Sample records for temperature anomalies 1850-2012

  1. Bouguer gravity anomalies, depth to bedrock, and shallow temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bouguer gravity anomalies, depth to bedrock, and shallow temperature in the Humboldt House geothermal area, Pershing County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

  2. Detection of Surface Temperature Anomalies in the Coso Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Temperature Anomalies in the Coso Geothermal Field Using Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings:...

  3. E-Print Network 3.0 - air temperature anomalies Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mean SST anomalies Fig.6 shows the low-pass mean SST anomalies, air temperature... wind speed anomalies, sea-air temperature difference anomalies, and sea-air ... Source: Maine,...

  4. Solar Flare Intermittency and the Earth's Temperature Anomalies Nicola Scafetta1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scafetta, Nicola

    Solar Flare Intermittency and the Earth's Temperature Anomalies Nicola Scafetta1,2 and Bruce J; published 17 June 2003) We argue that Earth's short-term temperature anomalies and the solar flare data sets that corresponds to the one that would be induced by the solar flare intermittency. The mean

  5. The Intra-Americas Sea springtime surface temperature anomaly dipole as fingerprint of remote influences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chunzai

    The Intra-Americas Sea springtime surface temperature anomaly dipole as fingerprint of remote anomaly dipole we find that the dipole forms mostly in response to changes in the air-sea heat fluxes. The changes in shortwave radiation also contribute to the dipole of net air-sea heat flux. The changes

  6. J 4.8 MODELING THE TALLAHASSEE MINIMUM TEMPERATURE ANOMALY Kelly G. Godsey*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuelberg, Henry

    1 J 4.8 MODELING THE TALLAHASSEE MINIMUM TEMPERATURE ANOMALY Kelly G. Godsey* 1,2 , Henry E author address: Kelly G. Godsey, NWS, Morristown, TN 37814; email: Kelly.Godsey@noaa.gov #12;2 Fig. 1

  7. What Global Warming Looks Like The July 2010 global map of surface temperature anomalies (Figure 1), relative to the average

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    What Global Warming Looks Like The July 2010 global map of surface temperature anomalies (Figure 1 anomalies an example of what we can expect global warming to look like? Maps of temperature anomalies, such as Figure 1, are useful for helping people understand the role of global warming in extreme events

  8. Solar turbulence in earth's global and regional temperature anomalies Nicola Scafetta,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scafetta, Nicola

    Solar turbulence in earth's global and regional temperature anomalies Nicola Scafetta,1,2 Paolo a study of the influence of solar activity on the earth's temperature. In particular, we focus on the repercussion of the fluctuations of the solar irradiance on the temperature of the Northern and Southern

  9. An updated global grid point surface air temperature anomaly data set: 1851--1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sepanski, R.J.; Boden, T.A.; Daniels, R.C.

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents land-based monthly surface air temperature anomalies (departures from a 1951--1970 reference period mean) on a 5{degree} latitude by 10{degree} longitude global grid. Monthly surface air temperature anomalies (departures from a 1957--1975 reference period mean) for the Antarctic (grid points from 65{degree}S to 85{degree}S) are presented in a similar way as a separate data set. The data were derived primarily from the World Weather Records and the archives of the United Kingdom Meteorological Office. This long-term record of temperature anomalies may be used in studies addressing possible greenhouse-gas-induced climate changes. To date, the data have been employed in generating regional, hemispheric, and global time series for determining whether recent (i.e., post-1900) warming trends have taken place. This document also presents the monthly mean temperature records for the individual stations that were used to generate the set of gridded anomalies. The periods of record vary by station. Northern Hemisphere station data have been corrected for inhomogeneities, while Southern Hemisphere data are presented in uncorrected form. 14 refs., 11 figs., 10 tabs.

  10. A New Theory for the Atmospheric Energy Spectrum: Depth-Limited Temperature Anomalies at the Tropopause

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, K. Shafer

    A New Theory for the Atmospheric Energy Spectrum: Depth-Limited Temperature Anomalies Sciences, New York University, 251 Mercer Street, New York, NY 10012 Communicated by Andrew J. Majda, June- bations generated at the planetary scale excite a direct cas- cade of energy with a slope of -3 at large

  11. Subsurface temperature anomalies as a key to petroleum-producing areas in the Cherokee and Forest City Basins, eastern Kansas?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merriam, D.F. [Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States); Foerster, A. [GeoForschungsZentrum Posdam (Germany)

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The relation of subsurface temperature to `plain-type fold` structure in the Midcontinent (USA) as an exploration tool has been speculated on for a long time. Structural highs, termed `plains-type folds,` are partly the result of differential compaction of sediments over rigid crystalline fault blocks in the Precambrian basement. In the Midcontinent, bottom-hole temperature (BHT) data, temperatures measured in drillstem tests (DSTs), and structural data are abundant. In the Cherokee and Forest City Basins, we analyzed BHT data by depth and stratigraphic unit (Cambro-Ordovician Arbuckle carbonates; Mississippian carbonates; and Perm-Pennsylvanian clastics). By relating the BHTs to DSTs, it was noted that the thermal disturbance inherent in BHT by drilling is minor and comparable within a formation. Also, the signal-noise ratio of BHTs could be improved utilizing the large data set. Although the resulting BHT formation gradients show unexpected values from the thermal conductivity in the carbonates and from the evaluated temperature disturbance by the drilling process, analysis of the BHT spatial pattern shows a coincidence of structural highs and temperature anomalies both in the clastics and in the carbonates. These BHT anomalies are outlined by values higher than the regional temperature trend. We attribute the anomalies partly to the insulation effect of petroleum (which may include the self-generation of heat) and partly to the movement of fluids vertically through the fracture and fault system created in the sedimentary veneer. Numerous examples from the oil- and gas-producing areas in eastern Kansas show that the nature of origin of fluids contained in a porous medium can alter local geothermal conditions.

  12. High temperature dielectric relaxation anomaly of Y{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 2+} doped barium strontium titanate ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Shiguang; Mao, Chaoliang, E-mail: maochaoliang@mail.sic.ac.cn, E-mail: xldong@mail.sic.ac.cn; Wang, Genshui; Yao, Chunhua; Cao, Fei; Dong, Xianlin, E-mail: maochaoliang@mail.sic.ac.cn, E-mail: xldong@mail.sic.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Inorganic Functional Materials and Devices, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1295 Dingxi Road, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Relaxation like dielectric anomaly is observed in Y{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 2+} doped barium strontium titanate ceramics when the temperature is over 450?K. Apart from the conventional dielectric relaxation analysis method with Debye or modified Debye equations, which is hard to give exact temperature dependence of the relaxation process, dielectric response in the form of complex impedance, assisted with Cole-Cole impedance model corrected equivalent circuits, is adopted to solve this problem and chase the polarization mechanism in this paper. Through this method, an excellent description to temperature dependence of the dielectric relaxation anomaly and its dominated factors are achieved. Further analysis reveals that the exponential decay of the Cole distribution parameter n with temperature is confirmed to be induced by the microscopic lattice distortion due to ions doping and the interaction between the defects. At last, a clear sight to polarization mechanism containing both the intrinsic dipolar polarization and extrinsic distributed oxygen vacancies hopping response under different temperature is obtained.

  13. Investigations of Possible Low-Level Temperature and Moisture Anomalies During the AMIE Field Campaign on Manus Island

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, CN; Holdridge, DJ

    2012-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This document discusses results stemming from the investigation of near-surface temperature and moisture “oddities” that were brought to light as part of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) Investigation Experiment (AMIE), Dynamics of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (DYNAMO), and Cooperative Indian Ocean experiment on intraseasonal variability in the Year 2011 (CINDY2011) campaigns.

  14. Chiral anomalies and differential geometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zumino, B.

    1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Some properties of chiral anomalies are described from a geometric point of view. Topics include chiral anomalies and differential forms, transformation properties of the anomalies, identification and use of the anomalies, and normalization of the anomalies. 22 references. (WHK)

  15. Astrometric solar system anomalies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nieto, Michael Martin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Anderson, John D [PROPULSION LABORATORY

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are at least four unexplained anomalies connected with astrometric data. perhaps the most disturbing is the fact that when a spacecraft on a flyby trajectory approaches the Earth within 2000 km or less, it often experiences a change in total orbital energy per unit mass. next, a secular change in the astronomical unit AU is definitely a concern. It is increasing by about 15 cm yr{sup -1}. The other two anomalies are perhaps less disturbing because of known sources of nongravitational acceleration. The first is an apparent slowing of the two Pioneer spacecraft as they exit the solar system in opposite directions. Some astronomers and physicists are convinced this effect is of concern, but many others are convinced it is produced by a nearly identical thermal emission from both spacecraft, in a direction away from the Sun, thereby producing acceleration toward the Sun. The fourth anomaly is a measured increase in the eccentricity of the Moon's orbit. Here again, an increase is expected from tidal friction in both the Earth and Moon. However, there is a reported unexplained increase that is significant at the three-sigma level. It is produent to suspect that all four anomalies have mundane explanations, or that one or more anomalies are a result of systematic error. Yet they might eventually be explained by new physics. For example, a slightly modified theory of gravitation is not ruled out, perhaps analogous to Einstein's 1916 explanation for the excess precession of Mercury's perihelion.

  16. Anomalies and Invertible Field Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel S. Freed

    2014-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We give a modern geometric viewpoint on anomalies in quantum field theory and illustrate it in a 1-dimensional theory: supersymmetric quantum mechanics. This is background for the resolution of worldsheet anomalies in orientifold superstring theory.

  17. Anomaly for Model Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utpal Sarkar

    2006-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple algorithm to calculate the group theory factor entering in anomalies at four and six dimensions for SU(N) and SO(N) groups in terms of the Casimir invariants of their subgroups is presented. Explicit examples of some of the lower dimensional representations of $SU(n), n \\leq 5$ and SO(10) groups are presented, which could be used for model building in four and six dimensions.

  18. System for closure of a physical anomaly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bearinger, Jane P; Maitland, Duncan J; Schumann, Daniel L; Wilson, Thomas S

    2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems for closure of a physical anomaly. Closure is accomplished by a closure body with an exterior surface. The exterior surface contacts the opening of the anomaly and closes the anomaly. The closure body has a primary shape for closing the anomaly and a secondary shape for being positioned in the physical anomaly. The closure body preferably comprises a shape memory polymer.

  19. ASTER Thermal Anomalies in western Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zehner, Richard E.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: ASTER Thermal Anomalies Western Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains the areas identified as areas of anomalous surface temperature from ASTER satellite imagery. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. Areas that had temperature greater than 2?, and areas with temperature equal to 1? to 2?, were considered ASTER modeled very warm and warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies), respectively Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4547052.446651 m Left: 158917.090117 m Right: 4101162.228281 m Bottom: 4101162.228281 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  20. Diffusivity anomaly in modified Stillinger-Weber liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sengupta, Shiladitya [TIFR Centre for Interdisciplinary Sciences, 21 Brundavan Colony, Narsingi, Hyderabad 500089 (India)] [TIFR Centre for Interdisciplinary Sciences, 21 Brundavan Colony, Narsingi, Hyderabad 500089 (India); Vasisht, Vishwas V. [Theoretical Sciences Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Jakkur Campus, Bangalore 560064 (India)] [Theoretical Sciences Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Jakkur Campus, Bangalore 560064 (India); Sastry, Srikanth [TIFR Centre for Interdisciplinary Sciences, 21 Brundavan Colony, Narsingi, Hyderabad 500089 (India) [TIFR Centre for Interdisciplinary Sciences, 21 Brundavan Colony, Narsingi, Hyderabad 500089 (India); Theoretical Sciences Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Jakkur Campus, Bangalore 560064 (India)

    2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    By modifying the tetrahedrality (the strength of the three body interactions) in the well-known Stillinger-Weber model for silicon, we study the diffusivity of a series of model liquids as a function of tetrahedrality and temperature at fixed pressure. Previous work has shown that at constant temperature, the diffusivity exhibits a maximum as a function of tetrahedrality, which we refer to as the diffusivity anomaly, in analogy with the well-known anomaly in water upon variation of pressure at constant temperature. We explore to what extent the structural and thermodynamic changes accompanying changes in the interaction potential can help rationalize the diffusivity anomaly, by employing the Rosenfeld relation between diffusivity and the excess entropy (over the ideal gas reference value), and the pair correlation entropy, which provides an approximation to the excess entropy in terms of the pair correlation function. We find that in the modified Stillinger-Weber liquids, the Rosenfeld relation works well above the melting temperatures but exhibits deviations below, with the deviations becoming smaller for smaller tetrahedrality. Further we find that both the excess entropy and the pair correlation entropy at constant temperature go through maxima as a function of the tetrahedrality, thus demonstrating the close relationship between structural, thermodynamic, and dynamical anomalies in the modified Stillinger-Weber liquids.

  1. Scalar Field Models: From the Pioneer Anomaly to Astrophysical Constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Paramos

    2005-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we study how scalar fields may affect solar observables, and use the constraint on the Sun's central temperature to extract bounds on the parameters of relevant models. Also, a scalar field driven by a suitable potential is shown to produce an anomalous acceleration similar to the one found in the Pioneer anomaly.

  2. Graph anomalies in cyber communications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vander Wiel, Scott A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Storlie, Curtis B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sandine, Gary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hagberg, Aric A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fisk, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Enterprises monitor cyber traffic for viruses, intruders and stolen information. Detection methods look for known signatures of malicious traffic or search for anomalies with respect to a nominal reference model. Traditional anomaly detection focuses on aggregate traffic at central nodes or on user-level monitoring. More recently, however, traffic is being viewed more holistically as a dynamic communication graph. Attention to the graph nature of the traffic has expanded the types of anomalies that are being sought. We give an overview of several cyber data streams collected at Los Alamos National Laboratory and discuss current work in modeling the graph dynamics of traffic over the network. We consider global properties and local properties within the communication graph. A method for monitoring relative entropy on multiple correlated properties is discussed in detail.

  3. Remotely Sensed Thermal Anomalies in western Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Landsat Thermal Anomalies Western Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains the areas identified as areas of anomalous surface temperature from Landsat satellite imagery in Western Colorado. Data was obtained for two different dates. The digital numbers of each Landsat scene were converted to radiance and the temperature was calculated in degrees Kelvin and then converted to degrees Celsius for each land cover type using the emissivity of that cover type. And this process was repeated for each of the land cover types (open water, barren, deciduous forest and evergreen forest, mixed forest, shrub/scrub, grassland/herbaceous, pasture hay, and cultivated crops). The temperature of each pixel within each scene was calculated using the thermal band. In order to calculate the temperature an average emissivity value was used for each land cover type within each scene. The NLCD 2001 land cover classification raster data of the zones that cover Colorado were downloaded from USGS site and used to identify the land cover types within each scene. Areas that had temperature residual greater than 2?, and areas with temperature equal to 1? to 2?, were considered Landsat modeled very warm and warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies), respectively Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4546381.234113 m Left: 140556.857021 m Right: 573390.000000 m Bottom: 4094583.641581 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  4. Magnetic anomalies northeast of Shatsky Plateau

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risch, David Lawrence

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MAGNETIC ANOMALIES NORTHEAST OF SHATSKY PLATEAU A Thesis by DAVID LAWRENCE RISCH Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1982 Major Subject...: Oceanography MAGNETIC ANOMALIES NORTHEAST OF SHATSKY PLATEAU A Thesis by DAVID LAWRENCE RISCH Approved as to style and content by: C rman Committee Member Member Head of Department May 198Z ABSTRACT Magnetic Anomalies Northeast of Shatsky Plateau...

  5. Anomalies of Nuclear Criticality, Revision 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clayton, E. D.; Prichard, Andrew W.; Durst, Bonita E.; Erickson, David; Puigh, Raymond J.

    2010-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is revision 6 of the Anomalies of Nuclear Criticality. This report is required reading for the training of criticality professionals in many organizations both nationally and internationally. This report describes many different classes of nuclear criticality anomalies that are different than expected.

  6. A New, Principled Approach to Anomaly Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferragut, Erik M [ORNL; Laska, Jason A [ORNL; Bridges, Robert A [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intrusion detection is often described as having two main approaches: signature-based and anomaly-based. We argue that only unsupervised methods are suitable for detecting anomalies. However, there has been a tendency in the literature to conflate the notion of an anomaly with the notion of a malicious event. As a result, the methods used to discover anomalies have typically been ad hoc, making it nearly impossible to systematically compare between models or regulate the number of alerts. We propose a new, principled approach to anomaly detection that addresses the main shortcomings of ad hoc approaches. We provide both theoretical and cyber-specific examples to demonstrate the benefits of our more principled approach.

  7. Inversion of marine magnetic anomalies by deconvolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harry, Dennis Lee

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -Chairmen of Advisory Committee: Dr. Richard L. Carlson Dr. Phillip D. Rabinowitz Marine magnetic anomalies can be expressed as a convolution between the equivalent magnetic line source in the oceanic crust and a transfer function. The transfer function contains..., with the resulting anomaly still exhibiting sharp reversals. This is compatible with the results of magnetic studies of ophiolites and dredged oceanic rocks, which indicate that a smoothly varying source is more probable than a block model for the generation...

  8. Hyperfine structure and hyperfine anomaly in Pb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. R. Persson

    2014-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The hyperfine structure in the 6p2-configuration in lead has been analysed and the results is compared with calculations. The hyperfine anomaly and improved values of the nuclear magnetic moment for four lead isotopes is obtained, using the results from the analysis. The results open up for new measurements of the hyperfine structure in unstable lead isotopes, in order to extract information of the hyperfine anomaly and distribution of magnetisation in the nucleus.

  9. Detection of Surface Temperature Anomalies in the Coso Geothermal Field

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision has beenFfe2fb55-352f-473b-a2dd-50ae8b27f0a6 No revision has beenFinancialSilverUsing Thermal Infrared

  10. Building envelope thermal anomaly analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melton, B.S.; Mulroney, P.; Scott, T.; Childs, K.W.

    1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed study has been made of building energy thermal anomalies (BETA's) in a large modern office building using computer simulation, on-site inspections, and infrared thermography. The goal was to better understand the heat and moisture flow through these ''bridges,'' develop the beginnings of a classification scheme, and establish techniques for assessing the potential for retrofit or initial design modifications. In terms of presently available analytical techniques, a one-dimensional equivalent of the bridge and its affected area can be created from a steady-state computer simulation. This equivalent, combined with a degree day model, yields good estimates of the bridge behavior in buildings employing heating only. With heating and cooling, the equivalent must be used with an hour-by-hour simulation. A classification scheme based on the one-dimensional equivalent is proposed which should make it possible to create a catalog of basic bridge types that can be used to estimate their effects without requiring a complete hour-by-hour simulation of each building. The classification relates both energy loss and moisture condensation potential to the bridge configuration and the building envelope. The potential for moisture condensation on interior surfaces near a BETA was found to be as significant as the energy loss and this factor needds to be considered in assessing the complete detrimental effects of a bridge. With such a catalog, building designers and analysts would be able to determine and estimate the advantages or disadvantages of modifying the building envelope to reduce the impact of a thermal bridge. 18 refs., 31 figs., 17 tabs.

  11. E-Print Network 3.0 - anomalies gravitational anomalies Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: Talang geothermal field lies in Solok Regency- West Sumatra Province. Low gravity anomaly (bouguer... and residual) occured around Cupak and Gabuo hot water complexes,...

  12. Predictions of Dynamic Behavior under Pressure for Two Scenarios to Explain Water Anomalies Pradeep Kumar,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franzese, Giancarlo

    of maximum correlation length in the (T, P) plane. Response functions, such as the isobaric heat capacity CP crossover is independent of whether water at very low temperature is characterized by a ``liquid-liquid scenarios are commonly used to interpret the anomalies of water [1,2]: (i) The liquid-liquid critical point

  13. Table of hyperfine anomaly in atomic systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Persson, J.R., E-mail: jonas.persson@ntnu.no

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This table is a compilation of experimental values of magnetic hyperfine anomaly in atomic and ionic systems. The last extensive compilation was published in 1984 by Büttgenbach [S. Büttgenbach, Hyperfine Int. 20 (1984) 1] and the aim here is to make an up to date compilation. The literature search covers the period up to January 2011.

  14. Dorsal Forebrain Anomaly in Williams Syndrome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in range to that seen in Down syndrome, show an unusual and uneven neuropsychological profileDorsal Forebrain Anomaly in Williams Syndrome Albert M. Galaburda, MD; J. Eric Schmitt, BS; Scott W. Atlas, MD; Stephan Eliez, MD; Ursula Bellugi, EdD; Allan L. Reiss, MD Background: Williams syndrome (WMS

  15. Wood anomalies in resonant photonic quasicrystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poddubny, A N

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A theory of light diffraction from planar quasicrystalline lattice with resonant scatterers is presented. Rich structure, absent in the periodic case, is found in specular reflection spectra, and interpreted as a specific kind of Wood anomalies, characteristic for quasicrystals. The theory is applied to semiconductor quantum dots arranged in Penrose tiling.

  16. Gravitational Anomalies in the Solar System?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorenzo Iorio

    2015-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Mindful of the anomalous perihelion precession of Mercury discovered by U. Le Verrier in the second half of the nineteenth century and its successful explanation by A. Einstein with his General Theory of Relativity in the early years of the twentieth century, discrepancies among observed effects in our Solar system and their theoretical predictions on the basis of the currently accepted laws of gravitation applied to known bodies have the potential of paving the way for remarkable advances in fundamental physics. This is particularly important now more than ever, given that most of the Universe seems to be made of unknown substances dubbed Dark Matter and Dark Energy. Should this not be directly the case, Solar system's anomalies could anyhow lead to advancements in cumulative science, as shown to us by the discovery of Neptune in the first half of the nineteenth century. Moreover, investigations in one of such directions can serendipitously enrich the other one as well. The current status of some alleged gravitational anomalies in the Solar system is critically reviewed. They are: a) Possible anomalous advances of planetary perihelia; b) Unexplained orbital residuals of a recently discovered moon of Uranus (Mab); c) The lingering unexplained secular increase of the eccentricity of the orbit of the Moon; d) The so-called Faint Young Sun Paradox; e) The secular decrease of the mass parameter of the Sun; f) The Flyby Anomaly; g) The Pioneer Anomaly; and h) The anomalous secular increase of the astronomical unit

  17. Gauge field, strings, solitons, anomalies and the speed of life

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antti J. Niemi

    2014-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    It's been said that "mathematics is biology's next microscope, only better; biology is mathematics' next physics, only better". Here we aim for something even better. We try to combine mathematical physics and biology into a picoscope of life. For this we merge techniques which have been introduced and developed in modern mathematical physics, largely by Ludvig Faddeev to describe objects such as solitons and Higgs and to explain phenomena such as anomalies in gauge fields. We propose a synthesis that can help to resolve the protein folding problem, one of the most important conundrums in all of science. We apply the concept of gauge invariance to scrutinize the extrinsic geometry of strings in three dimensional space. We evoke general principles of symmetry in combination with Wilsonian universality and derive an essentially unique Landau-Ginzburg energy that describes the dynamics of a generic string-like configuration in the far infrared. We observe that the energy supports topological solitons, that pertain to an anomaly in the manner how a string is framed around its inflection points. We explain how the solitons operate as modular building blocks from which folded proteins are composed. We describe crystallographic protein structures by multi-solitons with experimental precision, and investigate the non-equilibrium dynamics of proteins under varying temperature. We simulate the folding process of a protein at in vivo speed and with close to pico-scale accuracy using a standard laptop computer: With pico-biology as mathematical physics' next pursuit, things can only get better.

  18. E-Print Network 3.0 - anomalies mimicking physical Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geosciences 90 Thermal anomalies indicate preferential flow along faults in unconsolidated sedimentary aquifers Summary: Thermal anomalies indicate preferential flow along...

  19. Chiral anomaly, bosonization, and fractional charge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mignaco, J.A.; Monteiro, M.A.R.

    1985-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a method to evaluate the Jacobian of chiral rotations, regulating determinants through the proper-time method and using Seeley's asymptotic expansion. With this method we compute easily the chiral anomaly for ..nu.. = 4,6 dimensions, discuss bosonization of some massless two-dimensional models, and handle the problem of charge fractionization. In addition, we comment on the general validity of Fujikawa's approach to regulate the Jacobian of chiral rotations with non-Hermitian operators.

  20. Phenomenological explanation of elastic anomalies in superlattices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grimsditch, M.; Fullerton, E.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Schuller, I.K. [California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The experimental fact that measured elastic and structural properties of superlattices are strongly correlated can be understood on the basis of a simple model based on the packing of hard spheres. The model is consistent with features of many models that have been proposed to explain the supermodulus effect; but contrary to previous explanations, it allows predictions for a given pair of constitutents to be made. For an arbitrary pair of elements, it predicts the existence or non-existence of an elastic anomaly, and a rough estimate of its magnitude.

  1. Investigations of low-temperature geothermal potential in New York State

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodge, D.S.; De Rito, R.; Hifiker, K.; Morgan, P.; Swanberg, C.A.

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Temperature gradient map and published heat flow data indicate a possible potential for a geothermal resource in western and central New York State. A new analysis of bottom-hole temperature data for New York State confirms the existence of three positive gradient anomalies: the East Aurora, Cayuga, and Elmira anomalies, with gradients as high as 32/sup 0/C/km, 36/sup 0/C/km, and 36/sup 0/C/km, respectively. Ground waters from two of these anomalies are enriched in silica relative to surrounding areas. Heat flows based on silica geothermometry are 50 to 70 mWm/sup -2/ for the anomalies and 41.4 mWm/sup -2/ for bordering regional flux. A correlation between Bouguer gravity anomalies and the temperature gradient map suggests that the geothermal anomalies may occur above radioactive granites in the basement.

  2. IN SEARCH FOR THERMAL ANOMALIES IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AND FIELD DATA Abstract We attempt to identify thermal anomalies using thermal infrared (TIR) data collected over the Coso Geothermal Power Project with the spaceborne ASTER...

  3. Critical point anomalies include expansion shock waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nannan, N. R., E-mail: ryan.nannan@uvs.edu [Mechanical Engineering Discipline, Anton de Kom University of Suriname, Leysweg 86, PO Box 9212, Paramaribo, Suriname and Process and Energy Department, Delft University of Technology, Leeghwaterstraat 44, 2628 CA Delft (Netherlands); Guardone, A., E-mail: alberto.guardone@polimi.it [Department of Aerospace Science and Technology, Politecnico di Milano, Via La Masa 34, 20156 Milano (Italy); Colonna, P., E-mail: p.colonna@tudelft.nl [Propulsion and Power, Delft University of Technology, Kluyverweg 1, 2629 HS Delft (Netherlands)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    From first-principle fluid dynamics, complemented by a rigorous state equation accounting for critical anomalies, we discovered that expansion shock waves may occur in the vicinity of the liquid-vapor critical point in the two-phase region. Due to universality of near-critical thermodynamics, the result is valid for any common pure fluid in which molecular interactions are only short-range, namely, for so-called 3-dimensional Ising-like systems, and under the assumption of thermodynamic equilibrium. In addition to rarefaction shock waves, diverse non-classical effects are admissible, including composite compressive shock-fan-shock waves, due to the change of sign of the fundamental derivative of gasdynamics.

  4. Freshwater Availability Anomalies and Outbreak of Internal War

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Freshwater Availability Anomalies and Outbreak of Internal War: Results from a Global Spatial Time Organizers: Centre for the Study of Civil War, International Peace Research Institute, Oslo (PRIO) & Centre Freshwater Availability Anomalies and Outbreak of Internal War: Results from a Global Spatial Time Series

  5. anomaly guandong nuclear: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    anomaly guandong nuclear First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Axial anomaly and magnetism of...

  6. Anomalies of discrete symmetries in various dimensions and group cohomology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anton Kapustin; Ryan Thorngren

    2014-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We study 't Hooft anomalies for discrete global symmetries in bosonic theories in 2, 3 and 4 dimensions. We show that such anomalies may arise in gauge theories with topological terms in the action, if the total symmetry group is a nontrivial extension of the global symmetry by the gauge symmetry. Sometimes the 't Hooft anomaly for a d-dimensional theory with a global symmetry G can be canceled by anomaly inflow from a (d+1)-dimensional topological gauge theory with gauge group G. Such d-dimensional theories can live on the surfaces of Symmetry Protected Topological Phases. We also give examples of theories with more severe 't Hooft anomalies which cannot be canceled in this way.

  7. Ca isotopic anomaly in the atmospheres of Ap stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Ryabchikova; O. Kochukhov; S. Bagnulo

    2007-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results of the Ca stratification analysis in the atmospheres of 21 magnetic chemically peculiar (Ap) stars. This analysis was based on the spectral observations carried out with the UVES spectrograph attached to the 8-m VLT telescope. Ca was found to be strongly stratified in all stars with different effective temperatures and magnetic field strengths. This element is overabundant by 1-1.5 dex below logtau_5000~-1 and strongly depleted above logtau_5000=-1.5. Based on the overall Ca abundance distributions, we modelled a profile of the IR-triplet Ca II 8498 line. It shows a significant contribution of the heavy isotopes 46Ca and 48Ca, which represent less than 1% of the solar Ca isotopic mixture. In Ap stars with the relatively small surface magnetic fields (Ca isotope is concentrated close to the photosphere, while the heavy isotopes are pushed towards the outer layers. Isotopic separation disappears in the atmospheres of stars with magnetic fields above 6-7 kG. The observed overall Ca stratification and isotopic anomalies may be explained by a combined action of the radiatively-driven diffusion and the light-induced drift.

  8. Conformal Invariance of Black Hole Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ted Jacobson; Gungwon Kang

    1993-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that the surface gravity and temperature of a stationary black hole are invariant under conformal transformations of the metric that are the identity at infinity. More precisely, we find a conformal invariant definition of the surface gravity of a conformal Killing horizon that agrees with the usual definition(s) for a true Killing horizon and is proportional to the temperature as defined by Hawking radiation. This result is reconciled with the intimate relation between the trace anomaly and the Hawking effect, despite the {\\it non}invariance of the trace anomaly under conformal transformations.

  9. E-Print Network 3.0 - anomalies causing congenital Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    syndromes, including congenital glaucoma, posterior embryotoxon, Axenfeld anomaly and syndrome, Rieger... , Johnson GJ. Congenital cataract with microcornea and Peters' anomaly as...

  10. E-Print Network 3.0 - anomalies including refractive Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    index anomalies, Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst., 11, Q10005, doi:10... of clear, dif- fuse, hydrothermal fluids by tracking of refractive index anomalies related to changes......

  11. E-Print Network 3.0 - anomaly driven signatures Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to discriminate between many types of man-made and natural anomalies. One type... (TAD), is a data driven approach to anomaly detection that describes the back- ground...

  12. E-Print Network 3.0 - anomalies including tapvr Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Diagnosing Correlated Network Anomalies Ajay Mahimkar, Ashwin Lall, Jia... of Technology AT&T Labs - Research ABSTRACT Network anomalies occur in operational networks and...

  13. Case histories of temperature surveys in Kuwait

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, B.S.

    1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most crude produced in Kuwait is from naturally flowing wells. Casing, tubing, and cement in these wells remain unchanged after completion. This study discusses the major application of temperature surveys in indicating fluid movement both inside and behind the production string, hence locating any holes in the casing. Some significant cases of temperature anomalies are examined qualitatively, and suggestions are made for a more quantitative interpretation of temperature profiles. 9 refs.

  14. The physical observer II: Gauge and diff anomalies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. A. Larsson

    2008-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In a companion paper we studied field theory in the presence of a physical observer with quantum dynamics. Here we describe the most striking consequence of this assumption: new gauge and diff anomalies arise. The relevant cocycles depend on the observer's spacetime trajectory and can hence not appear in QFT, where this quantity is never introduced. Diff anomalies necessarily arise in every locally nontrivial, non-holographic theory of quantum gravity. Cancellation of the divergent parts of the anomalies only works if spacetime has four dimensions.

  15. Solar Eclipse Anomalies and Wave Refraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alasdair Macleod

    2006-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    There is some inconclusive evidence that measurement devices sensitive to local gravitation exhibit anomalous behaviour during solar eclipses. We investigate if these findings can be incorporated into the standard general relativistic model of gravitation. The General Theory of Relativity (GTR) describes gravitation as the response of an object to local spacetime curvature. Gravitational waves travelling at the speed of light are then a necessary mechanism to maintain the required consistency between local curvature and distant gravitating mass. Gravitational waves will certainly be subject to refraction by bodies such as the moon and we explore if such an effect can result in an error in the apparent position of the sources and thereby give rise to the characteristic pattern of response associated with the eclipse anomaly. It is found there are phenomenological similarities, but only if gravitational waves are considered not merely to respond to spacetime curvature but are also significantly affected by the presence of mass, perhaps in a manner analogous to electromagnetic waves propagating through matter.

  16. Gravitational Anomalies in the Solar System?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iorio, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mindful of the anomalous perihelion precession of Mercury discovered by U. Le Verrier in the second half of the nineteenth century and its successful explanation by A. Einstein with his General Theory of Relativity in the early years of the twentieth century, discrepancies among observed effects in our Solar system and their theoretical predictions on the basis of the currently accepted laws of gravitation applied to known bodies have the potential of paving the way for remarkable advances in fundamental physics. This is particularly important now more than ever, given that most of the Universe seems to be made of unknown substances dubbed Dark Matter and Dark Energy. Should this not be directly the case, Solar system's anomalies could anyhow lead to advancements in cumulative science, as shown to us by the discovery of Neptune in the first half of the nineteenth century. Moreover, investigations in one of such directions can serendipitously enrich the other one as well. The current status of some alleged gra...

  17. A discontinuity of the background explains the Pioneer anomaly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frederic Henry-Couannier

    2007-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pioneer anomaly is explained very simply if we assume that somewhere between us and the aircraft, the scale factor has undergone a discrete jump from an expansion a(t) regime to a contraction 1/a(t) regime

  18. anomaly intrusion detection: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Creation via Clustering Anomalies Gilbert R. Hendry and Shanchieh J. Yang apparent by the latency from day zero of an attack to the creation of an appropriate signature. This work...

  19. A Shallow Attenuating Anomaly Inside The Ring Fracture Of The...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Shallow Attenuating Anomaly Inside The Ring Fracture Of The Valles Caldera, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A Shallow...

  20. A New Methodology for Early Anomaly Detection of BWR Instabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivanov, K. N.

    2005-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the performed research is to develop an early anomaly detection methodology so as to enhance safety, availability, and operational flexibility of Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) nuclear power plants. The technical approach relies on suppression of potential power oscillations in BWRs by detecting small anomalies at an early stage and taking appropriate prognostic actions based on an anticipated operation schedule. The research utilizes a model of coupled (two-phase) thermal-hydraulic and neutron flux dynamics, which is used as a generator of time series data for anomaly detection at an early stage. The model captures critical nonlinear features of coupled thermal-hydraulic and nuclear reactor dynamics and (slow time-scale) evolution of the anomalies as non-stationary parameters. The time series data derived from this nonlinear non-stationary model serves as the source of information for generating the symbolic dynamics for characterization of model parameter changes that quantitatively represent small anomalies. The major focus of the presented research activity was on developing and qualifying algorithms of pattern recognition for power instability based on anomaly detection from time series data, which later can be used to formulate real-time decision and control algorithms for suppression of power oscillations for a variety of anticipated operating conditions. The research being performed in the framework of this project is essential to make significant improvement in the capability of thermal instability analyses for enhancing safety, availability, and operational flexibility of currently operating and next generation BWRs.

  1. VACTERL (vertebral anomalies, anal atresia or imperforate anus, cardiac anomalies, tracheoesophageal fistula, renal and limb defect) spectrum presenting with portal hypertension: a case report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhurtel, Dilli RAJ; Losa, Ignatius

    2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract Introduction We report for the first time a unique case of VACTERL (vertebral anomalies, anal atresia or imperforate anus, cardiac anomalies, tracheoesophageal fistula, renal and limb defect) spectrum associated with portal hypertension...

  2. Detecting anomalies in CMB maps: a new method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neelakanta, Jayanth T

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ever since WMAP announced its first results, different analyses have shown that there is weak evidence for several large-scale anomalies in the CMB data. While the evidence for each anomaly appears to be weak, the fact that there are multiple seemingly unrelated anomalies makes it difficult to account for them via a single statistical fluke. So, one is led to considering a combination of these anomalies. But, if we "hand-pick" the anomalies (test statistics) to consider, we are making an \\textit{a posteriori} choice. In this article, we propose two statistics that do not suffer from this problem. The statistics are linear and quadratic combinations of the $a_{\\ell m}$'s with random co-efficients, and they test the null hypothesis that the $a_{\\ell m}$'s are independent, normally-distributed, zero-mean random variables with an $m$-independent variance. The motivation for such statistics is generality; equivalently, it is a non \\textit{a posteriori} choice. But, a very useful by-product of considering such stat...

  3. Maps for currents and anomalies in noncommutative gauge theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rabin Banerjee; Kuldeep Kumar

    2005-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive maps relating currents and their divergences in non-abelian U(N) noncommutative gauge theory with the corresponding expressions in the ordinary (commutative) description. For the U(1) theory, in the slowly-varying-field approximation, these maps are also seen to connect the star-gauge-covariant anomaly in the noncommutative theory with the standard Adler--Bell--Jackiw anomaly in the commutative version. For arbitrary fields, derivative corrections to the maps are explicitly computed up to O(\\theta^2).

  4. QJT as a Regularization: Origin of the New Gauge Anomalies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. A. Larsson

    2009-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    QJT is considered as a regularization of QFT, where the fields are replaced by finite $p$-jets. The regularized phase space is infinite-dimensional, because not all histories are determined by initial conditions. Gauge symmetries are not fully preserved by the regularization, and gauge anomalies arise. These anomalies are of a new type, not present in QFT. They generically diverge when the regulator is removed, but can be made finite with a particular choice of field content, provided that spacetime has at most four dimensions. The field content appears to include unphysical fields that violate the spin-statistics theorem.

  5. Congenital anomalies and childhood cancer in Great Britain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narod, S.A. [Univ. of Toronto (Canada); Hawkins, M.M.; Robertson, C.M.; Stiller, C.A. [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom)

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of cancer and a congenital anomaly in the same child may be explained in certain cases by an underlying genetic abnormality. The study of these associations may lead to the identification of genes that are important in both processes. We have examined the records of 20,304 children with cancer in Britain, who were entered into the National Registry of Childhood Tumors (NRCT) during 1971-86, for the presence of congenital anomalies. The frequency of anomalies was much higher among children with solid tumors (4.4%) than among those with leukemia or lymphoma (2.6%; P < .0001). The types of cancer with the highest rates of anomalies were Wilms tumor (8.1 %), Ewing sarcoma (5.8%), hepatoblastoma (6.4%), and gonadal and germ-cell tumors (6.4%). Cases of spina bifida and abnormalities of the eye, ribs, and spine were more common in children with cancer than among population-based controls. Future studies may be directed toward identifying the developmental pathways and the relevant genes that are involved in the overlap between pediatric cancer and malformation. 46 refs., 12 tabs.

  6. Freshwater Availability Anomalies and Outbreak of Internal War

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Freshwater Availability Anomalies and Outbreak of Internal War: Results from a Global Spatial Time, Asker, near Oslo, 21­23 June 2005 Organizers: Centre for the Study of Civil War, International Peace War: Results from a Global Spatial Time Series Analysis1 Abstract We investigated the relationship

  7. Transductive anomaly detection Clayton Scott and Gilles Blanchard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Clayton

    Transductive anomaly detection Clayton Scott and Gilles Blanchard August 20, 2008 Abstract One approach, the transductive approach yields detectors that are optimal (e.g., statisti- cally consistent potentially of both nominal and anomalous data. We assume that each xi, i = m + 1, . . . , m + n is paired

  8. anomalies nuclear structure: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    anomalies nuclear structure First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 First high-resolution...

  9. Proceedings of the Axial Offset Anomaly (AOA) Science Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents proceedings of the Axial Offset Anomaly (AOA) Science Workshop, held February 10-11 in Palo Alto, California. Twenty-two papers were presented on various aspects of AOA by utilities, EPRI Robust Fuel Program contractors, staff from EPRI and universities, international researchers, and equipment vendors.

  10. Embedded Cyber-Physical Anomaly Detection in Smart Meters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Embedded Cyber-Physical Anomaly Detection in Smart Meters Massimiliano Raciti, Simin Nadjm vulnerabilities that arise from deployment of local cyber-physical attacks at a smart metering location at destabilisation. In this paper we study a smart metering device that uses a trusted platform for storage

  11. Anomaly Extraction in Backbone Networks using Association Rules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Anomaly Extraction in Backbone Networks using Association Rules Daniela Brauckhoff ETH Zurich Zurich, Switzerland brauckhoff@tik.ee.ethz.ch Xenofontas Dimitropoulos ETH Zurich Zurich, Switzerland fontas@tik.ee.ethz.ch Arno Wagner ETH Zurich Zurich, Switzerland wagner@tik.ee.ethz.ch Kavè Salamatian

  12. A RE-INTRODUCTION TO ANOMALIES OF CRITICALITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PUIGH RJ

    2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1974, a small innocuous document was submitted to the American Nuclear Society's Criticality Safety Division for publication that would have lasting impacts on this nuclear field The author was Duane Clayton, manager of the Battelle Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Critical Mass Lab, the world's preeminent reactor critical experimenter with plutonium solutions. The document was entitled, 'Anomalies of Criticality'. 'Anomalies...' was a compilation of more than thirty separate and distinct examples of departures from what might be commonly expected in the field of nuclear criticality. Mr. Clayton's publication was the derivative of more than ten thousand experiments and countless analytical studies conducted world-wide on every conceivable reactor system imaginable: from fissile bearing solutions to solids, blocks to arrays of fuel rods, low-enriched uranium oxide systems to pure plutonium and highly enriched uranium systems. After publication, the document was commonly used within the nuclear fuel cycle and reactor community to train potential criticality/reactor analysts, experimenters and fuel handlers on important things for consideration when designing systems with critically 'safe' parameters in mind The purpose of this paper is to re-introduce 'Anomalies of Criticality' to the current Criticality Safety community and to add new 'anomalies' to the existing compendium. By so doing, it is the authors' hope that a new generation of nuclear workers and criticality engineers will benefit from its content and might continue to build upon this work in support of the nuclear renaissance that is about to occur.

  13. Adaptive Anomaly Detection via Self-Calibration and Dynamic Updating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stavrou, Angelos

    on the site and the type of traffic it receives, the operators might have to provide recent and sanitized sanitization resulting in a fully automated AD maintenance cycle. Our approach is completely agnostic retaining the gains in performance from the sanitization process over time. Key words: anomaly detection

  14. Correlation between thermodynamic anomalies and pathways of ice nucleation in supercooled water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Rakesh S.; Bagchi, Biman, E-mail: bbagchi@sscu.iisc.ernet.in [Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)] [Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The well-known classical nucleation theory (CNT) for the free energy barrier towards formation of a nucleus of critical size of the new stable phase within the parent metastable phase fails to take into account the influence of other metastable phases having density/order intermediate between the parent metastable phase and the final stable phase. This lacuna can be more serious than capillary approximation or spherical shape assumption made in CNT. This issue is particularly significant in ice nucleation because liquid water shows rich phase diagram consisting of two (high and low density) liquid phases in supercooled state. The explanations of thermodynamic and dynamic anomalies of supercooled water often invoke the possible influence of a liquid-liquid transition between two metastable liquid phases. To investigate both the role of thermodynamic anomalies and presence of distinct metastable liquid phases in supercooled water on ice nucleation, we employ density functional theoretical approach to find nucleation free energy barrier in different regions of phase diagram. The theory makes a number of striking predictions, such as a dramatic lowering of nucleation barrier due to presence of a metastable intermediate phase and crossover in the dependence of free energy barrier on temperature near liquid-liquid critical point. These predictions can be tested by computer simulations as well as by controlled experiments.

  15. Profile-based adaptive anomaly detection for network security.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Pengchu C. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Durgin, Nancy Ann

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As information systems become increasingly complex and pervasive, they become inextricably intertwined with the critical infrastructure of national, public, and private organizations. The problem of recognizing and evaluating threats against these complex, heterogeneous networks of cyber and physical components is a difficult one, yet a solution is vital to ensuring security. In this paper we investigate profile-based anomaly detection techniques that can be used to address this problem. We focus primarily on the area of network anomaly detection, but the approach could be extended to other problem domains. We investigate using several data analysis techniques to create profiles of network hosts and perform anomaly detection using those profiles. The ''profiles'' reduce multi-dimensional vectors representing ''normal behavior'' into fewer dimensions, thus allowing pattern and cluster discovery. New events are compared against the profiles, producing a quantitative measure of how ''anomalous'' the event is. Most network intrusion detection systems (IDSs) detect malicious behavior by searching for known patterns in the network traffic. This approach suffers from several weaknesses, including a lack of generalizability, an inability to detect stealthy or novel attacks, and lack of flexibility regarding alarm thresholds. Our research focuses on enhancing current IDS capabilities by addressing some of these shortcomings. We identify and evaluate promising techniques for data mining and machine-learning. The algorithms are ''trained'' by providing them with a series of data-points from ''normal'' network traffic. A successful algorithm can be trained automatically and efficiently, will have a low error rate (low false alarm and miss rates), and will be able to identify anomalies in ''pseudo real-time'' (i.e., while the intrusion is still in progress, rather than after the fact). We also build a prototype anomaly detection tool that demonstrates how the techniques might be integrated into an operational intrusion detection framework.

  16. Diagenetic and Detrial Origin of Moretane Anomalies through the Permian-Triassic Boundary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    French, Katherine L.

    Many biogeochemical anomalies coincide with the Late Permian Extinction (LPE; 252.28 Ma). Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the moretane/hopane anomaly that has been identified in samples from Meishan GSSP ...

  17. M-anomaly Analyses and its implications for the architecture of the upper oceanic crust

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tominaga, Masako

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    My dissertation research consists of two themes: (a) the analysis of Middle Jurassic - Early Cretaceous marine magnetic anomalies (M-anomalies) in order to construct a comprehensive geomagnetic polarity timescale and (b) the investigation...

  18. Research Chlorination Disinfection By-Products and Risk of Congenital Anomalies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    In Engl; Mark J. Nieuwenhuijsen; Mireille B. Toledano; James Bennett; Nicky Best; Peter Hambly; Cornelis De Hoogh; Diana Wellesley; Patricia A. Boyd; Lenore Abramsky; Nirupa Dattani; John Fawell; David Briggs; Lars Jarup; Paul Elliott

    BACKGROUND: Increased risk of various congenital anomalies has been reported to be associated with trihalomethane (THM) exposure in the water supply. OBJECTIVES: We conducted a registry-based study to determine the relationship between THM concentrations and the risk of congenital anomalies in England and Wales. METHODS: We obtained congenital anomaly data from the National Congenital Anomalies System, regional registries, and the national terminations registry; THM data were obtained from water companies. Total THM (congenital anomalies. Analyses using fixed- and random-effects models were performed for broadly defined groups of anomalies (cleft palate/lip, abdominal wall, major cardiac, neural tube, urinary and respiratory defects), a more restricted set of anomalies with better ascertainment, and for isolated and multiple anomalies. Data were adjusted for sex, maternal age, and socioeconomic status. RESULTS: We found no statistically significant trends across exposure categories for either the

  19. The Transient Atmospheric Circulation Response to North Atlantic SST and Sea Ice Anomalies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hurrell, James

    The Transient Atmospheric Circulation Response to North Atlantic SST and Sea Ice Anomalies CLARA of the wintertime atmospheric circu- lation response to imposed patterns of SST and sea ice extent anomalies may produce different responses to the same SST anomaly depend- ing on their simulation

  20. Anomaly detection in thermal pulse combustors using symbolic time series analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Asok

    339 Anomaly detection in thermal pulse combustors using symbolic time series analysis S Gupta1 for anomaly detection in thermal pulse combustors. The anomaly detection method has been tested on the time pulse combustor. Results are presented to exemplify early detection of combustion instability due

  1. Generalized two-dimensional chiral QED: Anomaly and exotic statistics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saradzhev, F.M. [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of Azerbaijan, Huseyn Javid prospect 33, 370143 Baku (Azerbaijan)] [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of Azerbaijan, Huseyn Javid prospect 33, 370143 Baku (Azerbaijan)

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the influence of the anomaly on the physical quantum picture of the generalized chiral Schwinger model defined on S{sup 1}. We show that the anomaly (i) results in the background linearly rising electric field and (ii) makes the spectrum of the physical Hamiltonian nonrelativistic without a massive boson. The physical matter fields acquire exotic statistics. We construct explicitly the algebra of the Poincar{acute e} generators and show that it differs from the Poincar{acute e} one. We exhibit the role of the vacuum Berry phase in the failure of the Poincar{acute e} algebra to close. We prove that, in spite of the background electric field, such phenomenon as the total screening of external charges characteristic for the standard Schwinger model takes place in the generalized chiral Schwinger model, too. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  2. Conjecture on the physical implications of the scale anomaly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, Christopher T.; /Fermilab

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Murray Gell-Mann, after co-inventing QCD, recognized the interplay of the scale anomaly, the renormalization group, and the origin of the strong scale, {Lambda}{sub QCD}. I tell a story, then elaborate this concept, and for the sake of discussion, propose a conjecture that the physical world is scale invariant in the classical, {h_bar}, limit. This principle has implications for the dimensionality of space-time, the cosmological constant, the weak scale, and Planck scale.

  3. Structure order, local potentials, and physical anomalies of water ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang Q Sun

    2014-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogen-bond forms a pair of asymmetric, coupled, H-bridged oscillators with ultra-short-range interactions and memory. hydrogen bond cooperative relaxation and the associated binding electron entrapment and nonbonding electron polarization discriminate water and ice from other usual materials in the physical anomalies. As a strongly correlated fluctuating system, water prefers the statistically mean of tetrahedrally-coordinated structure with a supersolid skin that is elastic, polarized, ice like, hydrophobic, with 3/4 density.

  4. Reports on investigations of uranium anomalies. National Uranium Resource Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodknight, C.S.; Burger, J.A. (comps.) [comps.

    1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program, conducted for the US Department of Energy (DOE) by Bendix Field Engineering Corporation (BFEC), radiometric and geochemical surveys and geologic investigations detected anomalies indicative of possible uranium enrichment. Data from the Aerial Radiometric and Magnetic Survey (ARMS) and the Hydrogeochemical and Stream-Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR), both of which were conducted on a national scale, yielded numerous anomalies that may signal areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium deposits. Results from geologic evaluations of individual 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ quadrangles for the NURE program also yielded anomalies, which could not be adequately checked during scheduled field work. Included in this volume are individual reports of field investigations for the following six areas which were shown on the basis of ARMS, HSSR, and (or) geologic data to be anomalous: (1) Hylas zone and northern Richmond basin, Virginia; (2) Sischu Creek area, Alaska; (3) Goodman-Dunbar area, Wisconsin; (4) McCaslin syncline, Wisconsin; (5) Mt. Withington Cauldron, Socorro County, New Mexico; (6) Lake Tecopa, Inyo County, California. Field checks were conducted in each case to verify an indicated anomalous condition and to determine the nature of materials causing the anomaly. The ultimate objective of work is to determine whether favorable conditions exist for the occurrence of uranium deposits in areas that either had not been previously evaluated or were evaluated before data from recent surveys were available. Most field checks were of short duration (2 to 5 days). The work was done by various investigators using different procedures, which accounts for variations in format in their reports. All papers have been abstracted and indexed.

  5. Bouguer gravity anomalies, depth to bedrock, and shallow temperature in the

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin: EnergyBoston Area Solar Energy Association Jump to:BotetourtHumboldt House

  6. Letter to the Editor Temperature anomalies in high northerly latitudes and their link

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    meteorological records which led extremes in the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI) by a number of months and hourly wind directional and velocity measurements (in each 10° sector) were available for one monitoring continuous time series of coastal SSTs and concomitant surface wind conditions between January 1961 and April

  7. Pressure &Pressure & TemperatureTemperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    to measure atmospheric pressure, and thermometer toprobe to measure atmospheric pressure, and thermometer toprobe to measure atmospheric pressure, and thermometer toprobe to measure atmospheric pressure, and thermometer to measure air temperature.measure air temperature.measure air temperature.measure air temperature

  8. NEUTRON-POOR NICKEL ISOTOPE ANOMALIES IN METEORITES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steele, Robert C. J.; Coath, Christopher D.; Regelous, Marcel; Elliott, Tim [Bristol Isotope Group, School of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol, Wills Memorial Building, Queen's Road, Bristol BS8 1RJ (United Kingdom); Russell, Sara, E-mail: r.steele@uclmail.net [Meteoritics and Cosmic mineralogy, Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD (United Kingdom)

    2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new, mass-independent, Ni isotope data for a range of bulk chondritic meteorites. The data are reported as {epsilon}{sup 60}Ni{sub 58/61}, {epsilon}{sup 62}Ni{sub 58/61}, and {epsilon}{sup 64}Ni{sub 58/61}, or the parts per ten thousand deviations from a terrestrial reference, the NIST SRM 986 standard, of the {sup 58}Ni/{sup 61}Ni internally normalized {sup 60}Ni/{sup 61}Ni, {sup 62}Ni/{sup 61}Ni, and {sup 64}Ni/{sup 61}Ni ratios. The chondrites show a range of 0.15, 0.29, and 0.84 in {epsilon}{sup 60}Ni{sub 58/61}, {epsilon}{sup 62}Ni{sub 58/61}, and {epsilon}{sup 64}Ni{sub 58/61} relative to a typical sample precision of 0.03, 0.05, and 0.08 (2 s.e.), respectively. The carbonaceous chondrites show the largest positive anomalies, enstatite chondrites have approximately terrestrial ratios, though only EH match Earth's composition within uncertainty, and ordinary chondrites show negative anomalies. The meteorite data show a strong positive correlation between {epsilon}{sup 62}Ni{sub 58/61} and {epsilon}{sup 64}Ni{sub 58/61}, an extrapolation of which is within the error of the average of previous measurements of calcium-, aluminium-rich inclusions. Moreover, the slope of this bulk meteorite array is 3.003 {+-} 0.166 which is within the error of that expected for an anomaly solely on {sup 58}Ni. We also determined to high precision ({approx}10 ppm per AMU) the mass-dependent fractionation of two meteorite samples which span the range of {epsilon}{sup 62}Ni{sub 58/61} and {epsilon}{sup 64}Ni{sub 58/61}. These analyses show that 'absolute' ratios of {sup 58}Ni/{sup 61}Ni vary between these two samples whereas those of {sup 62}Ni/{sup 61}Ni and {sup 64}Ni/{sup 61}Ni do not. Thus, Ni isotopic differences seem most likely explained by variability in the neutron-poor {sup 58}Ni, and not correlated anomalies in the neutron-rich isotopes, {sup 62}Ni and {sup 64}Ni. This contrasts with previous inferences from mass-independent measurements of Ni and other transition elements which invoked variable contributions of a neutron-rich component. We have examined different nucleosynthetic environments to determine the possible source of the anomalous material responsible for the isotopic variations observed in Ni and other transition elements within bulk samples. We find that the Ni isotopic variability of the solar system cannot be explained by mixing with a component of bulk stellar ejecta from either SN II, Wolf-Rayet or, an asymptotic giant branch source and is unlikely to result from bulk mixing of material from an SN Ia. However, variable admixture of material from the Si/S zone of an SN II can create all the characteristics of Ni isotope variations in solar system materials. Moreover, these characteristics can also be provided by an SN II with a range of masses from 15 to 40 M{sub Sun }, showing that input from SN II is a robust source for Ni isotope variations in the solar system. Correlations of Ni isotope anomalies with O, Cr, and Ti isotope ratios and Pb/Yb in bulk meteorites suggest that the heterogeneous distribution of isotopic anomalies in the early solar system likely resulted from nebular sorting of chemically or physically different materials bearing different amounts of isotopes synthesized proximally to the collapse of the protosolar nebula.

  9. Muon g-2 Anomaly and Dark Leptonic Gauge Boson

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Hye-Sung [W& M

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the major motivations to search for a dark gauge boson of MeV-GeV scale is the long-standing muon g-2 anomaly. Because of active searches such as fixed target experiments and rare meson decays, the muon g-2 favored parameter region has been rapidly reduced. With the most recent data, it is practically excluded now in the popular dark photon model. We overview the issue and investigate a potentially alternative model based on the gauged lepton number or U(1)_L, which is under different experimental constraints.

  10. Multivariate forecast of winter monsoon rainfall in India using SST anomaly as a predictor: Neurocomputing and statistical approaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goutami Chattopadhyay; Surajit Chattopadhyay; Rajni Jain

    2009-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, the complexities in the relationship between rainfall and sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies during the winter monsoon (November-January) over India were evaluated statistically using scatter plot matrices and autocorrelation functions.Linear as well as polynomial trend equations were obtained and it was observed that the coefficient of determination for the linear trend was very low and it remained low even when polynomial trend of degree six was used. An exponential regression equation and an artificial neural network with extensive variable selection were generated to forecast the average winter monsoon rainfall of a given year using the rainfall amounts and the sea surface temperature anomalies in the winter monsoon months of the previous year as predictors. The regression coefficients for the multiple exponential regression equation were generated using Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. The artificial neural network was generated in the form of a multiplayer perceptron with sigmoid non-linearity and genetic-algorithm based variable selection. Both of the predictive models were judged statistically using the Willmott index, percentage error of prediction, and prediction yields. The statistical assessment revealed the potential of artificial neural network over exponential regression.

  11. An investigation of the subsurface Bouguer anomaly in the vicinity of shallow salt domes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnes, William Charles

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    'itted to the anomaly data in vertical profiles. Analysis of the anomalous vertical gravity gradients indicates that such gradients are too minute for purposes of salt dome exploration. However, calculations of the Bouguer anomaly reveal data which would be easily... detected in the field and amenable to geological interpretation. The empirical curves are fourd to be useful in estimating the Bouguer anomaly for salt domes not explicitly represented by the models. ACKNONLEDGEMENTS The author wishes to express his...

  12. CHINESE JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICS Vol.49, No.3, 2006, pp: 588598 REGIONAL DIFFERENCE OF SUMMER AIR TEMPERATURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SURFACE TEMPERATURE SUN Jian-Qi1,2 WANG Hui-Jun1 1 State Key Laboratory of Numerical Modeling, the temporal- spatial distributions of summer air temperature (SAT) are investigated. It is found TEMPERATURE ANOMALIES IN NORTHEAST CHINA AND ITS RELATIONSHIP TO ATMOSPHERIC GENERAL CIRCULATION AND SEA

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - anomalies tracheoesophageal fistula Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    results for: anomalies tracheoesophageal fistula Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 CHARGE syndrome: Coloboma Heart defect Summary: Growth deficiency Cardiovascular malformations...

  14. E-Print Network 3.0 - anomaly-based network intrusion Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computer Technologies and Information Sciences 5 INTRUSION DETECTION IN MOBILE AD HOC NETWORKS Summary: is anomaly-based intrusion detection which profiles the symptoms...

  15. E-Print Network 3.0 - anomalies suggest potential Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on traffic engineering Slvia Farraposo DEI ESTG... --In this paper we present a methodology for detecting traffic anomalies. To accomplish that, and as a ... Source:...

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - acquired pseudo-pelger-hut anomaly Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    site in ultramafic environment Summary: A positive magnetic anomaly at Rainbow hydrothermal site in ultramafic environment Jrme DYMENT1... substratum present a...

  17. E-Print Network 3.0 - anomaly grass valley Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to work in partnership with the geothermal... Calvin, Mark Coolbaugh, and Chris Kratt Remote Sensing for Mapping Mineralogy and Thermal Anomalies Hymap Source: Faulds, James E....

  18. E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric neutrino anomaly Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Group Collection: Physics 15 Vol. 30 (1999) ACTA PHYSICA POLONICA B No 11 PHENOMENOLOGY OF NEUTRINO MASSES Summary: ; Atmospheric neutrino anomaly: Interpreted as...

  19. E-Print Network 3.0 - anomaly-based intrusion detection Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and future anomaly-based intrusion detection systems. 1... arsenal, and the focus of this work, is the ... Source: Maxion, Roy - School of Computer Science, Carnegie Mellon...

  20. Primordial quantum nonequilibrium and large-scale cosmic anomalies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samuel Colin; Antony Valentini

    2014-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We study incomplete relaxation to quantum equilibrium at long wavelengths, during a pre-inflationary phase, as a possible explanation for the reported large-scale anomalies in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Our scenario makes use of the de Broglie-Bohm pilot-wave formulation of quantum theory, in which the Born probability rule has a dynamical origin. The large-scale power deficit could arise from incomplete relaxation for the amplitudes of the primordial perturbations. We show, by numerical simulations for a spectator scalar field, that if the pre-inflationary era is radiation dominated then the deficit in the emerging power spectrum will have a characteristic shape (an inverse-tangent dependence on wavenumber k, with oscillations). It is found that our scenario is able to produce a power deficit in the observed region and of the observed (approximate) magnitude for an appropriate choice of cosmological parameters. We also discuss the large-scale anisotropy, which could arise from incomplete relaxation for the phases of the primordial perturbations. We present numerical simulations for phase relaxation, and we show how to define characteristic scales for amplitude and phase nonequilibrium. The extent to which the data might support our scenario is left as a question for future work. Our results suggest that we have a potentially viable model that might explain two apparently independent cosmic anomalies by means of a single mechanism.

  1. Electron Capture and Scaling Anomaly in Polar Molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pulak Ranjan Giri; Kumar S. Gupta; S. Meljanac; A. Samsarov

    2007-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new analysis of the electron capture mechanism in polar molecules, based on von Neumann's theory of self-adjoint extensions. Our analysis suggests that it is theoretically possible for polar molecules to form bound states with electrons, even with dipole moments smaller than the critical value D_0 given by 1.63\\times10^{-18} esu cm. This prediction is consistent with the observed anomalous electron scattering in H_2S and HCl, whose dipole moments are smaller than the critical value D_0. We also show that for a polar molecule with dipole moment less than D_0, typically there is only a single bound state, which is in qualitative agreement with observations. We argue that the quantum mechanical scaling anomaly is responsible for the formation of these bound states.

  2. Isovector EMC effect explains the NuTeV anomaly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. C. Cloët; W. Bentz; A. W. Thomas

    2009-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron or proton excess in nuclei leads to an isovector-vector mean-field which, through its coupling to the quarks in a bound nucleon, implies a shift in the quark distributions with respect to the Bjorken scaling variable. We show that this result leads to an additional correction to the NuTeV measurement of sin^2(Theta_W). The sign of this correction is largely model independent and acts to reduce their result. Explicit calculation within a covariant and confining Nambu--Jona-Lasinio model predicts that this vector field correction accounts for approximately two-thirds of the NuTeV anomaly. We are therefore led to offer a new interpretation of the NuTeV measurement, namely, that it is further evidence for the medium modification of the bound nucleon wavefunction.

  3. Isovector EMC Effect and the NuTeV Anomaly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cloeet, I. C. [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-1560 (United States); Bentz, W. [Department of Physics, School of Science, Tokai University, Hiratsuka-shi, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan); Thomas, A. W. [Jefferson Lab, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, Virginia 23606, USA and College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, Virginia 23187 (United States)

    2009-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron or proton excess in nuclei leads to an isovector-vector mean field which, through its coupling to the quarks in a bound nucleon, implies a shift in the quark distributions with respect to the Bjorken scaling variable. We show that this result leads to an additional correction to the NuTeV measurement of sin{sup 2}theta{sub W}. The sign of this correction is largely model independent and acts to reduce their result. Explicit calculation in nuclear matter within a covariant and confining Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model predicts that this vector field correction may account for a substantial fraction of the NuTeV anomaly. We are therefore led to offer a new interpretation of the NuTeV measurement, namely, that it provides further evidence for the medium modification of the bound nucleon wave function.

  4. Hot flow anomaly remnant in the far geotail?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Facskó, Gábor; Lavraud, Benoit; Luhmann, Janet G; Russell, Christopher T; Sauvaud, Jean-Andre; Fedorov, Andrei; Kis, Árpád; Wesztergom, Viktor

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A hot flow anomaly (HFA) like event was observed by the Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO) in the night side magnetosheath in the far tail in February-March 2007. The magnetic signature of the tangential discontinuity was visible, but the resolution of the plasma ion data is not sufficient for our analysis, so a method is given to identify HFAs without solar wind velocity measurements. The event observed in the night side magnetosheath in the far tail might be the remnant of an HFA event, a not-so-active current sheet. This observation suggests that the lifetime of the HFAs might be several 10 minutes, much longer than the expected several minutes.

  5. Meridional movement of wind anomalies during ENSO events and their role in event termination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santoso, Agus

    Meridional movement of wind anomalies during ENSO events and their role in event termination Shayne), Meridional movement of wind anomalies during ENSO events and their role in event termination, Geophys. Res, setting up conditions favorable for the termination of ENSO warm events. The basic principles of the RDO

  6. Core-softened Fluids, Water-like Anomalies and the Liquid-Liquid Critical Points

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbosa, Marcia C. B.

    . INTRODUCTION Water is characterized by well-known thermodynamic and kinetic liquid-state anomalies; for examplePREPRINT Core-softened Fluids, Water-like Anomalies and the Liquid-Liquid Critical Points Evy simulations are used to examine the relationship between water-like anoma- lies and the liquid-liquid critical

  7. Simulated Arctic atmospheric feedbacks associated with late summer sea ice anomalies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, John

    Simulated Arctic atmospheric feedbacks associated with late summer sea ice anomalies A. Rinke,1,2 K depend on regional and decadal variations in the coupled atmosphere-ocean-sea ice system. Citation: Rinke to investigate feedbacks between September sea ice anomalies in the Arctic and atmospheric conditions in autumn

  8. Deep-tow study of magnetic anomalies in the Pacific Jurassic Quiet Zone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tominaga, Masako

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Jurassic Quiet Zone (JQZ) is a region of low amplitude, difficult-to-correlate magnetic anomalies located over Jurassic oceanic crust. We collected 1200 km of new deep-tow magnetic anomaly profiles over the Pacific JQZ that complement 2 deep...

  9. Gravity anomalies of the Northern Hawaiian Islands: Implications on the shield evolutions of Kauai and Niihau

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ito, Garrett

    Gravity anomalies of the Northern Hawaiian Islands: Implications on the shield evolutions of Kauai January 2010; accepted 16 March 2010; published 31 August 2010. [1] New land and marine gravity data reveal two positive residual gravity anomalies in the Northern Hawaiian Islands: one over Kaua

  10. The Extreme Cold Anomaly over Southeast Asia in February 2008: Roles of ISO and ENSO*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Tim

    The Extreme Cold Anomaly over Southeast Asia in February 2008: Roles of ISO and ENSO* CHI 2008. The cause of the ECA, in particular the role of the intraseasonal oscillation (ISO) and El Nin for a month or so. The onset of the northerly anomaly is concurrent with a phase change of an ISO over Sumatra

  11. A Simple Atmospheric Model of the Local and Teleconnection Responses to Tropical Heating Anomalies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chunzai

    the local and remote stationary responses of the atmosphere to tropical heating anomalies is describedA Simple Atmospheric Model of the Local and Teleconnection Responses to Tropical Heating Anomalies and forced with a localized heating for illustration. In the tropics, the baroclinic responses are familiar

  12. Geothermal low-temperature reservoir assessment in Dona Ana County, New Mexico. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Icerman, L.; Lohse, R.L.

    1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sixty-four shallow temperature gradient holes were drilled on the Mesilla Valley East Mesa (east of Interstate Highways 10 and 25), stretching from US Highway 70 north of Las Cruces to NM Highway 404 adjacent to Anthony, New Mexico. Using these data as part of the site selection process, Chaffee Geothermal, Ltd. of Denver, Colorado, drilled two low-temperature geothermal production wells to the immediate north and south of Tortugas Mountain and encountered a significant low-temperature reservoir, with a temperature of about 150{sup 0}F and flow rates of 750 to 1500 gallons per minute at depths from 650 to 1250 feet. These joint exploration activities resulted in the discovery and confirmation of a 30-square-mile low-temperature geothermal anomaly just a few miles to the east of Las Cruces that has been newly named as the Las Cruces east Mesa Geothermal Field. Elevated temperature and heat flow data suggest that the thermal anomaly is fault controlled and extends southward to the Texas border covering a 100-square-mile area. With the exception of some localized perturbations, the anomaly appears to decrease in temperature from the north to the south. Deeper drilling is required in the southern part of the anomaly to confirm the existence of commercially-exploitable geothermal waters.

  13. Hydrocarbon anomaly in soil gas as near-surface expressions of upflows and outflows in geothermal systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ong, H.L.; Higashihara, M.; Klusman, R.W.; Voorhees, K.J.; Pudjianto, R.; Ong, J

    1996-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of hydrocarbons, C1 - C12, have been found in volcanic gases (fumarolic) and in geothermal waters and gases. The hydrocarbons are thought to have come from products of pyrolysis of kerogen in sedimentary rocks or they could be fed into the geothermal system by the recharging waters which may contain dissolved hydrocarbons or hydrocarbons extracted by the waters from the rocks. In the hot geothermal zone, 300°+ C, many of these hydrocarbons are in their critical state. It is thought that they move upwards due to buoyancy and flux up with the upflowing geothermal fluids in the upflow zones together with the magmatic gases. Permeability which could be provided by faults, fissures, mini and micro fractures are thought to provide pathways for the upward flux. A sensitive technique (Petrex) utilizing passive integrative adsorption of the hydrocarbons in soil gas on activated charcoal followed by desorption and analysis of the hydrocarbons by direct introduction mass spectrometry allows mapping of the anomalous areas. Surveys for geothermal resources conducted in Japan and in Indonesia show that the hydrocarbon anomaly occur over known fields and over areas strongly suspected of geothermal potential. The hydrocarbons found and identified were n-paraffins (C7-C9) and aromatics (C7-C8). Detection of permeable, i.e. active or open faults, parts of older faults which have been reactivated, e.g. by younger intersecting faults, and the area surrounding these faulted and permeable region is possible. The mechanism leading to the appearance of the hydrocarbon in the soil gas over upflow zones of the geothermal reservoir is proposed. The paraffins seems to be better pathfinders for the location of upflows than the aromatics. However the aromatics may, under certain circumstances, give better indications of the direction of the outflow of the geothermal system. It is thought that an upflow zone can be defined when conditions exist where the recharging waters containing the hydrocarbons feed into the geothermal kitchen. The existence of open and active faults, fissures, mini and micro fractures allow sufficient permeability for the gases to flux up and express themselves at the surface as hydrocarbon anomaly in the soil gas. When any of the requirements is absent, i.e. in the absence of the recharging waters, hydrocarbons, temperature, or permeability, no anomaly can be expected. It assumes a dynamic convective system, i.e. recharging waters, upflow and outflow. The anomalies however can define to a certain extent, regions of geothermal upflow, buoyant transport of gases, and frequently down-gradient of cooling waters.

  14. Elastic anomalies associated with transformation sequences in perovskites: II. The strontium zirconatetitanate Sr(Zr,Ti)O

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Elastic anomalies associated with transformation sequences in perovskites: II. The strontium.1088/0953-8984/21/1/015902 Elastic anomalies associated with transformation sequences in perovskites: II. The strontium zirconate

  15. EMAG2: A 2arc min resolution Earth Magnetic Anomaly Grid compiled from satellite, airborne, and marine magnetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Dietmar

    grid for the World Digital Magnetic Anomaly Map. The resolution has been improved from 3 arc min to 2EMAG2: A 2­arc min resolution Earth Magnetic Anomaly Grid compiled from satellite, airborne, I-19020 Fezzano, Italy [1] A global Earth Magnetic Anomaly Grid (EMAG2) has been compiled from

  16. Possible relation of water structural relaxation to water anomalies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanley, H. Eugene

    to the dramatic indefinite increase at low temperature in the heat capacity, the compressibility heat capacity CP, and the thermal expansion coefficient P. Moreover, if one extrapolates the temperature, we find that the liquid undergoes a structural transformation coinciding with the onset of an ex

  17. SCADA Protocol Anomaly Detection Utilizing Compression (SPADUC) 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon Rueff; Lyle Roybal; Denis Vollmer

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a significant need to protect the nation’s energy infrastructures from malicious actors using cyber methods. Supervisory, Control, and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems may be vulnerable due to the insufficient security implemented during the design and deployment of these control systems. This is particularly true in older legacy SCADA systems that are still commonly in use. The purpose of INL’s research on the SCADA Protocol Anomaly Detection Utilizing Compression (SPADUC) project was to determine if and how data compression techniques could be used to identify and protect SCADA systems from cyber attacks. Initially, the concept was centered on how to train a compression algorithm to recognize normal control system traffic versus hostile network traffic. Because large portions of the TCP/IP message traffic (called packets) are repetitive, the concept of using compression techniques to differentiate “non-normal” traffic was proposed. In this manner, malicious SCADA traffic could be identified at the packet level prior to completing its payload. Previous research has shown that SCADA network traffic has traits desirable for compression analysis. This work investigated three different approaches to identify malicious SCADA network traffic using compression techniques. The preliminary analyses and results presented herein are clearly able to differentiate normal from malicious network traffic at the packet level at a very high confidence level for the conditions tested. Additionally, the master dictionary approach used in this research appears to initially provide a meaningful way to categorize and compare packets within a communication channel.

  18. Support for the thermal origin of the Pioneer anomaly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slava G. Turyshev; Viktor T. Toth; Gary Kinsella; Siu-Chun Lee; Shing M. Lok; Jordan Ellis

    2012-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the possibility that the anomalous acceleration of the Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecraft is due to the recoil force associated with an anisotropic emission of thermal radiation off the vehicles. To this end, relying on the project and spacecraft design documentation, we constructed a comprehensive finite-element thermal model of the two spacecraft. Then, we numerically solve thermal conduction and radiation equations using the actual flight telemetry as boundary conditions. We use the results of this model to evaluate the effect of the thermal recoil force on the Pioneer 10 spacecraft at various heliocentric distances. We found that the magnitude, temporal behavior, and direction of the resulting thermal acceleration are all similar to the properties of the observed anomaly. As a novel element of our investigation, we develop a parameterized model for the thermal recoil force and estimate the coefficients of this model independently from navigational Doppler data. We find no statistically significant difference between the two estimates and conclude that once the thermal recoil force is properly accounted for, no anomalous acceleration remains.

  19. GISS 2007 Temperature Analysis The year 2007 tied for second warmest in the period of instrumental data, behind the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    is an expected characteristic of global warming, as the loss of ice and snow engenders a positive feedback via causes of global temperature change including unforced chaotic fluctuations. The solar minimum forcing. Figure 1 shows 2007 temperature anomalies relative to the 1951-1980 base period mean. The global mean

  20. GLONASS Signal-in-Space Anomalies Liang Heng, Grace Xingxin Gao, Todd Walter, and Per Enge,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Grace Xingxin

    GLONASS Signal-in-Space Anomalies Since 2009 Liang Heng, Grace Xingxin Gao, Todd Walter, and Per Enge, Stanford University BIOGRAPHY Liang Heng is a Ph.D. candidate under the guidance of Pro- fessor

  1. E-Print Network 3.0 - anomaly massless scalars Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    massless scalars Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: anomaly massless scalars Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Nuclear Physics B203 (1982)...

  2. Real-time analysis of aggregate network traffic for anomaly detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Seong Soo

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The frequent and large-scale network attacks have led to an increased need for developing techniques for analyzing network traffic. If efficient analysis tools were available, it could become possible to detect the attacks, anomalies...

  3. Self-energy anomaly of an electric pointlike dipole in three-dimensional static spacetimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valeri P. Frolov; Andrey A. Shoom; Andrei Zelnikov

    2013-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the self-energy anomaly of a pointlike electric dipole located in a static $(2+1)$-dimensional curved spacetime. The energy functional for this problem is invariant under an infinite-dimensional (gauge) group of transformations parameterized by one scalar function of two variables. We demonstrate that the problem of the calculation of the self-energy anomaly for a pointlike dipole can be reduced to the calculation of quantum fluctuations of an effective two-dimensional Euclidean quantum field theory. We reduced the problem in question to the calculation of the conformal anomaly of an effective scalar field in two dimensions and obtained an explicit expression for the self-energy anomaly of an electric dipole in an asymptotically flat, regular $(2+1)$-dimensional spacetime which may have electrically neutral black-hole-like metrics with regular Killing horizon.

  4. E-Print Network 3.0 - assisted anomaly mediation Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In the wAP region for example warm northerly winds assisted an earlier... in monthly sea ice anomaly persistence between the 1980s and 1990s Smith et al., 1998; Stammerjohn et...

  5. Z' Bosons, the NuTeV Anomaly, and the Higgs Boson Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chanowitz, Michael S

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NuTeV Anomaly, and the Higgs Boson Mass Michael S. Chanowitzpredicted value of the Higgs boson mass, from ? 60 to ? 120from an increase in the Higgs boson mass. There is a vast

  6. E-Print Network 3.0 - anomaly-mediated supersymmetry breaking...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ; Physics 58 arXiv:hep-ph0103095v19Mar2001 Low-Energy Supersymmetry and its Phenomenology Summary: . This approach has been called anomaly-mediated SUSY-breaking (AMSB)....

  7. E-Print Network 3.0 - adaptive anomaly detection Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Communication Networks 13 4.1.1 Adaptive Threshold-Based Anomaly Detection Early work 38, 22, 48 in this area... ... Source: Ji, Chuanyi - School of Electrical and...

  8. anomalies apoptotic bodies: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    equation can be satisfied in a high temperature plasma in spite of the fact that all propagating fermionic excitations have a thermal mass. Per Elmfors 1998-02-23 19 Lectures...

  9. Kohn anomalies and non-adiabaticity in doped carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolas Caudal; A. Marco Saitta; Michele Lazzeri; Francesco Mauri

    2007-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The high-frequency Raman-active phonon modes of metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are thought to be characterized by Kohn anomalies (KAs), which are expected to be modified by the doping-induced tuning of the Fermi energy level $\\epsilon_F$, obtained through the intercalation of SWNTs with alkali atoms or by the application of a gate potential. We present a Density-Functional Theory (DFT) study of the phonon properties of a (9,9) metallic SWNT as a function of electronic doping. For such study, we use, as in standard DFT calculations of vibrational properties, the Born-Oppenheimer (BO) approximation. We also develop an analytical model capable of reproducing and interpreting our DFT results. Both DFT calculations and this model predict, for increasing doping levels, a series of EPC-induced KAs in the vibrational mode parallel to the tube axis at the $\\mathbf\\Gamma$ point of the Brillouin zone, usually indicated in Raman spectroscopy as the $G^-$ peak. Such KAs would arise each time a new conduction band is populated. However, we show that they are an artifact of the BO approximation. The inclusion of non-adiabatic (NA) effects dramatically affects the results, predicting KAs at $\\mathbf\\Gamma$ only when $\\epsilon_F$ is close to a band crossing $E_{X}$. For each band crossing a double KA occurs for $\\epsilon_F=E_{X}\\pm \\hbar\\omega/2$, where $\\hbar\\omega$ is the phonon energy. In particular, for a 1.2 $nm$ metallic nanotube, we predict a KA to occur in the so-called $G^-$ peak at a doping level of about $N_{el}/C=\\pm 0.0015$ atom ($\\epsilon_F\\approx \\pm 0.1 ~eV$). Furthermore, we predict that the Raman linewidth of the $G^-$ peak significantly decreases for $|\\epsilon_F| \\geq \\hbar\\omega/2$.

  10. Addressing the Challenges of Anomaly Detection for Cyber Physical Energy Grid Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferragut, Erik M [ORNL; Laska, Jason A [ORNL; Melin, Alexander M [ORNL; Czejdo, Bogdan [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The consolidation of cyber communications networks and physical control systems within the energy smart grid introduces a number of new risks. Unfortunately, these risks are largely unknown and poorly understood, yet include very high impact losses from attack and component failures. One important aspect of risk management is the detection of anomalies and changes. However, anomaly detection within cyber security remains a difficult, open problem, with special challenges in dealing with false alert rates and heterogeneous data. Furthermore, the integration of cyber and physical dynamics is often intractable. And, because of their broad scope, energy grid cyber-physical systems must be analyzed at multiple scales, from individual components, up to network level dynamics. We describe an improved approach to anomaly detection that combines three important aspects. First, system dynamics are modeled using a reduced order model for greater computational tractability. Second, a probabilistic and principled approach to anomaly detection is adopted that allows for regulation of false alerts and comparison of anomalies across heterogeneous data sources. Third, a hierarchy of aggregations are constructed to support interactive and automated analyses of anomalies at multiple scales.

  11. Results of temperature gradient and heat flow in Santiam Pass Area, Oregon, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, B.L.; Gardner, M.C.; Koenig, J.B.

    1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The conclusions of this report are: (1) There is a weakly defined thermal anomaly within the area examined by temperature-gradient holes in the Santiam Pass area. This is a relict anomaly showing differences in permeability between the High Cascades and Western Cascades areas, more than a fundamental difference in shallow crustal temperatures. (2) The anomaly as defined by the 60 F isotherms at 400 feet follows a north-south trend immediately westward of the Cascade axis in the boundary region. It is clear that all holes spudded into High Cascades rocks result in isothermal and reversal gradients. Holes spudded in Western Cascades rocks result in positive gradients. (3) Cold groundwater flow influences and masks temperature gradients in the High Cascades to a depth of at least 700 feet, especially eastward from the major north-south trending faults. Pleistocene and Holocene rocks are very permeable aquifers. (4) Shallow gradient drilling in the lowlands westward of the faults provides more interpretable information than shallow drilling in the cold-water recharge zones. Topographic and climatological effects can be filtered out of the temperature gradient results. (5) The thermal anomaly seems to have 2 centers: one in the Belknap-Foley area, and one northward in the Sand Mountain area. The anomalies may or may not be connected along a north-south trend. (6) A geothermal effect is seen in holes downslope of the Western-High Cascade boundary. Mixing with cold waters is a powerful influence on temperature gradient data. (7) The temperature-gradient program has not yet examined and defined the geothermal resources potential of the area eastward of the Western Cascades-High Cascades boundary. Holes to 1500-2000 feet in depth are required to penetrate the high permeability-cold groundwater regime. (8) Drilling conditions are unfavorable. There are very few accessible level drill sites. Seasonal access problems and environmental restrictions together with frequent lost circulation results in very high costs per foot drilled.

  12. North American climate of the last millennium: Underground temperatures and model comparison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beltrami, Hugo

    . The gridded output from the three distinct integrations of the GCM ECHO-g were similarly averaged by region, the externally forced runs from ECHO-g are in better agreement with underground temperature anomalies than with the control run, suggesting that boreholes are sensitive to external forcing. Not only do ECHO-g simulations

  13. Beamline Temperatures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1 PrintTemperatures Energy: 3.0000 GeV

  14. Improving Cyber-Security of Smart Grid Systems via Anomaly Detection and Linguistic Domain Knowledge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ondrej Linda; Todd Vollmer; Milos Manic

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The planned large scale deployment of smart grid network devices will generate a large amount of information exchanged over various types of communication networks. The implementation of these critical systems will require appropriate cyber-security measures. A network anomaly detection solution is considered in this work. In common network architectures multiple communications streams are simultaneously present, making it difficult to build an anomaly detection solution for the entire system. In addition, common anomaly detection algorithms require specification of a sensitivity threshold, which inevitably leads to a tradeoff between false positives and false negatives rates. In order to alleviate these issues, this paper proposes a novel anomaly detection architecture. The designed system applies the previously developed network security cyber-sensor method to individual selected communication streams allowing for learning accurate normal network behavior models. Furthermore, the developed system dynamically adjusts the sensitivity threshold of each anomaly detection algorithm based on domain knowledge about the specific network system. It is proposed to model this domain knowledge using Interval Type-2 Fuzzy Logic rules, which linguistically describe the relationship between various features of the network communication and the possibility of a cyber attack. The proposed method was tested on experimental smart grid system demonstrating enhanced cyber-security.

  15. Lessons Learned from the Pioneers 10/11 for a Mission to Test the Pioneer Anomaly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slava G. Turyshev; Michael Martin Nieto; John D. Anderson

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis of the radio-metric tracking data from the Pioneer 10/11 spacecraft at distances between 20--70 astronomical units (AU) from the Sun has consistently indicated the presence of an anomalous, small, constant Doppler frequency drift. The drift is a blue-shift, uniformly changing with rate a_t = (2.92 +/- 0.44) x 10^(-18) s/s^2. It can also be interpreted as a constant acceleration of a_P = (8.74 +/- 1.33) x 10^(-8) cm/s^2 directed towards the Sun. Although it is suspected that there is a systematic origin to the effect, none has been found. As a result, the nature of this anomaly has become of growing interest. Here we discuss the details of our recent investigation focusing on the effects both external to and internal to the spacecraft, as well as those due to modeling and computational techniques. We review some of the mechanisms proposed to explain the anomaly and show their inability to account for the observed behavior of the anomaly. We also present lessons learned from this investigation for a potential deep-space experiment that will reveal the origin of the discovered anomaly and also will characterize its properties with an accuracy of at least two orders of magnitude below the anomaly's size. A number of critical requirements and design considerations for such a mission are outlined and addressed.

  16. Searches for solar-influenced radioactive decay anomalies using Spacecraft RTGs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krause, D E; Fischbach, E; Buncher, J B; Ging, A; Jenkins, J H; Longuski, J M; Strange, N; Sturrock, P A

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments showing a seasonal variation of the nuclear decay rates of a number of different nuclei, and decay anomalies apparently related to solar flares and solar rotation, have suggested that the Sun may somehow be influencing nuclear decay processes. Recently, Cooper searched for such an effect in $^{238}$Pu nuclei contained in the radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) on board the Cassini spacecraft. In this paper we modify and extend Cooper's analysis to obtain constraints on anomalous decays of $^{238}$Pu over a wider range of models, but these limits cannot be applied to other nuclei if the anomaly is composition-dependent. We also show that it may require very high sensitivity for terrestrial experiments to discriminate among some models if such a decay anomaly exists, motivating the consideration of future spacecraft experiments which would require less precision.

  17. Searches for solar-influenced radioactive decay anomalies using Spacecraft RTGs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. E. Krause; B. A. Rogers; E. Fischbach; J. B Buncher; A. Ging; J. H. Jenkins; J. M. Longuski; N. Strange; P. A. Sturrock

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments showing a seasonal variation of the nuclear decay rates of a number of different nuclei, and decay anomalies apparently related to solar flares and solar rotation, have suggested that the Sun may somehow be influencing nuclear decay processes. Recently, Cooper searched for such an effect in $^{238}$Pu nuclei contained in the radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) on board the Cassini spacecraft. In this paper we modify and extend Cooper's analysis to obtain constraints on anomalous decays of $^{238}$Pu over a wider range of models, but these limits cannot be applied to other nuclei if the anomaly is composition-dependent. We also show that it may require very high sensitivity for terrestrial experiments to discriminate among some models if such a decay anomaly exists, motivating the consideration of future spacecraft experiments which would require less precision.

  18. Network Anomaly Detection: Flow-based or Packet-based Approach?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Huy

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most critical tasks for network administrator is to ensure system uptime and availability. For the network security, anomaly detection systems, along with firewalls and intrusion prevention systems are the must-have tools. So far in the field of network anomaly detection, people are working on two different approaches. One is flow-based; usually rely on network elements to make so-called flow information available for analysis. The second approach is packet-based; which directly analyzes the data packet information for the detection of anomalies. This paper describes the main differences between the two approaches through an in-depth analysis. We try to answer the question of when and why an approach is better than the other. The answer is critical for network administrators to make their choices in deploying a defending system, securing the network and ensuring business continuity.

  19. Electric/magnetic duality for chiral gauge theories with anomaly cancellation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jan De Rydt; Torsten T. Schmidt; Mario Trigiante; Antoine Van Proeyen; Marco Zagermann

    2009-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that 4D gauge theories with Green-Schwarz anomaly cancellation and possible generalized Chern-Simons terms admit a formulation that is manifestly covariant with respect to electric/magnetic duality transformations. This generalizes previous work on the symplectically covariant formulation of anomaly-free gauge theories as they typically occur in extended supergravity, and now also includes general theories with (pseudo-)anomalous gauge interactions as they may occur in global or local N=1 supersymmetry. This generalization is achieved by relaxing the linear constraint on the embedding tensor so as to allow for a symmetric 3-tensor related to electric and/or magnetic quantum anomalies in these theories. Apart from electric and magnetic gauge fields, the resulting Lagrangians also feature two-form fields and can accommodate various unusual duality frames as they often appear, e.g., in string compactifications with background fluxes.

  20. Multiscale Variability of the River Runoff System in China and Its Long-Term Link to Precipitation and Sea Surface Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Yongkang

    and Sea Surface Temperature YONGKANG XUE,*, SHUFEN SUN,# K.-M. LAU,@ JINJUN JI,*, ISABELLE POCCARD,* RENHE with precipitation and sea surface temperature (SST) at the continental scale. Monthly mean data from 72 runoff­north dipole anomaly patterns for the first two runoff EOF's spatial distributions have been identified

  1. Shedding light on the $b\\to s$ anomalies with a dark sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sierra, D Aristizabal; Vicente, Avelino

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The LHCb collaboration has recently reported on some anomalies in $b\\to s$ transitions. In addition to discrepancies with the Standard Model (SM) predictions in some angular observables and branching ratios, an intriguing hint for lepton universality violation was found. Here we propose a simple model that extends the SM with a dark sector charged under an additional $U(1)$ gauge symmetry. The spontaneous breaking of this symmetry gives rise to a massive $Z^\\prime$ boson, which communicates the SM particles with a valid dark matter candidate, while solving the $b\\to s$ anomalies with contributions to the relevant observables.

  2. S79JUNE 2006STATE OFTHE CLIMATE IN 2005 | FIG. 6.28. European average temperature anomalies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­90 average. Romania and Bulgaria received significant rainfall excesses during the year, with August totals above average in Romania (Fig. 6.29). A warm January, with areas of eastern Ukraine more than 5°C above

  3. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SIGNAL PROCESSING, VOL. 51, NO. 8, AUGUST 2003 2191 Anomaly Detection in IP Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ji, Chuanyi

    useful information to the network administrator. Using some basic knowledge of the network layout as well Networks Marina Thottan and Chuanyi Ji Abstract--Network anomaly detection is a vibrant research area that this signal processing technique is effective at detecting several network anomalies. Case studies from real

  4. Detecting Anomalies in Network Traffic Using Maximum Entropy Estimation Yu Gu, Andrew McCallum, Don Towsley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    the network administrator a multi­ dimensional view of the network traffic. Our method can detect anomalies classes that increase the relative entropy thus providing the network administrator information related1 Detecting Anomalies in Network Traffic Using Maximum Entropy Estimation Yu Gu, Andrew Mc

  5. An indigenous origin for the South Pole Aitken basin thorium anomaly Ian Garrick-Bethell and Maria T. Zuber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuber, Maria

    An indigenous origin for the South Pole Aitken basin thorium anomaly Ian Garrick-Bethell and Maria high abundance of thorium as determined by Apollo and Lunar Prospector gamma-ray spectroscopy that the anomaly is the result of convergence of thorium-enriched ejecta from the Imbrium impact. Examination

  6. High Temperatures & Electricity Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High Temperatures & Electricity Demand An Assessment of Supply Adequacy in California Trends.......................................................................................................1 HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND.....................................................................................................................7 SECTION I: HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND ..........................9 BACKGROUND

  7. Anomaly detection in monitoring sensor data for preventive maintenance Julien Rabatel a,b,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Anomaly detection in monitoring sensor data for preventive maintenance Julien Rabatel a,b, , Sandra Preventive maintenance a b s t r a c t Today, many industrial companies must face problems raised to make predictive maintenance to prevent a serious breakdown. In addition, the corrective maintenance

  8. Harada–Tsutsui gauge recovery procedure: From Abelian gauge anomalies to the Stueckelberg mechanism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lima, Gabriel Di Lemos Santiago, E-mail: gabriellemos3@hotmail.com

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Revisiting a path-integral procedure developed by Harada and Tsutsui for recovering gauge invariance from anomalous effective actions, it is shown that there are two ways to achieve gauge symmetry: one already presented by the authors, which is shown to preserve the anomaly in the sense of standard current conservation law, and another one which is anomaly-free, preserving current conservation. It is also shown that the application of the Harada–Tsutsui technique to other models which are not anomalous but do not exhibit gauge invariance allows the identification of the gauge invariant formulation of the Proca model, also done by the referred authors, with the Stueckelberg model, leading to the interpretation of the gauge invariant map as a generalization of the Stueckelberg mechanism. -- Highlights: • A gauge restoration technique from Abelian anomalous models is discussed. • It is shown that there is another way that leads to gauge symmetry restoration from such technique. • It is shown that the first gauge restoration preserves the anomaly, while the proposed second one is free from anomalies. • It is shown that the proposed gauge symmetry restoration can be identified with the Stueckelberg mechanism.

  9. On the Persistence of Cold-Season SST Anomalies Associated with the Annular Modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    England, Matthew

    . In the North Atlantic, however, the simple climate model overestimates the persistence of the coldOn the Persistence of Cold-Season SST Anomalies Associated with the Annular Modes LAURA M. CIASTO Climate Change Research Centre, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia MICHAEL

  10. The Atmospheric Response to Realistic Reduced Summer Arctic Sea Ice Anomalies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhatt, Uma

    for the continued ice melt [Polyakov et al., 2005], and recent work shows that heat from the Atlantic layer can91 The Atmospheric Response to Realistic Reduced Summer Arctic Sea Ice Anomalies Uma S. Bhatt,1 and Robert A. Tomas3 The impact of reduced Arctic summer sea ice on the atmosphere is investigated by forcing

  11. Rock magnetic investigation of possible sources of the Bangui magnetic anomaly1 , M., Quesnel2*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Rock magnetic investigation of possible sources of the Bangui magnetic anomaly1 2 Ouabego1,2 , M slices of such28 metamorphic rocks, or by an iron-rich mafic source, or by a combination of these two29 source using constraints19 from satellite and ground magnetic field measurements, as well as from surface

  12. Local and remote impacts of a tropical Atlantic salinity anomaly Juliette Mignot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Local and remote impacts of a tropical Atlantic salinity anomaly Juliette Mignot and Claude, the salinity increase leads to a rapid deepening and cooling of the surface mixed layer. This induces a deepening of the equatorial undercurrent and an intensication of the south equatorial current. A remote

  13. Characterization and removal of errors due to local magnetic anomalies in directional drilling Nathan Hancock*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Characterization and removal of errors due to local magnetic anomalies in directional drilling of Geophysics, Colorado School of Mines Summary Directional drilling has evolved over the last few decades utilizes a technique known as magnetic Measurement While Drilling (MWD). Vector measurements of geomagnetic

  14. HPNAIDM: The High-Performance Network Anomaly/Intrusion Detection and Mitigation System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yan [Northwesten University] [Northwesten University

    2013-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Identifying traffic anomalies and attacks rapidly and accurately is critical for large network operators. With the rapid growth of network bandwidth, such as the next generation DOE UltraScience Network, and fast emergence of new attacks/virus/worms, existing network intrusion detection systems (IDS) are insufficient because they: • Are mostly host-based and not scalable to high-performance networks; • Are mostly signature-based and unable to adaptively recognize flow-level unknown attacks; • Cannot differentiate malicious events from the unintentional anomalies. To address these challenges, we proposed and developed a new paradigm called high-performance network anomaly/intrustion detection and mitigation (HPNAIDM) system. The new paradigm is significantly different from existing IDSes with the following features (research thrusts). • Online traffic recording and analysis on high-speed networks; • Online adaptive flow-level anomaly/intrusion detection and mitigation; • Integrated approach for false positive reduction. Our research prototype and evaluation demonstrate that the HPNAIDM system is highly effective and economically feasible. Beyond satisfying the pre-set goals, we even exceed that significantly (see more details in the next section). Overall, our project harvested 23 publications (2 book chapters, 6 journal papers and 15 peer-reviewed conference/workshop papers). Besides, we built a website for technique dissemination, which hosts two system prototype release to the research community. We also filed a patent application and developed strong international and domestic collaborations which span both academia and industry.

  15. Controls on Martian hydrothermal systems: Application to valley network and magnetic anomaly formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Keith

    circulation can quantify limits to the role of hydrothermal activity in Martian crustal processes. We present the viability of hydrothermal circulation as the primary process responsible for the broad spatial correlationControls on Martian hydrothermal systems: Application to valley network and magnetic anomaly

  16. Resolving Spacecraft Earth-Flyby Anomalies with Measured Light Speed Anisotropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reginald T. Cahill

    2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Doppler shift observations of spacecraft, such as Galileo, NEAR, Cassini, Rosetta and MESSENGER in earth flybys, have all revealed unexplained speed `anomalies' - that the doppler-shift determined speeds are inconsistent with expected speeds. Here it is shown that these speed anomalies are not real and are actually the result of using an incorrect relationship between the observed doppler shift and the speed of the spacecraft - a relationship based on the assumption that the speed of light is isotropic in all frames, i.e. invariant. Taking account of the repeatedly measured light-speed anisotropy the anomalies are resolved. The Pioneer 10/11 anomalies are discussed, but not resolved. The spacecraft observations demonstrate again that the speed of light is not invariant, and is isotropic only with respect to a dynamical 3-space. The existing doppler shift data also offers a resource to characterise a new form of gravitational waves, the dynamical 3-space turbulence, that has also been detected by other techniques.

  17. Generation and Initial Evolution of a Mode Water S Anomaly* GREGORY C. JOHNSON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Gregory C.

    Generation and Initial Evolution of a Mode Water ­S Anomaly* GREGORY C. JOHNSON NOAA/Pacific Marine. Corresponding author address: Dr. Gregory C. Johnson, NOAA/PMEL, 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Bldg. 3, Seattle, WA 98115-6349. E-mail: gregory.c.johnson@noaa.gov APRIL 2006

  18. Gravity anomalies, crustal structure and thermo-mechanical support of the Himalaya of Central Nepal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avouac, Jean-Philippe

    Gravity anomalies, crustal structure and thermo-mechanical support of the Himalaya of Central Nepal, Department of Mines and Geology, Lainchaur, Kathmandu, Nepal Accepted 2001 June 8. Received 2001 January 6; in original form 2000 February 4 SUMMARY We use two gravity profiles that we measured across Central Nepal

  19. A Serenitatis origin for the Imbrian grooves and South Pole-Aitken thorium anomaly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuber, Maria

    1 A Serenitatis origin for the Imbrian grooves and South Pole-Aitken thorium anomaly Mark A) basin contains a high abundance of thorium and a unique Imbrian aged geomorphologic unit that consists are almost antipodal to the Imbrium basin, where high-thorium ejecta and seismic energy are expected to have

  20. Applying Scaled Vegetation Greenness Metrics to Constrain Simulated Transpiration Anomalies: A Study over Australia*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Jason

    , Climate Change Research Centre, Level 4 Mathews Building, University of New South Wales, Sydney NSW 2052: A Study over Australia* MARK DECKER, ANDY J. PITMAN, AND JASON EVANS Climate Change Research CentreApplying Scaled Vegetation Greenness Metrics to Constrain Simulated Transpiration Anomalies

  1. Thermal anomalies indicate preferential flow along faults in unconsolidated sedimentary aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bense, Victor

    Thermal anomalies indicate preferential flow along faults in unconsolidated sedimentary aquifers V in unconsolidated siliciclastic aquifers off-set by normal-faults in the Lower Rhine Embayment, Germany. High plane. Most current models of fault hydrology in unconsolidated sedimentary sequences assume faults

  2. ON THE SOLAR RADIATION BUDGET AND THE CLOUD ABSORPTION ANOMALY DEBATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Zhanqing

    ON THE SOLAR RADIATION BUDGET AND THE CLOUD ABSORPTION ANOMALY DEBATE ZHANQING LI Department-of-the-art radiative transfer models. 1. Introduction Solar radiation is the ultimate source of energy for the planet of solar radiation, which is unfortunately still fraught with large uncertainties (Wild et al. 1995; Li et

  3. Geochemical anomalies in soil and sandstone overlying the Phoenix uranium deposit, Athabasca Basin Natural Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Co Mo Ni UU Geochemical anomalies in soil and sandstone overlying the Phoenix uranium deposit, Athabasca Basin Natural Resources Canada Geological Survey of Canada with Provincial and Territorial Collaboration Introduction The Wheeler River Property, host of Denison Mine's Phoenix uranium deposit

  4. Local Frequency Based Estimators for Anomaly Detection in Oil and Gas Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    Local Frequency Based Estimators for Anomaly Detection in Oil and Gas Applications Alexander Singh industrial applications such as the smart grid and oil and gas are continuously monitored. The massive to positively impact the bottom line. In the oil and gas industry, modern oil rigs are outfitted with thousands

  5. Capacitance probe for detection of anomalies in non-metallic plastic pipe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mathur, Mahendra P. (Pittsburgh, PA); Spenik, James L. (Morgantown, WV); Condon, Christopher M. (Morgantown, WV); Anderson, Rodney (Grafton, WV); Driscoll, Daniel J. (Morgantown, WV); Fincham, Jr., William L. (Fairmont, WV); Monazam, Esmail R. (Morgantown, WV)

    2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure relates to analysis of materials using a capacitive sensor to detect anomalies through comparison of measured capacitances. The capacitive sensor is used in conjunction with a capacitance measurement device, a location device, and a processor in order to generate a capacitance versus location output which may be inspected for the detection and localization of anomalies within the material under test. The components may be carried as payload on an inspection vehicle which may traverse through a pipe interior, allowing evaluation of nonmetallic or plastic pipes when the piping exterior is not accessible. In an embodiment, supporting components are solid-state devices powered by a low voltage on-board power supply, providing for use in environments where voltage levels may be restricted.

  6. Cascade Model of an Anomaly in Blazar Spectra at Very High Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dzhatdoev, Timur

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is well known that the effect of gamma-ray absorption on extragalactic background light (EBL) is weakly expressed in the spectra of some blazars. It is shown that a secondary component generated by electromagnetic cascades might considerably decrease the statistical significance of this anomaly. Observational results indicate the existence of the cascade component in the spectra of extragalactic gamma-ray sources, thus supporting the proposed model.

  7. X-ray and Optical Flux Ratio Anomalies in Quadruply Lensed Quasars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    X-ray and Optical Flux Ratio Anomalies in Quadruply Lensed Quasars: Zooming in on Quasar Emission T (r) = 3GMBH M 8r3 1/4 1 - r0/r 1/4 2�1015 cm 100 Rg Optical X-ray 0.1 µarcsec 5 narcsec L ~ 1045-ray and optical should be affected the same Differences in X-ray and optical microlensing #12;Chandra 0.5 ­ 8 ke

  8. First integrals of motion in a gauge covariant framework, Killing-Maxwell system and quantum anomalies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Visinescu, M., E-mail: mvisin@theory.nipne.ro [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Department of Theoretical Physics (Romania)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Hidden symmetries in a covariant Hamiltonian framework are investigated. The special role of the Stackel-Killing and Killing-Yano tensors is pointed out. The covariant phase-space is extended to include external gauge fields and scalar potentials. We investigate the possibility for a higher-order symmetry to survive when the electromagnetic interactions are taken into account. Aconcrete realization of this possibility is given by the Killing-Maxwell system. The classical conserved quantities do not generally transfer to the quantized systems producing quantum gravitational anomalies. As a rule the conformal extension of the Killing vectors and tensors does not produce symmetry operators for the Klein-Gordon operator.

  9. Anomaly-free perturbations with inverse-volume and holonomy corrections in Loop Quantum Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Cailleteau; Linda Linsefors; Aurelien Barrau

    2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This article addresses the issue of the closure of the algebra of constraints for generic (cosmological) perturbations when taking into account simultaneously the two main corrections of effective loop quantum cosmology, namely the holonomy and the inverse-volume terms. Previous works on either the holonomy or the inverse volume case are reviewed and generalized. In the inverse-volume case, we point out new possibilities. An anomaly-free solution including both corrections is found for perturbations, and the corresponding equations of motion are derived.

  10. Oxygen isotope anomalies of the Sun and the original environment of the Solar system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeong-Eun Lee; Edwin A. Bergin; James R. Lyons

    2008-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results from a model of oxygen isotopic anomaly production through selective photodissociation of CO within the collapsing proto-Solar cloud. Our model produces a proto-Sun with a wide range of Delta_17O values depending on the intensity of the ultraviolet radiation field. Dramatically different results from two recent Solar wind oxygen isotope measurements indicate that a variety of compositions remain possible for the solar oxygen isotope composition. However, constrained by other measurements from comets and meteorites, our models imply the birth of the Sun in a stellar cluster with an enhanced radiation field and are therefore consistent with a supernova source for 60Fe in meteorites.

  11. Review Chlorination Disinfection By-Products in Drinking Water and Congenital Anomalies: Review and Meta-Analyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark J. Nieuwenhuijsen; David Martinez; James Grellier; James Bennett; Nicky Best; Nina Iszatt; Martine Vrijheid; Mireille B. Toledano

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to review epidemiologic evidence, provide summary risk estimates of the association between exposure to chlorination disinfection by-products (DBPs) and congenital anomalies, and provide recommendations for future studies. Data s o u r c e s a n d extraction: We included all published epidemiologic studies that evaluated a relationship between an index of DBP exposure (treatment, water source, DBP measurements, and both DBP measurements and personal characteristics) and risk of congenital anomalies. When three or more studies examined the same exposure index and congenital anomaly, we conducted a metaanalysis to obtain a summary risk estimate comparing the highest exposure group with the lowest exposure group. When five or more studies examined total trihalomethane (TTHM) exposure and a specific congenital anomaly, we conducted a meta-analysis to obtain exposure–response risk estimates per 10 µg/L TTHM. Data synthesis: For all congenital anomalies combined, the meta-analysis gave a statistically significant excess risk for high versus low exposure to water chlorination or TTHM [17%; 95 % confidence interval (CI), 3–34] based on a small number of studies. The meta-analysis also suggested a statistically significant excess risk for ventricular septal defects (58%; 95 % CI, 21–107), but this was

  12. Strings at finite temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arago C. de; Bazeia, D.; Eboli, O.J.P.; Marques, G.C.

    1985-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We obtain a semiclassical evaluation of the temperature for which the free energy of the strings of spontaneously broken scalar electrodynamics vanishes. We argue that, above this temperature, these objects should play a significant physical role.

  13. Resolution of the multichannel anomaly in the extraction of S-matrix resonance-pole parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ceci, Sasa [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka cesta 54, P.O. Box 180, 10002 Zagreb (Croatia); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States); Stahov, Jugoslav [Abilene Christian University, ACU Station Box 27963, Abilene, TX 79699 (United States); University of Tuzla, Faculty of Science, Univerzitetska 4, 35000 Tuzla (Bosnia and Herzegowina); Svarc, Alfred; Zauner, Branimir [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka cesta 54, P.O. Box 180, 10002 Zagreb (Croatia); Watson, Shon [Abilene Christian University, ACU Station Box 27963, Abilene, TX 79699 (United States)

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the framework of a mathematically well-defined coupled-channel T-matrix model we have improved the existing multichannel pole-extraction procedure based on the numerical analytic continuation of the channel propagator, and for the first time we present the full set of pole parameters for already published amplitudes. Standard single-channel pole-extraction method (speed plot) was then applied to those amplitudes and resulting sets of T-matrix poles were inspected. The anomaly has been established that in some partial waves the pole values extracted using the standard single-channel methods differ not only from the values obtained using the analytic continuation method, but also change from one reaction to another. Inspired by this peculiarity, we have developed a new single-channel pole-extraction method based solely on the assumption of the partial wave analyticity. Since the speed plot turns out to be the lowest order term of the proposed method, the anomaly is understood and resolved.

  14. Adler-Bardeen theorem and cancellation of gauge anomalies to all orders in nonrenormalizable theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anselmi, Damiano

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We prove the Adler-Bardeen theorem in a large class of general gauge theories, including nonrenormalizable ones. We assume that the gauge symmetries are general covariance, local Lorentz symmetry and Abelian and non-Abelian Yang-Mills symmetries, and that the local functionals of vanishing ghost number satisfy a variant of the Kluberg-Stern--Zuber conjecture. We show that if the gauge anomalies are trivial at one loop, for every truncation of the theory there exists a subtraction scheme where they manifestly vanish to all orders, within the truncation. Outside the truncation the cancellation of gauge anomalies can be enforced by fine-tuning local counterterms. The framework of the proof is worked out by combining a recently formulated chiral dimensional regularization with a gauge invariant higher-derivative regularization. If the higher-derivative regularizing terms are placed well beyond the truncation, and the energy scale $\\Lambda$ associated with them is kept fixed, the theory is super-renormalizable and...

  15. Nucleosynthetic osmium isotope anomalies in acid leachates of the Murchison meteorite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Reisberg; N. Dauphas; A. Luguet; D. G. Pearson; R. Gallino; C. Zimmermann

    2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present osmium isotopic results obtained by sequential leaching of the Murchison meteorite, which reveal the existence of very large internal anomalies of nucleosynthetic origin. The Os isotopic anomalies are correlated, and can be explained by the variable contributions of components derived from the s, r and p-processes of nucleosynthesis. Much of the s-process rich osmium is released by relatively mild leaching, suggesting the existence of an easily leachable s-process rich presolar phase, or alternatively, of a chemically resistant r-process rich phase. The s-process composition of Os released by mild leaching diverges slightly from that released by aggressive digestion techniques, perhaps suggesting that the presolar phases attacked by these differing procedures condensed in different stellar environments. The correlation between 190Os and 188Os can be used to constrain the s-process 190Os/188Os ratio to be 1.275 pm 0.043. Such a ratio can be reproduced in a nuclear reaction network for a MACS value for 190Os of ~200 pm 22 mbarn at 30 keV. We also present evidence for extensive internal variation of 184Os abundances in the Murchison meteorite. This suggests that p process rich presolar grains (e.g., supernova condensates) may be present in meteorites in sufficient quantities to influence the Os isotopic compositions of the leachates.

  16. 6, 13011320, 2006 Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ACPD 6, 1301­1320, 2006 Temperature climatology and trend estimates over Durban, South Africa H and Physics Discussions Temperature climatology and trend estimates in the UTLS region as observed over Commons License. 1301 #12;ACPD 6, 1301­1320, 2006 Temperature climatology and trend estimates over Durban

  17. Temperature compensated photovoltaic array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mosher, D.M.

    1997-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A temperature compensated photovoltaic module comprises a series of solar cells having a thermally activated switch connected in parallel with several of the cells. The photovoltaic module is adapted to charge conventional batteries having a temperature coefficient differing from the temperature coefficient of the module. The calibration temperatures of the switches are chosen whereby the colder the ambient temperature for the module, the more switches that are on and form a closed circuit to short the associated solar cells. By shorting some of the solar cells as the ambient temperature decreases, the battery being charged by the module is not excessively overcharged at lower temperatures. PV module is an integrated solution that is reliable and inexpensive. 2 figs.

  18. Temperature compensated photovoltaic array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mosher, Dan Michael (Plano, TX)

    1997-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A temperature compensated photovoltaic module (20) comprised of a series of solar cells (22) having a thermally activated switch (24) connected in parallel with several of the cells (22). The photovoltaic module (20) is adapted to charge conventional batteries having a temperature coefficient (TC) differing from the temperature coefficient (TC) of the module (20). The calibration temperatures of the switches (24) are chosen whereby the colder the ambient temperature for the module (20), the more switches that are on and form a closed circuit to short the associated solar cells (22). By shorting some of the solar cells (22) as the ambient temperature decreases, the battery being charged by the module (20) is not excessively overcharged at lower temperatures. PV module (20) is an integrated solution that is reliable and inexpensive.

  19. Temperature-associated increases in the global soil respiration record

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Thomson, Allison M.

    2010-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Soil respiration (RS), the flux of CO2 from the soil surface to the atmosphere, comprises the second-largest terrestrial carbon flux, but its dynamics are incompletely understood, and the global flux remains poorly constrained. Ecosystem warming experiments, modelling analyses, and biokinetics all suggest that RS should change with climate. This has been difficult to confirm observationally because of the high spatial variability of RS, inaccessibility of the soil medium, and inability of remote sensing instruments to measure large-scale RS fluxes. Given these constraints, is it possible to discern climate-driven changes in regional or global RS fluxes in the extant four-decade record of RS chamber measurements? Here we use a database of worldwide RS observations, matched with high-resolution historical climate data, to show a previously unknown temporal trend in the RS record after accounting for mean annual climate, leaf area, nitrogen deposition, and changes in CO2 measurement technique. Air temperature anomaly (deviation from the 1961-1990 mean) is significantly and positively correlated with changes in RS fluxes; both temperature and precipitation anomalies exert effects in specific biomes. We estimate that the current (2008) annual global RS flux is 98±12 Pg and has increased 0.1 Pg yr-1 over the last 20 years, implying a global RS temperature response (Q10) of 1.5. An increasing global RS flux does not necessarily constitute a positive feedback loop to the atmosphere; nonetheless, the available data are consistent with an acceleration of the terrestrial carbon cycle in response to global climate change.

  20. Is the GSI anomaly due to neutrino oscillations? A real time perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu Jun; Boyanovsky, Daniel [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260 (United States); Hutasoit, Jimmy A.; Holman, Richard [Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States)

    2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a model for the 'GSI anomaly' in which we obtain the time evolution of the population of parent and daughter particles directly in real time, considering explicitly the quantum entanglement between the daughter particle and neutrino mass eigenstates in the two-body decay. We confirm that the decay rate of the parent particle and the growth rate of the daughter particle do not feature a time modulation from interference of neutrino mass eigenstates. The lack of interference is a consequence of the orthogonality of the mass eigenstates. This result also follows from the density matrix obtained by tracing out the unobserved neutrino states. We confirm this result by providing a complementary explanation based on Cutkosky rules applied to the Feynman diagram that describes the self energy of the parent particle.

  1. Isospin dependence of EMC effect explains NuTeV anomaly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cloet, Ian; Bentz, Wolfgang; Thomas, Anthony

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron or proton excess in nuclei leads to an isovector-vector mean-field which, through its coupling to the quarks in a bound nucleon, implies a shift in the quark distributions with respect to the Bjorken scaling variable. We show that this result leads to an additional correction to the NuTeV measurement of sin^2Theta_W. The sign of this correction is largely model independent and acts to reduce the NuTeV result. Explicit calculation within a covariant and confining Nambu Jona-Lasinio model predicts that this vector field correction accounts for approximately two-thirds of the NuTeV anomaly. We are therefore led to offer a new interpretation of the NuTeV measurement, namely, that it is further evidence for the medium modification of the bound nucleon wavefunction.

  2. Fuzzy Logic Based Anomaly Detection for Embedded Network Security Cyber Sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ondrej Linda; Todd Vollmer; Jason Wright; Milos Manic

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Resiliency and security in critical infrastructure control systems in the modern world of cyber terrorism constitute a relevant concern. Developing a network security system specifically tailored to the requirements of such critical assets is of a primary importance. This paper proposes a novel learning algorithm for anomaly based network security cyber sensor together with its hardware implementation. The presented learning algorithm constructs a fuzzy logic rule based model of normal network behavior. Individual fuzzy rules are extracted directly from the stream of incoming packets using an online clustering algorithm. This learning algorithm was specifically developed to comply with the constrained computational requirements of low-cost embedded network security cyber sensors. The performance of the system was evaluated on a set of network data recorded from an experimental test-bed mimicking the environment of a critical infrastructure control system.

  3. Ancestral Nesson anticline and associated geothermal anomalies: Enhanced hydrocarbon generation controlled by crustal structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osadetz, K.G.; Snowdon, L.R. (Geological Survey of Canada, Calgary, Alberta (Canada))

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrocarbon generation in the Williston basin is influenced by crustal motions and geothermal gradient anomalies associated with the ancestral Nesson anticline, a long-lived crustal structure located along 103{degree} longitude. This structure and its effects are particularly important in Canada where most petroleum source rocks were not sufficiently buried to have generated hydrocarbons in a normal geothermal gradient environment. High geothermal gradients associated with this structure raise the oil window and expand the region of source rock thermal maturity. Ancestral Nesson structure subsided differentially throughout the Phanerozoic, controlling paleobathymetry and facies over its crest. During the Upper Ordovician the structure was positive; rich potential petroleum source rocks were deposited on the western flank of the structure, generally excluding them from the zone of elevated heat flows. The total petroleum potential of this oil-source system exceeds 5.5 billion bbl of oil equivalent in Canada alone. Unfortunately, its exclusion from the maturation anomaly results in no more than 200 million bbl of oil being expelled from these sources. During the Middle Devonian, the structure was a negative feature that formed a starved subbasin separating the Winnipegosis and Elm Point carbonate shelves. Rich potential petroleum source rocks that accumulated on the crest of the structure at that time now overlie the region of elevated heat that flows and enhanced hydrocarbon maturation. Two billion barrels of oil are estimated to have been expelled from this source rock. Understanding the history and tectonics of the ancestral Nesson anticline is fundamental to a correct appraisal of hydrocarbon resources in the Williston basin.

  4. Mining Building Energy Management System Data Using Fuzzy Anomaly Detection and Linguistic Descriptions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dumidu Wijayasekara; Ondrej Linda; Milos Manic; Craig Rieger

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Building Energy Management Systems (BEMSs) are essential components of modern buildings that utilize digital control technologies to minimize energy consumption while maintaining high levels of occupant comfort. However, BEMSs can only achieve these energy savings when properly tuned and controlled. Since indoor environment is dependent on uncertain criteria such as weather, occupancy, and thermal state, performance of BEMS can be sub-optimal at times. Unfortunately, the complexity of BEMS control mechanism, the large amount of data available and inter-relations between the data can make identifying these sub-optimal behaviors difficult. This paper proposes a novel Fuzzy Anomaly Detection and Linguistic Description (Fuzzy-ADLD) based method for improving the understandability of BEMS behavior for improved state-awareness. The presented method is composed of two main parts: 1) detection of anomalous BEMS behavior and 2) linguistic representation of BEMS behavior. The first part utilizes modified nearest neighbor clustering algorithm and fuzzy logic rule extraction technique to build a model of normal BEMS behavior. The second part of the presented method computes the most relevant linguistic description of the identified anomalies. The presented Fuzzy-ADLD method was applied to real-world BEMS system and compared against a traditional alarm based BEMS. In six different scenarios, the Fuzzy-ADLD method identified anomalous behavior either as fast as or faster (an hour or more), that the alarm based BEMS. In addition, the Fuzzy-ADLD method identified cases that were missed by the alarm based system, demonstrating potential for increased state-awareness of abnormal building behavior.

  5. Automatic temperature adjustment apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaplin, James E. (66 Overlook Rd., Bloomingdale, NJ 07403)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for increasing the efficiency of a conventional central space heating system is disclosed. The temperature of a fluid heating medium is adjusted based on a measurement of the external temperature, and a system parameter. The system parameter is periodically modified based on a closed loop process that monitors the operation of the heating system. This closed loop process provides a heating medium temperature value that is very near the optimum for energy efficiency.

  6. Temperature and RH Targets

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presented by Vishal O Mittal of the Florida Solar Energy Center at the High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting, San Francisco, September 14, 2006.

  7. Thulium anomalies and rare earth element patterns in meteorites and Earth: Nebular fractionation and the nugget effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dauphas, N

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study reports the bulk rare earth element (REEs, La-Lu) compositions of 41 chondrites, including 32 falls and 9 finds from carbonaceous (CI, CM, CO and CV), enstatite (EH and EL) and ordinary (H, L and LL) groups, as well as 2 enstatite achondrites (aubrite). The CI-chondrite-normalized REE patterns and Eu anomalies in ordinary and enstatite chondrites show more scatter in more metamorphosed than in unequilibrated chondrites. This is due to parent-body redistribution of the REEs in various carrier phases during metamorphism. The dispersion in REE patterns of equilibrated ordinary chondrites is explained by the nugget effect associated with concentration of REEs in minor phosphate grains. Terrestrial rocks and samples from ordinary and enstatite chondrites display negative Tm anomalies of ~-4.5 % relative to ca chondrites. In contrast, CM, CO and CV (except Allende) show no significant Tm anomalies. Allende CV chondrite shows large excess Tm (~+10 %). These anomalies are similar to those found in group II...

  8. Early India-Australia spreading history revealed by newly detected Mesozoic magnetic anomalies in the Perth Abyssal Plain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Granot, Roi

    Early India-Australia spreading history revealed by newly detected Mesozoic magnetic anomalies Abyssal Plain (PAP), offshore Western Australia, is the only section of crust that directly records the early spreading history between India and Australia during the Mesozoic breakup of Gondwana. However

  9. Plasma Barodiffusion in Inertial-Confinement-Fusion Implosions: Application to Observed Yield Anomalies in Thermonuclear Fuel Mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anomalies in Thermonuclear Fuel Mixtures Peter Amendt, O. L. Landen, and H. F. Robey Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551, USA C. K. Li and R. D. Petrasso Plasma Science and Fusion performance in general, and upcoming igni- tion tuning campaigns on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [4

  10. Characterisation of Optical Flow Anomalies in Pedestrian Traffic Ernesto L. Andrade, Scott Blunsden and Robert B. Fisher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Bob

    Characterisation of Optical Flow Anomalies in Pedestrian Traffic Ernesto L. Andrade, Scott Blunsden and Robert B. Fisher School of Informatics, Edinburgh University, UK eaneto@inf.ed.ac.uk, S.J.Blunsden@sms.ed.ac.uk, rbf@inf.ed.ac.uk ABSTRACT ­ This paper applies a video modelling technique to a surveillance scenario

  11. Superconductivityand absence of a Kohn anomaly in the quasi-one-dimensional organic conductor : (TMTSF)2AsF6 (+)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    L-607 Superconductivityand absence of a Kohn anomaly in the quasi-one-dimensional organic conductor Kohn à 2 kF à basse température et à pression atmosphérique. Abstract. 2014 Superconductivity has been under 12 kbar. The establishment of the superconducting state is apparently not related to the existence

  12. The Determination of sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W} in Neutrino Scattering: no more anomaly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, A. W. [ARC Centre of Excellence in Particle Physics at the Tera-scale (CoEPP) and CSSM, School of Chemistry and Physics, University of Adelaide, Adelaide SA 5005 (Australia)

    2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the corrections to the NuTeV determination of sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W}, concluding that it is no longer appropriate to present it as an ''anomaly''. Indeed, when well understood corrections associated with charge symmetry violation and the iso-vector nuclear force are properly included, the measurement is completely consistent with the Standard Model.

  13. Model-based Thermal Anomaly Detection in Cloud Datacenters Eun Kyung Lee, Hariharasudhan Viswanathan, and Dario Pompili

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pompili, Dario

    Model-based Thermal Anomaly Detection in Cloud Datacenters Eun Kyung Lee, Hariharasudhan datacenters make them prone to strategic attacks, misconfigurations, and failures (cooling as well) and observed thermal maps (obtained using thermal cameras) of datacenters is proposed. In addition, a Thermal

  14. Reliable detection of fluence anomalies in EPID-based IMRT pretreatment quality assurance using pixel intensity deviations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, J. J.; Gardner, J. K.; Wang, S.; Siebers, J. V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York 10095 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: This work uses repeat images of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) fields to quantify fluence anomalies (i.e., delivery errors) that can be reliably detected in electronic portal images used for IMRT pretreatment quality assurance. Methods: Repeat images of 11 clinical IMRT fields are acquired on a Varian Trilogy linear accelerator at energies of 6 MV and 18 MV. Acquired images are corrected for output variations and registered to minimize the impact of linear accelerator and electronic portal imaging device (EPID) positioning deviations. Detection studies are performed in which rectangular anomalies of various sizes are inserted into the images. The performance of detection strategies based on pixel intensity deviations (PIDs) and gamma indices is evaluated using receiver operating characteristic analysis. Results: Residual differences between registered images are due to interfraction positional deviations of jaws and multileaf collimator leaves, plus imager noise. Positional deviations produce large intensity differences that degrade anomaly detection. Gradient effects are suppressed in PIDs using gradient scaling. Background noise is suppressed using median filtering. In the majority of images, PID-based detection strategies can reliably detect fluence anomalies of {>=}5% in {approx}1 mm{sup 2} areas and {>=}2% in {approx}20 mm{sup 2} areas. Conclusions: The ability to detect small dose differences ({<=}2%) depends strongly on the level of background noise. This in turn depends on the accuracy of image registration, the quality of the reference image, and field properties. The longer term aim of this work is to develop accurate and reliable methods of detecting IMRT delivery errors and variations. The ability to resolve small anomalies will allow the accuracy of advanced treatment techniques, such as image guided, adaptive, and arc therapies, to be quantified.

  15. Fiber optic temperature sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabold, D.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Our fiber optic temperature measurement sensor and system is a major improvement over methods currently in use in most industrial processes, and it delivers all of the attributes required simplicity, accuracy, and cost efficiency-to help improve all of these processes. Because temperature is a basic physical attribute of nearly every industrial and commercial process, our system can eventually result in significant improvements in nearly every industrial and commercial process. Many finished goods, and the materials that go into them, are critically dependent on the temperature. The better the temperature measurement, the better quality the goods will be and the more economically they can be produced. The production and transmission of energy requires the monitoring of temperature in motors, circuit breakers, power generating plants, and transmission line equipment. The more reliable and robust the methods for measuring these temperature, the more available, stable, and affordable the supply of energy will become. The world is increasingly realizing the threats to health and safety of toxic or otherwise undesirable by products of the industrial economy in the environment. Cleanup of such contamination often depends on techniques that require the constant monitoring of temperature in extremely hazardous environments, which can damage most conventional temperature sensors and which are dangerous for operating personnel. Our system makes such monitoring safer and more economical.

  16. High temperature probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swan, Raymond A. (Fremont, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high temperature probe for sampling, for example, smokestack fumes, and is able to withstand temperatures of 3000.degree. F. The probe is constructed so as to prevent leakage via the seal by placing the seal inside the water jacket whereby the seal is not exposed to high temperature, which destroys the seal. The sample inlet of the probe is also provided with cooling fins about the area of the seal to provide additional cooling to prevent the seal from being destroyed. Also, a heated jacket is provided for maintaining the temperature of the gas being tested as it passes through the probe. The probe includes pressure sensing means for determining the flow velocity of an efficient being sampled. In addition, thermocouples are located in various places on the probe to monitor the temperature of the gas passing there through.

  17. E-Print Network 3.0 - anus cardiac anomalies Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    patterns of recovery. Resting cardiac variables generally increased with increasing water temperature... returned to the water. Maximal change occurred most rapidly for cardiac...

  18. High Temperature Capacitor Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Kosek

    2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The absence of high-temperature electronics is an obstacle to the development of untapped energy resources (deep oil, gas and geothermal). US natural gas consumption is projected to grow from 22 trillion cubic feet per year (tcf) in 1999 to 34 tcf in 2020. Cumulatively this is 607 tcf of consumption by 2020, while recoverable reserves using current technology are 177 tcf. A significant portion of this shortfall may be met by tapping deep gas reservoirs. Tapping these reservoirs represents a significant technical challenge. At these depths, temperatures and pressures are very high and may require penetrating very hard rock. Logistics of supporting 6.1 km (20,000 ft) drill strings and the drilling processes are complex and expensive. At these depths up to 50% of the total drilling cost may be in the last 10% of the well depth. Thus, as wells go deeper it is increasingly important that drillers are able to monitor conditions down-hole such as temperature, pressure, heading, etc. Commercial off-the-shelf electronics are not specified to meet these operating conditions. This is due to problems associated with all aspects of the electronics including the resistors and capacitors. With respect to capacitors, increasing temperature often significantly changes capacitance because of the strong temperature dependence of the dielectric constant. Higher temperatures also affect the equivalent series resistance (ESR). High-temperature capacitors usually have low capacitance values because of these dielectric effects and because packages are kept small to prevent mechanical breakage caused by thermal stresses. Electrolytic capacitors do not operate at temperatures above 150oC due to dielectric breakdown. The development of high-temperature capacitors to be used in a high-pressure high-temperature (HPHT) drilling environment was investigated. These capacitors were based on a previously developed high-voltage hybridized capacitor developed at Giner, Inc. in conjunction with a unique high-temperature electrolyte developed during the course of the program. During this program the feasibility of operating a high voltage hybridized capacitor at 230oC was demonstrated. Capacitor specifications were established in conjunction with potential capacitor users. A method to allow for capacitor operation at both ambient and elevated temperatures was demonstrated. The program was terminated prior to moving into Phase II due to a lack of cost-sharing funds.

  19. Low temperature cryoprobe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sungaila, Z.F.

    1988-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A portable, hand held probe usable within a small confine to produce a point source of nitrogen or helium at a relatively constant temperatures of 77 degrees Kelvin, is discussed. 3 figs.

  20. High-Temperature Superconductivity

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Peter Johnson

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Like astronomers tweaking images to gain a more detailed glimpse of distant stars, physicists at Brookhaven National Laboratory have found ways to sharpen images of the energy spectra in high-temperature superconductors ? materials that carry electrical c

  1. Elevated temperature crack propagation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orange, T.W.

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is a summary of two NASA contracts on high temperature fatigue crack propagation in metals. The first evaluated the ability of fairly simple nonlinear fracture parameters to correlate crack propagation. Hastelloy-X specimens were tested under isothermal and thermomechanical cycling at temperatures up to 980 degrees C (1800 degrees F). The most successful correlating parameter was the crack tip opening displacement derived from the J-integral. The second evaluated the ability of several path-independent integrals to correlate crack propagation behavior. Inconel 718 specimens were tested under isothermal, thermomechanical, temperature gradient, and creep conditions at temperatures up to 650 degrees C (1200 degrees F). The integrals formulated by Blackburn and by Kishimoto correlated the data reasonably well under all test conditions.

  2. Penrose Well Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christopherson, Karen

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Penrose Well Temperatures Geothermal waters have been encountered in several wells near Penrose in Fremont County, Colorado. Most of the wells were drilled for oil and gas exploration and, in a few cases, production. This ESRI point shapefile utilizes data from 95 wells in and around the Penrose area provided by the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) database at http://cogcc.state.co.us/ . Temperature data from the database were used to calculate a temperature gradient for each well. This information was then used to estimate temperatures at various depths. Projection: UTM Zone 13 NAD27 Extent: West -105.224871 East -105.027633 North 38.486269 South 38.259507 Originators: Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) Karen Christopherson

  3. High temperature pressure gauge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Echtler, J. Paul (Pittsburgh, PA); Scandrol, Roy O. (Library, PA)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high temperature pressure gauge comprising a pressure gauge positioned in fluid communication with one end of a conduit which has a diaphragm mounted in its other end. The conduit is filled with a low melting metal alloy above the diaphragm for a portion of its length with a high temperature fluid being positioned in the remaining length of the conduit and in the pressure gauge.

  4. A Lattice Non-Perturbative Hamiltonian Construction of 1+1D Anomaly-Free Chiral Fermions and Bosons - on the equivalence of the anomaly matching conditions and the boundary fully gapping rules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juven Wang; Xiao-Gang Wen

    2014-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A non-perturbative Hamiltonian construction of chiral fermions and bosons with anomaly-free symmetry $G$ in 1+1D spacetime is proposed. More precisely, we ask "whether there is a local short-range finite quantum Hamiltonian system realizing onsite symmetry $G$ defined on a 1D spatial lattice with a continuous time, such that its low energy physics produces a 1+1D anomaly-free chiral matter theory of symmetry $G$?" Our answer is "yes." In particular, we show that the 3$_L$-5$_R$-4$_L$-0$_R$ U(1) chiral fermion theory, with two left-moving fermions of charge-3 and charge-4, and two right-moving fermions of charge-5 and charge-0 at low energy, can be put on a 1D spatial lattice where the U(1) symmetry is realized as an onsite symmetry, if we include properly-designed interactions between fermions with intermediate strength. We show how to design such proper interactions by looking for interaction terms with extra symmetries. In general, we show that any 1+1D U(1)-anomaly-free chiral matter theory can be defined as a finite system on 1D lattice with onsite symmetry, by using a quantum Hamiltonian with a continuous time, if we include properly-designed interactions between matter fields. We comment on the new ingredients and the differences of ours comparing to Eichten-Preskill and Chen-Giedt-Poppitz models, and suggest modifying Chen-Giedt-Poppitz model to have successful mirror-decoupling. As an additional remark, we show a topological non-perturbative proof on the equivalence relation between 't Hooft anomaly matching conditions and the boundary fully gapping rules of U(1) symmetry.

  5. Emergent gravity and chiral anomaly in Dirac semimetals in the presence of dislocations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. A. Zubkov

    2015-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the recently discovered Dirac semimetals with two Dirac points $\\pm{\\bf K}$. In the presence of elastic deformations each fermion propagates in a curved space, whose metric is defined by the expansion of the effective Hamiltonian near the Dirac point. Besides, there is the emergent electromagnetic field that is defined by the shift of the Dirac point. We consider the case, when the deformations are caused by the dislocations. The dislocation carries singular torsion and the quantized flux of emergent magnetic field. Both torsion singularity and emergent magnetic flux may be observed in the scattering of quasiparticles on the dislocation due to Stodolsky and Aharonov - Bohm effects. We discuss quantum anomalies in the quasiparticle currents in the presence of emergent gauge and gravitational fields and the external electromagnetic field. In particular, it is demonstrated, that in the presence of external electric field the quasiparticles/holes are pumped from vacuum along the dislocation. The appeared chiral imbalance along the dislocation drives the analogue of chiral magnetic effect, that is the appearance of electric current along the dislocation.

  6. Magnetization anomaly of Nb3Al strands and instability of Nb3Al Rutherford cables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamada, Ryuji; /Fermilab; Kikuchi, Akihiro; /Tsukuba Magnet Lab; Wake, Masayoshi; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a Cu stabilized Nb{sub 3}Al strand with Nb matrix, a 30 meter long Nb{sub 3}Al Rutherford cable was made by a collaboration of Fermilab and NIMS. Recently the strand and cable were tested. In both cases instability was observed at around 1.5 Tesla. The magnetization of this Nb{sub 3}Al strand was measured first using a balanced coil magnetometer at 4.2 K. Strands showed an anomalously large magnetization behavior around at 1.6 T, which is much higher than the usual B{sub c2} {approx} 0.5 Tesla (4.2 K) of Nb matrix. This result is compared with the magnetization data of short strand samples using a SQUID magnetometer, in which a flux-jump signal was observed at 0.5 Tesla, but not at higher field. As a possible explanation for this magnetization anomaly, the interfilament coupling through the thin Nb films in the strands is suggested. The instability problem observed in low field tests of the Nb{sub 3}Al Rutherford cables is attributed to this effect.

  7. Hawking fluxes, fermionic currents, W{sub 1+{infinity}} algebra, and anomalies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonora, L. [International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA/ISAS) Via Beirut 2-4, 34014 Trieste (Italy) and INFN, Sezione di Trieste (Italy); Cvitan, M. [International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA/ISAS) Via Beirut 2-4, 34014 Trieste (Italy) and INFN, Sezione di Trieste (Italy); Theoretical Physics Department, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb Bijenicka cesta 32, HR-10002 Zagreb (Croatia); Pallua, S.; Smolic, I. [Theoretical Physics Department, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb Bijenicka cesta 32, HR-10002 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We complete the analysis carried out in previous papers by studying the Hawking radiation for a Kerr black hole carried to infinity by fermionic currents of any spin. We find agreement with the thermal spectrum of the Hawking radiation for fermionic degrees of freedom. We start by showing that the near-horizon physics for a Kerr black hole is approximated by an effective two-dimensional field theory of fermionic fields. Then, starting from two-dimensional currents of any spin that form a W{sub 1+{infinity}} algebra, we construct an infinite set of covariant currents, each of which carries the corresponding moment of the Hawking radiation. All together they agree with the thermal spectrum of the latter. We show that the predictive power of this method is based not on the anomalies of the higher-spin currents (which are trivial) but on the underlying W{sub 1+{infinity}} structure. Our results point toward the existence in the near-horizon geometry of a symmetry larger than the Virasoro algebra, which very likely takes the form of a W{sub {infinity}} algebra.

  8. On the specifics of the electrical conductivity anomalies in PVC nanocomposites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. V. Vlasov; L. A. Apresyan

    2013-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A qualitative model describing the "anomalous" features of the conductivity of polymer nanocomposites, in particular, switching to the conducting state in relatively thick (tens of microns or more) of flexible PVC films is considered. In previously published experimental results, change of conductivity by 10 or more orders of magnitude occurred both in the absence of external influences (spontaneously), and under the influence of an applied electric field, as well as other initiating factors (such as uniaxial pressure) . In a model of hopping conduction mechanism it is shown, that switching in the conduction states under the action of external field significantly (by orders of magnitude) below threshold can be associated with a high-resistance state instability that results from the sequence of "shorting" (reversible soft breakdown) of narrow insulating gaps between regions with relatively high conductivity. Increasing the field strength in the remaining insulating gaps ultimately leads to the formation of a conducting channel between the external electrodes and switching conductivity of the composite film sample in a state of high conductivity. This cascade model is essentially based on the transition from the usual description of the charge tunneling through single independent insulating gap to take into account correlations between adjacent gaps. In the frame of developed model other "anomalies" such as exponential dependence of the resistance on the sample thickness, pressure, and other influences can be qualitative explained. An analogy of the model with a cascading breakdown of avalanche transistors is also considered.

  9. Detection of pico-Tesla magnetic fields using magneto-electric sensors at room temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhai Junyi; Xing Zengping; Dong Shuxiang; Li Jiefang; Viehland, D. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)

    2006-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The measurement of low-frequency (10{sup -2}-10{sup 3} Hz) minute magnetic field variations (10{sup -12} Tesla) at room temperature in a passive mode of operation would be critically enabling for deployable neurological signal interfacing and magnetic anomaly detection applications. However, there is presently no magnetic field sensor capable of meeting all of these requirements. Here, we present new bimorph and push-pull magneto-electric laminate composites, which incorporate a charge compensation mechanism (or bridge) that dramatically enhances noise rejection, enabling achievement of such requirements.

  10. Estimation of the direction of remanent magnetization: an inverse method using the phase spectrum of a magnetic anomaly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moriarty, Thomas D.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in partial fidfillment of thc requirements for the degree of XIAS IER OF SOIL'NGF. December l988 iviajor Subject: Geophysics ES'I'llvlATION Ol' THV. DIIIECTION OF' RElvIANENT MACNETIZATION: AN INVERSE METHOD DSINC 'THE PIIASV. SPECTRIIM OV A MAGNETIC... ot Department) December 1988 ABSTRACT Estimation of Direction of Remanent Magnetization: An Inverse Method Using th~ Phase Spectrum ot a. Magnetic Anomaly. (December 1988) Thomas Daniel Moriarty, B. S. , Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Co...

  11. Unusual Congenital Aortic Anomaly with Rare Common Celiamesenteric Trunk Variation: MR Angiography and Digital Substraction Angiography Findings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tosun, Ozgur [Ankara Ataturk Education and Research Hospital, Department of Radiology (Turkey)], E-mail: ztosun@yahoo.com; Sanlidilek, Umman [Ankara University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Turkey); Cetin, Huseyin [Ankara Ataturk Education and Research Hospital, Department of Radiology (Turkey); Ozdemir, Ozcan [Ankara Akay Hospital, Department of Cardiology (Turkey); Kurt, Aydin; Sakarya, Mehmet Emin; Tas, Ismet [Ankara Ataturk Education and Research Hospital, Department of Radiology (Turkey)

    2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic resonance angiography and digital substraction angiography (DSA) findings in a case with a rare congenital thoracoabdominal aortic hypoplasia and common celiamesenteric trunk variation with occlusion of infrarenal abdominal aorta are described here. To our knowledge, this aortic anomaly has not been previously described in the English literature. DSA is the optimum imaging modality for determination of aortic hypoplasia, associated vascular malformations, collateral vessels, and direction of flow within vessels.

  12. Signature of the coronal hole near the north crest equatorial anomaly over Egypt during the strong geomagnetic storm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Signature of the coronal hole near the north crest equatorial anomaly over Egypt during the strong hole effect. We use multi-instruments as SCINDA-GPS station at Helwan, Egypt (29.86 N, 31.32 E) and ASW-MAGDAS station at Aswan, Egypt (23.59 N, 32.51 E) in the equatorial region. At the beginning of the storm our

  13. Temperature initiated passive cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, Charles W. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A passive cooling system for cooling an enclosure only when the enclosure temperature exceeds a maximum standby temperature comprises a passive heat transfer loop containing heat transfer fluid having a particular thermodynamic critical point temperature just above the maximum standby temperature. An upper portion of the heat transfer loop is insulated to prevent two phase operation below the maximum standby temperature.

  14. Temperature initiated passive cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A passive cooling system for cooling an enclosure only when the enclosure temperature exceeds a maximum standby temperature comprises a passive heat transfer loop containing heat transfer fluid having a particular thermodynamic critical point temperature just above the maximum standby temperature. An upper portion of the heat transfer loop is insulated to prevent two phase operation below the maximum standby temperature. 1 fig.

  15. High temperature thermometric phosphors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allison, S.W.; Cates, M.R.; Boatner, L.A.; Gillies, G.T.

    1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A high temperature phosphor consists essentially of a material having the general formula LuPO{sub 4}:Dy{sub x},Eu{sub y} wherein: 0.1 wt % {<=} x {<=} 20 wt % and 0.1 wt % {<=} y {<=} 20 wt %. The high temperature phosphor is in contact with an article whose temperature is to be determined. The article having the phosphor in contact with it is placed in the environment for which the temperature of the article is to be determined. The phosphor is excited by a laser causing the phosphor to fluoresce. The emission from the phosphor is optically focused into a beam-splitting mirror which separates the emission into two separate emissions, the emission caused by the dysprosium dopant and the emission caused by the europium dopant. The separated emissions are optically filtered and the intensities of the emission are detected and measured. The ratio of the intensity of each emission is determined and the temperature of the article is calculated from the ratio of the intensities of the separate emissions. 2 figs.

  16. High temperature thermometric phosphors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allison, Stephen W. (Knoxville, TN); Cates, Michael R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Boatner, Lynn A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Gillies, George T. (Earlysville, VA)

    1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A high temperature phosphor consists essentially of a material having the general formula LuPO.sub.4 :Dy.sub.(x),Eu.sub.y) wherein: 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.20 wt % and 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.20 wt %. The high temperature phosphor is in contact with an article whose temperature is to be determined. The article having the phosphor in contact with it is placed in the environment for which the temperature of the article is to be determined. The phosphor is excited by a laser causing the phosphor to fluoresce. The emission from the phosphor is optically focused into a beam-splitting mirror which separates the emission into two separate emissions, the emission caused by the dysprosium dopant and the emission caused by the europium dopent. The separated emissions are optically filtered and the intensities of the emission are detected and measured. The ratio of the intensity of each emission is determined and the temperature of the article is calculated from the ratio of the intensities of the separate emissions.

  17. Temperature Data Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gillespie, David

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Groundwater temperature is sensitive to the competing processes of heat flow from below the advective transport of heat by groundwater flow. Because groundwater temperature is sensitive to conductive and advective processes, groundwater temperature may be utilized as a tracer to further constrain the uncertainty of predictions of advective radionuclide transport models constructed for the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Since heat transport, geochemical, and hydrologic models for a given area must all be consistent, uncertainty can be reduced by devaluing the weight of those models that do not match estimated heat flow. The objective of this study was to identify the quantity and quality of available heat flow data at the NTS. One-hundred-forty-five temperature logs from 63 boreholes were examined. Thirteen were found to have temperature profiles suitable for the determination of heat flow values from one or more intervals within the boreholes. If sufficient spatially distributed heat flow values are obtained, a heat transport model coupled to a hydrologic model may be used to reduce the uncertainty of a nonisothermal hydrologic model of the NTS.

  18. Support for temporally varying behavior of the Pioneer anomaly from the extended Pioneer 10 and 11 Doppler data sets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slava G. Turyshev; Viktor T. Toth; Jordan Ellis; Craig B. Markwardt

    2011-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pioneer anomaly is a small sunward anomalous acceleration found in the trajectory analysis of the Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecraft. As part of the investigation of the effect, analysis of recently recovered Doppler data for both spacecraft has been completed. The presence of a small anomalous acceleration is confirmed using data spans more than twice as long as those that were previously analyzed. We examine the constancy and direction of the Pioneer anomaly, and conclude that: i) the data favor a temporally decaying anomalous acceleration (~2\\times 10^{-11} m/s^2/yr) with an over 10% improvement in the residuals compared to a constant acceleration model; ii) although the direction of the acceleration remains imprecisely determined, we find no support in favor of a Sun-pointing direction over the Earth-pointing or along the spin-axis directions, and iii) support for an early "onset" of the acceleration remains weak in the pre-Saturn Pioneer 11 tracking data. We present these new findings and discuss their implications for the nature of the Pioneer anomaly.

  19. High-temperature Pump Monitoring - High-temperature ESP Monitoring...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    7 4.4.4 High-temperature Pump Monitoring - High-temperature ESP Monitoring Presentation Number: 018 Investigator: Dhruva, Brindesh (Schlumberger Technology Corp.) Objectives: To...

  20. Development of a neural network model to nowcast/forecast the coastal water level anomalies on the entrance to Galveston Bay, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nam, Young Joo

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The water level anomaly, or the difference between the observed water level and that predicted by harmonic analysis (meteorological tide), was studied in this thesis for two locations on the northwestern Gulf of Mexico. Wind and water level...

  1. Dielectric, hypersonic, and domain anomalies of ,,PbMg13Nb23O3...1x,,PbTiO3...x single crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dielectric, hypersonic, and domain anomalies of ,,PbMg1Ã?3Nb2Ã?3O3...1Ã?x,,PbTiO3...x single crystals

  2. Fluorescent temperature sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, Gary A [Los Alamos, NM; Baker, Sheila N [Los Alamos, NM; McCleskey, T Mark [Los Alamos, NM

    2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a fluorescent temperature sensor or optical thermometer. The sensor includes a solution of 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane within a 1-butyl-1-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid solvent. The 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane remains unassociated when in the ground state while in solution. When subjected to UV light, an excited state is produced that exists in equilibrium with an excimer. The position of the equilibrium between the two excited states is temperature dependent.

  3. Low Frequency Modulation of Extreme Temperature Regimes in a Changing Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Black, Robert X.

    2014-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The project examines long-term changes in extreme temperature episodes (ETE) associated with planetary climate modes (PCMs) in both the real atmospheric and climate model simulations. The focus is on cold air outbreaks (CAOs) and warm waves (WWs) occurring over the continental US during the past 60 winters. No significant long-term trends in either WWs or CAOs are observed over the US. The annual frequency of CAOs is affected by the (i) North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) over the Southeast US and (ii) Pacific–North American (PNA) pattern over the Northwest US. WW frequency is influenced by the (i) NAO over the eastern US and (ii) combined influence of PNA, Pacific decadal oscillation (PDO), and ENSO over the southern US. The collective influence of PCMs accounts for as much as 50% of the regional variability in ETE frequency. During CAO (WW) events occurring over the southeast US, there are low (high) pressure anomalies at higher atmospheric levels over the southeast US with oppositely-signed pressure anomalies in the lower atmosphere over the central US. These patterns lead to anomalous northerly (for CAOs) or southerly (for WWs) flow into the southeast leading to cold or warm surface air temperature anomalies, respectively. One distinction is that CAOs involve substantial air mass transport while WW formation is more local in nature. The primary differences among event categories are in the origin and nature of the pressure anomaly features linked to ETE onset. In some cases, PCMs help to provide a favorable environment for event onset. Heat budget analyses indicate that latitudinal transport in the lower atmosphere is the main contributor to regional cooling during CAO onset. This is partly offset by adiabatic warming associated with subsiding air. Additional diagnoses reveal that this latitudinal transport is partly due to the remote physical influence of a shallow cold pool of air trapped along the east side of the Rocky Mountains. ETE and PCM behavior is also studied in (CMIP5) climate model simulations. Although the climate models considered are able to represent the overall behavior of ETEs, the frequency of WWs (CAOs) is too high (low) in many models. While all models qualitatively replicate the overall structure of the PNA pattern, a small minority of models fails to properly simulate the NAO pattern. Model shortcomings in representing the NAO and PNA patterns have important consequences for simulating associated regional variability in surface air temperature and storm track behavior. The influence of PCMs on ETEs is underestimated in most CMIP5 models. In particular, none of the models are able to accurately simulate observed linkages between ETEs and the PDO, due to a gross misrepresentation of the PDO pattern in most models. Our results indicate that predictions of future CAO and WW behavior are currently limited by the ability of climate models to accurately represent PCM characteristics. Our study also considers the behavior of PCMs known as annular modes. It is determined that north-south movements in the stratospheric jet stream (related to the Polar Annular Mode) result in long-lasting impacts upon surface weather conditions including regional air temperature anomalies. The structure and dynamics of the stratospheric northern annular mode (or SNAM, related to changes in the strength of the stratospheric jet stream) was studied in CMIP5 models. In models with poorly-resolved stratospheres, the amplitude of SNAM at stratospheric altitudes is typically too weak, consistent with weaker stratospheric jet variability. However, this distinction does not carry over to the associated tropospheric signature of SNAM. A regional analysis illustrates that most CMIP5 models (regardless of whether the stratosphere is well-resolved) have anomalously weak and eastward shifted (compared to observed SNAM events) storm track and sea level pressure anomaly patterns during SNAM events. Analyses of stratosphere–troposphere coupling reveal that large-scale wave activity in the stratosphere is anomalously weak in CMIP5 model

  4. Temperature differential detection device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Girling, P.M.

    1986-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A temperature differential detection device for detecting the temperature differential between predetermined portions of a container wall is disclosed as comprising a Wheatstone bridge circuit for detecting resistance imbalance with a first circuit branch having a first elongated wire element mounted in thermal contact with a predetermined portion of the container wall, a second circuit branch having a second elongated wire element mounted in thermal contact with a second predetermined portion of a container wall with the wire elements having a predetermined temperature-resistant coefficient, an indicator interconnected between the first and second branches remote from the container wall for detecting and indicating resistance imbalance between the first and second wire elements, and connector leads for electrically connecting the wire elements to the remote indicator in order to maintain the respective resistance value relationship between the first and second wire elements. The indicator is calibrated to indicate the detected resistance imbalance in terms of a temperature differential between the first and second wall portions. 2 figs.

  5. Low Temperature Performance Characterization

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    0.0036 0.0038 0.004 0.0042 Inverse Temperature, 1K Gen2 Electrodes and 1.2M LiPF6 in EC:EMC (3:7 ww) (BID 1935), 4.1V, 3 Sep. Gen2 Electrodes and 1.2M LiPF6 in EC:EMC (3:7 ww)...

  6. A universal high energy anomaly in angle resolved photoemission spectra of high temperature superconductors -- possible evidence of spinon and holon branches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    possible evidence of spinon and holon branches J. Graf, 1, 2the pro- posed spinon and holon dispersions, respectively.quasiparticles into a spinon and holon branch in the high T

  7. Localized temperature stability of low temperature cofired ceramics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dai, Steven Xunhu

    2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to low temperature cofired ceramic modules having localized temperature stability by incorporating temperature coefficient of resonant frequency compensating materials locally into a multilayer LTCC module. Chemical interactions can be minimized and physical compatibility between the compensating materials and the host LTCC dielectrics can be achieved. The invention enables embedded resonators with nearly temperature-independent resonance frequency.

  8. High Temperature Membrane Working Group

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation provides an overview of the High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting in May 2007.

  9. Engine Cylinder Temperature Control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kilkenny, Jonathan Patrick (Peoria, IL); Duffy, Kevin Patrick (Metamora, IL)

    2005-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for controlling a temperature in a combustion cylinder in an internal combustion engine. The cylinder is fluidly connected to an intake manifold and an exhaust manifold. The method and apparatus includes increasing a back pressure associated with the exhaust manifold to a level sufficient to maintain a desired quantity of residual exhaust gas in the cylinder, and varying operation of an intake valve located between the intake manifold and the cylinder to an open duration sufficient to maintain a desired quantity of fresh air from the intake manifold to the cylinder, wherein controlling the quantities of residual exhaust gas and fresh air are performed to maintain the temperature in the cylinder at a desired level.

  10. Manufacturing High Temperature Systems

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department of Energy Low-TemperatureEnergyAll ManufacturingFoodOctoberto DOE

  11. Cross-Plane Seebeck Coefficient Anomaly in a High Barrier Superlattice with Miniband Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is equivalent to a material with a positive Seebeck coefficient. This will be useful in cascading thermoelements for measurements. First, we calibrated the heater resistance with the stage temperature. To reduce the influence of the contact wires and pads, we used a four-wire measurement for gauging the resistance. At a given heater

  12. The role of forcing and internal dynamics in explaining the ``Medieval Climate Anomaly''

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goelzer, Heiko

    and relatively high solar output may have contributed to large-scale warmth (e.g. Crowley 2000). The solar, we use model simulations constrained by data assimilation estab- lishing the spatial pattern Data assimilation Á Atmospheric and ocean dynamics Á Radiative forcing 1 Introduction Proxy temperature

  13. Test for consistence of a flyby anomaly simulation with the observed Doppler residuals for the Messenger flybys of Mercury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hans-Juergen Busack

    2010-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2007, the observed Earth flyby anomalies have been successfully simulated using an empirical formula (H. J. Busack, 2007). This simulation has led to the prediction of anomaly values, to be expected for the Rosetta flybys of Mars in 2007, and following twice of Earth in 2007 and 2009. While the data for the Mars flyby are yet under evaluation, the predictions of the formula for the last two Earth flybys of Rosetta are fully confirmed now. This is remarkable, since an alternatively proposed formula (Anderson et al., 2007) failed to predict the correct values for the recent flybys. For the Mercury flybys of the Messenger spacecraft, this alternative formula predicts a null result. In the meantime, Doppler residuals of these flybys on 14.01.2008 and 06.10.2008 are availabel. On both flybys, significant residuals were observed, using gravity data derived by Mariner 10 on Mercury (D. E. Smith et al., 2009). According to the authors, these residuals cannot be eliminated totally by adjustment of the second degree gravity coefficients and by assumption of irregular mass concentrations of acceptable value on Mercury. In this investigation, I adapt the output of the simulation program to compare with the measured Doppler residuals of the Mercury flybys without changing the formerly derived parameters for the Earth flybys. The simulation with these parameters leads to Doppler residuals of the Mercury flybys compatible with the measured curves. Additionally, the expected flyby anomalies are calculated. Since the gravity field of Mercury is not explored yet with sufficient accuracy, this result cannot be falsified or confirmed until the evaluation of the coming Mercury orbits of Messenger will be finished. If the proposed empirical formula would be confirmed then again, this would be a strong indication of an underlying physical reality.

  14. Similarity of zitterbewegung of electron to the Adler-Bell-Jackiw anomaly in QED: its observable manifestation in graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Arunagiri

    2011-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The zitterbewegung being proportional to $\\sin(\\epsilon t)$, it is depicted as the motion of electron from the positive energy state to that of the negative energy and vice versa in the neighbourhood of Dirac point. Since such transition involves crossing the Dirac point, the same may be the possible realisation and measure of the zitterbewegung. In this respect, we draw a similirity between the zitterbewegung and the Adler-Bell-Jackiw anomaly in (1+1) QED. In a time dependent perturbation theory, the embodiment of zitterbewegung is envisaged in the context of graphene.

  15. Thermionic converter temperature controller

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shaner, Benjamin J. (McMurray, PA); Wolf, Joseph H. (Pittsburgh, PA); Johnson, Robert G. R. (Trafford, PA)

    2001-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for controlling the temperature of a thermionic reactor over a wide range of operating power, including a thermionic reactor having a plurality of integral cesium reservoirs, a honeycomb material disposed about the reactor which has a plurality of separated cavities, a solid sheath disposed about the honeycomb material and having an opening therein communicating with the honeycomb material and cavities thereof, and a shell disposed about the sheath for creating a coolant annulus therewith so that the coolant in the annulus may fill the cavities and permit nucleate boiling during the operation of the reactor.

  16. Thermionic Converter Temperature Controller

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaner,B. J.; Wolf, Joseph H.; Johnson, Robert G. R.

    1999-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for controlling the temperature of a thermionic reactor over a wide range of operating power, including a thermionic reactor having a plurality of integral cesium reservoirs, a honeycomb material disposed about the reactor which has a plurality of separated cavities, a solid sheath disposed about the honeycomb material and having an opening therein communicating with the honeycomb material and cavities thereof, and a shell disposed about the sheath for creating a coolant annulus therewith so that the coolant in the annulus may fill the cavities and permit nucleate boiling during the operation of the reactor.

  17. Drexel University Temperature Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. L. Davis; D. L. Knudson; J. L. Rempe; B. M. Chase

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes background information and presents results related to temperature measurements in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) Drexel University Project 31091 irradiation. The objective of this test was to assess the radiation performance of new ceramic materials for advanced reactor applications. Accordingly, irradiations of transition metal carbides and nitrides were performed using the Hydraulic Shuttle Irradiation System (HSIS) in the B-7 position and in static capsules inserted into the A-3 and East Flux Trap Position 5 locations of the ATR.

  18. Crowdsourcing urban air temperatures from smartphone battery?temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Overeem, A.

    Accurate air temperature observations in urban areas are important for meteorology and energy demand planning. They are indispensable to study the urban heat island effect and the adverse effects of high temperatures on ...

  19. N=(0, 2) Deformation of (2, 2) Sigma Models: Geometric Structure, Holomorphic Anomaly and Exact Beta Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin Chen; Xiaoyi Cui; Mikhail Shifman; Arkady Vainshtein

    2014-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We study N=(0,2) deformed (2,2) two-dimensional sigma models. Such heterotic models were discovered previously on the world sheet of non-Abelian strings supported by certain four-dimensional N=1 theories. We study geometric aspects and holomorphic properties of these models, and derive a number of exact expressions for the beta functions in terms of the anomalous dimensions analogous to the NSVZ beta function in four-dimensional Yang-Mills. Instanton calculus provides a straightforward method for the derivation. The anomalous dimensions are calculated up to two loops implying that one of the beta functions is explicitly known up to three loops. The fixed point in the ratio of the couplings found previously at one loop is not shifted at two loops. We also consider the N=(0,2) supercurrent supermultiplet (the so-called hypercurrent) and its anomalies, as well as the "Konishi anomaly." This gives us another method for finding exact $\\beta$ functions. We prove that despite the chiral nature of the models under consideration quantum loops preserve isometries of the target space.

  20. Philosophy 26 High Temperature Superconductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Callender, Craig

    Philosophy 26 High Temperature Superconductivity By Ohm's Law, resistance will dim. Low temperature superconductivity was discovered in 1911 by Heike was explained by BCS theory. BCS theory explains superconductivity microscopically

  1. The Greenhouse Effect Temperature Equilibrium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, Frederick M.

    The Greenhouse Effect #12;Temperature Equilibrium The Earth is in equilibrium with the Sun temperature is about 14C, or 287K. The 40K difference is due to the greenhouse effect. Essentially all

  2. Battery system with temperature sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, Steven J.; Trester, Dale B.

    2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A battery system to monitor temperature includes at least one cell with a temperature sensing device proximate the at least one cell. The battery system also includes a flexible member that holds the temperature sensor proximate to the at least one cell.

  3. Preparation of magnetic anomaly profile and contour maps from DOE-NURE aerial survey data. Volume I: processing procedures. [National Uranium Resource Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tinnel, E.P.; Hinze, W.J.

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Total intensity magnetic anomaly data acquired as a supplement to radiometric data in the DOE National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Program are useful in preparing regional profile and contour maps. Survey-contractor-supplied magnetic anomaly data are subjected to a multiprocess, computer-based procedure which prepares these data for presentation. This procedure is used to produce the following machine plotted maps of National Topographic Map Series quadrangle units at a 1:250,000 scale: (1) profile map of contractor-supplied magnetic anomaly data, (2) profile map of high-cut filtered data with contour levels of each profile marked and annotated on the associated flight track, (3) profile map of critical-point data with contour levels indicated, and (4) contour map of filtered and selected data. These quadrangle maps are supplemented with a range of statistical measures of the data which are useful in quality evaluation.

  4. Phase transformation in multiferroic Bi{sub 5}Ti{sub 3}FeO{sub 15} ceramics by temperature-dependent ellipsometric and Raman spectra: An interband electronic transition evidence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, P. P.; Duan, Z. H.; Xu, L. P.; Zhang, X. L.; Li, Y. W.; Hu, Z. G., E-mail: zghu@ee.ecnu.edu.cn; Chu, J. H. [Key Laboratory of Polar Materials and Devices, Ministry of Education, Department of Electronic Engineering, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200241 (China)

    2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal evolution and an intermediate phase between ferroelectric orthorhombic and paraelectric tetragonal phase of multiferroic Bi{sub 5}Ti{sub 3}FeO{sub 15} ceramic have been investigated by temperature-dependent spectroscopic ellipsometry and Raman scattering. Dielectric functions and interband transitions extracted from the standard critical-point model show two dramatic anomalies in the temperature range of 200–873?K. It was found that the anomalous temperature dependence of electronic transition energies and Raman mode frequencies around 800?K can be ascribed to intermediate phase transformation. Moreover, the disappearance of electronic transition around 3?eV at 590?K is associated with the conductive property.

  5. Hot Pot Contoured Temperature Gradient Map

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lane, Michael

    2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Temperature gradient contours derived from Oski temperature gradient hole program and from earlier published information.

  6. Hot Pot Contoured Temperature Gradient Map

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    Temperature gradient contours derived from Oski temperature gradient hole program and from earlier published information.

  7. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Chaffee County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Chaffee Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Chaffee County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4333432.368072 m Left: 366907.700763 m Right: 452457.816015 m Bottom: 4208271.566715 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  8. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Routt County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Routt Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Routt County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4501071.574000 m Left: 311351.975000 m Right: 359681.975000 m Bottom: 4447251.574000 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  9. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Garfield County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Garfield Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Garfield County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4441550.552290 m Left: 271445.053363 m Right: 359825.053363 m Bottom: 4312490.552290 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  10. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Archuleta County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Archuleta Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Archuleta County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4144691.792023 m Left: 285531.662851 m Right: 348694.182686 m Bottom: 4097005.210304 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  11. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Dolored County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Dolores Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Dolores County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4186234.213315 m Left: 212558.673056 m Right: 232922.811862 m Bottom: 4176781.467043 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  12. Quantum Chemistry at Finite Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liqiang Wei

    2006-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article, we present emerging fields of quantum chemistry at finite temperature. We discuss its recent developments on both experimental and theoretical fronts. First, we describe several experimental investigations related to the temperature effects on the structures, electronic spectra, or bond rupture forces for molecules. These include the analysis of the temperature impact on the pathway shifts for the protein unfolding by atomic force microscopy (AFM), the temperature dependence of the absorption spectra of electrons in solvents, and the temperature influence over the intermolecular forces measured by the AFM. On the theoretical side, we review advancements made by the author in the coming fields of quantum chemistry at finite temperature. Starting from the Bloch equation, we have derived the sets of hierarchy equations for the reduced density operators in both canonical and grand canonical ensembles. They provide a law according to which the reduced density operators vary in temperature for the identical and interacting many-body systems. By taking the independent particle approximation, we have solved the equations in the case of a grand canonical ensemble, and obtained an energy eigenequation for the molecular orbitals at finite temperature. The explicit expression for the temperature-dependent Fock operator is also given. They form a mathematical foundation for the examination of the molecular electronic structures and their interplay with finite temperature. Moreover, we clarify the physics concerning the temperature effects on the electronic structures or processes of the molecules, which is crucial for both theoretical understanding and computation. Finally, ....

  13. Meson properties at finite temperature in a three flavor nonlocal chiral quark model with Polyakov loop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Contrera, G. A. [Physics Department, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av.Libertador 8250, (1429) Buenos Aires (Argentina); CONICET, Rivadavia 1917, 1033 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Dumm, D. Gomez [CONICET, Rivadavia 1917, 1033 Buenos Aires (Argentina); IFLP, Dpto. de Fisica, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, C.C. 67, (1900) La Plata (Argentina); Scoccola, Norberto N. [Physics Department, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av.Libertador 8250, (1429) Buenos Aires (Argentina); CONICET, Rivadavia 1917, 1033 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Universidad Favaloro, Solis 453, (1078) Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the finite temperature behavior of light scalar and pseudoscalar meson properties in the context of a three-flavor nonlocal chiral quark model. The model includes mixing with active strangeness degrees of freedom, and takes care of the effect of gauge interactions by coupling the quarks with the Polyakov loop. We analyze the chiral restoration and deconfinement transitions, as well as the temperature dependence of meson masses, mixing angles and decay constants. The critical temperature is found to be T{sub c{approx_equal}}202 MeV, in better agreement with lattice results than the value recently obtained in the local SU(3) PNJL model. It is seen that above T{sub c} pseudoscalar meson masses get increased, becoming degenerate with the masses of their chiral partners. The temperatures at which this matching occurs depend on the strange quark composition of the corresponding mesons. The topological susceptibility shows a sharp decrease after the chiral transition, signalling the vanishing of the U(1){sub A} anomaly for large temperatures.

  14. Mental retardation, congenital heart defect, cleft palate, short stature, and facial anomalies: A new X-linked multiple congenital anomalies/mental retardation syndrome: Clinical description and molecular studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamel, B.C.J.; Mariman, E.C.M.; Beersum, S.E.C. van; Ropers, H.H. [University Hospital, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Schoonbrood-Lenssen, A.M.J. [Institute for the Mentally Retarded, Echt (Netherlands)

    1994-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on two brothers and their two maternal uncles with severe mental retardation, congenital heart defect, cleft or highly arched palate, short stature and craniofacial anomalies consisting of microcephaly, abnormal ears, bulbous nose, broad nasal bridge, malar hypoplasia, and micro-gnathia. Three of the four patients died at an early age. The mother of the two brothers had an atrial septal defect. She is assumed to be manifesting carrier of a mutant gene, which is expressed in her two sons and two brothers. By multipoint linkage analysis it is found that the most likely location of the responsible gene is the pericentromeric region Xp21.3-q21.3 with DMD and DXS3 as flanking markers. Maximum information is obtained with marker DXS453 (Z = 1.20 at {theta} = 0.0). 24 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  15. High temperature interfacial superconductivity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bozovic, Ivan (Mount Sinai, NY); Logvenov, Gennady (Port Jefferson Station, NY); Gozar, Adrian Mihai (Port Jefferson, NY)

    2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    High-temperature superconductivity confined to nanometer-scale interfaces has been a long standing goal because of potential applications in electronic devices. The spontaneous formation of a superconducting interface in bilayers consisting of an insulator (La.sub.2CuO.sub.4) and a metal (La.sub.1-xSr.sub.xCuO.sub.4), neither of which is superconducting per se, is described. Depending upon the layering sequence of the bilayers, T.sub.c may be either .about.15 K or .about.30 K. This highly robust phenomenon is confined to within 2-3 nm around the interface. After exposing the bilayer to ozone, T.sub.c exceeds 50 K and this enhanced superconductivity is also shown to originate from a 1 to 2 unit cell thick interfacial layer. The results demonstrate that engineering artificial heterostructures provides a novel, unconventional way to fabricate stable, quasi two-dimensional high T.sub.c phases and to significantly enhance superconducting properties in other superconductors. The superconducting interface may be implemented, for example, in SIS tunnel junctions or a SuFET.

  16. Measurement of thermodynamic temperature of high temperature fixed points

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gavrilov, V. R.; Khlevnoy, B. B.; Otryaskin, D. A.; Grigorieva, I. A.; Samoylov, M. L.; Sapritsky, V. I. [All-Russian Research Institute for Optical and Physical Measurements (VNIIOFI), 46 Ozernaya St., Moscow 119361 (Russian Federation)] [All-Russian Research Institute for Optical and Physical Measurements (VNIIOFI), 46 Ozernaya St., Moscow 119361 (Russian Federation)

    2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper is devoted to VNIIOFI's measurements of thermodynamic temperature of the high temperature fixed points Co-C, Pt-C and Re-C within the scope of the international project coordinated by the Consultative Committee for Thermometry working group 5 'Radiation Thermometry'. The melting temperatures of the fixed points were measured by a radiance mode radiation thermometer calibrated against a filter radiometer with known irradiance spectral responsivity via a high temperature black body. This paper describes the facility used for the measurements, the results and estimated uncertainties.

  17. High-temperature Pump Monitoring - High-temperature ESP Monitoring...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Report Detecting Fractures Using Technology at High Temperatures and Depths - Geothermal Ultrasonic Fracture Imager (GUFI); 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report...

  18. Interstitial deletion of 8q21{yields}22 associated with minor anomalies, congenital heart defect, and Dandy-Walker variant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donahue, M.L. [Medical Univ. of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Ryan, R.M. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    1995-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe an infant with a deletion of 8q21{yields}22 who had distinct clinical manifestations including minor facial anomalies, a congenital heart defect, a Dandy-Walker variant, and mild to moderate developmental delay. Her facial characteristics included small, wide-spaced eyes, asymmetric bilateral epicanthal folds, a broad nasal bridge, a {open_quotes}carp-shaped{close_quotes} mouth, micrognathia, and prominent, apparently low-set ears. Three other reports describe children with larger proximal deletions of 8q that include 8q21 and q22. These four children all have similar facial appearance. Of the others reported, one had a congenital heart defect and one had craniosynostosis. This case, in addition to the previously noted three cases, helps in delineating a recognizable syndrome. 12 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Neutron-Proton Mass Difference in Nuclear Matter and in Finite Nuclei and the Nolen-Schiffer Anomaly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulf-G. Meißner; A. M. Rakhimov; A. Wirzba; U. T. Yakhshiev

    2009-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutron-proton mass difference in (isospin asymmetric) nuclear matter and finite nuclei is studied in the framework of a medium-modified Skyrme model. The proposed effective Lagrangian incorporates both the medium influence of the surrounding nuclear environment on the single nucleon properties and an explicit isospin-breaking effect in the mesonic sector. Energy-dependent charged and neutral pion optical potentials in the s- and p-wave channels are included as well. The present approach predicts that the neutron-proton mass difference is mainly dictated by its strong part and that it markedly decreases in neutron matter. Furthermore, the possible interplay between the effective nucleon mass in finite nuclei and the Nolen-Schiffer anomaly is discussed. In particular, we find that a correct description of the properties of mirror nuclei leads to a stringent restriction of possible modifications of the nucleon's effective mass in nuclei.

  20. Microstructural evolution of Fe grown on a (001) Cu film and its implication to the elastic anomaly in metallic superlattices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koike, J.; Nastasi, M.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large softening of the shear modulus has been reported in metallic superlattices composed of insoluble bcc/fcc metals. In an attempt to understand this elastic anomaly, we have studied the microstructure of Fe/Cu bilayers as a function of the Fe thickness with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Analysis of the moire fringes observed in plan-view TEM images revealed that the fcc Fe structure epitaxially grows on the (001) Cu up to a thickness of 2.0 nm. At 2.3 nm. At 2.3 nm, the bcc Fe structure nucleates, accompanying lattice rotation around the growth direction with respect to the underlying fcc structure. As the Fe thickness further increases, the submicron polycrystalline grains formed. Based on these results, the microstructure of the metallic superlattices and its relation to the softening of the shear modulus will be discussed. 22 refs., 2 figs

  1. Fluctuating micro-heterogeneity in water–tert-butyl alcohol mixtures and lambda-type divergence of the mean cluster size with phase transition-like multiple anomalies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banerjee, Saikat; Furtado, Jonathan; Bagchi, Biman, E-mail: bbagchi@sscu.iisc.ernet.in [SSCU, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)] [SSCU, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)

    2014-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Water–tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) binary mixture exhibits a large number of thermodynamic and dynamic anomalies. These anomalies are observed at surprisingly low TBA mole fraction, with x{sub TBA} ? 0.03–0.07. We demonstrate here that the origin of the anomalies lies in the local structural changes that occur due to self-aggregation of TBA molecules. We observe a percolation transition of the TBA molecules at x{sub TBA} ? 0.05. We note that “islands” of TBA clusters form even below this mole fraction, while a large spanning cluster emerges above that mole fraction. At this percolation threshold, we observe a lambda-type divergence in the fluctuation of the size of the largest TBA cluster, reminiscent of a critical point. Alongside, the structure of water is also perturbed, albeit weakly, by the aggregation of TBA molecules. There is a monotonic decrease in the tetrahedral order parameter of water, while the dipole moment correlation shows a weak nonlinearity. Interestingly, water molecules themselves exhibit a reverse percolation transition at higher TBA concentration, x{sub TBA} ? 0.45, where large spanning water clusters now break-up into small clusters. This is accompanied by significant divergence of the fluctuations in the size of largest water cluster. This second transition gives rise to another set of anomalies around. Both the percolation transitions can be regarded as manifestations of Janus effect at small molecular level.

  2. Fluctuating micro-heterogeneity in water - tert-butyl alcohol mixtures and lambda-type divergence of the mean cluster size with phase transition-like multiple anomalies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saikat Banerjee; Jonathan Furtado; Biman Bagchi

    2014-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Water - tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) binary mixture exhibits a large number of thermodynamic and dynamic anomalies. These anomalies are observed at surprisingly low TBA mole fraction, with $x_{\\text{TBA}} \\approx 0.03 - 0.07$. We demonstrate here that the origin of the anomalies lies in the local structural changes that occur due to self-aggregation of TBA molecules. We observe a percolation transition of the TBA molecules at $x_{\\text{TBA}} \\approx 0.05$. We note that "islands" of TBA clusters form even below this mole fraction, while a large spanning cluster emerges above that mole fraction. At this percolation threshold, we observe a lambda-type divergence in the fluctuation of the size of the largest TBA cluster, reminiscent of a critical point. Alongside, the structure of water is also perturbed, albeit weakly, by the aggregation of TBA molecules. There is a monotonic decrease in the tetrahedral order parameter of water, while the dipole moment correlation shows a weak non-linearity. Interestingly, water molecules themselves exhibit a reverse percolation transition at higher TBA concentration, $x_{\\text{TBA}} \\approx 0.45$, where large spanning water clusters now break-up into small clusters. This is accompanied by significant divergence of the fluctuations in the size of largest water cluster. This second transition gives rise to another set of anomalies around. Both the percolation transitions can be regarded as manifestations of Janus effect at small molecular level.

  3. An Integrated Scheme for Anomaly Identification and Automatic Control of Nuclear Power Plants Xin Jin, Robert M. Edwards and Asok Ray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Asok

    An Integrated Scheme for Anomaly Identification and Automatic Control of Nuclear Power Plants Xin.edu INTRODUCTION Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) are complex systems with many variables that require adjustment Jin, Robert M. Edwards and Asok Ray Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania

  4. PHYSICAL AND MINERALOGY CHARACTERISTICS OF THE LUNAR REGOLITH IN THE AREAS OF THE THERMAL ANOMALIES. S. G. Pugacheva, V.V. Shevchenko. Sternberg State Astro-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pugacheva, Svetlana G.

    PHYSICAL AND MINERALOGY CHARACTERISTICS OF THE LUNAR REGOLITH IN THE AREAS OF THE THERMAL ANOMALIES and mineralogy characteristics upper layer of the surface. The analytic model of the lunar thermal field Surveyor I, III, V, VI, VII Microsymposium 38, MS080, 2003 (A4 format) #12;PHYSICAL AND MINERALOGY

  5. Actinide Thermodynamics at Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friese, Judah I.; Rao, Linfeng; Xia, Yuanxian; Bachelor, Paula P.; Tian, Guoxin

    2007-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The postclosure chemical environment in the proposed Yucca Mountain repository is expected to experience elevated temperatures. Predicting migration of actinides is possible if sufficient, reliable thermodynamic data on hydrolysis and complexation are available for these temperatures. Data are scarce and scattered for 25 degrees C, and nonexistent for elevated temperatures. This collaborative project between LBNL and PNNL collects thermodynamic data at elevated temperatures on actinide complexes with inorganic ligands that may be present in Yucca Mountain. The ligands include hydroxide, fluoride, sulfate, phosphate and carbonate. Thermodynamic parameters of complexation, including stability constants, enthalpy, entropy and heat capacity of complexation, are measured with a variety of techniques including solvent extraction, potentiometry, spectrophotometry and calorimetry

  6. Humidity, Temperature, and Voltage (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wohlgemuth, J.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An update is given on the work of the PV Quality Assurance Task Force; Group 3: studying the effects of humidity, temperature, and voltage bias.

  7. High Temperature Processing Symposium 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liley, David

    } High temperature recycling operations } Materials sustainability } New furnace technology (including solar) We look forward to seeing you in February 2014. Dr M Akbar Rhamdhani (Chairman HTPS 2014) Prof

  8. Low Temperature Material Bonding Technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramsey, J. Michael (Knoxville, TN); Foote, Robert S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2000-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of performing a lower temperature bonding technique to bond together two mating pieces of glass includes applying a sodium silicate aqueous solution between the two pieces.

  9. Low temperature material bonding technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramsey, J. Michael (Knoxville, TN); Foote, Robert S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2002-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of performing a lower temperature bonding technique to bond together two mating pieces of glass includes applying a sodium silicate aqueous solution between the two pieces.

  10. Experiment Hazard Class 3 - High Temperatures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Operation * APS Base Low Temperatures * Cryogenic Systems High Temperatures * Electric Furnace * Optical Furnace * Other High Temperature Lasers * Laser, Class 2 * Laser,...

  11. Low temperature irradiation tests on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Sample cool down by He gas loop 10K ­ 20K Fast neutron flux Measured by Ni activation in 2010 1.4xK #12;reactor Cryogenics #12;Al-Cu-Mg He gas temperature near sample 12K Resistance changesLow temperature irradiation tests on stabilizer materials using reactor neutrons at KUR Makoto

  12. Detecting temperature fluctuations at equilibrium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dixit, Purushottam D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gibbs and Boltzmann definitions of temperature agree only in the macroscopic limit. The ambiguity in identifying the equilibrium temperature of a finite sized `small' system exchanging energy with a bath is usually understood as a limitation of conventional statistical mechanics. We interpret this ambiguity as resulting from a stochastically fluctuating temperature coupled with the phase space variables giving rise to a broad temperature distribution. With this ansatz, we develop the equilibrium statistics and dynamics of small systems. Numerical evidence using an analytically tractable model shows that the effects of temperature fluctuations can be detected in equilibrium and dynamical properties of the phase space of the small system. Our theory generalizes statistical mechanics to small systems relevant to biophysics and nanotechnology.

  13. Effect of Gas Turbine Exhaust Temperature, Stack Temperature and Ambient Temperature on Overall Efficiency of Combine Cycle Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    Abstract—The gas turbine exhaust temperature, stack temperature and ambient temperature play a very important role during the predication of the performance of combine cycle power plant. This paper covers parametric analysis of effects of gas turbine exhaust temperature, stack temperature and ambient temperature on the overall efficiency of combine cycle power plant keeping the gas turbine efficiency as well as steam turbine efficiency constant. The results shows that out of three variables i.e. turbine exhaust temperature, stack temperature and ambient temperature, the most dominating factor of increasing the overall efficiency of the combine cycle power plant is the stack temperature.

  14. Shock temperature measurements in ammonia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radousky, H.B.; Mitchell, A.C.; Nellis, W.J.; Ross, M.

    1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Our first shock temperature measurements on a cryogenic target are reported for NH/sub 3/. A new fast optical pyrometer and a cryogenic specimen holder for liquid NH/sub 3/ were developed to measure shock temperatures of 4400 and 3600 K at pressures of 61 and 48 GPa. These conditions correspond to those in the ice layers in Uranus and Neptune. The shock temperature data are in reasonable agreement with an equation of state based on an intermolecular potential derived from NH/sub 3/ Hugoniot data.

  15. A Dynamical Approach to Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hans Henrik Rugh

    1997-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new dynamical approach for measuring the temperature of a Hamiltonian dynamical system in the micro canonical ensemble of thermodynamics. We show that under the hypothesis of ergodicity the temperature can be computed as a time-average of the functional, div(grad H/|grad H|^2), on the energy-surface. Our method not only yields an efficient computational approach for determining the temperature it also provides an intrinsic link between dynamical systems theory and the statistical mechanics of Hamiltonian systems.

  16. Method for measuring surface temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, Gary A. (Los Alamos, NM); Baker, Sheila N. (Los Alamos, NM); McCleskey, T. Mark (Los Alamos, NM)

    2009-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a method for measuring a surface temperature using is a fluorescent temperature sensor or optical thermometer. The sensor includes a solution of 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane within a 1-butyl-1-1-methyl pyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid solvent. The 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane remains unassociated when in the ground state while in solution. When subjected to UV light, an excited state is produced that exists in equilibrium with an excimer. The position of the equilibrium between the two excited states is temperature dependent.

  17. Validation of Noah-simulated Soil Temperature in the North American Land Data Assimilation System Phase 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xia, Youlong; Ek, Michael; Sheffield, Justin; Livneh, Ben; Huang, Maoyi; Wei, Helin; Song, Feng; Luo, Lifeng; Meng, Jesse; Wood, Eric

    2013-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Soil temperature can exhibit considerable memory from weather and climate signals and is among the most important initial conditions in numerical weather and climate models. Consequently, a more accurate long-term land surface soil temperature dataset is needed to improve weather and climate simulation and prediction, and is also important for the simulation of agricultural crop yield and ecological processes. The North-American Land Data Assimilation (NLDAS) Phase 2 (NLDAS-2) has generated 31-years (1979-2009) of simulated hourly soil temperature data with a spatial resolution of 1/8o. This dataset has not been comprehensively evaluated to date. Thus, the ultimate purpose of the present work is to assess Noah-simulated soil temperature for different soil depths and timescales. We used long-term (1979-2001) observed monthly mean soil temperatures from 137 cooperative stations over the United States to evaluate simulated soil temperature for three soil layers (0-10 cm, 10-40 cm, 40-100 cm) for annual and monthly timescales. We used short-term (1997-1999) observed soil temperature from 72 Oklahoma Mesonet stations to validate simulated soil temperatures for three soil layers and for daily and hourly timescales. The results showed that the Noah land surface model (Noah LSM) generally matches observed soil temperature well for different soil layers and timescales. At greater depths, the simulation skill (anomaly correlation) decreased for all time scales. The monthly mean diurnal cycle difference between simulated and observed soil temperature revealed large midnight biases in the cold season due to small downward longwave radiation and issues related to model parameters.

  18. temperature heat pumps applied to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Very high- temperature heat pumps applied to energy efficiency in industry Application June 21th 2012 Energy efficiency : A contribution to environmental protection Kyoto Copenhage Emission, plastics Partnership : EDF R&D Bil

  19. Conducting polymer actuators : temperature effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Del Zio, Michael R. (Michael Robert), 1982-

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to utilize conducting polymer actuators as a viable engineering solution, it is necessary to produce usable levels of force with a reasonable bandwidth. Polypyrrole actuated at temperatures as high as 100 °C ...

  20. High temperature structural insulating material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, W.Y.

    1984-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A high temperature structural insulating material useful as a liner for cylinders of high temperature engines through the favorable combination of high service temperature (above about 800/sup 0/C), low thermal conductivity (below about 0.2 W/m/sup 0/C), and high compressive strength (above about 250 psi). The insulating material is produced by selecting hollow ceramic beads with a softening temperature above about 800/sup 0/C, a diameter within the range of 20-200 ..mu..m, and a wall thickness in the range of about 2 to 4 ..mu..m; compacting the beads and a compatible silicate binder composition under pressure and sintering conditions to provide the desired structural form with the structure having a closed-cell, compact array of bonded beads.

  1. High temperature structural insulating material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Wayne Y. (Munster, IN)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high temperature structural insulating material useful as a liner for cylinders of high temperature engines through the favorable combination of high service temperature (above about 800.degree. C.), low thermal conductivity (below about 0.2 W/m.degree. C.), and high compressive strength (above about 250 psi). The insulating material is produced by selecting hollow ceramic beads with a softening temperature above about 800.degree. C., a diameter within the range of 20-200 .mu.m, and a wall thickness in the range of about 2-4 .mu.m; compacting the beads and a compatible silicate binder composition under pressure and sintering conditions to provide the desired structural form with the structure having a closed-cell, compact array of bonded beads.

  2. Spin-phonon interactions of multiferroic Bi{sub 4}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 12}-BiFeO{sub 3} ceramics: Low-temperature Raman scattering and infrared reflectance spectra investigations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, P. P.; Zhang, X. L.; Chang, P.; Hu, Z. G., E-mail: zghu@ee.ecnu.edu.cn; Bai, W.; Li, Y. W.; Chu, J. H. [Department of Electronic Engineering, Key Laboratory of Polar Materials and Devices, Ministry of Education, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200241 (China)

    2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical phonons of multiferroic Bi{sub 4}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 12}-BiFeO{sub 3} ceramic have been investigated by low temperature Raman scattering and infrared reflectance spectra. Anomalies at about 85?K can be observed from the temperature dependence of the Raman and infrared modes, which arise from spin-phonon interaction during antiferromagnetic to paramagnetic phase transition. It was found that the change of exchange interaction in magnetic phase transition can be induced by Fe-O-Fe octahedral tilting driven from the A-site atoms. Moreover, ferroelectricity-related displacement of Bismuth atoms suggests the coupling of magnetic and ferroelectric orders.

  3. Fuel Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loewe, W.E.

    2001-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for measuring the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity in a heterogeneous nuclear reactor is presented. The method, which is used during normal operation, requires that calibrated control rods be oscillated in a special way at a high reactor power level. The value of the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity is found from the measured flux responses to these oscillations. Application of the method in a Savannah River reactor charged with natural uranium is discussed.

  4. Curie temperature of multiphase nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skomski, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Center for Materials Research and Analysis, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Center for Materials Research and Analysis, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States); Sellmyer, D. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Center for Materials Research and Analysis, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Center for Materials Research and Analysis, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States)

    2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Curie temperature and the local spontaneous magnetization of ferromagnetic nanocomposites are investigated. The macroscopic character of the critical fluctuations responsible for the onset of ferromagnetic order means that there is only one Curie temperature, independent of the number of magnetic phases present. The Curie temperature increases with the grain size and is, in general, larger than predicted from the volume averages of the exchange constants. However, the Curie-temperature enhancement is accompanied by a relative reduction of the spontaneous magnetization. Due to the quadratic dependence of the permanent-magnet energy product on the spontaneous magnetization, this amounts to a deterioration of the magnets performance. The length scale on which an effective intergranular exchange coupling is realized (coupling length) depends on the Curie-temperature difference between the phases and on the spacial distribution of the local interatomic exchange. As a rule, it is of the order of a few interatomic distances; for much bigger grain sizes the structures mimic an interaction-free ensemble of different ferromagnetic materials. This must be compared to the magnetic-anisotropy coupling length, which is of the order of 10 nm. The difference is explained by the nonrelativistic character of the Curie-temperature problem. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  5. The Connection Between the Positron Fraction Anomaly and the Spectral Features in Galactic Cosmic-Ray Hadrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomassetti, N

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent data on Galactic cosmic-ray (CR) leptons and hadrons gave rise to two exciting problems: on the lepton side, the origin of the rise of the CR positron fraction e+/(e- + e+) at ~10 - 300 GeV of energy; on the hadron side, the nature of the spectral hardening observed in CR protons and nuclei at ~TeV energies. The lepton anomaly indicates the existence of a nearby e+/- source. It has been proposed that high-energy positrons can be produced inside nearby supernova remnants (SNRs) via interactions of CR hadrons with the ambient medium. A distinctive prediction of this mechanism is a high-energy rise of the boron-to-carbon ratio, which has not been observed. It also requires old SNRs at work (with ineffective magnetic field amplification and slow shock speed), that cannot account for the CR hadronic spectra observed up to the knee energies (~5 PeV). We propose a new picture where, in addition to such a nearby CR accelerator, the high-energy spectrum of CR hadrons is provided by the large-scale population of...

  6. Experimental Investigation of the Root Cause Mechanism and Effectiveness of Mitigating Actions for Axial Offset Anomaly in Pressurized Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Said Abdel-Khalik

    2005-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Axial offset anomaly (AOA) in pressurized water reactors refers to the presence of a significantly larger measured negative axial offset deviation than predicted by core design calculations. The neutron flux depression in the upper half of high-power rods experiencing significant subcooled boiling is believed to be caused by the concentration of boron species within the crud layer formed on the cladding surface. Recent investigations of the root-cause mechanism for AOA [1,2] suggest that boron build-up on the fuel is caused by precipitation of lithium metaborate (LiBO2) within the crud in regions of subcooled boiling. Indirect evidence in support of this hypothesis was inferred from operating experience at Callaway, where lithium return and hide-out were, respectively, observed following power reductions and power increases when AOA was present. However, direct evidence of lithium metaborate precipitation within the crud has, heretofore, not been shown because of its retrograde solubility. To this end, this investigation has been undertaken in order to directly verify or refute the proposed root-cause mechanism of AOA, and examine the effectiveness of possible mitigating actions to limit its impact in high power PWR cores.

  7. Low to moderate temperature nanolaminate heater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eckels, J. Del (Livermore, CA); Nunes, Peter J. (Danville, CA); Simpson, Randall L. (Livermore, CA); Hau-Riege, Stefan (Fremont, CA); Walton, Chris (Oakland, CA); Carter, J. Chance (Livermore, CA); Reynolds, John G. (San Ramon, CA)

    2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A low to moderate temperature heat source comprising a high temperature energy source modified to output low to moderate temperatures wherein the high temperature energy source modified to output low to moderate temperatures is positioned between two thin pieces to form a close contact sheath. In one embodiment the high temperature energy source modified to output low to moderate temperatures is a nanolaminate multilayer foil of reactive materials that produces a heating level of less than 200.degree. C.

  8. High temperature thermometric phosphors for use in a temperature sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allison, Stephen W. (Knoxville, TN); Cates, Michael R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Boatner, Lynn A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Gillies, George T. (Earlysville, VA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high temperature phosphor consists essentially of a material having the general formula LuPO.sub.4 :Dy.sub.(x),Eu.sub.(y), wherein: 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.20 wt % and 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.20 wt %. The high temperature phosphor is in contact with an article whose temperature is to be determined. The article having the phosphor in contact with it is placed in the environment for which the temperature of the article is to be determined. The phosphor is excited by a laser causing the phosphor to fluoresce. The emission from the phosphor is optically focused into a beam-splitting mirror which separates the emission into two separate emissions, the emission caused by the dysprosium dopant and the emission caused by the europium dopent. The separated emissions are optically filtered and the intensities of the emission are detected and measured. The ratio of the intensity of each emission is determined and the temperature of the article is calculated from the ratio of the intensities of the separate emissions.

  9. THE TEMPERATURES OF RED SUPERGIANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davies, Ben [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Egerton Wharf, Birkenhead CH41 1LD (United Kingdom)] [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Egerton Wharf, Birkenhead CH41 1LD (United Kingdom); Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Gazak, Zach [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)] [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Plez, Bertrand [Laboratoire Univers et Particules de Montpellier, Universite Montpellier 2, CNRS, F-34095 Montpellier (France)] [Laboratoire Univers et Particules de Montpellier, Universite Montpellier 2, CNRS, F-34095 Montpellier (France); Trager, Scott [Kapteyn Institute, University of Groningen, P.O. Box 800, 9700-AV Groningen (Netherlands)] [Kapteyn Institute, University of Groningen, P.O. Box 800, 9700-AV Groningen (Netherlands); Lancon, Ariane [Observatoire Astronomique and CNRS UMR 7550, Universite de Strasbourg, F-67000 Strasbourg (France)] [Observatoire Astronomique and CNRS UMR 7550, Universite de Strasbourg, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Bergemann, Maria [Max-Planck-Institute for Astrophysics, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85741 Garching (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institute for Astrophysics, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Evans, Chris [UK Astronomy Technology Centre, Royal Observatory Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom)] [UK Astronomy Technology Centre, Royal Observatory Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Chiavassa, Andrea [CNRS Laboratoire Lagrange, Universite de Nice Sophia-Antipolis, Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, BP 4229, F-06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France)] [CNRS Laboratoire Lagrange, Universite de Nice Sophia-Antipolis, Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, BP 4229, F-06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France)

    2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a re-appraisal of the temperatures of red supergiants (RSGs) using their optical and near-infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs). We have obtained data of a sample of RSGs in the Magellanic Clouds using VLT+XSHOOTER, and we fit MARCS model atmospheres to different regions of the spectra, deriving effective temperatures for each star from (1) the TiO bands, (2) line-free continuum regions of the SEDs, and (3) the integrated fluxes. We show that the temperatures derived from fits to the TiO bands are systematically lower than the other two methods by several hundred kelvin. The TiO fits also dramatically overpredict the flux in the near-IR, and imply extinctions which are anomalously low compared to neighboring stars. In contrast, the SED temperatures provide good fits to the fluxes at all wavelengths other than the TiO bands, are in agreement with the temperatures from the flux integration method, and imply extinctions consistent with nearby stars. After considering a number of ways to reconcile this discrepancy, we conclude that three-dimensional effects (i.e., granulation) are the most likely cause, as they affect the temperature structure in the upper layers where the TiO lines form. The continuum, however, which forms at much deeper layers, is apparently more robust to such effects. We therefore conclude that RSG temperatures are much warmer than previously thought. We discuss the implications of this result for stellar evolution and supernova progenitors, and provide relations to determine the bolometric luminosities of RSGs from single-band photometry.

  10. Comment on a recent attempt to explain the `GSI anomaly' by initial-state e.m. spin-rotation coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avraham Gal

    2014-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A recently proposed solution of the `GSI anomaly' by spin precession of the decaying heavy ions in the magnetic field that controls their circular motion at the GSI storage ring [G. Lambiase, G. Papini, G. Scarpetta, PLB 718 (2013) 998, Ann. Phys. 332 (2013) 143] is dubious: the uncertainty in the computed electron-capture decay-rate modulation frequency is at least of order 10E(7) Hz, by far exceeding the 1 Hz modulation frequency reported in the GSI experiment.

  11. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Alamosa and Saguache Counties, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Alamosa Saguache Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Alamosa and Saguache Counties identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4217727.601630 m Left: 394390.400264 m Right: 460179.841813 m Bottom: 4156258.036086 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  12. Temperature & Nuclear Fusion 4 October 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Militzer, Burkhard

    Temperature & Nuclear Fusion 4 October 2011 Goals · Review temperature in stars · Practice using the important energy scales for nuclear fusion Temperature 1. For each relation we regularly use in class temperature. #12;temperature & nuclear fusion 2 Nuclear Fusion 2. There are a few different energy scales

  13. Thermal disconnect for high-temperature batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jungst, Rudolph George (Albuquerque, NM); Armijo, James Rudolph (Albuquerque, NM); Frear, Darrel Richard (Austin, TX)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new type of high temperature thermal disconnect has been developed to protect electrical and mechanical equipment from damage caused by operation at extreme temperatures. These thermal disconnects allow continuous operation at temperatures ranging from 250.degree. C. to 450.degree. C., while rapidly terminating operation at temperatures 50.degree. C. to 150.degree. C. higher than the continuous operating temperature.

  14. Single-Duct Constant Air Volume System Supply Air Temperature Reset: Using Return Air Temperature or Outside Air Temperature?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, G.; Turner, W. D.; Claridge, D.; Liu, M.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The supply air temperature set point for a singleduct constant air volume air handling unit (AHU) system is often reset based on either return air temperature or outside air temperature in order to reduce simultaneous cooling and heating energy...

  15. Finite Temperature Closed Superstring Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyamoli Chaudhuri

    2005-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We find that the gas of IIA strings undergoes a phase transition into a gas of IIB strings at the self-dual temperature. A gas of free heterotic strings undergoes a Kosterlitz-Thouless duality transition with positive free energy and positive specific heat but vanishing internal energy at criticality. We examine the consequences of requiring a tachyon-free thermal string spectrum. We show that in the absence of Ramond-Ramond fluxes the IIA and IIB string ensembles are thermodynamically ill-defined. The 10D heterotic superstrings have nonabelian gauge fields and in the presence of a temperature dependent Wilson line background are found to share a stable and tachyon-free ground state at all temperatures starting from zero with gauge group SO(16)xSO(16). The internal energy of the heterotic string is a monotonically increasing function of temperature with a stable and supersymmetric zero temperature limit. Our results point to the necessity of gauge fields in a viable weakly coupled superstring theory. Note Added (Sep 2005).

  16. Mechanical instability at finite temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiaoming Mao; Anton Souslov; Carlos I. Mendoza; T. C. Lubensky

    2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Many physical systems including lattices near structural phase transitions, glasses, jammed solids, and bio-polymer gels have coordination numbers that place them at the edge of mechanical instability. Their properties are determined by an interplay between soft mechanical modes and thermal fluctuations. In this paper we investigate a simple square-lattice model with a $\\phi^4$ potential between next-nearest-neighbor sites whose quadratic coefficient $\\kappa$ can be tuned from positive negative. We show that its zero-temperature ground state for $\\kappa power-law behavior of the shear modulus as a function of temperature. We expect our study to provide a general framework for the study of finite-temperature mechanical and phase behavior of other systems with a large number of floppy modes.

  17. High temperature Seebeck coefficient metrology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, J. [Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Tritt, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634 (United States); Uher, C. [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an overview of the challenges and practices of thermoelectric metrology on bulk materials at high temperature (300 to 1300 K). The Seebeck coefficient, when combined with thermal and electrical conductivity, is an essential property measurement for evaluating the potential performance of novel thermoelectric materials. However, there is some question as to which measurement technique(s) provides the most accurate determination of the Seebeck coefficient at high temperature. This has led to the implementation of nonideal practices that have further complicated the confirmation of reported high ZT materials. To ensure meaningful interlaboratory comparison of data, thermoelectric measurements must be reliable, accurate, and consistent. This article will summarize and compare the relevant measurement techniques and apparatus designs required to effectively manage uncertainty, while also providing a reference resource of previous advances in high temperature thermoelectric metrology.

  18. High temperature Seebeck coefficient metrology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, J.; Tritt, T.; Uher, Ctirad

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an overview of the challenges and practices of thermoelectric metrology on bulk materials at high temperature (300 to 1300 K). The Seebeck coefficient, when combined with thermal and electrical conductivity, is an essential propertymeasurement for evaluating the potential performance of novel thermoelectricmaterials. However, there is some question as to which measurement technique(s) provides the most accurate determination of the Seebeck coefficient at high temperature. This has led to the implementation of nonideal practices that have further complicated the confirmation of reported high ZT materials. To ensure meaningful interlaboratory comparison of data, thermoelectricmeasurements must be reliable, accurate, and consistent. This article will summarize and compare the relevant measurement techniques and apparatus designs required to effectively manage uncertainty, while also providing a reference resource of previous advances in high temperature thermoelectric metrology.

  19. Integrated Emissivity And Temperature Measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Poulsen, Peter (Livermore, CA)

    2005-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-channel spectrometer and a light source are used to measure both the emitted and the reflected light from a surface which is at an elevated temperature relative to its environment. In a first method, the temperature of the surface and emissivity in each wavelength is calculated from a knowledge of the spectrum and the measurement of the incident and reflected light. In the second method, the reflected light is measured from a reference surface having a known reflectivity and the same geometry as the surface of interest and the emitted and the reflected light are measured for the surface of interest. These measurements permit the computation of the emissivity in each channel of the spectrometer and the temperature of the surface of interest.

  20. Temperature Resistant Optimal Ratchet Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cesar Manchein; Alan Celestino; Marcus W Beims

    2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Stable periodic structures containing optimal ratchet transport, recently found in the parameter space dissipation versus ratchet parameter [PRL 106, 234101 (2011)], are shown to be resistant to reasonable temperatures, reinforcing the expectation that they are essential to explain the optimal ratchet transport in nature. Critical temperatures for their destruction, valid from the overdamping to close to the conservative limits, are obtained numerically and shown to be connected to the current efficiency, given here analytically. Results are demonstrated for a discrete ratchet model and generalized to the Langevin equation with an additional external oscillating force.

  1. Crystal face temperature determination means

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nason, D.O.; Burger, A.

    1994-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An optically transparent furnace having a detection apparatus with a pedestal enclosed in an evacuated ampule for growing a crystal thereon is disclosed. Temperature differential is provided by a source heater, a base heater and a cold finger such that material migrates from a polycrystalline source material to grow the crystal. A quartz halogen lamp projects a collimated beam onto the crystal and a reflected beam is analyzed by a double monochromator and photomultiplier detection spectrometer and the detected peak position in the reflected energy spectrum of the reflected beam is interpreted to determine surface temperature of the crystal. 3 figs.

  2. High temperature superconductor current leads

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, J.R.; Poeppel, R.B.

    1995-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrical lead is disclosed having one end for connection to an apparatus in a cryogenic environment and the other end for connection to an apparatus outside the cryogenic environment. The electrical lead includes a high temperature superconductor wire and an electrically conductive material distributed therein, where the conductive material is present at the one end of the lead at a concentration in the range of from 0 to about 3% by volume, and at the other end of the lead at a concentration of less than about 20% by volume. Various embodiments are shown for groups of high temperature superconductor wires and sheaths. 9 figs.

  3. RFID tag antenna based temperature sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhattacharyya, Rahul

    Temperature monitoring is important in a number of fields, particularly cold supply chain applications. Most commercial wireless temperature sensors consist of transceivers, memory and batteries to maintain a temperature ...

  4. High-Temperature Thermoelectric Materials Characterization for...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    High-Temperature Thermoelectric Materials Characterization for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery: Success Stories from the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program...

  5. High Temperature Thermoelectric Materials Characterization for...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    High Temperature Thermoelectric Materials Characterization for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery: Success Stories from the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program...

  6. Acid Doped Membranes for High Temperature PEMFC

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation on Acid Doped Membranes for High Temperature PEMFC to the High Temperature Membrane Working Group, May 25, 2004 in Philadelphia, PA.

  7. Nanostructured High Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion for Efficient Waste Heat Recovery Nanostructured High Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion for Efficient Waste...

  8. Susanville District Heating District Heating Low Temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Susanville District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Susanville District Heating District Heating Low Temperature...

  9. Litchfield Correctional Center District Heating Low Temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Correctional Center District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Litchfield Correctional Center District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

  10. Low-temperature magnetic refrigerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barclay, J.A.

    1983-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to magnetic refrigeration and more particularly to low temperature refrigeration between about 4 and about 20 K, with an apparatus and method utilizing a belt of magnetic material passed in and out of a magnetic field with heat exchangers within and outside the field operably disposed to accomplish refrigeration.

  11. 3, 771789, 2007 temperatures and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    cooling and the onset of North American glaciation P. Huybers1 and P. Molnar2 1 Department of Earth that gradual cooling in the eastern tropical Pacific led to cooling of North America and the initiation affects North American temperature and ice-ablation. Assuming that the modern relationship holds5 over

  12. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boyd, Gary L. (Tempe, AZ)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high temperature turbine engine includes a rotor portion having axially stacked adjacent ceramic rotor parts. A ceramic/ceramic joint structure transmits torque between the rotor parts while maintaining coaxial alignment and axially spaced mutually parallel relation thereof despite thermal and centrifugal cycling.

  13. High temperature lightweight foamed cements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugama, Toshifumi.

    1989-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Cement slurries are disclosed which are suitable for use in geothermal wells since they can withstand high temperatures and high pressures. The formulation consists of cement, silica flour, water, a retarder, a foaming agent, a foam stabilizer, and a reinforcing agent. A process for producing these cements is also disclosed. 3 figs.

  14. High temperature synthetic cement retarder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eoff, L.S.; Buster, D.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A synthetic cement retarder which provides excellent retardation and compressive strength development has been synthesized. The response properties and temperature ranges of the synthetic retarder far exceed those of commonly used retarders such as lignosulfonates. The chemical nature of the new retarder is discussed and compared to another synthetic retarder.

  15. High temperature lightweight foamed cements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugama, Toshifumi (Mastic Beach, NY)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cement slurries are disclosed which are suitable for use in geothermal wells since they can withstand high temperatures and high pressures. The formulation consists of cement, silica flour, water, a retarder, a foaming agent, a foam stabilizer, and a reinforcing agent. A process for producing these cements is also disclosed.

  16. HIGH TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, R.C.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on the Cerro P r i e t o Geothermal F i e l d , Mexicali,e C e r r o P r i e t o Geothermal F i e l d , Baja C a l i1979 HIGH TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING R.

  17. Novel room temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, Amita

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Today's information world, bits of data are processed by semiconductor chips, and stored in the magnetic disk drives. But tomorrow's information technology may see magnetism (spin) and semiconductivity (charge) combined in one 'spintronic' device that exploits both charge and 'spin' to carry data (the best of two worlds). Spintronic devices such as spin valve transistors, spin light emitting diodes, non-volatile memory, logic devices, optical isolators and ultra-fast optical switches are some of the areas of interest for introducing the ferromagnetic properties at room temperature in a semiconductor to make it multifunctional. The potential advantages of such spintronic devices will be higher speed, greater efficiency, and better stability at a reduced power consumption. This Thesis contains two main topics: In-depth understanding of magnetism in Mn doped ZnO, and our search and identification of at least six new above room temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors. Both complex doped ZnO based new materials, as well as a number of nonoxides like phosphides, and sulfides suitably doped with Mn or Cu are shown to give rise to ferromagnetism above room temperature. Some of the highlights of this work are discovery of room temperature ferromagnetism in: (1) ZnO:Mn (paper in Nature Materials, Oct issue, 2003); (2) ZnO doped with Cu (containing no magnetic elements in it); (3) GaP doped with Cu (again containing no magnetic elements in it); (4) Enhancement of Magnetization by Cu co-doping in ZnO:Mn; (5) CdS doped with Mn, and a few others not reported in this thesis. We discuss in detail the first observation of ferromagnetism above room temperature in the form of powder, bulk pellets, in 2-3 mu-m thick transparent pulsed laser deposited films of the Mn (<4 at. percent) doped ZnO. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) spectra recorded from 2 to 200nm areas showed homogeneous distribution of Mn substituting for Zn a 2+ state in the ZnO lattice. Ferromagnetic Resonance (FMR) technique is used to confirm the existence of ferromagnetic ordering at temperatures as high as 425K. The ab initio calculations were found to be consistent with the observation of ferromagnetism arising from fully polarized Mn 2+ state. The key to observed room temperature ferromagnetism in this system is the low temperature processing, which prevents formation of clusters, secondary phases and the host ZnO from becoming n-type. The electronic structure of the same Mn doped ZnO thin films studied using XAS, XES and RIXS, revealed a strong hybridization between Mn 3d and O 2p states, which is an important characteristic of a Dilute magnetic Semiconductor (DMS). It is shown that the various processing conditions like sintering temperature, dopant concentration and the properties of precursors used for making of DMS have a great influence on the final properties. Use of various experimental techniques to verify the physical properties, and to understand the mechanism involved to give rise to ferromagnetism is presented. Methods to improve the magnetic moment in Mn doped ZnO are also described. New promising DMS materials (such as Cu doped ZnO are explored). The demonstrated new capability to fabricate powder, pellets, and thin films of room temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors thus makes possible the realization of a wide range of complex elements for a variety of new multifunctional phenomena related to Spintronic devices as well as magneto-optic components.

  18. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Alamosa and Saguache Counties, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Alamosa Saguache Edition: First Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Alamosa and Saguache Counties identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4217727.601630 m Left: 394390.400264 m Right: 460179.841813 m Bottom: 4156258.036086 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  19. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Archuleta County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Warm Modeled Temperature Archuleta Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Archuleta County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature between 1? and 2? were considered ASTER modeled warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies). Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4144825.235807 m Left: 285446.256851 m Right: 350577.338852 m Bottom: 4096962.250137 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  20. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Garfield County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Warm Modeled Temperature Garfield Edition: First Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Garfield County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature between 1? and 2? were considered ASTER modeled warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4442180.552290 m Left: 268655.053363 m Right: 359915.053363 m Bottom: 4312490.552290 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  1. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Dolores County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Dolores Edition: First Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Dolores County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4186234.213315 m Left: 212558.673056 m Right: 232922.811862 m Bottom: 4176781.467043 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  2. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Chaffee County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Chaffee Edition: First Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Chaffee County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4333432.368072 m Left: 366907.700763 m Right: 452457.816015 m Bottom: 4208271.566715 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  3. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Routt County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Warm Modeled Temperature Routt Edition: First Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Routt County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature between 1? and 2? were considered ASTER modeled warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4501071.574000 m Left: 311351.975000 m Right: 359411.975000 m Bottom: 4447521.574000 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  4. AN ELECTRICAL OXYGEN-TEMPERATURE METER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    426 AN ELECTRICAL OXYGEN-TEMPERATURE METER FOR FISHERY BIOLOGISTS SEP 2 1196: vuUiJo HIM. . SPECIAL and Wildlife, Daniel H. Janzen, Director AN ELECTRICAL OXYGEN-TEMPERATURE METER FOR FISHERY BIOLOGISTS -temperature meter 11 Maintenance and trouble -shooting 12 #12;AN ELECTRICAL OXYGEN-TEMPERATURE METER

  5. Temperature & Nuclear Fusion 4 October 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Militzer, Burkhard

    Temperature & Nuclear Fusion 4 October 2011 Goals · Review temperature in stars · Practice using the important energy scales for nuclear fusion Temperature 1. For each relation we regularly use in class-Boltzmann equation: L = 4R2 T4 . (d) In fusion energy generation: T . #12;temperature & nuclear fusion 2 Nuclear

  6. High Temperature Heat Exchanger Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony E. Hechanova, Ph.D.

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The UNLV Research Foundation assembled a research consortium for high temperature heat exchanger design and materials compatibility and performance comprised of university and private industry partners under the auspices of the US DOE-NE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative in October 2003. The objectives of the consortium were to conduct investigations of candidate materials for high temperature heat exchanger componets in hydrogen production processes and design and perform prototypical testing of heat exchangers. The initial research of the consortium focused on the intermediate heat exchanger (located between the nuclear reactor and hydrogen production plan) and the components for the hydrogen iodine decomposition process and sulfuric acid decomposition process. These heat exchanger components were deemed the most challenging from a materials performance and compatibility perspective

  7. Battery system with temperature sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, Steven J; Trester, Dale B

    2014-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A battery system includes a platform having an aperture formed therethrough, a flexible member having a generally planar configuration and extending across the aperture, wherein a portion of the flexible member is coextensive with the aperture, a cell provided adjacent the platform, and a sensor coupled to the flexible member and positioned proximate the cell. The sensor is configured to detect a temperature of the cell.

  8. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carruthers, William D. (Mesa, AZ); Boyd, Gary L. (Tempe, AZ)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high temperature ceramic/metallic turbine engine includes a metallic housing which journals a rotor member of the turbine engine. A ceramic disk-like shroud portion of the engine is supported on the metallic housing portion and maintains a close running clearance with the rotor member. A ceramic spacer assembly maintains the close running clearance of the shroud portion and rotor member despite differential thermal movements between the shroud portion and metallic housing portion.

  9. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carruthers, William D. (Mesa, AZ); Boyd, Gary L. (Tempe, AZ)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high temperature ceramic/metallic turbine engine includes a metallic housing which journals a rotor member of the turbine engine. A ceramic disk-like shroud portion of the engine is supported on the metallic housing portion and maintains a close running clearance with the rotor member. A ceramic spacer assembly maintains the close running clearance of the shroud portion and rotor member despite differential thermal movements between the shroud portion and metallic housing portion.

  10. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carruthers, William D. (Mesa, AZ); Boyd, Gary L. (Tempe, AZ)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high temperature ceramic/metallic turbine engine includes a metallic housing which journals a rotor member of the turbine engine. A ceramic disk-like shroud portion of the engine is supported on the metallic housing portion and maintains a close running clearance with the rotor member. A ceramic spacer assembly maintains the close running clearance of the shroud portion and rotor member despite differential thermal movements between the shroud portion and metallic housing portion.

  11. Variable temperature semiconductor film deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, X.; Sheldon, P.

    1998-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of depositing a semiconductor material on a substrate is disclosed. The method sequentially comprises (a) providing the semiconductor material in a depositable state such as a vapor for deposition on the substrate; (b) depositing the semiconductor material on the substrate while heating the substrate to a first temperature sufficient to cause the semiconductor material to form a first film layer having a first grain size; (c) continually depositing the semiconductor material on the substrate while cooling the substrate to a second temperature sufficient to cause the semiconductor material to form a second film layer deposited on the first film layer and having a second grain size smaller than the first grain size; and (d) raising the substrate temperature, while either continuing or not continuing to deposit semiconductor material to form a third film layer, to thereby anneal the film layers into a single layer having favorable efficiency characteristics in photovoltaic applications. A preferred semiconductor material is cadmium telluride deposited on a glass/tin oxide substrate already having thereon a film layer of cadmium sulfide.

  12. NSTX High Temperature Sensor Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B.McCormack; H.W. Kugel; P. Goranson; R. Kaita; et al

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design of the more than 300 in-vessel sensor systems for the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) has encountered several challenging fusion reactor diagnostic issues involving high temperatures and space constraints. This has resulted in unique miniature, high temperature in-vessel sensor systems mounted in small spaces behind plasma facing armor tiles, and they are prototypical of possible high power reactor first-wall applications. In the Center Stack, Divertor, Passive Plate, and vessel wall regions, the small magnetic sensors, large magnetic sensors, flux loops, Rogowski Coils, thermocouples, and Langmuir Probes are qualified for 600 degrees C operation. This rating will accommodate both peak rear-face graphite tile temperatures during operations and the 350 degrees C bake-out conditions. Similar sensor systems including flux loops, on other vacuum vessel regions are qualified for 350 degrees C operation. Cabling from the sensors embedded in the graphite tiles follows narrow routes to exit the vessel. The detailed sensor design and installation methods of these diagnostic systems developed for high-powered ST operation are discussed.

  13. Quantifying Temperature Effects on Fall Chinook Salmon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jager, Yetta [ORNL

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The motivation for this study was to recommend relationships for use in a model of San Joaquin fall Chinook salmon. This report reviews literature pertaining to relationships between water temperature and fall Chinook salmon. The report is organized into three sections that deal with temperature effects on development and timing of freshwater life stages, temperature effects on incubation survival for eggs and alevin, and temperature effects on juvenile survival. Recommendations are made for modeling temperature influences for all three life stages.

  14. New Measurements of the Solubility of Metal Oxides at High Temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G.A. Palmer; P. Benezeth; D.J. Wesolowski; S.A. Wood; C. Xiao

    2000-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of high temperature solubility studies at ORNL are presented in which mainly direct pH measurements were made of aqueous solutions in contact with the crystalline solid phases: Al(OH){sub 3}, AlOOH, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, Mg(OH){sub 2}, Nd(OH){sub 3}, and ZnO. Examples are highlighted of specific phenomena such as: the kinetics of gibbsite and boehmite dissolution and precipitation; the appearance of metastable equilibria in the dissolution of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}; the extremely rapid precipitation of crystalline brucite, Mg(OH){sub 2}; and anomalies in the apparent solubility profiles of AlO(OH) and ZnO. General trends associated with the effects of temperature and ionic strength are mentioned. Some of the potentiometric investigations were augmented by conventional batch [AlO(OH) and ZnO], and flow-through column (ZnO) experiments. In the additional case of ZnCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}, the extremely low solubility of this spinel permitted application of only the latter technique and these results are discussed in terms of the measured chromium levels that resulted from incongruent dissolution.

  15. Method and apparatus for optical temperature measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Rourke, P.E.; Livingston, R.R.; Prather, W.S.

    1994-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A temperature probe and a method for using said probe for temperature measurements based on changes in light absorption by the probe are disclosed. The probe comprises a first and a second optical fiber that carry light to and from the probe, and a temperature sensor material, the absorbance of which changes with temperature, through which the light is directed. Light is directed through the first optical fiber, passes through the temperature sensor material, and is transmitted by a second optical fiber from the material to a detector. Temperature-dependent and temperature-independent factors are derived from measurements of the transmitted light intensity. For each sensor material, the temperature T is a function of the ratio, R, of these factors. The temperature function f(R) is found by applying standard data analysis techniques to plots of T versus R at a series of known temperatures. For a sensor having a known temperature function f(R) and known characteristic and temperature-dependent factors, the temperature can be computed from a measurement of R. Suitable sensor materials include neodymium-doped borosilicate glass, accurate to [+-]0.5 C over an operating temperature range of about [minus]196 C to 400 C; and a mixture of D[sub 2]O and H[sub 2]O, accurate to [+-]0.1 C over an operating range of about 5 C to 90 C. 13 figs.

  16. Method and apparatus for optical temperature measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Rourke, Patrick E. (Martinez, GA); Livingston, Ronald R. (Aiken, SC); Prather, William S. (Augusta, GA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A temperature probe and a method for using said probe for temperature measurements based on changes in light absorption by the probe. The probe comprises a first and a second optical fiber that carry light to and from the probe, and a temperature sensor material, the absorbance of which changes with temperature, through which the light is directed. Light is directed through the first optical fiber, passes through the temperature sensor material, and is transmitted by a second optical fiber from the material to a detector. Temperature-dependent and temperature-independent factors are derived from measurements of the transmitted light intensity. For each sensor material, the temperature T is a function of the ratio, R, of these factors. The temperature function f(R) is found by applying standard data analysis techniques to plots of T versus R at a series of known temperatures. For a sensor having a known temperature function f(R) and known characteristic and temperature-dependent factors, the temperature can be computed from a measurement of R. Suitable sensor materials include neodymium-doped boresilicate glass, accurate to .+-.0.5.degree. C. over an operating temperature range of about -196.degree. C. to 400.degree. C.; and a mixture of D.sub.2 O and H.sub.2 O, accurate to .+-.0.1.degree. C. over an operating range of about 5.degree. C. to 90.degree. C.

  17. University of Illinois Temperature Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. L. Davis; D. L. Knudson; J. L. Rempe; B. M. Chase

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes background information and presents results related to temperature measurements in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) University of Illinois Project 29609 irradiation. The objective of this test was to assess the radiation performance of ferritic alloys for advanced reactor applications. The FeCr-based alloy system is considered the lead alloy system for a variety of advanced reactor components and applications. Irradiations of FeCr alloy samples were performed using the Hydraulic Shuttle Irradiation System (HSIS) in the B-7 position and in a static capsule in the A-11 position of the ATR.

  18. Magnetic insulation at finite temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goedecke, G. H.; Davis, Brian T.; Chen, Chiping [Physics Department, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, New Mexico 88003 and Raytheon Missile Systems, 1151 E. Hermans Road, Tucson, Arizona 85706 (United States); Intense Beam Theoretical Research Group, Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 and Raytheon Missile Systems, 1151 E. Hermans Road, Tucson, Arizona 85706 (United States)

    2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A finite-temperature non-neutral plasma (FTNNP) theory of magnetically insulated (MI) electron flows in crossed-field vacuum devices is developed and applied in planar geometry. It is shown that, in contrast to the single type of MI flow predicted by traditional cold-plasma treatments, the nonlinear FTNNP equations admit five types of steady flow, of which three types are MI flows, including flows in which the electric field and/or the tangential velocity at the cathode may be zero or nonzero. It is also shown that finite-temperature Vlasov-Poisson treatments yield solutions for electron number densities and electrostatic potentials that are a subset of the FTNNP solutions. The algorithms that are used to solve the FTNNP equations numerically are discussed, and the numerical results are presented for several examples of the three types of MI flow. Results include prediction of the existence, boundaries, number density profiles, and other properties of sheaths of electrons in the anode-cathode gap.

  19. LOW TEMPERATURE CATHODE SUPPORTED ELECTROLYTES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harlan U. Anderson; Fatih Dogan; Vladimir Petrovsky

    2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report represents a summary of the work carried out on this project which started October 1999 and ended March 2003. A list of the publications resulting from the work are contained in Appendix A. The most significant achievements are: (1) Dense nanocrystalline zirconia and ceria films were obtained at temperatures < 400 C. (2) Nanocrystalline films of both ceria and zirconia were characterized. (3) We showed that under anodic conditions 0.5 to 1 micron thick nanocrystalline films of Sc doped zirconia have sufficient electronic conductivity to prevent them from being useful as an electrolyte. (4) We have developed a process by which dense 0.5 to 5 micron thick dense films of either YSZ or ceria can be deposited on sintered porous substrates which serve as either the cathode or anode at temperatures as low as 400 C. (5) The program has provided the research to produce two PhD thesis for students, one is now working in the solid oxide fuel cell field. (6) The results of the research have resulted in 69 papers published, 3 papers submitted or being prepared for publication, 50 oral presentations and 3 patent disclosures.

  20. Liquid-liquid phase transition model incorporating evidence for ferroelectric state near the lambda-point anomaly in supercooled water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter O. Fedichev; Leonid I. Menshikov

    2012-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a unified model combining the first-order liquid-liquid and the second-order ferroelectric phase transitions models and explaining various features of the $\\lambda$-point of liquid water within a single theoretical framework. It becomes clear within the proposed model that not only does the long-range dipole-dipole interaction of water molecules yield a large value of dielectric constant $\\epsilon$ at room temperatures, our analysis shows that the large dipole moment of the water molecules also leads to a ferroelectric phase transition at a temperature close to the lambda-point. Our more refined model suggests that the phase transition occurs only in the low density component of the liquid and is the origin of the singularity of the dielectric constant recently observed in experiments with supercooled liquid water at temperature T~233K. This combined model agrees well with nearly every available set of experiments and explains most of the well-known and even recently obtained results of MD simulations.

  1. Collaborative Research: Process-Resolving Decomposition of the Global Temperature Response to Modes of Low Frequency Variability in a Changing Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Yi

    2014-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE-GTRC-05596 11/24/2104 Collaborative Research: Process-Resolving Decomposition of the Global Temperature Response to Modes of Low Frequency Variability in a Changing Climate PI: Dr. Yi Deng (PI) School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Georgia Institute of Technology 404-385-1821, yi.deng@eas.gatech.edu El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and Annular Modes (AMs) represent respectively the most important modes of low frequency variability in the tropical and extratropical circulations. The projection of future changes in the ENSO and AM variability, however, remains highly uncertain with the state-of-the-science climate models. This project conducted a process-resolving, quantitative evaluations of the ENSO and AM variability in the modern reanalysis observations and in climate model simulations. The goal is to identify and understand the sources of uncertainty and biases in models’ representation of ENSO and AM variability. Using a feedback analysis method originally formulated by one of the collaborative PIs, we partitioned the 3D atmospheric temperature anomalies and surface temperature anomalies associated with ENSO and AM variability into components linked to 1) radiation-related thermodynamic processes such as cloud and water vapor feedbacks, 2) local dynamical processes including convection and turbulent/diffusive energy transfer and 3) non-local dynamical processes such as the horizontal energy transport in the oceans and atmosphere. In the past 4 years, the research conducted at Georgia Tech under the support of this project has led to 15 peer-reviewed publications and 9 conference/workshop presentations. Two graduate students and one postdoctoral fellow also received research training through participating the project activities. This final technical report summarizes key scientific discoveries we made and provides also a list of all publications and conference presentations resulted from research activities at Georgia Tech. The main findings include: 1) the distinctly different roles played by atmospheric dynamical processes in establishing surface temperature response to ENSO at tropics and extratropics (i.e., atmospheric dynamics disperses energy out of tropics during ENSO warm events and modulate surface temperature at mid-, high-latitudes through controlling downward longwave radiation); 2) the representations of ENSO-related temperature response in climate models fail to converge at the process-level particularly over extratropics (i.e., models produce the right temperature responses to ENSO but with wrong reasons); 3) water vapor feedback contributes substantially to the temperature anomalies found over U.S. during different phases of the Northern Annular Mode (NAM), which adds new insight to the traditional picture that cold/warm advective processes are the main drivers of local temperature responses to the NAM; 4) the overall land surface temperature biases in the latest NCAR model (CESM1) are caused by biases in surface albedo while the surface temperature biases over ocean are related to multiple factors including biases in model albedo, cloud and oceanic dynamics, and the temperature biases over different ocean basins are also induced by different process biases. These results provide a detailed guidance for process-level model turning and improvement, and thus contribute directly to the overall goal of reducing model uncertainty in projecting future changes in the Earth’s climate system, especially in the ENSO and AM variability.

  2. Temperature Sensor Data Michael W. Bigrigg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadeh, Norman M.

    in the room. Sensor networks can be used to identify larger trends in temperature which could be used to report energy usage, HVAC problems, computer failures based on high temperatures, and fire evacuation

  3. High-temperature thermocouples and related methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rempe, Joy L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Knudson, Darrell L. (Firth, ID); Condie, Keith G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wilkins, S. Curt (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-temperature thermocouple and methods for fabricating a thermocouple capable of long-term operation in high-temperature, hostile environments without significant signal degradation or shortened thermocouple lifetime due to heat induced brittleness.

  4. Temperature-Dependent Chemical Properties of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petta, Jason

    Silberstein #12;What is a fuel cell? #12;Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Two phase ionomer (ionic polymer temperatures (thermal history) and relative humidities Temperatures 150o C for 1 hour 100o C, 90o C, 80o C, 70o

  5. Water Power Calculator Temperature and Analog Input/Output Module Ambient Temperature Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark D. McKay

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water Power Calculator Temperature and Analog input/output Module Ambient Temperature Testing A series of three ambient temperature tests were conducted for the Water Power Calculator development using the INL Calibration Laboratory’s Tenney Environmental Chamber. The ambient temperature test results demonstrate that the Moore Industries Temperature Input Modules, Analog Input Module and Analog Output Module, ambient temperature response meet or exceed the manufactures specifications

  6. Carbon nanotube temperature and pressure sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ivanov, Ilia N; Geohegan, David Bruce

    2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention, in one embodiment, provides a method of measuring pressure or temperature using a sensor including a sensor element composed of a plurality of carbon nanotubes. In one example, the resistance of the plurality of carbon nanotubes is measured in response to the application of temperature or pressure. The changes in resistance are then recorded and correlated to temperature or pressure. In one embodiment, the present invention provides for independent measurement of pressure or temperature using the sensors disclosed herein.

  7. Determining Outdoor CPV Cell Temperature: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muller, M.; Deline, C.; Marion, B.; Kurtz, S.; Bosco, N.

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An accurate method is needed for determining cell temperature when measuring CPV modules outdoors. It has been suggested that cell temperature can be calculated though a procedure that shutters sunlight to the cells while measuring the transients in open-circuit voltage (Voc) and heat sink temperature. This paper documents application of this shutter procedure to multiple CPV modules at NREL. The challenges and limitations are presented along with an alternate approach to measuring CPV cell operating temperature.

  8. Agenda: High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Agenda for the High Temperature Membrane Working Group (HTMWG) meeting on May 18, 2009, in Arlington, Virginia

  9. Corrosion Resistant Coatings for High Temperature Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Besman, T.M.; Cooley, K.M.; Haynes, J.A.; Lee, W.Y.; Vaubert, V.M.

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efforts to increase efficiency of energy conversion devices have required their operation at ever higher temperatures. This will force the substitution of higher-temperature structural ceramics for lower temperature materials, largely metals. Yet, many of these ceramics will require protection from high temperature corrosion caused by combustion gases, atmospheric contaminants, or the operating medium. This paper discusses examples of the initial development of such coatings and materials for potential application in combustion, aluminum smelting, and other harsh environments.

  10. LOW TEMPERATURE CATHODE SUPPORTED ELECTROLYTES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harlan U. Anderson

    2000-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This project has three main goals: Thin Films Studies, Preparation of Graded Porous Substrates and Basic Electrical Characterization and Testing of Planar Single Cells. During this time period substantial progress has been made in developing low temperature deposition techniques to produce dense, nanocrystalline yttrium-stabilized zirconia films on both dense oxide and polymer substrates. Progress has been made in the preparation and characterization of thin electrolytes and porous LSM substrates. Both of these tasks are essentially on or ahead of schedule. In our proposal, we suggested that the ZrO{sub 2}/Sc system needed to be considered as a candidate as a thin electrolyte. This was because microcrystalline ZrO{sub 2}/Sc has a significantly higher ionic conductivity than YSZ, particularly at the lower temperatures. As a result, some 0.5 micron thick film of ZrO{sub 2}/16% Sc on an alumina substrate (grain size 20nm) was prepared and the electrical conductivity measured as a function of temperature and oxygen activity. The Sc doped ZrO{sub 2} certainly has a higher conductivity that either 20nm or 2400nm YSZ, however, electronic conductivity dominates the conductivity for oxygen activities below 10{sup -15}. Whereas for YSZ, electronic conductivity is not a problem until the oxygen activity decreases below 10{sup -25}. These initial results show that the ionic conductivity of 20nm YSZ and 20nm ZrO{sub 2}/16% Sc are essentially the same and the enhanced conductivity which is observed for Sc doping in microcrystalline specimens is not observed for the same composition when it is nanocrystalline. In addition they show that the electronic conductivity of Sc doped ZrO{sub 2} is at least two orders of magnitude higher than that observed for YSZ. The conclusion one reaches is that for 0.5 to 1 micron thick nanocrystalline films, Sc doping of ZrO{sub 2} has no benefits compared to YSZ. As a result, electrolyte films of ZrO{sub 2}/Sc should not be considered as candidates. However, they have the potential of being useful as an interface on the anode side of the electrolyte. NexTech has focused much of its effort during the past few months on establishing tape casting methods for porous LSM substrates. This work, performed under a separate DOE-funded program, involved tape casting formulations comprising LSM powders with bi-modal particle size distributions and fugitive pore forming additives. Sintered LSM substrates with porosities in the 30 to 40 vol% range, and pore sizes of 10 {approx} 20 microns have been prepared. In addition, tape casting formulations involving composite mixtures of LSM and Sm-doped ceria (SDC) have been evaluated. The LSM/SDC cathode substrates are expected to provide better performance at low temperatures. Characterization of these materials is currently underway.

  11. LOW TEMPERATURE CATHODE SUPPORTED ELECTROLYTES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harlan U. Anderson; Wayne Huebner; Igor Kosacki

    2000-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This project has three main goals: Thin Films Studies, Preparation of Graded Porous Substrates and Basic Electrical Characterization and testing of Planar Single Cells. During this time period substantial progress has been made in developing low temperature deposition techniques to produce dense, nanocrystalline yttrium-stabilized zirconia films on both dense oxide and polymer substrates. Microstructural changes in unsupported nanocrystalline yttrium stabilized zirconia (ZrO{sub 2}:16%Y, or YSZ) thin films were examined as a function of temperature and annealing time in order to determine the grain growth exponent and the mechanisms of pinhole formation. Grain growth and pinhole formation were measured using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), normal imaging mode transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electron diffraction, and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDS). Grain growth was found to vary with a time exponent of about one half before pinhole formation and about one third after. Pinhole formation in 70 nm thick films occurred at temperatures near 600 C, corresponding to a grain size of about 15 nm, or a grain size to film thickness ration of approximately 0.25. The deposition of films on porous substrates is hampered by the penetration of the polymer precursor solution into the substrate whose pores as > 0.2 {micro}m, therefore much attention has to be paid to the development of porous colloidal oxide films onto surfaces. Thus during this line period we have been studying these films. Optical properties have proven to be an excellent way to study the quality of these nanoporous films. The influence of porosity and densification on optical properties of films on sapphire substrates that were prepared from water colloidal suspensions of small ({approx}5nm) particles of ceria was investigated. The colloidal ceria films have initially very porous structure (porosity about 50%) and densification starts at about 600 C accompanied by grain growth. The concurrence of these two processes makes it difficult to interpret the results of the optical spectrophotometry, but the combination of transmittance and reflectance measurements provides enough data to separate these two influences and to calculate the porosity, particle size and energy band gap separately. XRD, SEM, ellipsometry and mechanical profilometry were used to confirm the results obtained from the spectrophotometric measurements. All these methods gave results, which are in good agreement: the change in the porosity from 50% to 15% and the particle size increased from 5 to 65nm in the temperature region from 400 to 1000 C. An important result of the investigation is the fact that the main optical properties of the coating such as refractive index and band gap energy depend only on the porosity, but not on the grain size. The grain size influences the scattering properties of the coating, which allows the grain size to be estimated from optical measurements.

  12. High temperature superconducting fault current limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, J.R.

    1997-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A fault current limiter for an electrical circuit is disclosed. The fault current limiter includes a high temperature superconductor in the electrical circuit. The high temperature superconductor is cooled below its critical temperature to maintain the superconducting electrical properties during operation as the fault current limiter. 15 figs.

  13. Optical temperature sensor using thermochromic semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical thermometry is a growing technological field which exploits the ability of certain materials to change their optical properties with temperature. A subclass of such materials are those which change their color as a reversible and reproducible function of temperature. These materials are thermochromic. This invention is a composition to measure temperature utilizing thermochromic semiconductors.

  14. Air Handling Unit Supply Air Temperature Optimization During Economizer Cycles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, K.; Liu, M.; Wang, G.; Wang, Z.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    temperature at supply air temperature setpoint. Mechanical cooling is always required when outside air temperature is higher than the supply air temperature setpoint. Generally the supply air temperature setpoint is set at 55°F for space humidity control...

  15. Teleconnected influence of North Atlantic sea surface temperature on the El Nin~o onset

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chunzai

    Carpenter Asia-Pacific Climate Impact Centre, School of Energy and Environment, City University of Hong Kong the subsequent winter and spring, which produces equatorial westerly wind anomalies in the western Pacific. The equatorial westerly wind anomalies in the winter and spring can help initiate a Pacific El Nin~o event

  16. Temperature and electrical memory of polymer fibers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuan, Jinkai; Zakri, Cécile; Grillard, Fabienne; Neri, Wilfrid; Poulin, Philippe [Centre de Recherche Paul Pascal - CNRS, University of Bordeaux, Avenue Schweitzer, 33600 Pessac (France)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report in this work studies of the shape memory behavior of polymer fibers loaded with carbon nanotubes or graphene flakes. These materials exhibit enhanced shape memory properties with the generation of a giant stress upon shape recovery. In addition, they exhibit a surprising temperature memory with a peak of generated stress at a temperature nearly equal to the temperature of programming. This temperature memory is ascribed to the presence of dynamical heterogeneities and to the intrinsic broadness of the glass transition. We present recent experiments related to observables other than mechanical properties. In particular nanocomposite fibers exhibit variations of electrical conductivity with an accurate memory. Indeed, the rate of conductivity variations during temperature changes reaches a well defined maximum at a temperature equal to the temperature of programming. Such materials are promising for future actuators that couple dimensional changes with sensing electronic functionalities.

  17. Low temperature sodium-beta battery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farmer, Joseph C

    2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A battery that will operate at ambient temperature or lower includes an enclosure, a current collector within the enclosure, an anode that will operate at ambient temperature or lower within the enclosure, a cathode that will operate at ambient temperature or lower within the enclosure, and a separator and electrolyte within the enclosure between the anode and the cathode. The anode is a sodium eutectic anode that will operate at ambient temperature or lower and is made of a material that is in a liquid state at ambient temperature or lower. The cathode is a low melting ion liquid cathode that will operate at ambient temperature or lower and is made of a material that is in a liquid state at ambient temperature or lower.

  18. Topological Insulators at Room Temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Haijun; /Beijing, Inst. Phys.; Liu, Chao-Xing; /Tsinghua U., Beijing; Qi, Xiao-Liang; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Dai, Xi; Fang, Zhong; /Beijing, Inst. Phys.; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Topological insulators are new states of quantum matter with surface states protected by the time-reversal symmetry. In this work, we perform first-principle electronic structure calculations for Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}, Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3}, Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} crystals. Our calculations predict that Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}, Bi{sub 2}T e{sub 3} and Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} are topological insulators, while Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3} is not. In particular, Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} has a topologically non-trivial energy gap of 0.3eV , suitable for room temperature applications. We present a simple and unified continuum model which captures the salient topological features of this class of materials. These topological insulators have robust surface states consisting of a single Dirac cone at the {Lambda} point.

  19. High Temperature Superconducting Underground Cable

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrell, Roger, A.

    2010-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Project was to design, build, install and demonstrate the technical feasibility of an underground high temperature superconducting (HTS) power cable installed between two utility substations. In the first phase two HTS cables, 320 m and 30 m in length, were constructed using 1st generation BSCCO wire. The two 34.5 kV, 800 Arms, 48 MVA sections were connected together using a superconducting joint in an underground vault. In the second phase the 30 m BSCCO cable was replaced by one constructed with 2nd generation YBCO wire. 2nd generation wire is needed for commercialization because of inherent cost and performance benefits. Primary objectives of the Project were to build and operate an HTS cable system which demonstrates significant progress towards commercial progress and addresses real world utility concerns such as installation, maintenance, reliability and compatibility with the existing grid. Four key technical areas addressed were the HTS cable and terminations (where the cable connects to the grid), cryogenic refrigeration system, underground cable-to-cable joint (needed for replacement of cable sections) and cost-effective 2nd generation HTS wire. This was the world’s first installation and operation of an HTS cable underground, between two utility substations as well as the first to demonstrate a cable-to-cable joint, remote monitoring system and 2nd generation HTS.

  20. Investigations into High Temperature Components and Packaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marlino, L.D.; Seiber, L.E.; Scudiere, M.B.; M.S. Chinthavali, M.S.; McCluskey, F.P.

    2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to document the work that was performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in support of the development of high temperature power electronics and components with monies remaining from the Semikron High Temperature Inverter Project managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). High temperature electronic components are needed to allow inverters to operate in more extreme operating conditions as required in advanced traction drive applications. The trend to try to eliminate secondary cooling loops and utilize the internal combustion (IC) cooling system, which operates with approximately 105 C water/ethylene glycol coolant at the output of the radiator, is necessary to further reduce vehicle costs and weight. The activity documented in this report includes development and testing of high temperature components, activities in support of high temperature testing, an assessment of several component packaging methods, and how elevated operating temperatures would impact their reliability. This report is organized with testing of new high temperature capacitors in Section 2 and testing of new 150 C junction temperature trench insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBTs) in Section 3. Section 4 addresses some operational OPAL-GT information, which was necessary for developing module level tests. Section 5 summarizes calibration of equipment needed for the high temperature testing. Section 6 details some additional work that was funded on silicon carbide (SiC) device testing for high temperature use, and Section 7 is the complete text of a report funded from this effort summarizing packaging methods and their reliability issues for use in high temperature power electronics. Components were tested to evaluate the performance characteristics of the component at different operating temperatures. The temperature of the component is determined by the ambient temperature (i.e., temperature surrounding the device) plus the temperature increase inside the device due the internal heat that is generated due to conduction and switching losses. Capacitors and high current switches that are reliable and meet performance specifications over an increased temperature range are necessary to realize electronics needed for hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs), fuel cell (FC) and plug-in HEVs (PHEVs). In addition to individual component level testing, it is necessary to evaluate and perform long term module level testing to ascertain the effects of high temperature operation on power electronics.

  1. Quick Anomaly Detection by the Newcomb--Benford Law, with Applications to Electoral Processes Data from the USA, Puerto Rico and Venezuela

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pericchi, Luis; 10.1214/09-STS296

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple and quick general test to screen for numerical anomalies is presented. It can be applied, for example, to electoral processes, both electronic and manual. It uses vote counts in officially published voting units, which are typically widely available and institutionally backed. The test examines the frequencies of digits on voting counts and rests on the First (NBL1) and Second Digit Newcomb--Benford Law (NBL2), and in a novel generalization of the law under restrictions of the maximum number of voters per unit (RNBL2). We apply the test to the 2004 USA presidential elections, the Puerto Rico (1996, 2000 and 2004) governor elections, the 2004 Venezuelan presidential recall referendum (RRP) and the previous 2000 Venezuelan Presidential election. The NBL2 is compellingly rejected only in the Venezuelan referendum and only for electronic voting units. Our original suggestion on the RRP (Pericchi and Torres, 2004) was criticized by The Carter Center report (2005). Acknowledging this, Mebane (2006) and The...

  2. Variable temperature seat climate control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karunasiri, Tissa R. (Van Nuys, CA); Gallup, David F. (Pasadena, CA); Noles, David R. (Glendale, CA); Gregory, Christian T. (Alhambra, CA)

    1997-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A temperature climate control system comprises a variable temperature seat, at least one heat pump, at least one heat pump temperature sensor, and a controller. Each heat pump comprises a number of Peltier thermoelectric modules for temperature conditioning the air in a main heat exchanger and a main exchanger fan for passing the conditioned air from the main exchanger to the variable temperature seat. The Peltier modules and each main fan may be manually adjusted via a control switch or a control signal. Additionally, the temperature climate control system may comprise a number of additional temperature sensors to monitor the temperature of the ambient air surrounding the occupant as well as the temperature of the conditioned air directed to the occupant. The controller is configured to automatically regulate the operation of the Peltier modules and/or each main fan according to a temperature climate control logic designed both to maximize occupant comfort during normal operation, and minimize possible equipment damage, occupant discomfort, or occupant injury in the event of a heat pump malfunction.

  3. Hypersonic and dielectric anomalies of ,,Pb,,Zn1/3Nb2/3...O3...0.905,,PbTiO3...0.095 single crystal Chi-Shun Tu, F.-C. Chao, C.-H. Yeh, and C.-L. Tsai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hypersonic and dielectric anomalies of ,,Pb,,Zn1/3Nb2/3...O3...0.905,,PbTiO3...0.095 single crystal scattering and dielectric permittivity on PZN-9.5%PT to look for both hypersonic and dielectric anomalies

  4. Use Remote Sensing Data (selected visible and infrared spectrums) to locate high temperature ground anomalies in Colorado. Confirm heat flow potential with on-site surveys to drill deep resource wells

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Technologies Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project Objectives: A cost effective three (3) Phased Program to locate and confirm up to Five (5) commercial geothermal resources in Colorado. The heat resources to be prioritized will be those able to support a minimum electrical generation capacity of 10 MW by location.

  5. High temperature solar selective coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kennedy, Cheryl E

    2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Improved solar collectors (40) comprising glass tubing (42) attached to bellows (44) by airtight seals (56) enclose solar absorber tubes (50) inside an annular evacuated space (54. The exterior surfaces of the solar absorber tubes (50) are coated with improved solar selective coatings {48} which provide higher absorbance, lower emittance and resistance to atmospheric oxidation at elevated temperatures. The coatings are multilayered structures comprising solar absorbent layers (26) applied to the meta surface of the absorber tubes (50), typically stainless steel, topped with antireflective Savers (28) comprising at least two layers 30, 32) of refractory metal or metalloid oxides (such as titania and silica) with substantially differing indices of refraction in adjacent layers. Optionally, at least one layer of a noble metal such as platinum can be included between some of the layers. The absorbent layers cars include cermet materials comprising particles of metal compounds is a matrix, which can contain oxides of refractory metals or metalloids such as silicon. Reflective layers within the coating layers can comprise refractory metal silicides and related compounds characterized by the formulas TiSi. Ti.sub.3SiC.sub.2, TiAlSi, TiAN and similar compounds for Zr and Hf. The titania can be characterized by the formulas TiO.sub.2, Ti.sub.3O.sub.5. TiOx or TiO.sub.xN.sub.1-x with x 0 to 1. The silica can be at least one of SiO.sub.2, SiO.sub.2x or SiO.sub.2xN.sub.1-x with x=0 to 1.

  6. Temperature Dependent Neutron Scattering Sections for Polyethylene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roger E. Hill; C. -Y. Liu

    2003-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This note presents neutron scattering cross sections for polyethylene at 296 K, 77 K and 4 K derived from a new scattering kernel for neutron scattering off of hydrogen in polyethylene. The kernel was developed in ENDF-6 format as a set of S(alpha,beta) tables using the LEAPR module of the NJOY94 code package. The polyethylene density of states (from 0 to sub eV) adopted to derive the new kernel is presented. We compare our calculated room temperature total scattering cross sections and double differential cross sections at 232 meV at various angles with the available experimental data (at room temperature), and then extrapolate the calculations to lower temperatures (77K and 4K). The new temperature dependent scattering kernel gives a good quantitative fit to the available room temperature data and has a temperature dependence that is qualitatively consistent with thermodynamics.

  7. Temperature detection in a gas turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lacy, Benjamin; Kraemer, Gilbert; Stevenson, Christian

    2012-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A temperature detector includes a first metal and a second metal different from the first metal. The first metal includes a plurality of wires and the second metal includes a wire. The plurality of wires of the first metal are connected to the wire of the second metal in parallel junctions. Another temperature detector includes a plurality of resistance temperature detectors. The plurality of resistance temperature detectors are connected at a plurality of junctions. A method of detecting a temperature change of a component of a turbine includes providing a temperature detector include ing a first metal and a second metal different from the first metal connected to each other at a plurality of junctions in contact with the component; and detecting any voltage change at any junction.

  8. Electronic Applications of High Temperature Superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kroger, H.; Miracky, R. F.

    ELECfRONIC APPLICAnONS OF HIGH TEMPERATURE SUPERCONDUCTORS HARRY KROGER and ROBERT F. MIRACKY Superconductivity Program MCC Austin, Texas ABSTRACT The possible uses of high temperature superconductors in electronics applications... attempts a sober appraisal of the potential ap plications of high temperature superconductors to electronics. Al though we believe that these applications are very promising, and in some sense unlimited, we offer here an opinion which runs contrary...

  9. Optical temperature indicator using thermochromic semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A reversible optical temperature indicator utilizes thermochromic semiconductors which vary in color in response to various temperature levels. The thermochromic material is enclosed in an enamel which provides protection and prevents breakdown at higher temperatures. Cadmium sulfide is the preferred semiconductor material. The indicator may be utilized as a sign or in a striped arrangement to clearly provide a warning to a user. The various color responses provide multiple levels of alarm.

  10. Deep Trek High Temperature Electronics Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce Ohme

    2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes technical progress achieved during the cooperative research agreement between Honeywell and U.S. Department of Energy to develop high-temperature electronics. Objects of this development included Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) wafer process development for high temperature, supporting design tools and libraries, and high temperature integrated circuit component development including FPGA, EEPROM, high-resolution A-to-D converter, and a precision amplifier.

  11. Low temperature proton conducting oxide devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Armstrong, Timothy R. (Clinton, TN); Payzant, Edward A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Speakman, Scott A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Greenblatt, Martha (Highland Park, NJ)

    2008-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for conducting protons at a temperature below 550.degree. C. includes a LAMOX ceramic body characterized by an alpha crystalline structure.

  12. Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory: Focus on Carbon Fiber and Composites Project ID: LM027 DOE 2011 Vehicle Technologies Annual Merit...

  13. SWTDI Geothermal Aquaculture Facility Aquaculture Low Temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations": The following error has been detected in your syntax: * Display map Temperature 57.0 C 135.0...

  14. Intertwined Orders in High Temperature Superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ostoja-Starzewski, Martin

    Intertwined Orders in High Temperature Superconductors ! Eduardo Fradkin University of Illinois · Electronic liquid crystal phases have also been seen heavy fermions and iron superconductors 7 #12

  15. Low-Temperature Automotive Diesel Combustion

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    reaction 12 The CO LIF results are semi-quantitative - lending credence to the measured spatial distributions We apply temperature and pressure corrections to the CO absorption...

  16. Quantitative Modeling of High Temperature Magnetization Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Shufeng

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Final Technical Report Project title: Quantitative Modeling of High Temperature Magnetization Dynamics DOE/Office of Science Program Manager Contact: Dr. James Davenport

  17. Polyelectrolyte Materials for High Temperature Fuel Cells

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    High 3M (3M) Temperature Fuel Cells John B. Kerr Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Collaborators: Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). February 13, 2007 This...

  18. High temperature, optically transparent plastics from biomass

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    temperature, optically transparent plastics from biomass At a Glance Rapid, selective catalytic system to produce vinyl plastics from renewable biomass Stereoregular...

  19. Group 3: Humidity, Temperature, and Voltage (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wohlgemuth, J.

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Group 3 is chartered to develop accelerated stress tests that can be used as comparative predictors of module lifetime versus stresses associated with humidity, temperature and voltage.

  20. High Temperature 300°C Directional Drilling System

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objective: provide a directional drilling system that can be used at environmental temperatures of up to 300°C; and at depths of 10; 000 meters.

  1. Estimating Temperature Distributions In Geothermal Areas Using...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    neuronet temperature estimates based on well log data derive from: (a) the neuronet "education level" (which depends on the amount and structure of information used for teaching)...

  2. Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2010 -- Washington D.C. lm028laracurzio2010o.pdf More Documents & Publications Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory and HTML...

  3. Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Review and Peer Evaluation lm028laracurzio2011o.pdf More Documents & Publications Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory and HTML...

  4. Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and Peer Evaluation Meeting lm028laracurzio2012o.pdf More Documents & Publications Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory and HTML...

  5. Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. lm01laracurzio.pdf More Documents & Publications Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory and HTML...

  6. Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Laboratory: Focus on Carbon Fiber and Composites Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory: Focus on Carbon Fiber and Composites 2011 DOE...

  7. Geothermal Energy Production from Low Temperature Resources,...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Novel Energy Conversion Equipment for Low Temperature Geothermal Resources Oregon Johnson Controls, Inc. Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Klamath Falls, OR...

  8. The temperature dependence of equilibrium plasma density

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. V. Vasiliev

    2002-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Temperature dependence of an electron-nuclear plasma equilibrium density is considered basing on known approaches, which are given in (1)(2). It is shown that at a very high temperature, which is characteristic for a star interior, the equilibrium plasma density is almost constant and equals approximately to $10^{25}$ particles per $cm^3$. At a relatively low temperature, which is characteristic for star surface, the equilibrium plasma density is in several orders lower and depends on temperature as $T^{3/2}$.

  9. Photonic crystals for high temperature applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeng, Yi Xiang

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis focuses on the design, optimization, fabrication, and experimental realization of metallic photonic crystals (MPhCs) for high temperature applications, for instance thermophotovoltaic (TPV) energy conversion ...

  10. Manufacturing Barriers to High Temperature PEM Commercialization...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Barriers to High Temperature PEM Commercialization Presented at the NREL Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Manufacturing R&D Workshop in Washington, DC, August 11-12, 2011....

  11. Accelerated Laboratory Tests Using Simultaneous UV, Temperature...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Accelerated Laboratory Tests Using Simultaneous UV, Temperature, and Moisture for PV Encapsulants, Frontsheets, and Backsheets Accelerated Laboratory Tests Using Simultaneous UV,...

  12. Relativistic Random Phase Approximation At Finite Temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niu, Y. F. [State Key Laboratory for Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Physics Department, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb (Croatia); Paar, N.; Vretenar, D. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb (Croatia); Meng, J. [State Key Laboratory for Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2009-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The fully self-consistent finite temperature relativistic random phase approximation (FTRRPA) has been established in the single-nucleon basis of the temperature dependent Dirac-Hartree model (FTDH) based on effective Lagrangian with density dependent meson-nucleon couplings. Illustrative calculations in the FTRRPA framework show the evolution of multipole responses of {sup 132}Sn with temperature. With increased temperature, in both monopole and dipole strength distributions additional transitions appear in the low energy region due to the new opened particle-particle and hole-hole transition channels.

  13. Variable Temperature UHV STM/AFM | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of oxide materials, determining their properties is widely pursued both... Surface Chemistry of 2-Propanol on TiO2(110): Low and High Temperature Dehydration, Isotope...

  14. Biodiesel's Enabling Characteristics in Attaining Low Temperature...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Combustion Discusses reasons and physical significance of cool-flame behavior of biodiesel on improving low temperature diesel combustion deer11jacobs.pdf More Documents &...

  15. Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Temperatures and intervalgeothermal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Temperatures and interval geothermal-gradient determinations from wells in National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map |...

  16. Low Temperature Material Bonding Techniq Ue

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramsey, J. Michael (Knoxville, TN); Foote, Robert S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2002-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of performing a lower temperature bonding technique to bond together two mating pieces of glass includes applying a sodium silicate aqueous solution between the two pieces.

  17. High-Temperature Falling-Particle Receiver

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    temperatures, nitrate salt fluids become chemically unstable. In contrast, direct absorption receivers using solid particles that fall through a beam of concentrated solar...

  18. Advanced Low Temperature Absorption Chiller Module Integrated...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Advanced Low Temperature Absorption Chiller Module Integrated with a CHP System at a Distributed Data Center - Presentation by Exergy Partners Corp., June 2011 Advanced Low...

  19. LOW TEMPERATURE CATHODE SUPPORTED ELECTROLYTES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harlan U. Anderson; Fatih Dogan; Vladimir Petrovsky

    2002-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This project has three main goals: Thin Films Studies, Preparation of Graded Porous Substrates and Basic Electrical Characterization and testing of Planar Single Cells. This period has continued to address the problem of making dense 1/2 to 5 {micro}m thick dense layers on porous substrates (the cathode LSM). Our current status is that we are making structures of 2-5 cm{sup 2} in area, which consist of either dense YSZ or CGO infiltrated into a 2-5 {micro}m thick 50% porous layer made of either nanoncrystalline CGO or YSZ powder. This composite structure coats a macroporous cathode or anode; which serves as the structural element of the bi-layer structure. These structures are being tested as SOFC elements. A number of structures have been evaluated both as symmetrical and as button cell configuration. Results of this testing indicates that the cathodes contribute the most to cell losses for temperatures below 750 C. In this investigation different cathode materials were studied using impedance spectroscopy of symmetric cells and IV characteristics of anode supported fuel cells. Cathode materials studied included La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (LSCF), La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.2}MnO{sub 3} (LSM), Pr{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (PSCF), Sm{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (SSCF), and Yb{sub .8}Sr{sub 0.2}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (SSCF). A new technique for filtering the Fourier transform of impedance data was used to increase the sensitivity of impedance analysis. By creating a filter specifically for impedance spectroscopy the resolution was increased. The filter was tailored to look for specific circuit elements like R//C, Warburg, or constant phase elements. As many as four peaks can be resolved using the filtering technique on symmetric cells. It may be possible to relate the different peaks to material parameters, like the oxygen exchange coefficient. The cathode grouped in order from lowest to highest ASR is LSCF < PSCF < SSCF < YSCF < LSM. The button cell results agree with this ordering indicating that this is an important tool for use in developing our understanding of electrode behavior in fuel cells.

  20. LOW TEMPERATURE CATHODE SUPPORTED ELECTROLYTES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harlan U. Anderson; Wayne Huebner; Igor Kosacki

    2001-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This project has three main goals: Thin Films Studies, Preparation of Graded Porous Substrates and Basic Electrical Characterization and testing of Planar Single Cells. Substantial progress has been made on both characterizing thin films as well as developing methods to produce films on nanoporous substrates. The results of electrical conductivity measurements on ZrO{sub 2}:16%Sc nanocrystalline thin films under controlled oxygen partial pressure and temperature are presented. The experimental data have been interpreted using a defect model, which describes the interaction between Sc and oxygen vacancies resulting in the formation of donor - (Sc{sub Zr} - V{sub o} - e){sup x} and acceptor - (Sc{sub Zr}-h){sup x} levels. From this the electronic and ionic contribution to the electrical transport has been determined and correlated with the band structure. These results suggest that ZrO{sub 2}:16%Sc possesses higher electronic conductivity than ZrO{sub 2}:16%Y, which dominates the total conductivity in reducing atmospheres. This is an important result since it indicates that Sc-YSZ maybe useful in the anode regions of the cell. We have made important breakthroughs on depositing dense Ceria films on to porous LSM substrates. In previous studies we have found that in order to produce a surface which is smooth enough to coat with dense polymer precursor derived films, the required thickness of the colloidal film layer is determined by the maximum surface roughness. That is, if we wish to make 2 micron thick colloidal oxide layers, the roughness of the LSM surface can not exceed 2 microns. Currently, we are producing the composite CeO{sub 2}/LSM structures that can be coated with polymer precursor to produce 0.5 to 1.5 micron thickness dense YSZ films. In the next quarter, we will be testing SOFC's using these structures. YSZ/CeO{sub 2}/LSM composites have been formed by annealing at 800 C. Our studies show that the YSZ films are very dense with a 20 nm grain size. SOFC's using these composites are being fabricated and we expect to obtain cell data during the next quarter. As we reported in November 2000, we have had difficulties in making pore free films with larger areas that about 0.2cm{sup 2} which is due to problems in our clean room. Modifications have now been completed on the clean room and we should be approaching a class 100 in the film making area. This level of cleanliness is sufficient to obtain films without pores over areas up to 100cm{sup 2}.

  1. High-Temperature Water Splitting | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Temperature Water Splitting High-Temperature Water Splitting High-temperature water splitting (a "thermochemical" process) is a long-term technology in the early stages of...

  2. High Temperature, High Pressure Devices for Zonal Isolation in...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    High Temperature, High Pressure Devices for Zonal Isolation in Geothermal Wells High Temperature, High Pressure Devices for Zonal Isolation in Geothermal Wells High Temperature,...

  3. LOW TEMPERATURE CATHODE SUPPORTED ELECTROLYTES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harlan U. Anderson; Wayne Huebner; Igor Kosacki

    2001-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This project has three main goals: Thin Films Studies, Preparation of Graded Porous Substrates and Basic Electrical Characterization and testing of Planar Single Cells. In this portion of study we have focused on producing YSZ films on porous LSM substrates. When using the polymer precursor there are a number of obstacles to overcome in order to form dense electrolyte layers on porous substrates (cathode or anode). Probably the most difficult problems are: (1) Extreme penetration of the polymer into the substrate must be prevented. (2) Shrinkage cracking must be avoided. (3) Film thickness in the 1 to 5{micro}m range must be achieved. We have demonstrated that cracking due to shrinkage involved during the elimination of solvents and organic matter and densification of the remaining oxide is not a problem as long as the resulting oxide film is < {approx} 0.15 {micro}m in thickness. We have also shown that we can make thicker films by making multiple depositions if the substrate is smooth (roughness {le} 0.1 {micro}m) and contains no surface pores > 0.2 {micro}m. The penetration of the polymer into the porous substrate can be minimized by increasing the viscosity of the polymer and reducing the largest pore at the surface of the substrate to {le} 0.2 {micro}m. We have shown that this can be done, but we have also shown that it is difficult to make dense films that are defect free with areas > 1 cm{sup 2}. This is because of the roughness of the substrate and the difficulty in making a substrate which does not have surface voids > 0.2 {micro}m. Thus the process works well for dense, smooth substrates for films < 1 {micro}m thick, but is difficult to apply to rough, porous surfaces and to make film thickness > 1 {micro}m. As a result of these problems, we have been addressing the issue of how to make dense films in the thickness range of 1 to 5 {micro}m on sintered porous substrates without introducing cracks and holes due to shrinkage and surface voids? These endeavors have lead us to a solution which we think is quite unique and should allow us to obtain flaw free dense films of thickness in the 0.5 to 5 {micro}m range at processing temperatures {le} 900{sup o}. The process involves the deposition of a slurry of nanocrystalline YSZ onto a presintered porous LSM substrate. The key element in the deposition is that the slurry contains sufficient YSZ polymer precursor to allow adhesion of the YSZ particles to each other and the surface after annealing at about 600 C. This allows the formation of a porous film of 0.5 to 5 {micro}m thick which adheres to the surface. After formation of this film, YSZ polymer precursor is allowed to impregnate the porous surface layer (capillary forces tend to confine the polymer solution in the nanoporous layer). After several impregnation/heat treatment cycles, a dense film results. Within the next few months, this process should be developed to the point that single cell measurements can be made on 0.5 to 5 {micro}m films on a LSM substrate. This type of processing allows the formation of essentially flaw free films over areas > 1 cm{sup 2}.

  4. Postgraduate Scholarship Pricing temperature derivatives and modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banaji,. Murad

    the volumetric risk of the energy units sold, rather than the price risk of each unit. Weather derivativesPostgraduate Scholarship Pricing temperature derivatives and modelling the market price of risk: Pricing temperature derivatives and modelling the market price of risk. Main Supervisor: A. Alexandridis

  5. High Temperature Solar Splitting of Methane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -term commercialization opportunities #12;Why Use Solar Energy?Why Use Solar Energy? · High concentrations possible (>1000High Temperature Solar Splitting of Methane to Hydrogen and Carbon High Temperature Solar Splitting and worldwide) ­ Sufficient to power the world (if we choose to) · Advantages tradeoff against collection area

  6. Temperature-Aware Architecture: Lessons and Opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skadron, Kevin

    TEMPERATURE-AWARE, NOT JUST POWER-AWARE? To address these thermal concerns requires modeling at every design the two design approaches [2]. First, temperature is proportional to power density, not just power unit area is scaling up faster than the power density is scaling down. This requires more expensive

  7. High temperature hot water systems: A primer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Govan, F.A. [NMD and Associates, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fundamental principles of high temperature water (HTW) system technology and its advantages for thermal energy distribution are presented. Misconceptions of this technology are also addressed. The paper describes design principles, applications, HTW properties, HTW system advantages, selecting the engineer, load diversification, design temperatures, system pressurization, pump considerations, constant vs. VS pumps, HTW generator types, and burners and controls.

  8. The University of Edinburgh Space Temperature Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    The University of Edinburgh Space Temperature Standards Addendum to the Energy Policy 2003C causes an estimated 8% extra energy costs / global warming gas emissions. Comfort Levels: Summer, lights and / or solar gain and all other options have been exhausted · Temperature control is required

  9. High Temperature Gas Reactors The Next Generation ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Proof Advanced Reactor and Gas Turbine #12;Flow through Power Conversion Vessel 8 #12;9 TRISO Fuel Particle1 High Temperature Gas Reactors The Next Generation ? Professor Andrew C Kadak Massachusetts of Brayton vs. Rankine Cycle · High Temperature Helium Gas (900 C) · Direct or Indirect Cycle · Originally

  10. THE MULTI-USE STEINEL VARIABLE TEMPERATURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleinfeld, David

    THE MULTI-USE STEINEL VARIABLE TEMPERATURE ELECTRONICALLY CONTROLLED HEAT GUNTEMPERATURE RANGE 212 at the outlet nozzle will bum flesh. Do not tum on Heat Gun with hand in front of nozzle. DO NOT USE NEAR equipment Specifications Temperature Variable from 212" F to 1100° F Watts 1500W Weight 1.5 lbs. Supply

  11. THE MULTI-USE STEINEL VARIABLE TEMPERATURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleinfeld, David

    THE MULTI-USE STEINEL VARIABLE TEMPERATURE ELECTRONICALLY CONTROLLED HEAT GUNTEMPERATURE RANGE 212 at the outlet nozzle will bum flesh. Do not tum on Heat Gun with hand in front of nozzle. DO NOT USE NEAR equipment Specifications Temperature Variable from 212° F to 1100° F Watts 1500W Weight 1.5 lbs. Supply

  12. Dynamic temperature measurements with embedded optical sensors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolan, Daniel H.,; Seagle, Christopher T; Ao, Tommy

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes LDRD project number 151365, %5CDynamic Temperature Measurements with Embedded Optical Sensors%22. The purpose of this project was to develop an optical sensor capable of detecting modest temperature states (<1000 K) with nanosecond time resolution, a recurring diagnostic need in dynamic compression experiments at the Sandia Z machine. Gold sensors were selected because the visible re ectance spectrum of gold varies strongly with temperature. A variety of static and dynamic measurements were performed to assess re ectance changes at di erent temperatures and pressures. Using a minimal optical model for gold, a plausible connection between static calibrations and dynamic measurements was found. With re nements to the model and diagnostic upgrades, embedded gold sensors seem capable of detecting minor (<50 K) temperature changes under dynamic compression.

  13. Influence of Sea Surface Temperature on Humidity and Temperature in the Outflow of Tropical Deep Convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Richard H.

    -Service Aircraft (MOZAIC) project are analyzed in the vicinity of deep convective outflow to study the variationsInfluence of Sea Surface Temperature on Humidity and Temperature in the Outflow of Tropical Deep upper-tropospheric temperature and humidity by the Mea- surement of Ozone and Water Vapor by Airbus In

  14. A Harmonic Approach for Calculating Daily Temperature Normals Constrained by2 Homogenized Monthly Temperature Normals3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 1 A Harmonic Approach for Calculating Daily Temperature Normals Constrained by2 Homogenized a constrained harmonic technique that forces the daily30 temperature normals to be consistent with the monthly, or harmonic even though the annual march of temperatures for some locations can be highly asymmetric. Here, we

  15. Undulator Hall Air Temperature Fault Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sevilla, J.; Welch, J.; /SLAC; ,

    2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent experience indicates that the LCLS undulator segments must not, at any time following tuning, be allowed to change temperature by more than about {+-}2.5 C or the magnetic center will irreversibly shift outside of acceptable tolerances. This vulnerability raises a concern that under fault conditions the ambient temperature in the Undulator Hall might go outside of the safe range and potentially could require removal and retuning of all the segments. In this note we estimate changes that can be expected in the Undulator Hall air temperature for three fault scenarios: (1) System-wide power failure; (2) Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system shutdown; and (3) HVAC system temperature regulation fault. We find that for either a system-wide power failure or an HVAC system shutdown (with the technical equipment left on), the short-term temperature changes of the air would be modest due to the ability of the walls and floor to act as a heat ballast. No action would be needed to protect the undulator system in the event of a system-wide power failure. Some action to adjust the heat balance, in the case of the HVAC power failure with the equipment left on, might be desirable but is not required. On the other hand, a temperature regulation failure of the HVAC system can quickly cause large excursions in air temperature and prompt action would be required to avoid damage to the undulator system.

  16. The extragalactic background light, the Hubble constant, and anomalies: conclusions from 20 years of TeV gamma-ray observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonathan Biteau; David A. Williams

    2015-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground-based observatories have been collecting 0.2-20 TeV gamma rays from blazars for about twenty years. These gamma rays can experience absorption along the line of sight due to interactions with the extragalactic background light (EBL). In this paper, we investigate the most extensive set of TeV spectra from blazars collected so far, twice as large as any other studied. We first show that the gamma-ray optical depth can be reduced to the convolution product of an EBL kernel with the EBL intensity. We extract the EBL intensity from the gamma-ray spectra, show that it is preferred at 11 sigma to a null intensity, and unveil the broad-band spectrum of the EBL from mid-UV to far IR. Our measurement shows that the total radiative content of the universe between 0.1 and 1000 microns represents 6.5+/-1.2% of the brightness of the CMB. This is slightly above the accumulated emission of stars and galaxies and constrains the unresolved sources that could have reionized the universe. We also propose a data-driven method to estimate the Hubble constant based on the comparison of local and gamma-ray measurements of the EBL, yielding H0 = 88 +/- 8(stat) +/-13(sys) km/s/Mpc. After setting the most stringent upper-limits on the redshift of four TeV blazars, we investigate the 106 intrinsic gamma-ray spectra in our sample and find no significant evidence for anomalies. We do not find evidence for the so-called "pair-production anomaly" at large optical depths, which has been used previously to place lower limits on the coupling of TeV gamma rays with axion-like particles. Finally, we investigate the impact of a modification of the pair-creation threshold due to a Lorentz invariance violation. A mild excess prevents us from ruling out an effect at the Planck energy and we constrain for the first time the energy scale of the modification to values larger than sixty percent of the Planck energy.

  17. Ultra-High Temperature Distributed Wireless Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, Russell; Rumpf, Raymond; Coggin, John; Davis, Williams; Yang, Taeyoung; O'Donnell, Alan; Bresnahan, Peter

    2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Research was conducted towards the development of a passive wireless sensor for measurement of temperature in coal gasifiers and coal-fired boiler plants. Approaches investigated included metamaterial sensors based on guided mode resonance filters, and temperature-sensitive antennas that modulate the frequency of incident radio waves as they are re-radiated by the antenna. In the guided mode resonant filter metamaterial approach, temperature is encoded as changes in the sharpness of the filter response, which changes with temperature because the dielectric loss of the guided mode resonance filter is temperature-dependent. In the mechanically modulated antenna approach, the resonant frequency of a vibrating cantilever beam attached to the antenna changes with temperature. The vibration of the beam perturbs the electrical impedance of the antenna, so that incident radio waves are phase modulated at a frequency equal to the resonant frequency of the vibrating beam. Since the beam resonant frequency depends on temperature, a Doppler radar can be used to remotely measure the temperature of the antenna. Laboratory testing of the guided mode resonance filter failed to produce the spectral response predicted by simulations. It was concluded that the spectral response was dominated by spectral reflections of radio waves incident on the filter. Laboratory testing of the mechanically modulated antenna demonstrated that the device frequency shifted incident radio waves, and that the frequency of the re-radiated waves varied linearly with temperature. Radio wave propagation tests in the convection pass of a small research boiler plant identified a spectral window between 10 and 13 GHz for low loss propagation of radio waves in the interior of the boiler.

  18. High temperature, minimally invasive optical sensing modules

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Riza, Nabeel Agha (Oviedo, FL); Perez, Frank (Tujunga, CA)

    2008-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A remote temperature sensing system includes a light source selectively producing light at two different wavelengths and a sensor device having an optical path length that varies as a function of temperature. The sensor receives light emitted by the light source and redirects the light along the optical path length. The system also includes a detector receiving redirected light from the sensor device and generating respective signals indicative of respective intensities of received redirected light corresponding to respective wavelengths of light emitted by the light source. The system also includes a processor processing the signals generated by the detector to calculate a temperature of the device.

  19. Low temperature monitoring system for subsurface barriers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); McKinzie, II. Billy John (Houston, TX)

    2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for monitoring temperature of a subsurface low temperature zone is described. The system includes a plurality of freeze wells configured to form the low temperature zone, one or more lasers, and a fiber optic cable coupled to at least one laser. A portion of the fiber optic cable is positioned in at least one freeze well. At least one laser is configured to transmit light pulses into a first end of the fiber optic cable. An analyzer is coupled to the fiber optic cable. The analyzer is configured to receive return signals from the light pulses.

  20. High temperature crystalline superconductors from crystallized glasses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shi, Donglu (Downers Grove, IL)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of preparing a high temperature superconductor from an amorphous phase. The method involves preparing a starting material of a composition of Bi.sub.2 Sr.sub.2 Ca.sub.3 Cu.sub.4 Ox or Bi.sub.2 Sr.sub.2 Ca.sub.4 Cu.sub.5 Ox, forming an amorphous phase of the composition and heat treating the amorphous phase for particular time and temperature ranges to achieve a single phase high temperature superconductor.

  1. Low-temperature thermodynamics with quantum coherence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varun Narasimhachar; Gilad Gour

    2014-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We find a new characterization of low-temperature processes, which we call "cooling processes", incorporating quantum coherence in the model of thermodynamics for the first time. We derive necessary and sufficient conditions for the feasibility of state transitions under cooling processes. We also rigorously confirm the intuitive robustness of coherence against low-temperature thermal noise. Additionally, we develop the low-temperature "Gibbs-preserving" model, and by comparing our results on the two models, we argue that the latter is a poor approximation to physical processes.

  2. The temperature sensitivity of a bistable RAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Janet Kay

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is applied to the polycrystalline-silicon resistor of a new bistable RAM cell. The effect of temperature on the resistor is explored with respect to the operation of the RAM cell's refresh mechanism. A temperature range of 0 ? 100'C is investigated... of user defined function, DER 16. TB, fpiy verses doping concentration 17. TB, f ty verses temperature range Page 16 17 26 27' 28 29 30 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION The search for small, dense memories has led to the dynamic RAM cell which...

  3. On quantum interferometric measurements of temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcin Jarzyna; Marcin Zwierz

    2014-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide a detailed description of the interferometric thermometer, which is a device that estimates the temperature of a sample from measurements of the optical phase. For the first time, we rigorously analyze the operation of such a device by studying the interaction of the optical probe system with a heated sample. We find that this approach to thermometry is capable of measuring the temperature of a sample in the nK regime. Furthermore, we compare the theoretical precision of interferometric thermometers with the precision offered by the idealized pyrometers, which infer the temperature from a measurement of the total thermal radiation emitted by the sample.

  4. Temperature measurement method using temperature coefficient timing for resistive or capacitive sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Britton, C.L. Jr.; Ericson, M.N.

    1999-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for temperature measurement especially suited for low cost, low power, moderate accuracy implementation. It uses a sensor whose resistance varies in a known manner, either linearly or nonlinearly, with temperature, and produces a digital output which is proportional to the temperature of the sensor. The method is based on performing a zero-crossing time measurement of a step input signal that is double differentiated using two differentiators functioning as respective first and second time constants; one temperature stable, and the other varying with the sensor temperature. 5 figs.

  5. Air separation with temperature and pressure swing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cassano, Anthony A. (Allentown, PA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A chemical absorbent air separation process is set forth which uses a temperature swing absorption-desorption cycle in combination with a pressure swing wherein the pressure is elevated in the desorption stage of the process.

  6. Low temperature joining of ceramic composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barton, T.J.; Anderson, I.E.; Ijadi-Maghsoodi, S.; Nosrati, M.; Unal, O.

    1999-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of joining similar or dissimilar ceramic and ceramic composite materials, such as SiC continuous fiber ceramic composites, at relatively low joining temperatures uses a solventless, three component bonding agent effective to promote mechanical bond toughness and elevated temperature strength to operating temperatures of approximately 1200 C. The bonding agent comprises a preceramic precursor, an aluminum bearing powder, such as aluminum alloy powder, and mixtures of aluminum metal or alloy powders with another powder, and boron powder in selected proportions. The bonding agent is disposed as an interlayer between similar or dissimilar ceramic or ceramic composite materials to be joined and is heated in ambient air or inert atmosphere to a temperature not exceeding about 1200 C to form a strong and tough bond joint between the materials. The bond joint produced is characterized by a composite joint microstructure having relatively soft, compliant aluminum bearing particulate regions dispersed in a ceramic matrix. 3 figs.

  7. Industrial Low Temperature Waste Heat Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Altin, M.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, some common and emerging techniques to better utilize energy in the chemical process industries are discussed. Temperature levels of waste heat available are pointed out. Emerging practices for further economical utilization of waste...

  8. Elevated temperature forming method and preheater apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krajewski, Paul E; Hammar, Richard Harry; Singh, Jugraj; Cedar, Dennis; Friedman, Peter A; Luo, Yingbing

    2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An elevated temperature forming system in which a sheet metal workpiece is provided in a first stage position of a multi-stage pre-heater, is heated to a first stage temperature lower than a desired pre-heat temperature, is moved to a final stage position where it is heated to a desired final stage temperature, is transferred to a forming press, and is formed by the forming press. The preheater includes upper and lower platens that transfer heat into workpieces disposed between the platens. A shim spaces the upper platen from the lower platen by a distance greater than a thickness of the workpieces to be heated by the platens and less than a distance at which the upper platen would require an undesirably high input of energy to effectively heat the workpiece without being pressed into contact with the workpiece.

  9. Comparison Measurements of Silicon Carbide Temperature Monitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. L. Rempe; K. G. Condie; D. L. Knudson; L. L. Snead

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the efforts initiated through the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) program to make Silicon Carbide (SiC) temperature monitors available, a capability was developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to complete post-irradiation evaluations of these monitors. INL selected the resistance measurement approach for detecting peak irradiation temperature from SiC temperature monitors. To demonstrate this new capability, comparison measurements were completed by INL and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on identical samples subjected to identical irradiation conditions. Results reported in this paper indicate that the resistance measurement approach can yield similar peak irradiation temperatures if appropriate equipment is used and appropriate procedures are followed.

  10. Finite Temperature Gases of Fermionic Strings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyamoli Chaudhuri

    2005-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that in the absence of a Ramond-Ramond sector both the type IIA and type IIB free string gases have a thermal instability due to low temperature tachyon modes. The gas of free IIA strings undergoes a thermal duality transition into a gas of free IIB strings at the self-dual temperature. The free heterotic string gas is a tachyon-free ensemble with gauge symmetry SO(16)$\\times$SO(16) in the presence of a timelike Wilson line background. It exhibits a holographic duality relation undergoing a self-dual phase transition with positive free energy and positive specific heat. The type IB open and closed string ensemble is related by thermal duality to the type I' string ensemble. We identify the order parameter for the Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition from a low temperature gas of short open strings to a high temperature long string phase at or below T_C. Note Added (Sep 2005).

  11. Low temperature joining of ceramic composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barton, Thomas J. (Ames, IA); Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA); Ijadi-Maghsoodi, Sina (Ames, IA); Nosrati, Mohammad (Ames, IA); Unal, Ozer (Ames, IA)

    2001-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of joining similar or dissimilar ceramic and ceramic composite materials, such as SiC continuous fiber ceramic composites, at relatively low joining temperatures uses a solventless, three component bonding agent effective to promote mechanical bond toughness and elevated temperature strength to operating temperatures of approximately 1200 degrees C. The bonding agent comprises a preceramic precursor, an aluminum bearing powder, such as aluminum alloy powder, and mixtures of aluminum metal or alloy powders with another powder, and and boron powder in selected proportions. The bonding agent is disposed as an interlayer between similar or dissimilar ceramic or cermaic composite materials to be joined and is heated in ambient air or inert atmosphere to a temperature not exceeding about 1200 degrees C. to form a strong and tough bond joint between the materials. The bond joint produced is characterized by a composite joint microstructure having relatively soft, compliant aluminum bearing particulate regions dispersed in a ceramic matrix.

  12. Low temperature joining of ceramic composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barton, T.J.; Anderson, I.E.; Ijadi-Maghsoodi, S.; Nosrati, M.; Unal, O.

    1999-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of joining similar or dissimilar ceramic and ceramic composite materials, such as SiC continuous fiber ceramic composites, at relatively low joining temperatures uses a solventless, three component bonding agent effective to promote mechanical bond toughness and elevated temperature strength to operating temperatures of approximately 1200 degrees C. The bonding agent comprises a preceramic precursor, an aluminum bearing powder, such as aluminum alloy powder, and mixtures of aluminum metal or alloy powders with another powder, and boron powder in selected proportions. The bonding agent is disposed as an interlayer between similar or dissimilar ceramic or ceramic composite materials to be joined and is heated in ambient air or inert atmosphere to a temperature not exceeding about 1200 degrees C. to form a strong and tough bond joint between the materials. The bond joint produced is characterized by a composite joint microstructure having relatively soft, compliant aluminum bearing particulate regions dispersed in a ceramic matrix. 3 figs.

  13. Low temperature joining of ceramic composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barton, Thomas J. (Ames, IA); Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA); Ijadi-Maghsoodi, Sina (Ames, IA); Nosrati, Mohammad (Ames, IA); Unal, Ozer (Ames, IA)

    1999-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of joining similar or dissimilar ceramic and ceramic composite materials, such as SiC continuous fiber ceramic composites, at relatively low joining temperatures uses a solventless, three component bonding agent effective to promote mechanical bond toughness and elevated temperature strength to operating temperatures of approximately 1200 degrees C. The bonding agent comprises a preceramic precursor, an aluminum bearing powder, such as aluminum alloy powder, and mixtures of aluminum metal or alloy powders with another powder, and and boron powder in selected proportions. The bonding agent is disposed as an interlayer between similar or dissimilar ceramic or ceramic composite materials to be joined and is heated in ambient air or inert atmosphere to a temperature not exceeding about 1200 degrees C. to form a strong and tough bond joint between the materials. The bond joint produced is characterized by a composite joint microstructure having relatively soft, compliant aluminum bearing particulate regions dispersed in a ceramic matrix.

  14. Low temperature joining of ceramic composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barton, Thomas J. (Ames, IA); Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA); Ijadi-Maghsoodi, Sina (Ames, IA); Nosrati, Mohammad (Ames, IA); Unal, Ozer (Ames, IA)

    1999-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of joining similar or dissimilar ceramic and ceramic composite materials, such as SiC continuous fiber ceramic composites, at relatively low joining temperatures uses a solventless, three component bonding agent effective to promote mechanical bond toughness and elevated temperature strength to operating temperatures of approximately 1200 degrees C. The bonding agent comprises a preceramic precursor, an aluminum bearing powder, such as aluminum alloy powder, and mixtures of aluminum metal or alloy powders with another powder, and and boron powder in selected proportions. The bonding agent is disposed as an interlayer between similar or dissimilar ceramic or cermaic composite materials to be joined and is heated in ambient air or inert atmosphere to a temperature not exceeding about 1200 degrees C. to form a strong and tough bond joint between the materials. The bond joint produced is characterized by a composite joint microstructure having relatively soft, compliant aluminum bearing particulate regions dispersed in a ceramic matrix.

  15. Photovoltaic cell efficiency at elevated temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Katherine Leung

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to determine what type of photovoltaic solar cell could best be used in a thermoelectric photovoltaic hybrid power generator, we tested the change in efficiency due to higher temperatures of three types of solar ...

  16. Ballistic dispersion in temperature gradient focusing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santiago, Juan G.

    regime is the most familiar regime in microfluidic systems, an oft-overlooked regime is that of purely kinematic (or ballistic) dispersion. In most microfluidic systems, this dispersion regime is transient systems. Keywords: microfluidics; temperature gradient focusing; kinematic dispersion; Taylor

  17. Self Contained Temperature Actuated Control Valves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pirkle, F.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a virtually unlimited potential for energy conservation by utilizing self contained temperature actuated valves. As steam costs soar it becomes more and more important to conserve feed stock dollars as well as the energy these dollars...

  18. Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Elangovan; Scott Barnett; Sossina Haile

    2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are high efficiency energy conversion devices. Present materials set, using yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte, limit the cell operating temperatures to 800 C or higher. It has become increasingly evident however that lowering the operating temperature would provide a more expeditious route to commercialization. The advantages of intermediate temperature (600 to 800 C) operation are related to both economic and materials issues. Lower operating temperature allows the use of low cost materials for the balance of plant and limits degradation arising from materials interactions. When the SOFC operating temperature is in the range of 600 to 700 C, it is also possible to partially reform hydrocarbon fuels within the stack providing additional system cost savings by reducing the air preheat heat-exchanger and blower size. The promise of Sr and Mg doped lanthanum gallate (LSGM) electrolyte materials, based on their high ionic conductivity and oxygen transference number at the intermediate temperature is well recognized. The focus of the present project was two-fold: (a) Identify a cell fabrication technique to achieve the benefits of lanthanum gallate material, and (b) Investigate alternative cathode materials that demonstrate low cathode polarization losses at the intermediate temperature. A porous matrix supported, thin film cell configuration was fabricated. The electrode material precursor was infiltrated into the porous matrix and the counter electrode was screen printed. Both anode and cathode infiltration produced high performance cells. Comparison of the two approaches showed that an infiltrated cathode cells may have advantages in high fuel utilization operations. Two new cathode materials were evaluated. Northwestern University investigated LSGM-ceria composite cathode while Caltech evaluated Ba-Sr-Co-Fe (BSCF) based pervoskite cathode. Both cathode materials showed lower polarization losses at temperatures as low as 600 C than conventional manganite or cobaltite cathodes.

  19. Group 3: Humidity, Temperature, and Voltage

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This PowerPoint presentation, focused on humidity, temperature and voltage testing, was originally presented by John Wohlgemuth at the NREL 2013 PV Module Reliability Workshop on Feb. 26-27, 2013 in Denver, CO. It summarizes the activities of a working group chartered to develop accelerated stress tests that can be used as comparative predictors of module life versus stresses associated with humidity, temperature and voltage.

  20. PREDICTING TEMPERATURE BEHAVIOR IN CARBONATE ACIDIZING TREATMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, Xuehao

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    PREDICTING TEMPERATURE BEHAVIOR IN CARBONATE ACIDIZING TREATMENTS A Thesis by XUEHAO TAN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 2009 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering PREDICTING TEMPERATURE BEHAVIOR IN CARBONATE ACIDIZING TREATMENTS A Thesis by XUEHAO TAN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University...

  1. Maine Geological Survey Borehole Temperature Profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marvinney, Robert

    2013-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This dataset includes temperature profiles from 30 boreholes throughout Maine that were selected for their depth, location, and lithologies encountered. Depths range from about 300 feet to 2,200 feet. Most of the boreholes selected for measurement were completed in granite because this lithology can be assumed to be nearly homogeneous over the depth of the borehole. Boreholes were also selected to address gaps in existing geothermal datasets. Temperature profiles were collected in October and November, 2012.

  2. Maine Geological Survey Borehole Temperature Profiles

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Marvinney, Robert

    This dataset includes temperature profiles from 30 boreholes throughout Maine that were selected for their depth, location, and lithologies encountered. Depths range from about 300 feet to 2,200 feet. Most of the boreholes selected for measurement were completed in granite because this lithology can be assumed to be nearly homogeneous over the depth of the borehole. Boreholes were also selected to address gaps in existing geothermal datasets. Temperature profiles were collected in October and November, 2012.

  3. High Temperature Materials for Aerospace Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adamczak, Andrea Diane

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    below 430 ?C for exposure times up to 20 minutes. Transition-metal carbides were initially synthesized by carbothermal reduction of transition-metal halides and polymer precursor mixtures, at temperatures that range from 900 to 1500 ?C in an argon... ........................................ 20 2.3 Present/Future Aerospace Applications ......................................... 24 2.4 Ultra-High Temperature Materials ................................................. 27 2.4.1 Transition-Metal Carbides...

  4. Rotating sample holder at low temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pasternak, Sebastien; Perrin, Florian; Ciatto, Gianluca; Palancher, Herve; Steinmann, Ricardo [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 38043 Grenoble (France)

    2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A low temperature rotary device (cryoturbine) for use in extended x-ray-absorption fine structure measurements in fluorescence mode has been designed and manufactured. The instrument works at a temperature close to liquid Nitrogen and can reach frequencies up to 100 Hz with good stability. The rotation speed is measured with a light-emitting diode driven in stroboscopic mode by a simple electronic circuit.

  5. What`s in a name? Chromosome 22q abnormalities and the DiGeorge, velocardiofacial and conotruncal anomalies face syndromes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wulfsberg, E.A.; Leana-Cox, J. [Univ. of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)] [Univ. of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Neri, G. [Universita Cattolica, Rome (Italy)] [Universita Cattolica, Rome (Italy)

    1996-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent advances in our understanding of the phenotype associated with deletion of the DiGeorge Chromosome Region (DGCR) at 22q11.2 are in many ways analogous to the fable about the blind men and the elephant. Originally described as three distinct phenotypes (DiGeorge (DG) syndrome, velocardiofacial (VCF) syndrome, and the conotruncal anomalies face (CTAF) syndrome), it is now clear that there is only a single broad and variable phenotype associated with deletion of the DGCR. As in the fable, distinguished clinicians approached this phenotypic {open_quotes}elephant{close_quotes} from different perspectives and provided three separate, although overlapping descriptions. Our analogy to this fable is not to imply some {open_quotes}blindness{close_quotes} on the part of these clinicians, but rather to point out the well-known difficulty in delineating the indistinct phenotypic boundaries of a syndrome until a genetic or biochemical marker for the condition is available. The recent availability of a fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) probe to detect deletion of the DGCR now allows delineation of the broad phenotype of our {open_quotes}elephant{close_quotes} which spans from lethal DG phenotypes through the intermediate VCF and CTAF phenotypes to the newly recognized {open_quotes}mild{close_quotes} phenotype consisting of only developmental delays and subtle facial abnormalities. 33 refs.

  6. Ion temperature measurements in the Maryland Spheromak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gauvreau, J.L.

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Initial spectroscopic data from MS showed evidence of ion heating as deduced from the line widths of different ion species. Detailed measurements of OIV spectral emission line profiles in space and time revealed that heating takes place at early time, before spheromak formation and is occurring within the current discharge. The measured ion temperature is several times the electron temperature and cannot be explained by classical (Spitzer) resistivity. Classically, ions are expected to have lower temperatures than the electrons and therefore, lower temperatures than observed. High ion temperatures have been observed in different RFP`s and Spheromaks but are usually associated with relaxation to the Taylor state and occur in the sustainment phase. During formation, the current delivered to start the discharge is not axisymmetric and as a consequence, X-points appear in the magnetic flux. A two dimensional analysis predicts that magnetic reconnection occurring at an X-point can give rise to high ion heating rates. A simple 0-dimensional calculation showed that within the first 20 {mu}s, a conversion of mass flow kinetic energy into ion temperature could take place due to viscosity.

  7. Elevated-Temperature Tribology of Metallic Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The wear of metals and alloys takes place in many forms, and the type of wear that dominates in each instance is influenced by the mechanics of contact, material properties, the interfacial temperature, and the surrounding environment. The control of elevated-temperature friction and wear is important for applications like internal combustion engines, aerospace propulsion systems, and metalworking equipment. The progression of interacting, often synergistic processes produces surface deformation, subsurface damage accumulation, the formation of tribolayers, and the creation of free particles. Reaction products, particularly oxides, play a primary role in debris formation and microstructural evolution. Chemical reactions are known to be influenced by the energetic state of the exposed surfaces, and that surface energy is in turn affected by localized deformation and fracture. At relatively low temperatures, work-hardening can occur beneath tribo-contacts, but exposure to high temperatures can modify the resultant defect density and grain structure to affect the mechanisms of re-oxidation. As research by others has shown, the rate of wear at elevated temperatures can either be enhanced or reduced, depending on contact conditions and nature of oxide layer formation. Furthermore, the thermodynamic driving force for certain chemical reactions is moderated by kinetics and microstructure. The role of deformation, oxidation, and tribo-corrosion in the elevated temperature tribology of metallic alloys will be exemplified by three examples involving sliding wear, single-point abrasion, and repetitive impact plus slip.

  8. Device for self-verifying temperature measurement and control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Watkins, Arthur D.; Cannon, Collins P.; Tolle, Charles R.

    2004-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A measuring instrument includes a first temperature sensor, a second temperature sensor and circuitry. The first and second temperature sensors each generate a signal indicative of the temperature of a medium being detected. The circuitry is configured to activate verification of temperature being sensed with the first sensor. According to one construction, the first temperature sensor comprises at least one thermocouple temperature sensor and the second temperature sensor comprises an optical temperature sensor, each sensor measuring temperature over the same range of temperature, but using a different physical phenomena. Also according to one construction, the circuitry comprises a computer configured to detect failure of one of the thermocouples by comparing temperature of the optical temperature sensor with each of the thermocouple temperature sensors. Even further, an output control signal is generated via a fuzzy inference machine and control apparatus.

  9. A study of temperature compensating circuits for voltage references which use negative temperature coefficient zener diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coleman, Spencer Delano

    1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Character- istics in Breakdown Region . 13 3f. 1N 751 Zener Diode Voltage vs Current Character- istics in Breakdown Region . 14 3g, lN752 Zener Diode Voltage vs Current Character- istics in Breakdown Region 15 4a. 1N746 Zener Diode Ambient Temperature... vs Voltage Characteristics in Breakdown Region. . . . . . . . . . 16 4b. IN747 Zener Diode Ambient Temperature vs Voltage Characteristics in Breakdown Region. . . . . . . . . . 17 4c. 1N748 Zener Diode Ambient Temperature vs Voltage...

  10. High temperature intermetallic binders for HVOF carbides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaw, K.G. [Xform, Inc., Cohoes, NY (United States); Gruninger, M.F.; Jarosinski, W.J. [Praxair Specialty Powders, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas turbines technology has a long history of employing the desirable high temperature physical attributes of ceramic-metallic (cermet) materials. The most commonly used coatings incorporate combinations of WC-Co and Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-NiCr, which have also been successfully utilized in other non-turbine coating applications. Increased turbine operating temperatures and other high temperature service conditions have made apparent the attractive notion of increasing the temperature capability and corrosion resistance of these coatings. In this study the intermetallic binder NiAl has been used to replace the cobalt and NiCr constituents of conventional WC and Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2} cermet powders. The composite carbide thermal spray powders were fabricated for use in the HVOF coating process. The structure of HVOF deposited NiAl-carbide coatings are compared directly to the more familiar WC-Co and Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-NiCr coatings using X-ray diffraction, back-scattered electron imaging (BEI) and electron dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Hardness variations with temperature are reported and compared between the NiAl and Co/NiCr binders.

  11. Compliant high temperature seals for dissimilar materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rynders, Steven Walton (Fogelsville, PA); Minford, Eric (Laurys Station, PA); Tressler, Richard Ernest (Boalsburg, PA); Taylor, Dale M. (Salt Lake City, UT)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high temperature, gas-tight seal is formed by utilizing one or more compliant metallic toroidal ring sealing elements, where the applied pressure serves to activate the seal, thus improving the quality of the seal. The compliant nature of the sealing element compensates for differences in thermal expansion between the materials to be sealed, and is particularly useful in sealing a metallic member and a ceramic tube art elevated temperatures. The performance of the seal may be improved by coating the sealing element with a soft or flowable coating such as silver or gold and/or by backing the sealing element with a bed of fine powder. The material of the sealing element is chosen such that the element responds to stress elastically, even at elevated temperatures, permitting the seal to operate through multiple thermal cycles.

  12. Holographic conductivity of zero temperature superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. A. Konoplya; A. Zhidenko

    2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the recently found by G. Horowitz and M. Roberts (arXiv:0908.3677) numerical model of the ground state of holographic superconductors (at zero temperature), we calculate the conductivity for such models. The universal relation connecting conductivity with the reflection coefficient was used for finding the conductivity by the WKB approach. The dependence of the conductivity on the frequency and charge density is discussed. Numerical calculations confirm the general arguments of (arXiv:0908.3677) in favor of non-zero conductivity even at zero temperature. In addition to the Horowitz-Roberts solution we have found (probably infinite) set of extra solutions which are normalizable and reach the same correct RN-AdS asymptotic at spatial infinity. These extra solutions (which correspond to larger values of the grand canonical potential) lead to effective potentials that also vanish at the horizon and thus correspond to a non-zero conductivity at zero temperature.

  13. Finite temperature Casimir effect for graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ignat V. Fialkovsky; Valery N. Marachevsky; Dmitri V. Vassilevich

    2011-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We adopt the Dirac model for quasiparticles in graphene and calculate the finite temperature Casimir interaction between a suspended graphene layer and a parallel conducting surface. We find that at high temperature the Casimir interaction in such system is just one half of that for two ideal conductors separated by the same distance. In this limit single graphene layer behaves exactly as a Drude metal. In particular, the contribution of the TE mode is suppressed, while one of the TM mode saturates the ideal metal value. Behaviour of the Casimir interaction for intermediate temperatures and separations accessible for an experiment is studied in some detail. We also find an interesting interplay between two fundamental constants of graphene physics: the fine structure constant and the Fermi velocity.

  14. Thermochemistry of high-temperature corrosion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Natesan, K.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multicomponent gas environments are prevalent in a number of energy systems, especially in those that utilize fossil fuels. The gas environments in these processes contain sulfur-bearing components in addition to oxidants. These complex environments, coupled with the elevated temperatures present in these systems, generally cause significant corrosion of engineering materials. Thermodynamic aspects of high-temperature corrosion processes occuring in complex gas mixtures are discussed, with emphasis on the role of thermochemical diagrams. The interrelationships between the corrosion behavior of materials and gas composition, alloy chemistry, and temperatures are examined. A number of examples from studies on materials behavior in coal-gasification environments are used to elucidate the role of thermochemistry in the understanding of corrosion processes that occur in complex gas mixtures. 11 figures.

  15. Basics of Low-temperature Refrigeration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alekseev, A

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter gives an overview of the principles of low temperature refrigeration and the thermodynamics behind it. Basic cryogenic processes - Joule-Thomoson process, Brayton process as well as Claude process - are described and compared. A typical helium laboratory refrigerator based on Claude process is used as a typical example of a low-temperature refrigeration system. A description of the hardware components for helium liquefaction is an important part of this paper, because the design of the main hardware components (compressors, turbines, heat exchangers, pumps, adsorbers, etc.) provides the input for cost calculation, as well as enables to estimate the reliability of the plant and the maintenance expenses. All these numbers are necessary to calculate the economics of a low temperature application.

  16. Remote temperature-set-point controller

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burke, W.F.; Winiecki, A.L.

    1984-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    An instrument is described for carrying out mechanical strain tests on metallic samples with the addition of means for varying the temperature with strain. The instrument includes opposing arms and associated equipment for holding a sample and varying the mechanical strain on the sample through a plurality of cycles of increasing and decreasing strain within predetermined limits, circuitry for producing an output signal representative of the strain during the tests, apparatus including a a set point and a coil about the sample for providing a controlled temperature in the sample, and circuitry interconnected between the strain output signal and set point for varying the temperature of the sample linearly with strain during the tests.

  17. Single Interval Rényi Entropy At Low Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bin Chen; Jie-qiang Wu

    2015-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we calculate the R\\'enyi entropy of one single interval on a circle at finite temperature in 2D CFT. In the low temperature limit, we expand the thermal density matrix level by level in the vacuum Verma module, and calculate the first few leading terms in $e^{-\\pi/TL}$ explicitly. On the other hand, we compute the same R\\'enyi entropy holographically. After considering the dependence of the R\\'enyi entropy on the temperature, we manage to fix the interval-independent constant terms in the classical part of holographic R\\'enyi entropy. We furthermore extend the analysis in Xi Dong's paper to higher orders and find exact agreement between the results from field theory and bulk computations in the large central charge limit. Our work provides another piece of evidence to support holographic computation of R\\'enyi entropy in AdS$_3$/CFT$_2$ correspondence, even with thermal effect.

  18. NGNP/HTE full-power operation at reduced high-temperature heat exchanger temperatures.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VIlim, R.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Operation of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) with reduced reactor outlet temperature at full power was investigated for the High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) hydrogen-production application. The foremost challenge for operation at design temperature is achieving an acceptably long service life for heat exchangers. In both the Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) and the Process Heat Exchanger (PHX) (referred to collectively as high temperature heat exchangers) a pressure differential of several MPa exists with temperatures at or above 850 C. Thermal creep of the heat exchanger channel wall may severely limit heat exchanger life depending on the alloy selected. This report investigates plant performance with IHX temperatures reduced by lowering reactor outlet temperature. The objective is to lower the temperature in heat transfer channels to the point where existing materials can meet the 40 year lifetime needed for this component. A conservative estimate for this temperature is believed to be about 700 C. The reactor outlet temperature was reduced from 850 C to 700 C while maintaining reactor power at 600 MWt and high pressure compressor outlet at 7 MPa. We included a previously reported design option for reducing temperature at the PHX. Heat exchanger lengths were adjusted to reflect the change in performance resulting from coolant property changes and from resizing related to operating-point change. Turbomachine parameters were also optimized for the new operating condition. An integrated optimization of the complete system including heat transfer equipment was not performed. It is estimated, however, that by performing a pinch analysis the combined plant efficiency can be increased from 35.5 percent obtained in this report to a value between 38.5 and 40.1 percent. Then after normalizing for a more than three percent decrease in commodities inventory compared to the reference plant, the commodities-normalized efficiency lies between 40.0 and 41.3. This compares with a value of 43.9 for the reference plant. This latter plant has a reactor outlet temperature of 850 C and the two high temperature heat exchangers. The reduction in reactor outlet temperature from 850 C to 700 C reduces the tritium permeability rate in the IHX metal by a factor of three and thermal creep by five orders of magnitude. The design option for reducing PHX temperature from 800 C to 200 C reduces the permeability there by three orders of magnitude. In that design option this heat exchanger is the single 'choke-point' for tritium migration from the nuclear to the chemical plant.

  19. Effects of temperature and temperature shock on the performance and microbial community structure of a submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qin, Wensheng

    in biogas pro- duction rate and biogas composition. However, temperature shocks resulted in an increase in biogas pro- duction temporarily. The SAnMBR could tolerate the 5 and 10 °C temperature shocks at 37 °C). The effects of digestion temperature and temperature shock on the biogas yields, temperature shocks

  20. Metallic substrates for high temperature superconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Truchan, Thomas G. (Chicago, IL); Miller, Dean J. (Darien, IL); Goretta, Kenneth C. (Downers Grove, IL); Balachandran, Uthamalingam (Hinsdale, IL); Foley, Robert (Chicago, IL)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A biaxially textured face-centered cubic metal article having grain boundaries with misorientation angles greater than about 8.degree. limited to less than about 1%. A laminate article is also disclosed having a metal substrate first rolled to at least about 95% thickness reduction followed by a first annealing at a temperature less than about 375.degree. C. Then a second rolling operation of not greater than about 6% thickness reduction is provided, followed by a second annealing at a temperature greater than about 400.degree. C. A method of forming the metal and laminate articles is also disclosed.

  1. Effective theory of high-temperature superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Igor F. Herbut

    2005-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    General field theory of a fluctuating d-wave superconductor is constructed and proposed as an effective description of superconducting cuprates at low energies. The theory is used to resolve a puzzle posed by recent experiments on superfluid density in severely underdoped YBCO. In particular, the overall temperature dependence of the superfluid density at low dopings is argued to be described well by the strongly anisotropic weakly interacting three-dimensional Bose gas, and thus approximately linear in temperature with an almost doping-independent slope.

  2. Recent Developments in High Temperature Superconductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hor, P. H.

    three-dimensional superconductor which can be teclmologically important if its superconducting transition Tc can be enhanced to be above the temperature liquid nitrogen. Possible superconductivity above room temperature has been reported in a... mixture of CuBr and CuBr2 system [8]. A mid-point resistive transition of 346K (73C) is observed but it is not confirmed by magnetic measurements. BCSCO and TCBCO The new series of high Tc superconductors is characterized by the chemical formula A2B2...

  3. High-temperature directional drilling turbodrill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neudecker, J.W.; Rowley, J.C.

    1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of a high-temperature turbodrill for directional drilling of geothermal wells in hard formations is summarized. The turbodrill may be used for straight-hole drilling but was especially designed for directional drilling. The turbodrill was tested on a dynamometer stand, evaluated in laboratory drilling into ambient temperature granite blocks, and used in the field to directionally drill a 12-1/4-in.-diam geothermal well in hot 200/sup 0/C (400/sup 0/F) granite at depths to 10,5000 ft.

  4. Temperature actuated automatic safety rod release

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hutter, Ernest (Wilmette, IL); Pardini, John A. (Brookfield, IL); Walker, David E. (Naperville, IL)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A temperature-actuated apparatus is disclosed for releasably supporting a safety rod in a nuclear reactor, comprising a safety rod upper adapter having a retention means, a drive shaft which houses the upper adapter, and a bimetallic means supported within the drive shaft and having at least one ledge which engages a retention means of the safety rod upper adapter. A pre-determined increase in temperature causes the bimetallic means to deform so that the ledge disengages from the retention means, whereby the bimetallic means releases the safety rod into the core of the reactor.

  5. Temperature actuated automatic safety rod release

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hutter, E.; Pardini, J.A.; Walker, D.E.

    1984-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A temperature-actuated apparatus is disclosed for releasably supporting a safety rod in a nuclear reactor, comprising a safety rod upper adapter having a retention means, a drive shaft which houses the upper adapter, and a bimetallic means supported within the drive shaft and having at least one ledge which engages a retention means of the safety rod upper adapter. A pre-determined increase in temperature causes the bimetallic means to deform so that the ledge disengages from the retention means, whereby the bimetallic means releases the safety rod into the core of the reactor.

  6. Temperature determination from the lattice gas model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Das Gupta; J. Pan; M. B. Tsang

    1996-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Determination of temperature from experimental data has become important in searches for critical phenomena in heavy ion collisions. Widely used methods are ratios of isotopes (which rely on chemical and thermal equilibrium), population ratios of excited states etc. Using the lattice gas model we propose a new observable: $n_{ch}/Z$ where $n_{ch}$ is the charge multiplicity and $Z$ is the charge of the fragmenting system. We show that the reduced multiplicity is a good measure of the average temperature of the fragmenting system.

  7. Investigation of temperature in the stratosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kays, Marvin Dale

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    of Parameters . 19 1. Horizontal temperature advection . . . . . . . 19 2. Local time rate-of- change of temperature . 26 Vertical motions . . . . 29 D. The 1"orecasting of Tempera- ture 51 E. Comparison of Thermal Winds and Wind. Shear Vectors V...!ITHOUT SMOOTHING THE HIND DATA I oc ation Date Vertical Velocity (cm/sec) Unsmoothed winds Smoothed winds (Rook Ss d d C ! (~ks, d Ss~d PGU"' 17 Jan 1$6$ 1700 GMT 'ktSI!R+ 1$ Dec I'36$ 1715 GMT. -5. 2 -1. $ 1 s7 IJSMR 18 Dec lo6$ 1800 GMT -2. 2 -1. 7...

  8. Low Temperature Heat Recovery for Boiler Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shook, J. R.; Luttenberger, D. B.

    be economically heated to within 50 0 F of the entering flue gas temperature. Other less common, but practical, uses for energy include driving a low-temperature electric turbine cycle or an absorption chilling cycle. An improvement in boiler efficiency of 3...% to 8% can normally be realized by cooling boiler flue gasses down to llO o F_200 0 F. This recovers a large quantity of the available sensible heat in most boiler flue gas streams. Efficiency can be improv ed by up to 10% if flue gas is cooled down...

  9. Short wavelength ion temperature gradient turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chowdhury, J.; Ganesh, R. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar (India); Brunner, S.; Lapillonne, X.; Villard, L. [CRPP, Association EURATOM-Confederation Suisse, EPFL, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Jenko, F. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode in the high wavenumber regime (k{sub y}{rho}{sub s}>1), referred to as short wavelength ion temperature gradient mode (SWITG) is studied using the nonlinear gyrokinetic electromagnetic code GENE. It is shown that, although the SWITG mode may be linearly more unstable than the standard long wavelength (k{sub y}{rho}{sub s}<1) ITG mode, nonlinearly its contribution to the total thermal ion heat transport is found to be low. We interpret this as resulting from an increased zonal flow shearing effect on the SWITG mode suppression.

  10. Frustrated phase separation and high temperature superconductivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emery, V.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Kivelson, S.A. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A dilute system of neutral holes in an antiferromagnet separates into a hole-rich and a hole-poor phase. The phase separation is frustrated by long-range Coulomb interactions but, provided the dielectric constant is sufficiently large, there remain large-amplitude low-energy fluctuations in the hole density at intermediate length scales. The extensive experimental evidence showing that this behavior giver, a reasonable picture of high temperature superconductors is surveyed. Further, it is shown that the scattering of mobile holes from the local density fluctuations may account for the anomalous normal-state properties of high temperature superconductors and also provide the mechanism of pairing.

  11. Frustrated phase separation and high temperature superconductivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emery, V.J. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Kivelson, S.A. (California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A dilute system of neutral holes in an antiferromagnet separates into a hole-rich and a hole-poor phase. The phase separation is frustrated by long-range Coulomb interactions but, provided the dielectric constant is sufficiently large, there remain large-amplitude low-energy fluctuations in the hole density at intermediate length scales. The extensive experimental evidence showing that this behavior giver, a reasonable picture of high temperature superconductors is surveyed. Further, it is shown that the scattering of mobile holes from the local density fluctuations may account for the anomalous normal-state properties of high temperature superconductors and also provide the mechanism of pairing.

  12. Finite-Temperature Non-equilibrium Quasicontinuum Method based on Langevin Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marian, J; Venturini, G; Hansen, B; Knap, J; Ortiz, M; Campbell, G

    2009-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The concurrent bridging of molecular dynamics and continuum thermodynamics presents a number of challenges, mostly associated with energy transmission and changes in the constitutive description of a material across domain boundaries. In this paper, we propose a framework for simulating coarse dynamic systems in the canonical ensemble using the Quasicontinuum method (QC). The equations of motion are expressed in reduced QC coordinates and are strictly derived from dissipative Lagrangian mechanics. The derivation naturally leads to a classical Langevin implementation where the timescale is governed by vibrations emanating from the finest length scale occurring in the computational cell. The equations of motion are integrated explicitly via Newmark's ({beta} = 0; {gamma} = 1/2) method, leading to a robust numerical behavior and energy conservation. In its current form, the method only allows for wave propagations supported by the less compliant of the two meshes across a heterogeneous boundary, which requires the use of overdamped dynamics to avoid spurious heating due to reflected vibrations. We have applied the method to two independent crystallographic systems characterized by different interatomic potentials (Al and Ta) and have measured thermal expansion in order to quantify the vibrational entropy loss due to homogenization. We rationalize the results in terms of system size, mesh coarseness, and nodal cluster diameter within the framework of the quasiharmonic approximation. For Al, we find that the entropy loss introduced by mesh coarsening varies linearly with the element size, and that volumetric effects are not critical in driving the anharmonic behavior of the simulated systems. In Ta, the anomalies of the interatomic potential employed result in negative and zero thermal expansion at low and high temperatures, respectively.

  13. Infrared Thermography Measurements of Window Thermal Test Specimen Surface Temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Infrared Thermography Measurements of Window Thermal Test Specimen Surface Temperatures Brent T Temperatures of Window Specimens: Infrared Thermography Laboratory Measurements Brent T. Griffith1 , Howdy and cold sides, respectively. Surface temperature maps were compiled using an infrared thermographic system

  14. Surface temperature trends in Russia over the past five centuries reconstructed from borehole temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smerdon, Jason E.

    Surface temperature trends in Russia over the past five centuries reconstructed from borehole in Russia and nearby areas to reconstruct the ground surface temperature history (GSTH) over the past five Siberia. We derive GSTHs for each region individually, and a composite ``all-Russia'' GSTH from the full

  15. Silicon Carbide Temperature Monitor Measurements at the High Temperature Test Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. L. Rempe; K. G. Condie; D. L. Knudson; L. L. Snead

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Silicon carbide (SiC) temperature monitors are now available for use as temperature sensors in Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) irradiation test capsules. Melt wires or paint spots, which are typically used as temperature sensors in ATR static capsules, are limited in that they can only detect whether a single temperature is or is not exceeded. SiC monitors are advantageous because a single monitor can be used to detect for a range of temperatures that may have occurred during irradiation. As part of the efforts initiated by the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to make SiC temperature monitors available, a capability was developed to complete post-irradiation evaluations of these monitors. As discussed in this report, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) selected the resistance measurement approach for detecting peak irradiation temperature from SiC temperature monitors. This document describes the INL efforts to develop the capability to complete these resistance measurements. In addition, the procedure is reported that was developed to assure that high quality measurements are made in a consistent fashion.

  16. Space Temperature Policy This document seeks to clarify the position regarding internal space temperature limits that

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chittka, Lars

    . It should be noted that it is the responsibility of local managers for the welfare of their staff action to be taken. Space Temperatures Limits The Health & Safety Executive (HSE) has stated by air temperature alone. The HSE considers 80% of occupants as a reasonable limit for the minimum number

  17. Low-Temperature Hydrocarbon/CO Oxidation Catalysis in Support...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Publications Low-Temperature HydrocarbonCO Oxidation Catalysis in Support of HCCI Emission Control Low-Temperature HydrocarbonCO Oxidation Catalysis in Support of HCCI...

  18. Low Temperature Combustion and Diesel Emission Reduction Research...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Low Temperature Combustion and Diesel Emission Reduction Research Low Temperature Combustion and Diesel Emission Reduction Research Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24,...

  19. Visualization of UHC Emissions for Low-Temperature Diesel Engine...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Visualization of UHC Emissions for Low-Temperature Diesel Engine Combustion Visualization of UHC Emissions for Low-Temperature Diesel Engine Combustion Presentation given at DEER...

  20. Idling Emissions Reduction Technology with Low Temperature Combustion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Idling Emissions Reduction Technology with Low Temperature Combustion of DI Biodiesel and PFI n-Butanol Idling Emissions Reduction Technology with Low Temperature Combustion of DI...

  1. Microchannel High-Temperature Recuperator for Fuel Cell Systems...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Microchannel High-Temperature Recuperator for Fuel Cell Systems - Fact Sheet, 2011 Microchannel High-Temperature Recuperator for Fuel Cell Systems - Fact Sheet, 2011 FuelCell...

  2. air temperature change: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Index 21 Air temperature regulation by urban trees and green infrastructure Renewable Energy Websites Summary: Air temperature regulation by urban trees and green...

  3. Modesto Memorial Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Memorial Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Modesto Memorial Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

  4. Jackson Hot Springs Lodge Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hot Springs Lodge Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Jackson Hot Springs Lodge Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

  5. Walley's Hot Springs Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Walley's Hot Springs Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Walley's...

  6. Senior Citizens' Center Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Senior Citizens' Center Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Senior Citizens' Center Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

  7. Steamboat Villa Hot Springs Spa Space Heating Low Temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Villa Hot Springs Spa Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Steamboat Villa Hot Springs Spa Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

  8. Shoshone Motel & Trailer Park Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Shoshone Motel & Trailer Park Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Shoshone Motel & Trailer Park Space Heating Low Temperature...

  9. Warm Springs State Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    State Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Warm Springs State Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

  10. Warner Springs Ranch Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Warner Springs Ranch Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Warner...

  11. Agua Calientes Trailer Park Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Calientes Trailer Park Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Agua Calientes Trailer Park Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

  12. Wiesbaden Motel & Health Resort Space Heating Low Temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Motel & Health Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Wiesbaden Motel & Health Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

  13. Pagosa Springs Private Wells Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Private Wells Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Pagosa Springs Private Wells Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

  14. Glenwood Hot Springs Lodge Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lodge Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Glenwood Hot Springs Lodge Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility...

  15. Hot Springs National Park Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    National Park Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Hot Springs National Park Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

  16. Broadwater Athletic Club & Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Athletic Club & Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Broadwater Athletic Club & Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature...

  17. Klamath Apartment Buildings (13) Space Heating Low Temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Apartment Buildings (13) Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Klamath Apartment Buildings (13) Space Heating Low Temperature...

  18. Waunita Hot Springs Ranch Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Springs Ranch Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Waunita Hot Springs Ranch Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

  19. Merle West Medical Center Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Merle West Medical Center Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Merle West Medical Center Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

  20. Maywood Industries of Oregon Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Maywood Industries of Oregon Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Maywood Industries of Oregon Space Heating Low Temperature...