valley KGRA. Radiometric temperatures were recorded at 10 to 12 ..mu..m and 4.5 to 5.5 ..mu..m. They were corrected to obtain true land-surface temperatures in agreement with field data. After accounting for thermal effects from surface features, there remained a thermal anomaly. The anomalous zone encompassed 2 km/sup 2/. It was a dry land area with a predawn surface temperature which averaged 1.4 +- 0.3/sup 0/C warmer than ambient. This area coincided with a thermal discharge zone where deep temperature gradients were 5 to 30 times normal. The predawn radiometric survey clarified and supplemented conclusions drawn from 6 to 30m deep field surveys. Heat from hydrothermal discharge was stored in a shallow aquifer and conducted to the surface.

Del Grande, N.K.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Ambient Temperature Stress Corrosion Cracking of 304L Stainless ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Study on the Stress Test of Truck Frames for Freight Trains A Study on the ... Defect Energetics and Fission Product Transport in ZrC Deformation Field and...

31

Airborne-temperature-survey maps of heat-flow anomalies for exploration geology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Precise airborne temperature surveys depicted small predawn surface temperature differences related to heat flow anomalies at the Long Valley, California, KGRA. Zones with conductive heat flow differences of 45 +- 16 ..mu..cal/cm/sup 2/(s) has predawn surface temperature differences of 1.4 +- 0.3/sup 0/C. The warmer zones had hot water circulating in a shallow (less than 60-m-deep) aquifer. Hot water is a useful geochemical indicator of geothermal and mineral resource potential. The precise airborne temperature survey method recorded redundant infrared scanner signals at two wavelengths (10 to 12 ..mu..m and 4.5 to 5.5 ..mu..m) and two elevations (0.3 km and 1.2 km). Ground thermistor probes recorded air and soil temperatures during the survey overflights. Radiometric temperatures were corrected for air-path and reflected-sky-radiation effects. Corrected temperatures were displayed in image form with color-coded maps which depicted 0.24/sup 0/C temperature differences. After accounting for surficial features on the corrected predawn thermal imagery, there remained several anomalous zones. These zones had high temperature gradients at depths from 6 to 30 m, compared to the temperature gradients in nearby areas.

Del Grande, N.K.

1982-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

32

Static Temperature Survey At Long Valley Caldera Area (Farrar, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Static Temperature Survey At Long Valley Caldera Area (Farrar, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Static Temperature Survey At Long Valley Caldera Area (Farrar, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Area Exploration Technique Static Temperature Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The temperature profile in LVEW consists of an upper part (within the volcanic fill) with generally conductive gradients averaging about 35degrees C/km. Within the underlying metamorphic basement, however,

33

Static Temperature Survey At Long Valley Caldera Area (Hurwitz, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Long Valley Caldera Area (Hurwitz, Et Al., Long Valley Caldera Area (Hurwitz, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Static Temperature Survey At Long Valley Caldera Area (Hurwitz, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Area Exploration Technique Static Temperature Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes At shallow depths in the caldera References Shaul Hurwitz, Christopher D. Farrar, Colin F. Williams (2010) The Thermal Regime In The Resurgent Dome Of Long Valley Caldera, California- Inferences From Precision Temperature Logs In Deep Wells Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Static_Temperature_Survey_At_Long_Valley_Caldera_Area_(Hurwitz,_Et_Al.,_2010)&oldid=511152"

34

Static Temperature Survey At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik &  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Static Temperature Survey At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Static Temperature Survey At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Lassen Volcanic National Park Area Exploration Technique Static Temperature Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes In 1978, the Walker "O" No. 1 well at Terminal Geyser was drilled to 1222 m, all in volcanic rocks (Beall, 1981). Temperature-log profiles made 10

35

Sea Surface Temperature and Wind Stress Curl Variability near a Cape  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The coupling between sea surface temperature (SST), SST gradients, and wind stress curl variability near a cape off Brazil is investigated using satellite observations and several different SST high-resolution analyses. The cape is characterized ...

Renato M. Castelao

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Summertime Coupling between Sea Surface Temperature and Wind Stress in the California Current System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Satellite observations of wind stress and sea surface temperature (SST) are analyzed to investigate oceanatmosphere interaction in the California Current System (CCS). As in regions of strong SST fronts elsewhere in the World Ocean, SST in the ...

Dudley B. Chelton; Michael G. Schlax; Roger M. Samelson

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Covariability of Surface Wind and Stress Responses to Sea Surface Temperature Fronts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The responses of surface wind and wind stress to spatial variations of sea surface temperature (SST) are investigated using satellite observations of the surface wind from the Quick Scatterometer (QuikSCAT) and SST from the Advanced Microwave ...

Larry W. ONeill; Dudley B. Chelton; Steven K. Esbensen

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Static Temperature Survey At Vale Hot Springs Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vale Hot Springs Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Vale Hot Springs Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Static Temperature Survey At Vale Hot Springs Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location Vale Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Static Temperature Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Numerous temperature logs were taken with Sandia's platinum-resistance-thermometer (PRT) tool which along with a Sandia logging truck remained on-site for the entire project. Static temperature logs (no flow in hole) were done with this tool when coring operations were suspended for bit trips, rig maintenance, or other time intervals that would permit the hole to warm up near its static temperature gradient.

39

Static Temperature Survey At Steamboat Springs Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Steamboat Springs Area Steamboat Springs Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location Steamboat Springs Area Exploration Technique Static Temperature Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Numerous temperature logs were taken with Sandia'splatinum-resistance-thermometer (PRT) tool which along with a Sandia logging truck remained on-site for the entire project. Static temperature logs (no flow in hole) were done with this tool before each series of productiotilnjection tests. References Jim Combs, John T. Finger, Colin Goranson, Charles E. Hockox Jr., Ronald D. Jacobsen, Gene Polik (1999) Slimhole Handbook- Procedures And Recommendations For Slimhole Drilling And Testing In Geothermal Exploration Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Static_Temperature_Survey_At_Steamboat_Springs_Area_(Combs,_Et_Al.,_1999)&oldid=511162"

40

Upgrading Amerada-type survey clocks for high-temperature geothermal service  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Amerada type subsurface recording gauges have been used by the oil and gas industry for many years. These mechanical logging instruments are currently used by the growing geothermal industry. As the gauges were designed for service in low-temperature oil and gas wells, a significant number of failures are occurring at elevated geothermal temperatures. The spring-driven mechanical survey clocks appear to be the primary cause of these failures. The clock mechanisms tend to stop or lock-up when exposed to temperatures as high as 300/sup 0/C. A project that was undertaken to upgrade the survey clocks to 300/sup 0/C capability is summarized. The major problems causing clock failure were determined and were rectified by minor modifications and lubrication of the moving parts. Several clocks so modified performed reliably, both during laboratory oven tests and during field tests performed in actual geothermal wells at temperatures up to 330/sup 0/C.

Major, B.H.; Witten, C.L.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature survey stress" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Rapid reconnaissance of geothermal prospects using shallow temperature surveys. Second technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The previously examined geothermal sites at Long Valley and Coso were studied in much greater detail. Techniques for correcting the 2-m temperature data were evaluated. Using a preliminary model and analysis of the Coso data, the importance of measuring soil thermal diffusivity data at each temperature probe site was shown. Corrected 2-m temperature anomaly at Coso was compared with a low altitude aeromagnetic anomaly and an anomaly outlined by electrical resistivity methods obtained independently. Preliminary tests were made with a simple thermal conductivity probe demonstrating the feasibility of measuring soil thermal diffusivity at the time the 2-m temperatures are recorded. This opens the way for operational shallow temperature surveys in areas which do not have, as at Coso, a simple set of surface conditions. It is concluded that making useful shallow temperature measurements where there is a modest amount of ground water flow need not be a hopeless task.

LeSchack, L.A.; Lewis, J.E.; Chang, D.C.; Lewellen, R.I.; O'Hara, N.W.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Objective measures, sensors and computational techniques for stress recognition and classification: A survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stress is a major growing concern in our day and age adversely impacting both individuals and society. Stress research has a wide range of benefits from improving personal operations, learning, and increasing work productivity to benefiting society - ... Keywords: Computational stress model, Pattern recognition, Stress classification, Stress computational techniques, Stress prediction, Stress sensors

Nandita Sharma; Tom Gedeon

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Strain rate, temperature and representative length scale influence on plasticity and yield stress in copper  

SciTech Connect

Shock compression of materials constitutes a complex process involving high strain rates, elevated temperatures and compression of the lattice. Materials properties are greatly affected by temperature, the representative length scale and the strain rate of the deformation. Experimentally, it is difficult to study the dynamic microscopic mechanisms that affect materials properties following high intensity shock loading, but they can be investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Moreover, MD allows a better control over some parameters. We are using MD simulations to study the effect of the strain rate, representative length scale and temperature on the properties of metals during compression. A half-million-atom Cu sample is subjected to strain rates ranging from 10{sup 7} s{sup -1} to 10{sup 12} s{sup -1} at different temperatures ranging from 50K to 1500K. Single crystals as well as polycrystals are investigated. Plasticity mechanisms as well as the evolution of the micro- and macro-yield stress are observed. Our results show that the yield stress increases with increasing strain rate and decreasing temperature. We also show that the strain rate at which the transition between constant and increasing yield stress as a function of the temperature occurs increases with increasing temperature. Calculations at different grain sizes will give an insight into the grain size effect on the plasticity mechanisms and the yield stress.

Dupont, Virginie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Germann, Timothy C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

44

Rapid reconnaissance of geothermal prospects using shallow temperature surveys. Semi-annual technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Shallow (2-m) soil temperature data have been collected at 27 sites at Long Valley, California and at 102 sites at Coso, California. These geothermal areas are locations where traditional deep reconnaissance geothermal survey bore holes have been emplaced, allowing us to compare directly the shallow temperature results with standard geothermal exploration techniques. The effects of surface roughness, albedo, soil thermal diffusivity, topography and elevation in making the necessary corrections to the 2-m temperature data were considered. The corrected data for both locations have been plotted up by computer to avoid any personal bias, and have been compared with the published 10-m contour data at Long Valley and the 30-m contour data for Coso. Close geometrical similarity has been observed. Additionally, previously located faults have been identified with the shallow temperature survey technique. Due to the relative inexpensiveness of the technique, it was concluded that shallow temperature exploration should be one of the first geophysical surveys initiated at a geothermal prospect to help guide the development and expenditure of financial resources when embarking on a detailed exploration program.

LeSchack, L.A.; Lewis, J.E.; Chang, D.C.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Rapid reconnaissance of geothermal prospects using shallow temperature surveys. Semi-annual technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Shallow (2-m) soil temperature data have been collected at 27 sites at Long Valley, California, and at 102 sites at Coso, California. These geothermal areas are locations where traditional deep reconnaissance geothermal survey bore holes have been emplaced, allowing us to compare directly our shallow temperature results with standard geothermal exploration techniques. The effects of surface roughness, albedo, soil thermal diffusivity, topography and elevation were considered in making the necessary corrections to our 2-m temperature data. The corrected data for both locations have been plotted up by computer to avoid any personal bias, and have been compared with the published 10-m contour data at Long Valley and the 30-m contour data for Coso. Close geometrical similarity has been observed. Additionally, previously located faults were identified with the shallow temperature survey technique. Due to the relative inexpensiveness of this technique, it was concluded that shallow temperature exploration should be one of the first geophysical surveys initiated at a geothermal prospect to help guide the development and expenditure of financial resources when embarking on a detailed exploration program.

LeSchack, L.A.; Lewis, J.E.; Chang, D.C.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Static Temperature Survey At Medicine Lake Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Medicine Lake Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Medicine Lake Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Static Temperature Survey At Medicine Lake Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Medicine Lake Area Exploration Technique Static Temperature Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The Glass Mountain region of northern California, which is considered to be one of the sites of the greatest untapped geothermal potential in the lower 48 states, is the focus of an exploration project to identify the characteristics of the resource at the Fourmile Hill location (northwest of Medicine Lake in T44N R3E). The objective of Phase I work was to deepen a temperature gradient well to finalize the assessment of the site. The

47

Static Temperature Survey At Long Valley Caldera Area (Sorey, Et Al., 1991)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Long Valley Caldera Area (Sorey, Et Al., 1991) Long Valley Caldera Area (Sorey, Et Al., 1991) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Static Temperature Survey At Long Valley Caldera Area (Sorey, Et Al., 1991) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Area Exploration Technique Static Temperature Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Discusses temperature and lithologic data from a dozen or so wells drilled, both by industry and the scientific community. At shallow depths in the caldera References Michael L. Sorey, Gene A. Suemnicht, Neil C. Sturchio, Gregg A. Nordquist (1991) New Evidence On The Hydrothermal System In Long Valley Caldera, California, From Wells, Fluid Sampling, Electrical Geophysics, And Age Determinations Of Hot-Spring Deposits

48

Static Temperature Survey At Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Static Temperature Survey At Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location Fort Bliss Area Exploration Technique Static Temperature Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Three principal types of data were obtained from this drilling project: core samples of the lithology penetrated by the holes, records of drilling behavior (such as water level in the hole, changes in rate of penetration etc.), and multiple temperature logs (both during and after drilling) in each well. A suite of geophysical logs (gamma ray, neutron, sonic, and resistivity) was also run after completion of drilling.

49

Static Temperature Survey At Newberry Caldera Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Newberry Caldera Area Newberry Caldera Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location Newberry Caldera Area Exploration Technique Static Temperature Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Downhole data collection during this operation was primarily limited to temperature measurements. These temperature logs were taken with Sandia's platinum-resistance-thermometer (PRT) tool which along with a Sandia logging truck remained on-site for the entire project. This instrument uses a simple resistance bridge, with changes in resistance measured from the surface through a four-conductor cable. Since there are no downhole electronics, temperature drift with time is negligible and the PRT temperature measurements are considered a reference standard for this kind

50

Static Temperature Survey At San Andreas Region (Williams, Et Al., 2004) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

San Andreas Region (Williams, Et Al., 2004) San Andreas Region (Williams, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Static Temperature Survey At San Andreas Region (Williams, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location San Andreas Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Static Temperature Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown Notes As part of an ongoing effort to investigate the thermal regime of California basins, the USGS has measured heat flow in idle oil and gas wells throughout the state. (Details and references on the published data presented in this paper can be found in the USGS heat flow database for California online at http://quake.wr.usgs.gov/heatflow/. Major references are Sass et al., 1971, Lachenbruch and Sass, 1980, DeRito et al., 1988, and

51

Comparative studies of geothermal surveys in 3-meter and temperature-gradient holes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The reliability of conducting temperature surveys within the upper 3 meters of the surface to map geothermal anomalies is demonstrated in experiments at two prospects in which deeper gradient hole data were obtained. The 3m temperatures faithfully outlined the thermal anomaly at McCoy, Nevada; and in Dixie Valley, NV 3m surveys reproduced and detailed patterns derived from 40m data. These encouraging results led to the development of multi-thermistor strings for logging the seasonal wave within the upper 3 meters. From many such logs, diffusivity variations can be detected, which might otherwise be misconstrued as thermal anomalies. The technique is demonstrated by a typical Basin-Range reconnaissance project. As many as 10 or more 3m holes can be emplaced in the time required for a conventional gradient well, and with considerably less impact on the environment.

Lang, A.L.; Deymonaz, J.; Pilkington, H.D.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Electrodeposition of nickel from low temperature sulfamate electrolytes.Part 1 :Electrochemistry and film stress.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The film stress of Ni films deposited at near-ambient temperatures from sulfamate electrolytes was studied. The particulate filtering of the electrolyte, a routine industrial practice, becomes an important deposition parameter at lower bath temperatures. At 28 C, elevated tensile film stress develops at low current densities (<10 mA/cm{sup 2}) if the electrolyte is filtered. Filtering at higher current densities has a negligible effect on film stress. A similar though less pronounced trend is observed at 32 C. Sulfate-based Ni plating baths display similar film stress sensitivity to filtering, suggesting that this is a general effect for Ni electrodeposition. It is shown that filtering does not significantly change the current efficiency or the pH near the surface during deposition. The observed changes in film stress are thus attributed not to adsorbed hydrogen but instead to the effects of filtering on the formation and concentration of polyborate species due to the decreased solubility of boric acid at near-ambient temperatures.

Hachman, John T.; Kelly, J.J. (IBM/T.J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY); Talin, Albert Alec; Goods, Steven Howard

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Growth strains and stress relaxation in alumina scales during high temperature oxidation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

combine with thermal stresses that develop during cooling toConsequently, thermal stresses build up on cooling withoutduring cooling and that the stresses resulting from thermal

Hou, P.Y.; Paulikas, A.P.; Veal, B.W.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Measuring Frac-pack Conductivity at Reservoir Temperature and High Closure Stress  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ultra-deepwater reservoirs are important non-conventional reservoirs that hold the potential to produce billions of barrels of hydrocarbons but present major challenges. Hydraulic fracturing or frac-packing high permeability reservoirs is different from the conventional hydraulic fracturing technology used in low permeability formations. While the main purpose of the conventional technique is to create a long, highly conductive path, frac-packing on the other hand is used predominantly to get past near wellbore formation damage, control sand production and reduce near wellbore pressure drop. Ultra-deepwater reservoirs are usually high temperature and high pressure with high permeabilities. Frac-packing these types of wells requires short fractures packed with high proppant concentrations. Understanding the behavior of the fracture fluid and proppant is critical to pump such a job successfully and to ensure long term productivity from the fracture. A series of laboratory experiments have been conducted to research the different problems resulting from high temperature and pressure which negatively affect conductivity. Unlike conventional long-term conductivity measurements, we placed the proppant into the fracture and pumped fracture fluid through it and then measured conductivity by pumping oil to represent true reservoir conditions. Proppant performance and fracture fluids clean-up during production were examined. High strength proppant is ideal for deep fracture stimulations and in this study different proppant loadings at different stresses were tested to measure the impact of crushing and embedment on conductivity. The preliminary test results indicated that oil at reservoir conditions does improve clean-up of fracture fluid left back in the proppant pack. Increasing the proppant concentration in the fracture showed higher conductivity values even at high closure stress. The increase in effective closure stress with high temperature yielded significant loss in conductivity values as compared to those obtained from industry tests.

Fernandes, Preston X.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Thermally activated low temperature creep and primary water stress corrosion cracking of NiCrFe alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A phenomenological SCC-CGR model is developed based on an apriori assumption that the SCC-CGR is controlled by low temperature creep (LTC). This mode of low temperature time dependent deformation occurs at stress levels above the athermal flow stress by a dislocation glide mechanism that is thermally activated and may be environmentally assisted. The SCC-CGR model equations developed contain thermal activation parameters descriptive of the dislocation creep mechanism. Thermal activation parameters are obtained by fitting the CGR model to SCC-CGR data obtained on Alloy 600 and Alloy X-750. These SCC-CGR activation parameters are compared to LTC activation parameters obtained from stress relaxation tests. When the high concentration of hydrogen at the tip of an SCC crack is considered, the SCC-CGR activation energies and rate sensitivities are shown to be quantitatively consistent with hydrogen reducing the activation energy and increasing the strain rate sensitivity in LTC stress relaxation tests. Stress dependence of SCC-CGR activation energy consistent with that found for the LTC activation energy. Comparisons between temperature dependence of the SCC-CGR stress sensitivity and LTC stress sensitivity provide a basis for speculation on effects of hydrogen and solute carbon on SCC crack growth rates.

Hall, M.M. Jr.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Survey of processes for high temperature-high pressure gas purification. [52 references  

SciTech Connect

In order to ensure the optimum operating efficiency of a combined-cycle electric power generating system, it is necessary to provide gas treatment processes capable of operating at high temperatures (> 1000/sup 0/F) and high pressures (> 10 atm (absolute)). These systems will be required to condition the inlet stream to the gas turbine to suitable levels of gas purity (removal of particulate matter, sulfur, nitrogen, and alkali metal compounds) to be compatible with both environmental and machine constraints. A survey of the available and developmental processes for the removal of these various contaminant materials has been conducted. Based on the data obtained from a variety of sources, an analysis has been performed to evaluate the performance of a number of potential cleanup processes in view of the overall system needs. The results indicate that commercially available, reliable, and economically competitive hot-gas cleanup systems (for the removal of H/sub 2/S, particulate matter, alkali, and nitrogen compounds) capable of conditioning raw product gas to the levels required for turbine use will not be available for some time.

Meyer, J.P.; Edwards, M.S.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Survey of industrial coal conversion equipment capabilities: high-temperature, high-pressure gas purification  

SciTech Connect

In order to ensure optimum operating efficiencies for combined-cycle electric generating systems, it is necessary to provide gas treatment equipment capable of operating at high temperatures (>1000/sup 0/F) and high pressure (>10 atmospheres absolute). This equipment, when assembled in a process train, will be required to condition the inlet stream to a gas turbine to suitable levels of gas purity (removal of particulate matter, sulfur, nitrogen, and alkali metal compounds) so that it will be compatible with both environmental and machine constraints. In this work, a survey of the available and developmental equipment for the removal of particulate matter and sulfur compounds has been conducted. In addition, an analysis has been performed to evaluate the performance of a number of alternative process configurations in light of overall system needs. Results from this study indicate that commercially available, reliable, and economically competitive hot-gas cleanup equipment capable of conditioning raw product gas to the levels required for high-temperatue turbine operation will not be available for some time.

Meyer, J. P.; Edwards, M. S.

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Temperature histories in geothermal wells: survey of rock thermomechanical properties and drilling, production, and injection case studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal and mechanical properties for geothermal formations are tabulated for a range of temperatures and stress conditions. Data was obtained from the technical literature and direct contacts with industry. Thermal properties include heat capacity, conductivity, and diffusivity. Undisturbed geothermal profiles are also presented. Mechanical properties include Youngs modulus and Poisson ratio. GEOTEMP thermal simulations of drilling, production and injection are reported for two geothermal regions, the hot dry rock area near Los Alamos and the East Mesa field in the Imperial Valley. Actual drilling, production, and injection histories are simulated. Results are documented in the form of printed GEOTEMP output and plots of temperatures versus depth, radius, and time. Discussion and interpretation of the results are presented for drilling and well completion design to determine: wellbore temperatures during drilling as a function of depth; bit temperatures over the drilling history; cement temperatures from setting to the end of drilling; and casing and formation temperatures during drilling, production, and injection.

Goodman, M.A.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Reply to "Comment on `Jamming at zero temperature and zero applied stress: The epitome of disorder' "  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We answer the questions raised by Donev, Torquato, Stillinger, and Connelly in their "Comment on "Jamming at zero temperature and zero applied stress: The epitome of disorder.' " We emphasize that we follow a fundamentally different approach than they have done to reinterpret random close packing in terms of the "maximally random jammed" framework. We define the "maximally random jammed packing fraction" to be where the largest number of initial states, chosen completely randomly, have relaxed final states at the jamming threshold in the thermodynamic limit. Thus, we focus on an ensemble of states at the jamming threshold, while DTSC are interested in determining the amount of order and degree of jamming for a particular configuration. We also argue that soft-particle systems are as "clean" as those using hard spheres for studying jammed packings and point out the benefits of using soft potentials.

C. S. O'Hern; L. E. Silbert; A. J. Liu; S. R. Nagel

2005-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

60

Approximate analysis of the temperature induced stresses and deformations of composite shells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper simple formulas are presented which can be used to estimate the response of composite plates and shells to hygrothermal loads. The layup of the shell can be arbitrary (i.e., it can be symmetric or unsymmetric, balanced or unbalanced). The formulas serve two purposes. First, they can be used to calculate directly the stresses, strains, and displacements caused by a temperature and a moisture gradient. Second, the formulas can be used to determine the 'effective' thermal and moisture expansion coefficients which are the parameters needed in more accurate numerical (FEM) calculations. The accuracies of the approximate formulas were assessed by sample problems. In these problems the hygrothermal deformations of cylinders and cylindrical segments were calculated by the present approximate formulas and by an exact, three-dimensional analysis. The results of the exact and approximate methods were compared. These comparisons showed that the approximate formulas yield the deformations with a high degree of accuracy. 18 refs.

Kollar, L.P. (Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States))

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature survey stress" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Thermal Analysis to Calculate the Vessel Temperature and Stress in Alcator C-Mod Due to the Divertor Upgrade  

SciTech Connect

Alcator C-Mod is planning an upgrade to its outer divertor. The upgrade is intended to correct the existing outer divertor alignment with the plasma, and to operate at elevated temperatures. Higher temperature operation will allow study of edge physics behavior at reactor relevant temperatures. The outer divertor and tiles will be capable of operating at 600oC. Longer pulse length, together with the plasma and RF heat of 9MW, and the inclusion of heater elements within the outer divertor produces radiative energy which makes the sustained operation much more difficult than before. An ANSYS model based on ref. 1 was built for the global thermal analysis of C-Mod. It models the radiative surfaces inside the vessel and between the components, and also includes plasma energy deposition. Different geometries have been simulated and compared. Results show that steady state operation with the divertor at 600oC is possible with no damage to major vessel internal components. The differential temperature between inner divertor structure, or "girdle" and inner vessel wall is ~70oC. This differential temperature is limited by the capacity of the studs that hold the inner divertor backing plates to the vessel wall. At a 70oC temperature differential the stress on the studs is within allowable limits. The thermal model was then used for a stress pass to quantify vessel shell stresses where thermal gradients are significant.

Han Zhang, Peter H. Titus, Robert Ellis, Soren Harrison and Rui Vieira

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

62

Frequency-Wavenumber Spectra of Sea Surface Temperature and Wind-Stress Curl in the Eastern North Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Frequency-wavenumber spectra of sea surface temperature and wind-stress curl are computed from 11 years of surface marine observations taken in the eastern North Pacific. These data were averaged by month and 2 quadrangles to yield spectra with ...

Artemio Gallegos-Garcia; William J. Emery; Robert O. Reid; Lorenz Magaard

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

The Impact of Spume Droplets and Wave Stress Parameterizations on Simulated Near-Surface Maritime Wind and Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of ocean gravity waves on the wind and temperature above the surface is investigated using a one-dimensional boundary layer model. The effect of the wave-induced stress is evaluated using three parameterizations: wave age (WaAg), ...

Valdir Innocentini; Iury Angelo Gonalves

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Influence of substrate properties and annealing temperature on the stress state of magnetron sputtered tungsten thin films  

SciTech Connect

The influence of substrate properties and annealing temperature on the stress state of tungsten thin films deposited by dc reactive magnetron sputtering was studied using 310 steel (AISI), Fecralloy registered and Invar registered substrates. Besides elemental tungsten, only residual amounts of contamination elements (O, C, Ar, etc.) were detected by electron probe microanalysis. Only the {alpha}-W crystalline structure, with a preferential <110> orientation, was detected in all the films by x-ray diffraction. The highest lattice parameters were measured for the films deposited on 310 steel substrates, while the smallest values were obtained for the films deposited on Invar registered substrates. These results are closely related to the thermal expansion coefficients of the substrates. All the as-deposited films were in a compressive stress state independent of the substrate type (-3 GPa for 310 steel and Fecralloy registered substrates and -2 GPa for Invar registered substrates). The residual compressive stresses of the films deposited on Fecralloy registered substrates strongly decrease with annealing temperatures up to {approx_equal}-8 GPa at 1175 K. This result shows that the measured compressive stresses are not real, and they are a direct consequence of plastic deformation of the substrate. On the contrary, the compressive stresses measured in the films deposited on Invar registered and 310 steel substrates are real as plastic deformation of the substrates is not observed.

Oliveira, J. C.; Cavaleiro, A. [Grupo de Materiais e Engenharia de Superficies, ICEMS, Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica, Universidade de Coimbra, Polo II, Pinhal de Marrocos, 3030 Coimbra (Portugal)

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

65

Volume fraction optimization of functionally graded composite panels for stress reduction and critical temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The volume fraction optimization of functionally graded (FG) composite panels is studied by considering stress reduction and thermo-mechanical buckling. The structure is made up of ceramic layer, functionally graded materials (FGMs) and metal layer. ... Keywords: 3-D finite element model, Functionally graded materials, Optimization, Stress reduction, Thermo-mechanical buckling

Kyung-Su Na; Ji-Hwan Kim

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Climate Change, High-Temperature Stress, Rice Productivity, and Water Use in Eastern China: A New Superensemble-Based Probabilistic Projection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of climate change on rice productivity in China remains highly uncertain because of uncertainties from climate change scenarios, parameterizations of biophysical processes, and extreme temperature stress in crop models. Here, the Model ...

Fulu Tao; Zhao Zhang

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Low temperature thermal energy storage: a state-of-the-art survey  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The preliminary version of an analysis of activities in research, development, and demonstration of low temperature thermal energy storage (TES) technologies having applications in renewable energy systems is presented. Three major categories of thermal storage devices are considered: sensible heat; phase change materials (PCM); and reversible thermochemical reactions. Both short-term and annual thermal energy storage technologies based on prinicples of sensible heat are discussed. Storage media considered are water, earth, and rocks. Annual storage technologies include solar ponds, aquifers, and large tanks or beds of water, earth, or rocks. PCM storage devices considered employ salt hydrates and organic compounds. The sole application of reversible chemical reactions outlined is for the chemical heat pump. All program processes from basic research through commercialization efforts are investigated. Nongovernment-funded industrial programs and foreign efforts are outlined as well. Data describing low temperature TES activities are presented also as project descriptions. Projects for all these programs are grouped into seven categories: short-term sensible heat storage; annual sensible heat storage; PCM storage; heat transfer and exchange; industrial waste heat recovery and storage; reversible chemical reaction storage; and models, economic analyses, and support studies. Summary information about yearly funding and brief descriptions of project goals and accomplishments are included.

Baylin, F.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Stress corrosion cracking behavior of Alloy 600 in high temperature water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SCC susceptibility of Alloy 600 in deaerated water at 360 C (statically loaded U-bend specimens) is dependent on microstructure and whether the material was cold-worked and annealed (CWA) or hot-worked and annealed (HWA). All cracking was intergranular, and materials lacking grain boundary carbides were most susceptible to SCC initiation. CWA tubing materials are more susceptible to SCC initiation than HWA ring-rolled forging materials with similar microstructures (optical metallography). In CWA tubing materials, one crack dominated and grew to a visible size. HWA materials with a low hot-working finishing temperature (980 C) and a high-temperature final anneal (>1040 C), with grain boundaries that are fully decorated, developed only microcracks in all specimens. These materials did not develop large, visually detectable cracks, even after more than 300 weeks exposure. A low-temperature thermal treatment (610 C for 7h), which reduces or eliminates SCC in Alloy 600, did not eliminate microcrack formation in high temperature processed HWA materials. Conventional metallographic and analytical electron microscopy (AEM) were done on selected materials to identify the factors responsible for the observed differences in cracking behavior. Major difference between high-temperature HWA and low-temperature HWA and CWA materials was that the high temperature processing and final annealing produced predominantly ``semi-continuous`` dendritic M{sub 7}C{sub 3} carbides along grain boundaries with a minimal amount of intragranular carbides. Lower temperature processing produced intragranular M7C3 carbides, with less intergranular carbides.

Webb, G.L.; Burke, M.G.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Survey of Materials Research and Development Needs to Support Early Deployment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The VHTR reference concept is a helium-cooled, graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor with an outlet temperature of 1000 C or higher. It is expected that the VHTR will be purchased in the future as either an electricity producing plant with a direct cycle gas turbine or a hydrogen producing (or other process heat application) plant. The process heat version of the VHTR will require that an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) and primary gas circulator be located in an adjoining power conversion vessel. A third VHTR mission - actinide burning - can be accomplished with either the hydrogen-production or gas turbine designs. The first ''demonstration'' VHTR will produce both electricity and hydrogen using the IHX to transfer the heat to either a hydrogen production plant or the gas turbine. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will be designed to assure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage during accidents. The fuel cycle will be a once-through very high burnup low-enriched uranium fuel cycle. The purpose of this report is to identify the materials research and development needs for the VHTR. To do this, we focused on the plant design described in Section 2, which is similar to the GT-MHR plant design (850 C core outlet temperature). For system or component designs that present significant material challenges (or far greater expense) there may be some viable design alternatives or options that can reduce development needs or allow use of available (cheaper) materials. Nevertheless, we were not able to assess those alternatives in the time allotted for this report and, to move forward with this material research and development assessment, the authors of this report felt that it was necessary to use a GT-MHR type design as the baseline design.

Eric Shaber; G. Baccaglini; S. Ball; T. Burchell; B. Corwin; T. Fewell; M. Labar; P. MacDonald; P. Rittenhouse; Russ Vollam; F. Southworth

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Survey Statisticians  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Survey Statisticians Survey Statisticians The U.S.Energy Information Administration (EIA) within the Department of Energy has forged a world-class information program that stresses quality, teamwork, and employee growth. In support of our program, we offer a variety of profes- sional positions, including the Survey Statistician, who measures the amounts of energy produced and consumed in the United States. Responsibilities: Survey Statisticians perform or participate in one or more of the following important functions: * Design energy surveys by writing questions, creating layouts and testing questions for clarity and accuracy. * Conduct energy surveys to include sending out and tracking survey responses, editing and analyzing data submis- sions and communicating with respondents to verify data.

71

Stress Corrosion Cracking of Alloy 690tt in High Temperature High ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Design of Pre-Weakening and Evaluation of Structural Safety for Explosive ... Crystallization Temperature of Pd-Cu-Si System Using Integrated Thin Film Samples ... Mechanical Properties of 5083 Aluminium Welds after Manual and Automatic...

72

Comparison of different algebraic stress models in predicting temperature fluctuations and mean velocity in liquid-metals  

SciTech Connect

The present work consists of a numerical investigation comparing three algebraic stress closures for turbulence in predicting the variance of temperature fluctuations and mean velocity for flow of mercury. The models of Ljuboja and Rodi, Sha and Launder, and Lemos and Sesonske are used, as they handle differently the modeling of the dissipation rate of temperature fluctuations, and several terms in the algebraic equations for the turbulent fluxes. A sensitivity analysis on some constants of the latter model is also presented. Pipe flow with constant wall heat flux were the geometry and boundary condition. The range for Re was from 30000 to 60000, and the buoyancy parameter Ra/Re/sup 2/ was varied from 10/sup -5/ to 10/sup -4/, where Ra is the Rayleigh number. The model of Lemos and Sesonske shows a substantial improvement in predicting temperature fluctuations, whereas predictions for the mean velocity show a weak dependence on the model used. Nevertheless, the model of Lemos and Sesonske gives results closer to available experimental data.

de Lemos, M.J.S.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Enhanced stability against bias-stress of metal-oxide thin film transistors deposited at elevated temperatures  

SciTech Connect

Transparent zinc-tin-oxide (ZTO) thin film transistors (TFTs) have been prepared by DC magnetron sputtering. Compared to reference devices with a channel deposited at room temperature and subsequently annealing at 400 deg. C, a substantially enhanced stability against bias stress is evidenced for devices with in-situ substrate heating during deposition (400 deg. C). A reduced density of sub-gap defect states in TFT channels prepared with in-situ substrate heating is found. Concomitantly, a reduced sensitivity to the adsorption of ambient gases is evidenced for the in-situ heated devices. This finding is of particular importance for an application as driver electronics for organic light emitting diode displays.

Fakhri, M.; Goerrn, P.; Riedl, T. [Institute of Electronic Devices, University of Wuppertal, Rainer-Gruenter-St. 21, 42119 Wuppertal (Germany); Weimann, T.; Hinze, P. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt Braunschweig, Bundesallee 100, 38116 Braunschweig (Germany)

2011-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

74

Stress-Rupture, Overstressing and a Proposed New Methodology to Assess the Durability and Reliability of Ceramic Matrix Composites at Elevated Temperatures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new testing strategy is proposed to assess the durability and reliability of non- oxide continuous fiber-reinforced ceramic composites for high temperature structural applications. The strategy is based on determining the reliability (probability of failure) of these materials when subjected to random loading schedules consisting of load and temperature spikes that are superimposed on otherwise constant stress and temperature histories. The frequency and magnitude of the load and temperature spikes would be representative of the number and characteristics of the transients that are associated with a particular industrial application and that are expected to occur over the life of the component. The effect of overstressing on the stress- ruptttre behavior of a CG-NicalonTM fiber-reinforced SiC composite was investigated and results arc presented from tests conducted in ambient air at 950"C.

Lara-Curzio, E.

1999-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

75

Stress-induced VO{sub 2} films with M2 monoclinic phase stable at room temperature grown by inductively coupled plasma-assisted reactive sputtering  

SciTech Connect

We report on growth of VO{sub 2} films with M2 monoclinic phase stable at room temperature under atmospheric pressure. The films were grown on quartz glass and Si substrates by using an inductively coupled plasma-assisted reactive sputtering method. XRD-sin{sup 2}{Psi} measurements revealed that the films with M2 phase are under compressive stress in contrast to tensile stress of films with M1 phase. Scanning electron microscopy observations revealed characteristic crystal grain aspects with formation of periodical twin structure of M2 phase. Structural phase transition from M2 to tetragonal phases, accompanied by a resistance change, was confirmed to occur as the temperature rises. Growth of VO{sub 2} films composed of M2 phase crystalline is of strong interest for clarifying nature of Mott transition of strongly correlated materials.

Okimura, Kunio; Watanabe, Tomo [School of Engineering, Tokai University, 4-1-1 Kitakaname, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan); Sakai, Joe [GREMAN, UMR 7347 CNRS, Universite Francois Rabelais de Tours, Parc de Grandmont 37200 Tours (France)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Evaluation of low-temperature geothermal potential in Utah and Goshen Valleys and adjacent areas, Utah. Part I. Gravity survey  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During 1980 and 1981 a total of 569 new gravity stations were taken in Utah and Goshen Valleys and adjacent areas, Utah. The new stations were combined with 530 other gravity stations taken in previous surveys which resulted in a compilation of 1099 stations which were used in this study. The additional surveys were undertaken to assist in the evaluation of the area for the possible development of geothermal resources by providing an interpreted structural framework by delineating faults, structural trends, intrusions, thickness of valley fill, and increased density of host rock. The gravity data are presented as (1) a complete Bouguer gravity anomaly map with a 2 mgal contour interval on a scale of 1:100,000 and (2) five generally east-trending gravity profiles. A geologic interpretation of the study area was made from the gravity map and from the interpretive geologic cross sections which were modeled along the gravity profiles.

Davis, D.A.; Cook, K.L.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

An Assessment of the Sea Surface Temperature Influence on Surface Wind Stress in Numerical Weather Prediction and Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability of six climate models to capture the observed coupling between SST and surface wind stress in the vicinity of strong midlatitude SST fronts is analyzed. The analysis emphasizes airsea interactions associated with ocean meanders in ...

Eric D. Maloney; Dudley B. Chelton

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

REACTOR FUEL WASTE DISPOSAL PROJECT PRESSURE-TEMPERATURE EFFECT ON SALT CAVITIES AND SURVEY OF LIQUEFIED PETROLEUM GAS STORAGE  

SciTech Connect

It is deemed feasible to store reactor fuel wastes in a salt dome cavity to a depth where the differential in pressure between the soil over-burden pressure and pressure of the fluid inside the cavity does not exceed 3000 psi, and the temperature is less than 400 deg F. Tests at pressure increments of 1000 psi were conducted on a 2" cylindrical cavity contained in a 6-in. long by 6-in. cylindrical salt core. Tests indicate that the cavity exhibited complete stability under pressures to 3000 psi and temperatures to 300 deg F. At temperatures of 100 to 400 deg F and pressures to 5000 psi continuous deformation of the cavity resulted. Initial movement of the salt was observed at all pressures. This was evidenced by vertical deformation and cavity size reduction. It was noted that a point of structural equilibrium was reached at lower temperatures when the pressure did not exceed 5000 psi. A literature study reveals that the most common type of cavity utilized in liquefied petroleum gas storage is either cylindrical or ellipsoidal. A few are pear or inverted cone shaped. There was no indication of leakage for cavities when pressure tested for as long as 72 hr. This indicates that the salt mass is not permeable under conditions of prevailing underground temperature and pressure. Salt specimens tested under atmospheric Pressure and temperature exhibited permeabilities of 0.1 to 0.2 millidarcys. The cost of completing underground storage cavities in salt masses is expected to be approximately 05 per barrel of storage space. (auth)

Brown, K.E.; Jessen, F.W.; Gloyna, E.F.

1959-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

79

Thermoregulation and temperature relations of alligators and other large ectotherms inhabiting thermally stressed habitats. Progress report, 1 October 1974--30 September 1977  

SciTech Connect

Significant progress has been made in determining the mechanisms by which large ectotherms adjust to thermal stress in their natural environment. The effect of mouth gaping on head temperatures and the role of radiation, conduction and convection on body temperatures of alligators have been determined. The utility of energy budget modeling as a method for studying the thermoregulatory mechanisms of animals has been demonstrated. Steady state and time dependent models of body temperature have been tested. Convection coefficients and evaporative water loss rates have been measured for the turtle, Chysemys scripta. Climate space diagrams have been formulated and are being tested. Behavioral thermoregulation of turtles has been studied in PAR pond on the Savannah River Plant, Aiken, S.C. Steady state energy budget equations have been computed for largemouth bass. Experimental heat transfer coefficients indicate that most heat transfer is through the body wall and not via the gills. A time dependent model is being tested. It predicts the body temperature of a fish in a heterothermal environment. Theoretical calculations have been made of the effects of body size, color, and metabolism on the temperature regulation of ectotherms.

Spotila, J.R.

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Materials Reliability Program: Evaluation of Potential for Low Temperature Crack Propagation in Reactor Pressure Vessel Outlet Nozzl e Dissimilar Metal Butt Welds by Stress and Fracture Mechanics Analyses (MRP-247)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Low Temperature Crack Propagation is a form of hydrogen embrittlement that can cause, under specific environmental conditions in laboratory tests, severe degradation of the fracture resistance of nickel-base alloys X-750 and 690, and weld metals 82/182 and 52/152. While no operating plant has exhibited evidence of LTCP, the hydrogen levels and temperature conditions necessary for LTCP to occur are present during some PWR shutdowns. This report evaluates the potential for the thermal stresses generated du...

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature survey stress" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Selected data for hydrothermal-convection systems in the United States with estimated temperatures greater than or equal to 90/sup 0/C: back-up data for US Geological Survey Circular 790  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A compilation of data used in determining the accessible resource base for identified hydrothermal convection systems greater than or equal to 90/sup 0/C in the United States are presented. Geographic, geologic, chemical, isotopic, volumetric, and bibliographic data and calculated thermal energy contents are listed for all vapor-dominated and hot-water systems with estimated reservoir temperatures greater than or equal to 90/sup 0/C and reservoir depths less than 3 km known to the authors in mid 1978. Data presented here is stored in the US Geological Survey's geothermal computer file GEOTHERM. Data for individual hydrothermal convection systems in each state are arranged geographically from north to south and west to east without regard to the type or temperature of the system. Locations of the systems and corresponding reference numbers are shown on map 1 accompanying US Geological Survey Circular 790.

Mariner, R.H.; Brook, C.A.; Swanson, J.R.; Mabey, D.R.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Very Slow Strain Rate Stress-Strain Behavior and Resisting Stress ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

rectly obtained from measurements of yield stress and flow stress made in constant strain rate tests at creep strain rates and temperatures. In this paper, constant.

83

Geophysical survey, Paso Robles geothermal area, California, part of the resource assessment of low- and moderate-temperature geothermal resource areas in California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some general background information concerning the geology and geothermal occurrences in the Southern Coast Ranges is included, as well as the more detailed information dealing with the Paso Robles area proper. Results for two geophysical methods that have been used in the area: the ground magnetic and gravity surveys, are discussed and interpreted.

Chapman, R.H.; Chase, G.W.; Youngs, L.G.

1980-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

84

Group 3: Humidity, Temperature, and Voltage (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Group 3 is chartered to develop accelerated stress tests that can be used as comparative predictors of module lifetime versus stresses associated with humidity, temperature and voltage.

Wohlgemuth, J.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Interdecadal Sea Surface Temperature Variability in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean. Part II: The Role of Equatorial/Off-Equatorial Wind Stresses in a Hybrid Coupled Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many modeling studies have been carried out to investigate the role of oceanic Rossby waves linking the off-equatorial and equatorial Pacific Ocean. Although the equatorial ocean response to off-equatorial wind stress forcing alone tends to be ...

Shayne McGregor; Neil J. Holbrook; Scott B. Power

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Selected data for low-temperature (less than 90{sup 0}C) geothermal systems in the United States: reference data for US Geological Survey Circular 892  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Supporting data are presented for the 1982 low-temperature geothermal resource assessment of the United States. Data are presented for 2072 geothermal sites which are representative of 1168 low-temperature geothermal systems identified in 26 States. The low-temperature geothermal systems consist of 978 isolated hydrothermal-convection systems, 148 delineated-area hydrothermal-convection systems, and 42 delineated-area conduction-dominated systems. The basic data and estimates of reservoir conditions are presented for each geothermal system, and energy estimates are given for the accessible resource base, resource, and beneficial heat for each isolated system.

Reed, M.J.; Mariner, R.H.; Brook, C.A.; Sorey, M.L.

1983-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

87

Survey Expectations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Michigan and is known as the Michigan survey, with many other similar surveys conducted across OECD countries so as to provide up to date information on consumer expectations. Questions on expectations are also sometimes included in panel surveys... be formed, do of course make it possible to assess whether, or how far, such expectations are well-founded by comparing the experiences of individual households with their prior expectations. A key aspect of the Michigan survey, and of many other more recent...

Pesaran, M Hashem; Weale, Martin

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

88

Beowawe geothermal-resource assessment. Final report. Shallow-hole temperature survey geophysics and deep test hole Collins 76-17  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal resource investigation field efforts in the Beowawe Geysers Area, Eureka County, Nevada are described. The objectives included acquisition of geotechnical data for understanding the nature and extent of the geothermal resource boundaries south of the known resource area. Fourteen shallow (<500 feet) temperature-gradient holes plus geophysics were used to select the site for a deep exploratory well, the Collins 76-17, which was completed to a total depth of 9005 feet. Maximum downhole recorded temperature was 311/sup 0/F, but no flow could be induced.

Jones, N.O.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Digital Surveying Directional Surveying Specialists | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Digital Surveying Directional Surveying Specialists Digital Surveying Directional Surveying Specialists Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Digital Surveying Directional Surveying Specialists Author Directional Surveying Specialists Published Publisher Not Provided, 2012 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Digital Surveying Directional Surveying Specialists Citation Directional Surveying Specialists. Digital Surveying Directional Surveying Specialists [Internet]. 2012. [cited 2013/10/08]. Available from: http://www.digitalsurveying.co.za/services/geophysical-borehole-surveying/overview/optical-televiewer/ Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Digital_Surveying_Directional_Surveying_Specialists&oldid=690244"

90

The effects of Biozyme on the germination and emergence of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and sweet corn (Zea mays L.) seeds under suboptimal temperatures, pesticide overdose, and salinity stress  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effect of Biozyme-, a commercial germination stimulant, on the germination and emergence of bean and sweet corn seeds, treated with four levels of Carbofuran and Chlorothalonil, and grown under suboptimal temperatures, was evaluated. Field experiments consisted of two plantings that provided suboptimal temperatures during emergence. Pesticide overdoses caused significant detrimental effects to all emerging seedlings. These effects were magnified under the low temperatures of the first planting. BiozymeTm improved the performance of sweet corn in both plantings. In beans, however, BiozymeTm had negative effects in the first planting, while proving beneficial in the second planting. Growth chamber experiments included, additionally, four levels of salinity. Increasing salinity levels caused decreases in most of the parameters evaluated. Low temperature decreased most growth parameters and in combination with salinity acted synergistically to cause a greater detrimental effect. Pesticide treatment decreased most growth parameters, with the exception of root growth. Sweet corn had a greater tolerance to low temperatures and salinity than beans; however, it proved to be more sensitive to pesticide overdoses. These factors in combination had greater detrimental effects on sweet corn percent germination than each factor alone. Suboptimal temperatures reduced percent germination and germination rate, and increased the time to 50% germination. Mgh salinity levels combined with low temperatures acted synergystically on rate and percent germination. Biozyme increased percent germination, but did not hasten germination rate or days to 50% germination. Biozyme treatment of bean seeds helped them overcome pesticide overdose stress. Aerobic respiration was measured 48 h after imbibition. Respiration rate of bean and sweet corn seeds was reduced by pesticide overdose and decreasing temperatures. Respiratory quotient decreased as temperature decreased and increased as pesticide levels increased. Biozyme-decreased bean respiratory quotient and increased sweet corn respiratory quotient. The increase in the respiratory quotient of bean and sweet corn seeds with increasing levels of pesticide suggests an increase in C02 evolution through a pathway that does not increase O2 uptake.

Campos Cruz, Armando

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

SCO Survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Survey on Future of NIST's Standards Information Services. June 5, 2013. *. Bookmark and Share. Contact: Clare Allocca 301-975-4359. ...

2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

92

Survey Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

fsidentoi fsidentoi Survey Consumption and 'Expenditures, April 1981 March 1982 Energy Information Administration Wasningtoa D '" N """"*"""*"Nlwr. . *'.;***** -. Mik>. I This publication is available from ihe your COr : 20585 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Consum ption and Expendi tures, April 1981 Through March 1982 Part 2: Regional Data Prepared by: Bruce Egan This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administra tion, the independent statistical

93

High temperature furnace  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature furnace for use above 2000.degree.C is provided that features fast initial heating and low power consumption at the operating temperature. The cathode is initially heated by joule heating followed by electron emission heating at the operating temperature. The cathode is designed for routine large temperature excursions without being subjected to high thermal stresses. A further characteristic of the device is the elimination of any ceramic components from the high temperature zone of the furnace.

Borkowski, Casimer J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1976-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

94

Temperature gradients in a portion of Michigan: a review of the usefulness of data from the AAPG geothermal survey of North America  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Temperature gradient data derived from drill holes in an east-west zone through the center of the southern peninsula of Michigan are analyzed. The purpose of this work is to investigate possible problems in utilizing the American Association of Petroleum Geologists data base. Michigan was chosen because a review of that State's geothermal potential shows inconsistencies between gradients from shallow wells and nearby deeper wells and because the geology of the State is relativey simple. The structure and stratigraphy are discussed because an understanding of Michigan basin geology makes it easier to predict the influence of lithology on the basin's geothermal gradients. Explanations for elevated gradients are reviewed. (MHR)

Vaught, T.L.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Climate Survey  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operations Employee Operations Employee Climate Survey March 2009 Acknowledgements The Berkeley Lab Survey Team consisted of the following: Jim Krupnick, Sponsor Vera Potapenko, Project Lead Karen Ramorino, Project Manager Chris Paquette, MOR Associates Alexis Bywater, MOR Associates MOR Associates, an external consulting firm, acted as project manager for this effort, analyzing the data and preparing this report. MOR Associates specializes in continuous improve- ment, strategic thinking and leadership development. MOR Associates has conducted a number of large-scale surveys for organizations in higher education, including MIT, Stanford, the University of Chicago, and others. MOR Associates, Inc. 462 Main Street, Suite 300 Watertown, MA 02472 tel: 617.924.4501

96

VLBI surveys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Systematic surveys of astronomical objects often lead to discoveries, but always provide invaluable information for statistical studies of well-defined samples. They also promote follow-up investigations of individual objects or classes. Surveys using a yet unexplored observing wavelength, a novel technique or a new instrument are of special importance. Significantly improved observing parameters (e.g. sensitivity, angular resolution, monitoring capability) provide new insight into the morphological and physical properties of the objects studied. I give a brief overview of the important Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) imaging surveys conducted in the past. A list of surveys guides us through the developments up until the present days. I also attempt to show directions for the near future.

S. Frey

2006-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

97

Analysis and Modeling of Stresses in Thermoelectrics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 28, 2013 ... Our stress distribution results indicate that the brittle TE alloys of the ... source of energy by converting a temperature gradient to electricity.

98

Effect of sulfuric acid, oxygen, and hydrogen in high-temperature water on stress corrosion cracking of sensitized Type 304 stainless steel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The influence of dissolved oxygen and hydrogen and dilute sulfuric acid in 289/sup 0/C water on the stress-corrosion-cracking susceptibility of lightly and moderately sensitized Type 304 stainless steel was determined in constant-extension-rate tensile (CERT) tests. The CERT parameters and the fracture surface morphologies were correlated with the concentrations of dissolved oxygen and sulfate, and the electrochemical potentials of platinum and Type 304 stainless steel electrodes in simulated boiling-water reactor (BWR) environments. A particularly high susceptibility to intergranular cracking was found for the steel in the lightly sensitized condition at oxygen concentrations between approx. 0.05 and 0.2 ppM under slightly acidic conditions (pH approx. 6.0 at 25/sup 0/C), which may, in part, account for the pervasive nature of intergranular cracking in BWR piping systems. Scanning-transmission electron microscopy analyses revealed significant differences between samples in the lightly and the moderately sensitized condition with respect to the width, but not the depth, of the chromium-depleted region at the grain boundaries. The addition of 0.5 ppM hydrogen to the water had only a small mitigating effect on intergranular cracking in water containing oxygen and sulfuric acid at low concentrations; however, oxygen suppression to less than or equal to 0.05 ppM in the reactor-coolant water, by means of hydrogen additions to the feedwater, would be quite beneficial provided impurities are also maintained at very low levels.

Ruther, W.E.; Soppet, W.K.; Ayrault, G.; Kassner, T.F.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Telluric Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Telluric Survey Telluric Survey Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Telluric Survey Details Activities (3) Areas (3) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Electromagnetic Sounding Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 522.2252,222 centUSD

100

JOM Salary Survey - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

JOM Salary Survey. This survey is currently closed. Please contact the author of this survey for further assistance. Javascript is required for this site to function,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature survey stress" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Aspects of Stress Corrosion Cracking Relevant to Irradiation-Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a comprehensive survey of crack initiation issues in irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). It considers microcracking on smooth specimens and the transition from microcracking to stable crack propagation.

2002-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

102

2012 NERSC User Survey  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Results 2012 User Survey Text 2012 NERSC User Survey Text The 2012 NERSC User Survey is closed. The following is the text of the survey. Section 1: Overall Satisfaction with...

103

Rapid reconnaissance of geothermal prospects using shallow temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reconnaissance of geothermal prospects using shallow temperature surveys. Second technical report Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Rapid...

104

Yeast and Temperature  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Yeast and Temperature Yeast and Temperature Name: Alyssaaum Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: How does temperature affect yeast? Replies: Dear Alyssa, At low temperatures (0-10 C) yeast will not grow, but not die either. At temperatures 10-37 C yeast will grow and multiply, faster at higher temperatures with an optimal growth at 30 or 37 C (that depends on the species). At higher temperature the cells become stressed, meaning that their content becomes damaged and which can be repaired to some degree. At high temperatures (>50 C) the cells die. The bacteria can survive freezing under certain conditions. When baking bread all yeast dies during the process. Dr. Trudy Wassenaar yeast is a unique type of fungi that grows quickly by rapid cell division. It grows best at about 100 degrees fahrenheit, colder will cause it to go dormant, much warmer could kill it

105

Reflection Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Reflection Survey Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Reflection Survey Details Activities (35) Areas (22) Regions (2) NEPA(3) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Active Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation. Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities.

106

Reduce Stress!  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Stress! Stress! x Take a break every hour. Do some relaxation or stretching exercises or talk with someone about topics unrelated to work. Give your body and mind a rest. x Massage your hands and forearms several times a day with a vitamin E lotion. The massage will improve circulation and break up adhesions. Since you can't touch a keyboard until the lotion is absorbed, it also enforces a good break. x Massage the muscles in your neck working your way down from the skull to the shoulders, applying more force to the larger muscles as you go down. x Periodically evaluate your environment for ways to reduce stress. Try to keep your desk uncluttered so you can always find things. Make sure programs are set up correctly on the computer, and see if you can use a macro program to reduce

107

Robotic Surveying  

SciTech Connect

ZAPATA ENGINEERING challenged our engineers and scientists, which included robotics expertise from Carnegie Mellon University, to design a solution to meet our client's requirements for rapid digital geophysical and radiological data collection of a munitions test range with no down-range personnel. A prime concern of the project was to minimize exposure of personnel to unexploded ordnance and radiation. The field season was limited by extreme heat, cold and snow. Geographical Information System (GIS) tools were used throughout this project to accurately define the limits of mapped areas, build a common mapping platform from various client products, track production progress, allocate resources and relate subsurface geophysical information to geographical features for use in rapidly reacquiring targets for investigation. We were hopeful that our platform could meet the proposed 35 acres per day, towing both a geophysical package and a radiological monitoring trailer. We held our breath and crossed our fingers as the autonomous Speedrower began to crawl across the playa lakebed. We met our proposed production rate, and we averaged just less than 50 acres per 12-hour day using the autonomous platform with a path tracking error of less than +/- 4 inches. Our project team mapped over 1,800 acres in an 8-week (4 days per week) timeframe. The expertise of our partner, Carnegie Mellon University, was recently demonstrated when their two autonomous vehicle entries finished second and third at the 2005 Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Grand Challenge. 'The Grand Challenge program was established to help foster the development of autonomous vehicle technology that will some day help save the lives of Americans who are protecting our country on the battlefield', said DARPA Grand Challenge Program Manager, Ron Kurjanowicz. Our autonomous remote-controlled vehicle (ARCV) was a modified New Holland 2550 Speedrower retrofitted to allow the machine-actuated functions to be controlled by an onboard computer. The computer-controlled Speedrower was developed at Carnegie Mellon University to automate agricultural harvesting. Harvesting tasks require the vehicle to cover a field using minimally overlapping rows at slow speeds in a similar manner to geophysical data acquisition. The Speedrower had demonstrated its ability to perform as it had already logged hundreds of acres of autonomous harvesting. This project is the first use of autonomous robotic technology on a large-scale for geophysical surveying.

Suzy Cantor-McKinney; Michael Kruzic

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

1998 NERSC User Survey Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 User Survey Results 1998 User Survey Results Respondent Summary NERSC has completed its first user survey since its move to Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The survey is...

109

Definition: 2-M Probe Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: 2-M Probe Survey Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png 2-M Probe Survey Probe surveys are used to physically identify and delineate thermal anomalies. A 2-m long hollow steel tube with a tungsten-carbide alloy tip is driven into the ground using a hammer drill. Then a high-precision resistive-temperature device is inserted into the tube. The probe is then left in place for at least one hour.[2] Also Known As Probe Survey, 30-cm Probe Survey, (Temperature) Probe Survey References ↑ Mark F. Coolbaugh,Chris Sladek,James E. Faulds,Richard E. Zehner,Gary L. Oppliger. 2007. Use of Rapid Temperature Measurements at a 2-Meter Depth to Augment Deeper Temperature Gradient Drilling. In:

110

Residual stresses and stress corrosion cracking in pipe fittings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Residual stresses can play a key role in the SCC performance of susceptible materials in PWR primary water applications. Residual stresses are stresses stored within the metal that develop during deformation and persist in the absence of external forces or temperature gradients. Sources of residual stresses in pipe fittings include fabrication processes, installation and welding. There are a number of methods to characterize the magnitude and orientation of residual stresses. These include numerical analysis, chemical cracking tests, and measurement (e.g., X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction, strain gage/hole drilling, strain gage/trepanning, strain gage/section and layer removal, and acoustics). This paper presents 400 C steam SCC test results demonstrating that residual stresses in as-fabricated Alloy 600 pipe fittings are sufficient to induce SCC. Residual stresses present in as-fabricated pipe fittings are characterized by chemical cracking tests (stainless steel fittings tested in boiling magnesium chloride solution) and by the sectioning and layer removal (SLR) technique.

Parrington, R.J.; Scott, J.J.; Torres, F.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Determination of the recovery stresses developed by shape memory alloys  

SciTech Connect

A simple relationship has been developed between recovery stresses, temperature, and strain, to explain the mechanical shape memory effect in some alloys which undergo thermoelastic martensitic transformation. (GHT)

Mohamed, H.A.

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Fracture Permeability and In Situ Stress in the Dixie Valley...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reservoir Abstract Borehole televiewer, temperature and flowmeter logs and hydraulic fracturing stress measurements conducted in six wells penetrating a geothermal reservoir...

113

2009 Annual Employee Survey Results for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 Annual Employee Survey Results for 9 Annual Employee Survey Results for Department of Energy All Respondents 1) Interpretation of Results: The agency's overall results were favorable and showed the agency improving in most areas. The agency remained strong in areas pertaining to Job Satisfaction and Talent Management. The agency's biggest challenge is in Performance Culture. This is an area that the agency has been working on for several years and will continue to do so in 2010. Scores related to Leadership/Supervisory dimension showed a substantial decrease from the 2008 Federal Human Capital Survey. This may stem from the stress related to the major transition in the Administration's leadership and the lack of management stability during this process. This is an area that the agency will be closely reviewing following the 2010 Employee Viewpoint Survey

114

On the Climatic Impact of Wind Stress  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A climate model is used to study the climatic impact of the stress exerted on the ocean by the atmosphere. When this stress is set to zero everywhere, the climate becomes much colder, with global-mean near-surface air temperature dropping from ...

Oleg A. Saenko

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

User_LaunchSurvey  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Completing Assigned Survey and Completing Assigned Survey © 2011 SuccessFactors, Inc. - 1 - SuccessFactors Learning Confidential. All rights reserved. Job Aid: Launching and Completing Assigned Survey Purpose The purpose of this job aid is to guide users through the step-by-step process of launching and completing assigned surveys. Task A. Launch and Complete Assigned Survey From the Home page, filter the To-Do List to show only Surveys. Hover over the course evaluation title. Click Open. 1 2 3 3 2 1 Launch and Complete Assigned Survey 6 Steps Task A SuccessFactors Learning v 6.4 User Job Aid Launching and Completing Assigned Survey © 2011 SuccessFactors, Inc. - 2 - SuccessFactors Learning Complete the survey by selecting the radio button for the appropriate rating

116

ORISE: Characterization surveys  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterization surveys Characterization surveys An ORISE technicians performs a characterization survey The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) performs independent, objective characterization surveys to define the extent of radiological contamination at sites scheduled for decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). A fundamental aspect of all D&D projects, characterization surveys provide guidance to determine the best remediation procedures and are a cost-effective method of ensuring a site meets preliminary regulatory standards. ORISE designs characterization surveys using the data quality objectives process. This approach focuses on the particular objective of characterization, and ensures that only the data needed to address the characterization decisions are collected. Data collection efforts are

117

Proceedings: Steam Turbine Stress Corrosion Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A recent survey of utilities commissioned by EPRI indicated that cracking of steam turbine disk rims by stress corrosion was a pervasive problem in both fossil and nuclear power plants. There is a clear need to document industry experience in this area so that guidelines can be provided to utilities on managing the problem.

1997-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

118

Field Investigations And Temperature-Gradient Drilling At Marine...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

years. Work has included self-potential (SP) surveys, fault structure analyses using LiDAR surveys, and drilling and assessment of five (5) temperature-gradient holes. For...

119

INFRASTRUCTURE SURVEY 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

10 Appendices Appendix 1. Glossary of Terminology and Definitions 11 Appendix 2. Survey Definitions. There is a Glossary of Terminology and Definitions (Appendix 1). The survey form is Appendix 3 of this Report

120

Borehole Imaging of In Situ Stress Tests at Mirror Lake Research Site |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Borehole Imaging of In Situ Stress Tests at Mirror Lake Research Site Borehole Imaging of In Situ Stress Tests at Mirror Lake Research Site Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Borehole Imaging of In Situ Stress Tests at Mirror Lake Research Site Author U.S. Geological Survey Published U.S. Geological Survey, 2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Borehole Imaging of In Situ Stress Tests at Mirror Lake Research Site Citation U.S. Geological Survey. Borehole Imaging of In Situ Stress Tests at Mirror Lake Research Site [Internet]. 2013. U.S. Geological Survey. [cited 2013/10/16]. Available from: http://water.usgs.gov/ogw/bgas/toxics/ml_bips.html Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Borehole_Imaging_of_In_Situ_Stress_Tests_at_Mirror_Lake_Research_Site&oldid=688729"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature survey stress" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Environmental Survey preliminary report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Sandia National Laboratories conducted August 17 through September 4, 1987. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with Sandia National Laboratories-Albuquerque (SNLA). The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at SNLA, and interviews with site personnel. 85 refs., 49 figs., 48 tabs.

Not Available

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Infrared Surveys for AGN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

From the earliest extragalactic infrared studies AGN have shown themselves to be strong infrared sources and IR surveys have revealed new populations of AGN. I briefly review current motivations for AGN surveys in the infrared and results from previous IR surveys. The Luminous Infrared Galaxies, which in some cases house dust-enshrouded AGN, submillimeter surveys, and recent studies of the cosmic x-ray and infrared backgrounds suggest that there is a population of highly-obscured AGN at high redshift. ISO Surveys have begun to resolve the infrared background and may have detected this obscured AGN population. New infrared surveys, particularly the SIRTF Wide-area Infrared Extragalactic Legacy Survey (SWIRE), will detect this population and provide a platform for understanding the evolution of AGN, Starbursts and passively evolving galaxies in the context of large-scale structure and environment.

Smith, H E

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Infrared Surveys for AGN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

From the earliest extragalactic infrared studies AGN have shown themselves to be strong infrared sources and IR surveys have revealed new populations of AGN. I briefly review current motivations for AGN surveys in the infrared and results from previous IR surveys. The Luminous Infrared Galaxies, which in some cases house dust-enshrouded AGN, submillimeter surveys, and recent studies of the cosmic x-ray and infrared backgrounds suggest that there is a population of highly-obscured AGN at high redshift. ISO Surveys have begun to resolve the infrared background and may have detected this obscured AGN population. New infrared surveys, particularly the SIRTF Wide-area Infrared Extragalactic Legacy Survey (SWIRE), will detect this population and provide a platform for understanding the evolution of AGN, Starbursts and passively evolving galaxies in the context of large-scale structure and environment.

Harding E. Smith

2002-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

124

Rapid reconnaissance of geothermal prospects using shallow temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reconnaissance of geothermal prospects using shallow temperature surveys. Semi-annual technical report Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Rapid...

125

ICME for Residual Stress  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 8, 2012 ... Application of ICME to Weld Process Innovations and Residual Stress ... Incorporation of Residual Stresses into Design of Ni-Base Superalloy...

126

Definition: Near Infrared Surveys | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Near Infrared Surveys Near Infrared Surveys Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Near Infrared Surveys Near infrared surveys refer to multi- and hyperspectral data collected in the region just outside wavelengths detectable by the human eye. Near infrared wavelengths are generally considered to be between approximately 0.75-1.4 micrometers. View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Infrared (IR) light is electromagnetic radiation with longer wavelengths than those of visible light, extending from the nominal red edge of the visible spectrum at 700 nanometres (nm) to 1 mm. This range of wavelengths corresponds to a frequency range of approximately 430 THz down to 300 GHz, and includes most of the thermal radiation emitted by objects near room temperature. Infrared light is emitted or absorbed by molecules

127

HTTF Core Stress Analysis  

SciTech Connect

In accordance with the need to determine whether cracking of the ceramic core disks which will be constructed and used in the High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF) for heatup and cooldown experiments, a set of calculation were performed using Abaqus to investigate the thermal stresses levels and likelihood for cracking. The calculations showed that using the material properties provided for the Greencast 94F ceramic, cracking is predicted to occur. However, this modeling does not predict the size or length of the actual cracks. It is quite likely that cracks will be narrow with rough walls which would impede the flow of coolant gases entering the cracks. Based on data recorded at Oregon State University using Greencast 94F samples that were heated and cooled at prescribed rates, it was concluded that the likelihood that the cracks would be detrimental to the experimental objectives is small.

Brian D. Hawkes; Richard Schultz

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Group 3: Humidity, Temperature and Voltage (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This is a summary of the work of Group 3 of the International PV QA Task Force. Group 3 is chartered to develop accelerated stress tests that can be used as comparative predictors of module lifetime versus stresses associated with humidity, temperature and voltage.

Wohlgemuth, J.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Berkeley Lab Postdoc Survey  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Founded in 1983, MOR Associates has led dozens of major survey efforts on behalf of higher education, such as UC Berkeley, MIT, Stanford University, University of Washington,...

130

ORISE: Characterization surveys  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

extent of radiological contamination at sites scheduled for decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). A fundamental aspect of all D&D projects, characterization surveys provide...

131

The Dark Energy Survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new proposed optical?near infrared survey of 5000 square degrees of the South Galactic Cap is presented. To perform it

E. Snchez; Dark Energy Survey Collaboration

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS - - A SURVEY OF RECENT THEORETICAL STUDIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

temperature underground thermal energy storage. In Proc. Th~1980), Aquifer Thermal Energy Sto:t'age--a survey, Invit.edal modeling of thermal energy storage in aquifers. In ~~-

Tsang, Chin Fu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Radiance Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Temperature using Detectors Calibrated for Absolute Spectral Power Response, HW ... A Third Generation Water Bath Based Blackbody Source, JB ...

2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

134

REMOTE SENSING GEOLOGICAL SURVEY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REMOTE SENSING IN GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF BRAZIL August/2010 Mônica Mazzini Perrotta Remote Sensing Division Head #12;SUMMARY The Geological Survey of Brazil mission The Remote Sensing Division Main remote, Paleontology, Remote Sensing Director of Hydrology and Land Management But Remote Sensing Division gives

135

Utility Baghouse Survey 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI conducted comprehensive surveys of utility baghouse installations in 1981, 1991, and 2005 to summarize the state of the technology. The current survey focuses on nine selected pulse-jet baghouses to provide a better understanding of the design, performance, and operation of recent installations.

2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

136

NASA Customer Satisfaction Survey  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Customer Satisfaction Survey Customer Satisfaction Survey NASA's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) would like to encourage you to participate in the NASA ESDIS 2013 American Customer Satisfaction Survey. The ORNL DAAC is one of twelve data centers sponsored by NASA's Earth Science Data and Information System (ESDIS) project. The ESDIS project uses the results of this survey to evaluate our success and to determine where improvements are needed. Invitations will be sent to you, our users, from CFI Group [CFI Group on behalf of NASA (NASA@jangomail.com)] during the week of August 20, 2013. Each invitation will reference us as "ORNL DAAC / FLUXNET", and contain a unique secure link to this Web-based anonymous survey. We encourage you to participate!

137

Building Technologies Residential Survey  

SciTech Connect

Introduction A telephone survey of 1,025 residential occupants was administered in late October for the Building Technologies Program (BT) to gather information on residential occupant attitudes, behaviors, knowledge, and perceptions. The next section, Survey Results, provides an overview of the responses, with major implications and caveats. Additional information is provided in three appendices as follows: - Appendix A -- Summary Response: Provides summary tabular data for the 13 questions that, with subparts, comprise a total of 25 questions. - Appendix B -- Benchmark Data: Provides a benchmark by six categories to the 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey administered by EIA. These were ownership, heating fuel, geographic location, race, household size and income. - Appendix C -- Background on Survey Method: Provides the reader with an understanding of the survey process and interpretation of the results.

Secrest, Thomas J.

2005-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

138

Stability Parameters and Wind-Stress Coefficients under Various Atmospheric Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stability parameters and wind-stress coefficients under various atmospheric conditions are related to wind velocity and air-sea temperature difference. Readily applicable formulae, without iterative computations, of wind-stress coefficients under ...

Jin Wu

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

The Development of a Warm-Weather Relative Stress Index for Environmental Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The heat stress index (HSI) is a new, comprehensive summer index that evaluates daily relative stress for locations throughout the United States based on deviations from the norm. The index is based on apparent temperature and other derived ...

Jill D. Watts; Laurence S. Kalkstein

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Solar energy industry survey  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the results of a survey of companies in the solar energy industry. The general objective of the survey was to provide information to help evaluate the effectiveness of technology transfer mechanisms for the development of the solar industry. The specific objectives of the survey included: (1) determination of the needs of the solar industry; (2) identification of special concerns of the solar industry; and (3) determination of the types of technology transfer mechanisms that would be most helpful to the solar industry in addressing these needs and concerns. The major focus was on technical problems and developments, but institutional and marketing considerations were also treated. The majority of the sample was devoted to the solar heating and cooling (SHAC) component of the industry. However, a small number of photovoltaic (PV), wind, and power generation system manufacturers were also surveyed. Part I discusses the methodology used in the selection, performance, and data reduction stages of the survey, comments on the nature of the responses, and describes the conclusions drawn from the survey. The latter include both general conclusions concerning the entire solar industry, and specific conclusions concerning component groups, such as manufacturers, architects, installers, or dealers. Part II consists of tabulated responses and non-attributed verbatim comments that summarize and illustrate the survey results.

1979-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature survey stress" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

High Temperature Capacitor Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The absence of high-temperature electronics is an obstacle to the development of untapped energy resources (deep oil, gas and geothermal). US natural gas consumption is projected to grow from 22 trillion cubic feet per year (tcf) in 1999 to 34 tcf in 2020. Cumulatively this is 607 tcf of consumption by 2020, while recoverable reserves using current technology are 177 tcf. A significant portion of this shortfall may be met by tapping deep gas reservoirs. Tapping these reservoirs represents a significant technical challenge. At these depths, temperatures and pressures are very high and may require penetrating very hard rock. Logistics of supporting 6.1 km (20,000 ft) drill strings and the drilling processes are complex and expensive. At these depths up to 50% of the total drilling cost may be in the last 10% of the well depth. Thus, as wells go deeper it is increasingly important that drillers are able to monitor conditions down-hole such as temperature, pressure, heading, etc. Commercial off-the-shelf electronics are not specified to meet these operating conditions. This is due to problems associated with all aspects of the electronics including the resistors and capacitors. With respect to capacitors, increasing temperature often significantly changes capacitance because of the strong temperature dependence of the dielectric constant. Higher temperatures also affect the equivalent series resistance (ESR). High-temperature capacitors usually have low capacitance values because of these dielectric effects and because packages are kept small to prevent mechanical breakage caused by thermal stresses. Electrolytic capacitors do not operate at temperatures above 150oC due to dielectric breakdown. The development of high-temperature capacitors to be used in a high-pressure high-temperature (HPHT) drilling environment was investigated. These capacitors were based on a previously developed high-voltage hybridized capacitor developed at Giner, Inc. in conjunction with a unique high-temperature electrolyte developed during the course of the program. During this program the feasibility of operating a high voltage hybridized capacitor at 230oC was demonstrated. Capacitor specifications were established in conjunction with potential capacitor users. A method to allow for capacitor operation at both ambient and elevated temperatures was demonstrated. The program was terminated prior to moving into Phase II due to a lack of cost-sharing funds.

John Kosek

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

142

Stress pulse phenomena  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is an introductory discussion of stress pulse phenomena in simple solids and fluids. Stress pulse phenomena is a very rich and complex field that has been studied by many scientists and engineers. This paper describes the behavior of stress pulses in idealized materials. Inviscid fluids and simple solids are realistic enough to illustrate the basic behavior of stress pulses. Sections 2 through 8 deal with the behavior of pressure pulses. Pressure is best thought of as the average stress at a point. Section 9 deals with shear stresses which are most important in studying solids.

McGlaun, M.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Environmental conditions and responses of circus elephants transported by truck and railcar during relatively high and low temperatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

No published research exists regarding the transport of circus elephants despite evidence of stressful conditions in transported livestock. Shipments of elephants with participating circuses and private exhibitors were identified during relatively high and low temperatures to characterize the transport environment and the animals' response to transport. Ten hot and five cold weather trips with seven circuses were surveyed. During each trip, external and internal temperature, relative humidity, and solar radiation were continuously measured during both extremes. Concentrations of ammonia and carbon monoxide during transport were also determined. Body temperature from a sample of elephants for each circus or exhibitor was also measured continuously as an indication of the animal's physiological response. Blood samples were taken an hour before, immediately before, immediately after, and an hour after transport to determine plasma cortisol concentrations as an indication of psycho-physiological response. Direct and video observations were made and analyzed for the occurrence of normal and abnormal behaviors. The temperature of the transport vehicle during transport maintained temperatures with a range under 36?C and above 0?C during hot and cool weather surveys, respectively. Concentrations of ammonia or carbon monoxide were not detectable during transport. Body temperature for each elephant was maintained within a 1.5?C range. Increases in body temperature were observed during or after physical activity with a maximum of 37.5?C. Significant differences in cortisol concentrations were found between the first and second (p=0.015) and the first and third (p=0.028) sample times during one trip, though appear minimal and may reflect arousal. No other significant differences were found between sample times. Observations during transport identified that the stereotypic behavior of weaving occurred in some elephants up to 80% of the time in transport time, although animals were observed to eat and drink, among other behaviors associated with a positive environment. Due to the lack of extreme temperatures within the transport vehicle during transport, biologically insignificant fluctuations in cortisol concentrations, stable body temperature, occurrence of natural behaviors, comparatively robust overall health, and the absence of the stressors in transported livestock, transport does not appear to be inherently stressful or compromise the welfare of the surveyed elephants.

Toscano, Michael Jeffrey

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Generalized survey propagation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Survey propagation (SP) has recently been discovered as an efficient algorithm in solving classes of hard constraint-satisfaction problems (CSP). Powerful as it is, SP is still a heuristic algorithm, and further understanding its algorithmic nature, ...

Ronghui Tu / Yongyi Mao, Jiying Zhao

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

n tal Specialist and the DOE NEPA Compliance Officer. NOTE: If Change of Scope oc:c:urs, Project Lead must submit a new NEPA Compliance Survey and contact the Technical...

146

Site Energy Surveys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Operating improvements and selected investments have already improved US refining and petrochemical energy utilization efficiency by about 20%, compared to 1972 operating efficiencies. This is equivalent to saving well over 250,000 B/D of crude; which is equal to the output of several major synthetic fuels projects! Site Energy Surveys can be an important technique for achieving the next major increment (1520%) in energy savings, even when using existing technology. These surveys encompass the total site, all associated plants, and investigate all aspects of energy requirements, heat integration configurations, steam/power cogeneration possibilities and inefficient practices. After potential energy conservation opportunities have been identified, screening is conducted to develop their economic attractiveness. This presentation reviews factors leading to the need for Site Energy Surveys, the objectives for conducting surveys, the approach utilized, considerations given to values of energy and concludes with overall improvements achieved.

Lockett, W., Jr.; Guide, J. J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Evaluating Our Instruction: Surveys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

you put in; and as the grandest mill in the world will not extract wheat flour from peascod, so pagesEvaluating Our Instruction: Surveys Mathematics may be compared to a mill of exquisite workmanship

Maryland at College Park, University of

148

Techniques for Measuring Residual Stresses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Classification of techniques for measuring residual stress...stress A-1 Stress-relaxation techniques using electric

149

Techniques for Measuring Residual Stresses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Classification of techniques for measuring residual stress...stress A-1 Stress relaxation techniques using electric

150

Development of 2-Meter Soil Temperature Probes and Results of Temperature  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development of 2-Meter Soil Temperature Probes and Results of Temperature Development of 2-Meter Soil Temperature Probes and Results of Temperature Survey Conducted at Desert Peak, Nevada, USA Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Development of 2-Meter Soil Temperature Probes and Results of Temperature Survey Conducted at Desert Peak, Nevada, USA Abstract Temperature gradient drilling has historically been a key tool in the exploration for geothermal resources in the Great Basin, USA but regulatory, environmental, and accessibility issues, as well as the expense of drilling, are increasingly limiting its use. In cases where thermal groundwater is not overlain by near-surface cold aquifers, temperatures measured at a depth of 2-meters is an efficient method for mapping thermal anomalies at a high level of detail. This is useful for augmenting deeper

151

Bias temperature instability from gate charge characteristics investigations in N-Channel Power MOSFET  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports the effects of bias temperature stress (positive and negative bias temperature instabilites, PBTI-NBTI) on threshold voltage, input capacitance and Miller capacitance of N-Channel Power MOSFET. The device is stressed with gate voltage ... Keywords: Gate charge, NBTI, PBTI, Power MOSFET, Thermal cycling, Thermal stress

M. Alwan; B. Beydoun; K. Ketata; M. Zoaeter

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Development of an instrument to measure stress among software professionals: factor analytic study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates sources of negative pressure among software professionals, from the perspective of the software development process. A multiple response questionnaire (survey instrument) was developed to measure sources of pressure among software ... Keywords: occupational stress, software professionals

K. S. Rajeswari; R. N. Anantharaman

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Survey of hydrogen monitoring devices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presented are results of a survey of commercially available monitoring devices suitable for hydrogen detection in the secondary containment vessel of a nuclear power plant during the post postulated accident period. Available detectors were grouped into the following five classes: combustion, solid state, electrochemical, thermal conductivity, and absorption. The performance of most available sensors is likely to deteriorate when exposed to the postulated conditions which include moisture, which could be at high temperature, and radioactive noncondensibles. Of the commercial devices, those using metallic filament thermal conductivity detectors seem least susceptible to performance change. Absorption detectors are best suited for this monitoring task but the only available device is designed for pipeline corrosion assessment. Initiation of experimental study to assess apparent deficiencies of commercial detectors is recommended. Also recommended is an analytical/experimental effort to determine the optimum detector array for monitoring in the secondary containment vessels.

Lai, W.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Evaluation of Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility of Drill Pipe ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

G-105 and S-135 grades of drill pipe steels have been used to study the effect of temperature and solution chemistry on the stress corrosion cracking behavior of...

155

Stress Relief Treatment of Alloy 600 Steam Generator Tubing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Various time-temperature combinations may hold potential for improving the resistance of tubesheet transition regions to intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). EPRI has discovered that the most significant enhancement in IGSCC of Alloy 600 steam generator tubing occurs with stress relief heat treatments administered in the range of 550-610 degrees Celsius for an average of nine hours. Treatments administered for shorter times at temperatures greater than 700 degrees Celsius also proved effective.

1994-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

156

Heliostat mirror survey and analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The mirrors used on concentrating solar systems must be able to withstand severe and sustained environmental stresses for long periods of time if they are to be economically acceptable. Little is known about how commercially produced wet process silvered second surface mirrors will withstand the test of time in solar applications. Field experience in existing systems has shown that the performance of the reflective surface varies greatly with time and is influenced to a large extent by the construction details of the mirror module. Degradation of the reflective layer has been seen that ranges from non-observable to severe. The exact mechanisms involved in the degradation process are not well understood from either the phenomenological or microanalytical points of view and are thus subject to much debate. The three chapters of this report summarize the work recently performed in three general areas that are key to understanding and ultimately controlling the degradation phenomena. These areas are: a survey of the present commercial mirroring industry, the microanalytical examination of numerous degraded and nondegraded mirrors, and an investigation of several novel techniques that might be used to extend the life of heliostat mirrors. Appendices include: (a) list of mirror manufacturers and (b) recommended specifications for second surface silvered mirrors for central receiver heliostat applications. (WHK)

Lind, M.A.; Buckwalter, C.Q.; Daniel, J.L.; Hartman, J.S.; Thomas, M.T.; Pederson, L.R.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Range Management Survey Date: Range Management Survey Date: 12/6/10 DOE Code: 6730.020.0000 Contractor 8067-788 Code: Project Lead: I Anthony Bowler Project Overview We will use a backhoe to get samples for our range management survey. At each site. one or 1. Brief project descnptlon [include anything that two holes will be excavated, and the samples will be taken from 0-1' and 1-2' deep. After could 1mpad the environment] excavating and the samples taken. the remaining soli Will be replaced and tamped back into 2. Legal location place. 3. Duratfon of tile project See attached NPR-3 Maps for preliminary locations : N~ area well 6-A-2\ NVV SW Section 21 . 4. Major equipment to be used f Township 39N, Range 78E) Middle area well 48-1 -Sh (SE SW 34 Township 39N, Range 4 WU-LSIT£5

158

Operations Improvement Surveys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exxon Chemical Company developed unique site-wide energy optimization technology in the mid1970's. This technology was applied by means of site energy surveys which were carried out at every major Exxon facility throughout the world during the 1976-1981 timeframe. The first 20% of energy savings, versus the 1972 reference, had already been captured or was in progress via conventional energy conservation methods. The site energy surveys identified attractive investments to save a second 20% of energy use. In early 1982, Exxon Corp. started to apply this same technology to its major facilities to define attractive NO INVESTMENT and LOW INVESTMENT operational improvement savings which could be implemented quickly. This presentation covers Exxon's approach to site energy optimization and the Operations Improvement Survey Program. The Program has identified at many sites, an average of 5% reduction in today's energy costs at No/Low investment plus additional savings in the feedstock and energy supply areas.

Guide, J. J.; O'Brien, W. J.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

AERIAL RADIOLOGICAL SURVEYS  

SciTech Connect

Measuring terrestrial gamma radiation from airborne platforms has proved to be a useful method for characterizing radiation levels over large areas. Over 300 aerial radiological surveys have been carried out over the past 25 years including U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites, commercial nuclear power plants, Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program/Uranium Mine Tailing Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP/UMTRAP) sites, nuclear weapons test sites, contaminated industrial areas, and nuclear accident sites. This paper describes the aerial measurement technology currently in use by the Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) for routine environmental surveys and emergency response activities. Equipment, data-collection and -analysis methods, and examples of survey results are described.

Proctor, A.E.

1997-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

160

TRENDS: TEMPERATURE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Historical Isotopic Temperature Record from the Vostok Ice Core Historical Isotopic Temperature Record from the Vostok Ice Core Graphics Digital Data J.R. Petit, D. Raynaud, and C. Lorius Laboratoire de Glaciogie et Géophysique de l'Environnement, CNRS, Saint Martin d'Hères Cedex, France J. Jouzel and G. Delaygue Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement (LSCE), CEA/CNRS, L'Orme des Merisiers, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex, France N.I. Barkov Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute, Beringa Street 38, 199397 St. Petersburg, Russia V.M. Kotlyakov Institute of Geography, Staromonetny, per 29, Moscow 109017, Russia DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/cli.006 Period of Record 420,000 years BP-present Methods Because isotopic fractions of the heavier oxygen-18 (18O) and deuterium (D) in snowfall are temperature-dependent and a strong spatial correlation

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature survey stress" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Static Temperature Survey At Long Valley Caldera Area (Farrar...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

On The Hydrothermal System Beneath The Resurgent Dome In Long Valley Caldera, East-Central California, Usa, From Recent Pumping Tests And Geochemical Sampling Retrieved from...

162

Static Temperature Survey At Rio Grande Rift Region (Morgan,...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

References Paul Morgan, Peter Barkmann, Charles Kluth, Matthew Sares (2010) Prospects For Electricity Generation In The San Luis Basin, Colorado, Usa Retrieved from "http:...

163

Static Temperature Survey At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jeffrey G. Hulen, Gregory D. Nash, Alex Schriener (2008) Esmeralda Energy Company Final Scientific Technical Report, January 2008, Emigrant Slimhole Drilling Project, Doe...

164

Effectiveness of shallow temperature surveys to target a geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

has used to delineate thermal anomalies at many sites, has already identified a shallow steam-heated thermal anomaly at McGee Mountain. The second innovative technology, the...

165

Wireless sensor network survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A wireless sensor network (WSN) has important applications such as remote environmental monitoring and target tracking. This has been enabled by the availability, particularly in recent years, of sensors that are smaller, cheaper, and intelligent. These ... Keywords: Protocols, Sensor network deployment, Sensor network services, Survey, Wireless sensor network

Jennifer Yick; Biswanath Mukherjee; Dipak Ghosal

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Correlation of the stress to rupture data of Incoloys  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on the application of a phenomenological approach for correlating the stress-to-rupture date of Incoloys which is in part based on the load relaxation behavior of the same material. An effective strain rate was calculated from the literature stress-to-rupture data. The resulting log modulus normalized stress vs log effective strain rate curves of different temperatures were translated to form a master composite curve. The master composite curve was found to exhibit qualitatively the same shape as the log stress vs log non-elastic strain rate curve obtained in the load relaxation test. The master composite curve was used as the basis for data correlation.

Wilson, H.; Suzuki, H.; Li, C.Y.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Diffraction: Stresses and Structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 6, 2013 ... O. Advanced Neutron and Synchrotron Studies of Materials: Diffraction: Stresses ... of Newcastle; 2ANSTO; 3European Spallation Source (ESS)

168

Modelling stress reduction techniques of cold compression and stretching in wrought Aluminium alloy products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heat treatable aluminium alloy aerospace products undergo a rapid quench from the solution heat treatment temperature into water/organic quenchant/spray quenching system during processing. As a result of this rapid quenching operation, residual stresses ... Keywords: aluminium alloy 7010, aluminium alloy forgings, cold compression, quenching stresses, residual stress

D. A. Tanner; J. S. Robinson

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

2010 Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey Page 1 of 20 ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Department of Energy 2010 Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey: Trend Report (2006 and 2008 results have been recalculated to exclude Do Not Know/No Basis to Judge responses) Response Summary Surveys Completed 2010 Governmentwide 263,475 2010 Department of Energy 6,648 2008 Department of Energy 6,093 2006 Department of Energy 7,742 This 2010 Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey Report provides summary results for your department or agency. The results include Positive, Neutral, and Negative response percentages for each survey item. For each of the

170

FACILITY SURVEY & TRANSFER Facility Survey & Transfer Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SURVEY & TRANSFER SURVEY & TRANSFER Facility Survey & Transfer Overview Transfer Activities Checklist Pre-Survey Information Request Survey Report Content Detailed Walkdown Checklist Walkdown Checklist Clipboard Aids S & M Checklist Survey Report Example - Hot Storage Garden Survey Report Example - Tritium System Test Assembly Survey Report Example - Calutron Overview As DOE facilities become excess, many that are radioactively and/or chemically contaminated will become candidate for transfer to DOE-EM for deactivation and decommissioning. Requirements and guidance for such transfers are contained in:  DOE Order 430.1B Chg. 2, REAL PROPERTY & ASSET MANAGEMENT  DOE Guide 430.1-5, TRANSITION IMPLEMENTATION GUIDE The transfer process is illustrated in the Transfer Process figure. The purpose here is to provide examples of methods and

171

DC Resistivity Survey (Dipole-Dipole Array) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DC Resistivity Survey (Dipole-Dipole Array) DC Resistivity Survey (Dipole-Dipole Array) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: DC Resistivity Survey (Dipole-Dipole Array) Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Electrical Profiling Configurations Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature

172

Direct-Current Resistivity Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Details Activities (65) Areas (34) Regions (4) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Electrical Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock type, mineral and clay content may be inferred. Stratigraphic/Structural: Determination of fracture zones, faults, depth to groundwater aquifers. Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water. Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature.[1] Cost Information

173

2006 NERSC User Survey Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 User Survey Results 6 User Survey Results Show All | 1 2 3 4 5 ... 15 | Next » 2006 User Survey Results Table of Contents Survey Results Users are invited to provide overall comments about NERSC: Here are the survey results: Respondent Demographics Overall Satisfaction and Importance All Satisfaction, Importance and Usefulness Ratings All Usefulness Topics Hardware Resources Software Visualization and Data Analysis HPC Consulting Services and Communications Web Interfaces Training Comments about NERSC Survey Results Many thanks to the 256 users who responded to this year's User Survey. This represents a response rate of about 13 percent of the active NERSC users. The respondents represent all six DOE Science Offices and a variety of home institutions: see Respondent Demographics. The survey responses provide feedback about every aspect of NERSC's

174

Sloan digital sky survey  

SciTech Connect

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey will produce a detailed digital photometric map of half the northern sky to about 23 magnitude using a special purpose wide field 2.5 meter telescope. From this map we will select {approximately} 10{sup 6} galaxies and 10{sup 5} quasars, and obtain high resolution spectra using the same telescope. The imaging catalog will contain 10{sup 8} galaxies, a similar number of stars, and 10{sup 6} quasar candidates.

Kent, S.M.; Stoughton, C.; Newberg, H.; Loveday, J.; Petravick, D.; Gurbani, V.; Berman, E.; Sergey, G. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States); Lupton, R. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Magma Source Location Survey  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A survey of Industry/University geophysicists was conducted to obtain their opinions on the existence of shallow (less than 10 km from surface) magma bodies in the western conterminous United States and methods for locating and defining them. Inputs from 35 individuals were received and are included. Responses were that shallow magma bodies exist and that existing geophysical sensing systems are adequate to locate them.

Hardee, H.C.; Dunn, J.C.; Colp, J.L.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Survey of solar homeowners  

SciTech Connect

Some key results are presented of a national mail survey of 3800 solar homeowners. The solar owners expressed their perceptions about performance, cost, problem areas, and their own motivations and degree of satisfaction. Various types of residential solar installations are represented, including active and passive water heating, space heating, and wind energy systems. After each question put to the respondents, the breakdown of answers is listed and a brief interpretation of the findings is presented. (LEW)

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Beamline Temperatures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Temperatures Temperatures Energy: 3.0000 GeV Current: 493.2242 mA Date: 11-Jan-2014 21:40:00 Beamline Temperatures Energy 3.0000 GeV Current 493.2 mA 11-Jan-2014 21:40:00 LN:MainTankLevel 124.4 in LN:MainTankPress 56.9 psi SPEAR-BL:B120HeFlow 15.4 l/min SPEAR-BL:B131HeFlow 22.2 l/min BL 4 BL02:LCW 0.0 ℃ BL02:M0_LCW 31.5 ℃ BL 4-1 BL04-1:BasePlate -14.0 ℃ BL04-1:Bottom1 46.0 ℃ BL04-1:Bottom2 47.0 ℃ BL04-1:Lower 32.0 ℃ BL04-1:Moly 46.0 ℃ BL04-1:ChinGuard1 31.0 ℃ BL04-1:ChinGuard2 31.0 ℃ BL04-1:FirstXtalA -167.0 ℃ BL04-1:FirstXtalB -172.0 ℃ BL04-1:Pad1 31.0 ℃ BL04-1:Pad2 31.0 ℃ BL04-1:SecondXtalA -177.0 ℃ BL04-1:SecondXtalB -175.0 ℃ BL 4-2 BL04-2:BasePlate -14.0 ℃ BL04-2:Bottom1 24.0 ℃ BL04-2:Bottom2 25.0 ℃

178

Definition: Airborne Gravity Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Survey Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Airborne Gravity Survey Airborne gravity gradiometry (AGG) surveys provide information regarding the mass distribution of the...

179

2010 State Laboratory Program Workload Survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. 2010 State Laboratory Program Workload Survey 2010 SLP Survey v.1.00 August 17, 2011 Page 2. SLP Survey 2010 - Page 2 of 122 ...

2011-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

180

2002 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey - User Needs Survey  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2002 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey: User-Needs Survey 2002 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey: User-Needs Survey View current results. We need your help in designing the next “ Energy Consumption Survey” (MECS)! As our valued customer, you are in an important position to tell us what kinds of data are most useful in helping you understand energy consumption in the U.S. manufacturing sector. Below is a short electronic survey with just a few questions. We will stop collecting responses for user feedback on May 17, 2002. This deadline serves to meet our intended release date of April/May 2003 for fielding MECS2002. The MECS is designed to produce estimates of energy consumption and other energy-related activities in manufacturing. The survey also collects information on energy expenditures, average prices, onsite generation of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature survey stress" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Microsoft PowerPoint - opening survey  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

General survey of JIHT RAS team General survey of JIHT RAS team approach and results Genri Genri Norman Norman Joint Institute for High Temperatures of Russian Academy of Sciences Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology Joint U.S. Russia Conference on Advances in Materials Science Prague, August 30 - September 4, 2009 My arguments *Elite young perspective staff *Multidisciplinary science *Very active style of life *Sustained funding STAFF Director of the JIHT RAS Academician Vladimir V. Fortov Founder of the JIHT RAS Academician Alexander E. Sheindlin (celebrated 90 years on September 4, 2007) My Department www.ihed.ras.ru/norman our site exists from our site exists from 2003 2003 Heads of laboratories I.V.Morozov born 1978, Ph.D. 2004 V.V.Stegailov born 1981, Ph.D. 2005 I.Yu.Skobelev, born 1952 PhD, Dr.Sc.

182

Adak Island, Alaska, Microearthquake survey: Preliminary Hypocenter Determinations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Microearthquakes, defined as shocks having magnitudes less than 4, are commonly recorded in the vicinity of geothermal manifestations and volcanism. They have been mapped from producing geothermal fields as well as those not yet developed, in such places as Iceland, El Salvador, Japan, Kenya and the US. Microearthquakes have been recorded at several geothermal sites in the Imperial Valley and Coso Hot Springs, California; Kilbourne Hole, New Mexico; Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming; and The Geysers, California, where there is debate over whether or not the seismicity is induced by steam production. Seismicity occurs around active volcanoes, but appears reduced directly over zones of high temperature or magma, where the depth of the brittle fracture zone is shallow, as over Yellowstone caldera. In areas of active hydrothermalism, regional stress is likely to be relieved by low-level seismicity rather than occasional large ruptures, owing to the high temperatures, presence of fluids, and crustal weakening due to alteration and fracturing. Active faulting maintains the permeability of the system, which in its absence, might otherwise seal. on the microscopic scale, pore-fluid pressures rise as a result of heating, resulting in the decrease of effective pressure at the pore-mineral boundary. When this effective pressure becomes less than the rock's tensile strength, the pore ruptures; and if it intersects a through-going fracture under hydrostatic pressure can result in a shock detectable on seismographs at the surface. Such a mechanism might also account for the swarms of very small events seen in a number of geothermal areas. A microearthquake survey was conducted on Adak Island, Alaska for the purpose of identifying seismicity associated with a possible geothermal reservoir. During 30 days of recording in September and October 1982, 190 seismic events were recorded on two or more stations of a nine-station network. Of the total, 33 were of local origin, and of these 24 were locatable. Utilizing a 5 km/sec constant velocity earth model, the hypocenters define a structure dipping north-northwestward toward the Bering Sea, beneath Mt. Adagdak. many of the events took place beneath the Adagdak peninsula in an area in which hot springs discharge and where other geophysical evidences suggest a geothermal reservoir. A similar NNW-dipping fault plane was deduced from a 9-day microearthquake survey conducted in 1974. At that time all of the activity occurred beneath the sea. the projected surface trace lies NNW of that deduced form the present survey. It is quite likely that the mapped structure and attendant fractures control a hydrothermal system by providing the necessary permeability for maintaining circulation of hot waters within the upper several kilometers of the surface. Only preliminary analysis of the records fell within the scope of the present project. The work should be supplemented with the application of a locally appropriate earth model, 3D fault-mapping, first-motion studies leading to fault-plane solutions, and computations of event magnitudes.

Lange, Arthur L.; Avramenko, Walter

1982-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

183

SDSS spectroscopic survey of stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In addition to optical photometry of unprecedented quality, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is also producing a massive spectroscopic database. We discuss determination of stellar parameters, such as effective temperature, gravity and metallicity from SDSS spectra, describe correlations between kinematics and metallicity, and study their variation as a function of the position in the Galaxy. We show that stellar parameter estimates by Beers et al. show a good correlation with the position of a star in the g-r vs. u-g color-color diagram, thereby demonstrating their robustness as well as a potential for photometric parameter estimation methods. Using Beers et al. parameters, we find that the metallicity distribution of the Milky Way stars at a few kpc from the galactic plane is bimodal with a local minimum at [Z/Zo]~ -1.3. The median metallicity for the low-metallicity [Z/Zo] -1.3 sample. We also find that the low-metallicity sample has ~2.5 times larger velocity dispersion and that it does not rotate (at ...

Ivezic, Z; Uomoto, A; Bond, N; Beers, T; Allende-Prieto, C; Wilhelm, R; Lee, Y S; Sivarani, T; Juric, M; Lupton, R; Rockosi, C M; Knapp, G; Gunn, J; Yanny, B; Jester, S; Kent, S; Pier, J; Munn, J A; Richards, G; Newberg, H; Blanton, M; Eisenstein, D; Hawley, S; Anderson, S; Harris, H; Kiuchi, F; Chen, A; Bushong, J; Sohi, H; Haggard, D; Kimball, A; Barentine, J; Brewington, H; Harvanek, M; Kleinman, S; Krzesnski, J; Long, D; Nitta, A; Snedden, S A

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

SDSS spectroscopic survey of stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In addition to optical photometry of unprecedented quality, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is also producing a massive spectroscopic database. We discuss determination of stellar parameters, such as effective temperature, gravity and metallicity from SDSS spectra, describe correlations between kinematics and metallicity, and study their variation as a function of the position in the Galaxy. We show that stellar parameter estimates by Beers et al. show a good correlation with the position of a star in the g-r vs. u-g color-color diagram, thereby demonstrating their robustness as well as a potential for photometric parameter estimation methods. Using Beers et al. parameters, we find that the metallicity distribution of the Milky Way stars at a few kpc from the galactic plane is bimodal with a local minimum at [Z/Zo]~ -1.3. The median metallicity for the low-metallicity [Z/Zo] -1.3 sample. We also find that the low-metallicity sample has ~2.5 times larger velocity dispersion and that it does not rotate (at the ~10 km/s level), while the rotational velocity of the high-metallicity sample decreases smoothly with the height above the galactic plane.

Z. Ivezic; D. Schlegel; A. Uomoto; N. Bond; T. Beers; C. Allende Prieto; R. Wilhelm; Y. Sun Lee; T. Sivarani; M. Juric; R. Lupton; C. Rockosi; G. Knapp; J. Gunn; B. Yanny; S. Jester; S. Kent; J. Pier; J. Munn; G. Richards; H. Newberg; M. Blanton; D. Eisenstein; S. Hawley; S. Anderson; H. Harris; F. Kiuchi; A. Chen; J. Bushong; H. Sohi; D. Haggard; A. Kimball; J. Barentine; H. Brewington; M. Harvanek; S. Kleinman; J. Krzesinski; D. Long; A. Nitta; S. Snedden; for the SDSS Collaboration

2007-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

185

Stress Test | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stress Test Stress Test Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Stress Test Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Testing Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Well Testing Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Fracture distribution and ambient tectonic stresses Hydrological: Fluid flow direction Thermal: Dictionary.png Stress Test: A geologic stress analysis based on images of a borehole wall and hydraulic fracturing tests to characterize fracture orientations and stress magnitudes in order to identify stress planes and zones of potential permeability. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle

186

BT8 Residual Stress Diffractometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Residual Stresses and Mechanical Damage in Gas Pipelines. ... Pressure in a pipeline superimposes a stress on ... are exceeded in pipelines with low ...

187

SAGBO Mechanism on High Temperature Cracking Behavior of Ni ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

mode I stress intensity factor, Q is the activation energy, R is the universal gas constant and T is the absolute temperature. Accordingly, a plot of log (da/dt)...

188

ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 RESIDENTIAL TRANSPORTATION 5 RESIDENTIAL TRANSPORTATION ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY Prepared for: UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION OFFICE OF ENERGY MARKETS AND END USE ENERGY END USE DIVISION RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL BRANCH WASHINGTON, DC 20585 Prepared by: THE ORKAND CORPORATION 8484 GEORGIA AVENUE SILVER SPRING, MD 20910 October 1986 Contract Number DE-AC01-84EI19658 TABLE OF CONTENTS FRONT MATTER Index to Program Descriptions........................................... vi List of Exhibits ....................................................... viii Acronyms and Abbreviations ............................................. ix SECTION 1: GENERAL INFORMATION ........................................ 1-1 1.1. Summary ....................................................... 1-1

189

Laundered protective clothing survey  

SciTech Connect

It is considered appropriate occasionally to make independent checks on the effectiveness of the plant laundry in removing radioactive contamination from plant-issue protective clothing. Previous surveys have offered constructive criticism resulting in improved handling of high level and soft beta contaminated clothing and incorporation in new designs of ventilating and air sampling recommendations. Recurrently the adequacy of laundry reject limits is questioned, and only recently an accurate, special study resulted in relaxed limits for Metal Preparation area clothing. A current question concerns the advisability of determining the reject level on the beta-gamma monitor more frequently than once a day. 2 tabs.

Clukey, H.V.

1952-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

190

High Temperature Failure of Expansion Joints Due to Stress ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of a Bucketwheel Stacker Reclaimer Structural Failure Analysis of Glass Breakage Analysis of Sealed, Integrated, Automotive Wheel Bearings.

191

The Effect of Phase Instability on the High Temperature Stress ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

of 10% HCl in methanol. Transmission ... line. Light micrographs of samples taken at various times of testing are shown in Figure 5. After 319 hours at 50,000 psi,...

192

Radiation Stress Estimators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The radiation stresses Sij associated with the propagation of wind-generated waves are principal driving forces for several important surf-zone processes. The accurate estimation of the onshore flux of longshore-directed mean momentum Syx, using ...

S. S. Pawka; D. L. Inman; R. T. Guza

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

SER Temperature Coefficient  

SciTech Connect

Experimentally determine the overall isothermal temperature coefficient of the SER up to the design operating temperatures.

Johnson, J.L.

1959-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

194

Residential Energy Consumption Survey: housing characteristics, 1982  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data in this report cover fuels and their use in the home, appliances, square footage of floor space, heating equipment, thermal characteristics of the housing unit, conservation activities, wood consumption, indoor temperatures, and weather. The 1982 survey included a number of questions on the reasons households make energy conservation improvements to their homes. Results of these questions are presented. Discussion also highlights data pertaining to: trends in home heating fuels, trends in conservation improvements, and characteristics of households whose energy costs are included in their rent.

Thompson, W.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY # 350 8 Revised 8/2/10 mjt Attachment 1 Written by Dan Smallwood Production Enhancement Project-5 T-2-34 to T-1-33 MIT all wells in this area to determine which are producing wells. There are 15 wells shut in this area because of no tank or shipping line. According to the old test sheet these wells make 24bbls oil and 120bbls of water. Two of these wells have leaks in the flow lines that will be fixed. One is 33-S-34 which could be run to 34-AX-34, about 400' .6 bbl/pd and the other is 35 shx 34 which could be run to 35-AX-34 which is about 200'.5bbl/pd. 42-AX-34 could be ran to 32-AX-34 and then to 33-SX-34 to 34-AX-34. There are two manifolds at T-2-34, one with 10 wells and the other with 12. None of the flow lines have valves or checks in the lines. I propose we flush, disconnect, and plug all wells that

196

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 Project Information Project Title: Survey Centralizer Design Date: 2-10-2010 DOE Code: 6730.020.71091 Contractor Code: 8067-762 Project Lead: Frank Ingham Project Overview 1. What are the environmental No environmental impacts. impacts? Run a logging tool through existing wells at : 2. What is the /ega/location? 67-LBT-3, SW SE sec 3, T38N , R78W 86-1 -X-10 , NE SE Sec 10, T38N , R78W 3. What is the duration of the project? 22-2-X-10H , NW NW Sec 10, T38N , R78W 4. What major equipment will be used if any (work over rig , drilling rig, 4 Days etc.)? Stinger truck or crane . The table below is to be completed by the Project Lead and reviewed by the Environmental Specialist and the DOE NEPA Compliance Officer. NOTE: If Change of Scope occurs, Project Lead must submit a new NEPA Compliance Survey and

197

LOWER TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYTE AND ELECTRODE MATERIALS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A thorough literature survey on low-temperature electrolyte and electrode materials for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) is presented. Preliminary results of co-sintering LaGaO{sub 3} (LSGM) film on the cathode substrate were also reported. The chemical stability of LSGM in various SOFC environments was thermodynamically assessed and verified by the molten-salt technique.

Keqin Huang

2001-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

198

Aeromagnetic Survey At Mokapu Penninsula Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Aeromagnetic Survey At Mokapu Penninsula Area (Thomas, 1986) Aeromagnetic Survey At Mokapu Penninsula Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Aeromagnetic Survey At Mokapu Penninsula Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Mokapu Penninsula Area Exploration Technique Aeromagnetic Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes A separate geophysical analysis performed on the Koolau caldera area (Kauahikaua, 1981 a) synthesized existing self-potential, gravity, seismic and aeromagnetic data with recently acquired resistivity soundings. An analysis of the observed remnant magnetization within the caldera complex suggested that subsurface temperatures ranged from less than 300degrees C to no more than 540degrees C. The resistivity data indicated that the

199

Aeromagnetic Survey At Coso Geothermal Area (1977) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

77) 77) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Aeromagnetic Survey Activity Date 1977 Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown Notes A detailed low-altitude aeromagnetic survey of 576 line-mi (927 line-km) was completed over a portion of the Coso Hot Springs KGRA. This survey defined a pronounced magnetic low that could help delineate the geothermal system that has an areal extent of approximately 10 sq mi (26 sq km) partially due to magnetite destruction by hydrothermal solutions associated with the geothermal system. The anomoly coincides with two other geophysical anomalies: 1) a bedrock electrical resistivity low and 2) an area of relatively high near-surface temperatures. References Fox, R. C. (1 May 1978) Low-altitude aeromagnetic survey of a

200

Piping stress handbook. Second edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This abridged volume contains the following: Coefficients of thermal expansion. Allowable stress range for ANSI/ASME Power Piping Code B31.1. Stress intensification and flexibility factors. Pressure and stress ratios. Design criteria for allowable loads, moment, and stresses. Properties of pipe. Weight and dimensions of pipe and components. Pipe support selection and design. Fundamentals of expansion joints. Index.

Helguero, V.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature survey stress" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Stress inversion using slip tendency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The in situ stress state is an important controlling factor for the slip behavior of faults and fractures in the earth's crust and hence for the productivity of faulted and fractured hydrocarbon reservoirs. Current methods for stress tensor estimation ... Keywords: Slip tendency, Stress inversion, Stress tensor, Structural geology

John M. McFarland; Alan P. Morris; David A. Ferrill

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

2000 NERSC User Survey Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 User Survey Results 0 User Survey Results Show All | 1 2 3 4 5 ... 10 | Next » 2000 User Survey Results Table of Contents Response Summary User Information Overall Satisfaction and Importance All Satisfaction Questions and FY 1999 to FY 2000 Changes Consulting and Account Support Web and Communications Hardware Resources Software Resources Training User Comments Response Summary NERSC extends its thanks to all the users who participated in this year's survey. Your responses provide feedback about every aspect of NERSC's operation, help us judge the quality of our services, give DOE information on how well NERSC is doing, and point us to areas we can improve. Every year we institute changes based on the survey; the FY 1999 survey resulted in the following changes: We created a long-running queue (12 hours maximum) for jobs using up

203

2002 NERSC User Survey Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 User Survey Results 2 User Survey Results Show All | 1 2 3 4 5 ... 11 | Next » 2002 User Survey Results Table of Contents Response Summary User Information Overall Satisfaction and Importance All Satisfaction Questions and Changes from Previous Years Visualization and Grid Computing Web, NIM, and Communications Hardware Resources Software Training User Services Comments about NERSC Response Summary Many thanks to the 300 users who responded to this year's User Survey -- this represents the highest response level in the five years we have conducted the survey. The respondents represent all five DOE Science Offices and a variety of home institutions: see User Information. You can see the FY 2002 User Survey text, in which users rated us on a 7-point satisfaction scale. Some areas were also rated on a 3-point

204

2005 NERSC User Survey Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 User Survey Results 5 User Survey Results Show All | 1 2 3 4 5 ... 10 | Next » 2005 User Survey Results Table of Contents Response Summary Respondent Demographics All Satisfaction, Importance and Usefulness Ratings Hardware Resources Software Visualization and Data Analysis Services and Communications Web Interfaces Training Comments about NERSC Response Summary Many thanks to the 201 users who responded to this year's User Survey. The respondents represent all six DOE Science Offices and a variety of home institutions: see Respondent Demographics. The survey responses provide feedback about every aspect of NERSC's operation, help us judge the quality of our services, give DOE information on how well NERSC is doing, and point us to areas we can improve. The survey results are listed below.

205

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 Project lnfonnation Project Title: C-EAG. Maintenance I grading of existing roads Date: 8/4/2011 and road drainages (barrow ditches): ex 81.3 DOE Code: Contractor Code: Project Lead: Michael J. Taylor [NCO] Project Overview 1. Brief project description [include C-EA 6. Maintenance I grading of existing roads and road drai nages anything that could impact the (barrow ditches) : ex 81.3 environment] Existing roads defined as per May 2010 Aerial Photos. (Changing out culverts, grading I modifying embankments, etc., that has potential to impact wetlands, requires a NCS.) The table below is to be completed by the Project Lead and reviewed by the Environmental Specialist and the DOE NEPA Compliance Officer. NOTE: If Change of Scope occurs, Project Lead must submit a new NEPA Compliance Survey and

206

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 Project lnfonnation Project Title: Restoration of 77 -13-SX-3 Date: 2-8-1 0 DOE Code: Contractor Code: Project Lead: Jeff Jones Project Overview We will be restoring 77-SX-3 per procedure. 1. What are the environmental impacts? The duration of this project will be 3-4 days. 2. What is the leg al location? 3. What is the duration of the project? The equipment to be used will be Backhoe, welder, tiller dump truck. 4. What major equipment will be used if any (work over rig , drilling rig , We will take oil contaminated dirt to the Eastside landfarm and backfill with d ean fill dirt from sec. 20. etc.)? The table below is to be completed by the Project Lead and reviewed by the Environmental Specialist and the DOE NEPA Compliance Officer. NOTE: If Change of Scope occurs, Project Lead must submit a new NEPA Compliance Survey and

207

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 Project lnfonnation Project Title: e-EA5. Reclamation of well sites Date: 8/4/2011 DOE Code: Contractor Code: Project Lead: Michael J. Taylor [NCO] Project Overview e-EA 5. Reclamation of wellsites : ex 81.3 and ex 86.1 1. Brief project description [include anything that could impact the Small-scale, short-term cleanup actions including excavation and environment] consolidation of contaminated soils, removal of underground piping, removal of rig anchors or T-bars, drainage control , transport and backfilling of clean soil I fill dirt, and reseeding . The table below is to be completed by the Project Lead and reviewed by the Environmental Specialist and the DOE NEPA Compliance Officer. NOTE: If Change of Scope occurs, Project Lead must submit a new NEPA Compliance Survey and

208

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 8 Project lnfonnation Project Title: Change out down guy on power pole Date: 2-8-10 DOE Code : Contractor Code: Project Lead: Mike Preston Project Overview 1 What are the environmental No impact to the environment impacts? Power pole east of B-1 -33 2. What is the legal location? 3. What is the duration of the project? 3Hr 4. What major equipment will be used if any (worl< over rig, drilling rig, Backhoe and operator for equ1 pment etc.)? The table below is to be completed by the Project Lead and reviewed by the Environmental Specialist and the DOE NEPA Compliance Officer. NOTE; If ChiingSurvey alld contact Ut TlrCh.,lcal Assunlnce DepartmenL Impacts If YES, then complete below

209

Fermilab Prairie Plant Survey  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Crack the Quadrat* Code! Crack the Quadrat* Code! compass plasnt * What is a Quadrat? It's a one-meter square plot. Plants in the quadrat are identified and counted. Fermilab quadrat specialists can! Attention Citizen Scientists Are you a prairie enthusiast? Learn scientific plant monitoring techniques while enjoying our beautiful prairie. Join a unique science program open to the public, adult groups, families, scouts and more …. Become a prairie quadrat specialist and do real science at Fermilab! In the Fermilab Prairie Plant Survey you will learn how to identify prairie plants, map a prairie plot and track restoration progress along with our experts. Use our Website to contribute data you collect. Come once or come back two or three times to see how the prairie changes. Keep an eye on this prairie for years to come!

210

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 8 Project lnfonnation Project Title: New Drilling Location in Section 29 Date: 12-10-2009 DOE Code: 6730.020.78002 Contractor Code: 8067-371 Project Lead: Mark Duletsky Project Overview The project will involve excavating 3-4 backhoe pits to a depth of about 8 feet to observe soil characteristics 1. What are the environmental impacts? in the vicinity of our planned reserve pit excavation area. 2. What is the legal location? NE 1/4, SE 1/4, Sec. 29. T39N. R78W. Natrona County, Wyoming 3. What is the duration of the project? 4. What major equipment will be used 1 day if any (work over rig, drilling rig, etc.)? Backhoe The table below is to be completed by the Project Lead and reviewed by the Environmental Specialist and the DOE NEPA Compliance Officer. NOTE: If Change of Scope occurs, Project Lead must submit a new NEPA Compliance Survey and

211

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 Project l nfonnation Project Title: Reclamation ofT-2-14 Date: 11/2412009 DOE Code: Contractor Code: Project Lead: Jeff Jones Project Overview We will be removing old piping from the treater@ T-2-14. We will also remove the berm and grade and 1. What are the environmental impacts? reclamate location. The duration of this project will be approx. 2 days. Equipment that will be used is as follows backhoe. dumptruck, blade,and a tiller so we can seed with native grasses. 2. What is the legal location? 3. What is the duration of the project? 4. What major equipment will be used if any (woO< over rig, drilling rig, etc.)? The table below Is to be completed by the Project Lead and reviewed by the Environmental Specialist and the DOE NEPA Compliance Officer. NOTE: If Change of Scope occurs, Project Lead must submit a new NEPA Compliance Survey and

212

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 0 Project lnfonnation Project Title: Replace electrical line from well to power pole Date: 3/10/2010 DOE Code: Contractor Code: Project Lead: Mike Preston Project Overview No impact to the environment. 1. What are the environmental impacts? Dig up old electrical line from pumping unit on 61-S-34 to power pole east of well , {approximately 75 feet 2. What is the legal location? from unit) and replace with new line. 3. What is the duration of the project? 4. What major equipment will be used 1 day if any (work over rig , drilling rig , etc.)? Electrician, ditch witch and operator for equipment The table below is to be completed by the Project Lead and reviewed by the Environmental Specialist and the DOE NEPA Compliance Officer. NOTE: If Change of Scope occurs, Project Lead must submit a new NEPA Compliance Survey and

213

SURVEY OF FALLOUT OPERATIONS  

SciTech Connect

A survey was made of fall-out operations in the various countries of the world, These operations are outlined by country. The source of information has largely been the reports submitted to UNSCEAR forwarding data for their consideration. In addition, some material has been received directly in exchange for HASL Quarterlies and other publications of the Laboratory. In many cases, responsible scientists from the country concerned have reviewed the sheets and have made corrections. All of the programs that are shown have been and are subject to modification as time goes on, thus, the data indicate the status of the program as of 1961. No attempt has been made to list re search projects or special fall-out measurements and only programs of a continuing nature have been covered. (auth)

1962-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

RESIDENTIAL ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY 1997  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

RESIDENTIAL ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY 1997. OVERVIEW: MOST POPULOUS STATES ... Homes with air-conditioning: 95%... with a central air-conditioning system: 83%

215

2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Residential Energy Consumption Survey ... Office of Management and Budget, Washington, DC 20503. Form EIA-457A (2001) Form Approval: OMB No. 1905-0092 ...

216

Near-Global Survey of Effective Droplet Radii in Liquid Water Clouds Using ISCCP Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A global survey of cloud particle size variations can provide crucial constraints on how cloud processes determine cloud liquid water contents and their variation with temperature, and further, may indicate the magnitude of aerosol effects on ...

Qingyuan Han; William B. Rossow; Andrew A. Lacis

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

CDIAC Temperature Data Sets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Temperature CDIAC Climate Holdings Containing Temperature Data Global Data Sets Data Set Name Investigators Data TypeFormat Period of Record NASA GISS Surface Temperature...

218

High Temperatures & Electricity Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High Temperatures & Electricity Demand An Assessment of Supply Adequacy in California Trends.......................................................................................................1 HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND.....................................................................................................................7 SECTION I: HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND ..........................9 BACKGROUND

219

Hydrogen sulfide stress corrosion cracking in materials for geothermal power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Studies to evaluate the performance of alloys used in geothermal power systems are reported. Alloys which are commercially available and those which have modified metallurgical structures and/or composition modifications were tested to determine the corrosive effects of the H/sub 2/S and thermal environments in geothermal fluids. Hydrogen embrittlement and sulfide stress corrosion cracking were tested. Test results showing the effects of alloy composition, tempering temperatures, fluid temperature and salt content, and ageing on sulfide stress cracking are tabulated. (LCL)

Hehemann, R.F.; Troiano, A.R.; Abu-Khater, B.; Ferrigno, S.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Radiological Habits Survey: Bradwell, 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.2 Comparisons with previous surveys 55 Table A Comparison between 1999 and 2007 aquatic internal exposure 56 3. METHODS FOR DATA ANALYSIS 19 3.1 Data recording 19 3.2 Data analysis 21 4. AQUATIC RADIATION RADIATION PATHWAYS 41 5.1 Terrestrial survey area 41 5.2 Unusual pathways 42 5.3 Retailers 43 5.4 Food

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature survey stress" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Radiological Habits Survey: Wylfa, 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.7 Internal exposure 28 4.8 External exposure 31 4.9 Water based activities 33 5. TERRESTRIAL RADIATION PATHWAYS 34 5.1 Terrestrial survey area 34 5.2 Wholesalers and retailers 36 5.3 Internal exposure 36 6 analysis 21 4. AQUATIC RADIATION PATHWAYS 23 4.1 Aquatic survey area 23 4.2 Commercial fisheries 25 4

222

Radiological Habits Survey: Winfrith, 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.7 Internal exposure 26 4.8 External exposure 30 4.9 Water based activities 31 5 TERRESTRIAL RADIATION exposure 37 6 DIRECT RADIATION PATHWAYS 40 6.1 Direct radiation survey area 40 6.2 Residential activities analysis 19 4 AQUATIC RADIATION PATHWAYS 21 4.1 Aquatic survey area 21 4.2 Commercial fisheries 23 4

223

Multidimensional Pattern Matching: A Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for this survey is the problem of searching aerial photographs. The (ambitious) practical goal of this applicationMultidimensional Pattern Matching: A Survey Amihood Amir \\Lambda GIT--CC--92/29 July 1992 Abstract is that of searching an aerial photograph for all ap­ pearances of some object. The issues we discuss are local errors

Amir, Amihood

224

1999 NERSC User Survey Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 User Survey Results 9 User Survey Results Show All | 1 2 3 4 5 ... 11 | Next » 1999 User Survey Results Table of Contents Respondent Summary Overall Satisfaction User Information Visualization Consulting and Account Support Information Technology and Communication Hardware Resources Software Training Comments about NERSC All Satisfaction Questions and FY 1998 to FY 1999 Changes Respondent Summary NERSC would like to thank all the users who participated in this year's survey. Your responses provide feedback about every aspect of NERSC's operation, help us judge the quality of our services, give DOE information on how well NERSC is doing, point us to areas we can improve, and show how we compare to similar facilities. This year 177 users responded to our survey, compared with 138 last year.

225

BOREAS Survey On-Line  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FF33"> FF33"> BOREAS Survey On-Line To improve the BOREAS and BOREAS Follow-On data sets and to meet users' needs, we are conducting a survey. The BOREAS and BOREAS Follow-On data sets continue to be important products at the ORNL DAAC. To date we have provided over 8,000 data products from these projects to nearly 1,500 users. We invite you to fill out this survey, identifying any problems you had with the data and documentation or any difficulties you experienced in finding and acquiring the data sets. Information you provide will enable us to address problems that need attention. It will also help us determine which aspects of the BOREAS and BOREAS Follow-On information need to be expanded. You can complete the survey at the BOREAS Home Page. After you complete the on-line survey, submit your answers to the ORNL

226

2004 NERSC User Survey Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 User Survey Results 4 User Survey Results Show All | 1 2 3 4 5 ... 13 | Next » 2004 User Survey Results Table of Contents Response Summary Respondent Demographics Overall Satisfaction and Importance All Satisfaction, Importance and Usefulness Ratings Hardware Resources Software Security and One Time Passwords Visualization and Data Analysis HPC Consulting Services and Communications Web Interfaces Training Comments about NERSC Response Summary Many thanks to the 209 users who responded to this year's User Survey. The respondents represent all six DOE Science Offices and a variety of home institutions: see Respondent Demographics. The survey responses provide feedback about every aspect of NERSC's operation, help us judge the quality of our services, give DOE information on how well NERSC is doing, and point us to areas we can improve. The

227

For Energy Conservation in Existing Plants - Start With a Good Process Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As a result of the drastic increase in the cost of process plant utilities, many operating companies are actively pursuing programs to effect energy conservation in their existing plants. Some have taken action to reduce the outright waste of energy by improving maintenance, operating procedures and energy management. However, significant additional savings can be realized by modifying those process schemes that are inefficient from an energy standpoint. To identify those schemes, a good overall process survey is required. This survey will result in the identification of areas of energy loss. A good energy survey will be defined and the need for it will be discussed. The screening procedure to select the most attractive project for further process design will be addressed. The importance of emphasizing the overall picture, during all phases of the process survey, will be stressed. In short, this paper will address the what, why, and how of a 'Good Process Survey'.

Krebs, N. R.; Castillo, R. O.; Malaty, W.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Residential Energy Consumption Survey:  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

E/EIA-0262/2 E/EIA-0262/2 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: 1978-1980 Consumption and Expenditures Part II: Regional Data May 1981 U.S. Department of Energy Energy Information Administration Assistant Administrator for Program Development Office of the Consumption Data System Residential and Commercial Data Systems Division -T8-aa * N uojssaooy 'SOS^-m (£03) ao£ 5925 'uofSfAfQ s^onpojj aa^ndmoo - aojAaag T BU T3gN am rcoj? aig^IT^^ '(adBx Q-naugBH) TOO/T8-JQ/30Q 30^703 OQ ' d jo :moaj ajqBfT^A^ 3J^ sjaodaa aAoqe aqa jo 's-TZTOO-eoo-Tgo 'ON ^ois odo 'g^zo-via/aoQ 'TBST Sujpjjng rXaAang uojidmnsuoo XSaaug sSu-ppjprig ON ^oo^s OdO '^/ZOZO-Via/aOQ *086T aunr '6L6I ?sn§ny og aunf ' jo suja^Bd uoj^dmnsuoo :XaAjng uo^^dmnsuoQ XSaaug OS '9$ '6-ieTOO- 00-T90 OdD 'S/ZOZO-Via/aOa C

229

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

. NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Project lnfonnation Project Title: Reclamation of Pits and Boxes Date: Nov. 3, 2010 DOE Code: 6740.010.00000 Contractor Code: 8067-451 Project Lead: Anthony Bowler Project Overview Reclamation of QD.]y the following Pits and Boxes : 1. Brief project description [include 1. B-2-1 0 Skim Box anything that could impact the 2. B-1-14 Skim Box environment 3. Near66-1-STX-14 Pit 2. Legal location 4. T-5-10 Skim Box 3. Duration of the project 5. WDFUpperPit 6. WDFLowerPit 4. Major equipment to be used 7. WDFSkimBox 8. B-1-3 Pit 9. B-1 -3 Skim Box 10. T-2-34 Pit 11 . B-1-10 Pit 12. B-1 -10 Skim Box 13. SE of SG3 & Welding Shop Skim Box 14. 58.Q4-1-SX-3 Skim Box 15. Near Tank 126 Skim Box 16. 77-1-SX-3 NW of Well Pit 17. T-5-3 Pit

230

Development of Rail Temperature Prediction Model SUMMARY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Preventing track buckling is important to the railroad industrys goal of operational safety. It is a common practice for railroads to impose slow orders during hot weather when the risk of track buckling is high. Numerous factors affect track buckling, but the instantaneous rail temperatures and stress-free (neutral) rail temperatures are the most critical factors. Unfortunately, neither of these two temperatures is easily obtainable. Decisions for slow orders are often based on an arbitrary, ambient temperature limit. The Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) Office of Research and Development has initiated a research project to develop a model for predicting rail temperatures based on real-time meteorological forecast data. The rail temperature prediction model is based on the heat transfer process of a rail exposed to the sun. In developing such a model, a rail-weather station was established, composed of a portable weather station and a short segment of rail track with temperature sensors installed on both rails. The model has proven to be able to predict the maximum rail temperature within a few degrees and within 30 minutes of the actual time when the maximum rail temperature occurs during the day. The model is being validated for three locations where real-time weather data and rail temperature are collected. A prototype webbased

unknown authors

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

2-M Probe Survey At Salt Wells Area (Skord, Et Al., 2011) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » 2-M Probe Survey At Salt Wells Area (Skord, Et Al., 2011) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: 2-M Probe Survey At Salt Wells Area (Skord, Et Al., 2011) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique 2-M Probe Survey Activity Date 2011 - 2011 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Two-meter temperature surveys were conducted at Salt Wells Basin from February to May 2011, with the goal of distinguishing and mapping zones of upwelling and outflow of hydrothermal fluids. The study also tests the ability of shallow temperature survey methods recently refined by the Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy to evaluate the structural controls of

232

Improvements in Shallow (Two-Meter) Temperature Measurements and Data  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Improvements in Shallow (Two-Meter) Temperature Measurements and Data Improvements in Shallow (Two-Meter) Temperature Measurements and Data Interpretation Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Improvements in Shallow (Two-Meter) Temperature Measurements and Data Interpretation Abstract The Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy has been working on improvements in shallow (two-meter) temperature surveys in two areas: overcoming limitations posed by difficult ground conditions with the use of a portable rock drill, and improvements in temperature measurements and interpretations Previous 2-meter temperature surveys conducted by the Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy have been limited to areas that were not excessively rocky. This limitation has been overcome by the use of a

233

Repair and Replacement Applications Center: Stress Corrosion Cracking in Closed Cooling Water Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of a recent EPRI project "Stress Corrosion Cracking in PWR and BWR Closed Cooling Water Systems," (EPRI Report 1009721, October 2004) indicated that approximately 10 of 143 light water reactor (LWR) plants surveyed had through-wall leaks in carbon steel piping in their closed cooling water (CCW) systems. The root cause of this leakage was intergranular stress corrosion cracking. Since there has not been extensive non-destructive testing in these systems, it is likely that the incidence rate o...

2006-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

234

Building Energy Codes Survey Tool  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Codes Program Codes Program Building Energy Codes Survey Tool The following surveys are available: No available surveys Please contact ( webmaster@energycode.pnl.gov ) for further assistance. English Albanian Arabic Basque Belarusian Bosnian Bulgarian Catalan Chinese (Simplified) Chinese (Traditional; Hong Kong) Chinese (Traditional; Taiwan) Croatian Czech Danish Dutch Dutch Informal English Estonian Finnish French Galician German German informal Greek Hebrew Hindi Hungarian Icelandic Indonesian Irish Italian Italian (formal) Japanese Korean Latvian Lithuanian Macedonian Malay Maltese Norwegian (Bokmal) Norwegian (Nynorsk) Persian Polish Portuguese Portuguese (Brazilian) Punjabi Romanian Russian Serbian Sinhala Slovak Slovenian Spanish Spanish (Mexico) Swedish Thai Turkish Urdu Vietnamese Welsh

235

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Binary Power Unit Test Binary Power Unit Test Date: 3-29-2010 DOE Code: 6730.020.61045 Contractor Code: 8067-768 Project Lead: Lyle Johnson Project Overview 1 What are the environmental The purpose of the project is to do confirmation testing of the binary power unit at several different impacts? temperatures and rates. This test will be conducted in a location covered in the Site Wide EA It will uses infrastructure installed for another project consisting of a hot-water source and a cooling water source. The 2. What is the legal location? hot water is from well 17 -WX-21 , a Madison well adjacent to the siting location. The cooling water will be 3. What is the duration of the project? pumped from Little Teapot Creek through an existing line and then returned to Teapot Creek. There should

236

Residual Stresses and Numerical Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 28, 2013 ... Advances in Hydroelectric Turbine Manufacturing and Repair: Residual Stresses and Numerical Simulation Sponsored by: Metallurgical...

237

2008/2009 NERSC User Survey Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

13.4%. The MPP hours used by the survey respondents represents 70.2 percent of total NERSC MPP usage as of the end of the survey period. The PDSF hours used by the PDSF survey...

238

2011 NERSC User Survey (Read Only)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Results Survey Text 2011 NERSC User Survey (Read Only) The survey is closed. Section 1: Overall Satisfaction with NERSC When you are finished with this page click "Save & Go to...

239

Analytical solution for unsteady thermal stresses in an infinite cylinder composed of two materials  

SciTech Connect

An exact analytical solution for unsteady thermal stresses in an infinitely long solid composite cylinder is presented. The unsteady temperature field is determined following Ozisik's (1980) treatment, but a more general solution is achieved by the present approach by considering a heat convection situation at the outer boundary. The plane stress and plane strain states are considered next, and the thermal stresses are evaluated. Results are provided as dimensionless plots for several combinations of thermal and mechanical parameters of practical interest. 6 references.

Pardo, E.; Sanchez Sarmiento, G.; Laura, P.A.A.; Gutierrez, R.H.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Heat Stress Management Program for Power Plants: Clothing Update of EPRI NP-4453-L -- 1991 Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clothing ensembles that protect workers from radioactive skin contamination can potentially increase the risk for heat stress. To address this issue, most nuclear power plants calculate action times (stay times) based on the ambient temperature and humidity, work level, and the protective clothing worn. The 1991 EPRI Heat Stress Management Program for Power Plants (report NP-4453-L, Rev. 1) described common methods for evaluating heat stress and provided the necessary adjustment factors for five specific...

1998-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature survey stress" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Coal Survey Frequently Asked Questions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Survey FAQ Survey FAQ Available FAQ: Q. Whom do I contact if I need assistance completing a survey form? Q. Whom do I contact if I require assistance with the registration process, log-in process, instructions pertaining to JavaScript or cookies? Q. What unit of measurement should be used to calculate Btu? Q. How do I update the information that appears under Item I on IDC? Q. Under "Item II: Coal Receipts, Consumption and Stocks," can a value be negative? Q. How do I convert between short tons and metric tons? Vice Versa. Q. How do I convert between pounds to short tons? Vice Versa. Q. How do I correct a mistake on the Survey Form once I have submitted the data? Q. How do I log in if forgot my password? Q. If I accidently deleted the registration letters, how can I get my Mail ID and Code?

242

Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey -- Overview  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Survey > Overview Survey > Overview Overview Percent of FBSS Buildings and Floorspace by Selected Agencies, FY 1993 Percent of FBSS Buildings and Floorspace by Selected Agencies, FY 1993 Sources: Energy Information Administration, Energy Markets and End Use, 1993 Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey. Divider Line Highlights on Federal Buildings The Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey 1993 provides building-level energy-related characteristics for a special sample of commercial buildings owned by the Government. Extensive analysis of the data was not conducted because this report represents the 881 responding buildings (buildings for which interviews were completed) and cannot be used to generalize about Federal buildings in each region. Crosstabulations of the data from the 881 buildings are provided in the Detailed Tables section.

243

2001 NERSC User Survey Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 User Survey Results 1 User Survey Results Show All | 1 2 3 4 5 ... 11 | Next » 2001 User Survey Results Table of Contents Response Summary User Information Overall Satisfaction and Importance All Satisfaction Questions and Changes from Previous Years NERSC Information Management (NIM) System Web and Communications Hardware Resources Software Training User Services Comments about NERSC Response Summary NERSC extends its thanks to the 237 users who participated in this year's survey; this compares with 134 respondents last year. The respondents represent all five DOE Science Offices and a variety of home institutions: see User Information. Your responses provide feedback about every aspect of NERSC's operation, help us judge the quality of our services, give DOE information on how well

244

2012 NERSC User Survey Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

operation, help us judge the quality of our services, give DOE information on how well NERSC is doing, and point us to areas we can improve. The survey strives to be...

245

Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Haleakala Volcano Area (Thomas, 1986)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Haleakala Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Haleakala Volcano Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Haleakala Volcano Area Exploration Technique Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The field survey program on the northwest rift zone consisted of soil mercury and radon emanometry surveys, groundwater temperature and chemistry studies, Schlumberger resistivity soundings and self-potential profiles. Geophysical and geochemical surveys along this rift (southwest) were limited by difficult field conditions and access limitations. The geophysical program consisted of one Schlumberger sounding, one self-potential profile and one controlled-source electromagnetic sounding. The geochemical data collected included a reconnaissance soil mercury and

246

Radiological Habits Survey: Amersham, 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.4 Wholesalers and retailers 29 4.5 Internal exposure 29 4.6 External exposure 30 4.7 Water based activities 32 5. TERRESTRIAL RADIATION PATHWAYS 35 5.1 Terrestrial survey area 35 5.2 Wholesalers and retailers 39 5.3 Internal exposure 39 6. DIRECT RADIATION PATHWAYS 43 6.1 Direct radiation survey area 43 6.2 Residential activities

247

Radiological Habits Survey, Dounreay, 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.5 Internal exposure 25 4.6 External exposure 28 5. TERRESTRIAL RADIATION PATHWAYS 32 5.1 Terrestrial survey area and local produce 32 5.2 Novel radiation pathways 33 5.3 Land cover 33 5.4 Internal exposure 34 5 conversion 14 3.2 Determination of critical groups 14 4. AQUATIC RADIATION PATHWAYS 18 4.1 Aquatic survey

248

Ground Gravity Survey At Mokapu Penninsula Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ground Gravity Survey At Mokapu Penninsula Area Ground Gravity Survey At Mokapu Penninsula Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Mokapu Penninsula Area Exploration Technique Ground Gravity Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes A separate geophysical analysis performed on the Koolau caldera area (Kauahikaua, 1981 a) synthesized existing self-potential, gravity, seismic and aeromagnetic data with recently acquired resistivity soundings. An analysis of the observed remnant magnetization within the caldera complex suggested that subsurface temperatures ranged from less than 300degrees C to no more than 540degrees C. The resistivity data indicated that the electrical basement, to a depth of 900 m, had resistivities ranging from 42 ohm.m to more than 1000 ohm.m, which is considered to be within the

249

Electrical Resistivity and Self-Potential Surveys Blue Mountain Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Electrical Resistivity and Self-Potential Surveys Blue Mountain Geothermal Area, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Electrical Resistivity and Self-Potential Surveys Blue Mountain Geothermal Area, Nevada Abstract Self potential and electrical resistivity surveys have been completed at the Blue Mountain geothermal area to search for the source of thermal fluids discovered during drilling for mineral exploration, and to help characterize the geothermal resource. Two large SP anomalies are associated with the artesian thermal area and the area of highest temperature observed in drill holes. Two similar anomalies were mapped 1 to 3 km to the south

250

Use Of Electrical Surveys For Geothermal Reservoir Characterization-  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Use Of Electrical Surveys For Geothermal Reservoir Characterization- Use Of Electrical Surveys For Geothermal Reservoir Characterization- Beowawe Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Use Of Electrical Surveys For Geothermal Reservoir Characterization- Beowawe Geothermal Field Details Activities (4) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The STAR geothermal reservoir simulator was used to model the natural state of the Beowawe geothermal field, and to compute the subsurface distributions of temperature and salinity which were in turn employed to calculate pore-fluid resistivity. Archie's law, which relates formation resistivity to porosity and pore-fluid resistivity, was adopted to infer formation resistivity distribution. Subsequently, DC, MT and SP postprocessors were used to compute the expected response corresponding to

251

Effects of thermal aging on Stress Corrosion Cracking and mechanical properties of stainless steel weld metals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) in and around primary loop piping welds in Boiling Water Reactors has been observed worldwide as plants continue to operate at temperatures and pressures near 2880C (5500F) and 6.9 MPa (1000 ...

Hixon, Jeff

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Finite Element Simulation of Residual Stresses in Thermo-coupled Wire Drawing Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this paper is to calculate residual stress in drawn wire taking into account induced temperature due to plastic dissipation energy. Finite element analysis (FEA) for the simulation of wire drawing is applied. The general purpose FEA ...

R. Iankov; A. Van Bael; P. Van Houtte

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1" .J(p(p 1" .J(p(p Project lnfonnation Project Title: Geothermal Technologies Program Da te: 12/8/09 DOE Code: 6730.020.61041 Contractor Code: 8067-731 Project Lead: Lyle Johnson Project Overview This wor1< will consist of the laying of two pipelines to complete the construction of a low temperature 1. What are the environmental impacts? geothermal testing facility at the t>M/F building in Section 21 . The first line will.re a 250 feet long. 6 inch steel line from well17 WX 21 to the building. This line will provide hot Madison water to the facility. The 2. What is the legal location? second line will be a 250 feet long 1 0 inch steel line to return the cooling water and excess Madison to the 3. What is the duration of the project? Teapot Creek drainage. This line will terminate on a cement slab * a stone pile or a combination of botn to

254

Residential energy consumption survey: housing characteristics 1984  

SciTech Connect

Data collected in the 1984 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the sixth national survey of households and their fuel suppliers, provides baseline information on how households use energy. Households living in all types of housing units - single-family homes (including townhouses), apartments, and mobile homes - were chosen to participate. Data from the surveys are available to the public. The housing characteristics this report describes include fuels and the uses they are put to in the home; appliances; square footage of floorspace; heating (and cooling) equipment; thermal characteristics of housing structures; conservation features and measures taken; the consumption of wood; temperatures indoors; and regional weather. These data are tabulated in sets, first showing counts of households and then showing percentages. Results showed: Fewer households are changing their main heating fuel. More households are air conditioned than before. Some 50% of air-conditioned homes now use central systems. The three appliances considered essential are the refrigerator, the range, and the television set. At least 98% of US homes have at least one television set; but automatic dishwashers are still not prevalent. Few households use the budget plans tht are available from their utility companies to ease the payment burden of seasonal surges in fuel bills. The most common type of heating equipment in the United States is the natural-gas forced-air furnace. About 40% ofthose furnaces are at least 15 years old. The oldest water heaters are those that use fuel oil. The most common conservation feature in 1984 is ceiling or attic insulation - 80% of homes report having this item. Relatively few households claimed tax credits in 1984 for energy-conservation improvements.

Not Available

1986-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

255

Geophysical survey, Paso Robles Geothermal area, California: Part of the Resource Assessment of Low- and Moderate-Temperature Geothermal Resource Areas in California; Part of the Second year Report, 1979-80 of the US Department of Energy-California State-Coupled Program for Reservoir Assessment and Confirmation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the details of new geophysical work for the Paso Robles geothermal area, California performed under terms of the second year contract, 1979-80 between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the California Division of Mines and Geology (CDMG). The report contains two sections. The first section is to provide background for the reader and consists of a reprint from CDMG's first year report (1979-80) to DOE. It describes only the Paso Robles studies performed by CDMG in its first year effort. The second section provides new information developed by CDMG in its 1979-80 studies concerning the geophysical survey of the Paso Robles geothermal area. Included in the first section is some general background information concerning the geology and geothermal occurrences in the Southern Coast Ranges, as well as the more detailed information dealing with the Paso Robles area proper. The second section is concerned only with discussion and interpretation of results for two geophysical methods that have so far been used by CDMG in the area: the ground magnetic and gravity surveys. The CDMG studies of the Paso Robles area are not yet complete and additional studies using newly acquired resistivity equipment are planned for the near future, as are more complete surveys of existing wells and new studies of the geothermal aquifers present in the area. A final report to DOE on the Paso Robles area is planned following completion of those studies.

Chapman, Rodger H.; Chase, Gordon W.; Youngs, Les G.

1980-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

256

LOWER TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYTE AND ELECTRODE MATERIALS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A thorough literature survey on low-temperature electrolyte and electrode materials for SOFC is given in this report. Thermodynamic stability of selected electrolyte and its chemical compatibility with cathode substrate were evaluated. Preliminary electrochemical characterizations were conducted on symmetrical cells consisting of the selected electrolyte and various electrode materials. Feasibility of plasma spraying new electrolyte material thin-film on cathode substrate was explored.

Keqin Huang

2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

257

2-M Probe Survey At Coso Geothermal Area (1977) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7) 7) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique 2-M Probe Survey Activity Date 1977 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Compare directly shallow temperature results with standard geothermal exploration techniques. Notes Shallow soil temperature data (2m) were collected at 102 sites at Coso. Close geometrical similarity between the shallow soil temperature has been observed with the 30-m contour data for Coso using computer program. References Leschack, L. A.; Lewis, J. E.; Chang, D. C. (1 December 1977) Rapid reconnaissance of geothermal prospects using shallow temperature surveys. Semi-annual technical report Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=2-M_Probe_Survey_At_Coso_Geothermal_Area_(1977)&oldid=47367

258

2-M Probe Survey At Coso Geothermal Area (2007) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2-M Probe Survey At Coso Geothermal Area (2007) 2-M Probe Survey At Coso Geothermal Area (2007) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique 2-M Probe Survey Activity Date 2007 Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Analyze if coupling remote sensing and field data is effective for determining geothermal areas using 1-M probe Notes The field data include subsurface temperature measured with temperature probes at depths down to 1 m, surface temperatures recorded with a hand-held infrared camera and an infrared thermometer, reflectance of contrasting surfaces measured with a hand-held spectroradiometer for the purpose of estimating the albedo effect, and radiosonde atmospheric profiles of temperature, water vapor, and pressure in order to apply

259

The Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey: Survey Description and Data Reduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS), a 1.1 mm continuum survey at 33" effective resolution of 170 square degrees of the Galactic Plane visible from the northern hemisphere. The survey is contiguous over the range -10.5 90%) and the linear scale at which the attenuation re aches 50% is 3.8'. Comparison with other millimeter-wave data sets implies a possible systematic offset in flux calibration, for which no cause has been discovered. This presentation serves as a companion and guide to the public data release through NASA's Infrared Processing and Analysis Center (IPAC) Infrared Science Archive (IRSA). New data releases will be provided through IPAC IRSA with any future improvements in the reduction.

Aguirre, James E; Dunham, Miranda K; Drosback, Meredith M; Bally, John; Battersby, Cara; Bradley, Eric Todd; Cyganowski, Claudia; Dowell, Darren; Evans, Neal J; Glenn, Jason; Harvey, Paul; Rosolowsky, Erik; Stringfellow, Guy S; Walawender, Josh; Williams, Jonathan P

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Merging High Resolution Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys to Reduce  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Merging High Resolution Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys to Reduce Merging High Resolution Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys to Reduce Exploration Risk at Glass Buttes, Oregon Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Merging High Resolution Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys to Reduce Exploration Risk at Glass Buttes, Oregon Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description This program will combine detailed gravity, high resolution aeromagnetic, and LIDAR data, all of which will be combined for structural modeling, with hyperspectral data, which will identify and map specific minerals and mineral assemblages that may point to upflow zones. The collection of these surveys and analyses of the merged data and model will be used to site deeper slim holes. Slim holes will be flow tested to determine whether or not Ormat can move forward with developing this resource. An innovative combination of geophysical and geochemical tools will significantly reduce risk in exploring this area, and the results will help to evaluate the value of these tools independently and in combination when exploring for blind resources where structure, permeability, and temperature are the most pressing questions. The slim holes will allow testing of models and validation of methods, and the surveys within the wellbores will be used to revise the models and site production wells if their drilling is warranted.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature survey stress" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

RESIDENTIAL ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY 1997 CONSUMPTION AND ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Residential Sector energy Intensities for 1978-1997 using data from EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey.

262

Zigzag Survey Designs in Line Transect Sampling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

survey lines are frequently used in shipboard and aerial line transect surveys of animal populations; Systematic designs; Zigzag designs. 1. INTRODUCTION Shipboard and aerial line transect surveys are widelyZigzag Survey Designs in Line Transect Sampling Samantha STRINDBERG and Stephen T. BUCKLAND Zigzag

Buckland, Steve

263

Low- to moderate-temperature geothermal resource assessment for Nevada: area specific studies, Pumpernickel Valley, Carlin and Moana. Final report June 1, 1981-July 31, 1982  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geological, geophysical and geochemical surveys were used in conjunction with temperature gradient hole drilling to assess the geothermal resources in Pumpernickel Valley and Carlin, Nevada. This program is based on a statewide assessment of geothermal resources that was completed in 1979. The exploration techniques are based on previous federally-funded assessment programs that were completed in six other areas in Nevada and include: literature search and compilation of existing data, geologic reconnaissance, chemical sampling of thermal and non-thermal fluids, interpretation of satellite imagery, interpretation of low-sun angle aerial photographs, two-meter depth temperature probe survey, gravity survey, seismic survey, soil-mercury survey, and temperature gradient drilling.

Trexler, D.T.; Flynn, T.; Koenig, B.A.; Bell, E.J.; Ghusn, G. Jr.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Quality Profile  

SciTech Connect

The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) is a periodic national survey that provides timely information about energy consumption and expenditures of U.S. households and about energy-related characteristics of housing units. The survey was first conducted in 1978 as the National Interim Energy Consumption Survey (NIECS), and the 1979 survey was called the Household Screener Survey. From 1980 through 1982 RECS was conducted annually. The next RECS was fielded in 1984, and since then, the survey has been undertaken at 3-year intervals. The most recent RECS was conducted in 1993.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Refraction Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Refraction Survey Refraction Survey Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Refraction Survey Details Activities (16) Areas (13) Regions (5) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Active Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Can provide information on crustal thickness, depth to basement. Hydrological: Thermal: Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 6,206.80620,680 centUSD 6.207 kUSD 0.00621 MUSD 6.2068e-6 TUSD / mile Median Estimate (USD): 10,877.331,087,733 centUSD 10.877 kUSD 0.0109 MUSD 1.087733e-5 TUSD / mile

266

Geodetic Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geodetic Survey Geodetic Survey Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Geodetic Survey Details Activities (17) Areas (10) Regions (5) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Remote Sensing Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Passive Sensors Parent Exploration Technique: Passive Sensors Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Map regional strain rates Hydrological: Thermal: Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 250.0025,000 centUSD 0.25 kUSD 2.5e-4 MUSD 2.5e-7 TUSD / point Median Estimate (USD): 600.0060,000 centUSD 0.6 kUSD 6.0e-4 MUSD 6.0e-7 TUSD / point High-End Estimate (USD): 1,500.00150,000 centUSD 1.5 kUSD 0.0015 MUSD 1.5e-6 TUSD / point Time Required Low-End Estimate: 5 days0.0137 years

267

The UKIDSS Galactic Plane Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The UKIDSS Galactic Plane Survey (GPS) is one of the five near infrared Public Legacy Surveys that are being undertaken by the UKIDSS consortium, using the Wide Field Camera on the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope. It is surveying 1868 sq.deg. of the northern and equatorial Galactic plane at Galactic latitudes -5Science results from DR2 and from the Science Verification programme. These results illustrate how GPS data will frequently be combined with data taken in other wavebands to produce scientific results. The Demonstration Science includes studies of: (i) the star formation region G28.983-0.603, cross matching with Spitzer-GLIMPSE data to identify YSOs; (ii) the M17 nebula; (iii) H_2 emission in the rho Ophiuchi dark cloud; (iv) X-ray sources in the Galactic Centre; (v) external galaxies in the Zone of Avoidance; (vi) IPHAS-GPS optical-infrared spectrophotometric typing. (abridged).

P. W. Lucas; M. G. Hoare; A. Longmore; A. C. Schroder; C. J. Davis; A. Adamson; R. M. Bandyopadhyay; R. de Grijs; M. Smith; A. Gosling; S. Mitchison; A. Gaspar; M. Coe; M. Tamura; Q. Parker; M. Irwin; N. Hambly; J. Bryant; R. S. Collins; N. Cross; D. W. Evans; E. Gonzalez-Solares; S. Hodgkin; J. Lewis; M. Read; M. Riello; E. T. W. Sutorius; A. Lawrence; J. E. Drew; S. Dye; M. A. Thompson

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

A luminescent nanocrystal stress gauge  

SciTech Connect

Microscale mechanical forces can determine important outcomes ranging from the site of material fracture to stem cell fate. However, local stresses in a vast majority of systems cannot be measured due to the limitations of current techniques. In this work, we present the design and implementation of the CdSe/CdS core/shell tetrapod nanocrystal, a local stress sensor with bright luminescence readout. We calibrate the tetrapod luminescence response to stress, and use the luminescence signal to report the spatial distribution of local stresses in single polyester fibers under uniaxial strain. The bright stress-dependent emission of the tetrapod, its nanoscale size, and its colloidal nature provide a unique tool that may be incorporated into a variety of micromechanical systems including materials and biological samples to quantify local stresses with high spatial resolution.

Choi, Charina; Koski, Kristie; Olson, Andrew; Alivisatos, Paul

2010-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

269

Department of Energy: 2011 Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy 2011 Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey: Trend Report Response Summary Surveys...

270

Characterization of Min-K TE-1400 Thermal Insulation (Two-Year Gradient Stress Relaxation Testing Update)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Min-K 1400TE insulation material was characterized at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for use in structural applications under gradient temperature conditions. A previous report (ORNL/TM-2008/089) discusses the testing and results from the original three year duration of the project. This testing included compression testing to determine the effect of sample size and test specimen geometry on the compressive strength of Min-K, subsequent compression testing on cylindrical specimens to determine loading rates for stress relaxation testing, isothermal stress relaxation testing, and gradient stress relaxation testing. This report presents the results from the continuation of the gradient temperature stress relaxation testing and the resulting updated modeling.

Hemrick, James Gordon [ORNL; Lara-Curzio, Edgar [ORNL; King, James [ORNL

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Aeromagnetic Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Aeromagnetic Survey Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Aeromagnetic Survey Details Activities (26) Areas (19) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Magnetic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Magnetic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: map structure, basin fill thickness, and magnetic mineral concentrations in ore bodies Hydrological: Thermal: Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 22.532,253 centUSD

272

Stress-Based Fatigue Monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The FatiguePro software, developed by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and first deployed in 1989, is a fatigue monitoring program that is widely used around the world to assist with aging management of nuclear power plants. The FatiguePro stress-based fatigue (SBF) module has used a single stress term for calculating fatigue usage factors. This simplified approach was chosen not only because of computer limitations at the time, but also because the conventional stress cycle counting algorith...

2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

273

Cooled, temperature controlled electrometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cooled, temperature controlled electrometer for the measurement of small currents. The device employs a thermal transfer system to remove heat from the electrometer circuit and its environment and dissipate it to the external environment by means of a heat sink. The operation of the thermal transfer system is governed by a temperature regulation circuit which activates the thermal transfer system when the temperature of the electrometer circuit and its environment exceeds a level previously inputted to the external variable temperature control circuit. The variable temperature control circuit functions as subpart of the temperature control circuit. To provide temperature stability and uniformity, the electrometer circuit is enclosed by an insulated housing.

Morgan, John P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Measurement and finite element analysis of temperature distribution in arc welding process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This presentation describes both the experimental measurement and finite element analysis used to study the temperature distribution during a metal inert gas (MIG) welding process, including the cooling down period. Welding was carried out on ... Keywords: FEA, MIG welding, arc welding, cracking, finite element analysis, metal inert gas welding, residual stress, simulation, temperature distribution, weldment temperature

C. K. Lee; J. Candy; C. P. H. Tan

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

BT8 Residual Stress Diffractometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 5) T. Gnaupel-Herold, HJ Prask, AV Clark, CS Hehman, TN Nguyen, A Comparison of Neutron and Ultrasonic Determinations of Residual Stress ...

276

IN SITU STRESS, FRACTURE AND FLUID FLOW ANALYSIS-EAST FLANK OF THE COSO  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IN SITU STRESS, FRACTURE AND FLUID FLOW ANALYSIS-EAST FLANK OF THE COSO IN SITU STRESS, FRACTURE AND FLUID FLOW ANALYSIS-EAST FLANK OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: IN SITU STRESS, FRACTURE AND FLUID FLOW ANALYSIS-EAST FLANK OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: High rock temperatures, a high degree of fracturing, high tectonic stresses, and low permeability are the combination of qualities that define an ideal candidate-Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) reservoir. The Coso Geothermal Field is an area where fluid temperatures exceeding 300°C have been measured at depths less than 10,000 feet and the reservoir is both highly fractured and tectonically stressed. Some of the wells within this portion of the reservoir are relatively impermeable,

277

Multifractal analysis of stress time series during ultrathin lubricant film melting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Melting of an ultrathin lubricant film confined between two atomically flat surfaces is we studied using the rheological model for viscoelastic matter approximation. Phase diagram with domains, corresponding to sliding, dry, and two types of $stick-slip$ friction regimes has been built taking into account additive noises of stress, strain, and temperature of the lubricant. The stress time series have been obtained for all regimes of friction using the Stratonovich interpretation. It has been shown that self-similar regime of lubricant melting is observed when intensity of temperature noise is much larger than intensities of strain and stress noises. This regime is defined by homogenous distribution, at which characteristic stress scale is absent. We study stress time series obtained for all friction regimes using multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis. It has been shown that multifractality of these series is caused by different correlations that are present in the system and also by a power-law distribu...

Khomenko, A V; Borisyuk, V N; 10.1142/S0219477510000046

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Biomedical question answering: A survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Objectives: In this survey, we reviewed the current state of the art in biomedical QA (Question Answering), within a broader framework of semantic knowledge-based QA approaches, and projected directions for the future research development in this critical ... Keywords: Answer/reason extraction, Biomedical question answering, Semantic information extraction

Sofia J. Athenikos; Hyoil Han

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Automotive Powertrain Control - A Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper surveys recent and historical publications on automotive powertrain control. Controloriented models of gasoline and diesel engines and their aftertreatment systems are reviewed, and challenging control problems for conventional engines, hybrid vehicles and fuel cell powertrains are discussed. Fundamentals are revisited and advancements are highlighted. A comprehensive list of references is provided. 1

Jeffrey A. Cook; Jing Sun; Julia H. Buckl; Ilya V. Kolmanovsky; Huei Peng; Jessy W. Grizzle

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Quantum Gravity An introductory survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantum Gravity An introductory survey Hermann Nicolai Max-Planck-Institut f¨ur Gravitationsphysik (Albert­Einstein­Institut, Potsdam) . ­ p.1/25 #12;Why Quantum Gravity? . ­ p.2/25 #12;Why Quantum Gravity theories: . ­ p.2/25 #12;Why Quantum Gravity? General Relativity and Quantum Theory: not only very

Rossak, Wilhelm R.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature survey stress" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

The NRC planetary decadal survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Once every ten years, the National Research Council carries out a "decadal survey" in planetary science. The objective is to recommend a decade-long national strategy for solar system exploration for NASA and the NSF. The most recent planetary decadal ...

Steven W. Squyres

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Body Area Networks: A Survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advances in wireless communication technologies, such as wearable and implantable biosensors, along with recent developments in the embedded computing area are enabling the design, development, and implementation of body area networks. This class of ... Keywords: body area networks, survey, wireless sensor networks

Min Chen; Sergio Gonzalez; Athanasios Vasilakos; Huasong Cao; Victor C. Leung

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Elevated Temperature Primary Load Design Method Using Pseudo Elastic-Perfectly Plastic Model  

SciTech Connect

A new primary load design method for elevated temperature service has been developed. Codification of the procedure in an ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section III Code Case is being pursued. The proposed primary load design method is intended to provide the same margins on creep rupture, yielding and creep deformation for a component or structure that are implicit in the allowable stress data. It provides a methodology that does not require stress classification and is also applicable to a full range of temperature above and below the creep regime. Use of elastic-perfectly plastic analysis based on allowable stress with corrections for constraint, steady state stress and creep ductility is described. This approach is intended to ensure that traditional primary stresses are the basis for design, taking into account ductility limits to stress re-distribution and multiaxial rupture criteria.

Carter, Peter [Stress Engineering Services Inc.; Sham, Sam [ORNL; Jetter, Robert I [Consultant

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Target selection for the SUNS and DEBRIS surveys for debris discs in the solar neighbourhood  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Debris discs - analogous to the Asteroid and Kuiper-Edgeworth belts in the Solar system - have so far mostly been identified and studied in thermal emission shortward of 100 um. The Herschel space observatory and the SCUBA-2 camera on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope will allow efficient photometric surveying at 70 to 850 um, which allow for the detection of cooler discs not yet discovered, and the measurement of disc masses and temperatures when combined with shorter wavelength photometry. The SCUBA-2 Unbiased Nearby Stars (SUNS) survey and the DEBRIS Herschel Open Time Key Project are complimentary legacy surveys observing samples of ~500 nearby stellar systems. To maximise the legacy value of these surveys, great care has gone into the target selection process. This paper describes the target selection process and presents the target lists of these two surveys.

Phillips, N M; Dent, W R F; Matthews, B C; Holland, W S; Wyatt, M C; Sibthorpe, B

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Enzymatic temperature change indicator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A temperature change indicator is described which is composed of an enzyme and a substrate for that enzyme suspended in a solid organic solvent or mixture of solvents as a support medium. The organic solvent or solvents are chosen so as to melt at a specific temperature or in a specific temperature range. When the temperature of the indicator is elevated above the chosen, or critical temperature, the solid organic solvent support will melt, and the enzymatic reaction will occur, producing a visually detectable product which is stable to further temperature variation.

Klibanov, Alexander M. (Newton, MA); Dordick, Jonathan S. (Iowa City, IA)

1989-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

286

Rapid reconnaissance of geothermal prospects using shallow temperature  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Semi-annual technical report Semi-annual technical report Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Rapid reconnaissance of geothermal prospects using shallow temperature surveys. Semi-annual technical report Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Shallow (2-m) soil temperature data have been collected at 27 sites at Long Valley, California, and at 102 sites at Coso, California. These geothermal areas are locations where traditional deep reconnaissance geothermal survey bore holes have been emplaced, allowing us to compare directly our shallow temperature results with standard geothermal exploration techniques. The effects of surface roughness, albedo, soil thermal diffusivity, topography and elevation were considered in making the necessary corrections to our 2-m temperature data. The corrected data for

287

Field Investigations And Temperature-Gradient Drilling At Marine Corps  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Investigations And Temperature-Gradient Drilling At Marine Corps Investigations And Temperature-Gradient Drilling At Marine Corps Air-Ground Combat Center (Mcagcc), Twenty-Nine Palms, Ca Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Field Investigations And Temperature-Gradient Drilling At Marine Corps Air-Ground Combat Center (Mcagcc), Twenty-Nine Palms, Ca Details Activities (4) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The U.S. Navy's Geothermal Program Office (GPO) has been conducting geothermal exploration activities in the Camp Wilson area of Marine Corps Air-Ground Combat Center (MCAGCC), Twenty-nine Palms, CA, for almost two years. Work has included self-potential (SP) surveys, fault structure analyses using LiDAR surveys, and drilling and assessment of five (5) temperature-gradient holes. For several decades the GPO has worked

288

Compliant high temperature seals for dissimilar materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature, gas-tight seal is formed by utilizing one or more compliant metallic toroidal ring sealing elements, where the applied pressure serves to activate the seal, thus improving the quality of the seal. The compliant nature of the sealing element compensates for differences in thermal expansion between the materials to be sealed, and is particularly useful in sealing a metallic member and a ceramic tube art elevated temperatures. The performance of the seal may be improved by coating the sealing element with a soft or flowable coating such as silver or gold and/or by backing the sealing element with a bed of fine powder. The material of the sealing element is chosen such that the element responds to stress elastically, even at elevated temperatures, permitting the seal to operate through multiple thermal cycles.

Rynders, Steven Walton (Fogelsville, PA); Minford, Eric (Laurys Station, PA); Tressler, Richard Ernest (Boalsburg, PA); Taylor, Dale M. (Salt Lake City, UT)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

The ESSENCE Supernova Survey: Survey Optimization, Observations, and Supernova Photometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe the implementation and optimization of the ESSENCE supernova survey, which we have undertaken to measure the equation of state parameter of the dark energy. We present a method for optimizing the survey exposure times and cadence to maximize our sensitivity to the dark energy equation of state parameter w = P/{rho}c{sup 2} for a given fixed amount of telescope time. For our survey on the CTIO 4m telescope, measuring the luminosity distances and redshifts for supernovae at modest redshifts (z {approx} 0.5 {+-} 0.2) is optimal for determining w. We describe the data analysis pipeline based on using reliable and robust image subtraction to find supernovae automatically and in near real-time. Since making cosmological inferences with supernovae relies crucially on accurate measurement of their brightnesses, we describe our efforts to establish a thorough calibration of the CTIO 4m natural photometric system. In its first four years, ESSENCE has discovered and spectroscopically confirmed 102 type Ia SNe, at redshifts from 0.10 to 0.78, identified through an impartial, effective methodology for spectroscopic classification and redshift determination. We present the resulting light curves for the all type Ia supernovae found by ESSENCE and used in our measurement of w, presented in Wood-Vasey et al. (2007).

Miknaitis, Gajus; Pignata, G.; Rest, A.; Wood-Vasey, W.M.; Blondin, S.; Challis, P.; Smith, R.C.; Stubbs, C.W.; Suntzeff, N.B.; Foley, R.J.; Matheson, T.; Tonry, J.L.; Aguilera, C.; Blackman, J.W.; Becker, A.C.; Clocchiatti, A.; Covarrubias, R.; Davis, T.M.; Filippenko, A.V.; Garg, A.; Garnavich, P.M.; /Fermilab /Chile U., Catolica /Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs. /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys. /Harvard U. /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept. /NOAO, Tucson /Inst. Astron., Honolulu /Res. Sch. Astron. Astrophys., Weston Creek /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /Bohr Inst. /Notre Dame U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Texas A-M /European Southern Observ. /Ohio State U., Dept. Astron. /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Johns Hopkins U. /Stockholm U.

2007-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

290

Geothermal fracture stimulation technology. Volume II. High-temperature proppant testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Data were obtained from a newly built proppant tester, operated at actual geothermal temperatures. The short term test results show that most proppants are temperature sensitive, particularly at the higher closure stresses. Many materials have been tested using a standard short-term test, i.e., fracture-free sand, bauxite, and a resin-coated sand retained good permeability at the high fluid temperatures in brine over a range of closure stresses. The tests were designed to simulate normal closure stress ranges for geothermal wells which are estimated to be from 2000 to 6000 psi. Although the ultra high closure stresses in oil and gas wells need not be considered with present geothermal resources, there is a definite need for chemically inert proppants that will retain high permeability for long time periods in the high temperature formations.

Not Available

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Temperature Variability over Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The variation of near-surface air temperature anomalies in Africa between 1979 and 2010 is investigated primarily using Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) total lower-tropospheric temperature data from the Remote Sensing Systems (RSS) and the ...

Jennifer M. Collins

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Fish and Temperature  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fish and Temperature Name: Christopher Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: Dear Sirs, I am doing a project on a sand tiger shark and i was wondering if temperature...

293

Climatic Temperature Normals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The published 195180 daily normals of maximum and minimum temperatures were prepared by interpolating between average monthly values. This study compares the published normal and 30-yr average daily temperatures in the eastern half of the United ...

Nathaniel B. Guttman; Marc S. Plantico

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Hygrometry with Temperature Stabilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is presented for stabilizing the temperature of air to allow the use of temperature-sensitive, humidity sensors for direct determination of an invariant humidity characteristic such as specific humidity and/or its fluctuations. Problems ...

Krzysztof E. Haman; Andrzej M. Makulski

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Survey of domestic research on superconducting magnetic energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the results of a survey of domestic research on superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) undertaken with the support of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Superconductivity Pilot Center. Each survey entry includes the following: Name, address, and other telephone and facsimile numbers of the principal investigator and other staff members; funding for fiscal year 1991, 1992, 1993; brief descriptions of the program, the technical progress to date, and the expected technical progress; a note on any other collaboration. Included with the survey are recommendations intended to help DOE decide how best to support SMES research and development (R&D). To summarize, I would say that important elements of a well-rounded SMES research program for DOE are as follows. (1) Construction of a large ETM. (2) Development of SMES as an enabling technology for solar and wind generation, especially in conjunction with the ETM program, if possible. (3) Development of small SMES units for electric networks, for rapid transit, and as noninterruptible power supplies [uses (2), (3), and (4) above]. In this connection, lightweight, fiber-reinforced polymer structures, which would be especially advantageous for space and transportation applications, should be developed. (4) Continued study of the potential impacts of high-temperature superconductors on SMES, with construction as soon as feasible of small SMES units using high-temperature superconductors (HTSs).

Dresner, L.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Survey of domestic research on superconducting magnetic energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the results of a survey of domestic research on superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) undertaken with the support of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Superconductivity Pilot Center. Each survey entry includes the following: Name, address, and other telephone and facsimile numbers of the principal investigator and other staff members; funding for fiscal year 1991, 1992, 1993; brief descriptions of the program, the technical progress to date, and the expected technical progress; a note on any other collaboration. Included with the survey are recommendations intended to help DOE decide how best to support SMES research and development (R D). To summarize, I would say that important elements of a well-rounded SMES research program for DOE are as follows. (1) Construction of a large ETM. (2) Development of SMES as an enabling technology for solar and wind generation, especially in conjunction with the ETM program, if possible. (3) Development of small SMES units for electric networks, for rapid transit, and as noninterruptible power supplies (uses (2), (3), and (4) above). In this connection, lightweight, fiber-reinforced polymer structures, which would be especially advantageous for space and transportation applications, should be developed. (4) Continued study of the potential impacts of high-temperature superconductors on SMES, with construction as soon as feasible of small SMES units using high-temperature superconductors (HTSs).

Dresner, L.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Anisotropic Curie Temperature Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Magnetic Materials for Energy Applications -III. Presentation Title, Anisotropic Curie Temperature Materials. Author(s), Harsh Deep Chopra, Jason...

298

Temperature-profile detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Temperature profiles at elevated temperature conditions are monitored by use of an elongated device having two conductors spaced by the minimum distance required to normally maintain an open circuit between them. The melting point of one conductor is selected at the elevated temperature being detected, while the melting point of the other is higher. As the preselected temperature is reached, liquid metal will flow between the conductors creating short circuits which are detectable as to location.

Not Available

1981-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

299

Temperature profile detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Temperature profiles at elevated temperature conditions are monitored by use of an elongated device having two conductors spaced by the minimum distance required to normally maintain an open circuit between them. The melting point of one conductor is selected at the elevated temperature being detected, while the melting point of the other is higher. As the preselected temperature is reached, liquid metal will flow between the conductors, creating short circuits which are detectable as to location.

Tokarz, Richard D. (West Richland, WA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Interfacial stress in a carbon-to-metal bond joint under thermal shock loading  

SciTech Connect

The duplex bond joint consisting of a metallic substrate armored with carbon-base materials is a promising candidate configuration for application to high heat flux operations. When a bond joint is subjected to thermal loadings, significant thermal stresses may develop due to mismatch of the thermal expansion coefficients. Stress intensification occurs near the free surface edge of the interface, sometimes showing singularity. The singular stress fields are critical for understanding the loading nature of the bond interface in a joint system. In this paper, thermal stresses in the bond interface of a carbon-to-molybdenum joint element were investigated. A high heat flux (HHF) pulse was assumed as the reference load history to simulate the thermal shock condition. The thermomechanical behavior was described quantitatively in terms of the stress intensity factor. The stress solutions of the singular field computed by the theoretical approach showed a good agreement with the numerical results of the finite element analysis. The stress intensity factor of the singular stress fields near the free surface edge of the interface showed a time variation similar to that of the bulk stress. The temperature gradient induced by the transient HHF load affected the overall interfacial stress only slightly.

You, J.H. [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). Inst. for Materials in Energy Systems] [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). Inst. for Materials in Energy Systems

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature survey stress" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Sealed glass coating of high temperature ceramic superconductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and article of manufacture of a lead oxide based glass coating on a high temperature superconductor. The method includes preparing a dispersion of glass powders in a solution, applying the dispersion to the superconductor, drying the dispersion before applying another coating and heating the glass powder dispersion at temperatures below oxygen diffusion onset and above the glass melting point to form a continuous glass coating on the superconductor to establish compressive stresses which enhance the fracture strength of the superconductor.

Wu, Weite (Tainan, TW); Chu, Cha Y. (Garnerville, NY); Goretta, Kenneth C. (Downers Grove, IL); Routbort, Jules L. (Darien, IL)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

THE BOLOCAM GALACTIC PLANE SURVEY: SURVEY DESCRIPTION AND DATA REDUCTION  

SciTech Connect

We present the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS), a 1.1 mm continuum survey at 33'' effective resolution of 170 deg{sup 2} of the Galactic Plane visible from the northern hemisphere. The BGPS is one of the first large area, systematic surveys of the Galactic Plane in the millimeter continuum without pre-selected targets. The survey is contiguous over the range -10.5 {<=} l {<=} 90.5, |b| {<=} 0.5. Toward the Cygnus X spiral arm, the coverage was flared to |b| {<=} 1.5 for 75.5 {<=} l {<=} 87.5. In addition, cross-cuts to |b| {<=} 1.5 were made at l= 3, 15, 30, and 31. The total area of this section is 133 deg{sup 2}. With the exception of the increase in latitude, no pre-selection criteria were applied to the coverage in this region. In addition to the contiguous region, four targeted regions in the outer Galaxy were observed: IC1396 (9 deg{sup 2}, 97.5 {<=} l {<=} 100.5, 2.25 {<=} b {<=} 5.25), a region toward the Perseus Arm (4 deg{sup 2} centered on l = 111, b = 0 near NGC 7538), W3/4/5 (18 deg{sup 2}, 132.5 {<=} l {<=} 138.5), and Gem OB1 (6 deg{sup 2}, 187.5 {<=} l {<=} 193.5). The survey has detected approximately 8400 clumps over the entire area to a limiting non-uniform 1{sigma} noise level in the range 11-53 mJy beam{sup -1} in the inner Galaxy. The BGPS source catalog is presented in a previously published companion paper. This paper details the survey observations and data reduction methods for the images. We discuss in detail the determination of astrometric and flux density calibration uncertainties and compare our results to the literature. Data processing algorithms that separate astronomical signals from time-variable atmospheric fluctuations in the data timestream are presented. These algorithms reproduce the structure of the astronomical sky over a limited range of angular scales and produce artifacts in the vicinity of bright sources. Based on simulations, we find that extended emission on scales larger than about 5.'9 is nearly completely attenuated (>90%) and the linear scale at which the attenuation reaches 50% is 3.'8. Comparison with other millimeter-wave data sets implies a possible systematic offset in flux calibration, for which no cause has been discovered. This presentation serves as a companion and guide to the public data release (http://irsa.ipac.caltech.edu/Missions/bolocam.html) through NASA's Infrared Processing and Analysis Center (IPAC) Infrared Science Archive (IRSA). New data releases will be provided through IPAC-IRSA with any future improvements in the reduction. The BGPS provides a complementary long-wavelength spectral band for the ongoing ATLASGAL and Herschel-SPIRE surveys, and an important database and context for imminent observations with SCUBA-2 and ALMA.

Aguirre, James E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Ginsburg, Adam G.; Bally, John; Battersby, Cara; Glenn, Jason; Harvey, Paul; Stringfellow, Guy S. [CASA, University of Colorado, 389-UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Dunham, Miranda K.; Evans, Neal J. II [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, 1 University Station C1400, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Drosback, Meredith M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Bradley, Eric Todd [Department of Physics, University of Central Florida, 4000 Central Florida Boulevard, Orlando, FL 32816-2385 (United States); Cyganowski, Claudia [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Dowell, Darren [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91104 (United States); Rosolowsky, Erik [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Okanagan (Canada); Walawender, Josh [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 640 North Aohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Williams, Jonathan P., E-mail: jaguirre@sas.upenn.edu [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

303

NEPA Litigation Surveys | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NEPA Litigation Surveys NEPA Litigation Surveys NEPA Litigation Surveys CEQ publishes surveys on NEPA litigation on an annual basis. These surveys identify the number of cases involving a NEPA based cause of action, Federal agencies that were identified as a lead defendant, general information on plaintiffs, general information on why litigation was pursued, and the outcomes of the cases decided during the year. Each year, Federal agencies conduct hundreds of EISs, tens of thousands of EAs and hundreds of thousands of CEs. The amount of litigation on these NEPA analyses is comparatively small. Since 2001, fewer than 175 NEPA cases were filed each year - with less than 100 filed in 2007, 2009, 2010, and 2011. The annual surveys are provided below: 2011 Litigation Survey 2010 Litigation Survey

304

NEPA Litigation Surveys | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NEPA Litigation Surveys NEPA Litigation Surveys NEPA Litigation Surveys CEQ publishes surveys on NEPA litigation on an annual basis. These surveys identify the number of cases involving a NEPA based cause of action, Federal agencies that were identified as a lead defendant, general information on plaintiffs, general information on why litigation was pursued, and the outcomes of the cases decided during the year. Each year, Federal agencies conduct hundreds of EISs, tens of thousands of EAs and hundreds of thousands of CEs. The amount of litigation on these NEPA analyses is comparatively small. Since 2001, fewer than 175 NEPA cases were filed each year - with less than 100 filed in 2007, 2009, 2010, and 2011. The annual surveys are provided below: 2011 Litigation Survey 2010 Litigation Survey

305

2008/2009 NERSC User Survey Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8/2009 User Survey Results 8/2009 User Survey Results Show All | 1 2 3 4 5 ... 9 | Next » 2008/2009 User Survey Results Table of Contents Response Survey Respondent Demographics Overall Satisfaction and Importance All Satisfaction and Importance Ratings Hardware Resources Software HPC Consulting Services and Communications Comments Response Survey Many thanks to the 421 users who responded to this year's User Survey. The response rate is comparable to last year's and both are significantly increased from previous years: 77.4 percent of users who had used more than 250,000 XT4-based hours when the survey opened responded 36.6 percent of users who had used between 10,000 and 250,000 XT4-based hours responded The overall response rate for the 3,134 authorized users during the survey period was 13.4%.

306

Hybrid heuristic algorithm for GPS surveying problem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper introduces several approaches based on ant colony optimization for efficient scheduling the surveying activities of designing satellite surveying networks. These proposed approaches use a set of agents called ants that cooperate to iteratively ...

Stefka Fidanova

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

TECHNICAL DOCUMENTATION Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This is the technical documentation for the public use data set based on the 1992 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), the national sample survey of commercial buildings and their energy suppliers conducted by the Energy Information Administration.

Information Center

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

A Survey of Information Retrieval Vendors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a survey of vendors that develop and market information retrieval technology. The objective of this survey is to provide information for those who want an overview of text retrieval and document management companies, their products, and ...

Robert J. Kuhns

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Temperature discovery search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Temperature Discovery Search (TDS) is a new minimax-based game tree search method designed to compute or approximate the temperature of a combinatorial game. TDS is based on the concept of an enriched environment, where a combinatorial game G ... Keywords: ?? algorithm, amazons, combinatorial games, go, temperature discovery search

Martin Mller; Markus Enzenberger; Jonathan Schaeffer

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Winter Morning Air Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results of temperature measurements, which may be applied to inference of winter temperatures in data-sparse areas, are presented. The morning air temperatures during three winters were measured at 80 places in a 10 km 30 km area along the ...

A. Hogan; M. Ferrick

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

High temperature sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature sensor includes a pair of electrical conductors separated by a mass of electrical insulating material. The insulating material has a measurable resistivity within the sensor that changes in relation to the temperature of the insulating material within a high temperature range (1,000 to 2,000 K.). When required, the sensor can be encased within a ceramic protective coating.

Tokarz, Richard D. (West Richland, WA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

NERSC-8 Vendor Market Survey  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Antypas! Antypas! NERSC-8 Project Lead NERSC-8 Market Survey --- 1 --- November 15, 2012 * Seek v endor i nput t o o p6mize 6 ming, r equirements and business prac6ces * Opportunity f or v endors t o p rovide i nput p rior t o formal p rocurement p rocess We are starting our next procurement, NERSC-8, with a round of market surveys Vendor B riefing --- 2 --- NERSC's mission is to enable science NERSC Mission: To accelerate the pace of scientific discovery by providing high-performance computing, data systems and services to the DOE Office of Science community. NERSC has over 4500 users in 650 projects that produce about 1500 publications per year! --- 3 --- Vendor B riefing NERSC's Long Term Strategy * New s ystem e very ~ 3 y ears, r un f or 5 ---6 y ears - Maximizes s tability r ather t han p eak / m achine

313

I COMPREHENSIVE RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY I  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

im im I COMPREHENSIVE RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY I Prepared by Oak Ridge Associated Universities Prprd* OFF-SITE PROPERTY H' | Prepared for Office of Operational FORMER LAKE ONTARIO ORDNANCE WORKS SITE Safety U.S. Department LEWISTON, NEW YORK I of Energy i J.D. BERGER i Radiological Site Assessment Program Manpower Education, Research, and Training Division I l*~~~~~~ ~~~~DRAFT REPORT January 1983 I I I ------- COMPREHENSIVE RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OFF-SITE PROPERTY H' FORMER LAKE ONTARIO ORDNANCE WORKS SITE LEWISTON, NEW YORK Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites -- Remedial Action Program J. D. Berger Project Staff L.W. Cole W.O. Helton R.D. Condra T.J. Sowell P.R. Cotten C.F. Weaver G.R. Foltz T.S. Yoo R.C. Gosslee Prepared by Radiological Site Assessment Program

314

PRELIMINARY SURVEY OF VITRO CORPORATION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

PRELIMINARY SURVEY OF VITRO CORPORATION (VITRO LABORATORIES) WEST ORANGE, NEW JERSEY Work performed by the Health and Safety Research Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 March 1980 OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY operated by UNION CARBIDE CORPORATION for the DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites-- Remedial Actton Program VITRO CORPORATION (VITRO LABORATORIES) WEST ORANGE, NEW JERSEY At the request of the Department of Energy (DOE), a preliminary survey was performed at the former Vitro Corporation Laboratory in West Orange, New Jersey (see Fig 1), on November 30, 1977, to assess the radiological status of those facilities utilized under Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) contract during the late 1950s and early 1960s. This

315

Simulator for Microlens Planet Surveys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We summarize the status of a computer simulator for microlens planet surveys. The simulator generates synthetic light curves of microlensing events observed with specified networks of telescopes over specified periods of time. Particular attention is paid to models for sky brightness and seeing, calibrated by fitting to data from the OGLE survey and RoboNet observations in 2011. Time intervals during which events are observable are identified by accounting for positions of the Sun and the Moon, and other restrictions on telescope pointing. Simulated observations are then generated for an algorithm that adjusts target priorities in real time with the aim of maximizing planet detection zone area summed over all the available events. The exoplanet detection capability of observations was compared for several telescopes.

Ipatov, Sergei I; Alsubai, Khalid A; Bramich, Daniel M; Dominik, Martin; Hundertmark, Markus P G; Liebig, Christine; Snodgrass, Colin D B; Street, Rachel A; Tsapras, Yiannis

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Rural electric cooperatives IRP survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the integrated resource planning (IRP) practices of US rural electric cooperatives and the IRP policies which influence these practices. It was prepared by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and its subcontractor Garrick and Associates to assist the US Department of Energy (DOE) in satisfying the reporting requirements of Title 1, Subtitle B, Section 111(e)(3) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct), which states: (e) Report--Not later than 2 years after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary (of the US Department of Energy) shall transmit a report to the President and to the Congress containing--(the findings from several surveys and evaluations, including:); (3) a survey of practices and policies under which electric cooperatives prepare IRPs, submit such plans to REA, and the extent to which such integrated resource planning is reflected in rates charged to customers.

Garrick, C. [Garrick and Associates, Morrison, CO (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey 1993  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey (FBSS) was conducted by EIA in conjunction with DOE's Office of Federal Energy Management Programs (OFEMP) to gain a better understanding of how Federal buildings use energy. This report presents the data from 881 completed telephone interviews with Federal buildings in three Federal regions. These buildings were systematically selected using OFEMP's specifications; therefore, these data do not statistically represent all Federal buildings in the country .

Information Center

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Radiological Habits Survey: Hartlepool, 2002  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.4 Seafood wholesalers and retailers 27 4.5 Wildfowl 28 4.6 Other food pathways 28 4.7 Internal exposure 29 4.8 External exposure 32 4.9 Water based activities 35 5. TERRESTRIAL RADIATION PATHWAYS 36 5.1 Terrestrial survey area 36 5.2 Terrestrial food wholesalers and retailers 38 5.3 Internal exposure 38 6. DIRECT

319

Radiological Habits Survey: Cardiff, 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.4 Seafood wholesalers and retailers 26 4.5 Wildfowl 26 4.6 Internal exposure 27 4.7 External exposure 29 4.2 Terrestrial food wholesalers and retailers 37 5.3 Internal exposure 37 6. COMBINED PATHWAYS 41 7. CONCLUSIONS of the survey 15 3. METHODS FOR DATA ANALYSIS 18 3.1 Data recording 18 3.2 Data analysis 20 4. AQUATIC RADIATION

320

Radiological Habits Survey, Faslane, 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.3 Land cover 24 5.4 Internal exposure 25 6. DIRECT RADIATION 26 7. COMBINED PATHWAYS 28 8. CONCLUSIONS.5 Wildfowling 18 4.6 Internal exposure 19 4.7 External exposure 21 4.8 Water based activities 22 5. TERRESTRIAL.2 Determination of critical groups 11 3.3 Data analysis 11 4. AQUATIC RADIATION PATHWAYS 15 4.1 Aquatic survey

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature survey stress" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Radiological Habits Survey: Devonport, 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

36 5.2 Wholesalers and retailers 38 5.3 Internal exposure 38 6. DIRECT RADIATION PATHWAYS 42 6.4 Wholesalers and retailers 28 4.5 Wildfowl 28 4.6 Other pathways 28 4.7 Internal exposure 29 4.8 External exposure 31 4.9 Water based activities 34 5. TERRESTRIAL RADIATION PATHWAYS 36 5.1 Terrestrial survey area

322

Radiological Habits Survey: Dungeness, 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

44 5.2 Wholesalers and retailers 47 5.3 Internal exposure 47 6. DIRECT RADIATION PATHWAYS 50 6.4 Wholesalers and retailers 34 4.5 Wildfowl 35 4.6 Other pathways 35 4.7 Internal exposure 36 4.8 External exposure 39 4.9 Water based activities 42 5. TERRESTRIAL RADIATION PATHWAYS 44 5.1 Terrestrial survey area

323

Radiological Habits Survey: Trawsfynydd, 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5.2 Wholesalers and retailers 36 5.3 Internal exposure 36 6. DIRECT RADIATION PATHWAYS 40 6.1 Direct.3 Angling 28 4.4 Wholesalers and retailers 28 4.5 Wildfowl 28 4.6 Internal exposure 29 4.7 External exposure analysis 22 4. AQUATIC RADIATION PATHWAYS 25 4.1 Aquatic survey area 25 4.2 Commercial fisheries 27 4

324

Radiological Habits Survey, Chapelcross, 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and local produce 25 5.2 Novel radiation pathways 26 5.3 Land cover 26 5.4 Internal exposure 27 6. DIRECT fisheries 18 4.3 Angling 19 4.4 Seafood wholesalers and retailers 19 4.5 Internal exposure 20 4.6 External exposure 22 4.7 Water based activities 23 5. TERRESTRIAL RADIATION PATHWAYS 25 5.1 Terrestrial survey area

325

Radiological Habits Survey, Hunterston 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and local produce 25 5.2 Novel radiation pathways 26 5.3 Land cover 26 5.4 Internal exposure 27 5.5 External fisheries 18 4.3 Angling and hobby fishing 19 4.4 Seafood wholesalers and retailers 19 4.5 Internal exposure 19 4.6 External exposure 23 5. TERRESTRIAL RADIATION PATHWAYS 25 5.1 Terrestrial survey area

326

Radiological Habits Survey: Sizewell, 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.1 Terrestrial survey area 38 5.2 Wholesalers and retailers 40 5.3 Internal exposure 40 6. DIRECT RADIATION fishing 29 4.4 Wholesalers and retailers 30 4.5 Wildfowl 30 4.6 Other pathways 30 4.7 Internal exposure 31 4.8 External exposure 34 4.9 Water based activities 36 5. TERRESTRIAL RADIATION PATHWAYS 38 5

327

Radiological Habits Survey: Sellafield, 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.4 Seafood wholesalers and retailers 28 4.5 Wildfowl 28 4.6 Other pathways 29 4.7 Internal exposure 29 4.8 External exposure 33 4.9 Water based activities 36 5. TERRESTRIAL RADIATION PATHWAYS 38 5.1 Terrestrial survey area 38 5.2 Terrestrial food wholesalers and retailers 41 5.3 Internal exposure 41 6. DIRECT

328

Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Below are historical data tables from the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). These tables cover the total number of households ...

329

Airborne electromagnetic surveys as a reconnaissance technique...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

electromagnetic surveys as a reconnaissance technique for geothermal exploration Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Airborne...

330

Survey of renewable chemicals produced from ...  

RESEARCH Open Access Survey of renewable chemicals produced from lignocellulosic biomass during ionic liquid pretreatment Patanjali Varanasi1,2, ...

331

Survey of innovative rates, 1991  

SciTech Connect

Current innovative rate data from 135 major utilities throughout the United States were gathered and analyzed. Over 1000 innovative rates that were in use by the utilities in 1990 and 1991 were identified, abstracted and entered into a database. Survey results indicate that over 616 million MWh were sold to the nearly five million customers using the innovative rates offered. From an annual sales perspective, the most widely used rates are demand-side management rates -- rates intended to change customer energy use -- and rates that are market-driven.'' The survey identified 525 demand-side management rates serving our four million customers with reported sales of approximately 520 million MWh. These rates serve over 80% of the total innovative rate customers and account for 84% of the total MWh sales. Also important in terms of MWh sales they represent are market-driven rates, which accounted for sales of 48 million MWh in 1990. Both demand-side management and market-driven rates show a 20% customer growth rate between 1988 and 1990. Other innovative rates examined in the survey included: prepaid service; load retention incentive rates; technology specific rates; and those rates related expressly to non-utility generators -- namely buy-back and standby rates.

White, L.J.; Wakefield, R.A.; McVicker, C.M.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Survey of innovative rates, 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current innovative rate data from 135 major utilities throughout the United States were gathered and analyzed. Over 1000 innovative rates that were in use by the utilities in 1990 and 1991 were identified, abstracted and entered into a database. Survey results indicate that over 616 million MWh were sold to the nearly five million customers using the innovative rates offered. From an annual sales perspective, the most widely used rates are demand-side management rates -- rates intended to change customer energy use -- and rates that are market-driven.'' The survey identified 525 demand-side management rates serving our four million customers with reported sales of approximately 520 million MWh. These rates serve over 80% of the total innovative rate customers and account for 84% of the total MWh sales. Also important in terms of the MWh sales they represent are market-driven rates, which accounted for sales of 48 million MWh in 1990. Both demand-side management and market-driven rates show a 20% customer growth rate between 1988 and 1990. Other innovative rates examined in the survey included: prepaid service; load retention incentive rates; technology specific rates; and those rates related expressly to non-utility generators -- namely buy-back and standby rates.

White, L.J.; Wakefield, R.A.; McVicker, C.M.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

RESIDUAL STRESSES IN 3013 CONTAINERS  

SciTech Connect

The DOE Complex is packaging plutonium-bearing materials for storage and eventual disposition or disposal. The materials are handled according to the DOE-STD-3013 which outlines general requirements for stabilization, packaging and long-term storage. The storage vessels for the plutonium-bearing materials are termed 3013 containers. Stress corrosion cracking has been identified as a potential container degradation mode and this work determined that the residual stresses in the containers are sufficient to support such cracking. Sections of the 3013 outer, inner, and convenience containers, in both the as-fabricated condition and the closure welded condition, were evaluated per ASTM standard G-36. The standard requires exposure to a boiling magnesium chloride solution, which is an aggressive testing solution. Tests in a less aggressive 40% calcium chloride solution were also conducted. These tests were used to reveal the relative stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of the as fabricated 3013 containers. Significant cracking was observed in all containers in areas near welds and transitions in the container diameter. Stress corrosion cracks developed in both the lid and the body of gas tungsten arc welded and laser closure welded containers. The development of stress corrosion cracks in the as-fabricated and in the closure welded container samples demonstrates that the residual stresses in the 3013 containers are sufficient to support stress corrosion cracking if the environmental conditions inside the containers do not preclude the cracking process.

Mickalonis, J.; Dunn, K.

2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

334

Electric/hybrid vehicle Delphi survey  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document presents the methodology and results of the Delphi survey. The viewgraphs depict the surveyed population in detail and the surveyed vehicles attributes such as range, recharging time, velocity, acceleration, etc. These opinions are given for forecast years 2000, 2010, and 2020.

Ng, H.K.; Anderson, J.L.; Santini, D.J.

1995-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

335

Christopher U.S. Geological Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Christopher Magirl U.S. Geological Survey 934 Broadway Suite 300 Tacoma, Washington 98402 Phone; Hydraulic modeling; Computer programming (C/C++, Fortran, Perl), Field survey; Geographic information Research Hydrologist U.S. Geological Survey, Tacoma, Washington. September 2009 ­ present · Analyzing

336

HERRING SPAWNING SURVEYS IN SOUTHEASTERN ALASKA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

--Fisheries No. 321 Washington, D. C. December 1959 #12;CONTENTS Page Introduction 1 Methods of aerial survey and Wildlife Service Galveston, Texas ABSTRACT Aerial surveys to observe milt herring in Southeastern Alaska that intensive ground surveys to assess spawn deposition are not feasible. There- fore, a method of aerial

337

Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, and residual stress and strain in (111)-oriented scandium nitride thin films on silicon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cyclotron resonance MBE which typically generate N2 + species with high kinetic energies. The causes of compressive stress in this case may instead be related to a trend commonly observed in vapor-deposited thin films. Such films typically experience... with the strain information hich is found to be 27025 GPa. Residual m growth temperature and film thickness#2; d by the differential thermal contraction ic compressive stresses generated during .1063/1.2217106#5; Accurate determination of residual stresses...

Moram, M A; Barber, Z H; Humphreys, C J; Joyce, T B; Chalker, P R

2006-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

338

Temperature measurement and sensor selection for solar heating and cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The different methods for temperature and temperature difference measurement are critically described as to their applicability to solar heating and cooling systems. The major commercial temperature sensors are surveyed, and their technical and economic aspects are discussed. Installation and calibration techniques are recommended. The temperature measuring system implemented in the University of Pennsylvania Solar Row House as a consequence of the above considerations is described.

Lior, N.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Gamma Survey of a Permeable Reactive Barrier at Monticello, Utah...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gamma Survey of a Permeable Reactive Barrier at Monticello, Utah Gamma Survey of a Permeable Reactive Barrier at Monticello, Utah Gamma Survey of a Permeable Reactive Barrier at...

340

Residual stress stability in fiber textured stoichiometric AlN film grown using rf magnetron sputtering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors report on the stability of mechanical stress with aging and thermal cycling for columnar structured stoichiometric and homogeneous aluminum nitride thin films grown using radio frequency magnetron sputtering technique. The set of deposition parameters were optimized for the best possible orientation of crystallites in the c axis of compositionally stoichiometric films. The as-grown stress in the slightly nitrogen-rich film does not change when exposed to the atmosphere following deposition, while that in the nitrogen-deficient film, it changes due to oxidation. Additionally, the magnitude of as-grown stress has been found to depend on the substrate material in addition to the deposition parameters. The stress in the film grown on a Si(001) substrate was more tensile than in the film grown on a semi-insulating (si) GaAs(001) substrate for a given set of deposition parameters. Furthermore, the stress in the film grown on Si decreased with temperature, while that on si GaAs increased, indicating the thermally induced stress component to be the major component in the residual stress. Upon subsequent cooling the stress changes in both substrates followed the same path as of heating, thus exhibiting no hysteresis with thermal cycles between room temperature and 400 deg. C.

Sah, R. E.; Kirste, L.; Baeumler, M.; Hiesinger, P.; Cimalla, V.; Lebedev, V.; Baumann, H.; Zschau, H.-E. [Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Solid State Physics, Tullastrasse 72, 79108 Freiburg (Germany); Institut fuer Kernphysik, J. Goethe Universitaet, Max-von-Lauer-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt/M (Germany); DECHEMA e.V., Karl-Winnacker-Institut, Theodor-Heuss-Allee 25, 60486 Frankfurt/M (Germany)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature survey stress" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Temperature compensated photovoltaic array  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A temperature compensated photovoltaic module (20) comprised of a series of solar cells (22) having a thermally activated switch (24) connected in parallel with several of the cells (22). The photovoltaic module (20) is adapted to charge conventional batteries having a temperature coefficient (TC) differing from the temperature coefficient (TC) of the module (20). The calibration temperatures of the switches (24) are chosen whereby the colder the ambient temperature for the module (20), the more switches that are on and form a closed circuit to short the associated solar cells (22). By shorting some of the solar cells (22) as the ambient temperature decreases, the battery being charged by the module (20) is not excessively overcharged at lower temperatures. PV module (20) is an integrated solution that is reliable and inexpensive.

Mosher, Dan Michael (Plano, TX)

1997-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

342

Temperature compensated photovoltaic array  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A temperature compensated photovoltaic module comprises a series of solar cells having a thermally activated switch connected in parallel with several of the cells. The photovoltaic module is adapted to charge conventional batteries having a temperature coefficient differing from the temperature coefficient of the module. The calibration temperatures of the switches are chosen whereby the colder the ambient temperature for the module, the more switches that are on and form a closed circuit to short the associated solar cells. By shorting some of the solar cells as the ambient temperature decreases, the battery being charged by the module is not excessively overcharged at lower temperatures. PV module is an integrated solution that is reliable and inexpensive. 2 figs.

Mosher, D.M.

1997-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

343

In situ stress, fracture, and fluid flow analysis in Well 38C-9: an  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

In situ stress, fracture, and fluid flow analysis in Well 38C-9: an In situ stress, fracture, and fluid flow analysis in Well 38C-9: an enhanced geothermal system in the Coso geothermal field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: In situ stress, fracture, and fluid flow analysis in Well 38C-9: an enhanced geothermal system in the Coso geothermal field Abstract Geoscientists from the Coso Operating Company, EGI-Utah, GeoMechanics International, and the U.S. Geological Survey are cooperating in a multi-year study to develop an Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) in the Coso Geothermal Field. Key to the creation of an EGS is an understanding of the relationship among natural fracture distribution, fluid flow, and the ambient tectonic stresses that exist within the resource in order to design

344

Pacific Northwest Residential Energy Survey 1983 : Basic Findings.  

SciTech Connect

The survey was designed to support BPA's conservation assessment, program evaluation, and power forecasting responsibilities. The resulting data base contains information on the socio-economic status, family size, and energy-related attitudes of residential consumers, as well as on the heating systems, electric appliances, weatherization, and other conservation practices followed in their dwellings. Personal interviews were conducted at a probability sample of 4703 households in 57 utility service areas. In addition to interviewing customers, the Louis Harris staff measured the temperature of hot water at the tap and recorded the outside dimensions of the dwellings. The survey was begun in late May 1983 and was completed in September 1983. About 70% of the interviews were done in June and July 1983. Surveyors also obtained waivers allowing access to utility data covering the period between September 1981 and January 1983. After the interviews, utility billing data were requested.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Microcantilever heater-thermometer with integrated temperature-compensated strain sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides microcantilever hotplate devices which incorporate temperature compensating strain sensors. The microcantilever hotplate devices of the present invention comprise microcantilevers having temperature compensating strain sensors and resistive heaters. The present invention also provides methods for using a microcantilever hotplate for temperature compensated surface stress measurements, chemical/biochemical sensing, measuring various properties of compounds adhered to the microcantilever hotplate surface, or for temperature compensated deflection measurements.

King, William P. (Champaign, IL); Lee, Jungchul (Champaign, IL); Goericke, Fabian T. (Wolfsburg, DE)

2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

346

Survey Design Surveys were conducted using an Aero Commander 690A at a speed of 110  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and exploratory tracklines. (see Rone et al. aerial survey poster) Sonobuoy deployments were incorporated whale detections. After considering limitations encountered during the aerial survey that year (iSurvey Design Surveys were conducted using an Aero Commander 690A at a speed of 110 knots and 1000

347

An Examination of the AGCM Simulated Surface Wind Stress and Low-Level Winds over the Tropical Pacific Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The monthly mean surface wind stress and winds in the lower troposphere for 198692 simulated by the Center for OceanLandAtmosphere Studies atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) forced with observed sea surface temperature (SST) is ...

Bohua Huang; J. Shukla

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Stress relief cracking in creep resisting low alloy ferritic steels.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Problem of Stress Relief Cracking in Low Alloy Steels During the welding of a ferritic steel, the HAZ adjacent to the weld transforms to austenite, the grains close to the fusion zone attaining particularly high tempel'ature and undergoing considerable... growth. At the same time, carbides tend to dissolve, dissolution being more complete in the coarse 14 grained region because it attains a higher temperature. The HAZ is cooled rapidly by the cold parent metal and, as a result, re- precipitation...

Tait, Robert Andrew

1976-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

349

Automatic temperature control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An automatic temperature control system is described for maintaining a preset temperature in an enclosed space in a building, comprising: heating and cooling means for conditioning the air in the enclosed space to maintain the preset temperature; exterior thermostat means outside the building for sensing ambient exterior temperature levels; interior thermostat means in the enclosed space, preset to the preset temperature to be maintained and connected with the heating and cooling means to energize the means for heating or cooling, as appropriate, when the preset temperature is reached; means defining a heat sink containing a volume of air heated by solar radiation, the volume of the heat sink being such that the temperature level therein is not affected by minor or temporary ambient temperature fluctuations; and heat sink thermostat means in the heat sink sensing the temperature in the heat sink, the heat sink thermostat means being connected in tandem with the exterior thermostat means and operative with the exterior thermostat means to switch the interior thermostat means to either a first readiness state for heating or a second readiness state for cooling, depending upon which mode is indicated by both the exterior and heat sink thermostat means, whereby the system automatically switches between heating and cooling, as required, in response to a comparison of exterior and heat sink temperatures.

Sheridan, J.P.

1986-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

350

Aeromagnetic Survey (Nannini, 1986) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Aeromagnetic Survey (Nannini, 1986) Aeromagnetic Survey (Nannini, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Aeromagnetic Survey (Nannini, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration Technique Aeromagnetic Survey Activity Date 1986 Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Detection and quantitative assessment of such intrusive events can be facilitated by magnetic surveys (ground or aerial magnetic field measurements). These surveys are based on the magnetic susceptibility contrast between magmatic rocks at depth and the sedimentary formations above. References Raffaello Nannini (1986) Some Aspects Of Exploration In Non-Volcanic Areas Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Aeromagnetic_Survey_(Nannini,_1986)&oldid=592438"

351

Helicopter magnetic survey conducted to locate wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A helicopter magnetic survey was conducted in August 2007 over 15.6 sq mi at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3s (NPR-3) Teapot Dome Field near Casper, Wyoming. The surveys purpose was to accurately locate wells drilled there during more than 90 years of continuous oilfield operation. The survey was conducted at low altitude and with closely spaced flight lines to improve the detection of wells with weak magnetic response and to increase the resolution of closely spaced wells. The survey was in preparation for a planned CO2 flood for EOR, which requires a complete well inventory with accurate locations for all existing wells. The magnetic survey was intended to locate wells missing from the well database and to provide accurate locations for all wells. The ability of the helicopter magnetic survey to accurately locate wells was accomplished by comparing airborne well picks with well locations from an intense ground search of a small test area.

Veloski, G.A.; Hammack, R.W.; Stamp, V. (Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center); Hall, R. (Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center); Colina, K. (Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Mapping Tectonic Stress Using Earthquakes  

SciTech Connect

An earthquakes occurs when the forces acting on a fault overcome its intrinsic strength and cause it to slip abruptly. Understanding more specifically why earthquakes occur at particular locations and times is complicated because in many cases we do not know what these forces actually are, or indeed what processes ultimately trigger slip. The goal of this study is to develop, test, and implement a Bayesian method of reliably determining tectonic stresses using the most abundant stress gauges available - earthquakes themselves.Existing algorithms produce reasonable estimates of the principal stress directions, but yield unreliable error bounds as a consequence of the generally weak constraint on stress imposed by any single earthquake, observational errors, and an unavoidable ambiguity between the fault normal and the slip vector.A statistical treatment of the problem can take into account observational errors, combine data from multiple earthquakes in a consistent manner, and provide realistic error bounds on the estimated principal stress directions.We have developed a realistic physical framework for modelling multiple earthquakes and show how the strong physical and geometrical constraints present in this problem allow inference to be made about the orientation of the principal axes of stress in the earth's crust.

Arnold, Richard; Townend, John; Vignaux, Tony [Victoria University of Wellington, PO Box 600, Wellington (New Zealand)

2005-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

353

Strees Corrosion Cracking Initiation of Ni-Bassed Alloys in High Temperature Water  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of the work is to provide stress corrosion cracking (SCC) initiation data for Alloy 600 that is not compromised by (1) specimens that suffer from stress relaxation, (2) specimens which have an unknown stress state, (3) specimens which are tested at unknown positions electrochemically relative to the Ni/NiO phase transition, and (4) testing which relies on the period of time between specimen inspection intervals to estimate SCC initiation times. The current study was aimed at studying the effects of temperature and coolant hydrogen concentration on SCC initiation in high purity, high temperature water.

E Richey; D Morton

2005-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

354

Daily Temperature Lag  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Daily Temperature Lag Daily Temperature Lag Name: Shyammayi Status: teacher Grade: K-2 Country: Mauritius Date: Summer 2011 Question: At what time of the day is the temperature hottest? At what time of the day is the temperature coldest? Replies: In general, the hottest part of the day is late afternoon. The sun has passed its peak in the sky but still heats the Earth up until very late in the afternoon. The lowest temperatures are around dawn. Earth has had all night to get rid of the day's heat by radiating it into space. After sunrise, temperatures begin to climb. This can be changed by local storms, sea breezes or mountain breezes and even monsoon winds. Hope this helps. R. W. "Bob" Avakian Instructor Arts and Sciences/CRC Oklahoma State Univ. Inst. of Technology Shyammayi

355

Site survey method and apparatus  

SciTech Connect

The disclosure of the invention is directed to a site survey ground vehicle based apparatus and method for automatically detecting source materials, such as radioactivity, marking the location of the source materials, such as with paint, and mapping the location of the source materials on a site. The apparatus of the invention is also useful for collecting and analyzing samples. The apparatus includes a ground vehicle, detectors mounted at the front of the ground vehicle, and individual detector supports which follow somewhat irregular terrain to allow consistent and accurate detection, and autolocation equipment.

Oldham, James G. (Albuquerque, NM); Spencer, Charles R. (Boise, ID); Begley, Carl L. (Albuquerque, NM); Meyer, H. Robert (Albuquerque, NM)

1991-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

356

Site survey method and apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosure of the invention is directed to a site survey ground vehicle based apparatus and method for automatically detecting source materials, such as radioactivity, marking the location of the source materials, such as with paint, and mapping the location of the source materials on a site. The apparatus of the invention is also useful for collecting and analyzing samples. The apparatus includes a ground vehicle, detectors mounted at the front of the ground vehicle, and individual detector supports which follow somewhat irregular terrain to allow consistent and accurate detection, and autolocation equipment. 19 figures.

Oldham, J.G.; Spencer, C.R.; Begley, C.L.; Meyer, H.R.

1991-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

357

Automatic temperature adjustment apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for increasing the efficiency of a conventional central space heating system is disclosed. The temperature of a fluid heating medium is adjusted based on a measurement of the external temperature, and a system parameter. The system parameter is periodically modified based on a closed loop process that monitors the operation of the heating system. This closed loop process provides a heating medium temperature value that is very near the optimum for energy efficiency.

Chaplin, James E. (66 Overlook Rd., Bloomingdale, NJ 07403)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

High-temperature sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature sensor is described which includes a pair of electrical conductors separated by a mass of electrical insulating material. The insulating material has a measurable resistivity within the sensor that changes in relation to the temperature of the insulating material within a high temperature range (1000 to 2000/sup 0/K). When required, the sensor can be encased within a ceramic protective coating.

Not Available

1981-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

359

High temperature refrigerator  

SciTech Connect

A high temperature magnetic refrigerator which uses a Stirling-like cycle in which rotating magnetic working material is heated in zero field and adiabatically magnetized, cooled in high field, then adiabatically demagnetized. During this cycle said working material is in heat exchange with a pumped fluid which absorbs heat from a low temperature heat source and deposits heat in a high temperature reservoir. The magnetic refrigeration cycle operates at an efficiency 70% of Carnot.

Steyert, Jr., William A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

West Coast Aerial Sardine Survey Application for Exempted Fishing Permit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

West Coast Aerial Sardine Survey 2010 Application for Exempted Fishing Permit Applicants ........................................................................................5 A. Coastwide Summer Aerial Sardine Survey (July-August, 2010) ....................6 I. Survey Design ­ Coastwide Summer Aerial Sardine Survey ...............................6 Stage 1: Aerial Transect

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature survey stress" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

External vs. body temperature  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

External vs. body temperature External vs. body temperature Name: jacqui Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: If one's internal body temperature is approximately 98.6, WHY when the external temperature is 98.6 do we feel hot? Since both temperatures are "balanced", shouldn't we feel comfortable? I am assuming here that humidity levels are controlled, and play no factor in the external temperature. Replies: First of all, skin temperature is lower than 98.6F; 98.6F is internal body temperature, so air at 98.6F is hotter than skin. But more important, it is the nervous system, and the cells in your skin that your brain uses to detect temperature that determine whether you "feel" hot or not, not whether the air is hotter than your skin. These are set so that you feel hot when the air is actually colder than your skin. Why? They are probably set to make you feel hot whenever the air is warm enough so that your body has some trouble getting rid of the excess heat it produces through metabolism. This insures that you take some actions to help your body cool off. Like drinking cool water, or reducing exercise

362

Surface Temperature of IGUs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

117 117 Surface Temperatures of Insulated Glazing Units: Infrared Thermography Laboratory Measurements Brent T. Griffith, Daniel Türler, and Dariush Arasteh Building Technologies Program Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory University of California Berkeley, CA 94720 USA Fax: 510-486-6046, email: D_Arasteh@lbl.gov Abstract Data are presented for the distribution of surface temperatures on the warm-side surface of seven different insulated glazing units. Surface temperatures are measured using infrared thermography and an external referencing technique. This technique allows detailed mapping of surface temperatures that is non-intrusive. The glazings were placed between warm and cold environmental chambers that were operated at conditions

363

High Temperature Corrosion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 18, 2010 ... Protective Coatings for Corrosion Resistance at High Temperatures: Vilupanur Ravi1; Thuan Nguyen1; Alexander Ly1; Kameron Harmon1;...

364

Low temperature cryoprobe  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portable, hand held probe usable within a small confine to produce a point source of nitrogen or helium at a relatively constant temperature of 77 degrees Kelvin.

Sungaila, Zenon F. (Orland Park, IL)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

DC Resistivity Survey (Schlumberger Array) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Schlumberger Array) Schlumberger Array) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: DC Resistivity Survey (Schlumberger Array) Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Vertical Electrical Sounding Configurations Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature

366

DC Resistivity Survey (Wenner Array) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wenner Array) Wenner Array) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: DC Resistivity Survey (Wenner Array) Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Vertical Electrical Sounding Configurations Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature Dictionary.png

367

DC Resistivity Survey (Pole-Dipole Array) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pole-Dipole Array) Pole-Dipole Array) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: DC Resistivity Survey (Pole-Dipole Array) Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Electrical Profiling Configurations Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature Dictionary.png

368

Speech Under Stress: Analysis, Modeling and Recognition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this chapter, we consider a range of issues associated with analysis, modeling, and recognition of speech under stress. We start by defining stress, what could be perceived as stress, and how it affects the speech production system. In the discussion ... Keywords: Lombard effect, Teager energy operator, hidden Markov models, pitch contours, robustness in speech recognition, speech technology, stress classification

John H. Hansen; Sanjay Patil

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Wellbore inertial directional surveying system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wellbore inertial directional surveying system for providing a complete directional survey of an oil or gas well borehole to determine the displacement in all three directions of the borehole path relative to the well head at the surface. The information generated by the present invention is especially useful when numerous wells are drilled to different geographical targets from a single offshore platform. Accurate knowledge of the path of the borehole allows proper well spacing and provides assurance that target formations are reached. The tool is lowered down into a borehole on an electrical cable. A computer positioned on the surface communicates with the tool via the cable. The tool contains a sensor block which is supported on a single gimbal, the rotation axis of which is aligned with the cylinder axis of the tool and, correspondingly, the borehole. The gyroscope measurement of the sensor block rotation is used in a null-seeking servo loop which essentially prevents rotation of the sensor block about the gimbal axis. Angular rates of the sensor block about axes which are perpendicular to te gimbal axis are measured by gyroscopes in a manner similar to a strapped-down arrangement. Three accelerometers provide acceleration information as the tool is lowered within the borehole. The uphole computer derives position information based upon acceleration information and angular rate information. Kalman estimation techniques are used to compensate for system errors. 25 figures.

Andreas, R.D.; Heck, G.M.; Kohler, S.M.; Watts, A.C.

1982-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

370

Survey of Climate Data Mining  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global climate change has been a discussion topic for years, finally culminating as a significant problem and a national defense issue according to the 2010 Quadrennial Defense Review. From weather to ecological data, the planet is continuously being monitored by researchers collecting spatio-temporal climate data. With the immense amount of data collected, the challenge is making sense of the data by building models and studying the climatic events that deviate and correlate to the models. Data mining is now being used for this research and has four related problems: preprocessing data, applying data mining techniques to build models and outlier/anomaly detection, evaluation techniques and methods, and data visualization. This survey paper will present a broad survey of these issues by first discussing preprocessing techniques to remove variation and other data quality issues, including a discussion on the two types of outliers: undesirable outliers and outliers that represent interesting climate events. Next this paper will discuss common data mining techniques for building models, including association analysis, clustering, and ICA, and discovering interesting outlier/anomalies using techniques including classification, clustering, and wavelet analysis. Third, evaluation techniques will be covered through descriptions and examples. Finally, issues and techniques for climate data visualization will be discussed including

Jason W. Powell

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Wellbore inertial directional surveying system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wellbore inertial directional surveying system for providing a complete directional survey of an oil or gas well borehole to determine the displacement in all three directions of the borehole path relative to the well head at the surface. The information generated by the present invention is especially useful when numerous wells are drilled to different geographical targets from a single off-shore platform. Accurate knowledge of the path of the borehole allows proper well spacing and provides assurance that target formations are reached. The tool is lowered down into a borehole on the electrical cable. A computer positioned on the surface communicates with the tool via the cable. The tool contains a sensor block which is supported on a single gimbal, the rotation axis of which is aligned with the cylinder axis of the tool and, correspondingly, the borehole. The gyroscope measurement of the sensor block rotation is used in a null-seeking servo loop which essentially prevents rotation of the sensor block aboutthe gimbal axis. Angular rates of the sensor block about axes which are perpendicular to the gimbal axis are measured by gyroscopes in a manner similar to a strapped-down arrangement. Three accelerometers provide acceleration information as the tool is lowered within the borehole. The uphole computer derives position information based upon acceleration information and anular rate information. Kalman estimation techniques are used to compensate for system errors.

Andreas, Ronald D. (Albuquerque, NM); Heck, G. Michael (Albuquerque, NM); Kohler, Stewart M. (Albuquerque, NM); Watts, Alfred C. (Albuquerque, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Fracture Permeability and In Situ Stress in the Dixie Valley, Nevada,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fracture Permeability and In Situ Stress in the Dixie Valley, Nevada, Fracture Permeability and In Situ Stress in the Dixie Valley, Nevada, Geothermal Reservoir Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Fracture Permeability and In Situ Stress in the Dixie Valley, Nevada, Geothermal Reservoir Abstract Borehole televiewer, temperature and flowmeter logs and hydraulic fracturing stress measurements conducted in six wells penetrating a geothermal reservoir associated with the Stillwater fault zone in Dixie Valley, Nevada, were used to investigate the relationship between reservoir permeability and the contemporary in situ stress field. Data from wells drilled into productive and nonproductive segments of the Stillwater fault zone indicate that permeability in all wells is dominated by a relatively

373

High-Energy X-ray Diffraction Study of Internal Stresses in Metal Matrix  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High-Energy X-ray Diffraction Study of Internal Stresses in Metal Matrix High-Energy X-ray Diffraction Study of Internal Stresses in Metal Matrix Composites Metal matrix composites (MMCs) comprise an intriguing new class of materials coming to prominence in the aerospace, electronics, and automotive industries. Internal stresses play an important role in the behavior and successful application of MMCs and multi-phase alloys. These stresses form during processing and service due to transformation or thermal expansion mismatch, as well as elastic and plastic mismatch during deformation. In order to develop a deeper understanding of the thermo-mechanical behavior of these materials, it is of key interest to examine the development of mean stresses in the phases of the composite as a function of time upon changes of temperature and/or external load.

374

2-M Probe Survey At Salt Wells Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Salt Wells Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: 2-M Probe Survey At Salt Wells Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique 2-M Probe Survey Activity Date 2005 - 2006 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Geochemical water sampling, mineral distribution mapping, and shallow (30 cm) temperature probe measurements were conducted to expand on a previous field mapping study of surface geothermal features at Salt Wells, in order to evaluate the relationship between these features and structures that control geothermal fluid flow. Notes This study used a modified version of the 2 m temperature probe survey,

375

The novel use of low temperature hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon germanium (cSiGe: H) for MEMS applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon germanium (@mcSiGe:H) as a MEMS structural material deposited at temperatures of 300-400 ^oC, showing good mechanical and electrical properties. This range of deposition temperatures is ... Keywords: Growth mechanism, Low temperature processing, Microcrystalline, Microelectromechanical systems, PECVD, SiGe, Stress

M. Gromova; K. Baert; C. Van Hoof; A. Mehta; A. Witvrouw

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Geodetic Survey At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geodetic Survey At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Geodetic Survey At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geodetic Survey At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geodetic Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown Notes Targeting of Potential Geothermal Resources in the Great Basin from Regional to Basin-Scale Relationships Between Geodetic Strain and Geological Structures, Geoffrey Blewitt. The objectives of this project are to assess the use of inter-seismic crustal strain rates derived from GPS-stations as an exploration tool for non-magmatic high-temperature

377

Fiber optic temperature sensor  

SciTech Connect

Our fiber optic temperature measurement sensor and system is a major improvement over methods currently in use in most industrial processes, and it delivers all of the attributes required simplicity, accuracy, and cost efficiency-to help improve all of these processes. Because temperature is a basic physical attribute of nearly every industrial and commercial process, our system can eventually result in significant improvements in nearly every industrial and commercial process. Many finished goods, and the materials that go into them, are critically dependent on the temperature. The better the temperature measurement, the better quality the goods will be and the more economically they can be produced. The production and transmission of energy requires the monitoring of temperature in motors, circuit breakers, power generating plants, and transmission line equipment. The more reliable and robust the methods for measuring these temperature, the more available, stable, and affordable the supply of energy will become. The world is increasingly realizing the threats to health and safety of toxic or otherwise undesirable by products of the industrial economy in the environment. Cleanup of such contamination often depends on techniques that require the constant monitoring of temperature in extremely hazardous environments, which can damage most conventional temperature sensors and which are dangerous for operating personnel. Our system makes such monitoring safer and more economical.

Rabold, D.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Electrolysis High Temperature Hydrogen  

INL has developed a high-temperature process the utilizes solid oxide fuel cells that are operated in the electrolytic mode. The first process includes combining a high-temperature heat source (e.g. nuclear reactor) with a hydrogen production facility ...

379

Temperature stratified turbine compressors  

SciTech Connect

A method and apparatus for improving the efficiency of a compressor of a gas turbine engine is disclosed. The inlet gas entering the compressor is stratified into two portions of different temperatures. The higher temperature gas is introduced adjacent the outer tipe of the compressor blades to reduce the relative Mach number of the flow at the area.

Earnest, E.R.; Passinos, B.

1979-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

380

High Temperature ESP Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the High Temperature ESP Monitoring project was to develop a downhole monitoring system to be used in wells with bottom hole well temperatures up to 300C for measuring motor temperature, formation pressure, and formation temperature. These measurements are used to monitor the health of the ESP motor, to track the downhole operating conditions, and to optimize the pump operation. A 220 C based High Temperature ESP Monitoring system was commercially released for sale with Schlumberger ESP motors April of 2011 and a 250 C system with will be commercially released at the end of Q2 2011. The measurement system is now fully qualified, except for the sensor, at 300 C.

Jack Booker; Brindesh Dhruva

2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature survey stress" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

WIPP Subsidence Monument Leveling Survey - 2005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sections 2 through 7 of this report define the result of the 2005 leveling survey through the subsidence monuments at the WIPP site. Approximately 15 miles of leveling was completed through nine vertical control loops. The 2005 survey includes the determination of elevation on each of the 48 existing subsidence monuments and the WIPP baseline survey, and 14 of the National Geodetic Surveys (NGS) vertical control points. The field observations were completed during September through November of 2005 by personnel from the Washington TRU Solutions (WTS) Surveying Group, Mine Engineering Department. Additional rod personnel were provided by the Geotechnical Engineering Department. Digital leveling techniques were utilized to achieve better than Second Order Class II loop closures as outlined by the Federal Geodetic Control Subcommittee (FGCS). Because it is important to perform the subsidence survey in exactly the same manner each year, WIPP procedure (WP 09-ES4001) details each step of the survey. Starting with the 2002 survey this procedure has been used to perform the subsidence survey. Starting with the survey of the year 2001, Loop 1 and redundant survey connections among the various loops were removed from the survey and report. This resulted in a reduction of fieldwork with no loss of accuracy or precision. The redundant connections caused multiple elevations for the same stations. The differences were so slight that they were not used in elevation adjustments for the loops. The redundancy was used to spot gross errors in the field. After several years of surveying these loops it is evident that no gross errors occur that are not also evident in the loop closures. Finally, Section 8 contains Table F, which summarizes the elevations for all surveys from 1987 through 2005, inclusive. A detailed listing of the 1986 through 1997 surveys is contained in the report, WIPP Subsidence Monument Leveling Surveys 1986-1997, DOE/WIPP 98-2293. A reference to the summary reports for each year after 1997 is listed in the reference section of this document.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

BNL | Baryonic Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Baryonic Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) Baryonic Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) sloan telescope The 2.5-meter Sloan telescope in New Mexico Mapping the Luminous Universe How are galaxies clustered together? What is fueling the accelerating expansion of the universe? Just what is dark energy? These are the big questions that scientists working at the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) are asking. Brookhaven National Lab is a member of BOSS, the largest of the four surveys that make up the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III, which maps the sky over the Northern Hemisphere with New Mexico's 2.5-meter Sloan telescope in an attempt to define dark energy and measure its effects. Building on the legacy of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and SDSS-II, the SDSS-III collaboration is working to map the Milky Way, search

383

Definition: Geodetic Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geodetic Survey Geodetic Survey Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Geodetic Survey Geodetic surveys study Earth's geodynamical phenomena (e.g., crustal motion, gravitational field) using a satellite-borne global positioning system (GPS) in conjunction with terrestrial base stations. Geodetic surveys measure three-dimensional changes in crustal motion at the mm-scale. Measurements are typically made over very large areas (1010 km2) spanning years.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Also Known As Geodesy References ↑ GPS and Space-Based Geodetic Methods (Blewitt 2007) from the book Treatise on Geophysics Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Geodetic_Survey&oldid=401158

384

Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Policy and Guidance » Human Capital Management » Federal Employee Policy and Guidance » Human Capital Management » Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey The Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey (FedView survey) is a tool that measures employees' perceptions of whether, and to what extent, conditions characterizing successful organizations are present in their agencies. Survey results provide valuable insight into the challenges agency leaders face in ensuring the Federal Government has an effective civilian workforce and how well they are responding. Documents Available For Download October 31, 2013 2013 - Federal Viewpoint Survey Reports The following highlight report focuses on the Department of Energy's areas of strengths and challenges, identifies areas of progress and opportunities for improvement. The Departments 2013 results are compared

385

Design Code Survey Form | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Design Code Survey Form Design Code Survey Form Design Code Survey Form Survey of Safety Software Used in Design of Structures, Systems, and Components 1. Introduction The Department's Implementation Plan for Software Quality Assurance (SQA) that was developed in response to Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 2002-01, Quality Assurance for Safety-Related Software, includes a commitment (4.2.1.5) to conduct a survey of design codes currently in use to determine if any should be included as part of the toolbox codes. Design Code Survey Form September 11, 2003 More Documents & Publications Technical Standards, Safety Analysis Toolbox Codes - November 2003 DOE G 414.1-4, Safety Software Guide for Use with 10 CFR 830 Subpart A, Quality Assurance Requirements, and DOE O 414.1C, Quality Assurance

386

2007/2008 NERSC User Survey Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7/2008 User Survey Results 7/2008 User Survey Results Show All | 1 2 3 4 5 ... 10 | Next » 2007/2008 User Survey Results Table of Contents Response Summary Overall Satisfaction and Importance All Satisfaction, Importance and Usefulness Ratings Hardware Resources Software Visualization and Data Analysis HPC Consulting Services and Communications Web Interfaces Comments about NERSC Response Summary Many thanks to the 467 users who responded to this year's User Survey. The response rate has significantly increased from previous years: 70 percent of users who had used more than 1 million MPP hours when the survey opened responded 43 percent of users who had used between 10,000 and 1 million MPP hours responded The overall response rate for the 2,804 authorized users during the survey period was 16.3%.

387

1980 Active-Solar Installations Survey  

SciTech Connect

The survey covers active solar installations made during and prior to calendar year 1980. As the first survey of active solar installations in the United States, the objective was to establish a national baseline information system that could provide current data on residential and commercial active solar installations as well as a listing of firms involved in the active solar industry, including installers. Potential respondents were identified from regional lists of solar equipment dealers and installers compiled by each Regional Solar Energy Center (RSEC). The RSEC lists were computerized and combined into a mailing list of 5466 company names and addresses. An additional 1619 referrals, were provided by survey respondents from the RSEC list. However, because of resource constraints, 981 of these referrals were not included in the survey. To substantiate that the results of this survey represent accurate statistics on the number of active solar installations in the United States, a comparison was made to the Solar Collector Manufacturing Survey installations. (PSB)

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Residential energy-consumption survey: housing characteristics, 1981  

SciTech Connect

Data in this report cover fuels and their use in the home, appliances, square footage of floor space, heating equipment, thermal characteristics of the housing unit, conservation activities, and consumption of wood. Collected for the first time are data related to indoor temperatures and the use of air conditioning. A unique feature of the 1981 survey is an increased sampling of low-income households funded by the Social Security Administration to provide them information for the Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program. Discussion highlights data pertaining to these topics: changes in home heating fuel, secondary heating, indoor temperatures, features of new homes, use of air conditioning, use of solar collectors, and wood consumption.

Thompson, W.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Validation of veracity on simulating the indoor temperature in PCM light weight building by energyplus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article surveys the EnergyPlus constructions solution algorithm and heat balance method in EnergyPlus, presents the new conduction finite difference solution algorithm and enthalpy-temperature function features, describes the implementation of the ... Keywords: energyplus, indoor temperature, phase change materials(PCMs), validation

Chun-Long Zhuang; An-Zhong Deng; Yong Chen; Sheng-Bo Li; Hong-Yu Zhang; Guo-Zhi Fan

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Forecasting Cosmological Constraints from Redshift Surveys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Observations of redshift-space distortions in spectroscopic galaxy surveys offer an attractive method for observing the build-up of cosmological structure, which depends both on the expansion rate of the Universe and our theory of gravity. In this paper we present a formalism for forecasting the constraints on the growth of structure which would arise in an idealized survey. This Fisher matrix based formalism can be used to study the power and aid in the design of future surveys.

Martin White; Yong-Seon Song; Will J. Percival

2008-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

391

Nuclear Engineering Academic Programs Survey, 2002 Data  

SciTech Connect

The survey includes degrees granted between July 1, 2001 and June 30, 2002. Enrollment information refers to the fall term 2002. Thirty-five academic programs were in the survey universe and all responded (100% response rate). One of the 35 programs reported that it was discontinued after the 2001-2002 academic year. Also, two programs were discontinued after the previous academic year (2000-2001) and were not included in 2002 survey.

Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Nuclear Engineering Academic Programs Survey, 2003  

SciTech Connect

The survey includes degrees granted between September 1, 2002 and August 31, 2003. Thirty-three academic programs reported having nuclear engineering programs during the survey time period and all responded (100% response rate). Three of the programs included in last year's report were discontinued or out-of-scope in 2003. One new program has been added to the list. This year the survey data include U.S. citizenship, gender, and race/ethnicity by degree level.

Science and Engineering Education, Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

REALIZING PRESSURE, TEMPERATURE, AND LENGTH ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The basic concept behind the proposed apparatus is illustrated in ... at room temperature, requiring realization of thermodynamic temperature near 23 ...

2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

394

Graphite having improved thermal stress resistance and method of preparation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method for fabricating a graphite article comprises the steps of impregnating a coke article by first heating the coke article in contact with a thermoplastic pitch at a temperature within the range of 250.degree.-300.degree. C. at a pressure within the range of 200-2000 psig for at least 4-10 hours and then heating said article at a temperature within the range of 450.degree.-485.degree. C. at a pressure of 200-2000 psig for about 16-24 hours to provide an impregnated article; heating the impregnated article for sufficient time to carbonize the impregnant to provide a second coke article, and graphitizing the second coke article. A graphite having improved thermal stress resistance results when the coke to be impregnated contains 1-3 wt.% sulfur and no added puffing inhibitors. An additional improvement in thermal stress resistance is achieved when the second coke article is heated above about 1400.degree. C. at a rate of at least 10.degree. C./minute to a temperature above the puffing temperature.

Kennedy, Charles R. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Development of High-Temperature Ferritic Alloys and Performance Prediction Methods for Advanced Fission Energy Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reports the results of a comprehensive development and analysis of a database on irradiation hardening and embrittlement of tempered martensitic steels (TMS). Alloy specific quantitative semi-empirical models were derived for the dpa dose, irradiation temperature (ti) and test (Tt) temperature of yield stress hardening (or softening) .

G. RObert Odette; Takuya Yamamoto

2009-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

396

2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F (2005) - Household Natural Gas Usage Form F (2005) - Household Natural Gas Usage Form OMB No. 1905-0092, Expiring May 31, 2008 Household Natural Gas Usage Form Service Address: If the customer account number is not shown above, please enter it here. STEP 1 Customer Account: __/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/ STEP 2 Now, please turn the page and provide the requested information for the household identified above. Completed forms are due by March 4, 2006. If you have any questions, please call (toll-free) 1-NNN-NNN-NNNN. Ask for the Supplier Survey Specialist. This report is mandatory under Public Law 93-275, as amended. See the enclosed Answers to Frequently Asked Questions for more details concerning confidentiality and sanctions. Use the enclosed self-addressed envelope and return the completed form to:

397

2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

G (2005) - Household Fuel Oil or Kerosene Usage Form G (2005) - Household Fuel Oil or Kerosene Usage Form OMB No. 1905-0092, Expiring May 31, 2008 Household Fuel Oil or Kerosene Usage Form Service Address: If the customer account number is not shown on the label, please enter it here. STEP 1 Customer Account: __/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/ STEP 2 Now, please turn the page and answer the seven questions for the household identified above. Completed forms are due by March 4, 2006. If you have any questions, please call (toll-free) 1-NNN-NNN-NNNN. Ask for the Supplier Survey Specialist. This report is mandatory under Public Law 93-275, as amended. See the enclosed Answers to Frequently Asked Questions for more details concerning confidentiality and sanctions.

398

2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

D (2005) - Household Propane (Bottled Gas or LPG) Usage Form D (2005) - Household Propane (Bottled Gas or LPG) Usage Form OMB No. 1905-0092, Expiring May 31, 2008 Household Propane (Bottled Gas or LPG) Usage Form Service Address: If the customer account number is not shown on the label, please enter it here. STEP 1 Customer Account: __/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/ STEP 2 Now, please turn the page and answer the seven questions for the household identified above. Completed forms are due by March 4, 2006. If you have any questions, please call (toll-free) 1-NNN-NNN-NNNN. Ask for the Supplier Survey Specialist. This report is mandatory under Public Law 93-275, as amended. See the enclosed Answers to Frequently Asked Questions for more details concerning confidentiality

399

Massive Variability Surveys from Venezuela  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At the Venezuela National Astronomical Observatory we are carrying out variability surveys spanning many hundreds of square degrees near the celestial equator, using an 8k x 8k CCD Mosaic Camera optimized for drift-scanning on a 1m Schmidt telescope. Among the initial efforts was a project to obtain the first moderately deep, homogeneous sample of young stars over an area of ? 180sqr.deg. encompassing the entire Orion OB1 association, one of the nearest and most active regions of star formation. The results show that variability is a powerful technique to identify pre-main sequence populations, specially in sparse areas devoid of gas and dust. We are currently developing a massive database, equipped with web-based data mining tools, that will make our data and results available to the astronomical community. 1.

C. D. Impey; C. E. Petry; Csar Briceo

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Massive Variability Surveys from Venezuela  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At the Venezuela National Astronomical Observatory we are carrying out variability surveys spanning many hundreds of square degrees near the celestial equator, using an 8k x 8k CCD Mosaic Camera optimized for drift-scanning on a 1m Schmidt telescope. Among the initial efforts was a project to obtain the first moderately deep, homogeneous sample of young stars over an area of ~180sqr.deg. encompassing the entire Orion OB1 association, one of the nearest and most active regions of star formation. The results show that variability is a powerful technique to identify pre-main sequence populations, specially in sparse areas devoid of gas and dust. We are currently developing a massive database, equipped with web-based data mining tools, that will make our data and results available to the astronomical community.

Briceo, C

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature survey stress" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Massive Variability Surveys from Venezuela  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At the Venezuela National Astronomical Observatory we are carrying out variability surveys spanning many hundreds of square degrees near the celestial equator, using an 8k x 8k CCD Mosaic Camera optimized for drift-scanning on a 1m Schmidt telescope. Among the initial efforts was a project to obtain the first moderately deep, homogeneous sample of young stars over an area of ~180sqr.deg. encompassing the entire Orion OB1 association, one of the nearest and most active regions of star formation. The results show that variability is a powerful technique to identify pre-main sequence populations, specially in sparse areas devoid of gas and dust. We are currently developing a massive database, equipped with web-based data mining tools, that will make our data and results available to the astronomical community.

Cesar Briceno

2003-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

402

Survey Background and Technical Information on CBECS  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Survey Background and Technical Information Survey Background and Technical Information Survey Background and Technical Information Survey Background The commercial sector encompasses a vast range of building types- service businesses, such as retail and wholesale stores, hotels and motels, restaurants, and hospitals, as well as certain buildings that would not be considered "commercial" in a traditional economic sense, such as public and private schools, correctional institutions, and religious and fraternal organizations. Excluded from the sector are the goods-producing industries: manufacturing, agriculture, mining, forestry and fisheries, and construction. Nearly all energy use in the commercial sector takes place in, or is associated with, the buildings that house these commercial activities. Analysis of the structures, activities, and equipment associated with different types of buildings is the clearest way to evaluate commercial sector energy use. The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) is a national-level sample survey of commercial buildings and their energy suppliers conducted quadrennially (previously triennially) by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The 2003 CBECS was the eighth survey in the series begun in 1979. From 1979 to 1986, the survey was known as the Nonresidential Buildings Energy Consumption Survey, or NBECS.

403

Reflection Survey (Nannini, 1986) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reflection Survey (Nannini, 1986) Reflection Survey (Nannini, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Reflection Survey (Nannini, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration Technique Reflection Survey Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes "seismic analyses" - no indication of active/passive, reflection/refraction, etc. ---> "On the contrary, in areas with little or no volcanic activity, assumptions on the nature, size and characteristics of the source of the thermal anomaly are generally much more difficult and hypothetical. In these circumstances, some useful data can be obtained from accurate seismic analyses, together with a seismotectonic and geodynamic

404

Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey - Index Page  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Buildings 1993 Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey Overview Full Report Tables Energy usage and energy costs, by building characteristics, for federally-owned buildings in...

405

PRELIMINARY SURVEY OF WESTINGHOUSE ELECTRIC CORPORATION EAST...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

EAST PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA At the request of the Department of Energy (DOE, then ERDA), a preliminary survey was performed at the Westinghouse Electric Corporation's East...

406

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Heating and cooling no longer majority of U.S. home energy use. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Residential Energy Consumption Survey.

407

Balancing Authority Related Proposals for EIA Surveys  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

for EIA Surveys EIA Stakeholder Presentation June 5, 2012 . ... smart grid technologies and demand response. Require balancing authorities to post the next day

408

Definition: DC Resistivity Survey (Schlumberger Array) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Schlumberger Array) Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png DC Resistivity Survey (Schlumberger Array) The Schlumberger array is a type of electrode configuration for a DC...

409

2009/2010 NERSC User Survey Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demographics Overall Satisfaction All Satisfaction and Importance Ratings HPC Resources NERSC Software Services Comments Survey Text Response Summary Many thanks to the 395 users...

410

Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - Analysis ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The gross output for the petroleum and coal products subsector grew by about 3 percent, ... Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey, MECS Definition of Fuel Use, ...

411

WIPP Subsidence Monument Leveling Survey - 2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sections 2 through 7 of this report define the result of the 2004 leveling survey through the subsidence monuments at the WIPP site. Approximately 15 miles of leveling was completed through nine vertical control loops. The 2004 survey includes the determination of elevation on each of the 48 existing subsidence monuments and the WIPP baseline survey, and 14 of the National Geodetic Survey's (NGS) vertical control points. The field observations were completed during August through November of 2004 by personnel from the WashingtonTRU Solutions (WTS) Surveying Group, Mine Engineering Department. Additional rod personnel were provided by the Geotechnical Engineering department. Digital leveling techniques were utilized to achieve better than Second Order Class II loop closures as outlined by the Federal Geodetic Control Subcommittee (FGCS). Because it is important to perform the subsidence survey in exactly the same manner each year, WIPP procedure (WP 09-ES4001) details each step of the survey. Starting with the 2002 survey this procedure has been used to perform the subsidence survey. Starting with the survey of the year 2001, Loop 1 and redundant survey connections among the various loops were removed from the survey and report. This resulted in a reduction of fieldwork with no loss of accuracy or precision. The redundant connections caused multiple elevations for the same stations. The differences were so slight that they were not used in elevation adjustments for the loops. The redundancy was used to spot gross errors in the field. After several years of surveying these loops it is evident that no gross errors occur that are not also evident in the loop closures. Finally, Section 8 contains Table F, which summarizes the elevations for all surveys from 1987 through 2004, inclusive. A detailed listing of the 1986 through 1997 surveys is contained in the report, WIPP Subsidence Monument Leveling Surveys 1986-1997, DOE/WIPP 98-2293. A reference to the summary reports for each year after 1997 is listed in the reference section of this document.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2004-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

412

Supporting Statement for Survey Clearance: Electric Power ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Form EIA-63B, Annual Photovoltaic Cell/Module Shipments Report The Form EIA-63B is a mandatory annual census survey of companies engaged in photovol ...

413

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) 2009 Technical ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) Using the 2009 microdata file to compute estimates and standard errors (RSEs) February 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis

414

2005 State Laboratory Program Workload Survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. 2005 State Laboratory Program Workload Survey Summary Graphs and Data by NCSLI Legal Metrology Committee FL PR Jun'05 Rev 1 ...

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

415

2003 State Laboratory Program Workload Survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. 2003 State Laboratory Program Workload Survey Summary Graphs and Data by NCWM Metrology Subcommittee FL PR Aug'03 Rev 2 ...

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

416

Survey of Geothermal Heat Pump Shipments  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Others 930 3,369 454 4,753 ... Source: Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-902 "Annual Geothermal Heat Pump Manufacturers Survey." Relased: March 2006

417

EIA initiates daily gasoline availability survey for ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

To develop the emergency survey, EIA used the representative sample of retail stations selling gasoline used in EIA's Form EIA-878, "Motor Gasoline ...

418

Fever and Body Temperature  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fever and Body Temperature Fever and Body Temperature Name: Ying Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Hi, I have a few questions that I want to ask you: Why does your body chose to raise its temperature when you have a fever? Replies: Most bacteria and viruses that live in your body grow best at body temperature. They don't grow very well when the temperature is raised. When there are bacteria in your body they give off chemicals that signal white blood cells to come to try to eat them and also affect an area in your brain called the hypothalamus. This part of the brain controls alot of the automatic functions in your body and is also the site of your body's "thermostat". When the chemicals from the bacteria circulate through the hypothalamus it sets the body's temperature higher. This is called a fever. Your body kind of tries to "sweat out" the bacteria and kill them with a higher temperature. Some scientists question whether trying to bring down a fever is the best thing to do. If it isn't too high, some believe we should just let it work

419

Maintaining body temperature  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Maintaining body temperature Maintaining body temperature Name: Jeff Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: What keeps the human body at a constant temperature of 98.6? Replies: Maintaining body temperature is very complex. It also takes a lot of energy. About 80% of the energy from the food you eat goes to maintaining body temperature. Basically, the chemical reactions of metabolism of stored food, especially fats, generate heat as a by product. This heat warms the body. The brain reads temperature and controls to some extent the rate of this metabolism. There are also many other mechanisms triggered by the brain to keep the core of your body warm, even if the periphery (skin) is cold. Blood vessels to the fingers and toes constrict, so that the cold air doesn't cool the blood too much, so that cooled blood doesn't cool down the heart and brain when it returns. In severe cases, your body will sacrifice a finger or a toe to keep you from dying of cold core temperature (frostbite: it saves your life!). Also the brain can order a lot of muscles to contract rapidly. This generates a lot of heat quickly, a response called shivering. There's much more to this exciting field of research.

420

Goa, India Permeability of Charnokite Rock at High Temperatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT: Permeability at high temperature is a very important parameter to be considered for designing underground high level nuclear waste repository (HLW) in rock mass. The surrounding rock mass is exposed to heat radiated by HLW when it is buried underground and development or extension of micro-cracks takes place in the host rock due to rise in temperature. Keeping this in view, the permeability study was conducted for Charnokite rock at high temperatures in the range from room temperature, 30 to 200 o C. The cylindrical rock samples of 36mm diameter and 150mm in length were used as per the required size for the equipment permeameter, TEMCO, USA. Total thirty rock samples were tested at various temperatures using nitrogen gas as fluid. The permeability tests were conducted at confining pressure of around 4MPa in order to simulate the horizontal in situ stress conditions in Charnokite rock at the depth of 400m for construction of HLW repository. 1

R. D. Dwivedi; R. K. Goel; A. Swarup; V. V. R. Prasad; R. K. Bajpai; P. K. Narayan; V. Arumugam

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature survey stress" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

EXTENDING SODIUM FAST REACTOR DRIVER FUEL USE TO HIGHER TEMPERATURES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Calculations of potential sodium-cooled fast reactor fuel temperatures were performed to estimate the effects of increasing the outlet temperature of a given fast reactor design by increasing pin power, decreasing assembly flow, or increasing inlet temperature. Based upon experience in the U.S., both metal and mixed oxide (MOX) fuel types are discussed in terms of potential performance effects created by the increased operating temperatures. Assembly outlet temperatures of 600, 650 and 700 C were used as goal temperatures. Fuel/cladding chemical interaction (FCCI) and fuel melting, as well as challenges to the mechanical integrity of the cladding material, were identified as the limiting phenomena. For example, starting with a recent 1000 MWth fast reactor design, raising the outlet temperature to 650 C through pin power increase increased the MOX centerline temperature to more than 3300 C and the metal fuel peak cladding temperature to more than 700 C. These exceeded limitations to fuel performance; fuel melting was limiting for MOX and FCCI for metal fuel. Both could be alleviated by design fixes, such as using a barrier inside the cladding to minimize FCCI in the metal fuel, or using annular fuel in the case of MOX. Both would also require an advanced cladding material with improved stress rupture properties. While some of these are costly, the benefits of having a high-temperature reactor which can support hydrogen production, or other missions requiring high process heat may make the extra costs justified.

Douglas L. Porter

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Moderate Temperature | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Moderate Temperature Moderate Temperature Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Sanyal Temperature Classification: Moderate Temperature Dictionary.png Moderate Temperature: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Sanyal Temp Classification This temperature scheme was developed by Sanyal in 2005 at the request of DOE and GEA, as reported in Classification of Geothermal Systems: A Possible Scheme. Extremely Low Temperature Very Low Temperature Low Temperature Moderate Temperature High Temperature Ultra High Temperature Steam Field Reservoir fluid between 190°C and 230°C is considered by Sanyal to be "moderate temperature." "The next higher resource temperature limit is chosen as 230°C, which is lower than the minimum initial resource temperature encountered in

423

Permeability reduction of unconsolidated media due to stress-induced silica dissolution  

SciTech Connect

Permeability measurements were made on both glass beads and Ottowa sand under uniform confining stress conditions. Extreme permeability reduction (95%) of the glass beads was observed at temperatures exceeding 150/sup 0/C and confining pressures of 13.8 MPa with distilled water as the flowing fluid. Permeability reduction in the Ottowa sand (40%) was also observed at high temperature and confining pressure. Effluent analysis revealed high concentrations of silica. Subsequent 300 hour experiments with Ottowa sand exhibited a steady decrease in permeability with time. SEM photographs of post experiment cores, indicate that the permeability reduction is mainly due to stress induced silica dissolution at grain contacts.

Udell, K.S.; Lofy, J.D.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Temperature, thermal-conductivity, and heat-flux data,Raft River area,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Temperature, thermal-conductivity, and heat-flux data,Raft River area, Temperature, thermal-conductivity, and heat-flux data,Raft River area, Cassia County, Idaho (1974-1976) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Temperature, thermal-conductivity, and heat-flux data,Raft River area, Cassia County, Idaho (1974-1976) Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Basin and Range Province; Cassia County Idaho; economic geology; exploration; geophysical surveys; geothermal energy; heat flow; heat flux; Idaho; North America; Raft River basin; south-central Idaho; surveys; temperature; thermal conductivity; United States; USGS Author(s): Urban, T.C.; Diment, W.H.; Nathenson, M.; Smith, E.P.; Ziagos, J.P.; Shaeffer, M.H. Published: Open-File Report - U. S. Geological Survey, 1/1/1986 Document Number: Unavailable

425

ARM - Measurement - Atmospheric temperature  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

temperature temperature ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Atmospheric temperature The temperature indicated by a thermometer exposed to the air in a place sheltered from direct solar radiation. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AERI : Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer SONDE : Balloon-Borne Sounding System CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System

426

ARM - Measurement - Virtual temperature  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsVirtual temperature govMeasurementsVirtual temperature ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Virtual temperature The virtual temperature Tv = T(1 + rv/{epsilon}), where rv is the mixing ratio, and {epsilon} is the ratio of the gas constants of air and water vapor ( 0.622). Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems MWRP : Microwave Radiometer Profiler RWP : Radar Wind Profiler

427

Complete Urban Surface Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An observation program using ground and airborne thermal infrared radiometers is used to estimate the surface temperature of urban areas, taking into account the total active surface area. The authors call this the complete urban surface ...

J. A. Voogt; T. R. Oke

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Temperature | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Showing 7 properties using this type. A Property:AvgGeoFluidTemp C Property:Combustion Intake Air Temperature F Property:FirstWellTemp G Property:GeofluidTemp M...

429

Low temperature cryoprobe  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portable, hand held probe usable within a small confine to produce a point source of nitrogen or helium at a relatively constant temperatures of 77 degrees Kelvin, is discussed. 3 figs.

Sungaila, Z.F.

1988-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

430

Temperature-aware microarchitecture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With power density and hence cooling costs rising exponentially, processor packaging can no longer be designed for the worst case, and there is an urgent need for runtime processor-level techniques that can regulate operating temperature when the package's ...

Kevin Skadron; Mircea R. Stan; Wei Huang; Sivakumar Velusamy; Karthik Sankaranarayanan; David Tarjan

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

1992--1993 low-temperature geothermal assessment program, Colorada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Previous assessments of Colorado`s low-temperature geothermal resources were completed by the Colorado Geological Survey in 1920 and in the mid- to late-1970s. The purpose of the 1992--1993 low-temperature geothermal resource assessment is to update the earlier physical, geochemical, and utilization data and compile computerized databases of the location, chemistry, and general information of the low-temperature geothermal resources in Colorado. The main sources of the data included published data from the Colorado Geological Survey, the US Geological Survey WATSTOR database, and the files of the State Division of Water Resources. The staff of the Colorado Geological Survey in 1992 and 1993 visited most of the known geothermal sources that were recorded as having temperatures greater than 30{degrees}C. Physical measurements of the conductivity, pH, temperature, flow rate, and notes on the current geothermal source utilization were taken. Ten new geochemical analyses were completed on selected geothermal sites. The results of the compilation and field investigations are compiled into the four enclosed Quattro Pro 4 databases. For the purposes of this report a geothermal area is defined as a broad area, usually less than 3 sq mi in size, that may have several wells or springs. A geothermal site is an individual well or spring within a geothermal area. The 1992-1993 assessment reports that there are 93 geothermal areas in the Colorado, up from the 56 reported in 1978; there are 157 geothermal sites up from the 125 reported in 1978; and a total of 382 geochemical analyses are compiled, up from the 236 reported in 1978. Six geothermal areas are recommended for further investigation: Trimble Hot Springs, Orvis Hot Springs, an area southeast of Pagosa Springs, the eastern San Luis Valley, Rico and Dunton area, and Cottonwood Hot Springs.

Cappa, J.A.; Hemborg, H.T.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

2-M Probe Survey At Coso Geothermal Area (1979) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9) 9) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique 2-M Probe Survey Activity Date 1979 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Correct previously analyzed 2-m probe data Notes Corrected 2-m temperature anomaly at Coso was compared with a low altitude aeromagnetic anomaly and an anomaly outlined by electrical resistivity methods obtained independently. Preliminary tests were made with a simple thermal conductivity probe demonstrating the feasibility of measuring soil thermal diffusivity at the time the 2-m temperatures are recorded. References Leschack, L. A.; Lewis, J. E.; Chang, D. C.; Lewellen, R. I.; O'Hara, N.W. (1 March 1979) Rapid reconnaissance of geothermal prospects using shallow temperature surveys. Second technical report

433

High Temperature | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Temperature Temperature Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Sanyal Temperature Classification: High Temperature Dictionary.png High Temperature: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Sanyal Temp Classification This temperature scheme was developed by Sanyal in 2005 at the request of DOE and GEA, as reported in Classification of Geothermal Systems: A Possible Scheme. Extremely Low Temperature Very Low Temperature Low Temperature Moderate Temperature High Temperature Ultra High Temperature Steam Field Reservoir fluid between 230°C and 300°C is considered by Sanyal to be "high temperature." "Above a temperature level of 230°C, the reservoir would be expected to become two-phase at some point during exploitation. The next higher

434

Dislocations, Strains and Stresses I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 1, 2011 ... Evolution of Internal Strain with Temperature in Depleted Uranium in the Presence of Hydrides: Michael Hemphill1; Elena Garlea2; Jonathan...

435

Independent Communication and Outreach Stakeholder Satisfaction Survey  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management December 2012 Independent Communication and Outreach Stakeholder Satisfaction Survey Independent Communication and Outreach Stakeholder Satisfaction Survey December 2012 Table of Contents List of Figures ............................................................................................................................................. iii List of Tables .............................................................................................................................................. iii Executive Summary .................................................................................................................................... v 1. Introduction............................................................................................................................................ 1

436

Tornado Damage Survey at Moore, Oklahoma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On 4 May 1999, the Wind Science and Engineering Research Center at Texas Tech University dispatched three survey teams to the Oklahoma City area to conduct a tornado damage survey. The author was the leader of one of the teams whose purpose was ...

Timothy P. Marshall

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Redshift Surveys with 2dF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on the 2dF Galaxy and QSO Redshift Surveys now in progress with the Two Degree Field facility at the Anglo-Australian Observatory. We describe the 2dF instrumentation, outline the scientific aims of the surveys and their current status, and present some initial results.

Matthew Colless; Brian Boyle

1997-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

438

Radiological Habits Survey: Berkeley and Oldbury, 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

aquatic internal exposure 63 pathways at Berkeley and Oldbury Table B Comparison between 2001 and 2007 of the survey 18 3. METHODS FOR DATA ANALYSIS 22 3.1 Data recording 22 3.2 Data analysis 24 4. AQUATIC RADIATION. TERRESTRIAL RADIATION PATHWAYS 45 5.1 Terrestrial survey area 45 5.2 Unusual pathways 48 5.3 Wholesalers

439

Radiological Habits Survey: Sellafield Review, 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2. Survey area 3 3. Conduct of survey 3 4. Data analysis 4 4.1 Internal exposure 4 Figure 2 Critical;3 1. Introduction This report describes a review of public radiation exposure pathways due to liquid 1996-2005 5 4.2 External exposure 6 5. Conclusions 7 6. Recommendations 7 7. References 7 Figure 1

440

KE Basin underwater visual fuel survey  

SciTech Connect

Results of an underwater video fuel survey in KE Basin using a high resolution camera system are presented. Quantitative and qualitative information on fuel degradation are given, and estimates of the total fraction of ruptured fuel elements are provided. Representative photographic illustrations showing the range of fuel conditions observed in the survey are included.

Pitner, A.L.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature survey stress" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Definition: Reflection Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reflection Survey Reflection Survey Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reflection Survey Seismic reflection surveys image the structure of the subsurface through the measurement of the two way travel time of reflected artificially-generated elastic waves.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Also Known As Seismic Reflection References ↑ http://www.amazon.com/Introduction-Geophysical-Prospecting-Milton-Dobrin/dp/0071004041 Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Reflection_Survey&oldid=598371" Category: Definitions What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

442

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1978, High temperature underground thermal energy storage,in Proceedings, Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Workshop:High temperature underground thermal energy storage, in ATES

Tsang, Chin Fu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is mandated by Congress to be the agency that collects, analyzes, and disseminates impartial, comprehensive data about energy including the volume consumed, its customers, and the purposes for which it is used. The Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey (FBSS) was conducted by EIA in conjunction with DOE`s Office of Federal Energy Management Programs (OFEMP) to gain a better understanding of how Federal buildings use energy. This report presents the data from 881 completed telephone interviews with Federal buildings in three Federal regions. These buildings were systematically selected using OFEMP`s specifications; therefore, these data do not statistically represent all Federal buildings in the country. The purpose of the FBSS was threefold: (1) to understand the characteristics of Federal buildings and their energy use; (2) to provide a baseline in these three Federal regions to measure future energy use in Federal buildings as required in EPACT; and (3) to compare building characteristics and energy use with the data collected in the CBECS.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Ethernet Topology Discovery: A Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ethernet networks have undergone impressive growth since the past few decades. This growth can be appreciated in terms of the equipment, such as switches and links, that have been added, as well as in the number of users that it supports. In parallel to this expansion, over the past decade the networking research community has shown a growing interest in discovering and analyzing the Ethernet topology. Research in this area has concentrated on the theoretical analysis of Ethernet topology as well as developing tools and methods for mapping the network layout. These efforts have brought us to a crucial juncture for Ethernet topology measurement infrastructures: while, previously, these were both small (in terms of number of measurement points), we are starting to see the deployment of large-scale distributed systems composed of hundreds or thousands of monitors. As we look forward to this next generation of systems, we take stock of what has been achieved so far. In this survey, we discuss past and current mec...

Ahmat, Kamal

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Low Temperature | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Temperature Temperature Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Sanyal Temperature Classification: Low Temperature Dictionary.png Low Temperature: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Sanyal Temp Classification This temperature scheme was developed by Sanyal in 2005 at the request of DOE and GEA, as reported in Classification of Geothermal Systems: A Possible Scheme. Extremely Low Temperature Very Low Temperature Low Temperature Moderate Temperature High Temperature Ultra High Temperature Steam Field Reservoir fluid between 150°C and 190°C is considered by Sanyal to be "low temperature." "The mobile fluid phase in these reservoirs is liquid water. A number of commercial power projects have been operated over the last two decades

446

STResS (Simulated Toxicant-Related Stress) documentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

STResS (Simulated Toxicant-Related Stress) is a program written in DEC FORTRAN v. 6.2. This program can be run either interactively or batch mode. This program is designed to model the effects of toxicant exposure on a simulated population of a specific species, as well as the effects of the toxicant on the demographic and genetic characteristics. The toxic effect on the time-to-death is based on an accelerated failure time model in which the time-to-death depends on size, sex and genotype, toxicant concentration, and frequency and duration of exposure. Sexual, fecundity, and meiotic drive/gametic selection can also be included. Multiple simulations can be run for a user-specified number of gestation periods of user-specified length. The effect of winter can be included, and the exposure duration can be changed once during each simulation, if desired.

Greene, K.D.; Newman, M.C.; Jagoe, R.H.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

447

Characterization of lithium niobate electro-optic modulators at cryogenic temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on the operation of lithium niobate electro-optic waveguide modulators at temperatures down to 15{degrees}K. Commercial and laboratory fiber pigtailed devices have successfully been cooled without any increases in insertion loss from temperature induced stresses in device packaging. Three x-cut devices exhibited a linear increase in V{pi} voltage of 8%{plus_minus}1% when cooled from room temperature to {approximately} 20{degree}K. The broadband frequency response improved at lower temperature. A velocity-matched experimental modular has shown increased bandwidth when cooled to liquid nitrogen temperature.

Morse, J.; McCammon, K.; McConaghy, C.; Masquelier, D.; Garrett, H.; Lowry, M.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

High temperature thermometric phosphors  

SciTech Connect

A high temperature phosphor consists essentially of a material having the general formula LuPO.sub.4 :Dy.sub.(x),Eu.sub.y) wherein: 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.20 wt % and 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.20 wt %. The high temperature phosphor is in contact with an article whose temperature is to be determined. The article having the phosphor in contact with it is placed in the environment for which the temperature of the article is to be determined. The phosphor is excited by a laser causing the phosphor to fluoresce. The emission from the phosphor is optically focused into a beam-splitting mirror which separates the emission into two separate emissions, the emission caused by the dysprosium dopant and the emission caused by the europium dopent. The separated emissions are optically filtered and the intensities of the emission are detected and measured. The ratio of the intensity of each emission is determined and the temperature of the article is calculated from the ratio of the intensities of the separate emissions.

Allison, Stephen W. (Knoxville, TN); Cates, Michael R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Boatner, Lynn A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Gillies, George T. (Earlysville, VA)

1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

449

Temperature initiated passive cooling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A passive cooling system for cooling an enclosure only when the enclosure temperature exceeds a maximum standby temperature comprises a passive heat transfer loop containing heat transfer fluid having a particular thermodynamic critical point temperature just above the maximum standby temperature. An upper portion of the heat transfer loop is insulated to prevent two phase operation below the maximum standby temperature.

Forsberg, Charles W. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Temperature initiated passive cooling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A passive cooling system for cooling an enclosure only when the enclosure temperature exceeds a maximum standby temperature comprises a passive heat transfer loop containing heat transfer fluid having a particular thermodynamic critical point temperature just above the maximum standby temperature. An upper portion of the heat transfer loop is insulated to prevent two phase operation below the maximum standby temperature. 1 fig.

Forsberg, C.W.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

A 250 GHz Survey of High Redshift QSOs from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present observations at 250 GHz (1.2 mm), 43 GHz, and 1.4 GHz of a sample of 41 QSOs at z > 3.7 found in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We detect 16 sources with a 250 GHz flux density greater than 1.4 mJy. The combination of centimeter and millimeter wavelength observations indicates that the 250 GHz emission is most likely thermal dust emission. Assuming a dust temperature of 50 K, the implied dust masses for the 16 detected sources are in the range 1.5e8 to 5.9e8 Msun, and the dust emitting regions are likely to be larger than 1 kpc in extent. The radio-through-optical spectral energy distributions for these sources are within the broad range defined by lower redshift, lower optical luminosity QSOs. We consider possible dust heating mechanisms, including UV emission from the active nucleus (AGN) and a starburst concurrent with the AGN, with implied star formation rates between 500 and 2000 Msun/year.

Carilli, C L; Rupen, M P; Fan, X; Strauss, M A; Menten, K M; Kreysa, E; Schneider, D P; Bertarini, A; Yun, M S; Zylka, R; Fan, Xiaohui; Strauss, Michael A.; Schneider, Donald P.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Aerial Surveys to Estimate Abundance of Wintering Waterfowl in Mississippi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Aerial Surveys to Estimate Abundance of Wintering Waterfowl in Mississippi Aaron Pearse, Rick Kaminski, Steve Dinsmore, and Ken Reinecke Monitoring Waterfowl · Banding program · Breeding-ground survey(s) · Hunter surveys · Wintering waterfowl surveys Objectives Design Evaluate Application 1) Sampling 2

Gray, Matthew

453

Residual stress analysis of multilayer environmental barrier coatings.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Silicon-based ceramics (SiC, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) are promising materials systems for high-temperature structural applications in gas turbine engines. However, the silica layer that forms on these materials is susceptible to attack from water vapor present in combustion environments. To protect against this degradation, environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) have been developed to shield the underlying substrate and prevent degradation. Here we report on elastic and thermal properties, as well as internal stresses of candidate multilayer coatings, as measured in situ using microfocused high-energy X-rays in a transmission diffraction geometry. Doped aluminosilicate coatings were investigated for their stability on a SiC/SiC melt-infiltrated substrate. The coatings consisted of a Ba{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}Al{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8} topcoat with a mullite or mullite+SrAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8} interlayer, and a silicon bond coat. A numerical model was used to compare the stress results with an ideal coating system. Experiments were carried out on as-sprayed and heat-treated samples in order to analyze the strain and phase evolution as a function of multilayer depth and temperature. The phase transformation of the topcoat promoted healing of cracks in the EBC and reduced stresses in the underlying layers and the addition of SAS to the interlayer reduced stresses in thermally cycled coatings, but did not stop cracks from forming.

Harder, B.; Almer, J.; Weyant, C.; Lee, K.; Faber, K.; Northwestern Univ.; Rolls-Royce Corp.

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Heat treatment of NiCrFe alloy to optimize resistance to intergrannular stress corrosion  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of producing a NiCrFe alloy having a high resistance to stress corrosion cracking comprising heating a NiCrFe alloy to a temperature sufficient to enable the carbon present in the alloy body in the form of carbide deposits to enter into solution, rapidly cool the alloy body, and heat the cooled body to a temperature between 1100.degree. to 1500.degree. F. for about 1 to 30 hours.

Steeves, Arthur F. (Schenectady, NY); Bibb, Albert E. (Clifton Park, NY)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Thermal stress analysis of eccentric tube receiver using concentrated solar radiation  

SciTech Connect

In the parabolic trough concentrator with tube receiver system, the heat transfer fluid flowing through the tube receiver can induce high thermal stress and deflection. In this study, the eccentric tube receiver is introduced with the aim to reduce the thermal stresses of tube receiver. The ray-thermal-structural sequential coupled numerical analyses are adopted to obtain the concentrated heat flux distributions, temperature distributions and thermal stress fields of both the eccentric and concentric tube receivers. During the sequential coupled numerical analyses, the concentrated heat flux distribution on the bottom half periphery of tube receiver is obtained by Monte-Carlo ray tracing method, and the fitting function method is introduced for the calculated heat flux distribution transformation from the Monte-Carlo ray tracing model to the CFD analysis model. The temperature distributions and thermal stress fields are obtained by the CFD and FEA analyses, respectively. The effects of eccentricity and oriented angle variation on the thermal stresses of eccentric tube receiver are also investigated. It is recommended to adopt the eccentric tube receiver with optimum eccentricity and 90 oriented angle as tube receiver for the parabolic trough concentrator system to reduce the thermal stresses. (author)

Wang, Fuqiang; Shuai, Yong; Yuan, Yuan; Yang, Guo; Tan, Heping [School of Energy Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, 92, West Dazhi Street, Harbin 150001 (China)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

456

Multifractal analysis of stress time series during ultrathin lubricant film melting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Melting of an ultrathin lubricant film confined between two atomically flat surfaces is we studied using the rheological model for viscoelastic matter approximation. Phase diagram with domains, corresponding to sliding, dry, and two types of $stick-slip$ friction regimes has been built taking into account additive noises of stress, strain, and temperature of the lubricant. The stress time series have been obtained for all regimes of friction using the Stratonovich interpretation. It has been shown that self-similar regime of lubricant melting is observed when intensity of temperature noise is much larger than intensities of strain and stress noises. This regime is defined by homogenous distribution, at which characteristic stress scale is absent. We study stress time series obtained for all friction regimes using multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis. It has been shown that multifractality of these series is caused by different correlations that are present in the system and also by a power-law distribution. Since the power-law distribution is related to small stresses, this case corresponds to self-similar solid-like lubricant.

A. V. Khomenko; I. A. Lyashenko; V. N. Borisyuk

2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

457

temperature | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

temperature temperature Dataset Summary Description Freedom Field is a not-for-profit organization formed to facilitate development and commercialization of renewable energy solutions. The organization has installed a variety of renewable energy generating technologies at their facility (located at Rock River Water Reclamation in Rockford, IL), with the intention of serving as a demonstration facility. The facility monitors data (at 5-minute intervals) from a weather station, 12.4 kW of PV panels (56 220-watt panels), a 10kW wind turbine (HAWT), a 1.2 kW wind turbine (VAWT), an absorption cooling system, and biogas burners. Source Freedom Field Date Released July 19th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords biogas monitoring data PV radiance solar temperature

458

Remote sensing for site-specific management of biotic and abiotic stress in cotton  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study evaluated the applicability of remote sensing instrumentation for site- specific management of abiotic and biotic stress on cotton grown under a center pivot. Three different irrigation regimes (100%, 75%, and 50% ETc) were imposed on a cotton field to 1) monitor canopy temperatures of cotton with infrared thermometers (IRTs) in order to pinpoint areas of biotic and abiotic stress, 2) compare aerial infrared photography to IRTs mounted on center pivots to correlate areas of biotic and abiotic stress, and 3) relate yield to canopy temperatures. Pivot-mounted IRTs and IR camera were able to differentiate water stress between the irrigation regimes, however, only the IR camera was effectively able to distinguish between biotic (cotton root rot) and abiotic (drought) stress with the assistance of groundtruthing. The 50% ETc regime had significantly higher canopy temperatures, which were reflected in significantly lower lint yields when compared to the 75% and 100% ETc regimes. Deficit irrigation up to 75% ETc had no impact on yield, indicating that water savings were possible without yield depletion.

Falkenberg, Nyland Ray

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Dark, Hypoxia, Herbicide, Other Stresses Energy Deprivation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dark, Hypoxia, Herbicide, Other Stresses Energy Deprivation Upstream PKs GBF5, bZIP11, 53, 1 Glycolysis NR, SPS, HMG-CoAR Energy homeostasis, Growth, Stress response, Survival Development, Reproduction. Plants are constantly challenged by multiple types of stress that ultimately converge as an energy

Sheen, Jen

460

Finite Temperature Aging Holography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We construct the gravity background which describes the dual field theory with aging invariance. We choose the decay modes of the bulk scalar field in the internal spectator direction to obtain the dissipative behavior of the boundary correlation functions of the dual scalar fields. In particular, the two-time correlation function at zero temperature has the characteristic features of the aging system: power law decay, broken time translation and dynamical scaling. We also construct the black hole backgrounds with asymptotic aging invariance. We extensively study characteristic behavior of the finite temperature two-point correlation function via analytic and numerical methods.

Seungjoon Hyun; Jaehoon Jeong; Bom Soo Kim

2011-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature survey stress" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Temperature determination using pyrometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for determining the temperature of a surface upon which a coating is grown using optical pyrometry by correcting Kirchhoff's law for errors in the emissivity or reflectance measurements associated with the growth of the coating and subsequent changes in the surface thermal emission and heat transfer characteristics. By a calibration process that can be carried out in situ in the chamber where the coating process occurs, an error calibration parameter can be determined that allows more precise determination of the temperature of the surface using optical pyrometry systems. The calibration process needs only to be carried out when the physical characteristics of the coating chamber change.

Breiland, William G. (Albuquerque, NM); Gurary, Alexander I. (Bridgewater, NJ); Boguslavskiy, Vadim (Princeton, NJ)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Fluorescent temperature sensor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present invention is a fluorescent temperature sensor or optical thermometer. The sensor includes a solution of 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane within a 1-butyl-1-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid solvent. The 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane remains unassociated when in the ground state while in solution. When subjected to UV light, an excited state is produced that exists in equilibrium with an excimer. The position of the equilibrium between the two excited states is temperature dependent.

Baker, Gary A [Los Alamos, NM; Baker, Sheila N [Los Alamos, NM; McCleskey, T Mark [Los Alamos, NM

2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

463

Marine surveys aid gas line  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detailed marine surveys helped B.C. Hydro, a Canadian gas distribution utility, select the submarine route portion of the proposed Vancouver Island gas pipeline system. In 1984, after a series of government hearings, B.C. Hydro's route selection was adopted by the British Columbia Provincial Government. Vancouver Island is the last major population center in Western Canada not supplied with natural gas. In fact, studies of a gas pipeline to the island have been carried out periodically over the past 30 years. But until recently, all schemes have appeared unattractive because of a combination of technical, economic, and political factors. The proposed Vancouver Island project which is awaiting funding, consists of a dual 52.7-km marine transmission pipeline link from the mainland to the island. Diameter of this portion of line will be either 12 of 16-in. Also, part of the proposed system will be an 18.5-km line on the mainland, a 280-km transmission pipeline on the island, compression facilities, and distribution systems in the major population centers. Diameters for the land portions will vary between 6 and 24 in. For several months in late 1983 and early 1984, the project was the subject of public hearings held by the British Columbia Utilities Commission. This process was complicated when two companies applied to construct and operate the marine pipeline link to the island using completely different routes and techniques. In July 1984, the commission recommended to the Provincial Government that B.C. Hydro's proposal for the marine pipeline be accepted. It further recommended that an Energy Project Certificate for construction of the pipeline link to the island be awarded to B.C. Hydro. The recommendation was accepted by the Provincial Government and the project now awaits a funding agreement between the Federal and Provincial Governments.

Park, C.A.; Baines, F.A. Koenig, H.L.

1986-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

464

Elastoplastic implicit integration algorithm applicable to both plane stress and three-dimensional stress states  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An elastoplastic implicit integration algorithm applicable to both plane stress and three-dimensional stress states is developed for a general class of combined nonlinear kinematic-isotropic hardening models. The algorithm is first built for three-dimensional ... Keywords: Constitutive models, Implicit integration, Plane stress, Plasticity, Three-dimensional stress

Nobutada Ohno; Masatoshi Tsuda; Takafumi Kamei

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Directional Stress Indices and Stress Intensification Factors for 90 Degree Elbows (PWRMRP-06)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides equations, based on analyses and test data, for determining the directional stress indices and stress intensification factors (SIFs) for 90 degree elbows. Present methodologies used to determine these parameters are generally overly conservative. The report contains results of an investigation into the stress intensification factors and directional stress indices of 90 degree elbows.

1999-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

466

Variability of Temperature in Wisconsin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Daily maximum and minimum temperatures since 1897 at three stations in Wisconsin are examined, and the hypothesis is tested that there is no association between interdiurnal or interannual temperature and either the local mean temperature or an ...

W. A. R. Brinkmann

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

High Temperature Materials Interim Data Qualification Report  

SciTech Connect

ABSTRACT Projects for the very high temperature reactor (VHTR) Technology Development Office provide data in support of Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing of the VHTR. Fuel and materials to be used in the reactor are tested and characterized to quantify performance in high temperature and high fluence environments. The VHTR program has established the NGNP Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS) to ensure that VHTR data are qualified for use, stored in a readily accessible electronic form, and analyzed to extract useful results. This document focuses on the first NDMAS objective. It describes the High Temperature Materials characterization data stream, the processing of these data within NDMAS, and reports the interim FY2010 qualification status of the data. Data qualification activities within NDMAS for specific types of data are determined by the data qualification category assigned by the data generator. The High Temperature Materials data are being collected under NQA-1 guidelines, and will be qualified data. For NQA-1 qualified data, the qualification activities include: (1) capture testing, to confirm that the data stored within NDMAS are identical to the raw data supplied, (2) accuracy testing to confirm that the data are an accurate representation of the system or object being measured, and (3) documenting that the data were collected under an NQA-1 or equivalent Quality Assurance program. Currently, data from two test series within the High Temperature Materials data stream have been entered into the NDMAS vault: 1. Tensile Tests for Sm (i.e., Allowable Stress) Confirmatory Testing 1,403,994 records have been inserted into the NDMAS database. Capture testing is in process. 2. Creep-Fatigue Testing to Support Determination of Creep-Fatigue Interaction Diagram 918,854 records have been processed and inserted into the NDMAS database. Capture testing is in process.

Nancy Lybeck

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Rapid reconnaissance of geothermal prospects using shallow temperature  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Second technical report Second technical report Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Rapid reconnaissance of geothermal prospects using shallow temperature surveys. Second technical report Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The previously examined geothermal sites at Long Valley and Coso were studied in much greater detail. Techniques for correcting the 2-m temperature data were evaluated. Using a preliminary model and analysis of the Coso data, the importance of measuring soil thermal diffusivity data at each temperature probe site was shown. Corrected 2-m temperature anomaly at Coso was compared with a low altitude aeromagnetic anomaly and an anomaly outlined by electrical resistivity methods obtained independently. Preliminary tests were made with a simple thermal conductivity probe

469

Sealed glass coating of high temperature ceramic superconductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and article of manufacture of a lead oxide based glass coating on a high temperature superconductor is disclosed. The method includes preparing a dispersion of glass powders in a solution, applying the dispersion to the superconductor, drying the dispersion before applying another coating and heating the glass powder dispersion at temperatures below oxygen diffusion onset and above the glass melting point to form a continuous glass coating on the superconductor to establish compressive stresses which enhance the fracture strength of the superconductor. 8 figs.

Wu, W.; Chu, C.Y.; Goretta, K.C.; Routbort, J.L.

1995-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

470

Temperature differential detection device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A temperature differential detection device for detecting the temperature differential between predetermined portions of a container wall is disclosed as comprising a Wheatstone bridge circuit for detecting resistance imbalance with a first circuit branch having a first elongated wire element mounted in thermal contact with a predetermined portion of the container wall, a second circuit branch having a second elongated wire element mounted in thermal contact with a second predetermined portion of a container wall with the wire elements having a predetermined temperature-resistant coefficient, an indicator interconnected between the first and second branches remote from the container wall for detecting and indicating resistance imbalance between the first and second wire elements, and connector leads for electrically connecting the wire elements to the remote indicator in order to maintain the respective resistance value relationship between the first and second wire elements. The indicator is calibrated to indicate the detected resistance imbalance in terms of a temperature differential between the first and second wall portions.

Girling, Peter M. (Allentown, PA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Temperature differential detection device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A temperature differential detection device for detecting the temperature differential between predetermined portions of a container wall is disclosed as comprising a Wheatstone bridge circuit for detecting resistance imbalance with a first circuit branch having a first elongated wire element mounted in thermal contact with a predetermined portion of the container wall, a second circuit branch having a second elongated wire element mounted in thermal contact with a second predetermined portion of a container wall with the wire elements having a predetermined temperature-resistant coefficient, an indicator interconnected between the first and second branches remote from the container wall for detecting and indicating resistance imbalance between the first and second wire elements, and connector leads for electrically connecting the wire elements to the remote indicator in order to maintain the respective resistance value relationship between the first and second wire elements. The indicator is calibrated to indicate the detected resistance imbalance in terms of a temperature differential between the first and second wall portions. 2 figs.

Girling, P.M.

1986-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

472

Being surveyed can change later behavior and related parameter estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Does completing a household survey change the later behavior of those surveyed? In three field studies of health and two of microlending, we randomly assigned subjects to be surveyed about health and/or household finances ...

Zwane, Alix Peterson

473

An Evaluation of Winter Weather Severity in the United States Using the Weather Stress Index  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to provide an evaluation of the magnitude of apparent temperature and the weather stress index (WSI) in winter across the United States. In addition, two extremely cold winters, 197677 and 198182, are analyzed in ...

Laurence S. Kalkstein; Kathleen M. Valimont

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Thermal Analysis and Stress Analysis of the Heat-Exchange Pipe Based on ANSYS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ANSYS to be as a finite element analysis software has powerful features in thermal analysis and structural analysis. Based on ANSYS thermal analysis function, this paper selects SOLID90 unit, for thermal analysis on the heat-exchange pipe of heat exchanger ... Keywords: ANSYS, temperature distribution, stress distribution

Fenhua Li; Jian Xing; Yuan Liu

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Wind Stress and Heat Flux over the Ocean in Gale Force Winds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An offshore stable platform has been instrumented with wind turbulence, temperature and wave height sensors. Data from this platform have been analyzed by the eddy correlation method to obtain wind stress and heat flux at wind speeds from 6 to 22 ...

Stuart D. Smith

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Thermoporoelastic Effects of Drilling Fluid Temperature on Rock Drillability at Bit/Formation Interface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A drilling operation leads to thermal disturbances in the near-wellbore stress, which is an important cause of many undesired incidents in well drilling. A major cause of this thermal disturbance is the temperature difference between the drilling fluid and the downhole formation. It is critical for drilling engineers to understand this thermal impact to optimize their drilling plans. This thesis develops a numerical model using partially coupled thermoporoelasticity to study the effects of the temperature difference between the drilling fluid and formation in a drilling operation. This study focuses on the thermal impacts at the bit/formation interface. The model applies the finite-difference method for the pore pressure and temperature solutions, and the finite-element method for the deformation and stress solutions. However, the model also provides the thermoporoelastic effects at the wellbore wall, which involves wellbore fractures and wellbore instability. The simulation results show pronounced effects of the drilling fluid temperature on near-wellbore stresses. At the bottomhole area, a cool drilling fluid reduces the radial and tangential effective stresses in formation, whereas the vertical effective stress increases. The outcome is a possible enhancement in the drilling rate of the drill bit. At the wellbore wall, the cool drilling fluid reduces the vertical and tangential effective stresses but raises the radial effective stress. The result is a lower wellbore fracture gradient; however, it benefits formation stability and prevents wellbore collapse. Conversely, the simulation gives opposite induced stress results to the cooling cases when the drilling fluid is hotter than the formation.

Thepchatri, Kritatee 1984-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Stress corrosion cracking of zirconium in nitric acid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The susceptibility of zirconium and its common alloys to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in nitric acid was investigated by slow strain-rate and constant deflection techniques. Cracking occurred at 25/sup 0/C over a wide range of acid concentrations and electrochemical potentials. The crack velocity increased slightly with increasing temperature. The failure mode was transgranular and the morphology was similar to SCC failures of zirconium alloys in other environments. The fracture was very orientation-dependent suggesting that it occurs on a single crystallographic plane in the material. The results of the study are not consistent with a hydrogen mechanism for cracking.

Beavers, J.A.; Griess, J.C.; Boyd, W.K.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Stress studies in EFG. Quarterly progress report, October 1-December 31, 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Stress analysis at Harvard University has examined the implication of non-zero interface stresses on model predictions. Stress distributions at distances greater than about 1 mm from the interface are shown to be independent of the interface stress at high creep intensities, and the predictions based on zero initial stress can be used with confidence. Numerical models for growth dynamics developed at MIT are compared with experimental data on t-V relationships and on interface shape obtained from impurity redistribution in aluminum-doped 10 cm wide ribbon. Comparison of primary creep responses in FZ (floating zone) and CZ (Czochralski) silicon above 1200/sup 0/C using four-point bending indicates that oxygen has a significant influence on the creep rate. Both the strain rate and resulting dislocation densities generated in FZ silicon are an order of magnitude higher than for the CZ material at comparable applied stress levels. A fiber optics probe suitable for temperature measurement during sheet growth has been constructed and tested. Study of the feasibility of using laser interferometric techniques for residual stress measurements has continued at the University of Illinois. The method has been successfully applied to CZ silicon, and is being evaluated for use with EFG ribbon.

Kalejs, J.P.

1984-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

479

2011 NERSC User Survey (Read Only)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Results » Survey Text Results » Survey Text 2011 NERSC User Survey (Read Only) The survey is closed. Section 1: Overall Satisfaction with NERSC When you are finished with this page click "Save & Go to Next Section" or your responses will be lost. Please do not answer a specific question or rate a specific item if you have no opinion on it. For each item you use, please indicate both your satisfaction and its importance to you. Please rate: How satisfied are you? How important is this to you? Overall satisfaction with NERSC Not Answered Very Satisfied Mostly Satisfied Somewhat Sat. Neutral Somewhat Dissat. Mostly Dissat. Very Dissatisfied I Do Not Use This Not Answered Very Important Somewhat Important Not Important NERSC services Not Answered Very Satisfied Mostly Satisfied Somewhat Sat. Neutral Somewhat Dissat. Mostly Dissat. Very Dissatisfied I Do Not Use This Not Answered Very Important Somewhat Important Not Important

480

Refraction Survey (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Refraction Survey (Laney, 2005) Refraction Survey (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Refraction Survey (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration Technique Refraction Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Seismic Imaging, Majer, Gritto and Daley. The project objective includes the development and application of active seismic methods for improved understanding of the subsurface structure, faults, fractures lithology, and fluid paths in geothermal reservoirs. While the objective of the work previous to FY2003 was concerned with the detection and location of faults and fractures based on an existing 3-D seismic data set collected at the Rye Patch geothermal reservoir, the current work was aimed at investigating

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature survey stress" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


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