National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for telephone cellular fax

  1. FAX

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8/2012 15:54 FAX 202 S94 7005 NAT'L SECURITY ARCHIVE GtJ 002/002 The National Security Archive The George Washington University Gelman Library, Suite 701 2130 H Street, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20037 ""}OJ-:L.- Phone: 202l994-rotrtr Fax: 2021994-7005 WAtt v- *..* RsarcR&\'@gwu.edu www.nsarchive.org 8 June 2012 JUN 1 1 2012 G J FOIA Requester Service Center '/ 1000 Independence Avenue. SW ~£olJuCA~VilJII\ Washington, DC 20585 . *GD**.* ~ . Re: Request under the FOIA. in reply refer to

  2. Cellular telephone-based radiation detection instrument

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Craig, William W.; Labov, Simon E.

    2011-06-14

    A network of radiation detection instruments, each having a small solid state radiation sensor module integrated into a cellular phone for providing radiation detection data and analysis directly to a user. The sensor module includes a solid-state crystal bonded to an ASIC readout providing a low cost, low power, light weight compact instrument to detect and measure radiation energies in the local ambient radiation field. In particular, the photon energy, time of event, and location of the detection instrument at the time of detection is recorded for real time transmission to a central data collection/analysis system. The collected data from the entire network of radiation detection instruments are combined by intelligent correlation/analysis algorithms which map the background radiation and detect, identify and track radiation anomalies in the region.

  3. Cellular telephone-based wide-area radiation detection network

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Craig, William W.; Labov, Simon E.

    2009-06-09

    A network of radiation detection instruments, each having a small solid state radiation sensor module integrated into a cellular phone for providing radiation detection data and analysis directly to a user. The sensor module includes a solid-state crystal bonded to an ASIC readout providing a low cost, low power, light weight compact instrument to detect and measure radiation energies in the local ambient radiation field. In particular, the photon energy, time of event, and location of the detection instrument at the time of detection is recorded for real time transmission to a central data collection/analysis system. The collected data from the entire network of radiation detection instruments are combined by intelligent correlation/analysis algorithms which map the background radiation and detect, identify and track radiation anomalies in the region.

  4. First Name: Last Name: Title: Telephone: Fax: Email: First Name...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    NOTICE: This report is mandatory under the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275). Failure to comply may result in criminal fines, civil penalties and other ...

  5. Cellular telephone-based radiation sensor and wide-area detection network

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Craig, William W.; Labov, Simon E.

    2006-12-12

    A network of radiation detection instruments, each having a small solid state radiation sensor module integrated into a cellular phone for providing radiation detection data and analysis directly to a user. The sensor module includes a solid-state crystal bonded to an ASIC readout providing a low cost, low power, light weight compact instrument to detect and measure radiation energies in the local ambient radiation field. In particular, the photon energy, time of event, and location of the detection instrument at the time of detection is recorded for real time transmission to a central data collection/analysis system. The collected data from the entire network of radiation detection instruments are combined by intelligent correlation/analysis algorithms which map the background radiation and detect, identify and track radiation anomalies in the region.

  6. CARLSBAD ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING & RESEARCH CENTER NEW MEXICO STATE UNIVERSITY TELEPHONE (575) 887-2759

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING & RESEARCH CENTER NEW MEXICO STATE UNIVERSITY TELEPHONE (575) 887-2759 1400 UNIVERSITY DRIVE, CARLSBAD, NEW MEXICO 88220 FAX NUMBER (575) 887-3051 An Update on CEMRC radiological results from air and surface water sampling activities following the February 14 th , 2014 radiation detection event The Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring and Research Center (CEMRC), an entity of New Mexico State University, continues to conduct radiological separation and analyses on a

  7. Telephone Service | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Request (log in with your Argonne username and password) Documentation Login to Blue Jeans Forward Your Telephone Calls Depending on what model of phone you have, you can...

  8. Alaska Power Telephone Company | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Alaska Power Telephone Company Address: 193 Otto Street PO Box 3222 Place: Port Townsend Zip: 98368 Region: United States Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone Number:...

  9. The Telephone: An Invention with Many Fathers

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Brenni, Paolo [CNR-FST-IMSS, Florence, Italy

    2010-01-08

    The names of A.G. Bell, A. Meucci, P.Reis, E. Gray, just to mention the most important ones, are all connected with the invention of the telephone. Today, the Italian inventor A. Meucci is recognized as being the first to propose a working prototype of the electric telephone. However, for a series of reasons his strenuous efforts were not rewarded. I will not repeat here the endless and complex disputes about the ?real father? of the telephone. From an historical point of view it is more interesting to understand why so many individuals from different backgrounds conceived of a similar apparatus and why most of these devices were simply forgotten or just remained laboratory curiosities. The case of the development of the telephone is an emblematic and useful example for better understanding the intricate factors which are involved in the birth of an invention and reasons for its success and failure.

  10. SBOT OKLAHOMA SOUTHWESTERN POWER ADMIN POC Gary Bridges Telephone

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    OKLAHOMA SOUTHWESTERN POWER ADMIN POC Gary Bridges Telephone (918) 595-6671 Email gary.bridges@swpa...

  11. UTILITIES COLORADO WESTERN POWER ADMIN POC Cheryl Drake Telephone

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    UTILITIES COLORADO WESTERN POWER ADMIN POC Cheryl Drake Telephone (720) 962-7154 Email drake@wapa.gov Electric Bulk Power Transmission and Control 221121 Electric Power Distribution 221122 GEORGIA SOUTHEASTERN POWER ADMIN POC Ann Craft Telephone (706) 213-3823 Email annc@sepa.doe.gov Electric Bulk Power Transmission and Control 221121 Electric Power Distribution 221122 OKLAHOMA SOUTHWESTERN POWER ADMIN POC Gary Bridges Telephone (918) 595-6671 Email gary.bridges@swpa.gov Electric Bulk Power

  12. COLORADO GOLDEN FIELD OFFICE POC Karen Downs Telephone

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    TRANSPORTATION & WAREHOUSING COLORADO GOLDEN FIELD OFFICE POC Karen Downs Telephone (720) 356-1269 Email karen.downs@go.doe.gov Other Support Activities for Air Transportation 488190 Freight Transportation Arrangement 488510 General Warehousing and Storage 493110 NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LAB POC Nancy Gardner Telephone (303) 384-7335 Email nancy.gardner@nrel.gov Specialized Freight (except Used Goods) Trucking, Local 484220 ROCKY FLATS POC Telephone Email Specialized Freight (except Used

  13. CALIFORNIA LAWRENCE BERKELEY LAB POC David Chen Telephone

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    PROFESSIONAL SCIENTIFIC TECHNICAL CALIFORNIA LAWRENCE BERKELEY LAB POC David Chen Telephone (510) 486-4506 Email dtchen@lbl.gov Engineering Services 541330 Drafting Services ...

  14. EDUCATION CALIFORNIA LAWRENCE BERKELEY LAB POC David Chen Telephone

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Professional and Management Development Training 611430 Educational Support Services 611710 NEW JERSEY PRINCETON PLASMA LAB POC Arlene White Telephone (609) 243-2080 Email ...

  15. SBOT TEXAS PANTEX PLANT POC Brad Beck Telephone

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PANTEX PLANT POC Brad Beck Telephone (806) 477-6192 Email bbrack@pantex.com ADMINISTATIVE WASTE REMEDIATION Facilities Support Services 561210 Executive Search Services 561312 ...

  16. FORESTRY COLORADO WESTERN POWER ADMIN POC Cheryl Drake Telephone

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FORESTRY COLORADO WESTERN POWER ADMIN POC Cheryl Drake Telephone (720) 962-7154 Email drake@wapa.gov Timber tract operations 113110 Cutting and transporting timber 113310 GEORGIA ...

  17. SBOT SOUTH CAROLINA SAVANNAH RIVER LAB POC Sharon Campbell Telephone

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SOUTH CAROLINA SAVANNAH RIVER LAB POC Sharon Campbell Telephone (800) 888-7986 Email sharon-pmmd.campbell@srs.gov EDUCATION Professional and Management Development Training 611430 ...

  18. Systems configured to distribute a telephone call, communication systems, communication methods and methods of routing a telephone call to a service representative

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harris, Scott H.; Johnson, Joel A.; Neiswanger, Jeffery R.; Twitchell, Kevin E.

    2004-03-09

    The present invention includes systems configured to distribute a telephone call, communication systems, communication methods and methods of routing a telephone call to a customer service representative. In one embodiment of the invention, a system configured to distribute a telephone call within a network includes a distributor adapted to connect with a telephone system, the distributor being configured to connect a telephone call using the telephone system and output the telephone call and associated data of the telephone call; and a plurality of customer service representative terminals connected with the distributor and a selected customer service representative terminal being configured to receive the telephone call and the associated data, the distributor and the selected customer service representative terminal being configured to synchronize, application of the telephone call and associated data from the distributor to the selected customer service representative terminal.

  19. Full page fax print

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

  20. Full page fax print

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

  1. Fax Cover Sheet

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy) Jeremy Dommu (DOE-Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy) Daniel Cohen (DOE-Office of General Counsel) Andrew deLaski (Appliance Standards Awareness Project) ...

  2. Full page fax print

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  3. Full page fax print

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... 11 ) Maintain adequate emergency tank space per the Tank ... to handle unanticipated problems that could require additional tank space. 6,0 plannIng Bases 6.1 Reference Date ...

  4. Full page fax print

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... 11 ) Maintain adequate emergency tank space per the Tank ... to handle unanticipated problems that could require additional tank space. 6,0 planning Bases 6,1 Reference Date ...

  5. Full page fax print

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    )lIJfjlHfllmj)mmllillruJt ((I(m(ti.JmlmmmlllWI ll .. . I*mw lffi )( HI I) SOVELEV RECELEV 40 40 Immlll1 illllmJil11)Immm lfm lli m l.lmillm(mj...

  6. CALIFORNIA LAWRENCE BERKELEY LAB POC David Chen Telephone

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ADMINISTATIVE / WASTE / REMEDIATION CALIFORNIA LAWRENCE BERKELEY LAB POC David Chen Telephone (510) 486-4506 Email dtchen@lbl.gov Security Systems Services (except Locksmiths) 561621 Hazardous Waste Treatment and Disposal 562211 Remediation Services 562910 LAWRENCE LIVERMORE LAB POC Jill Swanson Telephone (925) 423-4535 Email swanson6@llnl.gov Security Systems Services (except Locksmiths) 561621 Hazardous Waste Treatment and Disposal 562211 Remediation Services 562910 COLORADO GOLDEN FIELD

  7. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Bell Telephone Laboratories - Murray

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Hill - NJ 0-04 Bell Telephone Laboratories - Murray Hill - NJ 0-04 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: BELL TELEPHONE LABORATORIES - MURRAY HILL (NJ.0-04 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: New Jersey NJ.0-04-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 NJ.0-04-1 Site Operations: Research and development operation. NJ.0-04-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Insufficient information to support further consideration under FUSRAP NJ.0-04-1 Radioactive

  8. Stratified random sampling plan for an irrigation customer telephone survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnston, J.W.; Davis, L.J.

    1986-05-01

    This report describes the procedures used to design and select a sample for a telephone survey of individuals who use electricity in irrigating agricultural cropland in the Pacific Northwest. The survey is intended to gather information on the irrigated agricultural sector that will be useful for conservation assessment, load forecasting, rate design, and other regional power planning activities.

  9. CALIFORNIA LAWRENCE BERKELEY LAB POC David Chen Telephone

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PROFESSIONAL / SCIENTIFIC / TECHNICAL CALIFORNIA LAWRENCE BERKELEY LAB POC David Chen Telephone (510) 486-4506 Email dtchen@lbl.gov Engineering Services 541330 Drafting Services 541340 Geophysical Surveying and Mapping Services 541360 Testing Laboratories 541380 Custom Computer Programming Services 541511 Computer Systems Design Services 541512 Other Computer Related Services 541519 Administrative Management and General Management Consulting Services 541611 Other Scientific and Technical

  10. GOODS CALIFORNIA LAWRENCE BERKELEY LAB POC David Chen Telephone

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    GOODS CALIFORNIA LAWRENCE BERKELEY LAB POC David Chen Telephone (510) 486-4506 Email dtchen@lbl.gov Photographic Equipment and Supplies Merchant Wholesalers 423410 Computer and Computer Peripheral Equipment and Software Merchant Wholesalers 423430 Other Commercial Equipment Merchant Wholesalers 423440 Other Professional Equipment and Supplies Merchant Wholesalers 423490 Electrical Apparatus and Equipment, Wiring Supplies, and Related Equipment Merchant Wholesalers 423610 Electrical and

  11. Consensual Listening-in to or Recording Telephone/Radio Conversations (restricted)

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1992-11-12

    This Order specifies the Department of Energy (DOE) policy regarding the consensual listening-in to or recording of conversations on radio and telephone systems. Canceled by DOE N 251.107.

  12. > FAQs for Survey Form EIA-888

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Fax - fax price(s) to a secure, toll-free fax number, 1-877-359-6637 Telephone ... of the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (FEAA) (Public Law 93-275), as amended. ...

  13. FAQs for Survey Form EIA-878

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Fax - fax prices to a secure, toll-free fax number, 1-877-359-6637 Telephone ... of the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (FEAA) (Public Law 93-275), as amended. ...

  14. Supratik Guha | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Supratik Guha NST Division Director Telephone 630.252.7740 Fax 630.252.6866 E-mail sguha

  15. Suzanne Miller | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Suzanne Miller Engineering Specialist Senior Telephone 630.252.6790 Fax 630.252.5739 E-mail csmiller

  16. Tim Cundiff | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tim Cundiff Engineering Specialist, Electronics Telephone (630) 252-7735 Fax (630) 252-5047 E-mail Cundiff

  17. Dean Carbaugh | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carbaugh Senior Technician Telephone 630.252.4833 Fax 630.252.5739 E-mail dcarbaugh@anl.gov

  18. Naryanan (Bobby) Kasthuri | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Neuroscience Researcher Naryanan (Bobby) Kasthuri Telephone 630.252.4966 Fax 630.252.5739 E-mail bobbykasthuri...

  19. Rachel Mirelez | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mirelez Administrative Secretary Telephone 630.252.4651 Fax 630.252.6866 E-mail rmirelez

  20. Kathryn Tietz | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kathryn Tietz Administrative Secretary Telephone 630.252.4958 Fax 630.252.5739 E-mail ktietz

  1. Eva Stringer | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Eva Stringer Administrative Secretary Telephone 630.252.6889 Fax 630.252.4646 E-mail stringer

  2. Telephone Flat Geothermal Development Project Environmental Impact Statement Environmental Impact Report. Final: Comments and Responses to Comments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-02-01

    This document is the Comments and Responses to Comments volume of the Final Environmental Impact Statement and Environmental Impact Report prepared for the proposed Telephone Flat Geothermal Development Project (Final EIS/EIR). This volume of the Final EIS/EIR provides copies of the written comments received on the Draft EIS/EIR and the leady agency responses to those comments in conformance with the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA).

  3. En/ant Plaza. S. W,. Washington. D.C. 20024.2174, Telephones (202) 488-6000

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Suire 4000. 955 L' En/ant Plaza. S. W,. Washington. D.C. 20024.2174, Telephones (202) 488-6000 7117-03.87.cdy.27 27 May I987 Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE:23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: ., STATUS OF ACTIONS - FUSRAP SITE LIST Aerospace recently completed a comprehensive review of sites listed in the FUSRAP Site Investigation and Remedial Action Summary Report, dated December 31, 1986. The primary

  4. Mechanisms of cellular transformation by carcinogenic agents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grunberger, D.; Goff, S.P.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 14 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: DNA Modification by Chemical Carcinogens; Role of DNA Lesions and Repair in the Transformation of Human Cells; The Induction and Regulation of Radiogenic Transformation In Vitro: Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms; Cellular Transformation by Adenoviruses; and The fos Gene.

  5. River Corridor Closure Contract Section J, Attachment...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    use (i.e., use outside the employees regular schedule) of government property (such as computers, telephones, copiers, fax machines or other office equipment) or commercially...

  6. Deborah O'Rourke | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Deborah O'Rourke NST Assistant Division Director Telephone 630.252.3810 Fax 630.252.6866 E-mail dorourke

  7. Letter Report Final SA _01-17-01_.PDF

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    01 Constitution Avenue, NW, HA274, Washington, DC 20418 Telephone (202) 334 3376 Fax (202) 334 3370 Board on Infrastructure and the Constructed Environment January 17, 2001...

  8. Stefan Vajda | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    clusters and materials assembled of clusters Adjunct professor, Yale University News Copper clusters capture and convert carbon dioxide to make fuel Telephone 630.252.8123 Fax ...

  9. Nancy Dietz-Rago | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nancy Dietz-Rago Materials Scientist Telephone 630.252.9798 Fax 630.252.5739 E-mail dietz@anl.gov

  10. Gary Drake | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gary Drake Senior Electronics Engineer, Group Leader Telephone (630) 252-1568 Fax (630) 252-5047 E-mail drake@anl.gov Projects Cosmic Gamma Rays

  11. Vasudha Patri | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vasudha Patri Mechanical Engineer Telephone 630-252-6389 Fax 630-252-3440 E-mail vpatri@anl.gov

  12. Laurie Eichberger | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laurie Eichberger Executive Secretary Telephone 630.252.7570 Fax 630.252.6866 E-mail eichberger@anl.gov

  13. Directory Listings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    by organization including their telephone number, routing symbol, location (buildingroom number), and fax number (when available) A listing of Field staff by organization ...

  14. Brandon Fisher | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Brandon Fisher Engineering Specialist Senior News Atomically Thin Metallic Boron Telephone 630.252.5324 Fax 630.252.4646 E-mail bfisher@anl.gov

  15. Cathy Riblon | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cathy Riblon Administrative Assistant Telephone 630.252.4463 Fax 630.252.5739 E-mail criblon@anl.gov

  16. BPA-2014-00385-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BOX 398 * HEPPNER, OREGON 97836-0398 Telephone (541) 676-9146 * Fax (541) 676-5159 Condon Telephone (541) 384-2023 jerryh@coIumbabasin.cc tommyw@columbiabasin.cc...

  17. BPA-2014-00386-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WAY * P.O. BOX 398 * HEPPNER, OREGON Telephone (541) 676-9146 * Fax (541) 676-5159 Condon Telephone (541) 384-2023 97836-0398 jerryh@cokimbiabasin.cc tommyw@colmbiabasin.cc...

  18. BPA-2014-00383-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BOX 398 * HEPPNERI OREGON 97836-0398 Telephone (541) 676.9146 * Fax (541) 676-5159 Condon Telephone (541) 384-2023 jerryh@columbiabasin.cc tommyw@columbiabasin.cc...

  19. BPA-2014-00384-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WAY * P.O. BOX 398 * HEPPNER, OREGON Telephone (541) 676-9146 * Fax (541) 676-5159 Condon Telephone (541) 384-2023 97836-0398 jerryh@columbiabasin.cc tommyw@colurnbiabasin.cc...

  20. BPA-2014-00387-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BOX 398 * HEPPNER, OREGON 97836-0398 Telephone (541) 676-9146 * Fax (541) 676-5159 Condon Telephone (541) 384-2023 jerryh@columbiabasin.cc tommyw@coumbabasin.cc...

  1. BPA-2014-00382-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BOX 398 * HEPPNER, OREGON 97836-0398 Telephone (541) 676-9146 * Fax (541) 676-5159 Condon Telephone (541) 384-2023 jeh@coumbabasin,cc tommyw@columbiabasin.cc...

  2. Sustainable Nano-Materials: What is happening at the cellular...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nano-Materials What is happening at the cellular level? Art J. Ragauskas, Institute of Paper Science and Technology Georgia Institute of Technology Advanced Materials: Cellular ...

  3. Algorithmic crystal chemistry: A cellular automata approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krivovichev, S. V.

    2012-01-15

    Atomic-molecular mechanisms of crystal growth can be modeled based on crystallochemical information using cellular automata (a particular case of finite deterministic automata). In particular, the formation of heteropolyhedral layered complexes in uranyl selenates can be modeled applying a one-dimensional three-colored cellular automaton. The use of the theory of calculations (in particular, the theory of automata) in crystallography allows one to interpret crystal growth as a computational process (the realization of an algorithm or program with a finite number of steps).

  4. Toxicology and cellular effect of manufactured nanomaterials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Fanqing

    2014-07-22

    The increasing use of nanotechnology in consumer products and medical applications underlies the importance of understanding its potential toxic effects to people and the environment. Herein are described methods and assays to predict and evaluate the cellular effects of nanomaterial exposure. Exposing cells to nanomaterials at cytotoxic doses induces cell cycle arrest and increases apoptosis/necrosis, activates genes involved in cellular transport, metabolism, cell cycle regulation, and stress response. Certain nanomaterials induce genes indicative of a strong immune and inflammatory response within skin fibroblasts. Furthermore, the described multiwall carbon nanoonions (MWCNOs) can be used as a therapeutic in the treatment of cancer due to its cytotoxicity.

  5. Property:Incentive/ContFax | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Regulations: No.27 - Control of Nitrogen Oxide Emissions (Rhode Island) + 401-222-2017 + Air Quality (Nova Scotia, Canada) + (902) 424-0503 + Air Quality Approvals and Permits...

  6. Fax and Evaluation Letter: Fax transmits the following letter: Post-Cleanup Evaluation for the Southeast Drainage, February 12, 1999.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  7. Cellular responses to environmental DNA damage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of the conference entitled Cellular Responses to Environmental DNA Damage held in Banff,Alberta December 1--6, 1991. The conference addresses various aspects of DNA repair in sessions titled DNA repair; Basic Mechanisms; Lesions; Systems; Inducible Responses; Mutagenesis; Human Population Response Heterogeneity; Intragenomic DNA Repair Heterogeneity; DNA Repair Gene Cloning; Aging; Human Genetic Disease; and Carcinogenesis. Individual papers are represented as abstracts of about one page in length.

  8. Microsoft Word - frm-1901rev1.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Form FRM-1901 ASBESTIFORM SHIPMENT NOTIFICATION Fax to (702) 295-1153 02/14/08 Rev. 01 Page 1 of 1 The generator signed below shall submit this notification to NNSA/NSO at least seven days in advance of arrival of shipment of Asbestiform low-level waste to the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS). Generator: Generator Address: Generator Telephone Number: Fax Number: Transporter Name: Transporter Address: Transporter Telephone Number: Fax Number: Waste Stream Identification Number:

  9. Cellular membrane trafficking of mesoporous silica nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, I-Ju

    2012-06-21

    This dissertation mainly focuses on the investigation of the cellular membrane trafficking of mesoporous silica nanoparticles. We are interested in the study of endocytosis and exocytosis behaviors of mesoporous silica nanoparticles with desired surface functionality. The relationship between mesoporous silica nanoparticles and membrane trafficking of cells, either cancerous cells or normal cells was examined. Since mesoporous silica nanoparticles were applied in many drug delivery cases, the endocytotic efficiency of mesoporous silica nanoparticles needs to be investigated in more details in order to design the cellular drug delivery system in the controlled way. It is well known that cells can engulf some molecules outside of the cells through a receptor-ligand associated endocytosis. We are interested to determine if those biomolecules binding to cell surface receptors can be utilized on mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials to improve the uptake efficiency or govern the mechanism of endocytosis of mesoporous silica nanoparticles. Arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD) is a small peptide recognized by cell integrin receptors and it was reported that avidin internalization was highly promoted by tumor lectin. Both RGD and avidin were linked to the surface of mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials to investigate the effect of receptor-associated biomolecule on cellular endocytosis efficiency. The effect of ligand types, ligand conformation and ligand density were discussed in Chapter 2 and 3. Furthermore, the exocytosis of mesoporous silica nanoparticles is very attractive for biological applications. The cellular protein sequestration study of mesoporous silica nanoparticles was examined for further information of the intracellular pathway of endocytosed mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials. The surface functionality of mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials demonstrated selectivity among the materials and cancer and normal cell lines. We aimed to determine

  10. Evaluation of Cellular Shades in the PNNL Lab Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petersen, Joseph M.; Sullivan, Greg; Cort, Katherine A.; Merzouk, Massine B.; Weber, Jessica M.

    2015-10-28

    Understand the HVAC energy impact due to scheduled operation of Hunter Douglas cellular shades in the PNNL lab homes.

  11. Cellular membrane collapse by atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Kangil; Sik Yang, Sang E-mail: ssyang@ajou.ac.kr; Jun Ahn, Hak; Lee, Jong-Soo E-mail: ssyang@ajou.ac.kr; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Kim, Jae-Ho

    2014-01-06

    Cellular membrane dysfunction caused by air plasma in cancer cells has been studied to exploit atmospheric-pressure plasma jets for cancer therapy. Here, we report that plasma jet treatment of cervical cancer HeLa cells increased electrical conductivity across the cellular lipid membrane and caused simultaneous lipid oxidation and cellular membrane collapse. We made this finding by employing a self-manufactured microelectrode chip. Furthermore, increased roughness of the cellular lipid membrane and sequential collapse of the membrane were observed by atomic force microscopy following plasma jet treatment. These results suggest that the cellular membrane catastrophe occurs via coincident altered electrical conductivity, lipid oxidation, and membrane roughening caused by an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet, possibly resulting in cellular vulnerability to reactive species generated from the plasma as well as cytotoxicity to cancer cells.

  12. A Nanocrystal Sensor for Luminescence Detection of Cellular Forces...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    States Language: English Subject: 77 NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY; 47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION tetrapod stress gauge, luminescent nanocrystals, cellular forces Word Cloud More...

  13. Real-Time Bioluminescent Tracking of Cellular Population Dynamics...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    cellular aliquots followed by extrapolation to the total population size, or through the monitoring of signal intensity from any number of externally stimulated reporter proteins. ...

  14. Evaluation of Cellular Shades in the PNNL Lab Homes (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION Hunter; Douglas; Cellular; Shades; HVAC; ...

  15. On the reversibility of transitions between closed and open cellular...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and open cellular states is asymmetrical and characterized by a rapid ("runaway") transition from the closed- to the open-cell state but slower recovery to the closed-cell state. ...

  16. On the reversibility of transitions between closed and open cellular...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and open cellular states is asymmetrical, and characterized by a rapid ("runaway") transition from the closed- to the open-cell state, but slower recovery to the closed-cell state. ...

  17. A Nanocrystal Sensor for Luminescence Detection of Cellular Forces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Charina; Chou, Jonathan; Lutker, Katie; Werb, Zena; Alivisatos, Paul

    2011-09-29

    Quantum dots have been used as bright fluorescent tags with high photostability to probe numerous biological systems. In this work we present the tetrapod quantum dot as a dynamic, next-generation nanocrystal probe that fluorescently reports cellular forces with spatial and temporal resolution. Its small size and colloidal state suggest that the tetrapod may be further developed as a tool to measure cellular forces in vivo and with macromolecular spatial resolution.

  18. Scientists ratchet up understanding of cellular protein factory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Understanding of cellular protein factory Scientists ratchet up understanding of cellular protein factory The research could aid in development of new antibiotics used to fight multidrug resistant superbugs such as MRSA found in many U.S. hospitals. December 2, 2010 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to

  19. Nozomi Shirato | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nozomi Shirato Assistant Physicst Telephone 630.252.3605 Fax 630.252.5739 E-mail nshirato@anl.gov CV/Resume PDF icon Nozomi_Shirato_CV.pdf

  20. Peijun Guo | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Peijun Guo Postdoctoral Appointee (Supervisor, Richard Schaller) Telephone 630.252.5378 Fax 630.252.5739 E-mail gpeijun@anl.gov CV/Resume File Guo, Peijun - Bio.docx

  1. City of Port Townsend Office of City Manager

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Port Townsend Office of City Manager 250 Madison Street, 2, Port Townsend, WA 98368 Telephone: (360) 379-5047 Fax: (360) 385-4290 June 27, 2008 Mr. Mark Gendron Vice President...

  2. Tal Heilpern | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tal Heilpern Postdoctoral Appointee (Supervisor, Stephen Gray) Telephone 630.252.5884 Fax 630.252.4646 E-mail theilpern@anl.gov CV/Resume PDF icon Heilpern, Tal - Bio

  3. Edward Barry | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Edward Barry Argonne Scholar - ANL Named Postdoc (Joseph Katz Fellow); (Supervisor, Seth Darling) Telephone 630.252.6289 Fax 630.252.4646 E-mail edb@anl.gov CV/Resume PDF icon Barry, Edward - Resume.pdf

  4. Muge Acik | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Muge Acik Argonne Scholar - ANL Named Postdoc (Joseph Katz Fellow); (Supervisor, Seth Darling) News Employee Spotlight: Muge Acik Telephone 630.252.2734 Fax 630.252.4646 E-mail...

  5. Staff Listing - Office of Regulation and International Engagement...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DC 20585 Director of the Office of Regulation and International Engagement John A. Anderson, Director Room 3E-052 Telephone (202) 586-0521 FAX (202) 586-6050 Division of...

  6. Xufeng Zhang | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Xufeng Zhang Argonne Scholar - ANL Named Postdoc (Nikola Tesla Fellow); (Supervisor, Supratik Guha) Telephone 630.252.4721 Fax 630.252.5739 E-mail xufeng.zhang@anl.gov CV/Resume File Zhang, Xufeng-Bio.docx

  7. Marcia A. Wood | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Marcia A. Wood Group Leader, Information Solutions and Technology Assurance B.S. Computer Science, University of St. Francis Telephone 630.252.4656 Fax 630.252.6866 E-mail wood@anl.gov

  8. Quick Facts | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Contact Information Administrator: Kenneth E. Legg Headquarters: 1166 Athens Tech Road Elberton, GA 30635-6711 Telephone: 706-213-3800 FAX: 706-213-3884 Marketing Area Georgia, ...

  9. Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Post Office Box 1178 Richland, WA 99352 Attention: TC & WM EIS Email: TC&WMEIS@saic.com Fax: 1-888-785-2865 Telephone and voicemail: 1-888-829-6347 For general information ...

  10. Jonathan Logan | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jonathan Logan Postdoctoral Appointee (Supervisor, Ian McNulty) Telephone 630.252.4874 Fax 630.252.5739 E-mail jmlogan@anl.gov CV/Resume PDF icon Logan, Jonathan - Bio

  11. Alper Kinaci | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alper Kinaci Postdoctoral Appointee (Supervisor, Maria Chan) News Visualizing Redox Dynamics of a Single Ag/AgCl Heterogeneous Nanocatalyst at Atomic Resolution Telephone 630.252.5378 Fax 630.252.4646 E-mail akinaci

  12. Zifeng Lu | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and tropospheric ozone assessment and the UNECE report on hemispheric transport of air pollution (HTAP). Telephone 630-252-9853 Fax 630-252-8007 E-mail zlu@anl.gov Website Google ...

  13. --No Title--

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (PADD) levels, regions of the country, sub-PADD levels, and the state of California are released by the end of the day through email list, the Web, Fax, and telephone hotline. ...

  14. Real-Time Bioluminescent Tracking of Cellular Population Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Close, Dan; Sayler, Gary Steven; Xu, Tingting; Ripp, Steven Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Cellular population dynamics are routinely monitored across many diverse fields for a variety of purposes. In general, these dynamics are assayed either through the direct counting of cellular aliquots followed by extrapolation to the total population size, or through the monitoring of signal intensity from any number of externally stimulated reporter proteins. While both viable methods, here we describe a novel technique that allows for the automated, non-destructive tracking of cellular population dynamics in real-time. This method, which relies on the detection of a continuous bioluminescent signal produced through expression of the bacterial luciferase gene cassette, provides a low cost, low time-intensive means for generating additional data compared to alternative methods.

  15. QROU Questions Fax: Fax transmits questions on the Quarry Residuals Operable Unit - Remedial Investigation Report (QROU - RI) for technical meeting set for August 14, 1997.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  16. EE/CA Letter and Fax: Fax transmits a copy of a Weldon Spring Citizens Commission letter regarding the Engineering Evaluation Cost Assessment on the Southeast Drainage.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  17. Oscillatory cellular patterns in three-dimensional directional solidification

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tourret, D.; Debierre, J. -M.; Song, Y.; Mota, F. L.; Bergeon, N.; Guerin, R.; Trivedi, R.; Billia, B.; Karma, A.

    2015-09-11

    We present a phase-field study of oscillatory breathing modes observed during the solidification of three-dimensional cellular arrays in micro-gravity. Directional solidification experiments conducted onboard the International Space Station have allowed for the first time to observe spatially extended homogeneous arrays of cells and dendrites while minimizing the amount of gravity-induced convection in the liquid. In situ observations of transparent alloys have revealed the existence, over a narrow range of control parameters, of oscillations in cellular arrays with a period ranging from about 25 to 125 minutes. Cellular patterns are spatially disordered, and the oscillations of individual cells are spatiotemporally uncorrelatedmore » at long distance. However, in regions displaying short-range spatial ordering, groups of cells can synchronize into oscillatory breathing modes. Quantitative phase-field simulations show that the oscillatory behavior of cells in this regime is linked to a stability limit of the spacing in hexagonal cellular array structures. For relatively high cellular front undercooling (\\ie low growth velocity or high thermal gradient), a gap appears in the otherwise continuous range of stable array spacings. Close to this gap, a sustained oscillatory regime appears with a period that compares quantitatively well with experiment. For control parameters where this gap exist, oscillations typically occur for spacings at the edge of the gap. However, after a change of growth conditions, oscillations can also occur for nearby values of control parameters where this gap just closes and a continuous range of spacings exists. In addition, sustained oscillations at to the opening of this stable gap exhibit a slow periodic modulation of the phase-shift among cells with a slower period of several hours. While long-range coherence of breathing modes can be achieved in simulations for a perfect spatial arrangement of cells as initial condition, global

  18. Oscillatory cellular patterns in three-dimensional directional solidification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tourret, D.; Debierre, J. -M.; Song, Y.; Mota, F. L.; Bergeon, N.; Guerin, R.; Trivedi, R.; Billia, B.; Karma, A.

    2015-09-11

    We present a phase-field study of oscillatory breathing modes observed during the solidification of three-dimensional cellular arrays in micro-gravity. Directional solidification experiments conducted onboard the International Space Station have allowed for the first time to observe spatially extended homogeneous arrays of cells and dendrites while minimizing the amount of gravity-induced convection in the liquid. In situ observations of transparent alloys have revealed the existence, over a narrow range of control parameters, of oscillations in cellular arrays with a period ranging from about 25 to 125 minutes. Cellular patterns are spatially disordered, and the oscillations of individual cells are spatiotemporally uncorrelated at long distance. However, in regions displaying short-range spatial ordering, groups of cells can synchronize into oscillatory breathing modes. Quantitative phase-field simulations show that the oscillatory behavior of cells in this regime is linked to a stability limit of the spacing in hexagonal cellular array structures. For relatively high cellular front undercooling (\\ie low growth velocity or high thermal gradient), a gap appears in the otherwise continuous range of stable array spacings. Close to this gap, a sustained oscillatory regime appears with a period that compares quantitatively well with experiment. For control parameters where this gap exist, oscillations typically occur for spacings at the edge of the gap. However, after a change of growth conditions, oscillations can also occur for nearby values of control parameters where this gap just closes and a continuous range of spacings exists. In addition, sustained oscillations at to the opening of this stable gap exhibit a slow periodic modulation of the phase-shift among cells with a slower period of several hours. While long-range coherence of breathing modes can be achieved in simulations for a perfect spatial arrangement of cells as initial condition, global disorder is

  19. Investigation of Cellular Interactions of Nanoparticles by Helium Ion Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arey, Bruce W.; Shutthanandan, V.; Xie, Yumei; Tolic, Ana; Williams, Nolann G.; Orr, Galya

    2011-06-01

    The helium ion mircroscope (HIM) probes light elements (e.g. C, N, O, P) with high contrast due to the large variation in secondary electron yield, which minimizes the necessity of specimen staining. A defining characteristic of HIM is its remarkable capability to neutralize charge by the implementation of an electron flood gun, which eliminates the need for coating non-conductive specimens for imaging at high resolution. In addition, the small convergence angle in HeIM offers a large depth of field (~5x FE-SEM), enabling tall structures to be viewed in focus within a single image. Taking advantage of these capabilities, we investigate the interactions of engineered nanoparticles (NPs) at the surface of alveolar type II epithelial cells grown at the air-liquid interface (ALI). The increasing use of nanomaterials in a wide range of commercial applications has the potential to increase human exposure to these materials, but the impact of such exposure on human health is still unclear. One of the main routs of exposure is the respiratory tract, where alveolar epithelial cells present a vulnerable target at the interface with ambient air. Since the cellular interactions of NPs govern the cellular response and ultimately determine the impact on human health, our studies will help delineating relationships between particle properties and cellular interactions and response to better evaluate NP toxicity or biocompatibility. The Rutherford backscattered ion (RBI) is a helium ions imaging mode, which backscatters helium ions from every element except hydrogen, with a backscatter yield that depends on the atomic number of the target. Energy-sensitive backscatter analysis is being developed, which when combined with RBI image information, supports elemental identification at helium ion nanometer resolution. This capability will enable distinguishing NPs from cell surface structures with nanometer resolution.

  20. EVSE Features LED Charge Indicator Cellular Modem EVSE Specifcations

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Charge Indicator Cellular Modem EVSE Specifcations Grid connection Dual NEMA 6-50P Cordsets Connector type J1772 Approximate size (H x W x D inches) 16 x 24 x 6 Charge level AC Level 2 Input voltage 208 / 240 VAC Maximum input current 32 Amp Circuit breaker rating 40 Amp Test Conditions 1 Test date 12/5/2013 Nominal supply voltage (Vrms) 208.6 Supply frequency (Hz) 60.00 Initial ambient temperature (°F) 8 Test Vehicle 1,3 Make and model 2012 Chevrolet Volt Battery type Li-ion Steady state

  1. FORMATION BY IRRADIATION OF AN EXPANDED, CELLULAR, POLYMERIC BODY

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Charlesby, A.; Ross, M.

    1958-12-01

    The treatment of polymeric esters of methacrylic acid having a softening polnt above 40 icient laborato C to form an expanded cellular mass with a smooth skin is discussed. The disclosed method comprises the steps of subjecting the body at a temperature below the softenpoint to a dose of at least 5 x lO/sup 6/ roentgen of gamma radiation from cobalt-60 source until its average molecular weight is reduced to a value within the range of 3 x lO/sup 5/ to 10/sup 4/, and heating at a temperature within the range of 0 to lO icient laborato C above its softening point to effect expansion.

  2. CANCELLED EMT and back again: does cellular plasticity fuelneoplasticprogressi on?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turley, Eva A.; Veiseh, Mandana; Radisky, Derek C.; Bissell, MinaJ.

    2007-02-24

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a cellular transdifferentiation program that facilitates organ morphogenesis and tissue remodeling in physiological processes such as embryonic development and wound healing. However, a similar phenotypic conversion is also detected in fibrotic diseases and neoplasia, in which it is associated with disease progression. EMT in cancer epithelial cells often appears to be an incomplete and bi-directional process. Here we discuss the phenomenon of EMT as it pertains to tumor development, focusing on exceptions to the commonly held rule that EMT promotes invasion and metastasis. We also highlight the role of the Ras-controlled signaling mediators, ERK1, ERK2 and PI3-kinase, as microenvironmental responsive regulators of EMT.

  3. This form may be submitted to the EIA by mail, fax, e-mail, or...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    month." " since the last report, enter an ""X"" in the block:" " ",,,..."Mo",,,"Yea... "If this is a resubmission, enter an ""X"" in the block:",,,...

  4. This form may be submitted to the EIA by mail, fax, e-mail, or...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,," Version No: 2014.001" "ANNUAL REPORT OF THE ORIGIN OF NATURAL GAS LIQUIDS PRODUCTION" "FORM EIA-64A" "REPORT YEAR 2014" "This report is...

  5. This form may be submitted to the EIA by mail, fax, e-mail, or...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    under the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275). Failure to comply may result in criminal fines, civil penalties and other sanctions as provided by law. ...

  6. This form may be submitted to the EIA by mail, fax, e-mail, or...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Failure to comply may result in criminal fines, civil penalties and other sanctions as provided by law. Title 18 USC 1001 makes it a criminal offense for any person knowingly and ...

  7. This form may be submitted to the EIA by mail, fax, e-mail, or...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "REPORT YEAR 2011" "This report is mandatory under Public Law 93-275. Failure to comply may result in criminal fines, civil penalties and other sanctions as provided by law. ...

  8. This form may be submitted to the EIA by mail, fax, e-mail, or...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    business on the web.) To use this service, we recommend the use of Microsoft Internet Explorer 5.5 or later or Netscape 4.77 or later. Send your surveys using this secure...

  9. This form may be submitted to the EIA by mail, fax, e-mail, or...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...www.eia.govsurveyformeia782alist782a.pdf" "Phone No.:",,,..."Ex... you are reporting:" "Type of Report (Check One):" ,,"Original",,,..."Mo",,,"Da...

  10. This form may be submitted to the EIA by mail, fax, e-mail, or...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    over the web using secure, encrypted processes. (It is the same method that commercial companies communicate with customers when transacting business on the web.) To use this ...

  11. This form may be submitted to the EIA by mail, fax, e-mail, or...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    over the web using secure, encrypted processes. (It is the same method that commercial companies use to communicate with customers when transacting business on the web.) To use ...

  12. A New Slant on a Cellular Balancing Act - The Copper-sensing...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Slant on a Cellular Balancing Act - The Copper-sensing Repressor of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Copper is a required micronutrient for all living cells, being an essential ...

  13. TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN I hereby authorize the release of my occupational radiation exposure records to the Duke University/Duke University Medical Center Radiation Safety Officer. Name (Please print) Signature Duke Unique ID Date Please fax this form back to Radiation Safety at 668-2783. Thank you!  Duke University Duke University Medical Center Durham, North Carolina 27710 Occupational and Environmental Safety Office BOX 3155 RADIATION SAFETY DIVISION TELEPHONE (919) 684-3155 FAX (919)

  14. IGF-I enhances cellular senescence via the reactive oxygen species-p53 pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Handayaningsih, Anastasia-Evi; Takahashi, Michiko; Fukuoka, Hidenori; Iguchi, Genzo; Nishizawa, Hitoshi; Yamamoto, Masaaki; Suda, Kentaro; Takahashi, Yutaka

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cellular senescence plays an important role in tumorigenesis and aging process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We demonstrated IGF-I enhanced cellular senescence in primary confluent cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer IGF-I enhanced cellular senescence in the ROS and p53-dependent manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These results may explain the underlying mechanisms of IGF-I involvement in tumorigenesis and in regulation of aging. -- Abstract: Cellular senescence is characterized by growth arrest, enlarged and flattened cell morphology, the expression of senescence-associated {beta}-galactosidase (SA-{beta}-gal), and by activation of tumor suppressor networks. Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) plays a critical role in cellular growth, proliferation, tumorigenesis, and regulation of aging. In the present study, we show that IGF-I enhances cellular senescence in mouse, rat, and human primary cells in the confluent state. IGF-I induced expression of a DNA damage marker, {gamma}H2AX, the increased levels of p53 and p21 proteins, and activated SA-{beta}-gal. In the confluent state, an altered downstream signaling of IGF-I receptor was observed. Treatment with a reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger, N-acetylcystein (NAC) significantly suppressed induction of these markers, indicating that ROS are involved in the induction of cellular senescence by IGF-I. In p53-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts, the IGF-I-induced augmentation of SA-{beta}-gal and p21 was inhibited, demonstrating that p53 is required for cellular senescence induced by IGF-I. Thus, these data reveal a novel pathway whereby IGF-I enhances cellular senescence in the ROS and p53-dependent manner and may explain the underlying mechanisms of IGF-I involvement in tumorigenesis and in regulation of aging.

  15. Toward Real-time Modeling of Human Heart Ventricles at Cellular...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Simulation of Drug-induced Arrhythmias Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Toward Real-time Modeling of Human Heart Ventricles at Cellular Resolution: Multi-hour Simulation ...

  16. Microsoft Word - 2008 NESHAP_FINAL.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161-0002 Telephone: 800.553.6847 Fax: 703.605.6900 E-mail: orders@ntis.gov Online ordering: http://www.ntis.gov/help/ordermethods.aspx Available electronically at http://www.osti.gov/bridge Available for a processing fee to the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors, in paper, from: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information P.O. Box 62 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0062 Telephone: 865.576.8401 Fax: 865.576.5728 E-mail:

  17. Cell-to-cell communication and cellular environment alter the somatostatin status of delta cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, Catriona; Flatt, Peter R.; McClenaghan, Neville H.

    2010-08-20

    Research highlights: {yields} TGP52 cells display enhanced functionality in pseudoislet form. {yields} Somatostatin content was reduced, but secretion increased in high glucose conditions. {yields} Cellular interactions and environment alter the somatostatin status of TGP52 cells. -- Abstract: Introduction: Somatostatin, released from pancreatic delta cells, is a potent paracrine inhibitor of insulin and glucagon secretion. Islet cellular interactions and glucose homeostasis are essential to maintain normal patterns of insulin secretion. However, the importance of cell-to-cell communication and cellular environment in the regulation of somatostatin release remains unclear. Methods: This study employed the somatostatin-secreting TGP52 cell line maintained in DMEM:F12 (17.5 mM glucose) or DMEM (25 mM glucose) culture media. The effect of pseudoislet formation and culture medium on somatostatin content and release in response to a variety of stimuli was measured by somatostatin EIA. In addition, the effect of pseudoislet formation on cellular viability (MTT and LDH assays) and proliferation (BrdU ELISA) was determined. Results: TGP52 cells readily formed pseudoislets and showed enhanced functionality in three-dimensional form with increased E-cadherin expression irrespective of the culture environment used. However, culture in DMEM decreased cellular somatostatin content (P < 0.01) and increased somatostatin secretion in response to a variety of stimuli including arginine, calcium and PMA (P < 0.001) when compared with cells grown in DMEM:F12. Configuration of TGP52 cells as pseudoislets reduced the proliferative rate and increased cellular cytotoxicity irrespective of culture medium used. Conclusions: Somatostatin secretion is greatly facilitated by cell-to-cell interactions and E-cadherin expression. Cellular environment and extracellular glucose also significantly influence the function of delta cells.

  18. A coarse-grained model for the simulations of biomolecular interactions in cellular environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Zhong-Ru; Chen, Jiawen; Wu, Yinghao

    2014-02-07

    The interactions of bio-molecules constitute the key steps of cellular functions. However, in vivo binding properties differ significantly from their in vitro measurements due to the heterogeneity of cellular environments. Here we introduce a coarse-grained model based on rigid-body representation to study how factors such as cellular crowding and membrane confinement affect molecular binding. The macroscopic parameters such as the equilibrium constant and the kinetic rate constant are calibrated by adjusting the microscopic coefficients used in the numerical simulations. By changing these model parameters that are experimentally approachable, we are able to study the kinetic and thermodynamic properties of molecular binding, as well as the effects caused by specific cellular environments. We investigate the volumetric effects of crowded intracellular space on bio-molecular diffusion and diffusion-limited reactions. Furthermore, the binding constants of membrane proteins are currently difficult to measure. We provide quantitative estimations about how the binding of membrane proteins deviates from soluble proteins under different degrees of membrane confinements. The simulation results provide biological insights to the functions of membrane receptors on cell surfaces. Overall, our studies establish a connection between the details of molecular interactions and the heterogeneity of cellular environments.

  19. TelephoneDirec09_1944.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  20. TelephoneDirec10_1944.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  1. TelephoneDirec11_1944.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  2. EIA-877 WINTER HEATING FUELS TELEPHONE SURVEY

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    under the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275). Failure to comply may result in criminal fines, civil penalties and other sanctions as provided by law. ...

  3. Telephoning for Energy Efficiency in Vermont

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a phone call you want to take. NeighborWorks of Western Vermont (NWWVT) is phonebanking homeowners in Shrewsburgh, VT offering up home energy audits at a fraction of the cost to help local residents save energy to save money.

  4. EIS-0298: Telephone Flat Geothermal Development Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS is for a Plan of Operation (POO) for Development and Production; and for a POO for Utilization and Disposal for a proposed geothermal development project, including: a power plant, geothermal production and injection wellfield, ancillary facilities, and transmission line on the Modoc National Forest in Siskiyou and Modoc Counties, California.

  5. Telephone. Federal Communications Commission. Marlene H. Dortch...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... (GSA), and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). ACTION: Correction. ... DoD, GSA, and NASA adopted as final, with changes, an interim rule amending the Federal ...

  6. Telephone. Federal Communications Commission. Marlene H. Dortch...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Commission amends 47 CFR parts 20 and 54 as follows: PART 20-COMMERCIAL MOBILE RADIO SERVICES 1. The authority citation for part 20 continues to read as follows:...

  7. 2012 CELLULAR & MOLECULAR FUNGAL BIOLOGY GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, JUNE 17 - 22, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judith Berman

    2012-06-22

    The Gordon Research Conference on CELLULAR & MOLECULAR FUNGAL BIOLOGY was held at Holderness School, Holderness New Hampshire, June 17 - 22, 2012. The 2012 Gordon Conference on Cellular and Molecular Fungal Biology (CMFB) will present the latest, cutting-edge research on the exciting and growing field of molecular and cellular aspects of fungal biology. Topics will range from yeast to filamentous fungi, from model systems to economically important organisms, and from saprophytes and commensals to pathogens of plants and animals. The CMFB conference will feature a wide range of topics including systems biology, cell biology and morphogenesis, organismal interactions, genome organisation and regulation, pathogenesis, energy metabolism, biomass production and population genomics. The Conference was well-attended with 136 participants. Gordon Research Conferences does not permit publication of meeting proceedings.

  8. Tuning of the electro-mechanical behavior of the cellular carbon nanotube structures with nanoparticle dispersions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gowda, Prarthana; Misra, Abha; Ramamurty, Upadrasta; Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials Research, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589

    2014-03-10

    The mechanical and electrical characteristics of cellular network of the carbon nanotubes (CNT) impregnated with metallic and nonmetallic nanoparticles were examined simultaneously by employing the nanoindentation technique. Experimental results show that the nanoparticle dispersion not only enhances the mechanical strength of the cellular CNT by two orders of magnitude but also imparts variable nonlinear electrical characteristics; the latter depends on the contact resistance between nanoparticles and CNT, which is shown to depend on the applied load while indentation. Impregnation with silver nanoparticles enhances the electrical conductance, the dispersion with copper oxide and zinc oxide nanoparticles reduces the conductance of CNT network. In all cases, a power law behavior with suppression in the differential conductivity at zero bias was noted, indicating electron tunneling through the channels formed at the CNT-nanoparticle interfaces. These results open avenues for designing cellular CNT foams with desired electro-mechanical properties and coupling.

  9. Three-dimensional simulations of cellular non-premixed jet flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valaer, A.L.; Frouzakis, C.E.; Boulouchos, K.; Papas, P.; Tomboulides, A.G.

    2010-04-15

    The formation, dynamics and structure of cellular flames in circular non-premixed jets are examined with three-dimensional numerical simulations incorporating detailed descriptions of chemistry and transport. Similar to past experiments reported in the literature, CO{sub 2}-diluted hydrogen in diluted or pure oxygen co-flowing streams in the proximity of the extinction limit are considered. As in the experiments, several preferred cellular states are found to co-exist with the particular state realized depending on initial conditions as well as on the jet characteristics. The simulations provide additionally the temporal transitions to different stationary or rotating cellular flames, their detailed structure, and the dependence of the scaling of the realized number of cells with the vorticity thickness. (author)

  10. Method of forming a continuous polymeric skin on a cellular foam material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duchane, David V.; Barthell, Barry L.

    1985-01-01

    Hydrophobic cellular material is coated with a thin hydrophilic polymer skin which stretches tightly over the outer surface of the foam but which does not fill the cells of the foam, thus resulting in a polymer-coated foam structure having a smoothness which was not possible in the prior art. In particular, when the hydrophobic cellular material is a specially chosen hydrophobic polymer foam and is formed into arbitrarily chosen shapes prior to the coating with hydrophilic polymer, inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets of arbitrary shapes can be produced by subsequently coating the shapes with metal or with any other suitable material. New articles of manufacture are produced, including improved ICF targets, improved integrated circuits, and improved solar reflectors and solar collectors. In the coating method, the cell size of the hydrophobic cellular material, the viscosity of the polymer solution used to coat, and the surface tensin of the polymer solution used to coat are all very important to the coating.

  11. Application of spectral hole burning to the study of in vitro cellular systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milanovich, Nebojsa

    1999-11-08

    Chapter 1 of this thesis describes the various stages of tumor development and a multitude of diagnostic techniques used to detect cancer. Chapter 2 gives an overview of the aspects of hole burning spectroscopy important for its application to the study of cellular systems. Chapter 3 gives general descriptions of cellular organelles, structures, and physical properties that can serve as possible markers for the differentiation of normal and cancerous cells. Also described in Chapter 3 are the principles of cryobiology important for low temperature spectroscopy of cells, characterization of MCF-10F (normal) and MCF-7 (cancer) cells lines which will serve as model systems, and cellular characteristics of aluminum phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate (APT), which was used as the test probe. Chapters 4 and 5 are previously published papers by the author pertaining to the results obtained from the application of hole burning to the study of cellular systems. Chapter 4 presents the first results obtained by spectral hole burning of cellular systems and Chapter 5 gives results for the differentiation of MCF-10F and MCF-7 cells stained with APT by an external applied electric (Stark) field. A general conclusion is presented in Chapter 6. Appendices A and B provide additional characterization of the cell/probe model systems. Appendix A describes the uptake and subcellular distribution of APT in MCF-10F and MCF-7 cells and Appendix B compares the hole burning characteristics of APT in cells when the cells are in suspension and when they are examined while adhering to a glass coverslip. Appendix C presents preliminary results for a novel probe molecule, referred to as a molecular thumbtack, designed by the authors for use in future hole burning applications to cellular systems.

  12. Piezoelectricity and ferroelectricity of cellular polypropylene electrets films characterized by piezoresponse force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miao, Hongchen; Sun, Yao; Zhou, Xilong; Li, Yingwei; Li, Faxin

    2014-08-14

    Cellular electrets polymer is a new ferroelectret material exhibiting large piezoelectricity and has attracted considerable attentions in researches and industries. Property characterization is very important for this material and current investigations are mostly on macroscopic properties. In this work, we conduct nanoscale piezoelectric and ferroelectric characterizations of cellular polypropylene (PP) films using piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM). First, both the single-frequency PFM and dual-frequency resonance-tracking PFM testings were conducted on the cellular PP film. The localized piezoelectric constant d{sub 33} is estimated to be 7–11pC/N by correcting the resonance magnification with quality factor and it is about one order lower than the macroscopic value. Next, using the switching spectroscopy PFM (SS-PFM), we studied polarization switching behavior of the cellular PP films. Results show that it exhibits the typical ferroelectric-like phase hysteresis loops and butterfly-shaped amplitude loops, which is similar to that of a poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) ferroelectric polymer film. However, both the phase and amplitude loops of the PP film are intensively asymmetric, which is thought to be caused by the nonzero remnant polarization after poling. Then, the D-E hysteresis loops of both the cellular PP film and PVDF film were measured by using the same wave form as that used in the SS-PFM, and the results show significant differences. Finally, we suggest that the ferroelectric-like behavior of cellular electrets films should be distinguished from that of typical ferroelectrics, both macroscopically and microscopically.

  13. Cellular response to low dose radiation: Role of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase like kinases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balajee, A.S.; Meador, J.A.; Su, Y.

    2011-03-24

    It is increasingly realized that human exposure either to an acute low dose or multiple chronic low doses of low LET radiation has the potential to cause different types of cancer. Therefore, the central theme of research for DOE and NASA is focused on understanding the molecular mechanisms and pathways responsible for the cellular response to low dose radiation which would not only improve the accuracy of estimating health risks but also help in the development of predictive assays for low dose radiation risks associated with tissue degeneration and cancer. The working hypothesis for this proposal is that the cellular mechanisms in terms of DNA damage signaling, repair and cell cycle checkpoint regulation are different for low and high doses of low LET radiation and that the mode of action of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase like kinases (PIKK: ATM, ATR and DNA-PK) determines the dose dependent cellular responses. The hypothesis will be tested at two levels: (I) Evaluation of the role of ATM, ATR and DNA-PK in cellular response to low and high doses of low LET radiation in simple in vitro human cell systems and (II) Determination of radiation responses in complex cell microenvironments such as human EpiDerm tissue constructs. Cellular responses to low and high doses of low LET radiation will be assessed from the view points of DNA damage signaling, DNA double strand break repair and cell cycle checkpoint regulation by analyzing the activities (i.e. post-translational modifications and kinetics of protein-protein interactions) of the key target proteins for PI-3 kinase like kinases both at the intra-cellular and molecular levels. The proteins chosen for this proposal are placed under three categories: (I) sensors/initiators include ATM ser1981, ATR, 53BP1, gamma-H2AX, MDC1, MRE11, Rad50 and Nbs1; (II) signal transducers include Chk1, Chk2, FANCD2 and SMC1; and (III) effectors include p53, CDC25A and CDC25C. The primary goal of this proposal is to elucidate the

  14. Sample Format

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    LNG Exports (Truck)" ,,,"Monthly Sales and Price Report" "Month/Year: _______________",,"Exporter (Authorization Holder):________________________________________________________________" "E-Mail Address:_____________________________",,,,"Address:_______________________________________________________" "Preparer of Report:__________________________",,,,"Telephone No.:______________________",,,"FAX

  15. Sample Format

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    LNG Imports (Truck)" ,,,"Monthly Sales and Price Report" "Month/Year: _______________",,"Importer (Authorization Holder):_________________________________________________________________" "E-Mail Address:_____________________________",,,,"Address:_______________________________________________________" "Preparer of Report:__________________________",,,,"Telephone No.:___________________",,,"FAX

  16. Benjamin Diroll | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Benjamin Diroll Argonne Scholar - Director's Postdoctoral Fellow (Supervisor, Richard Schaller) My research is focused on time-, temperature-, and pressure-resolved spectroscopy of nanoscale materials, especially inorganic colloidal nanocrystals. Telephone 630.252.5418 Fax 630.252.5739 E-mail bdiroll@anl.gov CV/Resume PDF icon Diroll, Ben - CV.pdf

  17. Dmitri Talapin | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dmitri Talapin Scientist (Joint Appointment) & Professor, Chemistry, University of Chicago Telephone 773.834.2607 Fax 773.702.5863 E-mail dvtalapin@uchicago.edu CV/Resume Microsoft Office document icon Talapin Bio-Revised Jan 2016.doc

  18. Nancy Rezek | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nancy Rezek Administrative Secretary Nancy Rezek has been with the High Energy Physics Division since October 2010. She currently provides administrative support to the Accelerator Physics Group, Energy Frontier (ATLAS) Group, the Computational HEP Group and the ILC Accelerator Project. Telephone (630) 252-2574 Fax (630) 252-6169 E-mail nrezek

  19. Copy of Forms FE-746R 2015 Edits v3 BAN (FINAL) LNG Exports - Truck.xls

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    LNG Exports (Truck) Monthly Sales and Price Report Month/Year: _______________Exporter (Authorization Holder):________________________________________________________________ E-Mail Address:_____________________________ Address:_______________________________________________________ Preparer of Report:__________________________ Telephone No.:______________________ FAX No.:____________________ Exports Made Pursuant to DOE Opinion and Order No.________, under FE Docket No._______________. (1) (2)

  20. Copy of Forms FE-746R 2015 Edits v3 BAN (FINAL) LNG Imports - Truck.xls

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    LNG Imports (Truck) Monthly Sales and Price Report Month/Year: _______________ Importer (Authorization Holder):_________________________________________________________________ E-Mail Address:_____________________________ Address:_______________________________________________________ Preparer of Report:__________________________ Telephone No.:___________________ FAX No.:____________________ Imports Made Pursuant to DOE Opinion and Order No.________, under FE Docket No._______________. (1) (2)

  1. Geoffrey Bodwin | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geoffrey Bodwin Senior Theoretical Physicist Dr. Geoffrey Bodwin began his career at Argonne National Laboratory in May of 1983. He currently works as a Senior Physicist within the Theory Group in the High Energy Physics Division. Telephone (630) 252-6229 Fax (630) 252-5047 E-mail gtb@anl.gov

  2. Rui Zhang | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rui Zhang Postdoctoral Appointee (Supervisor, Jeff Guest) Designing and developing the optical combination system based on ultrahigh vacuum and low temperature STM, thus in order to study the light-matter interactions in single molecules. Telephone 630.252.5341 Fax 630.252.4646 E-mail zhangr@anl.gov CV/Resume PDF icon Zhang, Rui - Bio

  3. Matthew Sykes | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Matthew Sykes Postdoctoral Appointee (Supervisor, Gary Wiederrecht) Research focuses on characterizing ultrafast processes in metal and semiconductor hybrid nanomaterials for applications in energy conversion. Telephone 630.252.1572 Fax 630.252.4646 E-mail sykes@anl.gov CV/Resume PDF icon Sykes, Matthew - 5-2016 Bio

  4. Ji-sang Park | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ji-sang Park Postdoctoral Appointee (Supervier, Maria Chan) Research focuses primarily on physical properties of semiconductors for transistor, light emitting diode, and solar cell applications. Telephone 630.252.4628 Fax 630.252.4646 E-mail jisang.park@anl.gov CV/Resume File Park, Ji-Sang - Bio.docx

  5. Joonseok Lee | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Joonseok Lee Argonne Scholar - Director's Postdoctoral Fellow (Supervisor, Elena Roshkova) News Piezoelectrically enhanced ferroelectric polymers via nanoscale mechanical annealing Telephone 630.252.7317 Fax 630.252.4646 E-mail joonseoklee@anl.gov CV/Resume PDF icon Lee_Joonseok

  6. Kiran Kumar Kovi | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kumar Kovi Postdoctoral Appointee (Supervisor, Ani Sumant) Research is focused on Diamond based electronics with emphasis on high power devices. Other areas of interests include Valleytronics, 2D materials etc. Telephone 630.252.4258 Fax 630.252.5739 E-mail kkovi@anl.gov CV/Resume PDF icon Kiran_Kumar_Kovi

  7. San Diego Gas & Electric Video (Text Version) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    LNG Exports (Truck)" ,,,"Monthly Sales and Price Report" "Month/Year: _______________",,"Exporter (Authorization Holder):________________________________________________________________" "E-Mail Address:_____________________________",,,,"Address:_______________________________________________________" "Preparer of Report:__________________________",,,,"Telephone No.:______________________",,,"FAX

  8. Anand Bhattacharya | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Anand Bhattacharya Physicist Ph.D., University of Minnesota Research focuses on correlated states that emerge in complex oxides at interfaces, in cation-ordered analogs, and due to nanoscale confinement. News Spintronics: spin current from a paramagnet Young scientist discovers magnetic material unnecessary to create spin current Telephone 630.252.6518 Fax 630.252.4646 E-mail anand

  9. Center for Advanced Solar Photophysics | Contacts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Division Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, NM 87545 Office: (505) 665-8284 Cellular: (505) 699-7541 Fax: (505) 667-0440 E-mail: klimov@lanl.gov Artthur Nozik - Center...

  10. Human Homolog of Drosophila Ariadne (HHARI) is a marker of cellular proliferation associated with nuclear bodies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elmehdawi, Fatima; Wheway, Gabrielle; Szymanska, Katarzyna; Adams, Matthew; High, Alec S.; Johnson, Colin A.; Robinson, Philip A.

    2013-02-01

    HHARI (also known as ARIH1) is an ubiquitin-protein ligase and is the cognate of the E2, UbcH7 (UBE2L3). To establish a functional role for HHARI in cellular proliferation processes, we performed a reverse genetics screen that identified n=86/522 (16.5%) ubiquitin conjugation components that have a statistically significant effect on cell proliferation, which included HHARI as a strong hit. We then produced and validated a panel of specific antibodies that establish HHARI as both a nuclear and cytoplasmic protein that is expressed in all cell types studied. HHARI was expressed at higher levels in nuclei, and co-localized with nuclear bodies including Cajal bodies (p80 coilin, NOPP140), PML and SC35 bodies. We confirmed reduced cellular proliferation after ARIH1 knockdown with individual siRNA duplexes, in addition to significantly increased levels of apoptosis, an increased proportion of cells in G2 phase of the cell cycle, and significant reductions in total cellular RNA levels. In head and neck squamous cell carcinoma biopsies, there are higher levels of HHARI expression associated with increased levels of proliferation, compared to healthy control tissues. We demonstrate that HHARI is associated with cellular proliferation, which may be mediated through its interaction with UbcH7 and modification of proteins in nuclear bodies. -- Highlights: ? We produce and validate new antibody reagents for the ubiquitin-protein ligase HHARI. ? HHARI colocalizes with nuclear bodies including Cajal, PML and SC35 bodies. ? We establish new functions in cell proliferation regulation for HHARI. ? Increased HHARI expression associates with squamous cell carcinoma and proliferation.

  11. Advanced Cellular and Biomolecular Imaging at Lehigh University, (PA) Final Scientific/Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cassimeris, Lynne, U.

    2010-09-10

    Lehigh University is establishing an interdisciplinary program in high resolution cellular and subcellular biological imaging for a range of applications including improved cancer detection. The completed DOE project added to Lehigh?s bio-imaging infrastructure through acquisition of a new confocal microscope system as well as upgrades to two pieces of existing equipment. Bio-imaging related research at Lehigh was also supported through two seed grants for initiation of new projects.

  12. Coupled pulsating and cellular structure in the propagation of globally planar detonations in free space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Wenhu; Gao, Yang; Wang, Cheng; Law, Chung K.

    2015-10-15

    The globally planar detonation in free space is numerically simulated, with particular interest to understand and quantify the emergence and evolution of the one-dimensional pulsating instability and the two-dimensional cellular structure which is inherently also affected by pulsating instability. It is found that the pulsation includes three stages: rapid decay of the overdrive, approach to the Chapman-Jouguet state and emergence of weak pulsations, and the formation of strong pulsations; while evolution of the cellular structure also exhibits distinct behavior at these three stages: no cell formation, formation of small-scale, irregular cells, and formation of regular cells of a larger scale. Furthermore, the average shock pressure in the detonation front consists of fine-scale oscillations reflecting the collision dynamics of the triple-shock structure and large-scale oscillations affected by the global pulsation. The common stages of evolution between the cellular structure and the pulsating behavior, as well as the existence of shock-front pressure oscillation, suggest highly correlated mechanisms between them. Detonations with period doubling, period quadrupling, and chaotic amplitudes were also observed and studied for progressively increasing activation energies.

  13. GIM3E: Condition-specific Models of Cellular Metabolism Developed from Metabolomics and Expression Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, Brian; Ebrahim, Ali; Metz, Thomas O.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Palsson, Bernard O.; Hyduke, Daniel R.

    2013-11-15

    Motivation: Genome-scale metabolic models have been used extensively to investigate alterations in cellular metabolism. The accuracy of these models to represent cellular metabolism in specific conditions has been improved by constraining the model with omics data sources. However, few practical methods for integrating metabolomics data with other omics data sources into genome-scale models of metabolism have been reported. Results: GIMMME (Gene Inactivation Moderated by Metabolism, Metabolomics, and Expression) is an algorithm that enables the development of condition-specific models based on an objective function, transcriptomics, and intracellular metabolomics data. GIMMME establishes metabolite utilization requirements with metabolomics data, uses model-paired transcriptomics data to find experimentally supported solutions, and also provides calculations of the turnover (production / consumption) flux of metabolites. GIMMME was employed to investigate the effects of integrating additional omics datasets to create increasingly constrained solution spaces of Salmonella Typhimurium metabolism during growth in both rich and virulence media. This integration proved to be informative and resulted in a requirement of additional active reactions (12 in each case) or metabolites (26 or 29, respectively). The addition of constraints from transcriptomics also impacted the allowed solution space, and the cellular metabolites with turnover fluxes that were necessarily altered by the change in conditions increased from 118 to 271 of 1397. Availability: GIMMME has been implemented in Python and requires a COBRApy 0.2.x. The algorithm and sample data described here are freely available at: http://opencobra.sourceforge.net/

  14. Phenylbutyric acid induces the cellular senescence through an Akt/p21{sup WAF1} signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Hag Dong; Jang, Chang-Young; Choe, Jeong Min; Department of Biochemistry, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul 136-705; Korean Institute of Molecular Medicine and Nutrition, Seoul 136-705 ; Sohn, Jeongwon; Korean Institute of Molecular Medicine and Nutrition, Seoul 136-705 ; Kim, Joon

    2012-06-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phenylbutyric acid induces cellular senescence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phenylbutyric acid activates Akt kinase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The knockdown of PERK also can induce cellular senescence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Akt/p21{sup WAF1} pathway activates in PERK knockdown induced cellular senescence. -- Abstract: It has been well known that three sentinel proteins - PERK, ATF6 and IRE1 - initiate the unfolded protein response (UPR) in the presence of misfolded or unfolded proteins in the ER. Recent studies have demonstrated that upregulation of UPR in cancer cells is required to survive and proliferate. Here, we showed that long exposure to 4-phenylbutyric acid (PBA), a chemical chaperone that can reduce retention of unfolded and misfolded proteins in ER, induced cellular senescence in cancer cells such as MCF7 and HT1080. In addition, we found that treatment with PBA activates Akt, which results in p21{sup WAF1} induction. Interestingly, the depletion of PERK but not ATF6 and IRE1 also induces cellular senescence, which was rescued by additional depletion of Akt. This suggests that Akt pathway is downstream of PERK in PBA induced cellular senescence. Taken together, these results show that PBA induces cellular senescence via activation of the Akt/p21{sup WAF1} pathway by PERK inhibition.

  15. Interacting factors and cellular localization of SR protein-specific kinase Dsk1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Zhaohua; Luca, Maria; Taggart-Murphy, Laura; Portillio, Jessica; Chang, Cathey; Guven, Ayse; Lin, Ren-Jang; Murray, Johanne; Carr, Antony

    2012-10-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe Dsk1 is an SR protein-specific kinase (SRPK), whose homologs have been identified in every eukaryotic organism examined. Although discovered as a mitotic regulator with protein kinase activity toward SR splicing factors, it remains largely unknown about what and how Dsk1 contributes to cell cycle and pre-mRNA splicing. In this study, we investigated the Dsk1 function by determining interacting factors and cellular localization of the kinase. Consistent with its reported functions, we found that pre-mRNA processing and cell cycle factors are prominent among the proteins co-purified with Dsk1. The identification of these factors led us to find Rsd1 as a novel Dsk1 substrate, as well as the involvement of Dsk1 in cellular distribution of poly(A){sup +} RNA. In agreement with its role in nuclear events, we also found that Dsk1 is mainly localized in the nucleus during G{sub 2} phase and at mitosis. Furthermore, we revealed the oscillation of Dsk1 protein in a cell cycle-dependent manner. This paper marks the first comprehensive analysis of in vivo Dsk1-associated proteins in fission yeast. Our results reflect the conserved role of SRPK family in eukaryotic organisms, and provide information about how Dsk1 functions in pre-mRNA processing and cell-division cycle.

  16. Inhibition of HIV by Legalon-SIL is independent of its effect on cellular metabolism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McClure, Janela; Margineantu, Daciana H.; Sweet, Ian R.; Polyak, Stephen J.

    2014-01-20

    In this report, we further characterized the effects of silibinin (SbN), derived from milk thistle extract, and Legalon-SIL (SIL), a water-soluble derivative of SbN, on T cell metabolism and HIV infection. We assessed the effects of SbN and SIL on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and CEM-T4 cells in terms of cellular growth, ATP content, metabolism, and HIV infection. SIL and SbN caused a rapid and reversible (upon removal) decrease in cellular ATP levels, which was associated with suppression of mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis. SbN, but not SIL inhibited glucose uptake. Exposure of T cells to SIL (but not SbN or metabolic inhibitors) during virus adsorption blocked HIV infection. Thus, both SbN and SIL rapidly perturb T cell metabolism in vitro, which may account for its anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative effects that arise with prolonged exposure of cells. However, the metabolic effects are not involved in SIL's unique ability to block HIV entry. - Highlights: • Silibinin (SbN) and Legalon-SIL (SIL) are cytoprotective mixtures of natural products. • SbN and SIL reduce T cell oxidative phosphorylation and glycolysis in vitro. • SIL but not SbN blocks entry of multiple HIV isolates into T cells in vitro. • SIL's suppression of HIV appears independent of its effects on T cell metabolism. • Metabolic effects of SIL and SbN may be relevant in inflammatory diseases.

  17. Length Scale Correlations of Cellular Microstructures in Directionally Solidified Binary System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yunxue Shen

    2002-08-01

    In a cellular array, a range of primary spacing is found to be stable under given growth conditions. Since a strong coupling of solute field exists between the neighboring cells, primary spacing variation should also influence other microstructure features such as cell shape and cell length. The existence of multiple solutions is examined in this study both theoretically as well as experimentally. A theoretical model is developed that identifies and relates four important microstructural lengths, which are found to be primary spacing, tip radius, cell width and cell length. This general microstructural relationship is shown to be valid for different cells in an array as well as for other cellular patterns obtained under different growth conditions. The unique feature of the model is that the microstructure correlation does not depend on composition or growth conditions since these variables scale microstructural lengths to satisfy the relationship obtained in this study. Detailed directional solidification experimental studies have been carried out in the succinonitrile-salol system to characterize and measure these four length scales. Besides the validation of the model, experimental results showed additional scaling laws to be present. In the regime where only a cellular structure is formed, the shape of the cell, the cell tip radius and the length of the cell are all found to scale individually with the local primary spacing. The presence of multiple solutions of primary spacing is also shown to influence the cell-dendrite transition that is controlled not only by the processing variables (growth velocity, thermal gradient and composition) but also by the local cell spacing. The cell-dendrite transition was found not to be sharp, but occurred over a range of processing conditions. Two critical conditions have been identified such that only cells are present below lower critics condition, and only dendrites are formed above the upper critics condition. Between

  18. Length Scale Correlations of Cellular Microstructures in Directionally Solidified Binary System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yunxue Shen

    2002-06-27

    In a cellular array, a range of primary spacing is found to be stable under given growth conditions. Since a strong coupling of solute field exists between the neighboring cells, primary spacing variation should also influence other microstructure features such as cell shape and cell length. The existence of multiple solutions is examined in this study both theoretically as well as experimentally. A theoretical model is developed that identifies and relates four important microstructural lengths, which are found to be primary spacing, tip radius, cell width and cell length. This general microstructural relationship is shown to be valid for different cells in an array as well as for other cellular patterns obtained under different growth conditions. The unique feature of the model is that the microstructure correlation does not depend on composition or growth conditions since these variables scale microstructural lengths to satisfy the relationship obtained in this study. Detailed directional solidification experimental studies have been carried out in the succinonitrile-salol system to characterize and measure these four length scales. Besides the validation of the model, experimental results showed additional scaling laws to be present. In the regime where only a cellular structure is formed, the shape of the cell, the cell tip radius and the length of the cell are all found to scale individually with the local primary spacing. The presence of multiple solutions of primary spacing is also shown to influence the cell-dendrite transition that is controlled not only by the processing variables (growth velocity, thermal gradient and composition) but also by the local cell spacing. The cell-dendrite transition was found not to be sharp, but occurred over a range of processing conditions. Two critical conditions have been identified such that only cells are present below lower critics condition, and only dendrites are formed above the upper critics condition. Between

  19. Drosophila Frataxin: an Iron Chaperone During Cellular [2Fe-2S] Cluster Bioassembly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kondapalli,K.; Kok, N.; Dancis, A.; Stemmler, T.

    2008-01-01

    Frataxin, a mitochondrial protein that is directly involved in regulating cellular iron homeostasis, has been suggested to serve as an iron chaperone during cellular Fe-S cluster biosynthesis. In humans, decreased amounts or impaired function of frataxin causes the autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder Friedreich's ataxia. Cellular production of Fe-S clusters is accomplished by the Fe cofactor assembly platform enzymes Isu (eukaryotes) and IscU (prokaryotes). In this report, we have characterized the overall stability and iron binding properties of the Drosophila frataxin homologue (Dfh). Dfh is highly folded with secondary structural elements consistent with the structurally characterized frataxin orthologs. While the melting temperature (TM {approx} 59 C) and chemical stability ([urea]50% {approx} 2.4 M) of Drosophila frataxin, measured using circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence spectroscopy, closely match values determined for the human ortholog, pure Dfh is more stable against autodegradation than both the human and yeast proteins. The ferrous iron binding affinity (Kd {approx} 6.0 {mu}M) and optimal metal to protein stoichiometry (1:1) for Dfh have been measured using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Under anaerobic conditions with salt present, holo-Dfh is a stable iron-loaded protein monomer. Frataxin prevents reactive oxygen species-induced oxidative damage to DNA when presented with both Fe(II) and H2O2. Ferrous iron bound to Dfh is high-spin and held in a partially symmetric Fe-(O/N)6 coordination environment, as determined by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) simulations indicate the average Fe-O/N bond length in Dfh is 2.13 Angstroms, consistent with a ligand geometry constructed by water and carboxylate oxygens most likely supplied in part by surface-exposed conserved acidic residues located on helix 1 and strand 1 in the structurally characterized frataxin orthologs. The iron

  20. Drosophila Frataxin: An Iron Chaperone During Cellular Fe-S Cluster Bioassembly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kondapalli, K.C.; Kok, N.M.; Dancis, A.; Stemmler, T.L.

    2009-05-20

    Frataxin, a mitochondrial protein that is directly involved in regulating cellular iron homeostasis, has been suggested to serve as an iron chaperone during cellular Fe-S cluster biosynthesis. In humans, decreased amounts or impaired function of frataxin causes the autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder Friedreich's ataxia. Cellular production of Fe-S clusters is accomplished by the Fe cofactor assembly platform enzymes Isu (eukaryotes) and IscU (prokaryotes). In this report, we have characterized the overall stability and iron binding properties of the Drosophila frataxin homologue (Dfh). Dfh is highly folded with secondary structural elements consistent with the structurally characterized frataxin orthologs. While the melting temperature (T{sub M} {approx} 59 C) and chemical stability ([urea]{sub 50} {approx} 2.4 M) of Drosophila frataxin, measured using circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence spectroscopy, closely match values determined for the human ortholog, pure Dfh is more stable against autodegradation than both the human and yeast proteins. The ferrous iron binding affinity (K{sub d} {approx} 6.0 {micro}M) and optimal metal to protein stoichiometry (1:1) for Dfh have been measured using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Under anaerobic conditions with salt present, holo-Dfh is a stable iron-loaded protein monomer. Frataxin prevents reactive oxygen species-induced oxidative damage to DNA when presented with both Fe(II) and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Ferrous iron bound to Dfh is high-spin and held in a partially symmetric Fe-(O/N){sub 6} coordination environment, as determined by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) simulations indicate the average Fe-O/N bond length in Dfh is 2.13 {angstrom}, consistent with a ligand geometry constructed by water and carboxylate oxygens most likely supplied in part by surface-exposed conserved acidic residues located on helix 1 and strand 1 in the structurally

  1. Time dependence of tip morphology during cellular/dendritic arrayed growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, H.; Tewari, S.N.

    1996-04-01

    Succinonitrile-1.9 wt pct acetone has been directionally solidified in 0.7 x 0.7-cm-square cross section pyrex ampoules in order to observe the cell/dendrite tip morphologies, not influenced by the wall effects, which are present during growth in the generally used thin (about 200 {micro}m) crucibles. The tips do not maintain a steady-state shape, as is generally assumed. Instead, they fluctuate within a shape envelope. The extent of fluctuation increases with decreasing growth speed, as the micro structure changes from the dendritic to cellular. The influence of natural convection has been examined by comparing these morphologies with those grown, without convection, in the thin ampoules.

  2. Developing an Abaqus *HYPERFOAM Model for M9747 (4003047) Cellular Silicone Foam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siranosian, Antranik A.; Stevens, R. Robert

    2012-04-26

    This report documents work done to develop an Abaqus *HYPERFOAM hyperelastic model for M9747 (4003047) cellular silicone foam for use in quasi-static analyses at ambient temperature. Experimental data, from acceptance tests for 'Pad A' conducted at the Kansas City Plant (KCP), was used to calibrate the model. The data includes gap (relative displacement) and load measurements from three locations on the pad. Thirteen sets of data, from pads with different serial numbers, were provided. The thirty-nine gap-load curves were extracted from the thirteen supplied Excel spreadsheets and analyzed, and from those thirty-nine one set of data, representing a qualitative mean, was chosen to calibrate the model. The data was converted from gap and load to nominal (engineering) strain and nominal stress in order to implement it in Abaqus. Strain computations required initial pad thickness estimates. An Abaqus model of a right-circular cylinder was used to evaluate and calibrate the *HYPERFOAM model.

  3. Structure and biochemical characterization of proliferating cellular nuclear antigen from a parasitic protozoon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cardona-Felix, Cesar S.; Lara-Gonzalez, Samuel; Brieba, Luis G.

    2012-02-08

    Proliferating cellular nuclear antigen (PCNA) is a toroidal-shaped protein that is involved in cell-cycle control, DNA replication and DNA repair. Parasitic protozoa are early-diverged eukaryotes that are responsible for neglected diseases. In this work, a PCNA from a parasitic protozoon was identified, cloned and biochemically characterized and its crystal structure was determined. Structural and biochemical studies demonstrate that PCNA from Entamoeba histolytica assembles as a homotrimer that is able to interact with and stimulate the activity of a PCNA-interacting peptide-motif protein from E. histolytica, EhDNAligI. The data indicate a conservation of the biochemical mechanisms of PCNA-mediated interactions between metazoa, yeast and parasitic protozoa.

  4. Two-lane traffic rules for cellular automata: A systematic approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagel, K. |; Wolf, D.E. |; Wagner, P. |; Simon, P.

    1997-11-05

    Microscopic modeling of multi-lane traffic is usually done by applying heuristic lane changing rules, and often with unsatisfying results. Recently, a cellular automation model for two-lane traffic was able to overcome some of these problems and to produce a correct density inversion at densities somewhat below the maximum flow density. In this paper, the authors summarize different approaches to lane changing and their results, and propose a general scheme, according to which realistic lane changing rules can be developed. They test this scheme by applying it to several different lane changing rules, which, in spite of their differences, generate similar and realistic results. The authors thus conclude that, for producing realistic results, the logical structure of the lane changing rules, as proposed here, is at least as important as the microscopic details of the rules.

  5. Frequent biphasic cellular responses of permanent fish cell cultures to deoxynivalenol (DON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pietsch, Constanze; Bucheli, Thomas D.; Wettstein, Felix E.; Burkhardt-Holm, Patricia

    2011-10-01

    Contamination of animal feed with mycotoxins is a major problem for fish feed mainly due to usage of contaminated ingredients for production and inappropriate storage of feed. The use of cereals for fish food production further increases the risk of a potential contamination. Potential contaminants include the mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) which is synthesized by globally distributed fungi of the genus Fusarium. The toxicity of DON is well recognized in mammals. In this study, we confirm cytotoxic effects of DON in established permanent fish cell lines. We demonstrate that DON is capable of influencing the metabolic activity and cell viability in fish cells as determined by different assays to indicate possible cellular targets of this toxin. Evaluation of cell viability by measurement of membrane integrity, mitochondrial activity and lysosomal function after 24 h of exposure of fish cell lines to DON at a concentration range of 0-3000 ng ml{sup -1} shows a biphasic effect on cells although differences in sensitivity occur. The cell lines derived from rainbow trout are particularly sensitive to DON. The focus of this study lies, furthermore, on the effects of DON at different concentrations on production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the different fish cell lines. The results show that DON mainly reduces ROS production in all cell lines that were used. Thus, our comparative investigations reveal that the fish cell lines show distinct species-related endpoint sensitivities that also depend on the type of tissue from which the cells were derived and the severity of exposure. - Highlights: > DON uptake by cells is not extensive. > All fish cell lines are sensitive to DON. > DON is most cytotoxic to rainbow trout cells. > Biphasic cellular responses were frequently observed. > Our results are similar to studies on mammalian cell lines.

  6. 7th International Workshop on Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brenner, David J.

    2009-07-21

    The extended abstracts that follow present a summary of the Proceedings of the 7th International Workshop: Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response, held at Columbia University’s Kellogg Center in New York City on March 15–17, 2006. These International Workshops on Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response have been held regularly since 1993 (1–5). Since the first workshop, there has been a rapid growth (see Fig. 1) in the number of centers developing microbeams for radiobiological research, and worldwide there are currently about 30 microbeams in operation or under development. Single-cell/single-particle microbeam systems can deliver beams of different ionizing radiations with a spatial resolution of a few micrometers down to a few tenths of a micrometer. Microbeams can be used to addressquestions relating to the effects of low doses of radiation (a single radiation track traversing a cell or group of cells), to probe subcellular targets (e.g. nucleus or cytoplasm), and to address questions regarding the propagation of information about DNA damage (for example, the radiation-induced bystander effect). Much of the recent research using microbeams has been to study low-dose effects and ‘‘non-targeted’’ responses such as bystander effects, genomic instability and adaptive responses. This Workshop provided a forum to assess the current state of microbeam technology and current biological applications and to discuss future directions for development, both technological and biological. Over 100 participants reviewed the current state of microbeam research worldwide and reported on new technological developments in the fields of both physics and biology.

  7. On the reversibility of transitions between closed and open cellular convection

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Feingold, G.; Koren, I.; Yamaguchi, T.; Kazil, J.

    2015-02-26

    The two-way transition between closed and open cellular convection is addressed in an idealized cloud resolving modeling framework. A series of cloud resolving simulations shows that the transition between closed and open cellular states is asymmetrical, and characterized by a rapid ("runaway") transition from the closed- to the open-cell state, but slower recovery to the closed-cell state. Given that precipitation initiates the closed-open cell transition, and that the recovery requires a suppression of the precipitation, we apply an ad hoc time-varying drop concentration to initiate and suppress precipitation. We show that the asymmetry in the two-way transition occurs even formore » very rapid drop concentration replenishment. The primary barrier to recovery is the loss in turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) associated with the loss in cloud water (and associated radiative cooling), and the stabilization of the boundary layer during the open-cell period. In transitioning from the open to the closed state, the system faces the Sisyphusian task of replenishing cloud water fast enough to counter precipitation losses, such that it can generate radiative cooling and TKE. Recovery to the closed cell state is slower when radiative cooling is inefficient such as in the presence of free tropospheric clouds, or after sunrise, when it is hampered by the absorption of shortwave radiation. Tests suggest that a faster return to the closed-cell state requires that the drop concentration recovery be accompanied by significant dynamical forcing, e.g., via an increase in surface latent and sensible heat fluxes. This is supported by simulations with a simple predator-prey dynamical system analogue. It is suggested that the observed closing of open cells by ship effluent likely occurs when aerosol intrusions are large, when contact comes prior to the heaviest drizzle in the early morning hours, and when the free troposphere is cloud-free.« less

  8. Resveratrol induces cellular senescence with attenuated mono-ubiquitination of histone H2B in glioma cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Zhen; Xu, Michael S.; Barnett, Tamara L.; Xu, C. Wilson

    2011-04-08

    Research highlights: {yields} Resveratrol induces cellular senescence in glioma cell. {yields} Resveratrol inhibits mono-ubiquitination of histone H2B at K120. {yields} Depletion of RNF20, phenocopies the inhibitory effects of resveratrol. {yields} Mono-ubiquitination of histone H2B at K120 is a novel target of resveratrol. {yields} RNF20 inhibits cellular senescence in proliferating glioma cells. -- Abstract: Resveratrol (3,4',5-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene), a polyphenol naturally occurring in grapes and other plants, has cancer chemo-preventive effects and therapeutic potential. Although resveratrol modulates multiple pathways in tumor cells, how resveratrol or its affected pathways converge on chromatin to mediate its effects is not known. Using glioma cells as a model, we showed here that resveratrol inhibited cell proliferation and induced cellular hypertrophy by transforming spindle-shaped cells to enlarged, irregular and flatten-shaped ones. We further showed that resveratrol-induced hypertrophic cells expressed senescence-associated-{beta}-galactosidase, suggesting that resveratrol-induced cellular senescence in glioma cells. Consistent with these observations, we demonstrated that resveratrol inhibited clonogenic efficiencies in vitro and tumor growth in a xenograft model. Furthermore, we found that acute treatment of resveratrol inhibited mono-ubiquitination of histone H2B at K120 (uH2B) in breast, prostate, pancreatic, lung, brain tumor cells as well as primary human cells. Chronic treatment with low doses of resveratrol also inhibited uH2B in the resveratrol-induced senescent glioma cells. Moreover, we showed that depletion of RNF20, a ubiquitin ligase of histone H2B, inhibited uH2B and induced cellular senescence in glioma cells in vitro, thereby recapitulated the effects of resveratrol. Taken together, our results suggest that uH2B is a novel direct or indirect chromatin target of resveratrol and RNF20 plays an important role in inhibiting cellular

  9. On the Interaction between Marine Boundary Layer Cellular Cloudiness and Surface Heat Fluxes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kazil, J.; Feingold, G.; Wang, Hailong; Yamaguchi, T.

    2014-01-02

    The interaction between marine boundary layer cellular cloudiness and surface uxes of sensible and latent heat is investigated. The investigation focuses on the non-precipitating closed-cell state and the precipitating open-cell state at low geostrophic wind speed. The Advanced Research WRF model is used to conduct cloud-system-resolving simulations with interactive surface fluxes of sensible heat, latent heat, and of sea salt aerosol, and with a detailed representation of the interaction between aerosol particles and clouds. The mechanisms responsible for the temporal evolution and spatial distribution of the surface heat fluxes in the closed- and open-cell state are investigated and explained. It is found that the horizontal spatial structure of the closed-cell state determines, by entrainment of dry free tropospheric air, the spatial distribution of surface air temperature and water vapor, and, to a lesser degree, of the surface sensible and latent heat flux. The synchronized dynamics of the the open-cell state drives oscillations in surface air temperature, water vapor, and in the surface fluxes of sensible and latent heat, and of sea salt aerosol. Open-cell cloud formation, cloud optical depth and liquid water path, and cloud and rain water path are identified as good predictors of the spatial distribution of surface air temperature and sensible heat flux, but not of surface water vapor and latent heat flux. It is shown that by enhancing the surface sensible heat flux, the open-cell state creates conditions by which it is maintained. While the open-cell state under consideration is not depleted in aerosol, and is insensitive to variations in sea-salt fluxes, it also enhances the sea-salt flux relative to the closed-cell state. In aerosol-depleted conditions, this enhancement may replenish the aerosol needed for cloud formation, and hence contribute to the perpetuation of the open-cell state as well. Spatial homogenization of the surface fluxes is found to have

  10. Downregulation of microRNA-498 in colorectal cancers and its cellular effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gopalan, Vinod; Smith, Robert A.; Lam, Alfred K.-Y.

    2015-01-15

    miR-498 is a non-coding RNA located intergenically in 19q13.41. Due to its predicted targeting of several genes involved in control of cellular growth, we examined the expression of miR-498 in colon cancer cell lines and a large cohort of patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma. Two colon cancer cancer cell lines (SW480 and SW48) and one normal colonic epithelial cell line (FHC) were recruited. The expression of miR-498 was tested in these cell lines by using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Tissues from 80 patients with surgical resection of colorectum (60 adenocarcinomas and 20 non-neoplastic tissues) were tested for miR-498 expression by qRT-PCR. In addition, an exogenous miR-498 (mimic) was used to detect the miRNA's effects on cell proliferation and cell cycle events in SW480 using MTT calorimetric assay and flow cytometry respectively. The colon cancer cell lines showed reduced expression of miR-498 compared to a normal colonic epithelial cell line. Mimic driven over expression of miR-498 in the SW480 cell line resulted in reduced cell proliferation and increased proportions of G2-M phase cells. In tissues, miR-498 expression was too low to be detected in all colorectal adenocarcinoma compared to non-neoplastic tissues. This suggests that the down regulation of miR-498 in colorectal cancer tissues and the direct suppressive cellular effect noted in cancer cell lines implies that miR-498 has some direct or indirect role in the pathogenesis of colorectal adenocarcinomas. - Highlights: • miR-498 is a non-coding RNA located in 19q13.41. • Colon cancer cell lines showed reduced expression of miR-498. • Mimic driven over expression of miR-498 in colon cancer cells resulted in lower cell proliferation. • miR-498 expression was down regulated in all colorectal adenocarcinoma tissues.

  11. On the reversibility of transitions between closed and open cellular convection

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Feingold, G.; Koren, I.; Yamaguchi, T.; Kazil, J.

    2015-07-08

    The two-way transition between closed and open cellular convection is addressed in an idealized cloud-resolving modeling framework. A series of cloud-resolving simulations shows that the transition between closed and open cellular states is asymmetrical and characterized by a rapid ("runaway") transition from the closed- to the open-cell state but slower recovery to the closed-cell state. Given that precipitation initiates the closed–open cell transition and that the recovery requires a suppression of the precipitation, we apply an ad hoc time-varying drop concentration to initiate and suppress precipitation. We show that the asymmetry in the two-way transition occurs even for very rapidmore » drop concentration replenishment. The primary barrier to recovery is the loss in turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) associated with the loss in cloud water (and associated radiative cooling) and the vertical stratification of the boundary layer during the open-cell period. In transitioning from the open to the closed state, the system faces the task of replenishing cloud water fast enough to counter precipitation losses, such that it can generate radiative cooling and TKE. It is hampered by a stable layer below cloud base that has to be overcome before water vapor can be transported more efficiently into the cloud layer. Recovery to the closed-cell state is slower when radiative cooling is inefficient such as in the presence of free tropospheric clouds or after sunrise, when it is hampered by the absorption of shortwave radiation. Tests suggest that recovery to the closed-cell state is faster when the drizzle is smaller in amount and of shorter duration, i.e., when the precipitation causes less boundary layer stratification. Cloud-resolving model results on recovery rates are supported by simulations with a simple predator–prey dynamical system analogue. It is suggested that the observed closing of open cells by ship effluent likely occurs when aerosol intrusions are large

  12. Impact of Resolution on Simulation of Closed Mesoscale Cellular Convection Identified by Dynamically Guided Watershed Segmentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martini, Matus; Gustafson, William I.; Yang, Qing; Xiao, Heng

    2014-11-27

    Organized mesoscale cellular convection (MCC) is a common feature of marine stratocumulus that forms in response to a balance between mesoscale dynamics and smaller scale processes such as cloud radiative cooling and microphysics. We use the Weather Research and Forecasting model with chemistry (WRF-Chem) and fully coupled cloud-aerosol interactions to simulate marine low clouds during the VOCALS-REx campaign over the southeast Pacific. A suite of experiments with 3- and 9-km grid spacing indicates resolution-dependent behavior. The simulations with finer grid spacing have smaller liquid water paths and cloud fractions, while cloud tops are higher. The observed diurnal cycle is reasonably well simulated. To isolate organized MCC characteristics we develop a new automated method, which uses a variation of the watershed segmentation technique that combines the detection of cloud boundaries with a test for coincident vertical velocity characteristics. This ensures that the detected cloud fields are dynamically consistent for closed MCC, the most common MCC type over the VOCALS-REx region. We demonstrate that the 3-km simulation is able to reproduce the scaling between horizontal cell size and boundary layer height seen in satellite observations. However, the 9-km simulation is unable to resolve smaller circulations corresponding to shallower boundary layers, instead producing invariant MCC horizontal scale for all simulated boundary layers depths. The results imply that climate models with grid spacing of roughly 3 km or smaller may be needed to properly simulate the MCC structure in the marine stratocumulus regions.

  13. Restriction of Receptor Movement Alters Cellular Response: Physical Force Sensing by EphA2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salaita, Khalid; Nair, Pradeep M; Petit, Rebecca S; Neve, Richard M; Das, Debopriya; Gray, Joe W; Groves, Jay T

    2009-09-09

    Activation of the EphA2 receptor tyrosine kinase by ephrin-A1 ligands presented on apposed cell surfaces plays important roles in development and exhibits poorly understood functional alterations in cancer. We reconstituted this intermembrane signaling geometry between live EphA2-expressing human breast cancer cells and supported membranes displaying laterally mobile ephrin-A1. Receptor-ligand binding, clustering, and subsequent lateral transport within this junction were observed. EphA2 transport can be blocked by physical barriers nanofabricated onto the underlying substrate. This physical reorganization of EphA2 alters the cellular response to ephrin-A1, as observed by changes in cytoskeleton morphology and recruitment of a disintegrin and metalloprotease 10. Quantitative analysis of receptor-ligand spatial organization across a library of 26 mammary epithelial cell lines reveals characteristic differences that strongly correlate with invasion potential. These observations reveal a mechanism for spatio-mechanical regulation of EphA2 signaling pathways.

  14. Maintenance of cellular ATP level by caloric restriction correlates chronological survival of budding yeast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Joon-Seok; Lee, Cheol-Koo

    2013-09-13

    Highlights: •CR decreases total ROS and mitochondrial superoxide during the chronological aging. •CR does not affect the levels of oxidative damage on protein and DNA. •CR contributes extension of chronological lifespan by maintenance of ATP level -- Abstract: The free radical theory of aging emphasizes cumulative oxidative damage in the genome and intracellular proteins due to reactive oxygen species (ROS), which is a major cause for aging. Caloric restriction (CR) has been known as a representative treatment that prevents aging; however, its mechanism of action remains elusive. Here, we show that CR extends the chronological lifespan (CLS) of budding yeast by maintaining cellular energy levels. CR reduced the generation of total ROS and mitochondrial superoxide; however, CR did not reduce the oxidative damage in proteins and DNA. Subsequently, calorie-restricted yeast had higher mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), and it sustained consistent ATP levels during the process of chronological aging. Our results suggest that CR extends the survival of the chronologically aged cells by improving the efficiency of energy metabolism for the maintenance of the ATP level rather than reducing the global oxidative damage of proteins and DNA.

  15. Electrical substation service-area estimation using Cellular Automata: An initial report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fenwick, J.W.; Dowell, L.J.

    1998-07-01

    The service areas for electric power substations can be estimated using a Cellular Automata (CA) model. The CA model is a discrete, iterative process whereby substations acquire service area by claiming neighboring cells. The service area expands from a substation until a neighboring substation service area is met or the substation`s total capacity or other constraints are reached. The CA-model output is dependent on the rule set that defines cell interactions. The rule set is based on a hierarchy of quantitative metrics that represent real-world factors such as land use and population density. Together, the metrics determine the rate of cell acquisition and the upper bound for service area size. Assessing the CA-model accuracy requires comparisons to actual service areas. These actual service areas can be extracted from distribution maps. Quantitative assessment of the CA-model accuracy can be accomplished by a number of methods. Some are as simple as finding the percentage of cells predicted correctly, while others assess a penalty based on the distance from an incorrectly predicted cell to its correct service area. This is an initial report of a work in progress.

  16. Cellular morphology of organic-inorganic hybrid foams based on alkali alumino-silicate matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verdolotti, Letizia; Capasso, Ilaria; Lavorgna, Marino; Liguori, Barbara; Caputo, Domenico; Iannace, Salvatore

    2014-05-15

    Organic-inorganic hybrid foams based on an alkali alumino-silicate matrix were prepared by using different foaming methods. Initially, the synthesis of an inorganic matrix by using aluminosilicate particles, activated through a sodium silicate solution, was performed at room temperature. Subsequently the viscous paste was foamed by using three different methods. In the first method, gaseous hydrogen produced by the oxidization of Si powder in an alkaline media, was used as blowing agent to generate gas bubbles in the paste. In the second method, the porous structure was generated by mixing the paste with a meringue type of foam previously prepared by whipping, under vigorous stirring, a water solution containing vegetal proteins as surfactants. In the third method, a combination of these two methods was employed. The foamed systems were consolidated for 24 hours at 40C and then characterized by FTIR, X-Ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and compression tests. Low density foams (?500 Kg/m{sup 3}) with good cellular structure and mechanical properties were obtained by combining the meringue approach with the use of the chemical blowing agent based on Si.

  17. TWO-DIMENSIONAL CELLULAR AUTOMATON MODEL FOR THE EVOLUTION OF ACTIVE REGION CORONAL PLASMAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lpez Fuentes, Marcelo; Klimchuk, James A.

    2015-02-01

    We study a two-dimensional cellular automaton (CA) model for the evolution of coronal loop plasmas. The model is based on the idea that coronal loops are made of elementary magnetic strands that are tangled and stressed by the displacement of their footpoints by photospheric motions. The magnetic stress accumulated between neighbor strands is released in sudden reconnection events or nanoflares that heat the plasma. We combine the CA model with the Enthalpy Based Thermal Evolution of Loops model to compute the response of the plasma to the heating events. Using the known response of the X-Ray Telescope on board Hinode, we also obtain synthetic data. The model obeys easy-to-understand scaling laws relating the output (nanoflare energy, temperature, density, intensity) to the input parameters (field strength, strand length, critical misalignment angle). The nanoflares have a power-law distribution with a universal slope of 2.5, independent of the input parameters. The repetition frequency of nanoflares, expressed in terms of the plasma cooling time, increases with strand length. We discuss the implications of our results for the problem of heating and evolution of active region coronal plasmas.

  18. Direct speciation analysis of arsenic in sub-cellular compartments using micro-X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bacquart, Thomas; Deves, Guillaume; Ortega, Richard

    2010-07-15

    Identification of arsenic chemical species at a sub-cellular level is a key to understanding the mechanisms involved in arsenic toxicology and antitumor pharmacology. When performed with a microbeam, X-ray absorption near-edge structure ({mu}-XANES) enables the direct speciation analysis of arsenic in sub-cellular compartments avoiding cell fractionation and other preparation steps that might modify the chemical species. This methodology couples tracking of cellular organelles in a single cell by confocal or epifluorescence microscopy with local analysis of chemical species by {mu}-XANES. Here we report the results obtained with a {mu}-XANES experimental setup based on Kirkpatrick-Baez X-ray focusing optics that maintains high flux of incoming radiation (>10{sup 11} ph/s) at micrometric spatial resolution (1.5x4.0 {mu}m{sup 2}). This original experimental setup enabled the direct speciation analysis of arsenic in sub-cellular organelles with a 10{sup -15} g detection limit. {mu}-XANES shows that inorganic arsenite, As(OH){sub 3}, is the main form of arsenic in the cytosol, nucleus, and mitochondrial network of cultured cancer cells exposed to As{sub 2}O{sub 3}. On the other hand, a predominance of As(III) species is observed in HepG2 cells exposed to As(OH){sub 3} with, in some cases, oxidation to a pentavalent form in nuclear structures of HepG2 cells. The observation of intra-nuclear mixed redox states suggests an inter-individual variability in a cell population that can only be evidenced with direct sub-cellular speciation analysis.

  19. Accelerated cellular senescence phenotype of GAPDH-depleted human lung carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phadke, Manali; Krynetskaia, Natalia; Mishra, Anurag; Krynetskiy, Evgeny; Jayne Haines Center for Pharmacogenomics, Temple University School of Pharmacy, Philadelphia, PA 19140

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} We examined the effect of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate (GAPDH) depletion on proliferation of human carcinoma A549 cells. {yields} GAPDH depletion induces accelerated senescence in tumor cells via AMPK network, in the absence of DNA damage. {yields} Metabolic and genetic rescue experiments indicate that GAPDH has regulatory functions linking energy metabolism and cell cycle. {yields} Induction of senescence in LKB1-deficient lung cancer cells via GAPDH depletion suggests a novel strategy to control tumor cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a pivotal glycolytic enzyme, and a signaling molecule which acts at the interface between stress factors and the cellular apoptotic machinery. Earlier, we found that knockdown of GAPDH in human carcinoma cell lines resulted in cell proliferation arrest and chemoresistance to S phase-specific cytotoxic agents. To elucidate the mechanism by which GAPDH depletion arrests cell proliferation, we examined the effect of GAPDH knockdown on human carcinoma cells A549. Our results show that GAPDH-depleted cells establish senescence phenotype, as revealed by proliferation arrest, changes in morphology, SA-{beta}-galactosidase staining, and more than 2-fold up-regulation of senescence-associated genes DEC1 and GLB1. Accelerated senescence following GAPDH depletion results from compromised glycolysis and energy crisis leading to the sustained AMPK activation via phosphorylation of {alpha} subunit at Thr172. Our findings demonstrate that GAPDH depletion switches human tumor cells to senescent phenotype via AMPK network, in the absence of DNA damage. Rescue experiments using metabolic and genetic models confirmed that GAPDH has important regulatory functions linking the energy metabolism and the cell cycle networks. Induction of senescence in LKB1-deficient non-small cell lung cancer cells via GAPDH depletion suggests a novel strategy to control tumor cell proliferation.

  20. Activation of human natural killer cells by the soluble form of cellular prion protein

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seong, Yeon-Jae; Sung, Pil Soo; Jang, Young-Soon; Choi, Young Joon; Park, Bum-Chan; Park, Su-Hyung; Park, Young Woo; Shin, Eui-Cheol

    2015-08-21

    Cellular prion protein (PrP{sup C}) is widely expressed in various cell types, including cells of the immune system. However, the specific roles of PrP{sup C} in the immune system have not been clearly elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the effects of a soluble form of recombinant PrP{sup C} protein on human natural killer (NK) cells. Recombinant soluble PrP{sup C} protein was generated by fusion of human PrP{sup C} with the Fc portion of human IgG{sub 1} (PrP{sup C}-Fc). PrP{sup C}-Fc binds to the surface of human NK cells, particularly to CD56{sup dim} NK cells. PrP{sup C}-Fc induced the production of cytokines and chemokines and the degranulation of granzyme B from NK cells. In addition, PrP{sup C}-Fc facilitated the IL-15-induced proliferation of NK cells. PrP{sup C}-Fc induced phosphorylation of ERK-1/2 and JNK in NK cells, and inhibitors of the ERK or the JNK pathways abrogated PrP{sup C}-Fc-induced cytokine production in NK cells. In conclusion, the soluble form of recombinant PrP{sup C}-Fc protein activates human NK cells via the ERK and JNK signaling pathways. - Highlights: • Recombinant soluble PrP{sup C} (PrP{sup C}-Fc) was generated by fusion of human PrP{sup C} with IgG1 Fc portion. • PrP{sup C}-Fc protein induces the production of cytokines and degranulation from human NK cells. • PrP{sup C}-Fc protein enhances the IL-15-induced proliferation of human NK cells. • PrP{sup C}-Fc protein activates human NK cells via the ERK and JNK signaling pathways.

  1. Proteomic-based mechanistic investigation of low-dose radiation-induced cellular responses/effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Xian

    2013-10-23

    The goal of our project is to apply our unique systems investigation strategy to reveal the molecular mechanisms underlying the radiation induction and transmission of oxidative damage, adaptive response, and bystander effect at low-doses. Beginning with simple in vitro systems such as fibroblast or epithelial pure culture, our amino acid-coded mass tagging (AACT) comparative proteomic platform will be used to measure quantitatively proteomic changes at high- or low-dose level with respect to their endogenous damage levels respectively, in which a broad range of unique regulated proteins sensitive to low-dose IR will be distinguished. To zoom in how these regulated proteins interact with other in the form of networks in induction/transmission pathways, these regulated proteins will be selected as baits for making a series of fibroblast cell lines that stably express each of them. Using our newly developed method of ?dual-tagging? quantitative proteomics that integrate the capabilities of natural complex expression/formation, simple epitope affinity isolation (not through tandem affinity purification or TAP), and ?in-spectra? AACT quantitative measurements using mass spectrometry (MS), we will be able to distinguish systematically interacting proteins with each bait in real time. Further, in addition to both proteome-wide (global differentially expressed proteins) and pathway-scale (bait-specific) profiling information, we will perform a computational network analysis to elucidate a global pathway/mechanisms underlying cellular responses to real-time low-dose IR. Similarly, we will extend our scheme to investigate systematically those induction/transmission pathways occurring in a fibroblast-epithelial interacting model in which the bystander cell (fibroblast) monitor the IR damage to the target cell (epithelial cell). The results will provide the proteome base (molecular mechanisms/pathways for signaling) for the low dose radiation-induced essential tissue

  2. Improving the accuracy and efficiency of time-resolved electronic spectra calculations: Cellular dephasing representation with a prefactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zambrano, Eduardo; ulc, Miroslav; Van?ek, Ji?

    2013-08-07

    Time-resolved electronic spectra can be obtained as the Fourier transform of a special type of time correlation function known as fidelity amplitude, which, in turn, can be evaluated approximately and efficiently with the dephasing representation. Here we improve both the accuracy of this approximationwith an amplitude correction derived from the phase-space propagatorand its efficiencywith an improved cellular scheme employing inverse Weierstrass transform and optimal scaling of the cell size. We demonstrate the advantages of the new methodology by computing dispersed time-resolved stimulated emission spectra in the harmonic potential, pyrazine, and the NCO molecule. In contrast, we show that in strongly chaotic systems such as the quartic oscillator the original dephasing representation is more appropriate than either the cellular or prefactor-corrected methods.

  3. The role of cellular structure on increasing the detonability limits of three-step chain-branching detonations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Short, Mark; Kiyanda, Charles B; Quirk, James J; Sharpe, Gary J

    2011-01-27

    In [1], the dynamics of a pulsating three-step chain-branching detonation were studied. The reaction model consists of, sequentially, chain-initiation, chain-branching and chain-termination steps. The chain-initiation and chain-branching steps are taken to be thermally neutral, with chemical energy release occuring in the chain-termination stage. The purpose of the present study is to examine whether cellular detonation structure can increase the value of the chain-branching cross-over temperature T{sub b} at which fully coupled detonation solutions are observed over those in 1 D. The basic concept is straightforward and has been discussed in [1] and [3]; if T{sub s} drops below T{sub b} at the lead shock, the passage of a transverse shock can increase both the lead shock temperature and the temperature behind the transverse wave back above T{sub b}, thus sustaining an unstable cellular detonation for values of T{sub b} for which a one-dimensional pulsating detonation will fail. Experiments potentially supporting this hypothesis with irregular detonations have been shown in [3] in a shock tube with acoustically absorbing walls. Removal of the transverse waves results in detonation failure, giving way to a decoupled shock-flame complex. A number of questions remain to be addressed regarding the possibility of such a mechanism, and, if so, about the precise mechanisms driving the cellular structure for large T{sub b}. For instance, one might ask what sets the cell size in a chain-branching detonation, particularly could the characteristic cell size be set by the chain-branching cross-over temperature T{sub b}: after a transverse wave shock collision, the strength of the transverse wave weakens as it propagates along the front. If the spacing between shock collisions is too large (cell size), then the transverse shocks may weaken to the extent that the lead shock temperature or that behind the transverse waves is not raised above T{sub b}, losing chemical energy to

  4. Dimer monomer transition and dimer re-formation play important role for ATM cellular function during DNA repair

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du, Fengxia; Zhang, Minjie; Li, Xiaohua; Yang, Caiyun; Meng, Hao; Wang, Dong; Chang, Shuang; Xu, Ye; Price, Brendan; Sun, Yingli

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • ATM phosphorylates the opposite strand of the dimer in response to DNA damage. • The PETPVFRLT box of ATM plays a key role in its dimer dissociation in DNA repair. • The dephosphorylation of ATM is critical for dimer re-formation after DNA repair. - Abstract: The ATM protein kinase, is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is recruited and activated by DNA double-strand breaks, mediates responses to ionizing radiation in mammalian cells. Here we show that ATM is held inactive in unirradiated cells as a dimer and phosphorylates the opposite strand of the dimer in response to DNA damage. Cellular irradiation induces rapid intermolecular autophosphorylation of serine 1981 that causes dimer dissociation and initiates cellular ATM kinase activity. ATM cannot phosphorylate the substrates when it could not undergo dimer monomer transition. After DNA repair, the active monomer will undergo dephosphorylation to form dimer again and dephosphorylation is critical for dimer re-formation. Our work reveals novel function of ATM dimer monomer transition and explains why ATM dimer monomer transition plays such important role for ATM cellular activity during DNA repair.

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  9. Sridhar Sadasivam | Argonne National Laboratory

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    Sridhar Sadasivam Postdoctoral Appointee (Supervisor, Pierre Darancet) Research at Argonne is focused on the study of phonon dynamics during hot electron relaxation processes. Other research interests include micro/nano scale energy transfer processes and thermal transport across heterogeneous material interfaces. Telephone 630.252.4469 Fax 630.252.4646 E-mail sadasivam@anl.gov CV/Resume PDF icon Sadasivam, Sridhar - Bio

  10. Stephen Gray | Argonne National Laboratory

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    Stephen Gray Group Leader, Theory & Modeling Ph.D., University of California-Berkeley Research activities include the theory and modeling of dynamical processes in nanosystems with particular emphasis on modeling light interactions with metallic nanostructures via rigorous electrodynamics simulations and the quantum dynamics of molecular systems within nanoscale environments. News Shape-shifting nanorods release heat differently Telephone 630.252.3594 Fax 630.252.4646 E-mail gray@anl.gov

  11. Microsoft Word - S05827_WCR_Final.doc

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  20. SUSANA MARTINEZ Governor JOHN A SANCHEZ Lieutenant Governor

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    February 26, 2016 State of New Mexico ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT Harold Runnels Building 1190 Saint Francis Drive, PO Box 5469 Santa Fe, NM 87502-5469 Telephone (505) 827-2855 Fax (505) 827-2836 www .env.nm.gov CERTIFIED MAIL - RETURN RECEIPT REQUESTED RYAN FLYNN Cabinet Secretary BUTCHTONGATE Deputy Secretary Todd A. Shrader, Manager Carlsbad Field Office Department of Energy Philip J. Breidenbach, Project Manager Nuclear Waste Partnership, LLC P. 0. Box 2078 P. 0. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico

  1. Agenda080204 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    August 2, 2004 Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) NSAC Home Meetings NSAC Members Charges/Reports Charter .pdf file (78KB) NP Committees of Visitors Federal Advisory Committees NP Home Meetings August 2, 2004 Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page DOE/NSF Nuclear Science Advisory Committee Meeting Monday, August 2, 2004 Where: Doubletree Hotel, 1750 Rockville Pike, Rockville, Maryland (Located near the Twinbrook Metro Station on the Red Line) Telephone Number: 301-468-1100 Fax Number:

  2. Agenda10704 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

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    October 7, 2004 Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) NSAC Home Meetings NSAC Members Charges/Reports Charter .pdf file (78KB) NP Committees of Visitors Federal Advisory Committees NP Home Meetings October 7, 2004 Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page DOE/NSF Nuclear Science Advisory Committee Meeting Thursday, October 7, 2004 Where: Quality Suites Hotel, 3 Research Court, Rockville, Maryland (Located near the Shady Grove Metro Station on the Red Line) Telephone Number: 301-840-0200 Fax

  3. Agenda111804 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

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    18, 2004 Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) NSAC Home Meetings NSAC Members Charges/Reports Charter .pdf file (78KB) NP Committees of Visitors Federal Advisory Committees NP Home Meetings November 18, 2004 Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page DOE/NSF Nuclear Science Advisory Committee Meeting Thursday, November 18, 2004 Where: Doubletree Hotel, 1750 Rockville Pike, Rockville, Maryland (Located near the Twinbrook Metro Station on the Red Line) Telephone Number: 301-468-1100 Fax

  4. Agenda31105 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    1, 2005 Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) NSAC Home Meetings NSAC Members Charges/Reports Charter .pdf file (78KB) NP Committees of Visitors Federal Advisory Committees NP Home Meetings March 11, 2005 Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page DOE/NSF Nuclear Science Advisory Committee Meeting Thursday, March 11, 2005 Where: Doubletree Hotel, 1750 Rockville Pike, Rockville, Maryland (Located near the Twinbrook Metro Station on the Red Line) Telephone Number: 301-468-1100 Fax Number:

  5. Agenda61505 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    15, 2005 Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) NSAC Home Meetings NSAC Members Charges/Reports Charter .pdf file (78KB) NP Committees of Visitors Federal Advisory Committees NP Home Meetings June 15, 2005 Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page DOE/NSF Nuclear Science Advisory Committee Meeting Wednesday, June 15, 2005 Where: Marriott Crystal Gateway, 1700 Jefferson Davis Highway, Arlington, VA (Located on the Metro Blue Line) Telephone Number: 703-920-3230 Fax Number: 703-271-5212

  6. Standard Review Plan Preparation for Facility Operations Strengthening Line Management Oversight and

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    Department of Energy Staff Listing - Office of Regulation and International Engagement Staff Listing - Office of Regulation and International Engagement Office of Regulation and International Engagement Mailing Address: Office of Regulation and International Engagement Office of Fossil Energy FE-34 1000 Independence Ave. S.W. Washington, DC 20585 Director of the Office of Regulation and International Engagement John A. Anderson, Director Room 3E-052 Telephone (202) 586-0521 FAX (202)

  7. Valentina Kutepova | Argonne National Laboratory

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    Valentina Kutepova Cleanroom Manager Ph.D., Moscow Tech University, Russia 30 years experience in research and professional engineering development in the field of advanced technologies for thin-film growth and microelectronic devices fabrication and characterization. Numerous innovations in both materials and devices development, and utilization of research results. Telephone 630.252.4290 Fax 630.252.5739 E-mail kutepova@anl.gov CV/Resume PDF icon kutepova.pdf

  8. Michael Sternberg | Argonne National Laboratory

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    Michael Sternberg Senior Scientific Associate Ph.D., University of Paderborn, Germany Research focus is in the integration of various modeling programs, to enable researchers to combine the strengths of each approach to allow solving more complex problems Responsibility for the high-performance computing systems at the center Telephone 630.252.4631 Fax 630.252.4646 E-mail sternberg@anl.gov CV/Resume PDF icon sternberg

  9. Leonidas E. Ocola | Argonne National Laboratory

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    Leonidas E. Ocola Physicist Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison Novel nanofabrication techniques, micro- and nanofluidics, plasmonic optical devices, transparent capacitors, templated self-assembly, NEMS, electron-matter interactions, single molecule spectroscopy News Rewritable Artificial Magnetic Charge Ice Telephone 630.252.6613 Fax 630.252.5739 E-mail ocola@anl.gov CV/Resume PDF icon LO resume 4 color

  10. Liang Li | Argonne National Laboratory

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    Liang Li Postdoctoral Appointee (Supervisor, Maria Chan) Current research focuses on ab-initio theoretical studies on hybrid lithium-ion/lithium-oxygen battery materials and photocatalytic reduction of CO2. News Visualizing Redox Dynamics of a Single Ag/AgCl Heterogeneous Nanocatalyst at Atomic Resolution Telephone 630.252.2788 Fax 630.252.4646 E-mail liangli@anl.gov CV/Resume PDF icon Liang_Li

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  12. DOE F 4220-10

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  13. Ralu Divan | Argonne National Laboratory

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    Ralu Divan Chemist Ph.D., University of Bucharest, Romania Research interests are in the lithographic properties and chemistry of materials, characterizing interfacial and compatibility properties of materials used in MEMS and NEMS, nanogels, and metal nanoparticles synthesis. News Rewritable Artificial Magnetic Charge Ice Traveling Electrons in Loosely Bound Layers Telephone 630.252.0146 Fax 630.252.5739 E-mail divan@anl.gov CV/Resume PDF icon Dr Divan 2014

  14. MSDS Training

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    Training Radiation Safety Training Cleanroom Safety Information Test Material Forklift Training Crane Operation Training Tests Radiation Safety Test Forklift Test Crane Operation Test NOTE: All Training and Testing Material is for LSU CAMD Users ONLY! The J. Bennett Johnston, Sr. Center for Advanced Microstructures & Devices 6980 Jefferson Hwy., Baton Rouge, LA 70806 Telephone: 225-578-8887 * Fax: 225-578-6954 Copyright © 2012

  15. Kathy Vanoskey | Argonne National Laboratory

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    Drawings/Photos | Links Disclaimer The statements and opinions included in the CAMD SAXS Beamline pages are those of CAMD SAXS Beamline personnel and SAXS web designer only. Any statements and opinions included in these pages are not those of Louisiana State University or the LSU Board of Supervisors. Small Angle X-ray Scattering Beamline at The J. Bennett Johnston, Sr. Center for Advanced Microstructures & Devices Louisiana State University | Telephone: 225-578-8887 | Fax: 225-578-6954

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  7. Alaska Power and Telephone Co | Open Energy Information

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    Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  8. Alaska Power and Telephone Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    5,584.29 6,801 2008-06 639 1,752 4,603 1,231 3,853 2,163 1,870 5,605 6,766 2008-05 544.132 1,698 4,529 971.881 3,377 2,148 1,516.013 5,075 6,677 2008-04 646.155 1,969.605 4,471...

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  12. SBOT IOWA AMES LAB POC Lisa Rodgers Telephone

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  13. EIA-877 WINTER HEATING FUELS TELEPHONE SURVEY INSTRUCTIONS

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  14. Name Name Address Place Zip Category Sector Telephone number...

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  15. Title 30 Chapter 71 Telegraph, Telephone, and Electric Wires...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Electric WiresLegal Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 1969 Legal Citation 30 V.S.A. 2501 et seq. DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org...

  16. SBOT IDAHO IDAHO LAB POC Stacey Francis Telephone

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lessors of Residential Buildings and Dwellings 531110 Other Commercial and Industrial ... Lessors of Residential Buildings and Dwellings 531110 Other Commercial and Industrial ...

  17. SBOT NEW MEXICO CARLSBAD FIELD OFFICE POC Roland Taylor Telephone

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Types) Manufacturing 333512 Pump and Pumping Equipment Manufacturing 333911 Air and ... Types) Manufacturing 333512 Pump and Pumping Equipment Manufacturing 333911 Air and ...

  18. SBOT ILLINOIS ARGONNE LAB POC Karl Duke Telephone

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Accessory Manufacturing 333515 Pump and Pumping Equipment Manufacturing 333911 Air and ... Types) Manufacturing 333512 Pump and Pumping Equipment Manufacturing 333911 Air and ...

  19. Reconstitution of the cellular response to DNA damage in vitro using damage-activated extracts from mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roper, Katherine; Coverley, Dawn

    2012-03-10

    In proliferating mammalian cells, DNA damage is detected by sensors that elicit a cellular response which arrests the cell cycle and repairs the damage. As part of the DNA damage response, DNA replication is inhibited and, within seconds, histone H2AX is phosphorylated. Here we describe a cell-free system that reconstitutes the cellular response to DNA double strand breaks using damage-activated cell extracts and naieve nuclei. Using this system the effect of damage signalling on nuclei that do not contain DNA lesions can be studied, thereby uncoupling signalling and repair. Soluble extracts from G1/S phase cells that were treated with etoposide before isolation, or pre-incubated with nuclei from etoposide-treated cells during an in vitro activation reaction, restrain both initiation and elongation of DNA replication in naieve nuclei. At the same time, H2AX is phosphorylated in naieve nuclei in a manner that is dependent upon the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-like protein kinases. Notably, phosphorylated H2AX is not focal in naieve nuclei, but is evident throughout the nucleus suggesting that in the absence of DNA lesions the signal is not amplified such that discrete foci can be detected. This system offers a novel screening approach for inhibitors of DNA damage response kinases, which we demonstrate using the inhibitors wortmannin and LY294002. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A cell free system that reconstitutes the response to DNA damage in the absence of DNA lesions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Damage-activated extracts impose the cellular response to DNA damage on naieve nuclei. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PIKK-dependent response impacts positively and negatively on two separate fluorescent outputs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Can be used to screen for inhibitors that impact on the response to damage but not on DNA repair. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LY294002 and wortmannin demonstrate the system's potential as a pathway focused screening

  20. Sirtuin 7 promotes cellular survival following genomic stress by attenuation of DNA damage, SAPK activation and p53 response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiran, Shashi; Oddi, Vineesha; Ramakrishna, Gayatri

    2015-02-01

    Maintaining the genomic integrity is a constant challenge in proliferating cells. Amongst various proteins involved in this process, Sirtuins play a key role in DNA damage repair mechanisms in yeast as well as mammals. In the present work we report the role of one of the least explored Sirtuin viz., SIRT7, under conditions of genomic stress when treated with doxorubicin. Knockdown of SIRT7 sensitized osteosarcoma (U2OS) cells to DNA damage induced cell death by doxorubicin. SIRT7 overexpression in NIH3T3 delayed cell cycle progression by causing delay in G1 to S transition. SIRT7 overexpressing cells when treated with low dose of doxorubicin (0.25 µM) showed delayed onset of senescence, lesser accumulation of DNA damage marker γH2AX and lowered levels of growth arrest markers viz., p53 and p21 when compared to doxorubicin treated control GFP expressing cells. Resistance to DNA damage following SIRT7 overexpression was also evident by EdU incorporation studies where cellular growth arrest was significantly delayed. When treated with higher dose of doxorubicin (>1 µM), SIRT7 conferred resistance to apoptosis by attenuating stress activated kinases (SAPK viz., p38 and JNK) and p53 response thereby shifting the cellular fate towards senescence. Interestingly, relocalization of SIRT7 from nucleolus to nucleoplasm together with its co-localization with SAPK was an important feature associated with DNA damage. SIRT7 mediated resistance to doxorubicin induced apoptosis and senescence was lost when p53 level was restored by nutlin treatment. Overall, we propose SIRT7 attenuates DNA damage, SAPK activation and p53 response thereby promoting cellular survival under conditions of genomic stress. - Highlights: • Knockdown of SIRT7 sensitized cells to DNA damage induced apoptosis. • SIRT7 delayed onset of premature senescence by attenuating DNA damage response. • Overexpression of SIRT7 delayed cell cycle progression by delaying G1/S transition. • Upon DNA damage SIRT

  1. Investigations of DNA damage induction and repair resulting from cellular exposure to high dose-rate pulsed proton beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renis, M.; Malfa, G.; Tomasello, B.; Borghesi, M.; Schettino, G.; Favetta, M.; Romano, F.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Manti, L.

    2013-07-26

    Studies regarding the radiobiological effects of low dose radiation, microbeam irradiation services have been developed in the world and today laser acceleration of protons and heavy ions may be used in radiation therapy. The application of different facilities is essential for studying bystander effects and relating signalling phenomena in different cells or tissues. In particular the use of ion beams results advantageous in cancer radiotherapy compared to more commonly used X-rays, since the ability of ions in delivering lethal amount of doses into the target tumour avoiding or limiting damage to the contiguous healthy tissues. At the INFN-LNS in Catania, a multidisciplinary radiobiology group is strategically structured aimed to develop radiobiological research, finalised to therapeutic applications, compatible with the use of high dose laser-driven ion beams. The characteristic non-continuous dose rates with several orders of magnitude of laser-driven ion beams makes this facility very interesting in the cellular systems' response to ultra-high dose rates with non-conventional pulse time intervals cellular studies. Our group have projected to examine the effect of high dose laser-driven ion beams on two cellular types: foetal fibroblasts (normal control cells) and DU145 (prostate cancer cells), studying the modulation of some different bio-molecular parameters, in particular cell proliferation and viability, DNA damage, redox cellular status, morphological alterations of both the cytoskeleton components and some cell organelles and the possible presence of apoptotic or necrotic cell death. Our group performed preliminary experiments with high energy (60 MeV), dose rate of 10 Gy/min, doses of 1, 2, 3 Gy and LET 1 keV/?m on human foetal fibroblasts (control cells). We observed that cell viability was not influenced by the characteristics of the beam, the irradiation conditions or the analysis time. Conversely, DNA damage was present at time 0, immediately

  2. Numerical study of mechanical behavior of ceramic composites under compression loading in the framework of movable cellular automaton method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konovalenko, Igor S. Smolin, Alexey Yu. Konovalenko, Ivan S.; Promakhov, Vladimir V.; Psakhie, Sergey G.

    2014-11-14

    Movable cellular automaton method was used for investigating the mechanical behavior of ceramic composites under uniaxial compression. A 2D numerical model of ceramic composites based on oxides of zirconium and aluminum with different structural parameters was developed using the SEM images of micro-sections of a real composite. The influence of such structural parameters as the geometrical dimensions of layers, inclusions, and their spatial distribution in the sample, the volume content of the composite components and their mechanical properties (as well as the amount of zirconium dioxide that underwent the phase transformation) on the fracture, strength, deformation and dissipative properties was investigated.

  3. Cellular interactions via conditioned media induce in vivo nephron generation from tubular epithelial cells or mesenchymal stem cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Machiguchi, Toshihiko Nakamura, Tatsuo

    2013-06-07

    Highlights: We have attempted in vivo nephron generation using conditioned media. Vascular and tubular cells do cross-talks on cell proliferation and tubular changes. Tubular cells suppress these changes in mesenchymal stem cells. Tubular cells differentiate mesenchymal stem cells into tubular cells. Nephrons can be created from implanted tubular cells or mesenchymal stem cells. -- Abstract: There are some successful reports of kidney generation by utilizing the natural course of kidney development, namely, the use of an artificially treated metanephros, blastocyst or ureteric bud. Under a novel concept of cellular interactions via conditioned media (CMs), we have attempted in vivo nephron generation from tubular epithelial cells (TECs) or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Here we used 10 CMs of vascular endothelial cells (VECs) and TECs, which is the first to introduce a CM into the field of organ regeneration. We first present stimulative cross-talks induced by these CMs between VECs and TECs on cell proliferation and morphological changes. In MSCs, TEC-CM suppressed these changes, however, induced cytokeratin expression, indicating the differentiation of MSCs into TECs. As a result, glomerular and tubular structures were created following the implantation of TECs or MSCs with both CMs. Our findings suggest that the cellular interactions via CMs might induce in vivo nephron generation from TECs or MSCs. As a promoting factor, CMs could also be applied to the regeneration of other organs and tissues.

  4. C_Program FilesRightFaxRFaxGateINA001e2443-0f95-4c73-9ac5-402896144284.TIF

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    0: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-200000: Categorical Exclusion Determination Floridian Natural Gas Storage Company, LLC CX(s) Applied: B5.7 Date: 07/30/2015 Location(s): Florida Offices(s): Fossil Energy, Natural Gas Regulation American LNG Marketing LLC (American LNG), a Delaware limited liability company with its primary place of business in New York, New York, filed an application with the Office of Fossil Energy (FE) on December 31, 2014, seeking authorization to export domestically

  5. C_Program FilesRightFaxRFaxGateINA23326efa-6848-4e70-881e-87e980cbdc1a.TIF

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

  6. C_Program FilesRightFaxRFaxGateINAa402975d-cd59-4ccc-928d-ecde174f0e37.TIF

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

  7. A biphasic endothelial stress-survival mechanism regulates the cellular response to vascular endothelial growth factor A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Latham, Antony M.; Odell, Adam F.; Mughal, Nadeem A.; Issitt, Theo; Ulyatt, Clare; Walker, John H.; Homer-Vanniasinkam, Shervanthi; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2012-11-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) is an essential cytokine that regulates endothelial function and angiogenesis. VEGF-A binding to endothelial receptor tyrosine kinases such as VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 triggers cellular responses including survival, proliferation and new blood vessel sprouting. Increased levels of a soluble VEGFR1 splice variant (sFlt-1) correlate with endothelial dysfunction in pathologies such as pre-eclampsia; however the cellular mechanism(s) underlying the regulation and function of sFlt-1 are unclear. Here, we demonstrate the existence of a biphasic stress response in endothelial cells, using serum deprivation as a model of endothelial dysfunction. The early phase is characterized by a high VEGFR2:sFlt-1 ratio, which is reversed in the late phase. A functional consequence is a short-term increase in VEGF-A-stimulated intracellular signaling. In the late phase, sFlt-1 is secreted and deposited at the extracellular matrix. We hypothesized that under stress, increased endothelial sFlt-1 levels reduce VEGF-A bioavailability: VEGF-A treatment induces sFlt-1 expression at the cell surface and VEGF-A silencing inhibits sFlt-1 anchorage to the extracellular matrix. Treatment with recombinant sFlt-1 inhibits VEGF-A-stimulated in vitro angiogenesis and sFlt-1 silencing enhances this process. In this response, increased VEGFR2 levels are regulated by the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and PKB/Akt signaling pathways and increased sFlt-1 levels by the ERK1/2 signaling pathway. We conclude that during serum withdrawal, cellular sensing of environmental stress modulates sFlt-1 and VEGFR2 levels, regulating VEGF-A bioavailability and ensuring cell survival takes precedence over cell proliferation and migration. These findings may underpin an important mechanism contributing to endothelial dysfunction in pathological states. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Endothelial cells mount a stress response under conditions of low serum. Black

  8. Microbial Protein-Protein Interactions (MiPPI) Data from the Genomics: GTL Center for Molecular and Cellular Systems (CMCS)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Genomic Science Center for Molecular and Cellular Systems (CMCS), established in 2002, seeks to identify and characterize the complete set of protein complexes within a cell to provide a mechanistic basis for the understanding of biochemical functions. The CMCS is anchored at ORNL and PNNL. CMCS initially focused on the identification and characterization of protein complexes in two microbial systems,Rhodopseudomonas palustris (R. palustris) and Shewanella oneidensis (S. oneidensis). These two organisms have also been the focus of major DOE Genomic Science/Microbial Cell Program (MCP) projects. To develop an approach for identifying the diverse types of complexes present in microbial organisms, CMCS incorporates a number of molecular biology, microbiology, analytical and computational tools in an integrated pipeline.

  9. Depletion of cellular poly (A) binding protein prevents protein synthesis and leads to apoptosis in HeLa cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thangima Zannat, Mst.; Bhattacharjee, Rumpa B.; Bag, Jnanankur

    2011-05-13

    Highlights: {yields} Depletion of cellular PABP level arrests mRNA translation in HeLa cells. {yields} PABP knock down leads to apoptotic cell death. {yields} PABP depletion does not affect transcription. {yields} PABP depletion does not lead to nuclear accumulation of mRNA. -- Abstract: The cytoplasmic poly (A) binding protein (PABP) is important in mRNA translation and stability. In yeast, depletion of PABP leads to translation arrest. Similarly, the PABP gene in Drosophila is important for proper development. It is however uncertain, whether mammalian PABP is essential for mRNA translation. Here we showed the effect of PABP depletion on mRNA metabolism in HeLa cells by using a small interfering RNA. Our results suggest that depletion of PABP prevents protein synthesis and consequently leads to cell death through apoptosis. Interestingly, no detectable effect of PABP depletion on transcription, transport and stability of mRNA was observed.

  10. Inference of tumor evolution during chemotherapy by computational modeling and in situ analysis of genetic and phenotypic cellular diversity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Almendro, Vanessa; Cheng, Yu -Kang; Randles, Amanda; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Marusyk, Andriy; Ametller, Elisabet; Gonzalez-Farre, Xavier; Muñoz, Montse; Russnes, Hege  G.; Helland, Åslaug; et al

    2014-02-01

    Cancer therapy exerts a strong selection pressure that shapes tumor evolution, yet our knowledge of how tumors change during treatment is limited. Here, we report the analysis of cellular heterogeneity for genetic and phenotypic features and their spatial distribution in breast tumors pre- and post-neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We found that intratumor genetic diversity was tumor-subtype specific, and it did not change during treatment in tumors with partial or no response. However, lower pretreatment genetic diversity was significantly associated with pathologic complete response. In contrast, phenotypic diversity was different between pre- and post-treatment samples. We also observed significant changes in the spatialmore » distribution of cells with distinct genetic and phenotypic features. We used these experimental data to develop a stochastic computational model to infer tumor growth patterns and evolutionary dynamics. Our results highlight the importance of integrated analysis of genotypes and phenotypes of single cells in intact tissues to predict tumor evolution.« less