Sample records for temperature superconductivity hts

  1. SUPERCONDUCTIVITY PROGRAM RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT High Temperature Superconductivity (HTS) is a technology with the potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;SUPERCONDUCTIVITY PROGRAM RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT High Temperature Superconductivity (HTS-of-way. The Department of Energy's efforts to advance High Temperature Superconductivity combine major national strengths: the Superconductivity Partnership Initiative (SPI), the 2nd Generation Wire Initiative

  2. 2298 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON APPLIED SUPERCONDUCTIVITY, VOL. 13, NO. 2, JUNE 2003 Cryogenic Cooling Temperature of HTS Transformers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Ho-Myung

    , thermal optimization, transformer. I. INTRODUCTION MAIN advantages of HTS power transformers are the small and efficiency. As small size and low power consumption are conflicting in determining the oper- ating at around 77 K [1]. Toward the practical applications, an operation of HTS transformers at temperatures well

  3. Contribution of ion beam analysis methods to the development of 2nd generation high temperature superconducting (HTS) wires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Usov, Igor O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Arendt, Paul N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stan, Liliana [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Holesinger, Terry G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Foltyn, Steven R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Depaula, Raymond F [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the crucial steps in the second generation high temperature superconducting wire program was development of the buffer layer architecture. The architecture designed at the Superconductivity Technology Center at Los Alamos National Laboratory consists of several oxide layers wherein each layer plays a specific role, namely: nucleation layer, diffusion barrier, biaxially textured template, and an intermediate layer with a good match to the lattice parameter of superconducting Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} (YBCO) compound. This report demonstrates how a wide range of ion beam analysis techniques (SIMS, RBS, channeling, PIXE, PIGE, NRA, ERD) was employed for analysis of each buffer layer and the YBCO films. These results assisted in understanding of a variety of physical processes occurring during the buffet layer fabrication and helped to optimize the buffer layer architecture as a whole.

  4. High resolution low-temperature superconductivity superconducting quantum interference device microscope for imaging magnetic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiss, Benjamin P.

    -temperature superconducting niobium wire coupled to the input circuit of a superconducting quantum interference device SQUID-stated advantages of high-temperature superconductivity HTS over the more advanced low- temperature superconductivity LTS is that the higher oper- ating temperature, typically around 77 K, allows HTS SQUIDs

  5. HTS applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noe, M; Fietz, W H; Goldacker, W; Schneider, Th

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Superconductivity has found many attractive applications in medicine, science, power systems, engineering, transport and electronics. One of the most prominent applications of superconductivity are superconducting magnets e.g. MRI magnets, NMR magnets, accelerator magnets, and magnets for fusion; most applications still use low temperature superconductors. Since the discovery of high temperature superconductivity (HTS) in 1986 there has been a tremendous progress in R&D of HTS material, wires and applications. Especially for power system applications, HTS offers considerable economic benefits. Many HTS demonstrator or prototype applications have been built and successfully tested, and some HTS applications like cables and superconducting fault current limiters seem very close to commercialisation. This paper gives an overview about the present and future HTS applications in power applications, high field magnets and current leads. In addition results of the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe program to develop H...

  6. High Temperature Superconducting Underground Cable

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrell, Roger, A.

    2010-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Project was to design, build, install and demonstrate the technical feasibility of an underground high temperature superconducting (HTS) power cable installed between two utility substations. In the first phase two HTS cables, 320 m and 30 m in length, were constructed using 1st generation BSCCO wire. The two 34.5 kV, 800 Arms, 48 MVA sections were connected together using a superconducting joint in an underground vault. In the second phase the 30 m BSCCO cable was replaced by one constructed with 2nd generation YBCO wire. 2nd generation wire is needed for commercialization because of inherent cost and performance benefits. Primary objectives of the Project were to build and operate an HTS cable system which demonstrates significant progress towards commercial progress and addresses real world utility concerns such as installation, maintenance, reliability and compatibility with the existing grid. Four key technical areas addressed were the HTS cable and terminations (where the cable connects to the grid), cryogenic refrigeration system, underground cable-to-cable joint (needed for replacement of cable sections) and cost-effective 2nd generation HTS wire. This was the world’s first installation and operation of an HTS cable underground, between two utility substations as well as the first to demonstrate a cable-to-cable joint, remote monitoring system and 2nd generation HTS.

  7. Reflective HTS switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martens, J.S.; Hietala, V.M.; Hohenwarter, G.K.G.

    1994-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A HTS (High Temperature Superconductor) switch includes a HTS conductor for providing a superconducting path for an electrical signal and an serpentine wire actuator for controllably heating a portion of the conductor sufficiently to cause that portion to have normal, and not superconducting, resistivity. Mass of the portion is reduced to decrease switching time. 6 figs.

  8. Conductor requirements for high-temperature superconducting utility power transformers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pleva, E. F. [Waukesha Electric Systems, Waukesha, WI; Mehrotra, V. [Waukesha Electric Systems, Waukesha, WI; Schwenterly, S W [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-temperature superconducting (HTS) coated conductors in utility power transformers must satisfy a set of operating requirements that are driven by two major considerations-HTS transformers must be economically competitive with conventional units, and the conductor must be robust enough to be used in a commercial manufacturing environment. The transformer design and manufacturing process will be described in order to highlight the various requirements that it imposes on the HTS conductor. Spreadsheet estimates of HTS transformer costs allow estimates of the conductor cost required for an HTS transformer to be competitive with a similarly performing conventional unit.

  9. High-temperature superconducting transformer performance, cost, and market evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dirks, J.A.; Dagle, J.E.; DeSteese, J.G.; Huber, H.D.; Smith, S.A.; Currie, J.W. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Merrick, S.B. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Williams, T.A. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent laboratory breakthroughs in high-temperature superconducting (HTS) materials have stimulated both the scientific community and general public with questions regarding how these materials can be used in practical applications. While there are obvious benefits from using HTS materials (most notably the potential for reduced energy losses in the conductors), a number of issues (such as overall system energy losses, cost, and reliability) may limit applications of HTS equipment, even if the well known materials problems are solved. This study examined the future application potential of HTS materials to power transformers. This study effort was part of a US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Storage and Distribution (OESD) research program, Superconductivity Technology for Electric Power Systems (STEPS). The study took a systems perspective to gain insights to help guide DOE in managing research designed to realize the vision of HTS applications. Specific objectives of the study were as follows: to develop an understanding of the fundamental HTS transformer design issues that can provide guidance for developing practical devices of interest to the electric utility industry; to identify electric utility requirements for HTS transformers and to evaluate the potential for developing a commercial market; to evaluate the market potential and national benefits for HTS transformers that could be achieved by a successful HTS development program; to develop an integrated systems analysis framework, which can be used to support R&D planning by DOE, by identifying how various HTS materials characteristics impact the performance, cost, and national benefits of the HTS application.

  10. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON APPLIED SUPERCONDUCTIVITY, VOL. 23, NO. 3, JUNE 2013 1300405 Resonant Response of High-Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popovic, Zoya

    --High-temperature superconducting (HTS), MgO, split-ring resonators (SRRs), YBCO. I. INTRODUCTION THE demonstration of split superconducting metamaterials made of Niobium (Nb) SRRs deposited on single crystal quartz substrates and Nb wires. Chen et al. [14] studied the resonant properties of terahertz high-temperature superconducting (HTS

  11. Nanoscale high-temperature superconductivity P. Mohanty a,*, J.Y.T. Wei b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohanty, Raj

    of high-temperature superconducting nanoscale devices, including Y-junctions, four-probe wires and rings-Tc superconducting (HTS) cuprate structures are only a few nanometers in size [1]. Scan- ning tunneling microscopy on a typical HTS surface gives microscopic length scales of unit cells and do- mains, typically in the range

  12. 1698 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON APPLIED SUPERCONDUCTIVITY, VOL. 18, NO. 3, SEPTEMBER 2008 Self Field Effect Compensation in an HTS Tube

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Effect Compensation in an HTS Tube Bruno Douine, Kévin Berger, Jean Lévêque, Denis Netter, Olivia Arbey flux density in an HTS tube. It allows characterizing the true zero magnetic flux den- sity behaviour- sity . The characteristic is very important to calculate AC losses in superconducting wires. Indeed

  13. Project Fact Sheet Long Island HTS Power Cable Superconducting

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010 | Department ofPlantLong Island HTS Power Cable

  14. AMRIS Update Ultra High Sensitivity NMR: 1-mm HTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    , although they are difficult or impossible to fabricate like standard copper wire, HTS materials can provideAMRIS Update Ultra High Sensitivity NMR: 1-mm HTS Triple Resonance Probe W.W. Brey, NHMFL A and Rich Withers) and others at Conductus developed the first HTS (high temperature superconducting

  15. An investigation into high temperature superconducting flux pump technology with the circular type magnetic flux pump devices and YBaCuO films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Wei

    2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The rapid development of second generation (2G) high temperature superconducting (HTS) wires in the last decade has made it possible to wind high quality 2G HTS coils. These 2G HTS coils show promise for future applications such as magnetic...

  16. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON APPLIED SUPERCONDUCTIVITY, VOL. 17, NO. 2, JUNE 2007 3179 Variable Temperature Total AC Loss and Stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -temperature superconductors, sta- bility, superconducting filaments and wires. I. INTRODUCTION LARGE-SCALE power applications of high temperature superconductors (HTS) are looking more promising with the advances in commercial and increased stability. Both ac losses and stability of HTS materials are functions of temperature, transport

  17. Philosophy 26 High Temperature Superconductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Callender, Craig

    Philosophy 26 High Temperature Superconductivity By Ohm's Law, resistance will dim. Low temperature superconductivity was discovered in 1911 by Heike was explained by BCS theory. BCS theory explains superconductivity microscopically

  18. HTS High Gradient Magnetic Separation system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daugherty, M.A.; Coulter, J.Y.; Hults, W.L. [and others

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the assembly, characterization and operation of a high temperature superconducting (HTS) magnetic separator. The magnet is made of 624 m of Silver/BSCCO superconducting wire and has overall dimensions of 18 cm OD, 15.5 cm height and 5 cm ID. The HTS current leads are designed to operate with the warm end at 75 K and the cold end cooled by a two stage Gifford-McMahon cryocooler. The upper stage of the cryocooler cools the thermal shield and two heat pipe thermal intercepts. The lower stage of the cryocooler cools the HTS magnet and the bottom end of the HTS current leads. The HTS magnet was initially characterized in liquid cryogens. We report on the current- voltage (I-V) characteristics of the HTS magnet at temperatures ranging from 15 to 40 K. At 40 K the magnet can generate a central field of 2.0 T at a current of 120 A.

  19. Cryogenic System for a High Temperature Superconducting Power Transmission Cable

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demko, J.A.; Gouge, M.J.; Hughey, R.L.; Lue, J.W.; Martin, R.; Sinha, U.; Stovall, J.P.

    1999-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    High-temperature superconducting (HTS) cable systems for power transmission are under development that will use pressurized liquid nitrogen to provide cooling of the cable and termination hardware. Southwire Company and Oak Ridge National Laboratory have been operating a prototype HTS cable system that contains many of the typical components needed for a commercial power transmission application. It is being used to conduct research in the development of components and systems for eventual commercial deployment. The cryogenic system was built by Air Products and Chemicals, Allentown, Pennsylvania, and can circulate up to 0.35 kg/s of liquid nitrogen at temperatures as low as 67 K at pressures of 1 to 10 bars. Sufficient cooling is provided for testing a 5-m-long HTS transmission cable system that includes the terminations required for room temperature electrical connections. Testing of the 5-m HTS transmission cable has been conducted at the design ac conditions of 1250 A and 7.5 kV line to ground. This paper contains a description of the essential features of the HTS cable cryogenic system and performance results obtained during operation of the system. The salient features of the operation that are important in large commercial HTS cable applications will be discussed.

  20. Thermal and electrical stabilities of solid nitrogen (SN2) cooled YBCO coated conductors for HTS magnet applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, J. B.

    Recently, a cooling system using a solid cryogen such as solid nitrogen (SN2), was introduced for high temperature superconducting (HTS) magnet applications. In order to apply the SN2 cooling system successfully to HTS ...

  1. HTS wire requirements for SMES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoenung, S.; Schafer, W.J.

    1994-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation/paper gives an overview of the Sandia National Lab`s sponsorship of W.J. Schafer Associates, Inc. to examine the following topics: the refrigeration savings possible by using high temperature superconductors (HTS) in Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES), the impact of duty cycle on refrigeration requirements, and outline the required HTS wire performance. Included are specifications for SMES applications, advantages, cost components, assumed conductor performance parameters, and the effects of duty cycle and conductor twist pitch.

  2. History of HTS motor development at Reliance Electric

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schiferl, R. [Reliance Electric Co., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    1994-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A review of the High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) motor development program at Reliance Electric is presented. The project was initiated in 1987 by EPRI to investigate the use of high temperature superconducting materials in electric motors. Liquid nitrogen was proposed as the HTS winding coolant. The ultimate goal, motivation, motor type and HTS wire requirements as well as the program milestones are outlined. It was concluded that the HTS motor development has paralleled wire development; progress continues toward the goal of large horsepower HTS motors for commercial applications; the team is well on the way toward completing the design of a 125 hp, 1800 rpm motor with HTS coils cooled to 20 to 40 K; and the program is a vital step in the development of HTS motors.

  3. High temperature interfacial superconductivity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bozovic, Ivan (Mount Sinai, NY); Logvenov, Gennady (Port Jefferson Station, NY); Gozar, Adrian Mihai (Port Jefferson, NY)

    2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    High-temperature superconductivity confined to nanometer-scale interfaces has been a long standing goal because of potential applications in electronic devices. The spontaneous formation of a superconducting interface in bilayers consisting of an insulator (La.sub.2CuO.sub.4) and a metal (La.sub.1-xSr.sub.xCuO.sub.4), neither of which is superconducting per se, is described. Depending upon the layering sequence of the bilayers, T.sub.c may be either .about.15 K or .about.30 K. This highly robust phenomenon is confined to within 2-3 nm around the interface. After exposing the bilayer to ozone, T.sub.c exceeds 50 K and this enhanced superconductivity is also shown to originate from a 1 to 2 unit cell thick interfacial layer. The results demonstrate that engineering artificial heterostructures provides a novel, unconventional way to fabricate stable, quasi two-dimensional high T.sub.c phases and to significantly enhance superconducting properties in other superconductors. The superconducting interface may be implemented, for example, in SIS tunnel junctions or a SuFET.

  4. Electronic high voltage generator with a high temperature superconducting coil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, J.X.; Liu, H.K.; Dou, S.X. [Univ. of Wollongong (Australia)] [and others

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel method for generating high voltages from a low voltage DC source, by using a capacitor and inductor in a R, L, C resonant circuit has been developed with the consideration of using a high temperature superconducting (HTS) coil. To generate high voltages the polarity of a low voltage battery source is reversed each half resonant cycle, the control being achieved by an electronic switch. Resistance in the circuit limits the voltages that can be built up. By replacing a copper winding inductor with another inductor which has a HTS winding, the magnitude of achievable voltages is substantially increased. A (Bi,Pb){sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 10+x} multifilament HTS wire is considered in this work to make the superconducting inductor. The high voltages generated are not capable of supplying low impedance loads, however, possible applications of the generator include electrical partial discharge testing and insulation resistance testing. It could also be used as a testing method for the HTS itself with respect to the critical current and AC loss measurement.

  5. A Combined Near-field Scanning Microwave Microscope and Transport Measurement System for Characterizing Dissipation in Conducting and High-Tc Superconducting Films at Variable Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dizon, Jonathan Reyes

    2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Identifying defects and non-superconducting regions in high-temperature superconductors (HTS) is of great importance because they limit the material's capability to carry higher current densities and serve as nucleation ...

  6. Reflective HTS switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martens, Jon S. (Albuquerque, NM); Hietala, Vincent M. (Placitas, NM); Hohenwarter, Gert K. G. (Madison, WI)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A HTS switch includes a HTS conductor for providing a superconducting path for an electrical signal and an serpentine wire actuator for controllably heating a portion of the conductor sufficiently to cause that portion to have normal, and not superconducting, resistivity. Mass of the portion is reduced to decrease switching time.

  7. Prospects for HTS applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gamble, B.B.; Snitchler, G.L.; Schwall, R.E. [American Superconductor Corp., Westborough, MA (United States)] [American Superconductor Corp., Westborough, MA (United States)

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High temperature superconductor (HTS) wire is rapidly maturing into a working material being produced in ever larger quantities and being used in more significant demonstrations and prototypes. Conductor is now produced routinely in several hundred meter lengths with reproducible results. Current density has progressed to a level suitable for demonstration of many applications. Wire strength has improved and large prototypes fabricated or under consideration using HTS include Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES), rotating electrical machines including synchronous ac and dc homopolar motors and drives, generators and condensers, underground transmission cables, utility distribution equipment such as transformers and current limiters, commercial processing applications such as magnetic separation, and specialty magnets such as high field inserts. In this paper the requirements, progress toward these requirements, and the prospects for the future are reviewed.

  8. Superconducting Wires Enabled by Nanodots wins Nano50TM Award

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    includes nanoscale columns of non-superconducting material embedded within the superconductorSuperconducting Wires Enabled by Nanodots wins Nano50TM Award HTS Wires Enabled via 3D Self-Assembly of Insulating Nanodots Background · For most large-scale applications of high-temperature superconducting (HTS

  9. Stress Analysis of a High Temperature Superconductor Coil Wound With Bi-2223/Ag Tapes for High Field HTS/LTS NMR Magnet Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiyoshi, Tsukasa

    The electromagnetic stress distribution inside a HTS insert is one of the key issues for construction of a high field high/low temperature superconductor (HTS/LTS) magnet. The rmiddotJmiddotB formulae is widely used for ...

  10. Progress in superconducting performance of rolled multifilamentary Bi-2223 HTS composite conductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Q.; Riley, G.N. Jr.; Parrella, R.D. [American Superconductor Corp., Westborough, MA (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant enhancements in critical current densities in rolled multifilamentary Bi-2223 HTS composite conductors have been achieved using the powder-in-tube technique. At 77 K and self field, oxide critical current densities (J{sub c})of 55 kA/cm{sup 2}, overall or engineering critical current densities of 15 kA/cm{sup 2}, and critical currents of 125 A have been achieved in different rolled multifilamentary composites. Progress in achieving such high electrical performance is believed to stem in part from an improvement of grain connectivity by reducing weak links. The J{sub c} dependence on magnetic field and the degree of c-axis texture of these high quality conductors have been investigated at various temperatures. Our results also demonstrate that the critical current retention in magnetic field can be independently controlled from the self field critical current density, suggesting that flux pinning improvements and weak link reductions can be separately engineered into Bi-2223 composites fabricated using manufacturable processes.

  11. Development, Design, and Fabrication of Hybrid High-Temperature Superconducting Leads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kroeger, D. M. [ORNL; Arakawa, P. E. [American Magnetics, Inc.; Efferson, K. R. [American Magnetics, Inc.; Lee, D. F. [ORNL

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hybrid high-temperature superconducting (HTS) current leads employing a conventional vapor-cooled lead upper stage and a HTS lead lower stage made from YBCO compound were fabricated and then testing in magnetic fields as high as 9 T, with currents up to 750 A, at liquid helium temperature of 4.2 K. Various current lead performance parameters were measured, however the bulk of the work focused on the fabrication of melt-textured YBCO for use in practical current leads, and testing the HTS material in high background magnetic fields. This work was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase I grant.

  12. High-Temperature Superconductivity

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Peter Johnson

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Like astronomers tweaking images to gain a more detailed glimpse of distant stars, physicists at Brookhaven National Laboratory have found ways to sharpen images of the energy spectra in high-temperature superconductors ? materials that carry electrical c

  13. Design, Construction and Test of Cryogen-Free HTS Coil Structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hocker, H.; Anerella, M.; Gupta, R.; Plate, S.; Sampson, W.; Schmalzle, J.; Shiroyanagi, Y.

    2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper will describe design, construction and test results of a cryo-mechanical structure to study coils made with the second generation High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) for the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB). A magnet comprised of HTS coils mounted in a vacuum vessel and conduction-cooled with Gifford-McMahon cycle cryocoolers is used to develop and refine design and construction techniques. The study of these techniques and their effect on operations provides a better understanding of the use of cryogen free magnets in future accelerator projects. A cryogen-free, superconducting HTS magnet possesses certain operational advantages over cryogenically cooled, low temperature superconducting magnets.

  14. HTS wire irradiation test with 8 GeV protons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Feher; H. Glass; Y. Huang; P.J. Limon; D.F. Orris; P. Schlabach; M.A. Tartaglia; J.C. Tompkins

    1999-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The radiation level at High Energy Particle Accelerators (HEPA) is relatively high. Any active component which should be close to the accelerator has to be radiation hard. Since High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) have a great potential to be used in HEPAs (e.g., in superconducting magnets, current leads, RF cavities), it is important to understand the radiation hardness of these materials. A radiation test of HTS wire (Bi-2223) was performed at Fermilab. The HTS sample was irradiated with 8 GeV protons and the relative I{sub c} was measured during the irradiation. The total radiation dose was 10 Mrad, and no I{sub c} degradation was observed.

  15. Temperature dependence of impurity resonances in cuprate superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chatterjee, Kamalesh

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In conventional superconductors the superconducting gap in the electronic excitation spectrum prevents scattering of low energy electrons. In high temperature superconductors (HTS) an additional gap, the pseudogap, develops ...

  16. R&D ERL: HTS Solenoid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, R.; Muratore, J.; Plate, S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An innovative feature of the ERL project is the use of a solenoid made with High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) with the Superconducting RF cavity. The HTS solenoid design offers many advantages because of several unique design features. Typically the solenoid is placed outside the cryostat which means that the beam gets significantly defused before a focusing element starts. In the current design, the solenoid is placed inside the cryostat which provides an early focusing structure and thus a significant reduction in the emittance of the electron beam. In addition, taking full advantage of the high critical temperature of HTS, the solenoid has been designed to reach the required field at {approx}77 K, which can be obtained with liquid nitrogen. This significantly reduces the cost of testing and allows a variety of critical pre-tests which would have been prohibitively expensive at 4 K in liquid helium because of the additional requirements of cryostat and associated facilities.

  17. Test Results For a 25-m Prototype Fault Current Limiting HTS Cable for Project Hydra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rey, Christopher M [ORNL] [ORNL; Duckworth, Robert C [ORNL] [ORNL; Demko, Jonathan A [ORNL] [ORNL; Ellis, Alvin R [ORNL] [ORNL; Gouge, Michael J [ORNL] [ORNL; James, David Randy [ORNL] [ORNL; Tuncer, Enis [ORNL] [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has tested a 25-m long prototype High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) cable with inherent Fault-Current Limiting (FCL) capability at its recently upgraded HTS cable test facility in Oak Ridge, TN. The HTS-FCL cable and terminations were designed and fabricated by Ultera, which is a joint venture of Southwire and nkt cables with FCL features and HTS wire provided by American Superconductor Corporation. The overall project is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. The ultimate goal of the 25-m HTS-FCL cable test program was to verify the design and ensure the operational integrity for the eventual installation of a ~ 200-m fully functional HTS-FCL cable in the Consolidated Edison electric grid located in downtown New York City. The 25-m HTS-FCL cable consisted of a three-phase (3- ) Triax design with a cold dielectric between the phases. The HTS-FCL cable had an operational voltage of 13.8 kV phase-to-phase and an operating current of 4000 Arms per phase, which is the highest operating current to date of any HTS cable. The 25-m HTS-FCL cable was subjected to a series of cryogenic and electrical tests. Test results from the 25-m HTS-FCL cable are presented and discussed.

  18. Analysis of Future Prices and Markets for High Temperature Superconductors ENERGY SAVINGS IN HTS DEVICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of each device. The incremental capital cost is the cost over and above that of cryogenics and HTS wire SAVINGS IN HTS DEVICES This Appendix collects and explains several of the key assumptions a sequence of changes to the economic analysis of the individual HTS devices. Table 1-1 displays certain

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF HTS CONDUCTORS FOR ELECTRIC POWER APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goyal, A.; Rupich, M. (American Superconductor Corp.)

    2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Second generation (2G) technologies to fabricate high-performance superconducting wires developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) were transferred to American Superconductor via this CRADA. In addition, co-development of technologies for over a decade was done to enable fabrication of commercial high-temperature superconducting (HTS) wires with high performance. The massive success of this CRADA has allowed American Superconductor Corporation (AMSC) to become a global leader in the fabrication of HTS wire and the technology is fully based on the Rolling Assisted Biaxially Textured Substrates (RABiTS) technology invented and developed at ORNL.

  20. Evaluation of a strengthening and insulation system for high temperature BSCCO-2223 superconducting tape

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, C.; Mantone, A. [GE Medical Systems, Florence, SC (United States); Herd, K.; Laskaris, T. [GE Corp. Research and Development Center, Schenectady, NY (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent advances in BSCCO-2223 superconducting tape quality and length have led to demonstration programs for coil performance. The conductors in these coils need to be insulated without damage to the superconducting properties. A paper insulation process developed at the General Electric Company (GE) for low temperature superconducting Nb{sub 3}Sn tape has been modified to provide the same insulation system to high temperature (HTS) superconducting tapes, such as BSCCO-2223. In this paper, we report on the insulation process and its effect on the tape performance. Several long lengths of conductor have been tested, unwound, insulated and retested to examine any degradation issues. Additionally, it is known that HTS materials are inherently weak in relation to the winding and handling stresses in a manufacturing environment. A system to provide mechanical stabilization to Nb{sub 3}Sn tape through a lamination process has been successfully applied to high temperature superconductors as a method to build a strong, windable composite. The system is described and mechanical and electrical properties of the strengthened tapes are discussed.

  1. High Temperature Superconducting Thick Films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arendt, Paul N. (Los Alamos, NM); Foltyn, Stephen R. (Los Alamos, NM); Groves, James R. (Los Alamos, NM); Holesinger, Terry G. (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM)

    2005-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    An article including a substrate, a layer of an inert oxide material upon the surface of the substrate, (generally the inert oxide material layer has a smooth surface, i.e., a RMS roughness of less than about 2 nm), a layer of an amorphous oxide or oxynitride material upon the inert oxide material layer, a layer of an oriented cubic oxide material having a rock-salt-like structure upon the amorphous oxide material layer is provided together with additional layers such as at least one layer of a buffer material upon the oriented cubic oxide material layer or a HTS top-layer of YBCO directly upon the oriented cubic oxide material layer. With a HTS top-layer of YBCO upon at least one layer of a buffer material in such an article, Jc's of 1.4×106 A/cm2 have been demonstrated with projected Ic's of 210 Amperes across a sample 1 cm wide.

  2. Design, performance, and cost characteristics of high temperature superconducting magnetic energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoenung, S.M.; Meier, W.R. (W.J. Schafer Associates, Inc., Pleasanton, CA (United States)); Fagaly, R.L.; Heiberger, M.; Stephens, R.B.; Leuer, J.A.; Guzman, R.A. (General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States))

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A conceptual design for superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) using oxide superconductors with higher critical temperature than metallic superconductors has been analyzed for design features, refrigeration requirements, and estimated costs of major components. The study covered the energy storage range from 2 to 200 MWh at power levels from 4 to 400 MW. A SMES that uses high temperature superconductors (HTS) and operates at high magnetic field (e.g., 10 tesla), can be more compact than a comparable, conventional low-temperature device at lower field. The refrigeration power required for a higher temperature unit (20 to 77 Kelvin) will be less by 60 to 90 percent. The improvement in energy efficiency is significant for small units, but less important for large ones. The material cost for HTS units is dominated by the cost of superconductor, so that the total cost of an HTS system will be comparable to a low temperature system only if the superconductor price in $/Ampere-meter is made comparable by increasing current density or decreasing wire cost.

  3. HTS Wire Development Workshop: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1994 High-Temperature Superconducting Wire Development Workshop was held on February 16--17 at the St. Petersburg Hilton and Towers in St. Petersburg, Florida. The meeting was hosted by Florida Power Corporation and sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s Superconductivity Program for Electric Power Systems. The meeting focused on recent high-temperature superconducting wire development activities in the Department of Energy`s Superconductivity Systems program. The meeting opened with a general discussion on the needs and benefits of superconductivity from a utility perspective, the US global competitiveness position, and an outlook on the overall prospects of wire development. The meeting then focused on four important technology areas: Wire characterization: issues and needs; technology for overcoming barriers: weak links and flux pinning; manufacturing issues for long wire lengths; and physical properties of HTS coils. Following in-depth presentations, working groups were formed in each technology area to discuss the most important current research and development issues. The working groups identified research areas that have the potential for greatly enhancing the wire development effort. These areas are discussed in the summary reports from each of the working groups. This document is a compilation of the workshop proceedings including all general session presentations and summary reports from the working groups.

  4. Cryogenics Vision Workshop for High-Temperature Superconducting Electric Power Systems Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Energetics, Inc.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy's Superconductivity Program for Electric Systems sponsored the Cryogenics Vision Workshop, which was held on July 27, 1999 in Washington, D.C. This workshop was held in conjunction with the Program's Annual Peer Review meeting. Of the 175 people attending the peer review meeting, 31 were selected in advance to participate in the Cryogenics Vision Workshops discussions. The participants represented cryogenic equipment manufactures, industrial gas manufacturers and distributors, component suppliers, electric power equipment manufacturers (Superconductivity Partnership Initiative participants), electric utilities, federal agencies, national laboratories, and consulting firms. Critical factors were discussed that need to be considered in describing the successful future commercialization of cryogenic systems. Such systems will enable the widespread deployment of high-temperature superconducting (HTS) electric power equipment. Potential research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) activities and partnership opportunities for advancing suitable cryogenic systems were also discussed. The workshop agenda can be found in the following section of this report. Facilitated sessions were held to discuss the following specific focus topics: identifying Critical Factors that need to be included in a Cryogenics Vision for HTS Electric Power Systems (From the HTS equipment end-user perspective) identifying R and D Needs and Partnership Roles (From the cryogenic industry perspective) The findings of the facilitated Cryogenics Vision Workshop were then presented in a plenary session of the Annual Peer Review Meeting. Approximately 120 attendees participated in the afternoon plenary session. This large group heard summary reports from the workshop session leaders and then held a wrap-up session to discuss the findings, cross-cutting themes, and next steps. These summary reports are presented in this document. The ideas and suggestions raised during the Workshop will be used by the DOE Superconductivity Program for Electric Systems in preparing subsequent planning and strategy documents such as a Cryogenic Technology Development Roadmap.

  5. HTS thin films: Passive microwave components and systems integration issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miranda, F.A.; Chorey, C.M.; Bhasin, K.B. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The excellent microwave properties of the High-Temperature-Superconductors (HTS) have been amply demonstrated in the laboratory by techniques such as resonant cavity, power transmission and microstrip resonator measurements. The low loss and high Q passive structures made possible with HTS, present attractive options for applications in commercial, military and space-based systems. However, to readily insert HTS into these systems improvement is needed in such areas as repeatability in the deposition and processing of the HTS films, metal-contact formation, wire bonding, and overall film endurance to fabrication and assembly procedures. In this paper we present data compiled in our lab which illustrate many of the problems associated with these issues. Much of this data were obtained in the production of a space qualified hybrid receiver-downconverter module for the Naval Research Laboratory`s High Temperature Superconductivity Space Experiment II (HTSSE-II). Examples of variations observed in starting films and finished circuits will be presented. It is shown that under identical processing the properties of the HTS films can degrade to varying extents. Finally, we present data on ohmic contacts and factors affecting their adhesion to HTS films, strength of wire bonds made to such contacts, and aging effects.

  6. High temperature superconducting fault current limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, J.R.

    1997-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A fault current limiter for an electrical circuit is disclosed. The fault current limiter includes a high temperature superconductor in the electrical circuit. The high temperature superconductor is cooled below its critical temperature to maintain the superconducting electrical properties during operation as the fault current limiter. 15 figs.

  7. High temperature superconducting fault current limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fault current limiter (10) for an electrical circuit (14). The fault current limiter (10) includes a high temperature superconductor (12) in the electrical circuit (14). The high temperature superconductor (12) is cooled below its critical temperature to maintain the superconducting electrical properties during operation as the fault current limiter (10).

  8. ANGULAR MEASUREMENTS OF HTS CRITICAL CURRENT FOR HIGH FIELD SOLENOIDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turrioni, D.; Barzi, E.; Lamm, M.; Lombardo, V.; Zlobin, A. V. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Batavia, Illinois, 60510 (United States); Thieme, C. [American Superconductor (AMSC) Westborough, MA, 01581 (United States)

    2008-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An experiment is in the works at Fermilab to confirm that ionization cooling is an efficient way to shrink the size of a muon beam. This would pave the way for Muon Collider machines, which however require in their last stages of acceleration very high field solenoids. The use of high temperature superconducting materials (HTS) is being considered for these magnets using Helium or higher temperature refrigeration. A sample holder was designed to perform critical current (I{sub c}) measurements of HTS conductors under externally applied magnetic fields varying from zero to 90 degree with respect to the c-axis. This was performed in an ample range of temperatures and magnetic field values. A description of the test setup and results for (Bi,Pb){sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} (BSCCO-2223) tapes, and Second Generation HTS in the form of 348 superconductor are presented.

  9. Review of activities in USA on HTS materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, D.E.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rapid progress in attaining practical applications of High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) has been made since the discovery of these new materials. Many critical parameters influencing HTS powder synthesis and wire processing have been identified through a combination of fundamental exploration and applied research. The complexity of these novel materials with regard to phase behavior and physical properties has become evident as a result of these careful studies. Achieving optimal mechanical and superconducting properties in wires and tapes will require further understanding and synergy among several different technical disciplines. Highlights of efforts towards producing practical superconductors for electric power applications based on rare earth-, bismuth-, and thallium-based systems are reviewed.

  10. Study of HTS Wires at High Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turrioni, D.; Barzi, E.; Lamm, M.J.; Yamada, R.; Zlobin, A.V.; Kikuchi, A.; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fermilab is working on the development of high field magnet systems for ionization cooling of muon beams. The use of high temperature superconducting (HTS) materials is being considered for these magnets using Helium refrigeration. Critical current (I{sub c}) measurements of HTS conductors were performed at FNAL and at NIMS up to 28 T under magnetic fields at zero to 90 degree with respect to the sample face. A description of the test setups and results on a BSCCO-2223 tape and second generation (2G) coated conductors are presented.

  11. Thermal management of long-length HTS cable systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demko, Jonathan A [ORNL; Hassenzahl, William V [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Projections of electric power production suggest a major shift to renewables, such as wind and solar, which will be in remote locations where massive quantities of power are available. One solution for transmitting this power over long distances to load centers is direct current (dc), high temperature superconducting (HTS) cables. Electric transmission via dc cables promises to be effective because of the low-loss, highcurrent- carrying capability of HTS wire at cryogenic temperatures. However, the thermal management system for the cable must be carefully designed to achieve reliable and energyefficient operation. Here we extend the analysis of a superconducting dc cable concept proposed by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), which has one stream of liquid nitrogen flowing in a cryogenic enclosure that includes the power cable, and a separate return tube for the nitrogen. Refrigeration stations positioned every 10 to 20 km cool both nitrogen streams. Both go and return lines are contained in a single vacuum/cryogenic envelope. Other coolants, including gaseous helium and gaseous hydrogen, could provide potential advantages, though they bring some technical challenges to the operation of long-length HTS dc cable systems. A discussion of the heat produced in superconducting cables and a system to remove the heat are discussed. Also, an analysis of the use of various cryogenic fluids in long-distance HTS power cables is presented.

  12. Progress in scale-up of second-generation high-temperature superconductors at SuperPower Inc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Peter D.

    ­431 (2005) 849­857 www.elsevier.com/locate/physc #12;Keywords: Second-generation HTS wire; Coated conductors. Introduction Second-generation (2-G) high-temperature superconductor (HTS) wires are referred as the YBa2Cu3Ox (YBCO)-type superconducting films coated conductors while first-generation (1-G) HTS wires as Bi

  13. Numerical Analysis of Non-Uniformities and Anisotropy in High-Temperature Superconducting Coils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Di; Ainslie, Mark D.; Zou, Jin; Cardwell, David A.

    2014-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    , critical current density (superconductivity), high-temperature superconductors, numerical analysis, superconducting coils, transport ac loss....

  14. High Temperature Superconductivity in Cuprates: a model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. R. Silva

    2010-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A model is proposed such that quasi-particles (electrons or holes) residing in the CuO2 planes of cuprates may interact leading to metallic or superconducting behaviors. The metallic phase is obtained when the quasi-particles are treated as having classical kinetic energies and the superconducting phase occurs when the quasi-particles are taken as extremely relativistic objects. The interaction between both kinds of particles is provided by a force dependent-on-velocity. In the case of the superconducting behavior, the motion of apical oxygen ions provides the glue to establish the Cooper pair. The model furnishes explicit relations for the Fermi velocity, the perpendicular and the in-plane coherence lengths, the zero-temperature energy gap, the critical current density, the critical parallel and perpendicular magnetic fields. All these mentioned quantities are expressed in terms of fundamental physical constants as: charge and mass of the electron, light velocity in vacuum, Planck constant, electric permittivity of the vacuum. Numerical evaluation of these quantities show that their values are close those found for the superconducting YBaCuO, leading to think the model as being a possible scenario to explain superconductivity in cuprates.

  15. Advances in HTS materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tixador, P

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HTS (High Temperature Superconductor) offer great opportunities to reach higher magnetic flux densities when compared with LTS (Low Temperature Superconductor). The upper generally accepted limit of 23 T using Nb3Sn can be overstep with HTS. HTS Bi-2212 round wires have shown critical current densities as higher than 1000 MA/m2 under 45 T at 4.2 K. The road for very high fields is open. The round shape suits rather well for magnets, especially with high current specifications since the “classical” high current cables (Rutherford, CIC) require elementary round conductor. The absence of current anisotropy in round conductor is another advantage. The YBaCuO coated conductors (HTS second generation conductors) show large opportunities for high fields. Their higher mechanical performances (IBAD process) compared to Bi conductor bring advantages for high field magnets. The protection of HTS magnet is an identified issue since degradations have been observed in several magnets after a quench. A state of the art ...

  16. Electrodeposited Ag-Stabilization Layer for High Temperature Superconducting Coated Conductors: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhattacharya, R. N.; Mann, J.; Qiao, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Selvamanickam, V.

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We developed a non-aqueous based electrodepostion process of Ag-stabilization layer on YBCO superconductor tapes. The non-aqueous electroplating solution is non-reactive to the HTS layer thus does not detoriate the critical current capability of the superconductor layer when plated directly on the HTS tape. The superconducting current capabilities of these tapes were measured by non-contact magnetic measurements.

  17. DC characterization and 3D modelling of a triangular, epoxy-impregnated high temperature superconducting coil.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, D.; Ainslie, M. D.; Rush, J. P.; Durrell, J. H.; Zou, J.; Raine, M. J.; Hampshire, D. P.

    2015-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    of HTS coils wound from YBCO coated conductors for the stator winding of the machine. A triangular-shaped HTS coil is one of the test candidates of this superconducting stator, which is commonly used, along with trapezoidal and circular designs... process included a 10 bar overpressure with nitrogen gas, which was maintained for 4-5 hours before rotary baking. The resin used was stycast W19 with catalyst 11 in the ratio of 100:17. The specifications of the HTS coated conductor used [41...

  18. Report on discussions with utility engineers about superconducting generators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report relates to a series of discussions with electric utility engineers concerning the integration of high-temperature superconducting (HTS) generators into the present electric power system. The current and future interest of the utilities in the purchase and use of HTS generators is assessed. Various performance and economic factors are also considered as part of this inspection of the utility prospects for HTS generators. Integration of HTS generators into the electric utility sector is one goal of the Superconductivity Partnership Initiative (SPI). The SPI, a major part of the Department of Energy (DOE) Superconductivity Program for Electric Systems, features vertical teaming of a major industrial power apparatus manufacturers, a producer of HTS wire, and an end-user with assistance and technical support for the national laboratories. The SPI effort on HTS generators is headed by a General Electric Corporation internal team comprised of the Corporate Research Laboratories, Power Generation Engineering, and Power Systems Group. Intermagnetics General corporation, which assisted in the development of the superconducting coils, is the HTS wire and tape manufacturer. Additional technical support is provided by the national laboratories: Argonne, Los Alamos, and Oak Ridge, and the New York State Institute on Superconductivity. The end-user is represented by Niagara-Mohawk and the Electric Power Research Institute.

  19. AC Losses of Prototype HTS Transmission Cables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demko, J.A.; Dresner, L.; Hughey, R.L.; Lue, J.W.; Olsen, S.K.; Sinha, U.; Tolbert, J.C.

    1998-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1995 Southwire Company and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have jointly designed, built, and tested nine, l-m long, high temperature superconducting (HTS) transmission cable prototypes. This paper summarizes the AC loss measurements of five of the cables not reported elsewhere, and compares the losses with each other and with theory developed by Dresner. Losses were measured with both a calorimetric and an electrical technique. Because of the broad resistive transition of the HTS tapes, the cables can be operated stably beyond their critical currents. The AC losses were measured in this region as well as below critical currents. Dresner's theory takes into account the broad resistive transition of the HTS tapes and calculates the AC losses both below and above the critical current. The two sets of AC 10SS data agree with each other and with the theory quite welL In particular, at low currents of incomplete penetration, the loss data agree with the theoretical prediction of hysteresis loss based on only the outer two Iayers carrying the total current.

  20. High-Temperature Superconducting Composite Conductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holesinger, Terry G. (Los Alamos, NM); Foltyn, Stephen R. (Los Alamos, NM); Arendt, Paul N. (Los Alamos, NM); Groves, James R. (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM); Ayala, Alicia (Santa Fe, NM)

    2005-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Copper or excess copper is added to one or more layers of a superconducting composite structure to reduce migration of copper form a copper based superconducting layer.

  1. The US market for high-temperature superconducting wire in transmission cable applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forbes, D.

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Telephone interviews were conducted with 23 utility engineers concerning the future prospects for high-temperature superconducting (HTS) transmission cables. All have direct responsibility for transmission in their utility, most of them in a management capacity. The engineers represented their utilities as members of the Electric Power Research Institute`s Underground Transmission Task Force (which has since been disbanded). In that capacity, they followed the superconducting transmission cable program and are aware of the cryogenic implications. Nineteen of the 23 engineers stated the market for underground transmission would grow during the next decade. Twelve of those specified an annual growth rate; the average of these responses was 5.6%. Adjusting that figure downward to incorporate the remaining responses, this study assumes an average growth rate of 3.4%. Factors driving the growth rate include the difficulty in securing rights-of-way for overhead lines, new construction techniques that reduce the costs of underground transmission, deregulation, and the possibility that public utility commissions will allow utilities to include overhead costs in their rate base. Utilities have few plans to replace existing cable as preventive maintenance, even though much of the existing cable has exceeded its 40-year lifetime. Ten of the respondents said the availability of a superconducting cable with the same life-cycle costs as a conventional cable and twice the ampacity would induce them to consider retrofits. The respondents said a cable with those characteristics would capture 73% of their cable retrofits.

  2. Stability and quench protection of high-temperature superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ang, Ing Chea

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the design and operation of a superconducting magnet, stability and protection are two key issues that determine the magnet's reliability and safe operation. Although the high-temperature superconductor (HTS) is considered ...

  3. The effect of low temperature cryocoolers on the development of low temperature superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, Michael A.

    2000-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The commercial development of reliable 4 K cryocoolers improves the future prospects for magnets made from low temperature superconductors (LTS). The hope of the developers of high temperature superconductors (HTS) has been to replace liquid helium cooled LTS magnets with HTS magnets that operate at or near liquid nitrogen temperature. There has been limited success in this endeavor, but continued problems with HTS conductors have greatly slowed progress toward this goal. The development of cryocoolers that reliably operate below 4 K will allow magnets made from LTS conductor to remain very competitive for many years to come. A key enabling technology for the use of low temperature cryocoolers on LTS magnets has been the development of HTS leads. This report describes the characteristics of LTS magnets that can be successfully melded to low-temperature cryocoolers. This report will also show when it is not appropriate to consider the use of low-temperature cryocoolers to cool magnets made with LTS conductor. A couple of specific examples of LTS magnets where cryocoolers can be used are given.

  4. Superconducting electric power applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaugher, R.D. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The application of superconductors to electric power systems has been actively pursued over the past 30 years. Following the realization of high-field, high-current superconductors in 1961, researchers applied these type II materials, such as Nb-Ti and Nb{sub 3}Sn, to laboratory magnets, followed by generators, motors, and transmission cables. Successful prototypes for the latter were constructed and tested by the mid-1980s. It is fair to assume that widespread utility acceptance of these low-temperature superconducting (LTS) power applications was compromised by the necessity for liquid helium cooling. The discovery of the high-temperature superconductors (HTS) in 1986, which offered the prospect for liquid nitrogen cooling, provided renewed interest and impetus and spurred the development of HTS power components. The expectations for HTS power components are, in fact, near realization, as a result of the rapid worldwide progress in HTS wire and tape development. This paper will review the history and present status of superconducting power-system-related applications. The major problems facing this technology and the prospects for commercialization and eventual integration into the utility sector will be discussed. General acceptance for superconducting power equipment by the electric utilities and other end-users will ultimately be based on the respective system performance, efficiency, reliability and maintenance, operational lifetime, and installed cost compared to conventional technologies.

  5. Proposal for the Award of Two Contracts for the Supply of High Temperature SuperconductingTape for the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document concerns the award of two contracts for the supply of high temperature superconducting (HTS) BSCCO 2223 Ag-Au tape, of two different types, for the LHC. Following a call for tenders (IT-3143/AT/LHC) sent on 5 March 2003 to four firms in two Member States and one firm in the US, CERN received one tender from a firm in a Member State and one tender from the firm in the United States. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of contracts with: - VACUUMSCHMELZE (DE), for the supply of 17 km of HTS BSCCO 2223 Ag-Au tape with Ic > 66 A at 77 K for a total amount of 807 833 euros (1 201 900 Swiss francs), not subject to revision, with an option for the supply of up to additional 17 km of HTS BSCCO 2223 Ag-Au tape, for a total amount of up to 807 833 euros (1 201 900 Swiss francs), not subject to revision, bringing the total amount to a maximum of 1 615 666 euros (2 403 800 Swiss francs), not subject to revision. The rate of exchange used is that stipulated in the tender.

  6. Statistical analysis of the electromechanical behavior of AgMg sheathed Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+x superconducting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Institute of Physics. DOI: 10.1063/1.2715844 I. INTRODUCTION High temperature superconducting HTS wires and tapes, the failure is associated with the brittle failure of individual Bi2212 filaments

  7. Characterization of a high-temperature superconducting conductor on round core cables in magnetic fields up to 20 T

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van der Laan, Danko [Advanced Conductor Technologies; Noyes, Patrick [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory; Miller, George [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory; Weijers, Hubertus [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory; Willering, Gerard [CERN

    2013-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The next generation of high-field magnets that will operate at magnetic fields substantially above 20 T, or at temperatures substantially above 4.2 K, requires high-temperature superconductors (HTS). Conductor on round core (CORC) cables, in which RE-Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} (RE = rare earth) (REBCO) coated conductors are wound in a helical fashion on a fl?exible core, are a practical and versatile HTS cable option for low-inductance, high-field magnets. We performed the first tests of CORC magnet cables in liquid helium in magnetic fields of up to 20 T. A record critical current I{sub c} of 5021 A was measured at 4.2 K and 19 T. In a cable with an outer diameter of 7.5 mm, this value corresponds to an engineering current density J{sub e} of 114 A mm{sup -2} , the highest J{sub e} ever reported for a superconducting cable at such high magnetic fields. Additionally, the first magnet wound from an HTS cable was constructed from a 6 m-long CORC cable. The 12-turn, double-layer magnet had an inner diameter of 9 cm and was tested in a magnetic field of 20 T, at which it had an I{sub c} of 1966 A. The cables were quenched repetitively without degradation during the measurements, demonstrating the feasibility of HTS CORC cables for use in high-field magnet applications.

  8. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON APPLIED SUPERCONDUCTIVITY, VOL. 18, NO. 3, SEPTEMBER 2008 1743 Fatigue Behavior of YBaCuO/Hastelloy-C Coated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . INTRODUCTION DURING application, high-temperature superconducting (HTS) materials are subjected to various margin. Fatigue behavior of HTS materials has been studied by several research teams, especially in the wake of good progress in wire/tape manufacturing, their costs, and improvement in cooling devices

  9. Modular test facility for HTS insert coils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lombardo, V; Bartalesi, A.; Barzi, E.; Lamm, M.; Turrioni, D.; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The final beam cooling stages of a Muon Collider may require DC solenoid magnets with magnetic fields in the range of 40-50 T. In this paper we will present a modular test facility developed for the purpose of investigating very high field levels with available 2G HTS superconducting materials. Performance of available conductors is presented, together with magnetic calculations and evaluation of Lorentz forces distribution on the HTS coils. Finally a test of a double pancake coil is presented.

  10. Stability and Quench Protection for HTS Superconducting Magnets: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA number CRD-05-00160

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ginley, D. S.

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL will perform deposition and testing of various dielectrics on high-temperature superconductors.

  11. Superconducting Magnet Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Superconducting Magnet Division Ramesh Gupta 20T Target Solenoid with HTS Insert Solenoid Capture Laboratory New York, USA http://www.bnl.gov/magnets/staff/gupta #12;Superconducting Magnet Division Ramesh of HTS may significantly reduce the amount of Tungsten shielding · Summary #12;Superconducting Magnet

  12. Power applications of high-temperature superconductivity: Variable speed motors, current switches, and energy storage for end use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawsey, R.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Banerjee, B.B.; Grant, P.M. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to conduct joint research and development activities related to certain electric power applications of high-temperature superconductivity (HTS). The new superconductors may allow development of an energy-efficient switch to control current to variable speed motors, superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) systems, and other power conversion equipment. Motor types that were considered include induction, permanent magnet, and superconducting ac motors. Because it is impractical to experimentally alter certain key design elements in radial-gap motors, experiments were conducted on an axial field superconducting motor prototype using 4 NbTi magnets. Superconducting magnetic energy storage technology with 0.25--5 kWh stored energy was studied as a viable solution to short duration voltage sag problems on the customer side of the electric meter. The technical performance characteristics of the device wee assembled, along with competing technologies such as active power line conditioners with storage, battery-based uninterruptible power supplies, and supercapacitors, and the market potential for SMES was defined. Four reports were prepared summarizing the results of the project.

  13. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON APPLIED SUPERCONDUCTIVITY, VOL. 17, NO. 2, JUNE 2007 1863 Development of 220 V/300 A Class Non-Inductive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Ho-Myung

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON APPLIED SUPERCONDUCTIVITY, VOL. 17, NO. 2, JUNE 2007 1863 Development of 220 V-inductive winding type superconducting fault current limiter (SFCL) is being developed. The target of the second-inductively wound coils in se- ries using a 2G high temperature superconducting (HTS) wire and it was tested in sub

  14. High temperature superconductivity in metallic region near Mott transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian De Cao

    2009-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The spin-singlet superconductivity without phonons is examined in consideration of correlations on an extended Hubbard model. It is shown that the superconductivity requires not only the total correlation should be strong enough but also the density of state around Fermi energy should be large enough, which shows that the high temperature superconductivity could only be found in the metallic region near the Mott metal insulator transition (MIT). Other properties of superconductors are also discussed on these conclusions.

  15. Superconducting technology program Sandia 1996 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roth, E.P.

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia`s Superconductivity Technology Program is a thallium-based high-temperature superconductor (HTS) research and development program consisting of efforts in powder synthesis and process development, open-system thick film conductor development, wire and tape fabrication, and HTS motor design. The objective of this work is to develop high-temperature superconducting conductors (wire and tape) capable of meeting requirements for high-power electrical devices of interest to industry. The research efforts currently underway are: (1) Process development and characterization of thallium-based high-temperature superconducting closed system wire and tape, (2) Investigation of the synthesis and processing of thallium-based thick films using two-zone processing, and (3) Cryogenic design of a 30K superconducting motor. This report outlines the research that has been performed during FY96 in each of these areas.

  16. HTS powder synthesis and wire sintering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1994-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Successful processing of HTS wires that exhibit superconducting properties and lengths appropriate for applications requires thoroughly understanding and carefully controlling experimental parameters. Initial important processing considerations are the quality and nature of the powder used to produce the superconductor within the wire composite. Following fabrication of the wire, sintering conditions must be chosen based on a knowledge of the phase behavior of the associated materials. HTS wire studies with our industrial partners have involved Bi-2212, Bi-2223, and Tl-1223 based systems. The goals of this project`s efforts in these collaborations have been directed towards: (1) Establishing procedures for HTS powder syntheses that produce superconductors with optimal properties; (2) Studying conditions for HTS wire sintering that produce high current densities appropriate for conductor applications. The Los Alamos project involves 6 staff, 3 technicians, and 4 postdoctoral students.

  17. Optimization of operating temperature in cryocooled HTS magnets for compactness and efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Ho-Myung

    . The magnet systems considered here are refrigerated by a closed-cycle cryocooler, and liquid cryogens may-cooled without any liquid (Fig. 1b). As the operating temperature of the magnet decreases, both the refrigeration load of the magnet and the required power per unit refrigeration at cryocooler increases dramati- cally

  18. Damping in high-temperature superconducting levitation systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R. (Sammamish, WA)

    2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatuses for improved damping in high-temperature superconducting levitation systems are disclosed. A superconducting element (e.g., a stator) generating a magnetic field and a magnet (e.g. a rotor) supported by the magnetic field are provided such that the superconducting element is supported relative to a ground state with damped motion substantially perpendicular to the support of the magnetic field on the magnet. Applying this, a cryostat housing the superconducting bearing may be coupled to the ground state with high damping but low radial stiffness, such that its resonant frequency is less than that of the superconducting bearing. The damping of the cryostat may be substantially transferred to the levitated magnetic rotor, thus, providing damping without affecting the rotational loss, as can be derived applying coupled harmonic oscillator theory in rotor dynamics. Thus, damping can be provided to a levitated object, without substantially affecting the rotational loss.

  19. Engineered HTS microbridges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simon, R.W.; Bulman, J.B.; Burch, J.F.; Coons, S.B.; Daly, K.P.; Dozier, W.D.; Hu, R.; Lee, A.E.; Luine, J.A.; Platt, C.E.; Schwarzbek, S.M.; Zani, M.J. (TRW Space and Technology Group, Redondo Beach, CA (United States))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the absence of useful Josephson tunnel junctions made from cuprate superconductors, microbridges of various types are the only useful active devices for HTS electronics applications. A variety of techniques now exist to reproducibly engineer microbridges in high-quality epitaxial YBCO films. This paper reports on two such techniques from our own group that has resulted in high-yield processes for fabricating both dc and rf SQUIDs operating at temperatures as high as 82 K. The authors compare the results on these devices--step-edge microbridges and focused-ion beam microbridges--- with those on several other structures under investigation by other researchers.

  20. Superconducting Cable Termination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sinha, Uday K. (Carrollton, GA); Tolbert, Jerry (Newnan, GA)

    2005-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a termination that connects high temperature superconducting (HTS) cable immersed in pressurized liquid nitrogen to high voltage and neutral (shield) external bushings at ambient temperature and pressure. The termination consists of a splice between the HTS power (inner) and shield (outer) conductors and concentric copper pipes which are the conductors in the termination. There is also a transition from the dielectric tape insulator used in the HTS cable to the insulators used between and around the copper pipe conductors in the termination. At the warm end of the termination the copper pipes are connected via copper braided straps to the conventional warm external bushings which have low thermal stresses. This termination allows for a natural temperature gradient in the copper pipe conductors inside the termination which enables the controlled flashing of the pressurized liquid coolant (nitrogen) to the gaseous state. Thus the entire termination is near the coolant supply pressure and the high voltage and shield cold bushings, a highly stressed component used in most HTS cables, are eliminated. A sliding seal allows for cable contraction as it is cooled from room temperature to ˜72-82 K. Seals, static vacuum, and multi-layer superinsulation minimize radial heat leak to the environment.

  1. Recent Developments in High Temperature Superconductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hor, P. H.

    -Ca-Ba-Cu-O (TCBCO) [5] have been found to be superconducting at as high at 125K in TCBCO. Superconductivity up to - 30K has also been found in the Ba-K-Bi-O type perovskite system [6,7]. Without a copper-oxygen planar structure involved, this system offers a...Can-1 Cu n 04+2n where A =Bi or Tl and B =Ba or Sr and n is the number of CU-O layers stacked consecutively in the unit cell. For the BCSCO and TCBCO compound series, they all have layers of perovskite-like structures (with n =1, 2, or 3...

  2. Superconductivity for electric systems program plan, FY 1996--FY 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This describes a comprehensive, integrated approach for the development of HTS (high-temperature superconductivity) technology for cost-effective use in electric power applications. This approach supports the program`s mission: to develop the technology that could lead to industrial commercialization of HTS electric power applications, such as fault-current limiters, motors, generators, transmission cables, superinductors, and superconducting energy storage. The vision is that, by 2010, the US power systems equipment industry will regain a major share of the global market by offering superconducting products that outperform the competition; and in US, the power grid will gain increased efficiency and stability by incorporating many kinds of HTS devices. After an overview and a discussion of the program plan (wires, systems technology, partnership initiative), this document discusses technology status, stakeholders, and the role of US DOE.

  3. Superconducting technology program: Sandia 1995 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roth, E.P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Superconductivity Materials and Technology Dept.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia`s STP program is a thallium-based high-temperature superconductor (HTS) research and development program consisting of efforts in powder synthesis and process development, open-system thick film conductor development, wire and tape fabrication, and HTS motor design. The objective of this work is to develop high-temperature superconducting conductors (wire and tape) capable of meeting requirements for high-power electrical devices of interest to industry. The research efforts currently underway are: (1) process development and characterization of thallium-based high-temperature superconducting closed system wire and tape; (2) investigation of the synthesis and processing of thallium-based thick films using two-zone processing; and (3) cryogenic design of a 30K superconducting motor. This report outlines the research that has been performed during FY95 in each of these areas.

  4. Superconducting Technology Program: Sandia 1993 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roth, E.P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Superconductivity Materials and Optical Properties Dept.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia`s STP program is a four-part high-temperature superconductor (HTS) research and development program consisting of efforts in powder synthesis and process development, thallium-based HTS film development, wire and tape fabrication, and HTS motor design. The objective of this work is to develop high-temperature superconducting conductors (wire and tape) capable of meeting requirements for high-power electrical devices of interest to industry. The four research efforts currently underway are: (1) process research on the material synthesis of high-temperature superconductors; (2) investigation of the synthesis and processing of thallium-based high-temperature superconducting thick films; (3) process development and characterization of high-temperature superconducting wire and tape, and (4) cryogenic design of a high-temperature superconducting motor. This report outlines the research that has been performed during FY93 in each of these four areas. A brief background of each project is included to provide historical context and perspective. Major areas of research are described, although no attempt has been made to exhaustively include all work performed in each of these areas.

  5. Superconducting Technology Program Sandia 1994 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roth, E.P.

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia`s STP program is a four-part high-temperature superconductor (HTS) research and development program consisting of efforts in powder synthesis and process development, thallium-based HTS film development, wire and tape fabrication, and HTS motor design. The objective of this work is to develop high-temperature superconducting conductors (wire and tape) capable of meeting requirements for high-power electrical devices of interest to industry. The four research efforts currently underway are: (1) Process research on the material synthesis of high-temperature superconductors, (2) Investigation of the synthesis and processing of thallium-based high-temperature superconducting thick films, (3) Process development and characterization of high-temperature superconducting wire and tape, and (4) Cryogenic design of a high-temperature superconducting motor. This report outlines the research that has been performed during FY94 in each of these four areas. Major areas of research are described, although no attempt has been made to exhaustively include all work performed in each of these areas.

  6. A prototype high-temperature superconducting coil for the 32 T all-superconducting magnet was constructed with YBCO tape and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    A prototype high-temperature superconducting coil for the 32 T all- superconducting magnet T All-Superconducting Magnet Hubertus W. Weijers, W.D. Markiewicz, H. Bai, S.T. Hannahs National High

  7. Unique ORNL HTS Program Capabilities ORNL cable test facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unique ORNL HTS Program Capabilities ORNL cable test facility In order to achieve market acceptance is the only one in the U.S., is actively used in collaboration with U.S. superconducting wire and equipment of a commercial superconducting wire. Thorough understanding of other characteristics such as ac losses, wire

  8. ENHANCEMENT OF THE SUPERCONDUCTING TRANSITION TEMPERATURES IN ION-IMPLANTED ALUMINIUM ALLOYS (*)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    L-287 ENHANCEMENT OF THE SUPERCONDUCTING TRANSITION TEMPERATURES IN ION-IMPLANTED ALUMINIUM ALLOYS helium temperatures, have maximum superconducting transition temperatures Tc of 4.2 K (C), 7.35 K (Ge 1976, Classification Physics Abstracts 7.188 - 8.362 One of the crucial problems in superconductivity

  9. 2840 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON APPLIED SUPERCONDUCTIVITY, VOL. 21, NO. 3, JUNE 2011 Angular, Temperature, and Strain Dependencies of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hampshire, Damian

    . It is valuable for many applications such as power cables, transformers, motors, generators and high field temperature supercon- ducting (HTS) tape is the anisotropy which plays a critical Manuscript received August

  10. High temperature superconducting composite conductor and method for manufacturing the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holesinger, Terry G. (Los Alamos, NM); Bingert, John F. (Jemez Springs, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high temperature superconducting composite conductor is provided including a high temperature superconducting material surrounded by a noble metal layer, the high temperature superconducting composite conductor characterized as having a fill factor of greater than about 40. Additionally, the conductor can be further characterized as containing multiple cores of high temperature superconducting material surrounded by a noble metal layer, said multiple cores characterized as having substantially uniform geometry in the cross-sectional dimensions. Processes of forming such a high temperature superconducting composite conductor are also provided.

  11. Cost Effective Open Geometry HTS MRI System amended to BSCCO 2212 Wire for High Field Magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennth Marken

    2006-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The original goal of this Phase II Superconductivity Partnership Initiative project was to build and operate a prototype Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) system using high temperature superconductor (HTS) coils wound from continuously processed dip-coated BSCCO 2212 tape conductor. Using dip-coated tape, the plan was for MRI magnet coils to be wound to fit an established commercial open geometry, 0.2 Tesla permanent magnet system. New electronics and imaging software for a prototype higher field superconducting system would have added significantly to the cost. However, the use of the 0.2 T platform would allow the technical feasibility and the cost issues for HTS systems to be fully established. Also it would establish the energy efficiency and savings of HTS open MRI compared with resistive and permanent magnet systems. The commercial goal was an open geometry HTS MRI running at 0.5 T and 20 K. This low field open magnet was using resistive normal metal conductor and its heat loss was rather high around 15 kolwatts. It was expected that an HTS magnet would dissipate around 1 watt, significantly reduce power consumption. The SPI team assembled to achieve this goal was led by Oxford Instruments, Superconducting Technology (OST), who developed the method of producing commercial dip coated tape. Superconductive Components Inc. (SCI), a leading US supplier of HTS powders, supported the conductor optimization through powder optimization, scaling, and cost reduction. Oxford Magnet Technology (OMT), a joint venture between Oxford Instruments and Siemens and the world’s leading supplier of MRI magnet systems, was involved to design and build the HTS MRI magnet and cryogenics. Siemens Magnetic Resonance Division, a leading developer and supplier of complete MRI imaging systems, was expected to integrate the final system and perform imaging trials. The original MRI demonstration project was ended in July 2004 by mutual consent of Oxford Instruments and Siemens. Between the project start and that date a substantial shift in the MRI marketplace occurred, with rapid growth for systems at higher fields (1.5 T and above) and a consequent decline in the low field market (<1.0 T). While the project aim appeared technically attainable at that time, the conclusion was reached that the system and market economics do not warrant additional investment. The program was redirected to develop BSCCO 2212 multifilament wire development for high field superconducting magnets for NMR and other scientific research upon an agreement between DOE and Oxford Instruments, Superconducting Technology. The work t took place between September, 2004 and the project end in early 2006 was focused on 2212 multifilamentary wire. This report summarizes the technical achievements both in 2212 dip coated for an HTS MRI system and in BSCCO 2212 multifilamentary wire for high field magnets.

  12. REVIEW OF SCIENTIFIC INSTRUMENTS 83, 034704 (2012) Low temperature laser scanning microscopy of a superconducting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, Virginia 23606, USA of achievable accelerating gradients, has been continuously improving over the years. Niobium, either as a thin in high-temperature superconductors (HTS).6 The origins of the technique go back to electron-beam heating7

  13. Study of HTS Insert Coils for High Field Solenoids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lombardo, Vito; /Fermilab

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fermilab is currently working on the development of high field magnet systems for ionization cooling of muon beams. The use of high temperature superconducting materials (HTS) is being considered for these solenoids using Helium refrigeration. Several studies have been performed on insert coils made of BSCCO-2223 tapes and second generation (2G) YBCO coated conductors, which are tested at various temperatures and at external fields of up to 14 T. Critical current (I{sub c}) measurements of YBCO short samples are presented as a function of bending stress, magnetic field and field orientation with respect to the sample surface. An analytical fit of critical current data as a function of field and field orientation is also presented. Results from several single-layer and double-layer pancake coils are also discussed.

  14. Ab Initio Description of High-Temperature Superconductivity in Dense Molecular Hydrogen P. Cudazzo,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, E.K.U.

    Ab Initio Description of High-Temperature Superconductivity in Dense Molecular Hydrogen P. Cudazzo-principles study of the electron-phonon interaction and the prediction of the superconducting critical temperature superconductivity: mainly, a rich and complex Fermi surface and strongly coupled phonon modes driving the intra

  15. Cooling Configuration Design Considerations for Long-Length HTS Cables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demko, Jonathan A [ORNL; Duckworth, Robert C [ORNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent successes in demonstrating high temperature superconducting (HTS) cable systems hundreds of meters in length have inspired even longer length projects. A compact and energy efficient cooling configuration can be achieved using a counterflow-cooling arrangement. This is particularly attractive when all three phases are contained in a single cryostat because of the elimination of the space and thermal requirements of a separate liquid nitrogen return line. Future cable projects will utilize second generation (2G) wire which is expected to become lower in cost but may have different thermal requirements than first generation (1G) BSCCO wire due to the lower critical temperature and to a lesser extent, the lower thermal conductivity of the wire. HTS cable configurations will be studied with a numerical model to assess thermal hydraulic performance with AC and thermal losses; a summary of the results from the analysis will be presented. An analysis of the cable thermal- hydraulic response to over-current faults will be presented.

  16. Characterization of high-current, high-temperature superconductor current lead elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niemann, R.C.; Evans, D.J.; Fisher, B.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Brockenborough, W.E.; Roberts, P.R.; Rodenbush, A.J. [American Superconductor Corp., Westborough, MA (United States)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The refrigeration loads of current leads for superconducting magnets can be significantly reduced by using high-temperature superconductor (HTS) leads. An HTS conductor type that is well suited for this application is a laminated sintered stack of HTS powder-in-tube (PIT) tapes. The superconducting elements are normally characterized by their manufacturer by measuring critical currents at 77 K in self field. Additional characterization, which correlates electrical performance at 77 K and at lower temperatures with applied magnetic fields, provides the current lead designer and conductor element manufacturer with critical information. For HTS conductor elements comprising a laminated and sintered stack of Bi-2223 PIT tapes having an alloyed Ag sheath, this characterization uses variable applied fields and operating temperatures.

  17. Two Methods for a First Order Hardware Gradiometer Using Two HTS SQUID's

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Espy, M.A.; Flynn, E.R.; Kraus, R.H., Jr.; Matlachov, A.

    1998-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Two different systems for noise cancellation (first order gradiometers) have been developed using two similar high temperature superconducting (HTS) SQUIDs. ''Analog'' gradiometry is accomplished in hardware by either (1) subtracting the signals from the sensor and background SQUIDs at a summing amplifier (parallel technique) or (2) converting the inverted background SQUID signal to a magnetic field at the sensor SQUID (series technique). Balance levels achieved are 2000 and 1000 at 20 Hz for the parallel and series methods respectively. The balance level as a function of frequency is also presented. The effect which time delays in the two sets of SQUID electronics have on this balance level is presented and discussed.

  18. Two methods for a first order hardware gradiometer using two HTS SQUIDs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Espy, M.A.; Flynn, E.R.; Kraus, R.H. Jr.; Matlachov, A.

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Two different systems for noise cancellation (first order gradiometers) have been developed using two similar high temperature superconducting (HTS) SQUIDs. Analog gradiometry is accomplished in hardware by either (1) subtracting the signals from the sensor and background SQUIDs at a summing amplifier (parallel technique) or (2) converting the inverted background SQUID signal to a magnetic field at the sensor SQUID (series technique). Balance levels achieved are 2000 and 1000 at 20 Hz for the parallel and series methods respectively. The balance level as a function of frequency is also presented. The effect which time delays in the two sets of SQUID electronics have on this balance level is presented and discussed.

  19. Pseudogap The underdoped region of the temperature doping phase diagram from which cuprate superconductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    superconductivity emerges is referred to as the `pseudogap' because evidence exists for partial gapping the masking effects of superconductivity. Quantum Critical Point ­ This identifies the pseudogap in YBa2Cu3O6 is such that it terminates at zero temperature inside the superconducting dome. This indicates that quantum criticality

  20. ANALYSIS OF FUTURE PRICES AND MARKETS FOR HIGH TEMPERATURE SUPERCONDUCTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ANALYSIS OF FUTURE PRICES AND MARKETS FOR HIGH TEMPERATURE SUPERCONDUCTORS BY JOSEPH MULHOLLAND temperature superconductors (HTS) may impact the national electrical system over the next 25 years dollars. However, the savings from superconductivity are offset somewhat by the high cost of manufacturing

  1. High temperature superconductivity: The products and their benefits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence, L.R. Jr.; Cox, C.; Broman, D. [Bob Lawrence and Associates, Inc., Alexandria, VA (United States)

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerous qualitative studies have discussed, in detail, the benefits projected from the commercialization of HTS systems; however, few are available with quantitative predictions of market penetration and resultant benefits. This report attempts to quantify those benefits, as a function of time, by examining five key classes of candidate HTS electrical equipment, and projecting market entry and capture based on historical market entry o technologies considered analogous to HTS. Any such projection is a judgment, based on experience and available data, and the analyses in this report fall into that category. The five classes of equipment examined are electric motors, transformers, generators, underground cable, and fault current limiters. In each of these classes, major international programs are now underway to develop and commercialize HTS equipment in a time frame from the present to the year 2020. Based on technology status and perceived market advantages as determined from the references, market entry dates were projected followed by market penetration predictions. The earliest equipment to achieve commercialization is predicted to be fault current limiters, predicted for market entry in the 2003--2004 time period. Transformers and cable are projected for entry in 2005 followed by electric motors in 2006. The final market entry will be by generators, predicted for commercialization in 2011.

  2. Method and apparatus for fabricating superconducting wire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, N.

    1993-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for fabricating a superconducting wire comprising the steps of: in a first means, sputter depositing on a base wire a partial superconduction layer consisting of at least some, but not all, of the elements of an HTS material; and in a second means, reacting said partial superconduction layer with the other element or elements, including at least one metallic element, of the HTS material so that a complete superconduction layer is formed on said base wire.

  3. Method and etchant to join ag-clad BSSCO superconducting tape

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Balachandran, Uthamalingam (Hinsdale, IL); Iyer, Anand N. (Downers Grove, IL); Huang, Jiann Yuan (Hsinchu, TW)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of removing a silver cladding from high temperature superconducting material clad in silver (HTS) is disclosed. The silver clad HTS is contacted with an aqueous solution of HNO.sub.3 followed by an aqueous solution of NH.sub.4 OH and H.sub.2 O.sub.2 for a time sufficient to remove the silver cladding from the superconducting material without adversely affecting the superconducting properties of the superconducting material. A portion of the silver cladding may be masked with a material chemically impervious to HNO.sub.3 and to a combination of NH.sub.4 OH and H.sub.2 O.sub.2 to preserve the Ag coating. A silver clad superconductor is disclosed, made in accordance with the method discussed.

  4. Superconductivity program for electric systems, Superconductivity Technology Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, annual progress report for fiscal year 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willis, J.O.; Newnam, B.E. [eds.; Peterson, D.E.

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Development of high-temperature superconductors (HTS) has undergone tremendous progress during the past year. Kilometer tape lengths and associated magnets based on BSCCO materials are now commercially available from several industrial partners. Superconducting properties in the exciting YBCO coated conductors continue to be improved over longer lengths. The Superconducting Partnership Initiative (SPI) projects to develop HTS fault current limiters and transmission cables have demonstrated that HTS prototype applications can be produced successfully with properties appropriate for commercial applications. Research and development activities at LANL related to the HTS program for Fiscal Year 1997 are collected in this report. LANL continues to support further development of Bi2223 and Bi2212 tapes in collaboration with American Superconductor Corporation (ASC) and Oxford Superconductivity Technology, Inc. (OSTI), respectively. The tape processing studies involving novel thermal treatments and microstructural characterization have assisted these companies in commercializing these materials. The research on second-generation YBCO-coated conductors produced by pulsed-laser deposition (PLD) over buffer template layers produced by ion beam-assisted deposition (IBAD) continues to lead the world. The applied physics studies of magnetic flux pinning by proton and heavy ion bombardment of BSCCO and YBCO tapes have provided many insights into improving the behavior of these materials in magnetic fields. Sections 4 to 7 of this report contain a list of 29 referred publications and 15 conference abstracts, a list of patent and license activities, and a comprehensive list of collaborative agreements in progress and completed.

  5. {open_quotes}Local texture, current flow, and superconductive transport properties of Tl1223 deposits on practical substrates{close_quotes}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christen, D.K.; Specht, E.D.; Goyal, A. [and others

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantitative investigations of the crystal grain orientations and electrical transport properties of high temperature superconducting (HTS)TiBa{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 8+x} (Tl1223) deposits on polycrystalline substrates show that current flow comprises percolative networks of strongly-coupled material. Superconductive transport properties on different samples, on the same samples at different widths, and on samples with artificially-induced strong flux pinning defects confirm the nature of current flow, and suggest that these materials may be useful as a new class of HTS conductors.

  6. An anisotropic integral operator in high temperature superconductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boris Mityagin

    2008-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A simplified model in superconductivity theory studied by P. Krotkov and A. Chubukov \\cite{KC1,KC2} led to an integral operator $K$ -- see (1), (2). They guessed that the equation $E_0(a,T)=1$ where $E_0$ is the largest eigenvalue of the operator $K$ has a solution $T(a)=1-\\tau(a)$ with $\\tau (a) \\sim a^{2/5}$ when $a$ goes to 0. $\\tau(a)$ imitates the shift of critical (instability) temperature. We give a rigorous analysis of an anisotropic integral operator $K$ and prove the asymptotic ($*$) -- see Theorem 8 and Proposition 10. Additive Uncertainty Principle (of Landau-Pollack-Slepian [SP], \\cite{LP1,LP2}) plays important role in this analysis.

  7. Shock-induced synthesis of high temperature superconducting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ginley, D.S.; Graham, R.A.; Morosin, B.; Venturini, E.L.

    1987-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    It has now been determined that the unique features of the high pressure shock method, especially the shock-induced chemical synthesis technique, are fully applicable to high temperature superconducting materials. Extraordinarily high yields are achievable in accordance with this invention, e.g., generally in the range from about 20% to about 99%, often in the range from about 50% to about 90%, lower and higher yields, of course, also being possible. The method of this invention involves the application of a controlled high pressure shock compression pulse which can be produced in any conventional manner, e.g., by detonation of a high explosive material, the impact of a high speed projectile or the effect of intense pulsed radiation sources such as lasers or electron beams. Examples and a discussion are presented.

  8. High voltage design structure for high temperature superconducting device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tekletsadik, Kasegn D. (Rexford, NY)

    2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In accordance with the present invention, modular corona shields are employed in a HTS device to reduce the electric field surrounding the HTS device. In a exemplary embodiment a fault current limiter module in the insulation region of a cryogenic cooling system has at least one fault current limiter set which employs a first corona shield disposed along the top portion of the fault current limiter set and is electrically coupled to the fault current limiter set. A second corona shield is disposed along the bottom portion of the fault current limiter set and is electrically coupled to the fault current limiter set. An insulation barrier is disposed within the insulation region along at least one side of the fault current limiter set. The first corona shield and the second corona shield act together to reduce the electric field surrounding the fault limiter set when voltage is applied to the fault limiter set.

  9. Development of superconducting transmission cable. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawsey, R.; Stovall, J.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hughey, R.L.; Sinha, U.K. [Southwire Co., Carrollton, GA (United States)

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Southwire Company is to develop the technology necessary to proceed to commercialization of high-temperature superconducting (HTS) transmission cables. Power transmission cables are a promising near-term electric utility application for high-temperature superconductivity. Present HTS wires match the needs for a three-phase transmission cable: (1) the wires must conduct high currents in self-field, (2) there are no high forces developed, and (3) the cables may operate at relatively low current density. The commercially-available HTS wires, in 100-m lengths, make construction of a full three-phase, alternating current (ac) transmission cable possible. If completed through the pre-commercialization phase, this project will result in a new capability for electric power companies. The superconducting cable will enable delivery with greater efficiency, higher power density, and lower costs than many alternatives now on the market. Job creation in the US is expected as US manufacturers supply transmission cables to the expanding markets in Asia and to the densely populated European cities where pipe-type cable is prevalent. Finally, superconducting cables may enable delivery of the new, diverse and distributed sources of electricity that will constitute the majority of new installed electrical generation in the world during the coming decades.

  10. Alternative Design Concepts for Multi-Circuit HTS Link Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ballarino, A

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Superconducting cables for power transmission usually contain two conductors for DC application, or three conductors for AC, with high voltage insulation. In contrast, for some applications related to accelerators it is convenient to transfer high currents via superconducting links feeding a number of circuits at relatively low voltage, of the order of a kilovolt, over distances of up to a few hundred meters. For power transmission applications based on cooling via sub-cooled liquid nitrogen, suitable HTS conductors are only available in the form of tape, and a multi-layer variant can be envisaged for the multi-circuit links. However, where cooling to temperatures of the order of 20 K is feasible, MgB2 conductor, available in the form of both tape and wire, can also be envisaged and in the latter case used to assemble round cables. There are, therefore, two distinct topologies - based on the use of wires or tapes - that can be envisaged for use in applications to multi-circuit link systems. In this paper the ...

  11. Analytical Study of Stress State in HTS Solenoids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barzi, E.; Terzini, E.; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A main challenge for high field solenoids made of in High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) is the large stress developed in the conductor. This is especially constraining for BSCCO, a brittle and strain sensitive ceramic material. To find parametric correlations useful in magnet design, analytical models can be used. A simple model is herein proposed to obtain the radial, azimuthal and axial stresses in a solenoid as a function of size, i.e. self-field, and of the engineering current density for a number of different constraint hypotheses. The analytical model was verified against finite element modeling (FEM) using the same hypotheses of infinite rigidity of the constraints and room temperature properties. FEM was used to separately evaluate the effect of thermal contractions at 4.2 K for BSCCO and YBCO coils. Even though the analytical model allows for a finite stiffness of the constraints, it was run using infinite stiffness. For this reason, FEM was again used to determine how much stresses change when considering an outer stainless steel skin with finite rigidity for both BSCCO and YBCO coils. For a better understanding of the actual loads that high field solenoids made of HTS will be subject to, we have started some analytical studies of stress state in solenoids for a number of constraint hypotheses. This will hopefully show what can be achieved with the present conductor in terms of self-field. The magnetic field (B) exerts a force F = B x J per unit volume. In superconducting magnets, where the field and current density (J) are both high, this force can be very large, and it is therefore important to calculate the stresses in the coil.

  12. Multi-Scale Characterization: Evaluation of Microstructural and Superconducting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multiple Length Scales in 2nd Generation HTS Wire. MultiMulti--Scale Characterization: Evaluation of Across Multiple Length Scales inProperties Across Multiple Length Scales in 22ndnd Generation HTS Wire.Generation HTS Wire. Terry Holesinger and Leonardo Civale Superconductivity Technology Center Los Alamos National

  13. SUPERCONDUCTING PROPERTIES OF ALUMINIUM THIN FILMS AFTER ION IMPLANTATION AT LIQUID HELIUM TEMPERATURES (*)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    L-271 SUPERCONDUCTING PROPERTIES OF ALUMINIUM THIN FILMS AFTER ION IMPLANTATION AT LIQUID HELIUM concentration near AlH2. It is well-known [1] that the superconducting transition temperature Tc of metals as in the electronic density of states N(O) at the Fermi surface. In the case of weak-coupling superconductors

  14. Damping and support in high-temperature superconducting levitation systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R. (Sammamish, WA); McIver, Carl R. (Everett, WA); Mittleider, John A. (Kent, WA)

    2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatuses to provide improved auxiliary damping for superconducting bearings in superconducting levitation systems are disclosed. In a superconducting bearing, a cryostat housing the superconductors is connected to a ground state with a combination of a damping strip of material, a set of linkage arms to provide vertical support, and spring washers to provide stiffness. Alternately, the superconducting bearing may be supported by a cryostat connected to a ground state by posts constructed from a mesh of fibers, with the damping and stiffness controlled by the fiber composition, size, and mesh geometry.

  15. Low-Temperature Synthesis of Superconducting NanocrystallineMgB2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lu, Jun; Xiao, Zhili; Lin, Qiyin; Claus, Helmut; Fang, Zhigang Zak

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnesium diboride (MgB2) is considered a promising material for practical application in superconducting devices, with a transition temperature near 40?K. In the present paper, nanocrystalline MgB2with an average particle size of approximately 70?nm is synthesized by reacting LiBH4with MgH2at temperatures as low as 450°C. This synthesis approach successfully bypasses the usage of either elemental boron or toxic diborane gas. The superconductivity of the nanostructures is confirmed by magnetization measurements, showing a superconducting critical temperature of 38.7?K.

  16. Superconducting transition temperature in heterogeneous ferromagnet-superconductor systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pokrovsky, Valery L.; Wei, HD.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the superconducting phase transition in two systems: ferromagnet-superconductor bilayer (FSB) and a thin superconducting film with a periodic array of magnetic dots (SFMD) upon it. We show that this transition is of the first order in FSB...

  17. A "permanent" high-temperature superconducting magnet operated in thermal communication with a mass of solid nitrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haid, Benjamin J. (Benjamin John Jerome), 1974-

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis explores a new design for a portable "permanent" superconducting magnet system. The design is an alternative to permanent low-temperature superconducting (LTS) magnet systems where the magnet is cooled by a ...

  18. Double-sided Tl{sub 2}Ba{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 10} thin films based high temperature superconducting filter operating above 100?K

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Wei; Wang, Pei; He, Ming, E-mail: heming@nankai.edu.cn; Qiao, Ren; Du, Jia-Nan; Gao, Xiao-Xin; Liu, Xin; Zhang, Xu; Ji, Lu; Chen, Hai-Hua; Zhao, Xin-Jie, E-mail: zhaoxj@nankai.edu.cn [College of Electronic Information and Optical Engineering, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high temperature superconducting (HTS) filter on double-sided Tl{sub 2}Ba{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 10} (Tl-2223) thin films is designed in this letter. High-quality double-sided Tl-2223 thin films are prepared on 10?×?10?×?0.5?mm{sup 3} LaAlO{sub 3} (001) substrate. The critical temperatures T{sub c} of the films are 120?±?1?K and the critical current densities J{sub c} are 3–4 MA/cm{sup 2} at 77?K for both sides. X-ray diffraction ?-2? scans and rotational ?-scans prove that the films are strongly textured with the c axis perpendicular to the substrate surface. A 3-pole band-pass filter is then fabricated on the Tl-2223 thin films with 4% relative bandwidth and a center frequency of 4.0 GHz. At 77?K, 100?K, and 102?K, the insertion loss in the passband is 0.088?dB, 0.21?dB, and 0.27?dB, respectively. These performances show that the proposed HTS filter is satisfying even when the operating temperature is above 100?K, which makes it possible to work in outer space without cryogenic systems.

  19. To the Non-Local Theory of the High Temperature Superconductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boris V. Alexeev

    2012-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The possibility of the non local physics application in the theory of superconductivity is investigated. It is shown that by the superconducting conditions the relay ("estafette") motion of the soliton' system ("attice ion - electron") is realizing by the absence of chemical bonds. From the position of the quantum hydrodynamics the problem of creation of the high temperature superconductors leads to finding of materials which lattices could realize the soliton' motion without destruction. These materials should be created using the technology of quantum dots. Key words: Foundations of the theory of transport processes; The theory of solitons; Generalized hydrodynamic equations; Foundations of quantum mechanics; high temperature superconductivity.

  20. Automatic HTS force measurement instrument

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sanders, Scott T. (Valparaiso, IN); Niemann, Ralph C. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for measuring the levitation force of a high temperature superconductor sample with respect to a reference magnet includes a receptacle for holding several high temperature superconductor samples each cooled to superconducting temperature. A rotatable carousel successively locates a selected one of the high temperature superconductor samples in registry with the reference magnet. Mechanism varies the distance between one of the high temperature superconductor samples and the reference magnet, and a sensor measures levitation force of the sample as a function of the distance between the reference magnet and the sample. A method is also disclosed.

  1. Automatic HTS force measurement instrument

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sanders, S.T.; Niemann, R.C.

    1999-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A device is disclosed for measuring the levitation force of a high temperature superconductor sample with respect to a reference magnet includes a receptacle for holding several high temperature superconductor samples each cooled to superconducting temperature. A rotatable carousel successively locates a selected one of the high temperature superconductor samples in registry with the reference magnet. Mechanism varies the distance between one of the high temperature superconductor samples and the reference magnet, and a sensor measures levitation force of the sample as a function of the distance between the reference magnet and the sample. A method is also disclosed. 3 figs.

  2. Transport AC loss in high temperature superconducting coils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ainslie, Mark

    2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    be modelled. Using the original measured properties of the superconducting tape, there is an order of magnitude difference between the experiment and model. The properties of the superconductor can degrade during the winding and cooling processes, and a...

  3. Passive Superconducting Flux Conservers for Rotating-Magnetic-Field-Driven Field-Reversed Configurations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. Oz, C.E. Myers, M.R. Edwards, B. Berlinger, A. Brooks, and S.A. Cohen

    2011-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Princeton Field-Reversed Configuration (PFRC) experiment employs an odd-parity rotating magnetic field (RMFo) current drive and plasma heating system to form and sustain high-? plasmas. For radial confinement, an array of coaxial, internal, passive, flux-conserving (FC) rings applies magnetic pressure to the plasma while still allowing radio-frequency RMFo from external coils to reach the plasma. The 3 ms pulse duration of the present experiment is limited by the skin time (?fc) of its room-temperature copper FC rings. To explore plasma phenomena with longer characteristic times, the pulse duration of the next-generation PFRC-2 device will exceed 100 ms, necessitating FC rings with (?fc > 300 ms. In this paper we review the physics of internal, discrete, passive FCs and describe the evolution of the PFRC's FC array. We then detail new experiments that have produced higher performance FC rings that contain embedded high-temperature superconducting (HTS) tapes. Several HTS tape winding configurations have been studied and a wide range of extended skin times, from 0.4 s to over 103 s, has been achieved. The new FC rings must carry up to 3 kA of current to balance the expected PFRC-2 plasma pressure, so the dependence of the HTS-FC critical current on the winding configuration and temperature was also studied. From these experiments, the key HTS-FC design considerations have been identified and HTS-FC rings with the desired performance characteristics have been produced.

  4. Using inhomogeneity to raise the superconducting critical temperature in a two-dimensional Y. L. Loh and E. W. Carlson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlson, Erica

    Using inhomogeneity to raise the superconducting critical temperature in a two-dimensional XY model, USA Received 5 February 2007; published 27 April 2007 Superconductors with low superfluid density properties such as superconductivity. That is, does inhomogeneity help or harm superconductivity

  5. High-field magnets using high-critical-temperature superconducting thin films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mitlitsky, Fred (Livermore, CA); Hoard, Ronald W. (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-field magnets fabricated from high-critical-temperature superconducting ceramic (HTSC) thin films which can generate fields greater than 4 Tesla. The high-field magnets are made of stackable disk-shaped substrates coated with HTSC thin films, and involves maximizing the critical current density, superconducting film thickness, number of superconducting layers per substrate, substrate diameter, and number of substrates while minimizing substrate thickness. The HTSC thin films are deposited on one or both sides of the substrates in a spiral configuration with variable line widths to increase the field.

  6. High-field magnets using high-critical-temperature superconducting thin films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mitlitsky, F.; Hoard, R.W.

    1994-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    High-field magnets fabricated from high-critical-temperature superconducting ceramic (HTSC) thin films which can generate fields greater than 4 Tesla are disclosed. The high-field magnets are made of stackable disk-shaped substrates coated with HTSC thin films, and involves maximizing the critical current density, superconducting film thickness, number of superconducting layers per substrate, substrate diameter, and number of substrates while minimizing substrate thickness. The HTSC thin films are deposited on one or both sides of the substrates in a spiral configuration with variable line widths to increase the field. 4 figures.

  7. A design flux injector for NMR superconducting magnets : results of operation with superconducting insert cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mai, Rocky D. (Rocky Dikang)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been known for some time that high-temperature superconductors (HTS) are critical for the construction of NMR magnets generating 1 GHz and above. Such systems generally require an HTS insert to be placed in the inner ...

  8. Deformation processing of HTS wire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bingert, J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1994-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods to understand, control, and optimize deformation processing of HTS wire are outlined. Topics discussed include: technical progress, deformation processing effects on HTS - core uniformity in composite tapes, effects of rolling on tapes, deformation process modeling, channel die powder compaction stress-strain data, microhardness versus rolling reduction, minimum bifurcation strain versus material state, roll gap geometries for large versus small rolls, interactions, hydrostatic extrusion, and tensile properties.

  9. HTS power leads for the BTEV interaction region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feher, S.; Carcagno, R.; Orris, D.; Page, T.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Rabehl, R.; Sylvester, C.; Tartaglia, M.; Tompkins, J.C.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new Interaction Region (IR) for the BTEV experiment was planned to be built at Fermilab. This IR would have required new superconducting quadrupole magnets and many additional power circuits for their operation. The new ''low beta'' quadrupole magnet design was based upon the Fermilab LHC quadrupole design, and would have operated at 9.56 kA in 4.5 K liquid helium. The use of conventional power leads for these circuits would have required substantially more helium for cooling than is available from the cryogenic plant, which is already operating close to its limit. To decrease the heat load and helium cooling demands, the use of HTS power leads was necessary. In developing specifications for HTS leads for the BTEV interaction region, several 6 kA HTS leads produced by American Superconductor Corporation (ASC) have been tested at over-current conditions. Final design requirements were to be based on these test results. This paper summarizes the test results and describes the design requirements for the 9.65 kA HTS power leads.

  10. ORNL/HTSPC-16 ORNL Superconducting Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ORNL/HTSPC-16 ORNL Superconducting Technology Program for Electric Power Systems Annual Report government or any agency thereof. #12;ORNL/HTSPC-16 ORNL SUPERCONDUCTING TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM FOR ELECTRIC ................................................................ 1-1 1.1 Ultera/ORNL HTS Cable Superconductivity Partnership with Industry (SPI

  11. The Progress on Low-Cost, High-Quality, High-Temperature Superconducting Tapes Deposited by the Combustion Chemical Vapor Deposition Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shoup, S.S.; White, M.K.; Krebs, S.L.; Darnell, N.; King, A.C.; Mattox, D.S.; Campbell, I.H.; Marken, K.R.; Hong, S.; Czabaj, B.; Paranthaman, M.; Christen, H.M.; Zhai, H.-Y. Specht, E.

    2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The innovative Combustion Chemical Vapor Deposition (CCVD) process is a non-vacuum technique that is being investigated to enable next generation products in several application areas including high-temperature superconductors (HTS). In combination with the Rolling Assisted Biaxially Textured Substrate (RABiTS) technology, the CCVD process has significant promise to provide low-cost, high-quality lengths of YBCO coated conductor. Over 100 meter lengths of both Ni and Ni-W (3 at. Wt.%) substrates with a surface roughness of 12-18 nm were produced. The CCVD technology has been used to deposit both buffer layer coatings as well as YBCO superconducting layers. Buffer layer architecture of strontium titanate (SrTiO{sub 3}) and ceria (CeO{sub 2}) have been deposited by CCVD on textured nickel substrates and optimized to appropriate thicknesses and microstructures to provide templates for growing PLD YBCO with a J{sub c} of 1.1 MA/cm{sup 2} at 77 K and self-field. The CCVD buffer layers have been scaled to meter plus lengths with good epitaxial uniformity along the length. A short sample cut from one of the lengths enabled high critical current density PLD YBCO. Films of CCVD YBCO superconductors have been grown on single crystal substrates with critical current densities over 1 MA/cm{sup 2}. In addition, superconducting YBCO films with an I{sub c} of 60 A/cm-width (J{sub c} = 1.5 MA/cm{sup 2}) were grown on ORNL RABiTS (CeO{sub 2}/YSZ/Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Ni/Ni-3W) using CCVD process.

  12. Measurements of AC Losses and Current Distribution in Superconducting Cables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Doan A [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Ashworth, Stephen P [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Duckworth, Robert C [ORNL; Carter, Bill [AMSC; Fleshler, Steven [AMER Superconductor Corp, Devens, MA 01434

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents our new experimental facility and techniques to measure ac loss and current distribution between the layers for High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) cables. The facility is powered with a 45 kVA three-phase power supply which can provide three-phase currents up to 5 kA per phase via high current transformers. The system is suitable for measurements at any frequency between 20 and 500 Hz to better understand the ac loss mechanisms in HTS cables. In this paper, we will report techniques and results for ac loss measurements carried out on several HTS cables with and without an HTS shielding layer. For cables without a shielding layer, care must be taken to control the effect of the magnetic fields from return currents on loss measurements. The waveform of the axial magnetic field was also measured by a small pick-up coil placed inside a two-layer cable. The temporal current distribution between the layers can be calculated from the waveform of the axial field.

  13. Characterization of a high temperature superconducting oxide thin-film RF SQUID

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daly, K.P.; Silver, A.H.; Simon, R.W.; Platt, C.E.; Lee, A.E.; Wire, M.S.; Zimmerman, J.E.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors have successfully fabricated and operated RF SQUIDS made from thin-films of the high temperature superconducting oxide ErBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7-x/. The ideal triangular quantum interference pattern characteristic of RF SQUIDS is observed. The performance of a particular device, operating between 60 and 65K, is described in detail.

  14. HTS power lead testing at the Fermilab magnet test facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabehl, R.; Carcagno, R.; Feher, S.; Huang, Y.; Orris, D.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Sylvester, C.; Tartaglia, M.; /Fermilab

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fermilab Magnet Test Facility has tested high-temperature superconductor (HTS) power leads for cryogenic feed boxes to be placed at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) interaction regions and at the new BTeV C0 interaction region of the Fermilab Tevatron. A new test facility was designed and operated, successfully testing 20 pairs of HTS power leads for the LHC and 2 pairs of HTS power leads for the BTeV experiment. This paper describes the design and operation of the cryogenics, process controls, data acquisition, and quench management systems. Results from the facility commissioning are included, as is the performance of a new insulation method to prevent frost accumulation on the warm ends of the power leads.

  15. "Flexible aerogel as a superior thermal insulation for high temperature superconductor cable applications"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Shannon O. [Aspen Aerogel, Inc.; Demko, Jonathan A [ORNL; Tomich, A. [Aspen Aerogel, Inc.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High temperature superconducting (HTS) cables are an advanced technology that can both strengthen and improve the national electrical distribution infrastructure. HTS cables require sufficient cooling to overcome inherent low temperature heat loading. Heat loads are minimized by the use of cryogenic envelopes or cryostats. Cryostats require improvement in efficiency, reliability, and cost reduction to meet the demanding needs of HTS conductors (1G and 2G wires). Aspen Aerogels has developed a compression resistant aerogel thermal insulation package to replace compression sensitive multi-layer insulation (MLI), the incumbent thermal insulation, in flexible cryostats for HTS cables. Oak Ridge National Laboratory tested a prototype aerogel package in a lab-scale pipe apparatus to measure the rate of heat invasion. The lab-scale pipe test results of the aerogel solution will be presented and directly compared to MLI. A compatibility assessment of the aerogel material with HTS system components will also be presented. The aerogel thermal insulation solution presented will meet the demanding needs of HTS cables.

  16. Design and Development of a 100 MVA HTS Generator for Commercial Entry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2007-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2002, General Electric and the US Department of Energy (DOE) entered into a cooperative agreement for the development of a commercialized 100 MVA generator using high temperature superconductors (HTS) in the field winding. The intent of the program was to: (1) identify and develop technologies that would be needed for such a generator; (2) develop conceptual designs for generators with ratings of 100 MVA and higher using HTS technology; (3) perform proof of concept tests at the 1.5 MW level for GE's proprietary warm iron rotor HTS generator concept; and (4) design, build, and test a prototype of a commercially viable 100 MVA generator that could be placed on the power grid. This report summarizes work performed during the program and is provided as one of the final program deliverables. The design for the HTS generator was based on GE's warm iron rotor concept in which a cold HTS coil is wound around a warm magnetic iron pole. This approach for rotating HTS electrical machinery provides the efficiency benefits of the HTS technology while addressing the two most important considerations for power generators in utility applications: cost and reliability. The warm iron rotor concept uses the least amount of expensive HTS wire compared to competing concepts and builds on the very high reliability of conventional iron core stators and armature windings.

  17. Quasiparticle effective temperature in superconducting thin films illuminated at THz frequencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guruswamy, Tejas; Withington, Stafford

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The response of superconducting pair-breaking detectors is dependent on the details of the quasiparticle distribution. In Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KIDs), where both pair breaking and non-pair breaking photons are absorbed simultaneously, calculating the detector response therefore requires knowledge of the often nonequilibrium distributions. The quasiparticle effective temperature provides a good approximation to these nonequilibrium distributions. We compare an analytical expression relating absorbed power and the quasiparticle effective temperature in superconducting thin films to full solutions for the nonequilibrium distributions, and find good agreement for a range of materials, absorbed powers, photon frequencies and temperatures typical of KIDs. This analytical expression allows inclusion of nonequilibrium effects in device models without solving for the detailed distributions. We also show our calculations of the frequency dependence of the detector response are in agreement with recent experimen...

  18. Development of Strengthened Bundle High Temperature Superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lue, J.W.; Lubell, M.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Demko, J.A. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States); Tomsic, M. [Plastronic, Inc., Troy, OH (United States); Sinha, U. [Southwire Company, Carollton, GA (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In the process of developing high temperature superconducting (HTS) transmission cables, it was found that mechanical strength of the superconducting tape is the most crucial property that needs to be improved. It is also desirable to increase the current carrying capacity of the conductor so that fewer layers are needed to make the kilo-amp class cables required for electric utility usage. A process has been developed by encapsulating a stack of Bi-2223/Ag tapes with a silver or non-silver sheath to form a strengthened bundle superconductor. This process was applied to HTS tapes made by the Continuous Tube Forming and Filling (CTFF) technique pursued by Plastronic Inc. and HTS tapes obtained from other manufacturers. Conductors with a bundle of 2 to 6 HTS tapes have been made. The bundled conductor is greatly strengthened by the non-silver sheath. No superconductor degradation as compared to the sum of the original critical currents of the individual tapes was seen on the finished conductors.

  19. MOD Buffer/YBCO Approach to Fabricate Low-Cost Second Generation HTS Wires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans [ORNL; Sathyamurthy, Srivatsan [ORNL; Bhuiyan, Md S [ORNL; Martin, Patrick M [ORNL; Aytug, Tolga [ORNL; Kim, Kyunghoon [ORNL; Fayek, Mostafa [ORNL; Leonard, Keith J [ORNL; Li, Jing [ORNL; Zhang, W. [American Superconductor Corporation, Westborough, MA; Rupich, Marty [American Superconductor Corporation, Westborough, MA

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The metal organic deposition (MOD) of buffer layers on RABiTS substrates is considered a potential, low-cost approach to manufacturing high performance Second Generation (2G) high temperature superconducting (HTS) wires. The typical architecture used by American Superconductor in their 2G HTS wire consists of a Ni-W (5 at.%) substrate with a reactively sputtered Y2O3 seed layer, YSZ barrier layer and a CeO2 cap layer. This architecture supports critical currents of over 300 A/cm-width (77 K, self-field) with 0.8 mum YBCO films deposited by the TFA-MOD process. The main challenge in the development of the MOD buffers is to match or exceed the performance of the standard vacuum deposited buffer architecture. We have recently shown that the texture and properties of MOD - La2Zr2Ogamma (LZO) barrier layers can be improved by inserting a thin sputtered Y2O3 seed layer and prepared MOD deposited LZO layers followed by MOD or RF sputtered CeO2 cap layers that support MOD-YBCO films with Ic's of 200 and 255 A/cm-width, respectively. Detailed X-ray and microstructural characterizations indicated that MOD - CeO2 cap reacted completely with MOD YBCO to form BaCeOs. However, sputtered CeO2 cap/MOD YBCO interface remains clean. By further optimizing the coating conditions and reducing the heat-treatment temperatures, we have demonstrated an Ic of 336 A/cm with improved LZO layers and sputtered CeO2 cap and exceeded the performance of that of standard vacuum deposited buffers.

  20. Theory of AC Loss in Cables with 2G HTS Wire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clem, J.R.; Malozemoff, A.P.

    2009-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    While considerable work has been done to understand AC losses in power cables made of first generation (1G) high temperature superconductor (HTS) wires, use of second generation (2G) HTS wires brings in some new considerations. The high critical current density of the HTS layer 2G wire reduces the surface superconductor hysteretic losses. Instead, gap and polygonal losses, flux transfer losses in imbalanced two layer cables and ferromagnetic losses for wires with NiW substrates constitute the principal contributions. Current imbalance and losses associated with the magnetic substrate can be minimized by orienting the substrates of the inner winding inward and the outer winding outward.

  1. High-Tc superconductivity originated from strong spin-charge correlation: indication from linear temperature dependence of resistivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian De Cao

    2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Both the highest- and the linear temperature dependence of the resistivity in wide temperature range appear at the optimally doped regions of Cu-based superconductors1,2,3,4,5, and the highest- of Fe-based superconductors6,7 are also associated with the linear temperature dependence of the resistivity in normal states near superconducting states. This means that the high temperature superconductivity and the linear temperature dependence of the resistivity should be dominated by the same mechanism. This letter on theoretic calculation clearly shows that strong spin-charge correlation dominated resistivity behaves the linear temperature dependence, thus high-temperature superconductivity should be induced by strong spin-charge correlation.

  2. Narrowband high temperature superconducting receiver for low frequency radio waves

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reagor, David W. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An underground communicating device has a low-noise SQUID using high temperature superconductor components connected to detect a modulated external magnetic flux for outputting a voltage signal spectrum that is related to the varying magnetic flux. A narrow bandwidth filter may be used to select a portion of the voltage signal spectrum that is relatively free of power line noise to output a relatively low noise output signal when operating in a portion of the electromagnetic spectra where such power line noise exists. A demodulator outputs a communication signal, which may be an FM signal, indicative of a modulation on the modulated external magnetic flux.

  3. HTS wire development at Intermagnetic General Corporation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haldar, P. [Intermagnetics General Corp., Latham, NY (United States)

    1994-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The HTS wire development program at Intermagnetics General Corporation is outlined. Technical achievements in the Bi-2223, Tl-1223 and Tl-based conductor program are summarized. Long lengths of Tl-based HTS tapes with uniform transport properties have been fabricated. Multifilament samples of Tl-based HTS tapes have been fabricated for the first time. Optimization of thermomechanical processing is ongoing and weak links is still a major problem in P-I-T tapes. Future work is summarized.

  4. Ph.D. Research Projects available in the Superconductivity Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hampshire, Damian

    measurements for the first time on HTS materials. These measurements will provide the possibility-dependence of the critical current density in Nb3Sn superconducting wires - Supercond. Sci. Tech 18 (2005) S241- S252 Contact

  5. Calibration of tip and sample temperature of a scanning tunneling microscope using a superconductive sample

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stocker, Matthias; Pfeifer, Holger; Koslowski, Berndt, E-mail: berndt.koslowski@uni-ulm.de [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Ulm, D-89069 Ulm (Germany)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The temperature of the electrodes is a crucial parameter in virtually all tunneling experiments. The temperature not only controls the thermodynamic state of the electrodes but also causes thermal broadening, which limits the energy resolution. Unfortunately, the construction of many scanning tunneling microscopes inherits a weak thermal link between tip and sample in order to make one side movable. Such, the temperature of that electrode is badly defined. Here, the authors present a procedure to calibrate the tip temperature by very simple means. The authors use a superconducting sample (Nb) and a standard tip made from W. Due to the asymmetry in the density of states of the superconductor (SC)—normal metal (NM) tunneling junction, the SC temperature controls predominantly the density of states while the NM controls the thermal smearing. By numerically simulating the I-V curves and numerically optimizing the tip temperature and the SC gap width, the tip temperature can be accurately deduced if the sample temperature is known or measureable. In our case, the temperature dependence of the SC gap may serve as a temperature sensor, leading to an accurate NM temperature even if the SC temperature is unknown.

  6. Method and apparatus for forming high-critical-temperature superconducting layers on flat and/or elongated substrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ciszek, T.F.

    1994-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An elongated, flexible superconductive wire or strip is fabricated by pulling it through and out of a melt of metal oxide material at a rate conducive to forming a crystalline coating of superconductive metal oxide material on an elongated, flexible substrate wire or strip. A coating of crystalline superconductive material, such as Bi[sub 2]Sr[sub 2]CaCu[sub 2]O[sub 8], is annealed to effect conductive contact between adjacent crystalline structures in the coating material, which is then cooled to room temperature. The container for the melt can accommodate continuous passage of the substrate through the melt. Also, a second pass-through container can be used to simultaneously anneal and overcoat the superconductive coating with a hot metallic material, such as silver or silver alloy. A hollow, elongated tube casting method of forming an elongated, flexible superconductive wire includes drawing the melt by differential pressure into a heated tubular substrate. 8 figures.

  7. R AND D FOR ACCELERATOR MAGNETS WITH REACT AND WIND HIGH TEMPERATURE SUPERCONDUCTORS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GUPTA,R.; ANERELLA,M.; COZZOLINO,J.; ESCALLIER,J.; GANETIS,G.; GHOSH,A.; HARRISON,M.; JAIN,A.; MARONE,A.; MURATORE,J.; PARKER,B.; SAMPSON,W.; WANDERER,P.

    2001-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) have the potential to change the design and operation of future particle accelerators beginning with the design of high performance interaction regions. HTS offers two distinct advantages over conventional Low Temperature Superconductors (LTS)--they retain a large fraction of their current carrying capacity (a) at high fields and (b) at elevated temperatures. The Superconducting Magnet Division at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has embarked on a new R&D program for developing technology needed for building accelerator magnets with HTS. We have adopted a ''React & Wind'' approach to deal with the challenges associated with the demanding requirements of the reaction process. We have developed several ''conductor friendly'' designs to deal with the challenges associated with the brittle nature of HTS. We have instituted a rapid turn around program to understand and to develop this new technology in an experimental fashion. Several R&D coils and magnets with HTS tapes and ''Rutherford'' cables have been built and tested. We have recently performed field quality measurements to investigate issues related to the persistent currents. In this paper, we report the results to date and plans and possibilities for the future.

  8. Development of high temperature superconductors for magnetic field applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larbalestier, D.C.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The key requirement for magnetic field applications of high temperature superconductor (HTS) materials is to have conductors with high transport critical current density available for magnet builders. After 3 or 4 years of being without any such object, conductor makers have had recent success in producing simple conductor prototypes. These have permitted the construction of simple HTS magnets having self fields exceeding 1 tesla at 4K. Thus the scientific feasibility of making powerful HTS magnets has been demonstrated. Attention to the technological aspects of making HTS conductors for magnets with strong flux pinning and reduced superconducting granularity is now sensible and attractive. However, extrinsic defects such as filament sausaging, cracking, misaligned grains and other perturbation to long range current flow must be controlled at a low level if the benefit of intrinsic improvements to the critical current density is to be maintained in the conductor form. Due to the great complexity of the HTS materials, there is sometimes confusion as to whether a given sample has an intrinsically or extrinsically limited critical current density. Systematic microstructure variation experiments and resistive transition analysis are shown to be particularly helpful in this phase of conductor development.

  9. Superconductive wire

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korzekwa, David A. (Los Alamos, NM); Bingert, John F. (Jemez Springs, NM); Peterson, Dean E. (Los Alamos, NM); Sheinberg, Haskell (Santa Fe, NM)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A superconductive article is made by inserting a rigid mandrel into an internal cavity of a first metallic tube, said tube having an interior surface and an exterior surface, said interior surface defining the interior cavity, forming a layer of a superconductive material or superconductive precursor upon the exterior surface of said first metallic tube, machining the layer of superconductive material or superconductive precursor to a predetermined diameter to form an intermediate article configured for insertion into a second metallic tube having an interior diameter corresponding to the predetermined diameter, inserting the machined intermediate article into a second metallic tube having an internal diameter corresponding to the predetermined diameter of the intermediate article to form a composite intermediate article, reducing or ironing the composite intermediate article to a predetermined cross-sectional diameter, and sintering the reduced or ironed composite intermediate article at temperatures and for time sufficient for the superconductive material or superconductive precursor to exhibit superconductivity.

  10. Structure for HTS composite conductors and the manufacture of same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cotton, J.D.; Riley, G.N. Jr.

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A superconducting oxide composite structure including a superconducting oxide member, a metal layer surrounding the superconducting oxide member, and an insulating layer of a complex oxide formed in situ adjacent to the superconducting oxide member and the metal layer is provided together with a method of forming such a superconducting oxide composite structure including encapsulating a superconducting oxide member or precursor within a metal matrix layer from the group of: (1) a reactive metal sheath adjacent to the superconducting oxide member or precursor, the reactive metal sheath surrounded by a second metal layer or (2) an alloy containing a reactive metal; to form an intermediate product, and, heating the intermediate product at temperatures and for time sufficient to form an insulating layer of a complex oxide in situ, the insulating layer to the superconducting oxide member or precursor and the metal matrix layer. 10 figs.

  11. Structure for hts composite conductors and the manufacture of same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cotton, James D. (Seattle, WA); Riley, Jr., Gilbert Neal (Marlborough, MA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A superconducting oxide composite structure including a superconducting oxide member, a metal layer surrounding the superconducting oxide member, and an insulating layer of a complex oxide formed in situ adjacent to the superconducting oxide member and the metal layer is provided together with a method of forming such a superconducting oxide composite structure including encapsulating a superconducting oxide member or precursor within a metal matrix layer from the group of: (i) a reactive metal sheath adjacent to the superconducting oxide member or precursor, the reactive metal sheath surrounded by a second metal layer or (ii) an alloy containing a reactive metal; to form an intermediate product, and, heating the intermediate product at temperatures and for time sufficient to form an insulating layer of a complex oxide in situ, the insulating layer to the superconducting oxide member or precursor and the metal matrix layer.

  12. Tunneling study on HTS -digest version-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tonouchi, Masayoshi

    Tunneling study on HTS -digest version- Tunneling study on HTS -digest version- #12;Type contact tunneling #12;Tunneling spectra observed with different types of probes. (a):600Ê mÓ Pt wire, (b):200Ê mÓ Ag wire of coil shaped and (c):30Ê mÓ Au wire probes. The corresponding surface SEM image were

  13. Influence of Proton Irradiation on Angular Dependence of Second Generation (2G)HTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiroyanagi, Y.; Greene, G.; Gupta, R.; Sampson, W.

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) the quadrupoles in the fragment separator are exposed to very high radiation and heat loads. High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) are a good candidate for these magnets because they can be used at {approx}30-50 K and tolerate higher heat generation than Nb-Ti magnets. Radiation damage studies of HTS wires are crucial to ensure that they will survive in a high radiation environment. HTS wires from two vendors were studied. Samples of 2G HTS wires from SuperPower and American Superconductor (ASC) were irradiated with a 42 {mu}A, 142 MeV proton beam from the Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer (BLIP). The angular dependence of the critical current was measured in magnetic fields at 77K.

  14. Low temperature laser scanning microscopy of a superconducting radio-frequency cavity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi; Baldwin, Charles; Cheng, Guangfeng; Flood, Roger; Jordan, Kevin; Kneisel, Peter; Morrone, Michael; Nemes, George; Turlington, Larry; Wang, Haipeng; Wilson, Katherine

    2012-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus was developed to obtain, for the first time, 2D maps of the surface resistance of the inner surface of an operating superconducting radio-frequency niobium cavity by a low-temperature laser scanning microscopy technique. This allows identifying non-uniformities of the surface resistance with a spatial resolution of about one order of magnitude better than with earlier methods. A signal-to-noise ratio of about 10 dB was obtained with 240 mW laser power and 1 Hz modulation frequency. The various components of the apparatus, the experimental procedure and results are discussed in details in this contribution.

  15. On the Mechanism of Above Room Temperature Superconductivity and Superfluidity by Relativistic Quantum Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reginald B. Little

    2014-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A comprehensive theory of superconductivity (SC) and superfluidity (SF) is presented of new types III and IV at temperatures into millions of degrees involving phase transitions of fermions in heat reservoirs to form general relativistic triple quasi-particles of 3 fermions interacting to boson-fermion pairs. Types 0, I, and II SC/SF are deduced from such triples as: thermally dressed, relativistic fermionic vortices; spin coupled, dressed, fermionic vortical pairs (diamagnetic bosons); and spinrevorbitally coupled, dressed fermionic, vortical pairs (ferromagnetic bosons). All known SC, SF and trends in critical temperatures (Tc) are thereby explained. The recently observed SC/SF in nano-graphene systems is explained. The above room temperature SC/SF is predicted and modeled by transformations of intense thermal boson populations of heat reservoirs to relativistic mass, weight, spin and magnetism for further reasoning over compression to electricity, weak phenomena and strong phenomena for connecting general relativism and quantum mechanics.

  16. On the Mechanism of Above Room Temperature Superconductivity and Superfluidity by Relativistic Quantum Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reginald B. Little

    2015-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A comprehensive theory of superconductivity (SC) and superfluidity (SF) is presented of new types III and IV at temperatures into millions of degrees involving phase transitions of fermions in heat reservoirs to form general relativistic triple quasi-particles of 3 fermions interacting to boson-fermion pairs. Types 0, I, and II SC/SF are deduced from such triples as: thermally dressed, relativistic fermionic vortices; spin coupled, dressed, fermionic vortical pairs (diamagnetic bosons); and spinrevorbitally coupled, dressed fermionic, vortical pairs (ferromagnetic bosons). All known SC, SF and trends in critical temperatures (Tc) are thereby explained. The recently observed SC/SF in nano-graphene systems is explained. The above room temperature SC/SF is predicted and modeled by transformations of intense thermal boson populations of heat reservoirs to relativistic mass, weight, spin and magnetism for further reasoning over compression to electricity, weak phenomena and strong phenomena for connecting general relativism and quantum mechanics.

  17. Ceramic superconductor/metal composite materials employing the superconducting proximity effect

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcomb, Matthew J. (Manhattan Beach, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Superconducting composite materials having particles of superconducting material disposed in a metal matrix material with a high electron-boson coupling coefficient (.lambda.). The superconducting particles can comprise any type of superconductor including Laves phase materials, Chevrel phase materials, A15 compounds, and perovskite cuprate ceramics. The particles preferably have dimensions of about 10-500 nanometers. The particles preferably have dimensions larger than the superconducting coherence length of the superconducting material. The metal matrix material has a .lambda. greater than 0.2, preferably the .lambda. is much higher than 0.2. The metal matrix material is a good proximity superconductor due to its high .lambda.. When cooled, the superconductor particles cause the metal matrix material to become superconducting due to the proximity effect. In cases where the particles and the metal matrix material are chemically incompatible (i.e., reactive in a way that destroys superconductivity), the particles are provided with a thin protective metal coating. The coating is chemically compatible with the particles and metal matrix material. High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) cuprate ceramic particles are reactive and therefore require a coating of a noble metal resistant to oxidation (e.g., silver, gold). The proximity effect extends through the metal coating. With certain superconductors, non-noble metals can be used for the coating.

  18. Field Demonstration of a 24-kV Superconducting Cable at Detroit Edison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelley, Nathan; Corsaro, Pietro

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Customer acceptance of high temperature superconducting (HTS) cable technology requires a substantial field demonstration illustrating both the system's technical capabilities and its suitability for installation and operation within the utility environment. In this project, the world's first underground installation of an HTS cable using existing ductwork, a 120 meter demonstration cable circuit was designed and installed between the 24 kV bus distribution bus and a 120 kV-24 kV transformer at Detroit Edison's Frisbie substation. The system incorporated cables, accessories, a refrigeration system, and control instrumentation. Although the system was never put in operation because of problems with leaks in the cryostat, the project significantly advanced the state-of-the-art in the design and implementation of Warm Dielectric cable systems in substation applications. Lessons learned in this project are already being incorporated in several ongoing demonstration projects.

  19. HTS current lead using a composite heat pipe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daugherty, M.A.; Prenger, F.C.; Hill, D.D.; Daney, D.E.; Woloshun, K.A.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the design and fabrication of HTS current leads being built by Los Alamos to supply power to a demonstration HTS coil which will operate in a vacuum cooled by a cryocooler. Because vapor cooling is not an option for this application the leads must be entirely conductively cooled. In the design of HTS current leads for this type of application, it is desirable to intercept part of the heat load at an intermediate temperature. This thermal intercept or connection must be electrically insulating but thermally conductive, two mutually exclusive properties of most candidate solid materials. To achieve this end we incorporate a composite nitrogen heat pipe, constructed of conducting and non-conducting materials, to provide efficient thermal communication and simultaneously, electrical isolation between the lead and the intermediate temperature heat sink. Another important feature of the current lead design is the use of high Jc thick film superconductors deposited on a non-conducting substrate to reduce the conductive heat leak through the lower portion of the lead. Two flexible electrical conductors are incorporated to accommodate handling, assembly and the dissimilar expansion coefficients of the various materials.

  20. Superconducting vortex pinning with artificially prepared nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Yaniv Jacob

    K. Schuller, “Enhanced superconducting vortex pinning withat T/Tc = 0.99 of a superconducting Nb thin film on aof the triangles. The superconducting critical temperature

  1. High-Temperature Superconducting Cable Testing Gregory S. Boebinger, National High Magnetic Field Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    and need for improvement. A 20-strand cable sample was wound into a 12-turn coil, which is also a first of HTS coil technology needed, for example, for the design of a 60 T DC hybrid magnet at the MagLab PhD student who recently formed a company to develop his ideas for making cables out of REBCO coated

  2. Method for determining hydrogen mobility as a function of temperature in superconducting niobium cavities

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    May, Robert (Virginia Beach, VA)

    2008-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for determining the mobility of hydrogen as a function of temperature in superconducting niobium cavities comprising: 1) heating a cavity under test to remove free hydrogen; 2) introducing hydrogen-3 gas into the cavity; 3) cooling the cavity to allow absorption of hydrogen-3; and 4) measuring the amount of hydrogen-3 by: a) cooling the cavity to about 4.degree. K while flowing a known and regulated amount of inert carrier gas such as argon or helium into the cavity; b) allowing the cavity to warm at a stable rate from 4.degree. K to room temperature as it leaves the chamber; and c) directing the exit gas to an ion chamber radiation detector.

  3. Method for determining temperatures and heat transfer coefficients with a superconductive sample

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gentile, D.; Hassenzahl, W.; Polak, M.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The method that is described here uses the current-sharing characteristic of a copper-stabilized, superconductive NbTi wire to determine the temperature. The measurements were made for magnetic fields up to 6 T and the precision actually attained with this method is about 0.1 K. It is an improvement over one that has been used at 4.2 K to measure transient heat transfer in that all the parameters of the sample are well known and the current in the sample is measured directly. The response time of the probe is less than 5 ..mu..s and it has been used to measure temperatures during heat pulses as short as 20 ..mu..s. Temperature measurements between 1.6 and 8.5 K are described. An accurate formula based on the current and electric field along the sample has been developed for temperatures between 2.5 K and the critical temperature of the conductor, which, of course, depends on the applied field. Also described is a graphical method that must be used below 2.5 K, where the critical current is not a linear function of temperature.

  4. Method and apparatus for connecting high voltage leads to a high temperature super-conducting transformer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golner, Thomas M.; Mehta, Shirish P.

    2005-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for connecting high voltage leads to a super-conducting transformer is provided that includes a first super-conducting coil set, a second super-conducting coil set, and a third super-conducting coil set. The first, second and third super-conducting coil sets are connected via an insulated interconnect system that includes insulated conductors and insulated connectors that are utilized to connect the first, second, and third super-conducting coil sets to the high voltage leads.

  5. LANL: Superconductivity Technology Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NEWS LIBRARY JOBS Search Materials Physics & Applications: STC STC Home OUR FOCUS HTS Physics HTS Materials Development HTS Materials Processing Power Applications...

  6. Restoration and testing of an HTS fault current controller

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waynert, J. A. (Joseph A.); Boenig, H. (Heinrich E.); Mielke, C. H. (Charles H.); Willis, J. O. (Jeffrey O.); Burley, B. L. (Burt L.)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A three-phase, 1200 A, 12.5 kV fault current controller using three HTS 4 mH coils, was built by industry and tested in 1999 at the Center Substation of Southern California Edison in Norwalk, CA. During the testing, it appeared that each of the three single-phase units had experienced a voltage breakdown, one externally and two internally. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was asked by DOE to restore the operation of the fault current controller provided the HTS coils had not been damaged during the initial substation tests. When the internally-failed coil vacuum vessels were opened it became evident that in these two vessels, a flashover had occurred at the high voltage bus section leading to the terminals of the superconducting coil. An investigation into the failure mechanism resulted in six possible causes for the flashover. Based on these causes, the high voltage bus was completely redesigned. Single-phase tests were successfully performed on the modified unit at a 13.7 kV LANL substation. This paper presents the postulated voltage flashover failure mechanisms, the new high voltage bus design which mitigates the failure mechanisms, the sequence of tests used to validate the new design, and finally, the results of variable load and short-circuit tests with the single-phase unit operating on the LANL 13.7 kV substation.

  7. Superconducting magnetic Wollaston prism for neutron spin encoding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, F., E-mail: fankli@indiana.edu; Parnell, S. R.; Wang, T.; Baxter, D. V. [Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47408 (United States)] [Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47408 (United States); Hamilton, W. A. [Neutron Sciences Directorate, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States)] [Neutron Sciences Directorate, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States); Maranville, B. B. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States)] [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Semerad, R. [Ceraco Ceramic Coating GmbH, Ismaning 85737 (Germany)] [Ceraco Ceramic Coating GmbH, Ismaning 85737 (Germany); Cremer, J. T. [Adelphi Technology Inc., Redwood City, California 94063 (United States)] [Adelphi Technology Inc., Redwood City, California 94063 (United States); Pynn, R. [Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47408 (United States) [Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47408 (United States); Neutron Sciences Directorate, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A magnetic Wollaston prism can spatially split a polarized neutron beam into two beams with different neutron spin states, in a manner analogous to an optical Wollaston prism. Such a Wollaston prism can be used to encode the trajectory of neutrons into the Larmor phase associated with their spin degree of freedom. This encoding can be used for neutron phase-contrast radiography and in spin echo scattering angle measurement (SESAME). In this paper, we show that magnetic Wollaston prisms with highly uniform magnetic fields and low Larmor phase aberration can be constructed to preserve neutron polarization using high temperature superconducting (HTS) materials. The Meissner effect of HTS films is used to confine magnetic fields produced electromagnetically by current-carrying HTS tape wound on suitably shaped soft iron pole pieces. The device is cooled to ?30 K by a closed cycle refrigerator, eliminating the need to replenish liquid cryogens and greatly simplifying operation and maintenance. A HTS film ensures that the magnetic field transition within the prism is sharp, well-defined, and planar due to the Meissner effect. The spin transport efficiency across the device was measured to be ?98.5% independent of neutron wavelength and energizing current. The position-dependent Larmor phase of neutron spins was measured at the NIST Center for Neutron Research facility and found to agree well with detailed simulations. The phase varies linearly with horizontal position, as required, and the neutron beam shows little depolarization. Consequently, the device has advantages over existing devices with similar functionality and provides the capability for a large neutron beam (20 mm × 30 mm) and an increase in length scales accessible to SESAME to beyond 10 ?m. With further improvements of the external coupling guide field in the prototype device, a larger neutron beam could be employed.

  8. Electrical and Mechanical Characterizations of Nanocomposite Insulation for HTS Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, J K [Composite Technology Development, Inc., Lafayette, CO; Fabian, Paul E [Composite Technology Development, Inc., Lafayette, CO; Hooker, M W [Composite Technology Development, Inc., Lafayette, CO; Lizotte, M J [Composite Technology Development, Inc., Lafayette, CO; Tuncer, Enis [ORNL; Sauers, Isidor [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As HTS wire technology continues to advance, a critical need has emerged for dielectric materials that can be used in superconducting components such as terminations, fault current limiters, transformers, and motors. To address this need, CTD is developing nanocomposite insulations based on epoxy and benzoxazine chemistries. Depending on part geometry, some processing methods are more efficient than others. For this reason, CTD is investigating both fiber-reinforced and filled resin systems for use in these applications. A thorough set of electrical testing including AC breakdown, breakdown as a function of thickness, and flashover shows promising performance characteristics. In addition, mechanical testing (short beam shear and compression) indicate that these new materials to have as good or better performance than G10.

  9. Development of a cryogenic induction motor for use with a superconducting magnetic bearing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxley, Paul

    -tem- perature superconductor (HTS) to eliminate any stick-slip friction between the rotor and the stator distance between the magnet and the HTS is 5.5 mm. More details about the SMB are given by Hanany et al. [2 clad NbTi superconducting wire with diameter of 0.13 mm. The coils are driven with 120° phase

  10. On the Search for Higher Temperature Superconductors for Power Grid Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud 11, Université de

    availability of HTS wire, transmission and distribution HTS power cables have been successfully tested on three Consultant to AMSC, 64 Jackson Rd, Devens MA 01434 USA High temperature superconductors (HTS) such as YBCO continents, and HTS fault current limiters are starting to be introduced commercially. These applications

  11. Electromechanical characterization of superconducting wires and tapes at 77 K

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bjoerstad, Roger

    The strain dependency of the critical current in state-of-the-art cuprate high-temperature superconductors (HTS) has been characterized. A universal test machine (UTM) combined with a critical current measurement system has been used to characterize the mechanical and the superconducting properties of conductors immersed in an open liquid nitrogen dewar. A set-up has been developed in order to perform simultaneous measurements of the superconductor lattice parameter changes, critical current, as well as the stress and strain at 77 K in self-field in a high energy synchrotron beamline. The HTS tapes and wires studied were based on YBCO, Bi-2223 and Bi-2212. The YBCO tapes were produced by SuperPower and American Superconductors (AMSC). Two types of Bi-2223 tapes, HT and G, were produced by Sumitomo Electric Industries (SEI). The Bi-2212 wires were produced by Oxford Superconducting Technology (OST) using Nexans granulate precursor, before undergoing a specialized over pressure (OP) processing and heat treatmen...

  12. Thermodynamic Critical Field and Superconducting Fluctuation of Vortices for High Temperature Cuprate Superconductor: La-214

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas K. Finnemore

    2001-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermodynamics has been studied systematically for the high temperature cuprate superconductor La{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4-{delta}}, La-214, in the entire superconductive region from strongly underdoped to strongly overdoped regimes. Magnetization studies with H {parallel} c have been made in order to investigate the changes in free energy of the system as the number of carriers is reduced. Above the superconducting transition temperature, the normal-state magnetization exhibits a two-dimensional Heisenberg antiferromagnetic behavior. Below T{sub c}, magnetization data are thermodynamically reversible over large portions of the H-T plane, so the free energy is well defined in these regions. As the Sr concentration is varied over the wide range from 0.060 (strongly underdoped) to 0.234 (strongly overdoped), the free energy change goes through a maximum at the optimum doped in a manner similar to the T{sub c0} vs. x curve. The density of states, N(0), remains nearly constant in the overdoped and optimum doped regimes, taking a broad maximum around x = 0.188, and then drops abruptly towards zero in the underdoped regime. The La{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4} (La-214) system displays the fluctuating vortex behavior with the characteristic of either 2D or 3D fluctuations as indicated by clearly identifiable crossing points T* close to T{sub c}. The dimensional character of the fluctuations depends on both applied magnetic fields and the density of charge carriers. The dimensional crossover from 2D to 3D occurs in the strongly underdoped regime when the c-axis coherence distance {xi}{sub c} becomes comparable to the spacing between adjacent CuO{sub 2} layers s at sufficiently high magnetic field near H{sub c2}.

  13. Thermodynamic Critical Field and Superconducting Fluctuation of Vortices for High Temperature Cuprate Superconductor: La-214

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yung Moo Huh

    2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermodynamics has been studied systematically for the high temperature cuprate superconductor La{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4-{delta}}, La-214, in the entire superconductive region from strongly underdoped to strongly overdoped regimes. Magnetization studies with H{parallel}c have been made in order to investigate the changes in free energy of the system as the number of carriers is reduced. Above the superconducting transition temperature, the normal-state magnetization exhibits a two-dimensional Heisenberg antiferromagnetic behavior. Below T{sub c}, magnetization data are thermodynamically reversible over large portions of the H-T plane, so the free energy is well defined in these regions. As the Sr concentration is varied over the wide range from 0.060 (strongly underdoped) to 0.234 (strongly overdoped), the free energy change goes through a maximum at the optimum doped in a manner similar to the T{sub c0} vs. x curve. The density of states, N(0), remains nearly constant in the overdoped and optimum doped regimes, taking a broad maximum around x = 0.188, and then drops abruptly towards zero in the underdoped regime. The La{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4} (La-214) system displays the fluctuating vortex behavior with the characteristic of either 2D or 3D fluctuations as indicated by clearly identifiable crossing points T* close to T{sub c}. The dimensional character of the fluctuations depends on both applied magnetic fields and the density of charge carriers. The dimensional crossover from 2D to 3D occurs in the strongly underdoped regime when the c-axis coherence distance {zeta}{sub c} becomes comparable to the spacing between adjacent CuO{sub 2} layers s at sufficiently high magnetic fields near H{sub c2}.

  14. Effect of temperature on phonon contribution to Green function of high-temperature superconducting cuprates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korneeva, L. A., E-mail: korneeva_mila@mail.ru; Mazur, E. A. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Russian Federation)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The phonon contribution to the nodal electron Green function in cuprates is considered. It is shown that the temperature dependence of the real part of the self-energy component of the Green function for cuprates with a hole doping level close to optimal is described by the electron-phonon interaction in the framework of the extended Eliashberg model.

  15. Nanostructures of Boron, Carbon and Magnesium Diboride for High Temperature Superconductivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pfefferle, Lisa [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Fang, Fang [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Iyyamperumal, Eswarmoorthi [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Keskar, Gayatri [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Direct fabrication of MgxBy nanostructures is achieved by employing metal (Ni,Mg) incorporated MCM-41 in the Hybrid Physical-Chemical Vapor Deposition (HPCVD) reaction. Different reaction conditions are tested to optimize the fabrication process. TEM analysis shows the fabrication of MgxBy nanostructures starting at the reaction temperature of 600oC, with the yield of the nanostructures increasing with increasing reaction temperature. The as-synthesized MgxBy nanostructures have the diameters in the range of 3-5nm, which do not increase with the reaction temperature consistent with templated synthesis. EELS analysis of the template removed nanostructures confirms the existence of B and Mg with possible contamination of Si and O. NEXAFS and Raman spectroscopy analysis suggested a concentric layer-by-layer MgxBy nanowire/nanotube growth model for our as-synthesized nanostructures. Ni k-edge XAS indicates that the formation of MgNi alloy particles is important for the Vapor-Liquid-Solid (VLS) growth of MgxBy nanostructures with fine diameters, and the presence of Mg vapor not just Mg in the catalyst is crucial for the formation of Ni-Mg clusters. Physical templating by the MCM-41 pores was shown to confine the diameter of the nanostructures. DC magnetization measurements indicate possible superconductive behaviors in the as-synthesized samples.

  16. Accelerator Quality HTS Dipole Magnet Demonstrator Designs for the EuCARD-2, 5 Tesla 40 mm Clear Aperture Magnet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, GA; Ballarino, A; Bottura, L; Chouika, N; Clement, S; Datskov, V; Fajardo, L; Fleiter, J; Gauthier, R; Gentini, L; Lambert, L; Lopes, M; Perez, JC; de Rijk, G; Rijllart, A; Rossi, L; ten Kate, H; Durante, M; Fazilleau, P; Lorin, C; Härö, E; Stenvall, A; Caspi, S; Marchevsky, M; Goldacker, W; Kario, A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Future high-energy accelerators will need very high magnetic fields in the range of 20 T. The EuCARD-2 work-package-10 is a collaborative push to take HTS materials into an accelerator quality demonstrator magnet. The demonstrator will produce 5 T standalone and between 17 T and 20 T, when inserted into the 100 mm aperture of Fresca-2 high field out-sert magnet. The HTS magnet will demonstrate the field strength and field quality that can be achieved. An effective quench detection and protection system will have to be developed to operate with the HTS superconducting materials. This paper presents a ReBCO magnet design using multi strand Roebel cable that develops a stand-alone field of 5 T in a 40 mm clear aperture and discusses the challenges associated with good field quality using this type of material. A selection of magnet designs is presented as result of a first phase of development.

  17. Accelerator Quality HTS Dipole Magnet Demonstrator designs for the EuCARD-2, 5 Tesla 40 mm Clear Aperture Magnet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, G; Ballarino, A; Bottura, L; Chouika, N; Clement, S; Datskov, V; Fajardo, L; Fleiter, J; Gauthier, R; Lambert, L; Lopes, M; Perez, J; DeRijk, G; Rijllart, A; Rossi, L; Ten Kate, H; Durante, M; Fazilleau, P; Lorin, C; Haro, E; Stenvall, A; Caspi, S; Marchevsky, M; Goldacker, W; Kario, A

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Future high-energy accelerators will need very high magnetic fields in the range of 20 T. The EuCARD-2 work-package-10 is a collaborative push to take HTS materials into an accelerator quality demonstrator magnet. The demonstrator will produce 5 T standalone and between 17 T and 20 T, when inserted into the 100 mm aperture of Fresca-2 high field out-sert magnet. The HTS magnet will demonstrate the field strength and field quality that can be achieved. An effective quench detection and protection system will have to be developed to operate with the HTS superconducting materials. This paper presents a ReBCO magnet design using multi strand Roebel cable that develops a stand-alone field of 5 T in a 40 mm clear aperture and discusses the challenges associated with good field quality using this type of material. A selection of magnet designs is presented as result of a first phase of development.

  18. From Standard Model of particle physics to room-temperature superconductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. E. Volovik

    2015-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Topological media are gapped or gapless fermionic systems, whose properties are protected by topology, and thus are robust to deformations of parameters of the system and generic. We discuss the class of gapless topological media, which contains the quantum vacuum of Standard Model in its symmetric phase, and condensed matter systems with zeroes in the energy spectrum, which form Fermi surfaces, Weyl and Dirac points, Dirac lines, Khodel-Shaginyan flat bands, etc. Some zeroes are topologically protected, being characterized by topological invariants, expressed in terms of Green's function. For stability of the others the ${\\bf p}$-space topology must be accompanied by symmetry. Vacua with Weyl points serve as a source of effective relativistic quantum fields emerging at low energy: chiral fermions, effective gauge fields and tetrad gravity emerge together in the vicinity of a Weyl point. The accompanying effects, such as chiral anomaly, electroweak baryo-production and chiral vortical effect, are expressed via the symmetry protected ${\\bf p}$-space invariants. The gapless topological media exhibit the bulk-surface and bulk-vortex correspondence: which in particular may lead to the flat band on the surface of the system or in the core of topological defects. The materials with flat band in bulk, on the surface or within the dislocations have singular density of states, which crucially influences the critical temperature of the superconducting transition in such media. While in all the known superconductors the transition temperature is exponentially suppressed as a function of the pairing interaction, in the flat band the transition temperature is proportional to the pairing interaction, and can be essentially higher. The ${\\bf p}$-space topology may give us the general recipe for search or artificial fabrication of the room-temperature superconductors.

  19. Prospects for the medium- and long-term development of China`s electric power industry and analysis of the potential market for superconductivity technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Z. [Bob Lawrence and Associates, Inc., Alexandria, VA (United States)

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    First of all, overall economic growth objectives in China are concisely and succinctly specified in this report. Secondly, this report presents a forecast of energy supply and demand for China`s economic growth for 2000--2050. In comparison with the capability of energy construction in China in the future, a gap between supply and demand is one of the important factors hindering the sustainable development of Chain`s economy. The electric power industry is one of China`s most important industries. To adopt energy efficiency through high technology and utilizing energy adequately is an important technological policy for the development of China`s electric power industry in the future. After briefly describing the achievements of China`s electric power industry, this report defines the target areas and policies for the development of hydroelectricity and nuclear electricity in the 2000s in China, presents the strategic position of China`s electric power industry as well as objectives and relevant plans of development for 2000--2050. This report finds that with the discovery of superconducting electricity, the discovery of new high-temperature superconducting (HTS) materials, and progress in materials techniques, the 21st century will be an era of superconductivity. Applications of superconductivity in the energy field, such as superconducting storage, superconducting transmission, superconducting transformers, superconducting motors, its application in Magneto-Hydro-Dynamics (MHD), as well as in nuclear fusion, has unique advantages. Its market prospects are quite promising. 12 figs.

  20. Comparative Assessment of Direct Drive High Temperature Superconducting Generators in Multi-Megawatt Class Wind Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maples, B.; Hand, M.; Musial, W.

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes the work completed under the CRADA between NREL and American Superconductor (AMSC). The CRADA combined NREL and AMSC resources to benchmark high temperature superconducting direct drive (HTSDD) generator technology by integrating the technologies into a conceptual wind turbine design, and comparing the design to geared drive and permanent magnet direct drive (PMDD) wind turbine configurations. Analysis was accomplished by upgrading the NREL Wind Turbine Design Cost and Scaling Model to represent geared and PMDD turbines at machine ratings up to 10 MW and then comparing cost and mass figures of AMSC's HTSDD wind turbine designs to theoretical geared and PMDD turbine designs at 3.1, 6, and 10 MW sizes. Based on the cost and performance data supplied by AMSC, HTSDD technology has good potential to compete successfully as an alternative technology to PMDD and geared technology turbines in the multi megawatt classes. In addition, data suggests the economics of HTSDD turbines improve with increasing size, although several uncertainties remain for all machines in the 6 to 10 MW class.

  1. Investigating the relationship between the superconducting and pseudogap states of the high-temperature superconductor Bi-2201 using scanning tunneling microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Michael Christopher

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is considerable controversy regarding the nature of the relationship between the superconducting and pseudogap states of high-temperature superconductors. Although there exist a large number of theories regarding ...

  2. Superconducting microfabricated ion traps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Shannon Xuanyue

    We fabricate superconducting ion traps with niobium and niobium nitride and trap single [superscript 88]Sr ions at cryogenic temperatures. The superconducting transition is verified and characterized by measuring the ...

  3. Project Fact Sheet Columbus HTS Power Cable Superconductivity

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010 | Department ofPlant

  4. HTS Power Transformers Presented to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 HTS Power Transformers Presented to the 2004 DOE Peer Review Committee For the WES flexibility. Allows operation from 20 K to 77 K permitting full system optimization. Best available conductor/SP/EE/ORNL Team By S.W. Schwenterly E.F. Pleva D.W. Hazelton Oak Ridge Waukesha SuperPower, Inc. National

  5. Commercialization of Medium Voltage HTS Triax TM Cable Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knoll, David

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The original project scope that was established in 2007 aimed to install a 1,700 meter (1.1 mile) medium voltage HTS Triax{TM} cable system into the utility grid in New Orleans, LA. In 2010, however, the utility partner withdrew from the project, so the 1,700 meter cable installation was cancelled and the scope of work was reduced. The work then concentrated on the specific barriers to commercialization of HTS cable technology. The modified scope included long-length HTS cable design and testing, high voltage factory test development, optimized cooling system development, and HTS cable life-cycle analysis. In 2012, Southwire again analyzed the market for HTS cables and deemed the near term market acceptance to be low. The scope of work was further reduced to the completion of tasks already started and to testing of the existing HTS cable system in Columbus, OH. The work completed under the project included: • Long-length cable modeling and analysis • HTS wire evaluation and testing • Cable testing for AC losses • Optimized cooling system design • Life cycle testing of the HTS cable in Columbus, OH • Project management. The 200 meter long HTS Triax{TM} cable in Columbus, OH was incorporated into the project under the initial scope changes as a test bed for life cycle testing as well as the site for an optimized HTS cable cooling system. The Columbus cable utilizes the HTS TriaxTM design, so it provided an economical tool for these of the project tasks.

  6. HTS Wire Development Group: Achievements, technology transfer, and plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, G.N. Jr. [American Superconductor Corp., Westborough, MA (United States)

    1994-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the HTS wire development group is to develop high performance HTS wire for use in electric power systems. The HTS wire development group personnel is listed. The HTS wire development group achievements are outlined. These achievements include: focusing on the development of high performance and cost effective HTS wire; HTS wires were fabricated in laboratory scale and production scale lengths; ACS has fabricated the only conductor in the world to meet or surpass the DOE FY94 goals for electric power applications development; these wire fabrication successes at ASC are a direct result of the long-term collaboration between ASC and the other HTS Wire Development Group members; and plans are in place for a successful FY95 program.

  7. Spectroscopy of low-frequency noise and its temperature dependence in a superconducting qubit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orlando, Terry Philip

    We report a direct measurement of the low-frequency noise spectrum in a superconducting flux qubit. Our method uses the noise sensitivity of a free-induction Ramsey interference experiment, comprising free evolution in the ...

  8. Superconducting materials for large scale applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scanlan, Ronald M.; Malozemoff, Alexis P.; Larbalestier, David C.

    2004-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant improvements in the properties ofsuperconducting materials have occurred recently. These improvements arebeing incorporated into the latest generation of wires, cables, and tapesthat are being used in a broad range of prototype devices. These devicesinclude new, high field accelerator and NMR magnets, magnets for fusionpower experiments, motors, generators, and power transmission lines.These prototype magnets are joining a wide array of existing applicationsthat utilize the unique capabilities of superconducting magnets:accelerators such as the Large Hadron Collider, fusion experiments suchas ITER, 930 MHz NMR, and 4 Tesla MRI. In addition, promising newmaterials such as MgB2 have been discovered and are being studied inorder to assess their potential for new applications. In this paper, wewill review the key developments that are leading to these newapplications for superconducting materials. In some cases, the key factoris improved understanding or development of materials with significantlyimproved properties. An example of the former is the development of Nb3Snfor use in high field magnets for accelerators. In other cases, thedevelopment is being driven by the application. The aggressive effort todevelop HTS tapes is being driven primarily by the need for materialsthat can operate at temperatures of 50 K and higher. The implications ofthese two drivers for further developments will be discussed. Finally, wewill discuss the areas where further improvements are needed in order fornew applications to be realized.

  9. Operation of a test bed axial-gap brushless DC rotor with a superconducting stator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKeever, J.W.; Sohns, C.W.; Schwenterly, S.W.; Young, R.W. Sr.; Campbell, V.W.; Hickey, M.H.; Ott, G.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Bailey, J.M. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A variable-speed axial-gap motor with a stator consisting of four liquid helium cooled superconducting electromagnets (two pole pairs) was built and proof tested up to 608 rpm in November 1990 as a tool for joint industry-laboratory evaluation of coils fabricated from high-temperature oxide superconductors. A second rotor was fabricated with improved material, winding configuration, and wire type, and the drive system was modified to eliminate current spiking. The modified motor was characterized to design speed, 188 rad/s (1800 rpm), to acquire a performance baseline for future comparison with that of high-temperature superconducting (HTS) wire. As it becomes commercially available, HTS wire will replace the low-temperature electromagnet wire in a stator modified to control wire temperatures between 4 K and 77 K. Measurements of the superconducting electromagnetic field and locked rotor torque as functions of cryocurrent and dc current through two phases of the rotor, respectively, provided data to estimate power that could be developed by the rotor. Back emf and parasitic mechanical and electromagnetic drag torques were measured as functions of angular velocity to calculate actual rotor power developed and to quantify losses, which reduce the motor`s efficiency. A detailed measurement of motor power at design speed confirmed the developed power equation. When subsequently operated at the 33-A maximum available rotor current, the motor delivered 15.3 kW (20.5 hp) to the load. In a final test, the cryostat was operated at 2500 A, 200 A below its critical current. At rotor design current of 60 A and 2500 A stator current, the extrapolated developed power would be 44.2 kW (59.2 hp) with 94% efficiency.

  10. From Ions to Wires to the Grid: The Transformational Science of LANL Research in High-Tc Superconducting Tapes and Electric Power Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ken Marken

    2009-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) has been tasked to lead national efforts to modernize the electric grid, enhance security and reliability of the energy infrastructure, and facilitate recovery from disruptions to energy supplies. LANL has pioneered the development of coated conductors – high-temperature superconducting (HTS) tapes – which permit dramatically greater current densities than conventional copper cable, and enable new technologies to secure the national electric grid. Sustained world-class research from concept, demonstration, transfer, and ongoing industrial support has moved this idea from the laboratory to the commercial marketplace.

  11. From Ions to Wires to the Grid: The Transformational Science of LANL Research in High-Tc Superconducting Tapes and Electric Power Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marken, Ken (Superconductivity Technology Center, Los Alamos) [Superconductivity Technology Center, Los Alamos

    2009-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) has been tasked to lead national efforts to modernize the electric grid, enhance security and reliability of the energy infrastructure, and facilitate recovery from disruptions to energy supplies. LANL has pioneered the development of coated conductors - high-temperature superconducting (HTS) tapes - which permit dramatically greater current densities than conventional copper cable, and enable new technologies to secure the national electric grid. Sustained world-class research from concept, demonstration, transfer, and ongoing industrial support has moved this idea from the laboratory to the commercial marketplace.

  12. From Ions to Wires to the Grid: The Transformational Science of LANL Research in High-Tc Superconducting Tapes and Electric Power Applications

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ken Marken

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) has been tasked to lead national efforts to modernize the electric grid, enhance security and reliability of the energy infrastructure, and facilitate recovery from disruptions to energy supplies. LANL has pioneered the development of coated conductors ? high-temperature superconducting (HTS) tapes ? which permit dramatically greater current densities than conventional copper cable, and enable new technologies to secure the national electric grid. Sustained world-class research from concept, demonstration, transfer, and ongoing industrial support has moved this idea from the laboratory to the commercial marketplace.

  13. Preparation of high temperature superconducting coated wires by dipping and post annealing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Provenzano, V.; Singh, A.K.; Imam, M.A.; Tritt, T.M.

    1992-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a process for coating a film on a wire substrate, it comprises: melting a superconducting metal oxide mixture in a crucible to form a melt; coating the substrate with a diffusion barrier; dipping the coated wire substrate into the melt; cooling the coated wire substrate at a rate sufficiently slow to avoid thermal shock and hot cracking; and post-annealing the cooled, coated wire substrate to relieve thermal stresses in the coating, whereupon the superconducting metal-oxide mixture forms a perovskite coating upon the wire substrate.

  14. High Performance Superconducting Wire in High Applied Magnetic Fields via Nanoscale Defect Engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goyal, Amit [ORNL; Wee, Sung Hun [ORNL; Zuev, Yuri L [ORNL; Cantoni, Claudia [ORNL

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High temperature superconducting (HTS) wires capable of carrying large critical currents with low dissipation levels in high applied magnetic fields are needed for a wide range of applications. In particular, for electric power applications involving rotating machinery, such as large-scale motors and generators, a high critical current, Ic, and a high engineering critical current density, JE, in applied magnetic fields in the range of 3 5 Tesla (T) at 65 K are required. In addition, exceeding the minimum performance requirements needed for these applications results in a lower fabrication cost, which is regarded as crucial to realize or enable many large-scale bulk applications of HTS materials. Here we report the fabrication of short segments of a potential superconducting wire comprised of a 4 m thick YBa2Cu3O7? (YBCO) layer on a biaxially textured substrate with a 50% higher Ic and JE than the highest values reported previously. The YBCO film contained columns of self-assembled nanodots of BaZrO3 (BZO) roughly oriented along the c-axis of YBCO. Although the YBCO film was grown at a high deposition rate, three-dimensional self-assembly of the insulating BZO nanodots still occurred. For all magnetic field orientations, minimum Ic and JE at 65 K, 3 T for the wire were 353 A cm?1 and 65.4 kA cm?2, respectively.

  15. Increased superconducting transition temperature of a niobium thin-film proximity-coupled to gold nanoparticles using linking organic molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katzir, Eran; Zeides, Felix; Katz, Nadav; Kalcheim, Yoav; Millo, Oded; Leitus, Gregory; Myasodeyov, Yuri; Shapiro, Boris Ya; Naaman, Ron; Paltiel, Yossi

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The superconducting critical temperature, TC, of thin Nb films is significantly modified when gold nanoparticles (NPs) are chemically linked to the Nb film, with a consistent enhancement when using 3 nm long disilane linker molecules. The TC increases by up to 10% for certain linker length and NPs size. No change is observed when the nanoparticles are physisorbed with non-linking molecules. Electron tunneling spectra acquired on the linked NPs below TC typically exhibit zero-bias peaks. We attribute these results to a pairing mechanism coupling electrons in the Nb and the NPs, mediated by the organic linkers.

  16. Increased superconducting transition temperature of a niobium thin-film proximity-coupled to gold nanoparticles using linking organic molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eran Katzir; Shira Yochelis; Felix Zeides; Nadav Katz; Yoav Kalcheim; Oded Millo; Gregory Leitus; Yuri Myasodeyov; Boris Ya. Shapiro; Ron Naaman; Yossi Paltiel

    2011-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The superconducting critical temperature, TC, of thin Nb films is significantly modified when gold nanoparticles (NPs) are chemically linked to the Nb film, with a consistent enhancement when using 3 nm long disilane linker molecules. The TC increases by up to 10% for certain linker length and NPs size. No change is observed when the nanoparticles are physisorbed with non-linking molecules. Electron tunneling spectra acquired on the linked NPs below TC typically exhibit zero-bias peaks. We attribute these results to a pairing mechanism coupling electrons in the Nb and the NPs, mediated by the organic linkers.

  17. Department of Energy`s Wire Development Workshop - Superconductivity program for electric systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1996 High-Temperature Superconducting Wire Development Workshop was held on January 31--February 1 at the Crown Plaza Tampa Westshore in Tampa, Florida. The meeting was hosted by Tampa Electric Company and sponsored by the Department of Energy`s Superconductivity Program for Electric Systems. The meeting focused on recent high-temperature superconducting wire development activities in the Department of Energy`s Superconductivity Systems program. Tampa Electric`s Greg Ramon began the meeting by giving a perspective on the changes now occurring in the utility sector. Major program wire development accomplishments during the past year were then highlighted, particularly the world record achievements at Los Alamos and Oak Ridge National Laboratories. The meeting then focussed on three priority technical issues: thallium conductors; AC losses in HTS conductors; and coated conductors on textured substrates. Following in-depth presentations, working groups were formed in each technology area to discuss and critique the most important current research and development issues. The working groups identified research areas that have the potential for greatly enhancing the wire development effort. These areas are discussed in the summary reports from each of the working groups. This document is a compilation of the workshop proceedings including all general session presentations and summary reports from the working groups.

  18. ag-clad bi-2223 superconductors: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: The powering of the LHC machine requires more than 1000 High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) current leads. These leads contain, at their cold end, HTS conductors made...

  19. Crossover between fractal and nonfractal flux penetration in high-temperature superconducting thin films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wijngaarden, Rinke J.

    -optics. We study thin films of Tl2Ba2CuO6 x on substrates with vicinal angles of 0° well-oriented , 0.5°, 2 investigations of magnetic flux penetration in high-Tc superconducting thin films show often a flux front with the smooth and well-defined flux penetration observed in single crystals1,2,10­17 and in some thin films.1

  20. Superconductivity: the Gift that Keeps on Giving

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldberg, Bennett

    Superconductivity: the Gift that Keeps on Giving Superconductivity, first discovered recently the discovery of high superconducting transition temperatures in the ceramic copper oxides has superconductors. In the underdoped or pseudogap phase of the cuprate superconductors, a significant portion

  1. HTS Conductor Design Issues Including Quench and Stability,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HTS Conductor Design Issues Including Quench and Stability, AC Losses, and Fault Currents M. J objective and technical approach · The purpose of this collaborative R&D project is an investigation of HTS conductor design optimization with emphasis on stability and protection issues for YBCO wires and coils

  2. Columbus HTS Power Cable | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"Wave the White Flag"Department of8, 2013 DOEEnergyColumbus HTS

  3. Superconducting microfabricated ion traps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shannon X. Wang; Yufei Ge; Jaroslaw Labaziewicz; Eric Dauler; Karl Berggren; Isaac L. Chuang

    2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We fabricate superconducting ion traps with niobium and niobium nitride and trap single 88Sr ions at cryogenic temperatures. The superconducting transition is verified and characterized by measuring the resistance and critical current using a 4-wire measurement on the trap structure, and observing change in the rf reflection. The lowest observed heating rate is 2.1(3) quanta/sec at 800 kHz at 6 K and shows no significant change across the superconducting transition, suggesting that anomalous heating is primarily caused by noise sources on the surface. This demonstration of superconducting ion traps opens up possibilities for integrating trapped ions and molecular ions with superconducting devices.

  4. Method of forming an HTS article

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bhattacharya, Raghu N.; Zhang, Xun; Selvamanickam, Venkat

    2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of forming a superconducting article includes providing a substrate tape, forming a superconducting layer overlying the substrate tape, and depositing a capping layer overlying the superconducting layer. The capping layer includes a noble metal and has a thickness not greater than about 1.0 micron. The method further includes electrodepositing a stabilizer layer overlying the capping layer using a solution that is non-reactive to the superconducting layer. The superconducting layer has an as-formed critical current I.sub.C(AF) and a post-stabilized critical current I.sub.C(PS). The I.sub.C(PS) is at least about 95% of the I.sub.C(AF).

  5. SUPERCONDUCTING DEVICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarke, John

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on all aspects of superconducting devices. IEEE Trans.on all aspects vf superconducting devices. The IBM JournalJ. Matisoo, The Superconducting Computer," Scientific

  6. Nanostructured high-temperature superconductors: Creation of strong-pinning columnar defects in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Peidong

    's, such as wires for power transmission cables and solenoids.1,2 Conse- quently, enhancing Jc in HTS materials has the growth and incorporation of MgO nanorods into high temperature superconductors (HTS's) has been developedO nanorods create a columnar defect structure in the HTS matrices, form a compositionally sharp interface

  7. Computing AC losses in stacks of high-temperature superconducting tapes This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prigozhin, Leonid

    generation (2G) high-temperature superconductor tapes. The tapes can be wound into coils with a large number-mail: leonid@math.bgu.ac.il and sokolovv@bgu.ac.il Received 26 January 2011, in final form 2 May 2011 Published 26 May 2011 Online at stacks.iop.org/SUST/24/075012 Abstract Superconducting tape coils and Roebel

  8. INFLUENCE OF PROTON IRRADIATION ON ANGULAR DEPENDENCE OF SECOND GENERATION (2G) HTS*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Ramesh

    of HTS wires are crucial to ensure that they will survive in a high radiation environment. HTS wires from two vendors were studied. Samples of 2G HTS wires from SuperPower and American Superconductor (ASCINFLUENCE OF PROTON IRRADIATION ON ANGULAR DEPENDENCE OF SECOND GENERATION (2G) HTS* Y. Shiroyanagi

  9. On a mechanism of high-temperature superconductivity: Spin-electron acoustic wave as a mechanism for the Cooper pair formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreev, Pavel A; Kuz'menkov, L S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We found a mechanism of the electron Cooper pair formation via the electron interaction by means of the spin-electron acoustic waves. This mechanism exists in metals with the rather high spin polarization like ferromagnetic and ferrimagnetic materials. The spin-electron acoustic wave mechanism gives the transition temperature 100 times larger than the transition temperature given by the electron-phonon interaction. Therefore, spin-electron acoustic waves give explanation for the high-temperature superconductivity. We find that the transition temperature has strong dependence on the electron concentration and the spin polarization of the electrons.

  10. Cryogenic experiences during W7-X HTS-current lead tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richter, Thomas; Lietzow, Ralph [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Technical Physics (ITEP), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) was responsible for design, production and test of the High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) current leads (CL) for the stellerator Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X). 16 current leads were delivered. Detailed prototype tests as well as the final acceptance tests were performed at KIT, using a dedicated test cryostat assembled beside and connected to the main vacuum vessel of the TOSKA facility. A unique feature is the upside down orientation of the current leads due to the location of the power supplies in the basement of the experimental area of W7-X. The HTS-CL consists of three main parts: the cold end for the connection to the bus bar at 4.5 K, the HTS part operating in the temperature range from 4.5 K to 65 K and a copper heat exchanger (HEX) in the temperature range from 65 K to room temperature, which is cooled with 50 K helium. Therefore in TOSKA it is possible to cool test specimens simultaneously with helium at two different temperature levels. The current lead tests included different scenarios with currents up to 18.2 kA. In total, 10 cryogenic test campaigns with a total time of about 24 weeks were performed till beginning of 2013. The test facility as well as the 2 kW cryogenic plant of ITEP showed a very good reliability. However, during such a long and complex experimental campaign, one has to deal with failures, technical difficulties and incidents. The paper gives a summary of the test performance comprising the test preparation and operation. This includes the performance and reliability of the refrigerator and the test facility with reference to the process measuring and control system, the data acquisition system, as well as the building infrastructure.

  11. How the Performance of a Superconducting Magnet is affected by theConnection between a small cooler and the Magnet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, Michael A.

    2005-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    As low temperature cryocoolers become more frequently used to cool superconducting magnets, it becomes increasingly apparent that the connection between the cooler and the magnet has an effect on the design and performance of the magnet. In general, the use of small coolers can be considered in two different temperature ranges; (1) from 3.8 to 4.8 K for magnet fabricated with LTS conductor and (2) from 18 to 35 K for magnets fabricated using HTS conductor. In general, both temperature ranges call for the use of a two-stage cooler. The best method for connecting a cooler to the magnet depends on a number of factors. The factors include: (1) whether the cooler must be used to cool down the magnet from room temperature, (2) whether the magnet must have one or more reservoirs of liquid cryogen to keep the magnet cold during a loss of cooling, and (3) constraints on the distance from the cooler cold heads and the magnet and its shield. Two methods for connecting low temperature coolers to superconducting magnets have been studied. The first method uses a cold strap to connect the cold heads directly to the loads. This method is commonly used for cryogen-free magnets. The second method uses a thermal siphon and liquid cryogens to make the connection between the load being cooled and the cold head. The two methods of transferring heat from the magnet to the cooler low temperature cold head are compared for the two temperature ranges given above.

  12. Superconducting active impedance converter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ginley, D.S.; Hietala, V.M.; Martens, J.S.

    1993-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A transimpedance amplifier for use with high temperature superconducting, other superconducting, and conventional semiconductors allows for appropriate signal amplification and impedance matching to processing electronics. The amplifier incorporates the superconducting flux flow transistor into a differential amplifier configuration which allows for operation over a wide temperature range, and is characterized by high gain, relatively low noise, and response times less than 200 picoseconds over at least a 10-80 K. temperature range. The invention is particularly useful when a signal derived from either far-IR focal plane detectors or from Josephson junctions is to be processed by higher signal/higher impedance electronics, such as conventional semiconductor technology. 12 figures.

  13. Superconducting active impedance converter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ginley, David S. (Albuquerque, NM); Hietala, Vincent M. (Placitas, NM); Martens, Jon S. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A transimpedance amplifier for use with high temperature superconducting, other superconducting, and conventional semiconductor allows for appropriate signal amplification and impedance matching to processing electronics. The amplifier incorporates the superconducting flux flow transistor into a differential amplifier configuration which allows for operation over a wide temperature range, and is characterized by high gain, relatively low noise, and response times less than 200 picoseconds over at least a 10-80 K. temperature range. The invention is particularly useful when a signal derived from either far-IR focal plane detectors or from Josephson junctions is to be processed by higher signal/higher impedance electronics, such as conventional semiconductor technology.

  14. Cryocooler applications for high-temperature superconductor magnetic bearings.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niemann, R. C.

    1998-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The efficiency and stability of rotational magnetic suspension systems are enhanced by the use of high-temperature superconductor (HTS) magnetic bearings. Fundamental aspects of the HTS magnetic bearings and rotational magnetic suspension are presented. HTS cooling can be by liquid cryogen bath immersion or by direct conduction, and thus there are various applications and integration issues for cryocoolers. Among the numerous cryocooler aspects to be considered are installation; operating temperature; losses; and vacuum pumping.

  15. Superconductive radiofrequency window assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, H.L.; Elliott, T.S.

    1998-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The SRF window assembly has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The SRF window assembly comprises a superconducting frame, a ceramic plate having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet for sealing plate into frame. The plate is brazed to eyelet which is then electron beam welded to frame. A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the SRF window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator. 11 figs.

  16. Superconducting radiofrequency window assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, H.L.; Elliott, T.S.

    1997-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly comprises a superconducting frame, a ceramic plate having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet for sealing plate into frame. The plate is brazed to eyelet which is then electron beam welded to frame. A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator. 11 figs.

  17. INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING SUPERCONDUCTOR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY Supercond. Sci. Technol. 19 (2006) 968979 doi:10.1088/0953-2048/19/9/013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Xueyan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -temperature superconducting (HTS) wires based on coated conductors (CC) can meet the de- mand for high critical currents Ic

  18. Magnetic flux diffusion through HTS shields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Kai-Wai; Fan, C. X.; Havenhill, A. D.

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Slow field leakage in a polycrystalline superconducting cupshield placed in an external axial field (H-ext) much weaker than H-C1 shows a diffusive time dependence with a time scale of 10(2) s. As the field strength increases but is still less than...

  19. Apparatus and method for controlling the temperature of the core of a super-conducting transformer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golner, Thomas; Pleva, Edward; Mehta, Shirish

    2006-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for controlling the temperature of a core of a transformer is provided that includes a core, a shield surrounding the core, a cast formed between the core and the shield, and tubing positioned on the shield. The cast directs heat from the core to the shield and cooling fluid is directed through the tubing to cool the shield.

  20. Doubling the critical current density of high temperature superconducting coated conductors through proton irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jia, Y.; LeRoux, M.; Miller, D. J.; Wen, J. G.; Kwok, W. K.; Welp, U. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)] [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Rupich, M. W.; Li, X.; Sathyamurthy, S.; Fleshler, S.; Malozemoff, A. P. [American Superconductor Corp., 64 Jackson Road, Devens, Massachusetts 01434 (United States)] [American Superconductor Corp., 64 Jackson Road, Devens, Massachusetts 01434 (United States); Kayani, A. [Department of Physics, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, Michigan 49008-5252 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, Michigan 49008-5252 (United States); Ayala-Valenzuela, O.; Civale, L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS-K764, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS-K764, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2013-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The in-field critical current of commercial YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} coated conductors can be substantially enhanced by post-fabrication irradiation with 4 MeV protons. Irradiation to a fluence of 8 × 10{sup 16} p/cm{sup 2} induces a near doubling of the critical current in fields of 6 T || c at a temperature of 27 K, a field and temperature range of interest for applications, such as rotating machinery. A mixed pinning landscape of preexisting precipitates and twin boundaries and small, finely dispersed irradiation induced defects may account for the improved vortex pinning in high magnetic fields. Our data indicate that there is significant head-room for further enhancements.

  1. Pressure dependence of the superconducting critical temperature of HgBa 2Ca 2Cu 3O 8 y and HgBa 2Ca 3Cu 4O 10 y up to 30 GPa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wijngaarden, Rinke J.

    Pressure dependence of the superconducting critical temperature of HgBa 2Ca 2Cu 3O 8 y and HgBa 2Ca of the reported pressure- induced Tc values well above 150 K in the mercury-based high-Tc superconductors has been superconducting transition temperature Tc have been observed in HgBa2Ca2Cu3O8 y Hg-1223 samples under very high

  2. Pressure dependence of the superconducting critical temperature of Tl 2Ba 2Ca 2Cu 3O 10 y and Tl 2Ba 2Ca 3Cu 4O12 y up to 21 GPa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wijngaarden, Rinke J.

    Pressure dependence of the superconducting critical temperature of Tl 2Ba 2Ca 2Cu 3O 10 y and Tl 2 of the superconducting transition temperature Tc of Tl2Ba2Ca2Cu3O10 y Tl-2223 and Tl2Ba2Ca3Cu4O12 y Tl-2234 has been it is determined by that of the inner CuO2 layers. S0163-1829 96 07134-2 I. INTRODUCTION Superconductivity in high

  3. SUPERCONDUCTING DEVICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarke, John

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    communications. References Superconductor Applications: ~on all aspects of superconducting devices. IEEE Trans.on all aspects vf superconducting devices. The IBM Journal

  4. Tensile and torsional fatigue of fiber-reinforced composites at cryogenic temperatures. [Superconducting magnetic fusion energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, S.S.; Chim, E.S.M.; Socie, D.F.; Gauchel, J.V.; Olinger, J.L.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of the fundamental fatigue behavior of G-10 grade, glass fiber-reinforced composite laminate in a liquid nitrogen environment is presented. Both uniaxial tensile and pure torsional fatigue failure of the fiber composite are investigated. Cryogenic fatigue degradation of the composite in terms of stiffness reduction, energy dissipation, and cyclic fracture is examined in detail. Influences of loading mode, fiber orientation, surface condition, and geometric variables are studied also. Fatigue damage mechanisms at cryogenic temperatures under various loading conditions are discussed. 29 refs.

  5. Optimization of superconducting tiling pattern for superconducting bearings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, J.R.

    1996-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for reducing magnetic field inhomogeneities which produce rotational loss mechanisms in high temperature superconducting magnetic bearings are disclosed. Magnetic field inhomogeneities are reduced by dividing high temperature superconducting structures into smaller structures, and arranging the smaller structures into tiers which stagger the magnetic field maximum locations of the smaller structures. 20 figs.

  6. Optimization of superconducting tiling pattern for superconducting bearings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for reducing magnetic field inhomogeneities which produce rotational loss mechanisms in high temperature superconducting magnetic bearings. Magnetic field inhomogeneities are reduced by dividing high temperature superconducting structures into smaller structures, and arranging the smaller structures into tiers which stagger the magnetic field maximum locations of the smaller structures.

  7. Introduction to Color Superconductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Nardulli

    2006-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    At high nuclear density and small temperature, due to the asymptotic freedom property of Quantum ChromoDynamics and to the existence of an attractive channel in the color interaction, diquark condensates might be formed. Since these condensates break the color gauge symmetry, this phenomenon has the name of color superconductivity. In the last few years this has become a very active field of research. While a direct experimental test is still missing, color superconductivity might have implications in astrophysics because for some compact stars, e.g. pulsars, the baryon densities necessary for color superconductivity can probably be reached.

  8. Superconducting thermoelectric generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Metzger, J.D.; El-Genk, M.S.

    1998-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for producing electricity from heat is disclosed. The present invention is a thermoelectric generator that uses materials with substantially no electrical resistance, often called superconductors, to efficiently convert heat into electrical energy without resistive losses. Preferably, an array of superconducting elements is encased within a second material with a high thermal conductivity. The second material is preferably a semiconductor. Alternatively, the superconducting material can be doped on a base semiconducting material, or the superconducting material and the semiconducting material can exist as alternating, interleaved layers of waferlike materials. A temperature gradient imposed across the boundary of the two materials establishes an electrical potential related to the magnitude of the temperature gradient. The superconducting material carries the resulting electrical current at zero resistivity, thereby eliminating resistive losses. The elimination of resistive losses significantly increases the conversion efficiency of the thermoelectric device. 4 figs.

  9. Superconducting thermoelectric generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Metzger, John D. (Eaton's Neck, NY); El-Genk, Mohamed S. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for producing electricity from heat. The present invention is a thermoelectric generator that uses materials with substantially no electrical resistance, often called superconductors, to efficiently convert heat into electrical energy without resistive losses. Preferably, an array of superconducting elements is encased within a second material with a high thermal conductivity. The second material is preferably a semiconductor. Alternatively, the superconducting material can be doped on a base semiconducting material, or the superconducting material and the semiconducting material can exist as alternating, interleaved layers of waferlike materials. A temperature gradient imposed across the boundary of the two materials establishes an electrical potential related to the magnitude of the temperature gradient. The superconducting material carries the resulting electrical current at zero resistivity, thereby eliminating resistive losses. The elimination of resistive losses significantly increases the conversion efficiency of the thermoelectric device.

  10. Superconducting thermoelectric generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Metzger, J.D.; El-Genk, M.S.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for producing electricity from heat. The present invention is a thermoelectric generator that uses materials with substantially no electrical resistance, often called superconductors, to efficiently convert heat into electrical energy without resistive losses. Preferably, an array of superconducting elements is encased within a second material with a high thermal conductivity. The second material is preferably a semiconductor. Alternatively, the superconducting material can be doped on a base semiconducting material, or the superconducting material and the semiconducting material can exist as alternating, interleaved layers of waferlike materials. A temperature gradient imposed across the boundary of the two materials establishes an electrical potential related to the magnitude of the temperature gradient. The superconducting material carries the resulting electrical current at zero resistivity, thereby eliminating resistive losses. The elimination of resistive losses significantly increases the conversion efficiency of the thermoelectric device.

  11. Hydro-Thermal Scheduling (HTS) 1.0 Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    1 Hydro-Thermal Scheduling (HTS) 1.0 Introduction From an overall systems view, the single most, relative to that of thermal plants, are very small. There are three basic types of hydroelectric plants;2 Pump-storage This kind of hydro plant is a specialized reservoir-type plant which has capability to act

  12. The Theory of Super-conductivity in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landweber, Laura

    of high-Tc superconductivity in the cuprates. (Cuprates are ceramic materials that superconduct at temperatures much higher than should be possible according to conventional the- ory.) Superconductivity the development of a theory of high-temperature superconductivity. Since there is as yet no complete theory

  13. High Temperature Superconducting Cable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An integrated team from Southwire, ORNL and other industry partners will design, build and install a reliable · Introduction (David Lindsay, Southwire) ­ Overall SPI Goals & Objectives ­ Design Approach ­ Review FY 2003 and reliabilities. · SPI-2: Bixby Substation, AEP, Columbus, OH ­To complete a long length demonstration with AEP

  14. Unifying the strain and temperature scaling laws for the pinning force density in superconducting niobium-tin multifilamentary wires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hampshire, Damian

    niobium-tin multifilamentary wires Najib Cheggoura) and Damian P. Hampshire Superconductivity Group critical current density (Jc) tolerance to strain , performed on a bronze processed niobium force Fp( Jc B) in a series of niobium alloys.3 Later, several authors4­6 found that variable tem

  15. Design of High Field Solenoids made of High Temperature Superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartalesi, Antonio; /Pisa U.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis starts from the analytical mechanical analysis of a superconducting solenoid, loaded by self generated Lorentz forces. Also, a finite element model is proposed and verified with the analytical results. To study the anisotropic behavior of a coil made by layers of superconductor and insulation, a finite element meso-mechanic model is proposed and designed. The resulting material properties are then used in the main solenoid analysis. In parallel, design work is performed as well: an existing Insert Test Facility (ITF) is adapted and structurally verified to support a coil made of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}, a High Temperature Superconductor (HTS). Finally, a technological winding process was proposed and the required tooling is designed.

  16. Reinforced fluropolymer nanocomposites with high-temperature superconducting Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub y}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jayasree, T. K., E-mail: drjayasreetk@gmail.com [Laboratory for Molecular Photonics and Electronic (Lamp), Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Calicut, Kerala, India - 673601 and Department of Physics, Sree Ayyappa College, Eramallikkara, Chengannur, Kerala-689109 (India)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Bismuth Strontium Calcium Copper Oxide (Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub y})/Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) nanocomposite was prepared and their thermal properties were analyzed. The composite consists of the polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) as an insulating polymer matrix, and homogenously distributed Bismuth strontium calcium copperoxide (2212) nanoparticles. SEM data shows flaky grains of the superconductor coated and linked by polymer. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) results indicated that the melting point was not affected significantly by the addition of BSCCO. However, the addition of superconducting ceramic resulted in an extra melting peak at a lower temperature (145°C). Thermogravimetric analysis of the samples shows that the onset decomposition temperature of the PVDF matrix was decreased by the addition of SC filler.

  17. High Temperature Superconductors: From Delivery to Applications (Presentation from 2011 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award-winner, Dr. Amit Goyal, and including introduction by Energy Secretary, Dr. Steven Chu)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Goyal, Amit (Oak Ridge National Laboratory)

    2012-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Dr. Amit Goyal, a high temperature superconductivity (HTS) researcher at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, was named a 2011 winner of the Department of Energy's Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award honoring U.S. scientists and engineers for exceptional contributions in research and development supporting DOE and its mission. Winner of the award in the inaugural category of Energy Science and Innovation, Dr. Goyal was cited for his work in 'pioneering research and transformative contributions to the field of applied high temperature superconductivity, including fundamental materials science advances and technical innovations enabling large-scale applications of these novel materials.' Following his basic research in grain-to-grain supercurrent transport, Dr. Goyal focused his energy in transitioning this fundamental understanding into cutting-edge technologies. Under OE sponsorship, Dr. Goyal co-invented the Rolling Assisted Bi-Axially Textured Substrate technology (RABiTS) that is used as a substrate for second generation HTS wires. OE support also led to the invention of Structural Single Crystal Faceted Fiber Substrate (SSIFFS) and the 3-D Self Assembly of Nanodot Columns. These inventions and associated R&D resulted in 7 R&D 100 Awards including the 2010 R&D Magazine's Innovator of the Year Award, 3 Federal Laboratory Consortium Excellence in Technology Transfer National Awards, a DOE Energy100 Award and many others. As a world authority on HTS materials, Dr. Goyal has presented OE-sponsored results in more than 150 invited talks, co-authored more than 350 papers and is a fellow of 7 professional societies.

  18. High Temperature Superconductors: From Delivery to Applications (Presentation from 2011 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award-winner, Dr. Amit Goyal, and including introduction by Energy Secretary, Dr. Steven Chu)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goyal, Amit (Oak Ridge National Laboratory) [Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    2012-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Dr. Amit Goyal, a high temperature superconductivity (HTS) researcher at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, was named a 2011 winner of the Department of Energy's Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award honoring U.S. scientists and engineers for exceptional contributions in research and development supporting DOE and its mission. Winner of the award in the inaugural category of Energy Science and Innovation, Dr. Goyal was cited for his work in 'pioneering research and transformative contributions to the field of applied high temperature superconductivity, including fundamental materials science advances and technical innovations enabling large-scale applications of these novel materials.' Following his basic research in grain-to-grain supercurrent transport, Dr. Goyal focused his energy in transitioning this fundamental understanding into cutting-edge technologies. Under OE sponsorship, Dr. Goyal co-invented the Rolling Assisted Bi-Axially Textured Substrate technology (RABiTS) that is used as a substrate for second generation HTS wires. OE support also led to the invention of Structural Single Crystal Faceted Fiber Substrate (SSIFFS) and the 3-D Self Assembly of Nanodot Columns. These inventions and associated R&D resulted in 7 R&D 100 Awards including the 2010 R&D Magazine's Innovator of the Year Award, 3 Federal Laboratory Consortium Excellence in Technology Transfer National Awards, a DOE Energy100 Award and many others. As a world authority on HTS materials, Dr. Goyal has presented OE-sponsored results in more than 150 invited talks, co-authored more than 350 papers and is a fellow of 7 professional societies.

  19. Superconductivity in graphite intercalation compounds

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Smith, Robert P. [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Dean, Mark P. M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Weller, Thomas E. [Univ. College of London (United Kingdom); Howard, Christopher A. [Univ. College of London (United Kingdom); Rahnejat, Kaveh C. [Univ. College of London (United Kingdom); Saxena, Siddharth S. [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Ellerby, Mark [Univ. College of London (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The field of superconductivity in the class of materials known as graphite intercalation compounds has a history dating back to the 1960s This paper recontextualizes the field in light of the discovery of superconductivity in CaC? and YbC? in 2005. In what follows, we outline the crystal structure and electronic structure of these and related compounds. We go on to experiments addressing the superconducting energy gap, lattice dynamics, pressure dependence, and how this relates to theoretical studies. The bulk of the evidence strongly supports a BCS superconducting state. However, important questions remain regarding which electronic states and phonon modes are most important for superconductivity and whether current theoretical techniques can fully describe the dependence of the superconducting transition temperature on pressure and chemical composition.

  20. Superconductivity in graphite intercalation compounds

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Smith, Robert P.; Dean, Mark P. M.; Weller, Thomas E.; Howard, Christopher A.; Rahnejat, Kaveh C.; Saxena, Siddharth S.; Ellerby, Mark

    2015-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The field of superconductivity in the class of materials known as graphite intercalation compounds has a history dating back to the 1960s This paper recontextualizes the field in light of the discovery of superconductivity in CaC? and YbC? in 2005. In what follows, we outline the crystal structure and electronic structure of these and related compounds. We go on to experiments addressing the superconducting energy gap, lattice dynamics, pressure dependence, and how this relates to theoretical studies. The bulk of the evidence strongly supports a BCS superconducting state. However, important questions remain regarding which electronic states and phonon modes aremore »most important for superconductivity and whether current theoretical techniques can fully describe the dependence of the superconducting transition temperature on pressure and chemical composition.« less

  1. Superconducting materials for large scale applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scanlan, Ronald M.; Malozemoff, Alexis P.; Larbalestier, David C.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A. P. Malozemoff et al. , “HTS Wire: Status and Prospects,”Second generation HTS wire: an assessment,” (2004), [Online]progress in developing HTS wire, these materials have not

  2. Superconducting radiofrequency window assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Harry L. (Seaford, VA); Elliott, Thomas S. (Yorktown, VA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly (20) has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly (20) comprises a superconducting frame (30), a ceramic plate (40) having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet (50) for sealing plate (40) into frame (30). The plate (40) is brazed to eyelet (50) which is then electron beam welded to frame (30). A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator.

  3. Superconductive radiofrequency window assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Harry Lawrence (Seaford, VA); Elliott, Thomas S. (Yorktown, VA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly (20) has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly (20) comprises a superconducting frame (30), a ceramic plate (40) having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet (50) for sealing plate (40) into frame (30). The plate (40) is brazed to eyelet (50) which is then electron beam welded to frame (30). A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator.

  4. STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY DUPONT SUPERCONDUCTIVITY...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    its participation under the above referenced contract entitled "High Temperature Superconducting Reciprocating Magnetic Separator". This contract relates to the construction of...

  5. Superconducting Cable

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hughey, Raburn L. (Franklin, GA); Sinha, Uday K. (Carrollton, GA); Reece, David S. (Carrollton, GA); Muller, Albert C. (Eidson, TN)

    2005-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to provide a flexible oxide superconducting cable which is reduced in AC loss, tape-shaped superconducting wires covered with a stabilizing metal are wound on a flexible former. The superconducting wires are preferably laid on the former at a bending strain of not more than 0.2%. In laying on the former, a number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on a core member in a side-by-side manner, to form a first layer. A prescribed number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on top of the first layer in a side-by-side manner, to form a second layer. The former may be made of a metal, plastic, reinforced plastic, polymer, or a composite and provides flexibility to the superconducting wires and the cable formed therewith.

  6. Superconducting Cable

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hughey, Raburn L. (Franklin, GA); Sinha, Uday K. (Carrollton, GA); Reece, David S. (Carrollton, GA); Muller, Albert C. (Eidson, TN)

    2005-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to provide a flexible oxide superconducting cable which is reduced in AC loss, tape-shaped superconducting wires covered with a stabilizing metal are wound on a flexible former. The superconducting wires are preferably laid on the former at a bending strain of not more than 0.2%. In laying on the former, a number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on a core member in a side-by-side manner, to form a first layer. A prescribed number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on top of the first layer in a side-by-side manner, to form a second layer. The former may be made of a metal, plastic, reinforced plastic, polymer, or a composite and provides flexibility to the superconducting wires and the cable formed therewith.

  7. Superconducting Magnet Technology for Future Hadron Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scanlan, R.M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    must tum to new materials with higher critical fields thanfrom a critical field standpoint, HTS materials should beof HTS Materials as Accelerator Conductors Critical current

  8. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE CoZZoque C8, suppZ6ment au n08, Tome 41, aoiit 1980, page C8-745 LOW TEMPERATURE THERMAL PROPERTIES OF AMORPHOUS SUPERCONDUCTING ZrCu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    TEMPERATURE THERMAL PROPERTIES OF AMORPHOUS SUPERCONDUCTING ZrCu H.v. ~Ehneysen,M. Platte, W. Sander, H- applications - from two major points: (1) the investigation of superconductinq properties yields information the superconductinp transition temperatufe Tc, the condensation of electronic quasiparticles permits access

  9. Modeling forces in high-temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, L. R.; Foster, M. W.

    1997-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a simple model that uses computed shielding currents to determine the forces acting on a high-temperature superconductor (HTS). The model has been applied to measurements of the force between HTS and permanent magnets (PM). Results show the expected hysteretic variation of force as the HTS moves first toward and then away from a permanent magnet, including the reversal of the sign of the force. Optimization of the shielding currents is carried out through a simulated annealing algorithm in a C++ program that repeatedly calls a commercial electromagnetic software code. Agreement with measured forces is encouraging.

  10. Superconducting thermoelectric generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Metzger, J.D.; El-Genk, M.S.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermoelectricity is produced by applying a temperature differential to dissimilar electrically conducting or semiconducting materials, thereby producing a voltage that is proportional to the temperature difference. Thermoelectric generators use this effect to directly convert heat into electricity; however, presently-known generators have low efficiencies due to the production of high currents which in turn cause large resistive heating losses. Some thermoelectric generators operate at efficiencies between 4% and 7% in the 800{degrees} to 1200{degrees}C range. According to its major aspects and bradly stated, the present invention is an apparatus and method for producing electricity from heat. In particular, the invention is a thermoelectric generator that juxtaposes a superconducting material and a semiconducting material - so that the superconducting and the semiconducting materials touch - to convert heat energy into electrical energy without resistive losses in the temperature range below the critical temperature of the superconducting material. Preferably, an array of superconducting material is encased in one of several possible configurations within a second material having a high thermal conductivity, preferably a semiconductor, to form a thermoelectric generator.

  11. Certification of Superconducting Solenoid-Based Focusing Lenses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiMarco, E.Joseph; Hemmati, Ali M.; Orris, Darryl F.; Page, Thomas M.; Rabehl, Roger H.; Tartaglia, Michael A.; Terechkine, Iouri; Tompkins, John C.

    2010-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The first production focusing lens for the HINS beam line at Fermilab has been assembled into a cryostat and tested. A total of 5 devices will be tested before they are installed in the low energy section of the HINS beam line, which uses copper Crossbar-H (CH) style RF cavities. One of the tested CH-section lens assemblies includes a pair of weak orthogonal steering dipoles nested within a strong focusing solenoid, and has six vapor cooled power leads. The other device has only the strong focusing solenoid, and utilizes a single pair of HTS power leads. The production test program is designed to measure the thermal performance of the cryostat, minimum cooling requirements for the HTS leads, quench performance of all superconducting components, and precise determination of the magnetic axis and field angles. Results and future plans for the first production device tests are presented.

  12. Superconducting borides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, Z.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of superconductors are found among binary and ternary boride compounds. The highest {Tc}'s are often fund near a limiting composition for the compound's stability. Ternary borides have been a fertile area for exploring the interaction between superconductivity and magnetism, and appear to be the area in which further aspects of boride superconductivity will be pursued. 25 refs., 3 tabs.

  13. GE Hosts Visit by DOE to Kick Off High-Efficiency GeneratorDevelopment Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    design and HTS winding unprecedented in its simplicity. Recent progress in HTS wire manufacturing has.5-year program to move high-temperature superconducting (HTS) generator technology toward full on GE's extensive research into HTS materials and generators, the development program will lead

  14. INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING SUPERCONDUCTOR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY Supercond. Sci. Technol. 18 (2005) 15331538 doi:10.1088/0953-2048/18/11/021

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -temperature superconducting (HTS) wires is expected to enable most large-scale applications of HTS materials, in particular, for over a decade scientists world-wide have sought means to produce such columnar defects in HTS materials Publishing Ltd Printed in the UK 1533 #12;A Goyal et al 1. Introduction Second-generation HTS conductors

  15. Superconducting structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kwon, Chuhee (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM); Foltyn, Stephen R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A superconductive structure including a dielectric oxide substrate, a thin buffer layer of a superconducting material thereon; and, a layer of a rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film thereon the thin layer of yttrium-barium-copper oxide, the rare earth selected from the group consisting of samarium, gadolinium, ytterbium, erbium, neodymium, dysprosium, holmium, lutetium, a combination of more than one element from the rare earth group and a combination of one or more elements from the rare earth group with yttrium, the buffer layer of superconducting material characterized as having chemical and structural compatibility with the dielectric oxide substrate and the rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film is provided.

  16. Superconducting Structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kwon, Chuhee (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM); Foltyn, Stephen R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2005-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A superconductive structure including a dielectric oxide substrate, a thin buffer layer of a superconducting material thereon; and, a layer of a rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film thereon the thin layer of yttrium-barium-copper oxide, the rare earth selected from the group consisting of samarium, gadolinium, ytterbium, erbium, neodymium, dysprosium, holmium, lutetium, a combination of more than one element from the rare earth group and a combination of one or more elements from the rare earth group with yttrium, the buffer layer of superconducting material characterized as having chemical and structural compatibility with the dielectric oxide substrate and the rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film is provided.

  17. Development and Test of a Prototype 100MVA Superconducting Generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fogarty, James M.; Bray, James W.

    2007-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2002, General Electric and the US Department of Energy (DOE) entered into a cooperative agreement for the development of a commercialized 100 MVA generator using high temperature superconductors (HTS) in the field winding. The intent of the program was to: • Identify and develop technologies that would be needed for such a generator. • Develop conceptual designs for generators with ratings of 100 MVA and higher using HTS technology. • Perform proof of concept tests at the 1.5 MW level for GE’s proprietary warm iron rotor HTS generator concept. • Design, build, and test a prototype of a commercially viable 100 MVA generator that could be placed on the power grid. This report summarizes work performed during the program and is provided as one of the final program deliverables.

  18. Industrial Cu-Ni alloys for HTS coated conductor tape. A Girard1,2,3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Industrial Cu-Ni alloys for HTS coated conductor tape. A Girard1,2,3 , C E Bruzek4 , J L Jorda1 , L efficient substrates for coated conductor wires. The study is focused on two industrial compositions: Cu55Ni-textured substrate is one of the critical steps for the HTS coated conductor development. The RABiTS (Rolling

  19. Long Island HTS Power Cable | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetterEconomy andTerms Loan TermsLong Island HTS Power Cable Long

  20. Helical superconducting black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aristomenis Donos; Jerome P. Gauntlett

    2012-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct novel static, asymptotically $AdS_5$ black hole solutions with Bianchi VII$_0$ symmetry that are holographically dual to superconducting phases in four spacetime dimensions with a helical p-wave order. We calculate the precise temperature dependence of the pitch of the helical order. At zero temperature the black holes have vanishing entropy and approach domain wall solutions that reveal homogenous, non-isotropic dual ground states with emergent scaling symmetry.

  1. 100 kA Record Current for HTS Conductor "A conductor current of 100,000 A is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, James C.

    in Japan. Fujikura Ltd. provided the tapes used in the experiment. "Yttrium-based HTS wire has been100 kA Record Current for HTS Conductor "A conductor current of 100,000 A is sufficient for fusion, our 100 kA is still lower, however ours is presently the world's highest among HTS conductors. Put

  2. Superconducting phase qubits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinis, John M.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    frequency noise in dc superconducting quantum interfer- enceeld enhancement of superconductivity in ultranarrow wires.Transformed dissipation in superconducting quantum circuits.

  3. SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassenzahl, W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and R. W . BOOIll, "Superconductive Energy Storage Inducand H. A. Peterson, "Superconductive E nergy S torage forMeeting, Janua ry N. Mohan, "Superconductive Energy S torage

  4. Superconducting phase qubits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinis, John M.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    frequency noise in dc superconducting quantum interfer- enceTransformed dissipation in superconducting quantum circuits.two-level system noise in superconducting microreson- ators.

  5. SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassenzahl, W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Design of the BPA Superconducting 30-MJ Energy Storagefor a Utility Scale Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storagefor a Lnrge Scale Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage

  6. Non-Fermi Liquid Regimes and Superconductivity in the Low Temperature Phase Diagrams of Strongly Correlated d- and f-Electron Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brian Maple, M.; Baumbach, Ryan E.; Butch, Nicholas P.; Hamlin, James J.; Janoschek, Marc

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    V.S. Zapf, J. Wosnitza, Superconductivity in Conventionaland Unconven- tional Superconductors (Springer, Berlin,T C lies below T c and the superconductiv- ity vanishes at a

  7. Superconductivity for Electric Systems Program Review LANL Contributions to GE HTS Generator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    generator · LANL entered into a CRADA with GE to provide assistance in several technology areas · Technology system ­ Engineering support · AC loss characterization · 2nd Generation wire impact · CRADA ended was completed in FY05 · Measurements scheduled to follow were not performed due to premature end of CRADA Single

  8. Design, Fabrication and Testing of a Superconducting Fault Current Limiter (SFCL)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gouge, M..; Schwenterly, S.W.; Hazelton, D. (SuperPower, Inc.)

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project was to conduct R&D on specified components and provide technical design support to a SuperPower team developing a high temperature superconducting Fault Current Limiter (SFCL). ORNL teamed with SuperPower, Inc. on a Superconductivity Partnerships with Industry (SPI) proposal for the SFCL that was submitted to DOE and approved in FY 2003. A contract between DOE and SuperPower, Inc. was signed on July 14, 2003 to design, fabricate and test the SFCL. This device employs high temperature superconducting (HTS) elements and SuperPower's proprietary technology. The program goal was to demonstrate a device that will address a broad range of the utility applications and meet utility industry requirements. This DOE-sponsored Superconductivity Partnership with Industry project would positively impact electric power transmission reliability and security by introducing a new element in the grid that can significantly mitigate fault currents and provide lower cost solutions for grid protection. The project will conduct R&D on specified components and provide technical design support to a SuperPower-led team developing a SFCL as detailed in tasks 1-5 below. Note the SuperPower scope over the broad SPI project is much larger than that shown below which indicates only the SuperPower tasks that are complementary to the ORNL tasks. SuperPower is the Project Manager for the SFCL program, and is responsible for completion of the project on schedule and budget. The scope of work for ORNL is to provide R&D support for the SFCL in the following four broad areas: (1) Assist with high voltage subsystem R&D, design, fabrication and testing including characterization of the general dielectric performance of LN2 and component materials; (2) Consult on cryogenic subsystem R&D, design, fabrication and testing; (3) Participate in project conceptual and detailed design reviews; and (4) Guide commercialization by participation on the Technical Advisory Board (TAB). SuperPower's in-kind work for the SFCL will be provided in the following areas: (1) Work with ORNL to develop suitable test platforms for the evaluation of subsystems and components; (2) Provide cryogenic and high voltage subsystem designs for evaluation; (3) Lead the development of the test plans associated with the subsystem and components and participate in test programs at ORNL; and (4) Based on the test results, finalize the subsystem and component designs and incorporate into the respective SFCL prototypes.

  9. Effect of high temperature heat treatments on the quality factor of a large-grain superconducting radio-frequency niobium cavity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dhakal, P; Myneni, G R; Gray, K E; Groll, N; Maheshwari, P; McRae, D M; Pike, R; Proslier, T; Stevie, F; Walsh, R P; Yang, Q

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Large-grain Nb has become a viable alternative to fine-grain Nb for the fabrication of superconducting radio-frequency cavities. In this contribution we report the results from a heat treatment study of a large-grain 1.5 GHz single-cell cavity made of “medium purity” Nb. The baseline surface preparation prior to heat treatment consisted of standard buffered chemical polishing. The heat treatment in the range 800–1400°C was done in a newly designed vacuum induction furnace. Q{sub 0} values of the order of 2×10{sup 10} at 2.0 K and peak surface magnetic field (B{sub p}) of 90 mT were achieved reproducibly. A Q{sub 0} value of (5±1)×10{sup 10} at 2.0 K and B{sub p}=90??mT was obtained after heat treatment at 1400°C. This is the highest value ever reported at this temperature, frequency, and field. Samples heat treated with the cavity at 1400°C were analyzed by secondary ion mass spectrometry, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, energy dispersive x ray, point-contact tunneling, and x-ray diffraction, and revealed a complex surface composition which includes titanium oxide, increased carbon, and nitrogen content but reduced hydrogen concentration compared to a non-heat-treated sample.

  10. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C4, supplment au n 4, Tome 40, avril 1979, page C4-138 Superconducting critical field and low temperature heat capacity of ameri-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    to a sapphire platform that was ther- mally weakly-tied to a 1.38 K liquid helium bath. The heat capacity-138 Superconducting critical field and low temperature heat capacity of ameri- cium (*) J. L. Smith, G. R. Stewart, C on the superconductor americium yield an electronic heat capacity coefficient of y = 2 ±2 mJ/mole · K2 and a critical

  11. Landscape of superconducting membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frederik Denef; Sean A. Hartnoll

    2009-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The AdS/CFT correspondence may connect the landscape of string vacua and the `atomic landscape' of condensed matter physics. We study the stability of a landscape of IR fixed points of N=2 large N gauge theories in 2+1 dimensions, dual to Sasaki-Einstein compactifications of M theory, towards a superconducting state. By exhibiting instabilities of charged black holes in these compactifications, we show that many of these theories have charged operators that condense when the theory is placed at a finite chemical potential. We compute a statistical distribution of critical superconducting temperatures for a subset of these theories. With a chemical potential of one milliVolt, we find critical temperatures ranging between 0.24 and 165 degrees Kelvin.

  12. Ten questions and answers about superconductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian De Cao

    2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This work answers the basic questions of superconductivity in a question-and-answer format. We extend a basic hypothesis to various superconductors. This hypothesis is that superconductivity requires that the pairing gap locates around the Fermi level. On the basis of this hypothesis our calculations give the so-called three factor theory with which some key problems of the high temperature superconductivity are explained.

  13. Dynamic simulation of 10 kW Brayton cryocooler for HTS cable

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Ho-Myung; Park, Chan Woo [Hong Ik University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Seoul, 121-791 (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Hyung Suk; Hwang, Si Dole [KEPCO Research Institute, Daejeon, 305-760 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Dynamic simulation of a Brayton cryocooler is presented as a partial effort of a Korean governmental project to develop 1?3 km HTS cable systems at transmission level in Jeju Island. Thermodynamic design of a 10 kW Brayton cryocooler was completed, and a prototype construction is underway with a basis of steady-state operation. This study is the next step to investigate the transient behavior of cryocooler for two purposes. The first is to simulate and design the cool-down process after scheduled or unscheduled stoppage. The second is to predict the transient behavior following the variation of external conditions such as cryogenic load or outdoor temperature. The detailed specifications of key components, including plate-fin heat exchangers and cryogenic turbo-expanders are incorporated into a commercial software (Aspen HYSYS) to estimate the temporal change of temperature and flow rate over the cryocooler. An initial cool-down scenario and some examples on daily variation of cryocooler are presented and discussed, aiming at stable control schemes of a long cable system.

  14. FESAC-SP Whyte New HTS superconductors + integrated high-B physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    launchers & coupling G-9 Tame PMI & heat exhaust G-10-15 Integrated fusion materials & components High & innovative launchers for steady-state - High pressure boundary & PMI control Demountable HTS coils

  15. STRIPES AND SUPERCONDUCTIVITY IN CUPRATE SUPERCONDUCTORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TRANQUADA, J.M.

    2005-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    One type of order that has been observed to compete with superconductivity in cuprates involves alternating charge and antiferromagnetic stripes. Recent neutron scattering studies indicate that the magnetic excitation spectrum of a stripe-ordered sample is very similar to that observed in superconducting samples. In fact, it now appears that there may be a universal magnetic spectrum for the cuprates. One likely implication of this universal spectrum is that stripes of a dynamic form are present in the superconducting samples. On cooling through the superconducting transition temperature, a gap opens in the magnetic spectrum, and the weight lost at low energy piles up above the gap; the transition temperature is correlated with the size of the spin gap. Depending on the magnitude of the spin gap with respect to the magnetic spectrum, the enhanced magnetic scattering at low temperature can be either commensurate or incommensurate. Connections between stripe correlations and superconductivity are discussed.

  16. The millimeter-wave properties of superconducting microstrip lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The millimeter-wave properties of superconducting microstrip lines A. Vayonakis£, C. Luo , H of the millimeter-wave properties of superconducting thin-film microstrip transmission lines. Our exper- imental, with a temperature-independent loss tangent of 5 3 ¦0 5 ¢10 3 for our samples. INTRODUCTION Superconducting

  17. PERCOLATION AND SUPERCONDUCTIVITY IN ION-IMPLANTED ALUMINIUM FILMS (*)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    L-435 PERCOLATION AND SUPERCONDUCTIVITY IN ION-IMPLANTED ALUMINIUM FILMS (*) F. MEUNIER and P of Si and Ge in Al thin films at 8 K produces alloys exhibiting enhanced superconducting transition in the superconducting transition temperature Tc of several such alloys [2], [5], [6] : Josephson tunnelling

  18. Superconducting Properties MgB 2 from First Principles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, E.K.U.

    Superconducting Properties MgB 2 from First Principles Floris, Profeta, Lathiotakis, 1 LuË?ders, 4 M, such very high superconducting transition temperature. Focusing on compound, report first nontrivial.25.Jb, 71.15.Mb, -- 74.70.Ad Understanding and predicting superconducting proper­ ties real materials

  19. Superconductive articles including cerium oxide layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wu, X.D.; Muenchausen, R.E.

    1993-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A ceramic superconductor comprising a metal oxide substrate, a ceramic high temperature superconductive material, and a intermediate layer of a material having a cubic crystal structure, said layer situated between the substrate and the superconductive material is provided, and a structure for supporting a ceramic superconducting material is provided, said structure comprising a metal oxide substrate, and a layer situated over the surface of the substrate to substantially inhibit interdiffusion between the substrate and a ceramic superconducting material deposited upon said structure. 7 figures.

  20. Reverse circling supercurrents along a superconducting ring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian De Cao

    2012-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The reason why high temperature superconductivity has been being debated is that many basic ideas in literatures are wrong. This work shows that the magnetic flux quantum in a superconducting ring have been inaccurately explained in fact, thus we suggest a reinterpretation of the magnetic flux quantum in a superconducting ring on the basis of the translations of pairs. We also predict that the internal and external surface of a superconducting tube have the reverse circling supercurrents. This means that a more thick tube could trap a larger amount of flux. Both the magnetic flux quantum and the reverse circling supercurrents could not be found with the London equation.

  1. assembled coated conductor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CERN Preprints Summary: The powering of the LHC machine requires more than 1000 High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) current leads. These leads contain, at their cold...

  2. assembling coated conductor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CERN Preprints Summary: The powering of the LHC machine requires more than 1000 High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) current leads. These leads contain, at their cold...

  3. assembled coated conductors: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CERN Preprints Summary: The powering of the LHC machine requires more than 1000 High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) current leads. These leads contain, at their cold...

  4. Overcoming Resistance, and Lighting Up the World

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Identifying the mysterious mechanism underlying high-temperature superconductivity (HTS) remains one of the most important and tantalizing puzzles in physics.

  5. STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY E. I. DUPONT DE NEMOURS...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of this agreement encompasses building a full scale commercial High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) Reciprocating Magnet Separation Unit. Ultimately, the device is to be used...

  6. STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY SUPERPOWER, INC. FOR AN...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    design, build, install, test and operate a 138kv class prototype high temperature superconducting (HTS) fault current limiter (FCL) at a utility transmission substation. The...

  7. Effect of source tuning parameters on the plasma potential of heavy ions in the 18 GHz high temperature superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodrigues, G.; Mathur, Y.; Kumar, Sarvesh; Mandal, A.; Kanjilal, D.; Roy, A. [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi (India); Baskaran, R. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, Tamil Nadu (India); Kukrety, S. [Department of Physics, Kirori Mal College, Delhi University (India)

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasma potentials for various heavy ions have been measured using the retarding field technique in the 18 GHz high temperature superconducting ECR ion source, PKDELIS [C. Bieth, S. Kantas, P. Sortais, D. Kanjilal, G. Rodrigues, S. Milward, S. Harrison, and R. McMahon, Nucl. Instrum. Methods B 235, 498 (2005); D. Kanjilal, G. Rodrigues, P. Kumar, A. Mandal, A. Roy, C. Bieth, S. Kantas, and P. Sortais, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 77, 03A317 (2006)]. The ion beam extracted from the source is decelerated close to the location of a mesh which is polarized to the source potential and beams having different plasma potentials are measured on a Faraday cup located downstream of the mesh. The influence of various source parameters, viz., RF power, gas pressure, magnetic field, negative dc bias, and gas mixing on the plasma potential is studied. The study helped to find an upper limit of the energy spread of the heavy ions, which can influence the design of the longitudinal optics of the high current injector being developed at the Inter University Accelerator Centre. It is observed that the plasma potentials are decreasing for increasing charge states and a mass effect is clearly observed for the ions with similar operating gas pressures. In the case of gas mixing, it is observed that the plasma potential minimizes at an optimum value of the gas pressure of the mixing gas and the mean charge state maximizes at this value. Details of the measurements carried out as a function of various source parameters and its impact on the longitudinal optics are presented.

  8. Probes for investigating the effect of magnetic field, field orientation, temperature and strain on the critical current density of anisotropic high-temperature superconducting tapes in a split-pair 15 T horizontal magnet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sunwong, P.; Higgins, J. S.; Hampshire, D. P. [Superconductivity Group, Centre for Materials Physics, Department of Physics, University of Durham, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the designs of probes for making critical current density (J{sub c}) measurements on anisotropic high-temperature superconducting tapes as a function of field, field orientation, temperature and strain in our 40 mm bore, split-pair 15 T horizontal magnet. Emphasis is placed on the design of three components: the vapour-cooled current leads, the variable temperature enclosure, and the springboard-shaped bending beam sample holder. The vapour-cooled brass critical-current leads used superconducting tapes and in operation ran hot with a duty cycle (D) of ?0.2. This work provides formulae for optimising cryogenic consumption and calculating cryogenic boil-off, associated with current leads used to make J{sub c} measurements, made by uniformly ramping the current up to a maximum current (I{sub max}) and then reducing the current very quickly to zero. They include consideration of the effects of duty cycle, static helium boil-off from the magnet and Dewar (b{sup ?}), and the maximum safe temperature for the critical-current leads (T{sub max}). Our optimized critical-current leads have a boil-off that is about 30% less than leads optimized for magnet operation at the same maximum current. Numerical calculations show that the optimum cross-sectional area (A) for each current lead can be parameterized by LI{sub max}/A=[1.46D{sup ?0.18}L{sup 0.4}(T{sub max}?300){sup 0.25D{sup ?{sup 0{sup .{sup 0{sup 9}}}}}}+750(b{sup ?}/I{sub max})D{sup 10{sup ?{sup 3I{sub m}{sub a}{sub x}?2.87b{sup ?}}}}]× 10{sup 6}A m{sup ?1} where L is the current lead's length and the current lead is operated in liquid helium. An optimum A of 132 mm{sup 2} is obtained when I{sub max} = 1000 A, T{sub max} = 400 K, D = 0.2, b{sup ?} = 0.3 l?h{sup ?1} and L = 1.0 m. The optimized helium consumption was found to be 0.7 l?h{sup ?1}. When the static boil-off is small, optimized leads have a boil-off that can be roughly parameterized by: b/I{sub max?} ? (1.35 × 10{sup ?3})D{sup 0.41} l?h{sup ?1}?A{sup ?1}. A split-current-lead design is employed to minimize the rotation of the probes during the high current measurements in our high-field horizontal magnet. The variable-temperature system is based on the use of an inverted insulating cup that operates above 4.2 K in liquid helium and above 77.4 K in liquid nitrogen, with a stability of ±80 mK to ±150 mK. Uniaxial strains of ?1.4% to 1.0% can be applied to the sample, with a total uncertainty of better than ±0.02%, using a modified bending beam apparatus which includes a copper beryllium springboard-shaped sample holder.

  9. aerobic room temperature: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    superconducting quantum interference device SQUID-temperature RT sample scanning superconduct- ing quantum interference device SQUID microscopy SSM is a very Weiss, Benjamin P....

  10. ccsd00001219 Superconducting phase diagram of the lled skuterrudite PrOs 4 Sb 12

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ccsd­00001219 (version 2) : 16 Mar 2004 Superconducting phase diagram of the #12;lled skuterrudite a precise magnetic #12;eld-temperature superconducting phase diagram of PrOs4Sb12 down to 350 mK. We discuss the superconducting phase diagram of PrOs4Sb12 and its possible relation with an unconventional superconducting order

  11. Electrodynamics of superconducting pnictide superlattices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perucchi, A.; Pietro, P. Di [INSTM Udr Trieste-ST and Elettra - Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., Area Science Park, I-34012 Trieste (Italy); Capitani, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma Sapienza, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, I-00185 Rome (Italy); Lupi, S. [CNR-IOM and Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma Sapienza, P.le Aldo Moro 2, I-00185 Roma (Italy); Lee, S.; Kang, J. H.; Eom, C. B. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Jiang, J.; Weiss, J. D.; Hellstrom, E. E. [Applied Superconductivity Center, National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Florida State University, 2031 East Paul Dirac Drive, Tallahassee, Florida 32310 (United States); Dore, P. [CNR-SPIN and Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma Sapienza, P.le Aldo Moro 2, I-00185 Roma (Italy)

    2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    It was recently shown that superlattices where layers of the 8% Co-doped BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} superconducting pnictide are intercalated with non superconducting ultrathin layers of either SrTiO{sub 3} or of oxygen-rich BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}, can be used to control flux pinning, thereby increasing critical fields and currents, without significantly affecting the critical temperature of the pristine superconducting material. However, little is known about the electron properties of these systems. Here, we investigate the electrodynamics of these superconducting pnictide superlattices in the normal and superconducting state by using infrared reflectivity, from THz to visible range. We find that multigap structure of these superlattices is preserved, whereas some significant changes are observed in their electronic structure with respect to those of the original pnictide. Our results suggest that possible attempts to further increase the flux pinning may lead to a breakdown of the pnictide superconducting properties.

  12. Magnetism and superconductivity observed to exist in harmony

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    hundreds of degrees below zero, they will be one step closer to the "holy grail" of modern condensed matter physics: superconductivity at temperatures high enough to...

  13. DESIGN REQUIREMENTS AND OPTIONS FOR FINAL FOCUSING SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    DESIGN REQUIREMENTS AND OPTIONS FOR FINAL FOCUSING SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETS OF HEAVY-ION DRIVERS L of using both high-temperature superconductors and con- ventional low-temperature superconductors are investi- gated. The use of high-temperature superconducting materials may offer an attractive, although

  14. New Processing and Characterization Approaches for Achieving Full Performance of High Temperature Superconducting Tapes of (Bi,Pb)2Sr2Ca2Cu3Ox

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.E. Hellstrom; D.C. Larbalestier

    2006-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The thrust of this research was to identify and understand current limiting mechanisms (CLMs) that limit the current carrying capacity of (Bi,Pb)2Sr2Ca2Cu3Ox (2223) in Ag-sheathed wire. Our program concentrated on developing new methods to identify CLMs at the micrometer scale and new processing techniques to eliminate CLMs. All of the DOE Superconductivity Partnership Initiative (SPI) programs are using 2223 wire, so increasing the critical current density (Jc) in the wire can improve the technical performance of the demonstration projects, and at the same time it can decrease the cost of the wire. The important cost metric for superconducting wire is $/kA?m, so increasing Jc, which is in the denominator, decreases the wire cost. The obvious CLMs were micrometer size obstacles in the 2223 ceramic that block current flow, including: misaligned grains, cracks, pores, and nonsuperconducting phases. Pores and cracks - regions where there is no superconductor or the grains are not physically connected to one another ? cannot carry supercurrent, so they were the first CLMs we tried to eliminate with improved processing. Prior to the contract, we had started investigating overpressure (OP) processing with Williams at ORNL to heal cracks and remove pores. OP processing, which is a variant of hot isostatic pressing (HIP), uses an Ar/O2 gas mixture to apply a high pressure (up to 200 atm) to compress the sample and to set the oxygen partial pressure (pO2) to form 2223. Williams had a static pressure system we used to demonstrate that OP processing healed cracks and densified the wire, but the static system limited the processing parameters we could investigate. We proposed building a new gas-flow OP system to expand the experimental capabilities and to investigate new processing routes using the gas-flow OP system. Using the gas-flow OP system, we established new world records in 2003 for Jc and Ic. These records were finally matched by Sumitomo Electric Company in early 2006. The finest scale at which we could probe the local electromagnetic properties of a sample was about 100 ?m at the beginning of the contract. This was done by attaching voltage taps (10 ?m diameter wires) about 100 ?m apart on the 2223 conductor, and measuring the local I-V characteristics between each set of voltage taps. However, the largest CLMs were 2-3 times smaller than this length scale, and most CLMs were even much smaller. The original proposal was to investigate new methods to identify specific regions in samples that contained CLMs from their electromagnetic response, then to examine these regions of the sample using microstructural techniques to identify the CLM. We extended the use of magneto-optic (MO) imaging and magneto-optic current reconstruction (MOCR) and began developing a low-temperature laser scanning microscope (LTLSM) to show local current flow and local current dissipation, respectively, with a resolution of ~5 ?m. With MOCR we were able to show that local Jc in small regions of OP processed 2223 wire was as high as 300 kA/cm2 at 77K, which was 5-6 times higher than the average Jc measured across the whole sample.

  15. Superconducting Magnet Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Superconducting Magnet Division DOE NP Program Review - July 06 1 Brookhaven Magnet Division - Nuclear Physics Program Support Activities Superconducting Magnet Program RHIC Operations Support Spin Summary Peter Wanderer, DOE review, July 25, 2006 Acting Head, Superconducting Magnet Division #12

  16. Superconducting Spintronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linder, Jacob; Robinson, Jason W. A.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    such as the uranium based heavy- fermion compounds [35, 36] . This includes the creation of spin cur- rents without resistance [37–41] and spin-valve devices controlling the resistance of the junction via the superconducting critical temper- ature Tc [42]. There are... for each spin species [109]. Outlook and perspectives We end the review by offering our perspective on possible direc- tions that may be fruitful to explore in order to develop supercon- ducting spintronics. While progress has been most pronounced...

  17. ENERGY DIVISION STATUS OF SUPERCONDUCTING POWER TRANSFORMER

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    is not presently a room t e m p e r a t u r e phenomenon. Hence, any superconducting system must be cooied and remain cooled below a critical temperature to functioo as a...

  18. Magnetic fluctuations and heavy electron superconductivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norman, M.R.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A magnetic fluctuation self-energy based on neutron scattering data is used to calculate mass renormalizations, and superconducting critical temperatures and order parameters, for various heavy electron metals.

  19. SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassenzahl, W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Superconducting 30-MJ Energy Storage Coil", Proc. 19 80 ASC,Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage Plant", IEEE Trans.SlIperconducting Magnetic Energy Storage Unit", in Advances

  20. Superconducting Topological Insulators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Superconducting Topological Insulators Superconducting Topological Insulators Print Wednesday, 26 January 2011 00:00 Three-dimensional topological insulators (TIs), discovered...

  1. (Final Draft) Superconducting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANDAND (Final Draft) Achieving Advanced Electrical Wires From Superconducting Coatings Prepared and Development Roadmap to Achieve Electrical Wire Advancements from Superconducting Coatings (Final Draft) Edited

  2. Fast superconducting magnetic field switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goren, Yehuda (Mountain View, CA); Mahale, Narayan K. (The Woodlands, TX)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater that the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles.

  3. Superconducting Magnet Technology for Future Hadron Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scanlan, R.M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    within the framework of HTS wires for use at 20 K and 77 K,HTS materials is limited, not so much by intrinsic intragrain Je as by the ability of the wire

  4. Flavor Superconductivity & Superfluidity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthias Kaminski

    2010-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In these lecture notes we derive a generic holographic string theory realization of a p-wave superconductor and superfluid. For this purpose we also review basic D-brane physics, gauge/gravity methods at finite temperature, key concepts of superconductivity and recent progress in distinct realizations of holographic superconductors and superfluids. Then we focus on a D3/D7-brane construction yielding a superconducting or superfluid vector-condensate. The corresponding gauge theory is 3+1-dimensional N=2 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory with SU(N) color and SU(2) flavor symmetry. It shows a second order phase transition to a phase in which a U(1) subgroup of the SU(2) symmetry is spontaneously broken and typical superconductivity signatures emerge, such as a conductivity (pseudo-)gap and the Meissner-Ochsenfeld effect. Condensates of this nature are comparable to those recently found experimentally in p-wave superconductors such as a ruthenate compound. A string picture of the pairing mechanism and condensation is given using the exact knowledge of the corresponding field theory degrees of freedom.

  5. Critical temperatures of superconducting solders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pavão, Erica Medeiros

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Different magnetic strengths in MRIs produce different reactions and provide more insight into what being imaged. Being able to more quickly switch between two or more different magnet strengths would allow scientists in ...

  6. Superconducting Magnet Division Mike Harrison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Large Hadron Collider Program

    compensation with wires is also under active R&D at CERN). This also helps the triplets a little with centered-Showa-BNL) · Performance needs to increase by ~ factor of 3 from today HTS cable before and after winding in DCC008 & DCC Winding NOT disastrously large degradation despite extremly large bending strain (~1%) in HTS cable

  7. Shrink Tube Insulation Apparatus for Rebco Superconducting Tapes for Use in High Field Magnets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whittington, Andrew

    An increasing number of applications require the use of high temperature superconductors (HTS) such as (RE=Rare Earth) Ba2Cu3O7-x (REBCO) coated conductors [1]. HTS conductors show particularly great potential for high field magnets applications [1] due to their high upper critical fields [2], But several groups have shown that REBCO coated conductors are prone to delamination failure [3] [4] [5]. Under relatively low transverse stress the HTS film separates from the substrate and the conductor degrades [6]. This is problematic due to high transverse stresses that occur in fully epoxy impregnated solenoids wound with this conductor. Application of thin walled heat shrink tubing introduces a weak plane around the conductor, preventing delamination degradation [7]. However, manual application of the shrink tubing is impractical, requiring three operators limited to insulating 100 m lengths or less of REBCO conductor. The high risk of damage to the conductor, also associated with this process, shows the need for...

  8. Superconductivity for electric power systems: Program overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Largely due to government and private industry partnerships, electric power applications based upon high-temperature superconductivity are now being designed and tested only seven years after the discovery of the high-temperature superconductors. These applications offer many benefits to the national electric system including: increased energy efficiency, reduced equipment size, reduced emissions, increased stability/reliability, deferred expansion, and flexible electricity dispatch/load management. All of these benefits have a common outcome: lower electricity costs and improved environmental quality. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsors research and development through its Superconductivity Program for Electric Power Systems. This program will help develop the technology needed for U.S. industries to commercialize high-temperature superconductive electric power applications. DOE envisions that by 2010 the U.S. electric power systems equipment industry will regain a major share of the global market by offering superconducting products that outperform the competition.

  9. Superconductivity for Electric Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Superconductivity for Electric Systems Superconductivity Program Quarterly Progress Report For the Period October 1, 2006, to December 31, 2006 #12;2 Superconductivity Program Quarterly Progress Report Superconductivity Program Oak Ridge National Laboratory For U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery

  10. Superconductivity for Electric Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Superconductivity for Electric Systems Superconductivity Program Quarterly Progress Report For the Period January 1, 2007 to March 31, 2007 #12;2 Superconductivity Program Quarterly Progress Report Superconductivity Program Oak Ridge National Laboratory For: Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery

  11. Superconductivity for Electric Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Superconductivity for Electric Systems Superconductivity Program Quarterly Progress Report For the Period April 1, 2007, to June 30, 2007 #12;2 Superconductivity Program Quarterly Progress Report Superconductivity Program Oak Ridge National Laboratory For: Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery

  12. Quantum network of superconducting qubits through opto-mechanical interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang-qi Yin; W. L. Yang; L. Sun; L. M. Duan

    2015-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a scheme to realize quantum networking of superconducting qubits based on the opto-mechanical interface. The superconducting qubits interact with the microwave photons, which then couple to the optical photons through the opto-mechanical interface. The interface generates a quantum link between superconducting qubits and optical flying qubits with tunable pulse shapes and carrier frequencies, enabling transmission of quantum information to other superconducting or atomic qubits. We show that the scheme works under realistic experimental conditions and it also provides a way for fast initialization of the superconducting qubits under 1 K instead of 20 mK operation temperature.

  13. QUENCHES IN LARGE SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eberhard, P.H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    QUENCHES IN LARGE SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETS. P. H. Eberhard,Study of an Unprotected Superconducting Coil Going Normal,"Method for Testing Superconducting Magnets," LBL Physics

  14. A unified theory of superconductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiuqing Huang

    2008-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we study the reliability of BCS theory as a scientific explanation of the mystery of superconductivity. It is shown clearly that the phonon-mediated BCS theory is fundamentally incorrect. Two kinds of glues, pairing (pseudogap) glue and superconducting glue, are suggested based on a real space Coulomb confinement effect. The scenarios provide a unified explanation of the pairing symmetry, pseudogap and superconducting states, charge stripe order, spin density wave (SDW), checkerboard-type charge-ordered phase, magic doping fractions and vortex structures in conventional and unconventional (the high-Tc cuprates and MgB2) superconductors. The theory agrees with the existence of a pseudogap in high-temperature superconductors, while no pseudogap feature could be observed in MgB2 and most of the conventional superconductors. Our results indicate that the superconducting phase can coexist with a inclined hexagonal vortex lattice in pure MgB2 single crystal with a charge carrier density ps=1.49*10^{22}/cm^{3}. Finally, the physical reasons why the good conductors (for example, Ag, Au, and Cu) and the overdoped high-Tc superconductors are non-superconducting are also explored.

  15. Submicrometer superconducting YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 6+x particles made by a low-temperature synthetic route

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horowitz, H.S.; McLain, S.J.; Sleight, A.W.; Druliner, J.D.; Gai, P.L.; VanKavelaar, M.J. (E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Company, Wilmington, DE (USA)); Wagner, J.L.; Biggs, B.D.; Poon, S.J. (Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville (USA))

    1989-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Evidence suggests that superconducting, orthorhombic YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+x} (x{ge}0.5) is always produced by oxidation of the oxygen-deficient, tetragonal form (x{le}0.5) of this phase (commonly referred to as 123). A synthetic route whereby solution-derived, carbon-free precursors are decomposed at 650{degrees} to 700{degrees}C in inert atmosphere to yield tetragonal 123 is now available. Appropriate precursors include hydrated oxides derived from the hydrolysis of organometallic solutions and aqueous solution-derived hyponitrites. Subsequent oxidation of the tetragonal phase at 400{degrees}C results in submicrometer particles of orthorhombic 123. Superconductivity ({Tc} onset {approx}87 K) has been confirmed in these materials by both Meissner effect and specific-heat measurements.

  16. BNL has always been a leader in the world of superconducting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the Bulletin BNL has always been a leader in the world of superconducting magnets, which) (-452o Farenheit) become superconducting, that is, lose essentially all resistance to electricity superconducting at higher temperatures. These mate- rials can operate at the relatively high temperature of 77 K

  17. Permanent magnet design for high-speed superconducting bearings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, J.R.; Uherka, K.L.; Abdoud, R.G.

    1996-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A high temperature superconducting bearing including a permanent magnet rotor levitated by a high temperature superconducting structure is disclosed. The rotor preferably includes one or more concentric permanent magnet rings coupled to permanent magnet ring structures having substantially triangular and quadrangular cross-sections. Both alternating and single direction polarity magnet structures can be used in the bearing. 9 figs.

  18. Permanent magnet design for high-speed superconducting bearings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R. (5519 S. Bruner, Hinsdale, IL 60521); Uherka, Kenneth L. (830 Ironwood, Frankfort, IL 60423); Abdoud, Robert G. (13 Country Oaks La., Barrington Hills, IL 60010)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high temperature superconducting bearing including a permanent magnet rotor levitated by a high temperature superconducting structure. The rotor preferably includes one or more concentric permanent magnet rings coupled to permanent magnet ring structures having substantially triangular and quadrangular cross-sections. Both alternating and single direction polarity magnet structures can be used in the bearing.

  19. Distinguishing S-plus-minus and S-plus-plus electron pairing symmetries by neutron spin resonances in superconducting Sodium-Iron-Cobalt-Arsenic (transitional temperature = 18 Kelvin)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Tanmoy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Balatsky, Alexander V. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zhang, Chenglin [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee; Li, Haifeng [Institut fur Festkorperforschung, Julich, Germany; Su, Yiki [The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee; Nethertom, Tucker [The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee; Redding, Caleb [The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee; Carr, Scott [The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee; Schneidewind, Astrid [Forschungsneutronenquelle Heinz, Garching, Germany; Faulhaber, Enrico [Gemeinsame Forschergruppe HZB, Berlin, Germany; Li, Shiliang [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China; Yao, Daoxin [Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, China; Bruckel, Thomas [Institut fur Festkorperforschung, Julich, Germany; Dai, Pengchen [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China; Sobolev, Oleg [Forschungsneutronenquelle Heinz, Garching, Germany

    2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A determination of the superconducting (SC) electron pairing symmetry forms the basis for establishing a microscopic mechansim for superconductivity. For iron pnictide superconductors, the s{sup {+-}}-pairing symmetry theory predicts the presence of a sharp neutron spin resonance at an energy below the sum of hole and electron SC gap energies (E {le} 2{Delta}). Although the resonances have been observed for various iron pnictide superconductors, they are broad in energy and can also be interpreted as arising from the s{sup ++}-pairing symmetry with E {ge} 2{Delta}. Here we use inelastic neutron scattering to reveal a sharp resonance at E = 7 meV in the SC NaFe{sub 0.935}Co{sub 0.045}As (T{sub c} = 18 K). By comparing our experiments with calculated spin-excitations spectra within the s{sup {+-}} and s{sup ++}-pairing symmetries, we conclude that the resonance in NaFe{sub 0.935}Co{sub 0.045}As is consistent with the s{sup {+-}}-pairing symmetry, thus eliminating s{sup ++}-pairing symmetry as a candidate for superconductivity.

  20. LOW TEMPERATURE MAGNETORESISTIVITY OF G. REMENYI, D. JACCARD+, J. FIOUQUET++, A. BRIGGS++, Z. FISR+++

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    just above the superconducting transition temperature Tc. Extrapolated residual re- sistivity depends

  1. Lattice Vibrations and Superconductivity in Layered Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Roland E.; Alldredg, GP; WETTE, FWD.

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PHYSICAL REVIEW B VOLUME 2, NUMBER 7 1 OCTOB ER, 1970 Lattice Vibrations and Superconductivity in Layered Structures* B. E. Allen, G. P. Alldredge, and F. W. de bette DePartment of Physics, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (Received 18... May 1970) In order to estimate the influence of both surface and interface effects on phonon frequencies and superconducting transition temperatures in layered structures, we have calculated the vibrational modes of structures composed...

  2. advanced high-temperature reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of different instabilities that lead to many competing orders. In high-temperature superconduct- ors, besides the superconducting phase, many competing or- ders, such as...

  3. activated self-propagating high-temperature: Topics by E-print...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of different instabilities that lead to many competing orders. In high-temperature superconduct- ors, besides the superconducting phase, many competing or- ders, such as...

  4. anomalous high-temperature stability: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of different instabilities that lead to many competing orders. In high-temperature superconduct- ors, besides the superconducting phase, many competing or- ders, such as...

  5. aqueous high-temperature chemistry: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of different instabilities that lead to many competing orders. In high-temperature superconduct- ors, besides the superconducting phase, many competing or- ders, such as...

  6. Realization of a superconducting atom chip

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Nirrengarten; Angie Qarry; Cédric Roux; Andreas Emmert; Gilles Nogues; Michel Brune; Jean-Michel Raimond; Serge Haroche

    2006-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We have trapped rubidium atoms in the magnetic field produced by a superconducting atom chip operated at liquid Helium temperatures. Up to $8.2\\cdot 10^5$ atoms are held in a Ioffe-Pritchard trap at a distance of 440 $\\mu$m from the chip surface, with a temperature of 40 $\\mu$K. The trap lifetime reaches 115 s at low atomic densities. These results open the way to the exploration of atom--surface interactions and coherent atomic transport in a superconducting environment, whose properties are radically different from normal metals at room temperature.

  7. Superconducting magnet

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Satti, John A. (Naperville, IL)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A superconducting magnet designed to produce magnetic flux densities of the order of 4 to 5 Webers per square meter is constructed by first forming a cable of a plurality of matrixed superconductor wires with each wire of the plurality insulated from each other one. The cable is shaped into a rectangular cross-section and is wound with tape in an open spiral to create cooling channels. Coils are wound in a calculated pattern in saddle shapes to produce desired fields, such as dipoles, quadrupoles, and the like. Wedges are inserted between adjacent cables as needed to maintain substantially radial placement of the long dimensions of cross sections of the cables. After winding, individual strands in each of the cables are brought out to terminals and are interconnected to place all of the strands in series and to maximize the propagation of a quench by alternating conduction from an inner layer to an outer layer and from top half to bottom half as often as possible. Individual layers are separated from others by spiraled aluminum spacers to facilitate cooling. The wound coil is wrapped with an epoxy tape that is cured by heat and then machined to an interference fit with an outer aluminum pipe which is then affixed securely to the assembled coil by heating it to make a shrink fit. In an alternate embodiment, one wire of the cable is made of copper or the like to be heated externally to propagate a quench.

  8. Superconducting RF Cryomodule Demagnetization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, Anthony C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This note presents measurements that support the proposition that it is feasible to demagnetize a fully assembled superconducting RF cryomodule.

  9. Proton irradiation effects on critical current of bulk single-crystal superconducting YBCO wire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khanna, S.M. [Defence Research Establishment Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)] [Defence Research Establishment Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Figueredo, A.M. [National Research Council, Boucherville, Quebec (Canada). Industrial Materials Inst.] [National Research Council, Boucherville, Quebec (Canada). Industrial Materials Inst.

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors have investigated the effects of 10 MeV proton irradiation on the magnetization M and critical current density J{sub c} of bulk single-crystal YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} (YBCO) superconducting thick wire filaments produced through laser-heated floating zone (LHFZ) technique. M and J{sub c} were determined both along the length and perpendicular to the length of the wire. Radiation-induced enhancement of J{sub c} along the length of the wire was observed while there was a small decrease in J{sub c} {perpendicular} to its length. J{sub c} values along the length of the wire up to {approximately}1.4 {times} 10{sup 5} A/cm{sup 2} at 77K and {approximately}1.3 {times} 10{sup 6} A/cm{sup 2} at 30K and in applied magnetic field H = 1 T were observed in the irradiated samples. In the unirradiated sample, the difference in magnetization {Delta}M at a given field in the magnetic hysteresis loop for increasing and decreasing field applied {perpendicular} to the sample length was observed to depend on the orientation of the sample about its axis. This indicates anisotropy in J{sub c} along the sample length. This anisotropy increased on irradiation relative to the direction of irradiation. They believe that these J{sub c} values along the length are amongst the highest published J{sub c} values for bulk high temperature superconductor (HTS) thick wire filament.

  10. Basic principle of superconductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian De Cao

    2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The basic principle of superconductivity is suggested in this paper. There have been two vital wrong suggestions on the basic principle, one is the relation between superconductivity and the Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC), and another is the relation between superconductivity and pseudogap.

  11. The Results of Recent MICE Superconducting Spectrometer Solenoid Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, Michael A; Virostek, Steve P.; Zisman, Michael S.

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The MICE spectrometer solenoid magnets will be the first magnets to be installed within the MICE cooling channel. The MICE spectrometer solenoids may be the largest magnets that have been cooled using small two stage coolers. During the previous test of this magnet, the cooler first stage temperatures were too high. The causes of some of the extra first stage heat load has been identified and corrected. The rebuilt magnet had a single stage GM cooler in addition to the three pulse tube coolers. The added cooler reduces the temperature of the top of the HTS leads, the shield and of the first stage of the pulse tube coolers.

  12. Superconducting magnetic coil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aized, D.; Schwall, R.E.

    1999-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A superconducting magnetic coil includes a plurality of sections positioned axially along the longitudinal axis of the coil, each section being formed of an anisotropic high temperature superconductor material wound about a longitudinal axis of the coil and having an associated critical current value that is dependent on the orientation of the magnetic field of the coil. The cross section of the superconductor, or the type of superconductor material, at sections along the axial and radial axes of the coil are changed to provide an increased critical current at those regions where the magnetic field is oriented more perpendicularly to the conductor plane, to thereby increase the critical current at these regions and to maintain an overall higher critical current of the coil. 15 figs.

  13. Superconductivity, Superfluidity and Holography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alberto Salvio

    2013-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a concise review of holographic superconductors and superfluids. We highlight some predictions of the holographic models and the emphasis is given to physical aspects rather than to the technical details, although some references to understand the latter are systematically provided. We include gapped systems in the discussion, motivated by the physics of high-temperature superconductivity. In order to do so we consider a compactified extra dimension (with radius R), or, alternatively, a dilatonic field. The first setup can also be used to model cylindrical superconductors; when these are probed by an axial magnetic field a universal property of holography emerges: while for large R (compared to the other scales in the problem) non-local operators are suppressed, leading to the so called Little-Parks periodicity, the opposite limit shows non-local effects, e.g. the uplifting of the Little-Parks periodicity. This difference corresponds in the gravity side to a Hawking-Page phase transition.

  14. Superconducting magnetic coil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aized, Dawood (Marlboro, MA); Schwall, Robert E. (Northborough, MA)

    1999-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A superconducting magnetic coil includes a plurality of sections positioned axially along the longitudinal axis of the coil, each section being formed of an anisotropic high temperature superconductor material wound about a longitudinal axis of the coil and having an associated critical current value that is dependent on the orientation of the magnetic field of the coil. The cross section of the superconductor, or the type of superconductor material, at sections along the axial and radial axes of the coil are changed to provide an increased critical current at those regions where the magnetic field is oriented more perpendicularly to the conductor plane, to thereby increase the critical current at these regions and to maintain an overall higher critical current of the coil.

  15. Critical magnetic field of surface superconductivity in lead

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khlyustikov, I. N., E-mail: khly@kapitza.ras.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kapitza Institute of Physical Problems (Russian Federation)

    2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The critical superconductivity field H{sub c3} is measured on lead single crystals. It is shown that the temperature dependence of H{sub c3}/H{sub c} in the vicinity of superconducting transition temperature T{sub c} is essentially nonlinear. Relative changes in the value of H{sub c3}/H{sub c} reach approximately 30%, which cannot be described by the Ginzburg-Landau theory. The experimental temperature dependences lead to the conclusion that the surface superconducting transition temperature noticeably exceeds the superconducting transition temperature in the bulk of the semiconductor. The differences in the critical temperatures and in the Ginzburg-Landau parameters for lead are estimated.

  16. Protective link for superconducting coil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Umans, Stephen D. (Belmont, MA)

    2009-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A superconducting coil system includes a superconducting coil and a protective link of superconducting material coupled to the superconducting coil. A rotating machine includes first and second coils and a protective link of superconducting material. The second coil is operable to rotate with respect to the first coil. One of the first and second coils is a superconducting coil. The protective link is coupled to the superconducting coil.

  17. Crossover from a pseudogap state to a superconducting state

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian De Cao

    2011-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    On the basis of our calculation we deduce that the particular electronic structure of cuprate superconductors confines Cooper pairs to be firstly formed in the antinodal region which is far from the Fermi surface, and these pairs are incoherent and result in the pseudogap state. With the change of doping or temperature, some pairs are formed in the nodal region which locates the Fermi surface, and these pairs are coherent and lead to superconductivity. Thus the coexistence of the pseudogap and the superconducting gap is explained when the two kinds of gaps are not all on the Fermi surface. It is also shown that the symmetry of the pseudogap and the superconducting gap are determined by the electronic structure, and non-s wave symmetry gap favors the high-temperature superconductivity. Why the high-temperature superconductivity occurs in the metal region near the Mott metal-insulator transition is also explained.

  18. Coexisting Superconductivity and Magnetism in UCoGe Gregory S. Boebinger, National High Magnetic Field Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    Coexisting Superconductivity and Magnetism in UCoGe Gregory S. Boebinger, National High Magnetic focused on the coexistence of superconductivity and ferromagnetism, including UGe2, URhGe, and UCoGe. In these materials, superconductivity develops below the ferromagnetic Curie temperature TC without destroying

  19. ENHANCEMENT OF SUPERCONDUCTING Tc IN Pd-H LIKE COMPOUNDS BY OPTICAL PHONONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1227 ENHANCEMENT OF SUPERCONDUCTING Tc IN Pd-H LIKE COMPOUNDS BY OPTICAL PHONONS J. P. BURGER and D.450 1. Introduction. - The high superconducting tran- sition temperatures recently observed in Pd [1 interaction inhibiting superconductivity in pure Pd. As the density of states in Pd-H is rather similar [5

  20. Synthesis, structure, and superconducting properties of tantalum carbide nanorods and nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McHenry, Michael E.

    Synthesis, structure, and superconducting properties of tantalum carbide nanorods and nanoparticles, and HRSEM. Superconducting properties were characterized using a SQUID magnetometer. For reactions at lower in the rock salt structure and has a superconducting transition temperature of 9.7 K. In TaC nanorods

  1. Superconducting Properties of MgB2 from First Principles A. Floris,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, E.K.U.

    Superconducting Properties of MgB2 from First Principles A. Floris,1,2 G. Profeta,3 N. N, such as a very high superconducting transition temperature. Focusing on this compound, we report the first Understanding and predicting superconducting proper- ties of real materials is of both fundamental and techno

  2. A Test of HTS Power Cable in a Sweeping Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piekarz, H.; Hays, S.; Blowers, J.; Shiltsev, V.; /Fermilab

    2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Short sample HTS power cable composed of multiple 344C-2G strands and designed to energize a fast-cycling dipole magnet was exposed to a sweeping magnetic field in the (2-20) T/s ramping rate. The B-field orientation toward the HTS strands wide surface was varied from 0{sup 0} to 10{sup 0}, in steps of 1{sup 0}. The test arrangement allowed measurement of the combined hysteresis and eddy current power losses. For the validity of these measurements, the power losses of a short sample cable composed of multiple LTS wire strands were also performed to compare with the known data. The test arrangement of the power cable is described, and the test results are compared with the projections for the eddy and hysteresis power losses using the fine details of the test cable structures.

  3. A Test of HTS Power Cable in a Sweeping Magnetic Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piekarz, H; Blowers, J; Shiltsev, V

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Short sample HTS power cable composed of multiple 344C-2G strands and designed to energize a fast-cycling dipole magnet was exposed to a sweeping magnetic field in the (2-20) T/s rate. The B-field orientation toward the HTS strands wide surface was varied from 0 deg. to 10 deg., in steps of 1 deg.. The test arrangement allowed measurement of the combined hysteresis and eddy current power losses. For the validity of these measurements, the power losses of a short sample cable composed of multiple LTS wire strands were also performed to compare with the known data. The test arrangement of the power cable is described, and the test results are compared with the projections for the eddy and hysteresis power losses using the fine details of the test cable structures.

  4. Test of a NbTi Superconducting Quadrupole Magnet Based on Alternating Helical Windings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caspi, S.; Trillaud, F.; Godeke, A.; Dietderich, D.; Ferracin, P.; Sabbi, G.; Giloux, C.; Perez, J. G.; Karppinen, M.

    2009-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been shown that by superposing two solenoid-like thin windings, that are oppositely skewed (tilted) with respect to the bore axis, the combined current density on the surface is cos({theta})-like and the resulting magnetic field in the bore is a pure dipole field. Following a previous test of such a superconducting dipole magnet, a quadrupole magnet was designed and built using similar principles. This paper describes the design, construction and test of a 75 mm bore 600 mm long superconducting quadrupole made with NbTi wire. The simplicity of the design, void of typical wedges, end-spacers and coil assembly, is especially suitable for future high field insert coils using Nb{sub 3}Sn as well as HTS wires. The 3 mm thick coil reached 46 T/m but did not achieve its current plateau.

  5. Superconducting FCL using a combined inducted magnetic field trigger and shunt coil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tekletsadik, Kasegn D. (Rexford, NY)

    2007-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A single trigger/shunt coil is utilized for combined induced magnetic field triggering and shunt impedance. The single coil connected in parallel with the high temperature superconducting element, is designed to generate a circulating current in the parallel circuit during normal operation to aid triggering the high temperature superconducting element to quench in the event of a fault. The circulating current is generated by an induced voltage in the coil, when the system current flows through the high temperature superconducting element.

  6. HTS Solutions for a New Dimension in Power Superconductivity for Electric Systems 2004 Annual DOE Peer Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­ CRADA with ORNL on High Voltage Development, CRADAs with LANL and ANL dependent on funding $12.2M total

  7. Superconductive imaging surface magnetometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Overton, Jr., William C. (Los Alamos, NM); van Hulsteyn, David B. (Santa Fe, NM); Flynn, Edward R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved pick-up coil system for use with Superconducting Quantum Interference Device gradiometers and magnetometers involving the use of superconducting plates near conventional pick-up coil arrangements to provide imaging of nearby dipole sources and to deflect environmental magnetic noise away from the pick-up coils. This allows the practice of gradiometry and magnetometry in magnetically unshielded environments. One embodiment uses a hemispherically shaped superconducting plate with interior pick-up coils, allowing brain wave measurements to be made on human patients. another embodiment using flat superconducting plates could be used in non-destructive evaluation of materials.

  8. Spontaneous brillouin scattering quench diagnostics for large superconducting magnets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahar, Scott B

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Large superconducting magnets used in fusion reactors, as well as other applications, need a diagnostic that can non-invasively measure the temperature and strain throughout the magnet in real-time. A new fiber optic sensor ...

  9. Cryogenic direct current superconducting quantum interference device readout circuit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Le Roy, Robert J.

    Cryogenic direct current superconducting quantum interference device readout circuit Michael Mück SQUID readout circuit, which can be operated at liquid helium temperatures. Although room electronics, and feedback coil as short as possible to minimize phase shifts and time delays. Cooling

  10. Search for: superconduct* | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    superconduct* Find + Advanced Search Advanced Search All Fields: superconduct* Title: Full Text: Bibliographic Data: Creator Author: Name Name ORCID Search Authors Type: All...

  11. Dual control active superconductive devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martens, Jon S. (Albuquerque, NM); Beyer, James B. (Madison, WI); Nordman, James E. (Madison, WI); Hohenwarter, Gert K. G. (Madison, WI)

    1993-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A superconducting active device has dual control inputs and is constructed such that the output of the device is effectively a linear mix of the two input signals. The device is formed of a film of superconducting material on a substrate and has two main conduction channels, each of which includes a weak link region. A first control line extends adjacent to the weak link region in the first channel and a second control line extends adjacent to the weak link region in the second channel. The current flowing from the first channel flows through an internal control line which is also adjacent to the weak link region of the second channel. The weak link regions comprise small links of superconductor, separated by voids, through which the current flows in each channel. Current passed through the control lines causes magnetic flux vortices which propagate across the weak link regions and control the resistance of these regions. The output of the device taken across the input to the main channels and the output of the second main channel and the internal control line will constitute essentially a linear mix of the two input signals imposed on the two control lines. The device is especially suited to microwave applications since it has very low input capacitance, and is well suited to being formed of high temperature superconducting materials since all of the structures may be formed coplanar with one another on a substrate.

  12. Development of twisted high-temperature superconductor composite conductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christopherson, C.J.; Riley, G.N. Jr. [American Superconductor Corporation, Westborough, Massachusetts 01581 (United States)] [American Superconductor Corporation, Westborough, Massachusetts 01581 (United States)

    1995-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Multifilamentary high-temperature superconductor (HTS) composite conductors have been developed for alternating current (ac) applications. A twisted HTS conductor containing the Bi-2223 phase fabricated using a modified powder-in-tube technique is reported. Transport critical current densities of 13 800 and 10 900 A/cm {sup 2} (77 K, self-field, 1 {mu}V/cm) have been achieved for twisted tape and wire conductors with twist pitches of 3.7 and 3.6 mm, respectively. These conductors are strongly linked and are thus suitable for use in ac applications.

  13. Superconducting Magnet Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Ramesh

    Superconducting Magnet Division Permanent Magnet Designs with Large Variations in Field Strength the residual field of the magnetized bricks by concentrating flux lines at the iron pole. Low Field Design Medium Field Design Superconducting Magnet Division Dipole and Quadrupole Magnets for RHIC e

  14. Discovery of plutonium-based superconductivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarrao, John L.,; Thompson, J. D. (Joe David); Moreno, N. O.; Morales, L. A. (Luis A.); Wastin, F. (Franck); Rebizant, J.; Boulet, P.; Colineau, E.; Lander, G. H.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The discovery of superconductivity in single crystals of PuCoGa{sub 5} with transition temperature T{sub c}=18.5 K is discussed. The existing data lead to the speculation that the superconductivity in PuCoGa{sub 5} may be unconventional. In such a scenario the properties of PuCoGa{sub 5} would be intermediate between those of isostructural UCoGa{sub 5} and CeCoIn{sub 5}, more heavily studied f-electron materials.

  15. Apparatus for characterizing conductivity of superconducting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doss, James D. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus and method for noncontact, radio-frequency shielding current characterization of materials. Self- or mutual inductance changes in one or more inductive elements, respectively, occur when materials capable of supporting shielding currents are placed in proximity thereto, or undergo change in resistivity while in place. Such changes can be observed by incorporating the inductor(s) in a resonant circuit and determining the frequency of oscillation or by measuring the voltage induced on a coupled inductive element. The present invention is useful for determining the critical temperature and superconducting transition width for superconducting samples.

  16. Apparatus for characterizing conductivity of superconducting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doss, J.D.

    1993-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus and method for noncontact, radio-frequency shielding current characterization of materials. Self- or mutual inductance changes in one or more inductive elements, respectively, occur when materials capable of supporting shielding currents are placed in proximity thereto, or undergo change in resistivity while in place. Such changes can be observed by incorporating the inductor(s) in a resonant circuit and determining the frequency of oscillation or by measuring the voltage induced on a coupled inductive element. The present invention is useful for determining the critical temperature and superconducting transition width for superconducting samples. 10 figures.

  17. Levitation pressure and friction losses in superconducting bearings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R. (Downers Grove, IL)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A superconducting bearing having at least one permanent magnet magnetized with a vertical polarization. The lower or stator portion of the bearing includes an array of high-temperature superconducting elements which are comprised of a plurality of annular rings. An annular ring is located below each permanent magnet and an annular ring is offset horizontally from at least one of the permanent magnets. The rings are composed of individual high-temperature superconducting elements located circumferentially along the ring. By constructing the horizontally-offset high-temperature superconducting ring so that the c-axis is oriented in a radial direction, a higher levitation force can be achieved. Such an orientation will also provide substantially lower rotational drag losses in the bearing.

  18. Superconducting Radiofrequency (SRF) Accelerator Cavities

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Reece, Charlie

    2014-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Charlie Reece, an accelerator technology scientist, explains how superconducting radiofrequency accelerator cavities work.

  19. Improved superconducting magnet wire

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schuller, I.K.; Ketterson, J.B.

    1983-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention is directed to a superconducting tape or wire composed of alternating layers of copper and a niobium-containing superconductor such as niobium of NbTi, Nb/sub 3/Sn or Nb/sub 3/Ge. In general, each layer of the niobium-containing superconductor has a thickness in the range of about 0.05 to 1.5 times its coherence length (which for Nb/sub 3/Si is 41 A) with each copper layer having a thickness in the range of about 170 to 600 A. With the use of very thin layers of the niobium composition having a thickness within the desired range, the critical field (H/sub c/) may be increased by factors of 2 to 4. Also, the thin layers of the superconductor permit the resulting tape or wire to exhibit suitable ductility for winding on a magnet core. These compositions are also characterized by relatively high values of critical temperature and therefore will exhibit a combination of useful properties as superconductors.

  20. Segmented superconducting tape having reduced AC losses and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foltyn, Stephen R. (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM); Arendt, Paul N. (Los Alamos, NM); Holesinger, Terry G. (Los Alamos, NM); Wang, Haiyan (Los Alamos, NM)

    2009-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A superconducting tape having reduced AC losses. The tape has a high temperature superconductor layer that is segmented. Disruptive strips, formed in one of the tape substrate, a buffer layer, and the superconducting layer create parallel discontinuities in the superconducting layer that separate the current-carrying elements of the superconducting layer into strips or filament-like structures. Segmentation of the current-carrying elements has the effect of reducing AC current losses. Methods of making such a superconducting tape and reducing AC losses in such tapes are also disclosed.

  1. Superconducting Magnet Technology for Future Hadron Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scanlan, R.M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I. Superconducting Magnet Technology for Future Hadl"On1994. M.N. Wilson, Superconducting Magnets (Clarendon Press,The application of superconducting magnets to large-scale

  2. Self-recovering superconducting strip detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gabutti, A.; Gray, K.E.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a 1.8 {mu}m wide superconducting strip made of granular tungsten, we have observed self-recovering pulses when the detector is irradiated with a {sup 55}Fe 6 keV X-rays source. For low values of the bias current (i.e. I{sub b}<30{mu}A at T{sub b}=1.5K) the superconducting state is recovered in 10--50 ns giving voltage pulses across the strip of few hundred {mu}v in amplitude. At high bias currents the detector did not self-recover and a constant counting efficiency has measured at different operating temperatures. There are good indications that this high counting rate can be extended to all the reduced bias currents where the detector is able to reset itself after every switch. The current threshold between collapsing and propagating switches and the time evolution of the voltage pulses can be described using a thermal propagation model developed in previous works. The ability of detectors to automatically recover the superconducting state in a short period of time after sensing a particle is encouraging in the feasibility study of fast superconducting microvertex detectors and also confirm the potential application of superconducting strips as high fast resolution X-rays detectors.

  3. Second Generation HTs Wire Based on RABiTS Substrates and MOD YBCO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoop, U. [American Superconductor Corporation, Westborough, MA; Rupich, Marty [American Superconductor Corporation, Westborough, MA; Thieme, C. L. H. [American Superconductor Corporation, Westborough, MA; Verebelyi, D. T. [American Superconductor Corporation, Westborough, MA; Zhang, W. [American Superconductor Corporation, Westborough, MA; Li, Xiaoping [American Superconductor Corporation, Westborough, MA; Kodenkandath, Thomas [American Superconductor Corporation, Westborough, MA; Nguyen, N. [American Superconductor Corporation, Westborough, MA; Siegal, E. E. [American Superconductor Corporation, Westborough, MA; Civale, L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Holesinger, T. G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Maiorov, B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goyal, Amit [ORNL; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans [ORNL

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance of Second Generation (2G) high temperature superconducting wire manufactured by continuous reel-to-reel processes is nearing the 300 A/cm-width (77 K, self field) performance threshold for commercial power cable applications. The 2G manufacturing approach under development at American Superconductor is based on the combination of the RABiTS substrate-buffer technology with metal organic deposition (MOD) of the YBCO layer. The capability of this process has been demonstrated in multiple 10 meter lengths with critical currents exceeding 250 A/cm-width with high uniformity and reproducibility. Critical currents of 380 A/cm-width have been achieved in short length samples prepared by the same basic process. The incorporation of nanoparticles ('nanodots') into the YBCO layer using the MOD process has resulted in a 2-fold improvement in the critical current at 65 K in a 3 T field. The research and development focus at ASMC is now directed toward the economical scale-up of the RABiTS/MOD process, optimization of the conductor properties for targeted applications and the use of 2G wire in initial demonstration applications.

  4. Electronic stiffness of a superconducting niobium nitride single crystal under pressure Xiao-Jia Chen, Viktor V. Struzhkin, Zhigang Wu, Ronald E. Cohen, Simon Kung,* Ho-kwang Mao, and Russell J. Hemley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Zhigang

    Electronic stiffness of a superconducting niobium nitride single crystal under pressure Xiao report a quantitative study of pressure effects on the superconducting transition temperature Tc transition temperatures Tc's of materials, pur- suing new classes of superconductors and shedding light

  5. Fluctuations in systemsFluctuations in systems with superconducting islandswith superconducting islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fominov, Yakov

    Fluctuations in systemsFluctuations in systems with superconducting islandswith superconductingTwo mechanism of TTcc suppressionsuppression #12;SuperconductingSuperconductingmetal transitionsmetal: Superconductive transitionGrains: Superconductive transition #12;Islands on a film: what's the difference

  6. Fusion Engineering and Design 54 (2001) 167180 Options for the use of high temperature superconductor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    superconductor in tokamak fusion reactor designs L. Bromberg a, *, M. Tekula b , L.A. El-Guebaly c , R. Miller d temperature superconductors (HTS) in long term tokamak fusion reactors is analyzed in this paper. The well-documented physical properties of high temperature superconductors are used in the evaluation. Short-sam- ple wires

  7. Superconducting transmission line particle detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, Kenneth E. (Naperville, IL)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microvertex particle detector for use in a high energy physic collider including a plurality of parallel superconducting thin film strips separated from a superconducting ground plane by an insulating layer to form a plurality of superconducting waveguides. The microvertex particle detector indicates passage of a charged subatomic particle by measuring a voltage pulse measured across a superconducting waveguide caused by the transition of the superconducting thin film strip from a superconducting to a non-superconducting state in response to the passage of a charged particle. A plurality of superconducting thin film strips in two orthogonal planes plus the slow electromagnetic wave propogating in a superconducting transmission line are used to resolve N.sup.2 ambiguity of charged particle events.

  8. Superconducting transmission line particle detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, K.E.

    1988-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A microvertex particle detector for use in a high energy physic collider including a plurality of parallel superconducting thin film strips separated from a superconducting ground plane by an insulating layer to form a plurality of superconducting waveguides. The microvertex particle detector indicates passage of a charged subatomic particle by measuring a voltage pulse measured across a superconducting waveguide caused by the transition of the superconducting thin film strip from a superconducting to a non- superconducting state in response to the passage of a charged particle. A plurality of superconducting thin film strips in two orthogonal planes plus the slow electromagnetic wave propagating in a superconducting transmission line are used to resolve N/sup 2/ ambiguity of charged particle events. 6 figs.

  9. Radiofrequency amplifier based on a dc superconducting quantum interference device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hilbert, Claude (Berkeley, CA); Martinis, John M. (Berkeley, CA); Clarke, John (Berkeley, CA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A low noise radiofrequency amplifier (10), using a dc SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) as the input amplifying element. The dc SQUID (11) and an input coil (12) are maintained at superconductivity temperatures in a superconducting shield (13), with the input coil (12) inductively coupled to the superconducting ring (17) of the dc SQUID (11). A radiofrequency signal from outside the shield (13) is applied to the input coil (12), and an amplified radiofrequency signal is developed across the dc SQUID ring (17) and transmitted to exteriorly of the shield (13). A power gain of 19.5.+-.0.5 dB has been achieved with a noise temperature of 1.0.+-.0.4 K. at a frequency of 100 MHz.

  10. Radiofrequency amplifier based on a dc superconducting quantum interference device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hilbert, C.; Martinis, J.M.; Clarke, J.

    1984-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A low noise radiofrequency amplifer, using a dc SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) as the input amplifying element. The dc SQUID and an input coil are maintained at superconductivity temperatures in a superconducting shield, with the input coil inductively coupled to the superconducting ring of the dc SQUID. A radiofrequency signal from outside the shield is applied to the input coil, and an amplified radiofrequency signal is developed across the dc SQUID ring and transmitted to exteriorly of the shield. A power gain of 19.5 +- 0.5 dB has been achieved with a noise temperature of 1.0 +- 0.4 K at a frequency of 100 MHz.

  11. Giant Triplet Proximity Effect in Superconducting Pseudo Spin-Valves with Engineered Anisotropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, X. L.; Di Bernardo, A.; Banerjee, N.; Wells, A.; Bergeret, F. S.; Blamire, M. G.; Robinson, J. W. A.

    2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The proximity coupling of a thin superconducting layer and an inhomogeneous ferromagnet can lead to a significant reduction of the critical temperature due to the generation of spin-polarized triplet Cooper pairs. We report critical temperature...

  12. Method and apparatus of cryogenic cooling for high temperature superconductor devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yuan, Xing; Mine, Susumu

    2005-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for providing cryogenic cooling to HTS devices, in particular those that are used in high-voltage electric power applications. The method involves pressurizing liquid cryogen to above one atmospheric pressure to improve its dielectric strength, while sub-cooling the liquid cryogen to below its saturation temperature in order to improve the performance of the HTS components of the device. An apparatus utilizing such a cooling method consists of a vessel that contains a pressurized gaseous cryogen region and a sub-cooled liquid cryogen bath, a liquid cryogen heating coupled with a gaseous cryogen venting scheme to maintain the pressure of the cryogen to a value in a range that corresponds to optimum dielectric strength of the liquid cryogen, and a cooling system that maintains the liquid cryogen at a temperature below its boiling point to improve the performance of HTS materials used in the device.

  13. Electro thermal simulation of superconducting nanowire avalanche photodetectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francesco Marsili; Faraz Najafi; Charles Herder; Karl K. Berggren

    2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We developed an electro thermal model of NbN superconducting nanowire avalanche photodetectors (SNAPs) on sapphire substrates. SNAPs are single photon detectors consisting of the parallel connection of N superconducting nanowires. We extrapolated the physical constants of the model from experimental data and we simulated the time evolution of the device resistance, temperature and current by solving two coupled electrical and thermal differential equations describing the nanowires. The predictions of the model were in good quantitative agreement with the experimental results.

  14. Superconducting instabilities of R-charged black branes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon A. Gentle; Benjamin Withers

    2012-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore superconducting instabilities of black branes in SO(6) gauged supergravity at finite temperature and finite R-charge densities. We compute the critical temperatures for homogeneous neutral and superconducting instabilities in a truncation of 20 scalars and 15 gauge fields as a function of the chemical potentials conjugate to the three U(1) charges in SO(6). We find that despite the imbalance provided by multiple chemical potentials there is always at least one superconducting black brane branch, emerging at a temperature where the normal phase is locally thermodynamically stable. We emphasise that the three-equal charge solution, Reissner-Nordstrom, is subdominant to a thermodynamically unstable black brane at sufficiently low temperatures --- a feature which is hidden in an equal charge truncation.

  15. Witten Index and Superconducting Strings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. K. Oikonomou

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Yukawa interaction sector of superstring inspired models that give superconducting strings, can be described in terms of a supersymmetric quantum mechanics algebra. We relate the Witten index of susy quantum mechanics with an index characteristic to superconducting string models.

  16. A constrained theory of non-BCS type superconductivity in gapped Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vivek M. Vyas; Prasanta K. Panigrahi

    2011-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that gapped Graphene, with a local constraint that current arising from the two valley fermions are exactly equal, shows a non-BCS type superconductivity. Unlike the conventional mechanisms, this superconductivity phenomenon does not require any pairing. We estimate the critical temperature for superconducting-to-normal transition via Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless mechanism, and find that it is proportional to the gap.

  17. Superconducting articles of manufacture and method of producing same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Newkirk, Lawrence R. (Los Alamos, NM); Valencia, Flavio A. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bulk coatings of Nb.sub.3 Ge with high superconducting transition temperatures bonded to metallic substrates and a chemical vapor deposition method for producing such coatings on metallic substrates are disclosed. In accordance with the method, a Nb.sub.3 Ge coating having a transition temperature in excess of 21.5 K may be tightly bonded to a copper substrate.

  18. Holographic Superconductivity with Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruth Gregory

    2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    I review recent work on holographic superconductivity with Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity, and show how the critical temperature of the superconductor depends on both gravitational backreaction and the Gauss-Bonnet parameter, using both analytic and numerical arguments. I also review computations of the conductivity, finding the energy gap, and demonstrating that there is no universal gap ratio, $\\omega_g/T_c$, for these superconductors.

  19. Superconductivity and Magnetism: Materials Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .g. within high-Tc superconductivity, magnetic superconductors, MgB2, CMR materials, nanomagnetism and spin#12;#12;Superconductivity and Magnetism: Materials Properties and Developments #12;Copyright 2003 Risø National Laboratory Roskilde, Denmark ISBN 87-550-3244-3 ISSN 0907-0079 #12;Superconductivity

  20. Interplay of superconductivity, magnetism, and density waves in rare-earth tritellurides and iron-based superconducting materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zocco, Diego Andrés

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    B. Superconductivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .IV Superconductivity and Magnetism in Iron-PnictideSearch for Pressure Induced Superconductivity in Undoped Ce-

  1. Orbit Spaces in Superconductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vittorino Talamini

    2006-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In the framework of Landau theory of phase transitions one is interested to describe all the possible low symmetry ``superconducting'' phases allowed for a given superconductor crystal and to determine the conditions under which this crystal undergoes a phase transition. These problems are best described and analyzed in the orbit space of the high symmetry group of the ``normal, non-superconducting'' phase of the crystal. In this article it is worked out a simple example concerning superconductivity, that shows the P-matrix method to determine the equations and inequalities defining the orbit space and its stratification. This approach is of general validity and can be used in all physical problems that make use of invariant functions, as long as the symmetry group is compact.

  2. Supertubes versus superconducting tubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruben Cordero; Efrain Rojas

    2005-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we show the relationship between cylindrical D2-branes and cylindrical superconducting membranes described by a generic effective action at the bosonic level. In the first case the extended objects considered, arose as blown up type IIA superstrings to D2-branes, named supertubes. In the second one, the cosmological objects arose from some sort of field theories. The Dirac-Born-Infeld action describing supertubes is shown to be equivalent to the generic effective action describing superconducting membranes via a special transformation.

  3. Investigating the mechanism of High Temperature Superconductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keren, Amit

    in CLBLCO #12;S. Chakravarty et al. PRB 63, 094503 http://www.fis.unipr.it/~derenzi Lee, Nagaosa, and Wen.2 0 20 40 60 80 200 300 400 y TC ,Tg ,TN [K] R.Ofer et al. PRB 74, 220508 (2006) The CLBLCO Compound. Kanigel and G.Bazalitsky, PRB 74, 172506 (2006) O. Chmaissem, Y. Eckstein and C. G. Kuper, PRB 63, 174510

  4. High Temperature Superconductivity Partners | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To:Department of EnergySeacrist, Senior Fellow -

  5. High-Temperature Superconductivity Cable Demonstration Projects |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To:Department of EnergySeacrist, SeniorVolume 6Department of

  6. High Temperature Interfacial Superconductivity - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School football High School football Fancy footwork by C. Kim

  7. KT McDonald PASI2 (RAL) Apr 4, 2013 1 Radiation-Damage Considerations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    lifetime to only a few times the ITER limit. Radiation damage to HTS conductors is not as well documented wires Supercritical helium flows in interstices and central channel A high-temperature superconducting

  8. Supercond. Sci. Technol. 13 (2000) 12701278. Printed in the UK PII: S0953-2048(00)08817-5 A model for texture development in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferreira, Paulo J.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in high-temperature superconductor (HTS) single crystals, the large-scale application of polycrystalline HTSs, such as in wires, solenoids and magnets has been limited by the poor alignment of superconducting

  9. Deposition and characterization of YBa2Cu3O7 /LaMnO3 / MgO/TiN heterostructures on Cu metal substrates for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    the rolling process. I. INTRODUCTION The development of a superconducting wire technol- ogy that is functional-temperature superconductor (HTS) coating are deposited. However, in the future, more suc- cessful coated conductor

  10. STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY SUPERPOWER, INC. FOR AN...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Corporation to design, build, install and test a long length, high temperature superconducting (HTS) cable system in the 34.5 kV underground distribution system in Albany, NY....

  11. STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    a cooperative agreement for the development of a 100 MVA HTS (high temperature superconducting) generator under DOE Contract No. DE- FC36-93CH10589. This agreement was awarded...

  12. Magnetic signature of granular superconductivity in electrodeposited Pb nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riminucci, Alberto, E-mail: a.riminucci@bo.ismn.cnr.it [CNR, Institute for Nanostructured Materials, Via Gobetti 101, 40129 Bologna (Italy); H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Schwarzacher, Walther [H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanocrystalline freestanding Pb nanowires ?200?nm in diameter were fabricated by electrodeposition into track etched polycarbonate membranes in order to study their superconducting properties. Their superconducting critical temperature, as determined by measuring the Meissner effect, was the same as for bulk Pb, but their critical field was greatly enhanced up to ?3000?Oe. By assuming the wires consisted of spherical superconducting grains, an estimated grain size r?=?60?±?25?nm was obtained from the magnetization measured as a function of the applied magnetic field at a fixed temperature. An independent estimate for r?=?47?±?12?nm, in good agreement with the previous one, was obtained from the magnetization measured as a function of temperature at a fixed applied magnetic field. Transmission electron microscopy was used to characterize grain size at the wire edges, where a grain size in agreement with the magnetic studies was observed.

  13. 10MW Class Direct Drive HTS Wind Turbine: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-00312

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musial, W.

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes the work completed under the CRADA between NREL and American Superconductor (AMSC). The CRADA combined NREL and AMSC resources to benchmark high temperature superconducting direct drive (HTSDD) generator technology by integrating the technologies into a conceptual wind turbine design, and comparing the design to geared drive and permanent magnet direct drive (PMDD) wind turbine configurations. Analysis was accomplished by upgrading the NREL Wind Turbine Design Cost and Scaling Model to represent geared and PMDD turbines at machine ratings up to 10 MW and then comparing cost and mass figures of AMSC's HTSDD wind turbine designs to theoretical geared and PMDD turbine designs at 3.1, 6, and 10 MW sizes.

  14. Superconducting Magnets for Particle Accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossi, L

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Superconductivity has been the most influential technology in the field of accelerators in the last 30 years. Since the commissioning of the Tevatron, which demonstrated the use and operability of superconductivity on a large scale, superconducting magnets and rf cavities have been at the heart of all new large accelerators. Superconducting magnets have been the invariable choice for large colliders, as well as cyclotrons and large synchrotrons. In spite of the long history of success, superconductivity remains a difficult technology, requires adequate R&D and suitable preparation, and has a relatively high cost. Hence, it is not surprising that the development has also been marked by a few setbacks. This article is a review of the main superconducting accelerator magnet projects; it highlights the main characteristics and main achievements, and gives a perspective on the development of superconducting magnets for the future generation of very high energy colliders.

  15. WORLD RECORD ACCELERATING GRADIENT ACHIEVED IN A SUPERCONDUCTING NIOBIUM RF CAVITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geng, Rong-Li

    WORLD RECORD ACCELERATING GRADIENT ACHIEVED IN A SUPERCONDUCTING NIOBIUM RF CAVITY R.L. Geng On November 16, 2004, a CW accelerating gradient of 46 MV/m was achieved in a superconducting niobium cav- ity/m was achieved. This represents a world record gradient in a niobium RF resonator. At a reduced temperature of 1

  16. Journal of Superconductivity, Vol. 5, No. 4, 1992 Magnetic Penetration Depth Measurements in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    of superconductivity is the diamagnetic response of a superconductor below its transition temperature To. The abilityJournal of Superconductivity, Vol. 5, No. 4, 1992 Magnetic Penetration Depth Measurements in Cuprate Superconductors Steven M. AnlageI and Dong-Ho Wut Received 16 April 1992 We examine recent results

  17. Proceedings of the fourth international conference and exhibition: World Congress on superconductivity. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishen, K.; Burnham, C. [eds.] [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Houston, TX (United States). Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The goals of the World Congress on Superconductivity (WCS) have been to establish and foster the development and commercial application of superconductivity technology on a global scale by providing a non-adversarial, non-advocacy forum where scientists, engineers, businessmen and government personnel can freely exchange information and ideas on recent developments and directions for the future of superconductive research. Sessions were held on: accelerator technology, power and energy, persistent magnetic fields, performance characterization, physical properties, fabrication methodology, superconductive magnetic energy storage (SMES), thin films, high temperature materials, device applications, wire fabrication, and granular superconductors. Individual papers are indexed separately.

  18. Superconducting Magnet Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    Superconducting Magnet Division MAGNETIC DESIGN OF E-LENS SOLENOID AND CORRECTOR SYSTEM FOR RHIC* R.6 A gun collectors gun Combined Horizontal and Vertical Corrector Design Both types of dipole correctors. Gupta, M. Anerella, W. Fischer, G. Ganetis, X. Gu, A. Ghosh, A. Jain, P. Kovach, A. Marone, S. Plate, A

  19. Competition between Superconductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fominov, Yakov

    . Liu, D.V. Haviland, B. Nease, and A.M. Goldman, PRB 47, 5931 (1993)S I Bi films Rc = 6.45 k } M ? 0.M. Goldman, PRB 47, 5931 (1993) } M ? metal Drude conductivity + quantum corrections G ln T SMIT #12;Suppression of Superconductivity by Disorder MoxSi1-x films S. Okuma, T. Terashima, and Kokubo, PRB 58, 2816

  20. Langmuir vacuum and superconductivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veklenko, B. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation)

    2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that, in the 'jelly' model of cold electron-ion plasma, the interaction between electrons and the quantum electromagnetic vacuum of Langmuir waves involves plasma superconductivity with an energy gap proportional to the energy of the Langmuir quantum.

  1. seshadri@mrl Superconductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akhmedov, Azer

    Superconducting magnets and MRI The rudiments of Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory High TC Newer systems #12 are they achieved: Cascaded refrigeration processes involving the successive compression and expansion of different?ng 273.15 32 0 Water boiling 373.15 212 100 Refrigeration in a nutshell: Compress a fluid isothermally

  2. Idealelectricalmaterials,superconductorsofferconsiderable possibilities for energy applications. The high critical tempera-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Tiggelen, Bart

    - cessive generations of strong and flexible High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) wires for electrical, superconducting YBCO layer. We produced the world's first round HTS wires in September 2008. This project conductors, we have invented a new concept of a round superconductor wire (patent applications in 2008

  3. Micro-Electromagnetic Formation Flight of Satellite Systems Aya Sakaguchi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to maintain a satellite's relative position in a formation. Thus far, high temperature superconducting (HTS) wire has been considered the enabling technology and the concept has been sized for aggressive as well as HTS EMFF and shown to be advantageous in close proximity formations. Because the forces

  4. Development of Ultra-Efficient Electric Motors Final Technical Report Covering work from April 2002 through September 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rich Schiferl

    2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    High temperature superconducting (HTS) motors offer the potential for dramatic volume and loss reduction compared to conventional, high horspower, industrial motors. This report is the final report on the results of eight research tasks that address some of the issues related to HTS motor development that affect motor efficiency, cost, and reliability.

  5. Spontaneous Emission Near Superconducting Bodies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bo-Sture K. Skagerstam; Per Kristian Rekdal

    2007-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present paper we study the spontaneous photon emission due to a magnetic spin-flip transition of a two-level atom in the vicinity of a dielectric body like a normal conducting metal or a superconductor. For temperatures below the transition temperature T_c of a superconductor, the corresponding spin-flip lifetime is boosted by several orders of magnitude as compared to the case of a normal conducting body. Numerical results of an exact formulation are also compared to a previously derived approximative analytical expression for the spin-flip lifetime and we find an excellent agreement. We present results on how the spin-flip lifetime depends on the temperature T of a superconducting body as well as its thickness H. Finally, we study how non-magnetic impurities as well as possible Eliashberg strong-coupling effects influence the spin-flip rate. It is found that non-magnetic impurities as well as strong-coupling effects have no dramatic impact on the spin-flip lifetime.

  6. ARPES Studies of Cuprate Fermiology: Superconductivity, Pseudogap and Quasiparticle Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vishik, Inna

    2011-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We present angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) studies of the cuprate high-temperature superconductors which elucidate the relation between superconductivity and the pseudogap and highlight low-energy quasiparticle dynamics in the superconducting state. Our experiments suggest that the pseudogap and superconducting gap represent distinct states, which coexist below T{sub c}. Studies on Bi-2212 demonstrate that the near-nodal and near-antinodal regions behave differently as a function of temperature and doping, implying that different orders dominate in different momentum-space regions. However, the ubiquity of sharp quasiparticles all around the Fermi surface in Bi-2212 indicates that superconductivity extends into the momentum-space region dominated by the pseudogap, revealing subtlety in this dichotomy. In Bi-2201, the temperature dependence of antinodal spectra reveals particle-hole asymmetry and anomalous spectral broadening, which may constrain the explanation for the pseudogap. Recognizing that electron-boson coupling is an important aspect of cuprate physics, we close with a discussion of the multiple 'kinks' in the nodal dispersion. Understanding these may be important to establishing which excitations are important to superconductivity.

  7. Superconducting cuprate heterostructures for hot electron bolometers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wen, B.; Yakobov, R.; Vitkalov, S. A. [Department of Physics, City College of New York, New York 10031 (United States)] [Department of Physics, City College of New York, New York 10031 (United States); Sergeev, A. [SUNY Research Foundation, SUNY at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14226 (United States)] [SUNY Research Foundation, SUNY at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14226 (United States)

    2013-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Transport properties of the resistive state of quasi-two dimensional superconducting heterostructures containing ultrathin La{sub 2?x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4} layers synthesized using molecular beam epitaxy are studied. The electron transport exhibits strong deviation from Ohm's law, ?V??I{sup 3}, with a coefficient ?(T) that correlates with the temperature variation of the resistivity d?/dT. Close to the normal state, analysis of the nonlinear behavior in terms of electron heating yields an electron-phonon thermal conductance per unit area g{sub e?ph}?1 W/K cm{sup 2} at T = 20 K, one-two orders of magnitude smaller than in typical superconductors. This makes superconducting LaSrCuO heterostructures to be attractive candidate for the next generation of hot electron bolometers with greatly improved sensitivity.

  8. Overview of Superconductivity and Challenges in Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flükiger, Rene

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Considerable progress has been achieved during the last few decades in the various fields of applied superconductivity, while the related low temperature technology has reached a high level. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) are so far the most successful applications, with tens of thousands of units worldwide, but high potential can also be recognized in the energy sector, with high energy cables, transformers, motors, generators for wind turbines, fault current limiters and devices for magnetic energy storage. A large number of magnet and cable prototypes have been constructed, showing in all cases high reliability. Large projects involving the construction of magnets, solenoids as well as dipoles and quadrupoles are described in the present book. A very large project, the LHC, is currently in operation, demonstrating that superconductivity is a reliable technology, even in a device of unprecedented high complexity. A project of similar complexity is ITER, a fusion device...

  9. applying temperature control: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Applications Behnood G. Ghamsari, Member, IEEE, John Abrahams-temperature superconduct- ing spiral resonators as a viable candidate for realization of RFmicrowave...

  10. Superconducting vortex pinning with artificially prepared nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Yaniv Jacob

    E. Dubin, Physica C: Superconductivity 369, 21 (2002). R. D.P. G. De Gennes, Superconductivity of Metals and Alloys (W.Schuller, Journal of Superconductivity and Novel Magnetism

  11. Superconducting ``metals'' and ``insulators'' Smitha Vishveshwara

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Superconducting ``metals'' and ``insulators'' Smitha Vishveshwara Department of Physics, University to the distinction between normal metals and insulators: the superconducting ``metal'' with delocalized qua- siparticle excitations and the superconducting ``insulator'' with localized quasiparticles. We describe

  12. Superconducting solenoids for the Muon collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, M.A.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    muon collider has superconducting solenoids as an integralLBNL-44303 SCMAG-690 Superconducting Solenoids for the MuonDE-AC03-76SFOOO98. J Superconducting Solenoids for the Muon

  13. SUPERCONDUCTING SHIELDING By W. O. HAMILTON,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    41. SUPERCONDUCTING SHIELDING By W. O. HAMILTON, Stanford University, Department of Physics, Stanford, California (U.S.A.). Abstract. 2014 Superconducting shields offer the possibility of obtaining shielding from external time varying fields. Various techniques of superconducting shielding

  14. HIGH-FIELD SUPERCONDUCTING ACCELERATOR MAGNETS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, C.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    D. C. 'Niobium-Titanium Superconducting Material s ', in S.14, 1982 HIGH-FIELD SUPERCONDUCTING ACCELERATOR MAGNETS C.SUMAG-68 HIGH-FIELD SUPERCONDUCTING ACCELERATOR MAGNETS* C.

  15. Fiber Optic Cryogenic Sensors for Superconducting Magnets and Superconducting Power Transmission lines at CERN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiuchiolo, A; Cusano, A; Bajko, M; Perez, J C; Bajas, H; Giordano, M; Breglio, G; Palmieri, L

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design, fabrication and tests of a new generation of superconducting magnets for the upgrade of the LHC require the support of an adequate, robust and reliable sensing technology. The use of Fiber Optic Sensors is becoming particularly challenging for applications in extreme harsh environments such as ultra-low temperatures, high electromagnetic fields and strong mechanical stresses offering perspectives for the development of technological innovations in several applied disciplines.

  16. Competition between singlet and triplet superconductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian De Cao; Tie Bang Wang

    2009-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The competition between singlet and triplet superconductivity is examined in consideration of correlations on an extended Hubbard model. It is shown that the triplet superconductivity may not be included in the common Hubbard model since the strong correlation favors the singlet superconductivity, and thus the triplet superconductivity should be induced by the electron-phonon interaction and the ferromagnetic exchange interaction. We also present a superconducting qualification with which magnetism is unbeneficial to superconductivity.

  17. Equilibrium Distributions and Superconductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashot Vagharshakyan

    2011-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article two models for charges distributions are discussed. On the basis of our consideration we put different points of view for stationary state. We prove that only finite energy model for charges' distribution and well-known variation principle explain some well-known experimental results. A new model for superconductivity was suggested, too. In frame of that model some characteristic experimental results for superconductors is possible to explain.

  18. Superconducting magnet wire

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schuller, Ivan K. (Woodridge, IL); Ketterson, John B. (Evanston, IL); Banerjee, Indrajit (San Jose, CA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A superconducting tape or wire with an improved critical field is formed of alternating layers of a niobium-containing superconductor such as Nb, NbTi, Nb.sub.3 Sn or Nb.sub.3 Ge with a thickness in the range of about 0.5-1.5 times its coherence length, supported and separated by layers of copper with each copper layer having a thickness in the range of about 170-600 .ANG..

  19. Superconducting VAR control. [Patent application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boenig, H.J.; Hassenzahl, W.V.

    1980-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Static VAR control means are described employing an asymmetrically controlled Graetz bridge and a superconducting direct current coil having low losses and low cost characteristics.

  20. Superconducting dark energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi-Dong Liang; Tiberiu Harko

    2015-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on the analogy with superconductor physics we consider a scalar-vector-tensor gravitational model, in which the dark energy action is described by a gauge invariant electromagnetic type functional. By assuming that the ground state of the dark energy is in a form of a condensate with the U(1) symmetry spontaneously broken, the gauge invariant electromagnetic dark energy can be described in terms of the combination of a vector and of a scalar field (corresponding to the Goldstone boson), respectively. The gravitational field equations are obtained by also assuming the possibility of a non-minimal coupling between the cosmological mass current and the superconducting dark energy. The cosmological implications of the dark energy model are investigated for a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker homogeneous and isotropic geometry for two particular choices of the electromagnetic type potential, corresponding to a pure electric type field, and to a pure magnetic field, respectively. The time evolution of the scale factor, matter energy density and deceleration parameter are obtained for both cases, and it is shown that in the presence of the superconducting dark energy the Universe ends its evolution in an exponentially accelerating vacuum de Sitter state. By using the formalism of the irreversible thermodynamic processes for open systems we interpret the generalized conservation equations in the superconducting dark energy model as describing matter creation. The particle production rates, the creation pressure and the entropy evolution are explicitly obtained.

  1. Superconductivity and Superfluidity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. V. Vasiliev

    2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently there is a common belief that the explanation of superconductivity phenomenon lies in understanding the mechanism of the formation of electron pairs. Paired electrons, however, cannot form a superconducting condensate spontaneously. These paired electrons perform disorderly zero-point oscillations and there are no force of attraction in their ensemble. In order to create a unified ensemble of particles, the pairs must order their zero-point fluctuations so that an attraction between the particles appears. As a result of this ordering of zero-point oscillations in the electron gas, superconductivity arises. This model of condensation of zero-point oscillations creates the possibility of being able to obtain estimates for the critical parameters of elementary superconductors, which are in satisfactory agreement with the measured data. On the another hand, the phenomenon of superfluidity in He-4 and He-3 can be similarly explained, due to the ordering of zero-point fluctuations. It is therefore established that both related phenomena are based on the same physical mechanism.

  2. Superconducting gamma-detectors for non-destructive analysis in nuclear safeguards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robles Olson, Andrea Elizabeth

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultra-high energy resolution superconducting gamma ray detectors operated at temperatures of 0. 1 K can improve the accuracy of non-destructive analysis of nuclear materials. These detectors offer an order of magnitude ...

  3. THE TECHNOLOGY OF SUPERCONDUCTING ACCELERATOR DIPOLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassenzahl, W.V.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    properties of practical superconductors,2 2. their sta-winding from the superconductive to the resistive state. *I. II. III. IV. V. Superconducting Materials Conductor Matri

  4. Surface Superconductivity in Niobium for Superconducting RF Cavities0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Surface Superconductivity in Niobium for Superconducting RF Cavities0 S. Casalbuoni1,2 , E) parameters of the ultrapure niobium used for the fabrication of the nine-cell 1.3 GHz cavities for the lin.3 GHz nine-cell cavities which are made from pure niobium and cooled by superfluid helium at 2 K. The 0

  5. Rotatable superconducting cyclotron adapted for medical use

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blosser, Henry G. (East Lansing, MI); Johnson, David A. (Williamston, MI); Riedel, Jack (East Lansing, MI); Burleigh, Richard J. (Berkeley, CA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A superconducting cyclotron (10) rotatable on a support structure (11) in an arc of about 180.degree. around a pivot axis (A--A) and particularly adapted for medical use is described. The rotatable support structure (13, 15) is balanced by being counterweighted (14) so as to allow rotation of the cyclotron and a beam (12), such as a subparticle (neutron) or atomic particle beam, from the cyclotron in the arc around a patient. Flexible hose (25) is moveably attached to the support structure for providing a liquified gas which is supercooled to near 0.degree. K. to an inlet means (122) to a chamber (105) around superconducting coils (101, 102). The liquid (34) level in the cyclotron is maintained approximately half full so that rotation of the support structure and cyclotron through the 180.degree. can be accomplished without spilling the liquid from the cyclotron. With the coils vertically oriented, each turn of the winding is approximately half immersed in liquid (34) and half exposed to cold gas and adequate cooling to maintain superconducting temperatures in the section of coil above the liquid level is provided by the combination of cold gas/vapor and by the conductive flow of heat along each turn of the winding from the half above the liquid to the half below.

  6. Color superconducting quark matter in compact stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. B. Blaschke; T. Klahn; F. Sandin

    2007-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent indications for high neutron star masses (M \\sim 2 M_sun) and large radii (R > 12 km) could rule out soft equations of state and have provoked a debate whether the occurence of quark matter in compact stars can be excluded as well. We show that modern quantum field theoretical approaches to quark matter including color superconductivity and a vector meanfield allow a microscopic description of hybrid stars which fulfill the new, strong constraints. For these objects color superconductivity turns out to be an essential ingredient for a successful description of the cooling phenomenology in accordance with recently developed tests. We discuss the energy release in the neutrino untrapping transition as a new aspect of the problem that hybrid stars masquerade themselves as neutron stars. Quark matter searches in future generations of low-temperature/high-density nucleus-nucleus collision experiments such as low-energy RHIC and CBM @ FAIR might face the same problem of an almost crossover behavior of the deconfinement transition. Therefore, diagnostic tools shall be derived from effects of color superconductivity.

  7. Magnetoelastically coupled structural, magnetic, and superconducting order parameters in BaFe?(As??xPx)?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kuo, H.-H.; Analytis, James G.; Chu, J.-H.; Fernandes, R. M.; Schmalian, J.; Fisher, I. R.

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We measure the transport properties of mechanically strained single crystals of BaFe?(As??xPx)? over a wide range of x. The Néel transition is extremely sensitive to stress and this sensitivity increases as optimal doping is approached (doping with the highest superconducting Tc), even though the magnetic transition itself is strongly suppressed. Furthermore, we observe significant changes in the superconducting transition temperature with applied strain, which mirror changes in the composition x. These experiments are a direct illustration of the intimate coupling between different degrees of freedom in iron-based superconductors, revealing the importance of magnetoelastic coupling to the magnetic and superconducting transition temperatures.

  8. Method for obtaining large levitation pressure in superconducting magnetic bearings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, J.R.

    1997-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for compressing magnetic flux to achieve high levitation pressures. Magnetic flux produced by a magnetic flux source travels through a gap between two high temperature superconducting material structures. The gap has a varying cross-sectional area to compress the magnetic flux, providing an increased magnetic field and correspondingly increased levitation force in the gap. 4 figs.

  9. Preparation and characterization of TL-based superconducting thin films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Pingshu

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of high Tc superconductors. . . . A. High superconducting transition temperature. B. Short coherence length. C. Large spatial anisotropy. D. Charge carriers. 2. Crystal structure. A. Ideal perovskite unit celL. B. Structure of Tl... perovskite unit cell, ABX3 Oxygen-deficient YBa2Cu307 8 structure . Crystal structure of T10 double layer compounds. . . . . . . . , . . . . . . . . . . . Crystal Structure of T10 monolayer compounds. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Schematic...

  10. Nature Macmillan Publishers Ltd 1997 Superconductivity at 1017K

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemley, Russell J.

    Nature © Macmillan Publishers Ltd 1997 Superconductivity at 10­17K in compressed sulphur Viktor V-induced changes in materials properties is the transfor- mation of insulators into metals and superconductors, but also to a superconductor with a transition temperature, Tc, of 10.1 K. Using a highly sensitive

  11. Long Pulse Fusion Physics Experiments Without Superconducting Electromagnets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    without any refrigeration system), the consequent ``room temperature'' magnet operation can require of fusion, so near­term superconducting experience may not ultimately be useful. High magnetic field copper magnet heating. Pulse length is thus independent of device size and is easily extended. This scheme

  12. Long Pulse Fusion Physics Experiments Without Superconducting Electromagnets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    without any refrigeration system), the consequent "room temperature" magnet operation can require a costly of fusion, so near-term superconducting experience may not ultimately be useful. High magnetic field copper magnet heating. Pulse length is thus independent of device size and is easily extended. This scheme

  13. Columnar defect formation in nanorod/Tl2Ba2Ca2Cu3Oz superconducting Peidong Yang and Charles M. Liebera)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Peidong

    to the realization of large critical current density (Jc) high-temperature superconductor HTS applications.1 Although significant effort has been placed on high-Jc Bi2Sr2Can 1CunOz (n 2,3) and YBa2Cu3Oz wires,2,3 thallium based penetration depth of the protons that enables the creation of columnar defects in completed wires; however

  14. Power superconducting power transmission cable

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ashworth, Stephen P. (Cambridge, GB)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is for a compact superconducting power transmission cable operating at distribution level voltages. The superconducting cable is a conductor with a number of tapes assembled into a subconductor. These conductors are then mounted co-planarly in an elongated dielectric to produce a 3-phase cable. The arrangement increases the magnetic field parallel to the tapes thereby reducing ac losses.

  15. High critical current superconducting tapes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holesinger, Terry G. (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM); Foltyn, Stephen R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2003-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Improvements in critical current capacity for superconducting film structures are disclosed and include the use of a superconducting RE-BCO layer including a mixture of rare earth metals, e.g., yttrium and europium, where the ratio of yttrium to europium in the RE-BCO layer ranges from about 3 to 1 to from about 1.5 to 1.

  16. SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassenzahl, W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    impact of high critical temperature material s on SMES, asthen the high critical temperature materials are not likelyCRITICAL TEMPERATURE SUPERCONDUCTORS ON SMES If e ffect ive HTSC materials

  17. Method of manufacturing a niobium-aluminum-germanium superconductive material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, John L. (San Francisco, CA); Pickus, Milton R. (Oakland, CA); Douglas, Kent E. (Redondo Beach, CA)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for manufacturing flexible Nb.sub.3 (Al,Ge) multifilamentary superconductive material in which a sintered porous niobium compact is infiltrated with an aluminum-germanium alloy and thereafter deformed and heat treated in a series of steps at different successively higher temperatures preferably below 1000.degree. C. to produce filaments composed of Nb.sub.3 (Al,G3) within the compact. By avoiding temperatures in excess of 1000.degree. C. during the heat treatment, cladding material such as copper can be applied to facilitate a deformation step preceding the heat treatment and can remain in place through the heat treatment to also serve as a temperature stabilizer for supeconductive material produced. Further, these lower heat treatment temperatures favor formation of filaments with reduced grain size and, hence with more grain boundaries which in turn increase the current-carrying capacity of the superconductive material.

  18. Competition between superconductivity and spin density wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian De Cao

    2012-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hubbard model has been investigated widely by many authors, while this work may be new in two aspects. One, we focus on the possible effects of the positions of the gaps associated with the pairing and the spin density wave. Two, we suggest that the models with different parameters are appropriate for different materials (or a material in different doped regions). This will lead to some new insights into the high temperature superconductors. It is shown that the SDW can appear at some temperature region when the on-site Coulomb interaction is larger, while the SC requires a decreased U at a lower temperature. This can qualitatively explain the relationship between superconducting and pseudogap states of Cu-based superconductors in underdoped and optimally doped regions. The superinsulator is also discussed.

  19. Magnetoresistance oscillations in superconducting granular niobium nitride nanowires.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patel, U.; Xiao, Z. L.; Gurevich, A.; Avci, S.; Hua, J.; Divan, R.; Welp, U.; Kwok, W. K.; Northern Illinois Univ.; National High Magnetic Field Lab.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on magnetoresistance oscillations in superconducting NbN{sub x} nanowires synthesized through ammonia gas annealing of NbSe{sub 3} precursor nanostructures. Even though the transverse dimensions of the nanowires are much larger than the superconducting coherence length, the voltage-current characteristics of these nanowires at low temperatures are reminiscent of one-dimensional superconductors where quantum phase slips are associated with the origin of dissipation. We show that both the magnetoresistance oscillations and voltage-current characteristics observed in this work result from the granular structure of our nanowires.

  20. Superconductivity in Metal-mixed Ion-Implanted Polymer Films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. P. Micolich; E. Tavenner; B. J. Powell; A. R. Hamilton; M. T. Curry; R. E. Giedd; P. Meredith

    2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion-implantation of normally insulating polymers offers an alternative to depositing conjugated organics onto plastic films to make electronic circuits. We used a 50 keV nitrogen ion beam to mix a thin 10 nm Sn/Sb alloy film into the sub-surface of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) and report the low temperature properties of this material. We observed metallic behavior, and the onset of superconductivity below 3 K. There are strong indications that the superconductivity does not result from a residual thin-film of alloy, but instead from a network of alloy grains coupled via a weakly conducting, ion-beam carbonized polymer matrix.

  1. 2003 Annual Superconductivity2003 Annual Superconductivity Peer ReviewPeer Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003 Annual Superconductivity2003 Annual Superconductivity Peer ReviewPeer Review Raghu;Superconductivity Program at NREL for Electric SystemsSuperconductivity Program at NREL for Electric Systems Non) Industry CRADA:Industry CRADA: Oxford Superconducting Technologies (Ken Marken, Miao Hanping) *University

  2. Superconducting Topological Insulators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructure of All-Polymer.Supercomputing on aSuperconducting Topological

  3. Superconducting Topological Insulators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructure of All-Polymer.Supercomputing on aSuperconducting

  4. Superconducting Topological Insulators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructure of All-Polymer.Supercomputing onSuperconducting Topological

  5. Superconductivity Centennial | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructure of All-Polymer.Supercomputing onSuperconducting

  6. Superconducting gamma and fast-neutron spectrometers with high energy resolution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Friedrich, Stephan (San Jose, CA); , Niedermayr, Thomas R. (Oakland, CA); Labov, Simon E. (Berkeley, CA)

    2008-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Superconducting Gamma-ray and fast-neutron spectrometers with very high energy resolution operated at very low temperatures are provided. The sensor consists of a bulk absorber and a superconducting thermometer weakly coupled to a cold reservoir, and determines the energy of the incident particle from the rise in temperature upon absorption. A superconducting film operated at the transition between its superconducting and its normal state is used as the thermometer, and sensor operation at reservoir temperatures around 0.1 K reduces thermal fluctuations and thus enables very high energy resolution. Depending on the choice of absorber material, the spectrometer can be configured either as a Gamma-spectrometer or as a fast-neutron spectrometer.

  7. Superconductivity from D3/D7: Holographic Pion Superfluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pallab Basu; Jianyang He; Anindya Mukherjee; Hsien-Hang Shieh

    2008-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that a D3/D7 system (at zero quark mass limit) at finite isospin chemical potential goes through a superconductor (superfluid) like phase transition. This is similar to a flavored superfluid phase studied in QCD literature, where mesonic operators condensate. We have studied the frequency dependent conductivity of the condensate and found a delta function pole in the zero frequency limit. This is an example of superconductivity in a string theory context. Consequently we have found a superfluid/supercurrent type solution and studied the associated phase diagram. The superconducting transition changes from second order to first order at a critical superfluid velocity. We have studied various properties of the superconducting system like superfluid density, energy gap, second sound etc. We investigate the possibility of the isospin chemical potential modifying the embedding of the flavor branes by checking whether the transverse scalars also condense at low temperature. This however does not seem to be the case.

  8. Superconducting Materials and Conductors : Fabrication and Limiting Parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bottura, L

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Superconductivity is the technology that enabled the construction of the most recent generation of high-energy particle accelerators, the largest scientific instruments ever built. In this review we trace the evolution of superconducting materials for particle accelerator magnets, from the first steps in the late 1960s, through the rise and glory of Nb–Ti in the 1970s, till the 2010s, and the promises of Nb3Sn for the 2020s. We conclude with a perspective on the opportunities for high-temperature superconductors (HTSs). Many such reviews have been written in the past, as witnessed by the long list of references provided. In this review we put particular emphasis on the practical aspects of wire and tape manufacturing, cabling, engineering performance, and potential for use in accelerator magnets, while leaving in the background matters such as the physics of superconductivity and fundamental material issues.

  9. Surface-resistance measurements using superconducting stripline resonators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hafner, Daniel; Dressel, Martin; Scheffler, Marc, E-mail: scheffl@pi1.physik.uni-stuttgart.de [1. Physikalisches Institut, Universität Stuttgart, D-70550 Stuttgart (Germany)] [1. Physikalisches Institut, Universität Stuttgart, D-70550 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a method to measure the absolute surface resistance of conductive samples at a set of GHz frequencies with superconducting lead stripline resonators at temperatures 1–6 K. The stripline structure can easily be applied for bulk samples and allows direct calculation of the surface resistance without the requirement of additional calibration measurements or sample reference points. We further describe a correction method to reduce experimental background on high-Q resonance modes by exploiting TEM-properties of the external cabling. We then show applications of this method to the reference materials gold, tantalum, and tin, which include the anomalous skin effect and conventional superconductivity. Furthermore, we extract the complex optical conductivity for an all-lead stripline resonator to find a coherence peak and the superconducting gap of lead.

  10. Method for producing strain tolerant multifilamentary oxide superconducting wire

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Finnemore, D.K.; Miller, T.A.; Ostenson, J.E.; Schwartzkopf, L.A.; Sanders, S.C.

    1994-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A strain tolerant multifilamentary wire capable of carrying superconducting currents is provided comprising a plurality of discontinuous filaments formed from a high temperature superconducting material. The discontinuous filaments have a length at least several orders of magnitude greater than the filament diameter and are sufficiently strong while in an amorphous state to withstand compaction. A normal metal is interposed between and binds the discontinuous filaments to form a normal metal matrix capable of withstanding heat treatment for converting the filaments to a superconducting state. The geometry of the filaments within the normal metal matrix provides substantial filament-to-filament overlap, and the normal metal is sufficiently thin to allow supercurrent transfer between the overlapped discontinuous filaments but is also sufficiently thick to provide strain relief to the filaments. 6 figs.

  11. Reaching 10 ms single photon lifetimes for superconducting aluminum cavities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Reagor; Hanhee Paik; G. Catelani; L. Sun; C. Axline; E. Holland; I. M. Pop; N. A. Masluk; T. Brecht; L. Frunzio; M. H. Devoret; L. I. Glazman; R. J. Schoelkopf

    2013-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Three-dimensional microwave cavities have recently been combined with superconducting qubits in the circuit quantum electrodynamics (cQED) architecture. These cavities should have less sensitivity to dielectric and conductor losses at surfaces and interfaces, which currently limit the performance of planar resonators. We expect that significantly (>10^3) higher quality factors and longer lifetimes should be achievable for 3D structures. Motivated by this principle, we have reached internal quality factors greater than 0.5x10^9 and intrinsic lifetimes of 0.01 seconds for multiple aluminum superconducting cavity resonators at single photon energies and millikelvin temperatures. These improvements could enable long lived quantum memories with submicrosecond access times when strongly coupled to superconducting qubits.

  12. Overview on superconducting photoinjectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, A

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The success of most of the proposed energy recovery linac (ERL) based electron accelerator projects for future storage ring replacements (SRR) and high power IR–free-electron lasers (FELs) largely depends on the development of an appropriate source. For example, to meet the FEL specifications [J.W. Lewellen, Proc. SPIE Int. Soc. Opt. Eng. 5534, 22 (2004)] electron beams with an unprecedented combination of high brightness, low emittance (0.1 µmrad), and high average current (hundreds of mA) are required. An elegant way to create a beam of such quality is to combine the high beam quality of a normal conducting rf photoinjector with the superconducting technology, i.e., to build a superconducting rf photoinjector (SRF gun). SRF gun R&D programs based on different approaches have been launched at a growing number of institutes and companies (AES, Beijing University, BESSY, BNL, DESY, FZD, TJNAF, Niowave, NPS, Wisconsin University). Substantial progress was achieved in recent years and the first long term ...

  13. Overview of Superconducting Photoinjectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, A

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The success of most of the proposed ERL based electron accelerator projects for future storage ring replacements (SRR) and high power IR-FELs is contingent upon the development of an appropriate source. Electron beams with an unprecedented combination of high brightness, low emittance (0.1 µm rad) and high average current (hundreds of mA) are required to meet the FEL specification [1]. An elegant way to create such an unique beam is to combine the high beam quality of a normal conducting RF photo injector with the superconducting technology to get a superconducting RF photo injector (SRF gun). SRF gun R&D programs based on different approaches are under investigation at a growing number of institutes and companies (AES, Beijing University, BESSY, BNL, DESY, FZD, JLab, Niowave, NPS, Wisconsin University). Lot of progress could be achieved during the last years and first long term operation was demonstrated at the FZD [2]. In the near future, this effort will lead to SRF guns, which are indispensab...

  14. A Strained Organic Field-Effect-Transistor with a Gate-Tunable Superconducting Channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiroshi M. Yamamoto; Masaki Nakano; Masayuki Suda; Yoshihiro Iwasa; Masashi Kawasaki; Reizo Kato

    2013-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    In state-of-the-art silicon devices, mobility of the carrier is enhanced by the lattice strain from the back substrate. Such an extra control of device performance is significant in realizing high performance computing and should be valid for electric-field-induced superconducting devices, too. However, so far, the carrier density is the sole parameter for field-induced superconducting interfaces. Here we show an active organic superconducting field-effect-transistor whose lattice is modulated by the strain from the substrate. The soft organic lattice allows tuning of the strain by a choice of the back substrate to make an induced superconducting state accessible at low temperature with a paraelectric solid gate. An active three terminal Josephson junction device thus realized is useful both in advanced computing and in elucidating a direct connection between filling-controlled and bandwidth-controlled superconducting phases in correlated materials.

  15. Cr-free Fe-based metal oxide catalysts for high temperature water gas shift reaction of fuel processor using LPG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    lee, Joon Y.; Lee, Dae-Won; Lee, Kwan Young; Wang, Yong

    2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this study was to identify the most suitable chromium-free iron-based catalysts for the HTS (high temperature shift) reaction of a fuel processor using LPG. Hexavalent chromium (Cr6+) in the commercial HTS catalyst has been regarded as hazardous material. We selected Ni and Co as the substitution for chromium in the Fe-based HTS catalyst and investigated the HTS activities of these Crfree catalysts at LPG reformate condition. Cr-free Fe-based catalysts which contain Ni, Zn, or Co instead of Cr were prepared by coprecipitation method and the performance of the catalysts in HTS was evaluated under gas mixture conditions (42% H2, 10% CO, 37% H2O, 8% CO2, and 3% CH4; R (reduction factor): about 1.2) similar to the gases from steam reforming of LPG (100% conversion at steam/carbon ratio = 3), which is higher than R (under 1) of typically studied LNG reformate condition. Among the prepared Cr-free Febased catalysts, the 5 wt%-Co/Fe/20 wt%-Ni and 5 wt%-Zn/Fe/20 wt%-Ni catalysts showed good catalytic activity under this reaction condition simulating LPG reformate gas.

  16. Preliminary Test Results for the MICE Spectrometer Superconducting Solenoids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virostek, Steve P.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transactions on Applied Superconductivity 19, No. 3 MICETransactions on Applied Superconductivity 15, No. 2, p 1259,Transactions on Applied Superconductivity 18, No. 2, p 937,

  17. Quantum State Protection and Transfer Using Superconducting Qubits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keane, Kyle Michael

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    relaxation . . . . . . . . .1.5 Superconducting ? ux-biasedCorrection Algorithms for Superconducting Qubits,” APS Marchand correction for superconducting qubits,” Phys. Rev. A,

  18. SUPERCONDUCTING TRANSITION EDGE BOLOMETER AND NOISE IN THIN FILMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeh, Nan-Hsiung

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a) Composite Al superconducting bolometer (b) Composite SNSLBL-8019 SUPERCONDUCTING TRANSITION EDGE BOLOMETER AND INrights . LBL-8019 SUPERCONDUCTING TRANSITION EDGE BOLOMETER

  19. Special issue on quantum computing with superconducting qubits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Korotkov, Alexander N.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on quantum computing with superconducting qubits 10. Shaw,quantum computing with superconducting qubits Alexander N.years ago the ?rst superconducting qubit was demonstrated

  20. FORCED TWO PHASE HELIUM COOLING OF LARGE SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, M.A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DIAMETER TPC THIN SUPERCONDUCTING SOLENOID . 'i.A. Green,and Construction of a Superconducting Stabilized AluminumM.A. Green, "Large Superconducting Detector Magnets with

  1. Exotic superconducting phases of ultracold atom mixtures on triangular lattices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathey, Ludwig; Tsai, Shan-Wen; Castro Neto, Antonio H.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exotic Superconducting Phases of Ultracold Atom Mixtures onlattice contain exotic superconducting phases. For spin-1/2competition between superconducting phases with di?erent

  2. GROUND PLANE INSULATION FAILURE IN THE FIRST TPC SUPERCONDUCTING COIL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, M.A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FAILURE IN THE FIRST TPC SUPERCONDUCTING COIL M. A. Green,Time Projection Cnamber) thin superconducting solenoid. Thefailure of the first superconducting coil at the Lawrence

  3. A Superconducting transformer system for high current cable testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Godeke, A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Superconducting Transformer System for High Current Cablea Direct-Current (DC) superconducting transformer system forhigh current test of superconducting cables. The transformer

  4. Progress on Superconducting Magnets for the MICE Cooling Channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, Michael A

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    274 Progress on the Superconducting Magnets for the MICEM. A Green and J. M. Rey, “Superconducting Solenoids for anG, “Supercritically Cooled Superconducting Muon Channel,”

  5. Phase Structure and Instability Problem in Color Superconductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenji Fukushima

    2005-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We address the phase structure of color superconducting quark matter at high quark density. Under the electric and color neutrality conditions there appear various phases as a result of the Fermi surface mismatch among different quark flavors induced by finite strange quark mass; the color-flavor locked (CFL) phase where quarks are all energy gapped, the u-quark superconducting (uSC) phase where u-quarks are paired with either d- or s-quarks, the d-quark superconducting (dSC) phase that is the d-quark analogue of the uSC phase, the two-flavor superconducting (2SC) phase where u- and d-quarks are paired, and the unpaired quark matter (UQM) that is normal quark matter without pairing. Besides these possibilities, when the Fermi surface mismatch is large enough to surpass the gap energy, the gapless superconducting phases are expected. We focus our discussion on the chromomagnetic instability problem related to the gapless CFL (gCFL) onset and explore the instability regions on the phase diagram as a function of the temperature and the quark chemical potential. We sketch how to reach stable physical states inside the instability regions.

  6. Proximity effects in superconducting triplet spin-valve F2/F1/S R.G. Deminov a,n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fominov, Yakov

    Proximity effects in superconducting triplet spin-valve F2/F1/S R.G. Deminov a,n , L.R. Tagirov a effect Superconducting Ferromagnetic Triplet spin-valve Magnetization Transition temperature Interface of the spin-valve effect mode selection (standard switching effect, the triplet spin-valve effect or reentrant

  7. A superconducting-nanowire 3-terminal electronic device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adam N. McCaughan; Karl K. Berggren

    2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In existing superconducting electronic systems, Josephson junctions play a central role in processing and transmitting small-amplitude electrical signals. However, Josephson-junction-based devices have a number of limitations including: (1) sensitivity to magnetic fields, (2) limited gain, (3) inability to drive large impedances, and (4) difficulty in controlling the junction critical current (which depends sensitively on sub-Angstrom-scale thickness variation of the tunneling barrier). Here we present a nanowire-based superconducting electronic device, which we call the nanocryotron (nTron), that does not rely on Josephson junctions and can be patterned from a single thin film of superconducting material with conventional electron-beam lithography. The nTron is a 3-terminal, T-shaped planar device with a gain of ~20 that is capable of driving impedances of more than 100 k{\\Omega}, and operates in typical ambient magnetic fields at temperatures of 4.2K. The device uses a localized, Joule-heated hotspot formed in the gate to modulate current flow in a perpendicular superconducting channel. We have characterized the nTron, matched it to a theoretical framework, and applied it both as a digital logic element in a half-adder circuit, and as a digital amplifier for superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors pulses. The nTron has immediate applications in classical and quantum communications, photon sensing and astronomy, and its performance characteristics make it compatible with existing superconducting technologies. Furthermore, because the hotspot effect occurs in all known superconductors, we expect the design to be extensible to other materials, providing a path to digital logic, switching, and amplification in high-temperature superconductors.

  8. Radio Broadcasts from Superconducting Strings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi-Fu Cai; Eray Sabancilar; Daniele A. Steer; Tanmay Vachaspati

    2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Superconducting cosmic strings can give transient electromagnetic signatures that we argue are most evident at radio frequencies. We investigate the three different kinds of radio bursts from cusps, kinks, and kink-kink collisions on superconducting strings. We find that the event rate is dominated by kink bursts in a range of parameters that are of observational interest, and can be quite high (several a day at 1 Jy flux) for a canonical set of parameters. In the absence of events, the search for radio transients can place stringent constraints on superconducting cosmic strings.

  9. Design considerations for fast-cycling superconducting accelerator magnets of 2 T B-field generated by a transmission line conductor of up to 100 kA current

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piekarz, Henryk; Hays, Steven; Huang, Yuenian; Kashikhin, Vadim; /FERMILAB; de Rijk, Gijsbert; Rossi, Lucio; /CERN

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently proposed synchrotrons, SF-SPS at CERN and DSF-MR at Fermilab, would operate with a 0.5 Hz cycle (or 2 second time period) while accelerating protons to 480 GeV. We examine possibilities of superconducting magnet technology that would allow for an accelerator quality magnetic field sweep of 2 T/s. For superconducting magnets the cryogenic cooling power demand due to AC losses in the superconductor leads to a high operational cost. We outline a novel magnet technology based on HTS superconductors that may allow to reduce AC losses in the magnet coil possibly up to an order of magnitude as compared to similar applications based on LTS type superconductors.

  10. Finite-temperature phase diagram of nonmagnetic impurities in high-temperature superconductors using a d=3 tJ model with quenched disorder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thirumalai, Devarajan

    Finite-temperature phase diagram of nonmagnetic impurities in high-temperature superconductors to the superconducting phase in cuprates which is eliminated for p 0.05; in the same region for these dilute impurity destruction of the superconducting phase.1,2 In yttrium barium copper oxide YBCO , the transition temperature

  11. Superconducting dark energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Shi-Dong

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on the analogy with superconductor physics we consider a scalar-vector-tensor gravitational model, in which the dark energy action is described by a gauge invariant electromagnetic type functional. By assuming that the ground state of the dark energy is in a form of a condensate with the U(1) symmetry spontaneously broken, the gauge invariant electromagnetic dark energy can be described in terms of the combination of a vector and of a scalar field (corresponding to the Goldstone boson), respectively. The gravitational field equations are obtained by also assuming the possibility of a non-minimal coupling between the cosmological mass current and the superconducting dark energy. The cosmological implications of the dark energy model are investigated for a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker homogeneous and isotropic geometry for two particular choices of the electromagnetic type potential, corresponding to a pure electric type field, and to a pure magnetic field, respectively. The time evolution of the scale fact...

  12. Superconducting magnetic energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassenzahl, W.

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent programmatic developments in Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) have prompted renewed and widespread interest in this field. In mid 1987 the Defense Nuclear Agency, acting for the Strategic Defense Initiative Office, issued a request for proposals for the design and construction of SMES Engineering Test Model (ETM). Two teams, one led by Bechtel and the other by Ebasco, are now engaged in the first phase of the development of a 10 to 20 MWhr ETM. This report presents the rationale for energy storage on utility systems, describes the general technology of SMES, and explains the chronological development of the technology. The present ETM program is outlined; details of the two projects for ETM development are described in other papers in these proceedings. The impact of high T/sub c/ materials on SMES is discussed. 69 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Superconducting energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giese, R.F.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the status of energy storage involving superconductors and assesses what impact the recently discovered ceramic superconductors may have on the design of these devices. Our description is intended for R&D managers in government, electric utilities, firms, and national laboratories who wish an overview of what has been done and what remains to be done. It is assumed that the reader is acquainted with superconductivity, but not an expert on the topics discussed here. Indeed, it is the author`s aim to enable the reader to better understand the experts who may ask for the reader`s attention, support, or funding. This report may also inform scientists and engineers who, though expert in related areas, wish to have an introduction to our topic.

  14. Spinning superconducting electrovacuum soliton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irina Dymnikova

    2006-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In nonlinear electrodynamics coupled to general relativity and satisfying the weak energy condition, a spherically symmetric electrically charged electrovacuum soliton has obligatory de Sitter center in which the electric field vanishes while the energy density of electromagnetic vacuum achieves its maximal value. De Sitter vacuum supplies a particle with the finite positive electromagnetic mass related to breaking of space-time symmetry from the de Sitter group in the origin. By the G\\"urses-G\\"ursey algorithm based on the Newman-Trautman technique it is transformed into a spinning electrovacuum soliton asymptotically Kerr-Newman for a distant observer. De Sitter center becomes de Sitter equatorial disk which has both perfect conductor and ideal diamagnetic properties. The interior de Sitter vacuum disk displays superconducting behavior within a single spinning soliton. This behavior found for an arbitrary nonlinear lagrangian ${\\cal L}(F)$, is generic for the class of regular spinning electrovacuum solutions describing both black holes and particle-like structures.

  15. Mixed-mu superconducting bearings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, J.R.; Mulcahy, T.M.

    1998-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A mixed-mu superconducting bearing is disclosed including a ferrite structure disposed for rotation adjacent a stationary superconductor material structure and a stationary permanent magnet structure. The ferrite structure is levitated by said stationary permanent magnet structure. 9 figs.

  16. Mixed-mu superconducting bearings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL); Mulcahy, Thomas M. (Western Springs, IL)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A mixed-mu superconducting bearing including a ferrite structure disposed for rotation adjacent a stationary superconductor material structure and a stationary permanent magnet structure. The ferrite structure is levitated by said stationary permanent magnet structure.

  17. EIS-0138: Superconducting Super Collider

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy developed this EIS to analyze the potential environmental impacts of constructing the Superconducting Super Collider, a large proton accelerator, at each of seven alternative locations.

  18. On the theory of superconductivity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Kai-Chia

    The phenomenon of superconductivity has so for defied all attempts of explanation since it was first discovered in 1911. Although two phenomenological theories have been put forward and proved very successful, yet no atomic theories based on quantum...

  19. Progress of APT superconducting linac engineering development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, K.C.D.; Campbell, B.M.; Gentzlinger, R.C.; Balleyguier, P.; Waynert, J.A.; Haynes, W.B.; Kelley, J.P.; Rusnak, B.; Safa, H.

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors initiated a program to develop superconducting (SC) RF for high-power proton linacs. These linacs are useful in accelerator-driven transmutation technologies and the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) Project. They are developing multicell niobium cavities with elliptical-cell shapes at 700 MHz. These cavities, unlike most elliptical cavities for electron accelerators, are designed to accelerate protons at {beta}<1. Coaxial power couplers are being developed to transmit high (250 kW) CW RF power to the cavities. The couplers will be tested both at ambient temperature and at cryogenic temperature (2K). Their power handling and thermal properties will be measured. The cavities and power couplers will be integrated into a prototype cryomodule. The cryomodule will be tested and characterized with RF under cryogenic conditions required for a high-power proton linac. This paper describes the status of this program.

  20. Process for producing clad superconductive materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cass, Richard B. (Ringoes, NJ); Ott, Kevin C. (Los Alamos, NM); Peterson, Dean E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for fabricating superconducting composite wire by the steps of placing a superconductive precursor admixture capable of undergoing a self propagating combustion in stoichiometric amounts sufficient to form a superconductive product within a metal tube, sealing one end of said tube, igniting said superconductive precursor admixture whereby said superconductive precursor admixture endburns along the length of the admixture, and cross-section reducing said tube at a rate substantially equal to the rate of burning of said superconductive precursor admixture and at a point substantially planar with the burnfront of the superconductive precursor mixture, whereby a clad superconductive product is formed in situ, the product characterized as superconductive without a subsequent sintering stage, is disclosed.

  1. The challenge of unconventional superconductivity.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norman, M. R. (Materials Science Division)

    2011-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    During the past few decades, several new classes of superconductors have been discovered that do not appear to be related to traditional superconductors. The source of the superconductivity of these materials is likely different from the electron-ion interactions that are at the heart of conventional superconductivity. Developing a rigorous theory for any of these classes of materials has proven to be a difficult challenge and will remain one of the major problems in physics in the decades to come.

  2. HoustonChronicle.com Page 1 of 2 http://www.chron.com/cs/CDA/printstory.hts/prn/texas/880944 4/23/2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiao, Jung-Chih

    HoustonChronicle.com Page 1 of 2 http://www.chron.com/cs/CDA/printstory.hts/prn/texas/880944 4 in Richardson, Texas (c) 2001 Business Wire. News/Assignment Editors & High-Tech Writers REMINDER...for Tuesday (April 17) --(BUSINESS WIRE)-- WHAT: Chorum Technologies' presentation of findings on advanced, all

  3. High-Tc superconductivity in entirely end-bonded multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Takesue; J. Haruyama; N. Kobayashi; S. Chiashi; S. Maruyama; T. Sugai; H. Shinohara

    2005-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We report that entirely end-bonded multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) can show superconductivity with the transition temperature Tc as high as 12K that is approximately 40-times larger than those reported in ropes of single-walled nanotubes. We find that emergence of this superconductivity is very sensitive to junction structures of Au electrode/MWNTs. This reveals that only MWNTs with optimal numbers of electrically activated shells, which are realized by the end-bonding, can allow the superconductivity due to inter shell effects.

  4. Ceramic/metal and A15/metal superconducting composite materials exploiting the superconducting proximity effect and method of making the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcomb, Matthew J. (Manhattan Beach, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A composite superconducting material made of coated particles of ceramic superconducting material and a metal matrix material. The metal matrix material fills the regions between the coated particles. The coating material is a material that is chemically nonreactive with the ceramic. Preferably, it is silver. The coating serves to chemically insulate the ceramic from the metal matrix material. The metal matrix material is a metal that is susceptible to the superconducting proximity effect. Preferably, it is a NbTi alloy. The metal matrix material is induced to become superconducting by the superconducting proximity effect when the temperature of the material goes below the critical temperature of the ceramic. The material has the improved mechanical properties of the metal matrix material. Preferably, the material consists of approximately 10% NbTi, 90% coated ceramic particles (by volume). Certain aspects of the material and method will depend upon the particular ceramic superconductor employed. An alternative embodiment of the invention utilizes A15 compound superconducting particles in a metal matrix material which is preferably a NbTi alloy.

  5. Computation of the Field in an Axial Gap, Trapped-Flux Type Superconducting Electric Machine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Zejun; Ainslie, Mark D.; Campbell, Archie M.; Cardwell, David A.

    2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract—The Bulk Superconductivity Group at the University of Cambridge is currently investigating the use of high temper- ature superconductors in wire and bulk form to increase the electrical and magnetic loading of an axial gap, trapped flux... electric machines are an importantapplication of superconducting materials in both bulk and wire forms. Bulk high temperature superconductors, in partic- ular, are capable of trapping magnetic fields greater than 17 T below 30 K [1], [2], as well as up to 3...

  6. Design, Test and Demonstration of Saturable Reactor High-Temperature Superconductor Fault Current Limiters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank Darmann; Robert Lombaerde; Franco Moriconi; Albert Nelson

    2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Zenergy Power has successfully designed, built, tested, and installed in the US electrical grid a saturable reactor Fault Current Limiter. Beginning in 2007, first as SC Power Systems and from 2008 as Zenergy Power, Inc., ZP used DOE matching grant and ARRA funds to help refine the design of the saturated reactor fault current limiter. ZP ultimately perfected the design of the saturated reactor FCL to the point that ZP could reliably design a suitable FCL for most utility applications. Beginning with a very basic FCL design using 1G HTS for a coil housed in a LN2 cryostat for the DC bias magnet, the technology progressed to a commercial system that was offered for sale internationally. Substantial progress was made in two areas. First, the cryogenics cooling system progressed from a sub-cooled liquid nitrogen container housing the HTS coils to cryostats utilizing dry conduction cooling and reaching temperatures down to less than 20 degrees K. Large, round cryostats with â??warm boreâ? diameters of 1.7 meters enabled the design of large tanks to hold the AC components. Second, the design of the AC part of the FCL was refined from a six legged â??spiderâ? design to a more compact and lighter design with better fault current limiting capability. Further refinement of the flux path and core shape led to an efficient saturated reactor design requiring less Ampere-turns to saturate the core. In conclusion, the development of the saturable reactor FCL led to a more efficient design not requiring HTS magnets and their associated peripheral equipment, which yielded a more economical product in line with the electric utility industry expectations. The original goal for the DOE funding of the ZP project â??Design, Test and Demonstration of Saturable Reactor High-Temperature Superconductor Fault Current Limitersâ? was to stimulate the HTS wire industry with, first 1G, then 2G, HTS wire applications. Over the approximately 5 years of ZPâ??s product development program, the amount of HTS wire employed per FCL and its cost as a percentage of the total FCL product content had not dropped substantially from an unsustainable level of more than 50% of the total cost of the FCL, nor had the availability increased (today the availability of 2G wire for commercial applications outside of specific partnerships with the leading 2G wire manufacturers is extremely limited). ZP had projected a very significant commercial potential for FCLs with higher performance and lower costs compared to the initial models built with 1G wire, which would come about from the widespread availability of low-cost, high-performance 2G HTS wire. The potential for 2G wires at greatly reduced performance-based prices compared to 1G HTS conductor held out the potential for the commercial production of FCLs at price and performance levels attractive to the utility industry. However, the price of HTS wire did not drop as expected and today the available quantities of 2G wire are limited, and the price is higher than the currently available supplies of 1G wire. The commercial option for ZP to provide a reliable and reasonably priced FCL to the utility industry is to employ conventional resistive conductor DC electromagnets to bias the FCL. Since the premise of the original funding was to stimulate the HTS wire industry and ZP concluded that copper-based magnets were more economical for the foreseeable future, DOE and ZP decided to mutually terminate the project.

  7. Suppressed Superconductivity on the Surface of Superconducting RF Quality Niobium for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suppressed Superconductivity on the Surface of Superconducting RF Quality Niobium for Particle 32310, USA Abstract. Significant performance degradation of superconducting RF (radio frequency) niobium superconductivity at chemically treated RF-quality niobium. We found that pinning of vortices along GBs is weaker

  8. Chapter 54. Superconducting Circuits and Quantum Computing Superconducting Circuits and Quantum Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter 54. Superconducting Circuits and Quantum Computing 54-1 Superconducting Circuits. William D. Oliver (MIT Lincoln Laboratory Senior Staff Member, RLE affiliate) Overview: Superconducting computer. Our qubit species of choice is the superconducting persistent-current (PC) qubit (also known

  9. 35.4 T Field Generated Using a Layer Wound Superconducting Coil Made of REBCO Coated Conductor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    and round wire Bi-2212 are not be understood as mere competitors in field of HTS magnets but rather technology has caused a peak in the performance of HTS magnets. The two conductors featured here, REBCO

  10. OUT Success Stories: The Superconductivity Partnership Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reeca, L.; Platt, C.

    2000-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Superconductivity Partnership Initiative (SPI) stands at the forefront of worldwide efforts to advance research and development of superconducting power equipment for energy transmission, distribution, and industrial use.

  11. ORNL/HTSPC-12 ORNL Superconducting Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ORNL/HTSPC-12 ORNL Superconducting Technology Program for Electric Power Systems Annual Report States Government or any agency thereof. #12;ORNL/HTSPC-12 ORNL SUPERCONDUCTING TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM

  12. ORNL/HTSPC-18 ORNL Superconducting Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ORNL/HTSPC-18 ORNL Superconducting Technology Program for Electric Power Systems Annual Report Government or any agency thereof. #12;ORNL/HTSPC-18 ORNL SUPERCONDUCTING TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM FOR ELECTRIC

  13. ORNL/HTSPC-14 ORNL Superconducting Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ORNL/HTSPC-14 ORNL Superconducting Technology Program for Electric Power Systems Annual Report States Government or any agency thereof. #12;ORNL/HTSPC-14 ORNL SUPERCONDUCTING TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM

  14. HIGH-FIELD SUPERCONDUCTING ACCELERATOR MAGNETS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, C.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    D. C. 'Niobium-Titanium Superconducting Material s ', in S.Nb -Ti and Nb3Sn superconductors. , •• ,""" s. S. Clamp, Tie14, 1982 HIGH-FIELD SUPERCONDUCTING ACCELERATOR MAGNETS C.

  15. Superconducting Partnership with Readiness Review Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Superconducting Partnership with Industry: Readiness Review Update Mike Gouge, ORNL Steve Ashworth, LANL Paul Bakke, DOE-Golden DOE 2004 Superconductivity Peer Review July 27-29, 2004 #12;2 SPI

  16. ORNL/HTSPC-10 ORNL Superconducting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ORNL/HTSPC-10 ORNL Superconducting Technology Program for Electric Power Systems Annual Report http://www.doe.gov/bridge #12;ORNL/HTSPC-10 ORNL SUPERCONDUCTING TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM FOR ELECTRIC POWER

  17. A SUPERCONDUCTING-SOLENOID ISOTOPE SPECTROMETER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Donnell, Tom

    A SUPERCONDUCTING-SOLENOID ISOTOPE SPECTROMETER FOR PRODUCTION OF NEUTRON-RICH NUCLEI ( 136 Xe Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory's weekly \\Green Sheet," 30 July 1999 #12; c Thomas W. O'Donnell 2000 All

  18. A Synergy of Novel Experiments, Materials Science, Fundamental Physics, and Superconducting Magnets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Godeke, Arno

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fundamental Physics Superconducting Magnets Yields: Accuraterecord setting superconducting magnet systems ITER, NMRScience, Fundamental Physics, and Superconducting Magnets

  19. Thermodynamics and superconductivity of Th7(Fe, Ru, Os, Co, Rh, Ir)3 system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, James L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lashley, Jason C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Volz, Heather M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fisher, Robert A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Expanding the temperature range of previous specific-heat measurements on the Th7(Fe, Ru, Os, Co, Rh, Ir)3 system, we measure the effect of transition-metal substitution on total entropy (S{sub 298 k}), electronic specific heat ({gamma}), and Debye temperature ({Theta}D). In addition we measure the pressure dependence, up to 10 kbar, of the superconducting transition.

  20. Pressure Effects on Two Superconducting Iron-based Families

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Safa-Sefat, Athena [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Insight into the mechanism of high-temperature superconductivity can be gained by pressure-dependent studies of structural, thermodynamics and transport data. The role of pressure may be complicated by the level of hydrostaticity. High-pressure studies on two iron-based families of RFeAsO (R = rare-earth metals) and AFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} (A = alkaline-earth metals) are reviewed here.