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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature superconducting magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Developing a High-Temperature Superconducting Bulk Magnet for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In addition to these well-developed technologies, high-critical temperature superconductors that show superconductivity at liquid nitrogen are also prospective ...

2

Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage in Trapped Field Magnets of High Temperature Superconductors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Superconducting permanent magnets for storing high magnetic fields can serve as a means of energy storage and are useful in applications ranging from motors and generators to fault current limiters and circuit breakers. This report presents the results of experimental studies on high temperature superconductors, which were successfully used to trap a record high stable magnetic field of 83,000 G at 54 K and 100,000 G at 42 K.

1995-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

3

Magneto-Optical Images from the Superconductivity & Magnetism Low-temperature Laboratory  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

This is a small, online collection of video supplements to published papers, images, Flash movies, etc. Activities of the Superconductivity and Magnetism Low-Temperature Lab are focused on the experimental studies of superconductivity, magnetism and their coexistence in novel materials at low temperatures. In addition to the magneto-optical gallery, see the video supplements at http://www.cmpgroup.ameslab.gov/supermaglab/video/index.html

Condensed Matter Physics Group (Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory)

4

SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scale Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage Plant", IEEEfor SlIperconducting Magnetic Energy Storage Unit", inSuperconducting Magnetic Energy Storage Plant, Advances in

Hassenzahl, W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

High-field magnets using high-critical-temperature superconducting thin films  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High-field magnets fabricated from high-critical-temperature superconducting ceramic (HTSC) thin films which can generate fields greater than 4 Tesla. The high-field magnets are made of stackable disk-shaped substrates coated with HTSC thin films, and involves maximizing the critical current density, superconducting film thickness, number of superconducting layers per substrate, substrate diameter, and number of substrates while minimizing substrate thickness. The HTSC thin films are deposited on one or both sides of the substrates in a spiral configuration with variable line widths to increase the field.

Mitlitsky, Fred (Livermore, CA); Hoard, Ronald W. (Livermore, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

High-field magnets using high-critical-temperature superconducting thin films  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High-field magnets fabricated from high-critical-temperature superconducting ceramic (HTSC) thin films which can generate fields greater than 4 Tesla are disclosed. The high-field magnets are made of stackable disk-shaped substrates coated with HTSC thin films, and involves maximizing the critical current density, superconducting film thickness, number of superconducting layers per substrate, substrate diameter, and number of substrates while minimizing substrate thickness. The HTSC thin films are deposited on one or both sides of the substrates in a spiral configuration with variable line widths to increase the field. 4 figures.

Mitlitsky, F.; Hoard, R.W.

1994-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

7

SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Superconducting 30-MJ Energy Storage Coil", Proc. 19 80 ASC,Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage Plant", IEEE Trans.SlIperconducting Magnetic Energy Storage Unit", in Advances

Hassenzahl, W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

High Temperature Superconducting Magnets: Revolutionizing Next Generation Accelerators and Other Applications (466th Brookhaven Lecture)  

SciTech Connect

BNL has always been a leader in the world of superconducting magnets, which are essential to the great modern ccelerators such as the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at BNL, or the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, Switzerland. These magnets are made of material that, cooled to 4 Kelvins (K) (-452° Farenheit) become superconducting, that is, lose essentially all resistance to electricity. For the past decade, however, Lab researchers have been exploring the use of new materials that become superconducting at higher temperatures. These materials can operate at the relatively high temperature of 77 K (-351°F), allowing them to be cooled by cheap, plentiful liquid nitrogen, rather than helium, and can create very high magnetic fields. Now far in the lead of this area of research, BNL scientists are exploring avenues for high temperature superconducting magnets that are energy efficient and have magnetic fields that are a million times stronger than the Earth’s. If successful, these new magnets could potentially revolutionize usage in future accelerators, play a key role in energy efficiency and storage, and make possible new applications such as muon colliders and MRI screening in remote areas.

Gupta, Ramesh (BNL Superconducting Magnet Division)

2011-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

9

Video Supplements for Papers from the Superconducting and Magnetism Low-temperature Laboratory at AMES Laboratory  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Superconductivity and Magnetism Low-temperature Laboratory is part of the Condensed Matter Physics group in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory. Some of the publications from this lab have data and figures on video. These videos have been posted online with their "parent" publications.

10

Superconducting magnet  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A superconducting magnet designed to produce magnetic flux densities of the order of 4 to 5 Webers per square meter is constructed by first forming a cable of a plurality of matrixed superconductor wires with each wire of the plurality insulated from each other one. The cable is shaped into a rectangular cross-section and is wound with tape in an open spiral to create cooling channels. Coils are wound in a calculated pattern in saddle shapes to produce desired fields, such as dipoles, quadrupoles, and the like. Wedges are inserted between adjacent cables as needed to maintain substantially radial placement of the long dimensions of cross sections of the cables. After winding, individual strands in each of the cables are brought out to terminals and are interconnected to place all of the strands in series and to maximize the propagation of a quench by alternating conduction from an inner layer to an outer layer and from top half to bottom half as often as possible. Individual layers are separated from others by spiraled aluminum spacers to facilitate cooling. The wound coil is wrapped with an epoxy tape that is cured by heat and then machined to an interference fit with an outer aluminum pipe which is then affixed securely to the assembled coil by heating it to make a shrink fit. In an alternate embodiment, one wire of the cable is made of copper or the like to be heated externally to propagate a quench.

Satti, John A. (Naperville, IL)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Magnetically leviated superconducting bearing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A magnetically levitated superconducting bearing includes a magnet (2) mounted on a shaft (12) that is rotatable around an axis of rotation and a Type II superconductor (6) supported on a stator (14) in proximity to the magnet (2). The superconductor (6) is positioned so that when it is cooled to its superconducting state in the presence of a magnetic field, it interacts with the magnet (2) to produce an attractive force that levitates the magnet (2) and supports a load on the shaft (12). The interaction between the superconductor (6) and magnet(2) also produces surface screening currents (8) that generate a repulsive force perpendicular to the load. The bearing also has means for maintaining the superconductor at a temperature below its critical temperature (16, 18). The bearing could also be constructed so the magnet (2) is supported on the stator (14) and the superconductor (6) is mounted on the shaft (12). The bearing can be operated by cooling the superconductor (6) to its superconducting state in the presence of a magnetic field.

Weinberger, Bernard R. (Avon, CT); Lynds, Jr., Lahmer (Glastonbury, CT)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Superconducting Magnets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

magnet technology has allowed physicists to attain higher energies in circular accelerators. One can obtain higher magnetic fields because there is no resistance in a...

13

Superconducting Magnets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mit Hilfe der Technologie supraleitender Magnete lassen sich in Mit Hilfe der Technologie supraleitender Magnete lassen sich in Ringbeschleunigern höhere Energien erreichen. Weil supraleitende Spulen keinen elektrischen Widerstand aufweisen, können damit stärkere Magnetfelder erzeugt werden. In normal leitenden Elektromagneten wird - wegen des elektrischen Widerstands der Drähte - die Spule aufgeheizt. Auf diese Weise geht sehr viel Energie in Form von Wärme verloren, was die Energiekosten dieser Magnete in die Höhe treibt. Supraleitende Spulen erlauben es, Magnete grosser Feldstärke unter günstigen Bedingungen zu betreiben und damit die Energiekosten zu senken. Durch den Einbau supraleitender Spulen in den Ringbeschleuniger von Fermilab konnte dessen Energie verdoppelt werden.Auch der im Bau befindliche "Large Hadron Collider" am CERN wird supraleitende Magnete

14

Fast superconducting magnetic field switch  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with an electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater than the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles. Magnetic switches and particularly fast kicker magnets are used in the accelerator industry to quickly deflect particle beams into and out of various transport lines, storage rings, dumps, and specifically to differentially route individual bunches of particles from a train of bunches which are injected or ejected from a given ring.

Goren, Y.; Mahale, N.K.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

15

Fast superconducting magnetic field switch  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater that the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles.

Goren, Yehuda (Mountain View, CA); Mahale, Narayan K. (The Woodlands, TX)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Magnetism and Superconductivity in Iron Pnictides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The discovery of high temperature superconductivity in iron pnictides and chalcogenides has resulted in surprising new insights into high temperature superconductivity and its relationship with magnetism. Here we provide an overview of some of what is known about these materials and in particular about the interplay of magnetism and superconductivity in them. Similarities and contrasts with cuprate superconductors are emphasized and the superconducting pairing is discussed within the framework of spin fluctuation induced pairing.

Singh, David J [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Ramesh Gupta | Superconducting Magnet Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ramesh Gupta Ramesh Gupta Ramesh Gupta has always been a leader in the world of superconducting magnets, which are essential to great modern accelerators such as the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at BNL, and the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, Switzerland. For the past decade, Lab researchers have been exploring the use of new materials that become superconducting at higher temperatures. Gupta, head of the High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) Research and Development Group in the Superconducting Magnet Division, is among those exploring avenues for HTS magnets that are energy efficient and have magnetic fields that are a million times stronger than the Earth's. These new magnets could revolutionize use in future accelerators, play a key role in energy efficiency and storage, and make possible new

18

Superconducting magnetic coil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A superconducting magnetic coil includes a plurality of sections positioned axially along the longitudinal axis of the coil, each section being formed of an anisotropic high temperature superconductor material wound about a longitudinal axis of the coil and having an associated critical current value that is dependent on the orientation of the magnetic field of the coil. The cross section of the superconductor, or the type of superconductor material, at sections along the axial and radial axes of the coil are changed to provide an increased critical current at those regions where the magnetic field is oriented more perpendicularly to the conductor plane, to thereby increase the critical current at these regions and to maintain an overall higher critical current of the coil. 15 figs.

Aized, D.; Schwall, R.E.

1999-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

19

High Temperature Superconductivity Partners | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

High Temperature Superconductivity Partners High Temperature Superconductivity Partners Map showing DOE's partnersstakeholders in the High Temperature Superconductivity Program...

20

Use of high-temperature superconductors in superconducting magnetic energy power sources  

SciTech Connect

The concept of mobile superconducting magnetic energy power sources (SMEPS) is introduced and scrutinized. Use of high-temperature superconductors (HTSs) in mobile SMEPS is discussed. Coil scaling and structural-force calculations for small solenoidal and toroidal coil systems are presented, and the efficiency of system refrigeration as a function of mechanical support, insulation, and power lead thermal losses is estimated. Required HTS properties, derived from considerations developed in this paper, are compared to properties of presently available materials or those expected to evolve in the near term. Analysis verifies the possibility of using SMEPS for military and nonmilitary mobile energy storage and power backup. The results show that the evolution of SMEPS will be stimulated by the development of higher-strength, tougher HTS that can operate at current densities greater than 10{sup 4} A/cm{sup 2} in magnetic fields of 4 to 6 T and temperatures of 77 K or higher. Earliest prototype SMEPS may employ coils cooled by liquid helium with HTS power leads or 20--30 K cryorefrigerated HTS materials that are engineered to withstand coil stresses during charge and discharge. 24 refs. 6 figs., 1 tab.

Palmer, D.N. (ABB/Combustion Engineering, Windsor, CT (USA)); Hull, J.R.; Kuzay, T.M. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Schoenung, S.M. (Schafer (W.J.) Associates, Inc., Pleasanton, CA (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature superconducting magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Superconducting Magnet Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 - 6/13/06 3 - 6/13/06 Superconducting Magnet Division S&T Committee Program Review June 22-23, 2006 Conference Room A, Bldg. 725, BNL DRAFT AGENDA Thursday, June 22 0830 Executive Session to address the charge S. Aronson (25 min) 0855 Welcome S. Aronson (5 min) 0900 Superconducting Magnet Division Status & M. Harrison (45 + 15 min) Issues - mission statement, core competencies, themes, program, problems, etc. 1000 Themes - Nb3Sn, HTS, Direct wind, Accelerator integration, P. Wanderer (20 + 10 min) rapid cycling Core Competencies 1030 Superconducting Materials A. Ghosh (20 + 5 min) 1055 Break 1110 Magnetic Design R. Gupta (20 + 5 min) 1135 Magnet Construction M. Anerella (20 + 5 min) 1200 Magnet Testing G. Ganetis (20 + 5 min)

22

Superconducting magnet of Aurora  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The AURORAsuperconducting magnet system is composed of a cylindrical single?body magnet and a refrigeration system for superconducting coils. The magnet generates B z =1 T on the central orbit at the 150 MeV electron beam injection energy and B z =4.3 T at the 650 MeV storage energy. The diameter of the central orbit is 1 m. Iron poles and yokes are used for shielding the magnetic field

T. Takayama; SHI Accelerator Research Group

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

HTS Magnet Program | Superconducting Magnet Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HTS Magnet Program HTS Magnet Program High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) have the potential to revolutionize the field of superconducting magnets for particle accelerators, energy storage and medical applications. This is because of the fact that as compared to the conventional Low Temperature Superconductors (LTS), the critical current density (Jc ) of HTS falls slowly both: as a function of increasing field, and as a function of increasing temperature These unique properties can be utilized to design and build: HTS magnets that produce very high fields (20 - 50 T) HTS magnets that operate at elevated temperatures (20 - 77 K) This is a significant step forward over the convention LTS magnets which generally operate at a temperature of ~4 K and with field usually limited

24

AFRD - Superconducting Magnets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Superconducting Magnets Superconducting Magnets Home Organization Diversity Safety Links Gallery/History Updated July 2008 Ever-stronger magnets (which must be cost-effective as well) are a key to building tomorrow's high-energy accelerators and upgrading today's. Our role— not only a leading R&D group but also the administrators of the multi-institutional National Conductor Development Program— to create both evolutionary improvements and paradigm shifts in the application of accelerator magnets, providing innovative technology that enables new science. Improvements in conductor, innovative structures to solve the challenges of high fields and brittle superconductors, and integration of computerized design and analysis tools are key. The performance requirements of modern accelerators continue to press the

25

High temperature interfacial superconductivity  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High-temperature superconductivity confined to nanometer-scale interfaces has been a long standing goal because of potential applications in electronic devices. The spontaneous formation of a superconducting interface in bilayers consisting of an insulator (La.sub.2CuO.sub.4) and a metal (La.sub.1-xSr.sub.xCuO.sub.4), neither of which is superconducting per se, is described. Depending upon the layering sequence of the bilayers, T.sub.c may be either .about.15 K or .about.30 K. This highly robust phenomenon is confined to within 2-3 nm around the interface. After exposing the bilayer to ozone, T.sub.c exceeds 50 K and this enhanced superconductivity is also shown to originate from a 1 to 2 unit cell thick interfacial layer. The results demonstrate that engineering artificial heterostructures provides a novel, unconventional way to fabricate stable, quasi two-dimensional high T.sub.c phases and to significantly enhance superconducting properties in other superconductors. The superconducting interface may be implemented, for example, in SIS tunnel junctions or a SuFET.

Bozovic, Ivan (Mount Sinai, NY); Logvenov, Gennady (Port Jefferson Station, NY); Gozar, Adrian Mihai (Port Jefferson, NY)

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

26

Improved superconducting magnet wire  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is directed to a superconducting tape or wire composed of alternating layers of copper and a niobium-containing superconductor such as niobium of NbTi, Nb/sub 3/Sn or Nb/sub 3/Ge. In general, each layer of the niobium-containing superconductor has a thickness in the range of about 0.05 to 1.5 times its coherence length (which for Nb/sub 3/Si is 41 A) with each copper layer having a thickness in the range of about 170 to 600 A. With the use of very thin layers of the niobium composition having a thickness within the desired range, the critical field (H/sub c/) may be increased by factors of 2 to 4. Also, the thin layers of the superconductor permit the resulting tape or wire to exhibit suitable ductility for winding on a magnet core. These compositions are also characterized by relatively high values of critical temperature and therefore will exhibit a combination of useful properties as superconductors.

Schuller, I.K.; Ketterson, J.B.

1983-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

27

Superconducting combined function magnets  

SciTech Connect

Superconducting accelerators and storage rings, presently under construction or in the design phase, are based on separate dipole and quadrupole magnets. It is here suggested that a hybrid lattice configuration consisting of dipoles and combined function gradient magnets would: (1) reduce the number of magnet units and their total cost; and (2) increase the filling factor and thus the energy at a given field. Coil cross sections are presented for the example of the Brookhaven Colliding Beam Accelerator. An asymmetric two-layer cable gradient magnet would have transfer functions of 10.42 G/A and 0.628 G cm/sup -1//A versus 15.77 G/A and 2.03 G cm/sup -1//A of the present separate dipoles and quadrupoles.

Hahn, H.; Fernow, R.C.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Possibility of color magnetic superconductivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two aspects of quark matter at high density are addressed: one is color superconductivity and the other is ferromagnetism. We are mainly concerned with the latter and its relation to color superconductivity, which we call "color magnetic superconductivity". The relation of ferromagnetism and chiral symmetry restoration is also discussed.

Toshitaka Tatsumi; Tomoyuki Maruyama; Eiji Nakano

2003-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

29

Superconductivity Program Overview High-Temperature Superconductivity  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SuperconducTiviTy program haS Three FocuS areaS: SuperconducTiviTy program haS Three FocuS areaS: SuperconducTiviTy applicaTionS Developing HTS-based electric power equipment such as transmission and distribution cables and fault current limiters Second-generaTion Wire developmenT Developing high-performance, low-cost, second- generation HTS wire at long lengths STraTegic reSearch Supporting fundamental research activities to better understand relationships between the microstructure of HTS materials and their ability to carry large electric currents over long lengths Superconductivity Program Overview High-Temperature Superconductivity for Electric Systems Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability www.oe.energy.gov Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, OE-1 U.S. Department of Energy - 1000 Independence Avenue, SW - Washington, DC 20585

30

Superconducting magnetic energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Long-time varying-daily, weekly, and seasonal-power demands require the electric utility industry to have installed generating capacity in excess of the average load. Energy storage can reduce the requirement for less efficient excess generating capacity used to meet peak load demands. Short-time fluctuations in electric power can occur as negatively damped oscillations in complex power systems with generators connected by long transmission lines. Superconducting inductors with their associated converter systems are under development for both load leveling and transmission line stabilization in electric utility systems. Superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) is based upon the phenomenon of the nearly lossless behavior of superconductors. Application is, in principal, efficient since the electromagnetic energy can be transferred to and from the storage coils without any intermediate conversion to other energy forms. Results from a reference design for a 10-GWh SMES unit for load leveling are presented. The conceptual engineering design of a 30-MJ, 10-MW energy storage coil is discussed with regard to system stabilization, and tests of a small scale, 100-KJ SMES system are presented. Some results of experiments are provided from a related technology based program which uses superconducting inductive energy storage to drive fusion plasmas.

Rogers, J.D.; Boenig, H.J.; Hassenzahl, W.V.; Schermer, R.I.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Freely oriented portable superconducting magnet  

SciTech Connect

A freely oriented portable superconducting magnet is disclosed. Coolant is supplied to the superconducting magnet from a repository separate from the magnet, enabling portability of the magnet. A plurality of support assemblies structurally anchor and thermally isolate the magnet within a thermal shield. A plurality of support assemblies structurally anchor and thermally isolate the thermal shield within a vacuum vessel. The support assemblies restrain movement of the magnet resulting from energizing and cooldown, as well as from changes in orientation, enabling the magnet to be freely orientable.

Schmierer, Eric N. (Los Alamos, NM); Prenger, F. Coyne (Los Alamos, NM); Hill, Dallas D. (Los Alamos, NM)

2010-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

32

Helical Magnets Project | Superconducting Magnet Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RHIC, the basic construction unit is a superconducting dipole magnet producing a four tesla dipole field that rotates through 360 degrees in a length of 2.4 meters. The magnets...

33

High Field Magnet R&D |Superconducting Magnet Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Field Magnet R&D High Field Magnet R&D The Superconducting Magnet Division is developing advanced magnet designs and magnet-related technologies for high field accelerator magnets. We are currently working on magnets for three inter-related programs: High Field Magnets for Muon Collider Papers, Presentations Common Coil Magnets Papers, Presentations Interaction Region Magnets Papers, Presentations High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) Magnets Papers, Presentations This is part of a multi-lab superconducting magnet development program for new accelerator facilities that would be part of the U.S. High Energy Physics program. These programs (@BNL, @FNAL, @LBNL) are quite complimentary to each other, so that magnet designs and technologies developed at one laboratory can be easily transferred to another. The BNL

34

Brett Parker | Superconducting Magnet Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brett Parker Brett Parker Recent Presentations "BNL Direct Wind Magnets," (pdf) presentation dedicated to the memory of Pat Thompson given at the 22nd Magnet Technology Conference (MT22), September 11 - 16, 2011, Marseille, France A Review of BNL Direct-Wind Superconducting IR Magnet Experience, (pdf) presented at the 30th Advanced ICFA Beam Dynamics Workshop on High Luminosity e+e- Collisions, October 13 - 16, 2003, Stanford, California The Serpentine Coil Design for BEPC-II Superconducting IR Magnets, (pdf) presented at the "Mini-Workshop on BEPC-II IR Design", January 12 - 16, 2004, Beijing, P.R. China Ma nufacture of a Superconducting Octupole Magnet for the ALPHA Experiment at CERN using the Direct Wind Machine Presentations Prior to 2004 Superconducting Final Focus Magnet Issues (pdf), presented at

35

Superconducting magnetic energy storage  

SciTech Connect

Recent programmatic developments in Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) have prompted renewed and widespread interest in this field. In mid 1987 the Defense Nuclear Agency, acting for the Strategic Defense Initiative Office, issued a request for proposals for the design and construction of SMES Engineering Test Model (ETM). Two teams, one led by Bechtel and the other by Ebasco, are now engaged in the first phase of the development of a 10 to 20 MWhr ETM. This report presents the rationale for energy storage on utility systems, describes the general technology of SMES, and explains the chronological development of the technology. The present ETM program is outlined; details of the two projects for ETM development are described in other papers in these proceedings. The impact of high T/sub c/ materials on SMES is discussed. 69 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

Hassenzahl, W.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

QUENCHES IN LARGE SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

stored energy (J); jo is the superconducting matrix currentstored energy Eo(J) XBL 777-1557 Superconductor matrixmatrix current density as a function of sto~ed magnetic energy

Eberhard, P.H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

High-Temperature Superconductivity Cable Demonstration Projects...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

High-Temperature Superconductivity Cable Demonstration Projects High-Temperature Superconductivity Cable Demonstration Projects A National Effort to Introduce New Technology into...

38

Superconducting magnetic energy storage  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. electric utility industry transmits power to customers at a rate equivalent to only 60% of generating capacity because, on an annual basis, the demand for power is not constant. Load leveling and peak shaving units of various types are being used to increase the utilization of the base load nuclear and fossil power plants. The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) is developing superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) systems which will store and deliver electrical energy for the purpose of load leveling, peak shaving, and the stabilization of electric utility networks. This technology may prove to be an effective means of storing energy for the electric utilities because (1) it has a high efficiency (approximately 90%), (2) it may improve system stability through the fast response of the converter, and (3) there should be fewer siting restrictions than for other load leveling systems. A general SMES system and a reference design for a 10-GWh unit for load leveling are described; and the results of some recent converter tests are presented.

Hassenzahl, W.V.; Boenig, H.J.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Spontaneous brillouin scattering quench diagnostics for large superconducting magnets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Large superconducting magnets used in fusion reactors, as well as other applications, need a diagnostic that can non-invasively measure the temperature and strain throughout the magnet in real-time. A new fiber optic sensor ...

Mahar, Scott B

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

A permanent-magnet rotor for a high-temperature superconducting bearing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Design, fabrication, and performance, of a 1/3-m dia., 10-kg flywheel rotor with only one bearing is discussed. To achieve low-loss energy storage, the rotor`s segmented-ring permanent-magnet (PM) is optimized for levitation and circumferential homogeneity. The magnet`s carbon composite bands enable practical energy storage.

Mulcahy, T.M.; Hull, J.R.; Uherka, K.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Abboud, R.G. [Commonwealth Research Corp., Chicago, IL (United States); Wise, J.H.; Carnegie, D.W. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Engineering Science

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature superconducting magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Hermetically sealed superconducting magnet motor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hermetically sealed superconducting magnet motor includes a rotor separated from a stator by either a radial gap, an axial gap, or a combined axial and radial gap. Dual conically shaped stators are used in one embodiment to levitate a disc-shaped rotor made of superconducting material within a conduit for moving cryogenic fluid. As the rotor is caused to rotate when the field stator is energized, the fluid is pumped through the conduit. 6 figs.

DeVault, R.C.; McConnell, B.W.; Phillips, B.A.

1996-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

42

Hermetically sealed superconducting magnet motor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hermetically sealed superconducting magnet motor includes a rotor separated from a stator by either a radial gap, an axial gap, or a combined axial and radial gap. Dual conically shaped stators are used in one embodiment to levitate a disc-shaped rotor made of superconducting material within a conduit for moving cryogenic fluid. As the rotor is caused to rotate when the field stator is energized, the fluid is pumped through the conduit.

DeVault, Robert C. (Knoxville, TN); McConnell, Benjamin W. (Knoxville, TN); Phillips, Benjamin A. (Benton Harbor, MI)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

RHIC Project | Superconducting Magnet Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RHIC Project RHIC Project The Superconducting Magnet Division supplied 1740 magnetic elements, in 888 cryostats, for the RHIC facility at BNL. Of these, 780 magnetic elements were manufactured by Northrop-Grumman (Bethpage, NY) and 360 were made by Everson Electric (Bethlehem, PA). The magnets made in industry used designs developed at BNL. The first cooldown of the magnets for the RHIC engineering run was in 1999. Since then, the magnets have operated very reliably. arc dipole coil and yoke Arc dipole coil and yoke, with magnetic flux lines The magnets provide modest field (3.45 Teslas in the arc dipoles) in a cost-effective design. Key features in the principal bending and focusing magnets include the use of NbTi Rutherford cable, a single-layer coil, and cold iron as both yoke and collar. The magnets operate in forced-flow

44

High-Temperature Superconducting Magnets for NMR and MRI: R&D Activities at the MIT Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the NMR/MRI magnets that are currently being developed at the MIT Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory: 1) a 1.3 GHz NMR magnet; 2) a compact NMR magnet assembled from YBCO annuli; and 3) a persistent-mode, ...

Iwasa, Yukikazu

45

Damping in high-temperature superconducting levitation systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methods and apparatuses for improved damping in high-temperature superconducting levitation systems are disclosed. A superconducting element (e.g., a stator) generating a magnetic field and a magnet (e.g. a rotor) supported by the magnetic field are provided such that the superconducting element is supported relative to a ground state with damped motion substantially perpendicular to the support of the magnetic field on the magnet. Applying this, a cryostat housing the superconducting bearing may be coupled to the ground state with high damping but low radial stiffness, such that its resonant frequency is less than that of the superconducting bearing. The damping of the cryostat may be substantially transferred to the levitated magnetic rotor, thus, providing damping without affecting the rotational loss, as can be derived applying coupled harmonic oscillator theory in rotor dynamics. Thus, damping can be provided to a levitated object, without substantially affecting the rotational loss.

Hull, John R. (Sammamish, WA)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

46

Superconducting magnet wire  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A superconducting tape or wire with an improved critical field is formed of alternating layers of a niobium-containing superconductor such as Nb, NbTi, Nb.sub.3 Sn or Nb.sub.3 Ge with a thickness in the range of about 0.5-1.5 times its coherence length, supported and separated by layers of copper with each copper layer having a thickness in the range of about 170-600 .ANG..

Schuller, Ivan K. (Woodridge, IL); Ketterson, John B. (Evanston, IL); Banerjee, Indrajit (San Jose, CA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

High Temperature Superconducting Magnets for Efficient Low Energy Beam Transport Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modern ion accelerators and ion implantation systems need very short, highly versatile, Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) systems. The need for reliable and continuous operation requires LEBT designs to be simple and robust. The energy efficiency of available high temperature superconductors (HTS), with efficient and simple cryocooler refrigeration, is an additional attraction. Innovative, compact LEBT systems based on solenoids designed and built with high-temperature superconductor will be developed using computer models and prototyped. The parameters will be chosen to make this type of LEBT useful in a variety of ion accelerators, ion implantation systems, cancer therapy synchrotrons, and research accelerators, including the ORNL SNS. The benefits of solenoids made with HTS will be evaluated with analytical and numerical calculations for a two-solenoid configuration, as will be used in the SNS prototype LEBT that will replace the electrostatic one at SNS, and a single solenoid configuration, as was proposed...

Popovic, M; Johnson, R P; Nipper, J H

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Superconducting magnet cooling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device is provided for cooling a conductor to the superconducting state. The conductor is positioned within an inner conduit through which is flowing a supercooled liquid coolant in physical contact with the conductor. The inner conduit is positioned within an outer conduit so that an annular open space is formed therebetween. Through the annular space is flowing coolant in the boiling liquid state. Heat generated by the conductor is transferred by convection within the supercooled liquid coolant to the inner wall of the inner conduit and then is removed by the boiling liquid coolant, making the heat removal from the conductor relatively independent of conductor length.

Vander Arend, Peter C. (Center Valley, PA); Fowler, William B. (St. Charles, IL)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Recent Developments in High Temperature Superconductivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New material systems and the experimental progress of high temperature superconductivity are briefly reviewed. We examine both oxides and non-oxides which exhibit stable and/or unstable superconductivity at high temperatures.

Hor, P. H.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Testing and Final Construction of the Superconducting Magnet for the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) is a particle physics experiment based on the International Space Station (ISS). At the heart of the detector is a large superconducting magnet, cooled to a temperature of 1.8 K by ...

Harrison, Stephen

51

Compact High-Temperature Superconducting Cable Wins ' ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Compact High-Temperature Superconducting Cable Wins 'R&D 100' Award. From NIST Tech Beat: June 22, 2011. ...

2011-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

52

SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNET DIVISION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MAGNET DIVISION CY 2013 Tier 1 Inspection Schedule Frequency Building Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 S 902B (Offices) 11713 62013 S 902A (Offices) 11713 62013 Q 902-High Bay Shop 22113 5...

53

High Temperature Superconductivity in Cuprates: a model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A model is proposed such that quasi-particles (electrons or holes) residing in the CuO2 planes of cuprates may interact leading to metallic or superconducting behaviors. The metallic phase is obtained when the quasi-particles are treated as having classical kinetic energies and the superconducting phase occurs when the quasi-particles are taken as extremely relativistic objects. The interaction between both kinds of particles is provided by a force dependent-on-velocity. In the case of the superconducting behavior, the motion of apical oxygen ions provides the glue to establish the Cooper pair. The model furnishes explicit relations for the Fermi velocity, the perpendicular and the in-plane coherence lengths, the zero-temperature energy gap, the critical current density, the critical parallel and perpendicular magnetic fields. All these mentioned quantities are expressed in terms of fundamental physical constants as: charge and mass of the electron, light velocity in vacuum, Planck constant, electric permittivity of the vacuum. Numerical evaluation of these quantities show that their values are close those found for the superconducting YBaCuO, leading to think the model as being a possible scenario to explain superconductivity in cuprates.

P. R. Silva

2010-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

54

Development of a cryogenic induction motor for use with a superconducting magnetic bearing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development of a cryogenic induction motor for use with a superconducting magnetic bearing Tomotake of a superconducting magnetic bearing (SMB). Both the motor and the SMB are operated at liquid He temperatures. We give Keywords: Astrophysical polarimeter; Induction motor; Superconducting magnetic bearings 1. Introduction

Oxley, Paul

55

Interplay of superconductivity, magnetism, and density waves in rare-earth tritellurides and iron-based superconducting materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

B. Superconductivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .IV Superconductivity and Magnetism in Iron-PnictideSearch for Pressure Induced Superconductivity in Undoped Ce-

Zocco, Diego Andrés

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

High-temperature superconducting current leads  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Use of high-temperature superconductors (HTSs) for current leads to deliver power to devices at liquid helium temperature can reduce refrigeration requirements to values significantly below those achievable with conventional leads. HTS leads are now near commercial realization. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has developed a sinter-forge process to fabricate current leads from bismuth-based superconductors. The current-carrying capacity of these leads is five times better than that of HTS leads made by a conventional fabrication process. ANL along with Superconductivity, Inc., has developed a 1500 ampere current lead for an existing superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) device. With Babcock & Wilcox Company, Argonne is creating 16-kiloampere leads for use in a 0.5 MWh SMES. In a third project Argonne performed characterization testing of a existing, proprietary conduction-cooled lead being developed by Zer Res Corp.

Niemann, R.C.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

LHC Magnet Program | Superconducting Magnet Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Magnet Program Magnet Program The Superconducting Magnet Division is building a number of dipole magnets for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which is now under construction at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland. Scheduled to begin operation in 2007, this machine will collide beams of protons with the unprecedented energy of 7 TeV per beam to explore the nature of matter at its most basic level (RHIC can collide beams of protons with energies of 0.25 TeV, but is mostly used to collide heavy ions with energies of 0.1 TeV per nucleon). The magnets are being built as part of the US program, recommended by the High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP) and approved by Congress, to contribute to the construction and, later, use of that frontier machine by the US high energy physics community. Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) and

58

RECENT ADVANCES IN THE TECHNOLOGY OF SUPERCONDUCTING ACCELERATOR MAGNETS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accelerator Magnets,· Brookhaven National Laboratory,in Superconducting Magnets,- Brookhaven National Laboratory,Accelerator Magnet Wire," Brookhaven National Laboratory,

Taylor, C.E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Superconducting magnetic energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fusion power production requires energy storage and transfer on short time scales to create confining magnetic fields and for heating plasmas. The theta-pinch Scyllac Fusion Test Reactor (SFTR) requires 480 MJ of energy to drive the 5-T compression field with a 0.7-ms rise time. Tokamak Experimental Power Reactors (EPR) require 1 to 2 GJ of energy with a 1 to 2-s rise time for plasma ohmic heating. The design, development, and testing of four 300-kJ energy storage coils to satisfy the SFTR needs are described. Potential rotating machinery and homopolar energy systems for both the Reference Theta-Pinch Reactor (RTPR) and tokamak ohmic-heating are presented.

Rogers, J.D.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

J-PARC Correctors | Superconducting Magnet Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Magnet Construction Magnet Construction The final turn of the J-PARC extracted proton beam is a superconducting combined function magnet line. The combined function magnets are dipole cable magnets, typical of cold mass collared magnets, but have been designed to include a large component of quadrupole field. This provides both bending and focussing of the proton beam prior to target impact, where neutrinos will be produced. The BNL Superconducting Magnet Division is using its direct wind facility to produce superconducting corrector magnets to be used in conjunction with the combined function magnets. combined function magnet The first direct wind magnet set designed and fabricated is a combined function magnet with an additional skew dipole. This magnet is intended to be used within the cable collared combined function dipole used for the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature superconducting magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Magnetism and superconductivity observed to exist in harmony  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Magnetism and superconductivity exist in harmony Magnetism and superconductivity observed to exist in harmony Physicists have observed, for the first time in a single exotic phase,...

62

MAGNETIC DESIGN OF A SUPERCONDUCTING AGS SNAKE*  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a partial helical snake for polarized proton acceleration in the AGS. It will be a 3 Tesla superconducting magnet having a magnetic length of 1.9 meter. AGS needs only one...

63

Superconducting Magnet Division | Brookhaven National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Superconducting Magnet Division Superconducting Magnet Division Home Production & Testing LHC Dipole Acceptance APUL Schedule (pdf) Projects Main Projects HTS Magnet Program High Field Magnet R&D Linear Collider Final Focus e Lens Solenoid Correctors for J-PARC Correctors for SuperKEKB IR Magnets LARP APUL Past Projects BEPC-II IR Quadrupoles Bio-Med Variable Field MRI GSI Rapid Cycling Magnets Helical Magnets HERA upgrade LHC IR Dipoles RHIC Publications Search Publications Selected Cryogenic Data Notebook Proceedings of the 1968 Summer Study on Superconducting Devices and Accelerators Meetings & Workshops Safety Environmental, Safety & Health ES&H Documents Lockout-Tagout Personnel Staff Pages Ramesh Gupta Brett Parker Peter Wanderer Pe ter Wanderer, head of Brookhaven's Superconducting Magnet Division,

64

Safety and reliability in superconducting MHD magnets  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This compilation adapts studies on safety and reliability in fusion magnets to similar problems in superconducting MHD magnets. MHD base load magnet requirements have been identified from recent Francis Bitter National Laboratory reports and that of other contracts. Information relevant to this subject in recent base load magnet design reports for AVCO - Everett Research Laboratories and Magnetic Corporation of America is included together with some viewpoints from a BNL workshop on structural analysis needed for superconducting coils in magnetic fusion energy. A summary of design codes used in large bubble chamber magnet design is also included.

Laverick, C.; Powell, J.; Hsieh, S.; Reich, M.; Botts, T.; Prodell, A.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

High Temperature Interfacial Superconductivity - Energy Innovation ...  

Cuprate superconductors exhibit relatively high transition temperatures, but their unit cells are complex and large. Localizing a superconducting layer to a small ...

66

SCMS-1, Superconducting Magnet System for an MHD generator  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The research and development effort connected with the building of the superconducting magnet systems for MHD generators at the Institute for High Temperatures of the U.S.S.R. Academy of Sciences included the designing, fabrication and testing of the superconducting magnet system for an MHD generator (SCMS-1), producing a magnetic field up to 4 Tesla in a warm bore tube 300 mm in diameter and 1000 mm long (the nonuniformity of the magnetic field in the warm bore did not exceed +-5%. The superconducting magnet system is described. The design selected consisted of a dipole, saddle-form coil, wound around a tube. The cooling of the coils is of the external type with helium access to each layer of the winding. For winding of the superconducting magnet system a 49-strand cable was used consisting of 42 composition conductors, having a diameter of 0.3 mm each, containing six superconducting strands with a niobium-titanium alloy base (the superconducting strands were 70 microns in diameter), and seven copper conductors of the same diameter as the composite conductors. The cable is made monolithic with high purity indium and insulated with lavsan fiber. The cable diameter with insulation is 3.5 mm. (WHK)

Zenkevich, V.B.; Kirenin, I.A.; Tovma, V.A.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Reassessment of Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) Transmission System Benefits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report reassesses the benefits of superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) for enhancing transmission system performance.

2002-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

68

High Temperature Superconducting Underground Cable  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Project was to design, build, install and demonstrate the technical feasibility of an underground high temperature superconducting (HTS) power cable installed between two utility substations. In the first phase two HTS cables, 320 m and 30 m in length, were constructed using 1st generation BSCCO wire. The two 34.5 kV, 800 Arms, 48 MVA sections were connected together using a superconducting joint in an underground vault. In the second phase the 30 m BSCCO cable was replaced by one constructed with 2nd generation YBCO wire. 2nd generation wire is needed for commercialization because of inherent cost and performance benefits. Primary objectives of the Project were to build and operate an HTS cable system which demonstrates significant progress towards commercial progress and addresses real world utility concerns such as installation, maintenance, reliability and compatibility with the existing grid. Four key technical areas addressed were the HTS cable and terminations (where the cable connects to the grid), cryogenic refrigeration system, underground cable-to-cable joint (needed for replacement of cable sections) and cost-effective 2nd generation HTS wire. This was the world’s first installation and operation of an HTS cable underground, between two utility substations as well as the first to demonstrate a cable-to-cable joint, remote monitoring system and 2nd generation HTS.

Farrell, Roger, A.

2010-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

69

Superconducting magnetic shielding apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a method and apparatus for providing magnetic shielding around a working volume. The apparatus includes a hollow elongated superconducting shell or cylinder having an elongated low magnetic pinning central portion, and two high magnetic pinning end regions. Transition portions of varying magnetic pinning properties are interposed between the central and end portions. The apparatus further includes a solenoid substantially coextensive with and overlying the superconducting cylinder, so as to be magnetically coupled therewith. The method includes the steps passing a longitudinally directed current through the superconducting cylinder so as to depin magnetic reservoirs trapped in the cylinder. Next, a circumferentially directed current is passed through the cylinder, while a longitudinally directed current is maintained. Depinned magnetic reservoirs are moved to the end portions of the cylinder, where they are trapped.

Clem, J.R.

1982-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

70

Superconducting magnetic shielding apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are a method and apparatus for providing magnetic shielding around a working volume. The apparatus includes a hollow elongated superconducting shell or cylinder having an elongated low magnetic pinning central portion, and two high magnetic pinning end regions. Transition portions of varying magnetic pinning properties are interposed between the central and end portions. The apparatus further includes a solenoid substantially coextensive with and overlying the superconducting cylinder, so as to be magnetically coupled therewith. The method includes the steps passing a longitudinally directed current through the superconducting cylinder so as to depin magnetic reservoirs trapped in the cylinder. Next, a circumferentially directed current is passed through the cylinder, while a longitudinally directed current is maintained. Depinned magnetic reservoirs are moved to the end portions of the cylinder, where they are trapped. 5 figs.

Clem, J.R.; Clem, J.R.

1983-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

71

Superconducting magnetic shielding apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a method and apparatus for providing magnetic shielding around a working volume. The apparatus includes a hollow elongated superconducting shell or cylinder having an elongated low magnetic pinning central portion, and two high magnetic pinning end regions. Transition portions of varying magnetic pinning properties are interposed between the central and end portions. The apparatus further includes a solenoid substantially coextensive with and overlying the superconducting cylinder, so as to be magnetically coupled therewith. The method includes the steps passing a longitudinally directed current through the superconducting cylinder so as to depin magnetic reservoirs trapped in the cylinder. Next, a circumferentially directed current is passed through the cylinder, while a longitudinally directed current is maintained. Depinned magnetic reservoirs are moved to the end portions of the cylinder, where they are trapped.

Clem, John R. (Ames, IA); Clem, John R. (Ames, IA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Publications | Ramesh Gupta | Superconducting Magnet Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Symposium on Superconductivity (ISS2012) in Tokyo, Japan, December 3-5, 2012. HTS Magnet R&D at BNL (pdf), LTHFSW2012 at Napa, CA, November 5-7, 2012 High Field Solenoid Program...

73

Power Switches Utilizing Superconducting Material for Accelerator Magnets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power switches that utilize superconducting material find application in superconducting systems. They can be used for the protection of magnets as a replacement for warm DC breakers, as well as for the replacement of cold diodes. This paper presents a comparison of switches made of various superconducting materials having transport currents of up to 600 A and switching times of the order of milliseconds. The switches operate in the temperature range 4.2-77 K and utilize stainless steel clad YBCO tape and MgB2 tape with a nickel, copper, and iron matrix. Results from simulations and tests are reported.

March, S A; Yang, Y; 10.1109/TASC.2009.2017890

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

e Lens Solenoid | Superconducting Magnet Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electron Lens Solenoid Electron Lens Solenoid To increase the proton beam luminosity in RHIC, an electron lens (e-lens) magnet system with two superconducting solenoids is being built at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Initial Design of 200 mm, 6T Superconducting Solenoid for e-lens (pdf), R. Gupta, 3/30/10 Iterated Design of 200 mm, 6T Superconducting Solenoid for e-lens (pdf), R. Gupta, 4/6/10 Corrector Designs for Superconducting Solenoid for e-lens (pdf), R. Gupta, 4/14/10 eLens Layout (pdf), P. Kovach, 5/25/10 eLens Main Solenoid (pdf), A. Marone, 5/25/10 Optimization in Corrector Design for Superconducting Solenoid for e-Lens (pdf), R. Gupta, 6/15/10 Main Solenoid Axial Force Retention (pdf), A. Marone 8/24/10 Superconducting Solenoid for e-lens with Fringe Field Coil (pdf), R.

75

Brittle superconducting magnets: an equivilent strain model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To exceed fields of 10 T in accelerator magnets, brittle superconductors like A15 Nb{sub 3}Sn and Nb{sub 3}Al or ceramic High Temperature Superconductors have to be used. For such brittle superconductors it is not their maximum tensile yield stress that limits their structural resistance as much as strain values that provoke deformations in their delicate lattice, which in turn affect their superconducting properties. Work on the sensitivity of Nb{sub 3}Sn cables to strain has been conducted in a number of stress states, including uniaxial and multi-axial, producing usually different results. This has made the need of a constituent design criterion imperative for magnet builders. In conventional structural problems an equivalent stress model is typically used to verify mechanical soundness. In the superconducting community a simple scalar equivalent strain to be used in place of an equivalent stress would be an extremely useful tool. As is well known in fundamental mechanics, there is not one single way to reduce a multiaxial strain state as represented by a 2nd order tensor to a scalar. The conceptual experiment proposed here will help determine the best scalar representation to use in the identification of an equivalent strain model.

Barzi, E.; /Fermilab; Danuso, M.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Road to room-temperature superconductivity: A universal model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a semiclassical view superconductivity is attributed exclusively to the advance of atoms' outer s electrons through the nuclei of neighbor atoms in a solid. The necessary progression of holes in the opposite direction has the electric and magnetic effect as if two electrons were advancing instead of each actual one. Superconductivity ceases when the associated lateral oscillation of the outer s electrons extends between neighbor atoms. If such overswing occurs already at T = 0, then the material is a normal conductor. Otherwise, lateral overswing can be caused by lattice vibrations at a critical temperature Tc or by a critical magnetic field Bc. Lateral electron oscillations are reduced - and Tc is increased - when the atoms of the outer s electrons are squeezed, be it in the bulk crystal, in a thin film, or under external pressure on the sample. The model is applied to alkali metals and alkali-doped fullerenes. Aluminum serves as an example of a simple metal with superconductivity. Application of the model to transition metals, intertransitional alloys and compounds of transition metals with other elements sheds light on the pattern of their critical temperature. More examples of the squeeze effect are provided by the superconductivity of PdH, MgB2, borocarbides, ferropnictides, and organic charge-transfer salts. The model also provides the superconduction mechanism in the oxide superconductors, exemplified by YBa2Cu3O7. Finally the model suggests which steps to take in order to reach superconductivity at room temperature and above.

Manfred Bucher

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

77

Convective heat transfer model for determining quench recovery of high temperature superconducting YBCO in liquid nitrogen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stability of a superconducting magnet is critical for reliable operation of a device in which the magnet plays a role. With the advent of high temperature superconductors (HTS), liquid nitrogen may be used to cool HTS ...

Jankowski, Joseph Edward, 1980-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

On Color Superconductivity in External Magnetic Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study color superconductivity in external magnetic field. We discuss the reason why the mixing angles in color-flavor locked (CFL) and two-flavor superconductivity (2SC) phases are different despite the fact that the CFL gap goes to the 2SC gap for $m_s \\to \\infty$. Although flavor symmetry is explicitly broken in external magnetic field, we show that all values of gaps in their coset spaces of possible solutions in the CFL phase are equivalent in external magnetic field.

E. V. Gorbar

2000-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

79

Superconducting FCL using a combined inducted magnetic field trigger and shunt coil  

SciTech Connect

A single trigger/shunt coil is utilized for combined induced magnetic field triggering and shunt impedance. The single coil connected in parallel with the high temperature superconducting element, is designed to generate a circulating current in the parallel circuit during normal operation to aid triggering the high temperature superconducting element to quench in the event of a fault. The circulating current is generated by an induced voltage in the coil, when the system current flows through the high temperature superconducting element.

Tekletsadik, Kasegn D. (Rexford, NY)

2007-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

80

Ferromagnetism and Superconductivity in Quark Matter - Color magnetic superconductivity -  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A coexistent phase of spin polarization and color superconductivity in high-density QCD is studied at zero temperature. The axial-vector self-energy stemming from the Fock exchange term of the one-gluon-exchange interaction has a central role to cause spin polarization. As a significant feature, the Fermi surface is deformed by the axial-vector self-energy and then rotation symmetry is spontaneously broken down. The gap function results in being anisotropic in the momentum space in accordance with the deformation. It is found that spin polarization barely conflicts with color superconductivity, and almost coexists with it.

Toshitaka Tatsumi; Tomoyuki Maruyama; Eiji Nakano

2003-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature superconducting magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

High temperature superconducting fault current limiter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fault current limiter for an electrical circuit is disclosed. The fault current limiter includes a high temperature superconductor in the electrical circuit. The high temperature superconductor is cooled below its critical temperature to maintain the superconducting electrical properties during operation as the fault current limiter. 15 figs.

Hull, J.R.

1997-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

82

GSI Rapid Cycling Magnets Project | Superconducting Magnet Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GSI Rapid Cycling Magnets Project GSI Rapid Cycling Magnets Project While superconducting magnets easily achieve higher magnetic fields at lower cost than conventional electromagnets, it is very difficult to ramp superconducting magnets very quickly. But exactly that is needed at the planned new facility of GSI, the Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung (Institute for Heavy Ion Research), in Darmstadt, Germany. In the magnets of the SIS 200 ring, one of the components of the new facility, the magnetic field must be ramped from 0.5 Tesla to 4 Tesla at a rate of 1 Tesla per second. This ramp rate is almost 25 times faster than the ramp rate of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) magnets at Brookhaven National Lab (BNL), which ramp at a rate of 0.042 Tesla per second. While the SIS 200 magnets also require a slightly higher field strength than the

83

Magnetism and superconductivity of heavy fermion matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The interplay of magnetism and unconventional superconductivity (d singlet wave or p triplet wave) in strongly correlated electronic system (SCES) is discussed with recent examples found in heavy fermion compounds. A short presentation is given on the formation of the heavy quasiparticle with the two sources of a local and intersite enhancement for the effective mass. Two cases of the coexistence or repulsion of antiferromagnetism and superconductivity are given with CeIn3 and CeCoIn5. A spectacular example is the emergence of superconductivity in relatively strong itinerant ferromagnets UGe2 and URhGe. The impact of heavy fermion matter among other SCES as organic conductor or high TC oxide is briefly pointed out. Key words: heavy fermion, superconductivity, antiferromagnetism, ferromagnetism

J. Flouquet A; G. Knebel A; D. Braithwaite A; D. Aoki B; J. P. Brison C; F. Hardy A; A. Huxley A; S. Raymond A; B. Salce A; I. Sheikin D

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Search Publications | Superconducting Magnet Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rapid Cycling Magnets Helical Magnets HERA upgrade LHC IR Dipoles RHIC Publications Search Publications Selected Cryogenic Data Notebook Proceedings of the 1968 Summer Study on...

85

Scaling of Superconducting Switches for Extraction of Magnetic Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In certain cases it is necessary to extract the energy from a superconducting magnet when it quenches, in order to limit the heat generated by the event and thus prevent irreversible damage. This is usually achieved by opening a contact breaker across a resistor in the circuit feeding the magnet. For the heavy currents used to excite large magnets such switches incorporate sophisticated devices to limit arcing during the operation; besides being quite large and expensive, such switches have a limited lifetime. It is therefore interesting to consider the use of superconducting switches to perform this function, the advantage being that such switches would (i) not require maintenance and (ii) would be housed within the cryogenic environment of the magnet, and thus avoid permanent diversion of the current in and out of that environment to the mechanical switch (which operates at room temperature). However, practical switches for such an application are made up of superconductor in a metal matrix, and it is conve...

Ballarino, A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Critical temperatures of superconducting solders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Different magnetic strengths in MRIs produce different reactions and provide more insight into what being imaged. Being able to more quickly switch between two or more different magnet strengths would allow scientists in ...

Pavão, Erica Medeiros

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Toroidal constant-tension superconducting magnetic energy storage units  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A superconducting magnetic energy storage unit is provided in which the magnet is wound in a toroidal fashion such that the magnetic field produced is contained only within the bore of the magnet, and thus producing a very low external field. The superconducting magnet includes a coolant channel disposed through the wire. The bore of the magnet comprises a storage volume in which cryogenic coolant is stored, and this volume supplies the coolant to be delivered to the coolant in the magnet.

Herring, J.S.

1990-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

88

Toroidal constant-tension superconducting magnetic energy storage units  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A superconducting magnetic energy storage unit is provided in which the magnet is wound in a toroidal fashion such that the magnetic field produced is contained only within the bore of the magnet, and thus producing a very low external field. The superconducting magnet includes a coolant channel disposed through the wire. The bore of the magnet comprises a storage volume in which cryogenic coolant is stored, and this volume supplies the coolant to be delivered to the coolant channel in the magnet.

Herring, J. Stephen (Idaho Falls, ID)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

HERA Upgrade Project | Superconducting Magnet Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HERA Upgrade Project HERA Upgrade Project As part of the HERA luminosity upgrade, 6 superconducting Interaction Region quadrupoles were delivered, accepted, and are in service. These 6 layer magnets were designed to include the main quadrupole focus, a skew quad, a normal and skew dipole, and a final sextupole layer. Because of the physical space constraints imposed by the existing detector region components, the DESY magnets were of necessity designed to be very compact. In addition, they are also are required to operate within the solenoidal detector fields at the collision points, so all construction materials had to be non magnetic. Two types of DESY magnets were fabricated. The first, designated as G0, was a two meter long, constant radius magnet. The second, designated GG, is a

90

Critical Magnetic Field Determination of Superconducting Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Superconducting RF technology is becoming more and more important. With some recent cavity test results showing close to or even higher than the critical magnetic field of 170-180 mT that had been considered a limit, it is very important to develop a way to correctly measure the critical magnetic field (H{sup RF}{sub c}) of superconductors in the RF regime. Using a 11.4 GHz, 50-MW, electric field at the sample surface. A model of the system is presented in this paper along with a discussion of preliminary experimental data.

Canabal, A.; Tajima, T.; /Los Alamos; Dolgashev, V.A.; Tantawi, S.G.; /SLAC; Yamamoto, T.; /Tsukuba, Natl. Res. Lab. Metrol.

2011-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

91

Feasible utility scale Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents the latest design features and estimated costs of a 5000 MWh/1000 MW Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) plant. SMES is proposed as a commercially viable technology for electric utility load leveling. The primary advantage of SMES over other electrical energy storage technologies is its high net roundtrip efficiency. Other features include rapid availability and low maintenance and operating costs. Economic comparisons are made with other energy storage options and with gas turbines. In a diurnal load leveling application, a superconducting coil can be charged from the utility grid during off-peak hours. The ac grid is connected to the dc magnetic coil through a power conversion system that includes an inverter/rectifier. Once charged, the superconducting coil conducts current, which supports an electromagnetic field, with virtually no losses. During hours of peak load, the stored energy is discharged to the grid by reversing the charging process. The principle of operation of a SMES unit is shown in Fig. 1. For operation in the superconducting mode, the coil is maintained at extremely low temperature by immersion in a bath of liquid helium.

Loyd, R.J.; Schoenung, S.M.; Nakamura, T.; Lieurance, D.W.; Hilal, M.A.; Rogers, J.D.; Purcell, J.R.; Hassenzahl, W.V.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Magnetism and Superconductivity in Ruthenates, Ruthenocuprates, and Other Layered Oxides.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??There exist several classes of materials that simultaneously exhibit superconductivity and anomalous magnetic order, where both effects are homogeneous throughout the material. No cohesive explanation… (more)

Smylie, Matthew Passmore

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Studies in Magnetism and Superconductivity under Extreme Pressure.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Abstract Studies of superconductivity, magnetism and structure under pressure have made important contributions to furthering our understanding of the physical properties of materials. High pressure… (more)

Bi, Wenli

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

High-Temperature Superconductivity Cable Demonstration Projects  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Temperature Temperature Superconductivity Cable Demonstration Projects Superconductivity Power Equipment www.oe.energy.gov Phone: 202-586-1411 Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, OE-1 U.S. Department of Energy - 1000 Independence Avenue, SW - Washington, DC 20585. Plugging America Into the Future of Power "A National Effort to Introduce New Technology into the Power Delivery Infrastructure" "In order to meet President Obama's ambitious energy goals, we must modernize the nation's electrical grid to improve the transmission, storage and reliability of clean energy across the country and help to move renewable energy from the places it can be produced to the places it can be used. The Department of Energy is working with industry partners to develop the

95

Novel Approach to Linear Accelerator Superconducting Magnet System  

SciTech Connect

Superconducting Linear Accelerators include a superconducting magnet system for particle beam transportation that provides the beam focusing and steering. This system consists of a large number of quadrupole magnets and dipole correctors mounted inside or between cryomodules with SCRF cavities. Each magnet has current leads and powered from its own power supply. The paper proposes a novel approach to magnet powering based on using superconducting persistent current switches. A group of magnets is powered from the same power supply through the common, for the group of cryomodules, electrical bus and pair of current leads. Superconducting switches direct the current to the chosen magnet and close the circuit providing the magnet operation in a persistent current mode. Two persistent current switches were fabricated and tested. In the paper also presented the results of magnetic field simulations, decay time constants analysis, and a way of improving quadrupole magnetic center stability. Such approach substantially reduces the magnet system cost and increases the reliability.

Kashikhin, Vladimir; /Fermilab

2011-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

96

VLHC Meeting | Superconducting Magnet Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Second Annual Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) Meeting Second Annual Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) Meeting October 16 - 18, 2000 The Second Annual Meeting of the Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) was be held on Monday, October 16 through Wednesday, October 18, 2000. It took place at Danfords in Port Jefferson, NY, about 30 minutes from Brookhaven National Laboratory. The meeting featured reports of the U.S. effort towards a post-LHC hadron collider. The program included an overview of physics in the 100 TeV c.m. regime, reports on superconductor and magnet R&D, as well as studies of accelerators and accelerator systems. The agenda also included a roundtable discussion of plans for future activities. Presentations VLHC Update (pdf), Mike Harrison, BNL Physics at Very High Energies (pdf), Sekhar Chivukula, Boston

97

Perfectly elastic collisions as origin of quantum states of superconductivity and magnetic order  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the most interesting properties of solid materials is the ability to form different collective quantum states, such as superconductivity and magnetic order. This paper presents a model of perfectly elastic collisions (p.e.c.) as the universal origin of these collective quantum states. The superb agreement between calculated values and experimental data for critical temperatures, moreover, the explanation of the isotope effect in superconductivity and magnetic order confirms that this model successfully describes these two quantum states.

Mushkolaj Shpend

2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

98

Transformer current sensor for superconducting magnetic coils  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A transformer current sensor having primary turns carrying a primary current for a superconducting coil and secondary turns only partially arranged within the primary turns. The secondary turns include an active winding disposed within the primary turns and a dummy winding which is not disposed in the primary turns and so does not experience a magnetic field due to a flow of current in the primary turns. The active and dummy windings are wound in opposite directions or connected in series-bucking relationship, and are exposed to the same ambient magnetic field. Voltages which might otherwise develop in the active and dummy windings due to ambient magnetic fields thus cancel out. The resultant voltage is purely indicative of the rate of change of current flowing in the primary turns.

Shen, Stewart S. (Oak Ridge, TN); Wilson, C. Thomas (Norris, TN)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Cooling system for superconducting magnet  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cooling system is configured to control the flow of a refrigerant by controlling the rate at which the refrigerant is heated, thereby providing an efficient and reliable approach to cooling a load (e.g., magnets, rotors). The cooling system includes a conduit circuit connected to the load and within which a refrigerant circulates; a heat exchanger, connected within the conduit circuit and disposed remotely from the load; a first and a second reservoir, each connected within the conduit, each holding at least a portion of the refrigerant; a heater configured to independently heat the first and second reservoirs. In a first mode, the heater heats the first reservoir, thereby causing the refrigerant to flow from the first reservoir through the load and heat exchanger, via the conduit circuit and into the second reservoir. In a second mode, the heater heats the second reservoir to cause the refrigerant to flow from the second reservoir through the load and heat exchanger via the conduit circuit and into the first reservoir. 3 figs.

Gamble, B.B.; Sidi-Yekhlef, A.

1998-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

100

Cooling system for superconducting magnet  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cooling system is configured to control the flow of a refrigerant by controlling the rate at which the refrigerant is heated, thereby providing an efficient and reliable approach to cooling a load (e.g., magnets, rotors). The cooling system includes a conduit circuit connected to the load and within which a refrigerant circulates; a heat exchanger, connected within the conduit circuit and disposed remotely from the load; a first and a second reservoir, each connected within the conduit, each holding at least a portion of the refrigerant; a heater configured to independently heat the first and second reservoirs. In a first mode, the heater heats the first reservoir, thereby causing the refrigerant to flow from the first reservoir through the load and heat exchanger, via the conduit circuit and into the second reservoir. In a second mode, the heater heats the second reservoir to cause the refrigerant to flow from the second reservoir through the load and heat exchanger via the conduit circuit and into the first reservoir.

Gamble, Bruce B. (Wellesley, MA); Sidi-Yekhlef, Ahmed (Framingham, MA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature superconducting magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Linear Collider Final Focus Magnet Construction | Superconducting Magnet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Linear Collider Final Focus Magnet Construction Linear Collider Final Focus Magnet Construction The final focus magnets for the International Linear Collider require very small quadrupoles be placed within the detector background field for both the entrance and exit beams. The use of superconducting magnets for this function provide solutions to several problems confronting the machine designers. One constraint is the operation within the 3 tesla detector field. The direct wind magnets are capable of operation without the use of magnetic materials in their construction, making them ideal for compact focussing solutions within detectors. The second constraint is the small physical size dictated by the crossing angle of the beams and proximity to the IR within the detector solenoid. The Direct Wind design does not require a collar to withstand Lorentz

102

Fermilab | Recovery Act | High-field superconducting magnets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

may allow scientists to create high-field superconducting magnets that could exceed 50 Tesla, or more than twice the strength of existing magnets. In the project's first phase,...

103

Superconducting magnetic energy storage for asynchronous electrical systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

It is an object of the present invention to provide superconducting magnetic energy storage for a plurality of asynchronous electrical systems. It is a further object of the present invention to provide load leveling and stability improvement in a plurality of independent ac systems using a single superconducting magnetic energy storage coil.

Boenig, H.J.

1984-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

104

Performance evaluation of high-temperature superconducting current leads for micro-SMES systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the US Department of Energy`s Superconductivity Technology Program, Argonne National Laboratory and Superconductivity, Inc., are developing high-temperature superconductor (HTS) current leads for application to micro-superconducting magnetic energy storage systems. Two 1500-A HTS leads have been designed and constructed. The performance of the current lead assemblies is being evaluated in a zero-magnetic-field test program that includes assembly procedures, tooling, and quality assurance; thermal and electrical performance; and flow and mechanical characteristics. Results of evaluations performed to data are presented.

Niemann, R.C.; Cha, Y.S.; Hull, J.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Buckles, W.E.; Weber, B.R. [Superconductivity, Inc., Middleton, WI (United States); Yang, S.T. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Interplay between Superconductivity and Magnetism in Fe1-xPdxTe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The love/hate relationship between superconductivity and magnetic ordering has fascinated the condensed matter physics community for a century. In the early days, magnetic impurities doped into a superconductor were found to quickly suppress superconductivity. Later, a variety of systems, such as cuprates, heavy fermions and Fe pnictides, show superconductivity in a narrow region near the border to antiferromagnetism (AFM) as a function of pressure or doping. On the other hand, the coexistence of superconductivity and ferromagnetic (FM) or AFM ordering is found in a few compounds (RRh4B4 (R = Nd, Sm, Tm, Er), R'Mo6X8 (R' = Tb, Dy, Er, Ho, and X = S, Se), UMGe (M = Ge, Rh, Co), CeCoIn5, EuFe2(As1-xPx)2 etc.), providing evidence for their compatibility. Here, we present a third situation, where superconductivity coexists with FM and near the border of AFM in Fe1-xPdxTe. The doping of Pd for Fe gradually suppresses the first-order AFM ordering at temperature TN/S, and turns into short-range (SR) AFM correlation with a characteristic peak in magnetic susceptibility at T'N. Superconductivity sets in when T'N reaches zero. However, there is a gigantic ferromagnetic dome imposed in the superconducting-AFM (SR) crossover regime. Such a system is ideal for studying the interplay between superconductivity and two types of magnetic interactions (FM and AFM).

Karki, A B [Louisiana State University; Garlea, Vasile O [ORNL; Custelcean, Radu [ORNL; Stadler, S. [Louisiana State University; Plummer, E. W. [Louisiana State University; Jin, Rongying [Louisiana State University

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

J-PARC Correctors | Superconducting Magnet Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

J-PARC Correctors J-PARC Correctors Physics Japan is constructing a 50 Gev, high intensity proton accelerator at a site near the Japanese high energy research laboratory, KEK. The project is called J-PARC (Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex). The site is at Tokai and is part of the Japanese Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). KEK and JAERI are jointly responsible for its construction. J-PARC will serve many uses. One of the uses will be to produce neutrinos that will be directed toward a detector located in Kamiokande, Japan. The neutrinos will be produced when protons are extracted from J-PARC and are directed by magnets in a beam line to strike a target. Further information about the neutrino experiment is available. KEK and the BNL Superconducting Magnet Division are working together to

107

Pseudogap and Superconducting Gap in High-Temperature Superconductors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pseudogap and Superconducting Gap in Pseudogap and Superconducting Gap in High-Temperature Superconductors Two decades after the discovery of first high temperature superconductors, the microscopic mechanism of high-Tc superconductivity remains elusive. In conventional superconductors, it has been well established that electrons form so-called "Cooper pairs" to give rise to superconductivity. The pair binding manifests itself as an energy gap in many spectroscopic measurements. This energy gap, known as superconducting gap, appears at the superconducting transition temperature Tc where the resistance also vanishes. For high temperature superconductors, the story is more complicated. Over a wide region of compositions and temperatures, there exists an energy gap well above Tc. This energy gap is called pseudogap [1], because there is no direct correlation to the superconducting transition. The origin of this pseudogap and its relation to the superconducting gap are believed to hold the key for understanding the mechanism of high-Tc superconductivity - one of the outstanding problems in condensed matter physics. In this regard, researchers Kiyohisa Tanaka and Wei-Sheng Lee, along with their co-workers in Prof. Zhi-Xun Shen's group at Stanford University, have recently made an important discovery about the coexistence of two distinct energy gaps that have opposite doping dependence. Their observation not only provides a natural explanation for the contradictory results about the superconducting gap deduced from different experimental techniques, but also has profound implications on the mechanism of high-Tc superconductivity.

108

Magnetic profiles in ferromagnetic/superconducting superlattices.  

SciTech Connect

The interplay between ferromagnetism and superconductivity has been of longstanding fundamental research interest to scientists, as the competition between these generally mutually exclusive types of long-range order gives rise to a rich variety of physical phenomena. A method of studying these exciting effects is by investigating artificially layered systems, i.e. alternating deposition of superconducting and ferromagnetic thin films on a substrate, which enables a straight-forward combination of the two types of long-range order and allows the study of how they compete at the interface over nanometer length scales. While originally studies focused on low temperature superconductors interchanged with metallic ferromagnets, in recent years the scope has broadened to include superlattices of high T{sub c} superconductors and colossal magnetoresistance oxides. Creating films where both the superconducting as well as the ferromagnetic layers are complex oxide materials with similar crystal structures (Figure 1), allows the creation of epitaxial superlattices, with potentially atomically flat and ordered interfaces.

te Velthuis, S. G. E.; Hoffmann, A.; Santamaria, J.; Materials Science Division; Univ. Complutense de Madrid

2007-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

109

Toroidal constant-tension superconducting magnetic energy storage units  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A superconducting magnetic energy storage unit is provided in which the magnet is wound in a toroidal fashion such that the magnetic field produced is contained only within the bore of the magnet, and thus producing a very low external field. The superconducting magnet includes a coolant channel disposed through the wire. The bore of the magnet comprises a storage volume in which cryogenic coolant is stored, and this volume supplies the coolant to be delivered to the coolant channel in the magnet. 6 figs.

Herring, J.S.

1992-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

110

BSA 08-04: High Temperature Interfacial Superconductivity  

Cuprate superconductors exhibit relatively high transition temperatures, but their unit cells are complex and large. Localizing a superconducting layer to a small ...

111

Design Considerations of Fast-cycling Synchrotrons Based on Superconducting Transmission Line Magnets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Design Considerations of Fast-cycling Synchrotrons Based on Superconducting Transmission Line Magnets

Piekarz, H; Huang, Y; Shiltsev, V

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

LOTO Authorized Personnel | Superconducting Magnet Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lockout/Tagout (LOTO) Personnel Lockout/Tagout (LOTO) Personnel Primary Authorized Employee Have the training and/or experience to exercise group and system-level judgments, and are authorized to lockout and tagout any equipment for which they have division's approval. If coordinated multiple lock and tags are applied by more than one employee, those of the "primary authorized employee" must be the first to be applied and the last to be removed. SMD - LOTO Primary Authorized Personnel Name Phone # Systems/Group Raymond Ceruti Ext. 7116 Mechanical Engineering Technical Support John Cintorino Ext. 2544 Magnet Test & Measurement Joseph D'Ambra Ext. 3764 Superconducting Materials R&D Sebastian Dimaiuta Ext. 5265 Electrical Systems Technical Support Glenn Jochen Ext. 7320 Mechanical Engineering Technical Support

113

Superconducting magnetic energy storage for asynchronous electrical systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A superconducting magnetic energy storage coil connected in parallel between converters of two or more ac power systems provides load leveling and stability improvement to any or all of the ac systems. Control is provided to direct the charging and independently the discharging of the superconducting coil to at least a selected one of the ac power systems.

Boenig, Heinrich J. (Los Alamos, NM)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Method of constructing a superconducting magnet  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A superconducting magnet designed to produce magnetic flux densities of the order of 4 to 5 Webers per square meter is constructed by first forming a cable of a plurality of matrixed superconductor wires with each wire of the plurality insulated from each other one. The cable is shaped into a rectangular cross-section and is wound with tape in an open spiral to create cooling channels. Coils are wound in a calculated pattern in saddle shapes to produce desired fields, such as dipoles, quadrupoles, and the like. Wedges are inserted between adjacent cables as needed to maintain substantially radial placement of the long dimensions of cross sections of the cables. After winding, individual strands in each of the cables are brought out to terminals and are interconnected to place all of the strands in series and to maximize the propagation of a quench by alternating conduction from an inner layer to an outer layer and from top half to bottom half as often as possible. Individual layers are separated from others by spiraled aluminum spacers to facilitate cooling. The wound coil is wrapped with an epoxy tape that is cured by heat and then machined to an interference fit with an outer aluminum pipe which is then affixed securely to the assembled coil by heating it to make a shrink fit. In an alternate embodiment, one wire of the cable is made of copper or the like to be heated externally to propagate a quench.

Satti, John A. (Naperville, IL)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Use of POISSON to calculate the effect of magnetization in superconducting magnets  

SciTech Connect

The code POISSON is used to model a superconducting magnet. Two methods are used: a linear and reversible magnetization curve for which an analytical solution is compared with that of POISSON and a measured magnetization curve of a superconducting cable is introduced into POISSON and the results are compared with measurements. 13 figs. (WRF)

Caspi, S.; Gilbert, W.S.; Helm, M.; Laslett, L.J.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

PURPA and Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage: Energy Conservation, Environmental Protection and Entrepreneurial Opportunity in the Next Technological Revolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1988] SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE Corp. ,60 theSupercon- ducting Magnetic Energy Storage, 2 SUPERCURRENTS1988] SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE facilities (

Bovett, Robert E.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Cryogenic deformation of high temperature superconductive composite structures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improvement in a process of preparing a composite high temperature oxide superconductive wire is provided and involves conducting at least one cross-sectional reduction step in the processing preparation of the wire at sub-ambient temperatures.

Roberts, Peter R. (Groton, MA); Michels, William (Brookline, MA); Bingert, John F. (Jemez Springs, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Linear Collider Final Focus Magnet Construction | Superconducting Magnet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Single Strand Superconductor Windings Single Strand Superconductor Windings Initial direct wind quad coils were constructed using 13 mil diameter single strand wire. This wire provides the smallest coil patterns possible, with quad coils wound easily onto .75 inch (19mm) diameter support tubes. The 13mil diameter superconductor gives the smallest coils possible, the penalty being higher inductance and smaller transfer function, but allowing lower operational currents. long model magnet Figure 1 shows the first one foot long model magnet constructed using the 11 axis ultrasonic wiring machine with 13 mil superconducting wire, the same wire previously used for the 472 RHIC Corrector packages. Existing stock materials were used in the construction, and the coil pattern was not optimized for harmonics, but to put as many coil turns onto the tube as

119

High temperature superconductivity in metallic region near Mott transition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The spin-singlet superconductivity without phonons is examined in consideration of correlations on an extended Hubbard model. It is shown that the superconductivity requires not only the total correlation should be strong enough but also the density of state around Fermi energy should be large enough, which shows that the high temperature superconductivity could only be found in the metallic region near the Mott metal insulator transition (MIT). Other properties of superconductors are also discussed on these conclusions.

Tian De Cao

2009-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

120

Cryogenic expansion joint for large superconducting magnet structures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An expansion joint is provided that accommodates dimensional changes occurring during the cooldown and warm-up of large cryogenic devices such as superconducting magnet coils. Flattened tubes containing a refrigerant such as gaseous nitrogen (N.sub.2) are inserted into expansion spaces in the structure. The gaseous N.sub.2 is circulated under pressure and aids in the cooldown process while providing its primary function of accommodating differential thermal contraction and expansion in the structure. After lower temperatures are reached and the greater part of the contraction has occured, the N.sub.2 liquefies then solidifies to provide a completely rigid structure at the cryogenic operating temperatures of the device.

Brown, Robert L. (Kingston, TN)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature superconducting magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Survey of domestic research on superconducting magnetic energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the results of a survey of domestic research on superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) undertaken with the support of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Superconductivity Pilot Center. Each survey entry includes the following: Name, address, and other telephone and facsimile numbers of the principal investigator and other staff members; funding for fiscal year 1991, 1992, 1993; brief descriptions of the program, the technical progress to date, and the expected technical progress; a note on any other collaboration. Included with the survey are recommendations intended to help DOE decide how best to support SMES research and development (R&D). To summarize, I would say that important elements of a well-rounded SMES research program for DOE are as follows. (1) Construction of a large ETM. (2) Development of SMES as an enabling technology for solar and wind generation, especially in conjunction with the ETM program, if possible. (3) Development of small SMES units for electric networks, for rapid transit, and as noninterruptible power supplies [uses (2), (3), and (4) above]. In this connection, lightweight, fiber-reinforced polymer structures, which would be especially advantageous for space and transportation applications, should be developed. (4) Continued study of the potential impacts of high-temperature superconductors on SMES, with construction as soon as feasible of small SMES units using high-temperature superconductors (HTSs).

Dresner, L.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Survey of domestic research on superconducting magnetic energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the results of a survey of domestic research on superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) undertaken with the support of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Superconductivity Pilot Center. Each survey entry includes the following: Name, address, and other telephone and facsimile numbers of the principal investigator and other staff members; funding for fiscal year 1991, 1992, 1993; brief descriptions of the program, the technical progress to date, and the expected technical progress; a note on any other collaboration. Included with the survey are recommendations intended to help DOE decide how best to support SMES research and development (R D). To summarize, I would say that important elements of a well-rounded SMES research program for DOE are as follows. (1) Construction of a large ETM. (2) Development of SMES as an enabling technology for solar and wind generation, especially in conjunction with the ETM program, if possible. (3) Development of small SMES units for electric networks, for rapid transit, and as noninterruptible power supplies (uses (2), (3), and (4) above). In this connection, lightweight, fiber-reinforced polymer structures, which would be especially advantageous for space and transportation applications, should be developed. (4) Continued study of the potential impacts of high-temperature superconductors on SMES, with construction as soon as feasible of small SMES units using high-temperature superconductors (HTSs).

Dresner, L.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Publications | Ramesh Gupta | Superconducting Magnet Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for muon collider" (pdf), R. Gupta, et al., 2010 Applied Superconductivity Conference, Washington, DC, August 2010. Slides from the talk (pdf) "Second Generation HTS Quadrupole...

124

Critical magnetic field of surface superconductivity in lead  

SciTech Connect

The critical superconductivity field H{sub c3} is measured on lead single crystals. It is shown that the temperature dependence of H{sub c3}/H{sub c} in the vicinity of superconducting transition temperature T{sub c} is essentially nonlinear. Relative changes in the value of H{sub c3}/H{sub c} reach approximately 30%, which cannot be described by the Ginzburg-Landau theory. The experimental temperature dependences lead to the conclusion that the surface superconducting transition temperature noticeably exceeds the superconducting transition temperature in the bulk of the semiconductor. The differences in the critical temperatures and in the Ginzburg-Landau parameters for lead are estimated.

Khlyustikov, I. N., E-mail: khly@kapitza.ras.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kapitza Institute of Physical Problems (Russian Federation)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

125

Flywheel energy storage using superconducting magnetic bearings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Storage of electrical energy on a utility scale is currently not practicable for most utilities, preventing the full utilization of existing base-load capacity. A potential solution to this problem is Flywheel Energy Storage (FES), made possible by technological developments in high-temperature superconducting materials. Commonwealth Research Corporation (CRC), the research arm of Commonwealth Edison Company, and Argonne National Laboratory are implementing a demonstration project to advance the state of the art in high temperature superconductor (HTS) bearing performance and the overall demonstration of efficient Flywheel Energy Storage. Currently, electricity must be used simultaneously with its generation as electrical energy storage is not available for most utilities. Existing storage methods either are dependent on special geography, are too expensive, or are too inefficient. Without energy storage, electric utilities, such as Commonwealth Edison Company, are forced to cycle base load power plants to meet load swings in hourly customer demand. Demand can change by as much as 30% over a 12-hour period and result in significant costs to utilities as power plant output is adjusted to meet these changes. HTS FES systems can reduce demand-based power plant cycling by storing unused nighttime capacity until it is needed to meet daytime demand.

Abboud, R.G. [Commonwealth Research Corp., Chicago, IL (United States); Uherka, K.; Hull, J.; Mulcahy, T. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

High performance magnetic bearing systems using high temperature superconductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are a magnetic bearing apparatus and a method for providing at least one stabilizing force in a magnetic bearing structure with a superconducting magnetic assembly and a magnetic assembly, by providing a superconducting magnetic member in the superconducting magnetic assembly with a plurality of domains and arranging said superconducting magnetic member such that at least one domain has a domain C-axis vector alignment angularly disposed relative to a reference axis of the magnetic member in the magnetic assembly. 7 figs.

Abboud, R.G.

1998-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

127

High performance magnetic bearing systems using high temperature superconductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A magnetic bearing apparatus and a method for providing at least one stabilizing force in a magnetic bearing structure with a superconducting magnetic assembly and a magnetic assembly, by providing a superconducting magnetic member in the superconducting magnetic assembly with a plurality of domains and arranging said superconducting magnetic member such that at least one domain has a domain C-axis vector alignment angularly disposed relative to a reference axis of the magnetic member in the magnetic assembly.

Abboud, Robert G. (Barrington Hills, IL)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Unconventional temperature enhanced magnetism in iron telluride  

SciTech Connect

Discoveries of copper and iron-based high-temperature superconductors (HTSC)1-2 have challenged our views of superconductivity and magnetism. Contrary to the pre-existing view that magnetism, which typically involves localized electrons, and superconductivity, which requires freely-propagating itinerant electrons, are mutually exclusive, antiferromagnetic phases were found in all HTSC parent materials3,4. Moreover, highly energetic magnetic fluctuations, discovered in HTSC by inelastic neutron scattering (INS) 5,6, are now widely believed to be vital for the superconductivity 7-10. In two competing scenarios, they either originate from local atomic spins11, or are a property of cooperative spin-density-wave (SDW) behavior of conduction electrons 12,13. Both assume clear partition into localized electrons, giving rise to local spins, and itinerant ones, occupying well-defined, rigid conduction bands. Here, by performing an INS study of spin dynamics in iron telluride, a parent material of one of the iron-based HTSC families, we have discovered that this very assumption fails, and that conduction and localized electrons are fundamentally entangled. In the temperature range relevant for the superconductivity we observe a remarkable redistribution of magnetism between the two groups of electrons. The effective spin per Fe at T 10 K, in the2 antiferromagnetic phase, corresponds to S 1, consistent with the recent analyses that emphasize importance of Hund s intra-atomic exchange15-16. However, it grows to S 3/2 in the disordered phase, a result that profoundly challenges the picture of rigid bands, broadly accepted for HTSC.

Zalinznyak, I. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Xu, Zhijun [ORNL; Tranquada, John M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Gu, G. D. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Tsvelik, A. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Stone, Matthew B [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

SUPERCONDUCTING DIPOLE MAGNETS FOR THE LHC INSERTION REGIONS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SUPERCONDUCTING DIPOLE MAGNETS FOR THE LHC INSERTION SUPERCONDUCTING DIPOLE MAGNETS FOR THE LHC INSERTION REGIONS E. Willen, M. Anerella, J. Cozzolino, G. Ganetis, A. Ghosh, R. Gupta, M. Harrison, A. Jain, A. Marone, J. Muratore, S. Plate, J. Schmalzle, P. Wanderer, K.C. Wu, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973, USA Abstract Dipole bending magnets are required to change the horizontal separation of the two beams in the LHC. In Intersection Regions (IR) 1, 2, 5, and 8, the beams are brought into collision for the experiments located there. In IR4, the separation of the beams is increased to accommodate the machine's particle acceleration hardware. As part of the US contribution to the LHC Project, BNL is building the required superconducting magnets. Designs have been developed featuring a single

130

Magnetoelastic instabilities and vibrations of superconducting-magnet systems  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the research accomplished under Depatment of Energy/NSF grants associated with the structural design of superconducting magnets for magnetic fusion reactors. The main results pertain to magnetomechanical instabilities in toroidal and poloidal field magnets for proposed fusion reactors. One major accomplishment was the building and testing of a 1/75th scale superconducting structural model of a 16 coil Tokamak reactor. Using this model the buckling of toroidal and poloidal field coils under different constraints was observed. A series of dynamic tests were performed, including the effect of currents on natural frequencies, poloidal-toroidal coil interaction, and buckling induced superconducting-normal quench of the coils. The stability of poloidal coils in a toroidal magnet field were investigated with the 16 coil torus. A superconducting poloidal coil was observed to become statically unstable or buckle as the current approached a certain value. Magnetoelastic buckling of other magnet systems such as a yin-yang pair of magnets, Ioffe coils, and discrete coil solenoids were also studied.

Moon, F.C.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Dynamic high pressure process for fabricating superconducting and permanent magnetic materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Shock wave formation of superconductive ceramic oxide electric and magnetic circuit elements with improved microstructures and mechanical properties. 10 figs.

Nellis, W.J.; Maple, M.B.; Geballe, T.H.

1987-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

132

Structural performance of the first SSC (Superconducting Super Collider) Design B dipole magnet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first Design B Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) dipole magnet has been successfully tested. This magnet was heavily instrumented with temperature and strain gage sensors in order to evaluate its adherence to design constraints and design calculations. The instrumentation and associated data acquisition system allowed monitoring of the magnet during cooldown, warmup, and quench testing. This paper will focus on the results obtained from structural measurements on the suspension system during normal and rapid cooldowns and during quench studies at full magnet current. 4 refs., 9 figs.

Nicol, T.H.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

LHC Dipole Acceptance | Superconducting Magnet Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Magnet Division designed, constructed and tested dipole magnets for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Each of the BNL-built dipole magnets was tested at the Lab's...

134

Cryogen free superconducting splittable quadrupole magnet for linear accelerators  

SciTech Connect

A new superconducting quadrupole magnet for linear accelerators was fabricated at Fermilab. The magnet is designed to work inside a cryomodule in the space between SCRF cavities. SCRF cavities must be installed inside a very clean room adding issues to the magnet design, and fabrication. The designed magnet has a splittable along the vertical plane configuration and could be installed outside of the clean room around the beam pipe previously connected to neighboring cavities. For more convenient assembly and replacement a 'superferric' magnet configuration with four racetrack type coils was chosen. The magnet does not have a helium vessel and is conductively cooled from the cryomodule LHe supply pipe and a helium gas return pipe. The quadrupole generates 36 T integrated magnetic field gradient, has 600 mm effective length, and the peak gradient is 54 T/m. In this paper the quadrupole magnetic, mechanical, and thermal designs are presented, along with the magnet fabrication overview and first test results.

Kashikhin, V.S.; Andreev, N.; Kerby, J.; Orlov, Y.; Solyak, N.; Tartaglia, M.; Velev, G.; /Fermilab

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Safety analysis of the UTSI-CFFF superconducting magnet  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In designing a large superconducting magnet such as the UTSI-CFFF dipole, great attention must be devoted to the safety of the magnet and personnel. The conductor for the UTSI-CFFF magnet incorporates much copper stabilizer, which both insures its cryostability, and contributes to the magnet safety. The quench analysis and the cryostat fault condition analysis are presented. Two analyses of exposed turns follow; the first shows that gas cooling protects uncovered turns; the second, that the cryostat pressure relief system protects them. Finally the failure mode and safety analysis is presented.

Turner, L.R.; Wang, S.T.; Smith, R.P.; VanderArend, P.C.; Hsu, Y.H.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Superconducting Magnet Division | Brookhaven National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

accuracy of these probes is 1 part in 10,000 at 23 of the magnet inner radius. Hall and NMR probes are also available. generic image The photo shows a magnet cold mass being...

137

Electromagnetic interactions between the U-25 superconducting magnet and the U-25 B MHD flow train  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fluctuating voltage signals on the potential taps of the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) 5.0 Tesla MHD Superconducting Dipole Magnet have been observed during MHD power generation at the U-25 B Facility at the High Temperature Institute (IVAN), Moscow, U.S.S.R. The voltage fluctuations are analyzed with special emphasis on magnet stability. Various other thermodynamic and electrical parameters of the U-25 B flow train have been recorded and statistical correlations between these signals and the signals observed at the magnet terminals are described.

Smith, R.P.; Niemann, R.C.; Kraimer, M.R.; Zinneman, T.E.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Field polarity dependent nucleation of superconductivity in quasi-one-dimensional magnetic templates.  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the nucleation of superconductivity in an Al/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Py trilayer system by electrical transport measurements. Magnetic force microscopy images taken at room temperature show that the 0.7 {micro}m thick Py-film form stripes of magnetic domains with alternating out-of-plane stray field. After applying a strong out of plane magnetic field H the superconductor/normal phase boundary becomes asymmetric with respect to H = 0. This lack of field polarity symmetry results from the unbalanced size distribution of domains with opposite polarity.

Ataklti, G. W.; Silhanek, A. V.; Van de Vondel, J.; Gillijns, W.; Belkin, A.; Karapetrov, G.; Moshchalkov, V. V.; Materials Science Division; Katholieke Univ. Leuven; Illinois Inst. of Tech.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Compact High-Temperature Superconducting Cables ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Beside power transmission, the flexible cabling concept could be used ... and for medical applications such as next-generation magnetic resonance ...

2011-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

140

A Toy Model Study of Decay Trapping | Superconducting Magnet Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Toy Model Study of Decay Trapping, reported by Brett Parker A Toy Model Study of Decay Trapping, reported by Brett Parker Introduction A group from the BNL Superconducting Magnet Division is looking at various options for dipole magnets which would be suitable for use in a muon storage ring that is used as a neutrino factory. Since the useful neutrino beams from a neutrino factory come from straight sections it is desirable to minimize the rings arc circumference, in relation to straight section length, in order to ensure that the fraction of muons which decay in the straight section is as large as possible. Therefore superconducting magnets, with higher B-fields and smaller bend radii, are reasonable to consider for this application. Unfortunately the decay electrons generated along with the neutrinos carry on average about a third of the original

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature superconducting magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Superconducting Magnet Technology for Future Hadron Colliders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

accelerators organized at Brookhaven National Laboratory inquadrupole magnets (Brookhaven. 1965). the first of a longbeam transport dipoles (Brookhaven. 1973 and Argonne. 1976).

Scanlan, R.M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Nucleation of bulk superconductivity close to critical magnetic field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the two-dimensional Ginzburg-Landau functional with constant applied magnetic field. For applied magnetic fields close to the second critical field $H_{C_2}$ and large Ginzburg-Landau parameter, we provide leading order estimates on the energy of minimizing configurations. We obtain a fine threshold value of the applied magnetic field for which bulk superconductivity contributes to the leading order of the energy. Furthermore, the energy of the bulk is related to that of the Abrikosov problem in a periodic lattice. A key ingredient of the proof is a novel $L^\\infty$-bound which is of independent interest.

S. Fournais; A. Kachmar

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

143

Low-temperature magnetic refrigerator  

SciTech Connect

The disclosure is directed to a low temperature 4 to 20 K. refrigeration apparatus and method utilizing a ring of magnetic material moving through a magnetic field. Heat exchange is accomplished in and out of the magnetic field to appropriately utilize the device to execute Carnot and Stirling cycles.

Barclay, John A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Low-temperature magnetic refrigerator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to magnetic refrigeration and more particularly to low temperature refrigeration between about 4 and about 20 K, with an apparatus and method utilizing a belt of magnetic material passed in and out of a magnetic field with heat exchangers within and outside the field operably disposed to accomplish refrigeration.

Barclay, J.A.

1983-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

145

Dynamic high pressure process for fabricating superconducting and permanent magnetic materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Shock wave formation of thin layers of materials with improved superconducting and permanent magnetic properties and improved microstructures is disclosed. The material fabrication system includes a sandwiched structure including a powder material placed between two solid members to enable explosive shock consolidation. The two solid members are precooled to about 80--100 K to reduce the residual temperatures attained as a result of the shock wave treatment, and thereby increase the quench rate of the consolidated powder. 9 figs.

Nellis, W.J.; Geballe, T.H.; Maple, M.B.

1990-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

146

Dynamic high pressure process for fabricating superconducting and permanent magnetic materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Shock wave formation of thin layers of materials with improved superconducting and permanent magnetic properties and improved microstructures. The material fabrication system includes a sandwiched structure including a powder material placed between two solid members to enable explosive shock consolidation. The two solid members are precooled to about 80.degree.-100.degree. K. to reduce the residual temperatures attained as a result of the shock wave treatment, and thereby increase the quench rate of the consolidated powder.

Nellis, William J. (Berkeley, CA); Geballe, Theodore H. (Woodside, CA); Maple, M. Brian (Del Mar, CA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Method and Apparatus for measuring Gravitational Acceleration Utilizing a high Temperature Superconducting Bearing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Gravitational acceleration is measured in all spatial dimensions with improved sensitivity by utilizing a high temperature superconducting (HTS) gravimeter. The HTS gravimeter is comprised of a permanent magnet suspended in a spaced relationship from a high temperature superconductor, and a cantilever having a mass at its free end is connected to the permanent magnet at its fixed end. The permanent magnet and superconductor combine to form a bearing platform with extremely low frictional losses, and the rotational displacement of the mass is measured to determine gravitational acceleration. Employing a high temperature superconductor component has the significant advantage of having an operative temperature at or below 77K, whereby cooling maybe accomplished with liquid nitrogen.

Hull, John R.

1998-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

148

A test of a 2 Tesla superconducting transmission line magnet system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Superconducting transmission line magnet test system for an injector accelerator of a staged VLHC proton-proton colliding beam accelerator has been built and operated at Fermilab. The 1.5 m long, twin-aperture, combined function dipole magnet of 2 Tesla field is excited by a single turn 100 kA transmission line superconductor. The 100 kA dc current is generated using dc-dc switching converters powered by a bulk 240 kW supply. A pair of horizontally placed conventional leads facilitates transfer of this current to the magnet transmission line superconductor operating at liquid helium temperature. Fabrication of magnet components and magnet assembly work are described. The magnet test system and its operation are presented, and the performance is summarized.

Piekarz, Henryk; Carcagno, Ruben; Claypool, Brad; Foster, George W.; Hays, Steven L.; Huang, Yuenian; Kashikhin, Vladimir; Malamud, Ernest; Mazur, Peter O.; Nehring, Roger; Oleck, Andrew; Rabehl, Roger; Schlabach, Phil; Sylvester, Cosmore; Velev, Gueorgui; Volk, James; /Fermilab; Wake, Masayoshi; /KEK, Tsukuba

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Meetings & Workshops | Superconducting Magnet Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Meetings & Workshops Meetings & Workshops S&T Committee Program Review June 22 - 23, 2006 Second Annual VLHC Meeting October 16 - 18, 2000 Workshop on the Effect of Synchrotron Radiation in the VLHC September 18 - 20, 2000 Proceedings of the 1968 Summer Study on Superconducting Devices and Accelerators Upcoming Events JAN 17 Friday East Coast Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics - Lecture "The Nation's Nuclear Physics Program and the Role of the Government" Presented by Dr. Jehanne Gillo, U.S. Department of Energy, Nuclear Physics 9:30 am, Berkner Hall Auditorium Friday, January 17, 2014, 9:30 am Hosted by: Director's Office JAN 22 Wednesday Brookhaven Lecture "491st Brookhaven Lecture: Juergen Thieme of Photon Sciences Directorate" Presented by Juergen Thieme, Brookhaven Lab's Photon Sciences Directorate

150

The Cost of Superconducting Magnets as a Function of Stored Energy and Design Magnetic Induction Times the Field Volume  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

costs given magnet stored-energy or average bore induction timecost will go up with stored energy and with field volume timesCost of Superconducting Magnets as a Function of Stored Energy and Design Magnetic Induction times

Green, M.A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

J-PARC Correctors | Superconducting Magnet Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interconnect Corrector Magnet Interconnect Corrector Magnet The design of these steering correction magnets has them being placed in the interconnect regions between the cable magnets. Since they are located in a vacuum, they will not be in direct contact with the helium cooling flow, but instead, require cooling be done through conduction. corrector tube Figure 8. To aid in heat transfer, the corrector tube is machined entirely out of copper. coil pattern Figure 9. To maximize the operating thermal margin, the coil pattern comes within 10 mm of the end flanges. This required making the end flanges as separate parts, to be attached after winding. support tube is insulated Figure 10. After the support tube is insulated with Kapton insulation, it is covered with the b stage fiberglass winding substrate, mounted to the

152

Non-Fermi Liquid Regimes and Superconductivity in the Low Temperature Phase Diagrams of Strongly Correlated d- and f-Electron Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Zapf, J. Wosnitza, Superconductivity in Conventional andLiquid Regimes and Superconductivity in the Low Temperatureas un- conventional superconductivity and novel magnetic

Brian Maple, M.; Baumbach, Ryan E.; Butch, Nicholas P.; Hamlin, James J.; Janoschek, Marc

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

BEPC-II Magnet Project | Superconducting Magnet Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BEPC-II Magnet Project BEPC-II Magnet Project Project Overview The BEPC-II magnets are Interaction Region magnets to be used as part of an upgrade to the Beijing Electron Positron Collider. Two magnets will be produced, both of which will be inserted within the solenoidal detector at one of the collision points. Since the best use of the quadrupole focusing in this case requires placing the magnet as close to the collision point as possible, these magnets will be used within the magnetic field of the detector. This constrains the materials that can be used for construction to only non-magnetic materials. It also places severe demands on the structure of the magnet and it's holding supports due to the reaction forces between the solenoid and the magnet. To create the coil pattern for the final magnet, the coils will be

154

High Temperature Superconductivity -- A Joint Feasibility Study for a Power Application with High-Temperature Superconducting Cable by Peco Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Practical realization of high temperature superconductivity (HTS) technology is within the electric power industry's reach. This report documents a feasibility study co-sponsored by PECO Energy Company (PECO) to assess a real-world underground transmission application of this technology.

1998-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

155

High Temperature Superconductivity -- A Joint Feasibility Study for a Power Application with High-Temperature Superconducting Cable by South Carolina  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Practical realization of high temperature superconductivity (HTS) technology is within the reach of the electric power industry. This report documents a feasibility study co-sponsored by South Carolina Electric and Gas Company (SCE&G) to assess a real-world underground transmission application of this technology.

1998-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

156

Microcomputer control for the superconducting magnetic energy storage system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The microcomputer-based, automatic control and data acquisition system for the Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage system is described. A brief discussion of the function of SMES and identification of its major systems is followed by a detailed discussion of the control and data acquisition system. The distributed control and data acquisition architecture, interprocessor timing and communications, task scheduler, master-slave relationship, and man/machine interface are some of the topics discussed.

Seamons, M.J.; Criscuolo, A.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Recent Developments in High Temperature Superconductivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scope, Recently, significant progress has been made world-wide in both fabrication and fundamental understanding of high-temperature superconductors (HTS) ...

158

Scientific Image Gallery from the Applied Superconductivity Center at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Applied Superconductivity Center (ASC) is nested with the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory. Originally located at the University of Wisconsin, ASC transferred to NHMFL or Magnet Lab in 2003. ASC investigates both low and high-temperature materials. Focus areas include grain boundaries; coated conductors, BSCCO, and a new superconductor known as MgB2. The ASC Image Gallery provides graphs with text descriptions and single images with captions. The single images are organized into collections under scientific titles, such as MgB2 mentioned above. Click on the Videos link to see two 3D videos and be sure to check out the link to image collections at other organizations performing superconductivity research.

159

Second generation high-temperature superconducting solenoid coils and energy storage.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??One of the most promising applications of superconductors is in Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) systems, which are becoming the enabling engines for improving the… (more)

Baiej, Hanan Tahir

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

J-PARC Correctors | Superconducting Magnet Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Combined Function Magnet Combined Function Magnet Both of the coil designs are two layer serpentine designs using "six around one" cable. The skew dipole is the first coil to be wound as it is the simplest from a coding and e/m analysis point of view. skew dipole nearing completion Figure 1 shows the first layer of the skew dipole nearing completion. Of note is the lack of harmonic correction spacers within the body of the coil. This is made possible by the the two step wiring process, which allows the two layers of the coil to be entirely independent of each other. Previously, the nested wire type of design locked the second layer of the coil into the same pattern already established on the first. By isolating each, it is now possible to eliminate the harmonic error correction

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature superconducting magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Linear Collider Final Focus Magnet Construction | Superconducting Magnet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Superconducting Cable Winding Tests Superconducting Cable Winding Tests To increase the transfer function, a 6 around 1 cable was next used. This cable is more efficient because it allows the packing of more conductor within the volume surrounding the support tube. This also lowers the inductance of the coil, making quench protection easier, but requires a higher operating current. Traded off is the minimum radius of curvature that can be tolerated by the bonding process as well as the insulation integrity. For this test, the first layer was designed for a length of 8 inches, and the second layer is 6 inches long. The lengths were chosen to allow inspection of the different features which were designed in. The pole spacers on the first layer for this test were chosen to be solid copper wire, instead of the standard G-10 spacer. The copper allows for a

162

Microscopic Probes of High-Temperature Superconductivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The granularity of the cuprate superconductors limits the effectiveness of many experimental probes that average over volumes containing many atoms. This report presents theoretical studies on muon spin relaxation and positron annihilation, two microscopic experimental techniques that can probe the properties of both high- and low-temperature superconductors on the atomic scale.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Dynamic high pressure process for fabricating superconducting and permanent magnetic materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Shock waves directed on thin layers of materials is used to form superconducting and permanent magnetic materials with improved microstructures. 9 figs.

Nellis, W.J.; Maple, M.B.; Geballe, T.H.

1986-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

164

The Latent Heat of Single Flavor Color Superconductivity in a Magnetic Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate the energy release associated with first-order phase transition between different types of single flavor color superconductivity in a magnetic field.

Ping-ping Wu; Hang He; Defu Hou; Hai-cang Ren

2011-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

165

Transformer current sensor for superconducting magnetic coils  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a current transformer for operating currents larger than 2kA (two kiloamps) that is capable of detecting a millivolt level resistive voltage in the presence of a large inductive voltage. Specifically, the present invention includes substantially cylindrical primary turns arranged to carry a primary current and substantially cylindrical secondary turns arranged coaxially with and only partially within the primary turns, the secondary turns including an active winding and a dummy winding, the active and dummy windings being coaxial, longitudinally separated and arranged to mutually cancel voltages excited by commonly experienced magnetic fields, the active winding but not the dummy winding being arranged within the primary turns.

Shen, S.S.; Wilson, C.T.

1985-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

166

Superconducting magnetic energy storage for electric power system dynamic stabilization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) system is being developed at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) for a dynamic stabilizer to be installed in the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) power system at Tacoma, Washington, by 1982. This unit will be an alternate stabilization method to the dc modulator now used to stabilize the 900 mile, ac intertie between BPA and Southern California. The generation control systems' response to the constantly occuring, small-load and voltage changes can result in negatively damped, low-frequency power oscillations. The dc modulator provides stabilization by fast load control of the High-Voltage dc (HVDC). The SMES unit consists of a 30-MJ solenoid, a 10 MW convertor, a liquid helium dewar and auxiliary systems which operate independent of the HVDC system. The SMES dynamic stabilizer design is presented with status information about the superconducting coil, the converter and other components of the SMES dynamic stabilizer summarized.

Turner, R.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Accurate estimates for magnetic bottles in connection with superconductivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Motivated by the theory of superconductivity and more precisely by the problem of the onset of superconductivity in dimension two, many papers devoted to the analysis in a semi-classical regime of the lowest eigenvalue of the Schr\\"odinger operator with magnetic field have appeared recently. Here we would like to mention the works by Bernoff-Sternberg, Lu-Pan, Del Pino-Felmer-Sternberg and Helffer-Morame and also Bauman-Phillips-Tang for the case of a disc. In the present paper we settle one important part of this question completely by proving an asymptotic expansion to all orders for low-lying eigenvalues for generic domains. The word `generic' means in this context that the curvature of the boundary of the domain has a unique non-degenerate maximum.

S. Fournais; B. Helffer

2004-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

168

Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage for electric power system dynamic stabilization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) system is being developed at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) for a dynamic stabilizer to be installed in the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) power system at Tacoma, Washington, by 1982. This unit will be an alternate stabilization method to the dc modulator now used to stabilize the 900 mile, ac intertie between BPA and Southern California. The generation control systems' response to the constantly occurring, small-load and voltage changes can result in negatively damped, low-frequency power oscillations. The dc modulator provides stabilization by fast load control of the High-Voltage dc (HVDC). The SMES unit consists of a 30-MJ solenoid, a 10-MW convertor, a liquid helium dewar, and auxiliary systems which operate independent of the HVDC system. The SMES dynamic stabilizer design is presented and status information is given about the superconducting coil, the converter, and other components of the SMES dynamic stabilizer.

Turner, R.D.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Superconducting magnetic energy storage for BPA transmission-line stabilization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) operates the electrical transmission system that joins the Pacific Northwest with southern California. A 30 MJ (8.4 kWh) Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) unit with a 10 MW converter is being installed at the Tacoma Substation to provide system damping for low frequency oscillations of 0.35 Hz. The integrated system status is described and reviewed. Components included in the system are the superconducting coil, seismically mounted in an epoxy fiberglass nonconducting dewar; a helium refrigerator; a heat rejection subsystem; a high pressure gas recovery subsystem; a liquid nitrogen trailer; the converter with power transformers and switchgear; and a computer system for remote microwave link operation of the SMES unit.

Rogers, J.D.; Barron, M.H.; Boenig, H.J.; Criscuolo, A.L.; Dean, J.W.; Schermer, R.I.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Bio-Med Variable Field MRI Project | Superconducting Magnet Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bio-Med Variable Field MRI Project Bio-Med Variable Field MRI Project One of the Research and Development projects currently underway is the Bio-Med magnet. Destined for use within the solenoidal field of an MRI, it is designed for use where the subject, in this case a rat, must be tracked in order to obtain an image. Typical MRIs require the subject to remain stationary, and a rat will not normally oblige when it is awake. By moving the composite field (MRI Solenoid plus Bio-Med dipole) to track the rat, it is possible to allow the rat some freedom of motion, while still imaging the brain functions. For the rapid movement typical of a rat, the Bio-Med coil magnet must be capable of very rapid changes in field. Superconducting magnets are typically not designed to allow rapid field variations. To do so typically

171

Voltage spike detection in high field superconducting accelerator magnets  

SciTech Connect

A measurement system for the detection of small magnetic flux changes in superconducting magnets, which are due to either mechanical motion of the conductor or flux jump, has been developed at Fermilab. These flux changes are detected as small amplitude, short duration voltage spikes, which are {approx}15mV in magnitude and lasts for {approx}30 {micro}sec. The detection system combines an analog circuit for the signal conditioning of two coil segments and a fast data acquisition system for digitizing the results, performing threshold detection, and storing the resultant data. The design of the spike detection system along with the modeling results and noise analysis will be presented. Data from tests of high field Nb{sub 3}Sn magnets at currents up to {approx}20KA will also be shown.

Orris, D.F.; Carcagno, R.; Feher, S.; Makulski, A.; Pischalnikov, Y.M.; /Fermilab

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Power applications of high-temperature superconductivity: Variable speed motors, current switches, and energy storage for end use  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to conduct joint research and development activities related to certain electric power applications of high-temperature superconductivity (HTS). The new superconductors may allow development of an energy-efficient switch to control current to variable speed motors, superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) systems, and other power conversion equipment. Motor types that were considered include induction, permanent magnet, and superconducting ac motors. Because it is impractical to experimentally alter certain key design elements in radial-gap motors, experiments were conducted on an axial field superconducting motor prototype using 4 NbTi magnets. Superconducting magnetic energy storage technology with 0.25--5 kWh stored energy was studied as a viable solution to short duration voltage sag problems on the customer side of the electric meter. The technical performance characteristics of the device wee assembled, along with competing technologies such as active power line conditioners with storage, battery-based uninterruptible power supplies, and supercapacitors, and the market potential for SMES was defined. Four reports were prepared summarizing the results of the project.

Hawsey, R.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Banerjee, B.B.; Grant, P.M. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Superconducting magnetic energy storage for electric utilities and fusion systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Superconducting inductors provide a compact and efficient means of storing electrical energy without an intermediate conversion process. Energy storage inductors are under development for load leveling and transmission line stabilization in electric utility systems and for driving magnetic confinement and plasma heating coils in fusion energy systems. Fluctuating electric power demands force the electric utility industry to have more installed generating capacity than the average load requires. Energy storage can increase the utilization of base-load fossil and nuclear power plants for electric utilities. The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory and the University of Wisconsin are developing superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) systems, which will store and deliver electrical energy for load leveling, peak shaving, and the stabilization of electric utility networks. In the fusion area, inductive energy transfer and storage is being developed. Both 1-ms fast-discharge theta-pinch systems and 1-to-2-s slow energy transfer tokamak systems have been demonstrated. The major components and the method of operation of a SMES unit are described, and potential applications of different size SMES systems in electric power grids are presented. Results are given of a reference design for a 10-GWh unit for load leveling, of a 30-MJ coil proposed for system stabilization, and of tests with a small-scale, 100-kJ magnetic energy storage system. The results of the fusion energy storage and transfer tests are presented. The common technology base for the various storage systems is discussed.

Rogers, J.D.; Boenig, H.J.; Hassenzahl, W.V.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Computer-automated controls for superconducting magnetic energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A computer-automated control system that allows unmanned operation of the Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) system has been designed and almost completely installed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. In addition to unmanned operation, the computer offers continual monitoring and recording of all the important SMES signals, operator guidance in starting up and maintaining SMES, emergency shutdown control, and high-speed data acquisition for failure diagnosis. The major components of the computer-automated control system are two slave computers that perform the data acquisition and a master computer that performs the control.

Criscuolo, A.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Control aspects of the Tacoma superconducting magnetic energy storage project  

SciTech Connect

On February 16, 1983, a 10 MW/30 MJ superconducting magnetic energy storage unit was energized at the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) substation in Tacoma, Washington. The unit was retired a year later, after extensive tests directed toward its experimental use as a small-signal stabilizer for the Pacific AC Intertie. This paper addresses the control aspects of the project. These include the response characteristics of the unit, a-priori modeling of power system response, tradeoffs in control-law design, measured power system dynamics, and projection of unit effectiveness as a stabilizer.

Hauer, J.F.; Boenig, H.J.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Superconducting magnet development program progress report, July 1974--June 1975  

SciTech Connect

During FY 1975, the superconducting magnet development program at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory was primarily directed toward the development of multifilamentary Nb$sub 3$Sn conductor for large CTR machines. It was secondarily concerned with preliminary work for the MX experiment and with the acquisition of additional testing facilities. Among the significant achievements was the construction and operation of a 27-cm-bore coil to its short-sample limit of 7-T at the windings. The coil was wound with a 100-m length of 67,507- filament Nb$sub 3$Sn conductor. (auth)

Cornish, D.N.; Harvey, A.R.; Nelson, R.L.; Taylor, C.E.; Zbasnik, J.P.

1975-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

177

Performance evaluation of high-temperature superconducting current leads for electric utility SMES systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Superconductivity Technology Program, Argonne National Laboratory and Babcock & Wilcox are developing high-temperature super-conductor (HTS) current leads for application to electric utility superconducting magnetic energy storage systems. A 16,000-A HTS lead has been designed and is being constructed. An evaluation program for component performance was conducted to confirm performance predictions and/or to qualify the design features for construction. Performance of the current lead assemblies will be evaluated in a test program that includes assembly procedures, tooling, and quality assurance; thermal and electrical performance; and flow and mechanical characteristics. Results of the evaluations to date are presented.

Niemann, R.C.; Cha, Y.S.; Hull, J.R. [and others

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Construction of Superconducting Magnet System for the J-PARC Neutrino Beam Line  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Following success of a prototype R&D, construction of a superconducting magnet system for J-PARC neutrino beam line has been carried out since 2005. A new conceptual beam line with the superconducting combined function magnets demonstrated the successful beam transport to the neutrino production target.

Nakamoto, T.; Wanderer, P.; Sasaki, K.; Ajima, Y.; Araoka, O.; Fujii, Y.; Hastings, N.; Higashi, N.; Iida, M.; Ishii, T.; Kimura, N.; Kobayashi, T.; Makida, Y.; Nakadaira, T.; Ogitsu, T.; Ohhata, H.; Okamura, T.; Sakashita, K.; Sugawara, S.; Suzuki, S.; Tanaka, K.; Tomaru, T.; Terashima, A.; Yamamoto, A.; Ichikawa, A.; Kakuno, H.; Anerella, M.; Escallier, J.; Ganetis, G.; gupta, R.; Jain, A.; Muratore, J.; Parker, B.; Boussuge, T.; Charrier, J.-P.; Arakawa, M.; Ichihara, T.; Minato, T.; Okada, Y.; Itou, A.; Kumaki, T.; Nagami, M.; Takahashi, T.

2009-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

179

Route to Room-Temperature Superconductivity from a Practical Point of View  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To synthesize a new superconductor which has a critical temperature, Tc, exceeding the room temperature, one needs to know what chemical components to start with. This chapter presents analysis of experimental data which allow one to draw a conclusion about components and the structure of a potential room-temperature superconductor. The two essential components of a roomtemperature superconductor are large organic molecules (polymers, tissues) and atoms/molecules which are magnetic in the intercalated state. This conclusion is fully based on experimental facts known today, and does not require any assumptions about the mechanism of room-temperature superconductivity. This, however, does not mean that to synthesize a room-temperature superconductor is an easy task. Never let them persuade you that things are too difficult or impossible.

A. Mourachkine

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

At the Boundary between Superconducting and Magnetic Oxides  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

At the Boundary between Superconducting and Magnetic Oxides The transistor, which shaped so much of our modern technology and economics, grew out of scientists' desire to gain a greater understanding of the interfaces between different materials. In the same way, today's materials scientists seek to expand our understanding of complex oxides by creating new states at the interface of two materials. Novel growth of complex oxides provides the ability to combine different materials with different and often antagonistic order parameters to create novel, strongly correlated states at the interface. As shown in the article, " Magnetism at the interface between ferromagnetic and superconducting oxides " in the April 2006 issue of Nature Physics, element-resolved x-ray probes and neutrons can be used to construct the first microscopic picture of interactions in a La[subscript 0.7]Ca[subscript 0.3]MnO[subscript 3]/YBa[subscript 2]Cu[subscript 3]O[subscript 7-x] superlattice.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature superconducting magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Linear Collider Final Focus Magnet Construction | Superconducting Magnet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Two Layer Quadrupole Shielding Coil Two Layer Quadrupole Shielding Coil Near the interaction region if the ILC, the exit beam by design, is very close to the final focus quads, and is sensitive to the external field of the quads. To eliminate this effect and prevent disruption of the exiting beams, a two layer shielding quadrupole has been designed and wound. For simplicity as well as efficiency, the transfer function of this coilset has been designed to allow series connection of the focus quad with this outer shield coilset. The completed magnet will be finished with G-10 fillers, voltage taps and heaters will be added, blue epoxy filling for all interstitial spaces, and then the magnet will be wrapped with glass cloth and fiberglass roving, then cured. Once cured, this magnet will be capable of full power operation

182

Conductor requirements for high-temperature superconducting utility power transformers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-temperature superconducting (HTS) coated conductors in utility power transformers must satisfy a set of operating requirements that are driven by two major considerations-HTS transformers must be economically competitive with conventional units, and the conductor must be robust enough to be used in a commercial manufacturing environment. The transformer design and manufacturing process will be described in order to highlight the various requirements that it imposes on the HTS conductor. Spreadsheet estimates of HTS transformer costs allow estimates of the conductor cost required for an HTS transformer to be competitive with a similarly performing conventional unit.

Pleva, E. F. [Waukesha Electric Systems, Waukesha, WI; Mehrotra, V. [Waukesha Electric Systems, Waukesha, WI; Schwenterly, S W [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Transport AC loss in high temperature superconducting coils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and the world’s population continues to grow, our existing methods for energy supply and usage are clearly unsustainable. In developed industrialised nations, such as the UK and the US, the industrial sector uses about one third of all energy consumed [2... superconducting coil is found to be significantly large, and this will reduce the efficiency of the device in which it is utilised, par- ticularly when the loss is reflected back to room temperature by including the refrigeration cost. Many existing AC loss...

Ainslie, Mark

2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

184

Magnetic Energy Storage System: Superconducting Magnet Energy Storage System with Direct Power Electronics Interface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

GRIDS Project: ABB is developing an advanced energy storage system using superconducting magnets that could store significantly more energy than today’s best magnetic storage technologies at a fraction of the cost. This system could provide enough storage capacity to encourage more widespread use of renewable power like wind and solar. Superconducting magnetic energy storage systems have been in development for almost 3 decades; however, past devices were designed to supply power only for short durations—generally less than a few minutes. ABB’s system would deliver the stored energy at very low cost, making it ideal for eventual use in the electricity grid as a costeffective competitor to batteries and other energy storage technologies. The device could potentially cost even less, on a per kilowatt basis, than traditional lead-acid batteries.

None

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

The magnetic properties of the SLC intersection region superconducting quadrupole triplets  

SciTech Connect

The measured magnetic field parameters of the quadrupoles which comprise the final triplet lens system for the SLAC Linear Collider intersection region are presented here. The minimum design gradient specifications for these quadrupoles are 1.7T/cm at 4.6K and 1.6T/cm at 4.6K in a 0.6T external solenoidal field. These gradients are about three times larger than those available with the conventional iron/copper quadrupoles now used in the SLC. Superconducting quadrupoles of two lengths have been specified for the SLC triplets. The effective magnetic length of type Q/sub 1/ is 66.498 +- 0.305cm and of Q/sub 2/ is 121.106 +- 0.61cm. The superconducting performance characteristics of the quadrupoles that have been measured are: maximum critical current as a function of bath temperature, rate of change of magnetic field, and as a percentage of the ''short sample''. ''Short sample'' performance is defined as the current reached by the cable in a perpendicular magnetic field equal to the peak field in the winding at bath temperature. The maximum gradient achieved during testing was 2.04T/cm (4.25K) and 2.07T/cm (3.2K). This represented 95% of the strand critical current value. The magnetic length of the first Q/sub 2/ was measured to be 120.85 +- .1 cm. The Fourier harmonic coefficients of the magnetic field were measured as a function of current and are reported. 3 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

McInturff, A.D.; Carson, J.A.; Fisk, H.E.; Erickson, R.A.

1987-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

186

HERA Luminosity Upgrade Magnet Production | Superconducting Magnet Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HERA Luminosity Upgrade Magnet Production HERA Luminosity Upgrade Magnet Production Photos taken on or before 12-May-2000. GO horizontal test setup GO horizontal test setup view toward lead tower GO horizontal test setup GO horizontal test setup GO horizontal test setup GO horizontal test setup GO horizontal test setup GO horizontal test setup GO horizontal test setup GO horizontal test setup GO horizontal test setup GO horizontal test setup lead tower feedthroughs Close up of lead tower feedthroughs lead tower feedthroughs Close up of lead tower feedthroughs lead tower feedthroughs Close up of lead tower feedthroughs GO horizontal test setup GO horizontal test setup GO horizontal test setup GO horizontal test setup GO Coldmass GO Coldmass GO sextupole coil GO sextupole coil GO quadrupole coil lead end GO quadrupole coil lead end

187

Linear Collider Final Focus Magnet Construction | Superconducting Magnet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Six Layer Quadrupole Six Layer Quadrupole The incoming beam final quad for the linear collider 20 mr option requires a gradient of 140 T/m within a solenoid of 3 Tesla. To meet this goal, a design using 6 around 1 cable bonded to a one inch diameter tube was used. The magnet design required 6 layers of this cable. Two layers were bonded at a time, with S-glass compression wrap every two layers. Final cold testing results were very good, with only two training quenches before reaching short sample. Initial test results at a glance: Background Field Tesla Temp Kelvin Gradient T/m 3 4.3 158 4 4.22 139 5 4.22 134 6 3 137 This data scales to 232 Tesla/meter at 1.9 Kelvin in a 3 Tesla background field. Present field requirements for the 20 mr IR represents 60% of the magnet capability, a comfortable margin. Indeed, even at 4.3 Kelvin in a 3

188

BEPC-II Magnet Project | Superconducting Magnet Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Initial R&D Winding and Tests Initial R&D Winding and Tests To achieve the current densities required within the quad coils, it was decided to fabricate the magnet using coil pairs, with the S-glass compression applied after each double layer wind. Initial wiring tests were done using a nested pattern. second layer of conductor Figure 1 shows this pattern placed the second layer of conductor into the channel formed by the first layer wires, the end of a pole test. Note the ease with which the second layer wires dropped from the channel on the wires down to the substrate. While producing the highest packing factor in the straight section, it produces a variable height end. This end geometry does not allow a simple layer cover, but requires a very complex top piece. In addition, it does not allow for the simple addition of

189

Narrowband high temperature superconducting receiver for low frequency radio waves  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An underground communicating device has a low-noise SQUID using high temperature superconductor components connected to detect a modulated external magnetic flux for outputting a voltage signal spectrum that is related to the varying magnetic flux. A narrow bandwidth filter may be used to select a portion of the voltage signal spectrum that is relatively free of power line noise to output a relatively low noise output signal when operating in a portion of the electromagnetic spectra where such power line noise exists. A demodulator outputs a communication signal, which may be an FM signal, indicative of a modulation on the modulated external magnetic flux.

Reagor, David W. (Los Alamos, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Electromagnetically superconducting phase of QCD vacuum induced by strong magnetic field  

SciTech Connect

In this talk we discuss our recent suggestion that the QCD vacuum in a sufficiently strong magnetic field (stronger than 10{sup 16} Tesla) may undergo a spontaneous transition to an electromagnetically superconducting state. The possible superconducting state is anisotropic (the vacuum exhibits superconductivity only along the axis of the uniform magnetic field) and inhomogeneous (in the transverse directions the vacuum structure shares similarity with the Abrikosov lattice of an ordinary type-II superconductor). The electromagnetic superconductivity of the QCD vacuum is suggested to occur due to emergence of specific quark-antiquark condensates which carry quantum numbers of electrically charged rho mesons. A Lorentz-covariant generalization of the London transport equations for the magnetic-field-induced superconductivity is given.

Chernodub, M. N. [CNRS, Laboratoire de Mathematiques et Physique Theorique, Universite Francois-Rabelais Tours, Federation Denis Poisson, Parc de Grandmont, 37200 Tours (France); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Gent, Krijgslaan 281, S9, B-9000 Gent (Belgium)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

191

Electromagnetically superconducting phase of QCD vacuum induced by strong magnetic field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this talk we discuss our recent suggestion that the QCD vacuum in a sufficiently strong magnetic field (stronger than 10^{16} Tesla) may undergo a spontaneous transition to an electromagnetically superconducting state. The possible superconducting state is anisotropic (the vacuum exhibits superconductivity only along the axis of the uniform magnetic field) and inhomogeneous (in the transverse directions the vacuum structure shares similarity with the Abrikosov lattice of an ordinary type-II superconductor). The electromagnetic superconductivity of the QCD vacuum is suggested to occur due to emergence of specific quark-antiquark condensates which carry quantum numbers of electrically charged rho mesons. A Lorentz-covariant generalization of the London transport equations for the magnetic-field-induced superconductivity is given.

M. N. Chernodub

2010-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

192

Thin superconducting disk with field-dependent critical current: Magnetization and ac susceptibilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thin superconducting disk with field-dependent critical current: Magnetization and ac of a superconducting thin disk are calculated in the critical-state model assuming a field-dependent critical current for the flux and current distributions Phys. Rev. B 60, 13 112 1999 for a disk placed in a perpendicular

Johansen, Tom Henning

193

The design of new wind power controller based on Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fluctuation and intermittent with wind power output, as a key factor to connect a large-scale wind power system to grid, which result s in an adverse impact on the power system continues to grow. In order to reduce the net stability impact of the ... Keywords: Wind Farm, Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage, Wind Power, Applied Superconductivity

Zhou Xue-Song; Quan Bo; Ma You-Jie; Wu Le

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Construction program for a large superconducting MHD magnet system at the coal-fired flow facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Argonne National Laboratory has designed and is constructing a 6 T large aperture superconducting MHD magnet for use in the Coal-Fired Flow Facility (CFFF) at the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) at Tullahoma, Tennessee. The magnet system consists of the superconducting magnet, a magnet power supply, an integrated instrumentation for operation, control and protection, and a complete cryogenic facility including a CTI Model 2800 helium refrigerator/liquefier with two compressors, helium gas handling system and a 7500 liter liquid helium dewar. The complete system will be tested at Argonne, IL in 1981. The magnet design is reviewed, and the coil fabrication programs are described in detail.

Wang, S.T.; Genens, L.; Gonczy, J.; Ludwig, H.; Lieberg, M.; Kraft, E.; Gacek, D.; Huang, Y.C.; Chen, C.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

An anisotropic integral operator in high temperature superconductivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A simplified model in superconductivity theory studied by P. Krotkov and A. Chubukov \\cite{KC1,KC2} led to an integral operator $K$ -- see (1), (2). They guessed that the equation $E_0(a,T)=1$ where $E_0$ is the largest eigenvalue of the operator $K$ has a solution $T(a)=1-\\tau(a)$ with $\\tau (a) \\sim a^{2/5}$ when $a$ goes to 0. $\\tau(a)$ imitates the shift of critical (instability) temperature. We give a rigorous analysis of an anisotropic integral operator $K$ and prove the asymptotic ($*$) -- see Theorem 8 and Proposition 10. Additive Uncertainty Principle (of Landau-Pollack-Slepian [SP], \\cite{LP1,LP2}) plays important role in this analysis.

Boris Mityagin

2008-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

196

Shock-induced synthesis of high temperature superconducting materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

It has now been determined that the unique features of the high pressure shock method, especially the shock-induced chemical synthesis technique, are fully applicable to high temperature superconducting materials. Extraordinarily high yields are achievable in accordance with this invention, e.g., generally in the range from about 20% to about 99%, often in the range from about 50% to about 90%, lower and higher yields, of course, also being possible. The method of this invention involves the application of a controlled high pressure shock compression pulse which can be produced in any conventional manner, e.g., by detonation of a high explosive material, the impact of a high speed projectile or the effect of intense pulsed radiation sources such as lasers or electron beams. Examples and a discussion are presented.

Ginley, D.S.; Graham, R.A.; Morosin, B.; Venturini, E.L.

1987-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

197

The DARPA manufacturing initiative in high temperature superconductivity  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has a very aggressive Technology Base program in high temperature superconductivity. This program is expected to provide the basis for a specialized set of military products - passive microwave and millimeter wave devices - within the next three years. In order to get these high leverage products into military systems, a manufacturing base must be developed for HTSC components. A plan for DARPA in HTSC manufacturing is directly coupled with the ongoing DARPA materials and device oriented R and D program. In essence, this plan recommends a three phased effort: 1. Phase I (two years); Fund companies through R and D contracts for specialized HTSC components; prepare a detailed plan and develop an HTSC consortium. 2. Phase II (six years): Establish an HTSC Sematech initiative for electronic applications, including active devices. 3. Phase III (optional): Continue the HTSC Sematech with emphasis on high power applications.

Adams, K.R. (Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency DARPA (US))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Large Oscillations of the Magnetoresistance in Nanopatterned High-temperature Superconducting Films  

SciTech Connect

Measurements on nanoscale structures constructed from high-temperature superconductors are expected to shed light on the origin of superconductivity in these materials. To date, loops made from these compounds have had sizes of the order of hundreds of nanometeres. Here, we report the results of measurements on loops of La{sub 1.84}Sr{sub 0.16}CuO{sub 4}, a high-temperature superconductor that loses its resistance to electric currents when cooled below {approx}38 K, with dimensions down to tens of nanometres. We observe oscillations in the resistance of the loops as a function of the magnetic flux through the loops. The oscillations have a period of h/2e, and their amplitude is much larger than the amplitude of the resistance oscillations expected from the Little-Parks effect. Moreover, unlike Little-Parks oscillations, which are caused by periodic changes in the superconducting transition temperature, the oscillations we observe are caused by periodic changes in the interaction between thermally excited moving vortices and the oscillating persistent current induced in the loops. However, despite the enhanced amplitude of these oscillations, we have not detected oscillations with a period of h/e, as recently predicted for nanoscale loops of superconductors with d-wave symmetry or with a period of h/4e, as predicted for superconductors that exhibit stripes.

Sochnikov, I.; Bozovic, I.; Shaulov, A.; Yeshurun, Y.; Logvenov, G.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) program, January 1-December 31, 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work reported is on the development of a 30 MJ superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) unit for use by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to stabilize power oscillations on their Pacific AC Intertie. The 30 MJ superconducting coil manufacture was completed. Design of the seismic mounting of the coil to the nonconducting dewar lid and a concrete foundation is complete. The superconducting application VAR (SAVAR) control study indicated a low economic advantage and the SAVAR program was terminated. An economic and technological evaluation of superconducting fault current limiter (SFCL) was completed and the results are reported.

Rogers, J.D. (comp.)

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

The mechanical alignment of particles for use in fabricating superconducting and permanent magnetic materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Invention is related to the manufacture of high-quality mechanically aligned superconducting materials using oriented platelet-shaped powder particles, fibers, crystals, and other oriented forms of the recently discovered high-{Tc} class of superconducting ceramics, as well as other superconducting materials. It is also related to the use of these oriented materials in the manufacture of high quality permanent magnetic materials. This pretreatment optimizes the final crystallographic orientation and, thus, properties in these constructs. Such materials as superconducting fibers, needles and platelets are utilized. 11 figs.

Nellis, W.J.; Maple, M.B.

1990-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature superconducting magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Method and apparatus for making superconductive magnet coils  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A curved, shell-type magnet coil, adapted to be used in a superconducting magnet, is wound by providing a mandrel having a tubular cylindrical mid-portion terminating at both ends in tapered end portions formed with longitudinal slots having flexible fingers therebetween. An elongated electrical conductor is wound around an elongated oval-shaped pole island engaged with the outside of the cylindrical mid-portion, to form a multiplicity of oval-shaped turns engaged with a 180-degree segment of the mandrel. The coil turns have longitudinal portions with curved portions therebetween, engaging the tapered end portions of the mandrel. Upon completion of the winding, tapered expansion members are fully inserted into the tapered end portions, to displace the flexible fingers outwardly into a cylindrical form and to displace the curved portions of the turns into a shape conforming to such cylindrical form while also exerting increased tension upon the turns to minimize draping of the turns and to enhance the mechanical integrity of the coil. A half cylinder clamp may then be employed to clamp the coil, whereupon the coil may be solidified by the use of an epoxy adhesive.

Borden, A.R.

1983-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

202

Design options and trade-offs in superconducting magnetic energy storage with irreversible switching  

SciTech Connect

From symposium on technology of controlled thermonuclear fusion experiments and the engineering aspects of fusion reactors; Austin, Texas, USA (20 Nov 1973). A program is presently under way at Los Alamos to determine how superconducting magnetic energy storage in conjunction with normal-going superconducting switches can be made to deliver the energies of the order of 200 MJ that will be needed for plasma compression in a pulsed THETA -pinch scientific feasibility experiment. After a review of the circuit configurations, the properties of commercially available and of some developmental superconductors relevant to both the energy storage coil and to the switch are discussed. Critical current densities at low fields and stability requirements both with respect to rapidity changing external fields and to self fields are of particular importance in determining optimum operating fields and temperatures. The trade-off between eddy current losses in the stabilizing material and the need for coil protection if a coil normalcy should occur is described. Problems in potting or other forms of mechanical stabilization for both superconducting elements are pointed out. The experimental phenomenon of an only partially normalized superconducting switch is described as are the conditions for attaining fully normal resistance. A number of cryogenic engineering problems are discussed briefly, including the requirements for plastic, non-conducting dewars and for a staged refrigerator to re-cool the switch in the most economical manner. Results of 20-kJ energy-transfer experiments into both resistive and inductive loads are given and the design parameters are reported for a 300-kJ experiment now under construction. (auth)

Laquer, H.L.; Lindsay, J.D.G.; Little, E.M.; Rogers, J.D.; Weldon, D.M.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Fabrication experiences and operative characteristics of the U. S. SCMC superconducting dipole magnet for MHD research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. SCMS superconducting dipole magnet system consists of the superconducting magnet and its cryostat, a helium liquifier and refrigerator/liquifier facility, helium storage dewars, the transfer line, power supply, and a complete system for magnet instrumentations and control. The magnet system has been designed and built by Argonne National Laboratory. The entire magnet system was successfully tested to full design field in May 1977. It was then safely delivered to Moscow in June 1977, and the first energization of the magnet system is expected in early August 1977. The magnet design and the coil cryostability are reviewed; and the experiences of coil fabrication and coil assembly, magnet instrumentation and control, and results of magnet performance tests are described in detail.

Wang, S.T.; Niemann, R.C.; Kustom, R.L.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Magnetic and superconducting phase diagrams in ErNi2B2C  

SciTech Connect

We present measurements of the superconducting upper critical field Hc2(T) and the magneticphasediagram of the superconductor ErNi2B2C made with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The magnetic field was applied in the basal plane of the tetragonal crystal structure. We have found large gapless regions in the superconductingphasediagram of ErNi2B2C, extending between different magnetic transitions. A close correlation between magnetic transitions and Hc2(T) is found, showing that superconductivity is strongly linked to magnetism.

Galvis, J.A.; Crespo, M.; Guillamon, I.; Suderow, Hermann; Vieira, S.; Garcia Hernandez, M.; Budko, Serguei; Canfield, Paul

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

205

Electric Motors Using High Temperature Superconducting Materials Applied to Power Generating Station Equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large high-temperature superconducting (HTS) electric motors have the potential to operate with much greater efficiencies than conventional iron core induction motors of the same rating. This study describes the design and successful testing in the superconducting state of two synchronous motors, a 2 horsepower motor with stationary HTS field coils and a 5 horsepower motor with rotating HTS field coils.

1997-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

206

A 4 Tesla Superconducting Magnet Developed for a 6 Circle Huber Diffractometer at the XMaS Beamline  

SciTech Connect

We report here on the development and testing of a 4 Tesla cryogen free superconducting magnet designed to fit within the Euler cradle of a 6 circle Huber diffractometer, allowing scattering in both the vertical and horizontal planes. The geometry of this magnet allows the field to be applied in three orientations. The first being along the beam direction, the second with the field transverse to the beam direction a horizontal plane and finally the field can be applied vertically with respect to the beam. The magnet has a warm bore and an open geometry of 180 deg. , allowing large access to reciprocal space. A variable temperature insert has been developed, which is capable of working down to a temperature of 1.7 K and operating over a wide range of angles whilst maintaining a temperature stability of a few mK. Initial ferromagnetic diffraction measurements have been carried out on single crystal Tb and Dy samples.

Thompson, P. B. J.; Brown, S. D.; Bouchenoire, L.; Mannix, D. [XMaS, UK-CRG, ESRF, BP 220, F-38043 Grenoble CEDEX (France); Dept of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Paul, D. F. [XMaS, UK-CRG, ESRF, BP 220, F-38043 Grenoble CEDEX (France); Dept of Physics, University of Warwick, Gibbet Hill Road, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Lucas, C. A.; Kervin, J. [Dept of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Cooper, M. J. [Dept of Physics, University of Warwick, Gibbet Hill Road, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Arakawa, P.; Laughon, G. [American Magnetics Inc, P.O. Box2509, 112 Flint Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-2509 (United States)

2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

207

What Causes High-temperature Superconductivity? | U.S. DOE Office of  

Office of Science (SC) Website

What Causes High-temperature Superconductivity? What Causes High-temperature Superconductivity? Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) News & Resources Contact Information Basic Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-22/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3081 F: (301) 903-6594 E: sc.bes@science.doe.gov More Information » March 2013 What Causes High-temperature Superconductivity? A phase change at absolute zero temperature may provide key insights into the decades-old mystery of high-temperature superconductivity. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Click to enlarge photo. Enlarge Photo Image courtesy of Ames Laboratory

208

PURPA and Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage: Energy Conservation, Environmental Protection and Entrepreneurial Opportunity in the Next Technological Revolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE Corp. ,60 the Unitednational defense, 7 energy storage and environmental protec-and accompanying text. 8. Energy storage and the resulting

Bovett, Robert E.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

80 K anomaly and its effect on the superconducting and magnetic transition in deuterated {kappa}-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]Br  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we report careful transport and magnetic measurements on single crystals of deuterated {kappa}-(ET){sub 2}Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]Br. By cooling the sample at different rates, it is found that cooling through 80K has a dramatic effect on the normal state metal-insulator transition and the superconducting transition temperatures. In-plane resistivity depends strongly on the cooling rate for temperatures below 80K, above which all resistivity curves cooled at different rates converge. By comparing it with the nondeuterated salt and the quasi-1D Bechgaard salt, we speculate that 80K corresponds to a structural phase transition in the anion chain. Fast cooling through 80K will freeze the high temperature magnetic phase to low temperatures and the presence of local magnetic moments suppresses the superconducting T{sub c}. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

Su, X.; Zuo, F. [Department of Physics, University of Miami, Coral Gables, Florida 33124 (United States); Schlueter, J.A.; Kini, A.M.; Williams, J.M. [Chemistry and Materials Science Divisions, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Beam heating studies on an early model is a superconducting cosine theta magnet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Superconducting magnets for accelerators can be accidentally quenched by heat resulting from beam losses in the magnet. The threshold for such quenches is determined by the time structure of the beam loss and by details of the magnet application, construction and cooling. A 4.25 m long superconducting cosine theta dipole magnet, MARK VI, constructed during the research and development phase of the ISABELLE Project at BNL was installed in the 28.5 GeV/c primary proton beam line from the AGS. By energizing the magnet, the proton beam could be deflected into the magnet. The beam intensity required to quench the magnet was observed for different beam sizes and at several values of magnet current up to 2400 A or approximately 70% of the highest magnet operating current. The maximum current was limited by the gas-cooled power lead flow available using pool-boiling helium rather than single phase forced-flow helium at 5 atm for which the magnet system was designed. Details of the experimental setup including the magnet and cryogenic system, the beam-monitoring equipment and instrumentation are described. The measurements are discussed and compared with beam heating measurements made on another superconducting magnet and interpreted using the Cascade Simulation Program, CASIM.

Bozoki, G; Bunce, G; Danby, G; Foelsche, H; Jackson, J; Prodell, A; Soukas, A; Stevens, A; Stoehr, R; Weisenbloom, J

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Passive Superconducting Flux Conservers for Rotating-Magnetic-Field-Driven Field-Reversed Configurations  

SciTech Connect

The Princeton Field-Reversed Configuration (PFRC) experiment employs an odd-parity rotating magnetic field (RMFo) current drive and plasma heating system to form and sustain high-? plasmas. For radial confinement, an array of coaxial, internal, passive, flux-conserving (FC) rings applies magnetic pressure to the plasma while still allowing radio-frequency RMFo from external coils to reach the plasma. The 3 ms pulse duration of the present experiment is limited by the skin time (?fc) of its room-temperature copper FC rings. To explore plasma phenomena with longer characteristic times, the pulse duration of the next-generation PFRC-2 device will exceed 100 ms, necessitating FC rings with (?fc > 300 ms. In this paper we review the physics of internal, discrete, passive FCs and describe the evolution of the PFRC's FC array. We then detail new experiments that have produced higher performance FC rings that contain embedded high-temperature superconducting (HTS) tapes. Several HTS tape winding configurations have been studied and a wide range of extended skin times, from 0.4 s to over 103 s, has been achieved. The new FC rings must carry up to 3 kA of current to balance the expected PFRC-2 plasma pressure, so the dependence of the HTS-FC critical current on the winding configuration and temperature was also studied. From these experiments, the key HTS-FC design considerations have been identified and HTS-FC rings with the desired performance characteristics have been produced.

E. Oz, C.E. Myers, M.R. Edwards, B. Berlinger, A. Brooks, and S.A. Cohen

2011-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

212

Time-Resolved Magnetic Flux and AC-Current Distributions in Superconducting YBCO Thin Films and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Time-Resolved Magnetic Flux and AC-Current Distributions in Superconducting YBCO Thin Films magnetic field. We study the interaction behavior of YBCO thin films in an ac transport current and a dc the calibrated field profiles. The current density evolution in YBCO thin films is studied by TRMOI as a function

Lewis, Robert Michael

213

Quantum tunneling, quantum computing, and high temperature superconductivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this dissertation, I have studied four theoretical problems in quantum tunneling, quantum computing, and high-temperature superconductivity. I have developed a generally-useful numerical tool for analyzing impurity-induced resonant-state images observed with scanning tunneling microscope (STM) in high temperature superconductors. The integrated tunneling intensities on all predominant sites have been estimated. The results can be used to test the predictions of any tight-binding model calculation. I have numerically simulated two-dimensional time-dependent tunneling of a Gaussian wave packet through a barrier, which contains charged ions. We have found that a negative ion in the barrier directly below the tunneling tip can deflect the tunneling electrons and drastically reduce the probability for them to reach the point in the target plane directly below the tunneling tip. I have studied an infinite family of sure-success quantum algorithms, which are introduced by C.-R. Hu [Phys. Rev. A {\\bf 66}, 042301 (2002)], for solving a generalized Grover search problem. Rigorous proofs are found for several conjectures made by Hu and explicit equations are obtained for finding the values of two phase parameters which make the algorithms sure success. Using self-consistent Hartree-Fock theory, I have studied an extended Hubbard model which includes quasi-long-range Coulomb interaction between the holes (characterized by parameter V). I have found that for sufficiently large V/t, doubly-charged-antiphase-island do become energetically favored localized objects in this system for moderate values of U/t, thus supporting a recent conjecture by C.-R. Hu [Int. J. Mod. Phys. B {\\bf 17}, 3284 (2003)].

Wang, Qian

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Low-temperature synthesis of superconducting nanocrystalline MgB2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Magnesium diboride (MgB2) is considered a promising material for practical application in superconducting devices, with a transition temperature near 40 K. In the present paper, nanocrystalline MgB2 with an average particle size ...

Jun Lu; Zhili Xiao; Qiyin Lin; Helmut Claus; Zhigang Zak Fang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

To the Non-Local Theory of the High Temperature Superconductivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The possibility of the non local physics application in the theory of superconductivity is investigated. It is shown that by the superconducting conditions the relay ("estafette") motion of the soliton' system ("attice ion - electron") is realizing by the absence of chemical bonds. From the position of the quantum hydrodynamics the problem of creation of the high temperature superconductors leads to finding of materials which lattices could realize the soliton' motion without destruction. These materials should be created using the technology of quantum dots. Key words: Foundations of the theory of transport processes; The theory of solitons; Generalized hydrodynamic equations; Foundations of quantum mechanics; high temperature superconductivity.

Boris V. Alexeev

2012-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

216

Battery energy storage and superconducting magnetic energy storage for utility applications: A qualitative analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report was prepared at the request of the US Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Management for an objective comparison of the merits of battery energy storage with superconducting magnetic energy storage technology for utility applications. Conclusions are drawn regarding the best match of each technology with these utility application requirements. Staff from the Utility Battery Storage Systems Program and the superconductivity Programs at Sandia National contributed to this effort.

Akhil, A.A.; Butler, P.; Bickel, T.C.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Development of practical high temperature superconducting wire for electric power applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The technology of high temperature superconductivity has gone from beyond mere scientific curiosity into the manufacturing environment. Single lengths of multifilamentary wire are now produced that are over 200 meters long and that carry over 13 amperes at 77 K. Short-sample critical current densities approach 5 {times} 10{sup 4} A/cm{sup 2} at 77 K. Conductor requirements such as high critical current density in a magnetic field, strain-tolerant sheathing materials, and other engineering properties are addressed. A new process for fabricating round BSCCO-2212 wire has produced wires with critical current densities as high as 165,000 A/cm{sup 2} at 4.2 K and 53,000 A/cm{sup 2} at 40 K. This process eliminates the costly, multiple pressing and rolling steps that are commonly used to develop texture in the wires. New multifilamentary wires with strengthened sheathing materials have shown improved yield strengths up to a factor of five better than those made with pure silver. Many electric power devices require the wire to be formed into coils for production of strong magnetic fields. Requirements for coils and magnets for electric power applications are described.

Hawsey, R.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Sokolowski, R.S.; Haldar, P. [Intermagnetics General Corp., Latham, NY (United States); Motowidlo, L.R. [IGC/Advanced Superconductors, Inc., Waterbury, CT (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Improving the design and analysis of superconducting magnets for particle accelerators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High energy particle accelerators are now the primary means of discovering the basic building blocks of matter and understanding the forces between them. In order to minimize the cost of building these machines, superconducting magnets are used in essentially all present day high energy proton and heavy ion colliders. The cost of superconducting magnets is typically in the range of 20--30% of the total cost of building such machines. The circulating particle beam goes through these magnets a large number of times (over hundreds of millions). The luminosity performance and life time of the beam in these machines depends significantly on the field quality in these magnets. Therefore, even a small error in the magnetic field shape may create a large cumulative effect in the beam trajectory to throw the particles of the magnet aperture. The superconducting accelerator magnets must, therefore, be designed and constructed so that these errors are small. In this thesis the research and development work will be described 3which has resulted in significant improvements in the field quality of the superconducting magnets for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The design and the field quality improvements in the prototype of the main collider dipole magnet for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) will also be presented. RHIC will accelerate and collide two counter rotating beams of heavy ions up to 100 GeV/u and protons up to 250 GeV. It is expected that RHIC will create a hot, dense quark-gluon plasma and the conditions which, according to the Big Bang theory, existed in the early universe.

Gupta, R.C. [Univ. of Rajasthan, Jaipur (India). Dept. of Physics]|[Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Magnet Div.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Superconducting Magnet for Non-Neutral Plasma Research Alexei V. Dudarev, Victor E. Keilin, Nicolai Ph. Kopeikin, Igor O. Shugaev,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Superconducting Magnet for Non-Neutral Plasma Research Alexei V. Dudarev, Victor E. Keilin, Nicolai-7300 Abstract -- A superconducting magnet intended for non- neutral electron plasma research has been developed. Non-neutral plasma research is applicable to several other physics disciplines, such as two

California at Berkeley, University of

220

Engineering Nanocolumnar Defect Configurations for Optimized Vortex Pinning in High Temperature Superconducting Nanocomposite Wires  

SciTech Connect

High temperature superconducting (HTS), coated conductor wires based on nanocomposite films containing self-assembled, insulating BaZrO3 (BZO) nanocolumnar defects have previously been reported to exhibit enhanced vortex pinning. Here, we report on microstructural design via control of BZO nanocolumns density in YBa2Cu3O7- (YBCO)+BZO nancomposite films to achieve the highest critical current density, Jc(H, ,T). X-ray diffraction and microstructural examination shows increasing number density of epitaxial BZO nanocolumns in the highly cube-textured YBCO matrix with increasing nominal BZO additions. Transport property measurement reveals that an increase in BZO content upto 4 vol% is required to sustain the highest pinning and Jc performance as the magnetic field increases. By growing thicker, single-layer nanocomposite films (~4 m) with controlled density of BZO columnar defects, the critical current (Ic) of ~1000 A/cm at 77 K, self-field and the minimum Ic of 455 A/cm at 65 K and 3 T for all magnetic field orientations were obtained. This is the highest Ic reported to date for films on metallic templates which are the basis for the 2nd generation, coated conductor-based HTS wires.

Wee, Sung Hun [ORNL; Zuev, Yuri L [ORNL; Cantoni, Claudia [ORNL; Goyal, Amit [ORNL; Ahuja, Raj [Waukesha Electric Systems Inc.; Abiade, J. [North Carolina A& T State University

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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221

Cryogenic aspects of the experience in operating the U-25 superconducting MHD magnet in conjunction with the MHD generator  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to facilitate the rapid development of MHD technology for the generation of electrical energy, the U.S. and U.S.S.R. are jointly conducting research within the framework of the Program of Scientific and Technical Cooperation. The Institute for High Temperature (IVTAN) of the U.S.S.R. has designed and fabricated a special MHD facility which uses as its base much of the equipment of the existing U-25 Facility. The new MHD fow train consisting of a combustor, magnet, channel, and diffuser is named U-25B. The U.S. has provided a superconducting magnet system for the U-25B MHD Facility. As a result of these joint efforts, a unique and broad range of experimental test conditions similar to those that will exist in operation of commercial MHD generators has been created. The United States Superconducting Magnet System (U.S. SCMS) was designed, fabricated, and delivered to the U-25B Facility by the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy. The following description focuses on the cryogenic-related aspects of the magnet system commissioning and operation in the U.S.S.R.

Niemann, R.C.; Mataya, K.F.; Smith, R.P.; McWilliams, D.A.; Borden, R.; Streeter, M.H.; Wickson, R.; Privalov, N.P.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Stripes and superconductivity in cuprate superconductors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One type of order that has been observed to compete with superconductivity in cuprates involves alternating charge and antiferromagnetic stripes. Recent neutron scattering studies indicate that the magnetic excitation spectrum of a stripe-ordered sample is very similar to that observed in superconducting samples. In fact, it now appears that there may be a universal magnetic spectrum for the cuprates. One likely implication of this universal spectrum is that stripes of a dynamic form are present in the superconducting samples. On cooling through the superconducting transition temperature, a gap opens in the magnetic spectrum, and the weight lost at low energy piles up above the gap; the transition temperature is correlated with the size of the spin gap. Depending on the magnitude of the spin gap with respect to the magnetic spectrum, the enhanced magnetic scattering at low temperature can be either commensurate or incommensurate. Connections between stripe correlations and superconductivity are discussed.

J. M. Tranquada

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

STRIPES AND SUPERCONDUCTIVITY IN CUPRATE SUPERCONDUCTORS  

SciTech Connect

One type of order that has been observed to compete with superconductivity in cuprates involves alternating charge and antiferromagnetic stripes. Recent neutron scattering studies indicate that the magnetic excitation spectrum of a stripe-ordered sample is very similar to that observed in superconducting samples. In fact, it now appears that there may be a universal magnetic spectrum for the cuprates. One likely implication of this universal spectrum is that stripes of a dynamic form are present in the superconducting samples. On cooling through the superconducting transition temperature, a gap opens in the magnetic spectrum, and the weight lost at low energy piles up above the gap; the transition temperature is correlated with the size of the spin gap. Depending on the magnitude of the spin gap with respect to the magnetic spectrum, the enhanced magnetic scattering at low temperature can be either commensurate or incommensurate. Connections between stripe correlations and superconductivity are discussed.

TRANQUADA, J.M.

2005-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

224

Design studies of superconducting cos? magnets for a fast-pulsed synchrotron  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BNL-68235-AB BNL-68235-AB Abstract submitted to the 17 th International Conference on Magnet Technology (MT-17), Geneva, Switzerland, September 24-28, 2001 Design studies of superconducting cosθ θ θ θ magnets for a fast-pulsed synchrotron M. Wilson, G. Moritz, G. Ganetis, A. K. Ghosh, A. Jain, J. Muratore, R. Thomas, P. Wanderer, W. Hassenzahl Part of the GSI future project is an accelerator facility with two synchrotron rings in the same tunnel. The lower and upper rings have a rigidity of 100 and 200 Tm respectively. The upper ring will be equipped with superconducting cosθ magnets. The dipoles will be operated with fields up to 4 T and ramp rates up to 4 T/s and will be similar to the RHIC- dipoles. The challenge in building such magnets is the high ramp rate. Induced coupling and persistent

225

Soft magnetic lithography and giant magnetoresistance in superconducting/ferromagnetic hybrids.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We demonstrate an approach to create a tunable pinning potential in a superconducting/ferromagnetic (SC/FM) hybrid, allowing the switching of their electronic properties through the application of a small magnetic field. Using direct magneto-optical imaging, macroscopic transport, and magnetic measurements, we show that the alignment of stripe domains in the ferromagnet provides a remarkable directionality for the superconducting vortex motion. An analysis of the anisotropic flux motion demonstrates a substantial critical current anisotropy in the superconductor. The possibility of aligning stable lattices of stripe domains in select directions using in-plane magnetic fields allows the realization of soft magnetic lithography for efficient manipulation of supercurrent flow in SC/FM bilayers. Furthermore, in our samples we observed a pronounced magnetoresistance effect yielding 4 orders of magnitude resistivity change in a few millitesla in-plane field.

Vlasko-Vlasov, V.; Welp, U.; Imre, A.; Rosenmann, D.; Pearson, J.; Kwok, W. K.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Evaluation of Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage for San Diego Gas and Electric Company  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By providing rapid-response, real-power (P) or reactive-power (Q) modulation, superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) devices can increase power transfer capabilities. This report documents two phases of a technical study to determine potential benefits of locating a SMES unit at San Diego Gas and Electric's Blythe site.

1997-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

227

Design and cost of a utility scale superconducting magnetic energy storage plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) has potential as a viable technology for use in electric utility load leveling. The advantage of SMES over other energy storage technologies is its high net roundtrip energy efficiency. This paper reports the major features and costs of a jointly developed 5000 MWh SMES plant design.

Loyd, R.J.; Nakamura, T.; Schoenung, S.M.; Lieurance, D.W.; Hilal, M.A.; Rogers, J.D.; Purcell, J.R.; Hassenzahl, W.V.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Feasibility of detecting artificial magnetic anomalies in hydrofractured rock by superconducting gradiometer-SQUID systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study of the signal physics of magnetic anomaly detection by superconducting gradiometer-SQUID systems to determine the feasibility of possible applications to the geothermal energy program is described. The system would make full use of the incredible sensitivity of the superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) which can be in the range of 10/sup -11/ Oe. In addition to magnetic anomalies in the earth's field produced by spherical distributions of magnetic matter, anomalies that would be artificially produced by flooding magnetic material into cracks produced by hydrofracturing in deep boreholes drilled into dry rock geothermal sources are considered. The study indicates that surface detection by horizontal and vertical gradiometers of crack anomalies will not be feasible if the magnetic material flooding the crack is a paramagnetic solution. However, one can concoct a slurry to carry prepolarized ferromagnetic particles of a size sufficiently large to permit domain formation but small enough to permit rotation and alignment in the earth's field. In this case, the anomaly signal is large enough to permit extraction of anomaly orientation information out of the background of magnetic noise and earth's field gradients. The superconducting gradiometer-SQUID system is shown to be exceptional in its capability of removing undesirable magnetic noise and gradients. The greatest promise was found in systems that would be comprised of a magnetometer or gradiometer that could be lowered into the borehole to positions opposite the formations cracked by hydrofracturing. The use of a paramagnetic material to produce the artificial anomaly will not provide signals of sufficient amplitude to overcome the magnetic noise. However, the slurry containing only one percent by volume of ferromagnetic particles will produce a crack anomaly that is easily detectable by magnetometer or by the superconducting gradiometer-SQUID system.

Overton, W.C. Jr.

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Mechanical design and analysis of an eight-pole superconducting vector magnet for soft x-ray magnetic dichroism measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An eight-pole superconducting magnet is being developed for soft x-ray magnetic dichroism (XMD) experiments at the Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkley National Laboratory (LBNL). Eight conical Nb{sub 3}Sn coils with Holmium poles are arranged in octahedral symmetry to form four dipole pairs that provide magnetic fields of up to 5 T in any direction relative to the incoming x-ray beam. The dimensions of the magnet yoke as well as pole taper, diameter, and length were optimized for maximum peak field in the magnet center using the software package TOSCA. The structural analysis of the magnet is performed using ANSYS with the coil properties derived using a numerical homogenization scheme. It is found that the use of orthotropic material properties for the coil has an important influence in the design of the magnet.

Arbelaez, D.; Black, A.; Prestemon, S.O.; Wang, S.; Chen, J.; Arenholz, E.

2010-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

230

Measuring the Magnetic Center Behavior of an ILC Superconducting Quadrupole Prototype  

SciTech Connect

The main linacs of the proposed International Linear Collider (ILC) consist of superconducting cavities operated at 2K. The accelerating cavities are contained in a contiguous series of cryogenic modules that also house the main linac quadrupoles, thus the quadrupoles also need to be superconducting. In an early ILC design, these magnets are about 0.6 m long, have cos (2{theta}) coils, and operate at constant field gradients up to 60 T/m. In order to preserve the small beam emittances in the ILC linacs, the e+ and e- beams need to traverse the quadrupoles near their magnetic centers. A quadrupole shunting technique is used to measure the quadrupole alignment with the beams; this process requires the magnetic centers move by no more than about 5 micrometers when their strength is changed. To determine if such tight stability is achievable in a superconducting quadrupole, we at SLAC measured the magnetic center motions in a prototype ILC quadrupole built at CIEMAT in Spain. A rotating coil technique was used with a better than 0.1 micrometer precision in the relative field center position, and less than a 2 micrometer systematic error over 30 minutes. This paper describes the warm-bore cryomodule that houses the quadrupole in its Helium vessel, the magnetic center measurement system, the measured center data and strength and harmonics magnetic data.

Spencer, Cherrill M.; Adolphsen, Chris; Berndt, Martin; Jensen, David R.; Rogers, Ron; Sheppard, John C.; Lorant, Steve St; Weber, Thomas B.; Weisend, John, II; /SLAC; Brueck, Heinrich; /DESY; Toral, Fernando; /Madrid, CIEMAT

2011-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

231

High temperature superconducting current lead test facility with heat pipe intercepts  

SciTech Connect

A high temperature superconducting (HTS) current lead test facility using heat pipe thermal intercepts is under development at the Superconducting Technology Center at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The facility can be configured for tests at currents up to 1,000 A. Mechanical cryocoolers provide refrigeration to the leads. Electrical isolation is maintained by intercepting thermal energy from the leads through cryogenic heat pipes. HST lead warm end temperature is variable from 65 K to over 90 K by controlling heat pipe evaporator temperature. Cold end temperature is variable up to 30 K. Performance predictions in terms of heat pipe evaporator temperature as a function of lead current are presented for the initial facility configuration, which supports testing up to 200 A. Measurements are to include temperature and voltage gradient in the conventional and HTS lead sections, temperature and heat transfer rate in the heat pipes. as well as optimum and off-optimum performance of the conventional lead sections.

Blumenfeld, P.E.; Prenger, C.; Roth, E.W.; Stewart, J.A.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

232

Low-temperature magnetization of (Ga,Mn) As semiconductors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on a comprehensive study of the ferromagnetic moment per Mn atom in (Ga,Mn)As ferromagnetic semiconductors. Theoretical discussion is based on microscopic calculations and on an effective model of Mn local moments antiferromagnetically coupled to valence band hole spins. The validity of the effective model over the range of doping studied is assessed by comparing with microscopic tight-binding/coherent-potential approximation calculations. Using the virtual crystal k center dot p model for hole states, we evaluate the zero-temperature mean-field contributions to the magnetization from the hole kinetic and exchange energies, and magnetization suppression due to quantum fluctuations of Mn moment orientations around their mean-field ground state values. Experimental low-temperature ferromagnetic moments per Mn are obtained by superconducting quantum interference device and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements in a series of (Ga,Mn)As semiconductors with nominal Mn doping ranging from similar to 2 to 8%. Hall measurements in as-grown and annealed samples are used to estimate the number of uncompensated substitutional Mn moments. Based on our comparison between experiment and theory we conclude that all these Mn moments in high quality (Ga,Mn)As materials have nearly parallel ground state alignment.

Jungwirth, T.; Masek, J.; Wang, KY; Edmonds, KW; Sawicki, M.; Polini, M.; Sinova, Jairo; MacDonald, AH; Campion, RP; Zhao, LX; Farley, NRS; Johal, TK; van der Laan, G.; Foxon, CT; Gallagher, BL.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

SciTech Connect: "high temperature superconductivity"  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

high temperature superconductivity" Find high temperature superconductivity" Find How should I search Scitech Connect ... Basic or Advanced? Basic Search Advanced × Advanced Search Options Full Text: Bibliographic Data: Creator / Author: Name Name ORCID Title: Subject: Identifier Numbers: Research Org.: Sponsoring Org.: Site: All Alaska Power Administration, Juneau, Alaska (United States) Albany Research Center (ARC), Albany, OR (United States) Albuquerque Complex - NNSA Albuquerque Operations Office, Albuquerque, NM (United States) Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium, Amarillo, TX (United States) Ames Laboratory (AMES), Ames, IA (United States) Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States) Argonne National Laboratory-Advanced Photon Source (United States) Atlanta Regional Office,

234

Superconductivity | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Highlights Research Highlights Superconductivity Neutron diffraction reveals semiconducting phase and contributes to new understanding of iron-based superconductors Contact: Huibo Cao New VULCAN tests of Japanese cable for US ITER's central magnet system (2012) Contact: Ke An ARCS maps collaborative magnetic spin behavior in iron telluride (2011) Published Work: "Unconventional Temperature Enhanced Magnetism in Fe1:1Te" Contact: Igor Zaliznyak Doug Scalapino discusses "common thread" linking unconventional superconducting materials (2011) Contact: Douglas Scalapino Materials Engineering Research at SNS Helps International Collaboration on Fusion Energy Scientists and engineers at ORNL are working with the ITER Organization and the Japanese Atomic Energy Agency to resolve issues with a critical

235

200-GeV ISA with room temperature magnets  

SciTech Connect

A conceptual design study of 200-GeV proton intersecting storage accclerators with room temperature magnets is presented. The key to this study was thc desire to keep the electric power consumptiom to an acceptable level (40 MW). The design has been optimized by choosing small-gap (4 cm) aluminum coil dipoles operating at about 15 kG. The luminosity of this machine is limited to about 10/sup 32/ cm-/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/ by transverse space-charg e effects. An order of magnitude higher luminositics can be obtained by adding a booster of modest cost. A novel vacuum system using distributed Ti-sublimation pumps results in considerable savings. A cost comparison with a high-luminosity superconducting machine is given. (auth)

Willis, W.J.; Danby, G.T.; Hahn, H.; Halama, H.J.; Maschke, A.W.; Month, M.; Parzen, G.; Polk, I.

1974-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

236

AB Electronic Tubes and Quasi-Superconductivity at Room Temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Author offers and researches a new idea - filling tubes by electronic gases. He shows: If the insulating envelope (cover) of the tube is charged positively, the electrons within the tube are not attracted to covering. Tube (as a whole) remains a neutral (uncharged) body. The electron gas in the tube has very low density and very high conductivity, close to superconductivity. If we take the density (pressure) of electron gas as equal to atmospheric pressure, the thickness of insulator film may be very small and the resulting tube is very light. Author shows the offered tubes can be applied to many technical fields. For example: (1) Transfer of energy over very long distance with very small electric losses. (2) Design of cheap high altitude electric lines without masts. (3) Transfer of energy from one continent to another continent through the ionosphere. (4) Transfer of a plasma beam (which can convey thrust and energy) from Earth surface to a space ship. (5) Observation of the sky by telescope without atmospheric hindrances. (6) Dirigibles (air balloons) of the highest lift force. (7) Increasing of gun range severalfold. (8) Transfer of matter. And so on. Key words: AB tubes, electronic tubes, superconductivity, transmission energy.

Alexander Bolonkin

2008-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

237

IMPROVING THE DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETS FOR PARTICLE ACCELERATORS  

SciTech Connect

The field quality in superconducting magnets has been improved to a level that it does not appear to be a limiting factor on the performance of RHIC. The many methods developed, improved and adopted during the course of this work have contributed significantly to that performance. One can not only design and construct magnets with better field quality than in one made before but can also improve on that quality after construction. The relative field error ({Delta}B/B) can now be made as low as a few parts in 10{sup {minus}5} at 2/3 of the coil radius. This is about an order of magnitude better than what is generally expected for superconducting magnets. This extra high field quality is crucial to the luminosity performance of RHIC. The research work described here covers a number of areas which all must be addressed to build the production magnets with a high field quality. The work has been limited to the magnetic design of the cross section which in most cases essentially determines the field quality performance of the whole magnet since these magnets are generally long. Though the conclusions to be presented in this chapter have been discussed at the end of each chapter, a summary of them might be useful to present a complete picture. The lessons learned from these experiences may be useful in the design of new magnets. The possibilities of future improvements will also be presented.

GUPTA,R.C.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

30-MJ superconducting magnetic energy storage for electric-transmission stabilization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration operates the electric power transmission system that connects the Pacific Northwest and southern California. The HVAC interties develop 0.35 Hz oscillations when the lines are heavily loaded. A 30 MJ (8.4 kWh) Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) unit with a 10 MW converter can provide system damping for the oscillation. The unit is scheduled for installation in 1982 and operation in 1982-83. Status of the project is described. The conductor has been fully tested electrically and mechanically and the 5 kA superconducting cable has been produced. The 30 MJ superconducting coil is essentially complete. All major components of the electrical and cryogenic systems except the nonconducting dewar have been completed. The refrigerator and converter are undergoing tests. The system is to be located at the BPA Tacoma Substation and operated by microwave link from Portland, OR.

Turner, R.D.; Rogers, J.D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Comparative Assessment of Direct Drive High Temperature Superconducting Generators in Multi-Megawatt Class Wind Turbines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the work completed under the CRADA between NREL and American Superconductor (AMSC). The CRADA combined NREL and AMSC resources to benchmark high temperature superconducting direct drive (HTSDD) generator technology by integrating the technologies into a conceptual wind turbine design, and comparing the design to geared drive and permanent magnet direct drive (PMDD) wind turbine configurations. Analysis was accomplished by upgrading the NREL Wind Turbine Design Cost and Scaling Model to represent geared and PMDD turbines at machine ratings up to 10 MW and then comparing cost and mass figures of AMSC's HTSDD wind turbine designs to theoretical geared and PMDD turbine designs at 3.1, 6, and 10 MW sizes. Based on the cost and performance data supplied by AMSC, HTSDD technology has good potential to compete successfully as an alternative technology to PMDD and geared technology turbines in the multi megawatt classes. In addition, data suggests the economics of HTSDD turbines improve with increasing size, although several uncertainties remain for all machines in the 6 to 10 MW class.

Maples, B.; Hand, M.; Musial, W.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Comparative Assessment of Direct Drive High Temperature Superconducting Generators in Multi-Megawatt Class Wind Turbines  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the work completed under the CRADA between NREL and American Superconductor (AMSC). The CRADA combined NREL and AMSC resources to benchmark high temperature superconducting direct drive (HTSDD) generator technology by integrating the technologies into a conceptual wind turbine design, and comparing the design to geared drive and permanent magnet direct drive (PMDD) wind turbine configurations. Analysis was accomplished by upgrading the NREL Wind Turbine Design Cost and Scaling Model to represent geared and PMDD turbines at machine ratings up to 10 MW and then comparing cost and mass figures of AMSC's HTSDD wind turbine designs to theoretical geared and PMDD turbine designs at 3.1, 6, and 10 MW sizes. Based on the cost and performance data supplied by AMSC, HTSDD technology has good potential to compete successfully as an alternative technology to PMDD and geared technology turbines in the multi megawatt classes. In addition, data suggests the economics of HTSDD turbines improve with increasing size, although several uncertainties remain for all machines in the 6 to 10 MW class.

Maples, B.; Hand, M.; Musial, W.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature superconducting magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Nuclear Magnetism and Superconductivity: Investigations on Lithium and Rhodium.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis describes low temperature experiments on lithium. The experiments concentrate on investigating low temperature phase transitions of two subsystems in this metal: its nuclear… (more)

Juntunen, Kirsi

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Nuclear magnetism and superconductivity : investigations on lithium and rhodium.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis describes low temperature experiments on lithium. The experiments concentrate on investigating low temperature phase transitions of two subsystems in this metal: its nuclear… (more)

Juntunen, Kirsi

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Pulsed laser processing of high temperature superconducting thin films  

SciTech Connect

Systematic studies of the effects of pulsed laser deposition processing parameters on plume dynamics and resultant film properties have been performed. Plume angular distributions, cos{sup m}({theta}), were observed to be variable between 1 > m > 10 depending on laser energy density and spot size. Under optimized conditions, epitaxial, superconducting thin films could be grown in-situ on a variety of single-crystal substrates. High quality, 200 nm thick films were obtained at deposition rates approaching 15 nm/sec. Additionally, the patterning of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} thin films has been achieved by a process which combines thermal oxygen diffusion and laser annealing. This process is performed under relatively mild conditions which allows the structural integrity of the films to be preserved. 9 refs., 6 figs.

Muenchausen, R.E.; Dye, R.C.; Estler, R.C.; Foltyn, S.; Garcia, A.R.; Hubbard, K.M.; Nogar, N.S.; Wu, X.D. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Carim, A.; Mukherjee, A.; Brueck, S.R.J. (New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Production of Low-Carbon Magnetic Steel for the LHC Superconducting Dipole and Quadrupole Magnets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 1996 CERN negotiated a contract with Cockerill Sambre â?? ARCELOR Group for the supply of 50 000 tonnes of low-carbon steel for the LHC main magnets: this was the first contract to be placed for the project, and one of the single largest. In 2005 â?? after nine years of work â?? the contract is being successfully completed. This paper describes the steel specifically developed, known as MAGNETILâ?¢, its manufacturing and quality control process, organization of production, logistics and contract follow-up. Extensive statistics have been collected relating to physical, mechanical and technological parameters. Specific attention is dedicated to magnetic measurements (coercivity and permeability) performed at both room and cryogenic temperatures, the equipment used and statistical results. Reference is also made to the resulting precision of the fineblanked laminations used for the magnet yoke. The technology transfer from the particle accelerator domain to industry is ongoing, for example for ...

Bertinelli, F; Harlet, P; Peiro, G; Russo, A; Taquet, A

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

A Beamline for High-Pressure Studies at the Advanced Light Source with a Superconducting Bending Magnet as the Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a relatively low-energy (keV. The beam size in the ALS is small, due to the smallCompared to the prototype ALS superconducting bend magnet

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Electronic and magnetic phase diagram of [Beta]Fe[subscript1.01]Se with superconductivity at 36.7 K under pressure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The discovery of new high-temperature superconductors based on FeAs has led to a new 'gold rush' in high-T{sub C} superconductivity. All of the new superconductors share the same common structural motif of FeAs layers and reach T{sub C} values up to 55 K. Recently, superconductivity has been reported in FeSe, which has the same iron pnictide layer structure, but without separating layers. Here, we report the magnetic and electronic phase diagram of {beta}-Fe{sub 1.01}Se as a function of temperature and pressure. The superconducting transition temperature increases from 8.5 to 36.7 K under an applied pressure of 8.9 GPa. It then decreases at higher pressures. A marked change in volume is observed at the same time as T{sub C} rises, owing to a collapse of the separation between the Fe{sub 2}Se{sub 2} layers. No static magnetic ordering is observed for the whole p-T phase diagram. We also report that at higher pressures (starting around 7 GPa and completed at 38 GPa), Fe{sub 1.01}Se transforms to a hexagonal NiAs-type structure and exhibits non-magnetic behavior.

Medvedev, S.; McQueen, T.M.; Troyan, I.A.; Palasyuk, T.; Eremets, M.I.; Cava, R.J.; Naghavi, S.; Casper, F.; Ksenofontov, V.; Wortmann, G.; Felser, C.; (Paderborn); (MXPL-M); (Mainz); (Princeton)

2010-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

247

A Possible Pressure-Induced High-Temperature-Superconducting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Materials Forensics, Three-dimensional Modeling and Fractal Characterization · Vortex Physics in Oxide and Pnictide High Temperature Superconductors.

248

CRITICAL FIELD FOR SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND LOW-TEMPERATURE NORMAL-STATE HEAT CAPACITY OF TUNGSTEN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

y CRITICAL FIELD FOR SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND LOW-TEMPERATURECritical Field for Superconductivity and Low-Temperaturemagnetic field for superconductivity In tungsten from 5.5 to

Triplett, B.B.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Application of high temperature superconductors to high-gradient magnetic separation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High Gradient Magnetic Separation (HGMS) is a powerful technique which can be used to separate widely dispersed contaminants from a host material, This technology can separate magnetic solids from other solids, liquids or gases. As the name implies HGMS uses large magnetic field gradients to separate ferromagnetic and paramagnetic particles. HGMS separators usually consist of a high-field solenoid magnet, the bore of which contains a fine-structured, ferromagnetic matrix material. The matrix material locally distorts the magnetic field and creates large field gradients in the vicinity of the matrix elements. These elements then become trapping sites for magnetic particles and are the basis for the magnetic separation. In this paper we discuss the design and construction of a prototype HGMS unit using a magnet made with high temperature superconductors (HTS). The prototype consists of an outer vacuum vessel which contains the HTS solenoid magnet The magnet is surrounded by a thermal radiation shield and multilayer insulation (MLI) blankets. The magnet, thermal shield and current leads all operate in a vacuum and are cooled by a cryocooler. High temperature superconducting current leads are used to reduce the heat leak from the ambient environment to the HTS magnet.

Daugherty, M.A.; Prenger, F.C.; Hill, D.D.; Daney, D.E.; Worl, L.W.; Schake, A.R.; Padilla, D.D.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Temperature and frequency effects in a high-performance superconducting bearing.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A high-temperature superconducting (HTS) bearing was fabricated and tested by itself and as a component in a 1-kWh and a 10-kWh flywheel energy system (FES). The rotational losses of the HTS bearing as a function of rotational rate and HTS temperature were determined. The 1-kWh FES was tested with a motor/generator and with an eddy current clutch to determine the motor/generator losses.

Day, A. C.; Hull, J. R.; Strasik, M.; Johnson, P. E.; McCrary, K. E.; Edwards, J.; Mittleider, J.; Schindler, J. R.; Hawkins, R. A.; Yoder, M.

2002-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

251

Plant and operational features of the BPA 30 MJ superconducting magnetic energy storage system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 30 MJ superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) system was designed and developed for application in the Western US Power System to damp power oscillations that limit high voltage ac transmission. The system is in place at the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Tacoma Substation and has been in an experimental use for over a year. Extended operations of the unit have been undertaken with success. The physical, electrical, and operational features of the SMES system are given.

Rogers, J.D.; Hauer, J.F.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

30 MJ superconducting magnetic energy storage stabilizing coil. Final report for construction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers Phase II, Fabrication and Delivery of the 30 MJ Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage Stabilizing Coil. A history of the manufacturing and assembly phase of the magnet is presented. Major problems and solutions are summarized, and illustrations of the major operations are provided. The Quality Assurance program is described with a listing of all nonconformance reports. Design documentation is provided, including a Design Document Index, monthly progress reports, and a list of papers given on the project. Appendices to the report contain copies of released and revised design calculations, test reports, assembly procedure, and nonconformance reports and engineering dispositions.

NONE

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Assessment of biological effects associated with magnetic fields from a superconducting magnetic energy storage plant: Final report. [Contains glossary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides a detailed evaluation of the potential biological effects of fringe magnetic fields associated with a superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) plant. The aspects of magnetic fields that are discussed include mechanisms of interaction of static and slowly time-varying magnetic fields with living systems; biological effects of magnetic fields on human and subhuman species, including the results of both laboratory studies and human epidemiological surveys; physical hazards posed by the interactions of magnetic fields with metallic implants, e.g., aneurysm clips and prostheses, and with medical electronic devices such as cardiac pacemakers; extant guidelines for occupational exposure to magnetic fields are summarized; recommendations for defining acceptable levels of exposure to SMES magnetic fields by occupational personnel and the population-at-large; and recommendations concerning several areas of research that would further our understanding of magnetic field interactions with living systems, and would provide additional elements of information required for the development of future exposure standards. 328 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs.

Tenforde, T.S.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Temperature Measurements in the Magnetic Measurement Facility  

SciTech Connect

Several key LCLS undulator parameter values depend strongly on temperature primarily because of the permanent magnet material the undulators are constructed with. The undulators will be tuned to have specific parameter values in the Magnetic Measurement Facility (MMF). Consequently, it is necessary for the temperature of the MMF to remain fairly constant. Requirements on undulator temperature have been established. When in use, the undulator temperature will be in the range 20.0 {+-} 0.2 C. In the MMF, the undulator tuning will be done at 20.0 {+-} 0.1 C. For special studies, the MMF temperature set point can be changed to a value between 18 C and 23 C with stability of {+-}0.1 C. In order to ensure that the MMF temperature requirements are met, the MMF must have a system to measure temperatures. The accuracy of the MMF temperature measurement system must be better than the {+-}0.1 C undulator tuning temperature tolerance, and is taken to be {+-}0.01 C. The temperature measurement system for the MMF is under construction. It is similar to a prototype system we built two years ago in the Sector 10 alignment lab at SLAC. At that time, our goal was to measure the lab temperature to {+-}0.1 C. The system has worked well for two years and has maintained its accuracy. For the MMF system, we propose better sensors and a more extensive calibration program to achieve the factor of 10 increase in accuracy. In this note we describe the measurement system under construction. We motivate our choice of system components and give an overview of the system. Most of the software for the system has been written and will be discussed. We discuss error sources in temperature measurements and show how these errors have been dealt with. The calibration system is described in detail. All the LCLS undulators must be tuned in the Magnetic Measurement Facility at the same temperature to within {+-}0.1 C. In order to ensure this, we are building a system to measure the temperature of the undulators to {+-}0.01 C. This note describes the temperature measurement system under construction.

Wolf, Zachary

2010-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

255

Toward material-specific simulations of high temperature superconductivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High temperature superconductors could potentially revolutionize the use and transmission of electric power. This along with intriguing scientific questions have motivated an enormous research effort over the past twenty years, since the discovery of ...

Thomas C. Schulthess

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Solution of thin film magnetization problems in type-II superconductivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: critical current, numerical solution, superconductivity, thin film, variational inequality

Leonid Prigozhin

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

The Astromag Superconducting Magnet Facility Configured for a FreeFlying Satellite  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

ASTROMAG is a particle astrophysics facility that was originally configured for the Space Station. The heart of the ASTROMAG facility is a large superconducting magnet which is cooled using superfluid helium. The task of resizing the facility so that it will fly in a satellite in. a high angle of inclination orbit is driven by the launch weight capability of the launch rocket and the desire to be able to do nearly the same physics as the Space Station version of ASTROMAG. In order to reduce the launch weight, the magnet and its cryogenic system had to be downsized, yet the integrated field generated by the magnet in the particle detectors has to match the Space Station version of the magnet. The use of aluminum matrix superconductor and oriented composite materials in the magnet insulation permits one to achieve this goal. The net magnetic dipole moment from the ASTROMAG magnet must be small to minimize the torque due to interaction with the earth's magnetic field. The ASTROMAG magnet consists of identical two coils 1.67 meters apart. The two coils are connected in series in persistent mode. Each coil is designed to carry 2.34 million ampere turns. Both coils are mounted on the same magnetic axis and they operate at opposite polarity. This reduces the dipole moment by a factor of more than 1000. This is tolerable for the Space Station version of the magnet. A magnet operating on a free flying satellite requires additional compensation. This report presents the magnet parameters of a free flying version of ASTROMAG and the parameters of the space cryogenic system for the magnet.

Green, M.A.; Smoot, George F.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Heat leak testing of a superconducting RHIC dipole magnet at Brookhaven National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Brookhaven National Laboratory is currently performing heat load tests on a superconducting dipole magnet. The magnet is a prototype of the 360, 8 cm bore, arc dipole magnets that will be used in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RMC). An accurate measurement of the heat load is needed to eliminate cumulative errors when determining the REUC cryogenic system load requirements. The test setup consists of a dipole positioned between two quadrupoles in a common vacuum tank and heat shield. Piping and instrumentation are arranged to facilitate measurement of the heat load on the primary 4.6 K magnet load and the secondary 55 K heat shield load. Initial results suggest that the primary heat load is well below design allowances. The secondary load was found to be higher than estimated, but remained close to the budgeted amount. Overall, the dipole performed to specifications.

DeLalio, J.T.; Brown, D.P.; Sondericker, J.H.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Imaging magnetic sources in the presence of superconducting surfaces : model&experiment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The forward physics model describing the effect of a superconducting surface on the magnetic field distribution resulting from specific magnetic sources has numerous applications ranging from basic physics experiments to large superconducting magnets used in energy storage and magnetic resonance imaging. In this paper, we describe the novel application of a superconducting imaging surface (SIS) to enhance the performance of systems designed to directly observe and localize human brain function. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) measures the weak magnetic fields emanating from the brain as a direct consequence of the neuronal currents resulting from brain function[1]. The extraordinarily weak magnetic fields are measured by an array of SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) sensors. The position and vector characteristics of these neuronal sources can be estimated from the inverse solution of the field distribution at the surface of the head. In addition, MEG temporal resolution is unsurpassed by any other method currently used for brain imaging. Although MEG source reconstruction is limited by solutions of the electromagnetic inverse problem, constraints used for source localization produce reliable results. A novel MEG system incorporating a SIS has been designed and built at Los Alamos with the goal of dramatically improving source localization accuracy while mitigating limitations of current systems (e.g. low signal-to-noise, cost, bulk). We incorporate shielding and source field measurement into an integrated design and combine the latest SQUID and data acquisition technology. The Los Alamos MEG system is based on the principal that fields from nearby sources measured by a SQUID sensor array while the SIS simultaneously shields the sensor array from distant noise fields. In general, Meissner currents flow in the surface of superconductors, preventing any significant penetration of magnetic fields. A hemispherical SIS with a brim, or helmet, surrounds the SQUID sensor array largely sheilding the SQUID sensors from sources outside the helmet. We present the general derivation of the forward model used to describe the effect of a SIS on source fields. Experimental data for the SIS-MEG system are compared with computed field distributions for a comprehensive set of sources.

Matlachov, A. N. (Andrei N.); Espy, M. A. (Michelle A.); Volegov, P. (Petr); Flynn, E. R. (Edward. R.); Maharajh, K. (Keeran); Kraus, Robert H., Jr.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

COMMERCIALIZATION DEMONSTRATION OF MID-SIZED SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE TECHNOLOGY FOR ELECTRIC UTILITYAPPLICATIONS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As an outgrowth of the Technology Reinvestment Program of the 1990’s, an Agreement was formed between BWXT and the DOE to promote the commercialization of Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) technology. Business and marketing studies showed that the performance of electric transmission lines could be improved with this SMES technology by stabilizing the line thereby allowing the reserved stability margin to be used. One main benefit sought was to double the capacity and the amount of energy flow on an existing transmission line by enabling the use of the reserved stability margin, thereby doubling revenue. Also, electrical disturbances, power swings, oscillations, cascading disturbances and brown/black-outs could be mitigated and rendered innocuous; thereby improving power quality and reliability. Additionally, construction of new transmission lines needed for increased capacity could be delayed or perhaps avoided (with significant savings) by enabling the use of the reserved stability margin of the existing lines. Two crucial technical aspects were required; first, a large, powerful, dynamic, economic and reliable superconducting magnet, capable of oscillating power flow was needed; and second, an electrical power interface and control to a transmission line for testing, demonstrating and verifying the benefits and features of the SMES system was needed. A project was formed with the goals of commercializing the technology by demonstrating SMES technology for utility applications and to establish a domestic capability for manufacturing large superconducting magnets for both commercial and defense applications. The magnet had very low AC losses to support the dynamic and oscillating nature of the stabilizing power flow. Moreover, to economically interface to the transmission line, the magnet had the largest operating voltage ever made. The manufacturing of that design was achieved by establishing a factory with newly designed and acquired equipment, tooling, methods and skilled personnel. The final magnet system measured 14 feet in diameter, 10 feet in height, and weighed about 35 tons. The superconducting magnet and design technology was successfully implemented and demonstrated. The project was not successfully concluded however; as the critical planned final demonstration was not achieved. The utilities could not understand or clarify their future business needs and the regulatory requirements, because of the deregulation policies and practices of the country. Much uncertainty existed which prevented utilities from defining business plans, including asset allocation and cost recovery. Despite the technical successes and achievements, the commercial development could not be implemented and achieved. Thus, the demonstration of this enhancement to the utility’s transmission system and to the reliability of the nation’s electrical grid was not achieved. The factory was ultimately discontinued and the technology, equipment and product were placed in storage.

CHARLES M. WEBER

2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature superconducting magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Type II superconductivity and magnetic flux transport in neutrons stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The transition to a type II proton superconductor which is believed to occur in a cooling neutron star is accompanied by changes in the equation of hydrostatic equilibrium and by the formation of proton vortices with quantized magnetic flux. Analysis of the electron Boltzmann equation for this system and of the proton supercurrent distribution formed at the transition leads to the derivation of a simple expression for the transport velocity of magnetic flux in the liquid interior of a neutron star. This shows that flux moves easily as a consequence of the interaction between neutron and proton superfluid vortices during intervals of spin-down or spin-up in binary systems. The differences between the present analysis and those of previous workers are reviewed and an error in the paper of Jones (1991) is corrected.

P. B. Jones

2005-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

262

Test and evaluation of conductors for superconducting magnetic energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pancake coils of a monolithic conductor and several different types of braid and cable, using a variety of insulating tapes and bonding resins were constructed. The coils were tested to quench in self-field at currents up to 2700 A. Results are presented for the training behavior of the various coils as compared to short-sample tests. A conductor composed of several braids or cables in parallel, which will be suitable for the in situ fabrication of large magnets is described.

Schermer, R.I.; Hassenzahl, W.V.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Superconducting Power Equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2010 Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Technology Watch (Techwatch) report on superconducting power applications (EPRI report 1019995, Superconducting Power Equipment: Technology Watch 2010) introduced coverage about superconducting magnetic energy storage systems and superconducting transformers. The 2011 report contains additional information about superconducting power equipment, including progress to demonstrations in some projects. The 2011 report also includes a section on superconductin...

2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

264

18 kA vapour cooled current leads to test superconducting magnet models for the proposed Large Hadron Collider at CERN using wire matrix heat exchangers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

18 kA vapour cooled current leads to test superconducting magnet models for the proposed Large Hadron Collider at CERN using wire matrix heat exchangers

Hagedorn, Dietrich; Oberli, L R

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) program. January 1--December 31, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work is reported on the development of two superconducting magnetic energy storage units. One is a 30-MJ unit for use by the Bonneville Power Administration to stabilize power oscillations on their Pacific AC Intertie, and the second is a 1- to 10-GWh unit for use as a diurnal load-leveling device. Emphasis has been placed on the stabilizing system. The engineering specification design of the 30-MJ superconducting coil was completed and a contract will be placed for the coil fabrication design. Bids have been received for the stabilizing system 10-MW converter and coil protective dump resistor. These components will be purchased in 1979. The reference design for the 1- to 10-GWh diurnal load-leveling unit has been totally revised and is being assembled in redrafted report form. Plans are to build a 10- to 30-MWh prototype diurnal load-leveling demonstration unit.

Rogers, J.D. (comp.)

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) program. Progress report, January 1-December 31, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work is reported on the development of two superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) units. One is a 30-MJ unit for use by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to stabilize power oscillations on their Pacific AC Intertie, and the second is a 1- to 10-GWh unit for use as a diurnal load leveling device. Emphasis has been on the stabilizing system. The manufacturing phase of the 30-MJ superconducting coil was initiated and the coil fabrication has advanced rapidly. The two converter power transformers were manufactured, successfully factory tested, and shipped. One transformer reached the Tacoma Substation in good condition; the other was dropped enroute and has been returned to the factory for rebuilding. Insulation of the 30-MJ coil has been examined for high voltage effects apt to be caused by transients such as inductive voltage spikes from the protective dump circuit. The stabilizing system converter and protective energy dump system were completed, factory tested, and delivered.

Rogers, J.D. (comp.)

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Coupled Transient Finite Element Simulation of Quench in Jefferson Lab's 11 GeV Super High Momentum Spectrometer Superconducting Magnets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents coupled transient thermal and electromagnetic finite element analysis of quench in the Q2, Q3, and dipole superconducting magnets using Vector Fields Quench code. Detailed temperature distribution within coils and aluminum force collars were computed at each time step. Both normal (quench with dump resistor) and worst-case (quench without dump resistor) scenarios were simulated to investigate the maximum temperatures. Two simulation methods were utilized, and their algorithms, implementation, advantages, and disadvantages are discussed. The first method simulated the coil using nonlinear transient thermal analysis directly linked with the transient circuit analysis. It was faster because only the coil was meshed and no eddy current was modeled. The second method simulated the whole magnet including the coil, the force collar, and the iron yoke. It coupled thermal analysis with transient electromagnetic field analysis which modeled electromagnetic fields including eddy currents within the force collar. Since eddy currents and temperature in the force collars were calculated in various configurations, segmentation of the force collars was optimized under the condition of fast discharge.

E. Sun, P. Brindza, S. Lassiter, M. Fowler, E. Xu

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Superconductivity at 35 K in Graphite-Sulfur Composites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report magnetization measurements performed on graphite–sulfur composites which demonstrate a clear superconducting behavior below the critical temperature Tc0 = 35 K. The Meissner-Ochsenfeld effect, screening supercurrents, and magnetization hysteresis loops characteristic of type-II superconductors were measured. The results indicate that the superconductivity occurs in a small sample fraction, possibly related to the sample surface.

R. Ricardo Da Silva; J. H. S. Torres; Y. Kopelevich

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

High-Tc superconductivity originated from strong spin-charge correlation: indication from linear temperature dependence of resistivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Both the highest- and the linear temperature dependence of the resistivity in wide temperature range appear at the optimally doped regions of Cu-based superconductors1,2,3,4,5, and the highest- of Fe-based superconductors6,7 are also associated with the linear temperature dependence of the resistivity in normal states near superconducting states. This means that the high temperature superconductivity and the linear temperature dependence of the resistivity should be dominated by the same mechanism. This letter on theoretic calculation clearly shows that strong spin-charge correlation dominated resistivity behaves the linear temperature dependence, thus high-temperature superconductivity should be induced by strong spin-charge correlation.

Tian De Cao

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Type I and Two-Gap Superconductivity in Neutron Star Magnetism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Neutron-star inner cores with several charged baryonic components are likely to be analogues of the two-gap superconductor which is of current interest in condensed-matter physics. Consequently, type I superconductivity is less probable than type II but may nevertheless be present in some intervals of matter density. The intermediate state structure formed at finite magnetic flux densities after the superconducting transitions is subject to buoyancy, frictional and neutron-vortex interaction forces. These are estimated and it is shown that the most important frictional force is that produced by the stable stratification of neutron-star matter, the irreversible process being diffusion in the normal, finite magnetic-flux density, parts of the structure. The length-scale of the structure, in directions perpendicular to the local magnetic field is of crucial importance. For small scales, the flux comoves with the neutron vortices, as do the proton vortices of a type II superconductor. But for much larger length-scales, flux movement tends to that expected for normal charged Fermi systems.

P B Jones

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

271

30-MJ superconducting magnetic energy storage for BPA transmission-line stabilizer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration operates the transmission system that joins the Pacific Northwest and southern California. A 30 MJ (8.4 kWh) superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) unit with a 10 MW converter can provide system damping for low frequency oscillations. The unit is scheduled to operate in late 1982. Progress to date is described. The coil is complete. All major components of the electrical and cryogenic systems have been received and testing has begun. Computer control hardware is in place and software development is proceeding. Support system components and dewar lid are being fabricated and foundation design is complete. A contract for dewar fabrication is being negotiated.

Schermer, R.I.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

30-MJ superconducting magnetic-energy storage for BPA transmission-line stabilizer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration operates the transmission system that joins the Pacific Northwest and southern California. A 30 MJ (8.4 kWh) Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) unit with a 10 MW converter can provide system damping for low frequency oscillations. The unit is scheduled to operate in 1982. Progress during FY 81 is described. The coil is complete. All major components of the electrical and cryogenic systems have been received and testing has begun. Computer control hardware is in place and software development is proceeding. Support system components and dewar lid are being fabricated and foundation design is complete. A contract for dewar fabrication is being negotiated.

Schermer, R.I.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Status of Hall B superconducting magnets for the CLAS12 detector at JLab  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hadron physics has been an essential part of the physics program with the CLAS detector in experimental hall B at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab). With the 12 GeV upgrade of the CEBAF machine, hadron physics in Hall B will be extended to a new domain of higher mass resonances and the range of higher transferred momentum using up to 11 GeV electron beams and the upgraded CLAS12 detector. In this paper, status of the hall B superconducting magnets for the CLAS12 detector is presented.

Quettier, L; Kashy, D; Elouadrhiri, L; Salpietro, E; Schneider, W; Small, R; Leung, E; Juang, T; McMullin, J; Taylor, C; Xu, L; Wagner, B; Wang, B; Wang, M

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Hall B superconducting magnets for the CLAS12 detector at JLAB  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hadron physics has been an essential part of the physics program with the CLAS detector in experimental hall B at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab). With the 12 GeV upgrade of the CEBAF machine, hadron physics in Hall B will be extended to a new domain of higher mass resonances and the range of higher transferred momentum using up to 11 GeV electron beams and the upgraded CLAS12 detector. In this paper, status of the hall B superconducting magnets for the 12 GeV upgrade is presented.

L. Quettier, V. Burkert, L. Elouadrhiri, D. Kashy, E. Leung, W. Schneider

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

A 1.5 GeV compact light source with superconducting bending magnets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the design of a compact electron synchrotron light source for producing X-rays for medical imaging, protein crystallography, nano-machining and other uses up to 35 keV. The source will provide synchrotron light from six 6.9 tesla superconducting 60{degree} bending magnet stations. In addition the ring, contains conventional quadrupoles and sextupoles. The light source has a circumference of 26 meters, which permits it to be located in a variety of industrial and medical facilities.

Garren, A.A. [Particle Beam Lasers, Inc., Northridge, CA (United States)]|[Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Center for Advanced Accelerators]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Accelerator and Fusion Research Div.; Cline, D.B.; Kolonko, J.J. [Particle Beam Lasers, Inc., Northridge, CA (United States)]|[Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Center for Advanced Accelerators; Green, M.A. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Accelerator and Fusion Research Div.; Johnson, D.E. [Particle Beam Lasers, Inc., Northridge, CA (United States); Leung, E.M.; Madura, D.D. [Martin Marietta Technologies, Inc., Rancho Bernardo, CA (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Superconductive wire  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A superconductive article is made by inserting a rigid mandrel into an internal cavity of a first metallic tube, said tube having an interior surface and an exterior surface, said interior surface defining the interior cavity, forming a layer of a superconductive material or superconductive precursor upon the exterior surface of said first metallic tube, machining the layer of superconductive material or superconductive precursor to a predetermined diameter to form an intermediate article configured for insertion into a second metallic tube having an interior diameter corresponding to the predetermined diameter, inserting the machined intermediate article into a second metallic tube having an internal diameter corresponding to the predetermined diameter of the intermediate article to form a composite intermediate article, reducing or ironing the composite intermediate article to a predetermined cross-sectional diameter, and sintering the reduced or ironed composite intermediate article at temperatures and for time sufficient for the superconductive material or superconductive precursor to exhibit superconductivity.

Korzekwa, David A. (Los Alamos, NM); Bingert, John F. (Jemez Springs, NM); Peterson, Dean E. (Los Alamos, NM); Sheinberg, Haskell (Santa Fe, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Method and apparatus for forming high-critical-temperature superconducting layers on flat and/or elongated substrates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An elongated, flexible superconductive wire or strip is fabricated by pulling it through and out of a melt of metal oxide material at a rate conducive to forming a crystalline coating of superconductive metal oxide material on an elongated, flexible substrate wire or strip. A coating of crystalline superconductive material, such as Bi.sub.2 Sr.sub.2 CaCu.sub.2 O.sub.8, is annealed to effect conductive contact between adjacent crystalline structures in the coating material, which is then cooled to room temperature. The container for the melt can accommodate continuous passage of the substrate through the melt. Also, a second pass-through container can be used to simultaneously anneal and overcoat the superconductive coating with a hot metallic material, such as silver or silver alloy. A hollow, elongated tube casting method of forming an elongated, flexible superconductive wire includes drawing the melt by differential pressure into a heated tubular substrate.

Ciszek, Theodore F. (Evergreen, CO)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

30-MJ superconducting magnetic energy storage system for electric utility transmission stabilization  

SciTech Connect

A superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) system has been built to damp power oscillations on the Western U.S. Power System, particularly on the Pacific AC Intertie that is used to transmit power from the Northwest to southern California. The 30-MJ superconducting inductor that stores energy for this purpose is contained in a nonconducting dewar and is supported by a helium refrigerator and a gas-handling system mounted on trailers. Energy flows in and out of the inductor at frequencies from 0.1 to 1.0 Hz with power amplitudes up to 11 MW. The principal oscillation to be damped has a characteristic frequency of 0.35 Hz. The superconducting coil maximum current is 5 kA with terminal voltages up to 2.2 kV. The coil interfaces with the Bonneville Power Administration 13.8-kV bus at the Tacoma Substation through a converter and transformers. The system can be operated with the converter either in parallel-bridge mode or for constant VAR control with the bridges in buck-boost mode. The program for the design, fabrication, installation, and the preliminary experimental operation of the system is reviewed.

Rogers, J.D.; Hauer, J.F.; Miller, B.L.; Schermer, R.J.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Reactivation and operation of the large six-tesla CFFF superconducting magnet  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The second MHD superconducting magnet system constructed at the Argonne National Laboratory, originally intended for use in the coal-fired plasma MHD power generation program, has been in storage at Argonne since its assembly and short-term testing a decade ago. At that time it was energized for only a few days and then decommissioned. The magnet, a 6-T dipole having an effective length of 300 cm and a tapered warm bore of 80 to 100 cm, has recently been reactivated and put into service for sea water MHD propulsion research. This report describes the technical aspects of the reactivation process, as well as the operational characterization of the reconstituted system.

Hill, D.; Libera, J.; Petrick, M.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Reactivation and operation of the large six-tesla CFFF superconducting magnet  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The second MHD superconducting magnet system constructed at the Argonne National Laboratory, originally intended for use in the coal-fired plasma MHD power generation program, has been in storage at Argonne since its assembly and short-term testing a decade ago. At that time it was energized for only a few days and then decommissioned. The magnet, a 6-T dipole having an effective length of 300 cm and a tapered warm bore of 80 to 100 cm, has recently been reactivated and put into service for sea water MHD propulsion research. This report describes the technical aspects of the reactivation process, as well as the operational characterization of the reconstituted system.

Hill, D.; Libera, J.; Petrick, M.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

The US market for high-temperature superconducting wire in transmission cable applications  

SciTech Connect

Telephone interviews were conducted with 23 utility engineers concerning the future prospects for high-temperature superconducting (HTS) transmission cables. All have direct responsibility for transmission in their utility, most of them in a management capacity. The engineers represented their utilities as members of the Electric Power Research Institute`s Underground Transmission Task Force (which has since been disbanded). In that capacity, they followed the superconducting transmission cable program and are aware of the cryogenic implications. Nineteen of the 23 engineers stated the market for underground transmission would grow during the next decade. Twelve of those specified an annual growth rate; the average of these responses was 5.6%. Adjusting that figure downward to incorporate the remaining responses, this study assumes an average growth rate of 3.4%. Factors driving the growth rate include the difficulty in securing rights-of-way for overhead lines, new construction techniques that reduce the costs of underground transmission, deregulation, and the possibility that public utility commissions will allow utilities to include overhead costs in their rate base. Utilities have few plans to replace existing cable as preventive maintenance, even though much of the existing cable has exceeded its 40-year lifetime. Ten of the respondents said the availability of a superconducting cable with the same life-cycle costs as a conventional cable and twice the ampacity would induce them to consider retrofits. The respondents said a cable with those characteristics would capture 73% of their cable retrofits.

Forbes, D.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Interplay of superconductivity, magnetism, and density waves in rare-earth tritellurides and iron-based superconducting materials.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Superconductivity, charge- and spin-density waves are collective electronic phenomena that originate from electron-electron and electron-phonon interactions, and the concept of Fermi surface competition between these… (more)

Zocco, Diego Andrés

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Design, construction, and performance test of a six-tesla superconducting dipole magnet system for magnetohydrodynamic energy conversion research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A six-tesla superconducting dipole magnet for use in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) energy conversion research at either the Coal-Fired Flow Facility (CFFF) at the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) or the Component Development and Integration Facility at the Montana Energy and MHD Research and Development Institute has been designed, fabricated, and tested by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The magnet, SCMS-2, provides a 6-T tapered transverse field in a 1.0-m-diameter bore 5 meters long. The overall magnet and cryostat weigh 172 metric tons, and at full excitation, the magnetic field stores 210 MJ of electromagnetic energy. The magnet constitutes a unique research tool of unprecedented size and power for the study of open-cycle MHD generator performance. This document describes the detailed design considerations and supporting calculations for the CFFF magnet system, the development of the magnet fabrication facility, the process of fabrication and assembly of the superconducting coils and the magnet cryostat, and the magnet performance tests at ANL. The 5-T US superconducting magnet system, SCMS-1, designed and fabricated at ANL for tests in the US/USSR cooperative MHD program using the U-25 MHD facility in Moscow, USSR, is the direct predecessor to the SCMS-2 magnet described in this report. This magnet, however, demonstrates the scalability of key design concepts of the two magnet systems for application to larger magnets that will be required for larger systems needed for the steps in the development of commercial scale, MHD electrical power plants.

Not Available

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Fast superconducting kicker magnet. Final technical report, November 1994--October 1997  

SciTech Connect

Fast kicker magnets are needed in accelerators to deflect the beam out of the storage ring and into experimental targets and beam dumps. The work reported here is on a new type of fast kicker magnet. The basic idea is to transport the beam along the axis of a tube made of Type I superconductor. An ordinary magnet is used to create a field, B{sub o} perpendicular to the axis of the tube. If B{sub o}superconducting condition. Due to the Meissner effect, the tube shields the beam (on the axis of the tube) from B{sub o}. Thus the beam is in a zero field region. In order to apply a kicker field to the beam, B{sub o} is increased such that B{sub o}>B{sub c}. The tube of superconductor then goes normal. The field which had been shielded from the beam can now penetrate to the beam. This concept is applicable as a fast magnetic switch. DOE has been granted a patent on this device, which was disclosed to DOE by N.K. Mahale and D. Goren while they were at SSC. A feasibility study of this new form of kicker magnet is reported here.

Weinstein, R.; Mahale, N.K.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Program on Technology Innovation: Application of a High Temperature Superconducting Fault Current Limiter at AEP's Sporn Substation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the application of a Superconducting Fault Current Limiter (SFCL) to address fault current over-duty problems in American Electric Power's 138kV Sporn Substation. EPRI is current developing SFCL technology targeted to address fault current over-duty problems at the transmission voltage level of 138kV and higher. The technology under development is termed the Matrix Fault Current Limiter (MFCL) due to the modular nature arrangements of its High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) eleme...

2007-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

286

Method for producing low-resistivity electrical contacts for high-temperature superconducting ceramics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Production of low-resistivity electrical contacts for high-temperature superconducting ceramics capable of supporting large current densities by plasma spraying of a noble metal powder onto a chosen surface area of the ceramic and electrically contacting a metal conductor to the metallic pad formed thereby by either soldering or by use of a conducting epoxy is described. Surface resistivities in the 10{sup {minus}8} {Omega}-cm{sup 2} range have been measured at 76 K. Most experimental variables were found to have little effect on the properties of the contacts produced. 2 tabs.

Katz, J.D.; Willis, J.O.; Maley, M.P.; Castro, R.G.

1989-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

287

LANL: Superconductivity Technology Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sitemap | Lab Home | Phone Sitemap | Lab Home | Phone ABOUT LANL ContactsPhonebookPolicy CenterOrganizationMapsJobs Emergency NEWS LIBRARY JOBS Search Materials Physics & Applications: STC STC Home OUR FOCUS HTS Physics HTS Materials Development HTS Materials Processing Power Applications Electronic Materials FUTURE APPLICATIONS Biomedical Developments Magnetic Levitation Train MHD Ship CONTACTS Center Leader Ken Marken Program Administrator Brenda Espinoza Center Office Location: TA-03, Bdg. 0032, Rm. 141 Exploring technology at STC Superconductivity Technology Center (STC) The Superconductivity Technology Center (STC) coordinates a multidisciplinary program for research, development, and technology transfer in the area of high-temperature superconductivity. Our focus is on effective collaborations with American industry, universities, and other national laboratories to develop electric power and electronic device applications of high-temperature superconductors (HTS).

288

MAGNETIC PARAMETERS OF A NB3SN SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNET FOR A 56 HGz ECR ION SOURCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While third generation sources use NbTi superconductingfor a fourth generation ECR source", IEEE. Trans. Appl.magnet for a fourth generation ECR source operating at a

Ferracin, P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

1-GWh diurnal load-leveling superconducting magnetic energy storage system reference design. Appendix A: energy storage coil and superconductor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The technical aspects of a 1-GWh Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) coil for use as a diurnal load-leveling device in an electric utility system are presented. The superconductor for the coil is analyzed, and costs for the entire coil are developed.

Schermer, R.I.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Superconductive wire  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a superconductive article including a first metallic tube having an interior surface and an exterior surface, said interior surface defining an interior hollow cavity, a layer of superconductive material surrounding said exterior surface of said first metallic tube, and, a second metallic tube having an interior surface and an exterior surface, said interior surface adjacent to said layer of superconductive material is provided together with processes of making such a superconductive article including, e.g., inserting a rigid mandrel into an internal cavity of a first metallic tube, said tube having an interior surface and an exterior surface, said interior surface defining the interior cavity, forming a layer of a superconductive material or superconductive precursor upon the exterior surface of said first metallic tube, machining the layer of superconductive material or superconductive precursor to a predetermined diameter to form an intermediate article configured for insertion into a second metallic tube having an interior diameter corresponding to the predetermined diameter, inserting the machined intermediate article into a second metallic tube having an internal diameter corresponding to the predetermined diameter of the intermediate article to form a composite intermediate article, reducing and/or ironing the composite intermediate article to a predetermined cross-sectional diameter, and sintering the reduced or ironed composite intermediate article at temperatures and for time sufficient for the superconductive material or superconductive precursor to exhibit superconductivity.

Korzekwa, D.A.; Bingert, J.F.; Peterson, D.E.; Sheinberg, H.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

291

1-GWh diurnal load-leveling Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage system reference design  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A point reference design has been completed for a 1-GWh Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage system. The system is for electric utility diurnal load-leveling but can also function to meet much faster power demands including dynamic stabilization. This study explores several concepts of design not previously considered in the same detail as treated here. Because the study is for a point design, optimization in all respects is not complete. This report examines aspects of the coil, the superconductor supported off of the dewar shell, the dewar shell, and its configuration and stresses, the underground excavation and construction for holding the superconducting coil and its dewar, the helium refrigeration system, the electrical converter system, the vacuum system, the guard coil, and the costs. This report is divided into two major portions. The first is a general treatment of the work and the second is seven detailed technical appendices issued as separate reports. The information presented on the aluminum stabilizer for the conductor, on the excavation, and on the converter is based upon industrial studies contracted for this work.

Rogers, J.D.; Hassenzahl, W.V.; Schermer, R.I. (comps.)

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) program. Progress report, January 1-December 31, 1982  

SciTech Connect

Work reported is on the development of a 30 MJ superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) unit, its installation at the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Tacoma Substation, and the preliminary site tests in preparation for its use to stabilize power oscillations on the BPA Pacific AC Inertie. The seismic mounting of the 30 MJ superconducting coil to the dewar lid was completed. The manufacture and testing of the nonconducting dewar were completed. The 5 kV vapor cooled leads were assembled and tested. The refrigerator was placed in operation at the Tacoma Substation and tested by making liquid helium in a 500 l dewar. The refrigerator was connected to the coil dewar and is now used for cooling the 30 MJ coil and dewar with extended purification of the circulating helium to remove contaminants. All equipment was shipped and installed at the BPA Tacoma Substation. Assembly of the 30 MJ coil into the nonconducting dewar was done at the BPA Covington facility and transported to the Tacoma Substation. Substation preparation was completed by 11-1-82. BPA, at considerable expense, did an excellent job preparing the site and assisting with the SMES unit installation. All equipment is in place and operable except for components of the computer control and for full refrigeration of the 30 MJ coil. The converter was tested with the output shorted with the input transformers connected to the 13.8 kV. A new schedule for the SMES operation was established.

Rogers, J.D. (comp.)

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Method for determining hydrogen mobility as a function of temperature in superconducting niobium cavities  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for determining the mobility of hydrogen as a function of temperature in superconducting niobium cavities comprising: 1) heating a cavity under test to remove free hydrogen; 2) introducing hydrogen-3 gas into the cavity; 3) cooling the cavity to allow absorption of hydrogen-3; and 4) measuring the amount of hydrogen-3 by: a) cooling the cavity to about 4.degree. K while flowing a known and regulated amount of inert carrier gas such as argon or helium into the cavity; b) allowing the cavity to warm at a stable rate from 4.degree. K to room temperature as it leaves the chamber; and c) directing the exit gas to an ion chamber radiation detector.

May, Robert (Virginia Beach, VA)

2008-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

294

DOE Superconductivity Program Stakeholders | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Stakeholders Map showing the stakeholders involved in High Temperature Superconductivity work with the DOE. DOE Superconductivity Program Stakeholders More Documents &...

295

Temperature Dependence of Magnetic Correlations within a ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Therefore, detailed understanding of how magnetic domains form, evolve, and finally re-orient during field switching is vital. ...

296

Magnetic Blockade Mechanism for Quantum Nucleation of Superconducting Vortex-Antivortex Pairs in Zero External Magnetic Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a magnetic dual of the Coulomb blockade effect for quantum nucleation of flux vortex pairs in high-Tc superconducting (HTS) films and grain boundaries in zero applied field. The magnetic blockade instability occurs at {\\theta} = {\\pi}, where {\\theta} is the "vacuum" or theta angle. The {\\theta} term has recently been discussed in the context of several other systems, including charge and spin density waves, topological insulators, the quantum Hall effect, and spontaneous CP violation. Our model predicts a sharp pair creation threshold current at {\\theta} = {\\pi}, analogous to the Coulomb blockade voltage of a tunnel junction, and explains the observed thickness dependence of critical currents in HTS coated conductors. We use the Schr\\"odinger equation to compute the evolving macrostate amplitudes, coupled by a generalized tunneling matrix element. The simulations yield excellent quantitative agreement with measured voltage-current characteristics of bi-crystal and other HTS grain boundary junctions. The model also predicts non-sinusoidal behavior in the voltage oscillations resulting from time-correlated vortex tunneling.

J. H. Miller Jr.; A. I. Wijesinghe

2011-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

297

Conjectured explanation for room-temperature superconductivity in narrow channels in oxidized polypropylene  

SciTech Connect

Two groups of scientists have observed conductivity at least five orders of magnitude higher than that of copper at room temperature in narrow channels perpendicular to surfaces of films in oxidized polypropylene. For pulsed currents, this conductivity starts at a minimum value of applied current, and is destroyed at a current of about 30-60 times this value. Because of the existence of an upper critical current and of the observation that electronic thermal conductivity is negligible in the channels, it is thought that the channels are superconducting. A study is made of the hypothesis that these results are due to enhanced pairing, as first suggested by Parameter, when the drift velocity of current carriers becomes close to the velocity of sound or, in work by Hone and by the present author, to an appropriate phase velocity of optical phonons. Such enhancements can be expected to be larger in quasi-one-dimensional systems. 10 refs.

Eagles, D.M. (NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL (United States))

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Temperature compensated current sensor using reference magnetic field  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described to provide temperature compensation and self-calibration of a current sensor based on a plurality of magnetic field sensors positioned around a current carrying conductor. A reference magnetic field generated within the current sensor housing is detected by a separate but identical magnetic field sensor and is used to correct variations in the output signal due to temperature variations and aging.

Yakymyshyn, Christopher Paul (Seminole, FL); Brubaker, Michael Allen (Loveland, CO); Yakymyshyn, Pamela Jane (Seminole, FL)

2007-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

299

Effect of temperature on phonon contribution to Green function of high-temperature superconducting cuprates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The phonon contribution to the nodal electron Green function in cuprates is considered. It is shown that the temperature dependence of the real part of the self-energy component of the Green function for cuprates with a hole doping level close to optimal is described by the electron-phonon interaction in the framework of the extended Eliashberg model.

Korneeva, L. A., E-mail: korneeva_mila@mail.ru; Mazur, E. A. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Russian Federation)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

300

Convergence Studies of Thermal and Electromagnetic Transient Quench Analysis of 11 GeV Super High Momentum Spectrometer Superconducting Magnets in Jefferson Lab  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents results of convergence studies of transient thermal and electromagnetic quench analysis of five Super High Momentum Spectrometer (SHMS) superconducting magnets: HB, Q1, Q2, Q3, and Dipole, using Vector Fields Quench analysis codes. The convergence of the hot spot temperature and solution solve times were used to investigate the effects of element types, mesh densities, and tolerance criteria. The comparisons between tetrahedral elements and hexahedral elements was studied, and their advantages and disadvantages were discussed. Based on the results of convergence studies, a meshing guideline for coils is presented. The impact of iteration tolerance to the hot spot temperature was also explored, and it is found that tight tolerances result in extremely long solve times with only marginal improvements in the results.

Eric Sun, Paul Brindza, Steve Lassiter, Mike Fowler, E. Xu

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature superconducting magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Superconducting Magnet ESS with Direct Power Electronics Interface - V.R. Ramanan, ABB  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

© ABB Group © ABB Group October 5, 2012 | Slide 1 Superconducting Magnet Energy Storage System with Direct Power Electronics Interface Project Goal  Competitive, fast response, grid-scale MWh superconducting magnet energy storage (SMES) system  Demonstrated through a small scale prototype, (20 kW, 2.5 MJ) and direct connection power electronics converter (with Si-based devices) V.R. Ramanan, ABB US Corporrate Research Center GRIDS SMES SYSTEM SMES Coil MV Feeder Power Converter ABB Brookhaven NL 2G HTS Wire SuperPower MV/LV MV/LV MV/LV HV/MV Wind Park Solar Park Transmission Line Converter & System Design/Prototyping LV Loads University of Houston ABB Project Update  Issues related to SMES system integration being addressed  Project slightly behind schedule; on budget

302

Effects of magnetic non-linearities on a stored proton beam and their implications for superconducting storage rings  

SciTech Connect

A nonlinear lens may be used to study the effect of high-order multipolar field imperfections on a stored proton beam. Such a nonlinear lens is particulary suitable to simulate field imperfections of the types encountered in coil dominated superconducting magnets. We have studied experimentally at the SPS the effect of high order (5th and 8th) single isolated resonances driven by the nonlinear lens. The width of these resonances is of the order one expects to be caused by field errors in superconducting magnets of the SSC type. The experiment shows that, in absence of tune modulation, these resonances are harmless. Slow crossings of the resonance, on the other hand, have destructive effects on the beam, much more so than fast crossings caused by synchrotron oscillations. In the design of future storage rings, sources of low-frequency tune modulation should be avoided as a way to reduce the harmful effects of high order multipolar field imperfection.

Cornacchia, M.; Evans, L.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Design and operation of the 30-MJ superconducting magnetic-storage system on the Bonneville Power Administration bus  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A superconducting magnetic-energy-storage (SMES) unit is suitable for power-system stabilization because it can provide positive damping by absorbing or releasing energy with a relatively fast response time, 10 ms. In the fall of 1982, an SMES unit was installed at the Tacoma Substation of the Bonneville Power Administration as an experiment in monitoring, predicting and improving system stability. This paper reports principally on the system testing.

Schermer, R.I.; Barron, M.H.; Boenig, H.J.; Brown, R.R.; Criscuolo, A.L.; Cumming, C.J.; Dean, J.W.; Hassenzahl, W.V.; Rogers, J.D.; Seamons, M.J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Design and operating experience of an ac-dc power converter for a superconducting magnetic energy storage unit  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design philosophy and the operating behavior of a 5.5 kA, +-2.5 kV converter, being the electrical interface between a high voltage transmission system and a 30 MJ superconducting coil, are documented in this paper. Converter short circuit tests, load tests under various control conditions, dc breaker tests for magnet current interruption, and converter failure modes are described.

Boenig, H.J.; Nielsen, R.G.; Sueker, K.H.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Control of magnetic, nonmagnetic, and superconducting states in annealed Ca(Fe1?xCox)2As2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have grown single-crystal samples of Co substituted CaFe2As2 using an FeAs flux and systematically studied the effects of annealing/quenching temperature on the physical properties of these samples. Whereas the as-grown samples (quenched from 960 ?C) all enter the collapsed tetragonal phase upon cooling, annealing/quenching temperatures between 350 and 800 ?C can be used to tune the system to low-temperature antiferromagnetic/orthorhomic or superconducting states as well. The progression of the transition temperature versus annealing/quenching temperature (T-Tanneal) phase diagrams with increasing Co concentration shows that, by substituting Co, the antiferromagnetic/orthorhombic and the collapsed tetragonal phase lines are separated and bulk superconductivity is revealed. We established a 3D phase diagram with Co concentration and annealing/quenching temperature as two independent control parameters. At ambient pressure, for modest x and Tanneal values, the Ca(Fe1?xCox)2As2 system offers ready access to the salient low-temperature states associated with Fe-based superconductors: antiferromagnetic/orthorhombic, superconducting, and nonmagnetic/collapsed tetragonal.

Ran, Sheng; Budko, Serguei L.; Straszheim, Warren E.; Soh, Jing-Han; Kim, Min Gyu; Kreyssig, Andreas; Goldman, Alan I.; Canfield, Paul C.

2012-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

306

Fields and forces in flywheel energy storage with high-temperature superconducting bearings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of low-loss bearings employing high-temperature superconductors has brought closer the advent of practical flywheel energy storage systems. These systems require magnetic fields and forces for levitation, stabilization, and energy transfer. This paper describes the status of experiments on flywheel energy storage at Argonne National Laboratory and computations in support of that project, in particular computations for the permanent-magnet rotor of the motor-generator that transfers energy to and from the flywheel, for other energy-transfer systems under consideration, and for the levitation and stabilization subsystem.

Turner, L.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Technology Div.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Argonne TDC: Superconductive Components, Inc.  

High-Performance Tailored Materials for Levitation Permanent Magnet Technologies Making materials to help advance flywheel energy storage. Superconductive Components ...

308

Low temperature scanning tunneling microscope study of low-dimensional superconductivity on metallic nanostructures.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Superconductivity is a remarkable quantum phenomenon in which a macroscopic number of electrons form a condensate of Cooper pairs that can be described by a… (more)

Kim, Jungdae

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

30 MJ superconducting magnetic energy storage performance on the Bonneville Power Administration utility transmission system*  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 30 MJ, 10 MW superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) system was devised to interact in the Western U.S. Power System as an alternate means to damp unstable oscillations at 0.35 Hz on the Pacific HVAC Intertie. The SMES unit was installed at the Tacoma Substation of the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The operating limits of the 30 MJ SMES unit were established, and different means of controlling real and reactive power were tested. The unit can follow a sinusoidal power demand signal with an amplitude of up to 8.6 MW with the converter working in a 12 pulse mode. When the converter operates in the constant VAR mode, a time varying real power demand signal of up to 5 MW can be met. Experiments showed that the Pacific AC Intertie has current and reactive power variations of the same frequency as the modulating frequency of the SMES device. Endurance tests were run to assess the reliability of the SMES subsystems with a narrow band noise input, which is characteristic of the modulation signal for stabilizer operation. In this mode, the energy of the power spectrum is not concentrated at one frequency to avoid exciting a resonance frequency of the ac transmission system. During the endurance tests, parameters of the ac power system were determined. Accurate power system data are necessary for tuning the control algorithm so that the SMES unit can operate in the closed loop stabilizer mode.

Rogers, J.D.; Boenig, H.J.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Superconductive Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) System Studies for Electrical Utility at Wisconsin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two-layer low aspect ratio rippled and non-rippled solenoids mounted in surface trenches are described for superconductive magnetic energy storage utility applications. Open pool cooling in superfluid helium provides extended time cryogenic stability. Axial structure also functions as a protective heat absorbing secondary during emergency discharge. The cost of the conductor, trench, dewar, struts, radial structure, plus others are proportional to E^ 2/3 where E= stored energy; the cost of the axial structure is approximately E; and the cost of refrigeration is a constant plus an E^2/3 term. Costs scale approximately from E^0.58 (low E) to E^0.71 (100 - 3000 MWh) to E ^0.78 (3000 to 10,000 MWh). The cost of the ac-dc conversion system is about $60/kW. The electrical usage is best for load-leveling units that charge 8 h at night and discharge 15 h during the daytime. 98% storage efficiency and rapid power reversal are the two primary benefits of SMES. The potential impact of high Tc oxide superconductors is a 10%-20% cost reduction for large SMES units (above 3000 MWh). The operational storage efficiency of smaller units would improve to better than 95% for E > 10 MWh.

Boom, R. W.; Eyssa, Y. M.; Abdelsalem, M. K.; Huang, X.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Analysis of superconducting magnetic energy storage applications at a proposed wind farm site near Browning, Montana  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A computer program was developed to analyze the viability of integrating superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) with proposed wind farm scenarios at a site near Browning, Montana. The program simulated an hour-by-hour account of the charge/discharge history of a SMES unit for a representative wind-speed year. Effects of power output, storage capacity, and power conditioning capability on SMES performance characteristics were analyzed on a seasonal, diurnal, and hourly basis. The SMES unit was assumed to be charged during periods when power output of the wind resource exceeded its average value. Energy was discharged from the SMES unit into the grid during periods of low wind speed to compensate for below-average output of the wind resource. The option of using SMES to provide power continuity for a wind farm supplemented by combustion turbines was also investigated. Levelizing the annual output of large wind energy systems operating in the Blackfeet area of Montana was found to require a storage capacity too large to be economically viable. However, it appears that intermediate-sized SMES economically levelize the wind energy output on a seasonal basis.

Gaustad, K.L.; De Steese, J.G.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

30-MJ superconducting magnetic-energy-storage stabilizing system: an overview  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 30-MJ superconducting magnetic-energy-storage (SMES) system was devised as an alternate means to modulate the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Pacific AC Intertie, a part of the Western US Power System, to prevent undamped power oscillations at 0.35 Hz that were observed to be associated with high power transmission. The SMES system was installed at the BPA Tacoma Substation and successfully operated as an experimental device to initiate tests to determine power system dynamics, to investigate their variability, to assess system response to SMES modulation with a major variable load, and to use SMES to develop stability-control techniques. The system has been operated at frequencies of 0.1 to 1.0 Hz at power levels of +- 8.3 MW with a parallel modulation of the converter bridges and up to 9.5 MW reactive power together with +- 4.5 MW real power in constant VAR mode with buck-boost modulation of the bridges. The coil has been charged at a maximum rate of 11.8 MW. Operation of the SMES system is now under BPA jurisdiction, and all hardware has been transferred to BPA.

Roger, J.D.; Boenig, H.J.; Dean, J.W.; Schermer, R.I.; Annestrand, S.A.; Hauer, J.F.; Miller, B.L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) program. Progress report, January 1-December 31, 1984  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 30 MJ, 10 MW superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) system was devised to interact in the Western US Power System as an alternate means to damp unstable oscillations at 0.35 Hz on the Pacific HVAC Intertie. The SMES unit was installed at the Tacoma Substation of the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The operating limits of the 30 MJ SMES unit were established, and different means of controlling real and reactive power were tested. The unit can follow a sinusoidal power demand signal with an amplitude of up to 8.6 MW with the converter working in a 12 pulse mode. When the converter operates in the constant VAR mode, a time varying real power demand signal of up to 5 MW can be met. Experiments showed that the Pacific ac Intertie has current and reactive power variations of the same frequency as the modulating frequency of the SMES device. Endurance tests were run to assess the reliability of the SMES subsystems with a narrow band noise input, which is characteristic of the modulation signal for stabilizer operation. During the endurance tests, parameters of the ac power system were determined. Converter short circuit tests, load tests under various control conditions, dc breaker tests for coil current interruption, and converter failure mode tests were conducted. The experimental operation of the SMES system was concluded and the operation was terminated in early 1984.

Rogers, J.D. (comp.)

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Tests of the 30-MJ superconducting magnetic-energy storage unit  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 30-MJ (8.4 kWh) superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) unit with a 10-MW converter was installed during the later months of 1982 at the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Tacoma substation in Tacoma, Washington. The unit, which is capable of absorbing and releasing up to 10 MJ of energy at a frequency of 0.35 Hz, was designed to damp the dominant power swing mode of the Pacific AC Intertie. Extensive tests were performed with the unit during the first half of 1983. This paper will review the major components of the storage unit and describe the startup and steady state operating experience with the coil, dewar, refrigerator and converter. The unit has absorbed power up to a level of 11.8 Mw. Real power was modulated following a sinusoidal power demand with frequencies from 0.1 to 1.2 Hz and a power level up to +- 8.3 MW. The unit has performed in accordance with design expectations and no major problems have developed.

Boenig, H.J.; Dean, J.W.; Rogers, J.D.; Schermer, R.I.; Hauer, J.F.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Argonne TDC: Superconductive Components, Inc.  

Unlocking the Potential of High-Temperature Superconductors . Superconductive Components, Inc. Columbus, Ohio. For bulk applications of high-temperature ...

316

A finite temperature investigation of dual superconductivity in the modified SO(3) lattice gauge theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the SO(3) lattice gauge theory in 3+1 dimensions with the adjoint Wilson action modified by a $\\mathbb{Z}_2$ monopole suppression term and by means of the Pisa disorder operator. We find evidence for a finite temperature deconfinement transition driven by the condensation of U(1) magnetic charges. A finite-size scaling test shows consistency with the critical exponents of the 3D Ising model.

A. Barresi; G. Burgio; M. D'Elia; M. Mueller-Preussker

2004-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

317

The Cost of Superconducting Magnets as a Function of Stored Energy and Design Magnetic Induction Times the Field Volume  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

magnets to the magnetic energy stored within that magnet.the sample have stored magnetic energies as low as 3.3 M J (plotted against stored energy and magnetic field time field

Green, M.A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY DUPONT SUPERCONDUCTIVITY FOR AN ADVANCE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DUPONT SUPERCONDUCTIVITY FOR AN ADVANCE DUPONT SUPERCONDUCTIVITY FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS UNDER DOE CONTRACT NO. DE-FC36-99GO10287; W(A)-99-008; CH-1002 The Petitioner, DuPont Superconductivity (hereinafter "DuPont"), has requested a waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights for all subject inventions arising from its participation under the above referenced contract entitled "High Temperature Superconducting Reciprocating Magnetic Separator". This contract relates to the construction of 1/4 commercial scale High Temperature Superconducting (hereinafter "HTS") Reciprocating Magnetic Separations Unit for the purification ofkaoline clay and titanium dioxide. It is anticipated that this project will be performed in three phases, over a period of

319

Operation of the 30 MJ superconducting magnetic energy storage system in the Bonneville Power Administration Electrical Grid  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 30 MJ superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) system was installed in the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Tacoma Substation in 1982 to 1983. Operation of the unit since that time has been for over 1200 hours. Specific tests to explore the SMES system's thermal and electrical characteristics and the control functions were conducted. The coil heat load with current modulation was determined. A converter with two 6-pulse bridges interfaces the superconducting coil to the power bus. Equal bridge voltage amplitude and constant reactive power modes of operation of the system were run with computer control of the SCR bridge firing angles. Coil energy dump tests were performed. Electrical grid system response to SMES modulation was observed, and full power SMES modulation was undertaken.

Rogers, J.D.; Boenig, H.J.; Schermer, R.I.; Hauer, J.F.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Design and testing of a 13. 75-MW converter for a superconducting magnetic-energy-storage system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 30 MJ superconducting magnetic energy storage system will be installed in 1982 in Tacoma, WA, to act as a transmission line stabilizer. Two 6 MVA transformers and a 5.5 kA, + 2.5 kV converter will connect the superconducting coil to the 13.8 kV bus and regulate the power flow between the coil and the three phase system. The design philosophy for the converter including its control and protection system is given in the paper. The converter has been tested with 10% overvoltage at no load, with 10% overcurrent at zero output voltage and with a watercooled resistive load of about 1 MW. These test results show that the converter will meet the expected full load operating conditions.

Boenig, H.J.; Turner, R.D.; Neft, C.L.; Sueker, K.H.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature superconducting magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Operation of the 30 MJ superconducting magnetic energy storage system in the Bonneville Power Administration Electrical Grid  

SciTech Connect

The 30 MJ superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) system was installed in the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Tacoma Substation in 1982 to 1983. Operation of the unit since that time has been for over 1200 hours. Specific tests to explore the SMES system's thermal and electrical characteristics and the control functions were conducted. The coil heat load with current modulation was determined. A converter with two 6-pulse bridges interfaces the superconducting coil to the power bus. Equal bridge voltage amplitude and constant reactive power modes of operation of the system were run with computer control of the SCR bridge firing angles. Coil energy dump tests were performed. Electrical grid system response to SMES modulation was observed, and full power SMES modulation was undertaken.

Rogers, J.D.; Boenig, H.J.; Schermer, R.I.; Hauer, J.F.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Superconducting microfabricated ion traps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We fabricate superconducting ion traps with niobium and niobium nitride and trap single [superscript 88]Sr ions at cryogenic temperatures. The superconducting transition is verified and characterized by measuring the ...

Wang, Shannon Xuanyue

323

An improved oxygen diffusion model to explain the effect of low-temperature baking on high field losses in niobium superconducting cavities  

SciTech Connect

Radio-frequency (RF) superconducting cavities made of high purity niobium are widely used to accelerate charged particle beams in particle accelerators. The major limitation to achieve RF field values approaching the theoretical limit for niobium is represented by ''anomalous'' losses which degrade the quality factor of the cavities starting at peak surface magnetic fields of about 100 mT, in absence of field emission. These high field losses are often referred to as ''Q-drop''. It has been observed that the Q-drop is drastically reduced by baking the cavities at 120 C for about 48 h under ultrahigh vacuum. An improved oxygen diffusion model for the niobium-oxide system is proposed to explain the benefit of the low-temperature baking on the Q-drop in niobium superconducting rf cavities. The model shows that baking at 120 C for 48 h allows oxygen to diffuse away from the surface, and therefore increasing the lower critical field towards the value for pure niobium.

Gianluigi Ciovati

2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

324

Makeup and uses of a basic magnet laboratory for characterizing high-temperature permanent magnets  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A set of instrumentation for making basic magnetic measurements was assembled in order to characterize high-intrinsic-coercivity, rare-earth permanent magnets with respect to short-term demagnetization resistance and long-term aging at temperatures up to 300{degrees}C. The major specialized components of this set consist of a 13-T-peak-field, capacitor-discharge pulse magnetizer; a 10-in.-pole-size, variable-gap electromagnet; a temperature-controlled oven equipped with iron-cobalt pole piece extensions and a removable paddle that carries the magnetization and field sensing coils; associated electronic integrators; and standards for field intensity H and magnetic moment M calibration. A 1-cm cubic magnet sample, carried by the paddle, fits snugly between the pole piece extensions within the electrically heated aluminum oven, where fields up to 3.2 T can be applied by the electromagnet at temperatures up to 300{degrees}C. A sample set of demagnetization data for the high-energy Sm{sub 2}Co{sub 17} type of magnet is given for temperatures up to 300{degrees}C. These data are reduced to the temperature dependence of the M-H knee field and of the field for a given magnetic induction swing, and they are then interpreted to show the limits of safe magnet operation.

Niedra, J.M. [Sverdrup Technology, Inc., Brook Park, OH (United States). Lewis Research Center Group; Schwarze, G.E. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH (United States). Lewis Research Center

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Interplay of superconductivity, magnetism, and density waves in rare-earth tritellurides and iron-based superconducting materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1. Electrical Resistivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.diamond, for electrical resistivity measurements, as can beRoom-temperature electrical resistivity ? as a function of

Zocco, Diego Andrés

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Temperature and Magnetic Field Dependence of Electrical ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Design of Pre-Weakening and Evaluation of Structural Safety for Explosive ... Crystallization Temperature of Pd-Cu-Si System Using Integrated Thin Film Samples ... Mechanical Properties of 5083 Aluminium Welds after Manual and Automatic ...

327

Stability and quench protection of high-temperature superconductors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the design and operation of a superconducting magnet, stability and protection are two key issues that determine the magnet's reliability and safe operation. Although the high-temperature superconductor (HTS) is considered ...

Ang, Ing Chea

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Investigating the relationship between the superconducting and pseudogap states of the high-temperature superconductor Bi-2201 using scanning tunneling microscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is considerable controversy regarding the nature of the relationship between the superconducting and pseudogap states of high-temperature superconductors. Although there exist a large number of theories regarding ...

Boyer, Michael Christopher

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Texture improvements in the high-temperature superconducting Bi?Sr?Ca?Cu?Ox̳/Ag system via surface energy driven grain alignment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The relation between processing, microstructure, and material property was investigated in the high-temperature superconducting Bi?Sr?Ca?Cu?Ox̳/Ag system. Experiments were based on a theoretical surface energy model ...

Vodhanel, Mark E

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

High Temperature, Buried Permanent Magnet, Brushless DC Motor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A high temperature magnetic bearing system using high temperature permanent magnets from Electron Energy Corporation (EEC) is under development. The system consists of two radial bearings, one thrust bearing, two radial catcher bearings and one motor. The purpose of this research is to develop one of the critical components of the system, namely, the High Temperature Permanent Magnet motor. A novel High Temperature Permanent Magnet (HTPM) Brushless DC(BLDC) motor capable of operating at 1000 degrees F (538 degrees C) is designed. HTPMs developed at Electron Energy Corporation are buried into the rotor. The high temperature motor is designed to produce 5.1kw of power at a top running speed of 20000 rpm. The numerical values of the motor voltage, power and torque output are predicted from calculations of the nonlinear finite element model of the motor. The motor stator is wound, potted, cured and high potential tested at 1000 degrees F. A servo amplifier from Advanced Motion Control is used to drive the high temperature motor. High temperature displacement sensors are set up for sensing the rotor position to form a closed loop motion control. However, the noise problem of the high temperature sensors causes a failure of this approach. An open loop approach is then developed and this approach succeeds in spinning the rotor with the capability of self-starting. The status of the full system assembling is introduced. Some other components of the system are briefly presented.

Zhang, Zhengxin

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Proceedings of the fourth international conference and exhibition: World Congress on superconductivity. Volume 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goals of the World Congress on Superconductivity (WCS) have been to establish and foster the development and commercial application of superconductivity technology on a global scale by providing a non-adversarial, non-advocacy forum where scientists, engineers, businessmen and government personnel can freely exchange information and ideas on recent developments and directions for the future of superconductive research. Sessions were held on: accelerator technology, power and energy, persistent magnetic fields, performance characterization, physical properties, fabrication methodology, superconductive magnetic energy storage (SMES), thin films, high temperature materials, device applications, wire fabrication, and granular superconductors. Individual papers are indexed separately.

Krishen, K.; Burnham, C. [eds.] [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Houston, TX (United States). Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

332

Experience with the procurement of ferrite and temperature compensator for permanent magnets for accelerators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experience with the procurement of ferrite and temperature compensator for permanent magnets for accelerators

Fowler, W B; Volk, J T

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Secrets of superconductivity revealed  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Secrets of superconductivity revealed Secrets of superconductivity revealed Secrets of superconductivity revealed The superconducting material Cerium-Colbalt-Indium5 reveals new secrets about how superconductivity and magnetism can be related. January 3, 2014 Simon Gerber, first author of the publication on the superconducting properties of CeCoIn5 at the Morpheus instrument of the Spallation Neutron Source SINQ in Switzerland. (Photo: Paul Scherrer Institute/Markus Fischer) Simon Gerber, first author of the publication on the superconducting properties of CeCoIn5 at the Morpheus instrument of the Spallation Neutron Source SINQ in Switzerland. (Photo: Paul Scherrer Institute/Markus Fischer) "Superconductivity continues to give new surprises. As its secrets are revealed, we learn more about the quantum world of electrons and can begin

334

Secrets of superconductivity revealed  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Secrets of superconductivity revealed Secrets of superconductivity revealed Secrets of superconductivity revealed The superconducting material Cerium-Colbalt-Indium5 reveals new secrets about how superconductivity and magnetism can be related. January 3, 2014 Simon Gerber, first author of the publication on the superconducting properties of CeCoIn5 at the Morpheus instrument of the Spallation Neutron Source SINQ in Switzerland. (Photo: Paul Scherrer Institute/Markus Fischer) Simon Gerber, first author of the publication on the superconducting properties of CeCoIn5 at the Morpheus instrument of the Spallation Neutron Source SINQ in Switzerland. (Photo: Paul Scherrer Institute/Markus Fischer) "Superconductivity continues to give new surprises. As its secrets are revealed, we learn more about the quantum world of electrons and can begin

335

Superconducting cyclotrons  

SciTech Connect

Superconducting cyclotrons are particularly appropriate for acceleration of heavy ions. A review is given of design features of a superconducting cyclotron with energy 440 (Q$sup 2$/A) MeV. A strong magnetic field (4.6 tesla average) leads to small physical size (extraction radius 65 cm) and low construction costs. Operating costs are also low. The design is based on established technology (from present cyclotrons and from large bubble chambers). Two laboratories (in Chalk River, Canada and in East Lansing, Michigan) are proceeding with construction of full-scale prototype components for such cyclotrons.

Blosser, H.G.; Johnson, D.A.; Burleigh, R.J.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Study of Catcher Bearings for High Temperature Magnetic Bearing Application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Electron Energy Corporation (EEC) along with National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in collaboration with Vibration Control and Electro mechanics Lab (VCEL), Texas A & M University, College Station, TX are researching on high temperature permanent magnet based magnetic bearings. The magnetic bearings are made of high temperature resistant permanent magnets (up to 1000 degrees F). A test rig has been developed to test these magnetic bearings. The test rig mainly consists of two radial bearings, one axial thrust bearing and two catcher bearings. The test rig that the catcher bearing is inserted in is the first ultra-high temperature rig with permanent magnet biased magnetic bearings and motor. The magnetic bearings are permanent magnet based which is a novel concept. The Graphalloy bearings represent a new approach for ultra-high temperature backup bearing applications. One of the main objectives of this research is to insure the mechanical and electrical integrity for all components of the test rig. Some assemblies and accessories required for the whole assembly need to be designed. The assembly methods need to be designed. The preliminary tests for coefficient of friction, Young's modulus and thermal expansion characteristics for catcher bearing material need to be done. A dynamic model needs to be designed for studying and simulating the rotor drop of the shaft onto the catcher bearing using a finite element approach in MATLAB. The assembly of the test rig was completed successfully by developing assembly fixtures and assembly methods. The components of the test rig were tested before assembly. Other necessary systems like Sensor holder system, Graphalloy press fit system were designed, fabricated and tested. The catcher bearing material (Graphalloy) was tested for coefficient of friction and Young's modulus at room and high temperatures. The rotor drop was simulated by deriving a dynamic model, to study the effect of system parameters like clearance, coefficient of friction, negative stiffness, initial spin speed on system behavior. Increasing the friction increases the backward whirl and decreases the rotor stoppage time. Increasing the clearance reduces the stoppage time and increases the peak bearing force. Increasing the initial spin speed increases the rotor stoppage time. The maximum stress encountered for as built conditions is more than allowable limits.

Narayanaswamy, Ashwanth

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Low Temperature Chemical Vapor Deposition Of Thin Film Magnets  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thin-film magnet formed from a gas-phase reaction of tetracyanoetheylene (TCNE) OR (TCNQ), 7,7,8,8-tetracyano-P-quinodimethane, and a vanadium-containing compound such as vanadium hexcarbonyl (V(CO).sub.6) and bis(benzene)vanalium (V(C.sub.6 H.sub.6).sub.2) and a process of forming a magnetic thin film upon at least one substrate by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) at a process temperature not exceeding approximately 90.degree. C. and in the absence of a solvent. The magnetic thin film is particularly suitable for being disposed upon rigid or flexible substrates at temperatures in the range of 40.degree. C. and 70.degree. C. The present invention exhibits air-stable characteristics and qualities and is particularly suitable for providing being disposed upon a wide variety of substrates.

Miller, Joel S. (Salt Lake City, UT); Pokhodnya, Kostyantyn I. (Salt Lake City, UT)

2003-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

338

Superconductive imaging surface magnetometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved pick-up coil system for use with Superconducting Quantum Interference Device gradiometers and magnetometers involving the use of superconducting plates near conventional pick-up coil arrangements to provide imaging of nearby dipole sources and to deflect environmental magnetic noise away from the pick-up coils. This allows the practice of gradiometry and magnetometry in magnetically unshielded environments. One embodiment uses a hemispherically shaped superconducting plate with interior pick-up coils, allowing brain wave measurements to be made on human patients. another embodiment using flat superconducting plates could be used in non-destructive evaluation of materials.

Overton, Jr., William C. (Los Alamos, NM); van Hulsteyn, David B. (Santa Fe, NM); Flynn, Edward R. (Los Alamos, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Overview of Superconductivity and Challenges in Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Considerable progress has been achieved during the last few decades in the various fields of applied superconductivity, while the related low temperature technology has reached a high level. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) are so far the most successful applications, with tens of thousands of units worldwide, but high potential can also be recognized in the energy sector, with high energy cables, transformers, motors, generators for wind turbines, fault current limiters and devices for magnetic energy storage. A large number of magnet and cable prototypes have been constructed, showing in all cases high reliability. Large projects involving the construction of magnets, solenoids as well as dipoles and quadrupoles are described in the present book. A very large project, the LHC, is currently in operation, demonstrating that superconductivity is a reliable technology, even in a device of unprecedented high complexity. A project of similar complexity is ITER, a fusion device...

Flükiger, Rene

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Increased superconducting transition temperature of a niobium thin-film proximity-coupled to gold nanoparticles using linking organic molecules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The superconducting critical temperature, TC, of thin Nb films is significantly modified when gold nanoparticles (NPs) are chemically linked to the Nb film, with a consistent enhancement when using 3 nm long disilane linker molecules. The TC increases by up to 10% for certain linker length and NPs size. No change is observed when the nanoparticles are physisorbed with non-linking molecules. Electron tunneling spectra acquired on the linked NPs below TC typically exhibit zero-bias peaks. We attribute these results to a pairing mechanism coupling electrons in the Nb and the NPs, mediated by the organic linkers.

Katzir, Eran; Zeides, Felix; Katz, Nadav; Kalcheim, Yoav; Millo, Oded; Leitus, Gregory; Myasodeyov, Yuri; Shapiro, Boris Ya; Naaman, Ron; Paltiel, Yossi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature superconducting magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Increased superconducting transition temperature of a niobium thin-film proximity-coupled to gold nanoparticles using linking organic molecules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The superconducting critical temperature, TC, of thin Nb films is significantly modified when gold nanoparticles (NPs) are chemically linked to the Nb film, with a consistent enhancement when using 3 nm long disilane linker molecules. The TC increases by up to 10% for certain linker length and NPs size. No change is observed when the nanoparticles are physisorbed with non-linking molecules. Electron tunneling spectra acquired on the linked NPs below TC typically exhibit zero-bias peaks. We attribute these results to a pairing mechanism coupling electrons in the Nb and the NPs, mediated by the organic linkers.

Eran Katzir; Shira Yochelis; Felix Zeides; Nadav Katz; Yoav Kalcheim; Oded Millo; Gregory Leitus; Yuri Myasodeyov; Boris Ya. Shapiro; Ron Naaman; Yossi Paltiel

2011-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

342

Fluorinated Precursors of Superconducting Ceramics ...  

Fluorinated precursors for superconducting ceramics typically increase the critical current in the ... Applications and Industries. High-temperature ...

343

Superconductivity Program Overview | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Overview Superconductivity Program Overview High-Temperature Superconductivity (HTS) has the potential for achieving a more fundamental change to electric power...

344

How the Performance of a Superconducting Magnet is affected by the Connection between a small cooler and the Magnet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the magnet) and a condenser that is connected to thetemperature drop between the condenser and the cold head (Tdrop between the condenser and the magnet surface (T 2 -T

Green, Michael A.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Strong enhancement of superconductivity in a nanosized Pb bridge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent experiments with a superconducting nanosized Pb bridge formed between a scanning tunneling microscope tip and a substrate, superconductivity has been detected at magnetic fields, which are few times larger than the third (surface) critical field. We describe the observed phenomenon on the basis of a numerical solution of the Ginzburg-Landau equations in a model structure consisting of six conoids. The spatial distribution of the superconducting phase is shown to be strongly inhomogeneous, with concentration of the superconducting phase near the narrowest part (the “neck”) of the bridge. We show that suppression of superconductivity in the bridge by applied magnetic field or by temperature first occurs near the bases and then in the neck region, what leads to a continuous superconducting-to-normal resistive transition. A position of the transition midpoint depends on temperature and, typically, is by one order of magnitude higher than the second critical field Hc2. We find that the vortex states can be realized in the bridge at low temperatures T/Tc ? 0.6. The vortex states lead to a fine structure of the superconducting-to-normal resistive transition. We also analyze vortex states in the bridge, which are characterized by a varying vorticity as a function of the bridge’s height.

V. R. Misko; V. M. Fomin; J. T. Devreese

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Analysis of magnetic energy stored in superconducting coils with and without ferromagnetic inserts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Inductance and energy of superconducting coils are calculated by (1) a long solenoid approximation, (2) a finite element model, and (3) working formulas and tables. The results of the finite element model compare favorably with that of the working formulas. The long solenoid approximation overpredicts the energy and the inductance compared to the other two methods. The difference decreases with increasing length to diameter ratio.

Cha, Y.S.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Analysis of magnetic energy stored in superconducting coils with and without ferromagnetic inserts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Inductance and energy of superconducting coils are calculated by (1) a long solenoid approximation, (2) a finite element model, and (3) working formulas and tables. The results of the finite element model compare favorably with that of the working formulas. The long solenoid approximation overpredicts the energy and the inductance compared to the other two methods. The difference decreases with increasing length to diameter ratio.

Cha, Y.S.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Competition between singlet and triplet superconductivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The competition between singlet and triplet superconductivity is examined in consideration of correlations on an extended Hubbard model. It is shown that the triplet superconductivity may not be included in the common Hubbard model since the strong correlation favors the singlet superconductivity, and thus the triplet superconductivity should be induced by the electron-phonon interaction and the ferromagnetic exchange interaction. We also present a superconducting qualification with which magnetism is unbeneficial to superconductivity.

Tian De Cao; Tie Bang Wang

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

349

Superconducting microfabricated ion traps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We fabricate superconducting ion traps with niobium and niobium nitride and trap single 88Sr ions at cryogenic temperatures. The superconducting transition is verified and characterized by measuring the resistance and critical current using a 4-wire measurement on the trap structure, and observing change in the rf reflection. The lowest observed heating rate is 2.1(3) quanta/sec at 800 kHz at 6 K and shows no significant change across the superconducting transition, suggesting that anomalous heating is primarily caused by noise sources on the surface. This demonstration of superconducting ion traps opens up possibilities for integrating trapped ions and molecular ions with superconducting devices.

Shannon X. Wang; Yufei Ge; Jaroslaw Labaziewicz; Eric Dauler; Karl Berggren; Isaac L. Chuang

2010-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

350

High Temperature Superconducting Matrix Fault Current Limiter: Proof-of-Concept Test Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the design and proof-of-concept test results of a pre-prototype superconducting fault current limiter (FCL). The device employs SuperPower's Matrix Fault Current Limiter (MFCL) technology and BSCCO-2212 bulk material manufactured by Nexans SuperConductors' melt cast processing (MCP) technique. The MFCL technology is targeted to address fault current over-duty problems at the transmission voltage level of 138kV and higher. In addition to EPRI sponsorship, this $12M development progra...

2004-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

351

FABRICATION OF RUTHERFORD-TYPE SUPERCONDUCTING CABLES FOR CONSTRUCTION OF DIPOLE MAGNETS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SSC Design D Dipole," Brookhaven National Laboratory Report,Magnets and Cryogenics," Brookhaven National Laboratory (MayBerkeley Laboratory CLBL), Brookhaven National Laboratory (

Scanlan, R.M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Fast superconducting kicker magnet. Final technical report, November 1994--October 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fast kicker magnets are needed in accelerators to deflect the beam out of the storage ring and into experimental targets and beam dumps. The work reported here is on a new type of fast kicker magnet. The basic idea is to transport the beam along the axis of a tube made of Type I superconductor. An ordinary magnet is used to create a field, B{sub o} perpendicular to the axis of the tube. If B{sub o}B{sub c}. The tube of superconductor then goes normal. The field which had been shielded from the beam can now penetrate to the beam. This concept is applicable as a fast magnetic switch. DOE has been granted a patent on this device, which was disclosed to DOE by N.K. Mahale and D. Goren while they were at SSC. A feasibility study of this new form of kicker magnet is reported here.

Weinstein, R.; Mahale, N.K.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Inductively-Charged High-Temperature Superconductors And Methods Of Use  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides methods of charging superconducting materials and, in particular, methods of charging high-temperature superconducting materials. The methods generally involve cooling a superconducting material to a temperature below its critical temperature. Then, an external magnetic field is applied to charge the material at a nearly constant temperature. The external magnetic field first drives the superconducting material to a critical state and then penetrates into the material. When in the critical state, the superconducting material loses all the pinning ability and therefore is in the flux-flow regime. In some embodiments, a first magnetic field may be used to drive the superconducting material to the critical state and then a second magnetic field may be used to penetrate the superconducting material. When the external field or combination of external fields are removed, the magnetic field that has penetrated into the material remains trapped. The charged superconducting material may be used as solenoidal magnets, dipole magnets, or other higher order multipole magnets in many applications.

Bromberg, Leslie (Sharon, MA)

2003-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

354

Design and fabrication of a superconducting magnet for an 18 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion/photon source NFRI-ECRIPS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A superconducting magnet was designed and fabricated for an 18 GHz ECR ion/photon source, which will be installed at National Fusion Research Institute (NFRI) in South Korea. The magnetic system consists of a set of four superconducting coils for axial mirror field and 36 pieces of permanent magnets for hexapolar field. The superconducting coils with a cryocooler (1.5 W - 4.2 K) allow one to reach peak mirror fields of 2.2 T in the injection and those of 1.5 T in the extraction regions on the source axis, and the resultant hexapolar field gives 1.35 T on the plasma chamber wall. The unbalanced magnetic force between the coils and surrounding yoke has been minimized to 16 ton by a coil arrangement and their electrical connection, and then was successfully suspended by 12 strong thermal insulating supports made of large numbers of carbon fibers. In order to block radiative thermal losses, multilayer thermal insulations are covered on the coil windings as well as 40-K aluminum thermal shield. Also new schemes of quench detection and safety system (coil divisions, quench detection coils, and heaters) were employed. For impregnation of the windings a special epoxy has been selected and treated to have a higher breaking strength and a higher thermal conductivity, which enables the superconductors to be uniformly and rapidly cooled down or heated during a quench.

You, H.-J.; Jang, S.-W.; Jung, Y.-H.; Lho, T.-H. [Convergence Plasma Research Center, National Fusion Research Institute, Yusung-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, S.-J. [The Theoretical Solutions, JHeng Inc., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

355

Final design of a superconducting MHD magnet for the Coal-Fired Flow Facility at the University of Tennessee Space Institute  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The superconducting magnet system (SCMS) consisting of the superconducting magnet, magnet cryostat, a helium refrigerator/liquefier facility, a helium gas-handling system, apparatus for cryogenic transfer and storage, a magnet power supply, a integrated instrumentation and control system including a computer for magnet operation, data acquisition, system status and diagnosis, and magnet protection is described. The complete system will be tested at Argonne and installed at the Coal-Fired Flow Facility (CFFF) at the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) in 1981. The coil configuration is the US SCMS type circular saddle. The coil wil be assembled on the magnet tube with spiral banding. The bore tube will be about 6.3 cm thick (in the thickest section) and the banding will be strong enough for coil assembly but too weak to transmit the 30,180 kgf/cm maximum burst force to the bore tube. Fifteen ring girders will be used as the superstructure to contain the force. The decentering force of about 0.2177 x 10/sup 6/ kgf will be taken up by end flanges and bore tubes.

Wang, S T; Turner, L R; Genens, L; Pelczarski, W; Hoffman, J; Gonczy, J; Ludwig, H; Niemann, R C; Mataya, K; Kraft, E

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

CRITICAL FIELD FOR SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND LOW-TEMPERATURE NORMAL-STATE HEAT CAPACITY OF TUNGSTEN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LOW-TEMPERATURE NORMAL-STATE HEAT CAPACITY OF TUNGSTEN B. B.Temperature Nonnal-State Heat Capacity of Tungsten* B. n.single crystal This work, heat capacity 57,000a 4 d' 1&11.

Triplett, B.B.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Superconducting magnet development capability of the LLNL (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) High Field Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the following topics: High-Field Test Facility Equipment at LLNL; FENIX Magnet Facility; High-Field Test Facility (HFTF) 2-m Solenoid; Cryogenic Mechanical Test Facility; Electro-Mechanical Conductor Test Apparatus; Electro-Mechanical Wire Test Apparatus; FENIX/HFTF Data System and Network Topology; Helium Gas Management System (HGMS); Airco Helium Liquefier/Refrigerator; CTI 2800 Helium Liquefier; and MFTF-B/ITER Magnet Test Facility.

Miller, J.R.; Shen, S.; Summers, L.T.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Superconducting Power Cables  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power cables constructed from superconducting materials are being realized in utility demonstrations within the United States. Cooled by liquid nitrogen, high temperature superconducting power cables can transfer large amounts of power through relatively small cross sections. The key to their high power capacity is the high current density inherent with superconductors; a superconducting wire can conduct several times as much current as copper or aluminum conductors of the same cross section. For the pas...

2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

359

Direct current superconducting quantum interference device spectrometer for pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance and nuclear quadrupole resonance at frequencies up to 5 MHz  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A spectrometer based on a dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) has been developed for the direct detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) or nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) at frequencies up to 5 MHz. The sample is coupled to the input coil of the niobium-based SQUID via a nonresonant superconducting circuit. The flux locked loop involves the direct offset integration technique with additional positive feedback in which the output of the SQUID is coupled directly to a low-noise preamplifier. Precession of the nuclear quadrupole spins is induced by a magnetic field pulse with the feedback circuit disabled; subsequently, flux locked operation is restored and the SQUID amplifies the signal produced by the nuclear free induction signal. The spectrometer has been used to detect {sup 27}Al NQR signals in ruby (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}[Cr{sup 3+}]) at 359 and 714 kHz. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

TonThat, D.M.; Clarke, J. [Department of Physics, University of , California (United States)]|[Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Meissner superconductivity in itinerant ferromagnets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent results about the coexistence of ferromagnetism and unconventional superconductivity with spin-triplet Cooper pairing are reviewed on the basis of the quasi-phenomenological Ginzburg-Landau theory. The superconductivity in the mixed phase of coexistence of ferromagnetism and unconventional superconductivity is triggered by the spontaneous magnetization. The mixed phase is stable whereas the other superconducting phases that usually exist in unconventional superconductors are either unstable or metastable at relatively low temperatures in a quite narrow domain of the phase diagram and the stability properties are determined by the particular values of Landau parameters. The phase transitions from the normal phase to the phase of coexistence is of first order while the phase transition from the ferromagnetic phase to the coexistence phase can be either of first or second order depending on the concrete substance. The Cooper pair and crystal anisotropy are relevant to a more precise outline of the phase diagram shape and reduce the degeneration of the ground states of the system. The results are discussed in view of application to itinerant ferromagnetic compounds as UGe2, ZrZn2, URhGe. 1

D. V. Shopova; D. I. Uzunov

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature superconducting magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Stability Issues in Ambient-Temperature Passive Magnetic Bearing Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ambient-temperature passive magnetic bearing system developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory achieves rotor-dynamic stability by employing special combinations of levitating and stabilizing elements. These elements, energized by permanent magnet material, create the magnetic and electrodynamic forces that are required for the stable levitation of rotating systems, such as energy-storage flywheels. Stability criteria, derived from theory, describe the bearing element parameters, i.e., stiffnesses and damping coefficients, that are required both to assure stable levitation (''Earnshaw-stability''), and stability against whirl-type rotor-dynamic instabilities. The work described in this report concerns experimental measurements and computer simulations that address some critical aspects of this overall stability problem. Experimentally, a test device was built to measure the damping coefficient of dampers that employ eddy currents induced in a metallic disc. Another test device was constructed for the purpose of measuring the displacement-dependent drag coefficient of annular permanent magnet bearing elements. In the theoretical developments a computer code was written for the purpose of simulating the rotor-dynamics of our passive bearing systems. This code is capable of investigating rotor-dynamic stability effects for both small-amplitude transient displacements (i.e., those within the linear regime), and for large-amplitude displacements, where non-linear effects can become dominant. Under the latter conditions a bearing system that is stable for small-amplitude displacements may undergo a rapidly growing rotor-dynamic instability once a critical displacement is exceeded. A new result of the study was to demonstrate that stiffness anisotropy of the bearing elements (which can be designed into our bearing system) is strongly stabilizing, not only in the linear regime, but also in the non-linear regime.

Post, R.F.

2000-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

362

Temperature compensated and self-calibrated current sensor using reference magnetic field  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described to provide temperature compensation and self-calibration of a current sensor based on a plurality of magnetic field sensors positioned around a current carrying conductor. A reference magnetic field generated within the current sensor housing is detected by the magnetic field sensors and is used to correct variations in the output signal due to temperature variations and aging.

Yakymyshyn, Christopher Paul (Seminole, FL); Brubaker, Michael Allen (Loveland, CO); Yakymyshyn, Pamela Jane (Seminole, FL)

2007-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

363

Al Zeller, Shailendra Chouhan, Rick Swanson, Superconducting Magnets for the FRIB  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in hot cell All magnets have to be replaceable using remote handling Assumptions Zeller, RESMM12, Slide Remote Handling Requirements in Hot Cell Mechanical Design Zeller, RESMM12, Slide 25 #12;Warm iron quad · State-of-the-art remote handling » Fast and safe target changes · Target applicable to light and heavy

McDonald, Kirk

364

A worldwide overview of superconductivity development efforts for utility applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The progress and prospects for the application of high temperature superconductivity to the electric power sector has been the topic of an IEA Implementing Agreement begun in 1990. The present task members are: Canada, Denmark, Finland, Germany, Israel, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, the United Kingdom, and the United States. As a result of the Implementing Agreement, work has been performed by the Operating Agent with the full participation of all of the member countries. This work has facilitated the exchange of information among experts in all member countries and is the basis for much of the information contained in this paper. This paper summarizes progress toward application of high temperature superconductivity to devices for use in the electric power sector such as: fault-current limiters, cables, superconducting magnetic energy Storage, rotating machinery, transformers, and flywheels incorporating magnetic bearings. Such devices are being designed, built and tested throughout the world.

Giese, R.F.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Active superconducting devices formed of thin films  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Active superconducting devices are formed of thin films of superconductor which include a main conduction channel which has an active weak link region. The weak link region is composed of an array of links of thin film superconductor spaced from one another by voids and selected in size and thickness such that magnetic flux can propagate across the weak link region when it is superconducting. Magnetic flux applied to the weak link region will propagate across the array of links causing localized loss of superconductivity in the links and changing the effective resistance across the links. The magnetic flux can be applied from a control line formed of a superconducting film deposited coplanar with the main conduction channel and weak link region on a substrate. The devices can be formed of any type to superconductor but are particularly well suited to the high temperature superconductors since the devices can be entirely formed from coplanar films with no overlying regions. The devices can be utilized for a variety of electrical components, including switching circuits, amplifiers, oscillators and modulators, and are well suited to microwave frequency applications.

Martens, Jon S. (Madison, WI); Beyer, James B. (Madison, WI); Nordman, James E. (Madison, WI); Hohenwarter, Gert K. G. (Madison, WI)

1991-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

366

Superconductive radiofrequency window assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The SRF window assembly has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The SRF window assembly comprises a superconducting frame, a ceramic plate having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet for sealing plate into frame. The plate is brazed to eyelet which is then electron beam welded to frame. A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the SRF window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator. 11 figs.

Phillips, H.L.; Elliott, T.S.

1998-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

367

Superconducting radiofrequency window assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly comprises a superconducting frame, a ceramic plate having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet for sealing plate into frame. The plate is brazed to eyelet which is then electron beam welded to frame. A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator. 11 figs.

Phillips, H.L.; Elliott, T.S.

1997-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

368

Measurements of electromagnetic properties of LCT (Large Coil Task) coils in IFSMTF (International Fusion Superconducting Magnet Test Facility)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Participants in the international Large Coil Task (LCT) have designed, built, and tested six different toroidal field coils. Each coil has a 2.5- by 3.5-m, D-shaped bore and a current between 10 and 18 kA and is designed to demonstrate stable operation at 8 T, with a superimposed averaged pulsed field of 0.14 T in 1.0 s and simulated nuclear heating. Testing of the full six-coil toroidal array began early in 1986 and was successfully completed on September 3, 1987, in the International Fusion Superconducting Magnet Test Facility (IFSMTF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This paper summarizes electromagnetic properties of LCT coils measured in different modes of energization and fast dump. Effects of mutual coupling and induced eddy currents are analyzed and discussed. Measurements of the ac loss caused by the superimposed pulsed fields are summarized. Finally, the interpretation of the test results and their relevance to practical fusion are presented. 11 refs., 10 figs., 4 tab.

Shen, S.S.; Baylor, L.R.; Dresner, L.; Fehling, D.T.; Lubell, M.S.; Lue, J.W.; Luton, J.N.; McManamy, T.J.; Wilson, C.T.; Wintenberg, R.E.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

The Magnificent Seven: Magnetic fields and surface temperature distributions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Presently seven nearby radio-quiet isolated neutron stars discovered in ROSAT data and characterized by thermal X-ray spectra are known. They exhibit very similar properties and despite intensive searches their number remained constant since 2001 which led to their name ``The Magnificent Seven''. Five of the stars exhibit pulsations in their X-ray flux with periods in the range of 3.4 s to 11.4 s. XMM-Newton observations revealed broad absorption lines in the X-ray spectra which are interpreted as cyclotron resonance absorption lines by protons or heavy ions and / or atomic transitions shifted to X-ray energies by strong magnetic fields of the order of 10^13 G. New XMM-Newton observations indicate more complex X-ray spectra with multiple absorption lines. Pulse-phase spectroscopy of the best studied pulsars RX J0720.4-3125 and RBS 1223 reveals variations in derived emission temperature and absorption line depth with pulse phase. Moreover, RX J0720.4-3125 shows long-term spectral changes which are interpreted as due to free precession of the neutron star. Modeling of the pulse profiles of RX J0720.4-3125 and RBS 1223 provides information about the surface temperature distribution of the neutron stars indicating hot polar caps which have different temperatures, different sizes and are probably not located in antipodal positions.

F. Haberl

2006-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

370

Fundamental Studies of Tl-Ba-Ca-Cu-O Single Crystals and New High-Temperature Superconducting Compounds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experimental studies in creating new compounds may lead to a better understanding of high-temperature superconductors. Flux creep activation energies (minimum energies that cause magnetic flux motion) were designed in one new compound, single crystals of laboratory-grown Tl2Ba2CaCu2Ox, using an ac-susceptibility technique. Investigations also measured crystal resistivity and used a new processing technique to form high-quality Tl-based thin films.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

AC Losses in the New High-Temperature Superconductors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report addresses the properties of high-temperature ceramic oxide superconductors in low magnetic fields. It discusses ac losses in the superconducting and normal states, the influence of anisotropy, and a database for monitoring advances in superconductivity. The ac losses of the oxide superconductors were found to be excessive.

1989-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

372

Superconducting active impedance converter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A transimpedance amplifier for use with high temperature superconducting, other superconducting, and conventional semiconductors allows for appropriate signal amplification and impedance matching to processing electronics. The amplifier incorporates the superconducting flux flow transistor into a differential amplifier configuration which allows for operation over a wide temperature range, and is characterized by high gain, relatively low noise, and response times less than 200 picoseconds over at least a 10-80 K. temperature range. The invention is particularly useful when a signal derived from either far-IR focal plane detectors or from Josephson junctions is to be processed by higher signal/higher impedance electronics, such as conventional semiconductor technology. 12 figures.

Ginley, D.S.; Hietala, V.M.; Martens, J.S.

1993-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

373

Normal-zone detection in tokamak superconducting magnets with Co- wound voltage sensors  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses advantages and disadvantages of different locations of co-wound voltage sensors for quench detection in tokamak magnets with a cable-in-conduit conductor. The voltage sensor locations are analyzed and estimates of the anticipated noise vs. dB/dt are derived for transverse, parallel, and self fields. The LLNL Noise Rejection Experiment, also described here, is designed to verify theoretical expectations on a copper cable exposed to these fields that will simulate the tokamak field environment.

Martovetsky, N.N.; Chaplin, M.R.

1995-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

374

Lightweight Superconducting Cables for use with High-Field Magnets and Military Applications  

The development of YBCO coated conductors has resulted in high critical current densities, but have been limited by the upper critical field of the superconductor. Achieving higher fields would require the use of high-temperature super conductors, but ...

375

Superconductivity, Superfluidity and Holography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is a concise review of holographic superconductors and superfluids. We highlight some predictions of the holographic models and the emphasis is given to physical aspects rather than to the technical details, although some references to understand the latter are systematically provided. We include gapped systems in the discussion, motivated by the physics of high-temperature superconductivity. In order to do so we consider a compactified extra dimension (with radius R), or, alternatively, a dilatonic field. The first setup can also be used to model cylindrical superconductors; when these are probed by an axial magnetic field a universal property of holography emerges: while for large R (compared to the other scales in the problem) non-local operators are suppressed, leading to the so called Little-Parks periodicity, the opposite limit shows non-local effects, e.g. the uplifting of the Little-Parks periodicity. This difference corresponds in the gravity side to a Hawking-Page phase transition.

Alberto Salvio

2013-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

376

Ultrasonic signatures at the superconducting and the pseudogap phase boundaries in YBCO cuprates.  

SciTech Connect

A major issue in the understanding of cuprate superconductors is the nature of the metallic state from which high temperature superconductivity emerges. Central to this issue is the pseudogap region of the doping-temperature phase diagram that extends from room temperature to the superconducting transition. Although polarized neutron scattering studies hint at magnetic order associated with the pseudogap, there is no clear thermodynamic evidence for a phase boundary. Such evidence has a straightforward physical interpretation, however, it is difficult to obtain over a temperature range wide enough to encompass both the pseudogap and superconducting phases. We address this by measuring the elastic response of detwinned single crystals, an underdoped YBCO{sub 6.60} with superconducting transition at T{sub c} = 61.6K and a slightly overdoped YBCO{sub 6.98} with T{sub c} = 88.0K. We observe a discontinuity in the elastic moduli across the superconducting transition. Its magnitude requires that pair formation is coincident with superconducting coherence (the onset of the Meissner effect). For both crystals the elastic response reveals a phase transition at the pseudogap boundary. In slightly overdoped YBCO that transition is 20K below T{sub c}, extending the pseudogap phase boundary inside the superconducting dome. This supports a description of the metallic state in cuprates where a pseudogap phase boundary evolves into a quantum critical point masked by the superconducting dome.

Shehter, Arkady [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Migliori, Albert [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Betts, Jonathan B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Balakirev, Fedor F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; McDonald, Ross David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Riggs, Scott C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ramshaw, Brad [University of British Columbia, Canada; Liang, Ruixing [University of British Columbia, Canada; Hardy, Walter N. [University of British Columbia, Canada; Bonn, Doug A. [University of British Columbia, Canada

2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

377

Superconducting thermoelectric generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of an apparatus and method for producing electricity from heat. The present invention is a thermoelectric generator that uses materials with substantially no electrical resistance, often called superconductors, to efficiently convert heat into electrical energy without resistive losses. Preferably, an array of superconducting elements is encased within a second material with a higher thermal conductivity than that of the superconducting material. The second material is preferably a semiconductor. Alternatively, the superconducting material can be doped on a base semiconducting material, or the superconducting material and the semiconducting material can exist as alternating, interleaved layers of waferlike materials. A temperature gradient imposed across the boundary of the two materials, establishes an electrical potential related to the magnitude of the temperature gradient. The superconducting material carries the resulting electrical current at zero resistivity, thereby eliminating resistive losses. The elimination of resistive losses significantly increases the conversion efficiency of the thermoelectric device.

Metzger, J.D.; El-Genk, M.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

378

DC superconducting quantum interference device usable in nuclear quadrupole resonance and zero field nuclear magnetic spectrometers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A spectrometer for measuring the nuclear quadrupole resonance spectra or the zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance spectra generated by a sample is disclosed. The spectrometer uses an amplifier having a dc SQUID operating in a flux-locked loop for generating an amplified output as a function of the intensity of the signal generated by the sample. The flux-locked loop circuit includes an integrator. The amplifier also includes means for preventing the integrator from being driven into saturation. As a result, the time for the flux-locked loop to recover from the excitation pulses generated by the spectrometer is reduced.

Fan, Non Q. (San Diego, CA); Clarke, John (Berkeley, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

DC superconducting quantum interference device usable in nuclear quadrupole resonance and zero field nuclear magnetic spectrometers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A spectrometer for measuring the nuclear quadrupole resonance spectra or the zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance spectra generated by a sample is disclosed. The spectrometer uses an amplifier having a dc SQUID operating in a flux-locked loop for generating an amplified output as a function of the intensity of the signal generated by the sample. The flux-locked loop circuit includes an integrator. The amplifier also includes means for preventing the integrator from being driven into saturation. As a result, the time for the flux-locked loop to recover from the excitation pulses generated by the spectrometer is reduced. 7 figures.

Fan, N.Q.; Clarke, J.

1993-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

380

Experimental work on superconductivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The high thermal conductivity in the superconductive state at low reduced critical temperatures has been used for the detection of metal imperfections, including those caused by radiation damage. A statistically disordered single crystal of Ta with 30% ...

K. Mendelssohn

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature superconducting magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

High temperature magnetic properties of SmCo{sub 5}/{alpha}-Fe(Co) bulk nanocomposite magnets  

SciTech Connect

To find alternative high temperature magnets containing no heavy rare earths for power applications, SmCo{sub 5}/Fe bulk nanocomposite magnets with enhanced energy density and high thermal stability have been produced by using a ball-milling plus warm-compaction route. Up to 30% of the Fe soft magnetic phase has been added to the composites with grain size <20 nm distributed homogenously in the matrix of the SmCo{sub 5} hard magnetic phase. It was observed that the microstructure does not change with temperature up to 500 Degree-Sign C. It is also observed that the thermal stability of bulk nanocomposite samples is closely related to bulk density. Energy products above 11 MGOe have been obtained at 300 Degree-Sign C in fully dense bulk SmCo{sub 5}/Fe nanocomposite magnets, which is 65% higher than that of a single-phase counterpart at the same temperature.

Rong Chuanbing; Poudyal, Narayan; Liu, X. B.; Ping Liu, J. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, Texas 76019 (United States); Zhang Ying [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, Texas 76019 (United States); Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Ames Laboratory, USDOE, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Kramer, M. J. [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Ames Laboratory, USDOE, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)

2012-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

382

Ultra high-current superconducting cables for a 2. 2-Tesla, 300-kilojoule energy storage magnet  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

These 2.2-T, 300-kJ magnets are to operate at 10 to 12 kA with a safety factor in critical current of about 50 percent at 10 kA. The conductor must exhibit low losses in addition to being stable. Magnetic Corporation of America (MCA) designed a flat conductor using 1224 copper-matrix, monofilament wires combined in two stages of cabling followed by two stages of flat braiding. Two of these conductors were constructed, one with wire already on hand and the second using wire made specifically for this application. Intermagnetics General Corporation (IGC) designed two rectangular conductors using 315 and 319 mixed-matrix multifilament wires combined in three stages of cabling followed by compaction in a Turk's head. The maximum transport current capabilities (I/sub t/) of these cables were measured in hairpin shaped samples with the straight section under test in perpendicularly applied fields. The measured results at 2.5 T for the two MCA cables were 11.7 kA and 15.4 kA, and for the IGC cables were 18.2 kA and 19.3 kA (extrapolated). In addition, samples of the compacted and uncompacted major strands from the IGC cables were tested. The results of these measurements are compred with values of I/sub t/ from the single-wire critical currents taking into account the adjacent conductor fields and the cable self-fields.Several causes of degradation of I/sub t/ in the compacted cable are discussed including those due to experimental factors.

Miranda, G.A.; Rhodenizer, R.; Rackov, P.; Punchard, W.F.B.; de Winter, T.A.

1976-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

383

Superconducting wire  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention consists of a method of producing superconducting wire by drawing a glass fiber with a melted powder of a superconducting wire inside the glass tube. After drawing, the glass fiber is heated to crystallize the superconducting compound. The diameter of the superconducting wires is controlled by the rate at which the glass fiber s are drawn from the glass tube.

Day, D.E.; Petrovic, J.J.; Gac, F.D.; Ray, C.S.

1991-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

384

New Superconducting Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Superconductors with higher superconducting transition temperatures, higher critical currents, and better mechanical properties would be valuable. This report presents criteria to guide the search for higher transition temperature materials. To determine if candidate materials are suitably metallic, the study carried out detailed electronic structure calculations. These calculations identified boron-containing hydrides as particularly promising as a new class of possible superconducting materials that ma...

1994-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

385

MODELING OF EDDY CURRENT LOSS AND TEMPERATURE OF THE MAGNETS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(SPMSM); interior magnet PM motors; time-stepped ¯nite-element analysis (FEA); thermal circuits in traditional motor design and analysis. However, due to the high conductivity of the rare-earth magnet, neody-element analysis (FEA) for the calculation of eddy current loss in the magnet. Based on the calculated losses

Mi, Chunting "Chris"

386

Structural phase transitions and superconductivity in lanthanum copper oxides  

SciTech Connect

Despite the enormous effort expended over the past ten years to determine the mechanism underlying high temperature superconductivity in cuprates there is still no consensus on the physical origin of this fascinating phenomenon. This is a consequence of a number of factors, among which are the intrinsic difficulties in understanding the strong electron correlations in the copper oxides, determining the roles played by antiferromagnetic interactions and low dimensionality, analyzing the complex phonon dispersion relationships, and characterizing the phase diagrams which are functions of the physical parameters of temperature and pressure, as well as the chemical parameters of stoichiometry and hole concentration. In addition to all of these intrinsic difficulties, extrinsic materials issues such as sample quality and homogeneity present additional complications. Within the field of high temperature superconductivity there exists a subfield centered around the material originally reported to exhibit high temperature superconductivity by Bednorz and Mueller, Ba doped La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4}. This is structurally the simplest cuprate superconductor. The authors report on studies of phase differences observed between such base superconductors doped with Ba or Sr. What these studies have revealed is a fascinating interplay of structural, magnetic and superconducting properties which is unique in the field of high temperature superconductivity and is summarized in this paper.

Crawford, M.K.; Harlow, R.L.; McCarron, E.M. [DuPont, Wilmington, DE (United States)] [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

387

Structural / magnetic phase transitions and superconductivity in Ba(Fe1-xTMx)2As2 single crystals.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??BaFe2As2 single crystal undergoes strongly coupled tetragonal to orthorhombic / paramagnetic to antiferromagnetic phase transitions at 134 K and can become superconducting under doping. To… (more)

Ni, Ni

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Understanding Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) technology, applications, and economics, for end-use workshop  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project was to determine the state-of-the-art and to what extent existing SMES is a viable option in meeting the needs of utilities and their customers for improving electric service power quality. By defining and analyzing SMES electrical/mechanical performance characteristics, and comparing SMES application benefits with competitive stored energy systems, industry will be able to determine SMES unique applications and potential market penetration. Building on this information base, it would also be possible to evaluate the impact of high temperature superconductors (77 K and 20-35 K) on SMES technology applications. The authors of this report constructed a network of industry contacts and research consultants that were used to collect, update, and analyze ongoing SMES R&D and marketing activities in industries, utilities, and equipment manufacturers. These key resources were utilized to assemble performance characteristics on existing SMES, battery, capacitor, flywheel, and high temperature superconductor (HTS) stored energy technologies. From this information, preliminary stored energy system comparisons were accomplished. In this way, the electric load needs would be readily comparable to the potential solutions and applications offered by each aforementioned energy storage technology.

Ferraro, R.J. [Ferraro, Oliver, and Associates, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States); McConnell, B.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Superconductivity Highlights | Neutron Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Superconductivity Superconductivity SHARE Superconductivity Highlights 1-6 of 6 Results Doug Scalapino discusses "common thread" linking unconventional superconducting materials December 01, 2012 - Douglas Scalapino was the inaugural speaker for a new joint lecture series sponsored by the Spallation Neutron Source and the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. New VULCAN tests of Japanese cable for US ITER's central magnet system February 01, 2012 - Neutron testing of the Japanese-made superconducting cable for the central solenoid (CS) magnetic system for US ITER begins next Tuesday, says Ke An, lead instrument scientist for the VULCAN Engineering Materials Diffractometer at the Spallation Neutron Source. ARCS maps collaborative magnetic spin behavior in iron telluride

390

Method for making mirrored surfaces comprising superconducting material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Superconducting mirror surfaces are provided by forming a mirror surface from a material which is superconductive at a temperature above about 40 K and adjusting the temperature of the surface to that temperature at which the material is superconducting. The mirror surfaces are essentially perfect reflectors for electromagnetic radiation with photon energy less than the superconducting band gap.

Early, J.T.; Hargrove, R.S.

1989-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

391

Dual control active superconductive devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A superconducting active device has dual control inputs and is constructed such that the output of the device is effectively a linear mix of the two input signals. The device is formed of a film of superconducting material on a substrate and has two main conduction channels, each of which includes a weak link region. A first control line extends adjacent to the weak link region in the first channel and a second control line extends adjacent to the weak link region in the second channel. The current flowing from the first channel flows through an internal control line which is also adjacent to the weak link region of the second channel. The weak link regions comprise small links of superconductor, separated by voids, through which the current flows in each channel. Current passed through the control lines causes magnetic flux vortices which propagate across the weak link regions and control the resistance of these regions. The output of the device taken across the input to the main channels and the output of the second main channel and the internal control line will constitute essentially a linear mix of the two input signals imposed on the two control lines. The device is especially suited to microwave applications since it has very low input capacitance, and is well suited to being formed of high temperature superconducting materials since all of the structures may be formed coplanar with one another on a substrate.

Martens, Jon S. (Albuquerque, NM); Beyer, James B. (Madison, WI); Nordman, James E. (Madison, WI); Hohenwarter, Gert K. G. (Madison, WI)

1993-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

392

Power superconducting power transmission cable  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is for a compact superconducting power transmission cable operating at distribution level voltages. The superconducting cable is a conductor with a number of tapes assembled into a subconductor. These conductors are then mounted co-planarly in an elongated dielectric to produce a 3-phase cable. The arrangement increases the magnetic field parallel to the tapes thereby reducing ac losses.

Ashworth, Stephen P. (Cambridge, GB)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Apparatus to measure liquid helium boil-off from low-loss superconducting current leads  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A low-loss liquid helium dewar was constructed to measure the liquid helium boil-off rate from high-temperature superconducting current leads. The dewar has a measured background heat leakage rate of 12 mW. Equations calculating the heat leakage rate from the measured vapor mass flow rate in liquid helium boil-off experiments are derived. Parameters that affect the experiments, such as density ratio, absolute pressure, and rate of pressure variation, are discussed. This study is important as superconducting current leads may be used in superconducting magnetic energy storage systems.

Cha, Y.S.; Niemann, R.C.; Hull, J.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Technology Div.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Alexei Abrikosov and Superconductivity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alexei Abrikosov and Superconductivity Alexei Abrikosov and Superconductivity Resources with Additional Information · Publications at ANL Alexei A. Abrikosov of the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is a recipient of the 2003 Nobel Prize in Physics for his research in the area of superconductivity. Alexei Abrikosov Courtesy Argonne National Laboratory "Abrikosov's research [at ANL] centers on condensed-matter physics (the structure and behavior of solids and liquids), and concentrates on superconductivity, the ability of some materials to carry electrical current without resistance. He was the first to propose the concept of "type-II superconductors" in 1952 and constructed the theory of their magnetic properties, known as the Abrikosov vortex lattice.

395

Graphite and its Hidden Superconductivity | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Graphite and its Hidden Superconductivity Graphite and its Hidden Superconductivity Wednesday, November 20, 2013 - 2:00pm SLAC, Conference Room 137-322 Pablo Esquinazi, University of Leipzig We review different experimental results that indicate the existence of granular superconductivity at high temperatures at graphite interfaces. In particular we will discuss the following experimental results: The temperature and magnetic field dependence of the electrical resistance of bulk and thin graphite samples and its relation with the existence of two-dimensional (2D) interfaces. The anomalous hysteresis in the magnetoresistance observed in graphite thin samples as well as its enhancement restricting the current path within the sample. The Josephson behavior of the current-voltage characteristics with

396

Introduction to Color Superconductivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At high nuclear density and small temperature, due to the asymptotic freedom property of Quantum ChromoDynamics and to the existence of an attractive channel in the color interaction, diquark condensates might be formed. Since these condensates break the color gauge symmetry, this phenomenon has the name of color superconductivity. In the last few years this has become a very active field of research. While a direct experimental test is still missing, color superconductivity might have implications in astrophysics because for some compact stars, e.g. pulsars, the baryon densities necessary for color superconductivity can probably be reached.

G. Nardulli

2006-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

397

Superconducting thermoelectric generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for producing electricity from heat. The present invention is a thermoelectric generator that uses materials with substantially no electrical resistance, often called superconductors, to efficiently convert heat into electrical energy without resistive losses. Preferably, an array of superconducting elements is encased within a second material with a high thermal conductivity. The second material is preferably a semiconductor. Alternatively, the superconducting material can be doped on a base semiconducting material, or the superconducting material and the semiconducting material can exist as alternating, interleaved layers of waferlike materials. A temperature gradient imposed across the boundary of the two materials establishes an electrical potential related to the magnitude of the temperature gradient. The superconducting material carries the resulting electrical current at zero resistivity, thereby eliminating resistive losses. The elimination of resistive losses significantly increases the conversion efficiency of the thermoelectric device.

Metzger, John D. (Eaton' s Neck, NY); El-Genk, Mohamed S. (Albuquerque, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Superconducting thermoelectric generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for producing electricity from heat is disclosed. The present invention is a thermoelectric generator that uses materials with substantially no electrical resistance, often called superconductors, to efficiently convert heat into electrical energy without resistive losses. Preferably, an array of superconducting elements is encased within a second material with a high thermal conductivity. The second material is preferably a semiconductor. Alternatively, the superconducting material can be doped on a base semiconducting material, or the superconducting material and the semiconducting material can exist as alternating, interleaved layers of waferlike materials. A temperature gradient imposed across the boundary of the two materials establishes an electrical potential related to the magnitude of the temperature gradient. The superconducting material carries the resulting electrical current at zero resistivity, thereby eliminating resistive losses. The elimination of resistive losses significantly increases the conversion efficiency of the thermoelectric device. 4 figs.

Metzger, J.D.; El-Genk, M.S.

1998-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

399

Superconducting thermoelectric generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for producing electricity from heat. The present invention is a thermoelectric generator that uses materials with substantially no electrical resistance, often called superconductors, to efficiently convert heat into electrical energy without resistive losses. Preferably, an array of superconducting elements is encased within a second material with a high thermal conductivity. The second material is preferably a semiconductor. Alternatively, the superconducting material can be doped on a base semiconducting material, or the superconducting material and the semiconducting material can exist as alternating, interleaved layers of waferlike materials. A temperature gradient imposed across the boundary of the two materials establishes an electrical potential related to the magnitude of the temperature gradient. The superconducting material carries the resulting electrical current at zero resistivity, thereby eliminating resistive losses. The elimination of resistive losses significantly increases the conversion efficiency of the thermoelectric device.

Metzger, J.D.; El-Genk, M.S.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Structural and magnetic properties and superconductivity in Ba(Fe{sub 1-x}TM{sub x}){sub 2}As{sub 2}  

SciTech Connect

We studied the effects on structural and magnetic phase transitions and the emergence of superconductivity in transition metal substituted BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}. We grew four series of Ba(Fe{sub 1-x}TM{sub x}){sub 2}As{sub 2} (TM=Ru, Mn, Co+Cr and Co+Mn) and characterized them by crystallographic, magnetic and transport measurements. We also subjected Ba(Fe{sub 1-x}Cr{sub x}){sub 2}As{sub 2} and Ba(Fe{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}){sub 2}As{sub 2} to heat treatment to explore what changes might be induced.

Thaler, Alexander

2012-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature superconducting magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

LARGE SUPERCONDUCTING DETECTOR MAGNETS WITH ULTRA THIN COILS FOR USE IN HIGH ENERGY ACCELERATORS AND STORAGE RINGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

contained 890 kJ of magnetic energy,:and i t iia:~ ,operat:as a functiori of stored· magnetic energy' for a number ofabsorbs a portion of the magnetic energy in the process. The

Green, M.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Superconducting Magnet Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the AGS Snake Coil Assembly B. Parker M. Anerella S. Peggs J. Cozzolino F. Pilat J. Escallier S. Plate G. Ganetis C. Porretto M. Garber W. Sampson A. Ghosh J....

403

SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adki ns, "Raccoon Mountain Pumped-Storage Plant- Ten Years2J O. D. Johnson, "Worldwide Pumped-Storage Projects", PowerUnderground Pumped Hydro Storage", Proc. 1976 Eng.

Hassenzahl, W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pumped hydro, compressed air, and battery energy storage areto other energy storage sys tem s suc h as pumped hydro andenergy would be $50/MJ whereas the cost of the pumped hydro

Hassenzahl, W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Reply to "Comment on 'Vortex-assisted photon counts and their magnetic field dependence in single-photon superconducting detectors'"  

SciTech Connect

The vortex crossing rate in thin current-biased superconducting strips, calculated within the London approach employing the concept of a vortex as a particle, is very sensitive to the cutoff at the vortex core size. To account properly for the vortex core, one needs to use microscopic theory.

Bulaevskii, L.N.; Graf, Matthias; Kogan, Vladimir G.

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

406

Use of superconductive technology for energy storage and power transmission for large power systems: power parks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A general review and technology assessment of superconducting magnets for energy storage and superconducting cables for power transmission are presented. It is concluded that the technology is now available for applying superconductivity in the power industry. (TFD)

Keller, W.E.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Compact magnetic energy storage module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A superconducting compact magnetic energy storage module in which a plurality of superconducting toroids, each having a toroidally wound superconducting winding inside a poloidally wound superconducting winding, are stacked so that the flow of electricity in each toroidally wound superconducting winding is in a direction opposite from the direction of electrical flow in other contiguous superconducting toroids. This allows for minimal magnetic pollution outside of the module. 4 figures.

Prueitt, M.L.

1994-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

408

Compact magnetic energy storage module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A superconducting compact magnetic energy storage module in which a plurality of superconducting toroids, each having a toroidally wound superconducting winding inside a poloidally wound superconducting winding, are stacked so that the flow of electricity in each toroidally wound superconducting winding is in a direction opposite from the direction of electrical flow in other contiguous superconducting toroids. This allows for minimal magnetic pollution outside of the module.

Prueitt, Melvin L. (Los Alamos, NM)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

The positive ion temperature effect in magnetized electronegative plasma sheath with two species of positive ions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The properties of a magnetized multi-component (two species of positive ions, negative ions and electrons) plasma sheath with finite positive ion temperature are studied. By using three fluid hydrodynamic model and some dimensionless variables, the ion (both lighter and heavier positive ions, and negative ions) densities, the ion (only for positive ions) velocities, and electric potential inside the sheath are investigated. In addition, the absence and presence of magnetic field and the orientation of magnetic field are considered. It is noticed that, with increase of positive ion temperature, the lighter positive ion density peaks increase only at the sheath edge and shift towards the sheath edge for both absence and presence of magnetic field. For heavier positive ions, in the absence of magnetic field, the density peaks increase at the sheath edge. But in the presence of magnetic field, the density fluctuations increase at the sheath edge. For both the cases, the density peaks shift towards the sheath edge.

Shaw, A. K. [Centre of Plasma Physics, Institute for Plasma Research, Sonapur-782 402, Guwahati, Assam (India); Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar-382 428, Gujarat (India); Kar, S. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar-382 428, Gujarat (India); Goswami, K. S. [Centre of Plasma Physics, Institute for Plasma Research, Sonapur-782 402, Guwahati, Assam (India)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

410

Thermal and electrical stabilities of solid nitrogen (SN2) cooled YBCO coated conductors for HTS magnet applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently, a cooling system using a solid cryogen such as solid nitrogen (SN2), was introduced for high temperature superconducting (HTS) magnet applications. In order to apply the SN2 cooling system successfully to HTS ...

Song, J. B.

411

Quasi-one-dimensional magnetism in TiOCl and a theory of a lightly doped dimerized insulator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transition metal oxides with low dimensional geometry have displayed fascinating new phenomena such as high temperature superconductivity and unconventional magnetism. The first part of this thesis is related to this rich ...

Seidel, Alexander, 1975-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Solitons in SO(5) Superconductivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A model unifying superconductivity and antiferromagnetism using an underlying approximate SO(5) symmetry has injected energy into the field of high-temperature superconductivity. This model might lead to a variety of interesting solitons. In this paper, the idea that superconducting vortices may have antiferromagnetic cores is presented, along with the results of some preliminary numerical work. An outlook for future work, including speculations about other possible exotic solitons, is presented. 1

R. Mackenzie; Québec Hc J; J. M. Cline

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Finite temperature Casimir effect for charged massless scalars in a magnetic field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The zeta function regularization technique is used to study the finite temperature Casimir effect for a charged and massless scalar field confined between parallel plates and satisfying Dirichlet boundary conditions at the plates. A magnetic field perpendicular to the plates is included. Three equivalent expressions for the zeta function are obtained, which are exact to all orders in the magnetic field strength, temperature and plate distance. These expressions of the zeta function are used to calculate the Helmholtz free energy of the scalar field and the pressure on the plates, in the case of high temperature, small plate distance and strong magnetic field. In all cases, simple analytic expressions are obtained for the free energy and pressure which are accurate and valid for practically all values of temperature, plate distance and magnetic field.

Andrea Erdas; Kevin P. Seltzer

2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

414

CMB temperature anisotropy from broken spatial isotropy due to a homogeneous cosmological magnetic field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We derive the cosmic microwave background temperature anisotropy two-point correlation function (including off-diagonal correlations) from broken spatial isotropy due to an arbitrarily oriented homogeneous cosmological magnetic field.

Kahniashvili, Tina [Department of Physics, Kansas State University, 116 Cardwell Hall, Manhattan, Kansas 66506 (United States); Department of Physics, Laurentian University, Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, ON P3E 2C6 (Canada); National Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory, 2A Kazbegi Ave, Tbilisi, GE-0160 (Georgia); Lavrelashvili, George [Department of Theoretical Physics, A. Razmadze Mathematical Institute, 1 M. Aleksidze, Tbilisi, GE-0193 (Georgia); Ratra, Bharat [Department of Physics, Kansas State University, 116 Cardwell Hall, Manhattan, Kansas 66506 (United States)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

415

Temperature dependence of magnetic susceptibility of nuclear matter: Lowest order constrained variational calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we study the magnetic susceptibility and other thermodynamic properties of the polarized nuclear matter at finite temperature using the lowest order constrained variational (LOCV) method employing the AV{sub 18} potential. Our results show a monotonic behavior for the magnetic susceptibility which indicates that the spontaneous transition to the ferromagnetic phase does not occur for this system.

Bigdeli, M. [Department of Physics, Zanjan University, P. O. Box 45195-313, Zanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics of Maragha, P. O. Box 55134-441, Maragha (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bordbar, G. H. [Department of Physics, Shiraz University, Shiraz 71454 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics of Maragha, P. O. Box 55134-441, Maragha (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rezaei, Z. [Department of Physics, Shiraz University, Shiraz 71454 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

416

Pr and Cu magnetism in (Pr{sub 1.5}Ce{sub 0.5})Sr{sub 2}Cu{sub 2}MO{sub 10{minus}{delta}} (M=Nb, Ta): Correlations with a suppression of superconductivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The magnetic properties of nonsuperconducting (Pr{sub 1.5}Ce{sub 0.5})Sr{sub 2}Cu{sub 2}MO{sub 10{minus}{delta}} with M=Nb, Ta are characterized with dc magnetization, specific-heat, and neutron-diffraction experiments. Data for (Pr{sub 1.5}Ce{sub 0.5})Sr{sub 2}Cu{sub 2}NbO{sub 10{minus}{delta}} reveal complex Cu magnetism marked by antiferromagnetic order below 200 K, spin structure transitions at 130 and 57 K, both collinear and noncollinear antiferromagnetic spin structures, and weak ferromagnetic behavior below 130 K. The data also indicate an anomalous ordering of the Pr spins near 10 K, a large linear contribution to the low-temperature specific heat, and a Pr 4f crystal-field ground state similar to that found in PrBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}. Furthermore, there is evidence that the weak ferromagnetic behavior couples to the Pr ordering near 10 K. Identical Pr magnetism and similar Cu magnetism are found in (Pr{sub 1.5}Ce{sub 0.5})Sr{sub 2}Cu{sub 2}TaO{sub 10{minus}{delta}}, deoxygenated (Pr{sub 1.5}Ce{sub 0.5})Sr{sub 2}Cu{sub 2}NbO{sub 10{minus}{delta}}, and deoxygenated (Pr{sub 1.5}Ce{sub 0.5})Sr{sub 2}Cu{sub 2}TaO{sub 10{minus}{delta}}. These results indicate that superconductivity is suppressed in these compounds in the same phenomenological manner as in PrBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}. We interpret this as evidence that superconductivity is suppressed by the same mechanism in both structures and propose that a general correlation exists between anomalous Pr magnetism and a lack of superconductivity in these Pr-based high-T{sub C} cuprates. The significance of these results and analyses to understanding and modeling the suppression of superconductivity by Pr in high-T{sub C} cuprates is discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

Goodwin, T.J.; Shelton, R.N. [Department of Physics, University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Radousky, H.B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)]|[Department of Physics, University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Rosov, N.; Lynn, J.W. [Reactor Radiation Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Realization and modeling of rf superconducting quantum interference device metamaterials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have prepared meta-atoms based on radio frequency superconducting quantum interference devices (RF SQUIDs) and examined their tunability with dc magnetic field, rf current, and temperature. RF SQUIDs are superconducting split ring resonators in which the usual capacitance is supplemented with a Josephson junction, which introduces strong nonlinearity in the rf properties. We find excellent agreement between the data and a model which regards the Josephson junction as the resistively and capacitively-shunted junction. A magnetic field tunability of 80 THz/Gauss at 12 GHz is observed, a total tunability of 56$%$ is achieved, and a unique electromagnetically-induced transparency feature at intermediate excitation powers is demonstrated for the first time. An RF SQUID metamaterial is shown to have qualitatively the same behavior as a single RF SQUID with regards to DC flux and temperature tuning.

M. Trepanier; Daimeng Zhang; Oleg Mukhanov; Steven M. Anlage

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

418

Superconducting active impedance converter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a transimpedance amplifier for use with high temperature superconducting, other superconducting, and conventional semiconductor allows for appropriate signal amplification and impedance matching to processing electronics. The amplifier incorporates the superconducting flux flow transistor into a differential amplifier configuration which allows for operation over a wide temperature range, and is characterized by high gain, relatively low noise, and response times less than 200 picoseconds over at least a 10--80 K temperature range. The invention is particularly useful when a signal derived from either far-IR focal plane detectors or from Josephson junctions is to be processed by higher signal/higher impedance electronics, such as conventional semiconductor technology.

Ginley, D.S.; Hietala, V.M.; Martens, J.S.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

419

Potential impact of high temperature superconductors on maglev transportation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the potential impact that high-temperature superconductors (HTSs) may have on transportation by magnetically levitated vehicles. It is not intended as a planning document, but rather as an overview of potential HTS applications to magnetic-levitation (maglev) transportation. The present maglev program in the United States is summarized, and the present status of development of HTSs is described. Areas identified for possible impact on maglev technology are (1) liquid-nitrogen-cooled levitation magnets, (2) magnetic-field shielding of the passenger compartment, (3) superconducting magnetic energy storage for wayside power, (4) superconducting bearings for flywheel energy storage for wayside power, (5) downleads to continuously powered liquid-helium-cooled levitation magnets, and (6) liquid-hydrogen-cooled levitation magnets and linear motor propulsion windings. Major technical issues that remain to be resolved for the use of HTSs in maglev applications include thermal magnetic stability, mechanical properties, and critical current density at liquid-nitrogen temperatures.

Hull, J.R.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Partial Deconfinement in Color Superconductivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the fate of the unbroken SU(2) color gauge interactions for 2 light flavors color superconductivity at non zero temperature. Using a simple model we compute the deconfining/confining critical temperature and show that is smaller than the critical temperature for the onset of the superconductive state itself. The breaking of Lorentz invariance, induced already at zero temperature by the quark chemical potential, is shown to heavily affect the value of the critical temperature and all of the relevant features related to the deconfining transition. Modifying the Polyakov loop model to describe the SU(2) immersed in the diquark medium we argue that the deconfinement transition is second order. Having constructed part of the equation of state for the 2 color superconducting phase at low temperatures our results are relevant for the physics of compact objects featuring a two flavor color superconductive state.

F. Sannino; N. Marchal; W. Schäfer

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature superconducting magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Application of magnetic method to assess the extent of high temperature geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The extent of thermally altered rocks in high temperature geothermal reservoirs hosted by young volcanic rocks can be assessed from magnetic surveys. Magnetic anomalies associated with many geothermal field in New Zealand and Indonesia can be interpreted in terms of thick (up to 1 km) demagnetized reservoir rocks. Demagnetization of these rocks has been confirmed by core studies and is caused by hydrothermal alteration produced from fluid/rock interactions. Models of the demagnetized Wairakei (NZ) and Kamojang (Indonesia) reservoirs are presented which include the productive areas. Magnetic surveys give fast and economical investigations of high temperature prospects if measurements are made from the air. The magnetic interpretation models can provide important constraints for reservoir models. Magnetic ground surveys can also be used to assess the extent of concealed near surface alteration which can be used in site selection of engineering structures.

Soengkono, S.; Hochstein, M.P.

1995-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

422

LARGE SUPERCONDUCTING DETECTOR MAGNETS WITH ULTRA THIN COILS FOR USE IN HIGH ENERGY ACCELERATORS AND STORAGE RINGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The development of these ,magnets bas proceeded with theThe Lawrence Beme1ey Laboratory bas developed a 1:adtca11. "The PLUTO magnet bas the largest central inductiOn 'and

Green, M.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Layering and temperature-dependent magnetization and anisotropy of naturally produced Ni/NiO multilayers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ni/NiO multilayers were grown by magnetron sputtering at room temperature, with the aid of the natural oxidation procedure. That is, at the end of the deposition of each single Ni layer, air is let to flow into the vacuum chamber through a leak valve. Then, a very thin NiO layer ({approx}1.2 nm) is formed. Simulated x-ray reflectivity patterns reveal that layering is excellent for individual Ni-layer thickness larger than 2.5 nm, which is attributed to the intercalation of amorphous NiO between the polycrystalline Ni layers. The magnetization of the films, measured at temperatures 5-300 K, has almost bulk-like value, whereas the films exhibit a trend to perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) with an unusual significant positive interface anisotropy contribution, which presents a weak temperature dependence. The power-law behavior of the multilayers indicates a non-negligible contribution of higher order anisotropies in the uniaxial anisotropy. Bloch-law fittings for the temperature dependence of the magnetization in the spin-wave regime show that the magnetization in the multilayers decreases faster as a function of temperature than the one of bulk Ni. Finally, when the individual Ni-layer thickness decreases below 2 nm, the multilayer stacking vanishes, resulting in a dramatic decrease of the interface magnetic anisotropy and consequently in a decrease of the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy.

Pappas, S. D.; Trachylis, D.; Velgakis, M. J. [Laboratory of High-Tech Materials, School of Engineering, University of Patras, 26504 Patras (Greece); Kapaklis, V.; Joensson, P. E.; Papaioannou, E. Th. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Delimitis, A. [Chemical Process Engineering Research Institute (CPERI), Centre for Research and Technology Hellas (CERTH), 57001 Thermi, Thessaloniki (Greece); Poulopoulos, P. [Laboratory of High-Tech Materials, School of Engineering, University of Patras, 26504 Patras (Greece); Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Freie Universitaet Berlin, Arnimallee 14, D-14195 Berlin-Dahlem (Germany); Materials Science Department, University of Patras, 26504 Patras (Greece); Fumagalli, P. [Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Freie Universitaet Berlin, Arnimallee 14, D-14195 Berlin-Dahlem (Germany); Politis, C. [Laboratory of High-Tech Materials, School of Engineering, University of Patras, 26504 Patras (Greece); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, Texas 76019 (United States)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Atomic magnetic gradiometer for room temperature high sensitivity magnetic field detection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser-based atomic magnetometer (LBAM) apparatus measures magnetic fields, comprising: a plurality of polarization detector cells to detect magnetic fields; a laser source optically coupled to the polarization detector cells; and a signal detector that measures the laser source after being coupled to the polarization detector cells, which may be alkali cells. A single polarization cell may be used for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) by prepolarizing the nuclear spins of an analyte, encoding spectroscopic and/or spatial information, and detecting NMR signals from the analyte with a laser-based atomic magnetometer to form NMR spectra and/or magnetic resonance images (MRI). There is no need of a magnetic field or cryogenics in the detection step, as it is detected through the LBAM.

Xu,Shoujun (Berkeley, CA); Lowery, Thomas L. (Belmont, MA); Budker, Dmitry (El Cerrito, CA); Yashchuk, Valeriy V. (Richmond, CA); Wemmer, David E. (Berkeley, CA); Pines, Alexander (Berkeley, CA)

2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

425

Superconducting phase qubits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

eld enhancement of superconductivity in ultranarrow wires.computation · Qubits · Superconductivity · Decoherence PACS

Martinis, John M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

An Assessment of High-Temperature Superconductors for High-Field SMES Systems: U.S. Department of Energy -- EPRI Wind Turbine Verification Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study evaluated superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) systems made of different high temperature superconductor (HTS) materials. The research addressed a broad range of practical issues associated with building a high-field HTS SMES system.

1999-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

427

Superconductive articles including cerium oxide layer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A ceramic superconductor comprising a metal oxide substrate, a ceramic high temperature superconductive material, and a intermediate layer of a material having a cubic crystal structure, said layer situated between the substrate and the superconductive material is provided, and a structure for supporting a ceramic superconducting material is provided, said structure comprising a metal oxide substrate, and a layer situated over the surface of the substrate to substantially inhibit interdiffusion between the substrate and a ceramic superconducting material deposited upon said structure.

Wu, X.D.; Muenchausen, R.E.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

428

Superconducting radiofrequency window assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly (20) has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly (20) comprises a superconducting frame (30), a ceramic plate (40) having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet (50) for sealing plate (40) into frame (30). The plate (40) is brazed to eyelet (50) which is then electron beam welded to frame (30). A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator.

Phillips, Harry L. (Seaford, VA); Elliott, Thomas S. (Yorktown, VA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Superconductive radiofrequency window assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly (20) has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly (20) comprises a superconducting frame (30), a ceramic plate (40) having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet (50) for sealing plate (40) into frame (30). The plate (40) is brazed to eyelet (50) which is then electron beam welded to frame (30). A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator.

Phillips, Harry Lawrence (Seaford, VA); Elliott, Thomas S. (Yorktown, VA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Temperature-controlled molecular depolarization gates in nuclear magnetic resonance  

SciTech Connect

Down the drain: Cryptophane cages in combination with selective radiofrequency spin labeling can be used as molecular 'transpletor' units for transferring depletion of spin polarization from a hyperpolarized 'source' spin ensemble to a 'drain' ensemble. The flow of nuclei through the gate is adjustable by the ambient temperature, thereby enabling controlled consumption of hyperpolarization.

Schroder, Leif; Schroder, Leif; Chavez, Lana; Meldrum, Tyler; Smith, Monica; Lowery, Thomas J.; E. Wemmer, David; Pines, Alexander

2008-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

431

The Relation between Ion Temperature Anisotropy and Formation of Slow Shocks in Collisionless Magnetic Reconnection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We perform a two-dimensional simulation by using an electromagnetic hybrid code to study the formation of slow-mode shocks in collisionless magnetic reconnection in low beta plasmas, and we focus on the relation between the formation of slow shocks and the ion temperature anisotropy enhanced at the shock downstream region. It is known that as magnetic reconnection develops, the parallel temperature along the magnetic field becomes large in association with the anisotropic PSBL (plasma sheet boundary layer) ion beams, and this temperature anisotropy has a tendency to suppress the formation of slow shocks. Based on our simulation result, we found that the slow shock formation is suppressed due to the large temperature anisotropy near the X-type region, but the ion temperature anisotropy relaxes with increasing the distance from the magnetic neutral point. As a result, two pairs of current structures, which are the strong evidence of dissipation of magnetic field in slow shocks, are formed at the distance x > 11...

Higashimori, Katsuaki

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Relativistic mechanism of superconductivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

According to the theory of relativity, the relativistic Coulomb's force between an electron pair is composed of two parts, the main part is repulsive, while the rest part can be attractive in certain situations. Thus the relativistic attraction of an electron pair provides an insight into the mechanism of superconductivity. In superconductor, there are, probably at least, two kinds of collective motions which can eliminate the repulsion between two electrons and let the attraction being dominant, the first is the combination of lattice and electron gas, accounting for traditional superconductivity; the second is the electron gas themselves, accounting for high $T_c$ superconductivity. In usual materials, there is a good balance between the repulsion and attraction of an electron pair, the electrons are regarded as free electrons so that Fermi gas theory plays very well. But in some materials, when the repulsion dominates electron pairs, the electron gas will has a behavior opposite to superconductivity. In the present paper the superconducting states are discussed in terms of relativistic quantum theory in details, some significant results are obtained including quantized magnetic flux, London equation, Meissner effect and Josephson effect.

H. Y. Cui

2002-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

433

Superconductivity Technology Center - Los Alamos National Lab ...  

Researchers at the facility conduct research and development on processes for fabrication of high temperature superconducting tapes, measurement of the physical and ...

434

SQUID-Detected NMR and MRI at Ultralow Magnetic Fields  

By combining the use of supersensitive magnetic field detecting Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices (SQUIDS) with ...

435

Critical currents of YBCO tapes and Bi-2212 wires at different temperatures and magnetic fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Design studies for the cooling channel of a Muon Collider call for straight and helical solenoids generating field well in excess of the critical fields of state of the art Low Temperature Superconductors (LTS) such as Nb{sub 3}Sn or NbTi. Therefore, High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) will need to be used for the manufacturing of all or certain sections of such magnets to be able to generate and withstand the field levels at the cryogenic temperatures required by the new machine. In this work, two major High Temperature Superconductors - Bi2212 round wires and YBCO coated conductor tapes - are investigated to understand how critical current density of such conductors scales as a function of external field and operating temperature. This is vital information to make conductor choices depending on the application and to proceed with the design of such magnets.

Lombardo, V.; Barzi, e.; Turrioni, D.; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Magnetic Fluctuation Power Near Proton Temperature Anisotropy Instability Thresholds in the Solar Wind  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The proton temperature anisotropy in the solar wind is known to be constrained by the theoretical thresholds for pressure-anisotropy-driven instabilities. Here, we use approximately 1x10{sup 6} independent measurements of gyroscale magnetic fluctuations in the solar wind to show for the first time that these fluctuations are enhanced along the temperature anisotropy thresholds of the mirror, proton oblique firehose, and ion cyclotron instabilities. In addition, the measured magnetic compressibility is enhanced at high plasma beta (beta{sub ||} > or approx. 1) along the mirror instability threshold but small elsewhere, consistent with expectations of the mirror mode. We also show that the short wavelength magnetic fluctuation power is a strong function of collisionality, which relaxes the temperature anisotropy away from the instability conditions and reduces correspondingly the fluctuation power.

Bale, S. D. [Physics Department and Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California (United States); Kasper, J. C. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States); Howes, G. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Quataert, E. [Physics Department and Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, California (United States); Salem, C.; Sundkvist, D. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California (United States)

2009-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

437

Passive energy dump for superconducting coil protection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The patent describes a passive resistance type energy dump for the protection of the coils of a superconducting magnet. Insertion heaters are immersed in a rigid container filled with a fusible alloy. The energy dump is connected across the coils of the superconducting magnet wherein individual heater elements are connected singly to the windings or otherwise according to the energy dumping requirements upon transition of the magnet to a normal state.

Luton, J.N. Jr.

1973-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

438

Suppression of magnetism and development of superconductivity within the collapsed tetragonal phase of Ca[subscript 0.67]Sr[subscript 0.33]Fe[subscript 2]As[subscript 2] under pressure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Structural and electronic characterizations of (Ca{sub 0.67}Sr{sub 0.33})Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} have been performed as a function of pressure up to 12 GPa using conventional and designer diamond anvil cells. The compound (Ca{sub 0.67}Sr{sub 0.33})Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} behaves intermediately between its end members, displaying a suppression of magnetism and the onset of superconductivity. Like other members of the AFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} family, (Ca{sub 0.67}Sr{sub 0.33})Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} undergoes a pressure-induced isostructural volume collapse, which we associate with the development of As-As bonding across the mirror plane of the structure. This collapsed tetragonal phase abruptly cuts off the magnetic state and supports superconductivity with a maximum T{sub c} = 22.2 K. The maximum T{sub c} of the superconducting phase is not strongly correlated with any structural parameter, but its proximity to the abrupt suppression of magnetism as well as the volume-collapse transition suggests that magnetic interactions and structural inhomogeneity may play a role in its development.

Jeffries, J.R.; Butch, N.P.; Kirshenbaum, K.; Saha, S.R.; Samudrala, G.; Weir, S.T.; Vohra, Y.K.; Paglione, J. (LLNL); (UAB); (Maryland)

2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

439

Superconducting thermoelectric generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Thermoelectricity is produced by applying a temperature differential to dissimilar electrically conducting or semiconducting materials, thereby producing a voltage that is proportional to the temperature difference. Thermoelectric generators use this effect to directly convert heat into electricity; however, presently-known generators have low efficiencies due to the production of high currents which in turn cause large resistive heating losses. Some thermoelectric generators operate at efficiencies between 4% and 7% in the 800{degrees} to 1200{degrees}C range. According to its major aspects and bradly stated, the present invention is an apparatus and method for producing electricity from heat. In particular, the invention is a thermoelectric generator that juxtaposes a superconducting material and a semiconducting material - so that the superconducting and the semiconducting materials touch - to convert heat energy into electrical energy without resistive losses in the temperature range below the critical temperature of the superconducting material. Preferably, an array of superconducting material is encased in one of several possible configurations within a second material having a high thermal conductivity, preferably a semiconductor, to form a thermoelectric generator.

Metzger, J.D.; El-Genk, M.S.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Stability and Quench Protection for HTS Superconducting Magnets: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA number CRD-05-00160  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NREL will perform deposition and testing of various dielectrics on high-temperature superconductors.

Ginley, D. S.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temperature superconducting magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Superconductivity in gallium-substituted Ba8Si46 clathrates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report a joint experimental and theoretical investigation of superconductivity in Ga-substituted type-I silicon clathrates. We prepared samples of the general formula Ba8Si46-xGax, with different values of x. We show that Ba8Si40Ga6 is a bulk superconductor, with an onset at T-C approximate to 3.3 K. For x=10 and higher, no superconductivity was observed down to T=1.8 K. This represents a strong suppression of superconductivity with increasing Ga content, compared to Ba8Si46 with T-C approximate to 8 K. Suppression of superconductivity can be attributed primarily to a decrease in the density of states at the Fermi level, caused by a reduced integrity of the sp(3)-hybridized networks as well as the lowering of carrier concentration. These results are corroborated by first-principles calculations, which show that Ga substitution results in a large decrease of the electronic density of states at the Fermi level, which explains the decreased superconducting critical temperature within the BCS framework. To further characterize the superconducting state, we carried out magnetic measurements showing Ba8Si40Ga6 to be a type-II superconductor. The critical magnetic fields were measured to be H-C1 approximate to 35 Oe and H-C2 approximate to 8.5 kOe. We deduce the London penetration depth lambda approximate to 3700 A and the coherence length xi(c)approximate to 200 A. Our estimate of the electron-phonon coupling reveals that Ba8Si40Ga6 is a moderate phonon-mediated BCS superconductor.

Li, Yang; Zhang, Ruihong; Liu, Yang; Chen, Ning; Luo, Z. P.; Ma, Xingqiao; Cao, Guohui; Feng, Z. S.; Hu, Chia-Ren; Ross, Joseph H., Jr.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Supersymmetric color superconductivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Supersymmetric Color Superconductivity 1 arXiv:hep-patterns such as color superconductivity and color-?avortional method in color superconductivity, namely µ ? ?. In

Harnik, Roni; Larson, Daniel T.; Murayama, Hitoshi

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Active magnetic regenerator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for refrigeration are disclosed which provides efficient refrigeration over temperature ranges in excess of 20/sup 0/C and which requires no maintenance and is, therefore, usable on an unmanned satellite. The apparatus comprises a superconducting magnet which may be solenoidal. A piston comprising a substance such as a rare earth substance which is maintained near its Curie temperature reciprocates through the bore of the solenoidal magnet. A magnetic drive rod is connected to the piston and appropriate heat sinks are connected thereto. The piston is driven by a suitable mechanical drive such as an electric motor and cam. In practicing the invention, the body of the piston is magnetized and demagnetized as it moves through the magnetic field of the solenoid to approximate any of the following cycles or a condition thereof as well as, potentially, other cycles: Brayton, Carnot, Ericsson, and Stirling. Advantages of the present invention include: that refrigeration can be accomplished over at least a 20/sup 0/C scale at superconducting temperatures as well as at more conventional temperatures; very high efficiency, high reliability, and small size. (LCL)

Barclay, J.A.; Steyert, W.A.

1981-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

444

SLPX: superconducting long-pulse experiment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The principal objectives of the SLPX--Superconducting Long-Pulse Experiment--are to demonstrate quasi-steady operation of 3 to 5 MA hydrogen and deuterium plasmas at high temperature and high thermal wall loading, and to develop reliable operation of a prototypical reactor magnetics systems featuring a toroidal assembly of high-field niobium-tin coils. This report summarizes the results of an engineering scoping study for the SLPX. A range of sizes has been investigated, from a TF (toroidal-field) coil aperture of 2.6 m x 3.65 m, to an aperture of 3.1 m x 4.8 m, and with a maximum field at the Nb/sub 3/Sn conductor of 10 to 12 Tesla. The poloidal-field magnetics system utilizes superconducting ohmic-heating and d.c. EF coils located outside the TF coils, together with normal-conducting EF and divertor coils located inside the TF coils. For the largest embodiment, the D-shaped plasma in hydrogen operation has major radius = 3.6 m, half-width = 0.90 m, elongation < 1.5, and B = 7,2 T. Maximum plasma current of 5.0 MA can be maintained for a 30-s flat-top when Z/sub eff/approximately 1. A single-null poloidal magnetic divertor disposes of particles and heat diffusing out of the current channel, thereby helping to insure the feasibility of quasi-steady operation.

Jassby, D.L.; File, J.; Reardon, P.J.

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Optimization of Superconducting Bending Magnets for a 1.0-1.5 GeV Compact Light Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

twelve dipole storage ring bas a circumference that is 40dipole ring shown in Figure 1 bas a low magnet system cost.section at the top of Figure 4 bas a 1.6 meter drift in the

Green, M.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Pressure-temperature phase diagram, inverse isotope effect, and superconductivity in excess of 13 K in. kappa. -(BEDT-TTF) sub 2 Cu(N(CN) sub 2 )Cl, where BEDT-TTF is bis(ethylenedithio)tetrathiafulvalene  

SciTech Connect

The pressure-temperature phase diagram of the highest-{ital T}{sub {ital c}} organic superconductor, {kappa}-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}Cu(N(CN){sub 2})Cl is determined, where BEDT-TTF is bis(ethylenedithio)tetrathiafulvalene. Semiconducting, insulating, metallic, and superconducting regimes are seen at pressures below 1 kbar. Superconductivity at 12.5 K and 0.3 kbar {ital increases} by 0.5--1.5 K upon deuteration of BEDT-TTF, in striking contrast to the normal isotope effect determined previously for {kappa}-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}Cu(N(CN){sub 2})Br.

Schirber, J.E.; Overmyer, D.L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico (USA)); Carlson, K.D.; Williams, J.M.; Kini, A.M.; Wang, H.H.; Charlier, H.A.; Love, B.J.; Watkins, D.M.; Yaconi, G.A. (Chemistry and Materials Science Divisions, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois (USA))

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Type-I superconductivity in YbSb2 single crystals  

SciTech Connect

We present evidence of type-I superconductivity in YbSb2 single crystals from dc and ac magnetization, heat capacity, and resistivity measurements. The critical temperature and critical field are determined to be Tc? 1.3 K and Hc? 55 Oe. A small Ginzburg-Landau parameter ?= 0.05, together with typical magnetization isotherms of type-I superconductors, small critical field values, a strong differential paramagnetic effect signal, and a field-induced change from second- to first-order phase transition, confirms the type-I nature of the superconductivity in YbSb2. A possible second superconducting state is observed in the radio-frequency susceptibility measurements, with Tc(2)? 0.41 K and Hc(2)? 430 Oe.

Zhao, Liang L.; Lausberg, Stefan; Kim, Hyunsoo; Tanatar, Makariy A.; Brando, Manuel; Prozorov, Ruslan; Morosan, E.

2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

448

Element-specific study of the temperature dependent magnetization of Co-Mn-Sb thin films  

SciTech Connect

Magnetron sputtered thin Co-Mn-Sb films were investigated with respect to their element-specific magnetic properties. Stoichiometric Co{sub 1}Mn{sub 1}Sb{sub 1} crystallized in the C1{sub b} structure has been predicted to be half-metallic and is therefore of interest for spintronics applications. It should show a characteristic antiferromagnetic coupling of the Mn and Co magnetic moments and a transition temperature T{sub C} of about 480K. Although the observed transition temperature of our 20nm thick Co{sub 32.4}Mn{sub 33.7}Sb{sub 33.8}, Co{sub 37.7}Mn{sub 34.1}Sb{sub 28.2} and Co{sub 43.2}Mn{sub 32.6}Sb{sub 24.2} films is in quite good agreement with the expected value, we found a ferromagnetic coupling of the Mn and Co magnetic moments which indicates that the films do not crystallize in the C1{sub b} structure and are probably not fully spin-polarized. The ratio of the Co and Mn moments does not change up to the transition temperature and the temperature dependence of the magnetic moments can be well described by the mean field theory.

Schmalhorst, J.; Ebke, D.; Meinert, M.; Thomas, A.; Reiss, G.; Arenholz, E.

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

449

Effect of the annealing temperature on magnetic property for transformer with amorphous core  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of experimental investigations of annealing elevated, magnetic properties and their application with amorphous SA1 Cores. The phenomenon of two exothermic peaks correlated with the crystallization behavior was examined ... Keywords: amorphous materials, annealing, core loss, curies temperature, exciting power, transformer

Chang-Hung Hsu; Yeong-Hwa Chang

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Investigation of magnetic reconnection during a sawtooth crash in a high-temperature tokamak plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-temperature Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) plasmas [Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research 2986 in a poloidal plane, an observation consistent with the Kadomtsev reconnection theory. On the other hand Test Reactor)17 plasmas (where the magnetic Reynolds number exceeds 107) by a set of nonper- turbative

451

The effect of temperature and magnetic field on a quantum rod qubit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hamiltonian of a quantum rod (QR) with an ellipsoidal boundary is given after a coordinate transformation, which changes the ellipsoidal boundary into a spherical one. We obtain the eigenenergies and eigenfunctions of the ground and the first excited ... Keywords: Magnetic field, Quantum rod, Qubit, Temperature effect

Yong Sun; Zhao-Hua Ding; Jing-Lin Xiao

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

The Progress on Low-Cost, High-Quality, High-Temperature Superconducting Tapes Deposited by the Combustion Chemical Vapor Deposition Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The innovative Combustion Chemical Vapor Deposition (CCVD) process is a non-vacuum technique that is being investigated to enable next generation products in several application areas including high-temperature superconductors (HTS). In combination with the Rolling Assisted Biaxially Textured Substrate (RABiTS) technology, the CCVD process has significant promise to provide low-cost, high-quality lengths of YBCO coated conductor. Over 100 meter lengths of both Ni and Ni-W (3 at. Wt.%) substrates with a surface roughness of 12-18 nm were produced. The CCVD technology has been used to deposit both buffer layer coatings as well as YBCO superconducting layers. Buffer layer architecture of strontium titanate (SrTiO{sub 3}) and ceria (CeO{sub 2}) have been deposited by CCVD on textured nickel substrates and optimized to appropriate thicknesses and microstructures to provide templates for growing PLD YBCO with a J{sub c} of 1.1 MA/cm{sup 2} at 77 K and self-field. The CCVD buffer layers have been scaled to meter plus lengths with good epitaxial uniformity along the length. A short sample cut from one of the lengths enabled high critical current density PLD YBCO. Films of CCVD YBCO superconductors have been grown on single crystal substrates with critical current densities over 1 MA/cm{sup 2}. In addition, superconducting YBCO films with an I{sub c} of 60 A/cm-width (J{sub c} = 1.5 MA/cm{sup 2}) were grown on ORNL RABiTS (CeO{sub 2}/YSZ/Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Ni/Ni-3W) using CCVD process.

Shoup, S.S.; White, M.K.; Krebs, S.L.; Darnell, N.; King, A.C.; Mattox, D.S.; Campbell, I.H.; Marken, K.R.; Hong, S.; Czabaj, B.; Paranthaman, M.; Christen, H.M.; Zhai, H.-Y. Specht, E.

2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

453

Study on the energy criterion of cuprate superconductivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we use the variation of spontaneous magnetization to describe the influence of electron holes in cuprate superconductors, and use competitive energy relations to explore the superconductivity rule and energy criterion, on this basis, we can deduce a clear physical image of superconducting phase diagram and superconducting mechanism.

Gu Jiapu

2007-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

454

The Superconducting Horizontal Bend Magnet for the Jefferson Lab's 11 GeV/c Super High Momentum Spectrometer  

SciTech Connect

A collaboration between NSCL and Jlab has developed the reference design and coil winding for Jlab's Super High Momentum Spectrometer (SHMS) horizontal bend magnet. A warm iron ??C?? type superferric dipole magnet will bend the 12 GeV/c particles horizontally by 3?? to allow the SHMS to reach angles as low as 5.5??. This requires an integral field strength of up to 2.1 T.m. The major challenges are the tight geometry, high and unbalanced forces and a required low fringe field in primary beam path. A coil design based on flattened SSC Rutherford cable that provides a large current margin and commercially available fiberglass prepreg epoxy tape has been developed. A complete test coil has been wound and will be cold tested. This paper present the modified magnet design includes coil forces, coil restraint system and fringe field. In addition, coil properties, quench calculations and the full mechanical details are also presented.

S. Chouhan, J. DeKamp, A. Zeller, P. Brindza, S. Lassiter, M. Fowler, E. Sun

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

455