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1

Tuscaloosa County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tuscaloosa County, Alabama: Energy Resources Tuscaloosa County, Alabama: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.3227653°, -87.460397° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.3227653,"lon":-87.460397,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

2

Shelter Seeking Plans of Tuscaloosa Residents for a Future Tornado Event  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The enhanced Fujita scale category 4 (EF4) Tuscaloosa, Alabama, tornado on 27 April 2011 produced 64 fatalities along its 130-km track. Hybrid survey/interviews were conducted with a sample of 211 Tuscaloosa-area residents to determine how the 27 ...

Jason C. Senkbeil; Meganne S. Rockman; John B. Mason

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Determination of Heterogeneity by High-Resolution Seismic Reservoir Characterization in the Heavy Oil Temblor Reservoir of Coalinga Field, California.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The research focuses on analysis and subsurface imaging of siliciclastics rocks on steam-affected 3D poststack seismic data, merged from different vintages, from the Temblor Formation (more)

Mahapatra, Sailendra Nath

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Aquifer characterization at the Veterans Administration Hospital, Tuscaloosa, Alabama  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Veterans Administration (VA) is studying the feasibility of aquifer thermal storage (ATES) at their Tuscaloosa, Alabama, facility. To determine the characteristics of the aquifer underlying the facility, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory gathered information about the environment of the aquifer and conducted tests to estimate the aquifer's transmissivity, ground-water flow direction, and velocity. Seven wells were drilled at the VA site. It was found that ground-water flow direction at the site is generally toward the southwest. The magnitude of the gradient is approximately 2.5 {times} 10{sup -3} to 3 {times} 10{sup -3} ft/ft. For six of the seven wells, clay lenses or thick clay layers appear to be acting locally as confining or semi-confining layers. Three types of test were conducted at the site: a step drawdown test, a constant discharge and recover test, and a single-well tracer test. The data yielded responses suggesting leaky confined or delayed yield models for the aquifer. Drawdown and recovery versus time were matched type curves for delayed yield to obtain estimates of transmissivity and storage. This recovery method gave the best fit to the drawdown-versus-time curves. Using this method it was found that transmissivity ranged from 500 to 9000 ft{sup 2}/day and storage ranged from 1.5 {times} 10{sup -4} to 4.5 {times} 10{sup -2} for the wells tested. Using the results of the pump and tracer tests simultaneously, ground-water velocity was estimated to be approximately 0.8 ft/day, with an effective porosity of approximately 12%. 4 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

Cronin, W.E.; Luttrell, S.P.; Hall, S.H.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Robert Jemison Van de Graaff was born on December 20, 1901 in Tuscaloosa,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Van de Graaff Picture Van de Graaff Picture Short Biography Of Robert Jemison Van de Graaff Robert Jemison Van de Graaff was born on December 20, 1901 in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. His mother was Minnie Cherokee Hargrove and his father was Adrian Sebastian Van de Graaff. Robert attended the Tuscaloosa public schools and then attended the University of Alabama where he received a BS degree in 1922 and an MS degree in 1923. Both degrees were in mechanical engineering. After graduating from college he worked for the Alabama Power Company for a year as a research assistant. He studied at the Sorbonne in Paris from 1924 to 1925 and while there, attended lectures by Marie Curie on radiation. In 1925 he went to Oxford University in England as a Rhodes Scholar. At Oxford he received a BS in physics in 1926 and a Ph.D. in physics in 1928. While

6

Chattanooga Eagle Ford Western Gulf TX-LA-MS Salt Basin Uinta Basin  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Western Western Gulf TX-LA-MS Salt Basin Uinta Basin Devonian (Ohio) Marcellus Utica Bakken*** Avalon- Bone Spring San Joaquin Basin Monterey Santa Maria, Ventura, Los Angeles Basins Monterey- Temblor Pearsall Tuscaloosa Big Horn Basin Denver Basin Powder River Basin Park Basin Niobrara* Mowry Niobrara* Heath** Manning Canyon Appalachian Basin Antrim Barnett Bend New Albany Woodford Barnett- Woodford Lewis Hilliard- Baxter- Mancos Excello- Mulky Fayetteville Floyd- Neal Gammon Cody Haynesville- Bossier Hermosa Mancos Pierre Conasauga Michigan Basin Ft. Worth Basin Palo Duro Basin Permian Basin Illinois Basin Anadarko Basin Greater Green River Basin Cherokee Platform San Juan Basin Williston Basin Black Warrior Basin A r d m o r e B a s i n Paradox Basin Raton Basin Montana Thrust Belt Marfa Basin Valley & Ridge Province Arkoma Basin Forest

7

Hydrologic characterization of the unconfined aquifer at the University of Alabama Student Recreation Center, Tuscaloosa, Alabama  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Seasonal thermal energy storage (STES) involves storing thermal energy such as winter chill, summer heat, and industrial waste heat for future use in heat and/or cooling buildings or for industrial processes. Widespread development and implementation of STES would significantly reduce the need to generate primary energy in the United States. Recent data indicate that STES is technically suitable for providing 5% to 10% of the nation's energy, with major contributions in the commercial and industrial sectors and in district heating and cooling applications. This report describes aquifer characterization at the University of Alabama Student Recreation Center in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. The purpose of the testing is to provide design data for the University's use in modifying and expanding an existing ATES well field. The aquifer characterization work was conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program) in cooperation with the University of Alabama as part of efforts to assess the use of chill ATES for space cooling.

Hall, S.H.; Newcomer, D.R.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Hydrologic characterization of the unconfined aquifer at the University of Alabama Student Recreation Center, Tuscaloosa, Alabama  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Seasonal thermal energy storage (STES) involves storing thermal energy such as winter chill, summer heat, and industrial waste heat for future use in heat and/or cooling buildings or for industrial processes. Widespread development and implementation of STES would significantly reduce the need to generate primary energy in the United States. Recent data indicate that STES is technically suitable for providing 5% to 10% of the nation`s energy, with major contributions in the commercial and industrial sectors and in district heating and cooling applications. This report describes aquifer characterization at the University of Alabama Student Recreation Center in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. The purpose of the testing is to provide design data for the University`s use in modifying and expanding an existing ATES well field. The aquifer characterization work was conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program) in cooperation with the University of Alabama as part of efforts to assess the use of chill ATES for space cooling.

Hall, S.H.; Newcomer, D.R.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Hydrologic characterization of the unconfined aquifer at the General Motors Harrison Division Plant, Tuscaloosa, Alabama  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

General Motors (GM) is studying the feasibility of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) for air conditioning at their Harrison Division plant located in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has assisted in this effort by conducting field tests to measure the hydraulic properties of the proposed ATES well field, which will be within the unconfined aquifer and adjacent to the GM plant. Results showed that in the vicinity of the test well, transmissivity was 2000 ft{sup 2}/d, effective aquifer thickness was 50 ft, effective porosity was 6.2%, hydraulic gradient was 0.005, and seepage velocity was 3.2 ft/d. A second test series at a newly constructed well was expanded to include measuring specific capacity and investigating the vertical distribution of flow within the aquifer. Specific objectives were to determine the injection capacity of the aquifer and to examine efficiency of the well design. Transmissivity was 2300 to 2600 ft{sup 2}/d, effective aquifer thickness was 58 ft, effective porosity was 6.0 to 8.0%, hydraulic gradient was 0.0047, and seepage velocity was 3.1 to 2.7 ft/d. Injection capacity, based on a step-injection test, was approximately 17 gpm/ft and was independent of flow rate within the experimental range 90 to 338 gpm. Maximum hydraulic conductivity occurred within the uppermost 20 ft of saturated sediments, which consisted of well-sorted sand. Below the sand, sorting was progressively poorer with depth, and hydraulic conductivity decreased smoothly. At the base of the aquifer, hydraulic conductivity was less than 10% of that of the uppermost 20 ft. 7 refs., 10 figs.

Hall, S.H.; Newcomer, D.R.; Luttrell, S.P.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Analysis of Tornado-Induced Tree Fall Using Aerial Photography from the Joplin, Missouri, and TuscaloosaBirmingham, Alabama, Tornadoes of 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, aerial imagery of tornado damage is used to digitize the falling direction of trees (i.e., tree fall) along the 22 May 2011 Joplin, Missouri, and 27 April 2011 TuscaloosaBirmingham, Alabama, tornado tracks. Normalized mean patterns ...

Christopher D. Karstens; William A. Gallus Jr.; Bruce D. Lee; Catherine A. Finley

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

The aquifer chill storage project at the University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa: Progress report for 1985 and 1986  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) is predicted to be the most cost-effective technology for seasonal storage of low-grade thermal energy. Approximately 60% of the US is underlain with aquifers potentially suitable for underground energy storage. Under sponsorship of the US Department of Energy (DOE), Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), which is operated by Battelle Memorial Institute, has managed numerical modeling, laboratory studies, evaluation of environmental and institutional issues, and field testing of ATES at several sites. This report describes the monitoring and evaluation (under the auspices of PNL) of an ATES chill system constructed and operated by the University of Alabama at Tuscaloosa, Alabama. The system is the first such system to be monitored in a comprehensive manner. Results support both the promise and problems likely to be encountered in such systems. Chill ATES has the potential to substantially reduce energy consumption and, especially, summer peak cooling electrical demand. However, the geohydrologic environment that the system will use must be a major element in system design and operation. 9 refs., 25 figs., 10 tabs.

Schaetzle, W.J.; Brett, C.E.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Proceedings of the 25th Rare Earth Research Conference, June 22-26, Tuscaloosa, Alabama, USA Journal of Alloys and Compounds 2009, Vol. 488, Iss. 2, pp 491-656  

SciTech Connect

The program of the 25th Rare Earth Research Conference (RERC08) integrated basic and applied multidisciplinary research centered on the f-elements. Leading science was featured in the form of invited oral presentations and contributed posters on topics in f-element chemistry, physics, and material, earth, environmental, and biological sciences. The conference was held in Shelby Hall, located on The University of Alabama?s Tuscaloosa, AL campus. The final program and list of attendees is available at URL http://bama.ua.edu/~rdrogers/RERC08/.

Rogers, Robin D.

2009-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

13

Tuscaloosa, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

098407°, -87.5691735° 098407°, -87.5691735° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.2098407,"lon":-87.5691735,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

14

Surface geology of the northern Midway-Sunset Field and adjacent Temblor Range, Kern County, California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New surface mapping at a 1:12000 scale adjacent to the 2 billion barrel Midway Sunset Field has revealed complex intraformational stratigraphy within the upper Miocene Santa Margarita Formation (Tms). Locally known as the Potter and Spellacy Formations in the subsurface, these sandstone and conglomerate heavy oil reservoirs produce the majority of Midway Sunset daily production of 164,000 barrels of oil via thermal EOR processes. The Tms consists mostly of conglomerate inserted into the Belridge Diatomite (Tmb) interval. The stratigraphically lower intervals of the Tms clearly fill deeply incised valleys or submarine canyons cut into Tmb and locally into the underlying Antelope Shale (Tma). The basal intervals of Tms; are very coarse grained, containing boulders of granitic and metamorphic rock as large as 4 meters that were derived from the Salinian block west of the San Andreas Fault. The upper intervals of Tms are more sheet-like and interbedded containing clasts less than 50 cm in length. The incised valleys have a spacing of about one mile in outcrop, with a gap located in the area of the older Republic Sandstone (Tmr). Paleocurrents from Tms regionally suggest sediment transport to the northeast. The sedimentary structures of Tms suggest deposition in deep-water conditions, probably a slope (bathyal) setting. Shelf environments should have been present to the southwest (now stripped away by erosion) and submarine-fan and basin-floor environments to the northeast.

Wylie, A.S. Jr.; Sturm, D.H.; Gardiner, R.L.; Mercer, M.F. (Santa Fe Energy Resources, Bakersfield, CA (United States)) (and others)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Riggi 10012011 - 09302014 Pearsall, TX Improving Fuel Efficiency through Innovative Tire Design & Materials The Tire & Vehicle Test Center will be used for on-vehicle tire...

16

Environmental Assessment: Geothermal Energy Geopressure Subprogram. Gulf Coast Well Drilling and Testing Activity (Frio, Wilcox, and Tuscaloosa Formations, Texas and Louisiana)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has initiated a program to evaluate the feasibility of developing the geothermal-geopressured energy resources of the Louisiana-Texas Gulf Coast. As part of this effort, DOE is contracting for the drilling of design wells to define the nature and extent of the geopressure resource. At each of several sites, one deep well (4000-6400 m) will be drilled and flow tested. One or more shallow wells will also be drilled to dispose of geopressured brines. Each site will require about 2 ha (5 acres) of land. Construction and initial flow testing will take approximately one year. If initial flow testing is successful, a continuous one-year duration flow test will take place at a rate of up to 6400 m{sup 3} (40,000 bbl) per day. Extensive tests will be conducted on the physical and chemical composition of the fluids, on their temperature and flow rate, on fluid disposal techniques, and on the reliability and performance of equipment. Each project will require a maximum of three years to complete drilling, testing, and site restoration.

None

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Phylogenetics, development, and Cenozoic paleontology of Buccinidae (Mollusca:Gastropoda)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7) from the Vaqueros and Monterey formations of California,Formation, most of the Monterey Formation, and the BarkersSandstone of Monterey Group, Temblor Formation (Vallecitos

Vendetti, Jann Elizabeth

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

CX-006502: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Improving Fuel Efficiency through Innovative Tire Design and MaterialsCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 08/29/2011Location(s): Pearsall, TexasOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

19

untitled  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487, USA 2 Neutron Scattering Science Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6475, USA (Presented 16 November...

20

Microsoft Word - FT2b 092408 97-03  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Black Warrior Basin Coal Seam Project Field Test Location Tuscaloosa County, Alabama Summary of Field Test Site and Operations The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temblor pearsall tuscaloosa" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Plasma...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa Zornberg, Jorge G. (Jorge G. Zornberg) - Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering, University of Texas at Austin...

22

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Utility/Power Pool NERC Region Area Affected Type of Disturbance Loss (megawatts) ... Temblor Substation in McKittrick, California 08/04/2012 4:00 AM 08/04/2012 7:20 AM

23

Stephen C. Ruppel Principal Investigator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in mudrocks (gas shale) characterization and research ·Research integrates a wide spectrum of disciplines ranging from sedimentology to gas chemistry to fractures to fluid flow. ·Researchers include geoscientists Shale, Texas, Louisiana ·Eagle Ford Shale, South Texas ·Pearsall Shale, Gulf Coast Basin ·Bakken Shale

Texas at Austin, University of

24

final technical program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 28, 2000 ... discussed: the three-dimensional morphology of solid-liquid mix- tures and the .... to modify the free energy available for solidification using the ..... Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 USA; David Poirier, University of Arizona,. Matls.

25

State Oil and Gas Board State Oil and Gas Board Address Place...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Board State Oil and Gas Board Address Place Zip Website Alabama Oil and Gas Board Alabama Oil and Gas Board Hackberry Lane Tuscaloosa Alabama http www gsa state al us ogb ogb html...

26

MARTIN MARIETTA ENERGY SYSTEMS, INC. FOR THE UNITED STATES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Virginia University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky University of L'Aquila, L'Aquila, Italy Lawrence III, and Geralyn Zeller Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York University of California, Davis

27

LJournal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology, 233 (1999) 181211  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 Programming by John Voorhees PV & Associates Madison, WI October 4, 2003 #12;2 Contents..........................................................................................................................158 The Use of the WinDETPOND Program to Statistically Evaluate Wet Pond Performance.......................................................................................................................................................239 Monitoring Program

Darby, Dennis

28

Quantitative Methods for Reservoir Characterization and Improved Recovery: Application to Heavy Oil Sands  

SciTech Connect

The first twelve months of the project focused on collecting data for characterization and modeling. In addition, data from Coalinga Field was analyzed to define the fractal structure present in the data set. The following sections of the report parallel the first four subtasks of the investigation were: (1) Collect and Load Property Data from Temblor Outcrops in California, (2) Collect and Load Property Data from Temblor Reservoir Sands, West Coalinga Field, California, (3) Collect and Load Property Data from Continuous Upper Cretaceous Outcrops in Utah, and (4) Define Fractal Structure in the Data Sets and Apply to Generating Property Representations.

Castle, James W.; Molz, Fred J.

2001-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

29

Quantitative Methods for Reservoir Characterization and Improved Recovery: Application to Heavy Oil Sands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project involved application of advanced analytical property-distribution methods conditioned to continuous outcrop control for improved reservoir characterization and simulation. The investigation was performed in collaboration with Chevron Production Company U.S.A. as an industrial partner, and incorporates data from the Temblor Formation in Chevron's West Coalinga Field, California. Improved prediction of interwell reservoir heterogeneity was needed to increase productivity and to reduce recovery cost for California's heavy oil sands, which contained approximately 2.3 billion barrels of remaining reserves in the Temblor Formation and in other formations of the San Joaquin Valley.

Castle, James W.; Molz, Fred W.; Bridges, Robert A.; Dinwiddie, Cynthia L.; Lorinovich, Caitlin J.; Lu, Silong

2003-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

30

Enhanced Coalbed Methane Recovery Through Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide: Potential for a Market-Based Environmental Solution in the Black Warrior Basin of Alabama  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coalbed Methane Recovery Through Sequestration of Coalbed Methane Recovery Through Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide: Potential for a Market-Based Environmental Solution in the Black Warrior Basin of Alabama Jack C. Pashin (jpashin@gsa.state.al.us; 205-349-2852) Geological Survey of Alabama P.O. Box 869999 Tuscaloosa, AL 35486 Richard H. Groshong, Jr. (rgroshon@wgs.geo.ua.edu; 205-348-1882) Deparment of Geology University of Alabama Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 Richard E. Carroll (rcarroll@gsa.state.al.us; 205-349-2852) Geological Survey of Alabama P.O. Box 869999 Tuscaloosa, AL 35486 Abstract Sequestration of CO 2 in coal is a market-based environmental solution with potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions while increasing coalbed methane recovery. Producing coalbed methane through injection of CO 2 is also more efficient than current techniques requiring

31

Intergas `95: International unconventional gas symposium. Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

The International Unconventional Gas Symposium was held on May 14--20, 1995 in Tuscaloosa, Alabama where 52 reports were presented. These reports are grouped in this proceedings under: geology and resources; mine degasification and safety; international developments; reservoir characterization/coal science; and environmental/legal and regulatory. Each report has been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Managed by UT-Battelle for the Department of Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­ Tuscaloosa Auburn University Clemson University University of Kentucky Mississippi State University The Automotive Research Alliance is one significant way in which we have linked university researchers to ORNL scientists Oak Ridge National Laboratory University of Alabama ­ Birmingham University of Alabama

33

Quantitative Methods for Reservoir Characterization and Improved Recovery: Application to Heavy Oil Sands  

SciTech Connect

Improved prediction of interwell reservoir heterogeneity was needed to increase productivity and to reduce recovery cost for California's heavy oil sands, which contain approximately 2.3 billion barrels of remaining reserves in the Temblor Formation and in other formations of the San Joaquin Valley. This investigation involved application of advanced analytical property-distribution methods conditioned to continuous outcrop control for improved reservoir characterization and simulation.

Castle, J.W.; Molz, F.J.; Brame, S.E.; Falta, R.W.

2003-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

34

Quantitative Methods for Reservoir Characterization and Improved Recovery: Application to Heavy Oil Sands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Improved prediction of interwell reservoir heterogeneity is needed to increase productivity and to reduce recovery cost for California's heavy oil sands, which contain approximately 2.3 billion barrels of remaining reserves in the Temblor Formation and in other formations of the San Joaquin Valley. This investigation involved application of advanced analytical property-distribution methods conditioned to continuous outcrop control for improved reservoir characterization and simulation.

Castle, James W.; Molz, Fred J.

2003-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

35

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

51 - 5260 of 28,905 results. 51 - 5260 of 28,905 results. Download CX-000439: Categorical Exclusion Determination Actualistic and Geomechanical Modeling of Reservoir Rock, Carbon Dioxide and Formation Flue Interaction, Citronelle Oil Field, Alabama CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 11/20/2009 Location(s): Tuscaloosa, Alabama Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-000439-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-000440: Categorical Exclusion Determination Actualistic and Geomechanical Modeling of Reservoir Rock, Carbon Dioxide and Formation Flue Interaction, Citronelle Oil Field, Alabama CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 11/20/2009 Location(s): Tuscaloosa, Alabama Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-000440-categorical-exclusion-determination

36

Microsoft Word - DE-FC26-03NT41875_final.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

i i Report Title Resource Assessment of the In-Place and Potentially Recoverable Deep Natural Gas Resource of the Onshore Interior Salt Basins, North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico Type of Report Final Report Reporting Period Start Date October 1, 2003 Reporting Period End Date September 30, 2006 Principal Author Ernest A. Mancini (205/348-4319) Department of Geological Sciences Box 870338 202 Bevill Building University of Alabama Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0338 Date Report was Issued November 15, 2006 DOE Award Number DE-FC26-03NT41875 Name and Address of Participants Ernest A. Mancini Paul Aharon Dept. of Geological Sciences Box 870338 Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0338 Donald A. Goddard Roger Barnaby Center for Energy Studies

37

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41 - 16350 of 31,917 results. 41 - 16350 of 31,917 results. Download CX-006499: Categorical Exclusion Determination Improving Fuel Efficiency through Innovative Tire Design and Materials CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08/29/2011 Location(s): Findlay, Ohio Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-006499-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-006502: Categorical Exclusion Determination Improving Fuel Efficiency through Innovative Tire Design and Materials CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08/29/2011 Location(s): Pearsall, Texas Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-006502-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-006506: Categorical Exclusion Determination

38

Chattanooga Eagle Ford Rio Grande Embayment Texas- Louisiana-  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Rio Grande Rio Grande Embayment Texas- Louisiana- Mississippi Salt Basin Uinta Basin Appa lachia n Basin Utica Marcellus Devonian (Ohio) Antrim Barnett Bend New Albany Woodford Barnett- Woodford Lewis Hilliard- Baxter- Mancos Excello- Mulky Fayetteville Floyd- Neal Gammon Cody Haynesville Hermosa Mancos Pierre Conasauga Woodford- Caney Pearsall- Eagle Ford Michigan Basin Ft. Worth Basin Palo Duro Basin Permian Basin Illinois Basin Anadarko Basin Greater Green River Basin Cherokee Platform San Juan Basin Williston Basin Black Warrior Basin A r d m o r e B a s i n Paradox Basin Raton Basin Maverick Sub-Basin Montana Thrust Belt Marfa Basin Valley and Ridge Province Arkoma Basin Forest City Basin Piceance Basin Shale Gas Plays, Lower 48 States 0 200 400 100 300 Miles ± Source: Energy Information Administration based on data from various published studies

39

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Sales Price of Coal by State, County, and Number of Mines, 2012" Average Sales Price of Coal by State, County, and Number of Mines, 2012" "Coal-Producing State and County","Number of Mines","Sales","Average Sales Price" ,,"(thousand short tons)","(dollars per short ton)" "Alabama",39,19021,106.57 " Bibb",1,"w","w" " Blount",2,"w","w" " Fayette",1,"w","w" " Franklin",1,"w","w" " Jackson",2,"w","w" " Jefferson",11,4298,146.04 " Marion",1,"w","w" " Tuscaloosa",7,8599,111.55 " Walker",11,2370,81.88

40

into deeper and larger-volume saline formations. Researchers at  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

into deeper and larger-volume saline formations. Researchers at into deeper and larger-volume saline formations. Researchers at Cranfield have been monitoring the injected CO 2 with instrumentation installed nearly two miles beneath the surface to ensure the safe and permanent storage in the Lower Tuscaloosa Formations. The Cranfield project also has been successful in the deployment of pressure-response monitoring techniques in the injection zone ("in-zone") and above the injection zone ("above zone"). Real-time data collected since July 2008

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temblor pearsall tuscaloosa" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Refinery Capacity Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 (Barrels per Stream Day, Except Where Noted) ......................................................... Alabama 120,100 0 130,000 0 48,000 32,000 0 0 0 Goodway Refining LLC 4,100 0 5,000 0 0 0 0 0 ............................................................................................................................... 0 Atmore Hunt Refining Co 36,000 0 40,000 0 18,000 32,000 0 0 ............................................................................................................................... 0 Tuscaloosa Shell Chemical LP 80,000 0 85,000 0 30,000 0 0 0 ............................................................................................................................... 0 Saraland .........................................................

42

2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 FY 2011 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Alabama II.K.14 University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa: Protein-Templated Synthesis and Assembly of Nanostructuctures for Hydrogen Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 267 V.F.1 CFD Research Corporation: Water Transport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection, Testing, and Design Optimization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .814 V.F.1 ESI US R&D: Water Transport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection, Testing, and Design Optimization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .814 Arizona II.C.1 Arizona State University: Zeolite Membrane Reactor for Water-Gas Shift Reaction for Hydrogen

43

Underground Energy Storage Program. 1984 annual summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Underground Energy Storage (UES) Program activities during the period from April 1984 through March 1985 are briefly described. Primary activities in seasonal thermal energy storage (STES) involved field testing of high-temperature (>100/sup 0/C (212/sup 0/F)) aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) at St. Paul, laboratory studies of geochemical issues associated with high-temperatures ATES, monitoring of chill ATES facilities in Tuscaloosa, and STES linked with solar energy collection. The scope of international activities in STES is briefly discussed.

Kannberg, L.D.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Comparison of caprock pore networks which potentially will be impacted by carbon sequestration projects.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Injection of CO2 into underground rock formations can reduce atmospheric CO2 emissions. Caprocks present above potential storage formations are the main structural trap inhibiting CO2 from leaking into overlying aquifers or back to the Earth's surface. Dissolution and precipitation of caprock minerals resulting from reaction with CO2 may alter the pore network where many pores are of the micrometer to nanometer scale, thus altering the structural trapping potential of the caprock. However, the distribution, geometry and volume of pores at these scales are poorly characterized. In order to evaluate the overall risk of leakage of CO2 from storage formations, a first critical step is understanding the distribution and shape of pores in a variety of different caprocks. As the caprock is often comprised of mudstones, we analyzed samples from several mudstone formations with small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging to compare the pore networks. Mudstones were chosen from current or potential sites for carbon sequestration projects including the Marine Tuscaloosa Group, the Lower Tuscaloosa Group, the upper and lower shale members of the Kirtland Formation, and the Pennsylvanian Gothic shale. Expandable clay contents ranged from 10% to approximately 40% in the Gothic shale and Kirtland Formation, respectively. During SANS, neutrons effectively scatter from interfaces between materials with differing scattering length density (i.e., minerals and pores). The intensity of scattered neutrons, I(Q), where Q is the scattering vector, gives information about the volume and arrangement of pores in the sample. The slope of the scattering data when plotted as log I(Q) vs. log Q provides information about the fractality or geometry of the pore network. On such plots slopes from -2 to -3 represent mass fractals while slopes from -3 to -4 represent surface fractals. Scattering data showed surface fractal dimensions for the Kirtland formation and one sample from the Tuscaloosa formation close to 3, indicating very rough surfaces. In contrast, scattering data for the Gothic shale formation exhibited mass fractal behavior. In one sample of the Tuscaloosa formation the data are described by a surface fractal at low Q (larger pores) and a mass fractal at high Q (smaller pores), indicating two pore populations contributing to the scattering behavior. These small angle neutron scattering results, combined with high-resolution TEM imaging, provided a means for both qualitative and quantitative analysis of the differences in pore networks between these various mudstones.

McCray, John (Colorado School of Mines); Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis (Colorado School of Mines); Mouzakis, Katherine (Colorado School of Mines); Heath, Jason E.; Dewers, Thomas A.; Rother, Gernot (Oak Ridge National Laboratory)

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

A field study of underbalance pressures necessary to obtain clean perforations using tubing-conveyed perforating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study of 90 wells perforated with the tubing-conveyed perforating system showed a correlation between underbalanced pressure and formation permeability that can be used to achieve clean perforations. The data, from gas and oil producers in clean sandstones, are from wells that were perforated, tested, acidized, and retested. There is a clear minimum underbalance line separating the data sets of wells that had clean perforations (unassisted by acidizing) from those wells that showed a significant productivity increase after acidizing. The study includes data from oil and gas wells in the Gulf of Mexico, Lousiana (Tuscaloosa trend), New Mexico (Morrow sandstone), Rocky Mountain overthrust, and Alberta, Canada.

King, G.E.; Anderson, A.R.; Ringham, M.D.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

EIS-0023-FEIS-Figures-1979.pdf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NORTM NORTM CAROLINA 2 -- r /'- 3Charlo,te Gree,v:; I, o s. \ '~ ( % SOUTH CAROLINA ".4 o " .Alkenoco'"mb'a A1l.a,to \ August. ( SRP O Macon \ GEORGIA ? Charleston 50 MI ".* / 100 Ml 150 Mi 1 \ ATLANTIC OCEAN Sov.nn.h / FIGURE III-1. Location of SRP Relative to Surrounding Population Centers III-2 --- - FIGURE III-2. The Savannah River Plant III-3 FIGURE 'III-3. Profile of Geologic Formation Beneath the Savannah River Plant . III-5 ,-, -,.. . . . . . 5 .-- -612 CRYSTALLINE ROCK . II rfoce FIGURE III-4. Hydrostatic Head in Ground Water Near H Area III-8 ~'z 'Kw ) -.- ________ Alu EN F PLATEAU ";<--'-----% \ ~//i.s,t,,7 --- I '220--- Heed in Tuscaloosa ft H20 obove me.. $,0 level - 5 0 5 10 ,5 MILES FIGURE III-5. Flow in Tuscaloosa Aquifer (Ongoing hydrographic measurements indicate that this flow pattern has remained the same under the SRP site since the early 1950' s.) 111-10 . FIGURE

47

QUANTITATIVE METHODS FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND IMPROVED RECOVERY: APPLICATION TO HEAVY OIL SANDS  

SciTech Connect

Improved prediction of interwell reservoir heterogeneity has the potential to increase productivity and to reduce recovery cost for California's heavy oil sands, which contain approximately 2.3 billion barrels of remaining reserves in the Temblor Formation and in other formations of the San Joaquin Valley. This investigation involves application of advanced analytical property-distribution methods conditioned to continuous outcrop control for improved reservoir characterization and simulation, particularly in heavy oil sands. The investigation was performed in collaboration with Chevron Production Company U.S.A. as an industrial partner, and incorporates data from the Temblor Formation in Chevron's West Coalinga Field. Observations of lateral variability and vertical sequences observed in Temblor Formation outcrops has led to a better understanding of reservoir geology in West Coalinga Field. Based on the characteristics of stratigraphic bounding surfaces in the outcrops, these surfaces were identified in the subsurface using cores and logs. The bounding surfaces were mapped and then used as reference horizons in the reservoir modeling. Facies groups and facies tracts were recognized from outcrops and cores of the Temblor Formation and were applied to defining the stratigraphic framework and facies architecture for building 3D geological models. The following facies tracts were recognized: incised valley, estuarine, tide- to wave-dominated shoreline, diatomite, and subtidal. A new minipermeameter probe, which has important advantages over previous methods of measuring outcrop permeability, was developed during this project. The device, which measures permeability at the distal end of a small drillhole, avoids surface weathering effects and provides a superior seal compared with previous methods for measuring outcrop permeability. The new probe was used successfully for obtaining a high-quality permeability data set from an outcrop in southern Utah. Results obtained from analyzing the fractal structure of permeability data collected from the southern Utah outcrop and from core permeability data provided by Chevron from West Coalinga Field were used in distributing permeability values in 3D reservoir models. Spectral analyses and the Double Trace Moment method (Lavallee et al., 1991) were used to analyze the scaling and multifractality of permeability data from cores from West Coalinga Field. T2VOC, which is a numerical flow simulator capable of modeling multiphase, multi-component, nonisothermal flow, was used to model steam injection and oil production for a portion of section 36D in West Coalinga Field. The layer structure and permeability distributions of different models, including facies group, facies tract, and fractal permeability models, were incorporated into the numerical flow simulator. The injection and production histories of wells in the study area were modeled, including shutdowns and the occasional conversion of production wells to steam injection wells. The framework provided by facies groups provides a more realistic representation of the reservoir conditions than facies tracts, which is revealed by a comparison of the history-matching for the oil production. Permeability distributions obtained using the fractal results predict the high degree of heterogeneity within the reservoir sands of West Coalinga Field. The modeling results indicate that predictions of oil production are strongly influenced by the geologic framework and by the boundary conditions. The permeability data collected from the southern Utah outcrop, support a new concept for representing natural heterogeneity, which is called the fractal/facies concept. This hypothesis is one of the few potentially simplifying concepts to emerge from recent studies of geological heterogeneity. Further investigation of this concept should be done to more fully apply fractal analysis to reservoir modeling and simulation. Additional outcrop permeability data sets and further analysis of the data from distinct facies will be needed in order to fully develop

James W. Castle; Fred J. Molz; Ronald W. Falta; Cynthia L. Dinwiddie; Scott E. Brame; Robert A. Bridges

2002-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

48

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7. Estimated ultimate recovery for selected shale gas plays in three AEOs (billion cubic feet per well) 7. Estimated ultimate recovery for selected shale gas plays in three AEOs (billion cubic feet per well) AEO2010 AEO2011 AEO2012 Basin/Play Range Average Range Average Range Average Appalachian Marcellus 0.25-0.74 0.49 0.86-4.66 1.62 0.02-7.80 1.56 Utica -- -- -- -- 0.10-2.75 1.13 Arkoma Woodford 1.43-4.28 2.85 3.00-5.32 4.06 0.40-4.22 1.97 Fayetteville 0.91-2.73 1.82 0.86-2.99 2.03 0.19-3.22 1.30 Chattanooga -- -- -- -- 0.14-1.94 0.99 Caney -- -- -- -- 0.05-0.66 0.34 TX-LA-MS Salt Haynesville/Boosier 2.30-6.89 4.59 1.13-8.65 3.58 0.08-5.76 2.67 Western Gulf Eagle Ford 1.10-3.29 2.19 1.73-7.32 2.63 0.41-4.93 2.36 Pearsall -- -- -- -- 0.12-2.91 1.22

49

Simulation studies to evaluate the effect of fracture closure on the performance of naturally fractured reservoirs. Annual report  

SciTech Connect

The first of a three-year research program to evaluate the effect of fracture closure on the recovery of oil and gas from naturally fractured reservoirs has been completed. The objectives of the study are to (1) evaluate the reservoir conditions where fracture closure is significant, and (2) evaluate innovative fluid injection techniques capable of maintaining pressure within the reservoir. Simulation studies were conducted with a dual porosity simulator capable of simulating the performance of vertical and horizontal wells. Each simulator was initialized using properties typical of the Austin Chalk reservoir in Pearsall Field, Texas. Simulations of both vertical and horizontal well performance were made assuming that fracture permeability was insensitive to pressure change. Sensitivity runs indicate that the simulator is predicting the effects of critical reservoir parameters in a logical and consistent manner. The results to-date confirm that horizontal wells can increase both oil recovery rate and total oil recovery from naturally fractured reservoirs. The year one simulation results will provide the baseline for the ongoing study which will evaluate the performance degradation caused by the sensitivity of fracture permeability to pressure change, and investigate fluid injection pressure maintenance as a means to improve oil recovery performance. The study is likely to conclude that fracture closure decreases oil recovery and that pressure support achieved through fluid injection could be beneficial in improving recovery.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

FE Categorical Exclusions | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4, 2009 4, 2009 CX-000451: Categorical Exclusion Determination The Potential Risks of Freshwater Aquifer Contamination with Geosequestration CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1, B3.6 Date: 11/24/2009 Location(s): Durham, North Carolina Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory November 24, 2009 CX-000450: Categorical Exclusion Determination Gulf of Mexico Miocene Carbon Dioxide Site Characterization Mega Transect CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 11/24/2009 Location(s): Austin, Texas Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory November 24, 2009 CX-000449: Categorical Exclusion Determination Geologic Sequestration Training and Research CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1, B3.6 Date: 11/24/2009 Location(s): Tuscaloosa, Alabama Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

51

square-mile Black Warrior Basin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

will inject CO will inject CO 2 into a coalbed methane (CBM) well in Tuscaloosa County, Alabama, to assess the capability of mature CBM reservoirs to receive and adsorb large volumes of CO 2 . Injection began at the test site on June 15; the site was selected because it is representative of the 23,000- square-mile Black Warrior Basin located in northwestern Alabama and northeastern Mississippi. It is estimated that this area has the potential to store in the range of 1.1 to 2.3 Gigatons of CO 2 , which is approximately the amount that Alabama's coal-fired power plants emit in two decades. The targeted coal seams range from 940 to 1,800 feet deep and are one to six feet thick. Approximately 240 tons of CO 2 will be injected over a 45- to 60-day period. More information

52

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

01 - 9710 of 26,764 results. 01 - 9710 of 26,764 results. Download CX-000742: Categorical Exclusion Determination Site Characterization for Carbon Dioxide Storage from Coal-fired Power Facilities in the Black Warrior Basin of Alabama CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 01/22/2010 Location(s): Walker County, Alabama Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-000742-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-000741: Categorical Exclusion Determination Site Characterization for Carbon Dioxide Storage from Coal-fired Power Facilities in the Black Warrior Basin of Alabama CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 01/22/2010 Location(s): Tuscaloosa, Alabama Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-000741-categorical-exclusion-determination

53

skef103.tmp  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

vL+ vL+ . ,eric$n Chemical Society Symposium Series "Progress in Metal Ion Separation . d Preconcentration" ChapterXX Progress in Metal Ion Separation and Preconcentration: An Overview AndrewH.Bondl$* ,MarkL. Dietzl ,and Robin D. Rogers2 lChemistry Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, IL 60439 2Department of Chemistry, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 A brief historical perspective covering the most mature chemically- based metal ion separation methods is presented, as is a summary of the recommendations made in the 1987 National Research Council (NRC) report entitled "Separation and Purification: Critical Needs and Opportunities". A review of Progress in Metal Ion Separation and Preconcentration shows that advances are occurring in each area of need cited by the NRC. Following an explanation of the objectives

54

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Notice of Availability of Environmental Impact Statment for the Final EIS for the Tucson Electric Power Company Sahuarita-Nogales Transmission Line (DOE/EIS-0336) (03/25/05)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

15 15 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 57 / Friday, March 25, 2005 / Notices ERP No. DS-NPS-K65325-CA Rating LO, Merced Wild and Scenic River Revised Comprehensive Management Plan, Amend and Supplement Information, Yosemite National Park, El Portal Administrative Site, Tuolume, Merced, Mono, Mariposa and Madera Counties, CA. Summary: EPA has no objections to the preferred alternative. However, EPA requests that the Park Service consider additional protection measures for the exceptional cultural resources in El Portal when delineating and zoning the river boundary. Final EISs ERP No. F-AFS-E65069-AL, Longleaf Ecosystem Restoration Project, Proposes a Five-Year Project to Begin Restoration of Native Longleaf, Talladega National Forest, Oakmulgee District, Tuscaloosa,

55

FE Categorical Exclusions | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 11, 2011 July 11, 2011 CX-006188: Categorical Exclusion Determination B-3 Area 160 Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Upgrades Date: 07/11/2011 Location(s): Morgantown, West Virginia Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory July 11, 2011 CX-006181: Categorical Exclusion Determination Construct and Operate a 100 ton per day Ceramic Membrane Oxygen Separation Pilot Scale Unit -Phase III CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B5.1 Date: 07/11/2011 Location(s): Convent, Louisiana Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory July 11, 2011 CX-006180: Categorical Exclusion Determination Innovative Water Management Technology to Reduce Environmental Impact (Phase III) CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 07/11/2011 Location(s): Tuscaloosa County, Alabama Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

56

State Oil and Gas Board State Oil and Gas Board Address Place Zip Website  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

State Oil and Gas Board Address Place Zip Website State Oil and Gas Board Address Place Zip Website Alabama Oil and Gas Board Alabama Oil and Gas Board Hackberry Lane Tuscaloosa Alabama http www gsa state al us ogb ogb html Alaska Division of Oil and Gas Alaska Division of Oil and Gas W th Ave Suite Anchorage Alaska http dog dnr alaska gov Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission W th Ave Ste Anchorage Alaska http doa alaska gov ogc Arizona Oil and Gas Commission Arizona Oil and Gas Commission W Congress Street Suite Tucson Arizona http www azogcc az gov Arkansas Oil and Gas Commission Arkansas Oil and Gas Commission Natural Resources Dr Ste Little Rock Arkansas http www aogc state ar us JDesignerPro JDPArkansas AR Welcome html California Division of Oil Gas and Geothermal Resources California

57

EA-1625: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Environmental Assessment Final Environmental Assessment EA-1625: Final Environmental Assessment Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB) Phase III Early Test The Department of Energy proposes to co-fund a project to inject and closely monitor the flow of approximately 1.7 million short tons (1.5 million metric tons) of supercritical carbon dioxide into the brinebearing Tuscaloosa Formation in an area within the lease boundaries of the Cranfield Unit oilfield, about 12 miles (19 kilometers (km)) east of Natchez, Mississippi Final Environmental Assessment Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB) Phase III Early Test, DOE/EA-1625 (March 2009) More Documents & Publications EA-1785: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1846: Final Environmental Assessment

58

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: A9 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2, 2010 2, 2010 CX-000743: Categorical Exclusion Determination Site Characterization for Carbon Dioxide Storage from Coal-fired Power Facilities in the Black Warrior Basin of Alabama CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 01/22/2010 Location(s): Tuscaloosa, Alabama Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory January 21, 2010 CX-002153: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development of High Yield Tropical Feedstock and Biomass Conversion Technology for Renewable Energy Production and Economic Development CX(s) Applied: B3.8, A9, B5.1 Date: 01/21/2010 Location(s): Hawaii Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office January 21, 2010 CX-002154: Categorical Exclusion Determination Recovery Act: DeepCwind Consortium National Research Program: Validation of

59

FE Categorical Exclusions | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

43: Categorical Exclusion Determination 43: Categorical Exclusion Determination Site Characterization for Carbon Dioxide Storage from Coal-fired Power Facilities in the Black Warrior Basin of Alabama CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 01/22/2010 Location(s): Tuscaloosa, Alabama Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory January 18, 2010 CX-000731: Categorical Exclusion Determination Building 4 Equipment Decommissioning CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 01/18/2010 Location(s): Albany, Oregon Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory January 15, 2010 CX-000730: Categorical Exclusion Determination Skyonic Beneficial Carbon Dioxide Use Project: Interagency Coordinating Committees (ICCs) Area of Interest 2; Phase 1 only CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11 Date: 01/15/2010 Location(s): San Antonio, Texas

60

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

81 - 3690 of 28,905 results. 81 - 3690 of 28,905 results. Download CX-000741: Categorical Exclusion Determination Site Characterization for Carbon Dioxide Storage from Coal-fired Power Facilities in the Black Warrior Basin of Alabama CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 01/22/2010 Location(s): Tuscaloosa, Alabama Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-000741-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-000740: Categorical Exclusion Determination Site Characterization for Carbon Dioxide Storage from Coal-fired Power Facilities in the Black Warrior Basin of Alabama CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 01/22/2010 Location(s): Houston, Texas Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-000740-categorical-exclusion-determination

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temblor pearsall tuscaloosa" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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61

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

22, 2010 22, 2010 CX-000743: Categorical Exclusion Determination Site Characterization for Carbon Dioxide Storage from Coal-fired Power Facilities in the Black Warrior Basin of Alabama CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 01/22/2010 Location(s): Tuscaloosa, Alabama Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory January 21, 2010 CX-000708: Categorical Exclusion Determination Utah All Inclusive Statewide Alternative Fuels Transportation and Education Outreach Project CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 01/21/2010 Location(s): Murray, Utah Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory January 18, 2010 CX-000705: Categorical Exclusion Determination Florida - Sunshine State Buildings Parking Lot Canopies - State Energy Program CX(s) Applied: B1.15, B1.24, B2.1, B5.1

62

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Alabama | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 29, 2009 December 29, 2009 CX-001242: Categorical Exclusion Determination Energy Efficiency Retrofits: Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning Upgrade, Building Controls, Lighting, Outreach and Education, and Energy Efficiency Remodeling CX(s) Applied: A9, B1.32, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 12/29/2009 Location(s): Peoria, Alabama Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy November 24, 2009 CX-000449: Categorical Exclusion Determination Geologic Sequestration Training and Research CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1, B3.6 Date: 11/24/2009 Location(s): Tuscaloosa, Alabama Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory November 20, 2009 CX-000440: Categorical Exclusion Determination Actualistic and Geomechanical Modeling of Reservoir Rock, Carbon Dioxide and Formation Flue Interaction, Citronelle Oil Field, Alabama

63

Project 211  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

26507 26507 304-285-4133 dawn.deel@netl.doe.gov Jack C. Pashin Geological Survey of Alabama P.O. Box 869999 Tuscaloosa, AL 35486 205-349-2852 jpashin@gsa.state.al.us Sequestration GEOLOGIC SCREENING CRITERIA FOR SEQUESTRATION OF CO 2 IN COAL: QUANTIFYING POTENTIAL OF THE BLACK WARRIOR COALBED METHANE FAIRWAY, ALABAMA Background The amount of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) in the Earth's atmosphere has risen substantially since the start of the industrial age. This increase is attributed widely to the burning of fossil fuels, and if current trends in resource utilization continue, anthropogenic CO 2 emissions will triple during the 21st century. Among the principal ways CO 2 emissions from power plants can be addressed is to sequester this greenhouse gas in geologic formations. Within the number of geologic formations that can potentially store CO

64

Alabama Oil and Gas Board | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Board Board Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Alabama Oil and Gas Board State Alabama Name Alabama Oil and Gas Board Address 420 Hackberry Lane City, State Tuscaloosa, AL Zip 35401 Website http://www.gsa.state.al.us/ogb Coordinates 33.2121633°, -87.5431231° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.2121633,"lon":-87.5431231,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

65

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41 - 5250 of 28,905 results. 41 - 5250 of 28,905 results. Download CX-000449: Categorical Exclusion Determination Geologic Sequestration Training and Research CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1, B3.6 Date: 11/24/2009 Location(s): Tuscaloosa, Alabama Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-000449-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-000451: Categorical Exclusion Determination The Potential Risks of Freshwater Aquifer Contamination with Geosequestration CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1, B3.6 Date: 11/24/2009 Location(s): Durham, North Carolina Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-000451-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-000446: Categorical Exclusion Determination

66

High Level Computational Chemistry Approaches to the Prediction of Energetic Properties of Chemical Hydrogen Storage Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Level Computational Chemistry Approaches Level Computational Chemistry Approaches to the Prediction of the Energetic Properties of Chemical Hydrogen Storage Systems David A. Dixon Chemistry, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL Cast: Myrna Hernandez-Matus, Daniel Grant, Jackson Switzer, Jacob Batson, Ronita Folkes, Minh Nguyen Anthony J. Arduengo & co-workers Maciej Gutowski (PNNL) Robert Ramsay Chair Fund Shelby Hall Funding provided in part by the Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy under the Hydrogen Storage Grand Challenge, Solicitation No. DE-PS36- 03GO93013 Chemical H 2 Storage Center of Excellence The Promise of Chemical Hydrogen Storage * Chemical reaction releases H 2 at suitable pressures and temperatures - Reaction thermodynamics dictate max. H 2 pressure as function of T -

67

Microsoft Word - FT2b 092408 97-03  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Black Warrior Basin Coal Seam Project Black Warrior Basin Coal Seam Project Field Test Location Tuscaloosa County, Alabama Summary of Field Test Site and Operations The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership's (SECARB) Black Warrior Basin Coal Seam Project injection testing will be performed to provide an initial assessment of the capability of mature coalbed methane reservoirs to receive and adsorb significant volumes of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) for geologic carbon sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery. A coalbed methane well in Deerlick Creek Coal Degasification Field (Figure 1) will be used for injection testing, and three deep monitoring wells will be drilled and cored. Coal seams in the Black Creek, Mary Lee, and Pratt coal zones of the Pennsylvanian-age Pottsville

68

NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AC26-07NT42677 AC26-07NT42677 RPSEA FE Geological Survey of Alabama SCNGO FY13-14/24 months Gary Covatch Tuscaloosa, AL Petrophysics/Tight Rock Characterization for Improved Stimulation and Production Technology in Shales Activities include geologic characterization, geologic interpretation and modeling, petrologic characterization, and petrophyscial characterization. Gary L. Covatch Digitally signed by Gary L. Covatch DN: cn=Gary L. Covatch, o=NETL, ou=SCNGO, email=gary.covatch@netl.doe.gov, c=US Date: 2013.01.16 13:31:54 -05'00' 01 16 2013 Jesse Garcia Digitally signed by Jesse Garcia DN: cn=Jesse Garcia, o=NETL, ou=ECD, email=Jesse.Garcia@netl.doe.gov, c=US Date: 2013.01.30 07:40:08 -06'00' 01 30 2013 CX covers activities conducted in existing lab/office campus setting. No field work conducted under

69

Alabama Project Testing Potential for Combining CO2 Storage with Enhanced  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alabama Project Testing Potential for Combining CO2 Storage with Alabama Project Testing Potential for Combining CO2 Storage with Enhanced Methane Recovery Alabama Project Testing Potential for Combining CO2 Storage with Enhanced Methane Recovery June 16, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC -- Field testing the potential for combining geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) storage with enhanced methane recovery is underway at a site in Alabama by a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) team of regional partners. Members of the Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB) are injecting CO2 into a coalbed methane well in Tuscaloosa County to assess the capability of mature coalbed methane reservoirs to receive and adsorb significant volumes of carbon dioxide (CO2). Southern Company, El Paso Exploration & Production, the Geological Survey of Alabama, and the

70

Initial characterization of mudstone nanoporosity with small angle neutron scattering using caprocks from carbon sequestration sites.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geological carbon sequestration relies on the principle that CO{sub 2} injected deep into the subsurface is unable to leak to the atmosphere. Structural trapping by a relatively impermeable caprock (often mudstone such as a shale) is the main trapping mechanism that is currently relied on for the first hundreds of years. Many of the pores of the caprock are of micrometer to nanometer scale. However, the distribution, geometry and volume of porosity at these scales are poorly characterized. Differences in pore shape and size can cause variation in capillary properties and fluid transport resulting in fluid pathways with different capillary entry pressures in the same sample. Prediction of pore network properties for distinct geologic environments would result in significant advancement in our ability to model subsurface fluid flow. Specifically, prediction of fluid flow through caprocks of geologic CO{sub 2} sequestration reservoirs is a critical step in evaluating the risk of leakage to overlying aquifers. The micro- and nanoporosity was analyzed in four mudstones using small angle neutron scattering (SANS). These mudstones are caprocks of formations that are currently under study or being used for carbon sequestration projects and include the Marine Tuscaloosa Group, the Lower Tuscaloosa Group, the upper and lower shale members of the Kirtland Formation, and the Pennsylvanian Gothic shale. Total organic carbon varies from shale and Kirtland Formation, respectively. Neutrons effectively scatter from interfaces between materials with differing scattering length density (i.e. minerals and pores). The intensity of scattered neutrons, I(Q), where Q is the scattering vector, gives information about the volume of pores and their arrangement in the sample. The slope of the scattering data when plotted as log I(Q) vs. log Q provides information about the fractality or geometry of the pore network. Results from this study, combined with high-resolution TEM imaging, provide insight into the differences in volume and geometry of porosity between these various mudstones.

McCray, John (Colorado School of Mines); Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis (Colorado School of Mines); Mouzakis, Katherine (Colorado School of Mines); Heath, Jason E.; Dewers, Thomas A.; Rother, Gernot (Oak Ridge National Laboratory)

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Simulation studies to evaluate the effect of fracture closure on the performance of naturally fractured reservoirs. Annual report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The second year of this three-year research program to evaluate the effect of fracture closure on the recovery of oil and gas from naturally fractured reservoirs has been completed. The overall objectives of the study are to: (1) evaluate the reservoir conditions where fracture closure is significant, and (2) evaluate innovative fluid injection techniques capable of maintaining pressure within the reservoir. Simulation studies have been conducted with a dual porosity simulator capable of simulating the performance of vertical and horizontal wells. Each simulation model has been initialized with properties typical of the Austin Chalk reservoir in Pearsall Field, Texas. During year one, simulations of both vertical and horizontal well performance were made assuming that fracture permeability was insensitive to pressure charge. The results confirmed that horizontal wells could increase both rate of oil recovery and total oil recovery from naturally fractured reservoirs. During the second year the performances of the same vertical and horizontal wells were evaluated with the assumption that fracture permeability was a function of reservoir pressure. This required repetition of most of the natural depletion cases simulated in year one while invoking the pressure-sensitive fracture permeability option. To investigate sensitivity to in situ stress, two stress conditions were simulated for each primary variable. The water injection cases, begun in year one, were extended to include most of the reservoir parameters investigated for natural depletion, including fracture permeability as a function of net stress and the use of horizontal wells. The results thus far confirm that pressure-sensitive fractures degrade well performance and that the degradation is reduced by water injection pressure maintenance. Furthermore, oil recovery can be significantly increased by water injection pressure maintenance.

Not Available

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Simulation studies to evaluate the effect of fracture closure on the performance of fractured reservoirs; Final report  

SciTech Connect

A three-year research program to evaluate the effect of fracture closure on the recovery of oil and gas from naturally fractured reservoirs has been completed. The overall objectives of the study were to: (1) evaluate the reservoir conditions for which fracture closure is significant, and (2) evaluate innovative fluid injection techniques capable of maintaining pressure within the reservoir. The evaluations of reservoir performance were made by a modern dual porosity simulator, TETRAD. This simulator treats both porosity and permeability as functions of pore pressure. The Austin Chalk in the Pearsall Field in of South Texas was selected as the prototype fractured reservoir for this work. During the first year, simulations of vertical and horizontal well performance were made assuming that fracture permeability was insensitive to pressure change. Sensitivity runs indicated that the simulator was predicting the effects of critical reservoir parameters in a logical and consistent manner. The results confirmed that horizontal wells could increase both rate of oil recovery and total oil recovery from naturally fractured reservoirs. In the second year, the performance of the same vertical and horizontal wells was reevaluated with fracture permeability treated as a function of reservoir pressure. To investigate sensitivity to in situ stress, differing loading conditions were assumed. Simulated natural depletions confirm that pressure sensitive fractures degrade well performance. The severity of degradation worsens when the initial reservoir pressure approaches the average stress condition of the reservoir, such as occurs in over pressured reservoirs. Simulations with water injection indicate that degradation of permeability can be counteracted when reservoir pressure is maintained and oil recovery can be increased when reservoir properties are favorable.

Howrie, I.; Dauben, D.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells: Detailed completion prognosis for geopressured-geothermal well of opportunity, prospect #2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A geopressured-geothermal test of Martin Exploration Company's Crown Zellerbach Well No. 2 will be conducted in the Tuscaloosa Trend. The Crown Zellerbach Well No. 1 will be converted to a saltwater disposal well for disposal of produced brine. The well is located in the Satsuma Area, Livingston parish, Louisiana. Eaton proposes to test the Tuscaloosa by perforating the 7 inch casing from 16,718 feet to 16,754 feet. The reservoir pressure at an intermediate formation depth of 16,736 feet is anticipated to be 12,010 psi and the temperature is anticipated to be 297 F. Calculated water salinity is 16,000 ppm. The well is expected to produce a maximum of 16,000 barrels of water a day with a gas content of 51 SCF/bbl. Eaton will re-enter the test well, clean out to 17,000 feet, run production casing and complete the well. The disposal well will be re-entered and completed in the 9-5/8 inch casing for disposal of produced brine. Testing will be conducted similar to previous Eaton annular flow WOO tests. An optional test from 16,462 feet to 16,490 feet may be performed after the original test and will require a workover with a rig on location to perform the plugback. The surface production equipment utilized on previous tests will be utilized on this test. The equipment has worked satisfactorily and all parties involved in the testing are familiar with its operation. Weatherly Engineering will operate the test equipment. The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) and Mr. Don Clark will handle sampling, testing and reservoir engineering evaluation, respectively. wireline work required will be awarded on basis of bid evaluation. At the conclusion of the test period, the D.O.E. owned test equipment will be removed from the test site, the test and disposal wells plugged and abandoned and the sites restored to the satisfaction of all parties.

None

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Sales Price of Coal by State, County, and Number of Mines, 2012 Average Sales Price of Coal by State, County, and Number of Mines, 2012 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 30. Average Sales Price of Coal by State, County, and Number of Mines, 2012 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Coal-Producing State and County Number of Mines Sales (thousand short tons) Average Sales Price (dollars per short ton) Alabama 39 19,021 106.57 Bibb 1 w w Blount 2 w w Fayette 1 w w Franklin 1 w w Jackson 2 w w Jefferson 11 4,298 146.04 Marion 1 w w Tuscaloosa 7 8,599 111.55 Walker 11 2,370 81.88 Winston 2 w w Alaska 1 w w Yukon-Koyukuk 1 w w Arizona 1 w w Navajo 1 w w Arkansas 1 w w Sebastian 1 w w Colorado 12 28,856 37.54 Delta 1 w w Gunnison 2 w w La Plata

75

Chattan  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Chattan Chattan ooga Eag le For d Devo nian (Ohi o) Mar cellu s Utica He rm osa Nio bra ra* Bak ken *** Nio bra ra* Mo nte rey Mo nte rey - Tem blo r Ava lon Heath ** Tuscaloosa Mow ry Ant rim Bar net t Ben d New Alban y Wo odf ord Ba rn ett - Wo od for d Le wis Hilli ard- Ba xter - Man cos -Nio bra ra Exc e llo- Mul ky Fay ette ville Floyd- Neal Gam m on Cody Hayn esvil le- Boss ier Ma nco s Pie rre- Nio bra ra Conasauga Colo rado Grou p Utica Doig Phosphate Montney Muskwa- Otter Park Muskwa-Otter Park, Evie-Klua Lower Besa River Frederick Brook Horton Bluff Pimienta Eagle Ford, Tithonian Maltrata Eagle Ford, La Casita Pimienta, Tamaulipas North American shale plays 0 400 800 200 600 Miles ± Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration based on data from various published studies. Canada and Mexico plays from ARI. Updated: May 9, 2011 (as of May 2011) * Mixed shale & chalk play

76

Underground Energy Storage Program. 1985 annual summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Primary activities in seasonal thermal energy storage (STES) involved field testing of high-temperature (> 100/sup 0/C (212/sup 0/F)) aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) at St. Paul, monitoring of the University of Alabama Student Recreation Center in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, and limited numerical modeling efforts. The first long-cycle test at the University of Minnesota field test facility was completed. It consisted of approximately 59 days of heated water injection, 64 days of storage, and 58 days of heated water recovery. Chemistry of the recovered water was close to what was expected. Limited experimentation was done to characterize physical and chemical processes at the ATES test facility. A chill ATES monitoring project, initiated at the Student Recreation Center on the University of Alabama campus, continued during the reporting period. Numerical modeling efforts were continued at a minimum level to support field studies. The chill ATES facility at the University of Alabama Student Recreation Center was simulated with the Unconfined Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (UCATES) model to examine the effect of different injection/recovery patterns on the system's thermal performance.

Raymond, J.R.; Kannberg, L.D.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Utilization of a fuel cell power plant for the capture and conversion of gob well gas. Final report, June--December, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary study has been made to determine if a 200 kW fuel cell power plant operating on variable quality coalbed methane can be placed and successfully operated at the Jim Walter Resources No. 4 mine located in Tuscaloosa County, Alabama. The purpose of the demonstration is to investigate the effects of variable quality (50 to 98% methane) gob gas on the output and efficiency of the power plant. To date, very little detail has been provided concerning the operation of fuel cells in this environment. The fuel cell power plant will be located adjacent to the No. 4 mine thermal drying facility rated at 152 M British thermal units per hour. The dryer burns fuel at a rate of 75,000 cubic feet per day of methane and 132 tons per day of powdered coal. The fuel cell power plant will provide 700,000 British thermal units per hour of waste heat that can be utilized directly in the dryer, offsetting coal utilization by approximately 0.66 tons per day and providing an avoided cost of approximately $20 per day. The 200 kilowatt electrical power output of the unit will provide a utility cost reduction of approximately $3,296 each month. The demonstration will be completely instrumented and monitored in terms of gas input and quality, electrical power output, and British thermal unit output. Additionally, real-time power pricing schedules will be applied to optimize cost savings. 28 refs., 35 figs., 13 tabs.

Przybylic, A.R.; Haynes, C.D.; Haskew, T.A.; Boyer, C.M. II; Lasseter, E.L.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Oil and gas developments in Louisiana Gulf Coast onshore in 1981  

SciTech Connect

This report includes 38 parishes in south Louisiana. Industry drilled 1578 wells in 1981, an increase of 13.5% over 1980. The total footage drilled exceeds 18 million ft with a per well average depth of 11,568 ft. Wildcat wells numbered 319, other exploratory wells numbered 318, and development wells numbered 941. The successful completion rate includes the following: 8% for wildcat wells, 33% for other exploratory tests, and 54% for development wells. Wildcat wells discovered 26 new fields, 7 more than in 1980. This number includes 10 new fields in the Miocene trend, 7 in the Oligocene Frio-Hackberry trend, and 5 in the Tuscaloosa trend. Leasing activity totaled 1,766,536 acres, an 18% increase over 1980. This is the highest level since 1961, when over 2 million acres were leased. Rapides, St. Bernard, Plaquemines, Calcasieu, and Lafourche Parishes led the district in total acres leased. Geophysical activity increased in 1981 to 1734 crew-weeks, the highest level since 1965. This compares with 1656 crew-weeks in 1980. Seismic crews were most active in Plaquemines, Terrebonne, St. Tammany, and Livingston Parishes. Three carbon dioxide-enhanced oil recovery projects were initiated in onshore south Louisiana fields in 1980: Paradis field in St. Charles Parish, Bay St. Elaine field in Terrebonne Parish, and Right Hand Creek field in Beauregard Parish.

Rives, J.S. II (Conoco Inc., Lafayette, LA); McDowell, K.O.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Investigation and Evaluation of Geopressured - Geothermal Wells, Final Report; Alice C. Plantation No. 2 Well, St. Mary Parish, Louisiana; Volume 1; Narrative Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gruy Federal, Inc. (Gruy) operates under Contract No. EG-77-C-08-1528 to the Department of Energy, Division of Geothermal Energy, to evaluate potential alternate energy sources occurring within geopressured-geothermal (Geo) aquifers in Miocene, Oligocene, Tuscaloosa, Wilcox, and Frio formations along the Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coast. The project is entitled ''Investigation and Evaluation of Geopressured-Geothermal Wells''. The original period of performance was from September 26, 1977, through September 30, 1978; the contract was later extended through September 30, 1979. The first well on which testing was attempted under this contract was the Alice C. Plantation No. 2 Well, located in St. Mary Parish, Louisiana. Originally drilled by the Sun Oil Company to a total depth of 19,000 feet, this well was abandoned as a dry hole in January 1964. Gruy's reentry attempt ended with plugging and abandonment after a saltwater flow on September 17, 1978. This report is a comprehensive document detailing all events and costs relating to the Alice C. plantation well, from its initial selection as a reentry well through the plugging and abandonment operations.

Lohse, Alan; Willits, M.H.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Resource Assessment of the In-Place and Potentially Recoverable Deep Natural Gas Resource of the Onshore Interior Salt Basins, North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal research effort for the first six months of Year 2 of the project has been petroleum system characterization. Understanding the burial and thermal maturation histories of the strata in the onshore interior salt basins of the North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas is important in petroleum system characterization. The underburden and overburden rocks in these basins and subbasins are a product of their rift-related geohistory. Petroleum source rock analysis and thermal maturation and hydrocarbon expulsion modeling indicate that an effective regional petroleum source rock in the onshore interior salt basins, the North Louisiana Salt Basin, Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, Manila Subbasin and Conecuh Subbasin, was the Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone. The Upper Cretaceous Tuscaloosa shale was an effective local petroleum source rock in the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and a possible local source bed in the North Louisiana Salt Basin. Hydrocarbon generation and expulsion was initiated in the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary in the North Louisiana Salt Basin and the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin. Hydrocarbon generation and expulsion was initiated in the Late Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary in the Manila Subbasin and Conecuh Subbasin. Reservoir rocks include Jurassic, Cretaceous and Tertiary siliciclastic and carbonate strata. Seal rocks include Jurassic, Cretaceous and Tertiary anhydrite and shale beds. Petroleum traps include structural and combination traps.

Ernest A. Mancini; Donald A. Goddard

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "temblor pearsall tuscaloosa" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

State Oil and Gas Boards | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Boards Boards Jump to: navigation, search State Oil and Gas Board and Commission sites are related to oil and gas production, well sites, and any other relevant data and information. The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission is a multi-state government agency that promotes the quality of life for all Americans. This list is where information for OpenEI pages is held, and also, in most cases, where oil and gas data can be derived, open to the public. In many cases, EIA may hold the data related to Oil and Gas. Also, some datasets may only contain a state report pdf, in which case the data would need to be pulled out of the pdf and put into an excel or xml. Here are the states: State link Information Contact info Alabama Alabama Oil and Gas Board The State Oil and Gas Board of Alabama is a regulatory agency of the State of Alabama with the statutory charge of preventing waste and promoting the conservation of oil and gas while ensuring the protection of both the environment and the correlative rights of owners. The Board is granted broad authority in Alabama oil and gas conservation statutes to promulgate and enforce rules and regulations to ensure the conservation and proper development of Alabama's petroleum resources. 420 Hackberry Lane Tuscaloosa, AL 35401 205.349.2852

82

USE OF CUTTING-EDGE HORIZONTAL AND UNDERBALANCED DRILLING TECHNOLOGIES AND SUBSURFACE SEISMIC TECHNIQUES TO EXPLORE, DRILL AND PRODUCE RESERVOIRED OIL AND GAS FROM THE FRACTURED MONTEREY BELOW 10,000 FT IN THE SANTA MARIA BASIN OF CALIFORNIA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area by Temblor Petroleum with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper curved sections were drilled and lined through the problematic shale member without major stability problems. The top of the targeted Monterey was thought to be seen at the expected TVD of 10,000 ft where the 7-in. liner was set at a 60{sup o} hole angle. Significant oil and gas shows suggested the fractured interval anticipated at the heel location had been penetrated. A total of 2572 ft of 6.-in. near-horizontal interval was placed in the shale section, extending planned well length by approximately 470 ft. Very little hydrocarbon in-flow was observed from fractures along the productive interval. This may be a result of the well trajectory falling underneath the Monterey fractured zone. Hydrocarbon observations, cuttings analysis and gamma-ray response indicated additional fractured intervals were accessed along the last {+-}900 ft of well length. The well was completed with a 2 7/8-in. tubing string set in a production packer in preparation for flow and swab tests to be conducted later by a service rig. The planned well time was estimated as 39 days and overall cost as $2.4 million. The actual results are 66 days at a total cost of $3.4 million. Well productivity responses during subsequent flow and swabbing tests were negative. The well failed to inflow and only minor amounts (a few barrels) of light oil were recovered. The lack of production may suggest that actual sustainable reservoir pressure is far less than anticipated. Temblor is currently investigating the costs and operational viability of re-entering the well and conducting an FMI (fracture detection) log and/or an acid stimulation. No final decision or detailed plans have been made regarding these potential interventions at this time.

George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Single-well tracer methods for hydrogeologic evaluation of target aquifers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Designing an efficient well field for an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) project requires measuring local groundwater flow parameters as well as estimating horizontal and vertical inhomogeneity. Effective porosity determines the volume of aquifer needed to store a given volume of heated or chilled water. Ground-water flow velocity governs the migration of the thermal plume, and dispersion and heat exchange along the flow path reduces the thermal intensity of the recovered plume. Stratigraphic variations in the aquifer will affect plume dispersion, may bias the apparent rate of migration of the plume, and can prevent efficient hydraulic communication between wells. Single-well tracer methods using a conservative flow tracer such as bromide, along with pumping tests and water-level measurements, provide a rapid and cost-effective means for estimating flow parameters. A drift-and-pumpback tracer test yields effective porosity and flow velocity. Point-dilution tracer testing, using new instrumentation for downhole tracer measurement and a new method for calibrating the point-dilution test itself, yields depth-discrete hydraulic conductivity as it is affected by stratigraphy, and can be used to estimate well transmissivity. Experience in conducting both drift-and-pumpback and point-dilution tests at three different test sites has yielded important information that highlights both the power and the limitations of the single-well tracer methods. These sites are the University of Alabama Student Recreation Center (UASRC) ATES well field and the VA Medical Center (VA) ATES well field, both located in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, and the Hanford bioremediation test site north of Richland, Washington.

Hall, S.H.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Trace Metal Source Terms in Carbon Sequestration Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ABSTRACT: Carbon dioxide sequestration in deep saline and depleted oil geologic formations is feasible and promising; however, possible CO2 or CO2-saturated brine leakage to overlying aquifers may pose environmental and health impacts. The purpose of this study was to experimentally define to provide a range of concentrations that can be used as the trace element source term for reservoirs and leakage pathways in risk simulations. Storage source terms for trace metals are needed to evaluate the impact of brines leaking into overlying drinking water aquifers. The trace metal release was measured from cements and sandstones, shales, carbonates, evaporites, and basalts from the Frio, In Salah, Illinois Basin, Decatur, Lower Tuscaloosa, Weyburn-Midale, Bass Islands, and Grand Ronde carbon sequestration geologic formations. Trace metal dissolution was tracked by measuring solution concentrations over time under conditions (e.g., pressures, temperatures, and initial brine compositions) specific to the sequestration projects. Existing metrics for maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) for drinking water as defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) were used to categorize the relative significance of metal concentration changes in storage environments because of the presence of CO2. Results indicate that Cr and Pb released from sandstone reservoir and shale cap rocks exceed the MCLs byan order of magnitude, while Cd and Cu were at or below drinking water thresholds. In carbonate reservoirs As exceeds the MCLs by an order of magnitude, while Cd, Cu, and Pb were at or below drinking water standards. Results from this study can be used as a reasonable estimate of the trace element source term for reservoirs and leakage pathways in risk simulations to further evaluate the impact of leakage on groundwater quality.

Karamalidis, Athanasios; Torres, Sharon G.; Hakala, Jacqueline A.; Shao, Hongbo; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Carroll, Susan A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Oil and gas developments in Louisiana Gulf Coast onshore in 1982  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The south Louisiana Gulf Coast onshore area is composed of 38 parishes. Petroleum operators drilled 1,344 wells with a total footage of 15,670,916 ft, a 15% decline from the 1981 total of 1,578 wells. Operators in south Louisiana drilled 283 wildcat wells with a success rate of 11%, 328 other exploratory wells with a success rate of 29%, and 733 development wells with a success rate of 68%. Wildcat drilling discovered 12 significant new fields. These significant new discoveries consist of 5 fields producing from Miocene sands, 5 fields producing from Oligocene Frio or Hackberry sands, and 2 fields producing from Eocene Cockfield and Wilcox sands. For the first time in recent years, there was not a new field discovered within the state's famous Tuscaloosa trend. Operators acquired 1,005,464 acres of mineral leases, a 43% decline from the 1981 total of 1,766,536 acres. Leasing was most active in Lafourche, Calcasieu, Beauregard, Terrebonne, and Jefferson Davis Parishes. Arco led all major companies in acquiring leases in south Louisiana, and Florida Exploration was the most active independent operator. Geophysical activity in the onshore Louisiana Gulf Coast decreased for the first time since 1973. Activity dropped from the 1,734 crew-weeks in 1981 to 1,526 crew-weeks in 1982. The highest levels of geophysical activity were registered in Plaquemines, St. Landry, Terrebonne, Pointe Coupee, and Lafourche Parishes. For the third consecutive year, Arco led all operators in seismic activity in south Louisiana.

Duc, A.W.; Rives, J.S.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Use of Cutting-Edge Horizontal and Underbalanced Drilling Technologies and Subsurface Seismic Techniques to Explore, Drill and Produce Reservoired Oil and Gas from the Fractured Monterey Below 10,000 ft in the Santa Maria Basin of California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper curved sections were drilled and lined through the problematic shale member without major stability problems. The top of the targeted Monterey was thought to be seen at the expected TVD of 10,000 ft where the 7-in. liner was set at a 60{sup o} hole angle. Significant oil and gas shows suggested the fractured interval anticipated at the heel location had been penetrated. A total of 2572 ft of 6{Delta}-in. near-horizontal interval was placed in the shale section, extending planned well length by approximately 470 ft. Very little hydrocarbon in-flow was observed from fractures along the productive interval. This may be a result of the well trajectory falling underneath the Monterey fractured zone. Hydrocarbon observations, cuttings analysis and gamma-ray response indicated additional fractured intervals were accessed along the last {+-}900 ft of well length. The well was completed with a 2 and 7/8-in. tubing string set in a production packer in preparation for flow and swab tests to be conducted later by a service rig. The planned well time was estimated as 39 days and overall cost as $2.4 million. The actual results are 66 days at a total cost of $3.4 million. Well productivity responses during subsequent flow and swabbing tests were negative. The well failed to inflow and only minor amounts (a few barrels) of light oil were recovered. The lack of production may suggest that actual sustainable reservoir pressure is far less than anticipated. Temblor attempted in July, 2006, to re-enter and clean out the well and run an Array Induction log (primarily for resistivity and correlation purposes), and an FMI log (for fracture detection). Application of surfactant in the length of the horizontal hole, and acid over the fracture zone at 10,236 was also planned. This attempt was not successful in that the clean out tools became stuck and had to be abandoned.

George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

87

Use of Cutting-Edge Horizontal and Underbalanced Drilling Technologies and Subsurface Seismic Techniques to Explore, Drill and Produce Reservoired Oil and Gas from the Fractured Monterey Below 10,000 ft in the Santa Maria Basin of California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper curved sections were drilled and lined through the problematic shale member without major stability problems. The top of the targeted Monterey was thought to be seen at the expected TVD of 10,000 ft where the 7-in. liner was set at a 60{sup o} hole angle. Significant oil and gas shows suggested the fractured interval anticipated at the heel location had been penetrated. A total of 2572 ft of 6 1/8-in. near-horizontal interval was placed in the shale section, extending planned well length by approximately 470 ft. Very little hydrocarbon in-flow was observed from fractures along the productive interval. This may be a result of the well trajectory falling underneath the Monterey fractured zone. Hydrocarbon observations, cuttings analysis and gamma-ray response indicated additional fractured intervals were accessed along the last {+-}900 ft of well length. The well was completed with a 2 7/8-in. tubing string set in a production packer in preparation for flow and swab tests to be conducted later by a service rig. The planned well time was estimated as 39 days and overall cost as $2.4 million. The actual results are 66 days at a total cost of $3.4 million. Well productivity responses during subsequent flow and swabbing tests were negative. The well failed to inflow and only minor amounts (a few barrels) of light oil were recovered. The lack of production may suggest that actual sustainable reservoir pressure is far less than anticipated. Temblor is currently planning to re-enter and clean out the well and run an Array Induction log (primarily for resistivity and correlation purposes), and an FMI log (for fracture detection). Depending on the results of these logs, an acidizing or re-drill program will be planned.

George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

88

Biological & Environmental Research Abstracts Database  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

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