National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for temperature superconductivity hts

  1. Silver-bearing, high-temperature, superconducting (HTS) paint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrando, W.A.

    1990-02-15

    A substantial set of device applications awaits development of a workable, durable, high-temperature superconducting (HTS) paint. Such a paint should be truly superconducting with its critical temperature T sub c>77K. For most of these applications, a high critical current (J sub c) is not required, although probably desirable. A process is described which can be used to produce silver-bearing HTS paint coatings on many engineering materials. Preliminary tests have shown good adherence to several ceramics and the ability to meet the superconducting criteria. Moreover, the coatings withstand multiple thermal cycling and stability under laboratory ambient storage conditions for periods of at least several months.

  2. Project Fact Sheet Columbus HTS Power Cable Superconductivity

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Columbus HTS Power Cable Superconductivity Partnerships with Industry www.oe.energy.gov Phone: 202 \ 586-1411 Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, OE-1 U.S. Department of Energy - 1000 Independence Avenue, SW - Washington, DC 20585 Plugging America Into the Future of Power This project involves field-testing of a long-length high-temperature superconducting (HTS) cable under real environmental stresses and real electrical loads. The cable system forms an important electrical

  3. High Temperature Superconducting Underground Cable

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrell, Roger, A.

    2010-02-28

    The purpose of this Project was to design, build, install and demonstrate the technical feasibility of an underground high temperature superconducting (HTS) power cable installed between two utility substations. In the first phase two HTS cables, 320 m and 30 m in length, were constructed using 1st generation BSCCO wire. The two 34.5 kV, 800 Arms, 48 MVA sections were connected together using a superconducting joint in an underground vault. In the second phase the 30 m BSCCO cable was replaced by one constructed with 2nd generation YBCO wire. 2nd generation wire is needed for commercialization because of inherent cost and performance benefits. Primary objectives of the Project were to build and operate an HTS cable system which demonstrates significant progress towards commercial progress and addresses real world utility concerns such as installation, maintenance, reliability and compatibility with the existing grid. Four key technical areas addressed were the HTS cable and terminations (where the cable connects to the grid), cryogenic refrigeration system, underground cable-to-cable joint (needed for replacement of cable sections) and cost-effective 2nd generation HTS wire. This was the world’s first installation and operation of an HTS cable underground, between two utility substations as well as the first to demonstrate a cable-to-cable joint, remote monitoring system and 2nd generation HTS.

  4. Project Fact Sheet Long Island HTS Power Cable Superconducting

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Long Island HTS Power Cable Superconducting Power Equipment www.oe.energy.gov Phone: 202-586-1411 Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, OE-1 U.S. Department of Energy - 1000 Independence Avenue, SW - Washington, DC 20585 Plugging America Into the Future of Power What is the status of the Project? The cable was energized April 22, 2008 and serves the equivalent of 300,000 homes. It is the first HTS power cable to operate at transmission voltage in the grid. LIPA plans to retain

  5. Albany HTS Power Cable | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Albany HTS Power Cable Albany HTS Power Cable This project involves the development and demonstration of a high-temperature superconducting (HTS) cable in the power grid in Albany, ...

  6. Columbus HTS Power Cable | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Columbus HTS Power Cable Columbus HTS Power Cable This project involves field-testing of a long-length high-temperature superconducting (HTS) cable under real environmental stresses and real electrical loads. The cable system forms an important electrical link in a utility substation in Columbus, Ohio. Columbus HTS Power Cable (349.01 KB) More Documents & Publications HTS Cable Projects High-Temperature Superconductivity Cable Demonstration Projects Albany HTS Power Cable

  7. Long Island HTS Power Cable | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Long Island HTS Power Cable This project involves the demonstration of a hightemperature ... HTS Cable Projects High-Temperature Superconductivity Cable Demonstration Projects ...

  8. Reflective HTS switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martens, J.S.; Hietala, V.M.; Hohenwarter, G.K.G.

    1994-09-27

    A HTS (High Temperature Superconductor) switch includes a HTS conductor for providing a superconducting path for an electrical signal and an serpentine wire actuator for controllably heating a portion of the conductor sufficiently to cause that portion to have normal, and not superconducting, resistivity. Mass of the portion is reduced to decrease switching time. 6 figs.

  9. Superconductivity Program Overview High-Temperature Superconductivity

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SuperconducTiviTy program haS Three FocuS areaS: SuperconducTiviTy applicaTionS Developing HTS-based electric power equipment such as transmission and distribution cables and fault current limiters Second-generaTion Wire developmenT Developing high-performance, low-cost, second- generation HTS wire at long lengths STraTegic reSearch Supporting fundamental research activities to better understand relationships between the microstructure of HTS materials and their ability to carry large electric

  10. High-temperature superconducting current leads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niemann, R.C.

    1995-03-01

    Use of high-temperature superconductors (HTSs) for current leads to deliver power to devices at liquid helium temperature can reduce refrigeration requirements to values significantly below those achievable with conventional leads. HTS leads are now near commercial realization. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has developed a sinter-forge process to fabricate current leads from bismuth-based superconductors. The current-carrying capacity of these leads is five times better than that of HTS leads made by a conventional fabrication process. ANL along with Superconductivity, Inc., has developed a 1500 ampere current lead for an existing superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) device. With Babcock & Wilcox Company, Argonne is creating 16-kiloampere leads for use in a 0.5 MWh SMES. In a third project Argonne performed characterization testing of a existing, proprietary conduction-cooled lead being developed by Zer Res Corp.

  11. Cryogenic System for a High Temperature Superconducting Power Transmission Cable

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demko, J.A.; Gouge, M.J.; Hughey, R.L.; Lue, J.W.; Martin, R.; Sinha, U.; Stovall, J.P.

    1999-07-12

    High-temperature superconducting (HTS) cable systems for power transmission are under development that will use pressurized liquid nitrogen to provide cooling of the cable and termination hardware. Southwire Company and Oak Ridge National Laboratory have been operating a prototype HTS cable system that contains many of the typical components needed for a commercial power transmission application. It is being used to conduct research in the development of components and systems for eventual commercial deployment. The cryogenic system was built by Air Products and Chemicals, Allentown, Pennsylvania, and can circulate up to 0.35 kg/s of liquid nitrogen at temperatures as low as 67 K at pressures of 1 to 10 bars. Sufficient cooling is provided for testing a 5-m-long HTS transmission cable system that includes the terminations required for room temperature electrical connections. Testing of the 5-m HTS transmission cable has been conducted at the design ac conditions of 1250 A and 7.5 kV line to ground. This paper contains a description of the essential features of the HTS cable cryogenic system and performance results obtained during operation of the system. The salient features of the operation that are important in large commercial HTS cable applications will be discussed.

  12. High temperature interfacial superconductivity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bozovic, Ivan; Logvenov, Gennady; Gozar, Adrian Mihai

    2012-06-19

    High-temperature superconductivity confined to nanometer-scale interfaces has been a long standing goal because of potential applications in electronic devices. The spontaneous formation of a superconducting interface in bilayers consisting of an insulator (La.sub.2CuO.sub.4) and a metal (La.sub.1-xSr.sub.xCuO.sub.4), neither of which is superconducting per se, is described. Depending upon the layering sequence of the bilayers, T.sub.c may be either .about.15 K or .about.30 K. This highly robust phenomenon is confined to within 2-3 nm around the interface. After exposing the bilayer to ozone, T.sub.c exceeds 50 K and this enhanced superconductivity is also shown to originate from a 1 to 2 unit cell thick interfacial layer. The results demonstrate that engineering artificial heterostructures provides a novel, unconventional way to fabricate stable, quasi two-dimensional high T.sub.c phases and to significantly enhance superconducting properties in other superconductors. The superconducting interface may be implemented, for example, in SIS tunnel junctions or a SuFET.

  13. High Temperature Superconductivity Partners | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Temperature Superconductivity Partners Map showing DOE's partnersstakeholders in the ... More Documents & Publications DOE Superconductivity Program Stakeholders DOE Provides up ...

  14. High-Temperature Superconductivity Cable Demonstration Projects...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    High-Temperature Superconductivity Cable Demonstration Projects High-Temperature Superconductivity Cable Demonstration Projects A National Effort to Introduce New Technology into ...

  15. Reflective HTS switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martens, Jon S.; Hietala, Vincent M.; Hohenwarter, Gert K. G.

    1994-01-01

    A HTS switch includes a HTS conductor for providing a superconducting path for an electrical signal and an serpentine wire actuator for controllably heating a portion of the conductor sufficiently to cause that portion to have normal, and not superconducting, resistivity. Mass of the portion is reduced to decrease switching time.

  16. Microwave properties of HTS (high temperature superconductor) films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooke, D.W.; Arendt, P.N.; Gray, E.R.; Muenchausen, R.E.; Bennett, B.L.; Foltyn, S.R.; Estler, R.C.; Wu, X.D.; Reeves, G.A.; Elliott, N.E.; Brown, D.R. ); Portis, A.M. ); Taber, R.C. . Labs.); Mogro-Campero, A. . Corporate Research and Development Ce

    1990-01-01

    High-frequency applications of high-temperature superconductors generally fall into two categories: devices that require low values of surface resistance R{sub s} in ambient surface magnetic fields H{sub rf}, and devices that require low R{sub s} in modest fields. Moreover, many applications can be realized with small-surface-area films whereas others require larger areas-radiofrequency (rf) cavities, for example. Regardless of the application, the potential of HTS films is predicated on satisfying one or both of the above-stated requirements. We have measured the surface resistance of small-area (1 cm{sup 2}) and large-area (6.5 cm{sup 2}) YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} (YBCO) films that have been laser ablated onto LaA{ell}O{sub 3} substrates, large-area (5.1 cm{sup 2}) YBCO films that have been e-beam deposited onto LaA{ell}O{sub 3}, and large-area (11.4 cm{sup 2}) T{ell}-based films that have been magnetron sputtered onto metallic substrates. The best R{sub s} values are obtained from the 1-cm{sup 2} laser-ablated films; they are 40 {mu}{Omega} and 340 {mu}{Omega} at 4 K and 77 K, respectively ({omega}/2{pi} = 10 GHz). Comparable values for Cu are 6 and 13 m{Omega}, respectively. Large-area T{ell}-based films yield typical R{sub s} values of 4 m{Omega} and 14 m{Omega} at 4 K and 77 K, respectively ({omega}/2{pi} = 18 GHz). The dependence of R{sub s} on H{sub rf} for these films indicates that surface fields as large as 55 Oe can be achieved with R{sub s} increasing only by a factor of 10. This field dependence is associated with c-axis texturing.

  17. High temperature interface superconductivity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gozar, A.; Bozovic, I.

    2016-01-20

    High-Tc superconductivity at interfaces has a history of more than a couple of decades. In this review we focus our attention on copper-oxide based heterostructures and multi-layers. We first discuss the technique, atomic layer-by-layer molecular beam epitaxy (ALL-MBE) engineering, that enabled High-Tc Interface Superconductivity (HT-IS), and the challenges associated with the realization of high quality interfaces. Then we turn our attention to the experiments which shed light on the structure and properties of interfacial layers, allowing comparison to those of single-phase films and bulk crystals. Both ‘passive’ hetero-structures as well as surface-induced effects by external gating are discussed. Here, wemore » conclude by comparing HT-IS in cuprates and in other classes of materials, especially Fe-based superconductors, and by examining the grand challenges currently laying ahead for the field.« less

  18. OSTIblog Articles in the HTS Topic | OSTI, US Dept of Energy Office of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Scientific and Technical Information HTS Topic Solving the mystery of superconductivity by Kathy Chambers 17 Oct, 2013 in Products and Content 9539 yongchu.jpg Solving the mystery of superconductivity Read more about 9539 At the legendary 1987 American Physical Society conference, sometimes called the "Woodstock of physics", thousands of physicists descended upon a New York Hilton ballroom to hear about the discovery of high-temperature superconductivity (HTS) in ceramic materials.

  19. Superconductivity for Electric Systems: 2008 Annual Peer Review Final

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Report | Department of Energy Superconductivity for Electric Systems: 2008 Annual Peer Review Final Report Superconductivity for Electric Systems: 2008 Annual Peer Review Final Report The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability's High Temperature Superconductivity (HTS) for Electric Systems Program's specific mission is to work in partnership with industry to develop HTS wire and perform other research and development activities leading to the commercialization of HTS-based

  20. High-Temperature Superconductivity

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Peter Johnson

    2010-01-08

    Like astronomers tweaking images to gain a more detailed glimpse of distant stars, physicists at Brookhaven National Laboratory have found ways to sharpen images of the energy spectra in high-temperature superconductors ? materials that carry electrical c

  1. High-temperature superconductivity: A conventional conundrum...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: High-temperature superconductivity: A conventional conundrum Citation ... OSTI Identifier: 1245373 Report Number(s): BNL--111729-2016-JA Journal ID: ISSN 1745-2473; ...

  2. Design, Construction and Test of Cryogen-Free HTS Coil Structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hocker, H.; Anerella, M.; Gupta, R.; Plate, S.; Sampson, W.; Schmalzle, J.; Shiroyanagi, Y.

    2011-03-28

    This paper will describe design, construction and test results of a cryo-mechanical structure to study coils made with the second generation High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) for the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB). A magnet comprised of HTS coils mounted in a vacuum vessel and conduction-cooled with Gifford-McMahon cycle cryocoolers is used to develop and refine design and construction techniques. The study of these techniques and their effect on operations provides a better understanding of the use of cryogen free magnets in future accelerator projects. A cryogen-free, superconducting HTS magnet possesses certain operational advantages over cryogenically cooled, low temperature superconducting magnets.

  3. Method and apparatus for measuring gravitational acceleration utilizing a high temperature superconducting bearing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R.

    2000-01-01

    Gravitational acceleration is measured in all spatial dimensions with improved sensitivity by utilizing a high temperature superconducting (HTS) gravimeter. The HTS gravimeter is comprised of a permanent magnet suspended in a spaced relationship from a high temperature superconductor, and a cantilever having a mass at its free end is connected to the permanent magnet at its fixed end. The permanent magnet and superconductor combine to form a bearing platform with extremely low frictional losses, and the rotational displacement of the mass is measured to determine gravitational acceleration. Employing a high temperature superconductor component has the significant advantage of having an operating temperature at or below 77K, whereby cooling may be accomplished with liquid nitrogen.

  4. High Temperature Superconducting Thick Films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arendt, Paul N.; Foltyn, Stephen R.; Groves, James R.; Holesinger, Terry G.; Jia, Quanxi

    2005-08-23

    An article including a substrate, a layer of an inert oxide material upon the surface of the substrate, (generally the inert oxide material layer has a smooth surface, i.e., a RMS roughness of less than about 2 nm), a layer of an amorphous oxide or oxynitride material upon the inert oxide material layer, a layer of an oriented cubic oxide material having a rock-salt-like structure upon the amorphous oxide material layer is provided together with additional layers such as at least one layer of a buffer material upon the oriented cubic oxide material layer or a HTS top-layer of YBCO directly upon the oriented cubic oxide material layer. With a HTS top-layer of YBCO upon at least one layer of a buffer material in such an article, Jc's of 1.4×106 A/cm2 have been demonstrated with projected Ic's of 210 Amperes across a sample 1 cm wide.

  5. High Temperature Superconducting Thick Films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arendt, Paul N. (Los Alamos, NM); Foltyn, Stephen R. (Los Alamos, NM); Groves, James R. (Los Alamos, NM); Holesinger, Terry G. (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM)

    2005-08-23

    An article including a substrate, a layer of an inert oxide material upon the surface of the substrate, (generally the inert oxide material layer has a smooth surface, i.e., a RMS roughness of less than about 2 nm), a layer of an amorphous oxide or oxynitride material upon the inert oxide material layer, a layer of an oriented cubic oxide material having a rock-salt-like structure upon the amorphous oxide material layer is provided together with additional layers such as at least one layer of a buffer material upon the oriented cubic oxide material layer or a HTS top-layer of YBCO directly upon the oriented cubic oxide material layer. With a HTS top-layer of YBCO upon at least one layer of a buffer material in such an article, Jc's of 1.4×106 A/cm2 have been demonstrated with projected Ic's of 210 Amperes across a sample 1 cm wide.

  6. R&D ERL: HTS Solenoid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, R.; Muratore, J.; Plate, S.

    2010-01-01

    An innovative feature of the ERL project is the use of a solenoid made with High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) with the Superconducting RF cavity. The HTS solenoid design offers many advantages because of several unique design features. Typically the solenoid is placed outside the cryostat which means that the beam gets significantly defused before a focusing element starts. In the current design, the solenoid is placed inside the cryostat which provides an early focusing structure and thus a significant reduction in the emittance of the electron beam. In addition, taking full advantage of the high critical temperature of HTS, the solenoid has been designed to reach the required field at {approx}77 K, which can be obtained with liquid nitrogen. This significantly reduces the cost of testing and allows a variety of critical pre-tests which would have been prohibitively expensive at 4 K in liquid helium because of the additional requirements of cryostat and associated facilities.

  7. A potential Rosetta Stone of high temperature superconductivity...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    for the high temperature superconductivity. Summary Superconductivity enables the flow of electricity without any loss of energy, but this extremely-low temperature...

  8. Superconductivity Program Overview | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Superconductivity Program Overview Superconductivity Program Overview High-Temperature Superconductivity (HTS) has the potential for achieving a more fundamental change to electric power technologies than has occurred since the use of electricity became widespread nearly a century ago. Superconductivity Program Overview (3.2 MB) More Documents & Publications Fault Current Limiters (FCL) Fact Sheet High-Temperature Superconductivity Cable Demonstration Projects U.S. Department of Energy and

  9. Design Construction and Test Results of a HTS Solenoid For Energy Recovery Linac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anerella, M; Ben-Zvi, I; Kayran, D; McIntyre, G; Muratore, J; Plate, S; Sampson, W; Cole, M; Holmes, D

    2011-03-28

    An innovative feature of the proposed Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) is the use of a solenoid made with High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) with the Superconducting RF cavity. The use of HTS allows solenoid to be placed in close proximity to the cavity and thus provides early focusing of the electron beam. In addition, cryogenic testing at {approx}77 K is simpler and cheaper than 4 K testing. This paper will present the design, construction and test results of this HTS solenoid. The HTS solenoid in the proposed ERL will be situated in the transition region between the superconducting cavity at {approx}4 K and the cryostat at the room temperature. Solenoid inside the cryogenic structure provides an early focusing and hence low emittance beam. The temperature in the transition region will be too high for a conventional low temperature superconductor and resistive heat load from copper coils will be too high on cryogenic system. HTS coils also allow much higher current density and significant reduction in size as compared to copper coils. Hence HTS solenoid provide a unique and technically superior solution. The use of a HTS solenoid with superconducting cavity offers a unique option as it can be placed in a cold to warm transition region to provide early focussing without using additional space. Construction and test results so far are very encouraging for its use in the ERL project.

  10. High-temperature superconductivity: A conventional conundrum

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Božović, Ivan

    2016-01-07

    High-temperature superconductivity in ultrathin films of iron selenide deposited on strontium titanate has been attributed to various exotic mechanisms, and new experiments indicate that it may be conventional, with broader implications.

  11. High Temperature Interfacial Superconductivity - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High Temperature Interfacial Superconductivity Brookhaven National Laboratory Contact BNL About This Technology Publications: PDF Document Publication High-temperature interface superconductivity between metallic and insulating copper oxides (791 KB) <p> (a) Annular dark field image of the structure showing extended defects in the metal layer (marked by white arrows). The black arrow shows the metal-insulator interface (b) A magnified image of one defect which nucleated at the

  12. High temperature superconducting fault current limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R.

    1997-01-01

    A fault current limiter (10) for an electrical circuit (14). The fault current limiter (10) includes a high temperature superconductor (12) in the electrical circuit (14). The high temperature superconductor (12) is cooled below its critical temperature to maintain the superconducting electrical properties during operation as the fault current limiter (10).

  13. High temperature superconducting fault current limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, J.R.

    1997-02-04

    A fault current limiter for an electrical circuit is disclosed. The fault current limiter includes a high temperature superconductor in the electrical circuit. The high temperature superconductor is cooled below its critical temperature to maintain the superconducting electrical properties during operation as the fault current limiter. 15 figs.

  14. The Effect of Magnetic Field on HTS Leads What Happens when thePower Fails at RAL?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, Michael A.

    2007-02-14

    The key to being able to operate the MICE superconducting solenoids on small coolers is the use of high temperature superconducting (HTS) leads between the first stage of the cooler and the magnet, which operates at around 4.2 K. Because MICE magnets are not shielded, all of the MICE magnets have a stray magnetic field in the region where the coolers and the HTS leads are located. The behavior of the HTS leads in a magnetic field depends strongly on the HTS material used for the leads and the temperature of the cooler first stage temperature. The HTS leads can be specified to operate at the maximum current for the magnet. This report shows how the HTS leads can be specified for use the MICE magnets. MICE magnets take from 1.3 hours (the tracker solenoids) to 3.7 hours (the coupling magnet) to charge to the highest projected operating currents. If the power fails, the cooler and the upper ends of the HTS leads warm up. The question is how one can discharge the magnet to protect the HTS leads without quenching the MICE magnets. This report describes a method that one can use to protect the HTS leads in the event of a power failure at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL).

  15. HTS Wire Development Workshop: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The 1994 High-Temperature Superconducting Wire Development Workshop was held on February 16--17 at the St. Petersburg Hilton and Towers in St. Petersburg, Florida. The meeting was hosted by Florida Power Corporation and sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s Superconductivity Program for Electric Power Systems. The meeting focused on recent high-temperature superconducting wire development activities in the Department of Energy`s Superconductivity Systems program. The meeting opened with a general discussion on the needs and benefits of superconductivity from a utility perspective, the US global competitiveness position, and an outlook on the overall prospects of wire development. The meeting then focused on four important technology areas: Wire characterization: issues and needs; technology for overcoming barriers: weak links and flux pinning; manufacturing issues for long wire lengths; and physical properties of HTS coils. Following in-depth presentations, working groups were formed in each technology area to discuss the most important current research and development issues. The working groups identified research areas that have the potential for greatly enhancing the wire development effort. These areas are discussed in the summary reports from each of the working groups. This document is a compilation of the workshop proceedings including all general session presentations and summary reports from the working groups.

  16. Superconducting transition temperature in anodized aluminum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leemann, C.; Elliott, J.H.; Deutscher, G.; Orbach, R.; Wolf, S.A.

    1983-08-01

    We have measured the superconducting transition temperature of anodized aluminum films of grain sizes ranging from less than 100 to 3000 A. The transition temperature is 1.8 K for films of grain size 100 A and decreases monotonically with increasing grain size to 1.2 K for 3000-A grains. The effect depends only on the volume of the grains.

  17. High temperature interfacial superconductivity (Patent) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Patent: High temperature interfacial superconductivity Citation Details In-Document Search Title: High temperature interfacial superconductivity High-temperature superconductivity confined to nanometer-scale interfaces has been a long standing goal because of potential applications in electronic devices. The spontaneous formation of a superconducting interface in bilayers consisting of an insulator (La.sub.2CuO.sub.4) and a metal (La.sub.1-xSr.sub.xCuO.sub.4), neither of which is superconducting

  18. The creation of high-temperature superconducting cables of megawatt range in Russia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sytnikov, V. E. Bemert, S. E.; Krivetsky, I. V.; Romashov, M. A.; Popov, D. A.; Fedotov, E. V.; Komandenko, O. V.

    2015-12-15

    Urgent problems of the power industry in the 21st century require the creation of smart energy systems, providing a high effectiveness of generation, transmission, and consumption of electric power. Simultaneously, the requirements for controllability of power systems and ecological and resource-saving characteristics at all stages of production and distribution of electric power are increased. One of the decision methods of many problems of the power industry is the development of new high-efficiency electrical equipment for smart power systems based on superconducting technologies to ensure a qualitatively new level of functioning of the electric power industry. The intensive research and development of new types of electrical devices based on superconductors are being carried out in many industrialized advanced countries. Interest in such developments has especially increased in recent years owing to the discovery of so-called high-temperature superconductors (HTS) that do not require complicated and expensive cooling devices. Such devices can operate at cooling by inexpensive and easily accessible liquid nitrogen. Taking into account the obvious advantages of superconducting cable lines for the transmission of large power flows through an electrical network, as compared with conventional cables, the Federal Grid Company of Unified Energy System (JSC FGC UES) initiated a research and development program including the creation of superconducting HTS AC and DC cable lines. Two cable lines for the transmitted power of 50 MVA/MW at 20 kV were manufactured and tested within the framework of the program.

  19. HTS thin films: Passive microwave components and systems integration issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miranda, F.A.; Chorey, C.M.; Bhasin, K.B.

    1994-12-31

    The excellent microwave properties of the High-Temperature-Superconductors (HTS) have been amply demonstrated in the laboratory by techniques such as resonant cavity, power transmission and microstrip resonator measurements. The low loss and high Q passive structures made possible with HTS, present attractive options for applications in commercial, military and space-based systems. However, to readily insert HTS into these systems improvement is needed in such areas as repeatability in the deposition and processing of the HTS films, metal-contact formation, wire bonding, and overall film endurance to fabrication and assembly procedures. In this paper we present data compiled in our lab which illustrate many of the problems associated with these issues. Much of this data were obtained in the production of a space qualified hybrid receiver-downconverter module for the Naval Research Laboratory`s High Temperature Superconductivity Space Experiment II (HTSSE-II). Examples of variations observed in starting films and finished circuits will be presented. It is shown that under identical processing the properties of the HTS films can degrade to varying extents. Finally, we present data on ohmic contacts and factors affecting their adhesion to HTS films, strength of wire bonds made to such contacts, and aging effects.

  20. Review of activities in USA on HTS materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, D.E.

    1995-02-01

    Rapid progress in attaining practical applications of High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) has been made since the discovery of these new materials. Many critical parameters influencing HTS powder synthesis and wire processing have been identified through a combination of fundamental exploration and applied research. The complexity of these novel materials with regard to phase behavior and physical properties has become evident as a result of these careful studies. Achieving optimal mechanical and superconducting properties in wires and tapes will require further understanding and synergy among several different technical disciplines. Highlights of efforts towards producing practical superconductors for electric power applications based on rare earth-, bismuth-, and thallium-based systems are reviewed.

  1. Thermal management of long-length HTS cable systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demko, Jonathan A; Hassenzahl, William V

    2011-01-01

    Projections of electric power production suggest a major shift to renewables, such as wind and solar, which will be in remote locations where massive quantities of power are available. One solution for transmitting this power over long distances to load centers is direct current (dc), high temperature superconducting (HTS) cables. Electric transmission via dc cables promises to be effective because of the low-loss, highcurrent- carrying capability of HTS wire at cryogenic temperatures. However, the thermal management system for the cable must be carefully designed to achieve reliable and energyefficient operation. Here we extend the analysis of a superconducting dc cable concept proposed by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), which has one stream of liquid nitrogen flowing in a cryogenic enclosure that includes the power cable, and a separate return tube for the nitrogen. Refrigeration stations positioned every 10 to 20 km cool both nitrogen streams. Both go and return lines are contained in a single vacuum/cryogenic envelope. Other coolants, including gaseous helium and gaseous hydrogen, could provide potential advantages, though they bring some technical challenges to the operation of long-length HTS dc cable systems. A discussion of the heat produced in superconducting cables and a system to remove the heat are discussed. Also, an analysis of the use of various cryogenic fluids in long-distance HTS power cables is presented.

  2. Pseudogap and Superconducting Gap in High-Temperature Superconductors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pseudogap and Superconducting Gap in High-Temperature Superconductors Two decades after the discovery of first high temperature superconductors, the microscopic mechanism of high-Tc superconductivity remains elusive. In conventional superconductors, it has been well established that electrons form so-called "Cooper pairs" to give rise to superconductivity. The pair binding manifests itself as an energy gap in many spectroscopic measurements. This energy gap, known as superconducting

  3. High-Temperature Superconducting Composite Conductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holesinger, Terry G.; Foltyn, Stephen R.; Arendt, Paul N.; Groves, James R.; Jia, Quanxi; Ayala, Alicia

    2005-01-18

    Copper or excess copper is added to one or more layers of a superconducting composite structure to reduce migration of copper form a copper based superconducting layer.

  4. Purple Path toward High Temperature Superconductivity? | The Ames

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory Purple Path toward High Temperature Superconductivity? Discovery of an unconventional charge density wave (CDW) in purple bronze, a molybdenum oxide, points to a possible new pathway to high temperature superconductivity. A CDW is a state of matter where electrons bunch together periodically, like a standing wave of light or water. CDWs and superconductivity are frenemies, since they share a common origin and often coexist, yet compete for dominance. Conventional CDWs and

  5. Enhanced Superconducting Gaps in Trilayer High-Temperature Bi...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ...-Temperature Bi (2) Sr (2) Ca (2) Cu (3) O (10+delta) Cuprate Superconductor Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Enhanced Superconducting Gaps in Trilayer High-Temperature ...

  6. Cryogenic deformation of high temperature superconductive composite structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roberts, Peter R.; Michels, William; Bingert, John F.

    2001-01-01

    An improvement in a process of preparing a composite high temperature oxide superconductive wire is provided and involves conducting at least one cross-sectional reduction step in the processing preparation of the wire at sub-ambient temperatures.

  7. Characterization of a high-temperature superconducting conductor on round core cables in magnetic fields up to 20 T

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van der Laan, D. C.; Noyes, P. D.; Miller, G. E.; Weijers, H. W.; Willering, G. P.

    2013-02-13

    The next generation of high-ï¬eld magnets that will operate at magnetic ï¬elds substantially above 20 T, or at temperatures substantially above 4.2 K, requires high-temperature superconductors (HTS). Conductor on round core (CORC) cables, in which RE-Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} (RE = rare earth) (REBCO) coated conductors are wound in a helical fashion on a flexible core, are a practical and versatile HTS cable option for low-inductance, high-field magnets. We performed the first tests of CORC magnet cables in liquid helium in magnetic fields of up to 20 T. A record critical current I{sub c} of 5021 A was measured at 4.2 K and 19 T. In a cable with an outer diameter of 7.5 mm, this value corresponds to an engineering current density J{sub e} of 114 A mm{sup -2} , the highest J{sub e} ever reported for a superconducting cable at such high magnetic fields. Additionally, the first magnet wound from an HTS cable was constructed from a 6 m-long CORC cable. The 12-turn, double-layer magnet had an inner diameter of 9 cm and was tested in a magnetic field of 20 T, at which it had an I{sub c} of 1966 A. The cables were quenched repetitively without degradation during the measurements, demonstrating the feasibility of HTS CORC cables for use in high-field magnet applications.

  8. Power applications of high-temperature superconductivity: Variable speed motors, current switches, and energy storage for end use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawsey, R.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Banerjee, B.B.; Grant, P.M. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    The objective of this project is to conduct joint research and development activities related to certain electric power applications of high-temperature superconductivity (HTS). The new superconductors may allow development of an energy-efficient switch to control current to variable speed motors, superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) systems, and other power conversion equipment. Motor types that were considered include induction, permanent magnet, and superconducting ac motors. Because it is impractical to experimentally alter certain key design elements in radial-gap motors, experiments were conducted on an axial field superconducting motor prototype using 4 NbTi magnets. Superconducting magnetic energy storage technology with 0.25--5 kWh stored energy was studied as a viable solution to short duration voltage sag problems on the customer side of the electric meter. The technical performance characteristics of the device wee assembled, along with competing technologies such as active power line conditioners with storage, battery-based uninterruptible power supplies, and supercapacitors, and the market potential for SMES was defined. Four reports were prepared summarizing the results of the project.

  9. High temperature interfacial superconductivity (Patent) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Patent: High temperature interfacial superconductivity Citation Details In-Document Search ... OSTI Identifier: 1055453 Report Number(s): 8,204,564 US patent applicaiton 12264,742 DOE ...

  10. Damping in high-temperature superconducting levitation systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R.

    2009-12-15

    Methods and apparatuses for improved damping in high-temperature superconducting levitation systems are disclosed. A superconducting element (e.g., a stator) generating a magnetic field and a magnet (e.g. a rotor) supported by the magnetic field are provided such that the superconducting element is supported relative to a ground state with damped motion substantially perpendicular to the support of the magnetic field on the magnet. Applying this, a cryostat housing the superconducting bearing may be coupled to the ground state with high damping but low radial stiffness, such that its resonant frequency is less than that of the superconducting bearing. The damping of the cryostat may be substantially transferred to the levitated magnetic rotor, thus, providing damping without affecting the rotational loss, as can be derived applying coupled harmonic oscillator theory in rotor dynamics. Thus, damping can be provided to a levitated object, without substantially affecting the rotational loss.

  11. Superconducting Cable Termination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sinha, Uday K.; Tolbert, Jerry

    2005-08-30

    Disclosed is a termination that connects high temperature superconducting (HTS) cable immersed in pressurized liquid nitrogen to high voltage and neutral (shield) external bushings at ambient temperature and pressure. The termination consists of a splice between the HTS power (inner) and shield (outer) conductors and concentric copper pipes which are the conductors in the termination. There is also a transition from the dielectric tape insulator used in the HTS cable to the insulators used between and around the copper pipe conductors in the termination. At the warm end of the termination the copper pipes are connected via copper braided straps to the conventional warm external bushings which have low thermal stresses. This termination allows for a natural temperature gradient in the copper pipe conductors inside the termination which enables the controlled flashing of the pressurized liquid coolant (nitrogen) to the gaseous state. Thus the entire termination is near the coolant supply pressure and the high voltage and shield cold bushings, a highly stressed component used in most HTS cables, are eliminated. A sliding seal allows for cable contraction as it is cooled from room temperature to ˜72-82 K. Seals, static vacuum, and multi-layer superinsulation minimize radial heat leak to the environment.

  12. Superconducting Cable Termination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sinha, Uday K. (Carrollton, GA); Tolbert, Jerry (Newnan, GA)

    2005-08-30

    Disclosed is a termination that connects high temperature superconducting (HTS) cable immersed in pressurized liquid nitrogen to high voltage and neutral (shield) external bushings at ambient temperature and pressure. The termination consists of a splice between the HTS power (inner) and shield (outer) conductors and concentric copper pipes which are the conductors in the termination. There is also a transition from the dielectric tape insulator used in the HTS cable to the insulators used between and around the copper pipe conductors in the termination. At the warm end of the termination the copper pipes are connected via copper braided straps to the conventional warm external bushings which have low thermal stresses. This termination allows for a natural temperature gradient in the copper pipe conductors inside the termination which enables the controlled flashing of the pressurized liquid coolant (nitrogen) to the gaseous state. Thus the entire termination is near the coolant supply pressure and the high voltage and shield cold bushings, a highly stressed component used in most HTS cables, are eliminated. A sliding seal allows for cable contraction as it is cooled from room temperature to ˜72-82 K. Seals, static vacuum, and multi-layer superinsulation minimize radial heat leak to the environment.

  13. High temperature superconducting composite conductor and method for manufacturing the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holesinger, Terry G.; Bingert, John F.

    2002-01-01

    A high temperature superconducting composite conductor is provided including a high temperature superconducting material surrounded by a noble metal layer, the high temperature superconducting composite conductor characterized as having a fill factor of greater than about 40. Additionally, the conductor can be further characterized as containing multiple cores of high temperature superconducting material surrounded by a noble metal layer, said multiple cores characterized as having substantially uniform geometry in the cross-sectional dimensions. Processes of forming such a high temperature superconducting composite conductor are also provided.

  14. Study of HTS Insert Coils for High Field Solenoids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lombardo, Vito; /Fermilab

    2009-09-01

    Fermilab is currently working on the development of high field magnet systems for ionization cooling of muon beams. The use of high temperature superconducting materials (HTS) is being considered for these solenoids using Helium refrigeration. Several studies have been performed on insert coils made of BSCCO-2223 tapes and second generation (2G) YBCO coated conductors, which are tested at various temperatures and at external fields of up to 14 T. Critical current (I{sub c}) measurements of YBCO short samples are presented as a function of bending stress, magnetic field and field orientation with respect to the sample surface. An analytical fit of critical current data as a function of field and field orientation is also presented. Results from several single-layer and double-layer pancake coils are also discussed.

  15. Temperature Mapping of Nitrogen-doped Niobium Superconducting Radiofrequency Cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makita, Junki; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Dhakal, Pashupati

    2015-09-01

    It was recently shown that diffusing nitrogen on the inner surface of superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavities at high temperature can improve the quality factor of the niobium cavity. However, a reduction of the quench field is also typically found. To better understand the location of rf losses and quench, we used a thermometry system to map the temperature of the outer surface of ingot Nb cavities after nitrogen doping and electropolishing. Surface temperature of the cavities was recorded while increasing the rf power and also during the quenching. The results of thermal mapping showed no precursor heating on the cavities and quenching to be ignited near the equator where the surface magnetic field is maximum. Hot-spots at the equator area during multipacting were also detected by thermal mapping.

  16. (Neutron scattering studies of the high-temperature superconducting materials)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mook, H.A. Jr.

    1991-01-04

    The traveler was given beam time at the ILL to continue neutron scattering work on high-temperature superconductivity. The unique facilities at the ILL for both high-energy and low-energy neutron instrumentation made the experiments possible. The measurements consisted of two basic types. The first of these is the study of the nature of spin fluctuations in high-{Tc} materials. This work is fundamental to the mechanism that is responsible for the high-transition temperatures. The second consisted of experiments on the flux lattice in high-temperature superconductors. The flux lattice has interesting physics in its own right and is important in understanding the current-carrying capability of superconductors.

  17. HTS Cable Projects | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    HTS Cable Projects HTS Cable Projects Fact sheet describing what is being done to modernize electricity transmission and distribution PDF icon HTS Cable Projects More Documents &...

  18. Characterization of high-current, high-temperature superconductor current lead elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niemann, R.C.; Evans, D.J.; Fisher, B.L.; Brockenborough, W.E.; Roberts, P.R.; Rodenbush, A.J.

    1996-08-01

    The refrigeration loads of current leads for superconducting magnets can be significantly reduced by using high-temperature superconductor (HTS) leads. An HTS conductor type that is well suited for this application is a laminated sintered stack of HTS powder-in-tube (PIT) tapes. The superconducting elements are normally characterized by their manufacturer by measuring critical currents at 77 K in self field. Additional characterization, which correlates electrical performance at 77 K and at lower temperatures with applied magnetic fields, provides the current lead designer and conductor element manufacturer with critical information. For HTS conductor elements comprising a laminated and sintered stack of Bi-2223 PIT tapes having an alloyed Ag sheath, this characterization uses variable applied fields and operating temperatures.

  19. High Temperature Superconducting Reciprocating Magnetic Separator Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James F. Maguire

    2008-06-05

    In 2001, under DOE's Superconductivity Partnership Initiative (SPI), E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Co. (Dupont) was awarded a cost-share contract to build a fully functional full-scale model high temperature superconducting reciprocating magnet unit specifically designed for the koalin clay industry. After competitive bidding, American Superconductor (AMSC) was selected to provide the coil for the magnet. Dupont performed the statement of work until September 2004, when it stopped work, with the concurrence of DOE, due to lack of federal funds. DOE had paid all invoices to that point, and Dupont had provided all cost share. At this same time, Dupont determined that this program did not fit with its corporate strategies and notified DOE that it was not interesting in resuming the program when funding became available. AMSC expressed interest in assuming performance of the Agreement to Dupont and DOE, and in March 2005, this project was transferred to AMSC by DOE amendment to the original contract and Novation Agreement between AMSC and Dupont. Design drawings and some hardware components and subassemblies were transferred to AMSC. However, no funding was obligated by DOE and AMSC never performed work on the project. This report contains a summary of the work performed by Dupont up to the September 04 timeframe.

  20. HTS Magnets for Advanced Magnetoplasma Space Propulsion Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carte, M.D.; Chang-Diaz, F.R. Squire, J.P.; Schwenterly, S.W.

    1999-07-12

    Plasma rockets are being considered for both Earth-orbit and interplanetary missions because their extremely high exhaust velocity and ability to modulate thrust allow very efficient use of propellant mass. In such rockets, a hydrogen or helium plasma is RF-heated and confined by axial magnetic fields produced by coils around the plasma chamber. HTS coils cooled by the propellant are desirable to increase the energy efficiency of the system. We describe a set of prototype high-temperature superconducting (HTS) coils that are being considered for the VASIMR ( Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket) thruster proposed for testing on the Radiation Technology Demonstration (RTD) satellite. Since this satellite will be launched by the Space Shuttle, for safety reasons liquid helium will be used as propellant and coolant. The coils must be designed to operate in the space environment at field levels of 1 T. This generates a unique set of requirements. Details of the overall winding geometry and current density, as well as the challenging thermal control aspects associated with a compact, minimum weight design will be discussed.

  1. Shock-induced synthesis of high temperature superconducting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ginley, D.S.; Graham, R.A.; Morosin, B.; Venturini, E.L.

    1987-06-18

    It has now been determined that the unique features of the high pressure shock method, especially the shock-induced chemical synthesis technique, are fully applicable to high temperature superconducting materials. Extraordinarily high yields are achievable in accordance with this invention, e.g., generally in the range from about 20% to about 99%, often in the range from about 50% to about 90%, lower and higher yields, of course, also being possible. The method of this invention involves the application of a controlled high pressure shock compression pulse which can be produced in any conventional manner, e.g., by detonation of a high explosive material, the impact of a high speed projectile or the effect of intense pulsed radiation sources such as lasers or electron beams. Examples and a discussion are presented.

  2. The DARPA manufacturing initiative in high temperature superconductivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, K.R. )

    1989-01-01

    The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has a very aggressive Technology Base program in high temperature superconductivity. This program is expected to provide the basis for a specialized set of military products - passive microwave and millimeter wave devices - within the next three years. In order to get these high leverage products into military systems, a manufacturing base must be developed for HTSC components. A plan for DARPA in HTSC manufacturing is directly coupled with the ongoing DARPA materials and device oriented R and D program. In essence, this plan recommends a three phased effort: 1. Phase I (two years); Fund companies through R and D contracts for specialized HTSC components; prepare a detailed plan and develop an HTSC consortium. 2. Phase II (six years): Establish an HTSC Sematech initiative for electronic applications, including active devices. 3. Phase III (optional): Continue the HTSC Sematech with emphasis on high power applications.

  3. High voltage design structure for high temperature superconducting device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tekletsadik, Kasegn D.

    2008-05-20

    In accordance with the present invention, modular corona shields are employed in a HTS device to reduce the electric field surrounding the HTS device. In a exemplary embodiment a fault current limiter module in the insulation region of a cryogenic cooling system has at least one fault current limiter set which employs a first corona shield disposed along the top portion of the fault current limiter set and is electrically coupled to the fault current limiter set. A second corona shield is disposed along the bottom portion of the fault current limiter set and is electrically coupled to the fault current limiter set. An insulation barrier is disposed within the insulation region along at least one side of the fault current limiter set. The first corona shield and the second corona shield act together to reduce the electric field surrounding the fault limiter set when voltage is applied to the fault limiter set.

  4. Method and etchant to join ag-clad BSSCO superconducting tape

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Balachandran, Uthamalingam; Iyer, Anand N.; Huang, Jiann Yuan

    1999-01-01

    A method of removing a silver cladding from high temperature superconducting material clad in silver (HTS) is disclosed. The silver clad HTS is contacted with an aqueous solution of HNO.sub.3 followed by an aqueous solution of NH.sub.4 OH and H.sub.2 O.sub.2 for a time sufficient to remove the silver cladding from the superconducting material without adversely affecting the superconducting properties of the superconducting material. A portion of the silver cladding may be masked with a material chemically impervious to HNO.sub.3 and to a combination of NH.sub.4 OH and H.sub.2 O.sub.2 to preserve the Ag coating. A silver clad superconductor is disclosed, made in accordance with the method discussed.

  5. Method and etchant to join Ag-clad BSSCO superconducting tape

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Balachandran, U.; Iyer, A.N.; Huang, J.Y.

    1999-03-16

    A method of removing a silver cladding from high temperature superconducting material clad in silver (HTS) is disclosed. The silver clad HTS is contacted with an aqueous solution of HNO{sub 3} followed by an aqueous solution of NH{sub 4}OH and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} for a time sufficient to remove the silver cladding from the superconducting material without adversely affecting the superconducting properties of the superconducting material. A portion of the silver cladding may be masked with a material chemically impervious to HNO{sub 3} and to a combination of NH{sub 4}OH and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} to preserve the Ag coating. A silver clad superconductor is disclosed, made in accordance with the method discussed. 3 figs.

  6. Damping and support in high-temperature superconducting levitation systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R.; McIver, Carl R.; Mittleider, John A.

    2009-12-15

    Methods and apparatuses to provide improved auxiliary damping for superconducting bearings in superconducting levitation systems are disclosed. In a superconducting bearing, a cryostat housing the superconductors is connected to a ground state with a combination of a damping strip of material, a set of linkage arms to provide vertical support, and spring washers to provide stiffness. Alternately, the superconducting bearing may be supported by a cryostat connected to a ground state by posts constructed from a mesh of fibers, with the damping and stiffness controlled by the fiber composition, size, and mesh geometry.

  7. Using magnetic fields to understand high-temperature superconductivity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (high-Tc) superconductivity has been the issue as to whether a quantum critical point-a special doping value where quantum fluctuations lead to strong...

  8. Low-Temperature Synthesis of Superconducting NanocrystallineMgB2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lu, Jun; Xiao, Zhili; Lin, Qiyin; Claus, Helmut; Fang, Zhigang Zak

    2010-01-01

    Magnesium diboride (MgB2) is considered a promising material for practical application in superconducting devices, with a transition temperature near 40?K. In the present paper, nanocrystalline MgB2with an average particle size of approximately 70?nm is synthesized by reacting LiBH4with MgH2at temperatures as low as 450°C. This synthesis approach successfully bypasses the usage of either elemental boron or toxic diborane gas. The superconductivity of the nanostructures is confirmed by magnetization measurements, showing a superconducting critical temperature of 38.7?K.

  9. Low-Temperature Synthesis of Superconducting Nanocrystalline MgB 2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lu, Jun; Xiao, Zhili; Lin, Qiyin; Claus, Helmut; Fang, Zhigang Zak

    2010-01-01

    Magnesium diboride (MgB 2 ) is considered a promising material for practical application in superconducting devices, with a transition temperature near 40 K. In the present paper, nanocrystalline MgB 2 with an average particle size of approximately 70 nm is synthesized by reacting LiBH 4 with MgH 2 at temperatures as low as 450 ° C. This synthesis approach successfully bypasses the usage of either elemental boron or toxic diborane gas. The superconductivity of the nanostructures is confirmed by magnetization measurements, showing a superconducting critical temperature of 38.7 K.

  10. Workshop on research needs and opportunities in high-temperature superconductivity held in Copper Mountain, Colorado in 19-20 August 1991. Final report, 1 Jun 91-30 Apr 92

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaw, D.T.; Kroger, H.; Jin, S.; Gubser, D.U.; Falco, C.M.

    1991-11-01

    This is the report of the Workshop on New Research Opportunities in Superconductivity held at Copper Mountain, Colorado on August 19-20,1991. The workshop is a follow-up to two previous meetings to evaluate progress in superconductivity. The first, held at Copper Mountain, Colorado in 1983, focuses on low-temperature superconductors (LTS), while the second-in 1988 examined the progress of low-temperature materials and the potential of the then recently-discovered high-temperature superconductors (HTS). The summaries of these two superconductivity workshops were published in Cryogenics (July 1984, p.378; and November 1988, p.711). This workshop was the first in this series to concentrate largely on high-temperature superconductors. Its objectives were to identify the barriers limiting progress in high-temperature materials and to assess research areas that are ripe for important advances. The workshop was organized in four sessions, with Robert C.Dynes and Victor J. Emery leading the session on Fundamentals, Charles M. Falco and Donald U. Gubser leading the session on Materials, David K. Christen and Harry Kroger leading the session on Thin Films and Devices, and Sungho Jin and David T. Shaw leading the session on Bulk Materials and Large-Scale Applications. The organizational committee for the workshop consisted of David K. Christen, Alan F. Clark, Robert C. Dynes, Donald H. Liebenberg, David L. Nelson, and David T. Shaw (chair).

  11. Efficient growth of HTS films with volatile elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siegal, Michael P.; Overmyer, Donald L.; Dominguez, Frank

    1998-01-01

    A system for applying a volatile element-HTS layer, such as Tl-HTS, to a substrate in a multiple zone furnace, said method includes heating at higher temperature, in one zone of the furnace, a substrate and adjacent first source of Tl-HTS material, to sublimate Tl-oxide from the source to the substrate; and heating at lower temperature, in a separate zone of the furnace, a second source of Tl-oxide to replenish the first source of Tl-oxide from the second source.

  12. Efficient growth of HTS films with volatile elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siegal, M.P.; Overmyer, D.L.; Dominguez, F.

    1998-12-22

    A system is disclosed for applying a volatile element-HTS layer, such as Tl-HTS, to a substrate in a multiple zone furnace, said method includes heating at higher temperature, in one zone of the furnace, a substrate and adjacent first source of Tl-HTS material, to sublimate Tl-oxide from the source to the substrate; and heating at lower temperature, in a separate zone of the furnace, a second source of Tl-oxide to replenish the first source of Tl-oxide from the second source. 3 figs.

  13. Enhanced Superconducting Gaps in Trilayer High-Temperature Bi (2) Sr (2) Ca

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (2) Cu (3) O (10+delta) Cuprate Superconductor (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Enhanced Superconducting Gaps in Trilayer High-Temperature Bi (2) Sr (2) Ca (2) Cu (3) O (10+delta) Cuprate Superconductor Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Enhanced Superconducting Gaps in Trilayer High-Temperature Bi (2) Sr (2) Ca (2) Cu (3) O (10+delta) Cuprate Superconductor Authors: Ideta, S ; Takashima, K. ; Hashimoto, M. ; Yoshida, T. ; Fujimori, A. ; Anzai, H. ; Fujita, T. ; Nakashima, Y. ;

  14. High-field magnets using high-critical-temperature superconducting thin films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mitlitsky, F.; Hoard, R.W.

    1994-05-10

    High-field magnets fabricated from high-critical-temperature superconducting ceramic (HTSC) thin films which can generate fields greater than 4 Tesla are disclosed. The high-field magnets are made of stackable disk-shaped substrates coated with HTSC thin films, and involves maximizing the critical current density, superconducting film thickness, number of superconducting layers per substrate, substrate diameter, and number of substrates while minimizing substrate thickness. The HTSC thin films are deposited on one or both sides of the substrates in a spiral configuration with variable line widths to increase the field. 4 figures.

  15. High-field magnets using high-critical-temperature superconducting thin films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mitlitsky, Fred; Hoard, Ronald W.

    1994-01-01

    High-field magnets fabricated from high-critical-temperature superconducting ceramic (HTSC) thin films which can generate fields greater than 4 Tesla. The high-field magnets are made of stackable disk-shaped substrates coated with HTSC thin films, and involves maximizing the critical current density, superconducting film thickness, number of superconducting layers per substrate, substrate diameter, and number of substrates while minimizing substrate thickness. The HTSC thin films are deposited on one or both sides of the substrates in a spiral configuration with variable line widths to increase the field.

  16. HTS Cable Projects | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cable Projects HTS Cable Projects Fact sheet describing what is being done to modernize electricity transmission and distribution HTS Cable Projects More Documents & Publications...

  17. Automatic HTS force measurement instrument

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sanders, Scott T.; Niemann, Ralph C.

    1999-01-01

    A device for measuring the levitation force of a high temperature superconductor sample with respect to a reference magnet includes a receptacle for holding several high temperature superconductor samples each cooled to superconducting temperature. A rotatable carousel successively locates a selected one of the high temperature superconductor samples in registry with the reference magnet. Mechanism varies the distance between one of the high temperature superconductor samples and the reference magnet, and a sensor measures levitation force of the sample as a function of the distance between the reference magnet and the sample. A method is also disclosed.

  18. Automatic HTS force measurement instrument

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sanders, S.T.; Niemann, R.C.

    1999-03-30

    A device is disclosed for measuring the levitation force of a high temperature superconductor sample with respect to a reference magnet includes a receptacle for holding several high temperature superconductor samples each cooled to superconducting temperature. A rotatable carousel successively locates a selected one of the high temperature superconductor samples in registry with the reference magnet. Mechanism varies the distance between one of the high temperature superconductor samples and the reference magnet, and a sensor measures levitation force of the sample as a function of the distance between the reference magnet and the sample. A method is also disclosed. 3 figs.

  19. Passive Superconducting Flux Conservers for Rotating-Magnetic-Field-Driven Field-Reversed Configurations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oz, E.; Myers, C. E.; Edwards, M. R.; Berlinger, B.; Brooks, A.; Cohen, S. A.

    2011-01-05

    The Princeton Field-Reversed Configuration (PFRC) experiment employs an odd-parity rotating magnetic field (RMFo) current drive and plasma heating system to form and sustain high-? plasmas. For radial confinement, an array of coaxial, internal, passive, flux-conserving (FC) rings applies magnetic pressure to the plasma while still allowing radio-frequency RMFo from external coils to reach the plasma. The 3 ms pulse duration of the present experiment is limited by the skin time (?fc) of its room-temperature copper FC rings. To explore plasma phenomena with longer characteristic times, the pulse duration of the next-generation PFRC-2 device will exceed 100 ms, necessitating FC rings with (?fc > 300 ms. In this paper we review the physics of internal, discrete, passive FCs and describe the evolution of the PFRC's FC array. We then detail new experiments that have produced higher performance FC rings that contain embedded high-temperature superconducting (HTS) tapes. Several HTS tape winding configurations have been studied and a wide range of extended skin times, from 0.4 s to over 103 s, has been achieved. The new FC rings must carry up to 3 kA of current to balance the expected PFRC-2 plasma pressure, so the dependence of the HTS-FC critical current on the winding configuration and temperature was also studied. From these experiments, the key HTS-FC design considerations have been identified and HTS-FC rings with the desired performance characteristics have been produced.

  20. The Progress on Low-Cost, High-Quality, High-Temperature Superconducting Tapes Deposited by the Combustion Chemical Vapor Deposition Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shoup, S.S.; White, M.K.; Krebs, S.L.; Darnell, N.; King, A.C.; Mattox, D.S.; Campbell, I.H.; Marken, K.R.; Hong, S.; Czabaj, B.; Paranthaman, M.; Christen, H.M.; Zhai, H.-Y. Specht, E.

    2008-06-24

    The innovative Combustion Chemical Vapor Deposition (CCVD) process is a non-vacuum technique that is being investigated to enable next generation products in several application areas including high-temperature superconductors (HTS). In combination with the Rolling Assisted Biaxially Textured Substrate (RABiTS) technology, the CCVD process has significant promise to provide low-cost, high-quality lengths of YBCO coated conductor. Over 100 meter lengths of both Ni and Ni-W (3 at. Wt.%) substrates with a surface roughness of 12-18 nm were produced. The CCVD technology has been used to deposit both buffer layer coatings as well as YBCO superconducting layers. Buffer layer architecture of strontium titanate (SrTiO{sub 3}) and ceria (CeO{sub 2}) have been deposited by CCVD on textured nickel substrates and optimized to appropriate thicknesses and microstructures to provide templates for growing PLD YBCO with a J{sub c} of 1.1 MA/cm{sup 2} at 77 K and self-field. The CCVD buffer layers have been scaled to meter plus lengths with good epitaxial uniformity along the length. A short sample cut from one of the lengths enabled high critical current density PLD YBCO. Films of CCVD YBCO superconductors have been grown on single crystal substrates with critical current densities over 1 MA/cm{sup 2}. In addition, superconducting YBCO films with an I{sub c} of 60 A/cm-width (J{sub c} = 1.5 MA/cm{sup 2}) were grown on ORNL RABiTS (CeO{sub 2}/YSZ/Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Ni/Ni-3W) using CCVD process.

  1. Superconductivity Centennial | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Superconductivity Centennial Superconductivity Centennial Superconductivity Centennial - Friday, April 8, marks 100 years since Heike Kamerlingh Onnes discovered the basis for CEBAF's success: superconductivity. Superconducting radiofrequency accelerator cavities, like this one, harness the energy that the CEBAF accelerator pumps into its electron beam for nuclear physics research. SRF cavities are typically made of niobium, a metal that becomes superconducting at extremely low temperatures.

  2. A review of basic phenomena and techniques for sputter-deposition of high temperature superconducting films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auciello, O. North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Ameen, M.S.; Kingon, A.I.; Lichtenwalner, D.J. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Krauss, A.R. )

    1990-01-01

    The processes involved in plasma and ion beam sputter-deposition of high temperature superconducting thin films are critically reviewed. Recent advances in the development of these techniques are discussed in relation to basic physical phenomena, specific to each technique, which must be understood before high quality films can be produced. Control of film composition is a major issue in sputter-deposition of multicomponent materials. Low temperature processing of films is a common goal for each technique, particularly in relation to integrating high temperature superconducting films with the current microelectronics technology. It has been understood for some time that for Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} deposition, the most intensely studied high-{Tc} compound, incorporation of sufficient oxygen into the film during deposition is necessary to produce as-deposited superconducting films at relatively substrate temperatures. Recent results have shown that with the use of suitable buffer layers, high quality Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} sputtered films can be obtained on Si substrates without the need for post-deposition anneal processing. This review is mainly focussed on issues related to sputter-deposition of Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} thin films, although representative results concerning the bismuth and thallium based compounds are included. 143 refs., 11 figs.

  3. Vibrations Raise the Critical Temperature for Superconductivity | U.S. DOE

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Office of Science (SC) Vibrations Raise the Critical Temperature for Superconductivity Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) Community Resources Contact Information Basic Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-22/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3081 F: (301) 903-6594 E: Email Us More Information » 12.14.15

  4. Can Magnetism Explain High Temperature Superconductivity? | U.S. DOE Office

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Science (SC) Can Magnetism Explain High Temperature Superconductivity? Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) Community Resources Contact Information Basic Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-22/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3081 F: (301) 903-6594 E: Email Us More Information » 05.01.12 Can Magnetism

  5. Superconductive wire

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korzekwa, D.A.; Bingert, J.F.; Peterson, D.E.; Sheinberg, H.

    1995-07-18

    A superconductive article is made by inserting a rigid mandrel into an internal cavity of a first metallic tube, said tube having an interior surface and an exterior surface, said interior surface defining the interior cavity, forming a layer of a superconductive material or superconductive precursor upon the exterior surface of said first metallic tube, machining the layer of superconductive material or superconductive precursor to a predetermined diameter to form an intermediate article configured for insertion into a second metallic tube having an interior diameter corresponding to the predetermined diameter, inserting the machined intermediate article into a second metallic tube having an internal diameter corresponding to the predetermined diameter of the intermediate article to form a composite intermediate article, reducing or ironing the composite intermediate article to a predetermined cross-sectional diameter, and sintering the reduced or ironed composite intermediate article at temperatures and for time sufficient for the superconductive material or superconductive precursor to exhibit superconductivity. 2 figs.

  6. Superconductive wire

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korzekwa, David A.; Bingert, John F.; Peterson, Dean E.; Sheinberg, Haskell

    1995-01-01

    A superconductive article is made by inserting a rigid mandrel into an internal cavity of a first metallic tube, said tube having an interior surface and an exterior surface, said interior surface defining the interior cavity, forming a layer of a superconductive material or superconductive precursor upon the exterior surface of said first metallic tube, machining the layer of superconductive material or superconductive precursor to a predetermined diameter to form an intermediate article configured for insertion into a second metallic tube having an interior diameter corresponding to the predetermined diameter, inserting the machined intermediate article into a second metallic tube having an internal diameter corresponding to the predetermined diameter of the intermediate article to form a composite intermediate article, reducing or ironing the composite intermediate article to a predetermined cross-sectional diameter, and sintering the reduced or ironed composite intermediate article at temperatures and for time sufficient for the superconductive material or superconductive precursor to exhibit superconductivity.

  7. Narrowband high temperature superconducting receiver for low frequency radio waves

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reagor, David W.

    2001-01-01

    An underground communicating device has a low-noise SQUID using high temperature superconductor components connected to detect a modulated external magnetic flux for outputting a voltage signal spectrum that is related to the varying magnetic flux. A narrow bandwidth filter may be used to select a portion of the voltage signal spectrum that is relatively free of power line noise to output a relatively low noise output signal when operating in a portion of the electromagnetic spectra where such power line noise exists. A demodulator outputs a communication signal, which may be an FM signal, indicative of a modulation on the modulated external magnetic flux.

  8. Method and apparatus for forming high-critical-temperature superconducting layers on flat and/or elongated substrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ciszek, Theodore F.

    1994-01-01

    An elongated, flexible superconductive wire or strip is fabricated by pulling it through and out of a melt of metal oxide material at a rate conducive to forming a crystalline coating of superconductive metal oxide material on an elongated, flexible substrate wire or strip. A coating of crystalline superconductive material, such as Bi.sub.2 Sr.sub.2 CaCu.sub.2 O.sub.8, is annealed to effect conductive contact between adjacent crystalline structures in the coating material, which is then cooled to room temperature. The container for the melt can accommodate continuous passage of the substrate through the melt. Also, a second pass-through container can be used to simultaneously anneal and overcoat the superconductive coating with a hot metallic material, such as silver or silver alloy. A hollow, elongated tube casting method of forming an elongated, flexible superconductive wire includes drawing the melt by differential pressure into a heated tubular substrate.

  9. Method and apparatus for forming high-critical-temperature superconducting layers on flat and/or elongated substrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ciszek, T.F.

    1994-04-19

    An elongated, flexible superconductive wire or strip is fabricated by pulling it through and out of a melt of metal oxide material at a rate conducive to forming a crystalline coating of superconductive metal oxide material on an elongated, flexible substrate wire or strip. A coating of crystalline superconductive material, such as Bi[sub 2]Sr[sub 2]CaCu[sub 2]O[sub 8], is annealed to effect conductive contact between adjacent crystalline structures in the coating material, which is then cooled to room temperature. The container for the melt can accommodate continuous passage of the substrate through the melt. Also, a second pass-through container can be used to simultaneously anneal and overcoat the superconductive coating with a hot metallic material, such as silver or silver alloy. A hollow, elongated tube casting method of forming an elongated, flexible superconductive wire includes drawing the melt by differential pressure into a heated tubular substrate. 8 figures.

  10. "Flexible aerogel as a superior thermal insulation for high temperature superconductor cable applications"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Shannon O. [Aspen Aerogel, Inc.; Demko, Jonathan A [ORNL; Tomich, A. [Aspen Aerogel, Inc.

    2010-01-01

    High temperature superconducting (HTS) cables are an advanced technology that can both strengthen and improve the national electrical distribution infrastructure. HTS cables require sufficient cooling to overcome inherent low temperature heat loading. Heat loads are minimized by the use of cryogenic envelopes or cryostats. Cryostats require improvement in efficiency, reliability, and cost reduction to meet the demanding needs of HTS conductors (1G and 2G wires). Aspen Aerogels has developed a compression resistant aerogel thermal insulation package to replace compression sensitive multi-layer insulation (MLI), the incumbent thermal insulation, in flexible cryostats for HTS cables. Oak Ridge National Laboratory tested a prototype aerogel package in a lab-scale pipe apparatus to measure the rate of heat invasion. The lab-scale pipe test results of the aerogel solution will be presented and directly compared to MLI. A compatibility assessment of the aerogel material with HTS system components will also be presented. The aerogel thermal insulation solution presented will meet the demanding needs of HTS cables.

  11. Low temperature laser scanning microscopy of a superconducting radio-frequency cavity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ciovati, G.; Anlage, Steven M.; Baldwin, C.; Cheng, G.; Flood, R.; Jordan, K.; Kneisel, P.; Morrone, M.; Nemes, G.; Turlington, L.; et al

    2012-03-16

    An apparatus was created to obtain, for the first time, 2D maps of the surface resistance of the inner surface of an operating superconducting radio-frequency niobium cavity by a low-temperature laser scanning microscopy technique. This allows identifying non-uniformities of the surface resistance with a spatial resolution of about one order of magnitude better than with earlier methods. A signal-to-noise ratio of about 10 dB was obtained with 240 mW laser power and 1 Hz modulation frequency. The various components of the apparatus, the experimental procedure and results are discussed in details in this contribution.

  12. Ceramic superconductor/metal composite materials employing the superconducting proximity effect

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcomb, Matthew J.

    2002-01-01

    Superconducting composite materials having particles of superconducting material disposed in a metal matrix material with a high electron-boson coupling coefficient (.lambda.). The superconducting particles can comprise any type of superconductor including Laves phase materials, Chevrel phase materials, A15 compounds, and perovskite cuprate ceramics. The particles preferably have dimensions of about 10-500 nanometers. The particles preferably have dimensions larger than the superconducting coherence length of the superconducting material. The metal matrix material has a .lambda. greater than 0.2, preferably the .lambda. is much higher than 0.2. The metal matrix material is a good proximity superconductor due to its high .lambda.. When cooled, the superconductor particles cause the metal matrix material to become superconducting due to the proximity effect. In cases where the particles and the metal matrix material are chemically incompatible (i.e., reactive in a way that destroys superconductivity), the particles are provided with a thin protective metal coating. The coating is chemically compatible with the particles and metal matrix material. High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) cuprate ceramic particles are reactive and therefore require a coating of a noble metal resistant to oxidation (e.g., silver, gold). The proximity effect extends through the metal coating. With certain superconductors, non-noble metals can be used for the coating.

  13. Method and apparatus for connecting high voltage leads to a high temperature super-conducting transformer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Golner, Thomas M.; Mehta, Shirish P.

    2005-07-26

    A method and apparatus for connecting high voltage leads to a super-conducting transformer is provided that includes a first super-conducting coil set, a second super-conducting coil set, and a third super-conducting coil set. The first, second and third super-conducting coil sets are connected via an insulated interconnect system that includes insulated conductors and insulated connectors that are utilized to connect the first, second, and third super-conducting coil sets to the high voltage leads.

  14. Structure for HTS composite conductors and the manufacture of same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cotton, J.D.; Riley, G.N. Jr.

    1999-06-01

    A superconducting oxide composite structure including a superconducting oxide member, a metal layer surrounding the superconducting oxide member, and an insulating layer of a complex oxide formed in situ adjacent to the superconducting oxide member and the metal layer is provided together with a method of forming such a superconducting oxide composite structure including encapsulating a superconducting oxide member or precursor within a metal matrix layer from the group of: (1) a reactive metal sheath adjacent to the superconducting oxide member or precursor, the reactive metal sheath surrounded by a second metal layer or (2) an alloy containing a reactive metal; to form an intermediate product, and, heating the intermediate product at temperatures and for time sufficient to form an insulating layer of a complex oxide in situ, the insulating layer to the superconducting oxide member or precursor and the metal matrix layer. 10 figs.

  15. Structure for hts composite conductors and the manufacture of same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cotton, James D.; Riley, Jr., Gilbert Neal

    1999-01-01

    A superconducting oxide composite structure including a superconducting oxide member, a metal layer surrounding the superconducting oxide member, and an insulating layer of a complex oxide formed in situ adjacent to the superconducting oxide member and the metal layer is provided together with a method of forming such a superconducting oxide composite structure including encapsulating a superconducting oxide member or precursor within a metal matrix layer from the group of: (i) a reactive metal sheath adjacent to the superconducting oxide member or precursor, the reactive metal sheath surrounded by a second metal layer or (ii) an alloy containing a reactive metal; to form an intermediate product, and, heating the intermediate product at temperatures and for time sufficient to form an insulating layer of a complex oxide in situ, the insulating layer to the superconducting oxide member or precursor and the metal matrix layer.

  16. Method for determining hydrogen mobility as a function of temperature in superconducting niobium cavities

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    May, Robert

    2008-03-11

    A method for determining the mobility of hydrogen as a function of temperature in superconducting niobium cavities comprising: 1) heating a cavity under test to remove free hydrogen; 2) introducing hydrogen-3 gas into the cavity; 3) cooling the cavity to allow absorption of hydrogen-3; and 4) measuring the amount of hydrogen-3 by: a) cooling the cavity to about 4.degree. K while flowing a known and regulated amount of inert carrier gas such as argon or helium into the cavity; b) allowing the cavity to warm at a stable rate from 4.degree. K to room temperature as it leaves the chamber; and c) directing the exit gas to an ion chamber radiation detector.

  17. Design Considerations of Fast-cycling Synchrotrons Based on Superconducting Transmission Line Magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piekarz, H.; Hays, S.; Huang, Y.; Shiltsev, V.; /Fermilab

    2008-06-01

    Fast-cycling synchrotrons are key instruments for accelerator based nuclear and high-energy physics programs. We explore a possibility to construct fast-cycling synchrotrons by using super-ferric, {approx}2 Tesla B-field dipole magnets powered with a superconducting transmission line. We outline both the low temperature (LTS) and the high temperature (HTS) superconductor design options and consider dynamic power losses for an accelerator with operation cycle of 0.5 Hz. We also briefly outline possible power supply system for such accelerator, and discuss the quench protection system for the magnet string powered by a transmission line conductor.

  18. Field Demonstration of a 24-kV Superconducting Cable at Detroit Edison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelley, Nathan; Corsaro, Pietro

    2004-12-01

    Customer acceptance of high temperature superconducting (HTS) cable technology requires a substantial field demonstration illustrating both the system's technical capabilities and its suitability for installation and operation within the utility environment. In this project, the world's first underground installation of an HTS cable using existing ductwork, a 120 meter demonstration cable circuit was designed and installed between the 24 kV bus distribution bus and a 120 kV-24 kV transformer at Detroit Edison's Frisbie substation. The system incorporated cables, accessories, a refrigeration system, and control instrumentation. Although the system was never put in operation because of problems with leaks in the cryostat, the project significantly advanced the state-of-the-art in the design and implementation of Warm Dielectric cable systems in substation applications. Lessons learned in this project are already being incorporated in several ongoing demonstration projects.

  19. Superconducting magnetic Wollaston prism for neutron spin encoding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, F., E-mail: fankli@indiana.edu; Parnell, S. R.; Wang, T.; Baxter, D. V. [Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47408 (United States)] [Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47408 (United States); Hamilton, W. A. [Neutron Sciences Directorate, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States)] [Neutron Sciences Directorate, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States); Maranville, B. B. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States)] [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Semerad, R. [Ceraco Ceramic Coating GmbH, Ismaning 85737 (Germany)] [Ceraco Ceramic Coating GmbH, Ismaning 85737 (Germany); Cremer, J. T. [Adelphi Technology Inc., Redwood City, California 94063 (United States)] [Adelphi Technology Inc., Redwood City, California 94063 (United States); Pynn, R. [Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47408 (United States) [Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47408 (United States); Neutron Sciences Directorate, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    A magnetic Wollaston prism can spatially split a polarized neutron beam into two beams with different neutron spin states, in a manner analogous to an optical Wollaston prism. Such a Wollaston prism can be used to encode the trajectory of neutrons into the Larmor phase associated with their spin degree of freedom. This encoding can be used for neutron phase-contrast radiography and in spin echo scattering angle measurement (SESAME). In this paper, we show that magnetic Wollaston prisms with highly uniform magnetic fields and low Larmor phase aberration can be constructed to preserve neutron polarization using high temperature superconducting (HTS) materials. The Meissner effect of HTS films is used to confine magnetic fields produced electromagnetically by current-carrying HTS tape wound on suitably shaped soft iron pole pieces. The device is cooled to ?30 K by a closed cycle refrigerator, eliminating the need to replenish liquid cryogens and greatly simplifying operation and maintenance. A HTS film ensures that the magnetic field transition within the prism is sharp, well-defined, and planar due to the Meissner effect. The spin transport efficiency across the device was measured to be ?98.5% independent of neutron wavelength and energizing current. The position-dependent Larmor phase of neutron spins was measured at the NIST Center for Neutron Research facility and found to agree well with detailed simulations. The phase varies linearly with horizontal position, as required, and the neutron beam shows little depolarization. Consequently, the device has advantages over existing devices with similar functionality and provides the capability for a large neutron beam (20 mm × 30 mm) and an increase in length scales accessible to SESAME to beyond 10 ?m. With further improvements of the external coupling guide field in the prototype device, a larger neutron beam could be employed.

  20. Nanostructures of Boron, Carbon and Magnesium Diboride for High Temperature Superconductivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pfefferle, Lisa; Fang, Fang; Iyyamperumal, Eswarmoorthi; Keskar, Gayatri

    2013-12-23

    Direct fabrication of MgxBy nanostructures is achieved by employing metal (Ni,Mg) incorporated MCM-41 in the Hybrid Physical-Chemical Vapor Deposition (HPCVD) reaction. Different reaction conditions are tested to optimize the fabrication process. TEM analysis shows the fabrication of MgxBy nanostructures starting at the reaction temperature of 600oC, with the yield of the nanostructures increasing with increasing reaction temperature. The as-synthesized MgxBy nanostructures have the diameters in the range of 3-5nm, which do not increase with the reaction temperature consistent with templated synthesis. EELS analysis of the template removed nanostructures confirms the existence of B and Mg with possible contamination of Si and O. NEXAFS and Raman spectroscopy analysis suggested a concentric layer-by-layer MgxBy nanowire/nanotube growth model for our as-synthesized nanostructures. Ni k-edge XAS indicates that the formation of MgNi alloy particles is important for the Vapor-Liquid-Solid (VLS) growth of MgxBy nanostructures with fine diameters, and the presence of Mg vapor not just Mg in the catalyst is crucial for the formation of Ni-Mg clusters. Physical templating by the MCM-41 pores was shown to confine the diameter of the nanostructures. DC magnetization measurements indicate possible superconductive behaviors in the as-synthesized samples.

  1. Progress in high-temperature superconducting transistors and other devices; Proceedings of the SPIE Meeting, Vol. 1394, Santa Clara, CA, Oct. 4, 5, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, R.; Narayan, J.; Shaw, D.T.

    1991-01-01

    Various papers on progress in high-temperature superconducting transistors and other devices are presented. Individual topics addressed include: superconductor/semiconductor structure and its application to superconducting devices, superconducting YBa{sup 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} films on Si and GaAs with conducting indium tin oxide buffer layers, high-temperature superconducting Josephson junction devices, planar SNS Josephson junctions using multilayer Bi system, YBa{sup 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x}/Au/Nb device structures, cleaved surfaces of high Tc films for making SNS structures, high-temperature superconductive microwave technology for space applications, high-Tc superconducting infrared bolometric detector, thin film processing and device fabrication in the Tl-Ca-Ba-Cu-O system. Also discussed are: grain-oriented high--Tc superconductors and their applications, speed of optically controlled superconducting devices, effect of laser irradiation on superconducting properties of laser-deposited YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} thin films, role of buffer layers in the laser-ablated films on metallic substrates, progress toward device applications using MOCVD of TlBaCaCuO, versatility of metal organic chemical vapor deposition process for fabrication of high-quality YBCO superconducting thin films.

  2. Restoration and testing of an HTS fault current controller

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waynert, J. A.; Boenig, H.; Mielke, C. H.; Willis, J. O.; Burley, B. L.

    2002-01-01

    A three-phase, 1200 A, 12.5 kV fault current controller using three HTS 4 mH coils, was built by industry and tested in 1999 at the Center Substation of Southern California Edison in Norwalk, CA. During the testing, it appeared that each of the three single-phase units had experienced a voltage breakdown, one externally and two internally. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was asked by DOE to restore the operation of the fault current controller provided the HTS coils had not been damaged during the initial substation tests. When the internally-failed coil vacuum vessels were opened it became evident that in these two vessels, a flashover had occurred at the high voltage bus section leading to the terminals of the superconducting coil. An investigation into the failure mechanism resulted in six possible causes for the flashover. Based on these causes, the high voltage bus was completely redesigned. Single-phase tests were successfully performed on the modified unit at a 13.7 kV LANL substation. This paper presents the postulated voltage flashover failure mechanisms, the new high voltage bus design which mitigates the failure mechanisms, the sequence of tests used to validate the new design, and finally, the results of variable load and short-circuit tests with the single-phase unit operating on the LANL 13.7 kV substation.

  3. Comparative Assessment of Direct Drive High Temperature Superconducting Generators in Multi-Megawatt Class Wind Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maples, B.; Hand, M.; Musial, W.

    2010-10-01

    This paper summarizes the work completed under the CRADA between NREL and American Superconductor (AMSC). The CRADA combined NREL and AMSC resources to benchmark high temperature superconducting direct drive (HTSDD) generator technology by integrating the technologies into a conceptual wind turbine design, and comparing the design to geared drive and permanent magnet direct drive (PMDD) wind turbine configurations. Analysis was accomplished by upgrading the NREL Wind Turbine Design Cost and Scaling Model to represent geared and PMDD turbines at machine ratings up to 10 MW and then comparing cost and mass figures of AMSC's HTSDD wind turbine designs to theoretical geared and PMDD turbine designs at 3.1, 6, and 10 MW sizes. Based on the cost and performance data supplied by AMSC, HTSDD technology has good potential to compete successfully as an alternative technology to PMDD and geared technology turbines in the multi megawatt classes. In addition, data suggests the economics of HTSDD turbines improve with increasing size, although several uncertainties remain for all machines in the 6 to 10 MW class.

  4. Prospects for the medium- and long-term development of China`s electric power industry and analysis of the potential market for superconductivity technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Z.

    1998-05-01

    First of all, overall economic growth objectives in China are concisely and succinctly specified in this report. Secondly, this report presents a forecast of energy supply and demand for China`s economic growth for 2000--2050. In comparison with the capability of energy construction in China in the future, a gap between supply and demand is one of the important factors hindering the sustainable development of Chain`s economy. The electric power industry is one of China`s most important industries. To adopt energy efficiency through high technology and utilizing energy adequately is an important technological policy for the development of China`s electric power industry in the future. After briefly describing the achievements of China`s electric power industry, this report defines the target areas and policies for the development of hydroelectricity and nuclear electricity in the 2000s in China, presents the strategic position of China`s electric power industry as well as objectives and relevant plans of development for 2000--2050. This report finds that with the discovery of superconducting electricity, the discovery of new high-temperature superconducting (HTS) materials, and progress in materials techniques, the 21st century will be an era of superconductivity. Applications of superconductivity in the energy field, such as superconducting storage, superconducting transmission, superconducting transformers, superconducting motors, its application in Magneto-Hydro-Dynamics (MHD), as well as in nuclear fusion, has unique advantages. Its market prospects are quite promising. 12 figs.

  5. Flywheel energy storage advances using HTS bearings.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mulcahy, T. M.

    1998-09-11

    High-Temperature-Superconducting (HT) bearings have the potential to reduce idling losses and make flywheel energy storage economical. Demonstration of large, high-speed flywheels is key to market penetration. Toward this goal, a flywheel system has been developed and tested with 5-kg to 15-kg disk-shaped rotors. Rlm speeds exceeded 400 mls and stored energies were >80 W-hr. Test implementation required technological advances in nearly all aspects of the flywheel system. Features and limitations of the design and tests are discussed, especially those related to achieving additional energy storage.

  6. Superconducting materials for large scale applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scanlan, Ronald M.; Malozemoff, Alexis P.; Larbalestier, David C.

    2004-05-06

    Significant improvements in the properties ofsuperconducting materials have occurred recently. These improvements arebeing incorporated into the latest generation of wires, cables, and tapesthat are being used in a broad range of prototype devices. These devicesinclude new, high field accelerator and NMR magnets, magnets for fusionpower experiments, motors, generators, and power transmission lines.These prototype magnets are joining a wide array of existing applicationsthat utilize the unique capabilities of superconducting magnets:accelerators such as the Large Hadron Collider, fusion experiments suchas ITER, 930 MHz NMR, and 4 Tesla MRI. In addition, promising newmaterials such as MgB2 have been discovered and are being studied inorder to assess their potential for new applications. In this paper, wewill review the key developments that are leading to these newapplications for superconducting materials. In some cases, the key factoris improved understanding or development of materials with significantlyimproved properties. An example of the former is the development of Nb3Snfor use in high field magnets for accelerators. In other cases, thedevelopment is being driven by the application. The aggressive effort todevelop HTS tapes is being driven primarily by the need for materialsthat can operate at temperatures of 50 K and higher. The implications ofthese two drivers for further developments will be discussed. Finally, wewill discuss the areas where further improvements are needed in order fornew applications to be realized.

  7. Commercialization of Medium Voltage HTS Triax TM Cable Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knoll, David

    2012-12-31

    The original project scope that was established in 2007 aimed to install a 1,700 meter (1.1 mile) medium voltage HTS Triax{TM} cable system into the utility grid in New Orleans, LA. In 2010, however, the utility partner withdrew from the project, so the 1,700 meter cable installation was cancelled and the scope of work was reduced. The work then concentrated on the specific barriers to commercialization of HTS cable technology. The modified scope included long-length HTS cable design and testing, high voltage factory test development, optimized cooling system development, and HTS cable life-cycle analysis. In 2012, Southwire again analyzed the market for HTS cables and deemed the near term market acceptance to be low. The scope of work was further reduced to the completion of tasks already started and to testing of the existing HTS cable system in Columbus, OH. The work completed under the project included: • Long-length cable modeling and analysis • HTS wire evaluation and testing • Cable testing for AC losses • Optimized cooling system design • Life cycle testing of the HTS cable in Columbus, OH • Project management. The 200 meter long HTS Triax{TM} cable in Columbus, OH was incorporated into the project under the initial scope changes as a test bed for life cycle testing as well as the site for an optimized HTS cable cooling system. The Columbus cable utilizes the HTS TriaxTM design, so it provided an economical tool for these of the project tasks.

  8. Neutron scattering studies of spin-phonon hybridization and superconducting spin gaps in the high temperature superconductor La2-x(Sr;Ba)xCuO4

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wagman, J. J.; Carlo, Jeremy P.; Gaudet, J.; Van Gastel, G. J.; Abernathy, Douglas L.; Stone, Matthew B.; Granroth, Garrett E.; Kolesnikov, Alexander I.; Savici, Andrei T.; Kim, Young -June; et al

    2016-03-14

    We present time-of-flight neutron-scattering measurements on single crystals of La2-xBaxCuO4 (LBCO) with 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.095 and La2-xSrxCuO4 (LSCO) with x = 0.08 and 0.11. This range of dopings spans much of the phase diagram relevant to high temperature cuprate superconductivity, ranging from insulating, three dimensional commensurate long range antiferromagnetic order for x ≤ 0.02 to two dimensional (2D) incommensurate antiferromagnetism co-existing with superconductivity for x ≥ 0.05. Previous work on lightly doped LBCO with x = 0.035 showed a clear resonant enhancement of the inelastic scattering coincident with the low energy crossings of the highly dispersive spin excitationsmore » and quasi-2D optic phonons. The present work extends these measurements across the phase diagram and shows this enhancement to be a common feature to this family of layered quantum magnets. Furthermore we show that the low temperature, low energy magnetic spectral weight is substantially larger for samples with non-superconducting ground states relative to any of the samples with superconducting ground states. Lastly spin gaps, suppression of low energy magnetic spectral weight, are observed in both superconducting LBCO and LSCO samples, consistent with previous observations for superconducting LSCO« less

  9. Department of Energy`s Wire Development Workshop - Superconductivity program for electric systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-06-01

    The 1996 High-Temperature Superconducting Wire Development Workshop was held on January 31--February 1 at the Crown Plaza Tampa Westshore in Tampa, Florida. The meeting was hosted by Tampa Electric Company and sponsored by the Department of Energy`s Superconductivity Program for Electric Systems. The meeting focused on recent high-temperature superconducting wire development activities in the Department of Energy`s Superconductivity Systems program. Tampa Electric`s Greg Ramon began the meeting by giving a perspective on the changes now occurring in the utility sector. Major program wire development accomplishments during the past year were then highlighted, particularly the world record achievements at Los Alamos and Oak Ridge National Laboratories. The meeting then focussed on three priority technical issues: thallium conductors; AC losses in HTS conductors; and coated conductors on textured substrates. Following in-depth presentations, working groups were formed in each technology area to discuss and critique the most important current research and development issues. The working groups identified research areas that have the potential for greatly enhancing the wire development effort. These areas are discussed in the summary reports from each of the working groups. This document is a compilation of the workshop proceedings including all general session presentations and summary reports from the working groups.

  10. From Ions to Wires to the Grid: The Transformational Science of LANL Research in High-Tc Superconducting Tapes and Electric Power Applications

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Marken, Ken [Superconductivity Technology Center, Los Alamos, New Mexico, United States

    2010-01-08

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) has been tasked to lead national efforts to modernize the electric grid, enhance security and reliability of the energy infrastructure, and facilitate recovery from disruptions to energy supplies. LANL has pioneered the development of coated conductors ? high-temperature superconducting (HTS) tapes ? which permit dramatically greater current densities than conventional copper cable, and enable new technologies to secure the national electric grid. Sustained world-class research from concept, demonstration, transfer, and ongoing industrial support has moved this idea from the laboratory to the commercial marketplace.

  11. DOE Superconductivity Program Stakeholders | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Superconductivity Program Stakeholders DOE Superconductivity Program Stakeholders Map showing the stakeholders involved in High Temperature Superconductivity work with the DOE. DOE Superconductivity Program Stakeholders (104.19 KB) More Documents & Publications High Temperature Superconductivity Partners DOE Provides up to $51.8 Million to Modernize the U.S. Electric Grid System. June 27, 2007 Superconductivity for Electric Systems: 2008 Annual Peer Review Final Report

  12. 10MW Class Direct Drive HTS Wind Turbine: Cooperative Research...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SEMICONDUCTOR; 20MW CLASS DIRECT DRIVE HTS WIND TURBINE; Commercialization and Technology Transfer Word Cloud More Like This Full Text preview image File size NAView Full Text ...

  13. Direct evidence for a pressure-induced nodal superconducting gap in the Ba0.65Rb0.35Fe2As2 superconductor

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Guguchia, Z.; Amato, A.; Kang, J.; Luetkens, H.; Biswas, P. K.; Prando, G.; von Rohr, F.; Bukowski, Z.; Shengelaya, A.; Keller, H.; et al

    2015-11-09

    The superconducting gap structure in iron-based high-temperature superconductors (Fe-HTSs) is non-universal. Contrasting with other unconventional superconductors, in the Fe-HTSs both d-wave and extended s-wave pairing symmetries are close in energy. Probing the proximity between these very different superconducting states and identifying experimental parameters that can tune them is of central interest. Here we report high-pressure muon spin rotation experiments on the temperature-dependent magnetic penetration depth in the optimally doped nodeless s-wave Fe-HTS Ba0.65Rb0.35Fe2As2. Upon pressure, a strong decrease of the penetration depth in the zero-temperature limit is observed, while the superconducting transition temperature remains nearly constant. More importantly, the low-temperaturemore » behaviour of the inverse-squared magnetic penetration depth, which is a direct measure of the superfluid density, changes qualitatively from an exponential saturation at zero pressure to a linear-in-temperature behaviour at higher pressures, indicating that hydrostatic pressure promotes the appearance of nodes in the superconducting gap.« less

  14. Superconducting radiofrequency window assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, H.L.; Elliott, T.S.

    1997-03-11

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly comprises a superconducting frame, a ceramic plate having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet for sealing plate into frame. The plate is brazed to eyelet which is then electron beam welded to frame. A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator. 11 figs.

  15. Superconductive radiofrequency window assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, H.L.; Elliott, T.S.

    1998-05-19

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The SRF window assembly has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The SRF window assembly comprises a superconducting frame, a ceramic plate having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet for sealing plate into frame. The plate is brazed to eyelet which is then electron beam welded to frame. A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the SRF window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator. 11 figs.

  16. Method of forming an HTS article

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bhattacharya, Raghu N.; Zhang, Xun; Selvamanickam, Venkat

    2014-08-19

    A method of forming a superconducting article includes providing a substrate tape, forming a superconducting layer overlying the substrate tape, and depositing a capping layer overlying the superconducting layer. The capping layer includes a noble metal and has a thickness not greater than about 1.0 micron. The method further includes electrodepositing a stabilizer layer overlying the capping layer using a solution that is non-reactive to the superconducting layer. The superconducting layer has an as-formed critical current I.sub.C(AF) and a post-stabilized critical current I.sub.C(PS). The I.sub.C(PS) is at least about 95% of the I.sub.C(AF).

  17. What Causes High-temperature Superconductivity? | U.S. DOE Office...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Image courtesy of Ames Laboratory Diagram showing the properties of a material as temperature and chemical composition (phosphorus level in this study) are varied. The figure shows ...

  18. Superconducting active impedance converter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ginley, D.S.; Hietala, V.M.; Martens, J.S.

    1993-11-16

    A transimpedance amplifier for use with high temperature superconducting, other superconducting, and conventional semiconductors allows for appropriate signal amplification and impedance matching to processing electronics. The amplifier incorporates the superconducting flux flow transistor into a differential amplifier configuration which allows for operation over a wide temperature range, and is characterized by high gain, relatively low noise, and response times less than 200 picoseconds over at least a 10-80 K. temperature range. The invention is particularly useful when a signal derived from either far-IR focal plane detectors or from Josephson junctions is to be processed by higher signal/higher impedance electronics, such as conventional semiconductor technology. 12 figures.

  19. Superconducting active impedance converter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ginley, David S.; Hietala, Vincent M.; Martens, Jon S.

    1993-01-01

    A transimpedance amplifier for use with high temperature superconducting, other superconducting, and conventional semiconductor allows for appropriate signal amplification and impedance matching to processing electronics. The amplifier incorporates the superconducting flux flow transistor into a differential amplifier configuration which allows for operation over a wide temperature range, and is characterized by high gain, relatively low noise, and response times less than 200 picoseconds over at least a 10-80 K. temperature range. The invention is particularly useful when a signal derived from either far-IR focal plane detectors or from Josephson junctions is to be processed by higher signal/higher impedance electronics, such as conventional semiconductor technology.

  20. Direct evidence for a pressure-induced nodal superconducting gap in the Ba0.65Rb0.35Fe2As2 superconductor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guguchia, Z.; Amato, A.; Kang, J.; Luetkens, H.; Biswas, P. K.; Prando, G.; von Rohr, F.; Bukowski, Z.; Shengelaya, A.; Keller, H.; Morenzoni, E.; Fernandes, Rafael M.; Khasanov, R.

    2015-11-09

    The superconducting gap structure in iron-based high-temperature superconductors (Fe-HTSs) is non-universal. Contrasting with other unconventional superconductors, in the Fe-HTSs both d-wave and extended s-wave pairing symmetries are close in energy. Probing the proximity between these very different superconducting states and identifying experimental parameters that can tune them is of central interest. Here we report high-pressure muon spin rotation experiments on the temperature-dependent magnetic penetration depth in the optimally doped nodeless s-wave Fe-HTS Ba0.65Rb0.35Fe2As2. Upon pressure, a strong decrease of the penetration depth in the zero-temperature limit is observed, while the superconducting transition temperature remains nearly constant. More importantly, the low-temperature behaviour of the inverse-squared magnetic penetration depth, which is a direct measure of the superfluid density, changes qualitatively from an exponential saturation at zero pressure to a linear-in-temperature behaviour at higher pressures, indicating that hydrostatic pressure promotes the appearance of nodes in the superconducting gap.

  1. Apparatus and method for controlling the temperature of the core of a super-conducting transformer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golner, Thomas; Pleva, Edward; Mehta, Shirish

    2006-10-10

    An apparatus for controlling the temperature of a core of a transformer is provided that includes a core, a shield surrounding the core, a cast formed between the core and the shield, and tubing positioned on the shield. The cast directs heat from the core to the shield and cooling fluid is directed through the tubing to cool the shield.

  2. FLYWHEEL ENERGY STORAGE SYSTEMS WITH SUPERCONDUCTING BEARINGS FOR UTILITY APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Michael Strasik; Mr. Arthur Day; Mr. Philip Johnson; Dr. John Hull

    2007-10-26

    This project’s mission was to achieve significant advances in the practical application of bulk high-temperature superconductor (HTS) materials to energy-storage systems. The ultimate product was planned as an operational prototype of a flywheel system on an HTS suspension. While the final prototype flywheel did not complete the final offsite demonstration phase of the program, invaluable lessons learned were captured on the laboratory demonstration units that will lead to the successful deployment of a future HTS-stabilized, composite-flywheel energy-storage system (FESS).

  3. Method for making mirrored surfaces comprising superconducting material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Early, J.T.; Hargrove, R.S.

    1989-12-12

    Superconducting mirror surfaces are provided by forming a mirror surface from a material which is superconductive at a temperature above about 40 K and adjusting the temperature of the surface to that temperature at which the material is superconducting. The mirror surfaces are essentially perfect reflectors for electromagnetic radiation with photon energy less than the superconducting band gap.

  4. Method for making mirrored surfaces comprising superconducting material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Early, James T.; Hargrove, R. Steven

    1989-01-01

    Superconducting mirror surfaces are provided by forming a mirror surface from a material which is superconductive at a temperature above about 40.degree. K. and adjusting the temperature of the surface to that temperature at which the material is superconducting. The mirror surfaces are essentially perfect reflectors for electromagnetic radiation with photon energy less than the superconducting band gap.

  5. Optimization of superconducting tiling pattern for superconducting bearings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL)

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus and method for reducing magnetic field inhomogeneities which produce rotational loss mechanisms in high temperature superconducting magnetic bearings. Magnetic field inhomogeneities are reduced by dividing high temperature superconducting structures into smaller structures, and arranging the smaller structures into tiers which stagger the magnetic field maximum locations of the smaller structures.

  6. Optimization of superconducting tiling pattern for superconducting bearings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, J.R.

    1996-09-17

    An apparatus and method for reducing magnetic field inhomogeneities which produce rotational loss mechanisms in high temperature superconducting magnetic bearings are disclosed. Magnetic field inhomogeneities are reduced by dividing high temperature superconducting structures into smaller structures, and arranging the smaller structures into tiers which stagger the magnetic field maximum locations of the smaller structures. 20 figs.

  7. Superconducting thermoelectric generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Metzger, J.D.; El-Genk, M.S.

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus and method for producing electricity from heat. The present invention is a thermoelectric generator that uses materials with substantially no electrical resistance, often called superconductors, to efficiently convert heat into electrical energy without resistive losses. Preferably, an array of superconducting elements is encased within a second material with a high thermal conductivity. The second material is preferably a semiconductor. Alternatively, the superconducting material can be doped on a base semiconducting material, or the superconducting material and the semiconducting material can exist as alternating, interleaved layers of waferlike materials. A temperature gradient imposed across the boundary of the two materials establishes an electrical potential related to the magnitude of the temperature gradient. The superconducting material carries the resulting electrical current at zero resistivity, thereby eliminating resistive losses. The elimination of resistive losses significantly increases the conversion efficiency of the thermoelectric device.

  8. Superconducting thermoelectric generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Metzger, J.D.; El-Genk, M.S.

    1998-05-05

    An apparatus and method for producing electricity from heat is disclosed. The present invention is a thermoelectric generator that uses materials with substantially no electrical resistance, often called superconductors, to efficiently convert heat into electrical energy without resistive losses. Preferably, an array of superconducting elements is encased within a second material with a high thermal conductivity. The second material is preferably a semiconductor. Alternatively, the superconducting material can be doped on a base semiconducting material, or the superconducting material and the semiconducting material can exist as alternating, interleaved layers of waferlike materials. A temperature gradient imposed across the boundary of the two materials establishes an electrical potential related to the magnitude of the temperature gradient. The superconducting material carries the resulting electrical current at zero resistivity, thereby eliminating resistive losses. The elimination of resistive losses significantly increases the conversion efficiency of the thermoelectric device. 4 figs.

  9. Superconducting thermoelectric generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Metzger, John D.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    1998-01-01

    An apparatus and method for producing electricity from heat. The present invention is a thermoelectric generator that uses materials with substantially no electrical resistance, often called superconductors, to efficiently convert heat into electrical energy without resistive losses. Preferably, an array of superconducting elements is encased within a second material with a high thermal conductivity. The second material is preferably a semiconductor. Alternatively, the superconducting material can be doped on a base semiconducting material, or the superconducting material and the semiconducting material can exist as alternating, interleaved layers of waferlike materials. A temperature gradient imposed across the boundary of the two materials establishes an electrical potential related to the magnitude of the temperature gradient. The superconducting material carries the resulting electrical current at zero resistivity, thereby eliminating resistive losses. The elimination of resistive losses significantly increases the conversion efficiency of the thermoelectric device.

  10. Superconducting transistor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, Kenneth E.

    1979-01-01

    A superconducting transistor is formed by disposing three thin films of superconducting material in a planar parallel arrangement and insulating the films from each other by layers of insulating oxides to form two tunnel junctions. One junction is biased above twice the superconducting energy gap and the other is biased at less than twice the superconducting energy gap. Injection of quasiparticles into the center film by one junction provides a current gain in the second junction.

  11. Proximity effects of superconducting multilayer film

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xueyu, C.; Daole, Y.

    1984-07-01

    The proximity effects of superconducting multilayer films composed of different metals are considered. The relationship between the critical temperature of a superconducting multilayer film with strong heterogeneity and its geometric structure is given.

  12. The Mechanical Design Optimization of a High Field HTS Solenoid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lalitha, SL; Gupta, RC

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes the conceptual design optimization of a large aperture, high field (24 T at 4 K) solenoid for a 1.7 MJ superconducting magnetic energy storage device. The magnet is designed to be built entirely of second generation (2G) high temperature superconductor tape with excellent electrical and mechanical properties at the cryogenic temperatures. The critical parameters that govern the magnet performance are examined in detail through a multiphysics approach using ANSYS software. The analysis results formed the basis for the performance specification as well as the construction of the magnet.

  13. Cryogenic experiences during W7-X HTS-current lead tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richter, Thomas; Lietzow, Ralph

    2014-01-29

    The Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) was responsible for design, production and test of the High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) current leads (CL) for the stellerator Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X). 16 current leads were delivered. Detailed prototype tests as well as the final acceptance tests were performed at KIT, using a dedicated test cryostat assembled beside and connected to the main vacuum vessel of the TOSKA facility. A unique feature is the upside down orientation of the current leads due to the location of the power supplies in the basement of the experimental area of W7-X. The HTS-CL consists of three main parts: the cold end for the connection to the bus bar at 4.5 K, the HTS part operating in the temperature range from 4.5 K to 65 K and a copper heat exchanger (HEX) in the temperature range from 65 K to room temperature, which is cooled with 50 K helium. Therefore in TOSKA it is possible to cool test specimens simultaneously with helium at two different temperature levels. The current lead tests included different scenarios with currents up to 18.2 kA. In total, 10 cryogenic test campaigns with a total time of about 24 weeks were performed till beginning of 2013. The test facility as well as the 2 kW cryogenic plant of ITEP showed a very good reliability. However, during such a long and complex experimental campaign, one has to deal with failures, technical difficulties and incidents. The paper gives a summary of the test performance comprising the test preparation and operation. This includes the performance and reliability of the refrigerator and the test facility with reference to the process measuring and control system, the data acquisition system, as well as the building infrastructure.

  14. Superconductive devices and circuits. Proceedings SPIE Volume 2160

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buhrman, R.A.; Clarke, J.; Daly, K.; Koch, R.H.; Luine, J.A.; Simon, R.W.

    1994-12-31

    The relative infancy of high-temperature superconductor (HTS) technology is reflected in the number and diversity of approaches to microelectronic devices. Although each application calls for devices with specific functions and characteristics, all applications demand reproducibility, device-to-device uniformity, and manufacturability from device fabrication technology. The complexity of the various HTS materials contributes to the difficulty of achieving desired device properties but also provides many avenues of approach. This is why there is a multiplicity of approaches to HTS device design and fabrication. Although significant progress is being made, the technology is still too young to have settled upon a few clearly successful device designs. This is reflected in the articles where seven different types of Josephson junctions are discussed and used to illustrate physical phenomena. Also discussed are electric field effect phenomena related to HTS transistor-like three terminal devices. Separate abstracts were prepared for 22 papers in this book.

  15. Cryocooler applications for high-temperature superconductor magnetic bearings.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niemann, R. C.

    1998-05-22

    The efficiency and stability of rotational magnetic suspension systems are enhanced by the use of high-temperature superconductor (HTS) magnetic bearings. Fundamental aspects of the HTS magnetic bearings and rotational magnetic suspension are presented. HTS cooling can be by liquid cryogen bath immersion or by direct conduction, and thus there are various applications and integration issues for cryocoolers. Among the numerous cryocooler aspects to be considered are installation; operating temperature; losses; and vacuum pumping.

  16. Operation of a test bed axial-gap brushless dc rotor with a superconducting stator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKeever, J.W.; Sohns, C.W.; Schwenterly, S.W.; Young, R.W. Sr.; Campbell, V.W.; Hickey, M.H.; Ott, G.W.; Bailey, J.M.

    1993-08-01

    A variable-speed axial-gap motor with a stator consisting of four liquid helium cooled superconducting electromagnets (two pole pairs) was built and proof tested up to 608 rpm in November 1990 as a tool for joint industry-laboratory evaluation of coils fabricated from high-temperature oxide superconductors. A second rotor was fabricated with improved materia winding configuration, and wire type, and the drive system was modified to eliminate current spiking. The modified motor was characterized to design speed, 188 rad/s (1800 rpm), to acquire a performance baseline for future comparison with that of high-temperature superconducting (HIS) wire. As it becomes commercially available, HTS wire will replace the low-temperature electromagnet wire in a stator modified to control wire temperatures between 4 K and 77 K. Measurements of the superconducting electromagnetic field and locked rotor torque as functions of cryocurrent and dc current through two phases of the rotor, respectively, provided data to estimate power that could be developed by the rotor. Back emf and parasitic mechanical and electromagnetic drag torques were measured as functions of angular velocity to calculate actual rotor power developed and to quantify losses, which reduce the motor`s efficiency. A detailed measurement of motor power at design speed confirmed the developed power equation. When subsequently operated at the 33-A maximum available rotor current, the motor delivered 15.3 kill (20.5 hp) to the load. In a final test, the cryostat was operated at 2500 A, 200 A below its critical current. At rotor design current of 60 A and 2500 A stator current, the extrapolated developed power would be 44.2 kill (59.2 hp) with 94% efficiency.

  17. The Effect of Magnetic Field on the Position of HTS Leads and theCooler in the Services Tower of the MICE Focusing Magnet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, M.A.; Yang, S.Q.; Cobb, J.; Lau, P.; Lau, W.W.; Witte,H.; Baynham, D.E.; Bradshaw, T.W.

    2007-08-27

    The MICE focusing solenoids have three 4 K coolers (two forthe superconducting magnet and one for the liquid absorber) and four HTSleads that feed the current to the focusing coils. The focusing solenoidsproduce large radial external fields when they operate with the polarityof the two coils in opposition (the gradient or flip mode). When the MICEfocusing coils operate at the same polarity (the solenoid or non-flipmode), the fields are much smaller and parallel to the axis of thesolenoid. The worst-case magnetic field affects the selection of thecooler and the HTS leads. This magnetic field can also determine theheight of the service towers that house the three coolers and the fourHTS leads. This paper shows the criteria used for Cooler selection, HTSlead selection, and the position of both the cooler and leads withrespect to the solenoid axis of rotation.

  18. Superconducting Cable

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hughey, Raburn L.; Sinha, Uday K.; Reece, David S.; Muller, Albert C.

    2005-03-08

    In order to provide a flexible oxide superconducting cable which is reduced in AC loss, tape-shaped superconducting wires covered with a stabilizing metal are wound on a flexible former. The superconducting wires are preferably laid on the former at a bending strain of not more than 0.2%. In laying on the former, a number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on a core member in a side-by-side manner, to form a first layer. A prescribed number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on top of the first layer in a side-by-side manner, to form a second layer. The former may be made of a metal, plastic, reinforced plastic, polymer, or a composite and provides flexibility to the superconducting wires and the cable formed therewith.

  19. Superconducting Cable

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hughey, Raburn L.; Sinha, Uday K.; Reece, David S.; Muller, Albert C.

    2005-07-22

    In order to provide a flexible oxide superconducting cable which is reduced in AC loss, tape-shaped superconducting wires covered with a stabilizing metal are wound on a flexible former. The superconducting wires are preferably laid on the former at a bending strain of not more than 0.2%. In laying on the former, a number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on a core member in a side-by-side manner, to form a first layer. A prescribed number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on top of the first layer in a side-by-side manner, to form a second layer. The former may be made of a metal, plastic, reinforced plastic, polymer, or a composite and provides flexibility to the superconducting wires and the cable formed therewith.

  20. Superconductivity in graphite intercalation compounds

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Smith, Robert P.; Weller, Thomas E.; Howard, Christopher A.; Dean, Mark P. M.; Rahnejat, Kaveh C.; Saxena, Siddharth S.; Ellerby, Mark

    2015-02-26

    This study examines the field of superconductivity in the class of materials known as graphite intercalation compounds which has a history dating back to the 1960s. This paper recontextualizes the field in light of the discovery of superconductivity in CaC₆ and YbC₆ in 2005. In what follows, we outline the crystal structure and electronic structure of these and related compounds. We go on to experiments addressing the superconducting energy gap, lattice dynamics, pressure dependence, and how this relates to theoretical studies. The bulk of the evidence strongly supports a BCS superconducting state. However, important questions remain regarding which electronic statesmore » and phonon modes are most important for superconductivity and whether current theoretical techniques can fully describe the dependence of the superconducting transition temperature on pressure and chemical composition.« less

  1. Superconductive radiofrequency window assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Harry Lawrence; Elliott, Thomas S.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly (20) has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly (20) comprises a superconducting frame (30), a ceramic plate (40) having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet (50) for sealing plate (40) into frame (30). The plate (40) is brazed to eyelet (50) which is then electron beam welded to frame (30). A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator.

  2. Superconducting radiofrequency window assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Harry L.; Elliott, Thomas S.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly (20) has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly (20) comprises a superconducting frame (30), a ceramic plate (40) having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet (50) for sealing plate (40) into frame (30). The plate (40) is brazed to eyelet (50) which is then electron beam welded to frame (30). A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator.

  3. Superconductive articles including cerium oxide layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wu, Xin D.; Muenchausen, Ross E.

    1993-01-01

    A ceramic superconductor comprising a metal oxide substrate, a ceramic high temperature superconductive material, and a intermediate layer of a material having a cubic crystal structure, said layer situated between the substrate and the superconductive material is provided, and a structure for supporting a ceramic superconducting material is provided, said structure comprising a metal oxide substrate, and a layer situated over the surface of the substrate to substantially inhibit interdiffusion between the substrate and a ceramic superconducting material deposited upon said structure.

  4. Superconducting structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kwon, Chuhee; Jia, Quanxi; Foltyn, Stephen R.

    2003-04-01

    A superconductive structure including a dielectric oxide substrate, a thin buffer layer of a superconducting material thereon; and, a layer of a rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film thereon the thin layer of yttrium-barium-copper oxide, the rare earth selected from the group consisting of samarium, gadolinium, ytterbium, erbium, neodymium, dysprosium, holmium, lutetium, a combination of more than one element from the rare earth group and a combination of one or more elements from the rare earth group with yttrium, the buffer layer of superconducting material characterized as having chemical and structural compatibility with the dielectric oxide substrate and the rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film is provided.

  5. Superconducting Structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kwon, Chuhee; Jia, Quanxi; Foltyn, Stephen R.

    2005-09-13

    A superconductive structure including a dielectric oxide substrate, a thin buffer layer of a superconducting material thereon; and, a layer of a rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film thereon the thin layer of yttrium-barium-copper oxide, the rare earth selected from the group consisting of samarium, gadolinium, ytterbium, erbium, neodymium, dysprosium, holmium, lutetium, a combination of more than one element from the rare earth group and a combination of one or more elements from the rare earth group with yttrium, the buffer layer of superconducting material characterized as having chemical and structural compatibility with the dielectric oxide substrate and the rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film is provided.

  6. A New Universal Parameter for Superconductivity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A New Universal Parameter for Superconductivity A New Universal Parameter for Superconductivity Print Thursday, 14 April 2016 00:00 Scientists have been researching high-temperature (high-Tc) superconductors for decades with the goal of finding materials that express superconducting capabilities at room temperature, which would be a requirement for practical and cost-effective applications. The higher the operating temperature, the more realistic energy-saving applications such as lossless

  7. Spin dynamics near a putative antiferromagnetic quantum critical point in Cu-substituted BaFe2As2 and its relation to high-temperature superconductivity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kim, M. G.; Wang, M.; Tucker, G. S.; Valdivia, P. N.; Abernathy, D. L.; Chi, Songxue; Christianson, A. D.; Aczel, A. A.; Hong, T.; Heitmann, T. W.; et al

    2015-12-02

    We present the results of elastic and inelastic neutron scattering measurements on nonsuperconducting Ba(Fe0.957Cu0.043)2As2, a composition close to a quantum critical point between antiferromagnetic (AFM) ordered and paramagnetic phases. By comparing these results with the spin fluctuations in the low-Cu composition as well as the parent compound BaFe2As2 and superconducting Ba(Fe1–xNix)2As2 compounds, we demonstrate that paramagnon-like spin fluctuations are evident in the antiferromagnetically ordered state of Ba(Fe0.957Cu0.043)2As2, which is distinct from the AFM-like spin fluctuations in the superconducting compounds. Our observations suggest that Cu substitution decouples the interaction between quasiparticles and the spin fluctuations. In addition, we show that themore » spin-spin correlation length ξ(T) increases rapidly as the temperature is lowered and find ω/T scaling behavior, the hallmark of quantum criticality, at an antiferromagnetic quantum critical point.« less

  8. Superconducting thermoelectric generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Metzger, J.D.; El-Genk, M.S.

    1994-01-01

    Thermoelectricity is produced by applying a temperature differential to dissimilar electrically conducting or semiconducting materials, thereby producing a voltage that is proportional to the temperature difference. Thermoelectric generators use this effect to directly convert heat into electricity; however, presently-known generators have low efficiencies due to the production of high currents which in turn cause large resistive heating losses. Some thermoelectric generators operate at efficiencies between 4% and 7% in the 800{degrees} to 1200{degrees}C range. According to its major aspects and bradly stated, the present invention is an apparatus and method for producing electricity from heat. In particular, the invention is a thermoelectric generator that juxtaposes a superconducting material and a semiconducting material - so that the superconducting and the semiconducting materials touch - to convert heat energy into electrical energy without resistive losses in the temperature range below the critical temperature of the superconducting material. Preferably, an array of superconducting material is encased in one of several possible configurations within a second material having a high thermal conductivity, preferably a semiconductor, to form a thermoelectric generator.

  9. Superconductivity at Dawn of the Iron Age (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Superconductivity is a stunning quantum phenomenon and among the deepest paradigms in all ... in a new era of high-temperature superconductivity, and the joyous exuberance that ...

  10. Superconducting-semiconducting circuits, devices and systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kroger, H.; Ghoshal, U.S.

    1991-06-18

    This paper describes a superconducting-semiconducting electrical circuit element. It comprises: a superconducting charge controlled three-terminal device, having a device control terminal, a second terminal and a third terminal, wherein the output current between the second and third terminals is controlled by the voltage applied to the control terminal, and wherein the output current exhibits superconducting characteristics as a function of temperature and input charge conditions; and a cryogenic semiconducting interconnect circuit, adapted to receive as an input an output signal from the superconducting device, and to provide a semiconductor switching voltage level output signal modulated by the input signal from the superconducting device.

  11. Design of High Field Solenoids made of High Temperature Superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartalesi, Antonio; /Pisa U.

    2010-12-01

    This thesis starts from the analytical mechanical analysis of a superconducting solenoid, loaded by self generated Lorentz forces. Also, a finite element model is proposed and verified with the analytical results. To study the anisotropic behavior of a coil made by layers of superconductor and insulation, a finite element meso-mechanic model is proposed and designed. The resulting material properties are then used in the main solenoid analysis. In parallel, design work is performed as well: an existing Insert Test Facility (ITF) is adapted and structurally verified to support a coil made of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}, a High Temperature Superconductor (HTS). Finally, a technological winding process was proposed and the required tooling is designed.

  12. High Temperature Superconductors: From Delivery to Applications (Presentation from 2011 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award-winner, Dr. Amit Goyal, and including introduction by Energy Secretary, Dr. Steven Chu)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Goyal, Amit (Oak Ridge National Laboratory)

    2012-06-28

    Dr. Amit Goyal, a high temperature superconductivity (HTS) researcher at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, was named a 2011 winner of the Department of Energy's Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award honoring U.S. scientists and engineers for exceptional contributions in research and development supporting DOE and its mission. Winner of the award in the inaugural category of Energy Science and Innovation, Dr. Goyal was cited for his work in 'pioneering research and transformative contributions to the field of applied high temperature superconductivity, including fundamental materials science advances and technical innovations enabling large-scale applications of these novel materials.' Following his basic research in grain-to-grain supercurrent transport, Dr. Goyal focused his energy in transitioning this fundamental understanding into cutting-edge technologies. Under OE sponsorship, Dr. Goyal co-invented the Rolling Assisted Bi-Axially Textured Substrate technology (RABiTS) that is used as a substrate for second generation HTS wires. OE support also led to the invention of Structural Single Crystal Faceted Fiber Substrate (SSIFFS) and the 3-D Self Assembly of Nanodot Columns. These inventions and associated R&D resulted in 7 R&D 100 Awards including the 2010 R&D Magazine's Innovator of the Year Award, 3 Federal Laboratory Consortium Excellence in Technology Transfer National Awards, a DOE Energy100 Award and many others. As a world authority on HTS materials, Dr. Goyal has presented OE-sponsored results in more than 150 invited talks, co-authored more than 350 papers and is a fellow of 7 professional societies.

  13. Nozzle for superconducting fiber production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Righi, Jamal

    1992-11-17

    A nozzle apparatus for producing flexible fibers of superconducting material receives melted material from a crucible for containing a charge of the superconducting material. The material is melted in the crucible and falls in a stream through a bottom hole in the crucible. The stream falls through a protecting collar which maintains the stream at high temperatures. The stream is then supplied through the downwardly directed nozzle where it is subjected to a high velocity air flow which breaks the melted superconducting material into ligaments which solidify into the flexible fibers. The fibers are collected by blowing them against a porous cloth.

  14. Electronic structure of superconductivity refined

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electronic structure of superconductivity refined Electronic structure of superconductivity refined A team of physicists propose a new model that expands on a little understood aspect of the electronic structure in high-temperature superconductors. July 10, 2008 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma

  15. Hybrid superconducting neutron detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merlo, V.; Lucci, M.; Ottaviani, I.; Salvato, M.; Cirillo, M.; Scherillo, A.; Celentano, G.; Pietropaolo, A.

    2015-03-16

    A neutron detection concept is presented that is based on superconductive niobium (Nb) strips coated by a boron (B) layer. The working principle of the detector relies on the nuclear reaction, {sup 10}B + n → α + {sup 7}Li, with α and Li ions generating a hot spot on the current-biased Nb strip which in turn induces a superconducting-normal state transition. The latter is recognized as a voltage signal which is the evidence of the incident neutron. The above described detection principle has been experimentally assessed and verified by irradiating the samples with a pulsed neutron beam at the ISIS spallation neutron source (UK). It is found that the boron coated superconducting strips, kept at a temperature T = 8 K and current-biased below the critical current I{sub c}, are driven into the normal state upon thermal neutron irradiation. As a result of the transition, voltage pulses in excess of 40 mV are measured while the bias current can be properly modulated to bring the strip back to the superconducting state, thus resetting the detector. Measurements on the counting rate of the device are presented and the basic physical features of the detector are discussed.

  16. Superconducting Topological Insulators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Superconducting Topological Insulators Print Three-dimensional topological insulators (TIs), discovered experimentally in 2007-2009 by a Princeton-ALS collaboration, are a promising platform for developing the next generation of electronics. Electrons within one nanometer of a TI's surface move at high speeds in a "light-like" fashion. The quantum interactions that generate these electronic states cause individual electrons to be spin polarized even at room temperature and to strongly

  17. Superconducting Topological Insulators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Superconducting Topological Insulators Print Three-dimensional topological insulators (TIs), discovered experimentally in 2007-2009 by a Princeton-ALS collaboration, are a promising platform for developing the next generation of electronics. Electrons within one nanometer of a TI's surface move at high speeds in a "light-like" fashion. The quantum interactions that generate these electronic states cause individual electrons to be spin polarized even at room temperature and to strongly

  18. Superconducting Topological Insulators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Superconducting Topological Insulators Print Three-dimensional topological insulators (TIs), discovered experimentally in 2007-2009 by a Princeton-ALS collaboration, are a promising platform for developing the next generation of electronics. Electrons within one nanometer of a TI's surface move at high speeds in a "light-like" fashion. The quantum interactions that generate these electronic states cause individual electrons to be spin polarized even at room temperature and to strongly

  19. Superconducting Topological Insulators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Superconducting Topological Insulators Print Three-dimensional topological insulators (TIs), discovered experimentally in 2007-2009 by a Princeton-ALS collaboration, are a promising platform for developing the next generation of electronics. Electrons within one nanometer of a TI's surface move at high speeds in a "light-like" fashion. The quantum interactions that generate these electronic states cause individual electrons to be spin polarized even at room temperature and to strongly

  20. Superconducting Topological Insulators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Superconducting Topological Insulators Print Three-dimensional topological insulators (TIs), discovered experimentally in 2007-2009 by a Princeton-ALS collaboration, are a promising platform for developing the next generation of electronics. Electrons within one nanometer of a TI's surface move at high speeds in a "light-like" fashion. The quantum interactions that generate these electronic states cause individual electrons to be spin polarized even at room temperature and to strongly

  1. Towards a next theory of superconductivity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Understanding high-temperature superconductivity Using magnetic fields to understand high-temperature superconductivity The eventual goal of the research would be to create a superconductor that operates at room temperature and needs no cooling at all March 26, 2015 Los Alamos National Laboratory scientist Brad Ramshaw conducts an experiment at the Pulsed Field Facility of the National High Magnetic Field Lab, exposing high-temperature superconductors to very high magnetic fields, changing the

  2. Design, Fabrication and Testing of a Superconducting Fault Current Limiter (SFCL)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gouge, M..; Schwenterly, S.W.; Hazelton, D.

    2011-06-15

    The purpose of this project was to conduct R&D on specified components and provide technical design support to a SuperPower team developing a high temperature superconducting Fault Current Limiter (SFCL). ORNL teamed with SuperPower, Inc. on a Superconductivity Partnerships with Industry (SPI) proposal for the SFCL that was submitted to DOE and approved in FY 2003. A contract between DOE and SuperPower, Inc. was signed on July 14, 2003 to design, fabricate and test the SFCL. This device employs high temperature superconducting (HTS) elements and SuperPower's proprietary technology. The program goal was to demonstrate a device that will address a broad range of the utility applications and meet utility industry requirements. This DOE-sponsored Superconductivity Partnership with Industry project would positively impact electric power transmission reliability and security by introducing a new element in the grid that can significantly mitigate fault currents and provide lower cost solutions for grid protection. The project will conduct R&D on specified components and provide technical design support to a SuperPower-led team developing a SFCL as detailed in tasks 1-5 below. Note the SuperPower scope over the broad SPI project is much larger than that shown below which indicates only the SuperPower tasks that are complementary to the ORNL tasks. SuperPower is the Project Manager for the SFCL program, and is responsible for completion of the project on schedule and budget. The scope of work for ORNL is to provide R&D support for the SFCL in the following four broad areas: (1) Assist with high voltage subsystem R&D, design, fabrication and testing including characterization of the general dielectric performance of LN2 and component materials; (2) Consult on cryogenic subsystem R&D, design, fabrication and testing; (3) Participate in project conceptual and detailed design reviews; and (4) Guide commercialization by participation on the Technical Advisory Board (TAB). Super

  3. Magnetically leviated superconducting bearing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weinberger, Bernard R.; Lynds, Jr., Lahmer

    1993-01-01

    A magnetically levitated superconducting bearing includes a magnet (2) mounted on a shaft (12) that is rotatable around an axis of rotation and a Type II superconductor (6) supported on a stator (14) in proximity to the magnet (2). The superconductor (6) is positioned so that when it is cooled to its superconducting state in the presence of a magnetic field, it interacts with the magnet (2) to produce an attractive force that levitates the magnet (2) and supports a load on the shaft (12). The interaction between the superconductor (6) and magnet(2) also produces surface screening currents (8) that generate a repulsive force perpendicular to the load. The bearing also has means for maintaining the superconductor at a temperature below its critical temperature (16, 18). The bearing could also be constructed so the magnet (2) is supported on the stator (14) and the superconductor (6) is mounted on the shaft (12). The bearing can be operated by cooling the superconductor (6) to its superconducting state in the presence of a magnetic field.

  4. Superconductive articles including cerium oxide layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wu, X.D.; Muenchausen, R.E.

    1993-11-16

    A ceramic superconductor comprising a metal oxide substrate, a ceramic high temperature superconductive material, and a intermediate layer of a material having a cubic crystal structure, said layer situated between the substrate and the superconductive material is provided, and a structure for supporting a ceramic superconducting material is provided, said structure comprising a metal oxide substrate, and a layer situated over the surface of the substrate to substantially inhibit interdiffusion between the substrate and a ceramic superconducting material deposited upon said structure. 7 figures.

  5. Sr2IrO4: Gateway to cuprate superconductivity?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mitchell, J. F.

    2015-06-05

    High temperature superconductivity in cuprates remains a defining challenge in condensed matter physics. Recently, a new set of related compounds based on Ir rather than Cu has been discovered that may be on the verge of superconductivity themselves or be able to shed new light on the underlying interactions responsible for superconductivity in the cuprates.

  6. A New Universal Parameter for Superconductivity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A New Universal Parameter for Superconductivity Print Scientists have been researching high-temperature (high-Tc) superconductors for decades with the goal of finding materials that express superconducting capabilities at room temperature, which would be a requirement for practical and cost-effective applications. The higher the operating temperature, the more realistic energy-saving applications such as lossless electrical transmission or magnetically levitated trains become. Scientists thought

  7. A New Universal Parameter for Superconductivity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A New Universal Parameter for Superconductivity Print Scientists have been researching high-temperature (high-Tc) superconductors for decades with the goal of finding materials that express superconducting capabilities at room temperature, which would be a requirement for practical and cost-effective applications. The higher the operating temperature, the more realistic energy-saving applications such as lossless electrical transmission or magnetically levitated trains become. Scientists thought

  8. A New Universal Parameter for Superconductivity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A New Universal Parameter for Superconductivity Print Scientists have been researching high-temperature (high-Tc) superconductors for decades with the goal of finding materials that express superconducting capabilities at room temperature, which would be a requirement for practical and cost-effective applications. The higher the operating temperature, the more realistic energy-saving applications such as lossless electrical transmission or magnetically levitated trains become. Scientists thought

  9. A New Universal Parameter for Superconductivity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A New Universal Parameter for Superconductivity Print Scientists have been researching high-temperature (high-Tc) superconductors for decades with the goal of finding materials that express superconducting capabilities at room temperature, which would be a requirement for practical and cost-effective applications. The higher the operating temperature, the more realistic energy-saving applications such as lossless electrical transmission or magnetically levitated trains become. Scientists thought

  10. A New Universal Parameter for Superconductivity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A New Universal Parameter for Superconductivity Print Scientists have been researching high-temperature (high-Tc) superconductors for decades with the goal of finding materials that express superconducting capabilities at room temperature, which would be a requirement for practical and cost-effective applications. The higher the operating temperature, the more realistic energy-saving applications such as lossless electrical transmission or magnetically levitated trains become. Scientists thought

  11. A New Universal Parameter for Superconductivity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A New Universal Parameter for Superconductivity Print Scientists have been researching high-temperature (high-Tc) superconductors for decades with the goal of finding materials that express superconducting capabilities at room temperature, which would be a requirement for practical and cost-effective applications. The higher the operating temperature, the more realistic energy-saving applications such as lossless electrical transmission or magnetically levitated trains become. Scientists thought

  12. A New Universal Parameter for Superconductivity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A New Universal Parameter for Superconductivity Print Scientists have been researching high-temperature (high-Tc) superconductors for decades with the goal of finding materials that express superconducting capabilities at room temperature, which would be a requirement for practical and cost-effective applications. The higher the operating temperature, the more realistic energy-saving applications such as lossless electrical transmission or magnetically levitated trains become. Scientists thought

  13. Engineering Division Superconducting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Superconducting Fusion Magnets Present and Future * Superconducting Magnet Technology is available now for up to ITER scale - ITER is built with 1980's and 1990's technology * ...

  14. Electrodynamics of superconducting pnictide superlattices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perucchi, A.; Pietro, P. Di; Capitani, F.; Lupi, S.; Lee, S.; Kang, J. H.; Eom, C. B.; Jiang, J.; Weiss, J. D.; Hellstrom, E. E.; Dore, P.

    2014-06-02

    It was recently shown that superlattices where layers of the 8% Co-doped BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} superconducting pnictide are intercalated with non superconducting ultrathin layers of either SrTiO{sub 3} or of oxygen-rich BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}, can be used to control flux pinning, thereby increasing critical fields and currents, without significantly affecting the critical temperature of the pristine superconducting material. However, little is known about the electron properties of these systems. Here, we investigate the electrodynamics of these superconducting pnictide superlattices in the normal and superconducting state by using infrared reflectivity, from THz to visible range. We find that multigap structure of these superlattices is preserved, whereas some significant changes are observed in their electronic structure with respect to those of the original pnictide. Our results suggest that possible attempts to further increase the flux pinning may lead to a breakdown of the pnictide superconducting properties.

  15. 2D 'Flat' Boron Yields a Superconducting Surprise

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2D 'Flat' Boron Yields a Superconducting Surprise 2D 'Flat' Boron Yields a Superconducting Surprise Simulations Run at NERSC Help Reveal Material's Superconducting Superpowers April 22, 2016 2Dboron Electrons with opposite momenta and spins pair up via lattice vibrations at low temperatures in 2D boron and give it superconducting properties. Image: Evgeni Penev, Rice University Density functional theory simulations run at NERSC helped Rice University researchers determine that two-dimensional

  16. Upward shift of the vortex solid phase in high-temperature-superconducting wires through high density nanoparticle addition

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Miura, Masashi; Maiorov, Boris; Balakirev, Fedor F.; Kato, Takeharu; Sato, Michio; Takagi, Yuji; Izumi, Teruo; Civale, Leonardo

    2016-02-08

    Here, we show a simple and effective way to improve the vortex irreversibility line up to very high magnetic fields (60T) by increasing the density of second phase BaZrO3 nanoparticles. (Y0.77,Gd0.23)Ba2Cu3Oy films were grown on metal substrates with different concentration of BaZrO3 nanoparticles by the metal organic deposition method. We find that upon increase of the BaZrO3 concentration, the nanoparticle size remains constant but the twin-boundary density increases. Up to the highest nanoparticle concentration (n ~ 1.3 × 1022/m3), the irreversibility field (Hirr) continues to increase with no sign of saturation up to 60 T, although the vortices vastly outnumbermore » pinning centers. We find extremely high Hirr, namely Hirr = 30 T (H||45°) and 24 T (H||c) at 65 K and 58 T (H||45°) and 45 T (H||c) at 50K. The difference in pinning landscape shifts the vortex solid-liquid transition upwards, increasing the vortex region useful for power applications, while keeping the upper critical field, critical temperature and electronic mass anisotropy unchanged.« less

  17. DOE Science Showcase - Understanding High-Temperature Superconductors |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    OSTI, US Dept of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information Understanding High-Temperature Superconductors Credit: DOE Scientists have long worked to understand one of the great mysteries of modern physics - the origin and behavior of high-temperature superconductors (HTS) that are uniquely capable of transmitting electricity with zero loss when chilled to subzero temperatures. For decades there have been competing theories and misunderstandings of how HTS materials actually work

  18. Superconducting wires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lanagan, M.T.; Poeppel, R.B.; Singh, J.P.; Dos Santos, D.I.; Lumpp, J.K.; Dusek, J.T.; Goretta, K.C.

    1988-06-01

    The requirement of high critical current density has prompted extensive research on ceramic processing of high-T/sub c/ superconductors. An overview of wire fabrication techniques and the limitations they impose on component design will be presented. The effects of processing on microstructure and critical current density will also be discussed. Particle alignment has been observed in extruded samples which is attributed to high shear stresses during plastic forming. Composites of superconductor and silver in several configurations have been made with little deleterious effect on the superconducting properties. 35 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Molybdenum-rhenium superconducting suspended nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aziz, Mohsin; Christopher Hudson, David; Russo, Saverio

    2014-06-09

    Suspended superconducting nanostructures of MoRe 50%/50% by weight are fabricated employing commonly used fabrication steps in micro- and nano-meter scale devices followed by wet-etching with Hydro-fluoric acid of a SiO{sub 2} sacrificial layer. Suspended superconducting channels as narrow as 50?nm and length 3??m have a critical temperature of ?6.5?K, which can increase by 0.5?K upon annealing at 400?°C. A detailed study of the dependence of the superconducting critical current and critical temperature upon annealing and in devices with different channel widths reveals that desorption of contaminants is responsible for the improved superconducting properties. These findings pave the way for the development of superconducting electromechanical devices using standard fabrication techniques.

  20. Fast superconducting magnetic field switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goren, Y.; Mahale, N.K.

    1996-08-06

    The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater that the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles. 6 figs.

  1. Fast superconducting magnetic field switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goren, Yehuda; Mahale, Narayan K.

    1996-01-01

    The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater that the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles.

  2. Frequency dispersion of nonlinear response of thin superconducting...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resistance changes induced by microwaves were investigated at different temperatures (8-15 K) near the superconducting transition. A strong decrease of the nonlinear response is ...

  3. Ultrasonic signatures at the superconducting and the pseudogap...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A major issue in the understanding of cuprate superconductors is the nature of the metallic state from which high temperature superconductivity emerges. Central to this issue is ...

  4. Ultrasonic signatures at the superconducting and the pseudogap...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    that extends from room temperature to the superconducting transition. Although polarized neutron scattering studies hint at magnetic order associated with the pseudogap, there is...

  5. New Processing and Characterization Approaches for Achieving Full Performance of High Temperature Superconducting Tapes of (Bi,Pb)2Sr2Ca2Cu3Ox

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.E. Hellstrom; D.C. Larbalestier

    2006-03-22

    The thrust of this research was to identify and understand current limiting mechanisms (CLMs) that limit the current carrying capacity of (Bi,Pb)2Sr2Ca2Cu3Ox (2223) in Ag-sheathed wire. Our program concentrated on developing new methods to identify CLMs at the micrometer scale and new processing techniques to eliminate CLMs. All of the DOE Superconductivity Partnership Initiative (SPI) programs are using 2223 wire, so increasing the critical current density (Jc) in the wire can improve the technical performance of the demonstration projects, and at the same time it can decrease the cost of the wire. The important cost metric for superconducting wire is $/kAm, so increasing Jc, which is in the denominator, decreases the wire cost. The obvious CLMs were micrometer size obstacles in the 2223 ceramic that block current flow, including: misaligned grains, cracks, pores, and nonsuperconducting phases. Pores and cracks - regions where there is no superconductor or the grains are not physically connected to one another ? cannot carry supercurrent, so they were the first CLMs we tried to eliminate with improved processing. Prior to the contract, we had started investigating overpressure (OP) processing with Williams at ORNL to heal cracks and remove pores. OP processing, which is a variant of hot isostatic pressing (HIP), uses an Ar/O2 gas mixture to apply a high pressure (up to 200 atm) to compress the sample and to set the oxygen partial pressure (pO2) to form 2223. Williams had a static pressure system we used to demonstrate that OP processing healed cracks and densified the wire, but the static system limited the processing parameters we could investigate. We proposed building a new gas-flow OP system to expand the experimental capabilities and to investigate new processing routes using the gas-flow OP system. Using the gas-flow OP system, we established new world records in 2003 for Jc and Ic. These records were finally matched by Sumitomo Electric Company in early

  6. Superconductivity with Stripes | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    structure in high-Tc superconductors was manipulated in high-pressure experiments at the APS. The physics of low-temperature superconductivity is fairly well understood, but the...

  7. Secrets of superconductivity revealed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Secrets of superconductivity revealed Secrets of superconductivity revealed The superconducting material Cerium-Colbalt-Indium5 reveals new secrets about how superconductivity and magnetism can be related. January 3, 2014 Simon Gerber, first author of the publication on the superconducting properties of CeCoIn5 at the Morpheus instrument of the Spallation Neutron Source SINQ in Switzerland. (Photo: Paul Scherrer Institute/Markus Fischer) Simon Gerber, first author of the publication on the

  8. Strain tolerant microfilamentary superconducting wire

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Finnemore, D.K.; Miller, T.A.; Ostenson, J.E.; Schwartzkopf, L.A.; Sanders, S.C.

    1993-02-23

    A strain tolerant microfilamentary wire capable of carrying superconducting currents is provided comprising a plurality of discontinuous filaments formed from a high temperature superconducting material. The discontinuous filaments have a length at least several orders of magnitude greater than the filament diameter and are sufficiently strong while in an amorphous state to withstand compaction. A normal metal is interposed between and binds the discontinuous filaments to form a normal metal matrix capable of withstanding heat treatment for converting the filaments to a superconducting state. The geometry of the filaments within the normal metal matrix provides substantial filament-to-filament overlap, and the normal metal is sufficiently thin to allow supercurrent transfer between the overlapped discontinuous filaments but is also sufficiently thick to provide strain relief to the filaments.

  9. 119Sn-NMR investigations on superconducting Ca3Ir4Sn13: Evidence for multigap superconductivity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sarkar, R.; Petrovic, C.; Bruckner, F.; Gunther, M.; Wang, Kefeng; Biswas, P. K.; Luetkens, H.; Morenzoni, E.; Amato, A.; Klauss, H. -H.

    2015-09-25

    In this study, we report bulk superconductivity (SC) in Ca3Ir4Sn13 by means of 119Sn nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. Two classical signatures of BCS superconductivity in spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/T1), namely the Hebel–Slichter coherence peak just below the Tc, and the exponential decay in the superconducting phase, are evident. The noticeable decrease of 119Sn Knight shift below Tc indicates spin-singlet superconductivity. The temperature dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation rate 119(1/T1) is convincingly described by the multigap isotropic superconducting gap. NMR experiments do not witness any sign of enhanced spin fluctuations.

  10. HUMAN-RESOURCES-SYSTEM-PAYROLL-SYSTEM.pdf

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    HTS Cable Projects HTS Cable Projects Fact sheet describing what is being done to modernize electricity transmission and distribution HTS Cable Projects (461.25 KB) More Documents & Publications High-Temperature Superconductivity Cable Demonstration Projects Superconductivity Program Overview Albany HTS Power Cable D.C | Department of Energy

    HUBZone Business Opportunity Session to be held on July 29 in Washington D.C HUBZone Business Opportunity Session to be held on July 29 in

  11. Superconducting magnet

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Satti, John A. (Naperville, IL)

    1980-01-01

    A superconducting magnet designed to produce magnetic flux densities of the order of 4 to 5 Webers per square meter is constructed by first forming a cable of a plurality of matrixed superconductor wires with each wire of the plurality insulated from each other one. The cable is shaped into a rectangular cross-section and is wound with tape in an open spiral to create cooling channels. Coils are wound in a calculated pattern in saddle shapes to produce desired fields, such as dipoles, quadrupoles, and the like. Wedges are inserted between adjacent cables as needed to maintain substantially radial placement of the long dimensions of cross sections of the cables. After winding, individual strands in each of the cables are brought out to terminals and are interconnected to place all of the strands in series and to maximize the propagation of a quench by alternating conduction from an inner layer to an outer layer and from top half to bottom half as often as possible. Individual layers are separated from others by spiraled aluminum spacers to facilitate cooling. The wound coil is wrapped with an epoxy tape that is cured by heat and then machined to an interference fit with an outer aluminum pipe which is then affixed securely to the assembled coil by heating it to make a shrink fit. In an alternate embodiment, one wire of the cable is made of copper or the like to be heated externally to propagate a quench.

  12. Permanent magnet design for high-speed superconducting bearings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, J.R.; Uherka, K.L.; Abdoud, R.G.

    1996-09-10

    A high temperature superconducting bearing including a permanent magnet rotor levitated by a high temperature superconducting structure is disclosed. The rotor preferably includes one or more concentric permanent magnet rings coupled to permanent magnet ring structures having substantially triangular and quadrangular cross-sections. Both alternating and single direction polarity magnet structures can be used in the bearing. 9 figs.

  13. Permanent magnet design for high-speed superconducting bearings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R.; Uherka, Kenneth L.; Abdoud, Robert G.

    1996-01-01

    A high temperature superconducting bearing including a permanent magnet rotor levitated by a high temperature superconducting structure. The rotor preferably includes one or more concentric permanent magnet rings coupled to permanent magnet ring structures having substantially triangular and quadrangular cross-sections. Both alternating and single direction polarity magnet structures can be used in the bearing.

  14. Electrodynamic properties of coplanar waveguides made from high-temperature superconducting YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} electrodes on nonlinear dielectric SrTiO{sub 3} substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Findikoglu, A.T.; Reagor, D.W.; Rasmussen, K.O.; Bishop, A.R.; Gro Jia, Q.X.; Fan, Y.; Kwon, C.; Ostrovsky, L.A.

    1999-08-01

    We present a comprehensive study of broadband (0{endash}2 GHz) electrodynamic properties of coplanar waveguides made from high-temperature superconducting thin-film YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} electrodes on nonlinear dielectric single-crystal SrTiO{sub 3} substrates. The waveguides exhibit strong dielectric nonlinearities, in addition to temperature-, dc-bias-, and frequency-dependent dissipation and refractive index. By using parameters determined from small-signal (linear) transmission characteristics of the waveguides as a function of dc bias, we develop a model equation that successfully predicts and describes large-signal (nonlinear) behavior. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Protective link for superconducting coil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Umans, Stephen D.

    2009-12-08

    A superconducting coil system includes a superconducting coil and a protective link of superconducting material coupled to the superconducting coil. A rotating machine includes first and second coils and a protective link of superconducting material. The second coil is operable to rotate with respect to the first coil. One of the first and second coils is a superconducting coil. The protective link is coupled to the superconducting coil.

  16. Superconducting magnetic coil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aized, D.; Schwall, R.E.

    1999-06-22

    A superconducting magnetic coil includes a plurality of sections positioned axially along the longitudinal axis of the coil, each section being formed of an anisotropic high temperature superconductor material wound about a longitudinal axis of the coil and having an associated critical current value that is dependent on the orientation of the magnetic field of the coil. The cross section of the superconductor, or the type of superconductor material, at sections along the axial and radial axes of the coil are changed to provide an increased critical current at those regions where the magnetic field is oriented more perpendicularly to the conductor plane, to thereby increase the critical current at these regions and to maintain an overall higher critical current of the coil. 15 figs.

  17. Superconducting magnetic coil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aized, Dawood; Schwall, Robert E.

    1999-06-22

    A superconducting magnetic coil includes a plurality of sections positioned axially along the longitudinal axis of the coil, each section being formed of an anisotropic high temperature superconductor material wound about a longitudinal axis of the coil and having an associated critical current value that is dependent on the orientation of the magnetic field of the coil. The cross section of the superconductor, or the type of superconductor material, at sections along the axial and radial axes of the coil are changed to provide an increased critical current at those regions where the magnetic field is oriented more perpendicularly to the conductor plane, to thereby increase the critical current at these regions and to maintain an overall higher critical current of the coil.

  18. Superconducting magnetic coil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aized, Dawood; Schwall, Robert E.

    1996-06-11

    A superconducting magnetic coil includes a plurality of sections positioned axially along the longitudinal axis of the coil, each section being formed of an anisotropic high temperature superconductor material wound about a longitudinal axis of the coil and having an associated critical current value that is dependent on the orientation of the magnetic field of the coil. The cross section of the superconductor, or the type of superconductor material, at sections along the axial and radial axes of the coil are changed to provide an increased critical current at those regions where the magnetic field is oriented more perpendicularly to the conductor plane, to thereby increase the critical current at these regions and to maintain an overall higher critical current of the coil.

  19. Pseudogaps, Polarons, and the Mystery of High-Tc Superconductivity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pseudogaps, Polarons, and the Mystery of High-Tc Superconductivity Print Working at the ALS, a multi-institutional collaboration led by researchers at ALS and Stanford University has identified a pseudogap phase with a nodal-antinodal dichotomy in ferromagnetic manganese oxide materials (manganites). Even though ferromagnetism and superconductivity do not exist together, the pseudogap state found in these manganites is remarkably similar to that found in high-temperature superconducting copper

  20. Ultrasonic signatures at the superconducting and the pseudogap phase

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    boundaries in YBCO cuprates. (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Ultrasonic signatures at the superconducting and the pseudogap phase boundaries in YBCO cuprates. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ultrasonic signatures at the superconducting and the pseudogap phase boundaries in YBCO cuprates. A major issue in the understanding of cuprate superconductors is the nature of the metallic state from which high temperature superconductivity emerges. Central to this issue is the pseudogap

  1. Pseudogaps, Polarons, and the Mystery of High-Tc Superconductivity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pseudogaps, Polarons, and the Mystery of High-Tc Superconductivity Print Working at the ALS, a multi-institutional collaboration led by researchers at ALS and Stanford University has identified a pseudogap phase with a nodal-antinodal dichotomy in ferromagnetic manganese oxide materials (manganites). Even though ferromagnetism and superconductivity do not exist together, the pseudogap state found in these manganites is remarkably similar to that found in high-temperature superconducting copper

  2. Pseudogaps, Polarons, and the Mystery of High-Tc Superconductivity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pseudogaps, Polarons, and the Mystery of High-Tc Superconductivity Print Working at the ALS, a multi-institutional collaboration led by researchers at ALS and Stanford University has identified a pseudogap phase with a nodal-antinodal dichotomy in ferromagnetic manganese oxide materials (manganites). Even though ferromagnetism and superconductivity do not exist together, the pseudogap state found in these manganites is remarkably similar to that found in high-temperature superconducting copper

  3. Anisotropy reversal of the upper critical field at low temperatures and spin-locked superconductivity in K2Cr3As3

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Balakirev, F. F.; Kong, T.; Jaime, M.; McDonald, R. D.; Mielke, C. H.; Gurevich, A.; Canfield, P. C.; Bud'ko, S. L.

    2015-06-23

    We report measurements of the anisotropic upper critical field Hc2(T) for K2Cr3As3 single crystals up to 60 T and T>0.6K. Our results show that the upper critical field parallel to the Cr chains, H∥c2(T), exhibits a paramagnetically limited behavior, whereas the shape of the H⊥c2(T) curve (perpendicular to the Cr chains) has no evidence of paramagnetic effects. As a result, the curves H⊥c2(T) and H∥c2(T) cross at T≈4K, so that the anisotropy parameter γH(T)=H⊥c2/H∥c2(T)increases from γH(Tc)≈0.35 near Tc to γH(0)≈1.7 at 0.6 K. This behavior of H∥c2(T) is inconsistent with triplet superconductivity but suggests a form of singlet superconductivity withmore » the electron spins locked onto the direction of Cr chains.« less

  4. Supervisory IT Specialist | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Report | Department of Energy Superconductivity for Electric Systems: 2008 Annual Peer Review Final Report Superconductivity for Electric Systems: 2008 Annual Peer Review Final Report The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability's High Temperature Superconductivity (HTS) for Electric Systems Program's specific mission is to work in partnership with industry to develop HTS wire and perform other research and development activities leading to the commercialization of HTS-based

  5. MICROSTRUCTURE OF SUPERCONDUCTING MGB(2).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ZHU,Y.; LI,Q.; WU,L.; VOLKOV,V.; GU,G.; MOODENBAUGH,A.R.

    2001-07-12

    Recently, Akimitsu and co-workers [1] discovered superconductivity at 39 K in the intermetallic compound MgB{sub 2}. This discovery provides a new perspective on the mechanism for superconductivity. More specifically, it opens up possibilities for investigation of structure/properties in a new class of materials. With the exceptions of the cuprate and C{sub 60} families of compounds, MgB{sub 2} possesses the highest superconducting transition temperature T{sub c}. Its superconductivity appears to follow the BCS theory, apparently being mediated by electron-phonon coupling. The coherence length of MgB{sub 2} is reported to be longer than that of the cuprates [2]. In contrast to the cuprates, grain boundaries are strongly coupled and current density is determined by flux pinning [2,3]. Presently, samples of MgB{sub 2} commonly display inhomogeneity and porosity on the nanoscale, and are untextured. In spite of these obstacles, magnetization and transport measurements show that polycrystalline samples may carry large current densities circulating across many grains [3,4]. Very high values of critical current densities and critical fields have been recently observed in thin films [5,6]. These attributes suggest possible large scale and electronic applications. The underlying microstructure can be intriguing, both in terms of basic science and in applied areas. Subsequent to the discovery, many papers were published [1-13], most dealing with synthesis, physical properties, and theory. There have yet been few studies of microstructure and structural defects [11, 14]. A thorough understanding of practical superconducting properties can only be developed after an understanding of microstructure is gained. In this work we review transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies of sintered MgB{sub 2} pellets [14]. Structural defects, including second phase particles, dislocations, stacking faults, and grain boundaries, are analyzed using electron diffraction, electron

  6. Superconductivity at Dawn of the Iron Age

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Tesanovic, Zlatko [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, United States

    2010-09-01

    Superconductivity is a stunning quantum phenomenon and among the deepest paradigms in all of physics. From fundamental theories of the universe to strange goings-on in exotic materials to medical imaging and cell phones, its conceptual and practical dimensions span a reach as wide as anything in science. Twenty-odd years ago, the discovery of copper oxides ushered in a new era of high-temperature superconductivity, and the joyous exuberance that followed - with physicists throwing everything from fancy gauge theories to synchrotron radiation into its kitchen sink - only recently began to show any signs of waning. In the spring of 2008, as if on cue, a new family of iron pnictide high-temperature superconductors burst on the scene, hinting at an alternative route to room-temperature superconductivity and all of its momentous consequences. Fueled by genuine excitement - and a bit of hype - the iron-based superconductivity turned into a science blockbuster of 2009. I will present a pedagogical review of this new field, contrast the physics of iron- and copper-based systems, and speculate on the microscopic origins of the two types of high-temperature superconductivity.

  7. Superconducting Topological Insulators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    copper, it's possible to make the topologically ordered electrons superconducting, dropping electrical resistance in the surface states all the way to zero. A Major(ana) Quantum...

  8. Superconductive imaging surface magnetometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Overton, Jr., William C.; van Hulsteyn, David B.; Flynn, Edward R.

    1991-01-01

    An improved pick-up coil system for use with Superconducting Quantum Interference Device gradiometers and magnetometers involving the use of superconducting plates near conventional pick-up coil arrangements to provide imaging of nearby dipole sources and to deflect environmental magnetic noise away from the pick-up coils. This allows the practice of gradiometry and magnetometry in magnetically unshielded environments. One embodiment uses a hemispherically shaped superconducting plate with interior pick-up coils, allowing brain wave measurements to be made on human patients. another embodiment using flat superconducting plates could be used in non-destructive evaluation of materials.

  9. Superconducting VAR control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boenig, Heinrich J.; Hassenzahl, William V.

    1982-01-01

    Static VAR control means employing an asymmetrically controlled Graetz bridge and a superconducting direct current coil having low losses and low cost characteristics.

  10. Superconducting Topological Insulators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    taken even further. Their studies showed that by doping the TI, bismuth selenide, with copper, it's possible to make the topologically ordered electrons superconducting, dropping...

  11. SciTech Connect: superconduct*

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    superconduct* Find + Advanced Search Term Search Semantic Search Advanced Search All Fields: superconduct* Semantic Semantic Term Title: Full Text: Bibliographic Data: Creator ...

  12. Impurity effects in superconducting UPt sub 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aronson, M.C. (The Harrison M. Randall Laboratory of Physics, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (USA)); Vorenkamp, T.; Koziol, Z.; de Visser, A.; Bakker, K.; Franse, J.J.M. (Natuurkundig Laboratorium der Universiteit van Amsterdam, Valckenierstraat 65, 1018 XE Amsterdam, The Netherlands (USA)); Smith, J.L. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (USA))

    1991-04-15

    Superconducting UPt{sub 3} is characterized by a novel and complex magnetic field-temperature phase diagram, with two superconducting transitions at {ital T}{sub {ital c}1} and {ital T}{sub {ital c}2} in zero field. We have studied the effects of Pd and Y impurities on the zero field superconducting properties of UPt{sub 3}. Resistance measurements show that both dopants increase the residual resistivity and decrease the spin fluctuation temperature in the normal state. {ital T}{sub {ital c}1} is depressed by both dopants, but more effectively by Pd. {vert bar}{ital T}{sub {ital c}1} {minus} {ital T}{sub {ital c}2}{vert bar} is essentially unaffected by Y doping, but increases dramatically with Pd doping.

  13. Superconductivity of magnesium diboride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bud’ko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.

    2015-07-15

    Over the past 14 years MgB2 has gone from a startling discovery to a promising, applied superconductor. In our article we present a brief overview of the synthesis and the basic superconducting properties of this remarkable compound. Specifically, the effect of pressure, substitutions and neutron irradiation on superconducting properties are discussed.

  14. Superconductivity of magnesium diboride

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bud’ko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.

    2015-07-15

    Over the past 14 years MgB2 has gone from a startling discovery to a promising, applied superconductor. In our article we present a brief overview of the synthesis and the basic superconducting properties of this remarkable compound. Specifically, the effect of pressure, substitutions and neutron irradiation on superconducting properties are discussed.

  15. Dual control active superconductive devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martens, Jon S.; Beyer, James B.; Nordman, James E.; Hohenwarter, Gert K. G.

    1993-07-20

    A superconducting active device has dual control inputs and is constructed such that the output of the device is effectively a linear mix of the two input signals. The device is formed of a film of superconducting material on a substrate and has two main conduction channels, each of which includes a weak link region. A first control line extends adjacent to the weak link region in the first channel and a second control line extends adjacent to the weak link region in the second channel. The current flowing from the first channel flows through an internal control line which is also adjacent to the weak link region of the second channel. The weak link regions comprise small links of superconductor, separated by voids, through which the current flows in each channel. Current passed through the control lines causes magnetic flux vortices which propagate across the weak link regions and control the resistance of these regions. The output of the device taken across the input to the main channels and the output of the second main channel and the internal control line will constitute essentially a linear mix of the two input signals imposed on the two control lines. The device is especially suited to microwave applications since it has very low input capacitance, and is well suited to being formed of high temperature superconducting materials since all of the structures may be formed coplanar with one another on a substrate.

  16. Superconducting FCL using a combined inducted magnetic field trigger and shunt coil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tekletsadik, Kasegn D.

    2007-10-16

    A single trigger/shunt coil is utilized for combined induced magnetic field triggering and shunt impedance. The single coil connected in parallel with the high temperature superconducting element, is designed to generate a circulating current in the parallel circuit during normal operation to aid triggering the high temperature superconducting element to quench in the event of a fault. The circulating current is generated by an induced voltage in the coil, when the system current flows through the high temperature superconducting element.

  17. Superconducting Radiofrequency (SRF) Accelerator Cavities

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Reece, Charlie

    2014-05-22

    Charlie Reece, an accelerator technology scientist, explains how superconducting radiofrequency accelerator cavities work.

  18. Method for forming bismuth-based superconducting ceramics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maroni, Victor A.; Merchant, Nazarali N.; Parrella, Ronald D.

    2005-05-17

    A method for reducing the concentration of non-superconducting phases during the heat treatment of Pb doped Ag/Bi-2223 composites having Bi-2223 and Bi-2212 superconducting phases is disclosed. A Pb doped Ag/Bi-2223 composite having Bi-2223 and Bi-2212 superconducting phases is heated in an atmosphere having an oxygen partial pressure not less than about 0.04 atmospheres and the temperature is maintained at the lower of a non-superconducting phase take-off temperature and the Bi-2223 superconducting phase grain growth take-off temperature. The oxygen partial pressure is varied and the temperature is varied between about 815.degree. C. and about 835.degree. C. to produce not less than 80 percent conversion to Pb doped Bi-2223 superconducting phase and not greater than about 20 volume percent non-superconducting phases. The oxygen partial pressure is preferably varied between about 0.04 and about 0.21 atmospheres. A product by the method is disclosed.

  19. Improved superconducting magnet wire

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schuller, I.K.; Ketterson, J.B.

    1983-08-16

    This invention is directed to a superconducting tape or wire composed of alternating layers of copper and a niobium-containing superconductor such as niobium of NbTi, Nb/sub 3/Sn or Nb/sub 3/Ge. In general, each layer of the niobium-containing superconductor has a thickness in the range of about 0.05 to 1.5 times its coherence length (which for Nb/sub 3/Si is 41 A) with each copper layer having a thickness in the range of about 170 to 600 A. With the use of very thin layers of the niobium composition having a thickness within the desired range, the critical field (H/sub c/) may be increased by factors of 2 to 4. Also, the thin layers of the superconductor permit the resulting tape or wire to exhibit suitable ductility for winding on a magnet core. These compositions are also characterized by relatively high values of critical temperature and therefore will exhibit a combination of useful properties as superconductors.

  20. Scientists optimize defects for better superconducting effects | Argonne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Laboratory optimize defects for better superconducting effects By Jared Sagoff * July 12, 2016 Tweet EmailPrint High-temperature superconducting materials hold enormous promise for a variety of different applications because of their ability to transmit a current without any dissipation at relatively high temperatures - up to around 90 Kelvin (about -300° F), which permits cooling with liquid nitrogen. However, this special ability decreases rapidly in the presence of a magnetic

  1. Scientists optimize defects for better superconducting effects | Argonne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Leadership Computing Facility Scientists optimize defects for better superconducting effects Author: Jared Sagoff July 12, 2016 Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google E-mail Printer-friendly version High-temperature superconducting materials hold enormous promise for a variety of different applications because of their ability to transmit a current without any dissipation at relatively high temperatures - up to around 90 Kelvin (about -300° F), which permits cooling with liquid nitrogen. However,

  2. Apparatus for characterizing conductivity of superconducting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doss, James D.

    1993-01-01

    Apparatus and method for noncontact, radio-frequency shielding current characterization of materials. Self- or mutual inductance changes in one or more inductive elements, respectively, occur when materials capable of supporting shielding currents are placed in proximity thereto, or undergo change in resistivity while in place. Such changes can be observed by incorporating the inductor(s) in a resonant circuit and determining the frequency of oscillation or by measuring the voltage induced on a coupled inductive element. The present invention is useful for determining the critical temperature and superconducting transition width for superconducting samples.

  3. Superconducting nanowire single photon detector on diamond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atikian, Haig A.; Burek, Michael J.; Choy, Jennifer T.; Lon?ar, Marko; Eftekharian, Amin; Jafari Salim, A.; Hamed Majedi, A.

    2014-03-24

    Superconducting nanowire single photon detectors are fabricated directly on diamond substrates and their optical and electrical properties are characterized. Dark count performance and photon count rates are measured at varying temperatures for 1310?nm and 632?nm photons. A multi-step diamond surface polishing procedure is reported, involving iterative reactive ion etching and mechanical polishing to create a suitable diamond surface for the deposition and patterning of thin film superconducting layers. Using this approach, diamond substrates with less than 300?pm Root Mean Square surface roughness are obtained.

  4. Apparatus for characterizing conductivity of superconducting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doss, J.D.

    1993-12-07

    Apparatus and method for noncontact, radio-frequency shielding current characterization of materials. Self- or mutual inductance changes in one or more inductive elements, respectively, occur when materials capable of supporting shielding currents are placed in proximity thereto, or undergo change in resistivity while in place. Such changes can be observed by incorporating the inductor(s) in a resonant circuit and determining the frequency of oscillation or by measuring the voltage induced on a coupled inductive element. The present invention is useful for determining the critical temperature and superconducting transition width for superconducting samples. 10 figures.

  5. Superconducting Topological Insulators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Superconducting Topological Insulators Superconducting Topological Insulators Print Wednesday, 26 January 2011 00:00 Three-dimensional topological insulators (TIs), discovered experimentally in 2007-2009 by a Princeton-ALS collaboration, are a promising platform for developing the next generation of electronics. Electrons within one nanometer of a TI's surface move at high speeds in a "light-like" fashion. The quantum interactions that generate these electronic states cause individual

  6. Alexei Abrikosov and Superconductivity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alexei Abrikosov and Superconductivity Resources with Additional Information * Publications at ANL Alexei A. Abrikosov of the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is a recipient of the 2003 Nobel Prize in Physics for his research in the area of superconductivity. Alexei Abrikosov Courtesy Argonne National Laboratory "Abrikosov's research [at ANL] centers on condensed-matter physics (the structure and behavior of solids and liquids), and concentrates on

  7. Superconductive ceramic oxide combination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatterjee, D.K.; Mehrotra, A.K.; Mir, J.M.

    1991-03-05

    This patent describes the combination of a superconductive ceramic oxide which degrades in conductivity upon contact of ambient air with its surface and, interposed between the ceramic oxide surface and ambient air in the amount of at least 1 mg per square meter of surface area of the superconductive ceramic oxide, a passivant polymer selected from the group consisting of a polyester ionomer and an alkyl cellulose.

  8. Superconducting submillimeter and millimeter wave detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nahum, M.

    1992-10-20

    The series of projects described in this dissertation was stimulated by the discovery of high temperature superconductivity. Our goal was to develop useful applications which would be competitive with the current state of technology. The high-[Tc] microbolometer was developed into the most sensitive direct detector of millimeter waves, when operated at liquid nitrogen temperatures. The thermal boundary resistance of thin YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]0[sub 7-[delta

  9. Levitation pressure and friction losses in superconducting bearings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R.

    2001-01-01

    A superconducting bearing having at least one permanent magnet magnetized with a vertical polarization. The lower or stator portion of the bearing includes an array of high-temperature superconducting elements which are comprised of a plurality of annular rings. An annular ring is located below each permanent magnet and an annular ring is offset horizontally from at least one of the permanent magnets. The rings are composed of individual high-temperature superconducting elements located circumferentially along the ring. By constructing the horizontally-offset high-temperature superconducting ring so that the c-axis is oriented in a radial direction, a higher levitation force can be achieved. Such an orientation will also provide substantially lower rotational drag losses in the bearing.

  10. Magnetic and Superconducting Materials at High Pressures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Struzhkin, Viktor V.

    2015-03-24

    The work concentrates on few important tasks in enabling techniques for search of superconducting compressed hydrogen compounds and pure hydrogen, investigation of mechanisms of high-Tc superconductivity, and exploring new superconducting materials. Along that route we performed several challenging tasks, including discovery of new forms of polyhydrides of alkali metal Na at very high pressures. These experiments help us to establish the experimental environment that will provide important information on the high-pressure properties of hydrogen-rich compounds. Our recent progress in RIXS measurements opens a whole field of strongly correlated 3d materials. We have developed a systematic approach to measure major electronic parameters, like Hubbard energy U, and charge transfer energy Δ, as function of pressure. This technique will enable also RIXS studies of magnetic excitations in iridates and other 5d materials at the L edge, which attract a lot of interest recently. We have developed new magnetic sensing technique based on optically detected magnetic resonance from NV centers in diamond. The technique can be applied to study superconductivity in high-TC materials, to search for magnetic transitions in strongly correlated and itinerant magnetic materials under pressure. Summary of Project Activities; development of high-pressure experimentation platform for exploration of new potential superconductors, metal polyhydrides (including newly discovered alkali metal polyhydrides), and already known superconductors at the limit of static high-pressure techniques; investigation of special classes of superconducting compounds (high-Tc superconductors, new superconducting materials), that may provide new fundamental knowledge and may prove important for application as high-temperature/high-critical parameter superconductors; investigation of the pressure dependence of superconductivity and magnetic/phase transformations in 3d transition metal compounds, including

  11. Superconducting transmission line particle detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, K.E.

    1988-07-28

    A microvertex particle detector for use in a high energy physic collider including a plurality of parallel superconducting thin film strips separated from a superconducting ground plane by an insulating layer to form a plurality of superconducting waveguides. The microvertex particle detector indicates passage of a charged subatomic particle by measuring a voltage pulse measured across a superconducting waveguide caused by the transition of the superconducting thin film strip from a superconducting to a non- superconducting state in response to the passage of a charged particle. A plurality of superconducting thin film strips in two orthogonal planes plus the slow electromagnetic wave propagating in a superconducting transmission line are used to resolve N/sup 2/ ambiguity of charged particle events. 6 figs.

  12. Superconducting transmission line particle detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, Kenneth E.

    1989-01-01

    A microvertex particle detector for use in a high energy physic collider including a plurality of parallel superconducting thin film strips separated from a superconducting ground plane by an insulating layer to form a plurality of superconducting waveguides. The microvertex particle detector indicates passage of a charged subatomic particle by measuring a voltage pulse measured across a superconducting waveguide caused by the transition of the superconducting thin film strip from a superconducting to a non-superconducting state in response to the passage of a charged particle. A plurality of superconducting thin film strips in two orthogonal planes plus the slow electromagnetic wave propogating in a superconducting transmission line are used to resolve N.sup.2 ambiguity of charged particle events.

  13. Segmented superconducting tape having reduced AC losses and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foltyn, Stephen R.; Jia, Quanxi; Arendt, Paul N.; Holesinger, Terry G.; Wang, Haiyan

    2009-09-22

    A superconducting tape having reduced AC losses. The tape has a high temperature superconductor layer that is segmented. Disruptive strips, formed in one of the tape substrate, a buffer layer, and the superconducting layer create parallel discontinuities in the superconducting layer that separate the current-carrying elements of the superconducting layer into strips or filament-like structures. Segmentation of the current-carrying elements has the effect of reducing AC current losses. Methods of making such a superconducting tape and reducing AC losses in such tapes are also disclosed.

  14. Suppression of the Critical Temperature of Superconducting NdFeAs(OF) Single Crystals by Kondo-Like Defect Sites Induced by {alpha}-Particle Irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarantini, C.; Gurevich, A.; Larbalestier, D. C.; Putti, M.; Shen, Y.; Singh, R. K.; Rowell, J. M.; Newman, N.; Cheng Peng; Jia Ying; Wen Haihu

    2010-02-26

    We report the effect of {alpha}-particle irradiation on the reduction of the critical temperature T{sub c} of a NdFeAs(OF) single crystal. Our data indicate that irradiation defects cause both nonmagnetic and magnetic scattering, resulting in the Kondo-like excess resistance {Delta}{rho}(T)propor tolnT over 2 decades in temperatures above T{sub c}. The critical density of magnetic irradiation defects which suppresses T{sub c} is found to be much higher than those for cuprates and multiband BCS superconductors. We suggest that such anomalously weak pair breaking by irradiation defects indicates that magnetic scattering in pnictides is coupled with pairing interactions mediated by spin fluctuations.

  15. Prediction of superconductivity in Li-intercalated bilayer phosphorene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, G. Q.; Xing, Z. W.; Xing, D. Y.

    2015-03-16

    It is shown that bilayer phosphorene can be transformed from a direct-gap semiconductor to a BCS superconductor by intercalating Li atoms. For the Li-intercalated bilayer phosphorene, we find that the electron occupation of Li-derived band is small and superconductivity is intrinsic. With increasing the intercalation of Li atoms, both increased metallicity and strong electron-phonon coupling are favorable for the enhancement of superconductivity. The obtained electron-phonon coupling λ can be larger than 1 and the superconducting temperature T{sub c} can be increased up to 16.5 K, suggesting that phosphorene may be a good candidate for a nanoscale superconductor.

  16. Radiofrequency amplifier based on a dc superconducting quantum interference device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hilbert, C.; Martinis, J.M.; Clarke, J.

    1984-04-27

    A low noise radiofrequency amplifer, using a dc SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) as the input amplifying element. The dc SQUID and an input coil are maintained at superconductivity temperatures in a superconducting shield, with the input coil inductively coupled to the superconducting ring of the dc SQUID. A radiofrequency signal from outside the shield is applied to the input coil, and an amplified radiofrequency signal is developed across the dc SQUID ring and transmitted to exteriorly of the shield. A power gain of 19.5 +- 0.5 dB has been achieved with a noise temperature of 1.0 +- 0.4 K at a frequency of 100 MHz.

  17. Radiofrequency amplifier based on a dc superconducting quantum interference device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hilbert, Claude; Martinis, John M.; Clarke, John

    1986-01-01

    A low noise radiofrequency amplifier (10), using a dc SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) as the input amplifying element. The dc SQUID (11) and an input coil (12) are maintained at superconductivity temperatures in a superconducting shield (13), with the input coil (12) inductively coupled to the superconducting ring (17) of the dc SQUID (11). A radiofrequency signal from outside the shield (13) is applied to the input coil (12), and an amplified radiofrequency signal is developed across the dc SQUID ring (17) and transmitted to exteriorly of the shield (13). A power gain of 19.5.+-.0.5 dB has been achieved with a noise temperature of 1.0.+-.0.4 K. at a frequency of 100 MHz.

  18. Nonlinear terahertz superconducting plasmonics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Jingbo; Liang, Lanju; Jin, Biaobing E-mail: tonouchi@ile.osaka-u.ac.jp Kang, Lin; Xu, Weiwei; Chen, Jian; Wu, Peiheng E-mail: tonouchi@ile.osaka-u.ac.jp; Zhang, Caihong; Kawayama, Iwao; Murakami, Hironaru; Tonouchi, Masayoshi E-mail: tonouchi@ile.osaka-u.ac.jp; Wang, Huabing

    2014-10-20

    Nonlinear terahertz (THz) transmission through subwavelength hole array in superconducting niobium nitride (NbN) film is experimentally investigated using intense THz pulses. The good agreement between the measurement and numerical simulations indicates that the field strength dependent transmission mainly arises from the nonlinear properties of the superconducting film. Under weak THz pulses, the transmission peak can be tuned over a frequency range of 145 GHz which is attributed to the high kinetic inductance of 50?nm-thick NbN film. Utilizing the THz pump-THz probe spectroscopy, we study the dynamic process of transmission spectra and demonstrate that the transition time of such superconducting plasmonic device is within 5 ps.

  19. The Hardest Superconducting Metal Nitride

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Shanmin; Antonio, Daniel; Yu, Xiaohui; Zhang, Jianzhong; Cornelius, Andrew L.; He, Duanwei; Zhao, Yusheng

    2015-09-03

    Transition–metal (TM) nitrides are a class of compounds with a wide range of properties and applications. Hard superconducting nitrides are of particular interest for electronic applications under working conditions such as coating and high stress (e.g., electromechanical systems). However, most of the known TM nitrides crystallize in the rock–salt structure, a structure that is unfavorable to resist shear strain, and they exhibit relatively low indentation hardness, typically in the range of 10–20 GPa. Here, we report high–pressure synthesis of hexagonal ?–MoN and cubic ?–MoN through an ion–exchange reaction at 3.5 GPa. The final products are in the bulk form withmore »crystallite sizes of 50 – 80 ?m. Based on indentation testing on single crystals, hexagonal ?–MoN exhibits excellent hardness of ~30 GPa, which is 30% higher than cubic ?–MoN (~23 GPa) and is so far the hardest among the known metal nitrides. The hardness enhancement in hexagonal phase is attributed to extended covalently bonded Mo–N network than that in cubic phase. The measured superconducting transition temperatures for ?–MoN and cubic ?–MoN are 13.8 and 5.5 K, respectively, in good agreement with previous measurements.« less

  20. The Hardest Superconducting Metal Nitride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Shanmin; Antonio, Daniel; Yu, Xiaohui; Zhang, Jianzhong; Cornelius, Andrew L.; He, Duanwei; Zhao, Yusheng

    2015-09-03

    Transition–metal (TM) nitrides are a class of compounds with a wide range of properties and applications. Hard superconducting nitrides are of particular interest for electronic applications under working conditions such as coating and high stress (e.g., electromechanical systems). However, most of the known TM nitrides crystallize in the rock–salt structure, a structure that is unfavorable to resist shear strain, and they exhibit relatively low indentation hardness, typically in the range of 10–20 GPa. Here, we report high–pressure synthesis of hexagonal δ–MoN and cubic γ–MoN through an ion–exchange reaction at 3.5 GPa. The final products are in the bulk form with crystallite sizes of 50 – 80 μm. Based on indentation testing on single crystals, hexagonal δ–MoN exhibits excellent hardness of ~30 GPa, which is 30% higher than cubic γ–MoN (~23 GPa) and is so far the hardest among the known metal nitrides. The hardness enhancement in hexagonal phase is attributed to extended covalently bonded Mo–N network than that in cubic phase. The measured superconducting transition temperatures for δ–MoN and cubic γ–MoN are 13.8 and 5.5 K, respectively, in good agreement with previous measurements.

  1. The Hardest Superconducting Metal Nitride

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Shanmin; Antonio, Daniel; Yu, Xiaohui; Zhang, Jianzhong; Cornelius, Andrew L.; He, Duanwei; Zhao, Yusheng

    2015-09-03

    Transition–metal (TM) nitrides are a class of compounds with a wide range of properties and applications. Hard superconducting nitrides are of particular interest for electronic applications under working conditions such as coating and high stress (e.g., electromechanical systems). However, most of the known TM nitrides crystallize in the rock–salt structure, a structure that is unfavorable to resist shear strain, and they exhibit relatively low indentation hardness, typically in the range of 10–20 GPa. Here, we report high–pressure synthesis of hexagonal δ–MoN and cubic γ–MoN through an ion–exchange reaction at 3.5 GPa. The final products are in the bulk form withmore » crystallite sizes of 50 – 80 μm. Based on indentation testing on single crystals, hexagonal δ–MoN exhibits excellent hardness of ~30 GPa, which is 30% higher than cubic γ–MoN (~23 GPa) and is so far the hardest among the known metal nitrides. The hardness enhancement in hexagonal phase is attributed to extended covalently bonded Mo–N network than that in cubic phase. The measured superconducting transition temperatures for δ–MoN and cubic γ–MoN are 13.8 and 5.5 K, respectively, in good agreement with previous measurements.« less

  2. Graphite and its Hidden Superconductivity | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lightsource powders [7]. Special emphasis will be given to the possible ways to differentiate between ferromagnetic- from superconducting-like signals when the magnetic moments of interest remain small in comparison with the large diamagnetic backgrounds. Recently done transport and persistent currents experiments at room temperature on graphite flakes embedded in alkanes and their reproducibility. All the experimental evidence as a whole suggests the existence of superconductivity at very

  3. Magnetism and Superconductivity Compete in Iron-based Superconductors |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Magnetism and Superconductivity Compete in Iron-based Superconductors Wednesday, April 30, 2014 HTSC Figure 1 Fig. 1. Measured electronic structure of underdoped Ba1-xKxFe2As2 in the orthorhombic spin-density-wave (SDW) ordered state. The antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic directions are indicated by arrows. High-temperature superconductivity (HTSC), one of the long-standing unsolved mysteries of condensed matter physics, is a beautiful example of

  4. Electro-thermal simulation of superconducting nanowire avalanche photodetectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marsili, F.; Najafi, F.; Herder, C.; Berggren, K. K.

    2011-01-01

    We developed an electrothermal model of NbN superconducting nanowire avalanche photodetectors (SNAPs) on sapphire substrates. SNAPs are single-photon detectors consisting of the parallel connection of N superconducting nanowires. We extrapolated the physical constants of the model from experimental data and we simulated the time evolution of the device resistance, temperature and current by solving two coupled electrical and thermal differential equations describing the nanowires. The predictions of the model were in good quantitative agreement with the experimental results.

  5. DOE Science Showcase - Superconductivity | OSTI, US Dept of Energy Office

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Scientific and Technical Information Superconductivity "Harnessing the power of superconductivity, or the ability of certain materials to conduct electricity with zero energy loss, is one of the most exciting possibilities for creating a more energy-efficient future. But because most superconductors only work at very low temperatures-just a few degrees above absolute zero, or -273 degrees Celsius-they are not yet useful for everyday life. The discovery in the 1980s of

  6. A small-bore high-field superconducting quadrupole magnet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barlow, D.B.; Kraus, R.H.; Lobb, C.T.; Menzel, M.T. ); Walstrom, P.L. )

    1990-01-01

    A prototype superconducting quadrupole magnet was designed and built for use in superconducting coupled-cavity linacs where the use of permanent magnets is ruled out by consideration of trapped flux losses. The magnet has a clear bore diameter of 1.8 cm and outside diameter of 11 cm and length of 11 cm. The magnet was operated at a temperature of 4.2 K and obtained a peak quadrupole field gradient of 320 T/m.

  7. Composite arrays of superconducting microstrip line resonators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohebbi, H. R. Miao, G. X.; Benningshof, O. W. B.; Taminiau, I. A. J.; Cory, D. G.

    2014-03-07

    A novel design of an array of half-wave superconductive microstrip resonators is described. The resonator is intended to be useful for electron spin resonance studies of thin film samples at cryogenic temperatures. It achieves a high quality factor, has a small mode-volume, and creates a uniform magnetic field in a plane above the resonator. The device is made of thin film Niobium on sapphire wafer and is tested with a static magnetic field. Variation of Q-factor versus the magnetic field's strength at different temperatures is reported and is in a good agreement with simulation when the loss due to the vortices is included. Also, the power-dependence response of the resonator is shown in experiments and is verified by capturing the nonlinearity associated with the surface impedance of the superconducting film into the circuit model of the device.

  8. Active superconducting devices formed of thin films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martens, Jon S.; Beyer, James B.; Nordman, James E.; Hohenwarter, Gert K. G.

    1991-05-28

    Active superconducting devices are formed of thin films of superconductor which include a main conduction channel which has an active weak link region. The weak link region is composed of an array of links of thin film superconductor spaced from one another by voids and selected in size and thickness such that magnetic flux can propagate across the weak link region when it is superconducting. Magnetic flux applied to the weak link region will propagate across the array of links causing localized loss of superconductivity in the links and changing the effective resistance across the links. The magnetic flux can be applied from a control line formed of a superconducting film deposited coplanar with the main conduction channel and weak link region on a substrate. The devices can be formed of any type to superconductor but are particularly well suited to the high temperature superconductors since the devices can be entirely formed from coplanar films with no overlying regions. The devices can be utilized for a variety of electrical components, including switching circuits, amplifiers, oscillators and modulators, and are well suited to microwave frequency applications.

  9. Striving for Superconducting Perfection | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Striving for Superconducting Perfection A member of the complex family of iron-based superconductors has been newly synthesized, shown to be highly ordered, and exhibits nearly optimal properties. Well-ordered, single crystals of CaKFe4As4 superconductors have allowed researchers to remove one of the veils of complexity for iron-based superconductors-disorder. Previously, our understanding of the higher transition temperatures, and promising high-magnetic field properties of iron-based

  10. AC/RF Superconductivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2015-02-01

    This contribution provides a brief introduction to AC/RF superconductivity, with an emphasis on application to accelerators. The topics covered include the surface impedance of normal conductors and superconductors, the residual resistance, the field dependence of the surface resistance, and the superheating field.