National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for temperature superconducting magnetic

  1. High Temperature Superconducting Reciprocating Magnetic Separator Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James F. Maguire

    2008-06-05

    In 2001, under DOE's Superconductivity Partnership Initiative (SPI), E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Co. (Dupont) was awarded a cost-share contract to build a fully functional full-scale model high temperature superconducting reciprocating magnet unit specifically designed for the koalin clay industry. After competitive bidding, American Superconductor (AMSC) was selected to provide the coil for the magnet. Dupont performed the statement of work until September 2004, when it stopped work, with the concurrence of DOE, due to lack of federal funds. DOE had paid all invoices to that point, and Dupont had provided all cost share. At this same time, Dupont determined that this program did not fit with its corporate strategies and notified DOE that it was not interesting in resuming the program when funding became available. AMSC expressed interest in assuming performance of the Agreement to Dupont and DOE, and in March 2005, this project was transferred to AMSC by DOE amendment to the original contract and Novation Agreement between AMSC and Dupont. Design drawings and some hardware components and subassemblies were transferred to AMSC. However, no funding was obligated by DOE and AMSC never performed work on the project. This report contains a summary of the work performed by Dupont up to the September 04 timeframe.

  2. High-field magnets using high-critical-temperature superconducting thin films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mitlitsky, F.; Hoard, R.W.

    1994-05-10

    High-field magnets fabricated from high-critical-temperature superconducting ceramic (HTSC) thin films which can generate fields greater than 4 Tesla are disclosed. The high-field magnets are made of stackable disk-shaped substrates coated with HTSC thin films, and involves maximizing the critical current density, superconducting film thickness, number of superconducting layers per substrate, substrate diameter, and number of substrates while minimizing substrate thickness. The HTSC thin films are deposited on one or both sides of the substrates in a spiral configuration with variable line widths to increase the field. 4 figures.

  3. High-field magnets using high-critical-temperature superconducting thin films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mitlitsky, Fred; Hoard, Ronald W.

    1994-01-01

    High-field magnets fabricated from high-critical-temperature superconducting ceramic (HTSC) thin films which can generate fields greater than 4 Tesla. The high-field magnets are made of stackable disk-shaped substrates coated with HTSC thin films, and involves maximizing the critical current density, superconducting film thickness, number of superconducting layers per substrate, substrate diameter, and number of substrates while minimizing substrate thickness. The HTSC thin films are deposited on one or both sides of the substrates in a spiral configuration with variable line widths to increase the field.

  4. Using magnetic fields to understand high-temperature superconductivity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (high-Tc) superconductivity has been the issue as to whether a quantum critical point-a special doping value where quantum fluctuations lead to strong...

  5. Superconducting magnet

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Satti, John A. (Naperville, IL)

    1980-01-01

    A superconducting magnet designed to produce magnetic flux densities of the order of 4 to 5 Webers per square meter is constructed by first forming a cable of a plurality of matrixed superconductor wires with each wire of the plurality insulated from each other one. The cable is shaped into a rectangular cross-section and is wound with tape in an open spiral to create cooling channels. Coils are wound in a calculated pattern in saddle shapes to produce desired fields, such as dipoles, quadrupoles, and the like. Wedges are inserted between adjacent cables as needed to maintain substantially radial placement of the long dimensions of cross sections of the cables. After winding, individual strands in each of the cables are brought out to terminals and are interconnected to place all of the strands in series and to maximize the propagation of a quench by alternating conduction from an inner layer to an outer layer and from top half to bottom half as often as possible. Individual layers are separated from others by spiraled aluminum spacers to facilitate cooling. The wound coil is wrapped with an epoxy tape that is cured by heat and then machined to an interference fit with an outer aluminum pipe which is then affixed securely to the assembled coil by heating it to make a shrink fit. In an alternate embodiment, one wire of the cable is made of copper or the like to be heated externally to propagate a quench.

  6. Can Magnetism Explain High Temperature Superconductivity? | U.S. DOE Office

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Science (SC) Can Magnetism Explain High Temperature Superconductivity? Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) Community Resources Contact Information Basic Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-22/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3081 F: (301) 903-6594 E: Email Us More Information » 05.01.12 Can Magnetism

  7. Magnetically leviated superconducting bearing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weinberger, Bernard R.; Lynds, Jr., Lahmer

    1993-01-01

    A magnetically levitated superconducting bearing includes a magnet (2) mounted on a shaft (12) that is rotatable around an axis of rotation and a Type II superconductor (6) supported on a stator (14) in proximity to the magnet (2). The superconductor (6) is positioned so that when it is cooled to its superconducting state in the presence of a magnetic field, it interacts with the magnet (2) to produce an attractive force that levitates the magnet (2) and supports a load on the shaft (12). The interaction between the superconductor (6) and magnet(2) also produces surface screening currents (8) that generate a repulsive force perpendicular to the load. The bearing also has means for maintaining the superconductor at a temperature below its critical temperature (16, 18). The bearing could also be constructed so the magnet (2) is supported on the stator (14) and the superconductor (6) is mounted on the shaft (12). The bearing can be operated by cooling the superconductor (6) to its superconducting state in the presence of a magnetic field.

  8. Fast superconducting magnetic field switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goren, Y.; Mahale, N.K.

    1996-08-06

    The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater that the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles. 6 figs.

  9. Fast superconducting magnetic field switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goren, Yehuda; Mahale, Narayan K.

    1996-01-01

    The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater that the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles.

  10. Superconducting magnetic coil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aized, D.; Schwall, R.E.

    1999-06-22

    A superconducting magnetic coil includes a plurality of sections positioned axially along the longitudinal axis of the coil, each section being formed of an anisotropic high temperature superconductor material wound about a longitudinal axis of the coil and having an associated critical current value that is dependent on the orientation of the magnetic field of the coil. The cross section of the superconductor, or the type of superconductor material, at sections along the axial and radial axes of the coil are changed to provide an increased critical current at those regions where the magnetic field is oriented more perpendicularly to the conductor plane, to thereby increase the critical current at these regions and to maintain an overall higher critical current of the coil. 15 figs.

  11. Superconducting magnetic coil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aized, Dawood; Schwall, Robert E.

    1999-06-22

    A superconducting magnetic coil includes a plurality of sections positioned axially along the longitudinal axis of the coil, each section being formed of an anisotropic high temperature superconductor material wound about a longitudinal axis of the coil and having an associated critical current value that is dependent on the orientation of the magnetic field of the coil. The cross section of the superconductor, or the type of superconductor material, at sections along the axial and radial axes of the coil are changed to provide an increased critical current at those regions where the magnetic field is oriented more perpendicularly to the conductor plane, to thereby increase the critical current at these regions and to maintain an overall higher critical current of the coil.

  12. Superconducting magnetic coil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aized, Dawood; Schwall, Robert E.

    1996-06-11

    A superconducting magnetic coil includes a plurality of sections positioned axially along the longitudinal axis of the coil, each section being formed of an anisotropic high temperature superconductor material wound about a longitudinal axis of the coil and having an associated critical current value that is dependent on the orientation of the magnetic field of the coil. The cross section of the superconductor, or the type of superconductor material, at sections along the axial and radial axes of the coil are changed to provide an increased critical current at those regions where the magnetic field is oriented more perpendicularly to the conductor plane, to thereby increase the critical current at these regions and to maintain an overall higher critical current of the coil.

  13. High temperature interfacial superconductivity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bozovic, Ivan; Logvenov, Gennady; Gozar, Adrian Mihai

    2012-06-19

    High-temperature superconductivity confined to nanometer-scale interfaces has been a long standing goal because of potential applications in electronic devices. The spontaneous formation of a superconducting interface in bilayers consisting of an insulator (La.sub.2CuO.sub.4) and a metal (La.sub.1-xSr.sub.xCuO.sub.4), neither of which is superconducting per se, is described. Depending upon the layering sequence of the bilayers, T.sub.c may be either .about.15 K or .about.30 K. This highly robust phenomenon is confined to within 2-3 nm around the interface. After exposing the bilayer to ozone, T.sub.c exceeds 50 K and this enhanced superconductivity is also shown to originate from a 1 to 2 unit cell thick interfacial layer. The results demonstrate that engineering artificial heterostructures provides a novel, unconventional way to fabricate stable, quasi two-dimensional high T.sub.c phases and to significantly enhance superconducting properties in other superconductors. The superconducting interface may be implemented, for example, in SIS tunnel junctions or a SuFET.

  14. Improved superconducting magnet wire

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schuller, I.K.; Ketterson, J.B.

    1983-08-16

    This invention is directed to a superconducting tape or wire composed of alternating layers of copper and a niobium-containing superconductor such as niobium of NbTi, Nb/sub 3/Sn or Nb/sub 3/Ge. In general, each layer of the niobium-containing superconductor has a thickness in the range of about 0.05 to 1.5 times its coherence length (which for Nb/sub 3/Si is 41 A) with each copper layer having a thickness in the range of about 170 to 600 A. With the use of very thin layers of the niobium composition having a thickness within the desired range, the critical field (H/sub c/) may be increased by factors of 2 to 4. Also, the thin layers of the superconductor permit the resulting tape or wire to exhibit suitable ductility for winding on a magnet core. These compositions are also characterized by relatively high values of critical temperature and therefore will exhibit a combination of useful properties as superconductors.

  15. Permanent magnet design for high-speed superconducting bearings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, J.R.; Uherka, K.L.; Abdoud, R.G.

    1996-09-10

    A high temperature superconducting bearing including a permanent magnet rotor levitated by a high temperature superconducting structure is disclosed. The rotor preferably includes one or more concentric permanent magnet rings coupled to permanent magnet ring structures having substantially triangular and quadrangular cross-sections. Both alternating and single direction polarity magnet structures can be used in the bearing. 9 figs.

  16. Permanent magnet design for high-speed superconducting bearings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R.; Uherka, Kenneth L.; Abdoud, Robert G.

    1996-01-01

    A high temperature superconducting bearing including a permanent magnet rotor levitated by a high temperature superconducting structure. The rotor preferably includes one or more concentric permanent magnet rings coupled to permanent magnet ring structures having substantially triangular and quadrangular cross-sections. Both alternating and single direction polarity magnet structures can be used in the bearing.

  17. Characterization of a high-temperature superconducting conductor on round core cables in magnetic fields up to 20 T

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van der Laan, D. C.; Noyes, P. D.; Miller, G. E.; Weijers, H. W.; Willering, G. P.

    2013-02-13

    The next generation of high-ï¬eld magnets that will operate at magnetic ï¬elds substantially above 20 T, or at temperatures substantially above 4.2 K, requires high-temperature superconductors (HTS). Conductor on round core (CORC) cables, in which RE-Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} (RE = rare earth) (REBCO) coated conductors are wound in a helical fashion on a flexible core, are a practical and versatile HTS cable option for low-inductance, high-field magnets. We performed the first tests of CORC magnet cables in liquid helium in magnetic fields of up to 20 T. A record critical current I{sub c} of 5021 A was measured at 4.2 K and 19 T. In a cable with an outer diameter of 7.5 mm, this value corresponds to an engineering current density J{sub e} of 114 A mm{sup -2} , the highest J{sub e} ever reported for a superconducting cable at such high magnetic fields. Additionally, the first magnet wound from an HTS cable was constructed from a 6 m-long CORC cable. The 12-turn, double-layer magnet had an inner diameter of 9 cm and was tested in a magnetic field of 20 T, at which it had an I{sub c} of 1966 A. The cables were quenched repetitively without degradation during the measurements, demonstrating the feasibility of HTS CORC cables for use in high-field magnet applications.

  18. Superconducting magnet development in Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yasukochi, K.

    1983-05-01

    The present state of R and D works on the superconducting magnet and its applications in Japan are presented. On electrical rotating machines, 30 MVA superconducting synchronous rotary condenser (Mitsubishi and Fuji) and 50 MVA generator are under construction. Two ways of ship propulsion by superconducting magnets are developing. A superconducting magnetically levitated and linear motor propelled train ''MAGLEV'' was developed by the Japan National Railways (JNR). The superconducting magnet development for fusion is the most active field in Japan. The Cluster Test program has been demonstrated on a 10 T Nb/sub 3/Sn coil and the first coil of Large Coil Task in IEA collaboration has been constructed and the domestic test was completed in JAERI. These works are for the development of toroidal coils of the next generation tokamak machine. R and D works on superconducting ohmic heating coil are in progress in JAERI and ETL. The latter group has constructed 3.8 MJ pulsed coil. A high ramp rate of changing field in pulsed magnet, 200 T/s, has been tested successfully. High Energy Physics Laboratory (KEK) are conducting active works. The superconducting ..mu.. meson channel and ..pi.. meson channel have been constructed and are operating successfully. KEK has also a project of big accelerator named ''TRISTAN'', which is similar to ISABELLE project of BNL. Superconducting synchrotron magnets are developed for this project. The development of superconducting three thin wall solenoid has been started. One of them, CDF, is progressing under USA-Japan collaboration.

  19. High Temperature Superconductivity Partners | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Temperature Superconductivity Partners Map showing DOE's partnersstakeholders in the ... More Documents & Publications DOE Superconductivity Program Stakeholders DOE Provides up ...

  20. Freely oriented portable superconducting magnet

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmierer, Eric N.; Prenger, F. Coyne; Hill, Dallas D.

    2010-01-12

    A freely oriented portable superconducting magnet is disclosed. Coolant is supplied to the superconducting magnet from a repository separate from the magnet, enabling portability of the magnet. A plurality of support assemblies structurally anchor and thermally isolate the magnet within a thermal shield. A plurality of support assemblies structurally anchor and thermally isolate the thermal shield within a vacuum vessel. The support assemblies restrain movement of the magnet resulting from energizing and cooldown, as well as from changes in orientation, enabling the magnet to be freely orientable.

  1. Superconducting magnetic energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassenzahl, W.

    1988-08-01

    Recent programmatic developments in Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) have prompted renewed and widespread interest in this field. In mid 1987 the Defense Nuclear Agency, acting for the Strategic Defense Initiative Office, issued a request for proposals for the design and construction of SMES Engineering Test Model (ETM). Two teams, one led by Bechtel and the other by Ebasco, are now engaged in the first phase of the development of a 10 to 20 MWhr ETM. This report presents the rationale for energy storage on utility systems, describes the general technology of SMES, and explains the chronological development of the technology. The present ETM program is outlined; details of the two projects for ETM development are described in other papers in these proceedings. The impact of high T/sub c/ materials on SMES is discussed. 69 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. High-Temperature Superconductivity Cable Demonstration Projects...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    High-Temperature Superconductivity Cable Demonstration Projects High-Temperature Superconductivity Cable Demonstration Projects A National Effort to Introduce New Technology into ...

  3. Magnetic and Superconducting Materials at High Pressures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Struzhkin, Viktor V.

    2015-03-24

    The work concentrates on few important tasks in enabling techniques for search of superconducting compressed hydrogen compounds and pure hydrogen, investigation of mechanisms of high-Tc superconductivity, and exploring new superconducting materials. Along that route we performed several challenging tasks, including discovery of new forms of polyhydrides of alkali metal Na at very high pressures. These experiments help us to establish the experimental environment that will provide important information on the high-pressure properties of hydrogen-rich compounds. Our recent progress in RIXS measurements opens a whole field of strongly correlated 3d materials. We have developed a systematic approach to measure major electronic parameters, like Hubbard energy U, and charge transfer energy Δ, as function of pressure. This technique will enable also RIXS studies of magnetic excitations in iridates and other 5d materials at the L edge, which attract a lot of interest recently. We have developed new magnetic sensing technique based on optically detected magnetic resonance from NV centers in diamond. The technique can be applied to study superconductivity in high-TC materials, to search for magnetic transitions in strongly correlated and itinerant magnetic materials under pressure. Summary of Project Activities; development of high-pressure experimentation platform for exploration of new potential superconductors, metal polyhydrides (including newly discovered alkali metal polyhydrides), and already known superconductors at the limit of static high-pressure techniques; investigation of special classes of superconducting compounds (high-Tc superconductors, new superconducting materials), that may provide new fundamental knowledge and may prove important for application as high-temperature/high-critical parameter superconductors; investigation of the pressure dependence of superconductivity and magnetic/phase transformations in 3d transition metal compounds, including

  4. Hermetically sealed superconducting magnet motor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeVault, Robert C.; McConnell, Benjamin W.; Phillips, Benjamin A.

    1996-01-01

    A hermetically sealed superconducting magnet motor includes a rotor separated from a stator by either a radial gap, an axial gap, or a combined axial and radial gap. Dual conically shaped stators are used in one embodiment to levitate a disc-shaped rotor made of superconducting material within a conduit for moving cryogenic fluid. As the rotor is caused to rotate when the field stator is energized, the fluid is pumped through the conduit.

  5. Hermetically sealed superconducting magnet motor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeVault, R.C.; McConnell, B.W.; Phillips, B.A.

    1996-07-02

    A hermetically sealed superconducting magnet motor includes a rotor separated from a stator by either a radial gap, an axial gap, or a combined axial and radial gap. Dual conically shaped stators are used in one embodiment to levitate a disc-shaped rotor made of superconducting material within a conduit for moving cryogenic fluid. As the rotor is caused to rotate when the field stator is energized, the fluid is pumped through the conduit. 6 figs.

  6. Method for obtaining large levitation pressure in superconducting magnetic bearings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL)

    1996-01-01

    A method and apparatus for compressing magnetic flux to achieve high levitation pressures. Magnetic flux produced by a magnetic flux source travels through a gap between two high temperature superconducting material structures. The gap has a varying cross-sectional area to compress the magnetic flux, providing an increased magnetic field and correspondingly increased levitation force in the gap.

  7. Method for obtaining large levitation pressure in superconducting magnetic bearings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL)

    1997-01-01

    A method and apparatus for compressing magnetic flux to achieve high levitation pressures. Magnetic flux produced by a magnetic flux source travels through a gap between two high temperature superconducting material structures. The gap has a varying cross-sectional area to compress the magnetic flux, providing an increased magnetic field and correspondingly increased levitation force in the gap.

  8. Method for obtaining large levitation pressure in superconducting magnetic bearings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, J.R.

    1996-10-08

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for compressing magnetic flux to achieve high levitation pressures. Magnetic flux produced by a magnetic flux source travels through a gap between two high temperature superconducting material structures. The gap has a varying cross-sectional area to compress the magnetic flux, providing an increased magnetic field and correspondingly increased levitation force in the gap. 4 figs.

  9. Method for obtaining large levitation pressure in superconducting magnetic bearings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, J.R.

    1997-08-05

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for compressing magnetic flux to achieve high levitation pressures. Magnetic flux produced by a magnetic flux source travels through a gap between two high temperature superconducting material structures. The gap has a varying cross-sectional area to compress the magnetic flux, providing an increased magnetic field and correspondingly increased levitation force in the gap. 4 figs.

  10. High temperature interface superconductivity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gozar, A.; Bozovic, I.

    2016-01-20

    High-Tc superconductivity at interfaces has a history of more than a couple of decades. In this review we focus our attention on copper-oxide based heterostructures and multi-layers. We first discuss the technique, atomic layer-by-layer molecular beam epitaxy (ALL-MBE) engineering, that enabled High-Tc Interface Superconductivity (HT-IS), and the challenges associated with the realization of high quality interfaces. Then we turn our attention to the experiments which shed light on the structure and properties of interfacial layers, allowing comparison to those of single-phase films and bulk crystals. Both ‘passive’ hetero-structures as well as surface-induced effects by external gating are discussed. Here, wemore » conclude by comparing HT-IS in cuprates and in other classes of materials, especially Fe-based superconductors, and by examining the grand challenges currently laying ahead for the field.« less

  11. A small-bore high-field superconducting quadrupole magnet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barlow, D.B.; Kraus, R.H.; Lobb, C.T.; Menzel, M.T. ); Walstrom, P.L. )

    1990-01-01

    A prototype superconducting quadrupole magnet was designed and built for use in superconducting coupled-cavity linacs where the use of permanent magnets is ruled out by consideration of trapped flux losses. The magnet has a clear bore diameter of 1.8 cm and outside diameter of 11 cm and length of 11 cm. The magnet was operated at a temperature of 4.2 K and obtained a peak quadrupole field gradient of 320 T/m.

  12. Superconducting magnet wire

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schuller, Ivan K.; Ketterson, John B.; Banerjee, Indrajit

    1986-01-01

    A superconducting tape or wire with an improved critical field is formed of alternating layers of a niobium-containing superconductor such as Nb, NbTi, Nb.sub.3 Sn or Nb.sub.3 Ge with a thickness in the range of about 0.5-1.5 times its coherence length, supported and separated by layers of copper with each copper layer having a thickness in the range of about 170-600 .ANG..

  13. Damping in high-temperature superconducting levitation systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R.

    2009-12-15

    Methods and apparatuses for improved damping in high-temperature superconducting levitation systems are disclosed. A superconducting element (e.g., a stator) generating a magnetic field and a magnet (e.g. a rotor) supported by the magnetic field are provided such that the superconducting element is supported relative to a ground state with damped motion substantially perpendicular to the support of the magnetic field on the magnet. Applying this, a cryostat housing the superconducting bearing may be coupled to the ground state with high damping but low radial stiffness, such that its resonant frequency is less than that of the superconducting bearing. The damping of the cryostat may be substantially transferred to the levitated magnetic rotor, thus, providing damping without affecting the rotational loss, as can be derived applying coupled harmonic oscillator theory in rotor dynamics. Thus, damping can be provided to a levitated object, without substantially affecting the rotational loss.

  14. Superconducting magnet cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vander Arend, Peter C.; Fowler, William B.

    1977-01-01

    A device is provided for cooling a conductor to the superconducting state. The conductor is positioned within an inner conduit through which is flowing a supercooled liquid coolant in physical contact with the conductor. The inner conduit is positioned within an outer conduit so that an annular open space is formed therebetween. Through the annular space is flowing coolant in the boiling liquid state. Heat generated by the conductor is transferred by convection within the supercooled liquid coolant to the inner wall of the inner conduit and then is removed by the boiling liquid coolant, making the heat removal from the conductor relatively independent of conductor length.

  15. High-Temperature Superconductivity

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Peter Johnson

    2010-01-08

    Like astronomers tweaking images to gain a more detailed glimpse of distant stars, physicists at Brookhaven National Laboratory have found ways to sharpen images of the energy spectra in high-temperature superconductors ? materials that carry electrical c

  16. BNL Direct Wind Superconducting Magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, B.; Anerella, M.; Escallier, J.; Ghosh, A.; Jain, A.; Marone, A.; Muratore, A.; Wanderer, P.

    2011-09-12

    BNL developed Direct Wind magnet technology is used to create a variety of complex multi-functional multi-layer superconducting coil structures without the need for creating custom production tooling and fixturing for each new project. Our Direct Wind process naturally integrates prestress into the coil structure so external coil collars and yokes are not needed; the final coil package transverse size can then be very compact. Direct Wind magnets are produced with very good field quality via corrections applied during the course of coil winding. The HERA-II and BEPC-II Interaction Region (IR) magnet, J-PARC corrector and Alpha antihydrogen magnetic trap magnets and our BTeV corrector magnet design are discussed here along with a full length ILC IR prototype magnet presently in production and the coils that were wound for an ATF2 upgrade at KEK. A new IR septum magnet design concept for a 6.2 T combined-function IR magnet for eRHIC, a future RHIC upgrade, is introduced here.

  17. High-temperature superconducting current leads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niemann, R.C.

    1995-03-01

    Use of high-temperature superconductors (HTSs) for current leads to deliver power to devices at liquid helium temperature can reduce refrigeration requirements to values significantly below those achievable with conventional leads. HTS leads are now near commercial realization. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has developed a sinter-forge process to fabricate current leads from bismuth-based superconductors. The current-carrying capacity of these leads is five times better than that of HTS leads made by a conventional fabrication process. ANL along with Superconductivity, Inc., has developed a 1500 ampere current lead for an existing superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) device. With Babcock & Wilcox Company, Argonne is creating 16-kiloampere leads for use in a 0.5 MWh SMES. In a third project Argonne performed characterization testing of a existing, proprietary conduction-cooled lead being developed by Zer Res Corp.

  18. Superconductivity Program Overview High-Temperature Superconductivity

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SuperconducTiviTy program haS Three FocuS areaS: SuperconducTiviTy applicaTionS Developing HTS-based electric power equipment such as transmission and distribution cables and fault current limiters Second-generaTion Wire developmenT Developing high-performance, low-cost, second- generation HTS wire at long lengths STraTegic reSearch Supporting fundamental research activities to better understand relationships between the microstructure of HTS materials and their ability to carry large electric

  19. New Superconducting Magnet Will Lead to Next Generation of Wind...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Superconducting Magnet Will Lead to Next Generation of Wind Turbine Generators New Superconducting Magnet Will Lead to Next Generation of Wind Turbine Generators September 12, 2014 ...

  20. Performance of Conduction Cooled Splittable Superconducting Magnet...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A superconducting magnet package was designed and built as a collaborative effort of FNAL and KEK. The magnet package includes one quadrupole, and two dipole windings. It has a ...

  1. Magnetic excitations in Kondo liquid: superconductivity and hidden magnetic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    quantum critical fluctuations (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Magnetic excitations in Kondo liquid: superconductivity and hidden magnetic quantum critical fluctuations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Magnetic excitations in Kondo liquid: superconductivity and hidden magnetic quantum critical fluctuations We report Knight shift experiments on the superconducting heavy electron material CeCoIn{sub 5} that allow one to track with some precision the behavior of the heavy electron

  2. High-temperature superconductivity: A conventional conundrum...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: High-temperature superconductivity: A conventional conundrum Citation ... OSTI Identifier: 1245373 Report Number(s): BNL--111729-2016-JA Journal ID: ISSN 1745-2473; ...

  3. High Temperature Superconducting Underground Cable

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrell, Roger, A.

    2010-02-28

    The purpose of this Project was to design, build, install and demonstrate the technical feasibility of an underground high temperature superconducting (HTS) power cable installed between two utility substations. In the first phase two HTS cables, 320 m and 30 m in length, were constructed using 1st generation BSCCO wire. The two 34.5 kV, 800 Arms, 48 MVA sections were connected together using a superconducting joint in an underground vault. In the second phase the 30 m BSCCO cable was replaced by one constructed with 2nd generation YBCO wire. 2nd generation wire is needed for commercialization because of inherent cost and performance benefits. Primary objectives of the Project were to build and operate an HTS cable system which demonstrates significant progress towards commercial progress and addresses real world utility concerns such as installation, maintenance, reliability and compatibility with the existing grid. Four key technical areas addressed were the HTS cable and terminations (where the cable connects to the grid), cryogenic refrigeration system, underground cable-to-cable joint (needed for replacement of cable sections) and cost-effective 2nd generation HTS wire. This was the worlds first installation and operation of an HTS cable underground, between two utility substations as well as the first to demonstrate a cable-to-cable joint, remote monitoring system and 2nd generation HTS.

  4. Magnetism and Superconductivity Compete in Iron-based Superconductors |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Magnetism and Superconductivity Compete in Iron-based Superconductors Wednesday, April 30, 2014 HTSC Figure 1 Fig. 1. Measured electronic structure of underdoped Ba1-xKxFe2As2 in the orthorhombic spin-density-wave (SDW) ordered state. The antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic directions are indicated by arrows. High-temperature superconductivity (HTSC), one of the long-standing unsolved mysteries of condensed matter physics, is a beautiful example of

  5. Superconducting magnetic shielding apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clem, J.R.; Clem, J.R.

    1983-10-11

    Disclosed are a method and apparatus for providing magnetic shielding around a working volume. The apparatus includes a hollow elongated superconducting shell or cylinder having an elongated low magnetic pinning central portion, and two high magnetic pinning end regions. Transition portions of varying magnetic pinning properties are interposed between the central and end portions. The apparatus further includes a solenoid substantially coextensive with and overlying the superconducting cylinder, so as to be magnetically coupled therewith. The method includes the steps passing a longitudinally directed current through the superconducting cylinder so as to depin magnetic reservoirs trapped in the cylinder. Next, a circumferentially directed current is passed through the cylinder, while a longitudinally directed current is maintained. Depinned magnetic reservoirs are moved to the end portions of the cylinder, where they are trapped. 5 figs.

  6. Superconducting magnetic shielding apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clem, John R.; Clem, John R.

    1983-01-01

    Disclosed is a method and apparatus for providing magnetic shielding around a working volume. The apparatus includes a hollow elongated superconducting shell or cylinder having an elongated low magnetic pinning central portion, and two high magnetic pinning end regions. Transition portions of varying magnetic pinning properties are interposed between the central and end portions. The apparatus further includes a solenoid substantially coextensive with and overlying the superconducting cylinder, so as to be magnetically coupled therewith. The method includes the steps passing a longitudinally directed current through the superconducting cylinder so as to depin magnetic reservoirs trapped in the cylinder. Next, a circumferentially directed current is passed through the cylinder, while a longitudinally directed current is maintained. Depinned magnetic reservoirs are moved to the end portions of the cylinder, where they are trapped.

  7. Superconducting magnetic shielding apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clem, J.R.

    1982-07-09

    Disclosed is a method and apparatus for providing magnetic shielding around a working volume. The apparatus includes a hollow elongated superconducting shell or cylinder having an elongated low magnetic pinning central portion, and two high magnetic pinning end regions. Transition portions of varying magnetic pinning properties are interposed between the central and end portions. The apparatus further includes a solenoid substantially coextensive with and overlying the superconducting cylinder, so as to be magnetically coupled therewith. The method includes the steps passing a longitudinally directed current through the superconducting cylinder so as to depin magnetic reservoirs trapped in the cylinder. Next, a circumferentially directed current is passed through the cylinder, while a longitudinally directed current is maintained. Depinned magnetic reservoirs are moved to the end portions of the cylinder, where they are trapped.

  8. A potential Rosetta Stone of high temperature superconductivity...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    for the high temperature superconductivity. Summary Superconductivity enables the flow of electricity without any loss of energy, but this extremely-low temperature...

  9. Performance of Conduction Cooled Splittable Superconducting Magnet Package for Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kashikhin, Vladimire S.; Andreev, N.; Cheban, S.; DiMarco, J.; Kimura, N.; Makarov, A.; Orlov, Y.; Poloubotko. V., Poloubotko. V.; Tartaglia, M.; Yamamoto, A.

    2015-01-01

    New Linear Superconducting Accelerators need a superconducting magnet package installed inside SCRF Cryomodules to focus and steer electron or proton beams. A superconducting magnet package was designed and built as a collaborative effort of FNAL and KEK. The magnet package includes one quadrupole, and two dipole windings. It has a splittable in the vertical plane configuration, and features for conduction cooling. The magnet was successfully tested at room temperature, in a liquid He bath, and in a conduction cooling experiment. The paper describes the design and test results including: magnet cooling, training, and magnetic measurements by rotational coils. The effects of superconductor and iron yoke magnetization, hysteresis, and fringe fields are discussed.

  10. High-temperature superconductivity: A conventional conundrum

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Božović, Ivan

    2016-01-07

    High-temperature superconductivity in ultrathin films of iron selenide deposited on strontium titanate has been attributed to various exotic mechanisms, and new experiments indicate that it may be conventional, with broader implications.

  11. High Temperature Interfacial Superconductivity - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High Temperature Interfacial Superconductivity Brookhaven National Laboratory Contact BNL About This Technology Publications: PDF Document Publication High-temperature interface superconductivity between metallic and insulating copper oxides (791 KB) <p> (a) Annular dark field image of the structure showing extended defects in the metal layer (marked by white arrows). The black arrow shows the metal-insulator interface (b) A magnified image of one defect which nucleated at the

  12. Status of superconducting magnets for the Superconducting Super Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schermer, R.I.

    1993-09-01

    The arc sections of the High Energy Booster and the two Collider Rings will need more than 10,000, very large, superconducting dipole and quadrupole magnets. Development work on these magnets was carried out at US/DOE laboratories in a program that began in the mid 1980`s. In 1991-1992, the technology was transferred to industry and twenty, full-length, Collider dipoles were successfully fabricated and tested. This program, along with HERA and Tevatron experience, has provided industry a data base to use in formulating detailed designs for the prototypes of the accelerator magnets, with an eye to reducing cost and enhancing producibility. Several model magnets from this latest phase of the industrial program have already been tested. The excessive ramp-rate sensitivity of the magnets is understood and solutions are under investigation.

  13. Superconducting FCL using a combined inducted magnetic field trigger and shunt coil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tekletsadik, Kasegn D.

    2007-10-16

    A single trigger/shunt coil is utilized for combined induced magnetic field triggering and shunt impedance. The single coil connected in parallel with the high temperature superconducting element, is designed to generate a circulating current in the parallel circuit during normal operation to aid triggering the high temperature superconducting element to quench in the event of a fault. The circulating current is generated by an induced voltage in the coil, when the system current flows through the high temperature superconducting element.

  14. High temperature superconducting fault current limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R.

    1997-01-01

    A fault current limiter (10) for an electrical circuit (14). The fault current limiter (10) includes a high temperature superconductor (12) in the electrical circuit (14). The high temperature superconductor (12) is cooled below its critical temperature to maintain the superconducting electrical properties during operation as the fault current limiter (10).

  15. High temperature superconducting fault current limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, J.R.

    1997-02-04

    A fault current limiter for an electrical circuit is disclosed. The fault current limiter includes a high temperature superconductor in the electrical circuit. The high temperature superconductor is cooled below its critical temperature to maintain the superconducting electrical properties during operation as the fault current limiter. 15 figs.

  16. Stress analysis of superconducting magnets for magnetic fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akin, J.E.; Gray, W.H.; Baudry, T.V.

    1980-01-01

    Superconducting devices involve several factors that normally are not encountered in the structural analysis of more common systems. Several of these factors ae noted and methods for including them in an analysis are cited. To illustrate the state of the analysis art for superconducting magnets, in magnetic fusion reactors, two specific projects are illustrated. They are the Large Coil Program (LCP) and the Engineering Test Facility (ETF).

  17. Superconducting transition temperature in anodized aluminum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leemann, C.; Elliott, J.H.; Deutscher, G.; Orbach, R.; Wolf, S.A.

    1983-08-01

    We have measured the superconducting transition temperature of anodized aluminum films of grain sizes ranging from less than 100 to 3000 A. The transition temperature is 1.8 K for films of grain size 100 A and decreases monotonically with increasing grain size to 1.2 K for 3000-A grains. The effect depends only on the volume of the grains.

  18. Superconducting and magnetic properties of Sr?Ir?Sn??

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Biswas, P. K.; Wang, Kefeng; Amato, A.; Khasanov, R.; Luetkens, H.; Petrovic, C.; Cook, R. M.; Lees, M. R.; Morenzoni, E.

    2014-10-10

    Magnetization and muon spin relaxation or rotation (SR) measurements have been performed to study the superconducting and magnetic properties of Sr?Ir?Sn??. From magnetization measurements the lower and upper critical fields of Sr?Ir?Sn?? are found to be 81(1) Oe and 14.4(2) kOe, respectively. Zero-field SR data show no sign of any magnetic ordering or weak magnetism in Sr?Ir?Sn??. Transverse-field SR measurements in the vortex state provided the temperature dependence of the magnetic penetration depth ?. The dependence of ?? with temperature is consistent with the existence of single s-wave energy gap in the superconducting state of Sr?Ir?Sn?? with a gap valuemoreof 0.82(2) meV at absolute zero temperature. The magnetic penetration depth at zero temperature ?(0) is 291(3) nm. The ratio ?(0)/kBTc = 2.1(1) indicates that Sr?Ir?Sn?? should be considered as a strong-coupling superconductor.less

  19. High temperature interfacial superconductivity (Patent) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Patent: High temperature interfacial superconductivity Citation Details In-Document Search Title: High temperature interfacial superconductivity High-temperature superconductivity confined to nanometer-scale interfaces has been a long standing goal because of potential applications in electronic devices. The spontaneous formation of a superconducting interface in bilayers consisting of an insulator (La.sub.2CuO.sub.4) and a metal (La.sub.1-xSr.sub.xCuO.sub.4), neither of which is superconducting

  20. The superconducting solenoid magnets for MICE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, Michael A.

    2002-12-22

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is a channel of superconducting solenoid magnets. The magnets in MICE are around the RF cavities, absorbers (liquid or solid) and the primary particle detectors [1], [2]. The MICE superconducting solenoid system consists of eighteen coils that are grouped in three types of magnet assemblies. The cooling channel consists of two complete cell of an SFOFO cooling channel. Each cell consists of a focusing coil pair around an absorber and a coupling coil around a RF cavity that re-accelerates the muons to their original momentum. At the ends of the experiment are uniform field solenoids for the particle detectors and a set of matching coils used to match the muon beam to the cooling cells. Three absorbers are used instead of two in order to shield the detectors from dark currents generated by the RF cavities at high operating acceleration gradients.

  1. Toroidal constant-tension superconducting magnetic energy storage units

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Herring, J. Stephen

    1992-01-01

    A superconducting magnetic energy storage unit is provided in which the magnet is wound in a toroidal fashion such that the magnetic field produced is contained only within the bore of the magnet, and thus producing a very low external field. The superconducting magnet includes a coolant channel disposed through the wire. The bore of the magnet comprises a storage volume in which cryogenic coolant is stored, and this volume supplies the coolant to be delivered to the coolant channel in the magnet.

  2. Magnetism and superconductivity observed to exist in harmony

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Magnetism and superconductivity exist in harmony Magnetism and superconductivity observed to exist in harmony Physicists have observed, for the first time in a single exotic phase, a situation where magnetism and superconductivity are necessary for each other's existence. August 28, 2008 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable

  3. Superconducting flat tape cable magnet

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Takayasu, Makoto

    2015-08-11

    A method for winding a coil magnet with the stacked tape cables, and a coil so wound. The winding process is controlled and various shape coils can be wound by twisting about the longitudinal axis of the cable and bending following the easy bend direction during winding, so that sharp local bending can be obtained by adjusting the twist pitch. Stack-tape cable is twisted while being wound, instead of being twisted in a straight configuration and then wound. In certain embodiments, the straight length should be half of the cable twist-pitch or a multiple of it.

  4. History of the superconducting-magnet bubble chambers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derrick, M.; Hyman, L.G.; Pewitt, E.G.

    1980-01-01

    This review covers the development of superconducting magnets, small bubble chambers, and the early history of the 12-foot bubble chamber. (MOW)

  5. Pressure-induced electronic phase separation of magnetism and superconductivity in CrAs

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khasanov, Rustem; Guguchia, Zurab; Eremin, Ilya; Luetkens, Hubertus; Amato, Alex; Biswas, Pabitra K.; Ruegg, Christian; Susner, Michael A.; Sefat, Athena S.; Zhigadlo, Nikolai D.; et al

    2015-09-08

    We report that the recent discovery of pressure (p) induced superconductivity in the binary helimagnet CrAs has raised questions on how superconductivity emerges from the magnetic state and on the mechanism of the superconducting pairing. In the present work the suppression of magnetism and the occurrence of superconductivity in CrAs were studied by means of muon spin rotation. The magnetism remains bulk up to p ≃ 3.5 kbar while its volume fraction gradually decreases with increasing pressure until it vanishes at p ≃ 7 kbar. At 3.5 kbar superconductivity abruptly appears with its maximum Tc ≃ 1.2 K which decreasesmore » upon increasing the pressure. In the intermediate pressure region (3.5≲ p ≲ 7 kbar) the superconducting and the magnetic volume fractions are spatially phase separated and compete for phase volume. Our results indicate that the less conductive magnetic phase provides additional carriers (doping) to the superconducting parts of the CrAs sample thus leading to an increase of the transition temperature (Tc) and of the superfluid density (ρs). A scaling of ρs with Tc3.2 as well as the phase separation between magnetism and superconductivity point to a conventional mechanism of the Cooper-pairing in CrAs.« less

  6. Pressure-induced electronic phase separation of magnetism and superconductivity in CrAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khasanov, Rustem; Guguchia, Zurab; Eremin, Ilya; Luetkens, Hubertus; Amato, Alex; Biswas, Pabitra K.; Ruegg, Christian; Susner, Michael A.; Sefat, Athena S.; Zhigadlo, Nikolai D.; Morenzoni, Elvezio

    2015-09-08

    We report that the recent discovery of pressure (p) induced superconductivity in the binary helimagnet CrAs has raised questions on how superconductivity emerges from the magnetic state and on the mechanism of the superconducting pairing. In the present work the suppression of magnetism and the occurrence of superconductivity in CrAs were studied by means of muon spin rotation. The magnetism remains bulk up to p ≃ 3.5 kbar while its volume fraction gradually decreases with increasing pressure until it vanishes at p ≃ 7 kbar. At 3.5 kbar superconductivity abruptly appears with its maximum Tc ≃ 1.2 K which decreases upon increasing the pressure. In the intermediate pressure region (3.5≲ p ≲ 7 kbar) the superconducting and the magnetic volume fractions are spatially phase separated and compete for phase volume. Our results indicate that the less conductive magnetic phase provides additional carriers (doping) to the superconducting parts of the CrAs sample thus leading to an increase of the transition temperature (Tc) and of the superfluid density (ρs). A scaling of ρs with Tc3.2 as well as the phase separation between magnetism and superconductivity point to a conventional mechanism of the Cooper-pairing in CrAs.

  7. Superconductivity and magnetism in rapidly solidified perovskites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Handley, R.C.; Kalonji, G.

    1991-01-01

    The report is divided into six parts, reflecting major thrusts of our work since 1987. The six areas are: molecular orbital theory of high {Tc} superconductivity; rapid solidification processing of oxide superconductors; time dependent magnetic and superconducting properties of these inhomogeneous materials; excess Gd in Gd{sub 1+x}Ba{sub 2-x}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} perovskites; rapid solidification and directional annealing to achieve high Jc; and Mossbauer studies of T = Fe, Co and Ni site selection in YBa{sub 2}(CuT){sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} and GdBa{sub 2}(CuT){sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}}.

  8. Cooling system for superconducting magnet

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gamble, B.B.; Sidi-Yekhlef, A.

    1998-12-15

    A cooling system is configured to control the flow of a refrigerant by controlling the rate at which the refrigerant is heated, thereby providing an efficient and reliable approach to cooling a load (e.g., magnets, rotors). The cooling system includes a conduit circuit connected to the load and within which a refrigerant circulates; a heat exchanger, connected within the conduit circuit and disposed remotely from the load; a first and a second reservoir, each connected within the conduit, each holding at least a portion of the refrigerant; a heater configured to independently heat the first and second reservoirs. In a first mode, the heater heats the first reservoir, thereby causing the refrigerant to flow from the first reservoir through the load and heat exchanger, via the conduit circuit and into the second reservoir. In a second mode, the heater heats the second reservoir to cause the refrigerant to flow from the second reservoir through the load and heat exchanger via the conduit circuit and into the first reservoir. 3 figs.

  9. Cooling system for superconducting magnet

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gamble, Bruce B.; Sidi-Yekhlef, Ahmed

    1998-01-01

    A cooling system is configured to control the flow of a refrigerant by controlling the rate at which the refrigerant is heated, thereby providing an efficient and reliable approach to cooling a load (e.g., magnets, rotors). The cooling system includes a conduit circuit connected to the load and within which a refrigerant circulates; a heat exchanger, connected within the conduit circuit and disposed remotely from the load; a first and a second reservoir, each connected within the conduit, each holding at least a portion of the refrigerant; a heater configured to independently heat the first and second reservoirs. In a first mode, the heater heats the first reservoir, thereby causing the refrigerant to flow from the first reservoir through the load and heat exchanger, via the conduit circuit and into the second reservoir. In a second mode, the heater heats the second reservoir to cause the refrigerant to flow from the second reservoir through the load and heat exchanger via the conduit circuit and into the first reservoir.

  10. Pseudogap and Superconducting Gap in High-Temperature Superconductors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pseudogap and Superconducting Gap in High-Temperature Superconductors Two decades after the discovery of first high temperature superconductors, the microscopic mechanism of high-Tc superconductivity remains elusive. In conventional superconductors, it has been well established that electrons form so-called "Cooper pairs" to give rise to superconductivity. The pair binding manifests itself as an energy gap in many spectroscopic measurements. This energy gap, known as superconducting

  11. Critical Magnetic Field Determination of Superconducting Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canabal, A.; Tajima, T.; Dolgashev, V.A.; Tantawi, S.G.; Yamamoto, T.; /Tsukuba, Natl. Res. Lab. Metrol.

    2011-11-04

    Superconducting RF technology is becoming more and more important. With some recent cavity test results showing close to or even higher than the critical magnetic field of 170-180 mT that had been considered a limit, it is very important to develop a way to correctly measure the critical magnetic field (H{sup RF}{sub c}) of superconductors in the RF regime. Using a 11.4 GHz, 50-MW, <1 {mu}s, pulsed power source and a TE013-like mode copper cavity, we have been measuring critical magnetic fields of superconductors for accelerator cavity applications. This device can eliminate both thermal and field emission effects due to a short pulse and no electric field at the sample surface. A model of the system is presented in this paper along with a discussion of preliminary experimental data.

  12. Transformer current sensor for superconducting magnetic coils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shen, Stewart S.; Wilson, C. Thomas

    1988-01-01

    A transformer current sensor having primary turns carrying a primary current for a superconducting coil and secondary turns only partially arranged within the primary turns. The secondary turns include an active winding disposed within the primary turns and a dummy winding which is not disposed in the primary turns and so does not experience a magnetic field due to a flow of current in the primary turns. The active and dummy windings are wound in opposite directions or connected in series-bucking relationship, and are exposed to the same ambient magnetic field. Voltages which might otherwise develop in the active and dummy windings due to ambient magnetic fields thus cancel out. The resultant voltage is purely indicative of the rate of change of current flowing in the primary turns.

  13. High-Temperature Superconducting Composite Conductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holesinger, Terry G.; Foltyn, Stephen R.; Arendt, Paul N.; Groves, James R.; Jia, Quanxi; Ayala, Alicia

    2005-01-18

    Copper or excess copper is added to one or more layers of a superconducting composite structure to reduce migration of copper form a copper based superconducting layer.

  14. Low-Temperature Synthesis of Superconducting NanocrystallineMgB2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lu, Jun; Xiao, Zhili; Lin, Qiyin; Claus, Helmut; Fang, Zhigang Zak

    2010-01-01

    Magnesium diboride (MgB2) is considered a promising material for practical application in superconducting devices, with a transition temperature near 40?K. In the present paper, nanocrystalline MgB2with an average particle size of approximately 70?nm is synthesized by reacting LiBH4with MgH2at temperatures as low as 450C. This synthesis approach successfully bypasses the usage of either elemental boron or toxic diborane gas. The superconductivity of the nanostructures is confirmed by magnetization measurements, showing a superconducting critical temperature of 38.7?K.

  15. Low-Temperature Synthesis of Superconducting Nanocrystalline MgB 2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lu, Jun; Xiao, Zhili; Lin, Qiyin; Claus, Helmut; Fang, Zhigang Zak

    2010-01-01

    Magnesium diboride (MgB 2 ) is considered a promising material for practical application in superconducting devices, with a transition temperature near 40 K. In the present paper, nanocrystalline MgB 2 with an average particle size of approximately 70 nm is synthesized by reacting LiBH 4 with MgH 2 at temperatures as low as 450 ° C. This synthesis approach successfully bypasses the usage of either elemental boron or toxic diborane gas. The superconductivity of the nanostructures is confirmed by magnetization measurements, showing a superconducting critical temperature of 38.7 K.

  16. Magnetism and superconductivity observed to exist in harmony

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and helium. "It's really a question of the chicken and the egg," said coauthor Eric Bauer of Los Alamos. "Does superconductivity need magnetism in this state, or does magnetism...

  17. Superconducting magnetic energy storage for asynchronous electrical systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boenig, H.J.

    1984-05-16

    It is an object of the present invention to provide superconducting magnetic energy storage for a plurality of asynchronous electrical systems. It is a further object of the present invention to provide load leveling and stability improvement in a plurality of independent ac systems using a single superconducting magnetic energy storage coil.

  18. Performance of conduction cooled splittable superconducting magnet package for linear accelerators

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kashikhin, Vladimire S.; Andreev, N.; Cheban, S.; DiMarco, J.; Kimura, N.; Makarov, A.; Orlov, Y.; V. Poloubotko; Tartaglia, M.; Yamamoto, A.

    2016-02-19

    New Linear Superconducting Accelerators need a superconducting magnet package installed inside SCRF Cryomodules to focus and steer electron or proton beams. A superconducting magnet package was designed and built as a collaborative effort of FNAL and KEK. The magnet package includes one quadrupole, and two dipole windings. It has a splittable in the vertical plane configuration, and features for conduction cooling. The magnet was successfully tested at room temperature, in a liquid He bath, and in a conduction cooling experiment. The paper describes the design and test results including: magnet cooling, training, and magnetic measurements by rotational coils. Furthermore, themore » effects of superconductor and iron yoke magnetization, hysteresis, and fringe fields are discussed.« less

  19. Superconducting magnet performance for 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source developed at the Korea Basic Science Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Jin Yong; Pusan National University, Busan ; Choi, Seyong; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Ok, Jung-Woo; Shin, Chang Seouk; Won, Mi-Sook; Kim, Byoung Chul; Ahn, Jung Keun

    2014-02-15

    A superconducting magnet for use in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source was developed at the Korea Basic Science Institute. The superconducting magnet is comprised of three solenoids and a hexapole magnet. According to the design value, the solenoid magnets can generate a mirror field, resulting in axial magnetic fields of 3.6 T at the injection area and 2.2 T at the extraction region. A radial field strength of 2.1 T can also be achieved by hexapole magnet on the plasma chamber wall. NbTi superconducting wire was used in the winding process following appropriate techniques for magnet structure. The final assembly of the each magnet involved it being vertically inserted into the cryostat to cool down the temperature using liquid helium. The performance of each solenoid and hexapole magnet was separately verified experimentally. The construction of the superconducting coil, the entire magnet assembly for performance testing and experimental results are reported herein.

  20. Toroidal constant-tension superconducting magnetic energy storage units

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Herring, J.S.

    1992-11-03

    A superconducting magnetic energy storage unit is provided in which the magnet is wound in a toroidal fashion such that the magnetic field produced is contained only within the bore of the magnet, and thus producing a very low external field. The superconducting magnet includes a coolant channel disposed through the wire. The bore of the magnet comprises a storage volume in which cryogenic coolant is stored, and this volume supplies the coolant to be delivered to the coolant channel in the magnet. 6 figs.

  1. COLLOQUIUM: Large Scale Superconducting Magnets for Variety of Applications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab October 15, 2014, 4:00pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: Large Scale Superconducting Magnets for Variety of Applications Professor Joseph Minervini Massachusetts Institute of Technology Presentation: PDF icon Superconducting_Magnet_Technology_for_Fusion_and_Large_Scale_Applications.pdf Over the past several decades the U. S. magnetic confinement fusion program, working in collaboration with international partners, has developed superconductor and

  2. Purple Path toward High Temperature Superconductivity? | The Ames

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory Purple Path toward High Temperature Superconductivity? Discovery of an unconventional charge density wave (CDW) in purple bronze, a molybdenum oxide, points to a possible new pathway to high temperature superconductivity. A CDW is a state of matter where electrons bunch together periodically, like a standing wave of light or water. CDWs and superconductivity are frenemies, since they share a common origin and often coexist, yet compete for dominance. Conventional CDWs and

  3. Temperature Mapping of Nitrogen-doped Niobium Superconducting Radiofrequency Cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makita, Junki; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Dhakal, Pashupati

    2015-09-01

    It was recently shown that diffusing nitrogen on the inner surface of superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavities at high temperature can improve the quality factor of the niobium cavity. However, a reduction of the quench field is also typically found. To better understand the location of rf losses and quench, we used a thermometry system to map the temperature of the outer surface of ingot Nb cavities after nitrogen doping and electropolishing. Surface temperature of the cavities was recorded while increasing the rf power and also during the quenching. The results of thermal mapping showed no precursor heating on the cavities and quenching to be ignited near the equator where the surface magnetic field is maximum. Hot-spots at the equator area during multipacting were also detected by thermal mapping.

  4. Superconducting magnetic energy storage for asynchronous electrical systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boenig, Heinrich J.

    1986-01-01

    A superconducting magnetic energy storage coil connected in parallel between converters of two or more ac power systems provides load leveling and stability improvement to any or all of the ac systems. Control is provided to direct the charging and independently the discharging of the superconducting coil to at least a selected one of the ac power systems.

  5. Method of constructing a superconducting magnet

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Satti, John A. (Naperville, IL)

    1981-01-01

    A superconducting magnet designed to produce magnetic flux densities of the order of 4 to 5 Webers per square meter is constructed by first forming a cable of a plurality of matrixed superconductor wires with each wire of the plurality insulated from each other one. The cable is shaped into a rectangular cross-section and is wound with tape in an open spiral to create cooling channels. Coils are wound in a calculated pattern in saddle shapes to produce desired fields, such as dipoles, quadrupoles, and the like. Wedges are inserted between adjacent cables as needed to maintain substantially radial placement of the long dimensions of cross sections of the cables. After winding, individual strands in each of the cables are brought out to terminals and are interconnected to place all of the strands in series and to maximize the propagation of a quench by alternating conduction from an inner layer to an outer layer and from top half to bottom half as often as possible. Individual layers are separated from others by spiraled aluminum spacers to facilitate cooling. The wound coil is wrapped with an epoxy tape that is cured by heat and then machined to an interference fit with an outer aluminum pipe which is then affixed securely to the assembled coil by heating it to make a shrink fit. In an alternate embodiment, one wire of the cable is made of copper or the like to be heated externally to propagate a quench.

  6. Magnetic excitations in Kondo liquid: superconductivity and hidden...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Magnetic ... We report Knight shift experiments on the superconducting ... Report Number(s): LA-UR-09-05977; LA-UR-09-5977 Journal ID: ...

  7. Enhanced Superconducting Gaps in Trilayer High-Temperature Bi...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ...-Temperature Bi (2) Sr (2) Ca (2) Cu (3) O (10+delta) Cuprate Superconductor Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Enhanced Superconducting Gaps in Trilayer High-Temperature ...

  8. Cryogenic deformation of high temperature superconductive composite structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roberts, Peter R.; Michels, William; Bingert, John F.

    2001-01-01

    An improvement in a process of preparing a composite high temperature oxide superconductive wire is provided and involves conducting at least one cross-sectional reduction step in the processing preparation of the wire at sub-ambient temperatures.

  9. Cryogenic expansion joint for large superconducting magnet structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Robert L.

    1978-01-01

    An expansion joint is provided that accommodates dimensional changes occurring during the cooldown and warm-up of large cryogenic devices such as superconducting magnet coils. Flattened tubes containing a refrigerant such as gaseous nitrogen (N.sub.2) are inserted into expansion spaces in the structure. The gaseous N.sub.2 is circulated under pressure and aids in the cooldown process while providing its primary function of accommodating differential thermal contraction and expansion in the structure. After lower temperatures are reached and the greater part of the contraction has occured, the N.sub.2 liquefies then solidifies to provide a completely rigid structure at the cryogenic operating temperatures of the device.

  10. Magnetic nanoparticle temperature estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weaver, John B.; Rauwerdink, Adam M.; Hansen, Eric W.

    2009-05-15

    The authors present a method of measuring the temperature of magnetic nanoparticles that can be adapted to provide in vivo temperature maps. Many of the minimally invasive therapies that promise to reduce health care costs and improve patient outcomes heat tissue to very specific temperatures to be effective. Measurements are required because physiological cooling, primarily blood flow, makes the temperature difficult to predict a priori. The ratio of the fifth and third harmonics of the magnetization generated by magnetic nanoparticles in a sinusoidal field is used to generate a calibration curve and to subsequently estimate the temperature. The calibration curve is obtained by varying the amplitude of the sinusoidal field. The temperature can then be estimated from any subsequent measurement of the ratio. The accuracy was 0.3 deg. K between 20 and 50 deg. C using the current apparatus and half-second measurements. The method is independent of nanoparticle concentration and nanoparticle size distribution.

  11. Cold test facility for 1.8 m superconducting model magnets at the SSCL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaBarge, A.; Althaus, R.; Bird, R.; Baron, J.; Chagnon, J.; Deak, M.; Scott, M.; Vasilyev, V.; Williamson, G.

    1993-05-01

    A new facility has been constructed to measure the characteristic features of superconducting model magnets and cable at cryogenic temperatures--a function which supports the design and development process for building full-scale accelerator magnets. There are multiple systems operating in concert to test the model magnets, namely, cryogenic, magnet power, data acquisition and system control. A typical model magnet test includes the following items: warm measurements of magnet coils, strain gauges and voltage taps; hipot testing of insulation integrity; cooling with liquid nitrogen and then liquid helium; measuring quench current and magnetic field; (5) magnet warm-up. While the magnet is being cooled to 4.22 K, the mechanical stress is monitored through strain gauges. Current is then ramped into the magnet until it reaches some maximum value and the magnet transitions from the superconducting state to the normal state. Normal-zone propagation is monitored using voltage taps on the magnet coils during this process, thus indicating where the transition began. The current ramp is usually repeated until a plateau current is reached, where the magnet has mechanically settled. Many variations on the current ramping sequence are used to study different phenomena associated with magnet performance, e.g. magnetization hysteresis, eddy current losses, cryogenic stability, etc. A warm bore cryostat with a rotating coil is inserted in the magnet to measure field strength and homogeneity. These types of measurements yield multipole and current versus field data.

  12. High temperature interfacial superconductivity (Patent) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Patent: High temperature interfacial superconductivity Citation Details In-Document Search ... OSTI Identifier: 1055453 Report Number(s): 8,204,564 US patent applicaiton 12264,742 DOE ...

  13. Silver-bearing, high-temperature, superconducting (HTS) paint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrando, W.A.

    1990-02-15

    A substantial set of device applications awaits development of a workable, durable, high-temperature superconducting (HTS) paint. Such a paint should be truly superconducting with its critical temperature T sub c>77K. For most of these applications, a high critical current (J sub c) is not required, although probably desirable. A process is described which can be used to produce silver-bearing HTS paint coatings on many engineering materials. Preliminary tests have shown good adherence to several ceramics and the ability to meet the superconducting criteria. Moreover, the coatings withstand multiple thermal cycling and stability under laboratory ambient storage conditions for periods of at least several months.

  14. Operational experience with superconducting synchrotron magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, P.S.

    1987-03-01

    The operational experience with the Fermilab Tevatron is presented, with emphasis on reliability and failure modes. Comprisons are made between the operating efficiencies for the superconducting machine and for he conventional Main Ring.

  15. Interplay between superconductivity and magnetism in iron-based superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chubukov, Andrey V

    2015-06-10

    This proposal is for theoretical work on strongly correlated electron systems, which are at the center of experimental and theoretical activities in condensed-matter physics. The interest to this field is driven fascinating variety of observed effects, universality of underlying theoretical ideas, and practical applications. I propose to do research on Iron-based superconductors (FeSCs), which currently attract high attention in the physics community. My goal is to understand superconductivity and magnetism in these materials at various dopings, the interplay between the two, and the physics in the phase in which magnetism and superconductivity co-exist. A related goal is to understand the origin of the observed pseudogap-like behavior in the normal state. My research explores the idea that superconductivity is of electronic origin and is caused by the exchange of spin-fluctuations, enhanced due to close proximity to antiferromagnetism. The multi-orbital/multi-band nature of FeSCs opens routes for qualitatively new superconducting states, particularly the ones which break time-reversal symmetry. By all accounts, the coupling in pnictdes is below the threshold for Mott physics and I intend to analyze these systems within the itinerant approach. My plan is to do research in two stages. I first plan to address several problems within weak-coupling approach. Among them: (i) what sets stripe magnetic order at small doping, (ii) is there a preemptive instability into a spin-nematic state, and how stripe order affects fermions; (iii) is there a co-existence between magnetism and superconductivity and what are the system properties in the co-existence state; (iv) how superconductivity emerges despite strong Coulomb repulsion and can the gap be s-wave but with nodes along electron FSs, (v) are there complex superconducting states, like s+id, which break time reversal symmetry. My second goal is to go beyond weak coupling and derive spin-mediated, dynamic interaction between

  16. High performance magnetic bearing systems using high temperature superconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abboud, R.G.

    1998-05-05

    Disclosed are a magnetic bearing apparatus and a method for providing at least one stabilizing force in a magnetic bearing structure with a superconducting magnetic assembly and a magnetic assembly, by providing a superconducting magnetic member in the superconducting magnetic assembly with a plurality of domains and arranging said superconducting magnetic member such that at least one domain has a domain C-axis vector alignment angularly disposed relative to a reference axis of the magnetic member in the magnetic assembly. 7 figs.

  17. High performance magnetic bearing systems using high temperature superconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abboud, Robert G.

    1998-01-01

    A magnetic bearing apparatus and a method for providing at least one stabilizing force in a magnetic bearing structure with a superconducting magnetic assembly and a magnetic assembly, by providing a superconducting magnetic member in the superconducting magnetic assembly with a plurality of domains and arranging said superconducting magnetic member such that at least one domain has a domain C-axis vector alignment angularly disposed relative to a reference axis of the magnetic member in the magnetic assembly.

  18. Superconducting magnetic Wollaston prism for neutron spin encoding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, F., E-mail: fankli@indiana.edu; Parnell, S. R.; Wang, T.; Baxter, D. V. [Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47408 (United States)] [Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47408 (United States); Hamilton, W. A. [Neutron Sciences Directorate, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States)] [Neutron Sciences Directorate, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States); Maranville, B. B. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States)] [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Semerad, R. [Ceraco Ceramic Coating GmbH, Ismaning 85737 (Germany)] [Ceraco Ceramic Coating GmbH, Ismaning 85737 (Germany); Cremer, J. T. [Adelphi Technology Inc., Redwood City, California 94063 (United States)] [Adelphi Technology Inc., Redwood City, California 94063 (United States); Pynn, R. [Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47408 (United States) [Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47408 (United States); Neutron Sciences Directorate, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    A magnetic Wollaston prism can spatially split a polarized neutron beam into two beams with different neutron spin states, in a manner analogous to an optical Wollaston prism. Such a Wollaston prism can be used to encode the trajectory of neutrons into the Larmor phase associated with their spin degree of freedom. This encoding can be used for neutron phase-contrast radiography and in spin echo scattering angle measurement (SESAME). In this paper, we show that magnetic Wollaston prisms with highly uniform magnetic fields and low Larmor phase aberration can be constructed to preserve neutron polarization using high temperature superconducting (HTS) materials. The Meissner effect of HTS films is used to confine magnetic fields produced electromagnetically by current-carrying HTS tape wound on suitably shaped soft iron pole pieces. The device is cooled to ?30 K by a closed cycle refrigerator, eliminating the need to replenish liquid cryogens and greatly simplifying operation and maintenance. A HTS film ensures that the magnetic field transition within the prism is sharp, well-defined, and planar due to the Meissner effect. The spin transport efficiency across the device was measured to be ?98.5% independent of neutron wavelength and energizing current. The position-dependent Larmor phase of neutron spins was measured at the NIST Center for Neutron Research facility and found to agree well with detailed simulations. The phase varies linearly with horizontal position, as required, and the neutron beam shows little depolarization. Consequently, the device has advantages over existing devices with similar functionality and provides the capability for a large neutron beam (20 mm 30 mm) and an increase in length scales accessible to SESAME to beyond 10 ?m. With further improvements of the external coupling guide field in the prototype device, a larger neutron beam could be employed.

  19. New Superconducting Magnet Will Lead to Next Generation of Wind Turbine

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Generators | Department of Energy Superconducting Magnet Will Lead to Next Generation of Wind Turbine Generators New Superconducting Magnet Will Lead to Next Generation of Wind Turbine Generators September 12, 2014 - 11:08am Addthis AML Superconductivity and Magnetics, in conjunction with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Argonne National Laboratory, recently announced that their superconducting magnet system passed a landmark reliability test, demonstrating its potential suitability

  20. Dynamic high pressure process for fabricating superconducting and permanent magnetic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nellis, William J.; Geballe, Theodore H.; Maple, M. Brian

    1988-01-01

    Shock wave formation of thin layers of materials with improved superconducting and permanent magnetic properties and improved microstructures.

  1. Dynamic high pressure process for fabricating superconducting and permanent magnetic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nellis, William J.; Maple, M. Brian; Geballe, Theodore H.

    1988-01-01

    Shock wave formation of superconductive ceramic oxide electric and magnetic circuit elements with improved microstructures and mechanical properties.

  2. Dynamic high pressure process for fabricating superconducting and permanent magnetic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nellis, W.J.; Maple, M.B.; Geballe, T.H.

    1987-10-23

    Shock wave formation of superconductive ceramic oxide electric and magnetic circuit elements with improved microstructures and mechanical properties. 10 figs.

  3. Superconducting sector magnet for the deuteron cyclotron DC-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alenitskij, Y.G.; Vasilenko, A.T.; Zaplatin, N.L.; Mironov, S.V.; Morozov, N.A.; Pryanichnikov, V.I.; Samsonov, E.V.; Sukhanov, V.I.; Chesnov, A.F.; Chesnova, S.I. )

    1992-01-01

    In this paper the results of calculations of a superconducting magnet with a cold pole for a cyclotron to deuteron energy 100 MeV are presented. The maximum induction in the magnet is 4.5 T, stored energy 5 MJ, mean current density in coil 9 {center dot} 10{sup 7} A/m{sup 2}. The scheme and main parameters of the magnet protection system and cryogenic provision system are described. The results of calculation of magnetic and thermal forces acting on the coil and its case are presented. The status of the manufacture of the magnetic system elements is considered.

  4. Core/coil assembly for use in superconducting magnets and method for assembling the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kassner, David A.

    1979-01-01

    A core/coil assembly for use in a superconducting magnet of the focusing or bending type used in syncronous particle accelerators comprising a coil assembly contained within an axial bore of the stacked, washer type, carbon steel laminations which comprise the magnet core assembly, and forming an interference fit with said laminations at the operating temperature of said magnet. Also a method for making such core/coil assemblies comprising the steps of cooling the coil assembly to cryogenic temperatures and drawing it rapidly upwards into the bore of said stacked laminations.

  5. Structural performance of the first SSC (Superconducting Super Collider) Design B dipole magnet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicol, T.H.

    1989-09-01

    The first Design B Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) dipole magnet has been successfully tested. This magnet was heavily instrumented with temperature and strain gage sensors in order to evaluate its adherence to design constraints and design calculations. The instrumentation and associated data acquisition system allowed monitoring of the magnet during cooldown, warmup, and quench testing. This paper will focus on the results obtained from structural measurements on the suspension system during normal and rapid cooldowns and during quench studies at full magnet current. 4 refs., 9 figs.

  6. Cryogen free superconducting splittable quadrupole magnet for linear accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kashikhin, V.S.; Andreev, N.; Kerby, J.; Orlov, Y.; Solyak, N.; Tartaglia, M.; Velev, G.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    A new superconducting quadrupole magnet for linear accelerators was fabricated at Fermilab. The magnet is designed to work inside a cryomodule in the space between SCRF cavities. SCRF cavities must be installed inside a very clean room adding issues to the magnet design, and fabrication. The designed magnet has a splittable along the vertical plane configuration and could be installed outside of the clean room around the beam pipe previously connected to neighboring cavities. For more convenient assembly and replacement a 'superferric' magnet configuration with four racetrack type coils was chosen. The magnet does not have a helium vessel and is conductively cooled from the cryomodule LHe supply pipe and a helium gas return pipe. The quadrupole generates 36 T integrated magnetic field gradient, has 600 mm effective length, and the peak gradient is 54 T/m. In this paper the quadrupole magnetic, mechanical, and thermal designs are presented, along with the magnet fabrication overview and first test results.

  7. Advances on MHD superconducting magnets design and construction in Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Negrini, F.; Blasio, P.; Martinelli, G.; Molfino, P.

    1993-12-31

    The paper illustrates the activities developed in the frame of the Progetto Finalizzato {open_quotes}Superconducting and Cryogenic Technologies: superconducting magnets for MHD{close_quotes}. This five years Italian national program on MHD superconducting magnets is near the completions. Many important targets have been obtained in very good agreement with the initial hypotheses. The MHD s.c. prototype is now under fabrication at the Ansaldo workshop in Genova. One of the main effort of the project is the development and production of the 8800 metres of NbTi copper stabilised cable in conduit ({open_quotes}rope in a pipe{close_quotes} type) in single lengths of 300 m average. This cable is now under production at Europa Metalli (Fornaci di Barga, Italy). In the present contribution the main problems that had to be solved after and during the production by the designer and the manufacturer, are described.

  8. Superconducting Super Collider Magnet System requirements. Revision A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1986-10-23

    This report discusses the Superconducting Super Collider magnet system requirements when the following categories: Functions; operational performance requirements; system configuration and essential features; structural requirements; availability/reliability; instrumentation and control requirements; design life; environment; maintenance requirements; interface systems; quality assurance; safety; and applicable codes and standards.

  9. Rotor assembly including superconducting magnetic coil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Snitchler, Gregory L.; Gamble, Bruce B.; Voccio, John P.

    2003-01-01

    Superconducting coils and methods of manufacture include a superconductor tape wound concentrically about and disposed along an axis of the coil to define an opening having a dimension which gradually decreases, in the direction along the axis, from a first end to a second end of the coil. Each turn of the superconductor tape has a broad surface maintained substantially parallel to the axis of the coil.

  10. Superconducting and magnetic properties of Sr3Ir4Sn13

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Biswas, P. K.; Amato, A.; Khasanov, R.; Luetkens, H.; Wang, Kefeng; Petrovic, C.; Cook, R. M.; Lees, M. R.; Morenzoni, E.

    2014-10-10

    In this research, magnetization and muon spin relaxation or rotation (µSR) measurements have been performed to study the superconducting and magnetic properties of Sr₃Ir₄Sn₁₃. From magnetization measurements the lower and upper critical fields of Sr₃Ir₄Sn₁₃ are found to be 81(1) Oe and 14.4(2) kOe, respectively. Zero-field µSR data show no sign of any magnetic ordering or weak magnetism in Sr₃Ir₄Sn₁₃. Transverse-field µSR measurements in the vortex state provided the temperature dependence of the magnetic penetration depth λ. The dependence of λ⁻² with temperature is consistent with the existence of single s-wave energy gap in the superconducting state of Sr₃Ir₄Sn₁₃ withmore » a gap value of 0.82(2) meV at absolute zero temperature. The magnetic penetration depth at zero temperature λ(0) is 291(3) nm. The ratio Δ(0)/kBTc = 2.1(1) indicates that Sr₃Ir₄Sn₁₃ should be considered as a strong-coupling superconductor.« less

  11. Optimization of superconducting tiling pattern for superconducting bearings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL)

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus and method for reducing magnetic field inhomogeneities which produce rotational loss mechanisms in high temperature superconducting magnetic bearings. Magnetic field inhomogeneities are reduced by dividing high temperature superconducting structures into smaller structures, and arranging the smaller structures into tiers which stagger the magnetic field maximum locations of the smaller structures.

  12. Optimization of superconducting tiling pattern for superconducting bearings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, J.R.

    1996-09-17

    An apparatus and method for reducing magnetic field inhomogeneities which produce rotational loss mechanisms in high temperature superconducting magnetic bearings are disclosed. Magnetic field inhomogeneities are reduced by dividing high temperature superconducting structures into smaller structures, and arranging the smaller structures into tiers which stagger the magnetic field maximum locations of the smaller structures. 20 figs.

  13. Progress on Superconducting Magnets for the MICE Cooling Channel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, Michael A; Virostek, Steve P.; Li, Derun; Zisman, Michael S.; Wang, Li; Pan, Heng; Wu, Hong; Guo, XingLong; Xu, FengYu; Liu, X. K.; Zheng, S. X.; Bradshaw, Thomas; Baynham, Elwyn; Cobb, John; Lau, Wing; Lau, Peter; Yang, Stephanie Q.

    2009-09-09

    The muon ionization cooling experiment (MICE) consists of a target, a beam line, a pion decay channel, the MICE cooling channel. Superconducting magnets are used in the pion decay channel and the MICE cooling channel. This report describes the MICE cooling channel magnets and the progress in the design and fabrication of these magnets. The MICE cooling channel consists of three types of superconducting solenoids; the spectrometer solenoids, the coupling solenoids and the focusing solenoids. The three types of magnets are being fabricated in he United States, China, and the United Kingdom respectively. The spectrometer magnets are used to analyze the muon beam before and after muon cooling. The coupling magnets couple the focusing sections and keep the muon beam contained within the iris of the RF cavities that re used to recover the muon momentum lost during ionization cooling. The focusing magnets focus the muon beam in the center of a liquid hydrogen absorber. The first of the cooling channel magnets will be operational in MICE in the spring of 2010.

  14. Design Considerations of Fast-cycling Synchrotrons Based on Superconducting Transmission Line Magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piekarz, H.; Hays, S.; Huang, Y.; Shiltsev, V.; /Fermilab

    2008-06-01

    Fast-cycling synchrotrons are key instruments for accelerator based nuclear and high-energy physics programs. We explore a possibility to construct fast-cycling synchrotrons by using super-ferric, {approx}2 Tesla B-field dipole magnets powered with a superconducting transmission line. We outline both the low temperature (LTS) and the high temperature (HTS) superconductor design options and consider dynamic power losses for an accelerator with operation cycle of 0.5 Hz. We also briefly outline possible power supply system for such accelerator, and discuss the quench protection system for the magnet string powered by a transmission line conductor.

  15. Magnetism and superconductivity in U?PtxRh(1x)C?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wakeham, N.; Ni, Ni; Bauer, E. D.; Thompson, J. D.; Tegtmeier, E.; Ronning, F.

    2015-01-01

    We report the phase diagram of the doping series U?PtxRh(1x)C?, studied through measurements of resistivity, specific heat, and magnetic susceptibility. The Nel temperature of U?Rh?C? of ~ 22 K is suppressed with increasing Pt content, reaching zero temperature close to x = 0.7, where we observed signatures of increased quantum fluctuations. In addition, evidence is presented that the antiferromagnetic state undergoes a spin-reorientation transition upon application of an applied magnetic field. This transition shows non-monotonic behavior as a function of x, peaking at around x = 0.3. Superconductivity is observed for x ? 0.9, with Tc increasing with increasing x.moreThe reduction in Tc and increase in residual resistivity with decreasing Pt content is inconsistent with the extension of the Abrikosov-Gor'kov theory to unconventional superconductivity.less

  16. Magnetism and superconductivity in U2PtxRh1?xC2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wakeham, N.; Ni, Ni; Bauer, E. D.; Thompson, J. D.; Tegtmeier, E.; Ronning, F.

    2015-01-09

    We report the phase diagram of the doping series U?PtxRh(1x)C?, studied through measurements of resistivity, specific heat, and magnetic susceptibility. The Nel temperature of U?Rh?C? of ~ 22 K is suppressed with increasing Pt content, reaching zero temperature close to x = 0.7, where we observed signatures of increased quantum fluctuations. Additionally, evidence is presented that the antiferromagnetic state undergoes a spin-reorientation transition upon application of an applied magnetic field. This transition shows non-monotonic behavior as a function of x, peaking at around x = 0.3. Superconductivity is observed for x ? 0.9, with Tc increasing with increasing x. Themorereduction in Tc and increase in residual resistivity with decreasing Pt content is inconsistent with the extension of the Abrikosov-Gor'kov theory to unconventional superconductivity.less

  17. Magnetism and superconductivity in U2PtxRh1-xC2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wakeham, N.; Ni, Ni; Bauer, E. D.; Thompson, J. D.; Tegtmeier, E.; Ronning, F.

    2015-01-09

    We report the phase diagram of the doping series U₂PtxRh(1–x)C₂, studied through measurements of resistivity, specific heat, and magnetic susceptibility. The Néel temperature of U₂Rh₂C₂ of ~ 22 K is suppressed with increasing Pt content, reaching zero temperature close to x = 0.7, where we observed signatures of increased quantum fluctuations. Additionally, evidence is presented that the antiferromagnetic state undergoes a spin-reorientation transition upon application of an applied magnetic field. This transition shows non-monotonic behavior as a function of x, peaking at around x = 0.3. Superconductivity is observed for x ≥ 0.9, with Tc increasing with increasing x. Themore » reduction in Tc and increase in residual resistivity with decreasing Pt content is inconsistent with the extension of the Abrikosov-Gor'kov theory to unconventional superconductivity.« less

  18. Magnetic preferential orientation of metal oxide superconducting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Capone, D.W.; Dunlap, B.D.; Veal, B.W.

    1990-07-17

    A superconductor comprised of a polycrystalline metal oxide such as YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub 7[minus]X] (where 0 < X < 0.5) exhibits superconducting properties and is capable of conducting very large current densities. By aligning the two-dimensional Cu-O layers which carry the current in the superconducting state in the a- and b-directions, i.e., within the basal plane, a high degree of crystalline axes alignment is provided between adjacent grains permitting the conduction of high current densities. The highly anisotropic diamagnetic susceptibility of the polycrystalline metal oxide material permits the use of an applied magnetic field to orient the individual crystals when in the superconducting state to substantially increase current transport between adjacent grains. In another embodiment, the anisotropic paramagnetic susceptibility of rare-earth ions substituted into the oxide material is made use of as an applied magnetic field orients the particles in a preferential direction. This latter operation can be performed with the material in the normal (non-superconducting) state. 4 figs.

  19. Magnetic preferential orientation of metal oxide superconducting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Capone, Donald W.; Dunlap, Bobby D.; Veal, Boyd W.

    1990-01-01

    A superconductor comprised of a polycrystalline metal oxide such as YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.7-X (where 0superconducting properties and is capable of conducting very large current densities. By aligning the two-dimensional Cu-O layers which carry the current in the superconducting state in the a- and b-directions, i.e., within the basal plane, a high degree of crystalline axes alignment is provided between adjacent grains permitting the conduction of high current densities. The highly anisotropic diamagnetic susceptibility of the polycrystalline metal oxide material permits the use of an applied magnetic field to orient the individual crystals when in the superconducting state to substantially increase current transport between adjacent grains. In another embodiment, the anisotropic paramagnetic susceptibility of rare-earth ions substituted into the oxide material is made use of as an applied magnetic field orients the particles in a preferential direction. This latter operation can be performed with the material in the normal (non-superconducting) state.

  20. Dynamic high pressure process for fabricating superconducting and permanent magnetic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nellis, William J.; Geballe, Theodore H.; Maple, M. Brian

    1990-01-01

    Shock wave formation of thin layers of materials with improved superconducting and permanent magnetic properties and improved microstructures. The material fabrication system includes a sandwiched structure including a powder material placed between two solid members to enable explosive shock consolidation. The two solid members are precooled to about 80.degree.-100.degree. K. to reduce the residual temperatures attained as a result of the shock wave treatment, and thereby increase the quench rate of the consolidated powder.

  1. Dynamic high pressure process for fabricating superconducting and permanent magnetic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nellis, W.J.; Geballe, T.H.; Maple, M.B.

    1990-03-13

    Shock wave formation of thin layers of materials with improved superconducting and permanent magnetic properties and improved microstructures is disclosed. The material fabrication system includes a sandwiched structure including a powder material placed between two solid members to enable explosive shock consolidation. The two solid members are precooled to about 80--100 K to reduce the residual temperatures attained as a result of the shock wave treatment, and thereby increase the quench rate of the consolidated powder. 9 figs.

  2. Irreversible magnetization switching at the onset of superconductivity in a superconductor ferromagnet hybrid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curran, P. J.; Bending, S. J.; Kim, J.; Satchell, N.; Witt, J. D. S.; Burnell, G.; Flokstra, M. G.; Lee, S. L.; Cooper, J. F. K.; Kinane, C. J.; Langridge, S.; Isidori, A.; Eschrig, M.; Pugach, N.

    2015-12-28

    We demonstrate that the magnetic state of a superconducting spin valve, that is normally controlled with an external magnetic field, can also be manipulated by varying the temperature which increases the functionality and flexibility of such structures as switching elements. In this case, switching is driven by changes in the magnetostatic energy due to spontaneous Meissner screening currents forming in the superconductor below the critical temperature. Our scanning Hall probe measurements also reveal vortex-mediated pinning of the ferromagnetic domain structure due to the pinning of quantized stray fields in the adjacent superconductor. The ability to use temperature as well as magnetic field to control the local magnetisation structure raises the prospect of potential applications in magnetic memory devices.

  3. Superconducting magnetic energy storage apparatus structural support system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Withers, Gregory J.; Meier, Stephen W.; Walter, Robert J.; Child, Michael D.; DeGraaf, Douglas W.

    1992-01-01

    A superconducting magnetic energy storage apparatus comprising a cylindrical superconducting coil; a cylindrical coil containment vessel enclosing the coil and adapted to hold a liquid, such as liquefied helium; and a cylindrical vacuum vessel enclosing the coil containment vessel and located in a restraining structure having inner and outer circumferential walls and a floor; the apparatus being provided with horizontal compression members between (1) the coil and the coil containment vessel and (2) between the coil containment vessel and the vacuum vessel, compression bearing members between the vacuum vessel and the restraining structure inner and outer walls, vertical support members (1) between the coil bottom and the coil containment vessel bottom and (2) between the coil containment vessel bottom and the vacuum vessel bottom, and external supports between the vacuum vessel bottom and the restraining structure floor, whereby the loads developed by thermal and magnetic energy changes in the apparatus can be accommodated and the structural integrity of the apparatus be maintained.

  4. Method and apparatus for measuring gravitational acceleration utilizing a high temperature superconducting bearing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R.

    2000-01-01

    Gravitational acceleration is measured in all spatial dimensions with improved sensitivity by utilizing a high temperature superconducting (HTS) gravimeter. The HTS gravimeter is comprised of a permanent magnet suspended in a spaced relationship from a high temperature superconductor, and a cantilever having a mass at its free end is connected to the permanent magnet at its fixed end. The permanent magnet and superconductor combine to form a bearing platform with extremely low frictional losses, and the rotational displacement of the mass is measured to determine gravitational acceleration. Employing a high temperature superconductor component has the significant advantage of having an operating temperature at or below 77K, whereby cooling may be accomplished with liquid nitrogen.

  5. High temperature superconducting composite conductor and method for manufacturing the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holesinger, Terry G.; Bingert, John F.

    2002-01-01

    A high temperature superconducting composite conductor is provided including a high temperature superconducting material surrounded by a noble metal layer, the high temperature superconducting composite conductor characterized as having a fill factor of greater than about 40. Additionally, the conductor can be further characterized as containing multiple cores of high temperature superconducting material surrounded by a noble metal layer, said multiple cores characterized as having substantially uniform geometry in the cross-sectional dimensions. Processes of forming such a high temperature superconducting composite conductor are also provided.

  6. Transformer current sensor for superconducting magnetic coils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shen, S.S.; Wilson, C.T.

    1985-04-16

    The present invention is a current transformer for operating currents larger than 2kA (two kiloamps) that is capable of detecting a millivolt level resistive voltage in the presence of a large inductive voltage. Specifically, the present invention includes substantially cylindrical primary turns arranged to carry a primary current and substantially cylindrical secondary turns arranged coaxially with and only partially within the primary turns, the secondary turns including an active winding and a dummy winding, the active and dummy windings being coaxial, longitudinally separated and arranged to mutually cancel voltages excited by commonly experienced magnetic fields, the active winding but not the dummy winding being arranged within the primary turns.

  7. Low-temperature magnetic refrigerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barclay, J.A.

    1983-05-26

    The invention relates to magnetic refrigeration and more particularly to low temperature refrigeration between about 4 and about 20 K, with an apparatus and method utilizing a belt of magnetic material passed in and out of a magnetic field with heat exchangers within and outside the field operably disposed to accomplish refrigeration.

  8. Low-temperature magnetic refrigerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barclay, John A.

    1985-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to a low temperature 4 to 20 K. refrigeration apparatus and method utilizing a ring of magnetic material moving through a magnetic field. Heat exchange is accomplished in and out of the magnetic field to appropriately utilize the device to execute Carnot and Stirling cycles.

  9. Magnetoelastically coupled structural, magnetic, and superconducting order parameters in BaFe₂(As₁₋xPx)₂

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kuo, H.-H.; Analytis, James G.; Chu, J.-H.; Fernandes, R. M.; Schmalian, J.; Fisher, I. R.

    2012-10-04

    We measure the transport properties of mechanically strained single crystals of BaFe₂(As₁₋xPx)₂ over a wide range of x. The Néel transition is extremely sensitive to stress and this sensitivity increases as optimal doping is approached (doping with the highest superconducting Tc), even though the magnetic transition itself is strongly suppressed. Furthermore, we observe significant changes in the superconducting transition temperature with applied strain, which mirror changes in the composition x. These experiments are a direct illustration of the intimate coupling between different degrees of freedom in iron-based superconductors, revealing the importance of magnetoelastic coupling to the magnetic and superconducting transitionmore » temperatures.« less

  10. Superconducting magnets in high-radiation environment at supercolliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mokhov, N.V.; Chichili, D.R.; Gourlay, S.A.; Van Sciver, S.; Zeller, A.

    2006-07-01

    The principal challenges arising from beam-induced energy deposition in superconducting (SC) magnets at high-energy high-luminosity hadron and lepton colliders are described. Radiation constraints are analyzed that include quench stability, dynamic heat loads on the cryogenic system, radiation damage limiting the component lifetime, and residual dose rates related to hands-on maintenance. These issues are especially challenging for the interaction regions (IR), particularly for the considered upgrade layouts of the Large Hadron Collider. Up to a few kW of beam power can dissipate in a single SC magnet, and a local peak power density can substantially exceed the quench levels. Just formally, the magnet lifetime is limited to a few months under these conditions. Possible solutions and the ways to mitigate these problems are described in this paper along with R&D needed.

  11. Power applications of high-temperature superconductivity: Variable speed motors, current switches, and energy storage for end use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawsey, R.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Banerjee, B.B.; Grant, P.M. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    The objective of this project is to conduct joint research and development activities related to certain electric power applications of high-temperature superconductivity (HTS). The new superconductors may allow development of an energy-efficient switch to control current to variable speed motors, superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) systems, and other power conversion equipment. Motor types that were considered include induction, permanent magnet, and superconducting ac motors. Because it is impractical to experimentally alter certain key design elements in radial-gap motors, experiments were conducted on an axial field superconducting motor prototype using 4 NbTi magnets. Superconducting magnetic energy storage technology with 0.25--5 kWh stored energy was studied as a viable solution to short duration voltage sag problems on the customer side of the electric meter. The technical performance characteristics of the device wee assembled, along with competing technologies such as active power line conditioners with storage, battery-based uninterruptible power supplies, and supercapacitors, and the market potential for SMES was defined. Four reports were prepared summarizing the results of the project.

  12. Influence of fast magnetic pulses on the superconducting magnet test facility TOSKA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biro, O.; Maurer, W.

    1994-09-01

    An overview is given about the influence of fast magnetic field pulses (up to 40 T/s) on components of the TOSKA magnet test facility at KfK, Karlsruhe. Such fast magnetic field changes occur during the operation of poloidal field coils and accidental plasma disruptions in a Tokamak and also during safety discharges of superconducting magnets. Induced eddy currents in surrounding conductive components can cause some detrimental damage. FEM calculations were performed in order to study the influence on critical components of TOSKA and to identify necessary modifications of the facility. The paper presents the results of these calculations.

  13. Experimental determination of electrical characteristics and circuit models of superconducting dipole magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smedley, K.M. . Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering); Shafer, R.E. )

    1994-09-01

    Superconducting magnets are used very extensively in modern science and technology to produce high intensity magnetic fields. In many application, magnets are used in non-dc conditions and are subject to current ramping. The magnets studied in this paper were intended to be used in the Superconducting Supercollider with a ramping rate of 4A/sec and a maximum current of 7000A. Due to the effects of eddy currents and parasitic capacitance, the electrical characteristics of superconducting magnets are not completely inductive; instead, they are frequency dependent functions. This paper develops a method of accurately measuring the ac characteristics and determining the circuit models of superconducting magnets that characterize the eddy currents and the parasitic capacitance. This measurement method can be used to analyze eddy current and the resulting circuit model can be used to study the transmission line effect of long magnet strings.

  14. (Neutron scattering studies of the high-temperature superconducting materials)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mook, H.A. Jr.

    1991-01-04

    The traveler was given beam time at the ILL to continue neutron scattering work on high-temperature superconductivity. The unique facilities at the ILL for both high-energy and low-energy neutron instrumentation made the experiments possible. The measurements consisted of two basic types. The first of these is the study of the nature of spin fluctuations in high-{Tc} materials. This work is fundamental to the mechanism that is responsible for the high-transition temperatures. The second consisted of experiments on the flux lattice in high-temperature superconductors. The flux lattice has interesting physics in its own right and is important in understanding the current-carrying capability of superconductors.

  15. Progress with high-field superconducting magnets for high-energy colliders

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Apollinari, Giorgio; Prestemon, Soren; Zlobin, Alexander V.

    2015-10-01

    One of the possible next steps for high-energy physics research relies on a high-energy hadron or muon collider. The energy of a circular collider is limited by the strength of bending dipoles, and its maximum luminosity is determined by the strength of final focus quadrupoles. For this reason, the high-energy physics and accelerator communities have shown much interest in higher-field and higher-gradient superconducting accelerator magnets. The maximum field of NbTi magnets used in all present high-energy machines, including the LHC, is limited to ~10 T at 1.9 K. Fields above 10 T became possible with the use of Nb$_3$Sn superconductors.more » Nb$_3$Sn accelerator magnets can provide operating fields up to ~15 T and can significantly increase the coil temperature margin. Accelerator magnets with operating fields above 15 T require high-temperature superconductors. Furthermore, this review discusses the status and main results of Nb$_3$Sn accelerator magnet research and development and work toward 20-T magnets.« less

  16. Progress with high-field superconducting magnets for high-energy colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apollinari, Giorgio; Prestemon, Soren; Zlobin, Alexander V.

    2015-10-01

    One of the possible next steps for high-energy physics research relies on a high-energy hadron or muon collider. The energy of a circular collider is limited by the strength of bending dipoles, and its maximum luminosity is determined by the strength of final focus quadrupoles. For this reason, the high-energy physics and accelerator communities have shown much interest in higher-field and higher-gradient superconducting accelerator magnets. The maximum field of NbTi magnets used in all present high-energy machines, including the LHC, is limited to ~10 T at 1.9 K. Fields above 10 T became possible with the use of Nb$_3$Sn superconductors. Nb$_3$Sn accelerator magnets can provide operating fields up to ~15 T and can significantly increase the coil temperature margin. Accelerator magnets with operating fields above 15 T require high-temperature superconductors. Furthermore, this review discusses the status and main results of Nb$_3$Sn accelerator magnet research and development and work toward 20-T magnets.

  17. Subgap biasing of superconducting tunnel junctions without a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Segall, K.; Moyer, J.; Mazo, Juan J.

    2008-08-15

    Superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs) have been successfully used as single-photon detectors but require the use of a magnetic field to operate. A recent paper has proposed the idea to use a circuit of three junctions in place of a single junction in order to achieve the necessary biasing without applying a magnetic field. The nonlinear interaction between the different junctions in the circuit causes the existence of a stable subgap state for one of the junctions, which acts as the detector junction. In this paper, we present the first measurements demonstrating the existence of such a biasing state feasible for STJ detectors. Single junction measurements with an applied magnetic field help determine the functional form of the subgap current versus voltage; then the operating point of a three-junction circuit is measured and fit to theory. The excellent match between theory and experiment demonstrates the existence of the subgap biasing state. The outlook for possible use in detector applications is discussed.

  18. Electromagnetically superconducting phase of QCD vacuum induced by strong magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chernodub, M. N. [CNRS, Laboratoire de Mathematiques et Physique Theorique, Universite Francois-Rabelais Tours, Federation Denis Poisson, Parc de Grandmont, 37200 Tours (France); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Gent, Krijgslaan 281, S9, B-9000 Gent (Belgium)

    2011-05-23

    In this talk we discuss our recent suggestion that the QCD vacuum in a sufficiently strong magnetic field (stronger than 10{sup 16} Tesla) may undergo a spontaneous transition to an electromagnetically superconducting state. The possible superconducting state is anisotropic (the vacuum exhibits superconductivity only along the axis of the uniform magnetic field) and inhomogeneous (in the transverse directions the vacuum structure shares similarity with the Abrikosov lattice of an ordinary type-II superconductor). The electromagnetic superconductivity of the QCD vacuum is suggested to occur due to emergence of specific quark-antiquark condensates which carry quantum numbers of electrically charged rho mesons. A Lorentz-covariant generalization of the London transport equations for the magnetic-field-induced superconductivity is given.

  19. Evolution of superconducting correlations within magnetic-field...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: phonons, thermal conductivity, energy storage (including batteries and capacitors), superconductivity, defects,...

  20. Cryogenic Considerations for Superconducting Magnet Design for the Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duckworth, Robert C; Demko, Dr. Jonathan A; Lumsdaine, Arnold; Caughman, John B; Goulding, Richard Howell; McGinnis, William Dean; Bjorholm, Thomas P; Rapp, Juergen

    2015-01-01

    In order to determine long term performance of plasma facing components such as diverters and first walls for fusion devices, next generation plasma generators are needed. A Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX) has been proposed to address this need through the generation of plasmas in front of the target with electron temperatures of 1-15 eV and electron densities of 1020 to 1021 m-3. Heat fluxes on target diverters could reach 20 MW/m2. In order generate this plasma, a unique radio frequency helicon source and heating of electrons and ions through Electron Bernstein Wave (EBW) and Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) has been proposed. MPEX requires a series of magnets with non-uniform central fields up to 2 T over a 5m length in the heating and transport region and 1 T uniform central field over a 1-m length on a diameter of 1.3 m. Given the field requirements, superconducting magnets are under consideration for MPEX. In order to determine the best construction method for the magnets, the cryogenic refrigeration has been analyzed with respect to cooldown and operational performance criteria for open-cycle and closed-cycle systems, capital and operating costs of these system, and maturity of supporting technology such as cryocoolers. These systems will be compared within the context of commercially available magnet constructions to determine the most economical method for MPEX operation. The current state of the MPEX magnet design including details on possible superconducting magnet configurations will be presented.

  1. Narrowband high temperature superconducting receiver for low frequency radio waves

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reagor, David W.

    2001-01-01

    An underground communicating device has a low-noise SQUID using high temperature superconductor components connected to detect a modulated external magnetic flux for outputting a voltage signal spectrum that is related to the varying magnetic flux. A narrow bandwidth filter may be used to select a portion of the voltage signal spectrum that is relatively free of power line noise to output a relatively low noise output signal when operating in a portion of the electromagnetic spectra where such power line noise exists. A demodulator outputs a communication signal, which may be an FM signal, indicative of a modulation on the modulated external magnetic flux.

  2. Magnetism and superconductivity in U?PtxRh(1x)C?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wakeham, N.; Ni, Ni; Bauer, E. D.; Thompson, J. D.; Tegtmeier, E.; Ronning, F.

    2015-01-01

    We report the phase diagram of the doping series U?PtxRh(1x)C?, studied through measurements of resistivity, specific heat, and magnetic susceptibility. The Nel temperature of U?Rh?C? of ~ 22 K is suppressed with increasing Pt content, reaching zero temperature close to x = 0.7, where we observed signatures of increased quantum fluctuations. In addition, evidence is presented that the antiferromagnetic state undergoes a spin-reorientation transition upon application of an applied magnetic field. This transition shows non-monotonic behavior as a function of x, peaking at around x = 0.3. Superconductivity is observed for x ? 0.9, with Tc increasing with increasing x. The reduction in Tc and increase in residual resistivity with decreasing Pt content is inconsistent with the extension of the Abrikosov-Gor'kov theory to unconventional superconductivity.

  3. Shock-induced synthesis of high temperature superconducting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ginley, D.S.; Graham, R.A.; Morosin, B.; Venturini, E.L.

    1987-06-18

    It has now been determined that the unique features of the high pressure shock method, especially the shock-induced chemical synthesis technique, are fully applicable to high temperature superconducting materials. Extraordinarily high yields are achievable in accordance with this invention, e.g., generally in the range from about 20% to about 99%, often in the range from about 50% to about 90%, lower and higher yields, of course, also being possible. The method of this invention involves the application of a controlled high pressure shock compression pulse which can be produced in any conventional manner, e.g., by detonation of a high explosive material, the impact of a high speed projectile or the effect of intense pulsed radiation sources such as lasers or electron beams. Examples and a discussion are presented.

  4. The DARPA manufacturing initiative in high temperature superconductivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, K.R. )

    1989-01-01

    The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has a very aggressive Technology Base program in high temperature superconductivity. This program is expected to provide the basis for a specialized set of military products - passive microwave and millimeter wave devices - within the next three years. In order to get these high leverage products into military systems, a manufacturing base must be developed for HTSC components. A plan for DARPA in HTSC manufacturing is directly coupled with the ongoing DARPA materials and device oriented R and D program. In essence, this plan recommends a three phased effort: 1. Phase I (two years); Fund companies through R and D contracts for specialized HTSC components; prepare a detailed plan and develop an HTSC consortium. 2. Phase II (six years): Establish an HTSC Sematech initiative for electronic applications, including active devices. 3. Phase III (optional): Continue the HTSC Sematech with emphasis on high power applications.

  5. Cryostat design for the Superconducting Super Collider 50mm aperture dipole magnet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicol, T.H. ); Tsavalas, Y.P. . Medical Systems)

    1990-09-01

    The cryostat of an SSC dipole magnet consists of all magnet components except the cold mass assembly. It serves to support the cold mass accurately and reliably within the vacuum vessel, provide all required cryogenic piping, and to insulate the cold mass from heat radiated and conducted from the environment. It must function reliably during storage, shipping and handling, normal magnet operation, quenches, and seismic excitations and must be manufacturable at low cost. The major components of the cryostat are the vacuum vessel, thermal shields, multilayer insulation (MLI) system, cryogenic piping, interconnections, and suspension system. The overall design of a cryostat for superconducting accelerator magnets requires consideration of fluid flow, proper selection of materials for their thermal and structural performance at both ambient and operating temperature, and knowledge of the environment to which the magnets will be subjected over the course their 25 year expected life. This paper describes the design of the current SSC collider dipole magnet cryostat and includes discussions on the thermal, structural, and dynamic considerations involved in the development of each of the major systems. 7 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  6. Method and apparatus for making superconductive magnet coils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Borden, Albert R.

    1985-01-01

    A curved, shell-type magnet coil, adapted to be used in a superconducting magnet, is wound by providing a mandrel having a tubular cylindrical mid-portion terminating at both ends in tapered end portions formed with longitudinal slots having flexible fingers therebetween. An elongated electrical conductor is wound around an elongated oval-shaped pole island engaged with the outside of the cylindrical mid-portion, to form a multiplicity of oval-shaped turns engaged with a 180-degree segment of the mandrel. The coil turns have longitudinal portions with curved portions therebetween, engaging the tapered end portions of the mandrel. Upon completion of the winding, tapered expansion members are fully inserted into the tapered end portions, to displace the flexible fingers outwardly into a cylindrical form and to displace the curved portions of the turns into a shape conforming to such cylindrical form while also exerting increased tension upon the turns to minimize draping of the turns and to enhance the mechanical integrity of the coil. A half cylinder clamp may then be employed to clamp the coil, whereupon the coil may be solified by the use of an epoxy adhesive.

  7. Method and apparatus for making superconductive magnet coils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Borden, A.R.

    1983-11-07

    A curved, shell-type magnet coil, adapted to be used in a superconducting magnet, is wound by providing a mandrel having a tubular cylindrical mid-portion terminating at both ends in tapered end portions formed with longitudinal slots having flexible fingers therebetween. An elongated electrical conductor is wound around an elongated oval-shaped pole island engaged with the outside of the cylindrical mid-portion, to form a multiplicity of oval-shaped turns engaged with a 180-degree segment of the mandrel. The coil turns have longitudinal portions with curved portions therebetween, engaging the tapered end portions of the mandrel. Upon completion of the winding, tapered expansion members are fully inserted into the tapered end portions, to displace the flexible fingers outwardly into a cylindrical form and to displace the curved portions of the turns into a shape conforming to such cylindrical form while also exerting increased tension upon the turns to minimize draping of the turns and to enhance the mechanical integrity of the coil. A half cylinder clamp may then be employed to clamp the coil, whereupon the coil may be solidified by the use of an epoxy adhesive.

  8. Superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) program, January 1-December 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, J.D. (comp.)

    1982-02-01

    Work reported is on the development of a 30 MJ superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) unit for use by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to stabilize power oscillations on their Pacific AC Intertie. The 30 MJ superconducting coil manufacture was completed. Design of the seismic mounting of the coil to the nonconducting dewar lid and a concrete foundation is complete. The superconducting application VAR (SAVAR) control study indicated a low economic advantage and the SAVAR program was terminated. An economic and technological evaluation of superconducting fault current limiter (SFCL) was completed and the results are reported.

  9. Cryogenic System for a High Temperature Superconducting Power Transmission Cable

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demko, J.A.; Gouge, M.J.; Hughey, R.L.; Lue, J.W.; Martin, R.; Sinha, U.; Stovall, J.P.

    1999-07-12

    High-temperature superconducting (HTS) cable systems for power transmission are under development that will use pressurized liquid nitrogen to provide cooling of the cable and termination hardware. Southwire Company and Oak Ridge National Laboratory have been operating a prototype HTS cable system that contains many of the typical components needed for a commercial power transmission application. It is being used to conduct research in the development of components and systems for eventual commercial deployment. The cryogenic system was built by Air Products and Chemicals, Allentown, Pennsylvania, and can circulate up to 0.35 kg/s of liquid nitrogen at temperatures as low as 67 K at pressures of 1 to 10 bars. Sufficient cooling is provided for testing a 5-m-long HTS transmission cable system that includes the terminations required for room temperature electrical connections. Testing of the 5-m HTS transmission cable has been conducted at the design ac conditions of 1250 A and 7.5 kV line to ground. This paper contains a description of the essential features of the HTS cable cryogenic system and performance results obtained during operation of the system. The salient features of the operation that are important in large commercial HTS cable applications will be discussed.

  10. Damping and support in high-temperature superconducting levitation systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R.; McIver, Carl R.; Mittleider, John A.

    2009-12-15

    Methods and apparatuses to provide improved auxiliary damping for superconducting bearings in superconducting levitation systems are disclosed. In a superconducting bearing, a cryostat housing the superconductors is connected to a ground state with a combination of a damping strip of material, a set of linkage arms to provide vertical support, and spring washers to provide stiffness. Alternately, the superconducting bearing may be supported by a cryostat connected to a ground state by posts constructed from a mesh of fibers, with the damping and stiffness controlled by the fiber composition, size, and mesh geometry.

  11. Neutron scattering studies of spin-phonon hybridization and superconducting spin gaps in the high temperature superconductor La2-x(Sr;Ba)xCuO4

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wagman, J. J.; Carlo, Jeremy P.; Gaudet, J.; Van Gastel, G. J.; Abernathy, Douglas L.; Stone, Matthew B.; Granroth, Garrett E.; Kolesnikov, Alexander I.; Savici, Andrei T.; Kim, Young -June; et al

    2016-03-14

    We present time-of-flight neutron-scattering measurements on single crystals of La2-xBaxCuO4 (LBCO) with 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.095 and La2-xSrxCuO4 (LSCO) with x = 0.08 and 0.11. This range of dopings spans much of the phase diagram relevant to high temperature cuprate superconductivity, ranging from insulating, three dimensional commensurate long range antiferromagnetic order for x ≤ 0.02 to two dimensional (2D) incommensurate antiferromagnetism co-existing with superconductivity for x ≥ 0.05. Previous work on lightly doped LBCO with x = 0.035 showed a clear resonant enhancement of the inelastic scattering coincident with the low energy crossings of the highly dispersive spin excitationsmore » and quasi-2D optic phonons. The present work extends these measurements across the phase diagram and shows this enhancement to be a common feature to this family of layered quantum magnets. Furthermore we show that the low temperature, low energy magnetic spectral weight is substantially larger for samples with non-superconducting ground states relative to any of the samples with superconducting ground states. Lastly spin gaps, suppression of low energy magnetic spectral weight, are observed in both superconducting LBCO and LSCO samples, consistent with previous observations for superconducting LSCO« less

  12. Jefferson Lab CLAS12 Superconducting Solenoid magnet Requirements and Design Evolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rajput-Ghoshal, Renuka; Hogan, John P.; Fair, Ruben J.; Ghoshal, Probir K.; Luongo, Cesar; Elouadrhiri, Latifa

    2014-12-01

    As part of the Jefferson Lab 12GeV accelerator upgrade project, one of the experimental halls (Hall B) requires two superconducting magnets. One is a magnet system consisting of six superconducting trapezoidal racetrack-type coils assembled in a toroidal configuration and the second is an actively shielded solenoidal magnet system consisting of 5 coils. In this presentation the physics requirements for the 5 T solenoid magnet, design constraints, conductor decision, and cooling choice will be discussed. The various design iterations to meet the specification will also be discussed in this presentation.

  13. AC Loss Analysis on the Superconducting Coupling Magnet in MICE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Hong; Wang, Li; Green, Michael; Li, LanKai; Xu, FengYu; Liu, XiaoKun; Jia, LinXinag

    2008-07-08

    A pair of coupling solenoids is used in MICE experiment to generate magnetic field which keeps the muons within the iris of thin RF cavity windows. The coupling solenoids have a 1.5-meter inner diameter and will produce 7.4 T peak magnetic field. Three types of AC losses in coupling solenoid are discussed. The affect of AC losses on the temperature distribution within the cold mass during charging and rapid discharging process is analyzed also. The analysis result will be further confirmed by the experiment of the prototype solenoid for coupling solenoid, which will be designed, fabricated and tested at ICST.

  14. Passive Superconducting Flux Conservers for Rotating-Magnetic-Field-Driven Field-Reversed Configurations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oz, E.; Myers, C. E.; Edwards, M. R.; Berlinger, B.; Brooks, A.; Cohen, S. A.

    2011-01-05

    The Princeton Field-Reversed Configuration (PFRC) experiment employs an odd-parity rotating magnetic field (RMFo) current drive and plasma heating system to form and sustain high-? plasmas. For radial confinement, an array of coaxial, internal, passive, flux-conserving (FC) rings applies magnetic pressure to the plasma while still allowing radio-frequency RMFo from external coils to reach the plasma. The 3 ms pulse duration of the present experiment is limited by the skin time (?fc) of its room-temperature copper FC rings. To explore plasma phenomena with longer characteristic times, the pulse duration of the next-generation PFRC-2 device will exceed 100 ms, necessitating FC rings with (?fc > 300 ms. In this paper we review the physics of internal, discrete, passive FCs and describe the evolution of the PFRC's FC array. We then detail new experiments that have produced higher performance FC rings that contain embedded high-temperature superconducting (HTS) tapes. Several HTS tape winding configurations have been studied and a wide range of extended skin times, from 0.4 s to over 103 s, has been achieved. The new FC rings must carry up to 3 kA of current to balance the expected PFRC-2 plasma pressure, so the dependence of the HTS-FC critical current on the winding configuration and temperature was also studied. From these experiments, the key HTS-FC design considerations have been identified and HTS-FC rings with the desired performance characteristics have been produced.

  15. Engineering Division Superconducting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Superconducting Fusion Magnets Present and Future * Superconducting Magnet Technology is available now for up to ITER scale - ITER is built with 1980's and 1990's technology * ...

  16. Towards a next theory of superconductivity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Understanding high-temperature superconductivity Using magnetic fields to understand high-temperature superconductivity The eventual goal of the research would be to create a superconductor that operates at room temperature and needs no cooling at all March 26, 2015 Los Alamos National Laboratory scientist Brad Ramshaw conducts an experiment at the Pulsed Field Facility of the National High Magnetic Field Lab, exposing high-temperature superconductors to very high magnetic fields, changing the

  17. Enhanced Superconducting Gaps in Trilayer High-Temperature Bi (2) Sr (2) Ca

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (2) Cu (3) O (10+delta) Cuprate Superconductor (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Enhanced Superconducting Gaps in Trilayer High-Temperature Bi (2) Sr (2) Ca (2) Cu (3) O (10+delta) Cuprate Superconductor Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Enhanced Superconducting Gaps in Trilayer High-Temperature Bi (2) Sr (2) Ca (2) Cu (3) O (10+delta) Cuprate Superconductor Authors: Ideta, S ; Takashima, K. ; Hashimoto, M. ; Yoshida, T. ; Fujimori, A. ; Anzai, H. ; Fujita, T. ; Nakashima, Y. ;

  18. Anisotropic superconducting and normal state magnetic properties of single crystals of RNi*2*B*2*C compounds (R = Y, Gd, Dy, Ho, Er, and Tm)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, B.

    1995-11-01

    The interaction of superconductivity with magnetism has been one of the most interesting and important phenomena in solid state physics since the 1950`s when small amounts of magnetic impurities were incorporated in superconductors. The discovery of the magnetic superconductors RNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C (R = rare earth, Y) offers a new system to study this interaction. The wide ranges of superconducting transition (T{sub c}) and antiferromagnetic (AF) ordering temperatures (T{sub N}) (0 K {le} T{sub c} {le} 16 K, 0 K {le} T{sub N} {le} 20 K) give a good opportunity to observe a variety of interesting phenomena. Single crystals of high quality with appropriate size and mass are crucial in examining the anisotropic intrinsic properties. Single crystals have been grown successfully by an unusual high temperature flux method and characterized thoroughly by X-ray, electrical transport, magnetization, neutron scattering, scanning electron microscopy, and other measurements.

  19. Magnetism and superconductivity driven by identical 4f states in a heavy-fermion metal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, Joe E; Nair, S; Stockert, O; Witte, U; Nicklas, M; Schedler, R; Bianchi, A; Fisk, Z; Wirth, S; Steglich, K

    2009-01-01

    The apparently inimical relationship between magnetism and superconductivity has come under increasing scrutiny in a wide range of material classes, where the free energy landscape conspires to bring them in close proximity to each other. Particularly enigmatic is the case when these phases microscopically interpenetrate, though the manner in which this can be accomplished remains to be fully comprehended. Here, we present combined measurements of elastic neutron scattering, magnetotransport, and heat capacity on a prototypical heavy fermion system, in which antiferromagnetism and superconductivity are observed. Monitoring the response of these states to the presence of the other, as well as to external thermal and magnetic perturbations, points to the possibility that they emerge from different parts of the Fermi surface. Therefore, a single 4f state could be both localized and itinerant, thus accounting for the coexistence of magnetism and superconductivity.

  20. Ultrasonic signatures at the superconducting and the pseudogap...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    that extends from room temperature to the superconducting transition. Although polarized neutron scattering studies hint at magnetic order associated with the pseudogap, there is...

  1. Local-moment magnetism in superconducting FeTe0.35Se0.65 as seen...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Local-moment magnetism in superconducting FeTe0.35Se0.65 as seen via inelastic neutron scattering Prev Next Title: Local-moment magnetism in superconducting FeTe0.35Se0.65 as ...

  2. Superconducting Magnets for the 12 GeV Upgrade at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fair, Ruben J.; Young, Glenn R.

    2015-06-01

    Jefferson Laboratory is embarked on an energy upgrade to its flagship continuous electron beam accelerator in order to expand the scope of its research capabilities and probe further into the structure of nuclear particles. The 12 GeV upgrade includes the design, manufacture, integration, installation and commissioning of eight different superconducting magnets in three separate experimental halls. The effort involves other national laboratories, universities and industry spanning three countries. This paper will summarize the key characteristics of these magnets, ranging in size from 0.2 to 23 MJ in stored energy, and featuring many different types and configurations. The paper will also give an overview of the specific technical challenges for each magnet, and a status report on magnet manufacture and expected delivery dates. The 12GeV upgrade at J-Lab represents the largest superconducting magnet fabrication and installation program currently ongoing in the United States and this paper will present the breadth of collaborations supporting it.

  3. Nanostructures of Boron, Carbon and Magnesium Diboride for High Temperature Superconductivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pfefferle, Lisa; Fang, Fang; Iyyamperumal, Eswarmoorthi; Keskar, Gayatri

    2013-12-23

    Direct fabrication of MgxBy nanostructures is achieved by employing metal (Ni,Mg) incorporated MCM-41 in the Hybrid Physical-Chemical Vapor Deposition (HPCVD) reaction. Different reaction conditions are tested to optimize the fabrication process. TEM analysis shows the fabrication of MgxBy nanostructures starting at the reaction temperature of 600oC, with the yield of the nanostructures increasing with increasing reaction temperature. The as-synthesized MgxBy nanostructures have the diameters in the range of 3-5nm, which do not increase with the reaction temperature consistent with templated synthesis. EELS analysis of the template removed nanostructures confirms the existence of B and Mg with possible contamination of Si and O. NEXAFS and Raman spectroscopy analysis suggested a concentric layer-by-layer MgxBy nanowire/nanotube growth model for our as-synthesized nanostructures. Ni k-edge XAS indicates that the formation of MgNi alloy particles is important for the Vapor-Liquid-Solid (VLS) growth of MgxBy nanostructures with fine diameters, and the presence of Mg vapor not just Mg in the catalyst is crucial for the formation of Ni-Mg clusters. Physical templating by the MCM-41 pores was shown to confine the diameter of the nanostructures. DC magnetization measurements indicate possible superconductive behaviors in the as-synthesized samples.

  4. Quantitative Modeling of High Temperature Magnetization Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Shufeng

    2009-03-01

    Final Technical Report Project title: Quantitative Modeling of High Temperature Magnetization Dynamics DOE/Office of Science Program Manager Contact: Dr. James Davenport

  5. Materials, Strands, and Cables for Superconducting Accelerator Magnets. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sumption, Mike D.; Collings, Edward W.

    2014-09-19

    This report focuses on Materials, Strands and Cables for High Energy Physics Particle accelerators. In the materials area, work has included studies of basic reactions, diffusion, transformations, and phase assemblage of Nb3Sn. These materials science aspects have been married to results, in the form of flux pinning, Bc2, Birr, and transport Jc, with an emphasis on obtaining the needed Jc for HEP needs. Attention has also been paid to the “intermediate-temperature superconductor”, magnesium diboride emphasis being placed on (i) irreversibility field enhancement, (ii) critical current density and flux pinning, and (iii) connectivity. We also report on studies of Bi-2212. The second area of the program has been in the area of “Strands” in which, aside from the materials aspect of the conductor, its physical properties and their influence on performance have been studied. Much of this work has been in the area of magnetization estimation and flux jump calculation and control. One of the areas of this work was strand instabilities in high-performance Nb3Sn conductors due to combined fields and currents. Additionally, we investigated quench and thermal propagation in YBCO coated conductors at low temperatures and high fields. The last section, “Cables”, focussed on interstrand contact resistance, ICR, it origins, control, and implications. Following on from earlier work in NbTi, the present work in Nb3Sn has aimed to make ICR intermediate between the two extremes of too little contact (no current sharing) and too much (large and unacceptable magnetization and associated beam de-focussing). Interstrand contact and current sharing measurements are being made on YBCO based Roebel cables using transport current methods. Finally, quench was investigated for YBCO cables and the magnets wound from them, presently with a focus on 50 T solenoids for muon collider applications.

  6. Power supply subsystem for MHD generator superconducting magnet, baseline power supply designs and costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kusko, A.; Peeran, S.M.

    1981-04-10

    An analysis of the dc power supply requirements for superconducting magnets used in MHD generators of ratings 250 MW/sub e//sup -/ 1000 MW/sub e/ is presented. The power supplies considered are rated for a peak power of 10 MW and for currents of 20 kA to 100 kA. The various aspects discussed include: rectifier configurations and specifications, control requirements, dumping the magnet energy, and rectifier size, arrangement and cost. (WHK)

  7. A short model excitation of an asymmetric force free superconducting transmission line magnet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wake, M.; Sato, H.; Carcagno, R.; Foster, W.; Hays, S.; Kashikhin, V.; Oleck, A.; Piekarz, H.; Rabehl, R,; /Fermilab

    2005-09-01

    A short model of asymmetric force free magnet with single beam aperture was tested at Fermilab together with the excitation test of VLHC transmission line magnet. The design concept of asymmetric force free superconducting magnet was verified by the test. The testing reached up to 104 kA current and no indication of force imbalance was observed. Since the model magnet length was only 10cm, A 0.75m model was constructed and tested at KEK with low current to ensure the validity of the design. The cool down and the excitation at KEK were also successful finding very small thermal contraction of the conductor and reasonable field homogeneity.

  8. Pulsed magnetohydrodynamic generator with a superconducting magnetic system. [Translated from Russian

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirillin, V.A.; Sheyndlin, A.Ye.; Asinovskiy, E.I.; Sychev, V.V.; Zenkevich, V.B.

    1985-11-08

    An urgent need for creating independent sources of electric power capable of generating a power of tens or hundreds of megawatts in a few milliseconds has now emerged. A pulsed MHD generator, in which the conversion of mechanical energy of explosion products into electrical energy is accomplished, can serve as such a power source. There are published reports on testing of such MHD generators with ordinary magnetic systems. It seemed advisable to study the operation of a pulsed generator with a superconductive magnetic system in the overall plan of research on the creation of magnetohydrodynamic generators. The creation of a pulsed MHD generator with a superconductive magnetic system would make it possible to improve substantially the operational indicators of the installation and to ensure its continuous operation, regardless of the presence of additional power sources for feeding the magnet. The problem of creating an optimum generator and a magnetic system with the maximum acceptable field intensity was not raised in the first stage. The purpose of the work was to investigate the set of questions which arise in the joint use of a pulsed MHD generator and a superconductive magnetic system.

  9. Landau quantization and superconductivity at high magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norman, M.R.; Akera, H.; MacDonald, A.H.

    1991-05-01

    Recently, the possibility of superconducting for fields stronger than the semiclassical H{sub c2} due to Landau quantization has been raised again. In this paper, the theory of such a state is reviewed for both 2D and 3D systems. We explicitly discuss the effects of impurities and Zeeman splitting. A critical analysis of the possibility of observing this reentrant behavior in real materials is given. Finally, solutions of the mean field gap equations (Bogoliubov-deGennes equations) in the quantum limit are presented and discussed in regards to their flux lattice structure.

  10. Magnetic excitations in Kondo liquid: superconductivity and hidden...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    under pressure reveals the presence of 2d magnetic quantum critical fluctuations in ... similarities between the heavy electron materials and the high Tsub c cuprates. ...

  11. Magnetism and Superconductivity Compete in Iron-based Superconductors...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... in the material: orbital-dependent band shift for the nematic order, band folding and ... consistent with a reduction of both the magnetic and nematic order parameters when ...

  12. Comparative Assessment of Direct Drive High Temperature Superconducting Generators in Multi-Megawatt Class Wind Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maples, B.; Hand, M.; Musial, W.

    2010-10-01

    This paper summarizes the work completed under the CRADA between NREL and American Superconductor (AMSC). The CRADA combined NREL and AMSC resources to benchmark high temperature superconducting direct drive (HTSDD) generator technology by integrating the technologies into a conceptual wind turbine design, and comparing the design to geared drive and permanent magnet direct drive (PMDD) wind turbine configurations. Analysis was accomplished by upgrading the NREL Wind Turbine Design Cost and Scaling Model to represent geared and PMDD turbines at machine ratings up to 10 MW and then comparing cost and mass figures of AMSC's HTSDD wind turbine designs to theoretical geared and PMDD turbine designs at 3.1, 6, and 10 MW sizes. Based on the cost and performance data supplied by AMSC, HTSDD technology has good potential to compete successfully as an alternative technology to PMDD and geared technology turbines in the multi megawatt classes. In addition, data suggests the economics of HTSDD turbines improve with increasing size, although several uncertainties remain for all machines in the 6 to 10 MW class.

  13. Full-power test of a string of magnets comprising a half-cell of the Superconducting Super Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burgett, W.; Christianson, M.; Coombes, R.

    1992-10-01

    In this paper we describe the full-powered operation of a string of industrially-fabricated magnets comprising a half-cell of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). The completion of these tests marks the first successful operation of a major SSC subsystem. The five 15-m long dipole magnets in the string had an aperture of 50 mm and the single 5-m long quadrupole aperture was 40 mm. Power and cryogenic connections were made to the string through spool pieces that are prototypes for SSC operations. The string was cooled to cryogenic temperatures in early July, 1992, and power tests were performed at progressively higher currents up to the nominal SSC operating point above 6500 amperes achieved in mid-August. In this paper we report on the electrical and cryogenic performance of the string components and the quench protection system during these initial tests.

  14. Extended use of superconducting magnets for bio-medical development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoynev, Stoyan E.

    2015-05-19

    Magnetic fields interact with biological cells affecting them in variety of ways which are usually hard to predict. Among them, it was observed that strong fields can align dividing cells in a preferred direction. It was also demonstrated that dividing cancer cells are effectively destroyed by applying electric fields in vivo with a success rate dependent on the cell-to-field orientation. Based on these facts, the present note aims to suggest the use of magnetic and electric fields for improved cancer treatment. Several possibilities of generating the electric fields inside the magnetic field volume are reviewed, main tentative approaches are described and discussed. Most if not all of them require special magnet configuration research which can be based on existing magnet systems in operation or in development.

  15. Superconductive magnetic energy storage (SMES) external fields and safety considerations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polk, C. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Boom, R.W.; Eyssa, Y.M. . Applied Superconductivity Center)

    1992-01-01

    This paper addresses preferred SMES configurations and the external magnetic fields which they generate. Possible biological effects of fields are reviewed briefly. It is proposed that SMES units be fenced at the 10 gauss (1 mT) level to keep unrestricted areas safe, even for persons with cardiac pacemakers. For a full size 5000 MWh (1.8 {times} 10 {sup 13} J) SMES the magnetic field decreases to 10 gauss at a radial distance of 2 km from the center of the coil. Other considerations related to the environmental impact of large SMES magnetic fields are discussed briefly.

  16. Superconductivity Centennial | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Superconductivity Centennial Superconductivity Centennial Superconductivity Centennial - Friday, April 8, marks 100 years since Heike Kamerlingh Onnes discovered the basis for CEBAF's success: superconductivity. Superconducting radiofrequency accelerator cavities, like this one, harness the energy that the CEBAF accelerator pumps into its electron beam for nuclear physics research. SRF cavities are typically made of niobium, a metal that becomes superconducting at extremely low temperatures.

  17. Characterization of the magnetic moment distribution in low-concentration solutions of iron oxide nanoparticles by a high-T{sub c} superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saari, M. M. Sakai, K.; Kiwa, T.; Tsukada, K.; Sasayama, T.; Yoshida, T.

    2015-05-07

    We developed a highly sensitive AC/DC magnetometer using a high-temperature superconductor superconducting quantum interference device for the evaluation of magnetic nanoparticles in solutions. Using the developed system, we investigated the distribution of magnetic moments of iron oxide multi-core particles of 100 nm at various iron concentrations that are lower than 96 μg/ml by analyzing the measured magnetization curves. Singular value decomposition and non-regularized non-negative least-squares methods were used during the reconstruction of the distribution. Similar distributions were obtained for all concentrations, and the iron concentration could be determined from the measured magnetization curves. The measured harmonics upon the excitation of AC and DC magnetic fields curves agreed well with the harmonics simulated based on the reconstructed magnetization curves, implying that the magnetization curves of magnetic nanoparticles were successfully obtained as we will show in the article. We compared the magnetization curves between multi-core particles of 100 nm and 130 nm, composed of 12-nm iron oxide nanoparticles. A distinctive magnetic property between the 100 nm and 130 nm particles in low-concentration solutions was successfully characterized. The distribution characteristic of magnetic moments suggests that the net magnetic moment in a multi-core particle is affected by the size of the magnetic cores and their degree of aggregation. Exploration of magnetic properties with high sensitivity can be expected using the developed system.

  18. Radiation effects limits on superconducting magnets: Data base for copper stabilizers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guinan, M.W.

    1986-02-24

    A simple model has been developed which can predict the magnetoresistance of copper as a function of initial purity, the extent of cold work and the presence of both irradiation produced point defects and the extended defects produced by annealing. The remaining area of uncertainty in a complete description of the response of superconducting magnets to irradiation-anneal cycles is the dependence of annealing on dose impurity concentration and cold-work.

  19. Lightweight Superconducting Cables for use with High-Field Magnets and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Military Applications - Energy Innovation Portal Industrial Technologies Industrial Technologies Electricity Transmission Electricity Transmission Find More Like This Return to Search Lightweight Superconducting Cables for use with High-Field Magnets and Military Applications University of Colorado Contact CU About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryThe development of YBCO coated conductors has resulted in high critical current densities, but have been limited by the upper critical

  20. COMMERCIALIZATION DEMONSTRATION OF MID-SIZED SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE TECHNOLOGY FOR ELECTRIC UTILITYAPPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CHARLES M. WEBER

    2008-06-24

    As an outgrowth of the Technology Reinvestment Program of the 1990’s, an Agreement was formed between BWXT and the DOE to promote the commercialization of Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) technology. Business and marketing studies showed that the performance of electric transmission lines could be improved with this SMES technology by stabilizing the line thereby allowing the reserved stability margin to be used. One main benefit sought was to double the capacity and the amount of energy flow on an existing transmission line by enabling the use of the reserved stability margin, thereby doubling revenue. Also, electrical disturbances, power swings, oscillations, cascading disturbances and brown/black-outs could be mitigated and rendered innocuous; thereby improving power quality and reliability. Additionally, construction of new transmission lines needed for increased capacity could be delayed or perhaps avoided (with significant savings) by enabling the use of the reserved stability margin of the existing lines. Two crucial technical aspects were required; first, a large, powerful, dynamic, economic and reliable superconducting magnet, capable of oscillating power flow was needed; and second, an electrical power interface and control to a transmission line for testing, demonstrating and verifying the benefits and features of the SMES system was needed. A project was formed with the goals of commercializing the technology by demonstrating SMES technology for utility applications and to establish a domestic capability for manufacturing large superconducting magnets for both commercial and defense applications. The magnet had very low AC losses to support the dynamic and oscillating nature of the stabilizing power flow. Moreover, to economically interface to the transmission line, the magnet had the largest operating voltage ever made. The manufacturing of that design was achieved by establishing a factory with newly designed and acquired equipment

  1. High-temperature superconducting thin-film-based electronic devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, X.D; Finokoglu, A.; Hawley, M.; Jia, Q.; Mitchell, T.; Mueller, F.; Reagor, D.; Tesmer, J.

    1996-09-01

    This the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project involved optimization of processing of Y123 and Tl-2212 thin films deposited on novel substrates for advanced electronic devices. The Y123 films are the basis for development of Josephson Junctions to be utilized in magnetic sensors. Microwave cavities based on the Tl-2212 films are the basis for subsequent applications as communication antennas and transmitters in satellites.

  2. Superconducting magnetic control system for manipulation of particulate matter and magnetic probes in medical and industrial applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cha, Yung Sheng; Hull, John R.; Askew, Thomas R.

    2006-07-11

    A system and method of controlling movement of magnetic material with at least first and second high temperature superconductors at spaced locations. A plurality of solenoids are associated with the superconductors to induce a persistent currents in preselected high temperature superconductors establishing a plurality of magnetic fields in response to pulsed currents introduced to one or more of the solenoids. Control mechanism in communication with said solenoids and/or said high temperature superconductors are used to demagnetize selected ones of the high temperature superconductors to reduce the magnetic fields substantially to zero. Magnetic material is moved between magnetic fields by establishing the presence thereof and thereafter reducing magnetic fields substantially to zero and establishing magnetic fields in other superconductors arranged in a predetermined configuration.

  3. A review of basic phenomena and techniques for sputter-deposition of high temperature superconducting films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auciello, O. North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Ameen, M.S.; Kingon, A.I.; Lichtenwalner, D.J. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Krauss, A.R. )

    1990-01-01

    The processes involved in plasma and ion beam sputter-deposition of high temperature superconducting thin films are critically reviewed. Recent advances in the development of these techniques are discussed in relation to basic physical phenomena, specific to each technique, which must be understood before high quality films can be produced. Control of film composition is a major issue in sputter-deposition of multicomponent materials. Low temperature processing of films is a common goal for each technique, particularly in relation to integrating high temperature superconducting films with the current microelectronics technology. It has been understood for some time that for Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} deposition, the most intensely studied high-{Tc} compound, incorporation of sufficient oxygen into the film during deposition is necessary to produce as-deposited superconducting films at relatively substrate temperatures. Recent results have shown that with the use of suitable buffer layers, high quality Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} sputtered films can be obtained on Si substrates without the need for post-deposition anneal processing. This review is mainly focussed on issues related to sputter-deposition of Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} thin films, although representative results concerning the bismuth and thallium based compounds are included. 143 refs., 11 figs.

  4. Dependence of the magnitude and direction of the persistent current on the magnetic flux in superconducting rings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gurtovoi, V. L.; Dubonos, S. V.; Nikulov, A. V. Osipov, N. N.; Tulin, V. A.

    2007-12-15

    The obtained periodic magnetic-field dependences I{sub c+}({phi}/{phi}{sub 0}) and I{sub c-}({phi}/{phi}{sub 0}) of the critical current measured in opposite directions on asymmetric superconducting aluminum rings has made it possible to explain previously observed quantum oscillations of dc voltage as a result of alternating current rectification. It was found that a higher rectification efficiency of both single rings and ring systems is caused by hysteresis of the current-voltage characteristics. The asymmetry of current-voltage characteristics providing the rectification effect is due to the relative shifts of the magnetic dependences I{sub c-}({phi}/{phi}{sub 0}) = I{sub c+}({phi}/{phi}{sub 0} + {delta}{phi}) of the critical current measured in opposite directions. This shift means that the position of I{sub c+}({phi}/{phi}{sub 0}) and I{sub c-}({phi}/{phi}{sub 0}) minima does not correspond to n + 0.5 magnetic flux {phi} quanta, which is in direct contradiction to measured Little-Parks resistance oscillations. Despite this contradiction, the amplitude I{sub c,an}({phi}/{phi}{sub 0}) = I{sub c+}({phi}/{phi}{sub 0}) - I{sub c-}({phi}/{phi}{sub 0}) of critical current anisotropy oscillations and its variations with temperature correspond to the expected amplitude of persistent current oscillations and its variations with temperature.

  5. Characterization of High Current RRP(R) Wires as a Function of Magnetic Field, Temperature and Strain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Godeke, A.; Mentink, M.G.T.; Dietderich, D. R.; den Ouden, A.

    2009-08-16

    A new instrument for the characterization of superconducting materials as a function of Magnetic Field, Temperature and Strain, was designed, constructed and tested at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). A U-shaped bending spring was selected, since that design has proven to enable accurate characterizations of a multitude of superconducting materials for more than a decade. The new device is validated though measurements on very high current Rod Restack Processed (RRP) Internal-Tin (IT) wires, for which we will present initial results, including parameterizations of the superconducting phase boundaries and comparisons with other wire types. Accurate parametrization of modern high magnetic field conductors is important for the analysis of the performance of magnet systems.

  6. Superconductivity and magnetism in rapidly solidified perovskites. Final report, September 1, 1988--August 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Handley, R.C.; Kalonji, G.

    1991-12-31

    The report is divided into six parts, reflecting major thrusts of our work since 1987. The six areas are: molecular orbital theory of high {Tc} superconductivity; rapid solidification processing of oxide superconductors; time dependent magnetic and superconducting properties of these inhomogeneous materials; excess Gd in Gd{sub 1+x}Ba{sub 2-x}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} perovskites; rapid solidification and directional annealing to achieve high Jc; and Mossbauer studies of T = Fe, Co and Ni site selection in YBa{sub 2}(CuT){sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} and GdBa{sub 2}(CuT){sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}}.

  7. Vibrations Raise the Critical Temperature for Superconductivity | U.S. DOE

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Office of Science (SC) Vibrations Raise the Critical Temperature for Superconductivity Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) Community Resources Contact Information Basic Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-22/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3081 F: (301) 903-6594 E: Email Us More Information » 12.14.15

  8. Superconductive wire

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korzekwa, D.A.; Bingert, J.F.; Peterson, D.E.; Sheinberg, H.

    1995-07-18

    A superconductive article is made by inserting a rigid mandrel into an internal cavity of a first metallic tube, said tube having an interior surface and an exterior surface, said interior surface defining the interior cavity, forming a layer of a superconductive material or superconductive precursor upon the exterior surface of said first metallic tube, machining the layer of superconductive material or superconductive precursor to a predetermined diameter to form an intermediate article configured for insertion into a second metallic tube having an interior diameter corresponding to the predetermined diameter, inserting the machined intermediate article into a second metallic tube having an internal diameter corresponding to the predetermined diameter of the intermediate article to form a composite intermediate article, reducing or ironing the composite intermediate article to a predetermined cross-sectional diameter, and sintering the reduced or ironed composite intermediate article at temperatures and for time sufficient for the superconductive material or superconductive precursor to exhibit superconductivity. 2 figs.

  9. Superconductive wire

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korzekwa, David A.; Bingert, John F.; Peterson, Dean E.; Sheinberg, Haskell

    1995-01-01

    A superconductive article is made by inserting a rigid mandrel into an internal cavity of a first metallic tube, said tube having an interior surface and an exterior surface, said interior surface defining the interior cavity, forming a layer of a superconductive material or superconductive precursor upon the exterior surface of said first metallic tube, machining the layer of superconductive material or superconductive precursor to a predetermined diameter to form an intermediate article configured for insertion into a second metallic tube having an interior diameter corresponding to the predetermined diameter, inserting the machined intermediate article into a second metallic tube having an internal diameter corresponding to the predetermined diameter of the intermediate article to form a composite intermediate article, reducing or ironing the composite intermediate article to a predetermined cross-sectional diameter, and sintering the reduced or ironed composite intermediate article at temperatures and for time sufficient for the superconductive material or superconductive precursor to exhibit superconductivity.

  10. Nb3Sn superconducting magnets for electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferracin, P.; Caspi, S.; Felice, H.; Leitner, D.; Lyneis, C. M.; Prestemon, S.; Sabbi, G. L.; Todd, D. S.

    2009-05-04

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources are an essential component of heavy-ion accelerators. Over the past few decades advances in magnet technology and an improved understanding of the ECR ion source plasma physics have led to remarkable performance improvements of ECR ion sources. Currently third generation high field superconducting ECR ion sources operating at frequencies around 28 GHz are the state of the art ion injectors and several devices are either under commissioning or under design around the world. At the same time, the demand for increased intensities of highly charged heavy ions continues to grow, which makes the development of even higher performance ECR ion sources a necessity. To extend ECR ion sources to frequencies well above 28 GHz, new magnet technology will be needed in order to operate at higher field and force levels. The superconducting magnet program at LBNL has been developing high field superconducting magnets for particle accelerators based on Nb{sub 3}Sn superconducting technology for several years. At the moment, Nb{sub 3}Sn is the only practical conductor capable of operating at the 15 T field level in the relevant configurations. Recent design studies have been focused on the possibility of using Nb{sub 3}Sn in the next generation of ECR ion sources. In the past, LBNL has worked on the VENUS ECR, a 28 GHz source with solenoids and a sextupole made with NbTi operating at fields of 6-7 T. VENUS has now been operating since 2004. We present in this paper the design of a Nb{sub 3}Sn ECR ion source optimized to operate at an rf frequency of 56 GHz with conductor peak fields of 13-15 T. Because of the brittleness and strain sensitivity of Nb{sub 3}Sn- , particular care is required in the design of the magnet support structure, which must be capable of providing support to the coils without overstressing the conductor. In this paper, we present the main features of the support structure, featuring an external aluminum shell

  11. Superconducting quantum interference device microsusceptometer balanced over a wide bandwidth for nuclear magnetic resonance applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinante, A. Falferi, P.; Mezzena, R.

    2014-10-15

    Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) microsusceptometers have been widely used to study magnetic properties of materials at microscale. As intrinsically balanced devices, they could also be exploited for direct SQUID-detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) from micron sized samples, or for SQUID readout of mechanically detected NMR from submicron sized samples. Here, we demonstrate a double balancing technique that enables achievement of very low residual imbalance of a SQUID microsusceptometer over a wide bandwidth. In particular, we can generate ac magnetic fields within the SQUID loop as large as 1 mT, for frequencies ranging from dc up to a few MHz. As an application, we demonstrate direct detection of NMR from {sup 1}H spins in a glycerol droplet placed directly on top of the 20 ?m SQUID loops.

  12. Temperature Measurements in the Magnetic Measurement Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolf, Zachary

    2010-12-13

    Several key LCLS undulator parameter values depend strongly on temperature primarily because of the permanent magnet material the undulators are constructed with. The undulators will be tuned to have specific parameter values in the Magnetic Measurement Facility (MMF). Consequently, it is necessary for the temperature of the MMF to remain fairly constant. Requirements on undulator temperature have been established. When in use, the undulator temperature will be in the range 20.0 {+-} 0.2 C. In the MMF, the undulator tuning will be done at 20.0 {+-} 0.1 C. For special studies, the MMF temperature set point can be changed to a value between 18 C and 23 C with stability of {+-}0.1 C. In order to ensure that the MMF temperature requirements are met, the MMF must have a system to measure temperatures. The accuracy of the MMF temperature measurement system must be better than the {+-}0.1 C undulator tuning temperature tolerance, and is taken to be {+-}0.01 C. The temperature measurement system for the MMF is under construction. It is similar to a prototype system we built two years ago in the Sector 10 alignment lab at SLAC. At that time, our goal was to measure the lab temperature to {+-}0.1 C. The system has worked well for two years and has maintained its accuracy. For the MMF system, we propose better sensors and a more extensive calibration program to achieve the factor of 10 increase in accuracy. In this note we describe the measurement system under construction. We motivate our choice of system components and give an overview of the system. Most of the software for the system has been written and will be discussed. We discuss error sources in temperature measurements and show how these errors have been dealt with. The calibration system is described in detail. All the LCLS undulators must be tuned in the Magnetic Measurement Facility at the same temperature to within {+-}0.1 C. In order to ensure this, we are building a system to measure the temperature of the

  13. Superconducting magnetic energy storage. (Latest citations from the INSPEC database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning research, development, and assessment of superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) technology. References discuss the design and performance of toroidal and solenoid type SMES systems for military, space mission, and electric utility applications. Topics include active and reactive power control, power system stability and diagnosis, power supply quality, uninterruptible power supplies, and SMES systems for critical industrial and military uses. Cost analysis and optimization, marketing, and environmental issues are reviewed. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  14. Method and apparatus for forming high-critical-temperature superconducting layers on flat and/or elongated substrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ciszek, Theodore F.

    1994-01-01

    An elongated, flexible superconductive wire or strip is fabricated by pulling it through and out of a melt of metal oxide material at a rate conducive to forming a crystalline coating of superconductive metal oxide material on an elongated, flexible substrate wire or strip. A coating of crystalline superconductive material, such as Bi.sub.2 Sr.sub.2 CaCu.sub.2 O.sub.8, is annealed to effect conductive contact between adjacent crystalline structures in the coating material, which is then cooled to room temperature. The container for the melt can accommodate continuous passage of the substrate through the melt. Also, a second pass-through container can be used to simultaneously anneal and overcoat the superconductive coating with a hot metallic material, such as silver or silver alloy. A hollow, elongated tube casting method of forming an elongated, flexible superconductive wire includes drawing the melt by differential pressure into a heated tubular substrate.

  15. Method and apparatus for forming high-critical-temperature superconducting layers on flat and/or elongated substrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ciszek, T.F.

    1994-04-19

    An elongated, flexible superconductive wire or strip is fabricated by pulling it through and out of a melt of metal oxide material at a rate conducive to forming a crystalline coating of superconductive metal oxide material on an elongated, flexible substrate wire or strip. A coating of crystalline superconductive material, such as Bi[sub 2]Sr[sub 2]CaCu[sub 2]O[sub 8], is annealed to effect conductive contact between adjacent crystalline structures in the coating material, which is then cooled to room temperature. The container for the melt can accommodate continuous passage of the substrate through the melt. Also, a second pass-through container can be used to simultaneously anneal and overcoat the superconductive coating with a hot metallic material, such as silver or silver alloy. A hollow, elongated tube casting method of forming an elongated, flexible superconductive wire includes drawing the melt by differential pressure into a heated tubular substrate. 8 figures.

  16. A New Universal Parameter for Superconductivity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A New Universal Parameter for Superconductivity Print Scientists have been researching high-temperature (high-Tc) superconductors for decades with the goal of finding materials that express superconducting capabilities at room temperature, which would be a requirement for practical and cost-effective applications. The higher the operating temperature, the more realistic energy-saving applications such as lossless electrical transmission or magnetically levitated trains become. Scientists thought

  17. A New Universal Parameter for Superconductivity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A New Universal Parameter for Superconductivity Print Scientists have been researching high-temperature (high-Tc) superconductors for decades with the goal of finding materials that express superconducting capabilities at room temperature, which would be a requirement for practical and cost-effective applications. The higher the operating temperature, the more realistic energy-saving applications such as lossless electrical transmission or magnetically levitated trains become. Scientists thought

  18. A New Universal Parameter for Superconductivity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A New Universal Parameter for Superconductivity Print Scientists have been researching high-temperature (high-Tc) superconductors for decades with the goal of finding materials that express superconducting capabilities at room temperature, which would be a requirement for practical and cost-effective applications. The higher the operating temperature, the more realistic energy-saving applications such as lossless electrical transmission or magnetically levitated trains become. Scientists thought

  19. A New Universal Parameter for Superconductivity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A New Universal Parameter for Superconductivity Print Scientists have been researching high-temperature (high-Tc) superconductors for decades with the goal of finding materials that express superconducting capabilities at room temperature, which would be a requirement for practical and cost-effective applications. The higher the operating temperature, the more realistic energy-saving applications such as lossless electrical transmission or magnetically levitated trains become. Scientists thought

  20. A New Universal Parameter for Superconductivity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A New Universal Parameter for Superconductivity Print Scientists have been researching high-temperature (high-Tc) superconductors for decades with the goal of finding materials that express superconducting capabilities at room temperature, which would be a requirement for practical and cost-effective applications. The higher the operating temperature, the more realistic energy-saving applications such as lossless electrical transmission or magnetically levitated trains become. Scientists thought

  1. A New Universal Parameter for Superconductivity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A New Universal Parameter for Superconductivity Print Scientists have been researching high-temperature (high-Tc) superconductors for decades with the goal of finding materials that express superconducting capabilities at room temperature, which would be a requirement for practical and cost-effective applications. The higher the operating temperature, the more realistic energy-saving applications such as lossless electrical transmission or magnetically levitated trains become. Scientists thought

  2. A New Universal Parameter for Superconductivity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A New Universal Parameter for Superconductivity Print Scientists have been researching high-temperature (high-Tc) superconductors for decades with the goal of finding materials that express superconducting capabilities at room temperature, which would be a requirement for practical and cost-effective applications. The higher the operating temperature, the more realistic energy-saving applications such as lossless electrical transmission or magnetically levitated trains become. Scientists thought

  3. Role of magnetism in superconductivity of BaFe2As2: Study of 5d Au-doped crystals

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Li; Cao, Huibo; McGuire, Michael A.; Kim, J. S.; Stewart, G. R.; Sefat, Athena Safa

    2015-09-09

    We investigate properties of BaFe2As2 (122) single crystals upon gold doping, which is the transition metal with the highest atomic weight. The Au substitution into the FeAs-planes of 122 crystal structure (Au-122) is only possible up to a small amount of ~3%. We find that 5d is more effective in reducing magnetism in 122 than its counter 3d Cu, and this relates to superconductivity. We provide evidence of short-range magnetic fluctuations and local lattice inhomogeneities that may prevent strong percolative superconductivity in Ba(Fe1-xAux)2As2.

  4. The creation of high-temperature superconducting cables of megawatt range in Russia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sytnikov, V. E. Bemert, S. E.; Krivetsky, I. V.; Romashov, M. A.; Popov, D. A.; Fedotov, E. V.; Komandenko, O. V.

    2015-12-15

    Urgent problems of the power industry in the 21st century require the creation of smart energy systems, providing a high effectiveness of generation, transmission, and consumption of electric power. Simultaneously, the requirements for controllability of power systems and ecological and resource-saving characteristics at all stages of production and distribution of electric power are increased. One of the decision methods of many problems of the power industry is the development of new high-efficiency electrical equipment for smart power systems based on superconducting technologies to ensure a qualitatively new level of functioning of the electric power industry. The intensive research and development of new types of electrical devices based on superconductors are being carried out in many industrialized advanced countries. Interest in such developments has especially increased in recent years owing to the discovery of so-called high-temperature superconductors (HTS) that do not require complicated and expensive cooling devices. Such devices can operate at cooling by inexpensive and easily accessible liquid nitrogen. Taking into account the obvious advantages of superconducting cable lines for the transmission of large power flows through an electrical network, as compared with conventional cables, the Federal Grid Company of Unified Energy System (JSC FGC UES) initiated a research and development program including the creation of superconducting HTS AC and DC cable lines. Two cable lines for the transmitted power of 50 MVA/MW at 20 kV were manufactured and tested within the framework of the program.

  5. Equilibrium intermediate-state patterns in a type-I superconducting slab in an arbitrarily oriented applied magnetic field

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Clem, John; Prozorov, Ruslan; Wijngaarden, Rinke J.

    2013-09-04

    The equilibrium topology of superconducting and normal domains in flat type-I superconductors is investigated. Important improvements with respect to previous work are that (1) the energy of the external magnetic field, as deformed by the presence of superconducting domains, is calculated in the same way for three different topologies and (2) calculations are made for arbitrary orientation of the applied field. A phase diagram is presented for the minimum-energy topology as a function of applied field magnitude and angle. For small (large) applied fields, normal (superconducting) tubes are found, while for intermediate fields, parallel domains have a lower energy. Themore » range of field magnitudes for which the superconducting-tubes structure is favored shrinks when the field is more in-plane oriented.« less

  6. Experimental validation of advanced regulations for superconducting magnet cooling undergoing periodic heat loads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lagier, B.; Rousset, B.; Hoa, C.; Bonnay, P.

    2014-01-29

    Superconducting magnets used in tokamaks undergo periodic heat load caused by cycling plasma operations inducing AC losses, neutrons fluxes and eddy currents in magnet structures. In the cryogenic system of JT60-SA tokamak, the Auxiliary Cold Box (ACB) distributes helium from the refrigerator to the cryogenic users and in particular to the superconducting magnets. ACB comprises a saturated helium bath with immersed heat exchangers, extracting heat from independent cooling loops. The supercritical helium flow in each cooling loop is driven by a cold circulator. In order to safely operate the refrigerator during plasma pulses, the interface between the ACB and the refrigerator shall be as stable as possible, with well-balanced bath inlet and outlet mass flows during cycling operation. The solution presented in this paper relies on a combination of regulations to smooth pulsed heat loads and to keep a constant refrigeration power during all the cycle. Two smoothing strategies are presented, both regulating the outlet mass flow of the bath: the first one using the bath as a thermal buffer and the second one storing energy in the loop by varying the cold circulator speed. The bath outlet mass flow is also controlled by an immersed resistive heater which enables a constant evaporation rate in the bath when power coming from the loops is decreasing. The refrigeration power is controlled so that the compensating power remains within an acceptable margin. Experimental validation is achieved using the HELIOS facility. This facility running at CEA Grenoble since 2010 is a scaled down model of the ACB bath and Central Solenoid magnet cooling loop of the JT60-SA tokamak. Test results show performances and robustness of the regulations.

  7. Commissioning of horizontal-bend superconducting magnet for Jefferson Lab's 11-GeV super high momentum spectrometer

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sun, Eric; Brindza, Paul D.; Lassiter, Steven R.; Fowler, Mike J.; Fenker, Howard C.; DeKamp, Jon C.

    2016-03-02

    Commissioning characteristics of the Superconducting High Momentum Spectrometer (SHMS) Horizontal Bend (HB) magnet was presented. Pre-commissioning peer review of the magnet uncovered issues with eddy currents in the thermal shield, resulting in additional testing and modeling of the magnet. A three-stage test plan was discussed. A solution of using a small dump resistor and a warm thermal shield was presented. Analyses illustrated that it was safe to run the magnet to full test current. As a result, the HB magnet was successfully cooled to 4 K and reached its maximum test current of 4000 A.

  8. Electron Temperature Fluctuations During Magnetic Reconnection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fluctuations During Magnetic Reconnection in the Reversed-Field Pinch by Cale P. Kasten Undergraduate thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Science (Engineering Physics) at the UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN - MADISON April 5, 2011 Abstract Electron temperature correlates to the dominant m = 0, n = 1 edge-resonant tear- ing mode during sawtooth events in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field pinch. Using a high-repetition-rate Thomson scattering

  9. Low temperature laser scanning microscopy of a superconducting radio-frequency cavity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ciovati, G.; Anlage, Steven M.; Baldwin, C.; Cheng, G.; Flood, R.; Jordan, K.; Kneisel, P.; Morrone, M.; Nemes, G.; Turlington, L.; et al

    2012-03-16

    An apparatus was created to obtain, for the first time, 2D maps of the surface resistance of the inner surface of an operating superconducting radio-frequency niobium cavity by a low-temperature laser scanning microscopy technique. This allows identifying non-uniformities of the surface resistance with a spatial resolution of about one order of magnitude better than with earlier methods. A signal-to-noise ratio of about 10 dB was obtained with 240 mW laser power and 1 Hz modulation frequency. The various components of the apparatus, the experimental procedure and results are discussed in details in this contribution.

  10. Superconducting and magnetic properties of Sr3Ir4Sn13

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biswas, P. K.; Amato, A.; Khasanov, R.; Luetkens, H.; Wang, Kefeng; Petrovic, C.; Cook, R. M.; Lees, M. R.; Morenzoni, E.

    2014-10-10

    In this research, magnetization and muon spin relaxation or rotation (SR) measurements have been performed to study the superconducting and magnetic properties of Sr?Ir?Sn??. From magnetization measurements the lower and upper critical fields of Sr?Ir?Sn?? are found to be 81(1) Oe and 14.4(2) kOe, respectively. Zero-field SR data show no sign of any magnetic ordering or weak magnetism in Sr?Ir?Sn??. Transverse-field SR measurements in the vortex state provided the temperature dependence of the magnetic penetration depth ?. The dependence of ?? with temperature is consistent with the existence of single s-wave energy gap in the superconducting state of Sr?Ir?Sn?? with a gap value of 0.82(2) meV at absolute zero temperature. The magnetic penetration depth at zero temperature ?(0) is 291(3) nm. The ratio ?(0)/kBTc = 2.1(1) indicates that Sr?Ir?Sn?? should be considered as a strong-coupling superconductor.

  11. 119Sn-NMR investigations on superconducting Ca3Ir4Sn13: Evidence for multigap superconductivity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sarkar, R.; Petrovic, C.; Bruckner, F.; Gunther, M.; Wang, Kefeng; Biswas, P. K.; Luetkens, H.; Morenzoni, E.; Amato, A.; Klauss, H. -H.

    2015-09-25

    In this study, we report bulk superconductivity (SC) in Ca3Ir4Sn13 by means of 119Sn nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. Two classical signatures of BCS superconductivity in spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/T1), namely the Hebel–Slichter coherence peak just below the Tc, and the exponential decay in the superconducting phase, are evident. The noticeable decrease of 119Sn Knight shift below Tc indicates spin-singlet superconductivity. The temperature dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation rate 119(1/T1) is convincingly described by the multigap isotropic superconducting gap. NMR experiments do not witness any sign of enhanced spin fluctuations.

  12. Method and apparatus for connecting high voltage leads to a high temperature super-conducting transformer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Golner, Thomas M.; Mehta, Shirish P.

    2005-07-26

    A method and apparatus for connecting high voltage leads to a super-conducting transformer is provided that includes a first super-conducting coil set, a second super-conducting coil set, and a third super-conducting coil set. The first, second and third super-conducting coil sets are connected via an insulated interconnect system that includes insulated conductors and insulated connectors that are utilized to connect the first, second, and third super-conducting coil sets to the high voltage leads.

  13. Competition between magnetic and superconducting pairing exchange interactions in confined systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ying Zujian; Cuoco, Mario; Noce, Canio; Zhou Huanqiang

    2007-10-01

    We analyze the competition between magnetic and pairing interactions in confined systems relevant to either small superconducting grains or trapped ultracold atomic gases. The response to the imbalance of the chemical potential for the two spin states leads to various inhomogeneous profiles of the pair energy distribution. We show that the position in the energy spectrum for the unpaired particles can be tuned by varying the filling or the pairing strength. When small grains are considered, the antiferromagnetic exchange stabilizes the pair correlations, whereas for Fermi gases, a transition from a mixed configuration to a phase-separated one beyond a critical polarization threshold appears, as does an unconventional phase with a paired shell around a normal core.

  14. Method for determining hydrogen mobility as a function of temperature in superconducting niobium cavities

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    May, Robert

    2008-03-11

    A method for determining the mobility of hydrogen as a function of temperature in superconducting niobium cavities comprising: 1) heating a cavity under test to remove free hydrogen; 2) introducing hydrogen-3 gas into the cavity; 3) cooling the cavity to allow absorption of hydrogen-3; and 4) measuring the amount of hydrogen-3 by: a) cooling the cavity to about 4.degree. K while flowing a known and regulated amount of inert carrier gas such as argon or helium into the cavity; b) allowing the cavity to warm at a stable rate from 4.degree. K to room temperature as it leaves the chamber; and c) directing the exit gas to an ion chamber radiation detector.

  15. Secrets of superconductivity revealed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Secrets of superconductivity revealed Secrets of superconductivity revealed The superconducting material Cerium-Colbalt-Indium5 reveals new secrets about how superconductivity and magnetism can be related. January 3, 2014 Simon Gerber, first author of the publication on the superconducting properties of CeCoIn5 at the Morpheus instrument of the Spallation Neutron Source SINQ in Switzerland. (Photo: Paul Scherrer Institute/Markus Fischer) Simon Gerber, first author of the publication on the

  16. Amorphous RE–Fe–B–Na colloidal nanoparticles: High temperature solution synthesis and magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jia, Li-Ping; Yan, Bing

    2015-04-15

    Graphical abstract: RE–Fe–B–Na (RE = Nd–Er) colloidal nanoparticles by high-temperature solution synthesis are ultra-small monodisperse and air-stable amorphous, whose size and magnetic dependence are studied. - Highlights: • RE–Fe–B–Na nanoparticles are obtained by high-temperature solution synthesis. • These colloidal nanoparticles are monodisperse and size controlled. • The magnetism dependence and possible magnetic coupling mechanism are studied. - Abstract: RE–Fe–B–Na (RE = Nd–Er) colloidal nanoparticles are prepared by high-temperature solution synthesis. These nanoparticles are ultra-small monodisperse, air-stable and amorphous, whose particle size and magnetic property are characterized by transmission electron microscope and superconducting quantum interference device. Taking Nd–Fe–B–Na nanoparticle as an example, it is found that the particle size can be controlled in less than 7 nm. Besides, the magnetic properties of RE–Fe–B–Na colloidal nanoparticles can be compared for different rare earth elements. Based on the bulk ferromagnetic coupling, other possible magnetic coupling mechanism is discussed.

  17. Design of a superconducting 28 GHz ion source magnet for FRIB using a shell-based support structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Felice, H.; Rochepault, E.; Hafalia, R.; Caspi, S.; Dietderich, D. R.; Prestemon, S. O.; Machicoane, G.; Pozdeyev, E.; Bultman, N.; Rao, X.

    2014-12-05

    The Superconducting Magnet Program at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is completing the design of a 28 GHz NbTi ion source magnet for the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB). The design parameters are based on the parameters of the ECR ion source VENUS in operation at LBNL since 2002 featuring a sextupole-in-solenoids configuration. Whereas most of the magnet components (such as conductor, magnetic design, protection scheme) remain very similar to the VENUS magnet components, the support structure of the FRIB ion source uses a different concept. A shell-based support structure using bladders and keys is implemented in the design allowing fine tuning of the sextupole preload and reversibility of the magnet assembly process. As part of the design work, conductor insulation scheme, coil fabrication processes and assembly procedures are also explored to optimize performance. We present the main features of the design emphasizing the integrated design approach used at LBNL to achieve this result.

  18. Levitation pressure and friction losses in superconducting bearings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R.

    2001-01-01

    A superconducting bearing having at least one permanent magnet magnetized with a vertical polarization. The lower or stator portion of the bearing includes an array of high-temperature superconducting elements which are comprised of a plurality of annular rings. An annular ring is located below each permanent magnet and an annular ring is offset horizontally from at least one of the permanent magnets. The rings are composed of individual high-temperature superconducting elements located circumferentially along the ring. By constructing the horizontally-offset high-temperature superconducting ring so that the c-axis is oriented in a radial direction, a higher levitation force can be achieved. Such an orientation will also provide substantially lower rotational drag losses in the bearing.

  19. Cryocooler applications for high-temperature superconductor magnetic bearings.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niemann, R. C.

    1998-05-22

    The efficiency and stability of rotational magnetic suspension systems are enhanced by the use of high-temperature superconductor (HTS) magnetic bearings. Fundamental aspects of the HTS magnetic bearings and rotational magnetic suspension are presented. HTS cooling can be by liquid cryogen bath immersion or by direct conduction, and thus there are various applications and integration issues for cryocoolers. Among the numerous cryocooler aspects to be considered are installation; operating temperature; losses; and vacuum pumping.

  20. Effects of magnetic non-linearities on a stored proton beam and their implications for superconducting storage rings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cornacchia, M.; Evans, L.

    1985-06-01

    A nonlinear lens may be used to study the effect of high-order multipolar field imperfections on a stored proton beam. Such a nonlinear lens is particulary suitable to simulate field imperfections of the types encountered in coil dominated superconducting magnets. We have studied experimentally at the SPS the effect of high order (5th and 8th) single isolated resonances driven by the nonlinear lens. The width of these resonances is of the order one expects to be caused by field errors in superconducting magnets of the SSC type. The experiment shows that, in absence of tune modulation, these resonances are harmless. Slow crossings of the resonance, on the other hand, have destructive effects on the beam, much more so than fast crossings caused by synchrotron oscillations. In the design of future storage rings, sources of low-frequency tune modulation should be avoided as a way to reduce the harmful effects of high order multipolar field imperfection.

  1. Magnetic Resonance Flow Velocity and Temperature Mapping of a...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of a Shape Memory Polymer Foam Device Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Magnetic Resonance Flow Velocity and Temperature Mapping of a Shape Memory Polymer Foam ...

  2. Control of magnetic, nonmagnetic, and superconducting states in annealed Ca(Fe1–xCox)₂As₂

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ran, S.; Bud'ko, S. L.; Straszheim, W. E.; Soh, J.; Kim, M. G.; Kreyssig, A.; Goldman, A. I.; Canfield, P. C.

    2012-06-22

    We have grown single-crystal samples of Co substituted CaFe₂As₂ using an FeAs flux and systematically studied the effects of annealing/quenching temperature on the physical properties of these samples. Whereas the as-grown samples (quenched from 960°C) all enter the collapsed tetragonal phase upon cooling, annealing/quenching temperatures between 350 and 800°C can be used to tune the system to low-temperature antiferromagnetic/orthorhomic or superconducting states as well. The progression of the transition temperature versus annealing/quenching temperature (T-Tanneal) phase diagrams with increasing Co concentration shows that, by substituting Co, the antiferromagnetic/orthorhombic and the collapsed tetragonal phase lines are separated and bulk superconductivity is revealed.more » We established a 3D phase diagram with Co concentration and annealing/quenching temperature as two independent control parameters. At ambient pressure, for modest x and Tanneal values, the Ca(Fe₁₋xCox)₂As₂ system offers ready access to the salient low-temperature states associated with Fe-based superconductors: antiferromagnetic/orthorhombic, superconducting, and nonmagnetic/collapsed tetragonal.« less

  3. Progress in high-temperature superconducting transistors and other devices; Proceedings of the SPIE Meeting, Vol. 1394, Santa Clara, CA, Oct. 4, 5, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, R.; Narayan, J.; Shaw, D.T.

    1991-01-01

    Various papers on progress in high-temperature superconducting transistors and other devices are presented. Individual topics addressed include: superconductor/semiconductor structure and its application to superconducting devices, superconducting YBa{sup 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} films on Si and GaAs with conducting indium tin oxide buffer layers, high-temperature superconducting Josephson junction devices, planar SNS Josephson junctions using multilayer Bi system, YBa{sup 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x}/Au/Nb device structures, cleaved surfaces of high Tc films for making SNS structures, high-temperature superconductive microwave technology for space applications, high-Tc superconducting infrared bolometric detector, thin film processing and device fabrication in the Tl-Ca-Ba-Cu-O system. Also discussed are: grain-oriented high--Tc superconductors and their applications, speed of optically controlled superconducting devices, effect of laser irradiation on superconducting properties of laser-deposited YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} thin films, role of buffer layers in the laser-ablated films on metallic substrates, progress toward device applications using MOCVD of TlBaCaCuO, versatility of metal organic chemical vapor deposition process for fabrication of high-quality YBCO superconducting thin films.

  4. MagRad: A code to optimize the operation of superconducting magnets in a radiation environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yeaw, C.T.

    1995-12-31

    A powerful computational tool, called MagRad, has been developed which optimizes magnet design for operation in radiation fields. Specifically, MagRad has been used for the analysis and design modification of the cable-in-conduit conductors of the TF magnet systems in fusion reactor designs. Since the TF magnets must operate in a radiation environment which damages the material components of the conductor and degrades their performance, the optimization of conductor design must account not only for start-up magnet performance, but also shut-down performance. The degradation in performance consists primarily of three effects: reduced stability margin of the conductor; a transition out of the well-cooled operating regime; and an increased maximum quench temperature attained in the conductor. Full analysis of the magnet performance over the lifetime of the reactor includes: radiation damage to the conductor, stability, protection, steady state heat removal, shielding effectiveness, optimal annealing schedules, and finally costing of the magnet and reactor. Free variables include primary and secondary conductor geometric and compositional parameters, as well as fusion reactor parameters. A means of dealing with the radiation damage to the conductor, namely high temperature superconductor anneals, is proposed, examined, and demonstrated to be both technically feasible and cost effective. Additionally, two relevant reactor designs (ITER CDA and ARIES-II/IV) have been analyzed. Upon addition of pure copper strands to the cable, the ITER CDA TF magnet design was found to be marginally acceptable, although much room for both performance improvement and cost reduction exists. A cost reduction of 10-15% of the capital cost of the reactor can be achieved by adopting a suitable superconductor annealing schedule. In both of these reactor analyses, the performance predictive capability of MagRad and its associated costing techniques have been demonstrated.

  5. Temperature compensated current sensor using reference magnetic field

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yakymyshyn, Christopher Paul; Brubaker, Michael Allen; Yakymyshyn, Pamela Jane

    2007-10-09

    A method is described to provide temperature compensation and self-calibration of a current sensor based on a plurality of magnetic field sensors positioned around a current carrying conductor. A reference magnetic field generated within the current sensor housing is detected by a separate but identical magnetic field sensor and is used to correct variations in the output signal due to temperature variations and aging.

  6. Improved Magnetic Field Generation Efficiency and Higher Temperature Spheromak Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, R D; Hill, D N; McLean, H S; Hooper, E B; Hudson, B F; Moller, J M; Romero-Talamas, C A

    2008-09-15

    New understanding of the mechanisms governing the observed magnetic field generation limits on the sustained spheromak physics experiment has been obtained. Extending the duration of magnetic helicity injection during the formation of a spheromak and optimizing the ratio of injected current to bias flux produce higher magnetic field plasmas with record spheromak electron temperatures. To explore magnetic field buildup efficiency limits, the confinement region geometry was varied resulting in improved field buildup efficiencies.

  7. Electron Temperature Structures Associated With Magnetic Tearing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structures Associated With Magnetic Tearing Modes in the Madison Symmetric Torus By Hillary Dianne Stephens A dissertation submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy (Physics) at the UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN - MADISON 2010 i Abstract Tearing mode induced magnetic islands have a significant impact on the thermal char- acteristics of magnetically confined plasmas such as those in the reversed-field pinch. Using a state-of-the-art Thomson scattering

  8. Experimental Investigation of Magnetic, Superconducting, and other Phase Transitions in novel F-Electron Materials at Ultra-high Pressures - Final Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maple, Brian; Jeffires, Jason

    2006-07-28

    This grant, entitled “Experimental investigation of magnetic, superconducting and other phase transitions in novel f-electron materials at ultrahigh pressures,” spanned the funding period from May 1st, 2003 until April 30th, 2006. The major goal of this grant was to develop and utilize an ultrahigh pressure facility—capable of achieving very low temperatures, high magnetic fields, and extreme pressures as well as providing electrical resistivity, ac susceptibility, and magnetization measurement capabilities under pressure—for the exploration of magnetic, electronic, and structural phases and any corresponding interactions between these states in novel f-electron materials. Realizing this goal required the acquisition, development, fabrication, and implementation of essential equipment, apparatuses, and techniques. The following sections of this report detail the establishment of an ultrahigh pressure facility (Section 1) and measurements performed during the funding period (Section 2), as well as summarize the research project (Section 3), project participants and their levels of support (Section 4), and publications and presentations (Section 5).

  9. Superconducting YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}x} thin films on polycrystalline ferrite for magnetically tunable microwave components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jia, Q.X.; Findikoglu, A.T.; Arendt, P.; Foltyn, S.R.; Roper, J.M.; Groves, J.R.; Coulter, J.Y.; Li, Y.Q.; Dionne, G.F.

    1998-04-01

    Superconducting YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}x} (YBCO) thin films with a surface resistance of 0.86 m{Omega} at 10 GHz and 76 K have been grown on polycrystalline ferrite yttrium iron garnet (YIG) substrates. The chemical and structural mismatches between YBCO and YIG are solved by using a double buffer layer of biaxially oriented yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and CeO{sub 2}, where YSZ is deposited by an ion-beam-assisted-deposition technique. The YBCO films are {ital c} axis oriented with an in-plane mosaic spread [full width at half maximum of an x-ray {phi}-scan on (103) reflection] of less than 8{degree}. The films have a superconductive transition temperature above 88 K with a transition width less than 0.3 K, giving a critical current density above 10{sup 6}A/cm{sup 2} in self field at 75 K. At 75 K in an external magnetic field of 1 T perpendicular to the film surface, the films maintain a critical current density over 2{times}10{sup 5}A/cm{sup 2}. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Construction and tests of a model of the LHC superconducting corrector magnet MDSBV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ijspeert, A.; Perin, R. ); Baynham, E.; Clee, P.; Coombs, R.; Evans, D. ); Begg, M.; Landgrebe, D. )

    1992-01-01

    A full-scale model of the 1.25 m long MDSBV (Magnet Decapole Sextupole Bending Vertical) correction magnet for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been constructed and is currently being tested. The model contains the desired dipole and sextupole but not the decapole which was decided upon later. The magnet was built in a very compact way by placing the dipole coil around the sextupole coil. The two coils were vacuum impregnated and prestressed by shrink-fitted aluminum rings. The design took into account the high positional accuracy requirements for the coils and incorporated manufacturing techniques which are compatible with mass production methods, as approximately 800 of these magnets will be required for the LHC. The model is being tested in liquid helium at the temperature of 4.2 K and will be tested later at 2.0 K. The paper describes the construction, the experience gained during assembly, the test conditions and gives the first test-results.

  11. Scientists optimize defects for better superconducting effects | Argonne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Laboratory optimize defects for better superconducting effects By Jared Sagoff * July 12, 2016 Tweet EmailPrint High-temperature superconducting materials hold enormous promise for a variety of different applications because of their ability to transmit a current without any dissipation at relatively high temperatures - up to around 90 Kelvin (about -300° F), which permits cooling with liquid nitrogen. However, this special ability decreases rapidly in the presence of a magnetic

  12. Superconducting open-gradient magnetic separation for the pretreatment of radioactive or mixed waste vitrification feeds. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doctor, R.; Nunez, L.; Cicero-Herman, C.A.; Ritter, J.A.; Landsberger, S.

    1997-01-01

    'Vitrification has been selected as a final waste form technology in the US for long-term storage of high-level radioactive wastes (HLW). However, a foreseeable problem during vitrification in some waste feed streams lies in the presence of elements (e.g., transition metals) in the HLW that may cause instabilities in the final glass product. The formation of spinel compounds, such as Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and FeCrO{sub 4}, results in glass phase separation and reduces vitrifier lifetime, and durability of the final waste form. A superconducting open gradient magnetic separation (OGMS) system maybe suitable for the removal of the deleterious transition elements (e.g. Fe, Co, and Ni) and other elements (lanthanides) from vitrification feed streams due to their ferromagnetic or paramagnetic nature. The OGMS systems are designed to deflect and collect paramagnetic minerals as they interact with a magnetic field gradient. This system has the potential to reduce the volume of HLW for vitrification and ensure a stable product. In order to design efficient OGMS and High gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) processes, a fundamental understanding of the physical and chemical properties of the waste feed streams is required. Using HLW simulant and radioactive fly ash and sludge samples from the Savannah River Technology Center, Rocky Flats site, and the Hanford reservation, several techniques were used to characterize and predict the separation capability for a superconducting OGMS system.'

  13. Study on effect of annealing conditions on structural, magnetic and superconducting properties of MgB{sub 2} bulk samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phaneendra, Konduru Asokan, K. Kanjilal, D.; Awana, V. P. S.; Sastry, S. Sreehari

    2014-04-24

    Effect of annealing conditions on structural, magnetic and superconducting properties of Magnesium Diboride (MgB{sub 2}) bulk superconductor samples prepared by solid state route method are compared. The samples are made by taking Magnesium and Boron powders in stoichiometric ratio, grounded well and pelletized at pressure of about 10Tonnes. These pellets are annealed in both Argon and vacuum environment separately up to 800°c for two hours. Both the samples show clear superconducting transition at Tc ∼ 38 k. This is further conformed by AC/DC magnetization (M-T), Resistivity [ρ (T, H)] measurements under magnetic field up to 14 Tesla as well. Rietveld refinement of X-ray diffraction of both samples conformed the MgB{sub 2} phase formation with P6/mmm space group symmetry. Scanning Electron Microscopy images of the surface revile more agglomeration of grains in case of Argon annealed samples. This result in more critical current density (J{sub c}) of Argon annealed samples than vacuum annealed one calculated from Bean's critical state model. This high Jc is explained in terms of more inter grain connectivity for Argon annealed sample than vacuum annealed sample.

  14. Structural and magnetic phase transitions near optimal superconductivity in BaFe2(As1-xPx)2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hu, Ding; Lu, Xingye; Zhang, Wenliang; Luo, Huiqian; Li, Shiliang; Wang, Peipei; Chen, Genfu; Han, Fei; Banjara, Shree R.; Sapkota, A.; et al

    2015-04-17

    In this study, we use nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), high-resolution x-ray and neutron scattering to study structural and magnetic phase transitions in phosphorus-doped BaFe2(As1-xPx)2. Thus, previous transport, NMR, specific heat, and magnetic penetration depth measurements have provided compelling evidence for the presence of a quantum critical point (QCP) near optimal superconductivity at x = 0.3. However, we show that the tetragonal-to-orthorhombic structural (Ts) and paramagnetic to antiferromagnetic (AF, TN) transitions in BaFe2(As1-xPx)2 are always coupled and approach to TN ≈ Ts ≥ Tc (≈ 29 K) for x = 0.29 before vanishing abruptly for x ≥ 0.3. These results suggestmore » that AF order in BaFe2(As1-xPx)2 disappears in a weakly first order fashion near optimal superconductivity, much like the electron-doped iron pnictides with an avoided QCP.« less

  15. Argonne scientists announce first room-temperature magnetic skyrmion...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    left to right: Argonne researchers Wanjun Jiang, Suzanne G.E. te Velthuis, and Axel Hoffman published a new way to make magnetic skyrmion bubbles at room temperature. Photo by...

  16. Superconducting molybdenum-rhenium electrodes for single-molecule transport studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaudenzi, R.; Island, J. O.; Bruijckere, J. de; Burzurí, E.; Zant, H. S. J. van der; Klapwijk, T. M.

    2015-06-01

    We demonstrate that electronic transport through single molecules or molecular ensembles, commonly based on gold (Au) electrodes, can be extended to superconducting electrodes by combining gold with molybdenum-rhenium (MoRe). This combination induces proximity-effect superconductivity in the gold to temperatures of at least 4.6 K and magnetic fields of 6 T, improving on previously reported aluminum based superconducting nanojunctions. As a proof of concept, we show three-terminal superconductive transport measurements through an individual Fe{sub 4} single-molecule magnet.

  17. Proceedings of the fourth international conference and exhibition: World Congress on superconductivity. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishen, K.; Burnham, C.

    1994-12-31

    The goals of the World Congress on Superconductivity (WCS) have been to establish and foster the development and commercial application of superconductivity technology on a global scale by providing a non-adversarial, non-advocacy forum where scientists, engineers, businessmen and government personnel can freely exchange information and ideas on recent developments and directions for the future of superconductive research. Sessions were held on: accelerator technology, power and energy, persistent magnetic fields, performance characterization, physical properties, fabrication methodology, superconductive magnetic energy storage (SMES), thin films, high temperature materials, device applications, wire fabrication, and granular superconductors. Individual papers are indexed separately.

  18. Design of a superconducting 28 GHz ion source magnet for FRIB using a shell-based support structure

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Felice, H.; Rochepault, E.; Hafalia, R.; Caspi, S.; Dietderich, D. R.; Prestemon, S. O.; Machicoane, G.; Pozdeyev, E.; Bultman, N.; Rao, X.

    2014-12-05

    The Superconducting Magnet Program at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is completing the design of a 28 GHz NbTi ion source magnet for the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB). The design parameters are based on the parameters of the ECR ion source VENUS in operation at LBNL since 2002 featuring a sextupole-in-solenoids configuration. Whereas most of the magnet components (such as conductor, magnetic design, protection scheme) remain very similar to the VENUS magnet components, the support structure of the FRIB ion source uses a different concept. A shell-based support structure using bladders and keys is implemented in themore » design allowing fine tuning of the sextupole preload and reversibility of the magnet assembly process. As part of the design work, conductor insulation scheme, coil fabrication processes and assembly procedures are also explored to optimize performance. We present the main features of the design emphasizing the integrated design approach used at LBNL to achieve this result.« less

  19. Experimental Investigation of Magnetic Superconducting, and other Phase Transitions in Novel f-Electron Materials at Ultra-high Pressures Using Designer Diamond Anvils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maple, M. Brian

    2005-09-13

    Pressure is a powerful control parameter, owing to its ability to affect crystal and electronic structure without introducing defects, for the investigation of condensed matter systems. Some f-electron, heavy-fermion materials display interesting and novel behavior when exposed to pressures achievable with conventional experimental techniques; however, a growing number of condensed matter systems require extreme conditions such as ultrahigh pressures, high magnetic fields, and ultralow temperatures to sufficiently explore the important properties. To that end, we have been funded to develop an ultrahigh pressure facility at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) in order to investigate superconductivity, magnetism, non-Fermi liquid behavior, and other phenomena under extreme conditions. Our goals for the second year of this grant were as follows: (a) perform electrical resistivity measurements on novel samples at a myriad of pressures using conventional piston-cylinder techniques, Bridgman anvil techniques, and diamond anvil cell technology; (b) install, commission, and operate an Oxford Kelvinox MX-100 dilution refrigerator for access to ultralow temperatures and high magnetic fields. (c) continue the development of diamond anvil cell (DAC) technology. During the past year, we have successfully installed the Oxford Kelvinox MX-100 dilution refrigerator and verified its operability down to 12 mK. We have begun an experimental program to systematically investigate the f-electron compound URu2Si2 under pressure and in the presence of magnetic fields. We have also continued our collaborative work with Sam Weir at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) on Au4V and implemented a new corollary study on Au1-xVx using ultrahigh pressures. We have continued developing our DAC facility by designing and constructing an apparatus for in situ pressure measurement as well as designing high pressure cells. This report serves to highlight the progress we have made

  20. Superconductive imaging surface magnetometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Overton, Jr., William C.; van Hulsteyn, David B.; Flynn, Edward R.

    1991-01-01

    An improved pick-up coil system for use with Superconducting Quantum Interference Device gradiometers and magnetometers involving the use of superconducting plates near conventional pick-up coil arrangements to provide imaging of nearby dipole sources and to deflect environmental magnetic noise away from the pick-up coils. This allows the practice of gradiometry and magnetometry in magnetically unshielded environments. One embodiment uses a hemispherically shaped superconducting plate with interior pick-up coils, allowing brain wave measurements to be made on human patients. another embodiment using flat superconducting plates could be used in non-destructive evaluation of materials.

  1. Superconductivity in the presence of disorder in skutterudite-related La3Co4Sn13 and La3Ru4Sn13 compounds: Electrical transport and magnetic studies

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Slebarski, A.; Maska, M. M.; Fijalkowski, M.; McElroy, C. A.; Maple, M. B.

    2015-06-25

    La3Co4Sn13 and La3Ru4Sn13 were categorized as BCS superconductors. In a plot of the critical field Hc2 vs T, La3Ru4Sn13 displays a second superconducting phase at the higher critical temperature Tc*, characteristic of inhomogeneous superconductors, while La3Co4Sn13 shows bulk superconductivity below Tc. We observe a decrease in critical temperatures with external pressure and magnetic field for both compounds. Additionally, for La3Ru4Sn13 we find that Tc*/dP>dTc/dP. The pressure dependences of Tc are interpreted according to the McMillan theory and understood to be a consequence of lattice stiffening. The investigation of the superconducting state of La3CoxRu4–xSn13 shows a Tc* that is larger thenmore » Tc for x < 4. Furthermore, this unique and unexpected observation is discussed as a result of the local disorder and/or the effect of chemical pressure when Ru atoms are partially replaced by smaller Co atoms.« less

  2. Graphite and its Hidden Superconductivity | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lightsource powders [7]. Special emphasis will be given to the possible ways to differentiate between ferromagnetic- from superconducting-like signals when the magnetic moments of interest remain small in comparison with the large diamagnetic backgrounds. Recently done transport and persistent currents experiments at room temperature on graphite flakes embedded in alkanes and their reproducibility. All the experimental evidence as a whole suggests the existence of superconductivity at very

  3. Improvement of magnetic shielding effects: The superposition of a double-magnetic cylinder over a high-Tc superconducting cylinder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohyama, Takashi; Minemoto, Takumi ); Itoh, Mineo ); Hoshino, Kazutomo )

    1993-11-01

    Improvement of magnetic shielding was achieved by superimposing a double-magnetic cylinder over a YBCO (Y-Ba-Cu-0) cylinder. The value of the magnetic shielded field for the superimposed cylinder was 47 times larger than that of the YBCO cylinder. The magnetic shielded field obtained when superimposing a soft iron single-cylinder over a YBCO cylinder was analyzed using the Bean, Wills, and Mager models, with an important criterion being derived for designing an effective shield of the chamber.

  4. Cryostat design and analysis of the superconducting magnets for Jefferson Lab's 11-GEV/C super high momentum spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. Brindza, E. Sun, S. Lassiter, M. Fowler

    2010-04-01

    This paper describes the mechanical design and analysis of the cryostats for the two cos(2theta) quadrupoles and the cos(theta) dipole. All the magnets are currently being bid for commercial fabrication. The results of finite element analysis for the magnet cryostat helium vessels and outer vacuum chambers which investigate the mechanical integrity under maximum allowable internal working pressure, maximum allowable external working pressure, and cryogenic temperature are discussed. The allowable stress criterion is determined based on the allowable stress philosophy of the ASME codes. The computed cryogenic heat load of the magnets is compared with the allowable cryogenic consumption budget. The presented cool-down time of the magnets was studied under the conditions of a limited supply rate and a controlled temperature differential of 50 K in the magnets.

  5. Anomalous pressure dependence of magnetic ordering temperature in Tb revealed by resistivity measurements to 141 GPa. Comparison with Gd and Dy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lim, J.; Fabbris, G.; Haskel, D.; Schilling, J. S.

    2015-05-26

    In previous studies the pressure dependence of the magnetic ordering temperature To of Dy was found to exhibit a sharp increase above its volume collapse pressure of 73 GPa, appearing to reach temperatures well above ambient at 157 GPa. In a search for a second such lanthanide, electrical resistivity measurements were carried out on neighboring Tb to 141 GPa over the temperature range 3.8 - 295 K. Below Tb’s volume collapse pressure of 53 GPa, the pressure dependence To(P) mirrors that of both Dy and Gd. However, at higher pressures To(P) for Tb becomes highly anomalous. This result, together with the very strong suppression of superconductivity by dilute Tb ions in Y, suggests that extreme pressure transports Tb into an unconventional magnetic state with an anomalously high magnetic ordering temperature.

  6. Anomalous pressure dependence of magnetic ordering temperature in Tb revealed by resistivity measurements to 141 GPa. Comparison with Gd and Dy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lim, J.; Fabbris, G.; Haskel, D.; Schilling, J. S.

    2015-05-26

    In previous studies the pressure dependence of the magnetic ordering temperature To of Dy was found to exhibit a sharp increase above its volume collapse pressure of 73 GPa, appearing to reach temperatures well above ambient at 157 GPa. In a search for a second such lanthanide, electrical resistivity measurements were carried out on neighboring Tb to 141 GPa over the temperature range 3.8 - 295 K. Below Tb’s volume collapse pressure of 53 GPa, the pressure dependence To(P) mirrors that of both Dy and Gd. However, at higher pressures To(P) for Tb becomes highly anomalous. This result, together withmore » the very strong suppression of superconductivity by dilute Tb ions in Y, suggests that extreme pressure transports Tb into an unconventional magnetic state with an anomalously high magnetic ordering temperature.« less

  7. Anomalous pressure dependence of magnetic ordering temperature in Tb revealed by resistivity measurements to 141 GPa. Comparison with Gd and Dy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lim, J.; Fabbris, G.; Haskel, D.; Schilling, J. S.

    2015-05-26

    In previous studies the pressure dependence of the magnetic ordering temperature To of Dy was found to exhibit a sharp increase above its volume collapse pressure of 73 GPa, appearing to reach temperatures well above ambient at 157 GPa. In a search for a second such lanthanide, electrical resistivity measurements were carried out on neighboring Tb to 141 GPa over the temperature range 3.8 - 295 K. Below Tbs volume collapse pressure of 53 GPa, the pressure dependence To(P) mirrors that of both Dy and Gd. However, at higher pressures To(P) for Tb becomes highly anomalous. This result, together with the very strong suppression of superconductivity by dilute Tb ions in Y, suggests that extreme pressure transports Tb into an unconventional magnetic state with an anomalously high magnetic ordering temperature.

  8. Superconducting Open-Gradient Magnetic Separation for the Pretreatment of Radioactive or Mixed Waste Vitrification Feeds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nunez', L.; Kaminsky', M.D.,; Crawford, C.; Ritter, J.A.

    1999-12-31

    An open-gradient magnetic separation (OGMS) process is being considered to separate deleterious elements from radioactive and mixed waste streams prior to vitrification or stabilization. By physically segregating solid wastes and slurries based on the magnetic properties of the solid constituents, this potentially low-cost process may serve the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by reducing the large quantities of glass produced from defense-related high-level waste (HLW). Furthermore, the separation of deleterious elements from low-level waste (LLW) also can reduce the total quantity of waste produced in LLW immobilization activities. Many HLW 'and LLW waste' streams at both Hanford and the Savannah River Site (SRS) include constituents deleterious to the durability of borosilicate glass and the melter many of the constituents also possess paramagnetism. For example, Fe, Cr, Ni, and other transition metals may limit the waste loading and affect the durability of the glass by forming spine1 phases at the high operating temperature used in vitrification. Some magnetic spine1 phases observed in glass formation are magnetite (Fe,O,), chromite (FeCrO,), and others [(Fe, Ni, Mg, Zn, Mn)(Al, Fe, Ti, Cr)O,] as described elsewhere [Bates-1994, Wronkiewicz-1994] Stable spine1 phases can cause segregation between the glass and the crystalline phases. As a consequence of the difference in density, the spine1 phases tend to accumulate at the bottom of the glass melter, which decreases the conductivity and melter lifetime [Sproull-1993]. Crystallization also can affect glass durability [Jantzen-1985, Turcotte- 1979, Buechele-1990] by changing the chemical composition of the matrix glass surrounding the crystals or causing stress at the glass/crystal interface. These are some of the effects that can increase leaching [Jantzen-1985]. A SRS glass that was partially crystallized to contain 10% vol. crystals composed of spinels, nepheline, and acmite phases showed minimal changes in

  9. DOE Superconductivity Program Stakeholders | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Superconductivity Program Stakeholders DOE Superconductivity Program Stakeholders Map showing the stakeholders involved in High Temperature Superconductivity work with the DOE. DOE Superconductivity Program Stakeholders (104.19 KB) More Documents & Publications High Temperature Superconductivity Partners DOE Provides up to $51.8 Million to Modernize the U.S. Electric Grid System. June 27, 2007 Superconductivity for Electric Systems: 2008 Annual Peer Review Final Report

  10. Temperature and magnetic-field driven dynamics in artificial magnetic square ice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sophie A. Morley; Stein, Aaron; Rosamond, Mark C.; Venero, Diego Alba; Hrabec, Ales; Shepley, Philippa M.; Im, Mi -Young; Fischer, Peter; Bryan, Matthew T.; Allwood, Dan A.; Steadman, Paul; Langridge, Sean; Marrows, Christopher H.

    2015-08-09

    Artificial spin ices are often spoken of as being realisations of some of the celebrated vertex models of statistical mechanics, where the exact microstate of the system can be imaged using advanced magnetic microscopy methods. The fact that a stable image can be formed means that the system is in fact athermal and not undergoing the usual finite-temperature fluctuations of a statistical mechanical system. In this paper we report on the preparation of artificial spin ices with islands that are thermally fluctuating due to their very small size. The relaxation rate of these islands was determined using variable frequency focused magneto-optic Kerr measurements. We performed magnetic imaging of artificial spin ice under varied temperature and magnetic field using X-ray transmission microscopy which uses X-ray magnetic circular dichroism to generate magnetic contrast. Furthermore, we have developed an on-membrane heater in order to apply temperatures in excess of 700 K and have shown increased dynamics due to higher temperature. Due to the ‘photon-in, photon-out' method employed here, it is the first report where it is possible to image the microstates of an ASI system under the simultaneous application of temperature and magnetic field, enabling the determination of relaxation rates, coercivties, and the analysis of vertex population during reversal.

  11. Temperature and magnetic-field driven dynamics in artificial magnetic square ice

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sophie A. Morley; Stein, Aaron; Rosamond, Mark C.; Venero, Diego Alba; Hrabec, Ales; Shepley, Philippa M.; Im, Mi -Young; Fischer, Peter; Bryan, Matthew T.; Allwood, Dan A.; et al

    2015-08-09

    Artificial spin ices are often spoken of as being realisations of some of the celebrated vertex models of statistical mechanics, where the exact microstate of the system can be imaged using advanced magnetic microscopy methods. The fact that a stable image can be formed means that the system is in fact athermal and not undergoing the usual finite-temperature fluctuations of a statistical mechanical system. In this paper we report on the preparation of artificial spin ices with islands that are thermally fluctuating due to their very small size. The relaxation rate of these islands was determined using variable frequency focusedmore » magneto-optic Kerr measurements. We performed magnetic imaging of artificial spin ice under varied temperature and magnetic field using X-ray transmission microscopy which uses X-ray magnetic circular dichroism to generate magnetic contrast. Furthermore, we have developed an on-membrane heater in order to apply temperatures in excess of 700 K and have shown increased dynamics due to higher temperature. Due to the ‘photon-in, photon-out' method employed here, it is the first report where it is possible to image the microstates of an ASI system under the simultaneous application of temperature and magnetic field, enabling the determination of relaxation rates, coercivties, and the analysis of vertex population during reversal.« less

  12. Design and Fabrication of the Superconducting Horizontal Bend Magnet for the Super High Momentum Spectrometer at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chouhan, Shailendra S.; DeKamp, Jon; Burkhart, E. E,; Bierwagen, J.; Song, H.; Zeller, Albert F.; Brindza, Paul D.; Lassiter, Steven R.; Fowler, Michael J.; Sun, Qiuli

    2015-06-01

    A collaboration exists between NSCL and JLab to design and build JLab's Super High Momentum Spectrometer (SHMS) horizontal bend magnet that allows the bending of the 12 GeV/c particles horizontally by 3 to allow SHMS to reach angles as low as 5.5. Two full size coils have been wound and are cold tested for both magnetic and structural properties. Each coil is built from 90 layers of single-turn SSC outer conductor cable. An initial test coil with one third the turns was fabricated to demonstrate that the unique saddle shape with fully contoured ends could be wound with Rutherford superconducting cable. Learned lessons during the trial winding were integrated into the two complete full-scale coils that are now installed in the helium vessel. The fabrication of the iron yoke, cold mass, and thermal shield is complete, and assembly of the vacuum vessel is in progress. This paper presents the process and progress along with the modified magnet design to reduce the fringe field in the primary beam region and also includes the impact of the changes on coil forces and coil restraint system.

  13. Composite arrays of superconducting microstrip line resonators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohebbi, H. R. Miao, G. X.; Benningshof, O. W. B.; Taminiau, I. A. J.; Cory, D. G.

    2014-03-07

    A novel design of an array of half-wave superconductive microstrip resonators is described. The resonator is intended to be useful for electron spin resonance studies of thin film samples at cryogenic temperatures. It achieves a high quality factor, has a small mode-volume, and creates a uniform magnetic field in a plane above the resonator. The device is made of thin film Niobium on sapphire wafer and is tested with a static magnetic field. Variation of Q-factor versus the magnetic field's strength at different temperatures is reported and is in a good agreement with simulation when the loss due to the vortices is included. Also, the power-dependence response of the resonator is shown in experiments and is verified by capturing the nonlinearity associated with the surface impedance of the superconducting film into the circuit model of the device.

  14. Low Temperature Chemical Vapor Deposition Of Thin Film Magnets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Joel S.; Pokhodnya, Kostyantyn I.

    2003-12-09

    A thin-film magnet formed from a gas-phase reaction of tetracyanoetheylene (TCNE) OR (TCNQ), 7,7,8,8-tetracyano-P-quinodimethane, and a vanadium-containing compound such as vanadium hexcarbonyl (V(CO).sub.6) and bis(benzene)vanalium (V(C.sub.6 H.sub.6).sub.2) and a process of forming a magnetic thin film upon at least one substrate by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) at a process temperature not exceeding approximately 90.degree. C. and in the absence of a solvent. The magnetic thin film is particularly suitable for being disposed upon rigid or flexible substrates at temperatures in the range of 40.degree. C. and 70.degree. C. The present invention exhibits air-stable characteristics and qualities and is particularly suitable for providing being disposed upon a wide variety of substrates.

  15. New 30 kA power system at Fermilab and its use for measuring the effects of ripple current on the performance of superconducting high field magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carcagno, R.; Feher, S.; Garvey, J.; Jaskierny, W.; Lamm, M.; Makulski, A.; Orris, D.F.; Pfeffer, H.; Tartaglia, M.; Tompkins, J.; Wolff, D.; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    A new 30 kA, 30 V dc Power System was designed, built, and commissioned at Fermilab for testing Superconducting High Field Magnets. This system has been successfully supporting operations at the Fermilab Magnet Test Facility since April 2002. It is based on six commercial 150 kW Power Energy Industries power supply modules and the following in-house modules: six 720 Hz filters, two 15 kA/1kV dc solid-state dump switch, and a 3 MJ/30 kA/1 kV dc dump resistor. Additional inhouse electronic components were designed and built to provide precise current regulation and distribution of current and current rate of change. An industrial-type Programmable Logic Controller system was used to provide equipment interlocks and monitoring. This paper summarizes studies on the influence of characteristics of this new power system--such as ripple current--on the performance of High Field Superconducting magnets.

  16. Substitution of Ni for Fe in superconducting Fe?.??Te?.?Se?.? depresses the normal-state conductivity but not the magnetic spectral weight

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Jinghui; Tranquada, J. M.; Zhong, Ruidan; Li, Shichao; Gan, Yuan; Xu, Zhijun; Zhang, Cheng; Ozaki, T.; Matsuda, M.; Zhao, Yang; et al

    2015-01-05

    We have performed systematic resistivity and inelastic neutron scattering measurements on Fe?.???zNizTe?.?Se?.? samples to study the impact of Ni substitution on the transport properties and the low-energy (? 12 meV) magnetic excitations. It is found that, with increasing Ni doping, both the conductivity and superconductivity are gradually suppressed; in contrast, the low-energy magnetic spectral weight changes little. Comparing with the impact of Co and Cu substitution, we find that the effects on conductivity and superconductivity for the same degree of substitution grow systematically as the atomic number of the substituent deviates from that of Fe. The impact of the substituentsmoreas scattering centers appears to be greater than any contribution to carrier concentration. The fact that low-energy magnetic spectral weight is not reduced by increased electron scattering indicates that the existence of antiferromagnetic correlations does not depend on electronic states close to the Fermi energy.less

  17. Impurity effects in superconducting UPt sub 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aronson, M.C. (The Harrison M. Randall Laboratory of Physics, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (USA)); Vorenkamp, T.; Koziol, Z.; de Visser, A.; Bakker, K.; Franse, J.J.M. (Natuurkundig Laboratorium der Universiteit van Amsterdam, Valckenierstraat 65, 1018 XE Amsterdam, The Netherlands (USA)); Smith, J.L. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (USA))

    1991-04-15

    Superconducting UPt{sub 3} is characterized by a novel and complex magnetic field-temperature phase diagram, with two superconducting transitions at {ital T}{sub {ital c}1} and {ital T}{sub {ital c}2} in zero field. We have studied the effects of Pd and Y impurities on the zero field superconducting properties of UPt{sub 3}. Resistance measurements show that both dopants increase the residual resistivity and decrease the spin fluctuation temperature in the normal state. {ital T}{sub {ital c}1} is depressed by both dopants, but more effectively by Pd. {vert bar}{ital T}{sub {ital c}1} {minus} {ital T}{sub {ital c}2}{vert bar} is essentially unaffected by Y doping, but increases dramatically with Pd doping.

  18. Engineering Division Superconducting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Engineering Division Superconducting Magnet Technology for Fusion and Large Scale Applications Joseph V. Minervini Massachusetts Institute of Technology Plasma Science and Fusion Center Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Colloquium Princeton, NJ October 15, 2014 Technology & Engineering Division Contents * Fusion Magnets - Present and Future - Vision - State-of-the-art - New developments in superconductors * Advanced fusion magnet technology * Other large scale applications of

  19. Critical magnetic fields of superconducting aluminum-substituted Ba{sub 8}Si{sub 42}Al{sub 4} clathrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yang Garcia, Jose; Lu, Kejie; Shafiq, Basir; Franco, Giovanni; Lu, Junqiang; Rong, Bo; Chen, Ning; Liu, Yang; Liu, Lihua; Song, Bensheng; Wei, Yuping; Johnson, Shardai S.; Luo, Zhiping; Feng, Zhaosheng

    2015-06-07

    In recent years, efforts have been made to explore the superconductivity of clathrates containing crystalline frameworks of group-IV elements. The superconducting silicon clathrate is unusual in that the structure is dominated by strong sp{sup 3} covalent bonds between silicon atoms, rather than the metallic bonding that is more typical of traditional superconductors. This paper reports on critical magnetic fields of superconducting Al-substituted silicon clathrates, which were investigated by transport, ac susceptibility, and dc magnetization measurements in magnetic fields up to 90 kOe. For the sample Ba{sub 8}Si{sub 42}Al{sub 4}, the critical magnetic fields were measured to be H{sub C1}?=?40.2?Oe and H{sub C2}?=?66.4 kOe. The London penetration depth of 4360? and the coherence length 70? were obtained, whereas the estimated GinzburgLandau parameter of ??=?62 revealed that Ba{sub 8}Si{sub 42}Al{sub 4} is a strong type-II superconductor.

  20. Development of an alternating integrator for magnetic measurements for experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, D. M. Zhao, W. Z.; He, Y. G.; Chen, B.; Wan, B. N.; Shen, B.; Huang, J.; Liu, H. Q.

    2014-11-15

    A high-performance integrator is one of the key electronic devices for reliably controlling plasma in the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak for long pulse operation. We once designed an integrator system of real-time drift compensation, which has a low integration drift. However, it is not feasible for really continuous operations due to capacitive leakage error and nonlinearity error. To solve the above-mentioned problems, this paper presents a new alternating integrator. In the new integrator, the integrator system of real-time drift compensation is adopted as one integral cell while two such integral cells work alternately. To achieve the alternate function, a Field Programmable Gate Array built in the digitizer is utilized. The performance test shows that the developed integrator with the integration time constant of 20 ms has a low integration drift (<15 mV) for 1000 s.

  1. A Bulk Superconducting Magnetic System for the CLAS12 Target at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Statera, Marco; Contalbrigo, Marco; Ciullo, Giuseppe; Lenisa, Paulo; Lowry, Michael M.; Sandorfi, Andrew M.

    2015-06-01

    A feasibility study of a bulk magnetic system for the target of an experiment to measure the transverse spin effects in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (SIDIS) at 11 GeV with a transversely polarized target using the CLAS12 detector is presented. An experiment has been approved with the highest priority rating to study spin azimuthal asymmetries in SIDIS using 11-GeV polarized electron beams from the upgraded CEBAF facility and the CLAS12 detector equipped with a transversely polarized target. The transverse target in CLAS12 requires the shielding of a volume inside the longitudinal field of the main solenoid. In the shielded region, a transverse target magnet can operate; for the proposed magnetic configuration, the main solenoid maximum magnetic induction is 2 T. A bulk MgB2 cylinder cooled in liquid helium is proposed both to shield the longitudinal field of the main solenoid and to provide a transverse field induction up to 1.2 T for the hydrogen deuteride ice (HD-ice) target. The installation and magnetization procedure will be described. The magnetization procedure has to be compatible with the polarization and installation procedure of the HD-ice target. The design of a test bench to measure the transverse magnetization of a MgB2 bulk cylinder cooled by a coldhead is presented together with the scheduled measurements.

  2. Final Report: MATERIALS, STRANDS, AND CABLES FOR SUPERCONDUCTING ACCELERATOR MAGNETS [Grant Number DE-SC0010312

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sumption, Mike; Collings, E.

    2014-10-29

    Our program consisted of the two components: Strand Research and Cable Research, with a focus on Nb3Sn, Bi2212, and YBCO for accelerator magnet applications. We demonstrated a method to refine the grains in Nb3Sn by a factor of two, reaching 45 nm grain sizes, and layer Jcs of 6 kA/mm2 at 12 T. W also measured conductor magnetization for field quality. This has been done both with Nb3Sn conductor, as well as Bi:2212 strand. Work in support of quench studies of YBCO coils was also performed. Cable loss studies in Nb3Sn focused on connecting and comparing persistent magnetization and coupling magnetization for considering their relative impact on HEP machines. In the area of HTS cables, we have investigated both the quench in multistrand YBCO CORC cables, as well as the magnetization of these cables for use in high field magnets. In addition, we examined the magnetic and thermal properties of large (50 T) solenoids.

  3. Primary beam steering due to field leakage from superconducting SHMS magnets

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Moore, Michael H.; Waidyawansa, Buddhini P.; Covrig, Silviu; Carlini, Roger; Benesch, Jay

    2014-11-05

    In this study, simulations of the magnetic fields from the Super High Momentum Spectrometer in Hall C at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility show significant field leakage into the region of the primary beam line between the target and the beam dump. Without mitigation, these remnant fields will steer the unscattered beam enough to limit beam operations at small scattering angles. Presented here are magnetic field simulations of the spectrometer magnets and a solution using optimal placement of a minimal amount of shielding iron around the beam line.

  4. Temperature dependence of the magnetic excitations in Gd

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cable, J.W.; Nicklow, R.M.; Wakabayashi, N.

    1985-08-01

    Magnetic excitation spectra were measured for Gd in the and directions over the temperature range from 9 to 320/sup 0/K (T/sub c/ = 292.7/sup 0/K). Spin-wave-like modes are observed at T greater than or equal to T/sub c/. The critical wavevector for the appearance of these modes is proportional to the inverse correlation length.

  5. Mixed-mu superconducting bearings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, J.R.; Mulcahy, T.M.

    1998-03-03

    A mixed-mu superconducting bearing is disclosed including a ferrite structure disposed for rotation adjacent a stationary superconductor material structure and a stationary permanent magnet structure. The ferrite structure is levitated by said stationary permanent magnet structure. 9 figs.

  6. Mixed-mu superconducting bearings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL); Mulcahy, Thomas M. (Western Springs, IL)

    1998-01-01

    A mixed-mu superconducting bearing including a ferrite structure disposed for rotation adjacent a stationary superconductor material structure and a stationary permanent magnet structure. The ferrite structure is levitated by said stationary permanent magnet structure.

  7. HINS Superconducting Lens and Cryostat Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Page, T.M.; DiMarco, J.; Huang, Y.; Orris, D.F.; Tartaglia, M.A.; Terechkine, I.; Tompkins, J.C.; /Fermilab

    2008-08-01

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory is involved in the development of a 60 MeV superconducting linac. This linac is part of the High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) R&D Program. The initial beam acceleration in the front end section of the linac is achieved using room temperature spoke cavities, each of which is combined with a superconducting focusing solenoid. These solenoid magnets are cooled with liquid helium at 4.5K, operate at 250 A and have a maximum magnetic field strength of 7.5 T. A prototype solenoid cryostat was built and tested at the Fermilab Magnet Test Facility. This paper discusses the test results of the prototype and compares the measured and estimated performance of the cryostat. We also present the methods and results for measuring and fiducializing the axis of the solenoid lens.

  8. Harmonics suppression of vacuum chamber eddy current induced fields with application to the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Low Energy Booster (LEB) Magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlueter, R.D.; Halbach, K.

    1991-12-04

    This memo presents the formulation of an expression for eddy currents induced in a thin-walled conductor due to a time-dependent electromagnet field excitation. Then follows an analytical development for prediction of vacuum chamber eddy current induced field harmonics in iron-core electromagnets. A passive technique for harmonics suppression is presented with specific application to the design of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Low Energy B (LEB) Magnets.

  9. Superconducting radiofrequency window assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, H.L.; Elliott, T.S.

    1997-03-11

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly comprises a superconducting frame, a ceramic plate having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet for sealing plate into frame. The plate is brazed to eyelet which is then electron beam welded to frame. A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator. 11 figs.

  10. Superconductive radiofrequency window assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, H.L.; Elliott, T.S.

    1998-05-19

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The SRF window assembly has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The SRF window assembly comprises a superconducting frame, a ceramic plate having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet for sealing plate into frame. The plate is brazed to eyelet which is then electron beam welded to frame. A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the SRF window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator. 11 figs.

  11. Inductively-Charged High-Temperature Superconductors And Methods Of Use

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bromberg, Leslie

    2003-09-16

    The invention provides methods of charging superconducting materials and, in particular, methods of charging high-temperature superconducting materials. The methods generally involve cooling a superconducting material to a temperature below its critical temperature. Then, an external magnetic field is applied to charge the material at a nearly constant temperature. The external magnetic field first drives the superconducting material to a critical state and then penetrates into the material. When in the critical state, the superconducting material loses all the pinning ability and therefore is in the flux-flow regime. In some embodiments, a first magnetic field may be used to drive the superconducting material to the critical state and then a second magnetic field may be used to penetrate the superconducting material. When the external field or combination of external fields are removed, the magnetic field that has penetrated into the material remains trapped. The charged superconducting material may be used as solenoidal magnets, dipole magnets, or other higher order multipole magnets in many applications.

  12. Studies of time dependence of fields in TEVATRON superconducting dipole magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanft, R.W.; Brown, B.C.; Herrup, D.A.; Lamm, M.J.; McInturff, A.D.; Syphers, M.J.

    1988-08-22

    The time variation in the magnetic field of a model Tevatron dipole magnet at constant excitation current has been studied. Variations in symmetry allowed harmonic components over long time ranges show a log t behavior indicative of ''flux creep.'' Both short time range and long time range behavior depend in a detailed way on the excitation history. Similar effects are seen in the remnant fields present in full-scale Tevatron dipoles following current ramping. Both magnitudes and time dependences are observed to depend on details for the ramps, such as ramp rate, flattop duration, and number of ramps. In a few magnets, variations are also seen in symmetry unallowed harmonics. 9 refs., 10 figs.

  13. What Causes High-temperature Superconductivity? | U.S. DOE Office...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Image courtesy of Ames Laboratory Diagram showing the properties of a material as temperature and chemical composition (phosphorus level in this study) are varied. The figure shows ...

  14. Superconducting active impedance converter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ginley, D.S.; Hietala, V.M.; Martens, J.S.

    1993-11-16

    A transimpedance amplifier for use with high temperature superconducting, other superconducting, and conventional semiconductors allows for appropriate signal amplification and impedance matching to processing electronics. The amplifier incorporates the superconducting flux flow transistor into a differential amplifier configuration which allows for operation over a wide temperature range, and is characterized by high gain, relatively low noise, and response times less than 200 picoseconds over at least a 10-80 K. temperature range. The invention is particularly useful when a signal derived from either far-IR focal plane detectors or from Josephson junctions is to be processed by higher signal/higher impedance electronics, such as conventional semiconductor technology. 12 figures.

  15. Superconducting active impedance converter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ginley, David S.; Hietala, Vincent M.; Martens, Jon S.

    1993-01-01

    A transimpedance amplifier for use with high temperature superconducting, other superconducting, and conventional semiconductor allows for appropriate signal amplification and impedance matching to processing electronics. The amplifier incorporates the superconducting flux flow transistor into a differential amplifier configuration which allows for operation over a wide temperature range, and is characterized by high gain, relatively low noise, and response times less than 200 picoseconds over at least a 10-80 K. temperature range. The invention is particularly useful when a signal derived from either far-IR focal plane detectors or from Josephson junctions is to be processed by higher signal/higher impedance electronics, such as conventional semiconductor technology.

  16. Magnetic structure at low temperatures in FeGe{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Babu, P. D.; Mishra, P. K.; Dube, V.; Ravikumar, G.; Mishra, R.; Sastry, P. U.

    2014-04-24

    Magnetic phase of FeGe{sub 2} intermetallic is studied using low-temperature neutron diffraction and DC magnetization. Zero-magnetic-field neutron scattering data shows the presence of an antiferromagnetic phase in the low temperature range. We find the evidence of the presence of a ferromagnetic order overriding on the predominantly antiferromagnetic phase at low temperatures.

  17. Superconductivity Program Overview | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Superconductivity Program Overview Superconductivity Program Overview High-Temperature Superconductivity (HTS) has the potential for achieving a more fundamental change to electric power technologies than has occurred since the use of electricity became widespread nearly a century ago. Superconductivity Program Overview (3.2 MB) More Documents & Publications Fault Current Limiters (FCL) Fact Sheet High-Temperature Superconductivity Cable Demonstration Projects U.S. Department of Energy and

  18. Active superconducting devices formed of thin films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martens, Jon S.; Beyer, James B.; Nordman, James E.; Hohenwarter, Gert K. G.

    1991-05-28

    Active superconducting devices are formed of thin films of superconductor which include a main conduction channel which has an active weak link region. The weak link region is composed of an array of links of thin film superconductor spaced from one another by voids and selected in size and thickness such that magnetic flux can propagate across the weak link region when it is superconducting. Magnetic flux applied to the weak link region will propagate across the array of links causing localized loss of superconductivity in the links and changing the effective resistance across the links. The magnetic flux can be applied from a control line formed of a superconducting film deposited coplanar with the main conduction channel and weak link region on a substrate. The devices can be formed of any type to superconductor but are particularly well suited to the high temperature superconductors since the devices can be entirely formed from coplanar films with no overlying regions. The devices can be utilized for a variety of electrical components, including switching circuits, amplifiers, oscillators and modulators, and are well suited to microwave frequency applications.

  19. Striving for Superconducting Perfection | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Striving for Superconducting Perfection A member of the complex family of iron-based superconductors has been newly synthesized, shown to be highly ordered, and exhibits nearly optimal properties. Well-ordered, single crystals of CaKFe4As4 superconductors have allowed researchers to remove one of the veils of complexity for iron-based superconductors-disorder. Previously, our understanding of the higher transition temperatures, and promising high-magnetic field properties of iron-based

  20. A BEAMLINE FOR HIGH PRESSURE STUDIES AT THE ADVANCED LIGHT SOURCE WITH A SUPERCONDUCTING BENDING MAGNET AS THE SOURCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kunz, M; MacDowell, A A; Caldwell, W A; Cambie, D; Celestre, R S; Domning, E E; Duarte, R M; Gleason, A; Glossinger, J; Kelez, N; Plate, D W; Yu, T; Zaug, J M; Padmore, H A; Jeanloz, R; Alivisatos, A P; Clark, S M

    2005-04-19

    A new facility for high-pressure diffraction and spectroscopy using diamond anvil high-pressure cells has been built at the Advanced Light Source on Beamline 12.2.2. This beamline benefits from the hard X-radiation generated by a 6 Tesla superconducting bending magnet (superbend). Useful x-ray flux is available between 5 keV and 35 keV. The radiation is transferred from the superbend to the experimental enclosure by the brightness preserving optics of the beamline. These optics are comprised of: a plane parabola collimating mirror (M1), followed by a Kohzu monochromator vessel with a Si(111) crystals (E/{Delta}E {approx} 7000) and a W/B{sub 4}C multilayer (E/{Delta}E {approx} 100), and then a toroidal focusing mirror (M2) with variable focusing distance. The experimental enclosure contains an automated beam positioning system, a set of slits, ion chambers, the sample positioning goniometry and area detectors (CCD or image-plate detector). Future developments aim at the installation of a second end station dedicated for in situ laser-heating on one hand and a dedicated high-pressure single-crystal station, applying both monochromatic as well as polychromatic techniques.

  1. A Beamline for High-Pressure Studies at the Advanced Light Sourcewith a Superconducting Bending Magnet as the Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kunz, Martin; MacDowell, Alastair A.; Caldwell, Wendel A.; Cambie, Daniella; Celestre, Richard S.; Domning, Edward E.; Duarte,Robert M.; Gleason, Arianna E.; Glossinger, James M.; Kelez, Nicholas; Plate, David W.; Yu, Tony; Zaug, Joeseph M.; Padmore, Howard A.; Jeanloz,Raymond; Alivisatos, A. Paul; Clark, Simon M.

    2005-06-30

    A new facility for high-pressure diffraction and spectroscopy using diamond anvil high-pressure cells has been built at the Advanced Light Source on Beamline 12.2.2. This beamline benefits from the hard X-radiation generated by a 6 Tesla superconducting bending magnet (superbend). Useful x-ray flux is available between 5 keV and 35 keV. The radiation is transferred from the superbend to the experimental enclosure by the brightness preserving optics of the beamline. These optics are comprised of: a plane parabola collimating mirror (M1), followed by a Kohzu monochromator vessel with a Si(111) crystals (E/DE {approx}7000) and a W/B4C multilayers (E/DE {approx} 100), and then a toroidal focusing mirror (M2) with variable focusing distance. The experimental enclosure contains an automated beam positioning system, a set of slits, ion chambers, the sample positioning goniometry and area detectors (CCD or image-plate detector). Future developments aim at the installation of a second end station dedicated for in situ laser-heating on one hand and a dedicated high-pressure single-crystal station, applying both monochromatic as well as polychromatic techniques.

  2. First-cut design of an all-superconducting 100-T direct current magnet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iwasa, Yukikazu Hahn, Seungyong

    2013-12-16

    A 100-T magnetic field has heretofore been available only in pulse mode. This first-cut design demonstrates that a 100-T DC magnet (100?T) is possible. We base our design on: Gadolinium-based coated superconductor; a nested-coil formation, each a stack of double-pancake coils with the no-insulation technique; a band of high-strength steel over each coil; and a 12-T radial-field limit. The 100?T, a 20?mm cold bore, 6-m diameter, 17-m height, with a total of 12?500-km long superconductor, stores an energy of 122 GJ at its 4.2-K operating current of 2400?A. It requires a 4.2-K cooling power of 300?W.

  3. Superconductivity and Physical Properties of CaPd2Ge2 Single Crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anand, V K; Kim, Hyunsoo; Tanatar, Makariy A; Prozorov, Ruslan; Johnston, David C

    2014-10-08

    We present the superconducting and normal state properties of CaPd2Ge2 single crystals investigated by magnetic susceptibility ?, isothermal magnetization M, heat capacity Cp, in-plane electrical resistivity ? and London penetration depth ? versus temperature T and magnetic field H measurements. Bulk superconductivity is inferred from the ?(T) and Cp(T) data. The ?(T) data exhibit metallic behavior and a superconducting transition with Tc onset = 1.98 K and zero resistivity at Tc 0 = 1.67 K. The ?(T) reveals the onset of superconductivity at 2.0 K. For T > 2.0 K, the ?(T) and M(H) are weakly anisotropic paramagnetic with ?ab > ?c. The Cp(T) data confirm the bulk superconductivity below Tc = 1.69(3) K. The superconducting state electronic heat capacity is analyzed within the framework of a single-band ?-model of BCS superconductivity and various normal and superconducting state parameters are estimated. Within the ?-model, the Cp(T) data and the ab plane ?(T) data consistently indicate a moderately anisotropic s-wave gap with ?(0)/kBTc ? 1.6, somewhat smaller than the BCS value of 1.764. The relationship of the heat capacity jump at Tc and the penetration depth measurement to the anisotropy in the s-wave gap is discussed.

  4. MICROSTRUCTURE OF SUPERCONDUCTING MGB(2).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ZHU,Y.; LI,Q.; WU,L.; VOLKOV,V.; GU,G.; MOODENBAUGH,A.R.

    2001-07-12

    Recently, Akimitsu and co-workers [1] discovered superconductivity at 39 K in the intermetallic compound MgB{sub 2}. This discovery provides a new perspective on the mechanism for superconductivity. More specifically, it opens up possibilities for investigation of structure/properties in a new class of materials. With the exceptions of the cuprate and C{sub 60} families of compounds, MgB{sub 2} possesses the highest superconducting transition temperature T{sub c}. Its superconductivity appears to follow the BCS theory, apparently being mediated by electron-phonon coupling. The coherence length of MgB{sub 2} is reported to be longer than that of the cuprates [2]. In contrast to the cuprates, grain boundaries are strongly coupled and current density is determined by flux pinning [2,3]. Presently, samples of MgB{sub 2} commonly display inhomogeneity and porosity on the nanoscale, and are untextured. In spite of these obstacles, magnetization and transport measurements show that polycrystalline samples may carry large current densities circulating across many grains [3,4]. Very high values of critical current densities and critical fields have been recently observed in thin films [5,6]. These attributes suggest possible large scale and electronic applications. The underlying microstructure can be intriguing, both in terms of basic science and in applied areas. Subsequent to the discovery, many papers were published [1-13], most dealing with synthesis, physical properties, and theory. There have yet been few studies of microstructure and structural defects [11, 14]. A thorough understanding of practical superconducting properties can only be developed after an understanding of microstructure is gained. In this work we review transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies of sintered MgB{sub 2} pellets [14]. Structural defects, including second phase particles, dislocations, stacking faults, and grain boundaries, are analyzed using electron diffraction, electron

  5. DC superconducting quantum interference device usable in nuclear quadrupole resonance and zero field nuclear magnetic spectrometers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fan, Non Q.; Clarke, John

    1993-01-01

    A spectrometer for measuring the nuclear quadrupole resonance spectra or the zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance spectra generated by a sample is disclosed. The spectrometer uses an amplifier having a dc SQUID operating in a flux-locked loop for generating an amplified output as a function of the intensity of the signal generated by the sample. The flux-locked loop circuit includes an integrator. The amplifier also includes means for preventing the integrator from being driven into saturation. As a result, the time for the flux-locked loop to recover from the excitation pulses generated by the spectrometer is reduced.

  6. DC superconducting quantum interference device usable in nuclear quadrupole resonance and zero field nuclear magnetic spectrometers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fan, N.Q.; Clarke, J.

    1993-10-19

    A spectrometer for measuring the nuclear quadrupole resonance spectra or the zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance spectra generated by a sample is disclosed. The spectrometer uses an amplifier having a dc SQUID operating in a flux-locked loop for generating an amplified output as a function of the intensity of the signal generated by the sample. The flux-locked loop circuit includes an integrator. The amplifier also includes means for preventing the integrator from being driven into saturation. As a result, the time for the flux-locked loop to recover from the excitation pulses generated by the spectrometer is reduced. 7 figures.

  7. Apparatus and method for controlling the temperature of the core of a super-conducting transformer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golner, Thomas; Pleva, Edward; Mehta, Shirish

    2006-10-10

    An apparatus for controlling the temperature of a core of a transformer is provided that includes a core, a shield surrounding the core, a cast formed between the core and the shield, and tubing positioned on the shield. The cast directs heat from the core to the shield and cooling fluid is directed through the tubing to cool the shield.

  8. High temperature spin dynamics in linear magnetic chains, molecular rings, and segments by nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adelnia, Fatemeh; Lascialfari, Alessandro; Mariani, Manuel; Ammannato, Luca; Caneschi, Andrea; Rovai, Donella; Winpenny, Richard; Timco, Grigore; Corti, Maurizio Borsa, Ferdinando

    2015-05-07

    We present the room temperature proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate (NSLR) results in two 1D spin chains: the Heisenberg antiferromagnetic (AFM) Eu(hfac){sub 3}NITEt and the magnetically frustrated Gd(hfac){sub 3}NITEt. The NSLR as a function of external magnetic field can be interpreted very well in terms of high temperature spin dynamics dominated by a long time persistence of the decay of the two-spin correlation function due to the conservation of the total spin value for isotropic Heisenberg chains. The high temperature spin dynamics are also investigated in Heisenberg AFM molecular rings. In both Cr{sub 8} closed ring and in Cr{sub 7}Cd and Cr{sub 8}Zn open rings, i.e., model systems for a finite spin segment, an enhancement of the low frequency spectral density is found consistent with spin diffusion but the high cut-off frequency due to intermolecular anisotropic interactions prevents a detailed analysis of the spin diffusion regime.

  9. Temperature compensated and self-calibrated current sensor using reference magnetic field

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yakymyshyn, Christopher Paul; Brubaker, Michael Allen; Yakymyshyn, Pamela Jane

    2007-10-09

    A method is described to provide temperature compensation and self-calibration of a current sensor based on a plurality of magnetic field sensors positioned around a current carrying conductor. A reference magnetic field generated within the current sensor housing is detected by the magnetic field sensors and is used to correct variations in the output signal due to temperature variations and aging.

  10. Understanding Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) technology, applications, and economics, for end-use workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferraro, R.J.; McConnell, B.W.

    1993-06-01

    The overall objective of this project was to determine the state-of-the-art and to what extent existing SMES is a viable option in meeting the needs of utilities and their customers for improving electric service power quality. By defining and analyzing SMES electrical/mechanical performance characteristics, and comparing SMES application benefits with competitive stored energy systems, industry will be able to determine SMES unique applications and potential market penetration. Building on this information base, it would also be possible to evaluate the impact of high temperature superconductors (77 K and 20-35 K) on SMES technology applications. The authors of this report constructed a network of industry contacts and research consultants that were used to collect, update, and analyze ongoing SMES R&D and marketing activities in industries, utilities, and equipment manufacturers. These key resources were utilized to assemble performance characteristics on existing SMES, battery, capacitor, flywheel, and high temperature superconductor (HTS) stored energy technologies. From this information, preliminary stored energy system comparisons were accomplished. In this way, the electric load needs would be readily comparable to the potential solutions and applications offered by each aforementioned energy storage technology.

  11. Concerning the possibility of employing superconducting systems for analyzing the composition of cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anashkin, O.P.; Belitskiy, B.M.; Brodskiy, V.B.; Kurnosova, L.V.; Mikhaylov, N.N.

    1983-09-01

    The experimental results on the use of superconductive systems onboard spacecraft are described. To ensure low temperatures in the cryostat under weightlessness helium was used at a pressure above the critical value. In flight the temperature was controlled at six points while the pressure and intensity of the magnetic field were controlled in the solenoids.

  12. Method for making mirrored surfaces comprising superconducting material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Early, J.T.; Hargrove, R.S.

    1989-12-12

    Superconducting mirror surfaces are provided by forming a mirror surface from a material which is superconductive at a temperature above about 40 K and adjusting the temperature of the surface to that temperature at which the material is superconducting. The mirror surfaces are essentially perfect reflectors for electromagnetic radiation with photon energy less than the superconducting band gap.

  13. Method for making mirrored surfaces comprising superconducting material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Early, James T.; Hargrove, R. Steven

    1989-01-01

    Superconducting mirror surfaces are provided by forming a mirror surface from a material which is superconductive at a temperature above about 40.degree. K. and adjusting the temperature of the surface to that temperature at which the material is superconducting. The mirror surfaces are essentially perfect reflectors for electromagnetic radiation with photon energy less than the superconducting band gap.

  14. High intensity neutrino source superconducting solenoid cyrostat design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Page, T.M.; Nicol, T.H.; Feher, S.; Terechkine, I.; Tompkins, J.; /Fermilab

    2006-06-01

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) is involved in the development of a 100 MeV superconducting linac. This linac is part of the High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) R&D Program. The initial beam acceleration in the front end section of the linac is achieved using room temperature spoke cavities, each of which is combined with a superconducting focusing solenoid. These solenoid magnets are cooled with liquid helium at 4.5K, operate at 250 A and have a maximum magnetic field strength of 7.5 T. The solenoid cryostat will house the helium vessel, suspension system, thermal shield, multilayer insulation, power leads, instrumentation, a vacuum vessel and cryogenic distribution lines. This paper discusses the requirements and detailed design of these superconducting solenoid cryostats.

  15. Dual control active superconductive devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martens, Jon S.; Beyer, James B.; Nordman, James E.; Hohenwarter, Gert K. G.

    1993-07-20

    A superconducting active device has dual control inputs and is constructed such that the output of the device is effectively a linear mix of the two input signals. The device is formed of a film of superconducting material on a substrate and has two main conduction channels, each of which includes a weak link region. A first control line extends adjacent to the weak link region in the first channel and a second control line extends adjacent to the weak link region in the second channel. The current flowing from the first channel flows through an internal control line which is also adjacent to the weak link region of the second channel. The weak link regions comprise small links of superconductor, separated by voids, through which the current flows in each channel. Current passed through the control lines causes magnetic flux vortices which propagate across the weak link regions and control the resistance of these regions. The output of the device taken across the input to the main channels and the output of the second main channel and the internal control line will constitute essentially a linear mix of the two input signals imposed on the two control lines. The device is especially suited to microwave applications since it has very low input capacitance, and is well suited to being formed of high temperature superconducting materials since all of the structures may be formed coplanar with one another on a substrate.

  16. Sustenance of inhomogeneous electron temperature in a magnetized plasma column

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karkari, S. K. Mishra, S. K.; Kaw, P. K.

    2015-09-15

    This paper presents the equilibrium properties of a magnetized plasma column sustained by direct-current (dc) operated hollow cathode discharge in conjunction with a conducting end-plate, acting as the anode. The survey of radial plasma characteristics, performed in argon plasma, shows hotter plasma in the periphery as compared to the central plasma region; whereas the plasma density peaks at the center. The off-centered peak in radial temperature is attributed due to inhomogeneous power deposition in the discharge volume in conjunction with short-circuiting effect by the conducting end plate. A theoretical model based on particle flux and energy balance is given to explain the observed characteristics of the plasma column.

  17. Power superconducting power transmission cable

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ashworth, Stephen P.

    2003-06-10

    The present invention is for a compact superconducting power transmission cable operating at distribution level voltages. The superconducting cable is a conductor with a number of tapes assembled into a subconductor. These conductors are then mounted co-planarly in an elongated dielectric to produce a 3-phase cable. The arrangement increases the magnetic field parallel to the tapes thereby reducing ac losses.

  18. Power superconducting power transmission cable

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ashworth, Stephen P.

    2003-01-01

    The present invention is for a compact superconducting power transmission cable operating at distribution level voltages. The superconducting cable is a conductor with a number of tapes assembled into a subconductor. These conductors are then mounted co-planarly in an elongated dielectric to produce a 3-phase cable. The arrangement increases the magnetic field parallel to the tapes thereby reducing ac losses.

  19. Structural/magnetic phase transitions and superconductivity in Ba(Fe1-xTMx)2As2 (TM=Co, Ni, Cu, Co/Cu, Rh and Pd) single crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ni, Ni

    2009-08-15

    Since its discovery in 1911, superconductivity has been one of the most actively studied fields in condensed matter physics and has attracted immense experimental and theoretical effort. At this point in time, with more and more superconductors discovered in elements, alloys, intermetallic compounds and oxides, it is becoming clear that superconductivity is actually not so rare in nature. Almost half of the elements in the periodic table and hundreds of compounds have been found to be superconducting. Fig. 1.1 shows the milestones in discovering higher T{sub c} superconductors. Among the elemental superconductors, Niobium has the highest superconducting transition temperature, T{sub c}, of 9.5 K. This record held for more than ten years, until the discovery of niobium nitride which superconducts below 16 K. It took another thirty years for T{sub c} to increase from 16 K in niobium nitride to 23 K in niobium germanium.

  20. Superconducting thermoelectric generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Metzger, J.D.; El-Genk, M.S.

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus and method for producing electricity from heat. The present invention is a thermoelectric generator that uses materials with substantially no electrical resistance, often called superconductors, to efficiently convert heat into electrical energy without resistive losses. Preferably, an array of superconducting elements is encased within a second material with a high thermal conductivity. The second material is preferably a semiconductor. Alternatively, the superconducting material can be doped on a base semiconducting material, or the superconducting material and the semiconducting material can exist as alternating, interleaved layers of waferlike materials. A temperature gradient imposed across the boundary of the two materials establishes an electrical potential related to the magnitude of the temperature gradient. The superconducting material carries the resulting electrical current at zero resistivity, thereby eliminating resistive losses. The elimination of resistive losses significantly increases the conversion efficiency of the thermoelectric device.

  1. Superconducting thermoelectric generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Metzger, J.D.; El-Genk, M.S.

    1998-05-05

    An apparatus and method for producing electricity from heat is disclosed. The present invention is a thermoelectric generator that uses materials with substantially no electrical resistance, often called superconductors, to efficiently convert heat into electrical energy without resistive losses. Preferably, an array of superconducting elements is encased within a second material with a high thermal conductivity. The second material is preferably a semiconductor. Alternatively, the superconducting material can be doped on a base semiconducting material, or the superconducting material and the semiconducting material can exist as alternating, interleaved layers of waferlike materials. A temperature gradient imposed across the boundary of the two materials establishes an electrical potential related to the magnitude of the temperature gradient. The superconducting material carries the resulting electrical current at zero resistivity, thereby eliminating resistive losses. The elimination of resistive losses significantly increases the conversion efficiency of the thermoelectric device. 4 figs.

  2. Superconducting thermoelectric generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Metzger, John D.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    1998-01-01

    An apparatus and method for producing electricity from heat. The present invention is a thermoelectric generator that uses materials with substantially no electrical resistance, often called superconductors, to efficiently convert heat into electrical energy without resistive losses. Preferably, an array of superconducting elements is encased within a second material with a high thermal conductivity. The second material is preferably a semiconductor. Alternatively, the superconducting material can be doped on a base semiconducting material, or the superconducting material and the semiconducting material can exist as alternating, interleaved layers of waferlike materials. A temperature gradient imposed across the boundary of the two materials establishes an electrical potential related to the magnitude of the temperature gradient. The superconducting material carries the resulting electrical current at zero resistivity, thereby eliminating resistive losses. The elimination of resistive losses significantly increases the conversion efficiency of the thermoelectric device.

  3. Superconducting transistor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, Kenneth E.

    1979-01-01

    A superconducting transistor is formed by disposing three thin films of superconducting material in a planar parallel arrangement and insulating the films from each other by layers of insulating oxides to form two tunnel junctions. One junction is biased above twice the superconducting energy gap and the other is biased at less than twice the superconducting energy gap. Injection of quasiparticles into the center film by one junction provides a current gain in the second junction.

  4. Proximity effects of superconducting multilayer film

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xueyu, C.; Daole, Y.

    1984-07-01

    The proximity effects of superconducting multilayer films composed of different metals are considered. The relationship between the critical temperature of a superconducting multilayer film with strong heterogeneity and its geometric structure is given.

  5. Design considerations for fast-cycling superconducting accelerator magnets of 2 T B-field generated by a transmission line conductor of up to 100 kA current

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piekarz, Henryk; Hays, Steven; Huang, Yuenian; Kashikhin, Vadim; de Rijk, Gijsbert; Rossi, Lucio; /CERN

    2007-08-01

    Recently proposed synchrotrons, SF-SPS at CERN and DSF-MR at Fermilab, would operate with a 0.5 Hz cycle (or 2 second time period) while accelerating protons to 480 GeV. We examine possibilities of superconducting magnet technology that would allow for an accelerator quality magnetic field sweep of 2 T/s. For superconducting magnets the cryogenic cooling power demand due to AC losses in the superconductor leads to a high operational cost. We outline a novel magnet technology based on HTS superconductors that may allow to reduce AC losses in the magnet coil possibly up to an order of magnitude as compared to similar applications based on LTS type superconductors.

  6. CoxC nanorod magnets: Highly magnetocrystalline anisotropy with lower Curie temperature for potential applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Gendy, AA; Almugaiteeb, T; Carpenter, EE

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic CoxC nanorods with larger magnetocrystalline anisotropy of 5 x 10(5) J/m(3) as well as larger coercivity and lower Curie temperature are introduced. The particles have an average diameter of 8 nm and shows three different magnetic behaviors. The sample shows ferromagnetism up to 400 K, superparamagnetism at temperature > 400 K and magnets, magnetic sensors and contract agent for magnetic resonance imaging. (c) 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Low temperature and magnetic field behaviour of the (Cr{sub 84}Re{sub 16}){sub 89.6}V{sub 10.4} alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobs, B. S. Sheppard, C. J.; Prinsloo, A. R. E.; Lodya, L.

    2014-05-07

    Measurements of the temperature (T) dependence of the magnetic susceptibility (χ) and electrical resistance (R) on an antiferromagnetic (AFM) (Cr{sub 84}Re{sub 16}){sub 89.6}V{sub 10.4} alloy are reported in order to probe the existence of quantum critical behaviour (QCB) utilizing static magnetic fields (H) as a tuning parameter. The results indicate that an increase in H suppresses T{sub N} in such a way that it varies exponentially with increasing H. R(T) measurements show evidence of possible superconducting (SC) behaviour below 1 K at H = 0 T. These results therefore indicate the coexistence of the AFM and SC phases in the (Cr{sub 84}Re{sub 16}){sub 89.6}V{sub 10.4} alloy.

  8. Structural, magnetic, and superconducting properties of pulsed-laser-deposition-grown La1.85 Sr0.15 CuO4 / La2/3 Ca1/3 MnO3 superlattices on (001)-oriented LaSrAlO4 substrates

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Das, S.; Sen, K.; Marozau, I.; Uribe-Laverde, M. A.; Biskup, N.; Varela, M.; Khaydukov, Y.; Soltwedel, O.; Keller, T.; Döbeli, M.; et al

    2014-03-12

    Epimore » taxial La1.85 Sr0.15 CuO4 / La2/3 Ca1/3 MnO3 (LSCO/LCMO) superlattices (SL) on (001)- oriented LaSrAlO4 substrates have been grown with pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique. Their structural, magnetic and superconducting properties have been determined with in-situ reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED), x-ray diffraction, specular neutron reflectometry, scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), electric transport, and magnetization measurements. We find that despite the large mismatch between the in-plane lattice parameters of LSCO (a = 0.3779 nm) and LCMO (a = 0.387 nm) these superlattices can be grown epitaxially and with a high crystalline quality. While the first LSCO layer remains clamped to the LSAO substrate, a sizeable strain relaxation occurs already in the first LCMO layer. The following LSCO and LCMO layers adopt a nearly balanced state in which the tensile and compressive strain effects yield alternating in-plane lattice parameters with an almost constant average value. No major defects are observed in the LSCO layers, while a significant number of vertical antiphase boundaries are found in the LCMO layers. The LSCO layers remain superconducting with a relatively high superconducting onset temperature of Tconset ≈ 36 K. The macroscopic superconducting response is also evident in the magnetization data due to a weak diamagnetic signal below 10 K for H ∥ ab and a sizeable paramagnetic shift for H ∥ c that can be explained in terms of a vortex-pinning-induced flux compression. The LCMO layers maintain a strongly ferromagnetic state with a Curie temperature of TCurie ≈ 190 K and a large low-temperature saturation moment of about 3.5 (1) μB. These results suggest that the LSCO/LCMO superlattices can be used to study the interaction between the antagonistic ferromagnetic and superconducting orders and, in combination with previous studies on YBCO/LCMO superlattices, may allow one to identify the relevant

  9. Superconducting materials for large scale applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scanlan, Ronald M.; Malozemoff, Alexis P.; Larbalestier, David C.

    2004-05-06

    Significant improvements in the properties ofsuperconducting materials have occurred recently. These improvements arebeing incorporated into the latest generation of wires, cables, and tapesthat are being used in a broad range of prototype devices. These devicesinclude new, high field accelerator and NMR magnets, magnets for fusionpower experiments, motors, generators, and power transmission lines.These prototype magnets are joining a wide array of existing applicationsthat utilize the unique capabilities of superconducting magnets:accelerators such as the Large Hadron Collider, fusion experiments suchas ITER, 930 MHz NMR, and 4 Tesla MRI. In addition, promising newmaterials such as MgB2 have been discovered and are being studied inorder to assess their potential for new applications. In this paper, wewill review the key developments that are leading to these newapplications for superconducting materials. In some cases, the key factoris improved understanding or development of materials with significantlyimproved properties. An example of the former is the development of Nb3Snfor use in high field magnets for accelerators. In other cases, thedevelopment is being driven by the application. The aggressive effort todevelop HTS tapes is being driven primarily by the need for materialsthat can operate at temperatures of 50 K and higher. The implications ofthese two drivers for further developments will be discussed. Finally, wewill discuss the areas where further improvements are needed in order fornew applications to be realized.

  10. Superconducting Cable

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hughey, Raburn L.; Sinha, Uday K.; Reece, David S.; Muller, Albert C.

    2005-03-08

    In order to provide a flexible oxide superconducting cable which is reduced in AC loss, tape-shaped superconducting wires covered with a stabilizing metal are wound on a flexible former. The superconducting wires are preferably laid on the former at a bending strain of not more than 0.2%. In laying on the former, a number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on a core member in a side-by-side manner, to form a first layer. A prescribed number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on top of the first layer in a side-by-side manner, to form a second layer. The former may be made of a metal, plastic, reinforced plastic, polymer, or a composite and provides flexibility to the superconducting wires and the cable formed therewith.

  11. Superconducting Cable

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hughey, Raburn L.; Sinha, Uday K.; Reece, David S.; Muller, Albert C.

    2005-07-22

    In order to provide a flexible oxide superconducting cable which is reduced in AC loss, tape-shaped superconducting wires covered with a stabilizing metal are wound on a flexible former. The superconducting wires are preferably laid on the former at a bending strain of not more than 0.2%. In laying on the former, a number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on a core member in a side-by-side manner, to form a first layer. A prescribed number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on top of the first layer in a side-by-side manner, to form a second layer. The former may be made of a metal, plastic, reinforced plastic, polymer, or a composite and provides flexibility to the superconducting wires and the cable formed therewith.

  12. Superconductivity in graphite intercalation compounds

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Smith, Robert P.; Weller, Thomas E.; Howard, Christopher A.; Dean, Mark P. M.; Rahnejat, Kaveh C.; Saxena, Siddharth S.; Ellerby, Mark

    2015-02-26

    This study examines the field of superconductivity in the class of materials known as graphite intercalation compounds which has a history dating back to the 1960s. This paper recontextualizes the field in light of the discovery of superconductivity in CaC₆ and YbC₆ in 2005. In what follows, we outline the crystal structure and electronic structure of these and related compounds. We go on to experiments addressing the superconducting energy gap, lattice dynamics, pressure dependence, and how this relates to theoretical studies. The bulk of the evidence strongly supports a BCS superconducting state. However, important questions remain regarding which electronic statesmore » and phonon modes are most important for superconductivity and whether current theoretical techniques can fully describe the dependence of the superconducting transition temperature on pressure and chemical composition.« less

  13. Compact magnetic energy storage module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prueitt, Melvin L.

    1994-01-01

    A superconducting compact magnetic energy storage module in which a plurality of superconducting toroids, each having a toroidally wound superconducting winding inside a poloidally wound superconducting winding, are stacked so that the flow of electricity in each toroidally wound superconducting winding is in a direction opposite from the direction of electrical flow in other contiguous superconducting toroids. This allows for minimal magnetic pollution outside of the module.

  14. Compact magnetic energy storage module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prueitt, M.L.

    1994-12-20

    A superconducting compact magnetic energy storage module in which a plurality of superconducting toroids, each having a toroidally wound superconducting winding inside a poloidally wound superconducting winding, are stacked so that the flow of electricity in each toroidally wound superconducting winding is in a direction opposite from the direction of electrical flow in other contiguous superconducting toroids. This allows for minimal magnetic pollution outside of the module. 4 figures.

  15. Non-hysteretic superconducting quantum interference proximity transistor with enhanced responsivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jabdaraghi, R. N.; Meschke, M.; Pekola, J. P.

    2014-02-24

    This Letter presents fabrication and characterization of an optimized superconducting quantum interference proximity transistor. The present device, characterized by reduced tunnel junction area and shortened normal-metal section, demonstrates no hysteresis at low temperatures as we increased the Josephson inductance of the weak link by decreasing its cross section. It has consequently almost an order of magnitude improved magnetic field responsivity as compared to the earlier design. The modulation of both the current and the voltage across the junction have been measured as a function of magnetic flux piercing the superconducting loop.

  16. Discovery of superconductivity in hard hexagonal ε-NbN

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zou, Yongtao; Li, Qiang; Qi, Xintong; Zhang, Cheng; Ma, Shuailing; Zhang, Wei; Li, Ying; Chen, Ting; Wang, Xuebing; Chen, Zhiqiang; et al

    2016-02-29

    Since the discovery of superconductivity in boron-doped diamond with a critical temperature (TC) near 4 K, great interest has been attracted in hard superconductors such as transition-metal nitrides and carbides. Here we report the new discovery of superconductivity in polycrystalline hexagonal ε-NbN synthesized at high pressure and high temperature. Direct magnetization and electrical resistivity measurements demonstrate that the superconductivity in bulk polycrystalline hexagonal ε-NbN is below ~11.6 K, which is significantly higher than that for boron-doped diamond. The nature of superconductivity in hexagonal ε-NbN and the physical mechanism for the relatively lower TC have been addressed by the weaker bondingmore » in the Nb-N network, the co-planarity of Nb-N layer as well as its relatively weaker electron-phonon coupling, as compared with the cubic δ-NbN counterpart. Moreover, the newly discovered ε-NbN superconductor remains stable at pressures up to ~20 GPa and is significantly harder than cubic δ-NbN; it is as hard as sapphire, ultra-incompressible and has a high shear rigidity of 201 GPa to rival hard/superhard material γ-B (~227 GPa). Furthermore, this exploration opens a new class of highly desirable materials combining the outstanding mechanical/elastic properties with superconductivity, which may be particularly attractive for its technological and engineering applications in extreme environments.« less

  17. Superconductive radiofrequency window assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Harry Lawrence; Elliott, Thomas S.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly (20) has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly (20) comprises a superconducting frame (30), a ceramic plate (40) having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet (50) for sealing plate (40) into frame (30). The plate (40) is brazed to eyelet (50) which is then electron beam welded to frame (30). A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator.

  18. Superconducting radiofrequency window assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Harry L.; Elliott, Thomas S.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly (20) has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly (20) comprises a superconducting frame (30), a ceramic plate (40) having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet (50) for sealing plate (40) into frame (30). The plate (40) is brazed to eyelet (50) which is then electron beam welded to frame (30). A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator.

  19. Superconductive articles including cerium oxide layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wu, Xin D.; Muenchausen, Ross E.

    1993-01-01

    A ceramic superconductor comprising a metal oxide substrate, a ceramic high temperature superconductive material, and a intermediate layer of a material having a cubic crystal structure, said layer situated between the substrate and the superconductive material is provided, and a structure for supporting a ceramic superconducting material is provided, said structure comprising a metal oxide substrate, and a layer situated over the surface of the substrate to substantially inhibit interdiffusion between the substrate and a ceramic superconducting material deposited upon said structure.

  20. Near fifty percent sodium substituted lanthanum manganites—A potential magnetic refrigerant for room temperature applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sethulakshmi, N.; Anantharaman, M. R.; Al-Omari, I. A.; Suresh, K. G.

    2014-03-03

    Nearly half of lanthanum sites in lanthanum manganites were substituted with monovalent ion-sodium and the compound possessed distorted orthorhombic structure. Ferromagnetic ordering at 300 K and the magnetic isotherms at different temperature ranges were analyzed for estimating magnetic entropy variation. Magnetic entropy change of 1.5 J·kg{sup −1}·K{sup −1} was observed near 300 K. An appreciable magnetocaloric effect was also observed for a wide range of temperatures near 300 K for small magnetic field variation. Heat capacity was measured for temperatures lower than 300 K and the adiabatic temperature change increases with increase in temperature with a maximum of 0.62 K at 280 K.

  1. Magnetic Resonance Flow Velocity and Temperature Mapping of a...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A laser-heated SMP foam device was deployed in a simplified in vitro vascular model. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques were used to assess the fluid dynamics and thermal ...

  2. Upward shift of the vortex solid phase in high-temperature-superconducting wires through high density nanoparticle addition

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Miura, Masashi; Maiorov, Boris; Balakirev, Fedor F.; Kato, Takeharu; Sato, Michio; Takagi, Yuji; Izumi, Teruo; Civale, Leonardo

    2016-02-08

    Here, we show a simple and effective way to improve the vortex irreversibility line up to very high magnetic fields (60T) by increasing the density of second phase BaZrO3 nanoparticles. (Y0.77,Gd0.23)Ba2Cu3Oy films were grown on metal substrates with different concentration of BaZrO3 nanoparticles by the metal organic deposition method. We find that upon increase of the BaZrO3 concentration, the nanoparticle size remains constant but the twin-boundary density increases. Up to the highest nanoparticle concentration (n ~ 1.3 × 1022/m3), the irreversibility field (Hirr) continues to increase with no sign of saturation up to 60 T, although the vortices vastly outnumbermore » pinning centers. We find extremely high Hirr, namely Hirr = 30 T (H||45°) and 24 T (H||c) at 65 K and 58 T (H||45°) and 45 T (H||c) at 50K. The difference in pinning landscape shifts the vortex solid-liquid transition upwards, increasing the vortex region useful for power applications, while keeping the upper critical field, critical temperature and electronic mass anisotropy unchanged.« less

  3. Superconducting structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kwon, Chuhee; Jia, Quanxi; Foltyn, Stephen R.

    2003-04-01

    A superconductive structure including a dielectric oxide substrate, a thin buffer layer of a superconducting material thereon; and, a layer of a rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film thereon the thin layer of yttrium-barium-copper oxide, the rare earth selected from the group consisting of samarium, gadolinium, ytterbium, erbium, neodymium, dysprosium, holmium, lutetium, a combination of more than one element from the rare earth group and a combination of one or more elements from the rare earth group with yttrium, the buffer layer of superconducting material characterized as having chemical and structural compatibility with the dielectric oxide substrate and the rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film is provided.

  4. Superconducting Structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kwon, Chuhee; Jia, Quanxi; Foltyn, Stephen R.

    2005-09-13

    A superconductive structure including a dielectric oxide substrate, a thin buffer layer of a superconducting material thereon; and, a layer of a rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film thereon the thin layer of yttrium-barium-copper oxide, the rare earth selected from the group consisting of samarium, gadolinium, ytterbium, erbium, neodymium, dysprosium, holmium, lutetium, a combination of more than one element from the rare earth group and a combination of one or more elements from the rare earth group with yttrium, the buffer layer of superconducting material characterized as having chemical and structural compatibility with the dielectric oxide substrate and the rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film is provided.

  5. A New Universal Parameter for Superconductivity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A New Universal Parameter for Superconductivity A New Universal Parameter for Superconductivity Print Thursday, 14 April 2016 00:00 Scientists have been researching high-temperature (high-Tc) superconductors for decades with the goal of finding materials that express superconducting capabilities at room temperature, which would be a requirement for practical and cost-effective applications. The higher the operating temperature, the more realistic energy-saving applications such as lossless

  6. The positive ion temperature effect in magnetized electronegative plasma sheath with two species of positive ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaw, A. K. [Centre of Plasma Physics, Institute for Plasma Research, Sonapur-782 402, Guwahati, Assam (India); Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar-382 428, Gujarat (India); Kar, S. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar-382 428, Gujarat (India); Goswami, K. S. [Centre of Plasma Physics, Institute for Plasma Research, Sonapur-782 402, Guwahati, Assam (India)

    2012-10-15

    The properties of a magnetized multi-component (two species of positive ions, negative ions and electrons) plasma sheath with finite positive ion temperature are studied. By using three fluid hydrodynamic model and some dimensionless variables, the ion (both lighter and heavier positive ions, and negative ions) densities, the ion (only for positive ions) velocities, and electric potential inside the sheath are investigated. In addition, the absence and presence of magnetic field and the orientation of magnetic field are considered. It is noticed that, with increase of positive ion temperature, the lighter positive ion density peaks increase only at the sheath edge and shift towards the sheath edge for both absence and presence of magnetic field. For heavier positive ions, in the absence of magnetic field, the density peaks increase at the sheath edge. But in the presence of magnetic field, the density fluctuations increase at the sheath edge. For both the cases, the density peaks shift towards the sheath edge.

  7. Structural and magnetic phase transitions in gadolinium under high pressures and low temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samudrala, Gopi K.; Tsoi, Georgiy M.; Weir, Samuel T.; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    2014-11-07

    High pressure structural transition studies have been carried out on rare earth metal gadolinium in a diamond anvil cell at room temperature to 169 GPa. Gadolinium has been compressed to 38% of its initial volume at this pressure. With increasing pressure, a crystal structure sequence of hcp → Smtype→ dhcp → fcc → dfcc → monoclinic has been observed in our studies on gadolinium. The measured equation of state of gadolinium is presented to 169 GPa at ambient temperature. Magnetic ordering temperature of gadolinium has been studied using designer diamond anvils to a pressure of 25 GP and a temperature of 10 K. The magnetic ordering temperature has been determined from the four-point electrical resistivity measurements carried out on gadolinium. Furthermore, our experiments show that the magnetic transition temperature decreases with increasing pressure to 19 GPa and then increases when gadolinium is subjected to higher pressures.

  8. Spin dynamics near a putative antiferromagnetic quantum critical point in Cu-substituted BaFe2As2 and its relation to high-temperature superconductivity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kim, M. G.; Wang, M.; Tucker, G. S.; Valdivia, P. N.; Abernathy, D. L.; Chi, Songxue; Christianson, A. D.; Aczel, A. A.; Hong, T.; Heitmann, T. W.; et al

    2015-12-02

    We present the results of elastic and inelastic neutron scattering measurements on nonsuperconducting Ba(Fe0.957Cu0.043)2As2, a composition close to a quantum critical point between antiferromagnetic (AFM) ordered and paramagnetic phases. By comparing these results with the spin fluctuations in the low-Cu composition as well as the parent compound BaFe2As2 and superconducting Ba(Fe1–xNix)2As2 compounds, we demonstrate that paramagnon-like spin fluctuations are evident in the antiferromagnetically ordered state of Ba(Fe0.957Cu0.043)2As2, which is distinct from the AFM-like spin fluctuations in the superconducting compounds. Our observations suggest that Cu substitution decouples the interaction between quasiparticles and the spin fluctuations. In addition, we show that themore » spin-spin correlation length ξ(T) increases rapidly as the temperature is lowered and find ω/T scaling behavior, the hallmark of quantum criticality, at an antiferromagnetic quantum critical point.« less

  9. Superconducting thermoelectric generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Metzger, J.D.; El-Genk, M.S.

    1994-01-01

    Thermoelectricity is produced by applying a temperature differential to dissimilar electrically conducting or semiconducting materials, thereby producing a voltage that is proportional to the temperature difference. Thermoelectric generators use this effect to directly convert heat into electricity; however, presently-known generators have low efficiencies due to the production of high currents which in turn cause large resistive heating losses. Some thermoelectric generators operate at efficiencies between 4% and 7% in the 800{degrees} to 1200{degrees}C range. According to its major aspects and bradly stated, the present invention is an apparatus and method for producing electricity from heat. In particular, the invention is a thermoelectric generator that juxtaposes a superconducting material and a semiconducting material - so that the superconducting and the semiconducting materials touch - to convert heat energy into electrical energy without resistive losses in the temperature range below the critical temperature of the superconducting material. Preferably, an array of superconducting material is encased in one of several possible configurations within a second material having a high thermal conductivity, preferably a semiconductor, to form a thermoelectric generator.

  10. Temperature dependence of magnetic susceptibility of nuclear matter: Lowest order constrained variational calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bigdeli, M.; Bordbar, G. H.; Rezaei, Z.

    2009-09-15

    In this paper we study the magnetic susceptibility and other thermodynamic properties of the polarized nuclear matter at finite temperature using the lowest order constrained variational (LOCV) method employing the AV{sub 18} potential. Our results show a monotonic behavior for the magnetic susceptibility which indicates that the spontaneous transition to the ferromagnetic phase does not occur for this system.

  11. Temperature and magnetic-field driven dynamics in artificial...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of the celebrated vertex models of statistical mechanics, where the exact microstate ... undergoing the usual finite-temperature fluctuations of a statistical mechanical system. ...

  12. Passive energy dump for superconducting coil protection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Luton, J.N. Jr.

    1973-01-16

    The patent describes a passive resistance type energy dump for the protection of the coils of a superconducting magnet. Insertion heaters are immersed in a rigid container filled with a fusible alloy. The energy dump is connected across the coils of the superconducting magnet wherein individual heater elements are connected singly to the windings or otherwise according to the energy dumping requirements upon transition of the magnet to a normal state.

  13. Superconductivity at Dawn of the Iron Age (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Superconductivity is a stunning quantum phenomenon and among the deepest paradigms in all ... in a new era of high-temperature superconductivity, and the joyous exuberance that ...

  14. Structural and magnetic phase transitions in gadolinium under high pressures and low temperatures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Samudrala, Gopi K.; Tsoi, Georgiy M.; Weir, Samuel T.; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    2014-11-07

    High pressure structural transition studies have been carried out on rare earth metal gadolinium in a diamond anvil cell at room temperature to 169 GPa. Gadolinium has been compressed to 38% of its initial volume at this pressure. With increasing pressure, a crystal structure sequence of hcp → Smtype→ dhcp → fcc → dfcc → monoclinic has been observed in our studies on gadolinium. The measured equation of state of gadolinium is presented to 169 GPa at ambient temperature. Magnetic ordering temperature of gadolinium has been studied using designer diamond anvils to a pressure of 25 GP and a temperaturemore » of 10 K. The magnetic ordering temperature has been determined from the four-point electrical resistivity measurements carried out on gadolinium. Furthermore, our experiments show that the magnetic transition temperature decreases with increasing pressure to 19 GPa and then increases when gadolinium is subjected to higher pressures.« less

  15. Temperature measurement of axisymmetric flames under the influence of magnetic field using Talbot interferometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agarwal, Shilpi E-mail: manojklakra@gmail.com Kumar, Manoj E-mail: manojklakra@gmail.com Shakher, Chandra E-mail: manojklakra@gmail.com

    2014-10-15

    Combustion process control is related with ecological improvement and the problem of energy efficiency; hence it has a wide interest at both economical and scientific levels. Application of a magnetic field is one of the most promising methods of combustion control. The presence of magnetic field induces the changes in flame behavior. The effect of uniform magnetic field developed by permanent magnet is studied by Talbot interferometry using circular gratings. Experimental results show a small decrease in flame temperature and increase in flame dimensions.

  16. Atomic magnetic gradiometer for room temperature high sensitivity magnetic field detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xu,Shoujun; Lowery, Thomas L.; Budker, Dmitry; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Wemmer, David E.; Pines, Alexander

    2009-08-11

    A laser-based atomic magnetometer (LBAM) apparatus measures magnetic fields, comprising: a plurality of polarization detector cells to detect magnetic fields; a laser source optically coupled to the polarization detector cells; and a signal detector that measures the laser source after being coupled to the polarization detector cells, which may be alkali cells. A single polarization cell may be used for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) by prepolarizing the nuclear spins of an analyte, encoding spectroscopic and/or spatial information, and detecting NMR signals from the analyte with a laser-based atomic magnetometer to form NMR spectra and/or magnetic resonance images (MRI). There is no need of a magnetic field or cryogenics in the detection step, as it is detected through the LBAM.

  17. Layering and temperature-dependent magnetization and anisotropy of naturally produced Ni/NiO multilayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pappas, S. D.; Trachylis, D.; Velgakis, M. J.; Kapaklis, V.; Joensson, P. E.; Papaioannou, E. Th.; Delimitis, A.; Poulopoulos, P.; Fumagalli, P.; Politis, C.

    2012-09-01

    Ni/NiO multilayers were grown by magnetron sputtering at room temperature, with the aid of the natural oxidation procedure. That is, at the end of the deposition of each single Ni layer, air is let to flow into the vacuum chamber through a leak valve. Then, a very thin NiO layer ({approx}1.2 nm) is formed. Simulated x-ray reflectivity patterns reveal that layering is excellent for individual Ni-layer thickness larger than 2.5 nm, which is attributed to the intercalation of amorphous NiO between the polycrystalline Ni layers. The magnetization of the films, measured at temperatures 5-300 K, has almost bulk-like value, whereas the films exhibit a trend to perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) with an unusual significant positive interface anisotropy contribution, which presents a weak temperature dependence. The power-law behavior of the multilayers indicates a non-negligible contribution of higher order anisotropies in the uniaxial anisotropy. Bloch-law fittings for the temperature dependence of the magnetization in the spin-wave regime show that the magnetization in the multilayers decreases faster as a function of temperature than the one of bulk Ni. Finally, when the individual Ni-layer thickness decreases below 2 nm, the multilayer stacking vanishes, resulting in a dramatic decrease of the interface magnetic anisotropy and consequently in a decrease of the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy.

  18. Magnetic ordering temperatures in rare earth metal dysprosium under ultrahigh pressures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samudrala, Gopi K.; Tsoi, Georgiy M.; Weir, Samuel T.; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    2014-04-03

    Magnetic ordering temperatures in heavy rare earth metal Dysprosium (Dy) have been studied using an ultrasensitive electrical transport measurement technique in a designer diamond anvil cell to extreme conditions of pressure to 69 GPa and temperature to 10 K. Previous studies using magnetic susceptibility measurements at high pressures were only able to track magnetic ordering temperature till 7 GPa in the hexagonal close packed (hcp) phase of Dy. Our studies indicate that the magnetic ordering temperature shows an abrupt drop of 80 K at the hcp-Sm phase transition followed by a gradual decrease that continues till 17 GPa. This is followed by a rapid increase in the magnetic ordering temperatures in the double hexagonal close packed phase and finally leveling off in the distorted face centered cubic phase of Dy. Lastly, our studies reaffirm that 4f-shell remain localized in Dy and there is no loss of magnetic moment or 4f-shell delocalization for pressures up to 69 GPa.

  19. Magnetic ordering temperatures in rare earth metal dysprosium under ultrahigh pressures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Samudrala, Gopi K.; Tsoi, Georgiy M.; Weir, Samuel T.; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    2014-04-03

    Magnetic ordering temperatures in heavy rare earth metal Dysprosium (Dy) have been studied using an ultrasensitive electrical transport measurement technique in a designer diamond anvil cell to extreme conditions of pressure to 69 GPa and temperature to 10 K. Previous studies using magnetic susceptibility measurements at high pressures were only able to track magnetic ordering temperature till 7 GPa in the hexagonal close packed (hcp) phase of Dy. Our studies indicate that the magnetic ordering temperature shows an abrupt drop of 80 K at the hcp-Sm phase transition followed by a gradual decrease that continues till 17 GPa. This ismore » followed by a rapid increase in the magnetic ordering temperatures in the double hexagonal close packed phase and finally leveling off in the distorted face centered cubic phase of Dy. Lastly, our studies reaffirm that 4f-shell remain localized in Dy and there is no loss of magnetic moment or 4f-shell delocalization for pressures up to 69 GPa.« less

  20. Superconducting-semiconducting circuits, devices and systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kroger, H.; Ghoshal, U.S.

    1991-06-18

    This paper describes a superconducting-semiconducting electrical circuit element. It comprises: a superconducting charge controlled three-terminal device, having a device control terminal, a second terminal and a third terminal, wherein the output current between the second and third terminals is controlled by the voltage applied to the control terminal, and wherein the output current exhibits superconducting characteristics as a function of temperature and input charge conditions; and a cryogenic semiconducting interconnect circuit, adapted to receive as an input an output signal from the superconducting device, and to provide a semiconductor switching voltage level output signal modulated by the input signal from the superconducting device.

  1. Suppression of the Critical Temperature of Superconducting NdFeAs(OF) Single Crystals by Kondo-Like Defect Sites Induced by {alpha}-Particle Irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarantini, C.; Gurevich, A.; Larbalestier, D. C.; Putti, M.; Shen, Y.; Singh, R. K.; Rowell, J. M.; Newman, N.; Cheng Peng; Jia Ying; Wen Haihu

    2010-02-26

    We report the effect of {alpha}-particle irradiation on the reduction of the critical temperature T{sub c} of a NdFeAs(OF) single crystal. Our data indicate that irradiation defects cause both nonmagnetic and magnetic scattering, resulting in the Kondo-like excess resistance {Delta}{rho}(T)propor tolnT over 2 decades in temperatures above T{sub c}. The critical density of magnetic irradiation defects which suppresses T{sub c} is found to be much higher than those for cuprates and multiband BCS superconductors. We suggest that such anomalously weak pair breaking by irradiation defects indicates that magnetic scattering in pnictides is coupled with pairing interactions mediated by spin fluctuations.

  2. Theory of spin-fluctuation induced superconductivity in iron-based superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Junhua

    2011-01-01

    In this dissertation we focus on the investigation of the pairing mechanism in the recently discovered high-temperature superconductor, iron pnictides. Due to the proximity to magnetic instability of the system, we considered short-range spin fluctuations as the major mediating source to induce superconductivity. Our calculation supports the magnetic fluctuations as a strong candidate that drives Cooper-pair formation in this material. We find the corresponding order parameter to be of the so-called ss-wave type and show its evolution with temperature as well as the capability of supporting high transition temperature up to several tens of Kelvin. On the other hand, our itinerant model calculation shows pronounced spin correlation at the observed antiferromagnetic ordering wave vector, indicating the underlying electronic structure in favor of antiferromagnetic state. Therefore, the electronic degrees of freedom could participate both in the magnetic and in the superconducting properties. Our work shows that the interplay between magnetism and superconductivity plays an important role to the understanding of the rich physics in this material. The magnetic-excitation spectrum carries important information on the nature of magnetism and the characteristics of superconductivity. We analyze the spin excitation spectrum in the normal and superconducting states of iron pnictides in the magnetic scenario. As a consequence of the sign-reversed gap structure obtained in the above, a spin resonance mode appears below the superconducting transition temperature. The calculated resonance energy, scaled with the gap magnitude and the magnetic correlation length, agrees well with the inelastic neutron scattering (INS) measurements. More interestingly, we find a common feature of those short-range spin fluctuations that are capable of inducing a fully gapped ss state is the momentum anisotropy with elongated span along the direction transverse to the antiferromagnetic momentum

  3. Temperature-controlled molecular depolarization gates in nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroder, Leif; Schroder, Leif; Chavez, Lana; Meldrum, Tyler; Smith, Monica; Lowery, Thomas J.; E. Wemmer, David; Pines, Alexander

    2008-02-27

    Down the drain: Cryptophane cages in combination with selective radiofrequency spin labeling can be used as molecular 'transpletor' units for transferring depletion of spin polarization from a hyperpolarized 'source' spin ensemble to a 'drain' ensemble. The flow of nuclei through the gate is adjustable by the ambient temperature, thereby enabling controlled consumption of hyperpolarization.

  4. Magnetic modulation doping in topological insulators toward higher-temperature quantum anomalous Hall effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mogi, M. Yoshimi, R.; Yasuda, K.; Kozuka, Y.; Tsukazaki, A.; Takahashi, K. S.; Kawasaki, M.; Tokura, Y.

    2015-11-02

    Quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE), which generates dissipation-less edge current without external magnetic field, is observed in magnetic-ion doped topological insulators (TIs) such as Cr- and V-doped (Bi,Sb){sub 2}Te{sub 3}. The QAHE emerges when the Fermi level is inside the magnetically induced gap around the original Dirac point of the TI surface state. Although the size of gap is reported to be about 50 meV, the observable temperature of QAHE has been limited below 300 mK. We attempt magnetic-Cr modulation doping into topological insulator (Bi,Sb){sub 2}Te{sub 3} films to increase the observable temperature of QAHE. By introducing the rich-Cr-doped thin (1 nm) layers at the vicinity of both the surfaces based on non-Cr-doped (Bi,Sb){sub 2}Te{sub 3} films, we have succeeded in observing the QAHE up to 2 K. The improvement in the observable temperature achieved by this modulation-doping appears to be originating from the suppression of the disorder in the surface state interacting with the rich magnetic moments. Such a superlattice designing of the stabilized QAHE may pave a way to dissipation-less electronics based on the higher-temperature and zero magnetic-field quantum conduction.

  5. The Progress on Low-Cost, High-Quality, High-Temperature Superconducting Tapes Deposited by the Combustion Chemical Vapor Deposition Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shoup, S.S.; White, M.K.; Krebs, S.L.; Darnell, N.; King, A.C.; Mattox, D.S.; Campbell, I.H.; Marken, K.R.; Hong, S.; Czabaj, B.; Paranthaman, M.; Christen, H.M.; Zhai, H.-Y. Specht, E.

    2008-06-24

    The innovative Combustion Chemical Vapor Deposition (CCVD) process is a non-vacuum technique that is being investigated to enable next generation products in several application areas including high-temperature superconductors (HTS). In combination with the Rolling Assisted Biaxially Textured Substrate (RABiTS) technology, the CCVD process has significant promise to provide low-cost, high-quality lengths of YBCO coated conductor. Over 100 meter lengths of both Ni and Ni-W (3 at. Wt.%) substrates with a surface roughness of 12-18 nm were produced. The CCVD technology has been used to deposit both buffer layer coatings as well as YBCO superconducting layers. Buffer layer architecture of strontium titanate (SrTiO{sub 3}) and ceria (CeO{sub 2}) have been deposited by CCVD on textured nickel substrates and optimized to appropriate thicknesses and microstructures to provide templates for growing PLD YBCO with a J{sub c} of 1.1 MA/cm{sup 2} at 77 K and self-field. The CCVD buffer layers have been scaled to meter plus lengths with good epitaxial uniformity along the length. A short sample cut from one of the lengths enabled high critical current density PLD YBCO. Films of CCVD YBCO superconductors have been grown on single crystal substrates with critical current densities over 1 MA/cm{sup 2}. In addition, superconducting YBCO films with an I{sub c} of 60 A/cm-width (J{sub c} = 1.5 MA/cm{sup 2}) were grown on ORNL RABiTS (CeO{sub 2}/YSZ/Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Ni/Ni-3W) using CCVD process.

  6. Power and magnetic field-induced microwave absorption in Tl-based high T sub c superconducting films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Portis, A.M. ); Cooke, D.W.; Gray, E.R.; Arendt, P.N. ); Bohn, C.L.; Delayen, J.R.; Roche, C.T. ); Hein, M.; Klein, N.; Mueller, G.; Orbach, S.; Piel, H. )

    1991-01-21

    The increase in the microwave surface resistance {ital R}{sub {ital s}} of high {ital T}{sub {ital c}} superconductors at elevated microwave power levels is reported for both oriented and unoriented Tl-based films as a function of rf magnetic field at 820 MHz and 18 GHz. The application of dc magnetic fields produces qualitatively similar increases in {ital R}{sub {ital s}} and in the surface reactance {ital X}{sub {ital s}}. The increase in {ital R}{sub {ital s}} with dc field is shown to arise from simple decoupling of grains by intergranular magnetic flux. The increase in {ital R}{sub {ital s}} with microwave power, on the other hand, is a consequence of hysteretic intergranular processes.

  7. Nozzle for superconducting fiber production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Righi, Jamal

    1992-11-17

    A nozzle apparatus for producing flexible fibers of superconducting material receives melted material from a crucible for containing a charge of the superconducting material. The material is melted in the crucible and falls in a stream through a bottom hole in the crucible. The stream falls through a protecting collar which maintains the stream at high temperatures. The stream is then supplied through the downwardly directed nozzle where it is subjected to a high velocity air flow which breaks the melted superconducting material into ligaments which solidify into the flexible fibers. The fibers are collected by blowing them against a porous cloth.

  8. ASC 84: applied superconductivity conference. Final program and abstracts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Abstracts are given of presentations covering: superconducting device fabrication; applications of rf superconductivity; conductor stability and losses; detectors and signal processing; fusion magnets; A15 and Nb-Ti conductors; stability, losses, and various conductors; SQUID applications; new applications of superconductivity; advanced conductor materials; high energy physics applications of superconductivity; electronic materials and characterization; general superconducting electronics; ac machinery and new applications; digital devices; fusion and other large scale applications; in-situ and powder process conductors; ac applications; synthesis, properties, and characterization of conductors; superconducting microelectronics. (LEW)

  9. Low temperature magnetic properties of magnesium substituted YbMnO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sattibabu, Bhumireddi Bhatnagar, Anil K. Mohan, Dasari Das, Dibakar Sundararaman, Mahadevan; Siruguri, Vasudeva; Rayaprol, Sudhindra

    2014-04-24

    Structural and magnetic properties of polycrystalline Yb{sub 1−x}Mg{sub x}MnO{sub 3} (x = 0, 0.05 and 0.10) hexagonal compounds prepared by solid state method, have been studied. The structural analyses of the samples were carried out by Rietveld analysis of neutron diffraction data. With increasing Mg content, we find that the lattice parameter a decreases and c increases whereas the overall Mn-O bond length decreases. Magnetization measured as a function of magnetic field at 2.5 K exhibits hysteresis, which is attributed to ferromagnetic like ordering of Yb{sup 3+} sublattice. Temperature dependence of ac magnetic susceptibility, χ{sub ac}(T), shows no signature of spin-glass behavior. χ”(T) exhibits a sudden increase at low temperatures which is due to ordering of Yb{sup 3+} sublattice.

  10. Cryostat design for the Superconducting Super Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicol, T.H.

    1990-09-01

    The cryostat of an SSC dipole magnet consists of all magnet components except the cold mass assembly. It serves to support the cold mass accurately and reliably within the vacuum vessel, provide all required cryogenic piping, and to insulate the cold mass from heat radiated and conducted from the environment. It must function reliably during storage, shipping and handling, normal magnet operation, quenches, and seismic excitations and must be manufacturable at low cost. The major components of the cryostat are the vacuum vessel, thermal shields, multilayer insulation (MLI) system, cryogenic piping, interconnections, and suspension system. The overall design of a cryostat for superconducting accelerator magnets requires consideration of fluid flow, proper selection of materials for their thermal and structural performance at both ambient and operating temperature, and knowledge of the environment to which the magnets will be subjected over the course their 25 year expected life. This paper describes the design of the current SSC collider dipole magnet cryostat and includes discussions on the thermal, structural, and dynamic considerations involved in the development of each of the major systems. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  11. A superconducting focusing solenoid for the neutrino factory linear accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.A. Green; V. Lebedev; B.R. Strauss

    2002-03-01

    The proposed superconducting linear accelerator that accelerates muons from 190 MeV to 2.45 GeV will use superconducting solenoids for focusing the muon beam. The accelerator will use superconducting RF cavities. These cavities are very sensitive to stay magnetic field from the focusing magnets. Superconducting solenoids can have large stray fields. This paper describes the 201.25-MHz acceleration system for the neutrino factory. This paper also describes a focusing solenoid that delivers almost no stray field to a neighboring superconducting RF cavity.

  12. Magnetization studies of oxides related to the high temperature cuprate superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Z.

    1995-06-19

    The magnetic properties related to the following high temperature superconductors were measured utilizing a Faraday magnetometer: BaCuO{sub 2+x}, La{sub 2} CuO{sub 4}, Sr{sub 2} RhO{sub 4}, Sr{sub 2} VO{sub 4}, and Sr{sub 2} CuO{sub 3}. Neutron diffraction, magnetic susceptibility, and heat capacity measurements are discussed.

  13. Soliton reflection in magnetized plasma: Effect of ion temperature and nonisothermal electrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malik, Hitendra K.

    2008-07-15

    Reflection of solitons in magnetized inhomogeneous plasma is studied theoretically under the effect of ion temperature and low temperature nonisothermal electrons. The effect of ion temperature is to enhance (reduce) the amplitude (width) of the incident and reflected solitons, and this effect is more prominent in the case of a large number of nonisothermal electrons. The solitons are downshifted after the reflection and the stronger reflection is achieved when the ions of lower temperature and nonisothermal electrons with larger concentration are present in the plasma. The solitons shift more after the reflection for higher ion and electron temperatures, large concentration of the electrons, but the shift becomes smaller in the presence of stronger magnetic field. Both the incident and reflected solitons evolve with higher amplitudes if the temperature of nonisothermal electrons is raised, but the solitons are reflected weakly under this situation. The effect of magnetic field is to reduce the amplitudes of both the solitons, and the reduction in the amplitude of reflected soliton is at a faster rate, due to which the soliton reflection gets weaker. The magnetic field affects soliton reflection more significantly when it is applied at a larger angle with the direction of wave propagation.

  14. Electronic structure of superconductivity refined

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electronic structure of superconductivity refined Electronic structure of superconductivity refined A team of physicists propose a new model that expands on a little understood aspect of the electronic structure in high-temperature superconductors. July 10, 2008 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma

  15. Effect of Eu substitution on superconductivity in Ba{sub 8?x}Eu{sub x}Al{sub 6}Si{sub 40} clathrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Lihua; Bi, Shanli; Peng, Bailu; Li, Yang

    2015-05-07

    The silicon clathrate superconductor is uncommon as its structure is dominated by strong Si-Si covalent bonds, rather than the metallic bond, that are more typical of traditional superconductors. To understand the influence of large magnetic moment of Eu on superconductivity for type-I clathrates, a series of samples with the chemical formula Ba{sub 8?x}Eu{sub x}Al{sub 6}Si{sub 40} (x?=?0, 0.5, 1, and 2) were synthesised in which Eu occupied Ba sites in cage center. With the increase of Eu content, the cubic lattice parameter decreases monotonically signifying continuous shrinkage of the constituting (Ba/Eu)@Si{sub 20} and (Ba/Eu)@Si{sub 24} cages. The temperature dependence of magnetization at low temperature revealed that Ba{sub 8}Al{sub 6}Si{sub 40} is superconductive with transition temperature at T{sub C}?=?5.6?K. The substitution of Eu for Ba results in a strong superconductivity suppression; Eu-doping largely decreases the superconducting volume and transition temperature T{sub C}. Eu atoms enter the clathrate lattice and their magnetic moments break paired electrons. The Curie-Weiss temperatures were observed at 3.9, 6.6, and 10.9?K, respectively, for samples with x?=?0.5, 1.0, and 2.0. Such ferromagnetic interaction of Eu can destroy superconductivity.

  16. On the magnetic field signal radiated by an atmospheric pressure room temperature plasma jet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, S.; Huang, Q.; Wang, Z.; Lu, X. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China)

    2013-01-28

    In this paper, the magnetic field signal radiated from an atmospheric pressure room temperature plasma plume is measured. It's found that the magnetic field signal has similar waveform as the current carried by the plasma plume. By calibration of the magnetic field signal, the plasma plume current is obtained by measuring the magnetic field signal radiated by the plasma plume. In addition, it is found that, when gas flow modes changes from laminar regime to turbulence regime, the magnetic field signal waveforms appears different, it changes from a smooth curve to a curve with multiple spikes. Furthermore, it is confirmed that the plasma plume generated by a single electrode (without ground electrode) plasma jet device carries higher current than that with ground electrode.

  17. Active magnetic regenerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barclay, J.A.; Steyert, W.A.

    1981-01-27

    An apparatus and method for refrigeration are disclosed which provides efficient refrigeration over temperature ranges in excess of 20/sup 0/C and which requires no maintenance and is, therefore, usable on an unmanned satellite. The apparatus comprises a superconducting magnet which may be solenoidal. A piston comprising a substance such as a rare earth substance which is maintained near its Curie temperature reciprocates through the bore of the solenoidal magnet. A magnetic drive rod is connected to the piston and appropriate heat sinks are connected thereto. The piston is driven by a suitable mechanical drive such as an electric motor and cam. In practicing the invention, the body of the piston is magnetized and demagnetized as it moves through the magnetic field of the solenoid to approximate any of the following cycles or a condition thereof as well as, potentially, other cycles: Brayton, Carnot, Ericsson, and Stirling. Advantages of the present invention include: that refrigeration can be accomplished over at least a 20/sup 0/C scale at superconducting temperatures as well as at more conventional temperatures; very high efficiency, high reliability, and small size. (LCL)

  18. Synthesis of high magnetization Fe and FeCo nanoparticles by high temperature chemical reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kandapallil, B; Colborn, RE; Bonitatibus, PJ; Johnson, F

    2015-03-15

    Fe and FeCo ferromagnetic nanoparticles in the 5-10 nm size regimes featuring high magnetization were synthesized using a modified chemical reduction method. The structure and morphology of these nanoparticles were confirmed by XRD and TOM analysis. These small, monodisperse and phase pure nanoparticles exhibited magnetic saturation of 210 emu/g (Fe) and 220 emu/g (Fe+Co) for Fe and FeCo nanoparticles respectively. The magnetization was found to be dependent on the temperature at which the reducing agent was introduced. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved,

  19. Detection of pico-Tesla magnetic fields using magneto-electric sensors at room temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhai Junyi; Xing Zengping; Dong Shuxiang; Li Jiefang; Viehland, D. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)

    2006-02-06

    The measurement of low-frequency (10{sup -2}-10{sup 3} Hz) minute magnetic field variations (10{sup -12} Tesla) at room temperature in a passive mode of operation would be critically enabling for deployable neurological signal interfacing and magnetic anomaly detection applications. However, there is presently no magnetic field sensor capable of meeting all of these requirements. Here, we present new bimorph and push-pull magneto-electric laminate composites, which incorporate a charge compensation mechanism (or bridge) that dramatically enhances noise rejection, enabling achievement of such requirements.

  20. Superconducting current transducer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuchnir, M.; Ozelis, J.P. )

    1991-03-01

    This paper describes the construction and performance of an electric current meter that operates in liquid He and mechanically splits apart to permit replacement of the current carrying conductor. It permits the measurement of currents induced in a loop of superconducting cable and expeditious exchange of such loops. It is a key component for a short sample cable testing facility that requires no high current power supplies nor high current leads. Its superconducting pickup circuit involves a non-magnetic core toroidal split-coil that surrounds the conductor and a solenoid whose field is sensed by a Hall probe. This toroidal split-coil is potted inside another compensating toroidal split-coil.

  1. Facility for low-temperature spin-polarized-scanning tunneling microscopy studies of magnetic/spintronic materials prepared in situ by nitride molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Wenzhi; Foley, Andrew; Alam, Khan; Wang, Kangkang; Liu, Yinghao; Chen, Tianjiao; Pak, Jeongihm; Smith, Arthur R.

    2014-04-15

    breaking vacuum, and convenient visual access to the sample and tip inside a superconducting magnet cryostat. A sample/tip handling system is optimized for both the molecular beam epitaxy growth system and the scanning tunneling microscope system. The sample/tip handing system enables in situ STM studies on epitaxially grown samples, and tip exchange in the superconducting magnet cryostat. The hybrid molecular beam epitaxy and low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy system is capable of growing semiconductor-based hetero-structures with controlled accuracy down to a single atomic-layer and imaging them down to atomic resolution.

  2. Workshop on research needs and opportunities in high-temperature superconductivity held in Copper Mountain, Colorado in 19-20 August 1991. Final report, 1 Jun 91-30 Apr 92

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaw, D.T.; Kroger, H.; Jin, S.; Gubser, D.U.; Falco, C.M.

    1991-11-01

    This is the report of the Workshop on New Research Opportunities in Superconductivity held at Copper Mountain, Colorado on August 19-20,1991. The workshop is a follow-up to two previous meetings to evaluate progress in superconductivity. The first, held at Copper Mountain, Colorado in 1983, focuses on low-temperature superconductors (LTS), while the second-in 1988 examined the progress of low-temperature materials and the potential of the then recently-discovered high-temperature superconductors (HTS). The summaries of these two superconductivity workshops were published in Cryogenics (July 1984, p.378; and November 1988, p.711). This workshop was the first in this series to concentrate largely on high-temperature superconductors. Its objectives were to identify the barriers limiting progress in high-temperature materials and to assess research areas that are ripe for important advances. The workshop was organized in four sessions, with Robert C.Dynes and Victor J. Emery leading the session on Fundamentals, Charles M. Falco and Donald U. Gubser leading the session on Materials, David K. Christen and Harry Kroger leading the session on Thin Films and Devices, and Sungho Jin and David T. Shaw leading the session on Bulk Materials and Large-Scale Applications. The organizational committee for the workshop consisted of David K. Christen, Alan F. Clark, Robert C. Dynes, Donald H. Liebenberg, David L. Nelson, and David T. Shaw (chair).

  3. Hybrid superconducting neutron detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merlo, V.; Lucci, M.; Ottaviani, I.; Salvato, M.; Cirillo, M.; Scherillo, A.; Celentano, G.; Pietropaolo, A.

    2015-03-16

    A neutron detection concept is presented that is based on superconductive niobium (Nb) strips coated by a boron (B) layer. The working principle of the detector relies on the nuclear reaction, {sup 10}B + n → α + {sup 7}Li, with α and Li ions generating a hot spot on the current-biased Nb strip which in turn induces a superconducting-normal state transition. The latter is recognized as a voltage signal which is the evidence of the incident neutron. The above described detection principle has been experimentally assessed and verified by irradiating the samples with a pulsed neutron beam at the ISIS spallation neutron source (UK). It is found that the boron coated superconducting strips, kept at a temperature T = 8 K and current-biased below the critical current I{sub c}, are driven into the normal state upon thermal neutron irradiation. As a result of the transition, voltage pulses in excess of 40 mV are measured while the bias current can be properly modulated to bring the strip back to the superconducting state, thus resetting the detector. Measurements on the counting rate of the device are presented and the basic physical features of the detector are discussed.

  4. Superconducting Topological Insulators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Superconducting Topological Insulators Print Three-dimensional topological insulators (TIs), discovered experimentally in 2007-2009 by a Princeton-ALS collaboration, are a promising platform for developing the next generation of electronics. Electrons within one nanometer of a TI's surface move at high speeds in a "light-like" fashion. The quantum interactions that generate these electronic states cause individual electrons to be spin polarized even at room temperature and to strongly

  5. Superconducting Topological Insulators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Superconducting Topological Insulators Print Three-dimensional topological insulators (TIs), discovered experimentally in 2007-2009 by a Princeton-ALS collaboration, are a promising platform for developing the next generation of electronics. Electrons within one nanometer of a TI's surface move at high speeds in a "light-like" fashion. The quantum interactions that generate these electronic states cause individual electrons to be spin polarized even at room temperature and to strongly

  6. Superconducting Topological Insulators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Superconducting Topological Insulators Print Three-dimensional topological insulators (TIs), discovered experimentally in 2007-2009 by a Princeton-ALS collaboration, are a promising platform for developing the next generation of electronics. Electrons within one nanometer of a TI's surface move at high speeds in a "light-like" fashion. The quantum interactions that generate these electronic states cause individual electrons to be spin polarized even at room temperature and to strongly

  7. Superconducting Topological Insulators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Superconducting Topological Insulators Print Three-dimensional topological insulators (TIs), discovered experimentally in 2007-2009 by a Princeton-ALS collaboration, are a promising platform for developing the next generation of electronics. Electrons within one nanometer of a TI's surface move at high speeds in a "light-like" fashion. The quantum interactions that generate these electronic states cause individual electrons to be spin polarized even at room temperature and to strongly

  8. Superconducting Topological Insulators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Superconducting Topological Insulators Print Three-dimensional topological insulators (TIs), discovered experimentally in 2007-2009 by a Princeton-ALS collaboration, are a promising platform for developing the next generation of electronics. Electrons within one nanometer of a TI's surface move at high speeds in a "light-like" fashion. The quantum interactions that generate these electronic states cause individual electrons to be spin polarized even at room temperature and to strongly

  9. Characterization of Alloys with Potential for Application in Cable-in-Conduit Conductors for High-Field Superconducting Magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, R.P.; Miller, J.R.; Toplosky, V.J.

    2004-06-28

    Since the introduction of the cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC) concept, a variety of alloys have been proposed for fabricating the jacket. The jacket provides primary containment of the supercritical helium coolant and is typically also the primary structural component for the magnet. These functions create requirements for strength, toughness, weldability, and fabricability in tubular form. When the CICC uses Nb3Sn, there are additional requirements to accommodate the manufacturing and heat-treatment processes for the superconductor as well as its strain-sensitive performance during operation. Both of the present favorite jacket alloys, Incoloy 908 and modified (ultra-low carbon) 316LN, have both demonstrated acceptable functionality as well as a few undesirable features. In this paper, we present data from cryogenic mechanical tests on a group of heat-resistant, high-strength superalloys that appear to offer equal or better mechanical performance (e.g. strength, toughness, and modulus) while mitigating the undesirable aspects (e.g. SAGBO in the case of I908 and thermal-expansion mismatch with Nb3Sn in the case of 316LN). Data are presented for each alloy in the as-received and aged conditions. These alloys are presently being considered as candidates for use in the next-generation hybrid magnet for the NHMFL but may also be of interest to the fusion and energy storage communities.

  10. Non-magnetic organic/inorganic spin injector at room temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathew, Shinto P.; Mondal, Prakash Chandra; Naaman, Ron; Moshe, Hagay; Mastai, Yitzhak

    2014-12-15

    Spin injection into solid-state devices is commonly performed by use of ferromagnetic metal electrodes. Here, we present a spin injector design without permanent magnet; rather, the spin selectivity is determined by a chiral tunneling barrier. The chiral tunneling barrier is composed of an ultrathin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer that is deposited on top of a chiral self-assembled monolayer (SAM), which consists of cysteine or oligopeptide molecules. The experimentally observed magnetoresistance can be up to 20% at room temperature, and it displays an uncommon asymmetric curve as a function of the applied magnetic field. These findings show that the spin injector transmits only one spin orientation, independent of external magnetic field. The sign of the magnetoresistance depends on the handedness of the molecules in the SAM, which act as a spin filter, and the magnitude of the magnetoresistance depends only weakly on temperature.

  11. Method for preparing high cure temperature rare earth iron compound magnetic material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huang, Yuhong; Wei, Qiang; Zheng, Haixing

    2002-01-01

    Insertion of light elements such as H,C, or N in the R.sub.2 Fe.sub.17 (R=rare earth metal) series has been found to modify the magnetic properties of these compounds, which thus become prospective candidates for high performance permanent magnets. The most spectacular changes are increases of the Curie temperature, T.sub.c, of the magnetization, M.sub.s, and of coercivity, H.sub.c, upon interstitial insertion. A preliminary product having a component R--Fe--C,N phase is produced by a chemical route. Rare earth metal and iron amides are synthesized followed by pyrolysis and sintering in an inert or reduced atmosphere, as a result of which, the R--Fe--C,N phases are formed. Fabrication of sintered rare earth iron nitride and carbonitride bulk magnet is impossible via conventional process due to the limitation of nitridation method.

  12. Superconducting dipole electromagnet

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Purcell, John R.

    1977-07-26

    A dipole electromagnet of especial use for bending beams in particle accelerators is wound to have high uniformity of magnetic field across a cross section and to decrease evenly to zero as the ends of the electromagnet are approached by disposing the superconducting filaments of the coil in the crescent-shaped nonoverlapping portions of two intersecting circles. Uniform decrease at the ends is achieved by causing the circles to overlap increasingly in the direction of the ends of the coil until the overlap is complete and the coil is terminated.

  13. Temperature-dependent terahertz magnetic dipole radiation from antiferromagnetic GdFeO{sub 3} ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, Xiaojian; Xi, Xiaoqing; Bi, Ke; Zhou, Ji

    2013-11-18

    Temperature-dependent terahertz magnetic dipole radiation in antiferromagnetic GdFeO{sub 3} ceramic is investigated both theoretically and experimentally in this work. A two-level quantum transition mechanism is introduced to describe the excitation-radiation process, and radiative lifetime is derived analytically from the change of spin state density during this process. Terahertz spectral measurements demonstrate that the radiative frequency exhibits a red-shift and lifetime shortens as temperature increases, which is in good agreement with theoretical predictions. The temperature-sensitive radiative frequency and excellent terahertz emission mean that the antiferromagnetic ceramics show potential for application in terahertz sensors and frequency-tunable terahertz lasers.

  14. Extended magnetic exchange interactions in the high-temperature ferromagnet MnBi

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Christianson, Andrew D.; Hahn, Steven E.; Fishman, Randy Scott; Parker, David S.; McGuire, Michael A.; Sales, Brian C.; Lumsden, Mark D.; Williams, T. J.; Taylor, A. E.

    2016-05-09

    Here, the high-temperature ferromagnet MnBi continues to receive attention as a candidate to replace rare-earth-containing permanent magnets in applications above room temperature. This is due to a high Curie temperature, large magnetic moments, and a coercivity that increases with temperature. The synthesis of MnBi also allows for crystals that are free of interstitial Mn, enabling more direct access to the key interactions underlying the physical properties of binary Mn-based ferromagnets. In this work, we use inelastic neutron scattering to measure the spin waves of MnBi in order to characterize the magnetic exchange at low temperature. Consistent with the spin reorientationmore » that occurs below 140~K, we do not observe a spin gap in this system above our experimental resolution. A Heisenberg model was fit to the spin wave data in order to characterize the long-range nature of the exchange. It was found that interactions up to sixth nearest neighbor are required to fully parameterize the spin waves. Surprisingly, the nearest-neighbor term is antiferromagnetic, and the realization of a ferromagnetic ground state relies on the more numerous ferromagnetic terms beyond nearest neighbor, suggesting that the ferromagnetic ground state arises as a consequence of the long-ranged interactions in the system.« less

  15. In-situ neutron scattering studies of magnetic shape memory alloys under stress, temperature, and magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Donald W; Sisneros, Thomas A; Kabra, Saurabh; Schlagel, Deborah

    2010-01-01

    We have utilized the SMARTS engineering neutron diffractometer to study the crystallographic orientation and phase transformations in the ferromagnetic shape memory alloy Ni 2MnGa under conditions of temperature (200-600K), stress (500MPa), and magnetic field (2T). Neutrons are uniquely suited to probe the crystallographic response of materials to external stimuli because of their high penetration, which allows them to sample the bulk of the material (as opposed to the surface) as well as pass through environmental chambers. A single crystal of Ni{sub 5}MnGa was repeatedly thermally cycled through the Austenitic-Martensitic phase transformation under varying conditions of applied stress, magnetic field or both. In-situ neutron diffraction was used to quantitatively monitor the population of the crystallographic variants in the martensitic phase as a function of the external stimuli during cooling. Neutron diffraction was used to monitor variant selection in the Ferromagnetic Shape Memory Alloy Ni{sub 2}Mn Ga during austenitic to martensitic transformation under varying conditions of externally applied stress and magnetic field. Qualitatively, the results were to be expected in this simple example. The shorter and magnetically soft c-axis of the tetragonal martensitic phase aligned with the compressive stress or magnetic field. However, neutron diffraction proved useful in directly quantifying the selection of the preferred variant by external influence. For instance, by quantifying the variant selection, the neutron diffraction results made apparent that the sample 'remembered' a loading cycle following a 'reset' cycle with no external applied stress. Moreover, the power of in-situ neutron diffraction will become more apparent when applied to more complex, less understood, samples such as polycrystalline samples or composite samples.

  16. Dust-acoustic solitary structures in a magnetized dusty plasma with two-temperature nonextensive electrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emamuddin, M.; Yasmin, S.; Asaduzzaman, M.; Mamun, A. A.

    2013-08-15

    The nonlinear propagation of dust-acoustic (DA) waves in an obliquely propagating magnetized dusty plasma, containing nonextensively distributed electrons of distinct temperatures (namely lower and higher temperature nonextensive electrons), negatively charged mobile dust grains, and Maxwellian ions, is rigorously studied and analyzed by deriving the Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation. It is found that the characteristics of the DA solitary waves (DASWs) are significantly modified by the external magnetic field, obliqueness of the system, nonextensivity of the electrons, electron temperature-ratios, and the respective number densities of two species of electrons. The results obtained from this analysis can be employed in understanding and treating the structures and the characteristics of DASWs both in laboratory and astrophysical plasma system.

  17. Superconductive articles including cerium oxide layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wu, X.D.; Muenchausen, R.E.

    1993-11-16

    A ceramic superconductor comprising a metal oxide substrate, a ceramic high temperature superconductive material, and a intermediate layer of a material having a cubic crystal structure, said layer situated between the substrate and the superconductive material is provided, and a structure for supporting a ceramic superconducting material is provided, said structure comprising a metal oxide substrate, and a layer situated over the surface of the substrate to substantially inhibit interdiffusion between the substrate and a ceramic superconducting material deposited upon said structure. 7 figures.

  18. The Use of Small Coolers in a Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, Michael A.; Witte, Holger

    2007-07-25

    Small 4 K coolers are used to cool superconducting magnets.These coolers are usually used with high temperature suerconductor (HTS)leads. In most cases, magnet is shielded with iron or active shieldcoils. Thus the field at the cooler is low. There are instances when thecooler must be in a magnetic field. Gifford McMahon (GM) coolers or pulsetube coolers are commercially available to cool the magnets. This paperwill discuss how the two types of coolers are affected by the straymagnetic field. Strategies for using coolers on magnets that generatestray magnetic fields are discussed.

  19. Vibration Measurements to Study the Effect of Cryogen Flow in Superconducting Quadrupole.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He,P.; Anerella, M.; aydin, S.; Ganetis, G. Harrison, M.; Jain, A.; Parker, B.

    2007-06-25

    The conceptual design of compact superconducting magnets for the International Linear Collider final focus is presently under development. A primary concern in using superconducting quadrupoles is the potential for inducing additional vibrations from cryogenic operation. We have employed a Laser Doppler Vibrometer system to measure the vibrations in a spare RHIC quadrupole magnet under cryogenic conditions. Some preliminary results of these studies were limited in resolution due to a rather large motion of the laser head as well as the magnet. As a first step towards improving the measurement quality, a new set up was used that reduces the motion of the laser holder. The improved setup is described, and vibration spectra measured at cryogenic temperatures, both with and without helium flow, are presented.

  20. Sr2IrO4: Gateway to cuprate superconductivity?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mitchell, J. F.

    2015-06-05

    High temperature superconductivity in cuprates remains a defining challenge in condensed matter physics. Recently, a new set of related compounds based on Ir rather than Cu has been discovered that may be on the verge of superconductivity themselves or be able to shed new light on the underlying interactions responsible for superconductivity in the cuprates.

  1. Note: A sample holder design for sensitive magnetic measurements at high temperatures in a magnetic properties measurement system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arauzo, A.; Guerrero, E.; Urtizberea, A.; Stankiewicz, J.; Rillo, C.

    2012-06-15

    A sample holder design for high temperature measurements in a commercial MPMS SQUID magnetometer from Quantum Design is presented. It fulfills the requirements for the simultaneous use of the oven and reciprocating sample option (RSO) options, thus allowing sensitive magnetic measurements up to 800 K. Alternating current susceptibility can also be measured, since the holder does not induce any phase shift relative to the ac driven field. It is easily fabricated by twisting Constantan Copyright-Sign wires into a braid nesting the sample inside. This design ensures that the sample be placed tightly into a tough holder with its orientation fixed, and prevents any sample displacement during the fast movements of the RSO transport, up to high temperatures.

  2. Low-temperature crystal and magnetic structure of α – RuCl3

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cao, Huibo B.; Yan, Jiaqiang; Bridges, Craig A.; Lumsden, Mark D.; Mandrus, D. G.; Chakoumakos, Bryan C.; Nagler, Stephen E.; Banerjee, A.; Tennant, D. A.

    2016-04-19

    Here, single crystals of the Kitaev spin-liquid candidate α – RuCl3 have been studied to determine the low-temperature bulk properties, the structure, and the magnetic ground state. Refinements of x-ray diffraction data show that the low-temperature crystal structure is described by space group C2/m with a nearly perfect honeycomb lattice exhibiting less than 0.2% in-plane distortion. The as-grown single crystals exhibit only one sharp magnetic transition at TN = 7 K. The magnetic order below this temperature exhibits a propagation vector of k=(0,1,1/3), which coincides with a three-layer stacking of the C2/m unit cells. Magnetic transitions at higher temperatures upmore » to 14 K can be introduced by deformations of the crystal that result in regions in the crystal with a two-layer stacking sequence. The best-fit symmetry-allowed magnetic structure of the as-grown crystals shows that the spins lie in the ac plane, with a zigzag configuration in each honeycomb layer. The three-layer repeat out-of-plane structure can be refined as a 120° spiral order or a collinear structure with a spin direction of 35° away from the a axis. The collinear spin configuration yields a slightly better fit and also is physically preferred. The average ordered moment in either structure is less than 0.45(5) μB per Ru3+ ion.« less

  3. Effect of substrate temperature on the magnetic properties of epitaxial sputter-grown Co/Pt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mihai, A. P.; Whiteside, A. L.; Canwell, E. J.; Marrows, C. H.; Moore, T. A.; Benitez, M. J.; McGrouther, D.; McVitie, S.; McFadzean, S.

    2013-12-23

    Epitaxial Co/Pt films have been deposited by dc-magnetron sputtering onto heated C-plane sapphire substrates. X-ray diffraction, the residual resistivity, and transmission electron microscopy indicate that the Co/Pt films are highly ordered on the atomic scale. The coercive field and the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy increase as the substrate temperature is increased from 100250?C during deposition of the Co/Pt. Measurement of the domain wall creep velocity as a function of applied magnetic field yields the domain wall pinning energy, which scales with the coercive field. Evidence for an enhanced creep velocity in highly ordered epitaxial Co/Pt is found.

  4. Molybdenum-rhenium alloy based high-Q superconducting microwave resonators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Vibhor Schneider, Ben H.; Bosman, Sal J.; Merkx, Evert P. J.; Steele, Gary A.

    2014-12-01

    Superconducting microwave resonators (SMRs) with high quality factors have become an important technology in a wide range of applications. Molybdenum-Rhenium (MoRe) is a disordered superconducting alloy with a noble surface chemistry and a relatively high transition temperature. These properties make it attractive for SMR applications, but characterization of MoRe SMR has not yet been reported. Here, we present the fabrication and characterization of SMR fabricated with a MoRe 60–40 alloy. At low drive powers, we observe internal quality-factors as high as 700 000. Temperature and power dependence of the internal quality-factors suggest the presence of the two level systems from the dielectric substrate dominating the internal loss at low temperatures. We further test the compatibility of these resonators with high temperature processes, such as for carbon nanotube chemical vapor deposition growth, and their performance in the magnetic field, an important characterization for hybrid systems.

  5. Electrodynamics of superconducting pnictide superlattices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perucchi, A.; Pietro, P. Di; Capitani, F.; Lupi, S.; Lee, S.; Kang, J. H.; Eom, C. B.; Jiang, J.; Weiss, J. D.; Hellstrom, E. E.; Dore, P.

    2014-06-02

    It was recently shown that superlattices where layers of the 8% Co-doped BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} superconducting pnictide are intercalated with non superconducting ultrathin layers of either SrTiO{sub 3} or of oxygen-rich BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}, can be used to control flux pinning, thereby increasing critical fields and currents, without significantly affecting the critical temperature of the pristine superconducting material. However, little is known about the electron properties of these systems. Here, we investigate the electrodynamics of these superconducting pnictide superlattices in the normal and superconducting state by using infrared reflectivity, from THz to visible range. We find that multigap structure of these superlattices is preserved, whereas some significant changes are observed in their electronic structure with respect to those of the original pnictide. Our results suggest that possible attempts to further increase the flux pinning may lead to a breakdown of the pnictide superconducting properties.

  6. Dome – like variation of the superconducting gap anisotropy in Fe-based superconductors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Prozorov, R.; Cho, K.; Kim, H.; Tanatar, M. A.

    2013-07-17

    Experiments performed on different iron-based superconductors suggest a variety of possible structures of the superconducting energy gap, both nodeless and nodal. To understand the pairing mechanisms, it is important to identify common features in the behavior of different materials. Measurements of the temperature - dependent London penetration depth provide important information on the structure of the superconducting gap. We show that despite significant differences between different iron - based superconductors, there is a universal trend: the gap is least anisotropic at the optimal doping and its anisotropy increases upon the departure towards underdoped and overdoped ends of the ''superconducting dome''.more » As a result, this trend is not related to the presence of the long-range magnetic order in the underdoped state.« less

  7. Substitution of Ni for Fe in superconducting Fe0.98Te0.5Se0.5 depresses the normal-state conductivity but not the magnetic spectral weight

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Jinghui; Zhong, Ruidan; Li, Shichao; Gan, Yuan; Xu, Zhijun; Zhang, Cheng; Ozaki, T.; Matsuda, M.; Zhao, Yang; Li, Qiang; et al

    2015-01-05

    We have performed systematic resistivity and inelastic neutron scattering measurements on Fe₀.₉₈₋zNizTe₀.₅Se₀.₅ samples to study the impact of Ni substitution on the transport properties and the low-energy (≤ 12 meV) magnetic excitations. It is found that, with increasing Ni doping, both the conductivity and superconductivity are gradually suppressed; in contrast, the low-energy magnetic spectral weight changes little. Comparing with the impact of Co and Cu substitution, we find that the effects on conductivity and superconductivity for the same degree of substitution grow systematically as the atomic number of the substituent deviates from that of Fe. The impact of the substituentsmore » as scattering centers appears to be greater than any contribution to carrier concentration. The fact that low-energy magnetic spectral weight is not reduced by increased electron scattering indicates that the existence of antiferromagnetic correlations does not depend on electronic states close to the Fermi energy.« less

  8. Structural and magnetic phase transitions near optimal superconductivity in BaFe2(As1-xPx)2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Ding; Lu, Xingye; Zhang, Wenliang; Luo, Huiqian; Li, Shiliang; Wang, Peipei; Chen, Genfu; Han, Fei; Banjara, Shree R.; Sapkota, A.; Kreyssig, A.; Goldman, A. I.; Yamani, Z.; Niedermayer, Christof; Skoulatos, Markos; Georgii, Robert; Keller, T.; Wang, Pengshuai; Yu, Weiqiang; Dai, Pengcheng

    2015-04-17

    In this study, we use nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), high-resolution x-ray and neutron scattering to study structural and magnetic phase transitions in phosphorus-doped BaFe2(As1-xPx)2. Thus, previous transport, NMR, specific heat, and magnetic penetration depth measurements have provided compelling evidence for the presence of a quantum critical point (QCP) near optimal superconductivity at x = 0.3. However, we show that the tetragonal-to-orthorhombic structural (Ts) and paramagnetic to antiferromagnetic (AF, TN) transitions in BaFe2(As1-xPx)2 are always coupled and approach to TN ≈ Ts ≥ Tc (≈ 29 K) for x = 0.29 before vanishing abruptly for x ≥ 0.3. These results suggest that AF order in BaFe2(As1-xPx)2 disappears in a weakly first order fashion near optimal superconductivity, much like the electron-doped iron pnictides with an avoided QCP.

  9. 2D 'Flat' Boron Yields a Superconducting Surprise

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2D 'Flat' Boron Yields a Superconducting Surprise 2D 'Flat' Boron Yields a Superconducting Surprise Simulations Run at NERSC Help Reveal Material's Superconducting Superpowers April 22, 2016 2Dboron Electrons with opposite momenta and spins pair up via lattice vibrations at low temperatures in 2D boron and give it superconducting properties. Image: Evgeni Penev, Rice University Density functional theory simulations run at NERSC helped Rice University researchers determine that two-dimensional

  10. Superconducting wires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lanagan, M.T.; Poeppel, R.B.; Singh, J.P.; Dos Santos, D.I.; Lumpp, J.K.; Dusek, J.T.; Goretta, K.C.

    1988-06-01

    The requirement of high critical current density has prompted extensive research on ceramic processing of high-T/sub c/ superconductors. An overview of wire fabrication techniques and the limitations they impose on component design will be presented. The effects of processing on microstructure and critical current density will also be discussed. Particle alignment has been observed in extruded samples which is attributed to high shear stresses during plastic forming. Composites of superconductor and silver in several configurations have been made with little deleterious effect on the superconducting properties. 35 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Molybdenum-rhenium superconducting suspended nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aziz, Mohsin; Christopher Hudson, David; Russo, Saverio

    2014-06-09

    Suspended superconducting nanostructures of MoRe 50%/50% by weight are fabricated employing commonly used fabrication steps in micro- and nano-meter scale devices followed by wet-etching with Hydro-fluoric acid of a SiO{sub 2} sacrificial layer. Suspended superconducting channels as narrow as 50?nm and length 3??m have a critical temperature of ?6.5?K, which can increase by 0.5?K upon annealing at 400?C. A detailed study of the dependence of the superconducting critical current and critical temperature upon annealing and in devices with different channel widths reveals that desorption of contaminants is responsible for the improved superconducting properties. These findings pave the way for the development of superconducting electromechanical devices using standard fabrication techniques.

  12. Numerical investigation of the ion temperature effect in magnetized plasma sheath with two species of positive ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaw, A. K.; Goswami, K. S.; Saikia, B. J. [Centre of Plasma Physics-Institute for Plasma Research, Sonapur-782 402, Guwahati, Kamrup (M) (India); Kar, S. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar-382 428, Gujarat (India)

    2012-01-15

    The effect of ion temperature, magnitude of magnetic field and its orientation on a magnetized plasma sheath consisting of electrons and two species of positive ions are investigated. Using three-fluid hydrodynamic model and some dimensionless variables, the dimensionless equations are obtained and solved numerically. It is found that with the increase of the ion temperature and magnetic field strength there is a significant change in ion densities and energies in the sheath. It is also noticed that increase of magnetic field angle enhances the ion density near the sheath edge for a constant ion temperature. With increase in ion temperature and magnetic field angle, the lighter ion density near the sheath edge enhances and reverses for the heavier ion species.

  13. Spin liquid polymorphism in a correlated electron system on the threshold of superconductivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zalinznyak, Igor; Savici, Andrei T.; Lumsden, Mark D.; Tsvelik, Alexei; Hu, Rongwei; Petrovic, Cedomir

    2015-08-18

    We report neutron scattering measurements which reveal spin-liquid polymorphism in an 11 iron chalcogenide superconductor. It occurs when a poorly metallic magnetic state of FeTe is tuned toward superconductivity by substitution of a small amount of tellurium with isoelectronic sulfur. We also observe a liquid-like magnetic response, which is described by the coexistence of two disordered magnetic phases with different local structures whose relative abundance depends on temperature. One is the ferromagnetic (FM) plaquette phase observed in undoped, nonsuperconducting FeTe, which preserves the C4 symmetry of the underlying square lattice and is favored at high temperatures, whereas the other is the antiferromagnetic plaquette phase with broken C4 symmetry, which emerges with doping and is predominant at low temperatures. These findings suggest the coexistence of and competition between two distinct liquid states, and a liquidliquid phase transformation between these states, in the electronic spin system of FeTe1-x(S,Se)x. We have thus discovered the remarkable physics of competing spin-liquid polymorphs in a correlated electron system approaching superconductivity. These results facilitate an understanding of large swaths of recent experimental data in unconventional superconductors. In particular, the phase with lower C2 local symmetry, whose emergence precedes superconductivity, naturally accounts for a propensity for forming electronic nematic states which have been observed experimentally, in cuprate and iron-based superconductors alike.

  14. Spin liquid polymorphism in a correlated electron system on the threshold of superconductivity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zalinznyak, Igor; Savici, Andrei T.; Lumsden, Mark D.; Tsvelik, Alexei; Hu, Rongwei; Petrovic, Cedomir

    2015-08-18

    We report neutron scattering measurements which reveal spin-liquid polymorphism in an 11 iron chalcogenide superconductor. It occurs when a poorly metallic magnetic state of FeTe is tuned toward superconductivity by substitution of a small amount of tellurium with isoelectronic sulfur. We also observe a liquid-like magnetic response, which is described by the coexistence of two disordered magnetic phases with different local structures whose relative abundance depends on temperature. One is the ferromagnetic (FM) plaquette phase observed in undoped, nonsuperconducting FeTe, which preserves the C4 symmetry of the underlying square lattice and is favored at high temperatures, whereas the other ismorethe antiferromagnetic plaquette phase with broken C4 symmetry, which emerges with doping and is predominant at low temperatures. These findings suggest the coexistence of and competition between two distinct liquid states, and a liquidliquid phase transformation between these states, in the electronic spin system of FeTe1-x(S,Se)x. We have thus discovered the remarkable physics of competing spin-liquid polymorphs in a correlated electron system approaching superconductivity. These results facilitate an understanding of large swaths of recent experimental data in unconventional superconductors. In particular, the phase with lower C2 local symmetry, whose emergence precedes superconductivity, naturally accounts for a propensity for forming electronic nematic states which have been observed experimentally, in cuprate and iron-based superconductors alike.less

  15. Conventional magnetic superconductors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wolowiec, C. T.; White, B. D.; Maple, M. B.

    2015-07-01

    We discuss several classes of conventional magnetic superconductors including the ternary rhodium borides and molybdenum chalcogenides (or Chevrel phases), and the quaternary nickel-borocarbides. These materials exhibit some exotic phenomena related to the interplay between superconductivity and long-range magnetic order including: the coexistence of superconductivity and antiferromagnetic order; reentrant and double reentrant superconductivity, magnetic field induced superconductivity, and the formation of a sinusoidally-modulated magnetic state that coexists with superconductivity. We introduce the article with a discussion of the binary and pseudobinary superconducting materials containing magnetic impurities which at best exhibit short-range “glassy” magnetic order. Early experiments on these materials led tomore » the idea of a magnetic exchange interaction between the localized spins of magnetic impurity ions and the spins of the conduction electrons which plays an important role in understanding conventional magnetic superconductors. Furthermore, these advances provide a natural foundation for investigating unconventional superconductivity in heavy-fermion compounds, cuprates, and other classes of materials in which superconductivity coexists with, or is in proximity to, a magnetically-ordered phase.« less

  16. Electron holography study of the temperature variation of the magnetic order parameter within circularly chained nickel nanoparticle rings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sugawara, Akira; Fukunaga, Kei-ichi; Scheinfein, M. R.; Kobayashi, H.; Kitagawa, H.; Tonomura, A.

    2007-12-24

    The magnetic structure within circular chains composed of 30-nm-diameter, polymer-coated nickel particles was studied by electron holography. The magnetic flux closure due to dipolar coupling was confirmed at zero external magnetic field. Its long-range order parameter was determined from the magnitude of the electron phase shift, and it was found to decrease more rapidly than that of bulk nickel as a function of temperature. The results of Monte Carlo simulations indicated that the temperature variation of the order-parameter was explained in terms of weakened dipolar coupling field ascribed to the decay of the bulk magnetization and enhanced thermal fluctuations.

  17. Frequency dispersion of nonlinear response of thin superconducting...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resistance changes induced by microwaves were investigated at different temperatures (8-15 K) near the superconducting transition. A strong decrease of the nonlinear response is ...

  18. Ultrasonic signatures at the superconducting and the pseudogap...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A major issue in the understanding of cuprate superconductors is the nature of the metallic state from which high temperature superconductivity emerges. Central to this issue is ...

  19. New Processing and Characterization Approaches for Achieving Full Performance of High Temperature Superconducting Tapes of (Bi,Pb)2Sr2Ca2Cu3Ox

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.E. Hellstrom; D.C. Larbalestier

    2006-03-22

    The thrust of this research was to identify and understand current limiting mechanisms (CLMs) that limit the current carrying capacity of (Bi,Pb)2Sr2Ca2Cu3Ox (2223) in Ag-sheathed wire. Our program concentrated on developing new methods to identify CLMs at the micrometer scale and new processing techniques to eliminate CLMs. All of the DOE Superconductivity Partnership Initiative (SPI) programs are using 2223 wire, so increasing the critical current density (Jc) in the wire can improve the technical performance of the demonstration projects, and at the same time it can decrease the cost of the wire. The important cost metric for superconducting wire is $/kAm, so increasing Jc, which is in the denominator, decreases the wire cost. The obvious CLMs were micrometer size obstacles in the 2223 ceramic that block current flow, including: misaligned grains, cracks, pores, and nonsuperconducting phases. Pores and cracks - regions where there is no superconductor or the grains are not physically connected to one another ? cannot carry supercurrent, so they were the first CLMs we tried to eliminate with improved processing. Prior to the contract, we had started investigating overpressure (OP) processing with Williams at ORNL to heal cracks and remove pores. OP processing, which is a variant of hot isostatic pressing (HIP), uses an Ar/O2 gas mixture to apply a high pressure (up to 200 atm) to compress the sample and to set the oxygen partial pressure (pO2) to form 2223. Williams had a static pressure system we used to demonstrate that OP processing healed cracks and densified the wire, but the static system limited the processing parameters we could investigate. We proposed building a new gas-flow OP system to expand the experimental capabilities and to investigate new processing routes using the gas-flow OP system. Using the gas-flow OP system, we established new world records in 2003 for Jc and Ic. These records were finally matched by Sumitomo Electric Company in early

  20. Superconductivity with Stripes | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    structure in high-Tc superconductors was manipulated in high-pressure experiments at the APS. The physics of low-temperature superconductivity is fairly well understood, but the...

  1. Scaling and Optimization of Magnetic Refrigeration for Commercial Building HVAC Systems Greater than 175 kW in Capacity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdelaziz, Omar; West, David L; Mallow, Anne M

    2012-01-01

    Heating, ventilation, air-conditioning and refrigeration (HVACR) account for approximately one- third of building energy consumption. Magnetic refrigeration presents an opportunity for significant energy savings and emissions reduction for serving the building heating, cooling, and refrigeration loads. In this paper, we have examined the magnet and MCE material requirements for scaling magnetic refrigeration systems for commercial building cooling applications. Scaling relationships governing the resources required for magnetic refrigeration systems have been developed. As system refrigeration capacity increases, the use of superconducting magnet systems becomes more applicable, and a comparison is presented of system requirements for permanent and superconducting (SC) magnetization systems. Included in this analysis is an investigation of the ability of superconducting magnet based systems to overcome the parasitic power penalty of the cryocooler used to keep SC windings at cryogenic temperatures. Scaling relationships were used to develop the initial specification for a SC magnet-based active magnetic regeneration (AMR) system. An optimized superconducting magnet was designed to support this system. In this analysis, we show that the SC magnet system consisting of two 0.38 m3 regenerators is capable of producing 285 kW of cooling power with a T of 28 K. A system COP of 4.02 including cryocooler and fan losses which illustrates that an SC magnet-based system can operate with efficiency comparable to traditional systems and deliver large cooling powers of 285.4 kW (81.2 Tons).

  2. Temperature dependence of spin-orbit torque effective fields in the diluted magnetic semiconductor (Ga,Mn)As

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howells, B.; Edmonds, K. W.; Campion, R. P.; Gallagher, B. L.

    2014-07-07

    We report on a study of the temperature-dependence of current-induced effective magnetic fields due to spin-orbit interactions in the diluted ferromagnetic semiconductor (Ga,Mn)As. Contributions from the effective fields as well as from the anomalous Nernst effect are evident in the difference between transverse resistance measurements as a function of an external magnetic field for opposite orientations of the applied current. We separately extract these contributions by fitting to a model of coherently rotating magnetization. The component of the effective field with Dresselhaus symmetry is substantially enhanced with increasing temperature, while no significant temperature-dependence is observed for the component with Rashba symmetry.

  3. Investigation of magnetic properties of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles using temperature dependent magnetic hyperthermia in ferrofluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nemala, H.; Thakur, J. S.; Lawes, G.; Naik, R.; Naik, V. M.; Vaishnava, P. P.

    2014-07-21

    Rate of heat generated by magnetic nanoparticles in a ferrofluid is affected by their magnetic properties, temperature, and viscosity of the carrier liquid. We have investigated temperature dependent magnetic hyperthermia in ferrofluids, consisting of dextran coated superparamagnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles, subjected to external magnetic fields of various frequencies (188375 kHz) and amplitudes (140235 Oe). Transmission electron microscopy measurements show that the nanoparticles are polydispersed with a mean diameter of 13.8??3.1?nm. The fitting of experimental dc magnetization data to a standard Langevin function incorporating particle size distribution yields a mean diameter of 10.6??1.2?nm, and a reduced saturation magnetization (?65?emu/g) compared to the bulk value of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} (?95?emu/g). This is due to the presence of a finite surface layer (?1?nm thickness) of non-aligned spins surrounding the ferromagnetically aligned Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} core. We found the specific absorption rate, measured as power absorbed per gram of iron oxide nanoparticles, decreases monotonically with increasing temperature for all values of magnetic field and frequency. Using the size distribution of magnetic nanoparticles estimated from the magnetization measurements, we have fitted the specific absorption rate versus temperature data using a linear response theory and relaxation dissipation mechanisms to determine the value of magnetic anisotropy constant (28??2?kJ/m{sup 3}) of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles.

  4. 2D barrier in a superconducting niobium square

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joya, Miryam R. Barba-ortega, J.; Sardella, Edson

    2014-11-05

    The presence of barriers changes the vortex structure in superconducting Nb square in presence of a uniform applied magnetic field. The Cooper pair configurations in a mesoscopics superconducting square of Nb with a barrier are calculated within the nonlinear Ginzburg Landau equations. We predict the nucleation of multi-vortex states into the sample and a soft entry of the magnetic field inside and around into the barrier. A novel and non-conventional vortex configurations occurs at determined magnetic field.

  5. Noise temperature improvement for magnetic fusion plasma millimeter wave imaging systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lai, J.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C.

    2014-03-15

    Significant progress has been made in the imaging and visualization of magnetohydrodynamic and microturbulence phenomena in magnetic fusion plasmas [B. Tobias et al., Plasma Fusion Res. 6, 2106042 (2011)]. Of particular importance have been microwave electron cyclotron emission imaging and microwave imaging reflectometry systems for imaging T{sub e} and n{sub e} fluctuations. These instruments have employed heterodyne receiver arrays with Schottky diode mixer elements directly connected to individual antennas. Consequently, the noise temperature has been strongly determined by the conversion loss with typical noise temperatures of ?60?000 K. However, this can be significantly improved by making use of recent advances in Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit chip low noise amplifiers to insert a pre-amplifier in front of the Schottky diode mixer element. In a proof-of-principle design at V-Band (5075 GHz), significant improvement of noise temperature from the current 60?000 K to measured 4000 K has been obtained.

  6. High Temperature Superconducting Thick Films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arendt, Paul N.; Foltyn, Stephen R.; Groves, James R.; Holesinger, Terry G.; Jia, Quanxi

    2005-08-23

    An article including a substrate, a layer of an inert oxide material upon the surface of the substrate, (generally the inert oxide material layer has a smooth surface, i.e., a RMS roughness of less than about 2 nm), a layer of an amorphous oxide or oxynitride material upon the inert oxide material layer, a layer of an oriented cubic oxide material having a rock-salt-like structure upon the amorphous oxide material layer is provided together with additional layers such as at least one layer of a buffer material upon the oriented cubic oxide material layer or a HTS top-layer of YBCO directly upon the oriented cubic oxide material layer. With a HTS top-layer of YBCO upon at least one layer of a buffer material in such an article, Jc's of 1.4×106 A/cm2 have been demonstrated with projected Ic's of 210 Amperes across a sample 1 cm wide.

  7. High Temperature Superconducting Thick Films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arendt, Paul N. (Los Alamos, NM); Foltyn, Stephen R. (Los Alamos, NM); Groves, James R. (Los Alamos, NM); Holesinger, Terry G. (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM)

    2005-08-23

    An article including a substrate, a layer of an inert oxide material upon the surface of the substrate, (generally the inert oxide material layer has a smooth surface, i.e., a RMS roughness of less than about 2 nm), a layer of an amorphous oxide or oxynitride material upon the inert oxide material layer, a layer of an oriented cubic oxide material having a rock-salt-like structure upon the amorphous oxide material layer is provided together with additional layers such as at least one layer of a buffer material upon the oriented cubic oxide material layer or a HTS top-layer of YBCO directly upon the oriented cubic oxide material layer. With a HTS top-layer of YBCO upon at least one layer of a buffer material in such an article, Jc's of 1.4106 A/cm2 have been demonstrated with projected Ic's of 210 Amperes across a sample 1 cm wide.

  8. Research on ambient temperature passive magnetic bearings at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Post, R.F.; Ryitov, D.D.` Smith, J.R.; Tung, L.S.

    1997-04-01

    Research performed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory on the equilibrium and stability of a new class of ambient-temperature passive bearing systems is described. The basic concepts involved are: (1) Stability of the rotating system is only achieved in the rotating state. That is, disengaging mechanical systems are used to insure stable levitation at rest (when Earnshaw`s theorem applies). (2) Stable levitation by passive magnetic elements can be achieved if the vector sum of the force derivatives of the several elements of the system is net negative (i.e. restoring) for axial, transverse, and tilt-type perturbations from equilibrium. To satisfy the requirements of (2) using only permanent magnet elements we have employed periodic ``Halbach arrays.`` These interact with passive inductive loaded circuits and act as stabilizers, with the primary forces arising from axially symmetric permanent-magnet elements. Stabilizers and other elements needed to create compact passive magnetic bearing systems have been constructed. Novel passive means for stabilizing classes of rotor-dynamic instabilities in such systems have also been investigated.

  9. Strain tolerant microfilamentary superconducting wire

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Finnemore, D.K.; Miller, T.A.; Ostenson, J.E.; Schwartzkopf, L.A.; Sanders, S.C.

    1993-02-23

    A strain tolerant microfilamentary wire capable of carrying superconducting currents is provided comprising a plurality of discontinuous filaments formed from a high temperature superconducting material. The discontinuous filaments have a length at least several orders of magnitude greater than the filament diameter and are sufficiently strong while in an amorphous state to withstand compaction. A normal metal is interposed between and binds the discontinuous filaments to form a normal metal matrix capable of withstanding heat treatment for converting the filaments to a superconducting state. The geometry of the filaments within the normal metal matrix provides substantial filament-to-filament overlap, and the normal metal is sufficiently thin to allow supercurrent transfer between the overlapped discontinuous filaments but is also sufficiently thick to provide strain relief to the filaments.

  10. Superconducting current transducer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuchnir, M.; Ozelis, J.P.

    1990-10-01

    The construction and performance of an electric current meter that operates in liquid He and mechanically splits apart to permit replacement of the current carrying conductor is described. It permits the measurement of currents induced in a loop of superconducting cable and expeditious exchange of such loops. It is a key component for a short sample cable testing facility that requires no high current power supplies nor high current leads. Its superconducting pickup circuit involves a non-magnetic core toroidal split-coil that surrounds the conductor and a solenoid whose field is sensed by a Hall probe. This toroidal split-coil is potted inside another compensating toroidal split-coil. The C shaped half toroids can be separated and brought precisely together from outside the cryostat. The Hall probe is energized and sensed by a lock-in amplifier whose output drives a bipolar power supply which feeds the compensating coil. The output is the voltage across a resistor in this feedback circuit. Currents of up to 10 kA can be measured with a precision of 150 mA. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Modifications of Superconducting Properties of Niobium Caused by Nitrogen Doping Recipes for High Q Cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vostrikov, Alexander; Checchin, Mattia; Grassellino, Anna; Kim, Young-Kee; Romanenko, Alexander

    2015-06-01

    A study is presented on the superconducting properties of niobium used for the fabrication of the SRF cavities after treating by recently discovered nitrogen doping methods. Cylindrical niobium samples have been subjected to the standard surface treatments applied to the cavities (electro-polishing, l 20°C bake) and compared with samples treated by additional nitrogen doping recipes routinely used to reach ultra-high quality factor values (>3· 1010 at 2 K, 16 MV/m). The DC magnetization curves and the complex magnetic AC susceptibility have been measured. Evidence for the lowered field of first flux penetration after nitrogen doping is found suggesting a correlation with the lowered quench fields. Superconducting critical temperatures Tc = 9.25 K are found to be in agreement with previous measurements, and no strong effect on the critical surface field (Bd) from nitrogen doping was found.

  12. Role of pressure in understanding the anomalous superconductivity in europium (molybdenum)/sub 6/(sulfur)/sub 8/ and (TMTSF)/sub 2/FSO/sub 3/

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolf, S.A.; Huang, C.Y.; Lacoe, R.C.; Chaikin, P.M.; Fuller, W.W.; Luo, H.L.; Wudl, F.

    1983-01-01

    Both the Chevrel phase compound EuMo/sub 6/S/sub 8/ and the organic material, (TMTSF)/sub 2/FSO/sub 3/ are superconducting only under moderate pressure. In both instances the absence of superconductivity at ambient pressure is directly attributed to a low temperature structural distortion that introduces a gap over all or part of the Fermi surface. The role of pressure is to suppress the transition and thus allow the electrons to condense into the superconducting state. In EuMo/sub 6/S/sub 8/, details of the pressure dependence of both the structural and superconducting transition have been explained on the basis of a competition between a charge density wave-type state and superconductivity. In the case of (TMTSF)/sub 2/FSO/sub 3/ an anion ordering giving rise to a metal-insulator transition is responsible for suppressing superconductivity. The critical magnetic fields of EuMo/sub 6/S/sub 8/ are extremely anomalous and are related to the magnetism of the Eu as well as the structure of the compound.

  13. Electrostatic wave structures in a magnetized superthermal plasma with two-temperature electrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shahmansouri, M.; Alinejad, H.

    2013-08-15

    The linear and nonlinear excitation of arbitrary amplitude ion-acoustic (IA) solitary waves in a magnetized plasma comprising two-temperature electrons and cold ions are studied. The oblique propagation properties of two possible modes (in the linear regime) are investigated. It is found that the electron superthermality reduces the phase velocities of both modes, whereas obliqueness leads to an increase in the separation between two modes. In the nonlinear regime, an energy-like equation describes the evolution of IA solitary waves in the present model. The combined effects of the electron superthermality, magnitude of magnetic field, obliqueness and electron population are incorporated in the study of the existence domain of solitary waves and the soliton characteristics. It is shown that the small values of the hot electron population shift the permitted interval of Mach number to the lower values. Both compressive and rarefactive solitary structures are found to exist in the presence of two temperature electrons. The present investigation contributes to the physics of electrostatic wave structures in Saturn's magnetosphere in which two temperature electrons with kappa distribution exist.

  14. Design development for the 50mm Superconducting Super Collider dipole cryostat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicol, T.H.

    1991-03-01

    The cryostat of a Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) dipole magnet consists of all magnet components except the magnet assembly itself. It serves to support the magnet accurately and reliably within the vacuum vessel, provide all required cryogenic piping, and to insulate the cold mass from heat radiated and conducted from the environment. It must function reliably during storage, shipping and handling, normal magnet operation, quenches, and seismic excitations, and must be manufacturable at low cost. The major components of the cryostat are the vacuum vessel, thermal shields, multilayer insulation system, cryogenic piping, interconnections, and suspension system. The overall design of a cryostat for superconducting accelerator magnets requires consideration of fluid flow, proper selection of materials for their thermal and structural performance at both ambient and operating temperature, and knowledge of the environment to which the magnets will be subjected over the course their expected operating life. This paper describes the design of the current 50mm SSC collider dipole cryostat and includes discussions on the structural and thermal considerations involved in the development of each of the major systems. Where appropriate, comparisons will be made with the 40mm cryostat. 7 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Spin-fluctuation mechanism of anomalous temperature dependence of magnetocrystalline anisotropy in itinerant magnets

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhuravlev, I. A.; Antropov, V. P.; Belashchenko, K. D.

    2015-11-16

    The origins of the anomalous temperature dependence of magnetocrystalline anisotropy in (Fe1–xCox)2B alloys are elucidated using first-principles calculations within the disordered local moment model. Excellent agreement with experimental data is obtained. The anomalies are associated with the changes in band occupations due to Stoner-like band shifts and with the selective suppression of spin-orbit “hot spots” by thermal spin fluctuations. Under certain conditions, the anisotropy can increase, rather than decrease, with decreasing magnetization. These peculiar electronic mechanisms are in stark contrast to the assumptions of the existing models.

  16. IEFIT - An Interactive Approach to High Temperature Fusion Plasma Magnetic Equilibrium Fitting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peng, Q.; Schachter, J.; Schissel, D.P.; Lao, L.L.

    1999-06-01

    An interactive IDL based wrapper, IEFIT, has been created for the magnetic equilibrium reconstruction code EFIT written in FORTRAN. It allows high temperature fusion physicists to rapidly optimize a plasma equilibrium reconstruction by eliminating the unnecessarily repeated initialization in the conventional approach along with the immediate display of the fitting results of each input variation. It uses a new IDL based graphics package, GaPlotObj, developed in cooperation with Fanning Software Consulting, that provides a unified interface with great flexibility in presenting and analyzing scientific data. The overall interactivity reduces the process to minutes from the usual hours.

  17. A 31?T split-pair pulsed magnet for single crystal x-ray diffraction at low temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duc, F.; Frings, P.; Nardone, M.; Billette, J.; Zitouni, A.; Delescluse, P.; Bard, J.; Nicolin, J. P.; Rikken, G. L. J. A.; Fabrges, X.; Roth, T.; Detlefs, C.; Lesourd, M.; Zhang, L.

    2014-05-15

    We have developed a pulsed magnet system with panoramic access for synchrotron x-ray diffraction in magnetic fields up to 31?T and at low temperature down to 1.5?K. The apparatus consists of a split-pair magnet, a liquid nitrogen bath to cool the pulsed coil, and a helium cryostat allowing sample temperatures from 1.5 up to 250?K. Using a 1.15?MJ mobile generator, magnetic field pulses of 60?ms length were generated in the magnet, with a rise time of 16.5?ms and a repetition rate of 2 pulses/h at 31?T. The setup was validated for single crystal diffraction on the ESRF beamline ID06.

  18. Direct evidence for a pressure-induced nodal superconducting gap in the Ba0.65Rb0.35Fe2As2 superconductor

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Guguchia, Z.; Amato, A.; Kang, J.; Luetkens, H.; Biswas, P. K.; Prando, G.; von Rohr, F.; Bukowski, Z.; Shengelaya, A.; Keller, H.; et al

    2015-11-09

    The superconducting gap structure in iron-based high-temperature superconductors (Fe-HTSs) is non-universal. Contrasting with other unconventional superconductors, in the Fe-HTSs both d-wave and extended s-wave pairing symmetries are close in energy. Probing the proximity between these very different superconducting states and identifying experimental parameters that can tune them is of central interest. Here we report high-pressure muon spin rotation experiments on the temperature-dependent magnetic penetration depth in the optimally doped nodeless s-wave Fe-HTS Ba0.65Rb0.35Fe2As2. Upon pressure, a strong decrease of the penetration depth in the zero-temperature limit is observed, while the superconducting transition temperature remains nearly constant. More importantly, the low-temperaturemore » behaviour of the inverse-squared magnetic penetration depth, which is a direct measure of the superfluid density, changes qualitatively from an exponential saturation at zero pressure to a linear-in-temperature behaviour at higher pressures, indicating that hydrostatic pressure promotes the appearance of nodes in the superconducting gap.« less

  19. Scientific Affairs Division of NATO Advanced Study Institute: abstracts for nonequilibrium superconductivity, phonons and Kapitza boundaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-05-01

    Abstracts of papers presented at the meeting are given. Topics covered include: Kapitza resistance; superconducting tunneling; energy gap enhancement in superconductors; instabilities in nonequilibrium superconducting states; exchange of charge between superconducting pairs and quasiparticles; motion of magnetic flux (flux flow); and other new phenomena. (GHT)

  20. Design of a horizontal test cryostat for superconducting RF cavities for the FREIA facility at Uppsala University

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chevalier, N. R.; Thermeau, J.-P.; Bujard, P.; Junquera, T.; Hermansson, L.; Kern, R. Santiago; Ruber, R.

    2014-01-29

    Uppsala University is constructing a large scale facility, called FREIA (Facility for Research Instrumentation and Accelerator Development). FREIA includes a helium liquefier and an accelerator test facility and has the capacity to test superconducting radio-frequency (RF) cavities with the same RF system and RF power level as in an accelerator. A central element of FREIA is a horizontal test cryostat connected in closed loop to a helium liquefier. This cryostat can house two fully equipped (tuners, piezo, power coupler, helium tank) superconducting cavities to perform full RF high power tests and operate at temperatures between 1.8 K and 4.2 K. The cryostat is designed to accommodate a large array of superconducting cavities and magnets, among which the European Spallation Source (ESS) type spoke and high-β elliptical cavities as well as TESLA/ILC type elliptical cavities. The present status of the project and the design of the cryostat are reported.

  1. Giant magnetocaloric effect and temperature induced magnetization jump in GdCrO{sub 3} single crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin, L. H.; Yang, J.; Kan, X. C.; Song, W. H.; Dai, J. M.; Sun, Y. P.

    2015-04-07

    We report on a systematic study of the single-crystal GdCrO{sub 3}, which shows various novel magnetic features, such as temperature-induced magnetization reversal (TMR), temperature-induced magnetization jump (TMJ), spin reorientation, and giant magnetocaloric effect (MCE). In the field-cooled cooling process with modest magnetic field along the c axis, GdCrO{sub 3} first shows a TMR at T{sub comp}∼120−130 K and then an abrupt TMJ with a sign change of magnetization at T{sub jump}∼52−120 K, and finally a spin reorientation at T{sub SR}∼4−7 K. Interestingly, the remarkable TMJ behavior, which was not reported ever before, persists at higher fields up to 10 kOe even when TMR disappears. In addition, giant MCE with the maximum value of magnetic entropy change reaching ∼31.6 J/kg K for a field change of 44 kOe was also observed in GdCrO{sub 3} single crystal, suggesting it could be a potential material for low-T magnetic refrigeration. A possible mechanism for these peculiar magnetic behaviors is discussed based on the various competing magnetic interactions between the 3d electrons of Cr{sup 3+} ions and 4f electrons of Gd{sup 3+} ions.

  2. Rotating magnetic field current drive of high-temperature field reversed configurations with high {zeta} scaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, H. Y.; Hoffman, A. L.; Milroy, R. D.

    2007-11-15

    Greatly reduced recycling and impurity ingestion in the Translation, Confinement, and Sustainment--Upgrade (TCSU) device has allowed much higher plasma temperatures to be achieved in the field reversed configurations (FRC) under rotating magnetic field (RMF) formation and sustainment. The hotter plasmas have higher magnetic fields and much higher diamagnetic electron rotation rates so that the important ratio of average electron rotation frequency to RMF frequency, called {zeta}, approaches unity, for the first time, in TCSU. A large fraction of the RMF power is absorbed by an as yet unexplained (anomalous) mechanism directly proportional to the square of the RMF magnitude. It becomes of relatively lesser significance as the FRC current increases, and simple resistive heating begins to dominate, but the anomalous absorption is useful for initial plasma heating. Measurements of total absorbed power, and comparisons of applied RMF torque to torque on the electrons due to electron-ion friction under high-{zeta} operation, over a range of temperatures and fields, have allowed the separation of the classical Ohmic and anomalous heating to be inferred, and cross-field plasma resistivities to be calculated.

  3. Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation in a magnetized plasma with two temperature superthermal electrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saini, N. S. Chahal, B. S.; Bains, A. S.; Bedi, C.

    2014-02-15

    A nonlinear Zakharov-Kuznetsov (ZK) equation for ion-acoustic solitary waves (IASWs) in a magnetized plasmas containing kappa distributed cold and hot electrons is derived by using reductive perturbation method. From the solution of ZK equation, the characteristics of IASWs have been studied under the influence of various plasma parameters. Existence domain of physical parameters is determined. It has been observed that the present plasma system supports the existence of both positive as well as negative potential solitons. The combined effects of cold to hot electron temperature ratio (σ), density ratio of cold electrons to ions (f), superthermality of cold and hot electrons (κ{sub c},κ{sub h}), strength of magnetic field (via Ω{sub i}), and obliqueness (θ) significantly influence the profile of IASWs. The physical parameters play a great role to modify the width and amplitude of the solitary structures. The stability analysis is also presented in this investigation and parametric range is determined to check the presence of stable and unstable solitons. The findings of this study are important to the physics of electrostatic wave structures in the Saturn's magnetosphere where two temperature electrons with kappa distribution exist.

  4. Towards a beyond 1 GHz solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance: External lock operation in an external current mode for a 500 MHz nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takahashi, Masato; Maeda, Hideaki; Ebisawa, Yusuke; Tennmei, Konosuke; Yanagisawa, Yoshinori; Nakagome, Hideki; Hosono, Masami; Takasugi, Kenji; Hase, Takashi; Miyazaki, Takayoshi; Fujito, Teruaki; Kiyoshi, Tsukasa; Yamazaki, Toshio

    2012-10-15

    Achieving a higher magnetic field is important for solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). But a conventional low temperature superconducting (LTS) magnet cannot exceed 1 GHz (23.5 T) due to the critical magnetic field. Thus, we started a project to replace the Nb{sub 3}Sn innermost coil of an existing 920 MHz NMR (21.6 T) with a Bi-2223 high temperature superconducting (HTS) innermost coil. Unfortunately, the HTS magnet cannot be operated in persistent current mode; an external dc power supply is required to operate the NMR magnet, causing magnetic field fluctuations. These fluctuations can be stabilized by a field-frequency lock system based on an external NMR detection coil. We demonstrate here such a field-frequency lock system in a 500 MHz LTS NMR magnet operated in an external current mode. The system uses a {sup 7}Li sample in a microcoil as external NMR detection system. The required field compensation is calculated from the frequency of the FID as measured with a frequency counter. The system detects the FID signal, determining the FID frequency, and calculates the required compensation coil current to stabilize the sample magnetic field. The magnetic field was stabilized at 0.05 ppm/3 h for magnetic field fluctuations of around 10 ppm. This method is especially effective for a magnet with large magnetic field fluctuations. The magnetic field of the compensation coil is relatively inhomogeneous in these cases and the inhomogeneity of the compensation coil can be taken into account.

  5. Nano-superconducting quantum interference devices with suspended junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hazra, D.; Hasselbach, K.; Kirtley, J. R.

    2014-04-14

    Nano-Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (nano-SQUIDs) are usually fabricated from a single layer of either Nb or Al. We describe here a simple method for fabricating suspended nano-bridges in Nb/Al thin-film bilayers. We use these suspended bridges, which act as Josephson weak links, to fabricate nano-SQUIDs which show critical current oscillations at temperatures up to 1.5?K and magnetic flux densities up to over 20?mT. These nano-SQUIDs exhibit flux modulation depths intermediate between all-Al and all-Nb devices, with some of the desirable characteristics of both. The suspended geometry is attractive for magnetic single nanoparticle measurements.

  6. Eighth International Magnetic Measurement Workshop (IMMW-8) presentations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1993-09-01

    This report contains viewgraphs on magnetic field measurements conducted at the superconducting super collider and other accelerators.

  7. Low temperature London penetration depth and superfluid density in Fe-based superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Hyunsoo

    2013-05-15

    The superconducting gap symmetry of the Fe-based superconductors was studied by measurements and analysis of London penetration depth and super uid density. Tunnel diode resonator technique for these measurements was implemented in a dilution refrigerator allowing for the temperatures down to 50 mK. For the analysis of the super uid density, we used both experimental studies of Al-coated samples and original thermodynamic approach based on Rutgers relation. In three systems studied, we found that the superconducting gap at the optimal doping is best described in multi-gap full gap scenario. By performing experiments on samples with arti#12;cially introduced disorder with heavy ion irradiation, we show that evolution of the superconducting transition temperature and of the super uid density are consistent with full-gap sign changing s#6; superconducting state. The superconducting gap develops strong modulation both in the under-doped and the over-doped regimes. In the terminal hole-doped KFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}, both temperature dependence of the super uid density and its evolution with increase of the scattering rate are consistent with symmetry imposed vertical line nodes in the superconducting gap. By comparative studies of hole-doped (Ba,K)Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} and electron-doped Ca10-3-8, we show that the superconducting gap modulation in the under-doped regime is intrinsic and is not induced by the coexisting static magnetic order.

  8. Proximity effect bilayer nano superconducting quantum interference devices for millikelvin magnetometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blois, A. Rozhko, S.; Romans, E. J.; Hao, L.; Gallop, J. C.

    2013-12-21

    Superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) incorporating thin film nanobridges as weak links have sensitivities approaching that required for single spin detection at 4.2 K. However, due to thermal hysteresis they are difficult to operate at much lower temperatures which hinder their application to many quantum measurements. To overcome this, we have developed nanoscale SQUIDs made from titanium-gold proximity bilayers. We show that their electrical properties are consistent with a theoretical model developed for heat flow in bilayers and demonstrate that they enable magnetic measurements to be made on a sample at system temperatures down to 60 mK.

  9. Superconducting properties of Rh9In4S4 single crystals

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kaluarachchi, Udhara S.; Lin, Qisheng; Xie, Weiwei; Taufour, Valentin; Bud'ko, Sergey L.; Miller, Gordon J.; Canfield, Paul C.

    2016-03-28

    The synthesis and crystallographic, thermodynamic, and transport properties of single crystalline Rh9In4S4 were studied. The resistivity, magnetization, and specific heat measurements all clearly indicate bulk superconductivity with a critical temperature, Tc~2.25 K. The Sommerfeld coefficient γ and the Debye temperature (ΘD) were found to be 34 mJ mol–1 K–2 and 217 K, respectively. The observed specific heat jump, ΔC/γTc=1.66, is larger than the expected BCS weak coupling value of 1.43. Ginzburg-Landau (GL) ratio of the low-temperature GL-penetration depth, λGL≈5750 Å, to the GL-coherence length, ξGL≈94 Å, is large: κ ~60. However, we observed a peak effect in the resistivity measurementmore » as a function of both temperature and magnetic field.« less

  10. Electrodynamic properties of coplanar waveguides made from high-temperature superconducting YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} electrodes on nonlinear dielectric SrTiO{sub 3} substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Findikoglu, A.T.; Reagor, D.W.; Rasmussen, K.O.; Bishop, A.R.; Gro Jia, Q.X.; Fan, Y.; Kwon, C.; Ostrovsky, L.A.

    1999-08-01

    We present a comprehensive study of broadband (0{endash}2 GHz) electrodynamic properties of coplanar waveguides made from high-temperature superconducting thin-film YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} electrodes on nonlinear dielectric single-crystal SrTiO{sub 3} substrates. The waveguides exhibit strong dielectric nonlinearities, in addition to temperature-, dc-bias-, and frequency-dependent dissipation and refractive index. By using parameters determined from small-signal (linear) transmission characteristics of the waveguides as a function of dc bias, we develop a model equation that successfully predicts and describes large-signal (nonlinear) behavior. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Neutron-scattering evidence for a periodically modulated superconducting phase in the underdoped cuprate La1.905Ba0.095CuO4

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xu, Zhijun; Stock, C.; Chi, Songxue; Kolesnikov, A. I.; Xu, Guangyong I.; Gu, Genda; Tranquada, J. M.

    2014-10-01

    The role of antiferromagnetic spin correlations in high-temperature superconductors remains a matter of debate. We present inelastic neutron-scattering evidence that gapless spin fluctuations coexist with superconductivity in La1.905Ba0.095CuO4. Furthermore, we observe that both the low-energy magnetic spectral weight and the spin incommensurability are enhanced with the onset of superconducting correlations. We propose that the coexistence occurs through intertwining of spatial modulations of the pair wave function and the antiferromagnetic correlations. This proposal is also directly relevant to sufficiently underdoped La2-xSrxCuO4 and YBa2Cu3O6+x.

  12. Zeeman-driven phase transition within the superconducting state of {kappa}-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}Cu(NCS){sub 2}.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, J. A.; Green, E.; kuhns, P.; Reyes, A.; Brooks, J.; Schlueter, J.; Kato, R.; Yamamoto, H.; Kobayashi, M.; Brown , S. E.

    2011-08-16

    {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance measurements were performed on {kappa}-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}Cu(NCS){sub 2}, with the external field placed parallel to the quasi-2D conducting layers. The absorption spectrum is used to determine the electronic spin polarization M{sub s} as a function of external field H at a temperature T = 0.35 K. A discontinuity in the derivative dM{sub s}/dH at an applied field of H{sub s} = 213 {+-} 3 kOe is taken as evidence for a Zeeman-driven transition within the superconducting state and stabilization of inhomogeneous superconductivity.

  13. Design considerations of a power supply system for fast cycling superconducting accelerator magnets of 2 Tesla b-field generated by a conductor of 100 kA current

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hays, Steve; Piekarz, Henryk; Pfeffer, Howie; Claypool, Brad; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    Recently proposed fast cycling accelerators for proton drivers (SF-SPS, CERN and SF-MR, SF-BOOSTER, FNAL) neutrino sources require development of new magnet technology. In support of this magnet development a power supply system will need to be developed that can support the high current and high rate of power swing required by the fast cycling (1 sec rise and fall in the SF-MR, 5Hz in Booster). This paper will outline a design concept for a +/- 2000 V and 100,000 A fast ramping power supply system. This power supply design is in support of a 6.44 km magnet system at 0.020 H and 330 m 5 Hz, 0.00534 H superconducting loads. The design description will include the layout and plan for extending the present FNAL Main Injector style ramping power supply to the higher currents needed for this operation. This will also include the design for a harmonic filter and power factor corrector that will be needed to control the large power swings caused by the fast cycle time. A conceptual design for the current regulation system and control will also be outlined. The power circuit design will include the bridge, filter and transformer plan based on existing designs.

  14. The Calculated and Measured Resistance for Splices between Conductors in a MICE Superconducting Coil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, Michael A.; Dietderich, Dan; Higley, Hugh; Pan, Heng; Tam, Darren; Trillaud, Federic; Wang, Li; Wu, Hong; Xu, Feng Yu

    2009-03-19

    The resistance of superconducting joints within MICE coils is an important issue particularly for the coupling coils. The MICE tracker solenoids have only two superconducting joints in the three spectrometer set (end coil 1, the center coil and end coil 2). The AFC magnets may have only a single joint within the coil. The coupling coils may have as many as fifteen joints within the coil, due to relatively short piece lengths of the superconductor. LBNL and ICST looked at three types of coil joints. They are: (1) cold fusion butt joints, (2) side-by-side lap joints, and (3) up-down lap joints. A theoretical calculation of the joint resistance was done at LBNL and checked by ICST. After looking at the theoretical resistance of the three types of joints, it was decided that the cold welded butt joint was not an attractive alternative for joints within a MICE superconducting magnet coil. Side-by-side and up-down lap joints were fabricated at ICST using two types of soft solder between the conductors. These conductor joints were tested at LBNL at liquid helium temperatures over a range of magnetic fields. The joint resistance was compared with the theoretical calculations. Measurements of splice strength were also made at 300 K and 77 K.

  15. Oblique ion-acoustic cnoidal waves in two temperature superthermal electrons magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panwar, A. Ryu, C. M.; Bains, A. S.

    2014-12-15

    A study is presented for the oblique propagation of ion acoustic cnoidal waves in a magnetized plasma consisting of cold ions and two temperature superthermal electrons modelled by kappa-type distributions. Using the reductive perturbation method, the nonlinear Korteweg de-Vries equation is derived, which further gives the solutions with a special type of cnoidal elliptical functions. Both compressive and rarefactive structures are found for these cnoidal waves. Nonlinear periodic cnoidal waves are explained in terms of plasma parameters depicting the Sagdeev potential and the phase curves. It is found that the density ratio of hot electrons to ions ? significantly modifies compressive/refractive wave structures. Furthermore, the combined effects of superthermality of cold and hot electrons ?{sub c},?{sub h}, cold to hot electron temperature ratio ?, angle of propagation and ion cyclotron frequency ?{sub ci} have been studied in detail to analyze the height and width of compressive/refractive cnoidal waves. The findings in the present study could have important implications in understanding the physics of electrostatic wave structures in the Saturn's magnetosphere where two temperature superthermal electrons are present.

  16. Rotating superconductor magnet for producing rotating lobed magnetic field lines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hilal, Sadek K.; Sampson, William B.; Leonard, Edward F.

    1978-01-01

    This invention provides a rotating superconductor magnet for producing a rotating lobed magnetic field, comprising a cryostat; a superconducting magnet in the cryostat having a collar for producing a lobed magnetic field having oppositely directed adjacent field lines; rotatable support means for selectively rotating the superconductor magnet; and means for energizing the superconductor magnet.

  17. Magnetic and dielectric behavior of the spin-chain compound Er?BaNiO? well below its Nel temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basu, Tathamay; Singh, Kiran; Sampathkumaran, E. V.; Mohapatra, N.

    2014-09-21

    We have recently reported that the Haldane spin-chain system, Er?BaNiO?, undergoing antiferromagnetic order below (T{sub N}=) 32 K, is characterized by the onset of ferroelectricity near 60 K due to magnetoelectric coupling induced by short-range magnetic-order within spin-chains. We have carried out additional magnetic and dielectric studies to understand the properties well below T{sub N}. We emphasize here on the following: (i) A strong frequency dependent behaviors of ac magnetic susceptibility and complex dielectric properties have been observed at much lower temperatures (<8 K), that is, reentrant multiglass-like phenomenon, naturally suggesting the existence of an additional transition well below T{sub N}. (ii) Magnetoelectric phase coexistence is observed at very low temperature (e.g., T=2 K), where the high-field magnetoelectric phase is partially arrested on returning to zero magnetic field after a cycling through metamagnetic transition.

  18. Protective link for superconducting coil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Umans, Stephen D.

    2009-12-08

    A superconducting coil system includes a superconducting coil and a protective link of superconducting material coupled to the superconducting coil. A rotating machine includes first and second coils and a protective link of superconducting material. The second coil is operable to rotate with respect to the first coil. One of the first and second coils is a superconducting coil. The protective link is coupled to the superconducting coil.

  19. Nuclear spin conversion of water inside fullerene cages detected by low-temperature nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mamone, Salvatore Concistr, Maria; Carignani, Elisa; Meier, Benno; Krachmalnicoff, Andrea; Johannessen, Ole G.; Denning, Mark; Carravetta, Marina; Whitby, Richard J.; Levitt, Malcolm H.; Lei, Xuegong; Li, Yongjun; Goh, Kelvin; Horsewill, Anthony J.

    2014-05-21

    The water-endofullerene H{sub 2}O@C{sub 60} provides a unique chemical system in which freely rotating water molecules are confined inside homogeneous and symmetrical carbon cages. The spin conversion between the ortho and para species of the endohedral H{sub 2}O was studied in the solid phase by low-temperature nuclear magnetic resonance. The experimental data are consistent with a second-order kinetics, indicating a bimolecular spin conversion process. Numerical simulations suggest the simultaneous presence of a spin diffusion process allowing neighbouring ortho and para molecules to exchange their angular momenta. Cross-polarization experiments found no evidence that the spin conversion of the endohedral H{sub 2}O molecules is catalysed by {sup 13}C nuclei present in the cages.

  20. Anomalous Dynamical Line Shapes in a Quantum Magnet at Finite Temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tennant D. A.; James A.; Lake, B.; Essler, F.H.L.; Notbohm, S.; Mikeska, H.-J.; Fielden, J.; Kogerler,, P.; Canfield, P.C.; Telling, M.T.F.

    2012-01-04

    The effect of thermal fluctuations on the dynamics of a gapped quantum magnet is studied using inelastic neutron scattering on copper nitrate, a model material for the spin-1/2, one-dimensional (1D) bond alternating Heisenberg chain. A large, highly deuterated, single-crystal sample of copper nitrate is produced using a solution growth method and measurements are made using the high-resolution backscattering spectrometer OSIRIS at the ISIS Facility. Theoretical calculations and numerical analysis are combined to interpret the physical origin of the thermal effects observed in the magnetic spectra. The primary observations are (1) a thermally induced central peak due to intraband scattering, which is similar to Villain scattering familiar from soliton systems in 1D, and (2) the one-magnon quasiparticle pole is seen to develop with temperature into an asymmetric continuum of scattering. We relate this asymmetric line broadening to a thermal strongly correlated state caused by hard-core constraints and quasiparticle interactions. These findings are a counter example to recent assertions of the universality of line broadening in 1D systems and are applicable to a broad range of quantum systems.

  1. Magnetic Materials at finite Temperatures: thermodynamics and combined spin and molecular dynamics derived from first principles calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eisenbach, Markus; Perera, Meewanage Dilina N; Landau, David P; Nicholson, Don M; Yin, Junqi; Brown, Greg

    2015-01-01

    We present a unified approach to describe the combined behavior of the atomic and magnetic degrees of freedom in magnetic materials. Using Monte Carlo simulations directly combined with first principles the Curie temperature can be obtained ab initio in good agreement with experimental values. The large scale constrained first principles calculations have been used to construct effective potentials for both the atomic and magnetic degrees of freedom that allow the unified study of influence of phonon-magnon coupling on the thermodynamics and dynamics of magnetic systems. The MC calculations predict the specific heat of iron in near perfect agreement with experimental results from 300K to above Tc and allow the identification of the importance of the magnon-phonon interaction at the phase-transition. Further Molecular Dynamics and Spin Dynamics calculations elucidate the dynamics of this coupling and open the potential for quantitative and predictive descriptions of dynamic structure factors in magnetic materials using first principles derived simulations.

  2. Superconducting Cable Termination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sinha, Uday K. (Carrollton, GA); Tolbert, Jerry (Newnan, GA)

    2005-08-30

    Disclosed is a termination that connects high temperature superconducting (HTS) cable immersed in pressurized liquid nitrogen to high voltage and neutral (shield) external bushings at ambient temperature and pressure. The termination consists of a splice between the HTS power (inner) and shield (outer) conductors and concentric copper pipes which are the conductors in the termination. There is also a transition from the dielectric tape insulator used in the HTS cable to the insulators used between and around the copper pipe conductors in the termination. At the warm end of the termination the copper pipes are connected via copper braided straps to the conventional warm external bushings which have low thermal stresses. This termination allows for a natural temperature gradient in the copper pipe conductors inside the termination which enables the controlled flashing of the pressurized liquid coolant (nitrogen) to the gaseous state. Thus the entire termination is near the coolant supply pressure and the high voltage and shield cold bushings, a highly stressed component used in most HTS cables, are eliminated. A sliding seal allows for cable contraction as it is cooled from room temperature to 72-82 K. Seals, static vacuum, and multi-layer superinsulation minimize radial heat leak to the environment.

  3. Superconducting Cable Termination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sinha, Uday K.; Tolbert, Jerry

    2005-08-30

    Disclosed is a termination that connects high temperature superconducting (HTS) cable immersed in pressurized liquid nitrogen to high voltage and neutral (shield) external bushings at ambient temperature and pressure. The termination consists of a splice between the HTS power (inner) and shield (outer) conductors and concentric copper pipes which are the conductors in the termination. There is also a transition from the dielectric tape insulator used in the HTS cable to the insulators used between and around the copper pipe conductors in the termination. At the warm end of the termination the copper pipes are connected via copper braided straps to the conventional warm external bushings which have low thermal stresses. This termination allows for a natural temperature gradient in the copper pipe conductors inside the termination which enables the controlled flashing of the pressurized liquid coolant (nitrogen) to the gaseous state. Thus the entire termination is near the coolant supply pressure and the high voltage and shield cold bushings, a highly stressed component used in most HTS cables, are eliminated. A sliding seal allows for cable contraction as it is cooled from room temperature to ˜72-82 K. Seals, static vacuum, and multi-layer superinsulation minimize radial heat leak to the environment.

  4. Superconductivity for Electric Systems: 2008 Annual Peer Review Final

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Report | Department of Energy Superconductivity for Electric Systems: 2008 Annual Peer Review Final Report Superconductivity for Electric Systems: 2008 Annual Peer Review Final Report The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability's High Temperature Superconductivity (HTS) for Electric Systems Program's specific mission is to work in partnership with industry to develop HTS wire and perform other research and development activities leading to the commercialization of HTS-based

  5. Pseudogaps, Polarons, and the Mystery of High-Tc Superconductivity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pseudogaps, Polarons, and the Mystery of High-Tc Superconductivity Print Working at the ALS, a multi-institutional collaboration led by researchers at ALS and Stanford University has identified a pseudogap phase with a nodal-antinodal dichotomy in ferromagnetic manganese oxide materials (manganites). Even though ferromagnetism and superconductivity do not exist together, the pseudogap state found in these manganites is remarkably similar to that found in high-temperature superconducting copper

  6. Ultrasonic signatures at the superconducting and the pseudogap phase

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    boundaries in YBCO cuprates. (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Ultrasonic signatures at the superconducting and the pseudogap phase boundaries in YBCO cuprates. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ultrasonic signatures at the superconducting and the pseudogap phase boundaries in YBCO cuprates. A major issue in the understanding of cuprate superconductors is the nature of the metallic state from which high temperature superconductivity emerges. Central to this issue is the pseudogap

  7. Pseudogaps, Polarons, and the Mystery of High-Tc Superconductivity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pseudogaps, Polarons, and the Mystery of High-Tc Superconductivity Print Working at the ALS, a multi-institutional collaboration led by researchers at ALS and Stanford University has identified a pseudogap phase with a nodal-antinodal dichotomy in ferromagnetic manganese oxide materials (manganites). Even though ferromagnetism and superconductivity do not exist together, the pseudogap state found in these manganites is remarkably similar to that found in high-temperature superconducting copper

  8. Pseudogaps, Polarons, and the Mystery of High-Tc Superconductivity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pseudogaps, Polarons, and the Mystery of High-Tc Superconductivity Print Working at the ALS, a multi-institutional collaboration led by researchers at ALS and Stanford University has identified a pseudogap phase with a nodal-antinodal dichotomy in ferromagnetic manganese oxide materials (manganites). Even though ferromagnetism and superconductivity do not exist together, the pseudogap state found in these manganites is remarkably similar to that found in high-temperature superconducting copper

  9. Anisotropy reversal of the upper critical field at low temperatures and spin-locked superconductivity in K2Cr3As3

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Balakirev, F. F.; Kong, T.; Jaime, M.; McDonald, R. D.; Mielke, C. H.; Gurevich, A.; Canfield, P. C.; Bud'ko, S. L.

    2015-06-23

    We report measurements of the anisotropic upper critical field Hc2(T) for K2Cr3As3 single crystals up to 60 T and T>0.6K. Our results show that the upper critical field parallel to the Cr chains, H∥c2(T), exhibits a paramagnetically limited behavior, whereas the shape of the H⊥c2(T) curve (perpendicular to the Cr chains) has no evidence of paramagnetic effects. As a result, the curves H⊥c2(T) and H∥c2(T) cross at T≈4K, so that the anisotropy parameter γH(T)=H⊥c2/H∥c2(T)increases from γH(Tc)≈0.35 near Tc to γH(0)≈1.7 at 0.6 K. This behavior of H∥c2(T) is inconsistent with triplet superconductivity but suggests a form of singlet superconductivity withmore » the electron spins locked onto the direction of Cr chains.« less

  10. Brookhaven-Built Magnet Will Catch Subatomic Debris

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Peter Wanderer

    2013-07-22

    Peter Wanderer, head of Brookhaven's Superconducting Magnet Division, describes the magnet that's being built for the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams at Michigan State University

  11. Magnetic Response of Mn(III)F(salen) at Low Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, J. - H.; Risset, O. N.; Shiddiq, M.; Peprah, M. K.; Knowles, E. S.; Andrus, Matthew; Beedle, C. C.; Ehlers, Georg; Podlesnyak, Andrey A; Cizmar, E.; Nagler, Stephen E; Hill, S.; Talham, Daniel R.; Meisel, Mark W.

    2014-01-01

    The low temperature magnetic response of Mn(III)F(salen), salen = H14C16N2O2, an S = 2 linear-chain system, has been studied. Using a single crystal with the field applied perpendicular to the chain direction, torque magnetometry, down to 20 mK and up to 18 T, revealed a feature at 3.8 T when T 400 mK. ESR ( 200 GHz) studies, using single crystals at 4 K and in 5 T, have not detected any signal. In 10 mT, the temperature dependence of the susceptibility of powder-like samples can be reasonably fit when J/kB = 50 K and g = 2. In addition, these data are unchanged for P 1.0 GPa. Using a randomly-oriented, powder-like, deuterated (12 of 14 H replaced by D) sample of 2.2 g at 270 mK, neutron scattering data, acquired with the Cold Neutron Chopper Spectrometer at the Spallation Neutron Source, show several well defined excitations that may be from the zero-field energy levels of antiferromagnetic S = 2 spins with g = 2, J/kB = 50 K, D/kB = 2.8 K, and E/kB = 0.5 K.

  12. Direct evidence for a pressure-induced nodal superconducting gap in the Ba0.65Rb0.35Fe2As2 superconductor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guguchia, Z.; Amato, A.; Kang, J.; Luetkens, H.; Biswas, P. K.; Prando, G.; von Rohr, F.; Bukowski, Z.; Shengelaya, A.; Keller, H.; Morenzoni, E.; Fernandes, Rafael M.; Khasanov, R.

    2015-11-09

    The superconducting gap structure in iron-based high-temperature superconductors (Fe-HTSs) is non-universal. Contrasting with other unconventional superconductors, in the Fe-HTSs both d-wave and extended s-wave pairing symmetries are close in energy. Probing the proximity between these very different superconducting states and identifying experimental parameters that can tune them is of central interest. Here we report high-pressure muon spin rotation experiments on the temperature-dependent magnetic penetration depth in the optimally doped nodeless s-wave Fe-HTS Ba0.65Rb0.35Fe2As2. Upon pressure, a strong decrease of the penetration depth in the zero-temperature limit is observed, while the superconducting transition temperature remains nearly constant. More importantly, the low-temperature behaviour of the inverse-squared magnetic penetration depth, which is a direct measure of the superfluid density, changes qualitatively from an exponential saturation at zero pressure to a linear-in-temperature behaviour at higher pressures, indicating that hydrostatic pressure promotes the appearance of nodes in the superconducting gap.

  13. Superconductivity at Dawn of the Iron Age

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Tesanovic, Zlatko [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, United States

    2010-09-01

    Superconductivity is a stunning quantum phenomenon and among the deepest paradigms in all of physics. From fundamental theories of the universe to strange goings-on in exotic materials to medical imaging and cell phones, its conceptual and practical dimensions span a reach as wide as anything in science. Twenty-odd years ago, the discovery of copper oxides ushered in a new era of high-temperature superconductivity, and the joyous exuberance that followed - with physicists throwing everything from fancy gauge theories to synchrotron radiation into its kitchen sink - only recently began to show any signs of waning. In the spring of 2008, as if on cue, a new family of iron pnictide high-temperature superconductors burst on the scene, hinting at an alternative route to room-temperature superconductivity and all of its momentous consequences. Fueled by genuine excitement - and a bit of hype - the iron-based superconductivity turned into a science blockbuster of 2009. I will present a pedagogical review of this new field, contrast the physics of iron- and copper-based systems, and speculate on the microscopic origins of the two types of high-temperature superconductivity.

  14. FMEA on the superconducting torus for the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV accelerator upgrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghoshal, Probir K.; Biallas, George H.; Fair, Ruben J.; Rajput-Ghoshal, Renuka; Schneider, William J.; Legg, Robert A.; Kashy, David H.; Hogan, John P.; Wiseman, Mark A.; Luongo, Cesar; Ballard, Joshua T.; Young, Glenn R.; Elouadrhiri, Latifa; Rode, Claus H.

    2015-01-16

    As part of the Jefferson Lab 12GeV accelerator upgrade project, Hall B requires two conduction cooled superconducting magnets. One is a magnet system consisting of six superconducting trapezoidal racetrack-type coils assembled in a toroidal configuration and the second is an actively shielded solenoidal magnet system consisting of 5 coils. Both magnets are to be wound with Superconducting Super Collider-36 NbTi strand Rutherford cable soldered into a copper channel. This paper describes the various failure modes in torus magnet along with the failure modes that could be experienced by the torus and its interaction with the solenoid which is located in close proximity.

  15. Magnetic structures of R5Ni2In4 and R 11Ni4In9 ( R = Tb and Ho): strong hierarchy in the temperature dependence of the magnetic ordering in the multiple rare-earth sublattices

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ritter, C.; Provino, A.; Manfrinetti, P.; Pecharsky, V. K.; Gschneidner, K. A.; Dhar, S. K.

    2015-11-09

    The magnetic properties and magnetic structures of the R5Ni2In4 and the microfibrous R 11Ni4In9 compounds with R = Tb and Ho have been examined using magnetization, heat capacity, and neutron diffraction data. Rare earth atoms occupy three and five symmetrically inequivalent rare earth sites in R5Ni2In4 and R 11Ni4In9 compounds, respectively. As a result of the intra- and inter-magnetic sublattice interactions, the magnetic exchange interactions are different for various rare earth sites; this leads to a cascade of magnetic transitions with a strong hierarchy in the temperature dependence of the magnetic orderings.

  16. A facility for X-ray diffraction in magnetic fields up to 25 T and temperatures between 15 and 295 K

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, S.; Kovalev, A. E. Suslov, A. V.; Siegrist, T.

    2015-12-15

    A facility for X-ray diffraction has been developed at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory. It brings diffraction capability to the 25 T Florida split coil magnet and implements temperature control in a range of 15–295 K using a cold finger helium cryostat. This instrument represents an alternative to pulsed magnetic field systems, and it exceeds the static magnetic fields currently available at synchrotron facilities. Magnetic field compatibility of an X-ray source and detectors with the sizable magnetic fringe fields emanating from the magnet constrained the design of the diffractometer.

  17. Electron density distribution in BaPb{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x}O{sub 3} superconducting oxides studied by double nuclear magnetic resonance methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piskunov, Yu. V. Ogloblichev, V. V.; Arapova, I. Yu.; Sadykov, A. V.; Gerashchenko, A. P.; Verkhovskii, S. V.

    2011-11-15

    The effect of charge disorder on the formation of an inhomogeneous state of the electron system in the conduction band in BaPb{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x}O{sub 3} superconducting oxides is investigated experimentally by NMR methods. The NMR spectra of {sup 17}O are measured systematically, and the contributions from {sup 17}O atoms with different cation nearest surroundings are identified. It is found that microscopic regions with an elevated spin density of charge carriers are formed within two coordination spheres near antimony ions. Nuclei of the superconducting phase of the oxide (regions with an elevated antimony concentration) microscopically distributed over the sample are detected in compounds with x = 0.25 and 0.33. Experiments in which a double resonance signal of the spin echo of {sup 17}O-{sup 207}Pb and {sup 17}O-{sup 121}Sb are measured in the metal phase of BaPb{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x}O{sub 3} oxides are carried out for the first time. The constants of indirect heteronuclear spin-spin {sup 17}O-{sup 207}Pb interaction are determined as functions of the local Knight shift {sub 207}Ks. The estimates of the constants of the indirect interaction between the nuclei of the nearest neighbors (O-Pb and Pb-Pb atoms) and analysis of evolution of the NMR spectra of {sup 17}O upon a change in the antimony concentration are convincing evidence in favor of the development of a microscopically inhomogeneous state of the electron system in the metal phase of BaPb{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x}O{sub 3} oxides.

  18. Evolution of the magnetic excitation spectra of the YbB{sub 12} kondo insulator under variations in temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nemkovski, K. S. Alekseev, P. A.; Mignot, J.-M.

    2007-05-15

    The results obtained from experiments on inelastic neutron scattering in the YbB{sub 12} Kondo insulator are discussed. The structure of the magnetic excitation spectra and their evolution under variations in temperature are interpreted in the framework of a simple phenomenological model with due regard for the crystal field effects renormalized as a result of the influence of the intermediate valence state.

  19. Sub-Kelvin magnetic and electrical measurements in a diamond anvil cell with in situ tunability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, A; Silevitch, D M; Feng, Yejun; Wang, Y; Jaramillo, R.; Banerjee, A.; Ren, Y.; Rosenbaum, T. F.

    2015-09-01

    We discuss techniques for performing continuous measurements across a wide range of pressure–field–temperature phase space, combining the milli-Kelvin temperatures of a helium dilution refrigerator with the giga-Pascal pressures of a diamond anvil cell and the Tesla magnetic fields of a superconducting magnet. With a view towards minimizing remnant magnetic fields and background magnetic susceptibility, we characterize high-strength superalloy materials for the pressure cell assembly, which allows high fidelity measurements of low-field phenomena such as superconductivity below 100 mK at pressures above 10 GPa. In situ tunability and measurement of the pressure permit experiments over a wide range of pressure, while at the same time making possible precise steps across abrupt phase transitions such as those from insulator to metal.

  20. Superconducting Topological Insulators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    copper, it's possible to make the topologically ordered electrons superconducting, dropping electrical resistance in the surface states all the way to zero. A Major(ana) Quantum...

  1. Superconducting Topological Insulators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    taken even further. Their studies showed that by doping the TI, bismuth selenide, with copper, it's possible to make the topologically ordered electrons superconducting, dropping...

  2. Superconducting VAR control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boenig, Heinrich J.; Hassenzahl, William V.

    1982-01-01

    Static VAR control means employing an asymmetrically controlled Graetz bridge and a superconducting direct current coil having low losses and low cost characteristics.

  3. Pressure dependence of the magnetic order in CrAs: a neutron diffraction investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, L.; White, J. S.; Babkevich, P.; Susner, Michael A.; Sims, Zachary C; Safa-Sefat, Athena; Ronnow, H. M.; Ruegg, Ch.

    2015-01-29

    The suppression of magnetic order with pressure concomitant with the appearance of pressure-induced superconductivity was recently discovered in CrAs. Here we present a neutron diffraction study of the pressure evolution of the helimagnetic ground-state towards and in the vicinity of the superconducting phase. Neutron diffraction on polycrystalline CrAs was employed from zero pressure to 0.65 GPa and at various temperatures. The helimagnetic long-range order is sustained under pressure and the magnetic propagation vector does not show any considerable change. The average ordered magnetic moment is reduced from 1.73(2) μB at ambient pressure to 0.4(1) μB close to the critical pressure Pc ≈ 0.7 GPa, at which magnetic order is completely suppressed. The width of the magnetic Bragg peaks strongly depends on temperature and pressure, showing a maximum in the region of the onset of superconductivity. In conclusion, we interpret this as associated with competing ground-states in the vicinity of the superconducting phase.

  4. Role of oxygen vacancies in magnetic properties of LaAlO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3} interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohanta, N.; Taraphder, A.

    2014-04-24

    The interface of two band-insulators SrTiO{sub 3} and LaAlO{sub 3} exhibits a highly conducting two-dimensional electron gas which shows low-temperature superconductivity, ferromagnetism and many other novel properties. Several studies reveal that the oxygen vacancies at the interface have strong influence on the electronic and magnetic properties of the interface electrons. Here, we develop an insight into the effects of oxygen vacancies on the magnetic properties of the system; the oxygen vacancies help in establishing ferromagnetism which competes with superconductivity at low temperatures. Simulated Monte-Carlo annealing suggests an ordering of the oxygen vacant sites and sheds light on the experimental observation of the quenching of magnetic moment on annealing. A possible explanation for the coexistence of superconductivity and ferromagnetism is also discussed.

  5. SciTech Connect: superconduct*

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    superconduct* Find + Advanced Search Term Search Semantic Search Advanced Search All Fields: superconduct* Semantic Semantic Term Title: Full Text: Bibliographic Data: Creator ...

  6. Pressure-enhanced superconductivity in Eu3Bi2S4F4

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Luo, Yongkang; Zhai, Hui -Fei; Zhang, Pan; Xu, Zhu -An; Cao, Guang -Han; Thompson, J. D.

    2014-12-17

    The pressure effect on the newly discovered charge-transferred BiS2-based superconductor, Eu3Bi2S4F4, with a Tc of 1.5 K at ambient pressure, is investigated by transport and magnetic measurements. Accompanied with the enhancement of metallicity under pressures, the onset superconducting transition temperature increases abruptly around 1.0 GPa, reaching ~10.0 K at 2.26 GPa. Alternating current magnetic susceptibility measurements indicate that a new superconducting phase with a higher Tc emerges and dominates at high pressures. In the broad pressure window of 0.68GPa≤p≤2.00 GPa, the high-Tc phase coexists with the low-Tc phase. Hall effect measurements reveal a significant difference in electronic structures between themore » two superconducting phases. As a result, our work devotes the effort to establish the commonality of pressure effect on the BiS2-based superconductors, and also uncovers the importance of electron carrier density in the high-Tc phase.« less

  7. Zonal flows and ion temperature gradient instabilities in multiple-helicity magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrando-Margalet, S.; Sugama, H.; Watanabe, T.-H.

    2007-12-15

    The effects of multiple-helicity magnetic fields on the ion temperature gradient (ITG) instability and on the zonal flow (ZF) evolution are studied with the linear gyrokinetic Vlasov code GKV [T.-H. Watanabe and H. Sugama, Nucl. Fusion 46, 24 (2006)]. The model helical fields corresponding to the standard and inward-shifted axis configurations of the Large Helical Device [O. Motojima, N. Ohyabu, A. Komori et al., Nucl. Fusion 43, 1674 (2003)] are used to investigate how ITG mode properties and ZF evolution response to a given source are influenced by the field geometry. It is shown that, in the inward-shifted configuration, the ITG mode growth rate increases slightly while the ZF is sustained for a longer time. In addition, velocity-space structures of the ion perturbed distribution function are numerically obtained which illustrate the validity of the analytical prediction that the plasma inward shift retards the radial drift of the helically trapped particles leading to the enhancement of the ZF response. This supports the conjecture that anomalous transport can be reduced by the ZF generated in the configurations optimized to decrease the neoclassical transport.

  8. Status of the plasma generator of the superconducting proton linac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kronberger, M.; Lettry, J.; Paoluzzi, M.; Pereira, H.; Arias, J. Sanchez; Schmitzer, C.; Scrivens, R.; Faircloth, D.

    2012-02-15

    In the framework of the superconducting proton linac (SPL) study at CERN, a new non-cesiated H{sup -} plasma generator driven by an external 2 MHz RF antenna has been developed and successfully operated at repetition rates of 50 Hz, pulse lengths of up to 3 ms, and average RF powers of up to 3 kW. The coupling efficiency of RF power into the plasma was determined by the cooling water temperatures and the analysis of the RF forward and reflected power and the antenna current and amounts to 50%-60%. The plasma resistance increases between 10 kW and 40 kW RF power from about 0.45 {Omega} to 0.65 {Omega}. Measurements of RF power dissipated in the ferrites and the magnets on a test bench show a 5-fold decrease of the power losses for the magnets when they are contained in a Cu box, thus validating the strategy of shielding the magnets with a high electrical conductivity material. An air cooling system was installed in the SPL plasma generator to control the temperatures of the ferrites despite hysteresis losses of several Watts.

  9. Superconducting shielded core reactor with reduced AC losses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cha, Yung S.; Hull, John R.

    2006-04-04

    A superconducting shielded core reactor (SSCR) operates as a passive device for limiting excessive AC current in a circuit operating at a high power level under a fault condition such as shorting. The SSCR includes a ferromagnetic core which may be either closed or open (with an air gap) and extends into and through a superconducting tube or superconducting rings arranged in a stacked array. First and second series connected copper coils each disposed about a portion of the iron core are connected to the circuit to be protected and are respectively wound inside and outside of the superconducting tube or rings. A large impedance is inserted into the circuit by the core when the shielding capability of the superconducting arrangement is exceeded by the applied magnetic field generated by the two coils under a fault condition to limit the AC current in the circuit. The proposed SSCR also affords reduced AC loss compared to conventional SSCRs under continuous normal operation.

  10. Superconductivity of magnesium diboride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bud’ko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.

    2015-07-15

    Over the past 14 years MgB2 has gone from a startling discovery to a promising, applied superconductor. In our article we present a brief overview of the synthesis and the basic superconducting properties of this remarkable compound. Specifically, the effect of pressure, substitutions and neutron irradiation on superconducting properties are discussed.

  11. Superconductivity of magnesium diboride

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bud’ko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.

    2015-07-15

    Over the past 14 years MgB2 has gone from a startling discovery to a promising, applied superconductor. In our article we present a brief overview of the synthesis and the basic superconducting properties of this remarkable compound. Specifically, the effect of pressure, substitutions and neutron irradiation on superconducting properties are discussed.

  12. Radio Frequency Surface Impedance Characterization System for Superconducting Samples at 7.5 GHz

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Binping Xiao, Charles Reece, Michael Kelley, Larry Phillips, Rongli Geng, Haipeng Wang, Frank Marhauser

    2011-05-01

    A radio frequency (RF) surface impedance characterization (SIC) system that uses a sapphire-loaded Nb cavity operating at 7.5 GHz has been fabricated to measure the RF surface impedance of flat superconducting samples. Currently, the SIC system can make direct calorimetric surface impedance measurements in the central 0.8 cm2 area of 5 cm diameter disk samples in a temperature range from 2 to 20 K, exposed to a magnetic flux density of up to 14 mT. As an application, we present the measurement results for a bulk Nb sample.

  13. Physics and material science of ultra-high quality factor superconducting resonator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vostrikov, Alexander

    2015-08-01

    The nitrogen doping into niobium superconducting radio frequency cavity walls aiming to improve the fundamental mode quality factor is the subject of the research in the given work. Quantitative nitrogen diffusion into niobium model calculating the concentration profile was developed. The model estimations were confirmed with secondary ion mass spectrometry technique measurements. The model made controlled nitrogen doping recipe optimization possible. As a result the robust reproducible recipe for SRF cavity walls treatment with nitrogen doping was developed. The cavities produced with optimized recipe met LCLS–II requirements on quality factor of 2.7 ∙ 1010 at acceleration field of 16 MV/m. The microscopic effects of nitrogen doping on superconducting niobium properties were studied with low energy muon spin rotation technique and magnetometer measurements. No significant effect of nitrogen on the following features was found: electron mean free path, magnetic field penetration depth, and upper and surface critical magnetic fields. It was detected that for nitrogen doped niobium samples magnetic flux starts to penetrate inside the superconductor at lower external magnetic field value compared to the low temperature baked niobium ones. This explains lower quench field of SRF cavities treated with nitrogen. Quality factor improvement of fundamental mode forced to analyze the high order mode (HOM) impact on the particle beam dynamics. Both resonant and cumulative effects caused by monopole and dipole HOMs respectively are found to be negligible within the requirements for LCLS–II.

  14. Superconductivity for Large Scale Wind Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Fair; W. Stautner; M. Douglass; R. Rajput-Ghoshal; M. Moscinski; P. Riley; D. Wagner; J. Kim; S. Hou; F. Lopez; K. Haran; J. Bray; T. Laskaris; J. Rochford; R. Duckworth

    2012-10-12

    A conceptual design has been completed for a 10MW superconducting direct drive wind turbine generator employing low temperature superconductors for the field winding. Key technology building blocks from the GE Wind and GE Healthcare businesses have been transferred across to the design of this concept machine. Wherever possible, conventional technology and production techniques have been used in order to support the case for commercialization of such a machine. Appendices A and B provide further details of the layout of the machine and the complete specification table for the concept design. Phase 1 of the program has allowed us to understand the trade-offs between the various sub-systems of such a generator and its integration with a wind turbine. A Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and a Technology Readiness Level (TRL) analysis have been completed resulting in the identification of high risk components within the design. The design has been analyzed from a commercial and economic point of view and Cost of Energy (COE) calculations have been carried out with the potential to reduce COE by up to 18% when compared with a permanent magnet direct drive 5MW baseline machine, resulting in a potential COE of 0.075 $/kWh. Finally, a top-level commercialization plan has been proposed to enable this technology to be transitioned to full volume production. The main body of this report will present the design processes employed and the main findings and conclusions.

  15. Low temperature specific heat of the Kondo-semimetal CeNiSn in zero and applied magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brueckl, A.; Neumaier, K.; Einzel, D.; Andres, K.; Flaschin, S.; Kalvius, G.M.; Nakamoto, G.; Takabatake, T.

    1999-06-01

    The specific heat of several CeNiSn single crystals of various purity has been measured in the temperature range from 25 mK to 5 K and in magnetic fields from zero to 7 Tesla. At very low temperatures (below {approximately} 200 mK) the specific heat is found to vary linearly with temperature (C = {gamma}T), the coefficient {gamma} decreasing with increasing purity. Above 200 mK, the specific heat is well described as the sum of a linear and a quadratic term. An applied magnetic field affects mostly the linear term, which first slightly decreases, then strongly increases with field. In magnetic fields, a nuclear hyperfine specific heat contribution is superimposed, which is due mostly to the bare Zeeman-splitting of the {sup 115}Sn, {sup 117}Sn, {sup 119}Sn nuclei (all with spin I = 1/2 and with abundances of 0.35, 7.61, and 8.58% respectively) in the externally applied field. The results on the specific heat at very low temperatures in applied fields fit into the model of an enhanced (heavy-fermion type) density of states which is modified by coherent antiferromagnetic fluctuations into a V-shaped density of states at the Fermi energy.

  16. Structural, magnetic, and superconducting properties of pulsed-laser-deposition-grown La1.85 Sr0.15 CuO4 / La2/3 Ca1/3 MnO3 superlattices on (001)-oriented LaSrAlO4 substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, S.; Sen, K.; Marozau, I.; Uribe-Laverde, M. A.; Biskup, N.; Varela, M.; Khaydukov, Y.; Soltwedel, O.; Keller, T.; Döbeli, M.; Schneider, C. W.; Bernhard, C.

    2014-03-12

    Epitaxial La1.85 Sr0.15 CuO4 / La2/3 Ca1/3 MnO3 (LSCO/LCMO) superlattices (SL) on (001)- oriented LaSrAlO4 substrates have been grown with pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique. Their structural, magnetic and superconducting properties have been determined with in-situ reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED), x-ray diffraction, specular neutron reflectometry, scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), electric transport, and magnetization measurements. We find that despite the large mismatch between the in-plane lattice parameters of LSCO (a = 0.3779 nm) and LCMO (a = 0.387 nm) these superlattices can be grown epitaxially and with a high crystalline quality. While the first LSCO layer remains clamped to the LSAO substrate, a sizeable strain relaxation occurs already in the first LCMO layer. The following LSCO and LCMO layers adopt a nearly balanced state in which the tensile and compressive strain effects yield alternating in-plane lattice parameters with an almost constant average value. No major defects are observed in the LSCO layers, while a significant number of vertical antiphase boundaries are found in the LCMO layers. The LSCO layers remain superconducting with a relatively high superconducting onset temperature of Tconset ≈ 36 K. The macroscopic superconducting response is also evident in the magnetization data due to a weak diamagnetic signal below 10 K for H ∥ ab and a sizeable paramagnetic shift for H ∥ c that can be explained in terms of a vortex-pinning-induced flux compression. The LCMO layers maintain a

  17. The Effect of Magnetic Field on HTS Leads What Happens when thePower Fails at RAL?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, Michael A.

    2007-02-14

    The key to being able to operate the MICE superconducting solenoids on small coolers is the use of high temperature superconducting (HTS) leads between the first stage of the cooler and the magnet, which operates at around 4.2 K. Because MICE magnets are not shielded, all of the MICE magnets have a stray magnetic field in the region where the coolers and the HTS leads are located. The behavior of the HTS leads in a magnetic field depends strongly on the HTS material used for the leads and the temperature of the cooler first stage temperature. The HTS leads can be specified to operate at the maximum current for the magnet. This report shows how the HTS leads can be specified for use the MICE magnets. MICE magnets take from 1.3 hours (the tracker solenoids) to 3.7 hours (the coupling magnet) to charge to the highest projected operating currents. If the power fails, the cooler and the upper ends of the HTS leads warm up. The question is how one can discharge the magnet to protect the HTS leads without quenching the MICE magnets. This report describes a method that one can use to protect the HTS leads in the event of a power failure at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL).

  18. Superconducting Radiofrequency (SRF) Accelerator Cavities

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Reece, Charlie

    2014-05-22

    Charlie Reece, an accelerator technology scientist, explains how superconducting radiofrequency accelerator cavities work.

  19. Kondo Physics and Unconventional Superconductivity in the U Intermetallic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    U2PtC2 Revealed by NMR (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Kondo Physics and Unconventional Superconductivity in the U Intermetallic U2PtC2 Revealed by NMR Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Kondo Physics and Unconventional Superconductivity in the U Intermetallic U2PtC2 Revealed by NMR The set of slides begins by discussing the topic NMR of heavy fermion superconductors under the topics heavy fermion materials, superconductivity, and nuclear magnetic resonance.

  20. Wire rope superconducting cable for diurnal load leveling SMES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Costello, G.A.

    1980-01-01

    The design of a wire rope cable for a superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) unit is discussed. The superconducting wires in the rope permit the passage of large currents in the relatively small conductors of the windings and hence cause large electromagnetic forces to act on the rope. The diameter of the rope, from a strength point of view, can be considerably reduced by supporting the rope at various points along its length.

  1. A field-reversed magnetic configuration and applications of high-temperature FRC plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryzhkov, S. V.

    2011-12-15

    As applied to a tokomak, a magnetic trap for confinement of a plasma with an inverted field or a magnetic field reversed configuration (FRC) is one of the most promising alternatives of the systems with high {beta}. A brief review of the latest data on FRC and potential directions of using such configurations in addition to energy generation in thermonuclear reactors (TNRs) is proposed.

  2. Method for forming bismuth-based superconducting ceramics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maroni, Victor A.; Merchant, Nazarali N.; Parrella, Ronald D.

    2005-05-17

    A method for reducing the concentration of non-superconducting phases during the heat treatment of Pb doped Ag/Bi-2223 composites having Bi-2223 and Bi-2212 superconducting phases is disclosed. A Pb doped Ag/Bi-2223 composite having Bi-2223 and Bi-2212 superconducting phases is heated in an atmosphere having an oxygen partial pressure not less than about 0.04 atmospheres and the temperature is maintained at the lower of a non-superconducting phase take-off temperature and the Bi-2223 superconducting phase grain growth take-off temperature. The oxygen partial pressure is varied and the temperature is varied between about 815.degree. C. and about 835.degree. C. to produce not less than 80 percent conversion to Pb doped Bi-2223 superconducting phase and not greater than about 20 volume percent non-superconducting phases. The oxygen partial pressure is preferably varied between about 0.04 and about 0.21 atmospheres. A product by the method is disclosed.

  3. Temperature-induced martensite in magnetic shape memory Fe{sub 2}MnGa observed by photoemission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenkins, Catherine; Scholl, Andreas; Kainuma, R.; Elmers, Hans-Joachim; Omori, Toshihiro

    2012-01-18

    The magnetic domain structure in single crystals of a Heusler shape memory compound near the composition Fe{sub 2}MnGa was observed during phase transition by photoelectron emission microscopy at Beamline 11.0.1.1 of the Advanced Light Source. The behavior is comparable with recent observations of an adaptive martensite phase in prototype Ni{sub 2}MnGa, although the pinning in the recent work is an epitaxial interface and in this work the e#11;ective pinning plane is a boundary between martensitic variants that transform in a self-accommodating way from the single crystal austenite phase present at high temperatures. Temperature dependent observations of the twinning structure give information as to the coupling behavior between the magnetism and the structural evolution.

  4. Sub-Kelvin magnetic and electrical measurements in a diamond anvil cell with in-situ tunability

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Palmer, Alexander; Silevitch, Daniel; Feng, Yejun; Wang, Yishu; Jaramillo, R.; Banerjee, Arnab; Ren, Yang; Rosenbaum, Thomas F.

    2015-09-04

    We discuss techniques for performing continuous measurements across a wide range of pressure-field-temperature phase space, combining the milli-Kelvin temperatures of a helium dilution refrigerator with that of the giga-Pascal pressures of a diamond anvil cell and the Tesla magnetic fields of a superconducting magnet. With a view towards minimizing remnant magnetic fields and background magnetic susceptibility, we then characterize high-strength superalloy materials for the pressure cell assembly, which allows high fidelity measurements of low-field phenomena such as superconductivity below 100 mK at pressures above 10 GPa. In situ tunability and measurement of the pressure permit experiments over a wide rangemore » of pressure, while at the same time making possible precise steps across abrupt phase transitions such as that from insulator to metal.« less

  5. Sub-Kelvin magnetic and electrical measurements in a diamond anvil cell with in-situ tunability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, Alexander; Silevitch, Daniel; Feng, Yejun; Wang, Yishu; Jaramillo, R.; Banerjee, Arnab; Ren, Yang; Rosenbaum, Thomas F.

    2015-09-04

    We discuss techniques for performing continuous measurements across a wide range of pressure-field-temperature phase space, combining the milli-Kelvin temperatures of a helium dilution refrigerator with that of the giga-Pascal pressures of a diamond anvil cell and the Tesla magnetic fields of a superconducting magnet. With a view towards minimizing remnant magnetic fields and background magnetic susceptibility, we then characterize high-strength superalloy materials for the pressure cell assembly, which allows high fidelity measurements of low-field phenomena such as superconductivity below 100 mK at pressures above 10 GPa. In situ tunability and measurement of the pressure permit experiments over a wide range of pressure, while at the same time making possible precise steps across abrupt phase transitions such as that from insulator to metal.

  6. Scientists optimize defects for better superconducting effects | Argonne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Leadership Computing Facility Scientists optimize defects for better superconducting effects Author: Jared Sagoff July 12, 2016 Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google E-mail Printer-friendly version High-temperature superconducting materials hold enormous promise for a variety of different applications because of their ability to transmit a current without any dissipation at relatively high temperatures - up to around 90 Kelvin (about -300° F), which permits cooling with liquid nitrogen. However,

  7. Apparatus for characterizing conductivity of superconducting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doss, James D.

    1993-01-01

    Apparatus and method for noncontact, radio-frequency shielding current characterization of materials. Self- or mutual inductance changes in one or more inductive elements, respectively, occur when materials capable of supporting shielding currents are placed in proximity thereto, or undergo change in resistivity while in place. Such changes can be observed by incorporating the inductor(s) in a resonant circuit and determining the frequency of oscillation or by measuring the voltage induced on a coupled inductive element. The present invention is useful for determining the critical temperature and superconducting transition width for superconducting samples.

  8. Superconducting nanowire single photon detector on diamond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atikian, Haig A.; Burek, Michael J.; Choy, Jennifer T.; Lon?ar, Marko; Eftekharian, Amin; Jafari Salim, A.; Hamed Majedi, A.

    2014-03-24

    Superconducting nanowire single photon detectors are fabricated directly on diamond substrates and their optical and electrical properties are characterized. Dark count performance and photon count rates are measured at varying temperatures for 1310?nm and 632?nm photons. A multi-step diamond surface polishing procedure is reported, involving iterative reactive ion etching and mechanical polishing to create a suitable diamond surface for the deposition and patterning of thin film superconducting layers. Using this approach, diamond substrates with less than 300?pm Root Mean Square surface roughness are obtained.

  9. Apparatus for characterizing conductivity of superconducting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doss, J.D.

    1993-12-07

    Apparatus and method for noncontact, radio-frequency shielding current characterization of materials. Self- or mutual inductance changes in one or more inductive elements, respectively, occur when materials capable of supporting shielding currents are placed in proximity thereto, or undergo change in resistivity while in place. Such changes can be observed by incorporating the inductor(s) in a resonant circuit and determining the frequency of oscillation or by measuring the voltage induced on a coupled inductive element. The present invention is useful for determining the critical temperature and superconducting transition width for superconducting samples. 10 figures.

  10. Self-triggering superconducting fault current limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yuan, Xing; Tekletsadik, Kasegn

    2008-10-21

    A modular and scaleable Matrix Fault Current Limiter (MFCL) that functions as a "variable impedance" device in an electric power network, using components made of superconducting and non-superconducting electrically conductive materials. The matrix fault current limiter comprises a fault current limiter module that includes a superconductor which is electrically coupled in parallel with a trigger coil, wherein the trigger coil is magnetically coupled to the superconductor. The current surge doing a fault within the electrical power network will cause the superconductor to transition to its resistive state and also generate a uniform magnetic field in the trigger coil and simultaneously limit the voltage developed across the superconductor. This results in fast and uniform quenching of the superconductors, significantly reduces the burnout risk associated with non-uniformity often existing within the volume of superconductor materials. The fault current limiter modules may be electrically coupled together to form various "n" (rows).times."m" (columns) matrix configurations.

  11. Ion-temperature-gradient sensitivity of the hydrodynamic instability caused by shear in the magnetic-field-aligned plasma flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mikhailenko, V. V.; Mikhailenko, V. S.; Lee, Hae June; Koepke, M. E.

    2014-07-15

    The cross-magnetic-field (i.e., perpendicular) profile of ion temperature and the perpendicular profile of the magnetic-field-aligned (parallel) plasma flow are sometimes inhomogeneous for space and laboratory plasma. Instability caused either by a gradient in the ion-temperature profile or by shear in the parallel flow has been discussed extensively in the literature. In this paper, (1) hydrodynamic plasma stability is investigated, (2) real and imaginary frequency are quantified over a range of the shear parameter, the normalized wavenumber, and the ratio of density-gradient and ion-temperature-gradient scale lengths, and (3) the role of inverse Landau damping is illustrated for the case of combined ion-temperature gradient and parallel-flow shear. We find that increasing the ion-temperature gradient reduces the instability threshold for the hydrodynamic parallel-flow shear instability, also known as the parallel Kelvin-Helmholtz instability or the D'Angelo instability. We also find that a kinetic instability arises from the coupled, reinforcing action of both free-energy sources. For the case of comparable electron and ion temperature, we illustrate analytically the transition of the D'Angelo instability to the kinetic instability as (a) the shear parameter, (b) the normalized wavenumber, and (c) the ratio of density-gradient and ion-temperature-gradient scale lengths are varied and we attribute the changes in stability to changes in the amount of inverse ion Landau damping. We show that near a normalized wavenumber k{sub ?}?{sub i} of order unity (i) the real and imaginary values of frequency become comparable and (ii) the imaginary frequency, i.e., the growth rate, peaks.

  12. Alexei Abrikosov and Superconductivity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alexei Abrikosov and Superconductivity Resources with Additional Information * Publications at ANL Alexei A. Abrikosov of the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is a recipient of the 2003 Nobel Prize in Physics for his research in the area of superconductivity. Alexei Abrikosov Courtesy Argonne National Laboratory "Abrikosov's research [at ANL] centers on condensed-matter physics (the structure and behavior of solids and liquids), and concentrates on

  13. Superconductive ceramic oxide combination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatterjee, D.K.; Mehrotra, A.K.; Mir, J.M.

    1991-03-05

    This patent describes the combination of a superconductive ceramic oxide which degrades in conductivity upon contact of ambient air with its surface and, interposed between the ceramic oxide surface and ambient air in the amount of at least 1 mg per square meter of surface area of the superconductive ceramic oxide, a passivant polymer selected from the group consisting of a polyester ionomer and an alkyl cellulose.

  14. Superconducting Topological Insulators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Superconducting Topological Insulators Superconducting Topological Insulators Print Wednesday, 26 January 2011 00:00 Three-dimensional topological insulators (TIs), discovered experimentally in 2007-2009 by a Princeton-ALS collaboration, are a promising platform for developing the next generation of electronics. Electrons within one nanometer of a TI's surface move at high speeds in a "light-like" fashion. The quantum interactions that generate these electronic states cause individual

  15. Superconducting submillimeter and millimeter wave detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nahum, M.

    1992-10-20

    The series of projects described in this dissertation was stimulated by the discovery of high temperature superconductivity. Our goal was to develop useful applications which would be competitive with the current state of technology. The high-[Tc] microbolometer was developed into the most sensitive direct detector of millimeter waves, when operated at liquid nitrogen temperatures. The thermal boundary resistance of thin YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]0[sub 7-[delta

  16. Superconducting transmission line particle detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, K.E.

    1988-07-28

    A microvertex particle detector for use in a high energy physic collider including a plurality of parallel superconducting thin film strips separated from a superconducting ground plane by an insulating layer to form a plurality of superconducting waveguides. The microvertex particle detector indicates passage of a charged subatomic particle by measuring a voltage pulse measured across a superconducting waveguide caused by the transition of the superconducting thin film strip from a superconducting to a non- superconducting state in response to the passage of a charged particle. A plurality of superconducting thin film strips in two orthogonal planes plus the slow electromagnetic wave propagating in a superconducting transmission line are used to resolve N/sup 2/ ambiguity of charged particle events. 6 figs.

  17. Superconducting transmission line particle detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, Kenneth E.

    1989-01-01

    A microvertex particle detector for use in a high energy physic collider including a plurality of parallel superconducting thin film strips separated from a superconducting ground plane by an insulating layer to form a plurality of superconducting waveguides. The microvertex particle detector indicates passage of a charged subatomic particle by measuring a voltage pulse measured across a superconducting waveguide caused by the transition of the superconducting thin film strip from a superconducting to a non-superconducting state in response to the passage of a charged particle. A plurality of superconducting thin film strips in two orthogonal planes plus the slow electromagnetic wave propogating in a superconducting transmission line are used to resolve N.sup.2 ambiguity of charged particle events.

  18. Segmented superconducting tape having reduced AC losses and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foltyn, Stephen R.; Jia, Quanxi; Arendt, Paul N.; Holesinger, Terry G.; Wang, Haiyan

    2009-09-22

    A superconducting tape having reduced AC losses. The tape has a high temperature superconductor layer that is segmented. Disruptive strips, formed in one of the tape substrate, a buffer layer, and the superconducting layer create parallel discontinuities in the superconducting layer that separate the current-carrying elements of the superconducting layer into strips or filament-like structures. Segmentation of the current-carrying elements has the effect of reducing AC current losses. Methods of making such a superconducting tape and reducing AC losses in such tapes are also disclosed.

  19. Insights to Superconducting Radio-Frequency Cavity Processing from First Principles Calculations and Spectroscopic Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, Denise Christine

    2013-03-01

    Insights to the fundamental processes that occur during the manufacturing of niobium superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities are provided via analyses of density functional theory calculations and Raman, infrared, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra. I show that during electropolishing fluorine is bound and released by the reaction of the acid components in the solution: HF + H2SO4 <-> HFSO3 + H2O. This result implies that new recipes can possibly be developed on the principle of controlled release of fluorine by a chemical reaction. I also show that NMR or Raman spectroscopy can be used to monitor the free fluorine when polishing with the standard electropolishing recipe. Density functional theory was applied to calculate the properties of common processing impurities – hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon – in the niobium. These impurities lower the superconducting transition temperature of niobium, and hydride precipitates are at best weakly superconducting. I modeled several of the niobium hydride phases relevant to SRF cavities, and explain the phase changes in the niobium hydrogen system based on the charge transfer between niobium and hydrogen and the strain field inside of the niobium. I also present evidence for a niobium lattice vacancy serving as a nucleation center for hydride phase formation. In considering the other chemical impurities in niobium, I show that the absorption of oxygen into a niobium lattice vacancy is preferred over the absorption of hydrogen, which indicates that oxygen can block these phase nucleation centers. I also show that dissolved oxygen atoms can trap dissolved hydrogen atoms to prevent niobium hydride phase formation. Nitrogen and carbon were studied in less depth, but behaved similarly to oxygen. Based on these results and a literature survey, I propose a mechanism for the success of the low-temperature anneal applied to niobium SRF cavities. Finally, I

  20. Thermal performance measurements of a 100 percent polyester MLI (multilayer insulation) system for the Superconducting Super Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonczy, J.D.; Boroski, W.N.; Niemann, R.C.

    1989-09-01

    The plastic materials used in the multilayer insulation (MLI) blankets of the superconducting magnets of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) are comprised entirely of polyesters. This paper reports on tests conducted in three separate experimental blanket arrangements. The tests explore the thermal performance of two candidate blanket joint configurations each employing a variation of a stepped-butted joint nested between sewn blanket seams. The results from the joint configurations are compared to measurements made describing the thermal performance of the basic blanket materials as tested in an ideal joint configuration. Twenty foil sensors were incorporated within each test blanket to measure interstitial layer and joint layer temperatures. Heat flux and thermal gradients are reported for high and degraded insulating vacuums, and during transient and steady state conditions. In complement with this paper is an associate paper bearing the same title head but with the title extension Part 1: Instrumentation and experimental preparation (300K-80K)'. 5 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.