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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "telemetry systems geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Downhole telemetry system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A downhole telemetry system is described for optically communicating to the surface operating parameters of a drill bit during ongoing drilling operations. The downhole telemetry system includes sensors mounted with a drill bit for monitoring at least one operating parameter of the drill bit and generating a signal representative thereof. The downhole telemetry system includes means for transforming and optically communicating the signal to the surface as well as means at the surface for producing a visual display of the optically communicated operating parameters of the drill bit. 7 figs.

Normann, R.A.; Kadlec, E.R.

1994-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

2

Disposable telemetry cable deployment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A disposable telemetry cable deployment system for facilitating information retrieval while drilling a well includes a cable spool adapted for insertion into a drill string and an unarmored fiber optic cable spooled onto the spool cable and having a downhole end and a stinger end. Connected to the cable spool is a rigid stinger which extends through a kelly of the drilling apparatus. A data transmission device for transmitting data to a data acquisition system is disposed either within or on the upper end of the rigid stinger.

Holcomb, David Joseph (Sandia Park, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Impedance-matched drilling telemetry system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A downhole telemetry system that uses inductance or capacitance as a mode through which signal is communicated across joints between assembled lengths of pipe wherein efficiency of signal propagation through a drill string, for example, over multiple successive pipe segments is enhanced through matching impedances associated with the various telemetry system components.

Normann, Randy A. (Edgewood, NM); Mansure, Arthur J. (Albuquerque, NM)

2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

4

Ultrasonic ranging and data telemetry system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ultrasonic ranging and data telemetry system determines a surveyor's position and automatically links it with other simultaneously taken survey data. An ultrasonic and radio frequency (rf) transmitter are carried by the surveyor in a backpack. The surveyor's position is determined by calculations that use the measured transmission times of an airborne ultrasonic pulse transmitted from the backpack to two or more prepositioned ultrasonic transceivers. Once a second, rf communications are used both to synchronize the ultrasonic pulse transmission-time measurements and to transmit other simultaneously taken survey data. The rf communications are interpreted by a portable receiver and microcomputer which are brought to the property site. A video display attached to the computer provides real-time visual monitoring of the survey progress and site coverage.

Brashear, Hugh R. (Farragut, TN); Blair, Michael S. (Knoxville, TN); Phelps, James E. (Knoxville, TN); Bauer, Martin L. (Oak Ridge, TN); Nowlin, Charles H. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

NETL: News Release - Innovative Telemetry System Will Help Tap...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2, 2010 Innovative Telemetry System Will Help Tap Hard-to-Reach Natural Gas Resources Technology Developed by DOE and Industry Partners is Commercialized for Use in the Private...

6

Innovative Telemetry System Will Help Tap Hard-to-Reach Natural...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Innovative Telemetry System Will Help Tap Hard-to-Reach Natural Gas Resources Innovative Telemetry System Will Help Tap Hard-to-Reach Natural Gas Resources November 2, 2010 -...

7

A geochemical expert system prototype using object-oriented knowledge representation and a production rule system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: MINEQL, artificial intelligence, expert systems, geochemical expert system, geochemical modeling, geochemistry

Forrest M. Hoffman; Vijay S. Tripathi

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Innovative Telemetry System Will Help Tap Hard-to-Reach Natural Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Innovative Telemetry System Will Help Tap Hard-to-Reach Natural Gas Innovative Telemetry System Will Help Tap Hard-to-Reach Natural Gas Resources Innovative Telemetry System Will Help Tap Hard-to-Reach Natural Gas Resources November 2, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The commercialization of an innovative telemetry communications system developed through a U.S. Department of Energy research program will help U.S. producers tap previously hard-to-reach natural gas resources deep underground, resulting in access to additional supplies that will help enhance national energy security. The patented, proprietary Sharewell L.P. EM-MWD electromagnetic (EM) telemetry system was initially developed by the Office of Fossil Energy's (FE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and E-Spectrum Technologies of San Antonio, Texas, under a four-year, cost-shared

9

Performing thrill: designing telemetry systems and spectator interfaces for amusement rides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fairground: Thrill Laboratory was a series of live events that augmented the experience of amusement rides. A wearable telemetry system captured video, audio, heart-rate and acceleration data, streaming them live to spectator interfaces and a watching ... Keywords: amusement, biosensing, fairground, heart rate, orchestration, performance, spectator interface, telemetry, theme-park, wearable computing

Holger Schnädelbach; Stefan Rennick Egglestone; Stuart Reeves; Steve Benford; Brendan Walker; Michael Wright

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

PC-based PCM telemetry data reduction system software  

SciTech Connect

The Solar Energy Research Institute's (SERI) Wind Research Program is using pulse code modulation (PCM) telemetry systems to study horizontal-axis wind turbines. SERI has developed a low-cost PC-based PCM data-acquisition system to facilitate quick PCM data analysis in the field. The SERI PC-PCM system consists of AT-compatible hardware boards for decoding and combining PCM data streams and DOS software for control and management of data acquisition. Up to four boards can be installed in a single PC, providing the capability to combine data from four PCM streams direct to disk or memory. This paper describes the SERI Quick-Look Data Management Program, which is a comprehensive software package used to organize, acquire, process, and display information from PCM data streams. The software was designed for use in conjunction with SERI's PC-PCM hardware described in a related paper. Features of the Quick-Look program are highlighted, including those which make it useful in an experiment test environment to quickly examine and verify incoming data. Also discussed are problems and techniques associated with PC-based PCM data acquisition, processing, and real-time display. 7 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Simms, D.A.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

MEMS sensors and wireless telemetry for distributed systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Selectively coated cantilevers are being developed at ORNL for chemical and biological sensing. The sensitivity can exceed that of other electro-mechanical devices as parts-per-trillion detection can be demonstrated for certain species. The authors are now proceeding to develop systems that employ electrically readable microcantilevers in a standard MEMS process and standard CMOS processes. One of their primary areas of interest is chemical sensing for environmental applications. Towards this end, they are presently developing electronic readout of a mercury-sensitive coated cantilever. In order to field arrays of distributed sensors, a wireless network for data reporting is needed. For this, the authors are developing on-chip spread-spectrum encoding and modulation circuitry to improve the robustness and security of sensor data in typical interference- and multipath-impaired environments. They have also provided for a selection of distinct spreading codes to serve groups of sensors in a common environment by the application of code-division multiple-access techniques. Most of the RF circuitry they have designed and fabricated in 0.5 {micro}m CMOS has been tested and verified operational to above 1 GHz. The initial intended operation is for use in the 915 MHz Industrial, Scientific, and Medical (ISM) band. This paper presents measured data on the microcantilever-based mercury detector. They also present design data and measurements of the RF telemetry chip.

Britton, C.L. Jr.; Warmack, R.J.; Smith, S.F. [and others

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

An Acoustic Telemetry System Implemented for Real-Time Monitoring of the Gulf Stream with Inverted Echo Sounders  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From August 1989 until August 1990, a simple acoustic telemetry system was used for obtaining real-time data from four inverted echo sounders (IESs) deployed in the Synoptic Ocean Prediction Experiment (SYNOP) inlet array in the Gulf Stream east ...

Stephan D. Howden; D. Randolph Watts; Karen L. Tracey; H. Thomas Rossby

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Acoustic telemetry.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Broadcasting messages through the earth is a daunting task. Indeed, broadcasting a normal telephone conversion through the earth by wireless means is impossible with todays technology. Most of us don't care, but some do. Industries that drill into the earth need wireless communication to broadcast navigation parameters. This allows them to steer their drill bits. They also need information about the natural formation that they are drilling. Measurements of parameters such as pressure, temperature, and gamma radiation levels can tell them if they have found a valuable resource such as a geothermal reservoir or a stratum bearing natural gas. Wireless communication methods are available to the drilling industry. Information is broadcast via either pressure waves in the drilling fluid or electromagnetic waves in the earth and well tubing. Data transmission can only travel one way at rates around a few baud. Given that normal Internet telephone modems operate near 20,000 baud, these data rates are truly very slow. Moreover, communication is often interrupted or permanently blocked by drilling conditions or natural formation properties. Here we describe a tool that communicates with stress waves traveling through the steel drill pipe and production tubing in the well. It's based on an old idea called Acoustic Telemetry. But what we present here is more than an idea. This tool exists, it's drilled several wells, and it works. Currently, it's the first and only acoustic telemetry tool that can withstand the drilling environment. It broadcasts one way over a limited range at much faster rates than existing methods, but we also know how build a system that can communicate both up and down wells of indefinite length.

Drumheller, Douglas Schaeffer; Kuszmaul, Scott S.

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

A PC-based telemetry system for acquiring and reducing data from multiple PCM streams  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Solar Energy Research Institute's (SERI) Wind Research Program is using Pulse Code Modulation (PCM) telemetry data-acquisition systems to study horizontal-axis wind turbines. Many PCM systems are combined for use in test installations that require accurate measurements from a variety of different locations. SERI has found them ideal for data-acquisition from multiple wind turbines and meteorological towers in wind parks. A major problem has been in providing the capability to quickly combine and examine incoming data from multiple PCM sources in the field. To solve this problem, SERI has developed a low-cost PC-based PCM telemetry data-reduction system to facilitate quick, in-the-field multiple-channel data analysis. Called the PC-PCM System,'' it consists of two basic components. First, PC-compatible hardware boards are used to decode and combine multiple PCM data streams. Up to four hardware boards can be installed in a single PC, which provides the capability to combine data from four PCM streams directly to PC disk or memory. Each stream can have up to 62 data channels. Second, a software package written for use under DOS was developed to simplify data-acquisition control and management. The software provides a quick, easy-to-use interface between the PC and multiple PCM data streams. Called the Quick-Look Data Management Program,'' it is a comprehensive menu-driven package used to organize, acquire, process, and display information from incoming PCM data streams. The paper describes both hardware and software aspects of the SERI PC-PCM system, concentrating on features that make it useful in an experiment test environment to quickly examine and verify incoming data from multiple PCM streams. Also discussed are problems and techniques associated with PC-based telemetry data-acquisition, processing, and real-time display. 11 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Simms, D A; Butterfield, C P

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Design and Instrumentation of a Measurement and Calibration System for an Acoustic Telemetry System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) is an active sensing technology developed by Portland District, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for detecting and tracking small fish. It is used at hydroelectric projects and in the laboratory for evaluating behavior and survival of juvenile salmonids migrating through the Federal Columbia River Power System to the Pacific Ocean. It provides critical data for salmon protection and development of more “fish-friendly” hydroelectric facilities. The objective of this study was to design and build a measurement and calibration system for evaluating the JSATS component, because the JSATS requires comprehensive acceptance and performance testing in a controlled environment before it is deployed in the field. The system consists of a reference transducer, a water test tank lined with anechoic material, a motion control unit, a reference receiver, a signal conditioner and amplifier unit, a data acquisition board, MATLAB control and analysis interface, and a computer. The fully integrated system has been evaluated successfully at various simulated distances and using different encoded signals at frequencies within the bandwidth of the JSATS transmitter. It provides accurate acoustic mapping capability in a controlled environment and automates the process that allows real-time measurements and evaluation of the piezoelectric transducers, sensors, or the acoustic fields. The measurement and calibration system has been in use since 2009 for acceptance and performance testing of, and further improvements to, the JSATS.

Deng, Zhiqun; Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Eppard, M. B.

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

16

Spatial And Temporal Geochemical Trends In The Hydrothermal System Of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Spatial And Temporal Geochemical Trends In The Hydrothermal System Of Spatial And Temporal Geochemical Trends In The Hydrothermal System Of Yellowstone National Park- Inferences From River Solute Fluxes Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Spatial And Temporal Geochemical Trends In The Hydrothermal System Of Yellowstone National Park- Inferences From River Solute Fluxes Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: We present and analyze a chemical dataset that includes the concentrations and fluxes of HCO3-, SO42-, Cl-, and F- in the major rivers draining Yellowstone National Park (YNP) for the 2002-2004 water years (1 October 2001 - 30 September 2004). The total (molar) flux in all rivers decreases in the following order, HCO3- > Cl- > SO42- > F-, but each river is characterized by a distinct chemical composition, implying large-scale

17

A Geochemical Model Of The Platanares Geothermal System, Honduras | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » A Geochemical Model Of The Platanares Geothermal System, Honduras Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Geochemical Model Of The Platanares Geothermal System, Honduras Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Results of exploration drilling combined with results of geologic, geophysical, and hydrogeochemical investigations have been used to construct a geochemical model of the Platanares geothermal system, Honduras. Three coreholes were drilled, two of which produced fluids from fractured Miocene andesite and altered Cretaceous to Eocene conglomerate at

18

Geochemical characterization of geothermal systems in the Great Basin:  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

characterization of geothermal systems in the Great Basin: characterization of geothermal systems in the Great Basin: Implications for exploration, exploitation, and environmental issues Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Geochemical characterization of geothermal systems in the Great Basin: Implications for exploration, exploitation, and environmental issues Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The objective of this ongoing project is the development of a representative geochemical database for a comprehensive range of elemental and isotopic parameters (i.e., beyond the typical data suite) for a range of geothermal systems in the Great Basin. Development of this database is one of the first steps in understanding the nature of geothermal systems in the Great Basin. Of particular importance in the Great Basin is utilizing

19

Geochemical Enhancement Of Enhanced Geothermal System Reservoirs: An Integrated Field And Geochemical Approach  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The geochemical effects of injecting fluids into geothermal reservoirs are poorly understood and may be significantly underestimated. Decreased performance of injection wells has been observed in several geothermal fields after only a few years of service, but the reasons for these declines has not been established. This study had three primary objectives: 1) determine the cause(s) of the loss of injectivity; 2) utilize these observations to constrain numerical models of water-rock interactions; and 3) develop injection strategies for mitigating and reversing the potential effects of these interactions. In this study rock samples from original and redrilled injection wells at Coso and the Salton Sea geothermal fields, CA, were used to characterize the mineral and geochemical changes that occurred as a result of injection. The study documented the presence of mineral scales and at both fields in the reservoir rocks adjacent to the injection wells. At the Salton Sea, the scales consist of alternating layers of fluorite and barite, accompanied by minor anhydrite, amorphous silica and copper arsenic sulfides. Amorphous silica and traces of calcite were deposited at Coso. The formation of silica scale at Coso provides an example of the effects of untreated (unacidified) injectate on the reservoir rocks. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffractometry were used to characterize the scale deposits. The silica scale in the reservoir rocks at Coso was initially deposited as spheres of opal-A 1-2 micrometers in diameter. As the deposits matured, the spheres coalesced to form larger spheres up to 10 micrometer in diameter. Further maturation and infilling of the spaces between spheres resulted in the formation of plates and sheets that substantially reduce the original porosity and permeability of the fractures. Peripheral to the silica deposits, fluid inclusions with high water/gas ratios provide a subtle record of interactions between the injectate and reservoir rocks. In contrast, fluid inclusions trapped prior to injection are relatively gas rich. These results suggest that the rocks undergo extensive microfracturing during injection and that the composition of the fluid inclusions will be biased toward the youngest event. Interactions between the reservoir rocks and injectate were modeled using the non-isothermal reactive geochemical transport code TOUGHREACT. Changes in fluid pH, fracture porosity, fracture permeability, fluid temperature, and mineral abundances were monitored. The simulations predict that amorphous silica will precipitate primarily within a few meters of the injection well and that mineral deposition will lead to rapid declines in fracture porosity and permeability, consistent with field observations. In support of Enhanced Geothermal System development, petrologic studies of Coso well 46A-19RD were conducted to determine the regions that are most likely to fail when stimulated. These studies indicate that the most intensely brecciated and altered rocks in the zone targeted for stimulation (below 10,000 ft (3048 m)) occur between 11,200 and 11,350 ft (3414 and 3459 m). This zone is interpreted as a shear zone that initially juxtaposed quartz diorite against granodiorite. Strong pervasive alteration and veining within the brecciated quartz diorite and granodiorite suggest this shear zone was permeable in the past. This zone of weakness was subsequently exploited by a granophyre dike whose top occurs at 11,350 ft (3459 m). The dike is unaltered. We anticipate, based on analysis of the well samples that failure during stimulation will most likely occur on this shear zone.

Joseph N. Moore

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

20

Testing geochemical modeling codes using New Zealand hydrothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrothermal systems in the Taupo Volcanic Zone, North Island, New Zealand are being used as field-based modeling exercises for the EQ3/6 geochemical modeling code package. Comparisons of the observed state and evolution of selected portions of the hydrothermal systems with predictions of fluid-solid equilibria made using geochemical modeling codes will: (1) ensure that we are providing adequately for all significant processes occurring in natural systems; (2) determine the adequacy of the mathematical descriptions of the processes; (3) check the adequacy and completeness of thermodynamic data as a function of temperature for solids, aqueous species and gases; and (4) determine the sensitivity of model results to the manner in which the problem is conceptualized by the user and then translated into constraints in the code input. Preliminary predictions of mineral assemblages in equilibrium with fluids sampled from wells in the Wairakei geothermal field suggest that affinity-temperature diagrams must be used in conjunction with EQ6 to minimize the effect of uncertainties in thermodynamic and kinetic data on code predictions. The kinetics of silica precipitation in EQ6 will be tested using field data from silica-lined drain channels carrying hot water away from the Wairakei borefield.

Bruton, C.J.; Glassley, W.E.; Bourcier, W.L.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "telemetry systems geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Optimization of Concurrent Deployments of the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System and Other Hydroacoustic Equipment at John Day Dam  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to document the results of the acoustic optimization study conducted at John Day Dam during January and February 2008. The goal of the study was to optimize performance of the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) by determining deployment and data acquisition methods to minimize electrical and acoustic interference from various other acoustic sampling devices. Thereby, this would allow concurrent sampling by active and passive acoustic methods during the formal evaluations of the prototype surface flow outlets at the dam during spring and summer outmigration seasons for juvenile salmonids. The objectives for the optimization study at John Day Dam were to: 1. Design and test prototypes and provide a total needs list of pipes and trolleys to deploy JSATS hydrophones on the forebay face of the powerhouse and spillway. 2. Assess the effect on mean percentage decoded of JSATS transmissions from tags arrayed in the forebay and detected on the hydrophones by comparing: turbine unit OFF vs. ON; spill bay OPEN vs. CLOSED; dual frequency identification sonar (DIDSON) and acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) both OFF vs. ON at a spill bay; and, fixed-aspect hydroacoustic system OFF vs. ON at a turbine unit and a spill bay. 3. Determine the relationship between fixed-aspect hydroacoustic transmit level and mean percentage of JSATS transmissions decoded. The general approach was to use hydrophones to listen for transmissions from JSATS tags deployed in vertical arrays in a series perpendicular to the face of the dam. We used acoustic telemetry equipment manufactured by Technologic and Sonic Concepts. In addition, we assessed old and new JSATS signal detectors and decoders and two different types of hydrophone baffling. The optimization study consisted of a suite of off/on tests. The primary response variable was mean percentage of tag transmissions decoded. We found that there was no appreciable adverse effect on mean percentage decoded for JSATS transmitters from: turbine operations; spillway operations; DIDSON/ADCP acoustic energy; and PAS hydroacoustic systems at transmit level of -12 dB, although there was a significant impact at all higher transmit levels (-11 to -6 dB). The main conclusion from this optimization study is that valid JSATS telemetry data can be collected simultaneously with a DIDSON/ADCP and a PAS hydroacoustic system at transmit level -12 dB. Multiple evaluation tools should be considered to increase the robustness and thoroughness of future fish passage evaluations at John Day and other dams.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Khan, Fenton; Kim, Jina; Lamarche, Brian L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Choi, Eric Y.; Faber, Derrek M.; Wilberding, Matthew C.; Deng, Zhiqun; Weiland, Mark A.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Fischer, Eric S.; Cushing, Aaron W.

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Geochemical and Isotopic Interpretations of Groundwater Flow in the Oasis Valley Flow System, Southern Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the findings of a geochemical investigation of the Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley groundwater flow system in southwestern Nevada. It is intended to provide geochemical data and interpretations in support of flow and contaminant transport modeling for the Western and Central Pahute Mesa Corrective Action Units.

J.M. Thomas; F.C. Benedict, Jr.; T.P. Rose; R.L. Hershey; J.B. Paces; Z.E. Peterman; I.M. Farnham; K.H. Johannesson; A.K. Singh; K.J. Stetzenbach; G.B. Hudson; J.M. Kenneally; G.F. Eaton; D.K. Smith

2003-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

23

Advanced Telemetry Data Capturing  

SciTech Connect

This project developed a new generation or advanced data capturing process specifically designed for use in future telemetry test systems at the Kansas City Plant (KCP). Although similar data capturing processes are performed both commercially and at other DOE weapon facilities, the equipment used is not specifically designed to perform acceptance testing requirements unique to the KCP. Commercially available equipment, despite very high cost (up to $125,000), is deficient in reliability and long-term maintainability necessary in test systems at this facility. There are no commercial sources for some requirements, specifically Terminal Data Analyzer (TDA) data processing. Although other custom processes have been developed to satisfy these test requirements, these designs have become difficult to maintain and upgrade.

Paschke, G.A.

2000-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

24

A cabled acoustic telemetry system for detecting and tracking juvenile salmon: Part 1. Engineering design and instrumentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers-Portland District started development of the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS), a nonproprietary technology, in 2001 to meet the needs for monitoring the survival of juvenile salmonids through the 31 federal dams in the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). Initial development focused on coded acoustic microtransmitters, and autonomous receivers that could be deployed in open reaches of the river for detection of the juvenile salmonids implanted with microtransmitters as they passed the autonomous receiver arrays. In 2006 the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked with development of an acoustic receiver system for deployment at hydropower facilities (cabled receiver) for detecting fish tagged with microtransmitters as well as tracking them in 2 or 3-dimensions as the fish passed at the facility for determining route of passage. The additional route of passage information, combined with survival estimates, is used by the dam operators and managers to make structural and operational changes at the hydropower facilities to improve survival of fish as they pass the facilities and through the FCRPS.

Weiland, Mark A.; Deng, Zhiqun; Seim, Thomas A.; Lamarche, Brian L.; Choi, Eric Y.; Fu, Tao; Carlson, Thomas J.; Thronas, Aaron I.; Eppard, Matthew B.

2011-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

25

A Cabled Acoustic Telemetry System for Detecting and Tracking Juvenile Salmon: Part 2. Three-Dimensional Tracking and Passage Outcomes  

SciTech Connect

In Part 1 of this paper [1], we presented the engineering design and instrumentation of the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) cabled system, a nonproprietary technology developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, to meet the needs for monitoring the survival of juvenile salmonids through the 31 dams in the Federal Columbia River Power System. Here in Part 2, we describe how the JSATS cabled system was employed as a reference sensor network for detecting and tracking juvenile salmon. Time-of-arrival data for valid detections on four hydrophones were used to solve for the three-dimensional (3D) position of fish surgically implanted with JSATS acoustic transmitters. Validation tests demonstrated high accuracy of 3D tracking up to 100 m from the John Day Dam spillway. The along-dam component, used for assigning the route of fish passage, had the highest accuracy; the median errors ranged from 0.06 to 0.22 m, and root mean square errors ranged from 0.05 to 0.56 m at distances up to 100 m. For the case study at John Day Dam during 2008, the range for 3D tracking was more than 100 m upstream of the dam face where hydrophones were deployed, and detection and tracking probabilities of fish tagged with JSATS acoustic transmitters were higher than 98%. JSATS cabled systems have been successfully deployed on several major dams to acquire information for salmon protection and for development of more “fish-friendly” hydroelectric facilities.

Deng, Zhiqun; Weiland, Mark A.; Fu, Tao; Seim, Thomas A.; Lamarche, Brian L.; Choi, Eric Y.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Eppard, Matthew B.

2011-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

26

Design, development, and validation of a remotely reconfigurable vehicle telemetry system for consumer and government applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis explores the design and development of a cost-effective, easy-to-use system for remotely monitoring vehicle performance and drivers' habits, with the aim of collecting data for vehicle characterization and ...

Siegel, Joshua Eric

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Geochemical modeling of the nuclear-waste repository system. A status report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of the geochemical modeling task is to develop an understanding of the waste-repository geochemical system and provide a valuable tool for estimating future states of that system. There currently exists a variety of computer codes which can be used in geochemical modeling studies. Some available codes contain the framework for simulating a natural chemical system and estimating, within limits, the response of that system to environmental changes. By data-base enhancement and code development, this modeling technique can be even more usefully applied to a nuclear-waste repository. In particular, thermodynamic data on elements not presently in the data base but identified as being of particular hazard in the waste-repository system, need to be incorporated into the code to estimate the near-field as well as the far-field reactions during a hypothetical breach. A reaction-path-simulation code, which estimates the products of specific rock/water reactions, has been tested using basalt and ground water. Results show that the mass-transfer capabilities of the code will be useful in chemical-evolution studies and scenario analyses. The purpose of this report is to explain the status of geochemical modeling as it currently applies to the chemical system of a hypothetical nuclear-waste repository in basalt and to present the plan proposed for further developmet and application.

Deutsch, W.J.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Geochemical characterization of geothermal systems in the Great...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

insights into the possible contributions of geothermal systems to groundwater chemistry and development of mitigation strategies for attendant environmental issues....

29

Field-based tests of geochemical modeling codes using New Zealand hydrothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrothermal systems in the Taupo Volcanic Zone, North Island, New Zealand are being used as field-based modeling exercises for the EQ3/6 geochemical modeling code package. Comparisons of the observed state and evolution of the hydrothermal systems with predictions of fluid-solid equilibria made using geochemical modeling codes will determine how the codes can be used to predict the chemical and mineralogical response of the environment to nuclear waste emplacement. Field-based exercises allow us to test the models on time scales unattainable in the laboratory. Preliminary predictions of mineral assemblages in equilibrium with fluids sampled from wells in the Wairakei and Kawerau geothermal field suggest that affinity-temperature diagrams must be used in conjunction with EQ6 to minimize the effect of uncertainties in thermodynamic and kinetic data on code predictions.

Bruton, C.J.; Glassley, W.E.; Bourcier, W.L.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

EM Telemetry Tool for Deep Well Drilling Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This final report discusses the successful development and testing of a deep operational electromagnetic (EM) telemetry system, produced under a cooperative agreement with the United States Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. This new electromagnetic telemetry system provides a wireless communication link between sensors deployed deep within oil and gas wells and data acquisition equipment located on the earth's surface. EM based wireless telemetry is a highly appropriate technology for oil and gas exploration in that it avoids the need for thousands of feet of wired connections. In order to achieve the project performance objectives, significant improvements over existing EM telemetry systems were made. These improvements included the development of new technologies that have improved the reliability of the communications link while extending operational depth. A key element of the new design is the incorporation of a data-fusion methodology which enhances the communication receiver's ability to extract very weak signals from large amounts of ambient environmental noise. This innovative data-fusion receiver based system adapts advanced technologies, not normally associated with low-frequency communications, and makes them work within the harsh drilling environments associated with the energy exploration market. Every element of a traditional EM telemetry system design, from power efficiency to reliability, has been addressed. The data fusion based EM telemetry system developed during this project is anticipated to provide an EM tool capability that will impact both onshore and offshore oil and gas exploration operations, for conventional and underbalanced drilling applications.

Jeffrey M. Gabelmann

2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

31

Energy Solutions Using Wireless Telemetry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solutions Using Wireless Telemetry Solutions Using Wireless Telemetry Speaker(s): Andy Green Date: June 12, 2001 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Satkartar K. Kinney This talk will address the following: * Introduction to wireless data networks * What are cellular control channels and why do I care? * Telemetry using wireless short packet data * Aeris technologies * Energy applications - Automatic meter reading - HVAV-R monitoring and control - Home gateways and remote thermostat control - Load management and curtailment - Distribution automation - Supply monitoring/management * The future For more information on this topic, you're invited to visit Aeris.Net at: http://www.aeris.net For more information about this seminar, please contact: Satkartar Kinney(510) 495-2365

32

SATDAS—For Air-Sea Interaction Data Acquisition Using Satellite Telemetry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SATDAS (Satellite Data Acquisition System) is a data acquisition system utilizing a satellite telemetry link that has been developed for Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, N.Y. It is to be used for air-sea interaction and oceanographic ...

R. N. Lobecker; S. SethuRaman; G. Field

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

WHOI SDSL Data-Link Project – Ethernet Telemetry through Sea Cables  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A data telemetry technique for communicating over standard oceanographic sea cables that achieves a nearly 100-fold increase in bandwidth as compared to traditional systems has recently been developed and successfully used at sea onboard two R/V ...

Marshall Swartz; Daniel J. Torres; Steve Liberatore; Robert Millard

34

Downhole tool adapted for telemetry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cycleable downhole tool such as a Jar, a hydraulic hammer, and a shock absorber adapted for telemetry. This invention applies to other tools where the active components of the tool are displaced when the tool is rotationally or translationally cycled. The invention consists of inductive or contact transmission rings that are connected by an extensible conductor. The extensible conductor permits the transmission of the signal before, after, and during the cycling of the tool. The signal may be continuous or intermittent during cycling. The invention also applies to downhole tools that do not cycle, but in operation are under such stress that an extensible conductor is beneficial. The extensible conductor may also consist of an extensible portion and a fixed portion. The extensible conductor also features clamps that maintain the conductor under stresses greater than that seen by the tool, and seals that are capable of protecting against downhole pressure and contamination.

Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Fox, Joe (Provo, UT)

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

35

Transhorizon VHF Telemetry from Ocean Moorings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During long deployment periods, it is desirable to communicate remotely with moored or drifting instruments. In addition to providing access to the data set as it is collected, a telemetry capability provides insurance against undetected ...

David A. Brooks

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Mercury Geochemical, Groundwater Geochemical, And Radiometric Geophysical  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geochemical, Groundwater Geochemical, And Radiometric Geophysical Geochemical, Groundwater Geochemical, And Radiometric Geophysical Signatures At Three Geothermal Prospects In Northern Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Mercury Geochemical, Groundwater Geochemical, And Radiometric Geophysical Signatures At Three Geothermal Prospects In Northern Nevada Details Activities (14) Areas (3) Regions (0) Abstract: Ground water sampling, desorbed mercury soil geochemical surveys and a radiometric geophysical survey was conducted in conjunction with geological mapping at three geothermal prospects in northern Nevada. Orientation sample lines from 610 m (2000 ft.) to 4575 m (15,000 ft.) in length were surveyed at right angles to known and suspected faults. Scintillometer readings (gamma radiation - total counts / second) were also

37

Tests of Long-Range Ocean Data Telemetry Using Frequency-Agile HF Packet-switching Protocols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experiences with two prototype telemetry systems developed for potential use with moored or drifting ocean instruments are described. The systems transfer data and commands between remote and base stations using direct high-frequency (HF) ...

David A. Brooks; Melbourne G. Briscoe

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

GeoSys.Chem: Estimate of reservoir fluid characteristics as first step in geochemical modeling of geothermal systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A computer code GeoSys.Chem for the calculation of deep geothermal reservoir fluid characteristics from the measured physical-chemical parameters of separated water and condensed vapor samples obtained from drilled wells is presented. It was written ... Keywords: GeoChem, GeoSys.Chem, Geochemical modeling, Los Azufres, VB.NET

Mahendra P. Verma

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

The global geochemical cycles of iron and calcium: using novel isotope systems to understand weathering, global mass budgets, natural reaction rates, and paleoclimate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the sedimentary column, and diagenetic alteration of Ca isotope signals over geologic time scales. The overallThe global geochemical cycles of iron and calcium: using novel isotope systems to understand of Doctor of Philosophy in Geology in the GRADUATE DIVISION of the UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY

Fantle, Matthew

40

A Differential Pressure Instrument with Wireless Telemetry for In-Situ Measurement of Fluid Flow across Sediment-Water Boundaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An instrument has been built to carry out continuous in-situ measurement of small differences in water pressure, conductivity and temperature, in natural surface water and groundwater systems. A low-cost data telemetry ...

Gardner, Alan T.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "telemetry systems geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Space age telemetry for geothermal well logging: the wireline transmission link  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of aerospace telemetry has opened new communication data links for making measurements in deep boreholes in the earth's crust. However, now a transmission line must be used since high-frequency signals will not propagate through this medium. Further restrictions are imposed upon well-logging transmission lines in high-temperature boreholes. It is possible to extend the bandwidth and number of data channels to enhance measurements in geothermal boreholes by combining aerospace telemetry techniques with thermal protection systems and careful selection of wireline data transmission configurations. 5 refs., 2 figs.

Kolar, J.D.; Dennis, B.R.; Stephani, E.L.; Gutierrez, P.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Using toughreact to model reactive fluid flow and geochemical transport in hydrothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The interaction between hydrothermal fluids and the rocks through which they migrate alters the earlier formed primary minerals and leads to the formation of secondary minerals, resulting in changes in the physical and chemical properties of the system. We have developed a comprehensive numerical simulator, TOUGHREACT, which considers nonisothermal multi-component chemical transport in both liquid and gas phases. A variety of subsurface thermo-physical-chemical processes is considered under a wide range of conditions of pressure, temperature, water saturation, and ionic strength. The code can be applied to problems in fundamental analysis of the hydrothermal systems and in the exploration of geothermal reservoirs including chemical evolution, mineral alteration, mineral scaling, changes of porosity and permeability, and mineral recovery from geothermal fluids.

Xu, Tianfu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Spycher, Nicolas; Pruess, Karsten

2003-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

43

The Moana geothermal system in Reno, Nevada: A hydrologic, geochemical, and thermal analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Moana geothermal systems, located in Reno, Nevada, is a moderate-temperature geothermal resource used for space heating applications. Both historic and new hydrologic, thermal, and groundwater chemistry data were collected to evaluate the Moana system and to develop a calibrated numerical model of the geothermal aquifer for investigation of resource development scenarios. The new data collection consisted of static water level measurements and temperature with depth measurements for a 13-month period at 26 geothermal wells to investigate hydrologic and thermal changes with time. In addition, groundwater chemistry sampling at 10 wells was used to evaluate mixing of thermal and nonthermal waters. Collected information indicates that in the most heavily used portion of the geothermal aquifer, the hydraulic heads have declined. This decline may induce additional leakage of cooler water from the overlying unconfined aquifer and lead to decreased temperatures at well locations in the geothermal aquifer. The groundwater chemistry data show concentration changes with temperature for boron, chloride, fluoride, lithium, and bicarbonate that are a function of the degree of mixing of thermal and nonthermal waters. Temporal changes in these constituents may be used as an indication of relative temperature changes in the geothermal system caused by mixing at a given location. An attempt was made to use the hydraulic head and maximum temperature data to develop a calibrated numerical model for the Moana geothermal system. However, lack of information about the horizontal and vertical thermal and fluid fluxes made the development of a calibrated model not possible at this time. 25 refs., 54 figs., 6 tabs.

Jacobson, E.A.; Johnston, J.W.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Proceedings of the workshop on geochemical modeling  

SciTech Connect

The following collection of papers was presented at a workshop on geochemical modeling that was sponsored by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The LLNL Waste Management Program sponsored this conference based on their belief that geochemical modeling is particularly important to the radioactive waste disposal project because of the need to predict the consequences of long-term water-rock interactions at the proposed repository site. The papers included in this volume represent a subset of the papers presented at the Fallen Leaf Lake Conference and cover a broad spectrum of detail and breadth in a subject that reflects the diverse research interests of the conference participants. These papers provide an insightful look into the current status of geochemical modeling and illustrate how various geochemical modeling codes have been applied to problems of geochemical interest. The emphasis of these papers includes traditional geochemical modeling studies of individual geochemical systems, the mathematical and theoretical development and refinement of new modeling capabilities, and enhancements of data bases on which the computations are based. The papers in this proceedings volume have been organized into the following four areas: Geochemical Model Development, Hydrothermal and Geothermal Systems, Sedimentary and Low Temperature Environments, and Data Base Development. The participants of this symposium and a complete list of the talks presented are listed in the appendices.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

History of Geochemical Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Sources of geochemical modeling software...www.telusplanet.net/public/geogams/index SOLVEQ/CHILLER Mark H. Reed Department of Geological

46

Sandia National Laboratories Drilling Telemetry System  

... for the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security ... the mode of communicating information is mud ... POTENTIAL MARKET APPLICATIONS Oil ...

47

Remote down-hole well telemetry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention includes an apparatus and method for telemetry communication with oil-well monitoring and recording instruments located in the vicinity of the bottom of gas or oil recovery pipes. Such instruments are currently monitored using electrical cabling that is inserted into the pipes; cabling has a short life in this environment, and requires periodic replacement with the concomitant, costly shutdown of the well. Modulated reflectance, a wireless communication method that does not require signal transmission power from the telemetry package will provide a long-lived and reliable way to monitor down-hole conditions. Normal wireless technology is not practical since batteries and capacitors have to frequently be replaced or recharged, again with the well being removed from service. RF energy generated above ground can also be received, converted and stored down-hole without the use of wires, for actuating down-hole valves, as one example. Although modulated reflectance reduces or eliminates the loss of energy at the sensor package because energy is not consumed, during the transmission process, additional stored extra energy down-hole is needed.

Briles, Scott D. (Los Alamos, NM); Neagley, Daniel L. (Albuquerque, NM); Coates, Don M. (Santa Fe, NM); Freund, Samuel M. (Los Alamos, NM)

2004-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

48

Flexible network wireless transceiver and flexible network telemetry transceiver  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A transceiver for facilitating two-way wireless communication between a baseband application and other nodes in a wireless network, wherein the transceiver provides baseband communication networking and necessary configuration and control functions along with transmitter, receiver, and antenna functions to enable the wireless communication. More specifically, the transceiver provides a long-range wireless duplex communication node or channel between the baseband application, which is associated with a mobile or fixed space, air, water, or ground vehicle or other platform, and other nodes in the wireless network or grid. The transceiver broadly comprises a communication processor; a flexible telemetry transceiver including a receiver and a transmitter; a power conversion and regulation mechanism; a diplexer; and a phased array antenna system, wherein these various components and certain subcomponents thereof may be separately enclosed and distributable relative to the other components and subcomponents.

Brown, Kenneth D. (Grain Valley, MO)

2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

49

Geochemical Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geochemical Techniques Geochemical Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Geochemical Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(1) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geochemical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: None Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Geochemical Techniques: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Related Techniques Geochemical Techniques Geochemical Data Analysis Geothermometry Gas Geothermometry Isotope Geothermometry Liquid Geothermometry Cation Geothermometers Multicomponent Geothermometers Silica Geothermometers Thermal Ion Dispersion

50

Electromagnetic anti-jam telemetry tool  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mud-pulse telemetry tool includes a tool housing, a motor disposed in the tool housing, and a magnetic coupling coupled to the motor and having an inner shaft and an outer shaft. The tool may also include a stator coupled to the tool housing, a restrictor disposed proximate the stator and coupled to the magnetic coupling, so that the restrictor and the stator adapted to generate selected pulses in a drilling fluid when the restrictor is selectively rotated. The tool may also include a first anti-jam magnet coupled to the too housing, and an second anti-jam magnet disposed proximate the first anti-jam magnet and coupled to the inner shaft and/or the outer shaft, wherein at least one of the first anti-jam magnet and the second anti-jam magnet is an electromagnet, and wherein the first anti-jam magnet and the second anti-jam magnet are positioned with adjacent like poles.

Ganesan, Harini (Sugar Land, TX); Mayzenberg, Nataliya (Missouri City, TX)

2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

51

Nevada Test Site seismic: telemetry measurements  

SciTech Connect

The feasibility and limitations of surface-to-tunnel seismic telemetry at the Nevada Test Site were explored through field measurements using current technology. Range functions for signaling were determined through analysis of monofrequency seismic signals injected into the earth at various sites as far as 70 km (43 mi) from installations of seismometers in the G-Tunnel complex of Rainier Mesa. Transmitted signal power at 16, 24, and 32 Hz was measured at two locations in G-Tunnel separated by 670 m (2200 ft). Transmissions from 58 surface sites distributed primarily along three azimuths from G-Tunnel were studied. The G-Tunnel noise environment was monitored over the 20-day duration of the field tests. Noise-power probability functions were calculated for 20-s and 280-s seismic-record populations. Signaling rates were calculated for signals transmitted from superior transmitter sites to G-Tunnel. A detection threshold of 13 dB re 1 nm/sup 2/ displacement power at 95% reliability was demanded. Consideration of field results suggests that even for the frequency range used in this study, substantially higher signaling rates are likely to be obtained in future work in view of the present lack of information relevant to hardware-siting criteria and the seismic propagation paths at the Nevada Test Site. 12 references.

Albright, J N; Parker, L E; Horton, E H

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Geochemical Data Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geochemical Data Analysis Geochemical Data Analysis Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Geochemical Data Analysis Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geochemical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Geochemical Data Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Geochemical Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Geochemical Data Analysis: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition References No exploration activities found. Print PDF Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geochemical_Data_Analysis&oldid=594157" Categories: Geochemical Techniques Exploration Techniques

53

Geochemical assessment of gaseous hydrocarbons: mixing of bacterial and thermogenic methane in the deep subsurface petroleum system, Gulf of Mexico continental slope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mixtures of bacterial and thermogenic methane are found both at vents at the seafloor and in reservoirs in the deep subsurface of the Gulf of Mexico continental slope. The C1-C5 gas that most recently charged reservoirs of Jolliet (GC 184), Genesis (GC 160/161) and Petronius (VK 786) fields is estimated to include 17%-28%, 31%-51%, 31%-49% bacterial methane, respectively. Geochemical assessment of the reservoir gas in the fields show that the gas may be the product of thermal cracking of Upper Jurassic crude oil before final migration to the reservoirs. The gas from three different fields is of similar thermal maturity levels. In contrast to oil in reservoirs in the fields, which shows biodegradation effects, the C1-C5 reservoir gas is unaltered by biodegradation. Late gas migration may have occurred at or near present burial depth and flushed the reservoir system of previously biodegraded hydrocarbon gas to include any previous bacterial methane. Molecular and isotopic properties of reservoir gas and oil suggest that bacterial methane mixed with thermogenic hydrocarbon gas before entering the reservoirs. Thus the source of the bacterial methane is logically deeper than the present depth (>~4 km) and temperatures of the reservoirs. High sedimentation rate and low geothermal gradient may offer conditions favorable for generation and preservation of bacterial methane in deep subsurface petroleum system of the Gulf slope. Bacterial methane dispersed across the large drainage areas of the deep subsurface petroleum system may have been swept by migrating fluids at >4 km, and then charged both vents (GC 185, GC 233 and GC 286) at the seafloor and reservoirs in the deep subsurface. The volume of bacterial methane from geologically significant depth in rapidly subsiding basins may be underestimated.

Ozgul, Ercin

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

A Geochemical Reconnaissance Of The Alid Volcaniccenter And Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geochemical Reconnaissance Of The Alid Volcaniccenter And Geothermal Geochemical Reconnaissance Of The Alid Volcaniccenter And Geothermal System, Danakil Depression, Eritrea Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Geochemical Reconnaissance Of The Alid Volcaniccenter And Geothermal System, Danakil Depression, Eritrea Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Geological and geochemical studies indicate that a high-temperature geothermalsystem underlies the Alid volcanic center in the northern Danakil depression of Eritrea Alid is avery late-Pleistocene structural dome formed by shallow intrusion of rhyolitic magma some of which vented as lavas and pyroclastic flows Fumaroles and boiling pools distributed widelyover an area of ~10 km2 on the northern half of Alid suggest that an activehydrothermal system underlies much of that part of

55

Downhole pipe selection for acoustic telemetry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is described for transmitting signals along a downhole string including a plurality of serially connected tubular pipes such as drill or production pipes, a transmitter for transmitting a signal along the string and a receiver for receiving the signal placed along the string at a location spaced from said transmitting means, wherein the pipes between the transmitter and the receiver are ordered according to length of tube to minimize loss of signal from said transmitter to said receiver. 7 figs.

Drumheller, D.S.

1995-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

56

Downhole pipe selection for acoustic telemetry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for transmitting signals along a downhole string including a plurality of serially connected tubular pipes such as drill or production pipes, a transmitter for transmitting a signal along the string and a receiver for receiving the signal placed along the string at a location spaced from said transmitting means, wherein the pipes between the transmitter and the receiver are ordered according to length of tube to minimize loss of signal from said transmitter to said receiver.

Drumheller, Douglas S. (Cedar Crest, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

OIT Wireless Telemetry for Industrial Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The need for advanced wireless technology has been identified in the National Research Council publication (1) ''Manufacturing Process Controls for the Industries of the Future as a Critical Technology for the Future''. The deployment challenges to be overcome in order for wireless to be a viable option include: (1) eliminating interference (assuring reliable communications); (2) easing the deployment of intelligent, wireless sensors; (3) developing reliable networks (robust architectures); (4) developing remote power (long-lasting and reliable); and (5) developing standardized communication protocols. This project demonstrated the feasibility of robust wireless sensor networks that could meet these requirements for the harsh environments common to the DOE/OIT Industries of the Future. It resulted in a wireless test bed that was demonstrated in a paper mill and a steel plant. The test bed illustrated key protocols and components that would be required in a real-life, wireless network. The technologies for low power connectivity developed and demonstrated at the plant eased fears that the radios would interfere with existing control equipment. The same direct sequence, spread spectrum (DSSS) technology that helped assure the reliability of the connection also demonstrated that wireless communication was feasible in these plants without boosting the transmitted power to dangerous levels. Our experience and research have indicated that two key parameters are of ultimate importance: (1) reliability and (2) inter-system compatibility. Reliability is the key to immediate acceptance among industrial users. The importance cannot be overstated, because users will not tolerate an unreliable information network. A longer term issue that is at least as important as the reliability of a single system is the inter-system compatibility between these wireless sensor networks and other wireless systems that are part of our industries. In the long run, the ability of wireless sensor networks to operate cooperatively in an environment that includes wireless LANs, wireless headsets, RF heating, wireless crane controls and many other users of the electromagnetic spectrum will probably be the most important issue we can address. A network of units (Figure 1) has been developed that demonstrates the feasibility of direct-sequence spread spectrum wireless sensor networking for industrial environments. The hardware consists of a group of reprogrammable transceivers that can act as sensor nodes or network nodes or both. These units and the team that built them are the heart of a test bed development system that has been used successfully in demonstrations at various industrial sites. As previously reported, these units have been successfully tested at a paper mill. More recently, these units were utilized in a permanent installation at a steel mill. Both of these applications demonstrated the ease with which a new network could be installed, and the reality that DSSS units can operate successfully in plants where narrow band transmitters had previously caused interference with plant operations.

Manges, WW

2002-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

58

Category:Geochemical Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:Geochemical Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Geochemical Techniques page? For detailed information on exploration techniques, click here. Category:Geochemical Techniques Add.png Add a new Geochemical Techniques Technique Subcategories This category has only the following subcategory. G [×] Geochemical Data Analysis‎ 3 pages Pages in category "Geochemical Techniques" This category contains only the following page. G Geochemical Data Analysis Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Category:Geochemical_Techniques&oldid=689823"

59

Modeling brine-rock interactions in an enhanced geothermal system deep fractured reservoir at Soultz-Sous-Forets (France): a joint approach using two geochemical codes: frachem and toughreact  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

150 p. Bächler, D. , Durst, P. , Evans, K. , Hopkirk, R. ,in Mineralogy, 29: 259-308. Durst, P. , (2002). Geochemical1999. Rabemanana, V. , Durst, P. , Bächler, D. , Vuataz,

Andre, Laurent; Spycher, Nicolas; Xu, Tianfu; Vuataz, Francois-D.; Pruess, Karsten.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Hg Anomalies In Soils- A Geochemical Exploration Method For Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hg Anomalies In Soils- A Geochemical Exploration Method For Geothermal Hg Anomalies In Soils- A Geochemical Exploration Method For Geothermal Areas Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Hg Anomalies In Soils- A Geochemical Exploration Method For Geothermal Areas Details Activities (5) Areas (5) Regions (0) Abstract: Hg contents of soils in geothermal areas in the western U.S. were measured and a three-fold distribution was observed: peak, aureole and background. Peak values (up to several 100 ppm Hg) occur in fumaroles of vapour-dominated systems, around hot springs, and in zones overlying steeply dipping, hot-water aquifers. Aureoic values (up to several 100 ppb Hg) are found in zones surrounding the peak areas and delineate areas with shallow geothermal convection. Background values vary between 7 and 40 ppb

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "telemetry systems geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Alteration And Geochemical Zoning In Bodie Bluff, Bodie Mining District,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alteration And Geochemical Zoning In Bodie Bluff, Bodie Mining District, Alteration And Geochemical Zoning In Bodie Bluff, Bodie Mining District, Eastern California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Alteration And Geochemical Zoning In Bodie Bluff, Bodie Mining District, Eastern California Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Banded, epithermal quartz-adularia veins have produced about 1.5 million ounces of gold and 7 million ounces of silver from the Bodie mining district, eastern California. The veins cut dacitic lava flows, pyroclastic rocks and intrusions. Sinter boulders occur in a graben structure at the top of Bodie Bluff and fragments of sinter and mineralized quartz veins occur in hydrothermal breccias nearby. Explosive venting evidently was part of the evolution of the ore-forming geothermal systems which, at one time,

62

Data management of geostationary communication satellite telemetry and correlation to space weather observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To understand and mitigate the effects of space weather on the performance of geostationary communications satellites, we analyze sixteen years of archived telemetry data from Inmarsat, the UK-based telecommunications ...

Lohmeyer, Whitney Quinne

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Acoustic Telemetry Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Survival at John Day Dam with Emphasis on the Prototype Surface Flow Outlet, 2008  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The main purpose of the study was to evaluate the performance of Top Spill Weirs installed at two spillbays at John Day Dam and evaluate the effectiveness of these surface flow outlets at attracting juvenile salmon away from the powerhouse and reducing turbine passage. The Juvenile Salmonid Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) was used to estimate survival of juvenile salmonids passing the dam and also for calculating performance metrics used to evaluate the efficiency and effectiveness of the dam at passing juvenile salmonids.

Weiland, Mark A.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Deng, Zhiqun; Fu, Tao; Monter, Tyrell J.; Johnson, Gary E.; Khan, Fenton; Wilberding, Matthew C.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Faber, Derrek M.; Durham, Robin E.; Townsend, Richard L.; Skalski, John R.; Kim, Jina; Fischer, Eric S.; Meyer, Matthew M.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

The dynamics of oceanic transform faults : constraints from geophysical, geochemical, and geodynamical modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Segmentation and crustal accretion at oceanic transform fault systems are investigated through a combination of geophysical data analysis and geodynamical and geochemical modeling. Chapter 1 examines the effect of fault ...

Gregg, Patricia Michelle Marie

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

GEOCHEMICAL CONTROLS ON NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE MEASUREMENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is used in the Earth Sciences as a means of obtaining information about the molecular-scale environment of fluids in porous geological materials. Laboratory experiments were conducted to advance our fundamental understanding of the link between the NMR response and the geochemical properties of geological materials. In the first part of this research project, we studied the impact of both the surface-area-to-volume ratio (S/V) of the pore space and the surface relaxivity on the NMR response of fluids in sand-clay mixtures. This study highlighted the way in which these two parameters control our ability to use NMR measurements to detect and quantify fluid saturation in multiphase saturated systems. The second part of the project was designed to explore the way in which the mineralogic form of iron, as opposed to simply the concentration of iron, affects the surface relaxation rate and, more generally, the NMR response of porous materials. We found that the magnitude of the surface relaxation rate was different for the various iron-oxide minerals because of changes in both the surface-area-to-volume ratio of the pore space, and the surface relaxivity. Of particular significance from this study was the finding of an anomalously large surface relaxivity of magnetite compared to that of the other iron minerals. Differences in the NMR response of iron minerals were seen in column experiments during the reaction of ferrihydrite-coated quartz sand with aqueous Fe(II) solutions to form goethite, lepidocrocite and magnetite; indicating the potential use of NMR as a means of monitoring geochemical reactions. The final part of the research project investigated the impact of heterogeneity, at the pore-scale, on the NMR response. This work highlighted the way in which the geochemistry, by controlling the surface relaxivity, has a significant impact on the link between NMR data and the microgeometry of the pore space.

Rosemary Knight

2008-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

66

Validation of the WATEQ4 geochemical model for uranium  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Geochemical Modeling and Nuclide/Rock/Groundwater Interactions Studies Program, a study was conducted to partially validate the WATEQ4 aqueous speciation-solubility geochemical model for uranium. The solubility controls determined with the WATEQ4 geochemical model were in excellent agreement with those laboratory studies in which the solids schoepite (UO/sub 2/(OH)/sub 2/ . H/sub 2/O), UO/sub 2/(OH)/sub 2/, and rutherfordine ((UO/sub 2/CO/sub 3/) were identified as actual solubility controls for uranium. The results of modeling solution analyses from laboratory studies of uranyl phosphate solids, however, identified possible errors in the characterization of solids in the original solubility experiments. As part of this study, significant deficiencies in the WATEQ4 thermodynamic data base for uranium solutes and solids were corrected. Revisions included recalculation of selected uranium reactions. Additionally, thermodynamic data for the hydroxyl complexes of U(VI), including anionic (VI) species, were evaluated (to the extent permitted by the available data). Vanadium reactions were also added to the thermodynamic data base because uranium-vanadium solids can exist in natural ground-water systems. This study is only a partial validation of the WATEQ4 geochemical model because the available laboratory solubility studies do not cover the range of solid phases, alkaline pH values, and concentrations of inorganic complexing ligands needed to evaluate the potential solubility of uranium in ground waters associated with various proposed nuclear waste repositories. Further validation of this or other geochemical models for uranium will require careful determinations of uraninite solubility over the pH range of 7 to 10 under highly reducing conditions and of uranyl hydroxide and phosphate solubilities over the pH range of 7 to 10 under oxygenated conditions.

Krupka, K.M.; Jenne, E.A.; Deutsch, W.J.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Geochemical Journal, Vol. 39, pp. 383 to 389, 2005 *Corresponding author (e-mail: ytakaha@hiroshima-u.ac.jp)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

383 Geochemical Journal, Vol. 39, pp. 383 to 389, 2005 *Corresponding author (e-mail: ytakaha@hiroshima,3 1 Department of Earth & Planetary Systems Science, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739 for Multiple Isotope Research for Astro-and Geochemical Evolution (MIRAGE), Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima

68

Lectures on geochemical interpretation of hydrothermal waters | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Lectures on geochemical interpretation of hydrothermal waters Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Lectures on geochemical interpretation of hydrothermal waters Abstract The alkali carbonates, Na, K, and Li, are relatively soluble at all temperatures and generally precipitate only where there is extreme evapora- tion. In contrast, the alkaline earth carbonates. Ca. Ht, Sr, and Ba, are moderately to sparingly soluble and commonly precipitate in bydrothecmal systems. Calcite is by far the most abundant and important carbonate found

69

EQ6, a computer program for reaction path modeling of aqueous geochemical systems: Theoretical manual, user`s guide, and related documentation (Version 7.0); Part 4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EQ6 is a FORTRAN computer program in the EQ3/6 software package (Wolery, 1979). It calculates reaction paths (chemical evolution) in reacting water-rock and water-rock-waste systems. Speciation in aqueous solution is an integral part of these calculations. EQ6 computes models of titration processes (including fluid mixing), irreversible reaction in closed systems, irreversible reaction in some simple kinds of open systems, and heating or cooling processes, as well as solve ``single-point`` thermodynamic equilibrium problems. A reaction path calculation normally involves a sequence of thermodynamic equilibrium calculations. Chemical evolution is driven by a set of irreversible reactions (i.e., reactions out of equilibrium) and/or changes in temperature and/or pressure. These irreversible reactions usually represent the dissolution or precipitation of minerals or other solids. The code computes the appearance and disappearance of phases in solubility equilibrium with the water. It finds the identities of these phases automatically. The user may specify which potential phases are allowed to form and which are not. There is an option to fix the fugacities of specified gas species, simulating contact with a large external reservoir. Rate laws for irreversible reactions may be either relative rates or actual rates. If any actual rates are used, the calculation has a time frame. Several forms for actual rate laws are programmed into the code. EQ6 is presently able to model both mineral dissolution and growth kinetics.

Wolery, T.J.; Daveler, S.A.

1992-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

70

Predictive geochemical modeling of interactions between uranium-mill-tailings solutions and sediments in a flow-through system: model formulations and preliminary results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An equilibrium thermodynamic conceptual model consisting of minerals and solid phases was developed to represent a soil column. A computer program was used as a tool to solve the system of mathematical equations imposed by the conceptual chemical model. The combined conceptual model and computer program were used to predict aqueous phase compositions of effluent solutions from permeability cells packed with geologic materials and percolated with uranium mill tailings solutions. Initial calculations of ion speciation and mineral solubility and our understanding of the chemical processes occurring in the modeled system were used to select solid phases for inclusion in the conceptual model. The modeling predictions were compared to the analytically determined column effluent concentrations. Hypotheses were formed, based on modeling predictions and laboratory evaluations, as to the probable mechanisms controlling the migration of selected contaminants. An assemblage of minerals and other solid phases could be used to predict the concentrations of several of the macro constituents (e.g., Ca, SO/sub 4/, Al, Fe, and Mn) but could not be used to predict trace element concentrations. These modeling conclusions are applicable to situations where uranium mill tailings solutions of low pH and high total dissolved solids encounter either clay liners or natural geologic materials that contain inherent acid neutralizing capacities. 116 references, 22 figures, 6 tables.

Peterson, S.R.; Felmy, A.R.; Serne, R.J.; Gee, G.W.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

A Comparison of Snow Telemetry and Snow Course Measurements in the Colorado River Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Temporal and spatial differences in snow-water equivalent (SWE) at 240 snow telemetry (SNOTEL) and at 500 snow course sites and a subset of 93 collocated sites were evaluated by examining the correlation of site values over the snow season, ...

K. A. Dressler; S. R. Fassnacht; R. C. Bales

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Integrated model for the natural flow regime in the Cerro Prieto hydrothermal system, B. C. , Mexico, based upon petrological and isotope geochemical criteria  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Studies of cuttings and core at Cerro Prieto have now been extended to more than 50 boreholes. The aims of this petrological and isotopic work are to determine the shape of the reservoir, its physical properties, and its temperature distribution and flow regime before the steam field was produced. A map showing the first occurrence of hydrothermal epidote shows a dome-shaped top to the steam-producing zone. The hottest of the mapped mineral zones - the biotite vermiculite zone - shows a dome displaced to the northeast relative to the epidote zone. Patterns of mineral zones observed in wells are consistent with patterns of oxygen isotopic ratios in calcite and quartz. Using both criteria all of the boreholes so far studied were classified as belonging to one of four different regimes. These are: (a) the thermal plume of upward flowing water close to boiling, marked by a regular sequence of prograde mineral zones and large isotopic shifts; (b) the discharge system where fluid leaks to the surface, as indicated by the occurrence of only a few low temperature mineral zones, which extend over large depth intervals with little isotope exchange; (c) the horizontal flow zone, in which boreholes penetrate reversals of both mineral zones and isotope shifts with increasing depth; and (d) the recharge zone where cold water is descending. Plotting these four types of boreholes on a map reveals a simple, consistent, pattern. This is interpreted to have been produced by a thermal plume dipping at 45/sup 0/ to the northeast.

Elders, W.A.; Williams, A.E.; Hoagland, J.R.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

NUREG/CR-6870 Consideration of Geochemical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mining and milling of uranium ore. Nonetheless, the use of leaching fluids to mine uranium contaminatesNUREG/CR-6870 Consideration of Geochemical Issues in Groundwater Restoration at Uranium In in Groundwater Restoration at Uranium In-Situ Leach Mining Facilities Manuscript Completed: December 2006 Date

74

A Light-Weight Instrumentation System Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To meet challenging constraints on telemetry system weight and volume, a custom Light-Weight Instrumentation System was developed to collect vehicle environment and dynamics on a short-duration exo-atmospheric flight test vehicle. The total telemetry system, including electronics, sensors, batteries, and a 1 watt transmitter weighs about 1 kg. Over 80 channels of measurement, housekeeping, and telemetry system diagnostic data are transmitted at 128 kbps. The microcontroller-based design uses the automotive industry standard Controller Area Network to interface with and support in-flight control fimctions. Operational parameters are downloaded via a standard asynchronous serial communications intefiace. The basic design philosophy and functionality is described here.

Kidner, Ronald

1999-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

75

Pressure Sensor and Telemetry Methods for Measurement While Drilling...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MWD Tools for Directional Drilling Project Description - Phase I: Integrate and test pressure sensor system consisting of a commercial off the shelf silicon-on-sapphire...

76

Geochemical engineering problem identification and program description. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Geochemical Engineering Program has as its goal the improvement of geochemical fluid management techniques. This document presents the strategy and status of the Geochemical Engineering Program. The magnitude and scope of geochemical-related problems constraining geothermal industry productivity are described. The goals and objectives of the DGE Geochemical Engineering Program are defined. The rationale and strategy of the program are described. The structure, priorities, funding, and management of specific elements within the program are delineated, and the status of the overall program is presented.

Crane, C.H.; Kenkeremath, D.C.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Trace Element Geochemical Zoning in the Roosevelt Hot Springs Thermal Area,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Trace Element Geochemical Zoning in the Roosevelt Hot Springs Thermal Area, Utah Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Trace Element Geochemical Zoning in the Roosevelt Hot Springs Thermal Area, Utah Abstract Chemical interaction of thermal brines with reservoir rock in the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area has resulted in the development of distinctive trace element signatures. Geochemical analysis of soil sample, shallow temperature gradient drill hole cuttings and deep drill hole cutting provides a three dimensional perspective of trace element distributions within the system. Distributions of As, Hg and Li provide the clearest expression of hydrothermal activity. Comparison of these distribution

78

Experimental Geochemical Studies Relevant to Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geochemical Studies Relevant to Geochemical Studies Relevant to Carbon Sequestration James G. Blencoe (blencoejg@ornl.gov; 865-574-7041) David R. Cole (coledr@ornl.gov; 865-574-5473) Juske Horita (horitaj@ornl.gov; 865-576-2750) Geochemistry Group Chemical and Analytical Sciences Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory P.O. Box 2008, Building 4500-S Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6110 Gerilynn R. Moline (molinegr@ornl.gov; 865-576-5134) Environmental Sciences Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory P.O. Box 2008, Building 1505 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6038 Introduction Evidence is mounting that rising levels of atmospheric CO 2 will have profound effects on future global climates (1-2) . Consequently, many experts agree that technologies are needed to slow, and ultimately stop, further buildup (3-5) . One of the strategies proposed to achieve this aim

79

Geochemical modeling at Raft River  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chemical analysis of water from three depth regimes at the Raft River KGRA indicate the presence of at least two distinct hydrothermal fluids. One fluid predominates in the fracture system on the west side of the valley, known as the Bridge Fault. This fluid is characterized by low conductivity (2,000 to 3,000 ..mu..s) and 6 to 9 ..mu..g/ml F/sup -/. The second fluid, encountered in the center of the valley, appears to be associated with the Narrows Structure and is characterized by a conductivity of 6,000 to 11,000 ..mu..s and F/sup -/ of 3 to 6 ..mu..g/ml. Contour mapping of conductivity and Cl/sup -//F/sup -/ ratios indicates upwelling of both deep geothermal fluids into the shallow system. This recharge into the intermediate and shallow zones produces high-conductivity water which is used for irrigation. Application of a simple mixing model shows that all the water sampled in intermediate and deep zones can be described by mixtures of two nearly pure fluids. One mechanism, consistent with the known data, is deep upwelling of a highly mineralized fluid which is heated by the basement rock and then penetrates sediment layers through fractures. The second fluid is relatively recent meteoric water conductively heated by the basement rock.

Allen, C.A.; Chaney, R.E.; McAtee, R.E.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Acoustic Telemetry Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Survival Proportions at John Day Dam, 2009  

SciTech Connect

The overall purpose of the acoustic telemetry study at JDA during 2009 was to determine the best configuration and operation for JDA prior to conducting BiOp performance standard tests. The primary objective was to determine the best operation between 30% and 40% spill treatments. Route-specific and JDA to TDA forebay survival estimates, passage distribution, and timing/behavior metrics were used for comparison of 30% to a 40% spill treatments. A secondary objective was to evaluate the performance of TSWs installed in spill bays 15 and 16 and to estimate fish survival rates and passage efficiencies under 30% and 40% spill-discharge treatments each season.

Weiland, Mark A.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Deng, Zhiqun; Fu, Tao; Kim, Jin A.; Johnson, Gary E.; Fischer, Eric S.; Khan, Fenton; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Faber, Derrek M.; Carter, Kathleen M.; Boyd, James W.; Townsend, Richard L.; Skalski, J. R.; Monter, Tyrell J.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Wilberding, Matthew C.; Meyer, Matthew M.

2011-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "telemetry systems geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Category:Geochemical Data Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:Geochemical Data Analysis Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Geochemical Data Analysis page? For detailed information on exploration techniques, click here. Category:Geochemical Data Analysis Add.png Add a new Geochemical Data Analysis Technique Pages in category "Geochemical Data Analysis" The following 3 pages are in this category, out of 3 total. G Geothermometry T Thermal Ion Dispersion Thermochronometry Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Category:Geochemical_Data_Analysis&oldid=689825"

82

Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount St Helens, Usa, 1980-1994 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Temporal...

83

Trace Element Geochemical Zoning in the Roosevelt Hot Springs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Element Geochemical Zoning in the Roosevelt Hot Springs Thermal Area, Utah Abstract Chemical interaction of thermal brines with reservoir rock in the Roosevelt Hot Springs...

84

DNA-based methods of geochemical prospecting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present invention relates to methods for performing surveys of the genetic diversity of a population. The invention also relates to methods for performing genetic analyses of a population. The invention further relates to methods for the creation of databases comprising the survey information and the databases created by these methods. The invention also relates to methods for analyzing the information to correlate the presence of nucleic acid markers with desired parameters in a sample. These methods have application in the fields of geochemical exploration, agriculture, bioremediation, environmental analysis, clinical microbiology, forensic science and medicine.

Ashby, Matthew (Mill Valley, CA)

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

85

Acoustic Telemetry Studies of Juvenile Chinook Salmon Survival at the Lower Columbia Projects in 2006  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Portland District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers contracted with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to conduct three studies using acoustic telemetry to estimate detection probabilities and survival of juvenile Chinook salmon at three hydropower projects on the lower Columbia River. The primary goals were to estimate detection and survival probabilities based on sampling with JSATS equipment, assess the feasibility of using JSATS for survival studies, and estimate sample sizes needed to obtain a desired level of precision in future studies. The 2006 JSATS arrays usually performed as well or better than radio telemetry arrays in the JDA and TDA tailwaters, and underperformed radio arrays in the BON tailwater, particularly in spring. Most of the probabilities of detection on at least one of all arrays in a tailwater exceeded 80% for each method, which was sufficient to provide confidence in survival estimates. The probability of detection on one of three arrays includes survival and detection probabilities because fish may die or pass all three arrays undetected but alive.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Hughes, James S.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Durham, Robin E.; Fischer, Eric S.; Kim, Jina; Townsend, Richard L.; Skalski, John R.; McComas, Roy L.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

The hydrogeologic-geochemical model of Cerro Prieto revisited  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As the exploitation of the Cerro Prieto, Mexico, geothermal field continues, there is increasing evidence that the hydrogeologic model developed by Halfman et al. (1984, 1986) presents the basic features controlling the movement of geothermal fluids in the system. At the present time the total installed capacity at Cerro Prieto is 620 MWe requiring the production of more than 10,500 tonnes/hr of a brine-steam mixture. This significant rate of fluid production has resulted in changes in reservoir thermodynamic conditions and in the chemistry of the produced fluids. After reviewing the hydrogeologic-geochemical model of Cerro Prieto, some of the changes observed in the field due to its exploitation are discussed and interpreted on the basis of the model. 21 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

Lippmann, M.J.; Halfman, S.E.; Truesdell, A.H.; Manon M., A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

RF transmission line and drill/pipe string switching technology for down-hole telemetry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A modulated reflectance well telemetry apparatus having an electrically conductive pipe extending from above a surface to a point below the surface inside a casing. An electrical conductor is located at a position a distance from the electrically conductive pipe and extending from above the surface to a point below the surface. Modulated reflectance apparatus is located below the surface for modulating well data into a RF carrier transmitted from the surface and reflecting the modulated carrier back to the surface. A RF transceiver is located at the surface and is connected between the electrically conductive pipe and the electrical conductor for transmitting a RF signal that is confined between the electrically conductive well pipe and the electrical conductor to the modulated reflectance apparatus, and for receiving reflected data on the well from the modulated reflectance apparatus.

Clark, David D. (Santa Fe, NM); Coates, Don M. (Santa Fe, NM)

2007-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

88

Proceedings of the second workshop on hydrologic and geochemical monitoring in the Long Valley Caldera  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A workshop was held to review the results of hydrologic and geochemical monitoring and scientific drilling in the Long Valley caldera. Such monitoring is being done to detect changes in the hydrothermal system induced by ongoing magmatic and techonic processes. Data from a 2400-ft deep core hole completed in June 1986 were presented at the 1986 workshop and participants discussed the need and rationale for siting locations for future scientific drilling in the caldera.

Sorey, M.L.; Farrar, C.D.; Wollenberg, H.A. (eds.)

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Analysis and Geochemical Modeling of Vanadium Contamination in Groundwater New Rifle Processing Site, Colorado  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Analysis and Geochemical Modeling of Vanadium Contamination in Groundwater New Rifle Processing Site, Colorado

90

Geochemical Sampling of Thermal Waters in Nevada | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geochemical Sampling of Thermal Waters in Nevada Geochemical Sampling of Thermal Waters in Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Geochemical Sampling of Thermal Waters in Nevada Abstract There are 1000 thermal springs in Nevada for which a location is known, but for which there are no available temperature (or chemical) measurements. Although many of these sites are within known geothermal areas and are located near springs for which temperature and/or geochemical data are available for one of the springs, many of these sites are not so located and require evaluation before the geothermal potential of the area can be assessed. In order to begin filling in data gaps, water sampling commenced in 2002 when over 70 analyses were obtained from springs with previously

91

Factors Controlling The Geochemical Evolution Of Fumarolic Encrustations,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Controlling The Geochemical Evolution Of Fumarolic Encrustations, Controlling The Geochemical Evolution Of Fumarolic Encrustations, Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes, Alaska Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Factors Controlling The Geochemical Evolution Of Fumarolic Encrustations, Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes, Alaska Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Factor and canonical correlation analysis of geochemical data from eight fossil fumaroles suggest that six major factors controlled the formation and evolution of fumarolic encrustations on the 1912 ash-flow sheet in the Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes (VTTS). The six-factor solution model explains a large proportion (low of 74% for Ni to high of 99% for Si) of the individual element data variance. Although the primary fumarolic

92

Molecular geomicrobiology: genes and geochemical cycling Jennifer Macalady 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Frontiers Molecular geomicrobiology: genes and geochemical cycling Jennifer Macalady 1 , Jillian F occurs. Yet, the field of molecular geomicrobiology remains in its infancy. In the foreseeable future, merging of modern biogeochemistry with molecularly resolved ecological studies will inspire

Macalady, Jenn

93

Modeling brine-rock interactions in an enhanced geothermal system deep fractured reservoir at Soultz-Sous-Forets (France): a joint approach using two geochemical codes: frachem and toughreact  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rock interactions in enhanced geothermal systems (EGS).31 th Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, 301998). Computer modeling for geothermal systems: predicting

Andre, Laurent; Spycher, Nicolas; Xu, Tianfu; Vuataz, Francois-D.; Pruess, Karsten.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Reservoir simulation and geochemical study of Cerro Prieto I wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Combined reservoir simulation and geochemical data analysis are used to investigate the effects of recharge and other reservoir processes occurring in the western part of the Cerro Prieto, Mexico, geothermal field (i.e., Cerro Prieto I area). Enthalpy-based temperatures and bottomhole temperatures are calculated based on simplified models of the system, considering different reservoir boundary conditions and zones of contrasting initial temperatures and reservoir properties. By matching the computed trends with geothermometer-based temperature and enthalpy histories of producing wells, the main processes active in the western area of Cerro Prieto are identified. This part of the geothermal system is strongly influenced by nearby groundwater aquifers; cooler waters readily recharge the reservoirs. In response to exploitation, the natural influx of cold water into the shallower alpha reservoir is mainly from the west and down Fault L, while the recharge to the deeper beta reservoir in this part of the field, seems to be only lateral, from the west and possibly south. 11 refs., 12 figs.

Lippmann, M.J. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)); Truesdell, A.H. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (USA))

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

VOLTINT: A Matlab®-based program for semi-automated processing of geochemical data acquired by voltammetry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent progress has resulted in the development of advanced techniques to acquire geochemical information in situ in aquatic systems. Among these techniques, voltammetry has generated significant interest for its ability to detect several important redox-sensitive ... Keywords: Data processing, Geochemistry, Integration, Matlab®, Software, Voltammetry

Gwendolyn Bristow; Martial Taillefert

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Yakima River Radio-Telemetry Study: Spring Chinook Salmon, 1991-1992 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the presupplementation planning, baseline data on the productivity of spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Yakima River have been collected. However, for adult salmonids, data on habitat use, delays in passage at irrigation diversions, migration rates, and substock separation had not been previously collected. In 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service began a 2-year radio-telemetry study of adult spring chinook salmon in the Yakima River Basin. Specific objectives addressed in this study were: to determine spawning populations` run timing, passage patterns at irrigation diversion dams, and morphometric characteristics to determine where and when substocks become separated; to evaluate fish passage at Yakima River Basin diversion dams including Prosser, Sunnyside, Wapato, Roza, Town Diversion, Easton, Cowiche, and Wapatox Dams; to determine spring chinook salmon migration rates between Yakima River Basin dams, prespawning behavior, temporal distribution, and habitat utilization; to identify spawning distribution and timing of spring chinook salmon; to determine the amount and cause of prespawning mortality of spring chinook salmon; and to evaluate adult fish-handling procedures for the right-bank, adult-trapping facility at Prosser Dam.

Hockersmith, Eric

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount St Helens,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount St Helens, Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount St Helens, Usa, 1980-1994 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount St Helens, Usa, 1980-1994 Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Fumarole discharges (95-560°C) collected from the dacite dome inside Mount St. Helens crater show temporal changes in their isotopic and chemical compositions. A ΔD vs. Δ18O plot shows that condensed waters from the gases are mixtures of meteoric and magmatic components, but that the apparent magmatic end-member in 1994 was depleted by about 7‰ in ΔD relative to the apparent end-member in 1980. Based on ΔD modeling, approximately 63% of shallow, post-1980 magma has yet to degas.

98

A Reconnaissance Geochemical Study Of La Primavera Geothermal Area,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reconnaissance Geochemical Study Of La Primavera Geothermal Area, Reconnaissance Geochemical Study Of La Primavera Geothermal Area, Jalisco, Mexico Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Reconnaissance Geochemical Study Of La Primavera Geothermal Area, Jalisco, Mexico Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The Sierra La Primavera, a late Pleistocene rhyolitic caldera complex in Jalisco, Mexico, contains fumaroles and large-discharge 65°C hot springs that are associated with faults related to caldera collapse and to later magma insurgence. The nearly-neutral, sodium bicarbonate, hot springs occur at low elevations at the margins of the complex, whereas the water-rich fumaroles are high and central. The Comision Federal de Electricidad de Mexico (CFE) has recently drilled two deep holes at the

99

GEOCHEMICAL MODELING OF F AREA SEEPAGE BASIN COMPOSITION AND VARIABILITY  

SciTech Connect

From the 1950s through 1989, the F Area Seepage Basins at the Savannah River Site (SRS) received low level radioactive wastes resulting from processing nuclear materials. Discharges of process wastes to the F Area Seepage Basins followed by subsequent mixing processes within the basins and eventual infiltration into the subsurface resulted in contamination of the underlying vadose zone and downgradient groundwater. For simulating contaminant behavior and subsurface transport, a quantitative understanding of the interrelated discharge-mixing-infiltration system along with the resulting chemistry of fluids entering the subsurface is needed. An example of this need emerged as the F Area Seepage Basins was selected as a key case study demonstration site for the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Program. This modeling evaluation explored the importance of the wide variability in bulk wastewater chemistry as it propagated through the basins. The results are intended to generally improve and refine the conceptualization of infiltration of chemical wastes from seepage basins receiving variable waste streams and to specifically support the ASCEM case study model for the F Area Seepage Basins. Specific goals of this work included: (1) develop a technically-based 'charge-balanced' nominal source term chemistry for water infiltrating into the subsurface during basin operations, (2) estimate the nature of short term and long term variability in infiltrating water to support scenario development for uncertainty quantification (i.e., UQ analysis), (3) identify key geochemical factors that control overall basin water chemistry and the projected variability/stability, and (4) link wastewater chemistry to the subsurface based on monitoring well data. Results from this study provide data and understanding that can be used in further modeling efforts of the F Area groundwater plume. As identified in this study, key geochemical factors affecting basin chemistry and variability included: (1) the nature or chemistry of the waste streams, (2) the open system of the basins, and (3) duration of discharge of the waste stream types. Mixing models of the archetype waste streams indicated that the overall basin system would likely remain acidic much of the time. Only an extended periods of predominantly alkaline waste discharge (e.g., >70% alkaline waste) would dramatically alter the average pH of wastewater entering the basins. Short term and long term variability were evaluated by performing multiple stepwise modeling runs to calculate the oscillation of bulk chemistry in the basins in response to short term variations in waste stream chemistry. Short term (1/2 month and 1 month) oscillations in the waste stream types only affected the chemistry in Basin 1; little variation was observed in Basin 2 and 3. As the largest basin, Basin 3 is considered the primary source to the groundwater. Modeling showed that the fluctuation in chemistry of the waste streams is not directly representative of the source term to the groundwater (i.e. Basin 3). The sequence of receiving basins and the large volume of water in Basin 3 'smooth' or nullify the short term variability in waste stream composition. As part of this study, a technically-based 'charge-balanced' nominal source term chemistry was developed for Basin 3 for a narrow range of pH (2.7 to 3.4). An example is also provided of how these data could be used to quantify uncertainty over the long term variations in waste stream chemistry and hence, Basin 3 chemistry.

Millings, M.; Denham, M.; Looney, B.

2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

100

Distribution and Geochemical Evolution of Fluoride in Groundwater of Taiyuan Basin, China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrogeochemistry data were utilized to understand origin, distribution, and geochemical evolution of the high-fluoride groundwater in Taiyuan basin, China. In the study area, the spatial distribution of the high fluoride groundwater are strictly controlled ... Keywords: fluoride, geochemical mechanism

Xiangquan Li; Xinwei Hou; Zhichao Zhou; Lingxia Liu

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "telemetry systems geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Crustal melting in the Himalayan orogen : field, geochemical and geochronological studies in the Everest region, Nepal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A combination of field studies and geochemical techniques were used to investigate the timing and processes involved in leucogranite generation in the Everest region of the Himalayan orogen. Geochemical investigations ...

Viskupic, Karen M. (Karen Marie), 1975-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Development of a Seafloor Earthquake Measurement System  

SciTech Connect

A Seafloor Earthquake Measurement System is being developed at Sandia to measure marine sediment response to seismic activity. The system will use an acoustic telemetry system to transmit commands to and collect data from the seafloor package. The seafloor package contains a microprocessor which controls the data collection, data processing, and acoustic telemetry. A one million bit magnetic bubble memory is used for storage of seismic data obtained from a three-axis accelerometer package. The microprocessor continuously compares the incoming data in mass memory and saves the ''best'' data for later readout by the acoustic telemetry system. The seafloor package consists of a ballast emplaced pressure vessel and probe containing the accelerometer. After the probe is inserted into the sediment, the ballast weight is removed and a section of the probe is retracted to mechanically isolate the accelerometers.

Ryerson, D.E.; Reece, E.W.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Merging High Resolution Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys to Reduce  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Merging High Resolution Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys to Reduce Merging High Resolution Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys to Reduce Exploration Risk at Glass Buttes, Oregon Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Merging High Resolution Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys to Reduce Exploration Risk at Glass Buttes, Oregon Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description This program will combine detailed gravity, high resolution aeromagnetic, and LIDAR data, all of which will be combined for structural modeling, with hyperspectral data, which will identify and map specific minerals and mineral assemblages that may point to upflow zones. The collection of these surveys and analyses of the merged data and model will be used to site deeper slim holes. Slim holes will be flow tested to determine whether or not Ormat can move forward with developing this resource. An innovative combination of geophysical and geochemical tools will significantly reduce risk in exploring this area, and the results will help to evaluate the value of these tools independently and in combination when exploring for blind resources where structure, permeability, and temperature are the most pressing questions. The slim holes will allow testing of models and validation of methods, and the surveys within the wellbores will be used to revise the models and site production wells if their drilling is warranted.

104

Synthesis of organic geochemical data from the Eastern Gas Shales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over 2400 core and cuttings samples of Upper Devonian shales from wells in the Appalachian, Illinois, and Michigan Basins have been characterized by organic geochemical methods to provide a basis for accelerating the exploitation of this unconventional, gas-rich resource. This work was part of a program initiated to provide industry with criteria for locating the best areas for future drilling and for the development of stimulation methods that will make recovery of the resource economically attractive. The geochemical assessment shows that the shale, in much of the Appalachian, Illinois, and Michigan Basins is source rock that is capable of generating enormous quantities of gas. In some areas the shales are also capable of generating large quantities of oil as well. The limiting factors preventing these sources from realizing most of their potential are their very low permeabilities and the paucity of potential reservoir rocks. This geochemical data synthesis gives direction to future selection of sites for stimulation research projects in the Appalachian Basin by pinpointing those areas where the greatest volumes of gas are contained in the shale matrix. Another accomplishment of the geochemical data synthesis is a new estimate of the total resource of the Appalachian Basin. The new estimate of 2500 TCF is 25 percent greater than the highest previous estimates. This gives greater incentive to government and industry to continue the search for improved stimulation methods, as well as for improved methods for locating the sites where those improved stimulation methods can be most effectively applied.

Zielinski, R. E.; McIver, R. D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Organic Geochemical and tectonic evolution of the Midcontinent Rift system  

SciTech Connect

The older assemblages stand in contrast with the ca. 1000 Ma old Hunting Formation, Arctic Canada, which contains what may be the oldest evidence for modem algae - red algal fossils that compare closely with members of the extant family Bangiophyceae (Butterfield et al., 1990). Taken together the Nonesuch, Shaler, Hunting and other assemblages support the hypothesis of a major episode of eukaryotic diversification ca. 1000 Ma ago. Prior to this time, eukaryotic primary producers must have been physiologically primitive (and now extinct) algae whose abundance in ecosystems is poorly constrained by analogies with the present oceans. Cyanobacteria were major primary producers in a wide range of marine environments. After 1000 Ma, diversifying red green and chromophyte algae contributed significantly to primary production in all save microbial mat communities in restricted environments. It bears mention that such mat communities remained significant potential sources of buried organic matter until the end of the Proterozoic, necessitating exploration strategies that differ from those commonly employed for younger rocks (Knoll, in press). As in Phanerozoic basins, petroleum exploration in Proterozoic rocks requires tools for stratigraphic correlation. In Neoproterozoic (<1000 Ma) rocks, biostratigraphy is possible, and it is aided significantly by C and Sr isotopic chemostratigraphy. New data from the Shaler Group contribute to the construction of C and Sr isotopic curves for Neoproterozoic time, making possible much improved chronostratigraphy for this time interval. (Asmerom et al., 1991; Hayes et al., ms. in preparation).

Hayes, J.M.; Pratt, L.M. (Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)); Knoll, A.H. (Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Organismal and Evolutionary Biology)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Lattice gas automata for flow and transport in geochemical systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lattice gas automata models are described, which couple solute transport with chemical reactions at mineral surfaces within pore networks. Diffusion in a box calculations are illustrated, which compare directly with Fickian diffusion. Chemical reactions at solid surfaces, including precipitation/dissolution, sorption, and catalytic reaction, can be examined with the model because hydrodynamic transport, solute diffusion and mineral surface processes are all treated explicitly. The simplicity and flexibility of the approach provides the ability to study the interrelationship between fluid flow and chemical reactions in porous materials, at a level of complexity that has not previously been computationally possible.

Janecky, D.R.; Chen, S.; Dawson, S.; Eggert, K.C.; Travis, B.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Lattice gas automata for flow and transport in geochemical systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lattice gas automata models are described, which couple solute transport with chemical reactions at mineral surfaces within pore networks. Diffusion in a box calculations are illustrated, which compare directly with Fickian diffusion. Chemical reactions at solid surfaces, including precipitation/dissolution, sorption, and catalytic reaction, can be examined with the model because hydrodynamic transport, solute diffusion and mineral surface processes are all treated explicitly. The simplicity and flexibility of the approach provides the ability to study the interrelationship between fluid flow and chemical reactions in porous materials, at a level of complexity that has not previously been computationally possible.

Janecky, D.R.; Chen, S.; Dawson, S.; Eggert, K.C.; Travis, B.J.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Spatial And Temporal Geochemical Trends In The Hydrothermal System...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in their drainage basins and where a large fraction of the solute flux follows thaw of ice cover in the spring months. Although the total river HCO3- flux is larger than the flux...

109

Ecological and Geochemical Aspects of Terrestrial Hydrothermal Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Footwall Faulting at Dixie Valley, Nevada. Geothermal2009. Draft Version Dixie Valley Candidate ConservationAgreement. Dixie Valley Working Group. Potter D. , Urquhart

Forrest, Matthew James

110

Geochemical modeling of the Raft River geothermal field | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Geochemical modeling of the Raft River geothermal field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geochemical modeling of the Raft River geothermal field Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The results to date of chemical modeling of the Raft River KGRA are presented. Earlier work indicated a northwest-southeast anomaly in the contours. Modeling techniques applied to more complete data allowed further definition of the anomaly. Models described in this report show the source of various minerals in the geothermal water. There appears to be a regional heat source that gives rise to uniform conductive heat flow in the region, but convective flow is concentrated near the upwelling in the Crook well

111

Version 4.00 of the MINTEQ geochemical code  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The MINTEQ code is a thermodynamic model that can be used to calculate solution equilibria for geochemical applications. Included in the MINTEQ code are formulations for ionic speciation, ion exchange, adsorption, solubility, redox, gas-phase equilibria, and the dissolution of finite amounts of specified solids. Since the initial development of the MINTEQ geochemical code, a number of undocumented versions of the source code and data files have come into use at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). This report documents these changes, describes source code modifications made for the Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) program, and provides comprehensive listings of the data files. A version number of 4.00 has been assigned to the MINTEQ source code and the individual data files described in this report.

Eary, L.E.; Jenne, E.A.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Version 4. 00 of the MINTEQ geochemical code  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The MINTEQ code is a thermodynamic model that can be used to calculate solution equilibria for geochemical applications. Included in the MINTEQ code are formulations for ionic speciation, ion exchange, adsorption, solubility, redox, gas-phase equilibria, and the dissolution of finite amounts of specified solids. Since the initial development of the MINTEQ geochemical code, a number of undocumented versions of the source code and data files have come into use at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). This report documents these changes, describes source code modifications made for the Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) program, and provides comprehensive listings of the data files. A version number of 4.00 has been assigned to the MINTEQ source code and the individual data files described in this report.

Eary, L.E.; Jenne, E.A.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Networked Acoustic Modems for Real-Time Data Telemetry from Distributed Subsurface Instruments in the Coastal Ocean: Application to Array of Bottom-Mounted ADCPs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Through the winter and spring of 2002, networked acoustic modems demonstrated real-time wireless data telemetry from an array of bottom-mounted acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) on the inner continental shelf 20–60 m deep off of Montauk ...

Daniel L. Codiga; Joseph A. Rice; Paul A. Baxley; David Hebert

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

TOUGHREACT-A simulation program for non-isothermal multiphase reactive geochemical transport in variably saturated geologic media: Applications to geothermal injectivity and CO2 geological sequestration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TOUGHREACT is a numerical simulation program for chemically reactive non-isothermal flows of multiphase fluids in porous and fractured media. The program was written in Fortran 77 and developed by introducing reactive geochemistry into the multiphase ... Keywords: CO2 geologic sequestration, Clay swelling, Geochemical transport, Hydrothermal systems, Injectivity enhancement, Mineral scaling, Mineral trapping, Reactive fluid flow, Saline aquifer, TOUGHREACT

Tianfu Xu; Eric Sonnenthal; Nicolas Spycher; Karsten Pruess

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Geochemical Implications of CO2 Leakage Associated with Geologic Storage: A Review  

SciTech Connect

Leakage from deep storage reservoirs is a major risk factor associated with geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2). Different scientific theories exist concerning the potential implications of such leakage for near-surface environments. The authors of this report reviewed the current literature on how CO2 leakage (from storage reservoirs) would likely impact the geochemistry of near surface environments such as potable water aquifers and the vadose zone. Experimental and modeling studies highlighted the potential for both beneficial (e.g., CO2 re sequestration or contaminant immobilization) and deleterious (e.g., contaminant mobilization) consequences of CO2 intrusion in these systems. Current knowledge gaps, including the role of CO2-induced changes in redox conditions, the influence of CO2 influx rate, gas composition, organic matter content and microorganisms are discussed in terms of their potential influence on pertinent geochemical processes and the potential for beneficial or deleterious outcomes. Geochemical modeling was used to systematically highlight why closing these knowledge gaps are pivotal. A framework for studying and assessing consequences associated with each factor is also presented in Section 5.6.

Harvey, Omar R.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Brown, Christopher F.

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

116

Workshop on hydrologic and geochemical monitoring in the Long Valley Caldera: proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A workshop reviewed the results of hydrologic and geochemical monitoring in the Long Valley caldera. Such monitoring is being done to detect changes in the hydrothermal system induced by ongoing magmatic and tectonic processes. Workshop participants discussed the need to instrument sites for continuous measurements of several parameters and to obtain additional hydrologic and chemical information from intermediate and deep drill holes. In addition to seismic and deformation monitoring, programs are currently in progress to monitor changes in the discharge characteristics of hot springs, fumaroles, and soil gases, as well as pressures and temperatures in wells. Some hydrochemical parameters are measured continuously, others are measured monthly or at longer intervals. This report summarizes the information presented at the hydrologic monitoring workshop, following the workshop agenda which was divided into four sessions: (1) overview of the hydrothermal system; (2) monitoring springs, fumaroles, and wells; (3) monitoring gas emissions; and (4) conclusions and recommendations.

Sorey, M.L.; Farrar, C.D.; Wollenberg, H.A.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

A geochemical model of the Kilauea east rift zone | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A geochemical model of the Kilauea east rift zone A geochemical model of the Kilauea east rift zone Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A geochemical model of the Kilauea east rift zone Abstract N/A Author Donald Thomas Published Journal US Geological Survey Professional Paper 1350, 1987 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for A geochemical model of the Kilauea east rift zone Citation Donald Thomas. 1987. A geochemical model of the Kilauea east rift zone. US Geological Survey Professional Paper 1350. (!) . Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=A_geochemical_model_of_the_Kilauea_east_rift_zone&oldid=682589" Categories: Missing Required Information References Uncited References Geothermal References

118

The application of PHREEQCi, a geochemical computer program, to aid in the management of a wastewater treatment wetland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the past decade, constructed wetlands have become popular for treating coal-generated acid mine drainage and leachate from coal-ash disposal areas. The goal of the wetland manager is to design a system in which the pH is neutralized, toxic metals are removed, and wetland discharge meets or exceeds discharge standards for water quality. This is typically accomplished by using a combination of wetlands, ponds, and limestone drains. The treatment capability of a constructed wetland is based on relationships among dissolved oxygen (DO), pH, and metal speciation. The aim of this research was to determine if PHREEQCi, a geochemical computer program, could be used in wetland management and design. The wetland site chosen for this study was at a Texas Municipal Power Agency (TMPA) plant located in Grimes County, Texas and was created to treat leachate from a solid waste disposal area where coal ash and SO? scrubber sludge was deposited. The leachate contains significant concentrations of sulfate, chloride, total dissolved solids (TDS), arsenic, and selenium. Using PHREEQCi, geochemical speciation models were created to study the interrelationships between critical chemical components at the TMPA site in order to establish an optimum set of conditions to improve treatment capability and to avoid wetland failure. The results of the geochemical speciation modeling indicated a challenging situation for a wetland manager because different species precipitate under contrasting environments. In order to apply the geochemical speciation results to the design of the TMPA site, two conditions must be recognized. First, metal removal is best accomplished by generating alkaline and oxidative conditions to promote metal-oxide precipitation. Second, sulfate can be controlled under reducing environments where it is converted to sulfide and metal sulfides precipitate. Chlorides are very soluble and no viable conclusions as to the most appropriate removal method could be postulated. TDS has an ambiguous composition and could not be modeled using PHREEQCi.

Mitzman, Stephanie

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Assessment of Barotrauma Resulting from Rapid Decompression of Depth Acclimated Juvenile Chinook Salmon Bearing Radio Telemetry Transmitters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A multifactor study was conducted by Battelle for the US Army Corps of Engineers to assess the significance of the presence of a radio telemetry transmitter on the effects of rapid decompression from simulated hydro turbine passage on depth acclimated juvenile run-of-the-river Chinook salmon. Study factors were: (1) juvenile chinook salmon age;, subyearling or yearling, (2) radio transmitter present or absent, (3) three transmitter implantation factors: gastric, surgical, and no transmitter, and (4) four acclimation depth factors: 1, 10, 20, and 40 foot submergence equivalent absolute pressure, for a total of 48 unique treatments. Exposed fish were examined for changes in behavior, presence or absence of barotrauma injuries, and immediate or delayed mortality. Logistic models were used to test hypotheses that addressed study objectives. The presence of a radio transmitter was found to significantly increase the risk of barotrauma injury and mortality at exposure to rapid decompression. Gastric implantation was found to present a higher risk than surgical implantation. Fish were exposed within 48 hours of transmitter implantation so surgical incisions were not completely healed. The difference in results obtained for gastric and surgical implantation methods may be the result of study design and the results may have been different if tested fish had completely healed surgical wounds. However, the test did simulate the typical surgical-release time frame for in-river telemetry studies of fish survival so the results are probably representative for fish passing through a turbine shortly following release into the river. The finding of a significant difference in response to rapid decompression between fish bearing radio transmitters and those not implies a bias may exist in estimates of turbine passage survival obtained using radio telemetry. However, the rapid decompression (simulated turbine passage) conditions used for the study represented near worst case exposure for fish passing through turbines. At this time, insufficient data exist about the distribution of river-run fish entering turbines, and particularly, the distribution of fish passing through turbine runners, to extrapolate study findings to the population of fish passing through FCRPS turbines. This study is the first study examining rapid decompression study to include acclimation depth as an experimental factor for physostomous fish. We found that fish acclimated to deeper depth were significantly more vulnerable to barotrauma injury and death. Insufficient information about the distribution of fish entering turbines and their depth acclimation currently exists to extrapolate these findings to the population of fish passing through turbines. However, the risk of barotrauma for turbine-passed fish could be particularly high for subyearling Chinook salmon that migrate downstream at deeper depths late in the early summer portion of the outmigration. Barotrauma injuries led to immediate mortality delayed mortality and potential mortality due to increased susceptibility to predation resulting from loss of equilibrium or swim bladder rupture.

Brown, Richard S.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Welch, Abigail E.; Stephenson, John R.; Abernethy, Cary S.; McKinstry, Craig A.; Theriault, Marie-Helene

2007-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

120

Stream sediment detailed geochemical survey for Date Creek Basin, Arizona  

SciTech Connect

Results of the Date Creek Basin detailed geochemical survey are reported. Field and laboratory data are reported for 239 stream sediment samples. Statistical and areal distributions of uranium and possible uranium-related variables are displayed. A generalized geologic map of the area is provided, and pertinent geologic factors which may be of significance in evaluating the potential for uranium mineralization are briefly discussed. Based on stream sediment geochemical data, significant concentrations of uranium are restricted to the Anderson Mine area. The 84th percentile concentrations of U-FL, U-NT, and U-FL/U-NT combined with low thorium/U-NT values reflect increased mobility and enrichment of uranium in the carbonate host rocks of that area. Elements characteristically associated with the uranium mineralization include lithium and arsenic. No well defined diffusion halos suggesting outliers of similar uranium mineralization were observed from the stream sediment data in other areas of the Date Creek Basin. Significant concentrations of U-FL or U-NT found outside the mine area are generally coincident with low U-FL/U-NT values and high concentrations of zirconium, titanium, and phosphorus. This suggests that the uranium is related to a resistate mineral assemblage derived from surrounding crystalline igneous and metamorphic rocks.

Butz, T.R.; Tieman, D.J.; Grimes, J.G.; Bard, C.S.; Helgerson, R.N.; Pritz, P.M.

1980-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "telemetry systems geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Modules based on the geochemical model PHREEQC for use in scripting and programming languages  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The geochemical model PHREEQC is capable of simulating a wide range of equilibrium reactions between water and minerals, ion exchangers, surface complexes, solid solutions, and gases. It also has a general kinetic formulation that allows modeling of ... Keywords: C, C++, COM, Component object model, Fortran, Geochemical modeling, PHREEQC, Reactive-transport modeling

Scott R. Charlton; David L. Parkhurst

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

A terrestrial animal-borne video system for large mammals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Animal-borne video and environmental data collection systems (AVEDs) are integrated sensor systems that collect video from the animal's perspective and combine it with data from other sensors, including audio, location, temperature, acceleration, and ... Keywords: AVED, Telemetry, Video, White-tailed deer, Wildlife

Remington J. Moll; Joshua J. Millspaugh; Jeff Beringer; Joel Sartwell; Zhihai He; Jay A. Eggert; Xiwen Zhao

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Stragegies to Detect Hidden Geothermal Systems Based on Monitoring and Analysis of CO2 in the Near-Surface Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in volcanic and geothermal areas. Appl. Geochem. , 13, 543–1977. Chemistry and Geothermal Systems. Academic Press, Newfor detecting hidden geothermal systems by near-surface gas

Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Holocene deposition in Northwest Providence Channel, Bahamas: a geochemical approach  

SciTech Connect

The origins and depositional history of Holocene sediment in Northwest Providence Channel, Bahamas (NWPC) have been determined using geochemical measurements coupled with textural data, petrographic examination, and scanning electron microscopy. Most of the channel is 200 to 2000 m deep, and nearly 100% of the sediment is calcium carbonate. Shallow water platform sources contribute 75-90% of the Holocene sediment in NWPC. Bank derived sand is most abundant near the platforms (nearly 100%) and is concentrically distributed around a central area of abundant non-platform sand. Bank-derived mud (<62 ..mu..m) accounts for more than 80% of the mud fraction in NWPC. The coarse silt (62-16 ..mu..m), fine silt (16-4 ..mu..m) and clay (< 4 ..mu..m) fractions from LLB (Bight of Abaco) are geochemically distinct from the mud fractions of Great Bahama Bank (GBB). Their distributions in NWPC demonstrate that both platforms are significant sediment contributors to NWPC. The observed sediment distribution clearly indicates that significant off bank transport occurs. With regard to sediment transport, no windward or leeward effects are observed in Holocene sediment deposition. Gravity flow processes are not significant to Holocene deposition. 80% of the present sedimentation rate results from the banktop flooding and confirms that 75%-90% of the Holocene sediment is derived from platform sources. The C-14 dated Holocene sediment layer is approximately 50 cm thick, and its transition with the Pleistocene occurs over a vertical interval of less than 20 cm as a result of mixing by benthonic organisms. This Holocene sediment layer should remain intact to permanently record this banktop episode, and should have a different diagenetic future from the underlying stable (calcite-rich) sediment.

Boardman, M.R.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Geochemical exploration for uranium in the Red Desert, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Geochemical exploration techniques for uranium were performed at a known deposit, the ENQ uranium deposit, which is in arkosic sandstones of the Battle Spring Formation in the Red Desert of Wyoming. Regional gross-gamma aerial data did not indicate the most favorable terrain for follow-up surveys, but instead the radionuclide distribution mapped radioactive mudstones. The /sup 234/U//sup 238/U activity ratio and total uranium concentration in ground water were successful downflow indicators of the ENQ deposit. Helium concentration increased downflow in the ground water flowing from the deposit, while Cu, Pb, and Ba decreased. Radon emanometric techniques generally produced data that coincided with the equivalent uranium concentrations at shallow depth. Helium content in soil was interpreted to reflect local lithology and gaseous migration. Multielement geochemical analyses on soils were effective in delineating the general vicinity of the orebody. Factor analysis was used to recognize three lithologic subgroups. Leachable uranium in soils was the best indicator of subsurface mineralization for the entire subregional area. Equivalent uranium, as determined from the gamma-spectral borehole logs, revealed a consistent dispersion pattern within the host sand of the Battle Spring Formation, whereas gross gamma logs could not detect the subtle gradients in radioelement content. Halo models developed to explain the distribution of helium, radon, radioelements, and trace elements demonstrate uranium itself as the most mobile indicator. Radon and helium appear to reflect local generation from radium accumulations. Vertical leakage due to hydraulic flow against an impermeable barrier is interpreted to be the major secondary redistribution process responsible for the measureable surface signals.

Pacer, J.C.; Bramlett, L.; Moll, S.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

REAL-TIME TRACER MONITORING OF RESERVOIR STIMULATION PROCEDURES VIA ELECTRONIC WIRELINE AND TELEMETRY DATA TRANSMISSION  

SciTech Connect

Ongoing Phase 2-3 work comprises the final development and field-testing of two complementary real-time reservoir technologies; a stimulation process and a tracer fracturing diagnostic system. Initial DE-FC26-99FT40129 project work included research, development, and testing of the patented gamma tracer fracturing diagnostic system. This process was field-proven to be technically useful in providing tracer measurement of fracture height while fracturing; however, technical licensing restrictions blocked Realtimezone from fully field-testing this real-time gamma diagnostic system, as originally planned. Said restrictions were encountered during Phase 2 field test work as result of licensing limitations and potential conflicts between service companies participating in project work, as related to their gamma tracer logging tool technology. Phase 3 work principally demonstrated field-testing of Realtimezone (RTZ) and NETL's Downhole-mixed Reservoir Stimulation process. Early on, the simplicity of and success of downhole-mixing was evident from well tests, which were made commercially productive. A downhole-mixed acid stimulation process was tested successfully and is currently commercially used in Canada. The fourth well test was aborted due to well bore conditions, and an alternate test project is scheduled April, 2004. Realtimezone continues to effectuate ongoing patent protection in the United States and foreign markets. In 2002, Realtimezone and the NETL licensed their United States patent to Halliburton Energy Services (HES). Additional licensing arrangements with other industry companies are anticipated in 2004-2005. Ongoing Phase 2 and Phase 3 field-testing continues to confirm applications of both real-time technologies. Technical data transfer to industry is ongoing via Internet tech-transfer and various industry presentations and publications including Society of Petroleum Engineers. These real-time enhanced stimulation procedures should significantly increase future petroleum well recoveries in the United States, onshore and offshore, and in vertical and horizontal wells.

George Scott III

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Acoustic Telemetry Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Survival at John Day Dam, 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents survival, behavioral, and fish passage results for tagged yearling Chinook salmon and juvenile steelhead as part of a survival study conducted at John Day Dam during spring 2011. This study was designed to evaluate the passage and survival of yearling Chinook salmon and juvenile steelhead to assist managers in identifying dam operations for compliance testing as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion and the 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accords. Survival estimates were based on a paired-release survival model.

Weiland, Mark A.; Woodley, Christa M.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Hennen, Matthew J.; Kim, Jin A.; Deng, Zhiqun; Fu, Tao; Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Wagner, Katie A.; Fischer, Eric S.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Batten, G.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Carpenter, Scott M.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Elder, T.; Etherington, D. J.; Johnson, Gary E.; Khan, Fenton; Miracle, Ann L.; Mitchell, T. D.; Prather, K.; Rayamajhi, Bishes; Royer, Ida; Seaburg, Adam; Zimmerman, Shon A.

2013-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

128

Acoustic Telemetry Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Survival at John Day Dam, 2010  

SciTech Connect

This report presents survival, behavioral, and fish passage results for yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon smolts and juvenile steelhead tagged with JSATS acoustic micro-transmitters as part of a survival study conducted at John Day Dam during 2010. This study was designed to evaluate the passage and survival of yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and juvenile steelhead to assist managers in identifying dam operations for compliance testing as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion and the 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accords. Survival estimates were based on a single-release survival estimate model.

Weiland, Mark A.; Woodley, Christa M.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Kim, Jin A.; Deng, Zhiqun; Fu, Tao; Fischer, Eric S.; Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Hennen, Matthew J.; Wagner, Katie A.; Arntzen, Evan V.; Miller, Benjamin L.; Miracle, Ann L.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Royer, Ida M.; Khan, Fenton; Cushing, Aaron W.; Etherington, D. J.; Mitchell, T. D.; Elder, T.; Batton, George; Johnson, Gary E.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

REAL-TIME TRACER MONITORING OF RESERVOIR STIMULATION PROCEDURES VIA ELECTRONIC WIRELINE AND TELEMETRY DATA TRANSMISSION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Finalized Phase 2-3 project work has field-proven two separate real-time reservoir processes that were co-developed via funding by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Both technologies are presently patented in the United States and select foreign markets; a downhole-commingled reservoir stimulation procedure and a real-time tracer-logged fracturing diagnostic system. Phase 2 and early Phase 3 project work included the research, development and well testing of a U.S. patented gamma tracer fracturing diagnostic system. This stimulation logging process was successfully field-demonstrated; real-time tracer measurement of fracture height while fracturing was accomplished and proven technically possible. However, after the initial well tests, there were several licensing issues that developed between service providers that restricted and minimized Realtimezone's (RTZ) ability to field-test the real-time gamma diagnostic system as was originally outlined for this project. Said restrictions were encountered after when one major provider agreed to license their gamma logging tools to another. Both of these companies previously promised contributory support toward Realtimezone's DE-FC26-99FT40129 project work, however, actual support was less than desired when newly-licensed wireline gamma logging tools from one company were converted by the other from electric wireline into slickline, batter-powered ''memory'' tools for post-stimulation logging purposes. Unfortunately, the converted post-fracture measurement memory tools have no applications in experimentally monitoring real-time movement of tracers in the reservoir concurrent with the fracturing treatment. RTZ subsequently worked with other tracer gamma-logging tool companies for basic gamma logging services, but with lessened results due to lack of multiple-isotope detection capability. In addition to real-time logging system development and well testing, final Phase 2 and Phase 3 project work included the development of a real-time reservoir stimulation procedure, which was successfully field-demonstrated and is presently patented in the U.S. and select foreign countries, including Venezuela, Brazil and Canada. Said patents are co-owned by RTZ and the National Energy Technology Lab (NETL). In 2002, Realtimezone and the NETL licensed said patents to Halliburton Energy Services (HES). Additional licensing agreements (LA) are anticipated with other service industry companies in 2005. Final Phase 3 work has led to commercial applications of the real-time reservoir stimulation procedure. Four successfully downhole-mixed well tests were conducted with commercially expected production results. The most recent, fourth field test was a downhole-mixed stimulated well completed in June, 2004, which currently produces 11 BOPD with 90 barrels of water per day. Conducted Phase 2 and Phase 3 field-test work to date has resulted in the fine-tuning of a real-time enhanced stimulation system that will significantly increase future petroleum well recoveries in the United States and foreign petroleum fields, both onshore and offshore, and in vertical and horizontal wells.

George L. Scott III

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Multielement geochemical exploration data for the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale Known Geothermal Resource Area, Beaver and Millard counties, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Multielement geochemical exploration data have been acquired for the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA). This was accomplished by analysis of both whole rock and +3.3 specific gravity concentrate samples from cuttings composites collected from shallow rotary drill holes. Areal distributions are reported for arsenic, mercury, lead and zinc. These are elements indicated by previous studies to be broadly zoned around thermal centers in geothermal systems and thus to be useful for selecting and prioritizing drilling targets. Results from this work suggest that reservoir temperature and/or reservoir to surface permeability, and thus possibly overall potential for a geothermal resource, increase northward beneath the approximately 18 square mile area containing shallow drill holes, possibly to beyond the northern limits of the area. The data provide a basis for development of three principal target models for the geothermal system but do not permit prioritization of these models. It is recommended that geochemical, geological, and temperature gradient surveys be expanded northward from the present survey area to more fully define the area which appears to have the best resource potential and to aid prioritization of the target models.

Bamford, R.W.; Christensen, O.D.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Geochemical data package for the Hanford immobilized low-activity tank waste performance assessment (ILAW PA)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lockheed Martin Hanford Company (LMHC) is designing and assessing the performance of disposal facilities to receive radioactive wastes that are stored in single- and double-shell tanks at the Hanford Site. The preferred method of disposing of the portion that is classified as low-activity waste is to vitrify the liquid/slurry and place the solid product in near-surface, shallow-land burial facilities. The LMHC project to assess the performance of these disposal facilities is the Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Tank Waste (ILAW) Performance Assessment (PA) activity. The goal of this project is to provide a reasonable expectation that the disposal of the waste is protective of the general public, groundwater resources, air resources, surface-water resources, and inadvertent intruders. Achieving this goal will require prediction of contaminant migration from the facilities. This migration is expected to occur primarily via the movement of water through the facilities, and the consequent transport of dissolved contaminants in the porewater of the vadose zone. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory assists LMHC in their performance assessment activities. One of the PNNL tasks is to provide estimates of the geochemical properties of the materials comprising the disposal facility, the disturbed region around the facility, and the physically undisturbed sediments below the facility (including the vadose zone sediments and the aquifer sediments in the upper unconfined aquifer). The geochemical properties are expressed as parameters that quantify the adsorption of contaminants and the solubility constraints that might apply for those contaminants that may exceed solubility constraints. The common parameters used to quantify adsorption and solubility are the distribution coefficient (K{sub d}) and the thermodynamic solubility product (K{sub sp}), respectively. In this data package, the authors approximate the solubility of contaminants using a more simplified construct, called the solution concentration limit, a constant value. In future geochemical data packages, they will determine whether a more rigorous measure of solubility is necessary or warranted based on the dose predictions emanating from the ILAW 2001 PA and reviewers' comments. The K{sub d}s and solution concentration limits for each contaminant are direct inputs to subsurface flow and transport codes used to predict the performance of the ILAW system. In addition to the best-estimate K{sub d}s, a reasonable conservative value and a range are provided. They assume that K{sub d} values are log normally distributed over the cited ranges. Currently, they do not give estimates for the range in solubility limits or their uncertainty. However, they supply different values for both the K{sub d}s and solution concentration limits for different spatial zones in the ILAW system and supply time-varying K{sub d}s for the concrete zone, should the final repository design include concrete vaults or cement amendments to buffer the system pH.

DI Kaplan; RJ Serne

2000-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

132

Geochemical Data on Waters, Gases, Scales, and Rocks from the Dixie Valley  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geochemical Data on Waters, Gases, Scales, and Rocks from the Dixie Valley Geochemical Data on Waters, Gases, Scales, and Rocks from the Dixie Valley Region, Nevada (1996-1999) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geochemical Data on Waters, Gases, Scales, and Rocks from the Dixie Valley Region, Nevada (1996-1999) Abstract This report tabulates an extensive geochemical database on waters, gases, scales,rocks, and hot-spring deposits from the Dixie Valley region, Nevada. The samples fromwhich the data were obtained were collected and analyzed during 1996 to 1999. Thesedata provide useful information for ongoing and future investigations on geothermalenergy, volcanism, ore deposits, environmental issues, and groundwater quality in thisregion. Authors Los Alamos National Laboratory and NM Published

133

Geochemical heterogeneity in the Hawaiian plume : constraints from Hawaiian volcanoes and Emperor seamounts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The 6000-km long, age-progressive linear Hawaii-Emperor Chain is one of the best defined hotspot tracks. This hotspot track plays an important role in the plume hypothesis. In this research, geochemical data on the ...

Huang, Shichun

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Migratory patterns of American shad (Alosa sapidissima) revealed by natural geochemical tags in otoliths  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geochemical signatures in the otoliths of diadromous fishes may allow for retrospective analyses of natal origins. In an assessment of river-specific signatures in American shad (Alosa sapidissima), an anadromous clupeid ...

Walther, Benjamin (Benjamin Dwaine)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

An Experience in Testing an Object-Oriented Satellite Control System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents our experience in testing an object-oriented software: the Telemetry and Telecommand System (TMTC). The TMTC runs along a distributed architecture comprising microcomputers plus a Data Base server inter-connected via LAN under TCP/IP ... Keywords: hierarchical testing approach, object-oriented testing, satellite control system

Ana Maria Ambrosio; Luciana Seda C. Gonçalves; Paulo Eduardo Cardoso

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Geochemical interpretation of Kings Mountain, North Carolina, orientation area  

SciTech Connect

An orientation study has been made of uranium occurrences in the area of Kings Mountain, North Carolina. This is one of the orientation studies of known uranium occurrences that are being conducted in several geologic provinces and under various climatic (weathering) conditions to provide the technical basis for design and interpretation of NURE geochemical reconnaissance programs. The Kings Mountain area was chosen for study primarily because of the reported presence of high-uranium monazite. This 750-mi/sup 2/ area is in the deeply weathered southern Appalachian Piedmont and spans portions of the Inner Piedmont, Kings Mountain, and Charlotte geologic belts. Uranium concentration maps for ground and surface water samples clearly outline the outcrop area of the Cherryville Quartz Monzonite with highs up to 10 ppb uranium near the reported uraninite. Several surface water samples appear to be anomalous because of trace industrial contamination. Uranium concentration maps for -100 to +200 mesh stream sediments indicate the area of monazite abundance. Several samples with >100 ppM uranium content appear to be high in uranium-rich resistate minerals. When the uranium content of sediment samples is ratioed to the sum of Hf, Dy, and Th, the anomaly pattern shifts to coincide with uranium highs in ground and surface water samples. False anomalies from concentrations of monazite (Ce,ThPO/sub 4/), xenotime (Y,DyPO/sub 4/), and zircon (Zr,HfSiO/sub 4/) in stream sediment samples can thus be eliminated. Residual anomalies should be related to unusual uranium enrichment of these common minerals or to the presence of an uncommon uranium-rich mineral. Tantalum, beryllium, and tin in stream sediments correspond to high concentrations of uranium in stream and ground water but not to uranium in sediments. In an initial reconnaissance, several media should be sampled, and it is essential to correct uranium in sediments for the sample mineralogy.

Price, V.; Ferguson, R.B.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Origin and geochemical evolution of the Michigan basin brine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical and isotopic data were collected on 126 oil field brine samples and were used to investigate the origin and geochemical evolution of water in 8 geologic formations in the Michigan basin. Two groups of brine are found in the basin, the Na-Ca-Cl brine in the upper Devonian formations, and Ca-Na-Cl brine from the lower Devonian and Silurian aged formations. Water in the upper Devonian Berea, Traverse, and Dundee formations originated from seawater concentrated into halite facies. This brine evolved by halite precipitation, dolomitization, aluminosilicate reactions, and the removal of SO{sub 4} by bacterial action or by CaSO{sub 4} precipitation. The stable isotopic composition (D, O) is thought to represent dilution of evapo-concentrated seawater by meteoric water. Water in the lower Devonian Richfield, Detroit River Group, and Niagara-Salina formations is very saline Ca-Na-Cl brine. Cl/Br suggest it originated from seawater concentrated through the halite and into the MgSO{sub 4} salt facies, with an origin linked to the Silurian and Devonian salt deposits. Dolomitization and halite precipitation increased the Ca/Na, aluminosilicate reactions removed K, and bacterial action or CaSO{sub 4} precipitation removed SO{sub 4} from this brine. Water chemistry in the Ordovician Trenton-Black River formations indicates dilution of evapo-concentrated seawater by fresh or seawater. Possible saline end-members include Ordovician seawater, present-day upper Devonian brine, or Ca-Cl brine from the deeper areas in the basin.

Wilson, T.P.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

A Mineralogical Petrographic And Geochemical Study Of Samples From Wells In  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mineralogical Petrographic And Geochemical Study Of Samples From Wells In Mineralogical Petrographic And Geochemical Study Of Samples From Wells In The Geothermal Field Of Milos Island (Greece) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Mineralogical Petrographic And Geochemical Study Of Samples From Wells In The Geothermal Field Of Milos Island (Greece) Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: This paper presents a study of hydrothermal alteration on Milos island, Greece. Examination of cores and cuttings from the two drill sites, obtained from a depth of about 1100 m in Milos geothermal field, showed that the hydrothermal minerals occurring in the rock include: K-feldspar, albite, chlorite, talc, diopside, epidote, muscovite, tremolite, kaolinite, montmorillonite, alunite, anhydrite, gypsum, calcite, and opaque minerals.

139

An investigation of the effect of pore scale flow on average geochemical reaction rates using direct numerical simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The scale-dependence of geochemical reaction rates hinders their use in continuum scale models intended for the interpretation and prediction of chemical fate and transport in subsurface environments such as those considered for geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. Processes that take place at the pore scale, especially those involving mass transport limitations to reactive surfaces, may contribute to the discrepancy commonly observed between laboratory-determined and continuum-scale or field rates. Here, the dependence of mineral dissolution rates on the pore structure of the porous media is investigated by means of pore scale modeling of flow and multicomponent reactive transport. The pore scale model is comprised of high performance simulation tools and algorithms for incompressible flow and conservative transport combined with a general-purpose multicomponent geochemical reaction code. The model performs direct numerical simulation of reactive transport based on an operator-splitting approach to coupling transport and reactions. The approach is validated with a Poiseuille flow single-pore experiment and verified with an equivalent 1D continuum-scale model of a capillary tube packed with calcite spheres. Using the case of calcite dissolution as an example, the high resolution model is used to demonstrate that non-uniformity in the flow field at the pore scale has the effect of decreasing the overall reactivity of the system, even when systems with identical reactive surface area are considered. The effect becomes more pronounced as the heterogeneity of the reactive grain packing increases, particularly where the flow slows sufficiently such that the solution approaches equilibrium locally and the average rate becomes transport-limited.

Rafa, S. Molins; Trebotich, D.; Steefel, C. I.; Shen, C.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Trace metal speciation in saline waters affected by geothermal brines. [GEOCHEM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A description is given of the chemical equilibrium computer program GEOCHEM, which has been developed to calculate trace element speciation in soil, irrigation, drainage, or Salton Sea waters affected by geothermal brine. GEOCHEM is applied to irrigation water-brine mixtures and to Salton Sea water-brine mixtures in order to compute the chemical speciation of the elements Cd, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, and Zn, along with the oxyanions of As and B. The results suggest that the computer simulation can have an important effect on a program for managing brine spills. Appendices include published papers on related research.

Sposito, G.; Page, A.L.

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "telemetry systems geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Geochemical and hydrodynamic controls on arsenic and trace metal cycling in a seasonally stratified US sub-tropical reservoir  

SciTech Connect

The phase distribution of trace metals and oxyanions was investigated within a South Texas watershed hosting a high density of surface uranium mine pits and tailings. The objectives of the study were to evaluate the potential impact of these old uranium mining sites on the watershed with particular emphasis on spatial and temporal changes in water quality of a reservoir that serves as the major source of freshwater to a population of {approx} 350,000 people in the region. A livestock pond, bordered by uranium mine tailings, was used as a model case-study site to evaluate the cycling of uranium mine-derived oxyanions under changing redox conditions. Although the pond showed seasonal thermal and chemical stratification, geochemical cycling of metals was limited to Co and Pb, which seemed to be mostly associated with redox cycling of Mn mineral phases, and U, which suggested reductive precipitation in the ponds hypolimnion. Uranium levels, however, were too low to support strong inputs from th e tailings into the water column of the pond. The strong relations observed between particulate Cr, Cs, V and Fe suggest that these metals are associated with a stable particulate phase (probably allochthonous aluminosilicates) enriched in unreactive iron. This observation is supported by a parallel relationship in sediments collected across a broad range of sediment depositional processed (and histories) in the basin. Arsenic, though selectively enriched in the ponds water column, remained stable and mostly in solution throughout the depth of the profile and showed no sign of geochemical cycling or interaction with Fe-rich particles. We found no evidence of anthropogenic impacts of U mines beyond the purely local scale. Arsenic does decrease in concentration downstream of uranium mining sites but its presence within the Nueces drainage basin is related to interactions between surface and ground waters with uranium-rich geological formations rather than long-scale transport of contaminants downstream of the U mine pits and tailings. As in Lyssy pond, arsenic (and other oxyanions) in Lake Corpus Christi's water column are not affected by the abundant presence of Fe-rich particles but instead behave conservatively throughout the entire period of study. A quantitative mass balance model, constructed using monthly hydrological data for the reservoir, provides quantitative evidence of seasonal evaporative concentration of as in surface waters demonstrating the predominance of hydrodynamic constraints, over geochemical ones, on the cycling of this metal in selected aquatic systems.

Brandenberger, Jill M.; Louchouarn, Patrick; Herbert, Bruce; Tissot, Philippe

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Geochemical Data Package for the 2005 Hanford Integrated Disposal Facility Performance Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CH2M HILL) is designing and assessing the performance of an integrated disposal facility (IDF) to receive low-level waste (LLW), mixed low-level waste (MLLW), immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW), and failed or decommissioned melters. The CH2M HILL project to assess the performance of this disposal facility is the Hanford IDF Performance Assessment (PA) activity. The goal of the Hanford IDF PA activity is to provide a reasonable expectation that the disposal of the waste is protective of the general public, groundwater resources, air resources, surface-water resources, and inadvertent intruders. Achieving this goal will require prediction of contaminant migration from the facilities. This migration is expected to occur primarily via the movement of water through the facilities, and the consequent transport of dissolved contaminants in the vadose zone to groundwater where contaminants may be re-introduced to receptors via drinking water wells or mixing in the Columbia River. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) assists CH2M HILL in their performance assessment activities. One of the PNNL tasks is to provide estimates of the geochemical properties of the materials comprising the IDF, the disturbed region around the facility, and the physically undisturbed sediments below the facility (including the vadose zone sediments and the aquifer sediments in the upper unconfined aquifer). The geochemical properties are expressed as parameters that quantify the adsorption of contaminants and the solubility constraints that might apply for those contaminants that may exceed solubility constraints. The common parameters used to quantify adsorption and solubility are the distribution coefficient (Kd) and the thermodynamic solubility product (Ksp), respectively. In this data package, we approximate the solubility of contaminants using a more simplified construct, called the solution concentration limit, a constant value. The Kd values and solution concentration limits for each contaminant are direct inputs to subsurface flow and transport codes used to predict the performance of the IDF system. In addition to the best-estimate Kd values, a reasonable conservative value and a range are provided. The data package does not list estimates for the range in solubility limits or their uncertainty. However, the data package does provide different values for both the Kd values and solution concentration limits for different spatial zones in the IDF system and does supply time-varying Kd values for the cement solidified waste. The Kd values and solution concentration limits presented for each contaminant were previously presented in a report prepared by Kaplan and Serne (2000) for the 2001 ILAW PA, and have been updated to include applicable data from investigations completed since the issuance of that report and improvements in our understanding of the geochemistry specific to Hanford. A discussion is also included of the evolution of the Kd values recommended from the original 1999 ILAW PA through the 2001 ILAW and 2003 Supplement PAs to the current values to be used for the 2005 IDF PA for the key contaminants of concern: Cr(VI), nitrate, 129I, 79Se, 99Tc, and U(VI). This discussion provides the rationale for why certain Kd have changed with time.

Krupka, Kenneth M.; Serne, R JEFFREY.; Kaplan, D I.

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

143

TOUGHREACT User's Guide: A Simulation Program for Non-isothermal Multiphase Reactive geochemical Transport in Variable Saturated Geologic Media  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Coupled modeling of subsurface multiphase fluid and heat flow, solute transport and chemical reactions can be used for the assessment of mineral alteration in hydrothermal systems, waste disposal sites, acid mine drainage remediation, contaminant transport, and groundwater quality. A comprehensive non-isothermal multi-component reactive fluid flow and geochemical transport simulator, TOUGHREACT, has been developed. A wide range of subsurface thermo-physical-chemical processes is considered under various thermohydrological and geochemical conditions of pressure, temperature, water saturation, and ionic strength. The program can be applied to one-, two- or three-dimensional porous and fractured media with physical and chemical heterogeneity. The model can accommodate any number of chemical species present in liquid, gas and solid phases. A variety of equilibrium chemical reactions are considered, such as aqueous complexation, gas dissolution/exsolution, and cation exchange. Mineral dissolution/precipitation can proceed either subject to local equilibrium or kinetic conditions. Changes in porosity and permeability due to mineral dissolution and precipitation can be considered. Linear adsorption and decay can be included. For the purpose of future extensions, surface complexation by double layer model is coded in the program. Xu and Pruess (1998) developed a first version of a non-isothermal reactive geochemical transport model, TOUGHREACT, by introducing reactive geochemistry into the framework of the existing multi-phase fluid and heat flow code TOUGH2 (Pruess, 1991). Xu, Pruess, and their colleagues have applied the program to a variety of problems such as: (1) supergene copper enrichment (Xu et al, 2001), (2) caprock mineral alteration in a hydrothermal system (Xu and Pruess, 2001a), and (3) mineral trapping for CO{sub 2} disposal in deep saline aquifers (Xu et al, 2003b and 2004a). For modeling the coupled thermal, hydrological, and chemical processes during heater tests at proposed nuclear waste disposal site at Yucca Mountain (Nevada), Sonnenthal and Spycher (2000) and Spycher et al. (2003) enhanced TOUGHREACT on (1) high temperature geochemistry, (2) mineral reactive surface area calculations, and (3) porosity and permeability changes due to mineral alteration. On the other hand, Pruess et al. (1999) updated the TOUGH2 simulator to TOUGH2 V2. The present version of TOUGHREACT was developed by introducing the work of Sonnenthal and Spycher (2000) to the original work of Xu and Pruess (1998), and by replacing TOUGH2 (Pruess, 1991) by TOUGH2 V2 (Pruess et al, 1999). The TOUGHREACT program makes use of ''self-documenting'' features. It is distributed with a number of input data files for sample problems. Besides providing benchmarks for proper code installation, these can serve as self-teaching tutorial in the use of TOUGHREACT, and they provide templates to help jump-start new applications. The fluid and heat flow part of TOUGHREACT is derived from TOUGH2 V2, so in addition to the current manual, users must have manual of the TOUGH2 V2 (Pruess et al., 1999). The present version of TOUGHREACT provides the following different TOUGH2 fluid property or ''EOS'' (equation-of-state) modules: (1) EOS1 for water, or two waters with typical applications to hydrothermal problems, (2) EOS2 for multiphase mixtures of water and CO{sub 2} also with typical applications to hydrothermal problems, (3) EOS3 for multiphase mixtures of water and air with typical applications to vadose zone and nuclear waste disposal problems, (4) EOS4 that has the same capabilities as EOS3 but with vapor pressure lowering effects due to capillary pressure, (5) EOS9 for single phase water (Richards. equation) with typical applications to ambient reactive geochemical transport problems, (6) ECO2 for multiphase mixtures of water, CO{sub 2} and NaCl with typical applications to CO{sub 2} disposal in deep brine aquifers.

Xu, Tianfu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Spycher, Nicolas; Pruess, Karsten

2004-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

144

Chemie der Erde 65 (2005) 4778 Geochemical and isotopic characteristics and evolution of the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemie der Erde 65 (2005) 47­78 Geochemical and isotopic characteristics and evolution) and Pichowiak (1994). ARTICLE IN PRESS W. Kramer et al. / Chemie der Erde 65 (2005) 47­7848 #12;These east (Oficina Viz Fm.) on a wide front to the west (Caleta Ligate Fm.). W. Kramer et al. / Chemie der

Siebel, Wolfgang

145

Modeling of concentrated aqueous solutions: Efficient implementation of Pitzer equations in geochemical and reactive transport models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modeling concentrated solutions demands the use of ion-interaction models such as Pitzer equations, which involve a large number of operations. Implementation of these models in large reactive transport simulations significantly increases the computation ... Keywords: Concentrated solutions, Evaporation of seawater, Geochemical modeling, HMW model, Invariant points, Object-oriented programming, Pitzer, Reactive transport modeling

S. A. Bea; J. Carrera; C. Ayora; F. Batlle

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Geochemical Implications of Gas Leakage Associated with Geologic CO2 Storage - A Qualitative Review  

SciTech Connect

Leakage from deep storage reservoirs is considered the major risk factor associated with geologic sequestration of CO2. Different schools of thought exist concerning the potential implications of such leakage for near-surface environments. We reviewed the current literature on how CO2 leakage (from storage reservoirs) would likely impact the geochemistry of overlying potable aquifers. Results from experimental and modeling studies point to the potential for both beneficial (e.g. contaminant immobilization) and deleterious (e.g. contaminant mobilization) consequences of CO2 intrusion into potable groundwater. However, there are significant discrepancies between studies particularly concerning, what contaminants are of concern and the geochemical processes involved. These discrepancies reflected the lack of a consensus on CO2-induced changes in subsurface geochemical processes and subsequent effects on groundwater chemistry. The development of consistent experimental protocols and the identification of pertinent factors driving CO2-induced geochemical changes in the subsurface were identified as key research needs. Geochemical modeling was used to systematically highlight why a standardization of experimental protocols and the consideration of experimental factors such as gas leakage rates, redox status and the influence of co-transported gases are pertinent. The role of analog studies, reactions occurring in the vadose zone, and the influence of organic contaminants are also discussed.

Harvey, Omar R.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Lee, Gie Hyeon; Amonette, James E.; Brown, Christopher F.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Geochemical constraints on the Palaeocene^ Miocene evolution of eastern Azerbaijan, with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geochemical constraints on the Palaeocene^ Miocene evolution of eastern AzerbaijanEarth and Environmental Sciences, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington,TX, USA zAzerbaijan NationalAcademy of Sciences Geology Institute ^ 29 A. H. Javid Pr., Baku, Azerbaijan ABSTRACT Fine-grained Palaeogene

Johnson, Cari

148

Geochemical anomalies in soil and sandstone overlying the Phoenix uranium deposit, Athabasca Basin Natural Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Collaboration Introduction The Wheeler River Property, host of Denison Mine's Phoenix uranium depositCo Mo Ni UU Geochemical anomalies in soil and sandstone overlying the Phoenix uranium deposit is the most efficient analytical method to detect these anomalies. Athabasca Basin Figure 1: Denison Mine

149

Soil geochemical survey over concealed kimberlites in the Attawapiskat area in northern Canada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lengths of 562 m over the Whiskey kimberlite and 740 m over the Yankee kimberlite pipe. B-horizon soil of the kimberlite pipes. Ammonium acetate leach at pH 5 (AA5) dissolves most of these carbonates, and shows geochemical characteristics of kimberlites in com- parison with peridotites, oceanic basalts (MORB

150

Z .Chemical Geology 145 1998 153159 z /Geochemical Earth Reference Model GERM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Z .Chemical Geology 145 1998 153­159 z /Geochemical Earth Reference Model GERM : description on a chemical characterization of the Earth, its major reservoirs, and the fluxes between them. The Z .GERM chemical Z . Z .reservoirs of the present-day Earth, from core to atmosphere; 2 present-day fluxes between

Mcdonough, William F.

151

Paper #194973 GEOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF THE RESERVOIR HOSTING SHALE-GAS AND OIL in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Paper #194973 GEOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF THE RESERVOIR HOSTING SHALE-GAS AND OIL a reservoir for shale-gas and oil. We examined organic-rich black shale, known as Macasty shale, of Upper SHALE-GAS AND OIL in THE SUBSURFACE OF ANTICOSTI ISLAND, CANADA Key Words: Provenance, Anticosti Island

152

Oak Ridge Geochemical Reconnaissance Program. [For National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge reconnaissance program is responsible for the geochemical survey in a 12-state area covering Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, North Dakota, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, Iowa, Indiana, and Illinois as part of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program. The program concept is outlined and the planning and organization of the program is discussed. (JSR)

Arendt, J.W.

1977-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Soil Iodine Determination in Deccan Syneclise, India: Implications for Near Surface Geochemical Hydrocarbon Prospecting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The association of iodine with organic matter in sedimentary basins is well documented. High iodine concentration in soils overlying oil and gas fields and areas with hydrocarbon microseepage has been observed and used as a geochemical exploratory tool for hydrocarbons in a few studies. In this study, we measure iodine concentration in soil samples collected from parts of Deccan Syneclise in the west central India to investigate its potential application as a geochemical indicator for hydrocarbons. The Deccan Syneclise consists of rifted depositional sites with Gondwana-Mesozoic sediments up to 3.5 km concealed under the Deccan Traps and is considered prospective for hydrocarbons. The concentration of iodine in soil samples is determined using ICP-MS and the values range between 1.1 and 19.3 ppm. High iodine values are characteristic of the northern part of the sampled region. The total organic carbon (TOC) content of the soil samples range between 0.1 and 1.3%. The TOC correlates poorly with the soil iodine (r{sup 2} propane-oxidizing bacterial populations in the soil. The integration of geochemical observations show the occurrence of elevated values in the northern part of the study area, which is also coincident with the presence of exposed dyke swarms that probably serve as conduits for hydrocarbon microseepage. The corroboration of iodine with existing geological, geophysical, and geochemical data suggests its efficacy as one of the potential tool in surface geochemical exploration of hydrocarbons. Our study supports Deccan Syneclise to be promising in terms of its hydrocarbon prospects.

Mani, Devleena, E-mail: devleenatiwari@ngri.res.in [National Geophysical Research Institute (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research) (India); Kumar, T. Satish [Oil India Limited (India); Rasheed, M. A.; Patil, D. J.; Dayal, A. M.; Rao, T. Gnaneshwar; Balaram, V. [National Geophysical Research Institute (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research) (India)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

154

Progress in evaluation of radionuclide geochemical information developed by DOE high-level nuclear waste repository site projects: report for January-March 1985. Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geochemical information relevant to the retention of radionuclides by the Hanford Site (in basalt) and the Yucca Mountain site (in tuff), candidate high-level nuclear waste geologic repositories being developed by US Department of Energy (DOE) projects, is being evaluated by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Our evaluation of the sorption of technetium by basalt/groundwater systems was essentially completed this quarter and the results summarized; we conclude that the experimental methodology and results reported by the DOE for the Hanford Site have not conclusively established that significant retardation of technetium migration may be provided by phases present in the basalts of the Hanford Site. We have shown that sodium boltwoodite is the saturating uranium solid phase in two basalt/groundwater systems. Because thermodynamic data are not available for sodium boltwoodite, calculated solubilities for uranium are erroneous in these systems. Results of radionuclide solubility/speciation calculations, published by the DOE for the Yucca Mountain site, were evaluated this quarter under our geochemical modeling task. We express concerns relative to the inherent limitations of such calculations. Samples of Yucca Mountain tuff and J-13 well water were received for use in our planned radionuclide sorption/solubility experiments. These Yucca Mountain materials will be used to evaluate radionuclide sorption and apparent concentration limit values published by the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) project. 40 refs., 5 figs., 16 tabs.

Kelmers, A.D.; Seeley, F.G.; Arnold, W.D.; Blencoe, J.G.; Meyer, R.E.; Jacobs, G.K.; Whatley, S.K.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Geologic and Geochemical Evaluation of the Potential for CO2...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

suitability for this project. Gasses cannot be used as inputs to the system, preventing simulation of injection of CO 2 and pressure is fixed at 1 atm. However, its...

156

Multielement geochemistry of solid materials in geothermal systems and its applications. Part 1. Hot-water system at the Roosevelt Hot Springs KGRA, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geochemical studies of the geothermal system at Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah, have led to development of chemical criteria for recognition of major features of the system and to a three-dimensional model for chemical zoning in the system. Based on this improved level of understanding several new or modified geochemical exploration and assessment techniques have been defined and are probably broadly applicable to evaluation of hot-water geothermal systems. The main purpose of this work was the development or adaptation of solids geochemical exploration techniques for use in the geothermal environment. (MHR)

Bamford, R.W.; Christensen, O.D.; Capuano, R.M.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Geochemical Aspects of the Carbonation of Magnesium Silicates in an Aqueous Medium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GEOCHEMICAL ASPECTS OF THE CARBONATION OF MAGNESIUM GEOCHEMICAL ASPECTS OF THE CARBONATION OF MAGNESIUM SILICATES IN AN AQUEOUS MEDIUM George D. Guthrie, Jr. (gguthrie@lanl.gov 505-665-6340) J. William Carey (bcarey@lanl.gov 505-667-5540) Deborah Bergfeld (debberrg@lanl.gov 505-667-1812) Darrin Byler (dbyler@lanl.gov 505-665-9562) Steve Chipera (chipera@lanl.gov 505-667-1110) Hans-Joachim Ziock (ziock@lanl.gov 505-667-7265) Hydrology, Geochemistry, & Geology Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, NM 87545 Klaus Lackner (ksl@lanl.gov 505-667-5694) Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM and Columbia University, New York, NY KEYWORDS: CO 2 sequestration, magnesium silicate, mineral carbonation INTRODUCTION The volume of carbon dioxide associated with the use of fossil fuels to produce

158

Origin of geochemical heterogeneity in the mantle : constraints from volcanism associated with Hawaiian and Kerguelen mantle plumes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lavas derived from long-lived mantle plumes provide important information of mantle compositions and the processes that created the geochemical heterogeneity within the mantle. Kerguelen and Hawaii are two long-lived mantle ...

Xu, Guangping

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Evaluation of selected geochemical anomalies in Colorado and the Southeastern US. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This study demonstrates the utility of HSSR geochemical data from stream sediment in exploration for uranium. In the southeastern US, four uraniferous occurrences and associated radiometric anomalies were identified in areas where uranium mineralization has not been previously reported. At two localities, assays of about .01% have been obtained from saprolite. There is some evidence which suggests that uranium may have been leached at these localities and that higher grades of U are likely at depth.

Carpenter, R H

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Thermodynamic Data for Geochemical Modeling of Carbonate Reactions Associated with CO2 Sequestration – Literature Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Permanent storage of anthropogenic CO2 in deep geologic formations is being considered as a means to reduce the concentration of atmospheric CO2 and thus its contribution to global climate change. To ensure safe and effective geologic sequestration, numerous studies have been completed of the extent to which the CO2 migrates within geologic formations and what physical and geochemical changes occur in these formations when CO2 is injected. Sophisticated, computerized reservoir simulations are used as part of field site and laboratory CO2 sequestration studies. These simulations use coupled multiphase flow-reactive chemical transport models and/or standalone (i.e., no coupled fluid transport) geochemical models to calculate gas solubility, aqueous complexation, reduction/oxidation (redox), and/or mineral solubility reactions related to CO2 injection and sequestration. Thermodynamic data are critical inputs to modeling geochemical processes. The adequacy of thermodynamic data for carbonate compounds has been identified as an important data requirement for the successful application of these geochemical reaction models to CO2 sequestration. A review of thermodynamic data for CO2 gas and carbonate aqueous species and minerals present in published data compilations and databases used in geochemical reaction models was therefore completed. Published studies that describe mineralogical analyses from CO2 sequestration field and natural analogue sites and laboratory studies were also reviewed to identify specific carbonate minerals that are important to CO2 sequestration reactions and therefore require thermodynamic data. The results of the literature review indicated that an extensive thermodynamic database exists for CO2 and CH4 gases, carbonate aqueous species, and carbonate minerals. Values of ?fG298° and/or log Kr,298° are available for essentially all of these compounds. However, log Kr,T° or heat capacity values at temperatures above 298 K exist for less than approximately one-third of these compounds. Because the temperatures of host formations that will be used for CO2 injection and sequestration will be at tempera¬tures in the range of 50şC to 100şC or greater, the lack of high temperature thermodynamic values for key carbonate compounds especially minerals, will impact the accuracy of some modeling calculations.

Krupka, Kenneth M.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; McGrail, B. Peter

2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "telemetry systems geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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161

Geochemical Data Package for Performance Assessment Calculations Related to the Savannah River Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site disposes of certain types of radioactive waste within subsurface-engineered facilities. One of the tools used to establish the capacity of a given site to safely store radioactive waste (i.e., that a site does not exceed its Waste Acceptance Criteria) is the Performance Assessment (PA). The objective of this document is to provide the geochemical values for the PA calculations. This work is being conducted as part of the on-going maintenance program that permits the PA to periodically update existing calculations when new data becomes available. Because application of values without full understanding of their original purpose may lead to misuse, this document also provides the geochemical conceptual model, approach used for selecting the values, the justification for selecting data, and the assumptions made to assure that the conceptual and numerical geochemical models are reasonably conservative (i.e., reflect conditions that will tend to predict the maximum risk to the hypothetical recipient). The geochemical parameters describe transport processes for 38 elements (>90 radioisotopes) potentially occurring within eight disposal units (Slit Trenches, Engineered Trenches, Low Activity Waste (LAW) Vault, Intermediate Level (ILV) Vaults, TRU-Pad-1, Naval Reactor Waste Pads, Components-in-Grout Trenches, and Saltstone Facility). This work builds upon well-documented work from previous PA calculations (McDowell-Boyer et al. 2000). The new geochemical concepts introduced in this data package are: (1) In the past, solubility products were used only in a few conditions (element existing in a specific environmental setting). This has been expanded to >100 conditions. (2) Radionuclide chemistry in cementitious environments is described through the use of both the Kd and apparent solubility concentration limit. Furthermore, the solid phase is assumed to age during the assessment period (thousands of years), resulting in three main types of controlling solid phases, each possessing a unique set of radionuclide sorption parameters (Kd and solubility concentration limit). (3) A large amount of recent site-specific sorption research has been conducted since the last PA (McDowell-Boyer et al. 2000). These new data have replaced previous Kd values derived from literature values, thus reducing uncertainty and improving accuracy. Finally, because this document will be used by future PA calculations and external acceptance of the document will eventually be required, this document was extensively reviewed. The review process, including the internal review, site review, and external review process is described.

Kaplan, D

2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

162

GEOTECHNICAL/GEOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF ADVANCED COAL PROCESS WASTE STREAMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thirteen solid wastes, six coals and one unreacted sorbent produced from seven advanced coal utilization processes were characterized for task three of this project. The advanced processes from which samples were obtained included a gas-reburning sorbent injection process, a pressurized fluidized-bed coal combustion process, a coal-reburning process, a SO{sub x}, NO{sub x}, RO{sub x}, BOX process, an advanced flue desulfurization process, and an advanced coal cleaning process. The waste samples ranged from coarse materials, such as bottom ashes and spent bed materials, to fine materials such as fly ashes and cyclone ashes. Based on the results of the waste characterizations, an analysis of appropriate waste management practices for the advanced process wastes was done. The analysis indicated that using conventional waste management technology should be possible for disposal of all the advanced process wastes studied for task three. However, some wastes did possess properties that could present special problems for conventional waste management systems. Several task three wastes were self-hardening materials and one was self-heating. Self-hardening is caused by cementitious and pozzolanic reactions that occur when water is added to the waste. All of the self-hardening wastes setup slowly (in a matter of hours or days rather than minutes). Thus these wastes can still be handled with conventional management systems if care is taken not to allow them to setup in storage bins or transport vehicles. Waste self-heating is caused by the exothermic hydration of lime when the waste is mixed with conditioning water. If enough lime is present, the temperature of the waste will rise until steam is produced. It is recommended that self-heating wastes be conditioned in a controlled manner so that the heat will be safely dissipated before the material is transported to an ultimate disposal site. Waste utilization is important because an advanced process waste will not require ultimate disposal when it is put to use. Each task three waste was evaluated for utilization potential based on its physical properties, bulk chemical composition, and mineral composition. Only one of the thirteen materials studied might be suitable for use as a pozzolanic concrete additive. However, many wastes appeared to be suitable for other high-volume uses such as blasting grit, fine aggregate for asphalt concrete, road deicer, structural fill material, soil stabilization additives, waste stabilization additives, landfill cover material, and pavement base course construction.

Edwin S. Olson; Charles J. Moretti

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Data for the geochemical investigation of UMTRAP designated site at Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the geochemical data and the methods of data collection from the former tailings site at Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico. Data are from a one-time sampling of waters and solid material from the background, the area adjacent to the site, and the site. Selected solid samples are water extracted to remove easily soluble salts and acid extracted to remove carbonates and hydroxides. The waters, extracts, and solid samples were analyzed for selected major and trace elements. 3 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Markos, G.; Bush, K.J.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

TACK: a program coupling chemical kinetics with a two-dimensional transport model in geochemical systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Transport And Chemical Kinetics (TACK) program has been designed to make predictions of the chemistry in the vicinity of a planned repository for nuclear waste, i.e. SFL 3-5, where SFL is the Swedish abbreviation for "Swedish repository for long-lived ... Keywords: coupled, diffusion, dispersion, reaction, transport, two-dimensional

Göran Källvenius; Christian Ekberg

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Using toughreact to model reactive fluid flow and geochemical transport in hydrothermal systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

multiphase flow, solute transport and reactive chemistry in porousmultiphase fluid flow, mass transport and chemical reactions, (2) reactive fluid flow and transport in fractured rocks as well as porous

Xu, Tianfu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Spycher, Nicolas; Pruess, Karsten

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Organic Geochemical and tectonic evolution of the Midcontinent Rift system. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The older assemblages stand in contrast with the ca. 1000 Ma old Hunting Formation, Arctic Canada, which contains what may be the oldest evidence for modem algae - red algal fossils that compare closely with members of the extant family Bangiophyceae (Butterfield et al., 1990). Taken together the Nonesuch, Shaler, Hunting and other assemblages support the hypothesis of a major episode of eukaryotic diversification ca. 1000 Ma ago. Prior to this time, eukaryotic primary producers must have been physiologically primitive (and now extinct) algae whose abundance in ecosystems is poorly constrained by analogies with the present oceans. Cyanobacteria were major primary producers in a wide range of marine environments. After 1000 Ma, diversifying red green and chromophyte algae contributed significantly to primary production in all save microbial mat communities in restricted environments. It bears mention that such mat communities remained significant potential sources of buried organic matter until the end of the Proterozoic, necessitating exploration strategies that differ from those commonly employed for younger rocks (Knoll, in press). As in Phanerozoic basins, petroleum exploration in Proterozoic rocks requires tools for stratigraphic correlation. In Neoproterozoic (<1000 Ma) rocks, biostratigraphy is possible, and it is aided significantly by C and Sr isotopic chemostratigraphy. New data from the Shaler Group contribute to the construction of C and Sr isotopic curves for Neoproterozoic time, making possible much improved chronostratigraphy for this time interval. (Asmerom et al., 1991; Hayes et al., ms. in preparation).

Hayes, J.M.; Pratt, L.M. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Knoll, A.H. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Organismal and Evolutionary Biology

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

167

Laboratory and field-based investigations of subsurface geochemical processes in seafloor hydrothermal systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents the results of four discrete investigations into processes governing the organic and inorganic chemical composition of seafloor hydrothermal fluids in a variety of geologic settings. Though Chapters 2 ...

Reeves, Eoghan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Trace metal speciation in saline waters affected by geothermal brines. Final technical report. [GEOCHEM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The computer program GEOCHEM was developed and applied to calculate the speciation of trace elements, such as Li, B, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Pb, and As, in mixtures of geothermal brines with soil waters. A typical speciation calculation involved the simultaneous consideration of about 350 inorganic and organic complexes and about 80 possible solid phases that could form among the macro- and microconstituents in the mixtures. The four geothermal brines chosen for study were from the East Mesa, Heber, and Salton Sea KGRA's. Two examples of East Mesa brine were employed in order to illustrate the effect of brine variability within a given KGRA. The soil waters chosen for study were the Holtville, Rosita, and Vint soil solutions and the Vail 4 drain water. These waters were mixed with the four brines to produce 1%, 5%, and 10% brine combinations. The combinations then were analyzed with the help of GEOCHEM and were interpreted in the context of two proposed general contamination scenarios. The results of the speciation calculations pointed to the great importance, in brine, of sulfide as a precipitating agent for trace metals and of borate as a trace metal-complexing ligand. In general, precipitation and/or exchange adsorption in soil were found to reduce the levels of trace metals well below harmful concentrations. The principal exceptions were Li and B, which did not precipitate and which were at or very hear harmful levels in the soil water-brine mixtures.

Sposito, G.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Up-Scaling Geochemical Reaction Rates for Carbon Dioxide (CO2) in Deep Saline Aquifers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall goal of the project was to bridge the gap between our knowledge of small-scale geochemical reaction rates and reaction rates meaningful for modeling transport at core scales. The working hypothesis was that reaction rates, determined from laboratory measurements based upon reactions typically conducted in well mixed batch reactors using pulverized reactive media may be significantly changed in in situ porous media flow due to rock microstructure heterogeneity. Specifically we hypothesized that, generally, reactive mineral surfaces are not uniformly accessible to reactive fluids due to the random deposition of mineral grains and to the variation in flow rates within a pore network. Expected bulk reaction rates would therefore have to be correctly up-scaled to reflect such heterogeneity. The specific objective was to develop a computational tool that integrates existing measurement capabilities with pore-scale network models of fluid flow and reactive transport. The existing measurement capabilities to be integrated consisted of (a) pore space morphology, (b) rock mineralogy, and (c) geochemical reaction rates. The objective was accomplished by: (1) characterizing sedimentary sandstone rock morphology using X-ray computed microtomography, (2) mapping rock mineralogy using back-scattered electron microscopy (BSE), X-ray dispersive spectroscopy (EDX) and CMT, (3) characterizing pore-accessible reactive mineral surface area, and (4) creating network models to model acidic CO{sub 2} saturated brine injection into the sandstone rock samples.

Lindquist, W Brent

2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

170

Biotelemetry system for Epilepsy Seizure Control  

SciTech Connect

The Biotelemetry System for Epilepsy Seizure Control Project developed and tested an automated telemetry system for use in an epileptic seizure prevention device that precisely controls localized brain temperature. This project was a result of a Department of Energy (DOE) Global Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention (GIPP) grant to the Kansas City Plant (KCP), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to partner with Flint Hills Scientific, LLC, Lawrence, KS and Biophysical Laboratory Ltd (BIOFIL), Sarov, Russia to develop a method to help control epileptic seizures.

Smith, LaCurtise; Bohnert, George W.

2009-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

171

Supporting technology for enhanced recovery, Annex V: evaluate application of recently developed techniques in the areas of drilling, coring, and telemetry. Venezuela-MEM/USA-DOE fossil-energy report V-1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Agreement between the United States and Venezuela was designed to further energy research and development in six areas. This report focuses on Annex V - Drilling, Coring, and Telemetry as supporting technology for enhanced oil recovery projects in the United States and Venezuela. Annex V consists of 18 tasks to perform these three projects. This report completes the work for Annex V. Energy research and development in the area of Enhanced Oil Recovery has as its goal the more efficient and complete production of the third crop of oil. Methods and techniques must be developed to assist in the implementation of EOR projects. Technology development that reduces costs and provides better reservoir information often has a direct impact on the economic viability of EOR projects and Annex V addresses these areas. Each of the three areas covered by Annex V are separate entities and are presented in this report as different sections. Each has its own Abstract. The drilling and coring tests were highly successful but only a limited amount of work was necessary in the Telemetry area because a field test was not feasible.

Williams, C.R.; Lichaa, P.; Van Domselaar, H.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Advanced Telemetry | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

California Zip 92131-2435 Sector Buildings Product San Diego-based provider of energy management software, communication and display solutions for residential and commercial...

173

Electric drill-string telemetry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We design a numerical algorithm for simulation of low-frequency electric-signal transmission through a drill string. This is represented by a transmission line with varying geometrical and electromagnetic properties versus depth, depending on the characteristics ... Keywords: drill string, low frequency, simulation, transmission line, voltage

José M. Carcione; Flavio Poletto

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments;  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments; System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments; Multi-phase Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys in Overt and Subtle Volcanic Systems, Hawaii and Maui Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments; Multi-phase Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys in Overt and Subtle Volcanic Systems, Hawai'i and Maui Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description The project will perform a suite of stepped geophysical and geochemical surveys and syntheses at both a known, active volcanic system at Puna, Hawai'i and a blind geothermal system in Maui, Hawai'i. Established geophysical and geochemical techniques for geothermal exploration including gravity, major cations/anions and gas analysis will be combined with atypical implementations of additional geophysics (aeromagnetics) and geochemistry (CO2 flux, 14C measurements, helium isotopes and imaging spectroscopy). Importantly, the combination of detailed CO2 flux, 14C measurements and helium isotopes will provide the ability to directly map geothermal fluid upflow as expressed at the surface. Advantageously, the similar though active volcanic and hydrothermal systems on the east flanks of Kilauea have historically been the subject of both proposed geophysical surveys and some geochemistry; the Puna Geothermal Field (Puna) (operated by Puna Geothermal Venture [PGV], an Ormat subsidiary) will be used as a standard by which to compare both geophysical and geochemical results.

175

Geological, geochemical, and geophysical survey of the geothermal resources at Hot Springs Bay Valley, Akutan Island, Alaska  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An extensive survey was conducted of the geothermal resource potential of Hot Springs Bay Valley on Akutan Island. A topographic base map was constructed, geologic mapping, geophysical and geochemical surveys were conducted, and the thermal waters and fumarolic gases were analyzed for major and minor element species and stable isotope composition. (ACR)

Motyka, R.J.; Wescott, E.M.; Turner, D.L.; Swanson, S.E.; Romick, J.D.; Moorman, M.A.; Poreda, R.J.; Witte, W.; Petzinger, B.; Allely, R.D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Geochemical records in the South China Sea: implications for East Asian summer monsoon evolution over the last 20 Ma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geochemical records in the South China Sea: implications for East Asian summer monsoon evolution past changes in the East Asian summer monsoon over the last 20 Ma using samples from Ocean Drilling and combined review suggests that the long-term evolution of the East Asian summer monsoon is similar

Clift, Peter

177

Geochemical Data on Waters, gases, scales, and rocks from the Dixie Valley Region, Nevada (1996-1999)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report tabulates an extensive geochemical database on waters, gases, scales, rocks, and hot-spring deposits from the Dixie Valley region, Nevada. The samples from which the data were obtained were collected and analyzed during 1996 to 1999. These data provide useful information for ongoing and future investigations on geothermal energy, volcanism, ore deposits, environmental issues, and groundwater quality in this region.

Goff, Fraser; Bergfeld, Deborah; Janik, C.J.; et al

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Geochemical and physical properties of wetland soils at the Savannah River site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS), located in Aiken, Allendale, and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina, is a nuclear production facility operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). To facilitate future human health and ecological risk assessments, treatability studies, remedial investigations, and feasibility studies for its wetland areas, SRS needs a database of background geochemical and physical properties of wetland soils. These data are needed for comparison to data collected from wetland soils that may have been affected by SRS operations. SRS contains 36,000 acres of wetlands and an additional 5,000 acres of bottom land soils subject to flooding. Recent studies of wetland soils near various waste units at SRS show that some wetlands have been impacted by releases of contaminants resulting from SRS operations (WSRC, 1992). Waste waters originating from the operations facilities typically have been discharged into seepage basins located in upland soils, direct discharge of waste water to wetland areas has been minimal. This suggests that impacted wetland areas have been affected indirectly as a result of transport mechanisms such as surface runoff, groundwater seeps, fluvial or sediment transport, and leaching. Looney et al. (1990) conducted a study to characterize the geochemical and physical properties of upland soils and shallow sediments on the SRS. A primary objective of the upland study was to collect the data needed to assess the qualitative and quantitative impacts of SRS operations on the environment. By comparing the upland soils data to data collected from waste units located in similar soils, SRS impacts could be assessed. The data were also intended to aid in selection of remediation alternatives. Because waste units at SRS have historically been located in upland areas, wetland soils were not sampled. (Abstract Truncated)

Dixon, K.L; Rogers, V.A.; Conner, S.P.; Cummings, C.L.; Gladden, J.B.; Weber, J.M.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Hydrogeochemical and stream sediment detailed geochemical survey for Edgemont, South Dakota; Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Results of the Edgemont detailed geochemical survey are reported. Field and laboratory data are presented for 109 groundwater and 419 stream sediment samples. Statistical and areal distributions of uranium and possible uranium-related variables are given. A generalized geologic map of the survey area is provided, and pertinent geologic factors which may be of significance in evaluating the potential for uranium mineralization are briefly discussed. Groundwaters containing greater than or equal to 7.35 ppB uranium are present in scattered clusters throughout the area sampled. Most of these groundwaters are from wells drilled where the Inyan Kara Group is exposed at the surface. The exceptions are a group of samples in the northwestern part of the area sampled and south of the Dewey Terrace. These groundwaters are also produced from the Inyan Kara Group where it is overlain by the Graneros Group and alluvium. The high uranium groundwaters along and to the south of the terrace are characterized by high molybdenum, uranium/specific conductance, and uranium/sulfate values. Many of the groundwaters sampled along the outcrop of the Inyan Kara Group are near uranium mines. Groundwaters have high amounts of uranium and molybdenum. Samples taken downdip are sulfide waters with low values of uranium and high values of arsenic, molybdenum, selenium, and vanadium. Stream sediments containing greater than or equal to 5.50 ppM soluble uranium are concentrated in basins draining the Graneros and Inyan Kara Groups. These values are associated with high values for arsenic, selenium, and vanadium in samples from both groups. Anomalous values for these elements in the Graneros Group may be caused by bentonite beds contained in the rock units. As shown on the geochemical distribution plot, high uranium values that are located in the Inyan Kara Group are almost exclusively draining open-pit uranium mines.

Butz, T.R.; Dean, N.E.; Bard, C.S.; Helgerson, R.N.; Grimes, J.G.; Pritz, P.M.

1980-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

180

Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems through Integrated Geophysical, Geologic and Geochemical Interpretation Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems through Integrated Geophysical, Geologic and Geochemical Interpretation Abstract N/A Author U.S. Department of Energy Published Publisher Not Provided, Date Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems through Integrated Geophysical, Geologic and Geochemical Interpretation Citation U.S. Department of Energy. Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems through Integrated Geophysical, Geologic and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "telemetry systems geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

TOUGHREACT User's Guide: A Simulation Program for Non-isothermal Multiphase Reactive Geochemical Transport in Variably Saturated Geologic Media, V1.2.1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coupled modeling of subsurface multiphase fluid and heat flow, solute transport, and chemical reactions can be applied to many geologic systems and environmental problems, including geothermal systems, diagenetic and weathering processes, subsurface waste disposal, acid mine drainage remediation, contaminant transport, and groundwater quality. TOUGHREACT has been developed as a comprehensive non-isothermal multi-component reactive fluid flow and geochemical transport simulator to investigate these and other problems. A number of subsurface thermo-physical-chemical processes are considered under various thermohydrological and geochemical conditions of pressure, temperature, water saturation, and ionic strength. TOUGHREACT can be applied to one-, two- or three-dimensional porous and fractured media with physical and chemical heterogeneity. The code can accommodate any number of chemical species present in liquid, gas and solid phases. A variety of equilibrium chemical reactions are considered, such as aqueous complexation, gas dissolution/exsolution, and cation exchange. Mineral dissolution/precipitation can take place subject to either local equilibrium or kinetic controls, with coupling to changes in porosity and permeability and capillary pressure in unsaturated systems. Chemical components can also be treated by linear adsorption and radioactive decay. The first version of the non-isothermal reactive geochemical transport code TOUGHREACT was developed (Xu and Pruess, 1998) by introducing reactive geochemistry into the framework of the existing multi-phase fluid and heat flow code TOUGH2 (Pruess, 1991). TOUGHREACT was further enhanced with the addition of (1) treatment of mineral-water-gas reactive-transport under boiling conditions, (2) an improved HKF activity model for aqueous species, (3) gas species diffusion coefficients calculated as a function of pressure, temperature, and molecular properties, (4) mineral reactive surface area formulations for fractured and porous media, and (5) porosity, permeability, and capillary pressure changes owing to mineral precipitation/dissolution (Sonnenthal et al., 1998, 2000, 2001; Spycher et al., 2003a). Subsequently, TOUGH2 V2 was released with additional EOS modules and features (Pruess et al., 1999). The present version of TOUGHREACT includes all of the previous extensions to the original version, along with the replacement of the original TOUGH2 (Pruess, 1991) by TOUGH2 V2 (Pruess et al., 1999). TOUGHREACT has been applied to a wide variety of problems, some of which are included as examples, such as: (1) Supergene copper enrichment (Xu et al., 2001); (2) Mineral alteration in hydrothermal systems (Xu and Pruess, 2001a; Xu et al., 2004b; Dobson et al., 2004); (3) Mineral trapping for CO{sub 2} disposal in deep saline aquifers (Xu et al., 2003b and 2004a); (4) Coupled thermal, hydrological, and chemical processes in boiling unsaturated tuff for the proposed nuclear waste emplacement site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada (Sonnenthal et al., 1998, 2001; Sonnenthal and Spycher, 2000; Spycher et al., 2003a, b; Xu et al., 2001); (5) Modeling of mineral precipitation/dissolution in plug-flow and fracture-flow experiments under boiling conditions (Dobson et al., 2003); (6) Calcite precipitation in the vadose zone as a function of net infiltration (Xu et al., 2003); and (7) Stable isotope fractionation in unsaturated zone pore water and vapor (Singleton et al., 2004). The TOUGHREACT program makes use of 'self-documenting' features. It is distributed with a number of input data files for sample problems. Besides providing benchmarks for proper code installation, these can serve as a self-teaching tutorial in the use of TOUGHREACT, and they provide templates to help jump-start new applications. The fluid and heat flow part of TOUGHREACT is derived from TOUGH2 V2, so in addition to the current manual, users must have the manual of the TOUGH2 V2 (Pruess et al., 1999). The present version of TOUGHREACT provides the following TOUGH2 fluid property or 'EOS' (equation-of-state) modules: (1) EOS1 for

Xu, Tianfu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Spycher, Nicolas; Pruess, Karsten

2008-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

182

Core-based integrated sedimentologic, stratigraphic, and geochemical analysis of the oil shale bearing Green River Formation, Uinta Basin, Utah  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Award No.: DE-FE0001243 DOE Award No.: DE-FE0001243 Topical Report CORE-BASED INTEGRATED SEDIMENTOLOGIC, STRATIGRAPHIC, AND GEOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF THE OIL SHALE BEARING GREEN RIVER FORMATION, UINTA BASIN, UTAH Submitted by: University of Utah Institute for Clean and Secure Energy 155 South 1452 East, Room 380 Salt Lake City, UT 84112 Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory April 2011 Oil & Natural Gas Technology Office of Fossil Energy Core-based integrated sedimentologic, stratigraphic, and geochemical analysis of the oil shale bearing Green River Formation, Uinta Basin, Utah Topical Report Reporting Period: October 31, 2009 through March 31, 2011 Authors: Lauren P. Birgenheier, Energy and Geoscience Insitute, University of Utah

183

Geologic, geophysical, and geochemical aspects of site-specific studies of the geopressured-geothermal energy resource of southern Louisiana. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report consists of four sections dealing with progress in evaluating geologic, geochemical, and geophysical aspects of geopressured-geothermal energy resources in Louisiana. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the individual sections. (ACR)

Pilger, R.H. Jr. (ed.)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Injection and Reservoir Hazard Management: Mechanical Deformation and Geochemical Alteration at the InSalah CO2 Storage Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Injection and Reservoir Hazard Injection and Reservoir Hazard Management: Mechanical Deformation and Geochemical Alteration at the In Salah CO 2 Storage Project Background Safe and permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) in geologic reservoirs is critical to geologic sequestration. The In Salah Project (joint venture of British Petroleum (BP), Sonatrach, and StatoilHydro) has two fundamental goals: (1) 25-30 years of 9 billion cubic feet per year (bcfy) natural gas production from 8 fields in the Algerian

185

Geochemical and physical properties of soils and shallow sediments at the Savannah River Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A program to characterize the geochemical and physical properties of the unimpacted soils and shallow sediments at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has been completed. The maximum, minimum, median, standard deviation, and mean values for metals, radionuclides, inorganic anions, organic compounds, and agricultural indicator parameters are summarized for six soil series that were identified as representative of the 29 soil series at SRS. The soils from unimpacted areas of SRS are typical of soils found in moderately aggressive weathering environments, including the southeastern United States. Appendix 8 organic compounds were detected in all samples. Since these constituents are not generally present in soil, this portion of the investigation was intended to assess possible laboratory artifacts. An additional objective of the SRS Soil Study was to determine if the composition of the split spoon sampler biased chemical analysis of the soils. Twenty-five duplicate samples were analyzed for a number of metals, radiological and agricultural parameters, and organics by two laboratories currently contracted with to analyze samples during waste site characterization. In all cases, the absolute values of the average differences are relatively small compared to the overall variability in the population. 31 refs., 14 figs., 48 tabs.

Looney, B.B.; Eddy, C.A.; Ramdeen, M.; Pickett, J. (Savannah River Lab., Aiken, SC (USA)); Rogers, V. (Soil Conservation Service, Aiken, SC (USA). Savannah River Site Savannah River Lab., Aiken, SC (USA)); Scott, M.T.; Shirley, P.A. (Sirrine Environmental Consultants, Greenville, SC (USA))

1990-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

186

Geochemical Fingerprinting of Coltan Ores by Machine Learning on Uneven Datasets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two modern machine learning techniques, Linear Programming Boosting (LPBoost) and Support Vector Machines (SVMs), are introduced and applied to a geochemical dataset of niobium-tantalum ('coltan') ores from Central Africa to demonstrate how such information may be used to distinguish ore provenance, i.e., place of origin. The compositional data used include uni- and multivariate outliers and elemental distributions are not described by parametric frequency distribution functions. The 'soft margin' techniques of LPBoost and SVMs can be applied to such data. Optimization of their learning parameters results in an average accuracy of up to c. 92%, if spot measurements are assessed to estimate the provenance of ore samples originating from two geographically defined source areas. A parameterized performance measure, together with common methods for its optimization, was evaluated to account for the presence of uneven datasets. Optimization of the classification function threshold improves the performance, as class importance is shifted towards one of those classes. For this dataset, the average performance of the SVMs is significantly better compared to that of LPBoost.

Savu-Krohn, Christian, E-mail: christian.savu-krohn@unileoben.ac.at; Rantitsch, Gerd, E-mail: gerd.rantitsch@unileoben.ac.at [Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Department of Applied Geosciences and Geophysics (Austria); Auer, Peter, E-mail: auer@unileoben.ac.at [Chair for Information Technology, Montanuniversitaet Leoben (Austria); Melcher, Frank, E-mail: frank.melcher@bgr.de; Graupner, Torsten, E-mail: torsten.graupner@bgr.de [Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (Germany)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

187

Changes in Bacterial And Archaeal Community Structure And Functional Diversity Along a Geochemically Variable Soil Profile  

SciTech Connect

Spatial heterogeneity in physical, chemical, and biological properties of soils allows for the proliferation of diverse microbial communities. Factors influencing the structuring of microbial communities, including availability of nutrients and water, pH, and soil texture, can vary considerably with soil depth and within soil aggregates. Here we investigated changes in the microbial and functional communities within soil aggregates obtained along a soil profile spanning the surface, vadose zone, and saturated soil environments. The composition and diversity of microbial communities and specific functional groups involved in key pathways in the geochemical cycling of nitrogen, Fe, and sulfur were characterized using a coupled approach involving cultivation-independent analysis of both 16S rRNA (bacterial and archaeal) and functional genes (amoA and dsrAB) as well as cultivation-based analysis of Fe(III)-reducing organisms. Here we found that the microbial communities and putative ammonia-oxidizing and Fe(III)-reducing communities varied greatly along the soil profile, likely reflecting differences in carbon availability, water content, and pH. In particular, the Crenarchaeota 16S rRNA sequences are largely unique to each horizon, sharing a distribution and diversity similar to those of the putative (amoA-based) ammonia-oxidizing archaeal community. Anaerobic microenvironments within soil aggregates also appear to allow for both anaerobic- and aerobic-based metabolisms, further highlighting the complexity and spatial heterogeneity impacting microbial community structure and metabolic potential within soils.

Hansel, C.M.; Fendorf, S.; Jardine, P.M.; Francis, C.A.

2009-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

188

Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems Through Integrated Geophysical, Geologic and Geochemical Interpretation the Seismic Analysis Component Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems Through Integrated Geophysical, Geologic and Geochemical Interpretation the Seismic Analysis Component Authors Ileana M. Tibuleac, Joe Iovenitti, David von Seggern, Jon Sainsbury, Glenn Biasi and John G. Anderson Conference Stanford Geothermal Conference; Stanford University; 2013 Published PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Eighth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University;, 2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org

189

Geochemical and Isotopic Evaluation of Groundwater Movement in Corrective Action Unit 97: Yucca Flat/Climax Mine, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the results of a comprehensive geochemical evaluation of the groundwater flow system in the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine Corrective Action Unit (CAU). The main objectives of this study are to identify probable pathways for groundwater flow within the study area and to develop constraints on groundwater transit times between selected data collection sites. This work provides an independent means of testing and verifying predictive flow models being developed for this CAU using finite element methods. The Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAU constitutes the largest of six underground test areas on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) specified for remedial action in the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order''. A total of 747 underground nuclear detonations were conducted in this CAU. Approximately 23 percent of these detonations were conducted below or near the water table, resulting in groundwater contamination in the vicinity and possibly downgradient of these underground test locations. Therefore, a rigorous evaluation of the groundwater flow system in this CAU is necessary to assess potential long-term risks to the public water supply at downgradient locations.

Farnham, Irene

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Geochemical engineering design tools for uranium in situ recovery : the HYDROGEOCHEM codes.  

SciTech Connect

Geochemical Engineering Design (GED) is based on applications of the principles and various computer models that describe the biogeochemistry and physics of removal of contaminants from water by adsorption, precipitation and filtration. It can be used to optimize or evaluate the efficiency of all phases of in situ recovery (ISR). The primary tools of GED are reactive transport models; this talk describes the potential application of the HYDROGEOCHEM family of codes to ISR. The codes can describe a complete suite of equilibrium or kinetic aqueous complexation, adsorption-desorption, precipitation-dissolution, redox, and acid-base reactions in variably saturated media with density-dependent fluid flow. Applications to ISR are illustrated with simulations of (1) the effectiveness of a reactive barrier to prevent off-site uranium migration and (2) evaluation of the effect of sorption hysteresis on natural attenuation. In the first example, it can be seen that the apparent effectiveness of the barrier depends on monitoring location and that it changes over time. This is due to changes in pH, saturation of sorption sites, as well as the geometry of the flow field. The second simulation shows how sorption hysteresis leads to observable attenuation of a uranium contamination plume. Different sorption mechanisms including fast (or reversible), slow, and irreversible sorption were simulated. The migration of the dissolved and total uranium plumes for the different cases are compared and the simulations show that when 50-100% of the sites have slow desorption rates, the center of mass of the dissolved uranium plume begins to move upstream. This would correspond to the case in which the plume boundaries begin to shrink as required for demonstration of natural attenuation.

Siegel, Malcolm Dean; Li, Ming-Hsu (National Central University, Jhongli City, Taiwan); Yeh, Gour-Tsyh (University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL)

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Hardware and Software Developments for the Accurate Time-Linked Data Acquisition System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind-energy researchers at Sandia National Laboratories have developed a new, light-weight, modular data acquisition system capable of acquiring long-term, continuous, multi-channel time-series data from operating wind-turbines. New hardware features have been added to this system to make it more flexible and permit programming via telemetry. User-friendly Windows-based software has been developed for programming the hardware and acquiring, storing, analyzing, and archiving the data. This paper briefly reviews the major components of the system, summarizes the recent hardware enhancements and operating experiences, and discusses the features and capabilities of the software programs that have been developed.

BERG,DALE E.; RUMSEY,MARK A.; ZAYAS,JOSE R.

1999-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

192

Geological, geochemical, and operational summary, aurora well, OCS Y-0943-1, Beaufort Sea, Alaska. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Aurora well is located just off the coast of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR). The well was spudded November 2, 1987, in 68 ft of water and plugged and abandoned 286 days later on August 30, 1988, after drilling to a total depth (TD) of 18,325 ft below the Kelly Bushing (RKB). The report presents our interpretations of the geologic and geochemical information collected from the Aurora well. Additionally, a significant section of the report is devoted to the operational aspects of drilling the Aurora well.

Paul, L.E.; Choromanski, D.R.; Turner, R.F.; Flett, T.O.; Paul, L.E.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Geochemical Characterization of Chromate Contamination in the 100 Area Vadose Zone at the Hanford Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The major objectives of the proposed study were to: 1.) determine the leaching characteristics of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] from contaminated sediments collected from 100 Area spill sites; 2.) elucidate possible Cr(VI) mineral and/or chemical associations that may be responsible for Cr(VI) retention in the Hanford Site 100 Areas through the use of i.) macroscopic leaching studies and ii.) microscale characterization of contaminated sediments; and 3.) provide information to construct a conceptual model of Cr(VI) geochemistry in the Hanford 100 Area vadose zone. In addressing these objectives, additional benefits accrued were: (1) a fuller understanding of Cr(VI) entrained in the vadose zone that will that can be utilized in modeling potential Cr(VI) source terms, and (2) accelerating the Columbia River 100 Area corridor cleanup by providing valuable information to develop remedial action based on a fundamental understanding of Cr(VI) vadose zone geochemistry. A series of macroscopic column experiments were conducted with contaminated and uncontaminated sediments to study Cr(VI) desorption patterns in aged and freshly contaminated sediments, evaluate the transport characteristics of dichromate liquid retrieved from old pipelines of the 100 Area; and estimate the effect of strongly reducing liquid on the reduction and transport of Cr(VI). Column experiments used the with the column studies. Cr(VI) is found as ubiquitous coatings on sediment grain surfaces. Small, higher concentration, chromium sites are associated with secondary clay mineral inclusions, with occasional barium chromate minerals, and reduced to Cr(III) in association with iron oxides that are most likely magnetite primary minerals. Within the restricted access domains of sediment matrix, ferrous iron could also diffuse from in situ, high-surface-area minerals to cause the reductive immobilization of chromate. This process may be favored at microscale geochemical zones where ferrous iron could be supplied. Once nucleated, micrometer-scale precipitates are favored as growing locales for further accumulation, causing the formation of discrete zones of Cr(III).

Dresel, P. Evan; Qafoku, Nikolla; McKinley, James P.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Ainsworth, Calvin C.; Liu, Chongxuan; Ilton, Eugene S.; Phillips, J. L.

2008-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

194

Final Report: Molecular Basis for Microbial Adhesion and Geochemical Surface Reactions: A Study Across Scales  

SciTech Connect

Computational chemistry was used to help provide a molecular level description of the interactions of Gram-negative microbial membranes with subsurface materials. The goal is to develop a better understanding of the molecular processes involved in microbial metal binding, microbial attachment to mineral surfaces, and, eventually, oxidation/reduction reactions (electron transfer) that can occur at these surfaces and are mediated by the bacterial exterior surface. The project focused on the interaction of the outer microbial membrane, which is dominated by an exterior lipopolysaccharide (LPS) portion, of Pseudomonas aeruginosa with the mineral goethite and with solvated ions in the environment. This was originally a collaborative project with T.P. Straatsma and B. Lowery of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The University of Alabama effort used electronic structure calculations to predict the molecular behavior of ions in solution and the behavior of the sugars which form a critical part of the LPS. The interactions of the sugars with metal ions are expected to dominate much of the microscopic structure and transport phenomena in the LPS. This work, in combination with the molecular dynamics simulations of Straatsma and the experimental electrochemistry and microscopy measurements of Lowry, both at PNNL, is providing new insights into the detailed molecular behavior of these membranes in geochemical environments. The effort at The University of Alabama has three components: solvation energies and structures of ions in solution, prediction of the acidity of the critical groups in the sugars in the LPS, and binding of metal ions to the sugar anions. An important aspect of the structure of the LPS membrane as well as ion transport in the LPS is the ability of the sugar side groups such as the carboxylic acids and the phosphates to bind positively charged ions. We are studying the acidity of the acidic side groups in order to better understand the ability of these groups to bind metal ions. We need to understand the solvation properties of the metal ions in solution and their ability to bind not only to the sugars but to proteins and to other anions. Our goal is then to be able to predict the ability of the side groups to bind metal ions. One result from the earlier molecular dynamics simulations is the exclusion of water from the inner hydrophobic part of the membrane. We thus need to investigate the binding of the cations in media with different dielectric constants.

Dixon, David Adams [The University of Alabama

2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

195

Geologic, geochemical, and geographic controls on NORM in produced water from Texas oil, gas, and geothermal reservoirs. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Water from Texas oil, gas, and geothermal wells contains natural radioactivity that ranges from several hundred to several thousand Picocuries per liter (pCi/L). This natural radioactivity in produced fluids and the scale that forms in producing and processing equipment can lead to increased concerns for worker safety and additional costs for handling and disposing of water and scale. Naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) in oil and gas operations are mainly caused by concentrations of radium-226 ({sup 226}Ra) and radium-228 ({sup 228}Ra), daughter products of uranium-238 ({sup 238}U) and thorium-232 ({sup 232}Th), respectively, in barite scale. We examined (1) the geographic distribution of high NORM levels in oil-producing and gas-processing equipment, (2) geologic controls on uranium (U), thorium (Th), and radium (Ra) in sedimentary basins and reservoirs, (3) mineralogy of NORM scale, (4) chemical variability and potential to form barite scale in Texas formation waters, (5) Ra activity in Texas formation waters, and (6) geochemical controls on Ra isotopes in formation water and barite scale to explore natural controls on radioactivity. Our approach combined extensive compilations of published data, collection and analyses of new water samples and scale material, and geochemical modeling of scale Precipitation and Ra incorporation in barite.

Fisher, R.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Development and Application of a Paleomagnetic/Geochemical Method for Constraining the Timing of Burial Diagenetic and Fluid  

SciTech Connect

Studies of diagenesis caused by fluid migration or other events are commonly hindered by a lack of temporal control. Our results to date demonstrate that a paleomagnetic/geochemical approach can be used to date fluid migration as well as burial diagenetic events. Our principal working hypothesis is that burial diagenetic processes (e.g., maturation of organic-rich sediments and clay diagenesis) and the migration of fluids can trigger the authigenesis of magnetic mineral phases. The ages of these events can be constrained by comparing chemical remanent magnetizations (CRMs) to independently established Apparent Polar Wander Paths. While geochemical (e.g. stable isotope and organic analyses) and petrographic studies provide important clues for establishing these relationships, the ultimate test of this hypothesis requires the application of independent dating methods to verify the paleomagnetic ages. Towards this end, we have used K-Ar dating of illitization as an alternative method for constraining the ages of magnetic mineral phases in our field areas.

Elmore, Richard D.; Engel, Michael H.

2005-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

197

Microbial community structure of hydrothermal deposits from geochemically different vent fields along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To evaluate the effects of local fluid geochemistry on microbial communities associated with active hydrothermal vent deposits, we examined the archaeal and bacterial communities of 12 samples collected from two very different vent fields: the basalt-hosted Lucky Strike (37 17'N, 32 16.3'W, depth 1600-1750 m) and the ultramafic-hosted Rainbow (36 13'N, 33 54.1'W, depth 2270-2330 m) vent fields along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR). Using multiplexed barcoded pyrosequencing of the variable region 4 (V4) of the 16S rRNA genes, we show statistically significant differences between the archaeal and bacterial communities associated with the different vent fields. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays of the functional gene diagnostic for methanogenesis (mcrA), as well as geochemical modelling to predict pore fluid chemistries within the deposits, support the pyrosequencing observations. Collectively, these results show that the less reduced, hydrogen-poor fluids at Lucky Strike limit colonization by strict anaerobes such as methanogens, and allow for hyperthermophilic microaerophiles, like Aeropyrum. In contrast, the hydrogen-rich reducing vent fluids at the ultramafic-influenced Rainbow vent field support the prevalence of methanogens and other hydrogen-oxidizing thermophiles at this site. These results demonstrate that biogeographical patterns of hydrothermal vent microorganisms are shaped in part by large scale geological and geochemical processes.

Flores, Gilberto E [Portland State University; Campbell, James H [ORNL; Kirshtein, Julie D [United States Geological Survey, Reston, VA; Meneghin, Jennifer [Portland State University; Podar, Mircea [ORNL; Steinberg, Joshua [Oregon Episcopal School, Portland, OR; Seewald, Jeffrey S [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), Woods Hole, MA; Tivey, Margaret Kingston [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), Woods Hole, MA; Voytek, Mary A [United States Geological Survey & National Aeronautics and Space Administration; Reysenbach, Anna-Louise [Portland State University; Yang, Zamin Koo [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Geochemical Characterization of Chromate Contamination in the 100 Area Vadose Zone at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

The major objectives of the proposed study were to: 1.) determine the leaching characteristics of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] from contaminated sediments collected from 100 Area spill sites; 2.) elucidate possible Cr(VI) mineral and/or chemical associations that may be responsible for Cr(VI) retention in the Hanford Site 100 Areas through the use of i.) macroscopic leaching studies and ii.) microscale characterization of contaminated sediments; and 3.) provide information to construct a conceptual model of Cr(VI) geochemistry in the Hanford 100 Area vadose zone. In addressing these objectives, additional benefits accrued were: (1) a fuller understanding of Cr(VI) entrained in the vadose zone that will that can be utilized in modeling potential Cr(VI) source terms, and (2) accelerating the Columbia River 100 Area corridor cleanup by providing valuable information to develop remedial action based on a fundamental understanding of Cr(VI) vadose zone geochemistry. A series of macroscopic column experiments were conducted with contaminated and uncontaminated sediments to study Cr(VI) desorption patterns in aged and freshly contaminated sediments, evaluate the transport characteristics of dichromate liquid retrieved from old pipelines of the 100 Area; and estimate the effect of strongly reducing liquid on the reduction and transport of Cr(VI). Column experiments used the < 2 mm fraction of the sediment samples and simulated Hanford groundwater solution. Periodic stop-flow events were applied to evaluate the change in elemental concentration during time periods of no flow and greater fluid residence time. The results were fit using a two-site, one dimensional reactive transport model. Sediments were characterized for the spatial and mineralogical associations of the contamination using an array of microscale techniques such as XRD, SEM, EDS, XPS, XMP, and XANES. The following are important conclusions and implications. Results from column experiments indicated that most of contaminant Cr travels fast through the sediments and appears as Cr(VI) in the effluents. The significance of this for groundwater concentrations would, however, depend on the mass flux of recharge to the water table. adsorption of Cr(VI) to sediments from spiked Cr(VI) solution is low; calculated retardation coefficients are close to one. Calcium polysulfide solutions readily reduced Cr(VI) to Cr(III) in column experiments. However a significant amount of the Cr(VI) was mobilized ahead of the polysulfide solution front. This has significant implications for in-situ reductive remediation techniques. The experiments suggest that it would be difficult to design a remedial measure using infiltration of liquid phase reductants without increasing transport of Cr(VI) toward the water table. The microscopic characterization results are consistent with the column studies. Cr(VI) is found as ubiquitous coatings on sediment grain surfaces. Small, higher concentration, chromium sites are associated with secondary clay mineral inclusions, with occasional barium chromate minerals, and reduced to Cr(III) in association with iron oxides that are most likely magnetite primary minerals. Within the restricted access domains of sediment matrix, ferrous iron could also diffuse from in situ, high-surface-area minerals to cause the reductive immobilization of chromate. This process may be favored at microscale geochemical zones where ferrous iron could be supplied. Once nucleated, micrometer-scale precipitates are favored as growing locales for further accumulation, causing the formation of discrete zones of Cr(III).

Dresel, P. Evan; Qafoku, Nikolla; McKinley, James P.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Ainsworth, Calvin C.; Liu, Chongxuan; Ilton, Eugene S.; Phillips, J. L.

2008-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

199

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Harlingen Irrigation District Cameron County No. 1 Canal Meters and Telemetry Equipment, Impervious-Lining of Delivery Canals, Pipelines Replacing Delivery Canals, and On-Farm Delivery-Site Meters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for the capital renovation project proposed by Harlingen Irrigation District Cameron County No. 1 to the North American Development Bank (NADBank). Both nominal and real, expected economic and financial costs of water and energy savings are identified throughout the anticipated useful lives for each of the four components of the proposed project (i.e., canal meters and telemetry equipment, impervious-lining of delivery canals, 24" pipelines replacing delivery canals, and on-farm delivery-site meters). Sensitivity results for both the cost of water savings and cost of energy savings are presented for several important parameters. Expected cost of water savings and cost of energy savings for each of the four components are aggregated into a composite set of cost measures for the total proposed project. Aggregate cost of water savings is estimated to be $31.37 per ac-ft and energy savings are measured at an aggregate value of $0.0002253 per BTU (i.e., $0.769 per kwh). In addition, expected values are indicated for the Bureau of Reclamation’s three principal evaluation measures specified in the Public Law 106-576 legislation. The aggregate initial construction cost per ac-ft of water savings measure is $26.87 per ac-ft of water savings. The aggregate initial construction cost per BTU (kwh) of energy savings measure is $0.0001603 per BTU ($0.547 per kwh). The amount of initial construction costs per dollar of total annual economic savings is estimated to be -1.30.

Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.C.; Popp, Michael C.; Ellis, John R.

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

OPUS-97: A Generalized Operational Pipeline System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. OPUS is the platform on which the telemetry pipeline at the Hubble Space Telescope Science Institute is running currently. OPUS was developed both to repair the mistakes of the past, and to build a system which could meet the challenges of the future. The production pipeline inherited at the Space Telescope Science Institute was designed a decade earlier, and made assumptions about the environment which were unsustainable. While OPUS was developed in an environment that required a great deal of attention to throughput, speed, e#ciency, flexibility, robustness and extensibility, it is not just a "big science" machine. The OPUS platform, our baseline product, is a small compact system designed to solve a specific problem in a robust way. The OPUS platform handles communication with the OPUS blackboard; individual processes within this pipeline need have no knowledge of OPUS, of the blackboard, or of the pipeline itself. The OPUS API is an intermediate pipeline product. In addition to t...

J. Rose

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "telemetry systems geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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201

Monitoring CO2 intrusion and associated geochemical transformations in a shallow groundwater system using complex electrical methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dissolution and ion exchange. Both laboratory and field experiments demonstrate the potential of field complex resistivity method

Dafflon, B.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

A 3D partial-equilibrium model to simulate coupled hydrogeological, microbiological, and geochemical processes in subsurface systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of models following either the equilibrium [e.g., Walter et al., 1994; Yeh and Tripathi, 1989; Steefel, vi is the pore water velocity in the i-th direction, f denotes the porosity, qsk is the volumetric flux of water per unit volume of the aquifer (source/sink) and Csk is the concentration of the source

203

Geophysical and geochemical characterization of the groundwater system and the role of Chatham Fault in groundwater movement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

legislature initiated a moratorium on uranium mining in Virginia (Legislative bill number §45.1-283). Marline Fault in groundwater movement at the Coles Hill uranium deposit, Virginia, USA John P. Gannon & Thomas J. Burbey & Robert J. Bodnar & Joseph Aylor Abstract The largest undeveloped uranium deposit in the United

Houser, Paul R.

204

Monitoring CO2 intrusion and associated geochemical transformations in a shallow groundwater system using complex electrical methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

three-dimensional electrical resistivity tomography: Field-Archie, G. E. , The electrical resistivity log as an aid inResults show that electrical resistivity and phase responses

Dafflon, B.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Data Package of Samples Collected for Hydrogeologic and Geochemical Characterization: 300 Area RI/FS Sediment Cores  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a data package for sediment samples received from the 300 FF 5 OU. This report was prepared for CHPRC. Between August 16, 2010 and April 25, 2011 sediment samples were received from 300-FF-5 for geochemical studies. The analyses for this project were performed at the 331 building located in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. The analyses were performed according to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) approved procedures and/or nationally recognized test procedures. The data sets include the sample identification numbers, analytical results, estimated quantification limits (EQL), and quality control data. The preparatory and analytical quality control requirements, calibration requirements, acceptance criteria, and failure actions are defined in the on-line QA plan 'Conducting Analytical Work in Support of Regulatory Programs' (CAW). This QA plan implements the Hanford Analytical Services Quality Assurance Requirements Documents (HASQARD) for PNNL.

Lindberg, Michael J.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Lanigan, David C.; Williams, Benjamin D.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Developing usable and robust mixed reality systems requires unique human–computer interaction techniques and customized hardware systems. The design of the hardware is directed by the requirements of the rich 3D interactions that can be performed using immersive mobile MR systems. Geometry modeling and capture, navigational annotations, visualizations, and training simulations are all enhanced using augmented computer graphics. We present the design guidelines that have led us through 10 years of evolving mobile outdoor MR hardware systems.

Benjamin Avery; Ross T. Smith; Wayne Piekarski; Bruce H. Thomas

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Developing a robust geochemical and reactive transport model to evaluate possible sources of arsenic at the CO2 sequestration natural analog site in Chimayo, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Migration of carbon dioxide (CO2) from deep storage formations into shallow drinking water aquifers is a possible system failure related to geologic CO2 sequestration. A CO2 leak may cause mineral precipitation/ dissolution reactions, changes in aqueous speciation, and alteration of pH and redox conditions leading to potential increases of trace metal concentrations above EPA National Primary Drinking Water Standards. In this study, the Chimayo site (NM) was examined for site-specific impacts of shallow groundwater interacting with CO2 from deep storage formations. Major ion and trace element chemistry for the site have been previously studied. This work focuses on arsenic (As), which is regulated by the EPA under the Safe Drinking Water Act and for which some wells in the Chimayo area have concentrations higher than the maximum contaminant level (MCL). Statistical analysis of the existing Chimayo groundwater data indicates that As is strongly correlated with trace metals U and Pb indicating that their source may be from the same deep subsurface water. Batch experiments and materials characterization, such as: X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and synchrotron micro X-ray fluorescence (#2;-XRF), were used to identify As association with Fe-rich phases, such as clays or oxides, in the Chimayo sediments as the major factor controlling As fate in the subsurface. Batch laboratory experiments with Chimayo sediments and groundwater show that pH decreases as CO2 is introduced into the system and buffered by calcite. The introduction of CO2 causes an immediate increase in As solution concentration, which then decreases over time. A geochemical model was developed to simulate these batch experiments and successfully predicted the pH drop once CO2 was introduced into the experiment. In the model, sorption of As to illite, kaolinite and smectite through surface complexation proved to be the key reactions in simulating the drop in As concentration as a function of time in the batch experiments. Based on modeling, kaolinite precipitation is anticipated to occur during the experiment, which allows for additional sorption sites to form with time resulting in the slow decrease in As concentration. This mechanism can be viewed as trace metal “scavenging” due to sorption caused secondary mineral precipitation. Since deep geologic transport of these trace metals to the shallow subsurface by brine or CO2 intrusion is critical to assessing environmental impacts, the effective retardation of trace metal transport is an important parameter to estimate and it is dependent on multiple coupled reactions. At the field scale, As mobility is retarded due to the influence of sorption reactions, which can affect environmental performance assessment studies of a sequestration site.

Viswanathana, Hari; Daia, Zhenxue; Lopano, Christina; Keating, Elizabeth; Hakala, J. Alexandra; Scheckelc, Kirk G; Zhengd, Liange; Guthrie, George D.; Pawara, Rajesh

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Mercury Geochemical, Groundwater Geochemical, And Radiometric...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

at right angles to known and suspected faults. Scintillometer readings (gamma radiation - total counts second) were also recorded at each soil sample station. At the...

209

Cooperative geochemical investigation of geothermal resources in the Imperial Valley and Yuma areas. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Preliminary studies indicate that the Imperial Valley has a large geothermal potential. In order to delineate additional geothermal systems a chemical and isotopic investigation of samples from water wells, springs, and geothermal wells in the Imperial Valley and Yuma areas was conducted. Na, K, and Ca concentrations of nearly 200 well water, spring water, hot spring, and geothermal fluid samples from the Imperial Valley area were measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Fournier and Truesdell's function was determined for each water sample. Suspected geothermal areas are identified. Hydrogen and oxygen isotope abundances were determined in order to determine and to identify the source of the water in the Mesa geothermal system. (JGB)

Coplen, T.B.

1973-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

An Expert System For The Tectonic Characterization Of Ancient Volcanic  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

System For The Tectonic Characterization Of Ancient Volcanic System For The Tectonic Characterization Of Ancient Volcanic Rocks Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An Expert System For The Tectonic Characterization Of Ancient Volcanic Rocks Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The expert system approach enables geochemical evidence to be integrated with geological, petrological and mineralogical evidence in identifying the eruptive setting of ancient volcanic rocks. This paper explains the development of ESCORT, an Expert System for Characterization of Rock Types. ESCORT uses as its knowledge base a set of dispersion matrices derived from a geochemical data bank of some 8000 immobile element analyses, together with tables of magma-type membership probabilities based

211

Salt effects on stable isotope partitioning and their geochemical implications for geothermal brines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It has long been recognized that dissolved salts in water can change oxygen and hydrogen isotope partitioning between water and other phases (i.e., vapor, minerals) due to the hydration of ions upon the dissolution of salts in water. However, their effects have not been well determined at elevated temperatures. We are currently conducting a series of hydrothermal experiments of the system brine-vapor or minerals to 350{degrees}C, in order to determine precisely the effects of dissolved salts abundant in brines on isotope partitioning at temperatures encountered in geothermal systems. The so-called ``isotope salt effect`` has important implications for the interpretation and modeling of isotopic data of brines and rocks obtained from geothermal fields. We will show how to use our new results of isotopic partitioning to help better evaluate energy resources of many geothermal fields.

Horita, J.; Cole, D.R.; Wesolowski, D.J.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Geochemical Investigation of Pyrite Codisposal with Sluiced Fly Ash and Implications for Selecting Remedial Actions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oxidation of pyrite results in acid generation as well as the release of sulfate, iron, and other metals to solution. When pyritic coal mill rejects are codisposed with coal ash, pyrite oxidation and the subsequent interaction of oxidation products with the ash primarily control leachate quality. The geochemistry of the pyrite/ash system has implications for management and remediation actions at codisposal facilities. Utilities can use the results of this research to make decisions regarding such facilit...

1995-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

213

Development of a Drillrod/Telemetry Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Efficient extraction of deeply buried natural resources is dependent upon accurate geologic models. The model becomes the basis for developing plans for extraction of the resource. Geoscientists working in geothermal and hydrocarbon recovery have a great deal in common with fellow geoscientists working in the mining industry. They appreciate the intractable problem of increasing the depth of investigation to tens of meters from the wellbore. The goal of this project was to develop a borehole radar tool to acquire data within tens of meters from the wellbore. For geothermal and hydrocarbon applications, the tool was to acquire data for mapping fractures surrounding the wellbore. In mining of coal, the radar acquires data for determining coal seam thickness and detecting geologic anomalies ahead of mining.

Raton Technology Research, Inc.

1999-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

214

Water information bulletin No. 30: geothermal investigations in Idaho. Part 11. Geological, hydrological, geochemical and geophysical investigations of the Nampa-Caldwell and adjacent areas, southwestern Idaho  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The area under study included approximately 925 sq km (357 sq mi) of the Nampa-Caldwell portion of Canyon County, an area within the central portion of the western Snake River Plain immediately west of Boise, Idaho. Geologic mapping, hydrologic, geochemical, geophysical, including detailed gravity and aeromagnetic surveys, were run to acquire needed data. In addition, existing magnetotelluric and reflection seismic data were purchased and reinterpreted in light of newly acquired data.

Mitchell, J.C. (ed.)

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Geochemical Characterization Data Package for the Vadose Zone in the Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Areas at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

This data package discusses the geochemistry of vadose zone sediments beneath the single-shell tank (SST) farms at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Hanford Site. The purpose of the report is to provide a review of the most recent and relevant geochemical information available for the vadose zone beneath the SST farms and the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF).

Cantrell, Kirk J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Krupka, Kenneth M.

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

216

Final Report: Improved Site Characterization And Storage Prediction Through Stochastic Inversion Of Time-Lapse Geophysical And Geochemical Data  

SciTech Connect

During the last months of this project, our project activities have concentrated on four areas: (1) performing a stochastic inversion of pattern 16 seismic data to deduce reservoir bulk/shear moduli and density; the need for this inversion was not anticipated in the original scope of work, (2) performing a stochastic inversion of pattern 16 seismic data to deduce reservoir porosity and permeability, (3) complete the software needed to perform geochemical inversions and (4) use the software to perform stochastic inversion of aqueous chemistry data to deduce mineral volume fractions. This report builds on work described in progress reports previously submitted (Ramirez et al., 2009, 2010, 2011 - reports fulfilled the requirements of deliverables D1-D4) and fulfills deliverable D5: Field-based single-pattern simulations work product. The main challenge with our stochastic inversion approach is its large computational expense, even for single reservoir patterns. We dedicated a significant level of effort to improve computational efficiency but inversions involving multiple patterns were still intractable by project's end. As a result, we were unable to fulfill Deliverable D6: Field-based multi-pattern simulations work product.

Ramirez, A; Mcnab, W; Hao, Y; White, D; Johnson, J

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

217

Injection and Reservoir Hazard Management: The Role of Injection-Induced Mechanical Deformation and Geochemical Alteration at In Salah CO2 Storage Project: Status ReportQuarter end, June 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The In Salah Gas Project (ISG), a joint venture (JV) of BP, Sonatrach, and StatoilHydro, has two fundamental goals: (1) 25-30 years of 9 bcfy natural gas production from 8 fields in the Algerian Central Sahara, and (2) successful minimization of the associated environmental footprint by capture and subsurface isolation of the excess CO{sub 2} extracted from production streams and subsurface isolation in the Krechba sandstone reservoir. The In Salah project provides an opportunity to study key physical and chemical processes in operational deployment of geological carbon sequestration. The objectives of the research are to study two components relevant to storage effectiveness and operational success at In Salah: Reactive chemistry of the brine-CO{sub 2}-reservoir-caprock-wellbore system, and the geomechanical effects of large-scale injection on crustal deformation and fault leakage hazards. Results from this work will enhance predictive capability of field performance, provide a new basis for interpretation of geophysical monitoring at In Salah, and provide additional information relevant to the creation of geological sequestration standards. The Joint Industry Partners (JIP: BP, StatoilHydro, Sonatrach) and LLNL will share data and results to achieve the objectives of the proposed work. The objective of the work performed at LLNL is to integrate LLNL core strengths in geochemistry and geomechanics to better understand and predict the fate of injected CO{sub 2} in the field. The mechanical, chemical and transport properties of the reservoir-caprock system are coupled. We are using LLNL-developed quantitative tools to assess the potential for CO{sub 2} migration/leakage caused by injection-induced deformation. The geomechanical work is focused upon fault activation, fluid induced fracturing of the caprock and permeability field evolution of the fractured reservoir. These results will be used in concert with reactive transport calculations to predict the ultimate fate of the CO{sub 2}. We will integrate laboratory and reactive transport modeling to assess CO{sub 2} plume migration and partitioning between different trapping mechanisms. Geochemical reactive transport modeling will be used to address multiphase flow (supercritical CO{sub 2} and water), CO{sub 2} dissolution, mineral sequestration, and porosity/permeability changes. The reactive transport portion of the work ultimately couples with geomechanical modeling. In particular, the distribution of the pressure perturbation induced by injection drives the geomechanical response. Subsequently, the geochemical work determines if water-rock interactions eventually enhance or suppress fractures. A key focus of this work is to establish the site specific interactions of geomechanics, reactive flow and transport. This involves building and refining models of the reservoir and overburden. The models will undergo continual refinement in response to data collected in the field and experiments performed at LLNL and elsewhere. This project commenced in FY08, with DOE funding starting in April, FY08. We have successfully initiated a cross-disciplinary study of the In Salah CO{sub 2} sequestration project and have met all FY08 and FY09 Q1, Q2 and Q3 milestones. During the reporting period, we continued to acquire and process data from the JIP to import into our own geomechanical and geochemical computational tools. The lab testing program continued using both locally formulated cements and field samples from Krechba. The geomechanical studies indicate that pore fluid pressures induced by injection will lead to significant permeability enhancement of the combination of fracture network and fault network within the reservoir in the vicinity of the injectors. We continued reactive transport calculations for CO{sub 2} rich fluids flowing through fractures. These calculations demonstrate that although porosity and permeability changes are expected in response to CO{sub 2} injection they are not anticipated to have a significant effect upon transport properties within the reservoir or c

Morris, J P; McNab, W W; Carroll, S K; Hao, Y; Foxall, W; Wagoner, J L

2009-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

218

Hydrothermal system in Southern Grass Valley, Pershing County, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Southern Grass Valley is a fairly typical extensional basin in the Basin and Range province. Leach Hot Springs, in the southern part of the valley, represents the discharge end of an active hydrothermal flow system with an estimated deep aquifer temperature of 163 to 176/sup 0/C. Results of geologic, hydrologic, geophysical and geochemical investigations are discussed in an attempt to construct an internally consistent model of the system.

Welch, A.H.; Sorey, M.L.; Olmsted, F.H.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Progress Report, December 2010: Improved Site Characterization And Storage Prediction Through Stochastic Inversion Of Time-Lapse Geophysical And Geochemical Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the last project six months, our project activities have concentrated on three areas: (1) performing a stochastic inversion of pattern 16 seismic data to deduce reservoir permeability, (2) development of the geochemical inversion strategy and implementation of associated software, and (3) completing the software implementation of TProGS and the geostatistical analysis that provides the information needed when using the software to produce realizations of the Midale reservoir. The report partially the following deliverables: D2: Model development: MCMC tool (synthetic fluid chemistry data); deliverable completed. D4: Model development/verification: MCMC tool (TProGS, field seismic/chemistry data) work product; deliverable requirements partially fulfilled. D5: Field-based single-pattern simulations work product; deliverable requirements partially fulfilled. When completed, our completed stochastic inversion tool will explicitly integrate reactive transport modeling, facies-based geostatistical methods, and a novel stochastic inversion technique to optimize agreement between observed and predicted storage performance. Such optimization will be accomplished through stepwise refinement of: (1) the reservoir model - principally its permeability magnitude and heterogeneity - and (2) geochemical parameters - primarily key mineral volume fractions and kinetic data. We anticipate that these refinements will facilitate significantly improved history matching and forward modeling of CO{sub 2} storage. Our tool uses the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methodology. Deliverable D1, previously submitted as a report titled ''Development of a Stochastic Inversion Tool To Optimize Agreement Between The Observed And Predicted Seismic Response To CO{sub 2} Injection/Migration in the Weyburn-Midale Project'' (Ramirez et al., 2009), described the stochastic inversion approach that will identify reservoir models that optimize agreement between the observed and predicted seismic response. The software that implements this approach has been completed, tested, and used to process seismic data from pattern 16. A previously submitted report titled ''Model verification: synthetic single pattern simulations using seismic reflection data'', Ramirez et al. 2010, partially fulfilled deliverable D3 by summarizing verification activities that evaluate the performance of the seismic software and its ability to recover reservoir model permeabilities using synthetic seismic reflection data. A future progress report will similarly describe summarizing verification activities of the geochemical inversion software, thereby completing deliverable D3. This document includes a chapter that shows and discusses permeability models produced by seismic inversion that used seismic data from pattern 16 in Phase 1A. It partially fulfills deliverable D5: Field-based single-pattern simulations work product. The D5 work product is supposed to summarize the results of applying NUFT/MCMC to refine the reservoir model and geochemical parameters by optimizing observation/prediction agreement for the seismic/geochemical response to CO{sub 2} injection/migration within a single pattern of Phase 1A/1B. A future progress report will show inversion results for the same pattern using geochemical data, thereby completing deliverable D5. This document also contains a chapter that fulfills deliverable D2: Model development: MCMC tool (synthetic fluid chemistry data). The chapter will summarize model development activities required to facilitate application of NUFT/MCMC to optimize agreement between the observed and predicted geochemical response to CO{sub 2} injection/migration. Lastly, this document also contains a chapter that partially fulfills deliverable D4: Model development/verification: MCMC tool (TProGS, field seismic/chemistry data) work product. This work product is supposed to summarize model development activities required for (1) application of TProGS to Weyburn, (2) use of TProGS within the MCMC tool, and (3) application of the MCMC tool to address field seismic and g

Ramirez, A; Mcnab, W; Carle, S; Hao, Y; White, D; Johnson, J

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

220

Salt effects on isotope partitioning and their geochemical implications: An overview  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Essential to the use of stable isotopes as natural tracers and geothermometers is the knowledge of equilibrium isotope partitioning between different phases and species, which is usually a function of temperature only. The one exception known to date is oxygen and hydrogen isotope fractionation between liquid water and other phases (steam, gases, minerals), which changes upon the addition of salts to water, i.e., the isotope salt salt effect. Our knowledge of this effect, the difference between activity and composition (a-X) of isotopic water molecules in salt solutions, is very limited and controversial, especially at elevated temperatures. For the last several years, we have been conducting a detailed, systematic experimental study at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to determine the isotope salt effects from room temperature to elevated temperatures (currently to 500{degree}C). From this effort, a simple, coherent picture of the isotope salt effect is emerging, that differs markedly from the complex results reported in the literature. In this communication, we present an overview on the isotope salt effect, obtained chiefly from our study. Observed isotope salt effects in salt solutions are significant even at elevated temperatures. The importance and implications of the isotope salt effect for isotopic studies of brine-dominated systems are also discussed in general terms.

Horita, J.; Cole, D.R.; Fortier, S.M. [and others

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "telemetry systems geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Calculation of equilibria at elevated temperatures using the MINTEQ geochemical code  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Coefficients and equations for calculating mineral hydrolysis constants, solubility products and formation constants for 60 minerals and 57 aqueous species in the 13 component thermodynamic system K/sub 2/O-Na/sub 2/O-CaO-MgO-FeO-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/-SiO/sub 2/-CO/sub 2/-H/sub 2/O-HF-HCl-H/sub 2/S-H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ are presented in a format suitable for inclusion in the MINTEQ computer code. The temperature functions presented for minerals are based on the MINTEQ data base at 25/degree/C and the integration of analytical heat capacity power functions. This approach ensures that the temperature functions join smoothly with the low-temperature data base. A new subroutine, DEBYE, was added to MINTEQ that is used to calculate the theoretical Debye-Hueckel parameters A and B as a function of temperature. In addition, this subroutine also calculates a universal value of the extended Debye-Hueckel parameter, b/sub i/, as a function of temperature. The coefficients and equations provide the capability to use MINTEQ to more accurately calculate water/rock equilibrium for temperatures of up to 250/degree/C, and in dilute, low-sulfate, near neutral groundwaters to 300/degree/C. 52 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

Smith, R.W.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

CORE-BASED INTEGRATED SEDIMENTOLOGIC, STRATIGRAPHIC, AND GEOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF THE OIL SHALE BEARING GREEN RIVER FORMATION, UINTA BASIN, UTAH  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An integrated detailed sedimentologic, stratigraphic, and geochemical study of Utah's Green River Formation has found that Lake Uinta evolved in three phases (1) a freshwater rising lake phase below the Mahogany zone, (2) an anoxic deep lake phase above the base of the Mahogany zone and (3) a hypersaline lake phase within the middle and upper R-8. This long term lake evolution was driven by tectonic basin development and the balance of sediment and water fill with the neighboring basins, as postulated by models developed from the Greater Green River Basin by Carroll and Bohacs (1999). Early Eocene abrupt global-warming events may have had significant control on deposition through the amount of sediment production and deposition rates, such that lean zones below the Mahogany zone record hyperthermal events and rich zones record periods between hyperthermals. This type of climatic control on short-term and long-term lake evolution and deposition has been previously overlooked. This geologic history contains key points relevant to oil shale development and engineering design including: (1) Stratigraphic changes in oil shale quality and composition are systematic and can be related to spatial and temporal changes in the depositional environment and basin dynamics. (2) The inorganic mineral matrix of oil shale units changes significantly from clay mineral/dolomite dominated to calcite above the base of the Mahogany zone. This variation may result in significant differences in pyrolysis products and geomechanical properties relevant to development and should be incorporated into engineering experiments. (3) This study includes a region in the Uinta Basin that would be highly prospective for application of in-situ production techniques. Stratigraphic targets for in-situ recovery techniques should extend above and below the Mahogany zone and include the upper R-6 and lower R-8.

Lauren P. Birgenheier; Michael D. Vanden Berg,

2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

223

Developing a robust geochemical and reactive transport model to evaluate possible sources of arsenic at the CO[subscript 2] sequestration natural analog site in Chimayo, New Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Migration of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from deep storage formations into shallow drinking water aquifers is a possible system failure related to geologic CO{sub 2} sequestration. A CO{sub 2} leak may cause mineral precipitation/dissolution reactions, changes in aqueous speciation, and alteration of pH and redox conditions leading to potential increases of trace metal concentrations above EPA National Primary Drinking Water Standards. In this study, the Chimayo site (NM) was examined for site-specific impacts of shallow groundwater interacting with CO{sub 2} from deep storage formations. Major ion and trace element chemistry for the site have been previously studied. This work focuses on arsenic (As), which is regulated by the EPA under the Safe Drinking Water Act and for which some wells in the Chimayo area have concentrations higher than the maximum contaminant level (MCL). Statistical analysis of the existing Chimayo groundwater data indicates that As is strongly correlated with trace metals U and Pb indicating that their source may be from the same deep subsurface water. Batch experiments and materials characterization, such as: X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and synchrotron micro X-ray fluorescence ({mu}-XRF), were used to identify As association with Fe-rich phases, such as clays or oxides, in the Chimayo sediments as the major factor controlling As fate in the subsurface. Batch laboratory experiments with Chimayo sediments and groundwater show that pH decreases as CO{sub 2} is introduced into the system and buffered by calcite. The introduction of CO{sub 2} causes an immediate increase in As solution concentration, which then decreases over time. A geochemical model was developed to simulate these batch experiments and successfully predicted the pH drop once CO{sub 2} was introduced into the experiment. In the model, sorption of As to illite, kaolinite and smectite through surface complexation proved to be the key reactions in simulating the drop in As concentration as a function of time in the batch experiments. Based on modeling, kaolinite precipitation is anticipated to occur during the experiment, which allows for additional sorption sites to form with time resulting in the slow decrease in As concentration. This mechanism can be viewed as trace metal 'scavenging' due to sorption caused secondary mineral precipitation. Since deep geologic transport of these trace metals to the shallow subsurface by brine or CO{sub 2} intrusion is critical to assessing environmental impacts, the effective retardation of trace metal transport is an important parameter to estimate and it is dependent on multiple coupled reactions. At the field scale, As mobility is retarded due to the influence of sorption reactions, which can affect environmental performance assessment studies of a sequestration site.

Viswanathan, Hari; Dai, Zhenxue; Lopano, Christina; Keating, Elizabeth; Hakala, J. Alexandra; Scheckel, Kirk G.; Zheng, Liange; Gutherie, George D.; Pawar, Rajesh (EPA); (LBNL); (LANL); (NETL)

2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

224

Geochemical Processes Data Package for the Vadose Zone in the Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Areas at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

This data package discusses the geochemistry of vadose zone sediments beneath the single-shell tank farms at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Hanford Site. The purpose of the report is to provide a review of the most recent and relevant geochemical process information available for the vadose zone beneath the single-shell tank farms and the Integrated Disposal Facility. Two companion reports to this one were recently published which discuss the geology of the farms (Reidel and Chamness 2007) and groundwater flow and contamination beneath the farms (Horton 2007).

Cantrell, Kirk J.; Zachara, John M.; Dresel, P. Evan; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

2007-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

225

Geochemical engineering reference manual  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following topics are included in this manual: physical and chemical properties of geothermal brine and steam, scale and solids control, processing spent brine for reinjection, control of noncondensable gas emissions, and goethermal mineral recovery. (MHR)

Owen, L.B.; Michels, D.E.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Inferences On The Hydrothermal System Beneath The Resurgent Dome In Long  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Inferences On The Hydrothermal System Beneath The Resurgent Dome In Long Inferences On The Hydrothermal System Beneath The Resurgent Dome In Long Valley Caldera, East-Central California, Usa, From Recent Pumping Tests And Geochemical Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Inferences On The Hydrothermal System Beneath The Resurgent Dome In Long Valley Caldera, East-Central California, Usa, From Recent Pumping Tests And Geochemical Sampling Details Activities (6) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Quaternary volcanic unrest has provided heat for episodic hydrothermal circulation in the Long Valley caldera, including the present-day hydrothermal system, which has been active over the past 40 kyr. The most recent period of crustal unrest in this region of east-central California began around 1980 and has included periods of

227

Water geochemistry of hydrothermal systems, Wood River District, Idaho  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrothermal systems of the Wood River District, central Idaho, have been studied by geologic mapping of thermal spring areas and geochemical investigations of thermal and non-thermal waters. This report summarizes the new geochemical data gathered during the study. Integration of the results of geological and geochemical studies has led to development of a target model for hydrothermal resources on the margin of the Idaho Batholith. Warfield Hot Springs, with temperatures up to 58/sup 0/C, flow from a major shear zone along the margin of an apophysis of the batholith. Hailey Hot Springs, with temperatures up to 60/sup 0/C, occur in an area of multiple thrust faults and newly recognized, closely spaced normal faults in the Paleozoic Milligen and Wood River Formations, 2.5 km from a highly brecciated batholith contact. Other Wood River district hydrothermal systems also occur along the margins of batholith apophyses or in adjacent highly fractured Paleozoic rocks, where there are indications of batholith rocks at shallow depths (100 to 300 m) in water wells.

Zeisloft, J.; Foley, D.; Blackett, R.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Pre-test geological and geochemical evaluation of the Caprock, St. Peter Sandstone and formation fluids, Yakley Field, Pike County, Illinois  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of these studies is to ensure long-term stable containment of air in the underground reservoirs used in conjunction with compressed air energy storage (CAES) plants. The specific objective is to develop stability criteria and engineering guidelines for designing CAES reservoirs in each of the three major reservoir types, including aquifers, salt cavities, and mined hard rock caverns. This document characterizes the geologic nature of porous media constituents native to the aquifer field test site near Pittsfield, Illinois. The geologic samples were subjected to geochemical evaluations to determine anticipated responses to cyclic air injection, heating and moisture - conditions typical of an operating CAES reservoir. This report documents the procedures used and results obtained from these analyses.

Not Available

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Geothermal investigations in Idaho. Part IV. Isotopic and geochemical analyses of water from the Bruneau-Grand View and Weiser areas, southwest Idaho  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Variations of deuterium and oxygen-18 concentrations in thermal ground waters and local nonthermal springs have been used to aid in describing the source of recharge in the Bruneau-Grand View and Weiser areas, southwest Idaho. Isotope and geochemical data for the Bruneau-Grand View area suggest that recharge to the area may not be entirely from sources within the local surface-drainage area, but possibly from the areas of higher altitude of the Bruneau River drainage to the southeast; or that the hot water that wells and springs are discharging is water that was recharged at a time when the regional climate was much colder than the present climate. Recharge to the Weiser area is probably from areas of higher altitude to the north and northeast of the local drainage area. However, ''local'' precipitation does influence both the chemical and isotopic compositions of the waters in each area.

Rightmire, C.T.; Young, H.W.; Whitehead, R.L.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Elucidating geochemical response of shallow heterogeneous aquifers to CO2 leakage using high-performance computing: Implications for monitoring of CO2 sequestration  

SciTech Connect

Predicting and quantifying impacts of potential carbon dioxide (CO2) leakage into shallow aquifers that overlie geologic CO2 storage formations is an important part of developing reliable carbon storage techniques. Leakage of CO2 through fractures, faults or faulty wellbores can reduce groundwater pH, inducing geochemical reactions that release solutes into the groundwater and pose a risk of degrading groundwater quality. In order to help quantify this risk, predictions of metal concentrations are needed during geologic storage of CO2. Here, we present regional-scale reactive transport simulations, at relatively fine-scale, of CO2 leakage into shallow aquifers run on the PFLOTRAN platform using high-performance computing. Multiple realizations of heterogeneous permeability distributions were generated using standard geostatistical methods. Increased statistical anisotropy of the permeability field resulted in more lateral and vertical spreading of the plume of impacted water, leading to increased Pb2+ (lead) concentrations and lower pH at a well down gradient of the CO2 leak. Pb2+ concentrations were higher in simulations where calcite was the source of Pb2+ compared to galena. The low solubility of galena effectively buffered the Pb2+ concentrations as galena reached saturation under reducing conditions along the flow path. In all cases, Pb2+ concentrations remained below the maximum contaminant level set by the EPA. Results from this study, compared to natural variability observed in aquifers, suggest that bicarbonate (HCO3) concentrations may be a better geochemical indicator of a CO2 leak under the conditions simulated here.

Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis K.; Maxwell, Reed M.; Siirila, Erica R.; Hammond, Glenn E.; Lichtner, Peter C.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

GEOCHEMICAL PHASE DIAGRAMS AND GALE P.H. EDELMAN, S.W. PETERSON, V. REINER, AND J.H. STOUT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ater steam Steam 100 1 Pressure(bar) steam ice Figure 1. The phase diagram for the simple chemical system with phases ice, water, and steam. 1. Introduction A central problem in geochemistry has been illustrates the familiar phase diagram for a simple chemi- cal system that involves three phases (ice, water

Reiner, Victor

232

GEOCHEMICAL PHASE DIAGRAMS AND GALE P.H. EDELMAN, S.W. PETERSON, V. REINER, AND J.H. STOUT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

water steam Steam 100 1 Pressure (bar) steam ice Figure 1. The phase diagram for the simple chemical system with phases ice, water, and steam. 1. Introduction A central problem in geochemistry has been illustrates the familiar phase diagram for a simple chemi­ cal system that involves three phases (ice, water

Reiner, Victor

233

Geochemical tracers of processes affecting the formation of seafloor hydrothermal fluids and deposits in the Manus back-arc basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Systematic differences in trace element compositions (rare earth element (REE), heavy metal, metalloid concentrations) of seafloor vent fluids and related deposits from hydrothermal systems in the Manus back-arc basin ...

Craddock, Paul R

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Raytheon downhole information system. Electromagnetic borehole measurements while drilling system. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A description is given of the Raytheon Downhole Information System (RDIS), a real time electromagnetic borehole measurements while drilling system, applicable to oil, gas, and geothermal drilling. It communicates in both directions through the earth in a single hop at a downlink data rate of 3 bps and uplink rates dependent on depth--typically 6 bits/second at 10,000 ft and 2 bits/second at 15,000 ft; electromagnetic signal transmission time of approximately .1 second. Downhole hardware for communications, sensors, and power are packaged in three 30 ft subs. Downhole hardware can be developed to permit operation in a 275/sup 0/C geothermal environment. A cost analysis is included that predicts RDIS service could be economically priced at approximately $1000/day. Commercial availability depends primarily on proof of capability by demonstration in a working drilling well. The most significant portions of needed hardware are available. A description of a geothermal drilling telemetry system is included in Appendix A.

Kolker, M.; Greene, A.H.; Kasevich, R.S.; Robertson, J.C.; Grossi, M.D.

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Details Activities (5) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Two hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal energy reservoirs have been created by hydraulic fracturing of Precambrian granitic rock between two wells on the west flank of the Valles Caldera in the Jemez Mountains of northern New Mexico. Heat is extracted by injecting water into one well,

236

Drill-hole data, drill-site geology, and geochemical data from the study of Precambrian uraniferous conglomerates of the Medicine Bow Mountains and Sierra Madre of southeastern Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

This volume is presented as a companion to Volume 1: The Geology and Uranium Potential of Precambrian Conglomerates in the Medicine Bow Mountains and Sierra Madre of Southeastern Wyoming; and to Volume 3: Uranium Assessment for Precambrian Pebble Conglomerates in Southeastern Wyoming. Volume 1 summarized the geologic setting and geologic and geochemical characteristics of uranium-bearing conglomerates in Precambrian metasedimentary rocks of southeastern Wyoming. Volume 3 is a geostatistical resource estimate of U and Th in quartz-pebble conglomerates. This volume contains supporting geochemical data, lithologic logs from 48 drill holes in Precambrian rocks of the Medicine Bow Mountains and Sierra Madre, and drill site geologic maps and cross-sections from most of the holes.

Karlstrom, K.E.; Houston, R.S.; Schmidt, T.G.; Inlow, D.; Flurkey, A.J.; Kratochvil, A.L.; Coolidge, C.M.; Sever, C.K.; Quimby, W.F.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Sedimentological, mineralogical and geochemical definition of oil-shale facies in the lower Parachute Creek Member of Green River Formation, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

Sedimentological, mineralogical and geochemical studies of two drill cores penetrating the lower Saline zone of the Parachute Creek Member (middle L-4 oil-shale zone through upper R-2 zone) of the Green River Formation in north-central Piceance Creek basin, Colorado, indicate the presence of two distinct oil-shale facies. The most abundant facies has laminated stratification and frequently occurs in the L-4, L-3 and L-2 oil-shale zones. The second, and subordinate facies, has ''streaked and blebby'' stratification and is most abundant in the R-4, R-3 and R-2 zones. Laminated oil shale originated by slow, regular sedimentation during meromictic phases of ancient Lake Uinta, whereas streaked and blebby oil shale was deposited by episodic, non-channelized turbidity currents. Laminated oil shale has higher contents of nahcolite, dawsonite, quartz, K-feldspar and calcite, but less dolomite/ankerite and albite than streaked and blebby oil shale. Ca-Mg-Fe carbonate minerals in laminated oil shale have more variable compositions than those in streaked and blebby shales. Streaked and blebby oil shale has more kerogen and a greater diversity of kerogen particles than laminated oil shale. Such variations may produce different pyrolysis reactions when each shale type is retorted.

Cole, R.D.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

EQ3NR, a computer program for geochemical aqueous speciation-solubility calculations: Theoretical manual, user`s guide, and related documentation (Version 7.0); Part 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EQ3NR is an aqueous solution speciation-solubility modeling code. It is part of the EQ3/6 software package for geochemical modeling. It computes the thermodynamic state of an aqueous solution by determining the distribution of chemical species, including simple ions, ion pairs, and complexes, using standard state thermodynamic data and various equations which describe the thermodynamic activity coefficients of these species. The input to the code describes the aqueous solution in terms of analytical data, including total (analytical) concentrations of dissolved components and such other parameters as the pH, pHCl, Eh, pe, and oxygen fugacity. The input may also include a desired electrical balancing adjustment and various constraints which impose equilibrium with special pure minerals, solid solution end-member components (of specified mole fractions), and gases (of specified fugacities). The code evaluates the degree of disequilibrium in terms of the saturation index (SI = 1og Q/K) and the thermodynamic affinity (A = {minus}2.303 RT log Q/K) for various reactions, such as mineral dissolution or oxidation-reduction in the aqueous solution itself. Individual values of Eh, pe, oxygen fugacity, and Ah (redox affinity) are computed for aqueous redox couples. Equilibrium fugacities are computed for gas species. The code is highly flexible in dealing with various parameters as either model inputs or outputs. The user can specify modification or substitution of equilibrium constants at run time by using options on the input file.

Wolery, T.J.

1992-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

239

Development of an Experimental Data Base and Theories for Prediction of Thermodynamic Properties of Aqueous Electrolytes and Nonelectrolytes of Geochemical Significance at Supercritical Temperatures and Pressures.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this research was to combine new experimental measurements on heat capacities, volumes, and association constants of key compounds with theoretical equations of state and with first principles quantum mechanical calculations to generate predictions of thermodynamic data. The resulting thermodynamic data allow quantitative models of geochemical processes at high temperatures and pressures. Research funded by a DOE grant to Prof. Robert Wood at the University of Delaware involved the development of new theoretical equations of state for aqueous solutions of electrolytes and non-electrolytes, methods to estimate thermodynamic data not available from experiments, collection of data on model compounds through experiments and predictions of properties using ab initio quantum mechanics. During the last three and a half years, with support from our DOE grant, 16 papers have been accepted or published, and 3 more are in preparation. Results of this research have been reported in numerous invited and contributed presentations at national and international meetings. For this report, we will briefly comment on the highlights of the last 3 and a half years and give a complete list of papers published, accepted, or submitted during these years.

Wood, Robert H.

2005-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

240

TOURGHREACT: A Simulation Program for Non-isothermal MultiphaseReactive Geochemical Transport in Variably Saturated GeologicMedia  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

TOUGHREACT is a numerical simulation program for chemically reactive non-isothermal flows of multiphase fluids in porous and fractured media. The program was written in Fortran 77 and developed by introducing reactive geochemistry into the multiphase fluid and heat flow simulator TOUGH2. A variety of subsurface thermo-physical-chemical processes are considered under a wide range of conditions of pressure, temperature, water saturation, ionic strength, and pH and Eh. Interactions between mineral assemblages and fluids can occur under local equilibrium or kinetic rates. The gas phase can be chemically active. Precipitation and dissolution reactions can change formation porosity and permeability. The program can be applied to many geologic systems and environmental problems, including geothermal systems, diagenetic and weathering processes, subsurface waste disposal, acid mine drainage remediation, contaminant transport, and groundwater quality. Here we present two examples to illustrate applicability of the program: (1) injectivity effects of mineral scaling in a fractured geothermal reservoir and (2) CO2 disposal in a deep saline aquifer.

Xu, Tianfu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Spycher, Nicolas; Pruess, Karsten

2004-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "telemetry systems geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Synopses of R and D in geothermal-geochemical engineering at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory 1976-1980  

SciTech Connect

Research is summarized on the following: geothermal field test apparatus; brine acidification as a means of scale control at the Salton Sea Geothermal Field; tests of seeding and other chemical methods for the control of scale at the Salton Sea Geothermal Field; tests of proprietary organic additives for the control of scale at the Salton Sea Geothermal Field; tests of generic organic compounds for control of scale at Salton Sea Geothermal Field; studies of the dissolution of geothermal scale; chemical measurement developments; chemical modeling of geothermal systems; processing of geothermal brine effluents for injection; hydrogen sulfide abatement using geothermal brine effluents; use of surface waters to supplement injection at the Salton Sea Geothermal Field; and measurement of injectability of geothermal brines. (MHR)

Harrar, J.E. (comp.)

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Identification of cross-formation flow in multireservoir systems using isotopic techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study was designed to add quantitative solutions to the problem of undesirable hydraulic communication which results in active fluid flow between productive horizons. Transfer of novel geochemical methods, based on effective, economic, and environmentally acceptable isotopic techniques for identification of leaking hydrocarbon reservoirs, is a major objective of this study. The effectiveness of a continuous trap's seal depends on an equilibrium between the capillary forces holding formation water in pore spaces of the seal and the buoyancy forces of the oil and gas column in a system. Therefore, some seals may leak selectively at changing pressure and temperature conditions with respect to different fluid phases (oil, gas, and water). A break in continuity of confining layers will promote relatively fast interreservoir migration of fluids. It may intensify in reservoirs subjected to high pressures during implementation of secondary and tertiary processes of recovery. Such fluid flow should result in identifiable chemical, isotopic, and often thermal anomalies in the area of an open flow path. Quantitative hydrodynamic reservoir modeling based on geochemical/isotopic and other evidence of fluid migration in a system require, however, more systematic methodological study. Such a study is being recommended in addition to a field demonstration of the method in a selected oil/gas reservoir where geochemical and production anomalies have been documented. 62 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

Szpakiewicz, M.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Assessment of Geochemical Environment for the Proposed INL Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conservative sorption parameters have been estimated for the proposed Idaho National Laboratory Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility. This analysis considers the influence of soils, concrete, and steel components on water chemistry and the influence of water chemistry on the relative partitioning of radionuclides over the life of the facility. A set of estimated conservative distribution coefficients for the primary media encountered by transported radionuclides has been recommended. These media include the vault system, concrete-sand-gravel mix, alluvium, and sedimentary interbeds. This analysis was prepared to support the performance assessment required by U.S. Department of Energy Order 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management.' The estimated distribution coefficients are provided to support release and transport calculations of radionuclides from the waste form through the vadose zone. A range of sorption parameters are provided for each key transport media, with recommended values being conservative. The range of uncertainty has been bounded through an assessment of most-likely-minimum and most-likely-maximum distribution coefficient values. The range allows for adequate assessment of mean facility performance while providing the basis for uncertainty analysis.

D. Craig Cooper

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Development of an Advanced Hydraulic Fracture Mapping System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project to develop an advanced hydraulic fracture mapping system consisted of both hardware and analysis components in an effort to build, field, and analyze combined data from tiltmeter and microseismic arrays. The hardware sections of the project included: (1) the building of new tiltmeter housings with feedthroughs for use in conjunction with a microseismic array, (2) the development of a means to use separate telemetry systems for the tilt and microseismic arrays, and (3) the selection and fabrication of an accelerometer sensor system to improve signal-to-noise ratios. The analysis sections of the project included a joint inversion for analysis and interpretation of combined tiltmeter and microseismic data and improved methods for extracting slippage planes and other reservoir information from the microseisms. In addition, testing was performed at various steps in the process to assess the data quality and problems/issues that arose during various parts of the project. A prototype array was successfully tested and a full array is now being fabricated for industrial use.

Norm Warpinski; Steve Wolhart; Larry Griffin; Eric Davis

2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

245

Alteration of As-bearing Phases in a Small Watershed Located on a High Grade Arsenic-geochemical Anomaly (French Massif Central)  

SciTech Connect

At a watershed scale, sediments and soil weathering exerts a control on solid and dissolved transport of trace elements in surface waters and it can be considered as a source of pollution. The studied subwatershed (1.5 km{sup 2}) was located on an As-geochemical anomaly. The studied soil profile showed a significant decrease of As content from 1500 mg kg{sup -1} in the 135-165 cm deepest soil layer to 385 mg kg{sup -1} in the upper 0-5 cm soil layer. Directly in the stream, suspended matter and the <63 {micro}m fraction of bed sediments had As concentrations greater than 400 mg kg{sup -1}. In all these solid fractions, the main representative As-bearing phases were determined at two different observation scales: bulk analyses using X-ray absorption structure spectroscopy (XAS) and microanalyses using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and associated electron probe microanalyses (EPMA), as well as micro-Raman spectroscopy and synchrotron-based micro-scanning X-ray diffraction ({micro}SXRD) characterization. Three main As-bearing phases were identified: (i) arsenates (mostly pharmacosiderite), the most concentrated phases As in both the coherent weathered bedrock and the 135-165 cm soil layer but not observed in the river solid fraction, (ii) Fe-oxyhydroxides with in situ As content up to 15.4 wt.% in the deepest soil layer, and (iii) aluminosilicates, the least concentrated As carriers. The mineralogical evolution of As-bearing phases in the soil profile, coupled with the decrease of bulk As content, may be related to pedogenesis processes, suggesting an evolution of arsenates into As-rich Fe-oxyhydroxides. Therefore, weathering and mineralogical evolution of these As-rich phases may release As to surface waters.

A Bossy; C Grosbois; S Beauchemin; A Courtin-Nomade; W Hendershot; H Bril

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

246

SEESM: Scalable Extensible Earth System Model for Climate Change Science |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SEESM: Scalable Extensible Earth System Model for Climate Change Science SEESM: Scalable Extensible Earth System Model for Climate Change Science SEESM: Scalable Extensible Earth System Model for Climate Change Science This SciDAC project will transform an existing, state-of-the-science, third-generation global climate model, the Community Climate System Model (CCSM3), into a first-generation Earth system model that fully simulates the relationships between the physical, chemical, and bio-geochemical processes in the climate system. The model will incorporate new processes necessary to predict future climates based on the specification of greenhouse gas emissions rather than specification of atmospheric concentrations, as is done in present models, which make assumptions about the carbon cycle that are likely not valid. This project will include comprehensive treatments of the processes

247

Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems through Integrated Geophysical, Geologic and Geochemical Interpretation. Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems through Integrated Geophysical, Geologic and Geochemical Interpretation. Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 Geophysical Exploration Technologies Project Description A comprehensive, interdisciplinary approach is proposed using existing geophysical exploration technology coupled with new seismic techniques and subject matter experts to determine the combination of geoscience data that demonstrates the greatest potential for identifying EGS drilling targets using non-invasive techniques. This proposed exploration methodology is expected to increase spatial resolution and reduce the non-uniqueness that is inherent in geological data, thereby reducing the uncertainty in the primary selection criteria for identifying EGS drilling targets. These criteria are, in order of importance: (1) temperatures greater than 200-250°C at 1-5 km depth; (2) rock type at the depth of interest, and; (3) stress regime.

248

The oil and gas potential of southern Bolivia: Contributions from a dual source rock system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The southern Sub-Andean and Chaco basins of Bolivia produce oil, gas and condensate from reservoirs ranging from Devonian to Tertiary in age. Geochemical evidence points to contributions from two Paleozoic source rocks: the Devonian Los Monos Formation and the Silurian Kirusillas Formation. Rock-Eval pyrolysis, biomarker data, microscopic kerogen analysis, and burial history modeling are used to assess the quality, distribution, and maturity of both source rock systems. The geochemical results are then integrated with the structural model for the area in order to determine the most likely pathways for migration of oil and gas in the thrust belt and its foreland. Geochemical analysis and modeling show that the primary source rock, shales of the Devonian Los Monos Formation, entered the oil window during the initial phase of thrusting in the sub-Andean belt. This provides ideal timing for oil accumulation in younger reservoirs of the thrust belt. The secondary source rock, although richer, consumed most of its oil generating capacity prior to the development of the thrust related structures. Depending on burial depth and location, however, the Silurian source still contributes gas, and some oil, to traps in the region.

Hartshorn, K.G. [Chevron Petroleum Company of Colombia, Santafe de Bogota (Colombia)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

ENZYME ACTIVITY PROBE AND GEOCHEMICAL ASSESSMENT FOR POTENTIAL AEROBIC COMETABOLISM OF TRICHLOROETHENE IN GROUNDWATER OF THE NORTHWEST PLUME, PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT, KENTUCKY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overarching objective of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) enzyme activity probe (EAP) effort is to determine if aerobic cometabolism is contributing to the attenuation of trichloroethene (TCE) and other chlorinated solvents in the contaminated groundwater beneath PGDP. The site-specific objective for the EAP assessment is to identify if key metabolic pathways are present and expressed in the microbial community--namely the pathways that are responsible for degradation of methane and aromatic (e.g. toluene, benzene, phenol) substrates. The enzymes produced to degrade methane and aromatic compounds also break down TCE through a process known as cometabolism. EAPs directly measure if methane and/or aromatic enzyme production pathways are operating and, for the aromatic pathways, provide an estimate of the number of active organisms in the sampled groundwater. This study in the groundwater plumes at PGDP is a major part of a larger scientific effort being conducted by Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council (ITRC), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and North Wind Inc. in which EAPs are being applied to contaminated groundwater from diverse hydrogeologic and plume settings throughout the U.S. to help standardize their application as well as their interpretation. While EAP data provide key information to support the site specific objective for PGDP, several additional lines of evidence are being evaluated to increase confidence in the determination of the occurrence of biodegradation and the rate and sustainability of aerobic cometabolism. These complementary efforts include: (1) Examination of plume flowpaths and comparison of TCE behavior to 'conservative' tracers in the plume (e.g., {sup 99}Tc); (2) Evaluation of geochemical conditions throughout the plume; and (3) Evaluation of stable isotopes in the contaminants and their daughter products throughout the plume. If the multiple lines of evidence support the occurrence of cometabolism and the potential for the process to contribute to temporal and spatial attenuation of TCE in PGDP groundwater, then a follow-up enzyme probe microcosm study to better estimate biological degradation rate(s) is warranted.

Looney, B; M. Hope Lee, M; S. K. Hampson, S

2008-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

250

Wideband precision analog telemetry link using digital techniques  

SciTech Connect

A highly linear Wideband Analog Fiber Optic Link is described which samples at a 1 MHz rate with 10-bit accuracy and transmits and receives by means of a high speed PDM code. Aliasing and sampling effects are fully suppressed and a nearly Gaussian pulse response is attained with a 2 ..mu..sec risetime. Analog signals are recovered with very low distortion and d.c. drift and a S/N ratio of better than 52 db.

Hearn, W.E.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Progressively communicating rich telemetry from autonomous underwater vehicles via relays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As analysis of imagery and environmental data plays a greater role in mission construction and execution, there is an increasing need for autonomous marine vehicles to transmit this data to the surface. Without access to ...

Murphy, Christopher Alden

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Chemical telemetry of OH observed to measure interstellar magnetic fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present models for the chemistry in gas moving towards the ionization front of an HII region. When it is far from the ionization front, the gas is highly depleted of elements more massive than helium. However, as it approaches the ionization front, ices are destroyed and species formed on the grain surfaces are injected into the gas phase. Photodissociation removes gas phase molecular species as the gas flows towards the ionization front. We identify models for which the OH column densities are comparable to those measured in observations undertaken to study the magnetic fields in star forming regions and give results for the column densities of other species that should be abundant if the observed OH arises through a combination of the liberation of H2O from surfaces and photodissociation. They include CH3OH, H2CO, and H2S. Observations of these other species may help establish the nature of the OH spatial distribution in the clouds, which is important for the interpretation of the magnetic field results.

S. Viti; T. W. Hartquist; P. C. Myers

2005-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

253

Generic Natural Systems Evaluation - Thermodynamic Database Development and Data Management  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermodynamic data are essential for understanding and evaluating geochemical processes, as by speciation-solubility calculations, reaction-path modeling, or reactive transport simulation. These data are required to evaluate both equilibrium states and the kinetic approach to such states (via the affinity term or its equivalent in commonly used rate laws). These types of calculations and the data needed to carry them out are a central feature of geochemistry in many applications, including water-rock interactions in natural systems at low and high temperatures. Such calculations are also made in engineering studies, for example studies of interactions involving man-made materials such as metal alloys and concrete. They are used in a fairly broad spectrum of repository studies where interactions take place among water, rock, and man-made materials (e.g., usage on YMP and WIPP). Waste form degradation, engineered barrier system performance, and near-field and far-field transport typically incorporate some level of thermodynamic modeling, requiring the relevant supporting data. Typical applications of thermodynamic modeling involve calculations of aqueous speciation (which is of great importance in the case of most radionuclides), solubilities of minerals and related solids, solubilities of gases, and stability relations among the various possible phases that might be present in a chemical system at a given temperature and pressure. If a phase can have a variable chemical composition, then a common calculational task is to determine that composition. Thermodynamic modeling also encompasses ion exchange and surface complexation processes. Any and all of these processes may be important in a geochemical process or reactive transport calculation. Such calculations are generally carried out using computer codes. For geochemical modeling calculations, codes such as EQ3/6 and PHREEQC, are commonly used. These codes typically provide 'full service' geochemistry, meaning that they use a large body of thermodynamic data, generally from a supporting database file, to sort out the various important reactions from a wide spectrum of possibilities, given specified inputs. Usually codes of this kind are used to construct models of initial aqueous solutions that represent initial conditions for some process, although sometimes these calculations also represent a desired end point. Such a calculation might be used to determine the major chemical species of a dissolved component, the solubility of a mineral or mineral-like solid, or to quantify deviation from equilibrium in the form of saturation indices. Reactive transport codes such as TOUGHREACT and NUFT generally require the user to determine which chemical species and reactions are important, and to provide the requisite set of information including thermodynamic data in an input file. Usually this information is abstracted from the output of a geochemical modeling code and its supporting thermodynamic data file. The Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) developed two qualified thermodynamic databases to model geochemical processes, including ones involving repository components such as spent fuel. The first of the two (BSC, 2007a) was for systems containing dilute aqueous solutions only, the other (BSC, 2007b) for systems involving concentrated aqueous solutions and incorporating a model for such based on Pitzer's (1991) equations. A 25 C-only database with similarities to the latter was also developed for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP, cf. Xiong, 2005). The NAGRA/PSI database (Hummel et al., 2002) was developed to support repository studies in Europe. The YMP databases are often used in non-repository studies, including studies of geothermal systems (e.g., Wolery and Carroll, 2010) and CO2 sequestration (e.g., Aines et al., 2011).

Wolery, T W; Sutton, M

2011-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

254

Well, hydrology, and geochemistry problems encountered in ATES systems and their solutions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) systems, wells provide the interface between the energy storage and use. Efficient operational wells are, therefore, essential for the system to run at maximum (design) efficiency. Adequate test drilling to accurately predict aquifer properties is essential in the design phase; proper construction and development are crucial; and proper monitoring of performance is necessary to identify the early stages of clogging and to evaluate the adequacy of well rehabilitation. Problems related to hydrology, well, and aquifer properties include: loss of permeability resulting from gas exsolution, chemical precipitation, and dispersion and movement of fine-grained particles; loss of recoverable heat caused by excessive regional ground-water gradient, hydrodynamic mixing of injected and native ground water, buoyancy flow and heat conduction through the cap and base of the storage zone; leakage up along the well casing; and fracturing'' of a shallow upper aquiclude as a result of an injection pressure greater than the hydrostatic pressure on the aquiclude. The predominant geochemical problems encountered are precipitation of carbonates in some areas and iron plus manganese oxides in others. These precipitation problems can be anticipated, and thus avoided, via geochemical calculations. The likelihood of iron carbonate precipitation is less certain because of the lack of adequate research. Corrosion is a frequent problem. Most of the hydrochemically related clogging and corrosion problems that have been encountered in ATES systems can be predicted and avoided by appropriate design, construction, and operation of new ATF-S systems, assuming that appropriate hydrologic and geochemical modeling is carried out in advance. It is prudent to carefully consider the need for water treatment and to anticipate that there will be some increase in injection pressure and decrease of specific capacity over time.

Jenne, E.A. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Andersson, O. (VBB VIAK AB, Malmo (Sweden)); Willemsen, A. (IF Technology, Arnhem, (Netherlands))

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Well, hydrology, and geochemistry problems encountered in ATES systems and their solutions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) systems, wells provide the interface between the energy storage and use. Efficient operational wells are, therefore, essential for the system to run at maximum (design) efficiency. Adequate test drilling to accurately predict aquifer properties is essential in the design phase; proper construction and development are crucial; and proper monitoring of performance is necessary to identify the early stages of clogging and to evaluate the adequacy of well rehabilitation. Problems related to hydrology, well, and aquifer properties include: loss of permeability resulting from gas exsolution, chemical precipitation, and dispersion and movement of fine-grained particles; loss of recoverable heat caused by excessive regional ground-water gradient, hydrodynamic mixing of injected and native ground water, buoyancy flow and heat conduction through the cap and base of the storage zone; leakage up along the well casing; and ``fracturing`` of a shallow upper aquiclude as a result of an injection pressure greater than the hydrostatic pressure on the aquiclude. The predominant geochemical problems encountered are precipitation of carbonates in some areas and iron plus manganese oxides in others. These precipitation problems can be anticipated, and thus avoided, via geochemical calculations. The likelihood of iron carbonate precipitation is less certain because of the lack of adequate research. Corrosion is a frequent problem. Most of the hydrochemically related clogging and corrosion problems that have been encountered in ATES systems can be predicted and avoided by appropriate design, construction, and operation of new ATF-S systems, assuming that appropriate hydrologic and geochemical modeling is carried out in advance. It is prudent to carefully consider the need for water treatment and to anticipate that there will be some increase in injection pressure and decrease of specific capacity over time.

Jenne, E.A. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Andersson, O. [VBB VIAK AB, Malmo (Sweden); Willemsen, A. [IF Technology, Arnhem, (Netherlands)

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Total System Performance Assessment, 1993: An evaluation of the potential Yucca Mountain repository  

SciTech Connect

Total System Performance Assessments are an important component in the evaluation of the suitability of Yucca Mountain, Nevada as a potential site for a mined geologic repository for the permanent disposal of high-level radioactive wastes in the United States. The Total System Performance Assessments are conducted iteratively during site characterization to identify issues which should be addressed by the characterization and design activities as well as providing input to regulatory/licensing and programmatic decisions. During fiscal years 1991 and 1992, the first iteration of Total System Performance Assessment (hereafter referred to as TSPA 1991) was completed by Sandia National Laboratories and Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Beginning in fiscal year 1993, the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management and Operating Contractor was assigned the responsibility to plan, coordinate, and contribute to the second iteration of Total System Performance Assessment (hereafter referred to as TSPA 1993). This document presents the objectives, approach, assumptions, input, results, conclusions, and recommendations associated with the Management and Operating Contractor contribution to TSPA 1993. The new information incorporated in TSPA 1993 includes (1) revised estimates of radionuclide solubilities (and their thermal and geochemical dependency), (2) thermal and geochemical dependency of spent fuel waste alteration and glass dissolution rates, (3) new distribution coefficient (k{sub d}) estimates, (4) revised estimates of gas-phase velocities and travel times, and (5) revised hydrologic modeling of the saturated zone which provides updated estimates of the advective flux through the saturated zone.

Andrews, R.W.; Dale, T.F.; McNeish, J.A.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Design and testing of a non-intrusive torque measurement system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis details the initial development of a non-intrusive torque measurement system to measure torque in a rotating driveshaft like those commonly found on internal combustion engine powered irrigation pumping plants. A typical driveshaft used in pumping plant applications consists of flanged U-joints on each end with a constant cross-section steele tube portion connecting the U-joints. The photoelectric sensor based system was able to predict torque to within 3?9.1 N-m (346 in-lbs) under constant rpm conditions. Two sensor types, phototransistor and photodiode, were tested. The photodiode sensor was tested with two emitter types: infrared LED and red laser. No significant difference in response was found using either the LED or red laser emmitters. Both the photoelectric and photodiode sensor measurements showed correlation to actual torque. The photoelectric sensor configuration correlation had a standard error of 5?% of a typical natural-gas pumping plant installation running at 773.9 N-m of torque. The sensors were mounted independent of the driveshaft and measured the phaseshift of two pins mounted on the shaft as they passed through the photosensing area. This caused extreme sensitivity to vibration of the engine and driveshaft. A similar design with a temporary mount connected to the shaft and transmitting the response signal via radio frequency telemetry could decrease the effects of vibration on the system.

Wilson, Edwin Ernest

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) comparing water with CO2 as heat transmission fluids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vol. 17, pp. 325–330, 1993. Durst, D. Geochemical Modelingdevelopment and operation (Durst, 2002; Bächler, 2003; Xu

Pruess, Karsten

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Glossary - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Ash increases the weight of coal, adds to the cost of handling, ... A system of remote control and telemetry used to monitor and control the ...

260

1  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

datalogger network has been replaced with a set of wells instrumented for DOE's remote telemetry (System Operations and Analysis at Remote Sites, or SOARS) network. In...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "telemetry systems geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Flow and permeability structure of the Beowawe, Nevada hydrothermal system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A review of past geologic, geochemical, hydrological, pressure transient, and reservoir engineering studies of Beowawe suggests a different picture of the reservoir than previously presented. The Beowawe hydrothermal contains buoyant thermal fluid dynamically balanced with overlying cold water, as shown by repeated temperature surveys and well test results. Thermal fluid upwells from the west of the currently developed reservoir at the intersection of the Malpais Fault and an older structural feature associated with mid-Miocene rifting. A tongue of thermal fluid rises to the east up the high permeability Malpais Fault, discharges at the Geysers area, and is in intimate contact with overlying cooler water. The permeability structure is closely related to the structural setting, with the permeability of the shallow hydrothermal system ranging from 500 to 1,000 D-ft, while the deeper system ranges from 200 to 400 D-ft.

Faulder, D.D. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Johnson, S.D.; Benoit, W.R. [Oxbow Power Services, Inc., Reno, NV (United States)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Statistical Characterization of School Bus Drive Cycles Collected via Onboard Logging Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In an effort to characterize the dynamics typical of school bus operation, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) researchers set out to gather in-use duty cycle data from school bus fleets operating across the country. Employing a combination of Isaac Instruments GPS/CAN data loggers in conjunction with existing onboard telemetric systems resulted in the capture of operating information for more than 200 individual vehicles in three geographically unique domestic locations. In total, over 1,500 individual operational route shifts from Washington, New York, and Colorado were collected. Upon completing the collection of in-use field data using either NREL-installed data acquisition devices or existing onboard telemetry systems, large-scale duty-cycle statistical analyses were performed to examine underlying vehicle dynamics trends within the data and to explore vehicle operation variations between fleet locations. Based on the results of these analyses, high, low, and average vehicle dynamics requirements were determined, resulting in the selection of representative standard chassis dynamometer test cycles for each condition. In this paper, the methodology and accompanying results of the large-scale duty-cycle statistical analysis are presented, including graphical and tabular representations of a number of relationships between key duty-cycle metrics observed within the larger data set. In addition to presenting the results of this analysis, conclusions are drawn and presented regarding potential applications of advanced vehicle technology as it relates specifically to school buses.

Duran, A.; Walkowicz, K.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Role of Fluid Pressure in the Production Behavior of Enhanced Geothermal Systems with CO2 as Working Fluid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Turkey, 24-29 April 2005. Durst, D. Geochemical Modeling ofprecipitation reactions (Durst, 2002; Bächler, 2003; Xu and

Pruess, Karsten

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

H2O[underscore]TREAT users' manual: An aid for evaluating water treatment requirements for aquifer thermal energy storage systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This manual addresses the use of a public-domain software package developed to aid engineers in the desip of water treatment systems for aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES). The software, H20[underscore]TREAT, which runs in the DOS or UNIX Environment, was developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory and targeted to engineers possessing limited or no experience in geochemistry. To do this, the software provides guidance on geochemical phenomena that can cause problems in ATES systems (i.e., the formation of scale in heat exchangers, clogging of wells, corrosion in piping and heat exchangers, and degradation of aquifer materials causing a reduction in permeability). Preventing such problems frequently requires the use of water treatment systems. Because individual water treatment methods vary in cost, effectiveness, environmental impact, corrosion potential, and acceptability to regulators, proper evaluation of treatment options is required to determine the feasibility of ATES systems. The software is available for DOS- and UNIX-based computers. It uses a recently revised geochemical model, MINTEQ, to calculate the saturation indices of selected carbonate, oxide, and hydroxide minerals based on water chemistry and temperature data provided by the user. The saturation index of a specific mineral defines the point at which that mineral is oversaturated and hence may precipitate at the specified temperature. Cost calculations are not performed by the software; however, treatment capacity requirements are provided. Treatments include Na and H ion exchanger, fluidized-bed heat exchanger or pellet reactors, and CO[sub 2] injection. The H2O[underscore]TREAT software also provides the user with warning of geochemical problems that must be addressed, such as Fe and Mn oxide precipitation, SiO[sub 2] precipitation at high temperatures, corrosion, and clay swelling and dispersion.

Vail, L.W.; Jenne, E.A.; Zipperer, J.P.; McKinley, M.I.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

H2O{underscore}TREAT users` manual: An aid for evaluating water treatment requirements for aquifer thermal energy storage systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This manual addresses the use of a public-domain software package developed to aid engineers in the desip of water treatment systems for aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES). The software, H20{underscore}TREAT, which runs in the DOS or UNIX Environment, was developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory and targeted to engineers possessing limited or no experience in geochemistry. To do this, the software provides guidance on geochemical phenomena that can cause problems in ATES systems (i.e., the formation of scale in heat exchangers, clogging of wells, corrosion in piping and heat exchangers, and degradation of aquifer materials causing a reduction in permeability). Preventing such problems frequently requires the use of water treatment systems. Because individual water treatment methods vary in cost, effectiveness, environmental impact, corrosion potential, and acceptability to regulators, proper evaluation of treatment options is required to determine the feasibility of ATES systems. The software is available for DOS- and UNIX-based computers. It uses a recently revised geochemical model, MINTEQ, to calculate the saturation indices of selected carbonate, oxide, and hydroxide minerals based on water chemistry and temperature data provided by the user. The saturation index of a specific mineral defines the point at which that mineral is oversaturated and hence may precipitate at the specified temperature. Cost calculations are not performed by the software; however, treatment capacity requirements are provided. Treatments include Na and H ion exchanger, fluidized-bed heat exchanger or pellet reactors, and CO{sub 2} injection. The H2O{underscore}TREAT software also provides the user with warning of geochemical problems that must be addressed, such as Fe and Mn oxide precipitation, SiO{sub 2} precipitation at high temperatures, corrosion, and clay swelling and dispersion.

Vail, L.W.; Jenne, E.A.; Zipperer, J.P.; McKinley, M.I.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Critical issues in the use of metals and alloys in sulphur-containing aqueous systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sulphur-containing aqueous fluids are amongst the most corrosive environments experienced in industrial and natural systems. The high corrosivity is due principally to the wide range of oxidation states that sulphur may exist in within the thermodynamic stability domain of water, as well as to the high lability of many sulphur species, such as the polythionic acids and polysulfides. Additionally, sulphur, along with arsenic, antimony, and mercury, effectively promotes the entry of hydrogen into metal and alloy matrices, thereby leading to hydrogen damage and hydrogen embrittlement. In this paper, the chemistry of sulphur species in aqueous solutions and of the various iron sulphides is reviewed with emphasis on illustrating the diverse nature of metal/sulphur interactions. Finally, we identify a number of critical issues that need to be resolved to greatly improve our understanding of the chemistry of sulphur-containing systems and to improve our ability to predict the form and extent of corrosion in geochemical and geoenergy systems.

Macdonald, D.D.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

267

Critical issues in the use of metals and alloys in sulphur-containing aqueous systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sulphur-containing aqueous fluids are amongst the most corrosive environments experienced in industrial and natural systems. The high corrosivity is due principally to the wide range of oxidation states that sulphur may exist in within the thermodynamic stability domain of water, as well as to the high lability of many sulphur species, such as the polythionic acids and polysulfides. Additionally, sulphur, along with arsenic, antimony, and mercury, effectively promotes the entry of hydrogen into metal and alloy matrices, thereby leading to hydrogen damage and hydrogen embrittlement. In this paper, the chemistry of sulphur species in aqueous solutions and of the various iron sulphides is reviewed with emphasis on illustrating the diverse nature of metal/sulphur interactions. Finally, we identify a number of critical issues that need to be resolved to greatly improve our understanding of the chemistry of sulphur-containing systems and to improve our ability to predict the form and extent of corrosion in geochemical and geoenergy systems.

Macdonald, D.D.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Mineral Sequestration of Carbon Dixoide in a Sandstone-Shale System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A conceptual model of CO2 injection in bedded sandstone-shale sequences has been developed using hydrogeologic properties and mineral compositions commonly encountered in Gulf Coast sediments. Numerical simulations were performed with the reactive fluid flow and geochemical transport code TOUGHREACT to analyze mass transfer between sandstone and shale layers and CO2 immobilization through carbonate precipitation. Results indicate that most CO2 sequestration occurs in the sandstone. The major CO2 trapping minerals are dawsonite and ankerite. The CO2 mineral-trapping capacity after 100,000 years reaches about 90 kg per cubic meter of the medium. The CO2 trapping capacity depends on primary mineral composition. Precipitation of siderite and ankerite requires Fe+2 supplied mainly by chlorite and some by hematite dissolution and reduction. Precipitation of dawsonite requires Na+ provided by oligoclase dissolution. The initial abundance of chlorite and oligoclase therefore affects the CO2 mineral trapping capacity. The sequestration time required depends on the kinetic rate of mineral dissolution and precipitation. Dawsonite reaction kinetics is not well understood, and sensitivity regarding the precipitation rate was examined. The addition of CO2 as secondary carbonates results in decreased porosity. The leaching of chemical constituents from the interior of the shale causes slightly increased porosity. The limited information currently available for the mineralogy of natural high-pressure CO2 gas reservoirs is also generally consistent with our simulation. The ''numerical experiments'' give a detailed understanding of the dynamic evolution of a sandstone-shale geochemical system.

Xu, Tianfu; Apps, John A.; Pruess, Karsten

2004-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

269

Testing EQ3/6 and GEMBOCHS using fluid-mineral equilibria in the wairakei geothermal system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ability of the EQ3 and EQ6 geochemical modeling codes and the GEMBOCHS thermodynamic data bases to simulate geochemical changes in the post-emplacement environment at the potential Yucca Mountain, Nevada repository is being tested using observed mineral-fluid relations in the Taupo Volcanic Zone of New Zealand. In this report, comparisons between observed equilibria and simulations of field relations in the Wairakei geothermal system are used to test the codes and data bases in high temperature systems. Analysis of trends in water and gas chemistries and well discharge characteristics with time were used to identify a set of representative water and gas analyses from zones producing at about 250{degrees}C. The most common vein minerals at this temperature are: wairakite, adularia, epidote, quartz, albite, chlorite, calcite, prehnite, and pyrite. Calculations were carried out using version 7.2a R134 of EQ3 and version 7.2a R130 of EQ6 and the SUPCRT and COM subsets of the R24 version of GEMBOCHS. Thermodynamic data bases using different data for Al aqueous species were sued to identify the data set which produced the best matches between observed and calculated equilibria. The simulations described in this paper suggest that EQ6 can be used to identify facies of minerals that will be stable in various environments, but can not be used to predict the exact phase assemblage that is in equilibrium with a given water.

Bruton, C.J.

1995-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

270

Petrographic, Mineralogic, and Geochemical Studies of Hydrocarbon-derived Authigenic Carbonate Rock from Gas Venting, Seepage, Free Gas, and Gas Hydrate Sites in the Gulf of Mexico and offshore India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Authigenic carbonate rock (ACR) is derived from microbial oxidation of methane, biodegradation of crude oil, and oxidation of sedimentary organic matter. The precipitation of ACR was characterized petrographically, mineralogically, and geochemically. ACR collected from the seafloor in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) and ACR recovered from drilled cores in the Krishna-Godawari (KG) basin offshore India were used. All study sites are associated with hydrocarbon gas venting, seepage, free gas, or gas hydrate. ACR from the GOM is densely cemented and extremely irregular in shape, whereas ACR from offshore India is generally an oval-shaped smooth nodule and also densely cemented. The dominant mineral in ACR is authigenic calcite. ACR contains carbon derived from sedimentary organic carbon oxidation that geologically sequesters much fossil carbon. Bulk carbon and oxygen isotopes of ACR were measured. ACR from the GOM is strongly depleted in 13C with ?13C of ?42.5? and enriched in 18O with ?18O of 4.67?. The ?13C of hydrocarbon is typically more depleted in 13C than in the associated ACR. The reason is that authigenic carbonate cements from hydrocarbon oxidation generally enclose skeletal material characterized by normal marine carbonate. Three groups that represent different hydrocarbon sources to ACR were classified in this study: primary carbon sources to ACR from (1) methane plus biodegraded oil, (2) methane, or (3) biodegraded oil. Wide ranges in ?13C (?49.12 to 14.06?) and ?18O ( 1.27 to 14.06?) were observed in ACR from offshore India. In sediments, the ?13C may be affected by differences in the rate of organic carbon oxidation, which generate varying ?13C with depth during methanogenesis. Based on the wide range in ?13C, ACR from offshore India was classified: (1) ?13C may reflect high rates of organic carbon oxidation, (2) ACR may be derived primarily from methane oxidation, and (3) ?13C may reflect low rates of organic carbon oxidation. ?18O values are heavier than those of normal marine carbonates. The ?18O may be caused by reaction with deep-sourced water that was isotopically heavier than ambient seawater. Some samples may reflect heavy ?18O from gas hydrate decomposition, but it would not cause significant heavy oxygen isotopes.

Jung, Woodong

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Geochemical characerization of endmember mantle components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis uses trace elements and radiogenic isotope tracers to define elemental abundances in reservoirs of the Earth's mantle, including EM2 (the Enriched Mantle 2), as seen in the Samoan hotspot track, and DMM (the ...

Workman, Rhea K

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Stream sediment geochemical surveys for uranium  

SciTech Connect

Stream sediment is more universally available than ground and surface waters and comprises the bulk of NURE samples. Orientation studies conducted by the Savannah River Laboratory indicate that several mesh sizes can offer nearly equivalent information. Sediment is normally sieved in the field to pass a 420-micrometer screen (US Std. 40 mesh) and that portion of the dried sediment passing a 149-micrometer screen (US Std. 100 mesh) is recovered for analysis. Sampling densities usually vary with survey objectives and types of deposits anticipated. Principal geologic features that can be portrayed at a scale of 1:250,000, such as major tectonic units, plutons, and pegmatite districts, are readily defined using a sampling density of 1 site per 5 square miles (13 km/sup 2/). More detailed studies designed to define individual deposits require greater sampling density. Analyses for elements known to be associated with uranium in a particular mineral host may be used to estimate the relative proportion of uranium in several forms. For example, uranium may be associated with thorium and cerium in monazite, and with zirconium and hafnium in zircon. Readily leachable uranium may be adsorbed to trapped in oxide coatings on mineral particles. Soluble or mobile uranium may indicate an ore source, whereas uranium in monazite or zircon is not likely to be economically attractive. Various schemes may be used to estimate for form of uranium in a sample. Simple elemental ratios are a useful first approach. Multiple ratios and subtractive formulas empirically designed to account for the presence of particular minerals are more useful. Residuals calculated from computer-derived regression equations or factor scores appear to have the greatest potential for locating uranium anomalies.

Price, V.; Ferguson, R.B.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Organic geochemical biosignatures in alkaline Hydrothermal ecosystems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The 13C content of microbial products are controlled by many factors, including the 13C content of the growth substrate, growth rate, the flux of carbon through various parts of the biochemical network, and the isotopic ...

Bradley, Alexander Smith

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Applications of Geochemical Modeling to Corrosion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...T.S. Lee, S.K. Lee, and Y.K. Hong, Environmental Geophysics and Geochemistry for Contamination Mapping and Monitoring

275

National Geochemical Survey Database | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

federal data download, atomic absorption analysis, atomic emission spectrometry, geochemistry, lithostratigraphy, neutron activation analysis, soil chemistry, unconsolidated...

276

NETL: Gasification Systems - Feed Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feed Systems Gasification Systems Feed Systems Research on commercial gasifier feed systems is occurring in two primary areas of fuel (i.e. coal, biomass, etc.) feed and advanced...

277

Exploration strategy for high-temperature hydrothermal systems in Basin and Range province  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 15-phase strategy of exploration for high-temperature convective hydrothermal resources in the Basin and Range province features a balanced mix of geologic, geochemical, geophysical, hydrologic, and drilling activities. The strategy, based on a study of data submitted under the Department of Energy's Industry Coupled Case Study Program, provides justification for inclusion or exclusion of all pertinent exploration methods. With continuing research on methods of exploration for, and modeling of, convective hydrothermal systems, this strategy is expected to change and become more cost-effective with time. The basic strategy may vary with the geology or hydrology. Personal preferences, budgetary constraints, time and land position constraints, and varied experience may cause industrial geothermal exploration managers to differ with our strategy. For those just entering geothermal exploration, the strategy should be particularly useful; many of its elements may apply in other geologic settings.

Ward, S.H.; Ross, H.P.; Nielson, D.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Strategy of exploration for high temperature hydrothermal systems in the basin and range province  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A fifteen phase strategy of exploration for high temperature convective hydrothermal resources in the basin and range province, recommended herein, features a balanced mix of geological, geochemical, geophysical, hydrological, and drilling activities. The strategy is based on a study of data submitted under the Department of Energy's Industry Coupled Case Study Program. Justification for inclusion in or exclusion from the strategy of all pertinent geoscientific methods is given. With continuing research on methods of exploration for and modeling of convective hydrothermal systems, this strategy is expected to change and become more cost-effective with time. Variations on the basic strategy are to be expected where the geology or hydrology requires it. Personal preferences, budgetary constraints, time and land position constraints, and varied experience may cause industrial geothermal exploration managers to differ with our strategy. For those just entering geothermal exploration, the strategy is expected to be particularly useful.

Ward, S.H.; Ross, H.P.; Nielson, D.L.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

The Newcastle geothermal system, Iron County, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geological, geophysical and geochemical studies contributed to conceptual hydrologic model of the blind'' (no surface expression), moderate-temperature (greater than 130{degree}C) Newcastle geothermal system, located in the Basin and Range-Colorado Plateau transition zone of southwestern Utah. Temperature gradient measurements define a thermal anomaly centered near the surface trace of the range-bounding Antelope Range fault with and elongate dissipative plume extending north into the adjacent Escalante Valley. Spontaneous potential and resistivity surveys sharply define the geometry of the dominant upflow zone (not yet explored), indicating that most of the thermal fluid issues form a short segment along the Antelope Range fault and discharges into a gently-dipping aquifer. Production wells show that this aquifer lies at a depth between 85 and 95 meter. Electrical surveys also show that some leakage of thermal fluid occurs over a 1.5 km (minimum) interval along the trace of the Antelope Range fault. Major element, oxygen and hydrogen isotopic analyses of water samples indicate that the thermal fluid is a mixture of meteoric water derived from recharge areas in the Pine Valley Mountains and cold, shallow groundwater. A northwest-southeast trending system of faults, encompassing a zone of increased fracture permeability, collects meteoric water from the recharge area, allows circulation to a depth of 3 to 5 kilometers, and intersects the northeast-striking Antelope Range fault. We postulate that mineral precipitates form a seal along the Antelope Range fault, preventing the discharge of thermal fluids into basin-fill sediments at depth, and allowing heated fluid to approach the surface. Eventually, continued mineral deposition could result in the development of hot springs at the ground surface.

Blackett, R.E.; Shubat, M.A.; Bishop, C.E. (Utah Geological and Mineral Survey, Salt Lake City, UT (USA)); Chapman, D.S.; Forster, C.B.; Schlinger, C.M. (Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (USA). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Trace-Element Distribution In An Active Hydrothermal System,...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

flow-controlling fractures; (5) deposits of CaCO3 at depth where flashing of brine to steam has occurred due to pressure release. The geochemical enrichments are not, in...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "telemetry systems geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

The hydrothermal system in central Twin Falls County, Idaho  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the results of a study to define the areal extent and thickness of the hydrothermal reservoir in Twin Falls County and to propose a generalized conceptual model of the system. Specific objectives of the study, done in cooperation with the Idaho Department of Water Resources, were to evaluate the existing resource as to its volume, temperature, pressure, and water chemistry, and to determine the effects of present development on the resource. The study was limited to Twin Falls County. Some geologic, geochemical, and hydrologic data for the hydrothermal system were available from earlier studies. However, information about the subsurface at depths greater than 1000 feet was sparse. One well for which data were available was drilled to 2525 feet; several others were drilled to depths between 1200 and 2200 feet. Direct-current electrical resistivity soundings conducted during the summer of 1985 as part of the study provided valuable information about the subsurface at depths less than about 6000 feet. Interpretation of computer-generated subsurface profiles constructed from the soundings provided the basis for determining the thickness of the Idavada Volcanics over much of the study area. 42 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

Lewis, R.E.; Young, H.W.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

DOE workshop: Sedimentary systems, aqueous and organic geochemistry  

SciTech Connect

A DOE workshop on sedimentary systems, aqueous and organic geochemistry was held July 15-16, 1993 at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Papers were organized into several sections: Fundamental Properties, containing papers on the thermodynamics of brines, minerals and aqueous electrolyte solutions; Geochemical Transport, covering 3-D imaging of drill core samples, hydrothermal geochemistry, chemical interactions in hydrocarbon reservoirs, fluid flow model application, among others; Rock-Water Interactions, with presentations on stable isotope systematics of fluid/rock interaction, fluid flow and petotectonic evolution, grain boundary transport, sulfur incorporation, tracers in geologic reservoirs, geothermal controls on oil-reservoir evolution, and mineral hydrolysis kinetics; Organic Geochemistry covered new methods for constraining time of hydrocarbon migration, kinetic models of petroleum formation, mudstones in burial diagenesis, compound-specific carbon isotope analysis of petroleums, stability of natural gas, sulfur in sedimentary organic matter, organic geochemistry of deep ocean sediments, direct speciation of metal by optical spectroscopies; and lastly, Sedimentary Systems, covering sequence stratigraphy, seismic reflectors and diagenetic changes in carbonates, geochemistry and origin of regional dolomites, and evidence of large comet or asteroid impacts at extinction boundaries.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Photovoltaic system in system LABI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is prepared a new model marked as DE10 to extens the system LABI. It is a photovoltaic system. Utilizing of model is into the field of university studying and as a pilot test system for all extern experts. A special parts of model are measurement ... Keywords: automation, measurement, photovoltaic system, sun energy

Hruska Frantisek

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

File Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

File Systems File Systems File Systems For a general description of the different file systems available on PDSF please see Eliza File Systems and Other File Systems. Below is a summary of how STAR uses the various systems: /common The STAR software is installed on /common. For 32sl44 it is under /common/star/star44 and for sl53 it is under /common/star/star53. In both cases the software consists primarily of a STAR-specific ROOT installation on which releases of the STAR libraries are built as shown on the Local STAR Libraries page. /eliza3, /eliza6, /eliza9, /eliza14, /eliza15, /eliza17 STAR has space on 6 elizas as shown in the table below. File System star space (TB) use eliza3 39 production eliza6 9 production eliza9 39 production eliza14 34 production, user space under /eliza14/star/pwg

285

System Effectiveness  

SciTech Connect

An effective risk assessment system is needed to address the threat posed by an active or passive insider who, acting alone or in collusion, could attempt diversion or theft of nuclear material. It is critical that a nuclear facility conduct a thorough self-assessment of the material protection, control, and accountability (MPC&A) system to evaluate system effectiveness. Self-assessment involves vulnerability analysis and performance testing of the MPC&A system. The process should lead to confirmation that mitigating features of the system effectively minimize the threat, or it could lead to the conclusion that system improvements or upgrades are necessary to achieve acceptable protection against the threat. Analysis of the MPC&A system is necessary to understand the limits and vulnerabilities of the system to internal threats. Self-assessment helps the facility be prepared to respond to internal threats and reduce the risk of theft or diversion of nuclear material. MSET is a self-assessment or inspection tool utilizing probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methodology to calculate the system effectiveness of a nuclear facility's MPC&A system. MSET analyzes the effectiveness of an MPC&A system based on defined performance metrics for MPC&A functions based on U.S. and international best practices and regulations. A facility's MC&A system can be evaluated at a point in time and reevaluated after upgrades are implemented or after other system changes occur. The total system or specific subareas within the system can be evaluated. Areas of potential performance improvement or system upgrade can be assessed to determine where the most beneficial and cost-effective improvements should be made. Analyses of risk importance factors show that sustainability is essential for optimal performance. The analyses reveal where performance degradation has the greatest detrimental impact on total system risk and where performance improvements have the greatest reduction in system risk. The risk importance factors show the amount of risk reduction achievable with potential upgrades and the amount of risk reduction actually achieved after upgrades are completed. Applying the risk assessment tool gives support to budget prioritization by showing where budget support levels must be sustained for MC&A functions most important to risk. Results of the risk assessment are also useful in supporting funding justifications for system improvements that significantly reduce system risk.

Powell, Danny H [ORNL; Elwood Jr, Robert H [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Gasification Systems Projects & Performers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasification Systems Gasification Systems Projects & Performers Gasification Systems - Key Technologies Feed Systems Gasifier Optimization and Plant Supporting Systems Syngas...

287

Advanced Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Systems: Advanced Systems: high Performance fenestration systems Research areas: Research activities to improve the performance of windows and other fenestration products must address window systems issues as well as Glazing Materials research. LBNL activities in the area of Advanced Systems include research at both the product level and the building envelope and building systems levels. Highly insulating windows - using non structural center layers Lower cost solutions to more insulating three layer glazing systems, with the potential to turn windows in U.S. heating dominated residential applications into net-energy gainers. Highly Insulating Window Frames In collaboration with the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, we are researching the potentials for highly insulating window frames. Our initial work examines European frames with reported U-factors under 0.15 Btu/hr-ft2-F. Future research aims to analyze these designs, verify these performance levels and ensure that procedures used to calculate frame performance are accurate.

288

Engineered Barrier Systems Thermal-Hydraulic-Chemical Column Test Report  

SciTech Connect

The Engineered Barrier System (EBS) Thermal-Hydraulic-Chemical (THC) Column Tests provide data needed for model validation. The EBS Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Modeling Report (PMR) will be based on supporting models for in-drift THC coupled processes, and the in-drift physical and chemical environment. These models describe the complex chemical interaction of EBS materials, including granular materials, with the thermal and hydrologic conditions that will be present in the repository emplacement drifts. Of particular interest are the coupled processes that result in mineral and salt dissolution/precipitation in the EBS environment. Test data are needed for thermal, hydrologic, and geochemical model validation and to support selection of introduced materials (CRWMS M&O 1999c). These column tests evaluated granular crushed tuff as potential invert ballast or backfill material, under accelerated thermal and hydrologic environments. The objectives of the THC column testing are to: (1) Characterize THC coupled processes that could affect performance of EBS components, particularly the magnitude of permeability reduction (increases or decreases), the nature of minerals produced, and chemical fractionation (i.e., concentrative separation of salts and minerals due to boiling-point elevation). (2) Generate data for validating THC predictive models that will support the EBS Degradation, Flow, and Transport PMR, Rev. 01.

W.E. Lowry

2001-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

289

ACOUSTIC TELEMETRY FROM FISH JOHN KANWISHER.' KENNETH LAWSON,' AND GUNNAR SUNDNES'  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

swimming fish. Information is telemetered as sound radiating from an acoustic transmitter implanted. Thus we most frequently employ frequencies be- tween 40 and 80 kHz. Only in large tuna could we use

290

Heihe Watershed Allied Telemetry Experimental Research (HiWATER): Scientific Objectives and Experimental Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A major research plan entitled “Integrated research on the ecohydrological process of the Heihe River Basin” was launched by the National Natural Science Foundation of China in 2010. One of the key aims of this research plan is to establish a research ...

Xin Li; Guodong Cheng; Shaomin Liu; Qing Xiao; Mingguo Ma; Rui Jin; Tao Che; Qinhuo Liu; Weizhen Wang; Yuan Qi; Jianguang Wen; Hongyi Li; Gaofeng Zhu; Jianwen Guo; Youhua Ran; Shuoguo Wang; Zhongli Zhu; Jian Zhou; Xiaoli Hu; Ziwei Xu

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Modeling of the interaction of an acoustic wave with immersed targets for telemetry of complex structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Monitoring and inspection of nuclear reactor are stringent requirements from operator and safety authorities reactors, which consists in locating various reactor structures using an ultrasonic inspection performed theory of diffraction (GTD) and the Kirchhoff approximation (KA). These two approaches appear

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

292

Microsoft Word - s0070700.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

study is in progress. A ROD for OU III is scheduled to be completed in 2004. O&M costs include cap and drainage structure maintenance, telemetry system maintenance,...

293

Statistics of Heavy Rainfall Occurrences in Taiwan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The seasonal variations of heavy rainfall days over Taiwan are analyzed using 6-yr (1997–2002) hourly rainfall data from about 360 rainfall stations, including high-spatial-resolution Automatic Rainfall and Meteorological Telemetry System ...

Ching-Sen Chen; Yi-Leng Chen; Che-Ling Liu; Pay-Liam Lin; Wan-Chin Chen

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

CX-008436: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Intelligent Casing - Intelligent Formations Telemetry (ICIFT) System CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/27/2012 Location(s): Oklahoma Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

295

CX-008435: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Intelligent Casing - Intelligent Formations Telemetry (ICIFT) System CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/27/2012 Location(s): Oklahoma Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

296

CX-008437: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Intelligent Casing - Intelligent Formations Telemetry (ICIFT) System CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/27/2012 Location(s): Oklahoma Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

297

AEP Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Avoid costs of retrofitting systems to support secure access •Produced by the Yankee Group http://www.yankeegroup.com Page 25. ...

2007-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

298

NETL: Gasification Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasification Systems Coal and Power Systems Gasification Systems Gasifier Optimization & Plant Supporting Systems Feed Systems Feed Systems Gasifier Optimization & Plant Supporting...

299

Power system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A power system includes a prime mover, a transmission, and a fluid coupler having a selectively engageable lockup clutch. The fluid coupler may be drivingly connected between the prime mover and the transmission. Additionally, the power system may include a motor/generator drivingly connected to at least one of the prime mover and the transmission. The power-system may also include power-system controls configured to execute a control method. The control method may include selecting one of a plurality of modes of operation of the power system. Additionally, the control method may include controlling the operating state of the lockup clutch dependent upon the mode of operation selected. The control method may also include controlling the operating state of the motor/generator dependent upon the mode of operation selected.

Hickam, Christopher Dale (Glasford, IL)

2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

300

Gasification Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GASIFICATION SYSTEMS U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM PLAN PREFACE ii DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "telemetry systems geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Photovoltaic Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A photovoltaic (PV), or solar electric system, is made up of several photovoltaic solar cells. An individual PV cell is usually small, typically producing about 1 or 2 watts of power. To boost the...

302

Type systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study of type systems has emerged as one of the most active areas of research in programming languages, with applications in software engineering, language design, high-performance compiler implementation, and security. This chapter discusses the ...

Benjamin C. Pierce

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Battery system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A battery module includes a plurality of battery cells and a system configured for passing a fluid past at least a portion of the plurality of battery cells in a parallel manner.

Dougherty, Thomas J; Wood, Steven J; Trester, Dale B; Andrew, Michael G

2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

304

Systems Studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Systems Studies Activity had two objectives: (1) to investigate nontechnical barriers to the deployment of biomass production and supply systems and (2) to enhance and extend existing systems models of bioenergy supply and use. For the first objective, the Activity focused on existing bioenergy markets. Four projects were undertaken: a comparative analysis of bioenergy in Sweden and Austria; a one-day workshop on nontechnical barriers jointly supported by the Production Systems Activity; the development and testing of a framework for analyzing barriers and drivers to bioenergy markets; and surveys of wood pellet users in Sweden, Austria and the US. For the second objective, two projects were undertaken. First, the Activity worked with the Integrated BioEnergy Systems (TBS) Activity of TEA Bioenergy Task XIII to enhance the BioEnergy Assessment Model (BEAM). This model is documented in the final report of the IBS Activity. The Systems Studies Activity contributed to enhancing the feedstock portion of the model by developing a coherent set of willow, poplar, and switchgrass production modules relevant to both the US and the UK. The Activity also developed a pretreatment module for switchgrass. Second, the Activity sponsored a three-day workshop on modeling bioenergy systems with the objectives of providing an overview of the types of models used to evaluate bioenergy and promoting communication among bioenergy modelers. There were nine guest speakers addressing different types of models used to evaluate different aspects of bioenergy, ranging from technoeconomic models based on the ASPEN software to linear programming models to develop feedstock supply curves for the US. The papers from this workshop have been submitted to Biomass and Bioenergy and are under editorial review.

Graham, R.L.

1998-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

305

NETL: Gasification - Systems Analyses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

System Analyses Gasification Systems Systems Analyses Go to the NETL Gasification Systems Program's Systems and Industry Analyses Studies Technology & CostPerformance Studies NETL...

306

Lighting Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Purple LED lamp Purple LED lamp Lighting Systems Lighting research is aimed at improving the energy efficiency of lighting systems in buildings and homes across the nation. The goal is to reduce lighting energy consumption by 50% over twenty years by improving the efficiency of light sources, and controlling and delivering illumination so that it is available, where and when needed, and at the required intensity. Research falls into four main areas: Sources and Ballasts, Light Distribution Systems, Controls and Communications, and Human Factors. Contacts Francis Rubinstein FMRubinstein@lbl.gov (510) 486-4096 Links Lighting Research Group Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Applications Commercial Buildings Cool Roofs and Heat Islands Demand Response Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends

307

Natural System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Natural System Natural System Evaluation and Tool Development - FY11 Progress Report Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Used Fuel Disposition Program Yifeng Wang (SNL) Michael Simpson (INL) Scott Painter (LANL) Hui-Hai Liu (LBNL) Annie B. Kersting (LLNL) July 15, 2011 FCRD-USED-2011-000223 UFD Natural System Evaluation - FY11 Year-End Report July 15, 2011 2 DISCLAIMER This information was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the U.S. Government. Neither the U.S. Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness, of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe

308

ARAC system  

SciTech Connect

In spite of the remarkable safety record of the nuclear industry as a whole, recent public concern over the potential impact of the industry's accelerated growth has prompted ERDA to expand its emergency response procedures. The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability, ARAC, is a computer communications system designed to enhance the existing emergency response capability of ERDA nuclear facilities. ARAC will add at least two new functions to this capability: centralized, real-time data acquisition and storage, and simulation of the long range atmospheric transport of hazardous materials. To perform these functions, ARAC employs four major sub-systems or facilities: the site facility, the central facility, the global weather center and the regional model. The system has been under development for the past two years at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory of the University of California. (auth)

Kelly, M.F.; Wyman, R.H.

1975-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

309

BAE Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Information fusion system designs require sensor and resource management (SM) for effective and efficient data collection, processing, and dissemination. Common Level 4 fusion sensor management (or process refinement) inter-relations with target tracking and identification (Level 1 fusion) have been detailed in the literature. At the ISIF Fusion Conference, a panel discussion was held to examine the contemporary issues and challenges pertaining to the interaction between SM and situation and threat assessment (Level 2/3 fusion). This summarizes the key tenants of the invited panel experts. The common themes were: 1) Addressing the user in system control, 2) Determining a standard set of metrics,

Erik Blasch; John Salerno; Ivan Kadar; Ken Hintz; J. Biermann; Chee Chong; Subrata Das

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Investigating Army systems and Systems of Systems for value robustness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis proposes a value robustness approach to architect defense systems and Systems of Systems (SoS). A value robust system or SoS has the ability to provide continued value to stakeholders by performing well to meet ...

Koo, Kevin C. K. (Kevin Cheng Keong)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

NREL: Energy Systems Integration - Energy Systems Integration...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Systems Integration Facility NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility Garners LEED Platinum View the NREL Press Release. NREL's multistory Energy Systems Integration...

312

Gasification Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GASIFICATION SYSTEMS GASIFICATION SYSTEMS U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM PLAN PREFACE ii DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any

313

Burner systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A burner system particularly useful for downhole deployment includes a tubular combustion chamber unit housed within a tubular coolant jacket assembly. The combustion chamber unit includes a monolithic tube of refractory material whose inner surface defines the combustion zone. A metal reinforcing sleeve surrounds and extends the length of the refractory tube. The inner surface of the coolant jacket assembly and outer surface of the combustion chamber unit are dimensioned so that those surfaces are close to one another in standby condition so that the combustion chamber unit has limited freedom to expand with that expansion being stabilized by the coolant jacket assembly so that compression forces in the refractory tube do not exceed about one-half the safe compressive stress of the material; and the materials of the combustion chamber unit are selected to establish thermal gradient parameters across the combustion chamber unit to maintain the refractory tube in compression during combustion system start up and cool down sequences.

Doherty, Brian J. (Marblehead, MA)

1984-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

314

Initial investigation of soil mercury geochemistry as an aid to drill site selection in geothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A mercury-in-soil survey was conducted at the Roosevelt Hot Springs Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA), Utah, to evaluate mercury soil geochemistry as a method of selecting exploration well sites in a hot-water geothermal system. Samples of -80 mesh soil were collected at 30.5 m intervals along traverses crossing known structures, surficial geothermal alteration, and exploration well sites, and were analyzed using a Gold Film Mercury Detector. Strong mercury anomalies occur at locations along known structures in close proximity to subsurface thermal activity; examples include areas over hot spring deposits and near a shallow producing well. In contrast, background mercury concentrations are present in nearby locations with little or no indication of subsurface thermal activity, such as areas around deep marginal producing wells and dry wells, and areas lacking hot spring deposits. These results indicate that mercury geochemical surveys can be useful for identifying and mapping structures controlling fluid flow in geothermal systems and for delineating areas overlying near-surface thermal activity. Soil mercury geochemistry thus provides information which may aid in the cost-effective selection of exploratory well sites.

Capuano, R.M.; Bamford, R.W.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

CO{sub 2} flux measurements across portions of the Dixie Valley geothermal system, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A map of the CO{sub 2} flux across a newly formed area of plant kill in the NW part of the Dixie Valley geothermal system was constructed to monitor potential growth of a fumarole field. Flux measurements were recorded using a LI-COR infrared analyzer. Sample locations were restricted to areas within and near the dead zone. The data delineate two areas of high CO{sub 2} flux in different topographic settings. Older fumaroles along the Stillwater range front produce large volumes of CO{sub 2} at high temperatures. High CO{sub 2} flux values were also recorded at sites along a series of recently formed ground fractures at the base of the dead zone. The two areas are connected by a zone of partial plant kill and moderate flux on an alluvial fan. Results from this study indicate a close association between the range front fumaroles and the dead zone fractures. The goals of this study are to characterize recharge to the geothermal system, provide geochemical monitoring of reservoir fluids and to examine the temporal and spatial distribution of the CO{sub 2} flux in the dead zone. This paper reports the results of the initial CO{sub 2} flux measurements taken in October, 1997.

Bergfeld, D.; Goff, F. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Earth and Environmental Sciences Div.; Janik, C.J. [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Johnson, S.D. [Oxbow Power Services, Reno, NV (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

316

CONTROL SYSTEM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A boiling water type nuclear reactor power system having improved means of control is described. These means include provisions for either heating the coolant-moderator prior to entry into the reactor or shunting the coolantmoderator around the heating means in response to the demand from the heat engine. These provisions are in addition to means for withdrawing the control rods from the reactor. (AEC)

Shannon, R.H.; Williamson, H.E.

1962-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

317

Gasification system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and system for injecting coal and process fluids into a fluidized bed gasification reactor. Three concentric tubes extend vertically upward into the fluidized bed. Coal particulates in a transport gas are injected through an inner tube, and an oxygen rich mixture of oxygen and steam are injected through an inner annulus about the inner tube. A gaseous medium relatively lean in oxygen content, such as steam, is injected through an annulus surrounding the inner annulus.

Haldipur, Gaurang B. (Hempfield, PA); Anderson, Richard G. (Penn Hills, PA); Cherish, Peter (Bethel Park, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Gasification system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and system for injecting coal and process fluids into a fluidized bed gasification reactor. Three concentric tubes extend vertically upward into the fluidized bed. Coal particulates in a transport gas are injected through an inner tube, and an oxygen rich mixture of oxygen and steam are injected through an inner annulus about the inner tube. A gaseous medium relatively lean in oxygen content, such as steam, is injected through an annulus surrounding the inner annulus.

Haldipur, Gaurang B. (Hempfield, PA); Anderson, Richard G. (Penn Hills, PA); Cherish, Peter (Bethel Park, PA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Integrated System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Window System Our research activities in the field of high performance windows have led us to conclude that even by using high performance insulating glass units, low conductivity frames, and warm edge spacers, there are still untapped sources for improving energy efficiency in the design and use of residential windows. While such high performance windows are a dramatic improvement over conventional units, they do not reduce conductive losses through wall framing around the window, offer guarantees against excessive wall/window infiltration nor do they adapt to the daily and seasonal potentials for night insulation and summer shading. To meet this need, we have been working on the design, development, and prototyping of Integrated Window Systems (IWS) since 1993. Integrated Window Systems are a form of panelized construction where the wall panel includes an operable or fixed window sash, recessed night insulation, integral solar shading, and is built in a factory setting in order to minimize thermal short circuits and infiltration at joints. IWSs can be built in modular lengths to facilitate their installation with conventional wood frame stick construction or other forms of panelized construction.

320

Advanced Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optimal gap width for double and triple glazing systems Optimal gap width for double and triple glazing systems Glazing systems in the US are commonly designed with a 1/2 " (12.7 mm) gap. The optimal gap width depends on many factors, such as gas fill (air, argon, krypton), the use of Low-e coatings, the environmental conditions (temperature difference across the window), and the calculation standard used. NFRC standard conditions are -18 C (-0.4 F) outside, and 21 C (69.8 F) inside. The calculation standard used in the US is based on the ISO 15099 standard. European standard conditions are 0 C (32 F) outside, and 20 C (68 F) inside. The calculation standard is based on the EN 673 standard. A number of common glazing configurations both with and without Low-e coatings, and with a variety of gas fills were evaluated using both the North American NFRC standard and the European EN 673 standard. All results were calculated using WINDOW 6.3 from LBNL. All IGU's (Insulated Glazing Units) have a standard height of 1 meter.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "telemetry systems geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Braking system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A balanced braking system comprising a plurality of braking assemblies located about a member to be braked. Each of the braking assemblies consists of a spring biased piston of a first material fitted into a body of a different material which has a greater contraction upon cooling than the piston material. The piston is provided with a recessed head portion over which is positioned a diaphragm and forming a space therebetween to which is connected a pressurized fluid supply. The diaphragm is controlled by the fluid in the space to contact or withdraw from the member to be braked. A cooling means causes the body within which the piston is fitted to contract more than the piston, producing a tight shrink fit therebetween. The braking system is particularly applicable for selectively braking an arbor of an electron microscope which immobilizes, for example, a vertically adjustable low temperature specimen holder during observation. The system provides balanced braking forces which can be easily removed and re-established with minimal disturbance to arbor location.

Norgren, D.U.

1982-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

322

Components of systems software for parallel systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Systems software for clusters and other parallel systems affects multiple types of users. End users interact with it to submit and interact with application jobs and to avail themselves of scalable system tools. Systems administrators interact with it ...

Ewing Lusk

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Advanced Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Glazing Systems Glazing Systems Using Non-Structural Center Glazing Layers Windows in the United States use aproximately 2 quads a year in heating energy, approximately one third of all building space heating energy used and the largest single end use attributed to windows. Even if all existing windows were replaced with todayÂ’s ENERGY STAR low-e products (U values < 0.35 Btu/hr-ft2-F), windows related heating would still be over 1 Quad. Because heating loads are strongly tied to conductive losses, technologies which lead to lower window U-factors are the key to reducing heating energy. A 0.1 Btu/hr-ft2-F window is targeted as a product, which will meet the requirements of zero-energy homes. Dynamic control of solar gains will further reduce heating needs by allowing winter solar heat gains to be effectively utilized while limiting cooling season gains. Significant cooling load savings can also be expected from lower U-factor windows in certain climates and from dynamic windows in all climates.

324

Development of geothermal logging systems in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Logging technologies developed for hydrocarbon resource evaluation have not migrated into geothermal applications even though data so obtained would strengthen reservoir characterization efforts. Two causative issues have impeded progress: (1) there is a general lack of vetted, high-temperature instrumentation, and (2) the interpretation of log data generated in a geothermal formation is in its infancy. Memory-logging tools provide a path around the first obstacle by providing quality data at a low cost. These tools feature on-board computers that process and store data, and newer systems may be programmed to make decisions. Since memory tools are completely self-contained, they are readily deployed using the slick line found on most drilling locations. They have proven to be rugged, and a minimum training program is required for operator personnel. Present tools measure properties such as temperature and pressure, and the development of noise, deviation, and fluid conductivity logs based on existing hardware is relatively easy. A more complex geochemical tool aimed at a quantitative analysis of (potassium, uranium and thorium) is in the calibration phase, and it is expandable into all nuclear measurements common in the hydrocarbon industry. A fluid sampling tool is in the design phase. All tools are designed for operation at conditions exceeding 400 C, and for deployment in the slim holes produced by mining-coring operations. Partnerships are being formed between the geothermal industry and scientific drilling programs to define and develop inversion algorithms relating raw tool data to more pertinent information. These cooperative efforts depend upon quality guidelines such as those under development within the international Ocean Drilling Program.

Lysne, P.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Transfer system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A transport system includes a traveling rail (1) which constitutes a transport route and a transport body (3) which is capable of traveling on the traveling rail in the longitudinal direction of the traveling rail. Flexible drive tubes (5) are arranged on the traveling rail in the longitudinal direction of the traveling rail. The transport body includes a traveling wheel (4) which is capable of rolling on the traveling rail and drive wheels (2) which are capable of rolling on the drive tubes upon receiving the rotational drive power generated by pressure of a pressure medium supplied to the drive tubes while depressing the drive tubes. The traveling rail includes a plurality of transport sections and the transport body is capable of receiving a rotational drive force from the drive tubes at every transport sections. If necessary, a transport route changeover switch which changes over the transport route can be provided between the transport sections.

Kurosawa, Kanji (Tokyo, JP); Koga, Bunichiro (Miyagi, JP); Ito, Hideki (Miyagi, JP); Kiriyama, Shigeru (Miyagi, JP); Higuchi, Shizuo (Kanagawa, JP)

2003-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

326

Battery system  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a battery system for use with a battery powered device. It comprises a battery pack, the battery pack including; battery cells; positive and negative terminals serially coupled to the battery cells, the positive terminal being adapted to deliver output current to a load and receive input current in the direction of charging current; circuit means coupled to the positive and negative terminals and producing at an analog output terminal an analog output signal related to the state of charge of the battery cells; and display means separate from the battery pack and the battery powered device and electrically coupled to the analog output terminal for producing a display indicating the state of charge of the battery cells in accordance with the analog output signal.

Sokira, T.J.

1991-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

327

Creation of an Enhanced Geothermal System through Hydraulic and Thermal Stimulation  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a 10-year DOE-funded project to design, characterize and create an Engineered Geothermal System (EGS) through a combination of hydraulic, thermal and chemical stimulation techniques. Volume 1 describes a four-year Phase 1 campaign, which focused on the east compartment of the Coso geothermal field. It includes a description of the geomechanical, geophysical, hydraulic, and geochemical studies that were conducted to characterize the reservoir in anticipation of the hydraulic stimulation experiment. Phase 1 ended prematurely when the drill bit intersected a very permeable fault zone during the redrilling of target stimulation well 34-9RD2. A hydraulic stimulation was inadvertently achieved, however, since the flow of drill mud from the well into the formation created an earthquake swarm near the wellbore that was recorded, located, analyzed and interpreted by project seismologists. Upon completion of Phase 1, the project shifted focus to a new target well, which was located within the southwest compartment of the Coso geothermal field. Volume 2 describes the Phase 2 studies on the geomechanical, geophysical, hydraulic, and geochemical aspects of the reservoir in and around target-stimulation well 46A-19RD, which is the deepest and hottest well ever drilled at Coso. Its total measured depth exceeding 12,000 ft. It spite of its great depth, this well is largely impermeable below a depth of about 9,000 ft, thus providing an excellent target for stimulation. In order to prepare 46A-19RD for stimulation, however, it was necessary to pull the slotted liner. This proved to be unachievable under the budget allocated by the Coso Operating Company partners, and this aspect of the project was abandoned, ending the program at Coso. The program then shifted to the EGS project at Desert Peak, which had a goal similar to the one at Coso of creating an EGS on the periphery of an existing geothermal reservoir. Volume 3 describes the activities that the Coso team contributed to the Desert Peak project, focusing largely on a geomechanical investigation of the Desert Peak reservoir, tracer testing between injectors 21-2 and 22-22 and the field�s main producers, and the chemical stimulation of target well 27-15.

Rose, Peter Eugene [Energy and Geoscience Institute at the Univerity of Utah] [Energy and Geoscience Institute at the Univerity of Utah

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

328

Creation of an Enhanced Geothermal System through Hydraulic and Thermal Stimulation  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a 10-year DOE-funded project to design, characterize and create an Engineered Geothermal System (EGS) through a combination of hydraulic, thermal and chemical stimulation techniques. Volume 1 describes a four-year Phase 1 campaign, which focused on the east compartment of the Coso geothermal field. It includes a description of the geomechanical, geophysical, hydraulic, and geochemical studies that were conducted to characterize the reservoir in anticipation of the hydraulic stimulation experiment. Phase 1 ended prematurely when the drill bit intersected a very permeable fault zone during the redrilling of target stimulation well 34-9RD2. A hydraulic stimulation was inadvertently achieved, however, since the flow of drill mud from the well into the formation created an earthquake swarm near the wellbore that was recorded, located, analyzed and interpreted by project seismologists. Upon completion of Phase 1, the project shifted focus to a new target well, which was located within the southwest compartment of the Coso geothermal field. Volume 2 describes the Phase 2 studies on the geomechanical, geophysical, hydraulic, and geochemical aspects of the reservoir in and around target-stimulation well 46A-19RD, which is the deepest and hottest well ever drilled at Coso. Its total measured depth exceeding 12,000 ft. It spite of its great depth, this well is largely impermeable below a depth of about 9,000 ft, thus providing an excellent target for stimulation. In order to prepare 46A-19RD for stimulation, however, it was necessary to pull the slotted liner. This proved to be unachievable under the budget allocated by the Coso Operating Company partners, and this aspect of the project was abandoned, ending the program at Coso. The program then shifted to the EGS project at Desert Peak, which had a goal similar to the one at Coso of creating an EGS on the periphery of an existing geothermal reservoir. Volume 3 describes the activities that the Coso team contributed to the Desert Peak project, focusing largely on a geomechanical investigation of the Desert Peak reservoir, tracer testing between injectors 21-2 and 22-22 and the field�������¢����������������s main producers, and the chemical stimulation of target well 27-15.

Rose, Peter Eugene [Energy and Geoscience Institute at the University of Utah] [Energy and Geoscience Institute at the University of Utah

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

329

Environmental Management System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Video Community, Environment Environmental Stewardship Environmental Protection Environmental Management System Environmental Management System An Environmental...

330

Systems Infrastructure (SYS 18)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Networked Sensing Systems Infrastructure John Hicks, Karencomponents The Systems Infrastructure team assembles, tests,

Richard Guy; John Hicks; Karen Weeks

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

SYS 5: Systems Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Networked Sensing Systems Infrastructure Kevin Chang, Johnnents The Systems Infrastructure team assembles, tests, and

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

A re-evaluation of the Moyuta geothermal system, Southern Guatemala  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chemical and isotopic data from four fumarole sites combined with prefeasibility assessments obtained in the 1970s have resulted in a re-evaluation of the Moyuta geothermal system. Moyuta consists of an east-west trending complex of Quaternary andesite/dacite domes and flows cut by north-trending faults. Areas of fumaroles, acid springs, and bicarbonate-rich thermal springs flank the north and south sides of the volcanic complex. Chloride-rich thermal springs discharge along rivers at lower elevations around the Moyuta highland. The distribution of thermal features indicates that deep reservoir fluid rises convectively near the axis of volcanism. Geochemical data suggest that there are two subsystems having temperatures of about 210{degrees}C (north flank) and 170{degrees}C (south flank). Exploration wells sited near the most northerly fumarole (Azulco) achieved temperatures of {le}113{degrees}C at 1004 m depth. We suggest the fumaroles occur above hydrothermal outflow plumes confined to vertical, fault-controlled conduits. Better drilling sites occur closer to the intersections of the north trending faults and the Quaternary volcanic axis. 21 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

Goff, F.; Adams, A.; Trujillo, P.E.; Counce, D. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Janik, C.; Fahlquist, L. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (USA)); Roldan, A.; Revolorio, M. (Instituto Nacional de Electrificacion, Guatemala City (Guatemala). Unidad de Desarollo Geotermico)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Numerical studies of fluid-rock interactions in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) with CO2 as working fluid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University, pp. 233–238. Durst, D. (2002), “GeochemicalFrance (Jacquot, 2000; Durst, 2002; Bächler, 2003; André etfrom a Soultz Well GPK1 sample (Durst, 2002). Initial water

Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten; Apps, John

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

NREL: Energy Systems Integration - Energy Systems Integration...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Systems Integration Facility Newsroom The Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) will be one of the only megawatt-scale test facilities in the United States that...

335

Laser Music System.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? A Laser Music System has been created, that combines a laser and light sensor system with an infrared distance sensing system that detects the… (more)

Woodruff, Astra

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

NERSC Computational Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

My NERSC Getting Started Computational Systems Edison Hopper Carver Dirac PDSF Genepool Testbeds Retired Systems Data & File Systems Network Connections Queues and Scheduling Job...

337

Minimal fusion systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??We define minimal fusion systems in a way that every non-solvable fusion system has a section which is minimal. Minimal fusion systems can also be… (more)

Henke, Ellen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Evaluation of C-14 as a natural tracer for injected fluids at theAidlin sector of The Geysers geothermal system through modeling ofmineral-water-gas Reactions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A reactive-transport model for 14C was developed to test its applicability to the Aidlin geothermal system. Using TOUGHREACT, we developed a 1-D grid to evaluate the effects of water injection and subsequent water-rock-gas interaction on the compositions of the produced fluids. A dual-permeability model of the fracture-matrix system was used to describe reaction-transport processes in which the permeability of the fractures is many orders of magnitude higher than that of the rock matrix. The geochemical system included the principal minerals (K-feldspar, plagioclase, calcite, silica polymorphs) of the metagraywackes that comprise the geothermal reservoir rocks. Initial simulation results predict that the gas-phase CO2 in the reservoir will become more enriched in 14C as air-equilibrated injectate water (with a modern carbon signature) is incorporated into the system, and that these changes will precede accompanying decreases in reservoir temperature. The effects of injection on 14C in the rock matrix will be lessened somewhat because of the dissolution of matrix calcite with ''dead'' carbon.

Dobson, Patrick; Sonnenthal, Eric; Lewicki, Jennifer; Kennedy, Mack

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Communication Systems Chair of Communication Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, porn sites, web services, ... :-)) #12;8 | 28 Communication Systems network insecurity Inner and intra

Schindelhauer, Christian

340

TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS Transportation systems are the building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS Transportation systems are the building blocks of modern society. Efficient mobility improves the quality of life. However, transportation systems by their very nature also affect quality. The transportation systems graduate pro- gram provides in-depth knowledge on the design

Wang, Yuhang

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "telemetry systems geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Complex System Classification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of terms such as “Engineering Systems”, “System of systems” and others have been coming into greater use over the past decade to denote systems of importance but with implied higher complexity than for the term ...

Magee, Christopher

2004-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

342

A Reconnaissance Geochemical Study Of La Primavera Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1100 and 1560 mgkg after flashing. Neither of the high-temperature wells produced steam in commercial quantities. The well at the western margin of the Sierra produced fluids...

343

Geochemical Society and the Mineralogical Society of America  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Society and the Mineralogical Society of America Society and the Mineralogical Society of America Reviews in Mineralogy and Geochemistry (2006) Volume 63 Neutron Scattering in Earth Sciences Hans-Rudolf Wenk (Editor) (Click text for link. * Means no presentation available.) Short Course Presentations Chapter 1: Introduction to Neutron Properties and Applications. By John B. Parise *Chapter 2: Neutron Production, Neutron Facilities and Neutron Instrumentation. By Sven C. Vogel and Hans-Georg Priesmeyer Chapter 3: Single-Crystal Neutron Diffraction: Present and Future Applications. By Nancy L. Ross and Christina Hoffman Chapter 4: Neutron Rietveld Refinement. By Robert B. Von Dreele Chapter 5: Application of Neutron Powder-Diffraction to Mineral Structures. By Karsten Knorr and Wulf Depmeier

344

ORGANIC GEOCHEMICAL STUDIES. I. MOLECULAR CRITERIA FOR HYDROCARBON GENESIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

isoprenoid hydrocarbons in crude oils and sediments must beisomers (up to C ) in crude oil and those characterised inarc found ubiqubtously in crude oils and shalt extracts as

McCarthy, Eugene D.; Calvin, Kevin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Hg Anomalies In Soils- A Geochemical Exploration Method For Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Journal Article Mercury Vapor At Breitenbush Hot Springs Area (Varekamp & Buseck, 1983) Mercury Vapor At Desert Peak Area...

346

A Mineralogical Petrographic And Geochemical Study Of Samples...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

montmorillonite, alunite, anhydrite, gypsum, calcite, and opaque minerals. The chemical composition of the minerals (104 analyses) was determined with Electron Probe...

347

3Geochemistry Published by AGU and the Geochemical Society  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

identified by a systematic grid of conductive heat flow measure- 15 ments. An array of conductive heat flow, conductive heat flow data indicate a general crossvalley fluid flow, where 18 seawater enters the shallow occurring within faults that surround the fluid discharge sites. These conductive 23 heat flow data

Johnson, H. Paul

348

ORGANIC GEOCHEMICAL STUDIES. I. MOLECULAR CRITERIA FOR HYDROCARBON GENESIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at present. I The Fischer-Tropsch reaction has beenof petrol.eum. (The Fischer-Tropsch reaction is a catalyticcharacterised in the Fischer-Tropsch Z s reaction product.

McCarthy, Eugene D.; Calvin, Kevin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

GEOCHEMICAL TESTING AND MODEL DEVELOPMENT - RESIDUAL TANK WASTE TEST PLAN  

SciTech Connect

This Test Plan describes the testing and chemical analyses release rate studies on tank residual samples collected following the retrieval of waste from the tank. This work will provide the data required to develop a contaminant release model for the tank residuals from both sludge and salt cake single-shell tanks. The data are intended for use in the long-term performance assessment and conceptual model development.

CANTRELL KJ; CONNELLY MP

2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

350

Factors Controlling The Geochemical Evolution Of Fumarolic Encrustatio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

factors controlled the formation and evolution of fumarolic encrustations on the 1912 ash-flow sheet in the Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes (VTTS). The six-factor solution model...

351

Geochemical and sedimentological investigations of Youngest Toba Tuff ashfall deposits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Equivalent gal Fan, the i-welded pyro is colossal ive outflow een Prapa m in thickn and Ghaz ) caldera fill ported to -6). YTT as ; Acharyya l., 1998; We r et al., 1991 material h South Chin clastic density eruption a sheet, and d t and Porse ess... . Equivalent gal Fan, the i-welded pyro is colossal ive outflow een Prapa m in thickn and Ghaz ) caldera fill ported to -6). YTT as ; Acharyya l., 1998; We r et al., 1991 material h South Chin clastic density eruption a sheet, and d t and Porse ess...

Gatti, Emma

2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

352

Hydrological and Geochemical Investigations of Selenium Behavior at Kesterson Reservoir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Basic components of the SXRFM at NSLS (beamline X26A) FigureChicago), and the staff at NSLS; George Parks, John Bargar,Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), Brookhaven National

Zawislanski, P.T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

ORGANIC GEOCHEMICAL STUDIES. I. MOLECULAR CRITERIA FOR HYDROCARBON GENESIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

phy- tane, thought to be derived from the phytol side chain of the chloro- phyll molecules, the green

McCarthy, Eugene D.; Calvin, Kevin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

ORGANIC GEOCHEMICAL STUDIES. I. MOLECULAR CRITERIA FOR HYDROCARBON GENESIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cracking of a mixture of propane and ethane. These tworeaction, ethane and propane, could be generated fromMaterials: 50% ethane, 50% propane Rel. Amount (%) Ethylene

McCarthy, Eugene D.; Calvin, Kevin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Merging High Resolution Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys to...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

This program will combine detailed gravity, high resolution aeromagnetic, and LIDAR data, all of which will be combined for structural modeling, with hyperspectral data,...

356

Systems Engineering Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... advances, and deploys measurement science to address application of engineering information systems to complex cyber-physical systems. ...

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

357

Networked Control Systems Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and deploys measurement science for sensor networks and control systems used in manufacturing, construction, and other cyber-physical systems ...

2012-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

358

Systems Integration Division Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... systems integration and engineering, life cycle assessment, cyber-physical systems, productivity measurement, sustainability and energy efficiency. ...

2013-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

359

Complex Systems Program Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Systems Program seeks to understand the fundamental science of these ... Complex Systems Fundamentals Roldan Pozo; Measurement Science for ...

2011-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

360

NETL: Gasification Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brochures Gasification Systems Reference Shelf - Brochures The Gasification Technology brochures are as follows: Gasification Plant Databases (Aug 2013) Gasification Systems...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "telemetry systems geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Sensors, Instrumentation Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sensors, Instrumentation Systems science-innovationassetsimagesicon-science.jpg Sensors, Instrumentation Systems National security depends on science and technology. The...

362

Public Safety Communication Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... integrate legacy communication and information systems and ... will support system analysis and troubleshooting ... create a global market for equipment ...

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

363

Environmental Management Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Management Systems Technical Assistance Tools Technical Assistance Tool: Integrating Sustainable Practices into Environmental Management Systems , November 2009...

364

Fluid Imaging of Enhanced Geothermal Systems through Joint 3D Geophysical  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Imaging of Enhanced Geothermal Systems through Joint 3D Geophysical Imaging of Enhanced Geothermal Systems through Joint 3D Geophysical Inverse Modeling Geothermal Lab Call Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Fluid Imaging of Enhanced Geothermal Systems through Joint 3D Geophysical Inverse Modeling Project Type / Topic 1 Laboratory Call for Submission of Applications for Research, Development and Analysis of Geothermal Technologies Project Type / Topic 2 Fluid Imaging Project Description EGS has been defined as enhanced reservoirs that have been created to extract economical amounts of heat from low permeability and/or porosity geothermal resources. Critical to the success of EGS is the successful manipulation of fluids in the subsurface to enhance permeability. Knowledge in the change in volume and location of fluids in the rocks and fractures (both natural and induced) will be needed to manage injection strategies such as the number and location of step out wells, in-fill wells and the ratio of injection to production wells. The key difficulty in manipulating fluids has been our inability to reliably predict their locations, movements and concentrations. We believe combining data from MEQ and electrical surveys has the potential to overcome these problems and can meet many of the above needs, economically. Induced seismicity is currently viewed as one of the essential methods for inferring the success of creating fracture permeability and fluid paths during large scale EGS injections. Fluids are obviously playing a critical role in inducing the seismicity, however, other effects such as thermal, geochemical and stress redistribution, etc. may also play a role.

365

Wireless Infrastructure for Performing Monitoring, Diagnostics, and Control HVAC and Other Energy-Using Systems in Small Commercial Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project focused on developing a low-cost wireless infrastructure for monitoring, diagnosing, and controlling building systems and equipment. End users receive information via the Internet and need only a web browser and Internet connection. The system used wireless communications for: (1) collecting data centrally on site from many wireless sensors installed on building equipment, (2) transmitting control signals to actuators and (3) transmitting data to an offsite network operations center where it is processed and made available to clients on the Web (see Figure 1). Although this wireless infrastructure can be applied to any building system, it was tested on two representative applications: (1) monitoring and diagnostics for packaged rooftop HVAC units used widely on small commercial buildings and (2) continuous diagnosis and control of scheduling errors such as lights and equipment left on during unoccupied hours. This project developed a generic infrastructure for performance monitoring, diagnostics, and control, applicable to a broad range of building systems and equipment, but targeted specifically to small to medium commercial buildings (an underserved market segment). The proposed solution is based on two wireless technologies. The first, wireless telemetry, is used for cell phones and paging and is reliable and widely available. This risk proved to be easily managed during the project. The second technology is on-site wireless communication for acquiring data from sensors and transmitting control signals. The technology must enable communication with many nodes, overcome physical obstructions, operate in environments with other electrical equipment, support operation with on-board power (instead of line power) for some applications, operate at low transmission power in license-free radio bands, and be low cost. We proposed wireless mesh networking to meet these needs. This technology is relatively new and has been applied only in research and tests. This proved to be a major challenge for the project and was ultimately abandoned in favor of a directly wired solution for collecting sensor data at the building. The primary reason for this was the relatively short ranges at which we were able to effectively place the sensor nodes from the central receiving unit. Several different mesh technologies were attempted with similar results. Two hardware devices were created during the original performance period of the project. The first device, the WEB-MC, is a master control unit that has two radios, a CPU, memory, and serves as the central communications device for the WEB-MC System (Currently called the 'BEST Wireless HVAC Maintenance System' as a tentative commercial product name). The WEB-MC communicates with the local mesh network system via one of its antennas. Communication with the mesh network enables the WEB-MC to configure the network, send/receive data from individual motes, and serves as the primary mechanism for collecting sensor data at remote locations. The second antenna enables the WEB-MC to connect to a cellular network ('Long-Haul Communications') to transfer data to and from the NorthWrite Network Operations Center (NOC). A third 'all-in-one' hardware solution was created after the project was extended (Phase 2) and additional resources were provided. The project team leveraged a project funded by the State of Washington to develop a hardware solution that integrated the functionality of the original two devices. The primary reason for this approach was to eliminate the mesh network technical difficulties that severely limited the functionality of the original hardware approach. There were five separate software developments required to deliver the functionality needed for this project. These include the Data Server (or Network Operations Center), Web Application, Diagnostic Software, WEB-MC Embedded Software, Mote Embedded Software. Each of these developments was necessarily dependent on the others. This resulted in a challenging management task - requiring high bandwidth communications among

Patrick O'Neill

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

366

Wireless Infrastructure for Performing Monitoring, Diagnostics, and Control HVAC and Other Energy-Using Systems in Small Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect

This project focused on developing a low-cost wireless infrastructure for monitoring, diagnosing, and controlling building systems and equipment. End users receive information via the Internet and need only a web browser and Internet connection. The system used wireless communications for: (1) collecting data centrally on site from many wireless sensors installed on building equipment, (2) transmitting control signals to actuators and (3) transmitting data to an offsite network operations center where it is processed and made available to clients on the Web (see Figure 1). Although this wireless infrastructure can be applied to any building system, it was tested on two representative applications: (1) monitoring and diagnostics for packaged rooftop HVAC units used widely on small commercial buildings and (2) continuous diagnosis and control of scheduling errors such as lights and equipment left on during unoccupied hours. This project developed a generic infrastructure for performance monitoring, diagnostics, and control, applicable to a broad range of building systems and equipment, but targeted specifically to small to medium commercial buildings (an underserved market segment). The proposed solution is based on two wireless technologies. The first, wireless telemetry, is used for cell phones and paging and is reliable and widely available. This risk proved to be easily managed during the project. The second technology is on-site wireless communication for acquiring data from sensors and transmitting control signals. The technology must enable communication with many nodes, overcome physical obstructions, operate in environments with other electrical equipment, support operation with on-board power (instead of line power) for some applications, operate at low transmission power in license-free radio bands, and be low cost. We proposed wireless mesh networking to meet these needs. This technology is relatively new and has been applied only in research and tests. This proved to be a major challenge for the project and was ultimately abandoned in favor of a directly wired solution for collecting sensor data at the building. The primary reason for this was the relatively short ranges at which we were able to effectively place the sensor nodes from the central receiving unit. Several different mesh technologies were attempted with similar results. Two hardware devices were created during the original performance period of the project. The first device, the WEB-MC, is a master control unit that has two radios, a CPU, memory, and serves as the central communications device for the WEB-MC System (Currently called the 'BEST Wireless HVAC Maintenance System' as a tentative commercial product name). The WEB-MC communicates with the local mesh network system via one of its antennas. Communication with the mesh network enables the WEB-MC to configure the network, send/receive data from individual motes, and serves as the primary mechanism for collecting sensor data at remote locations. The second antenna enables the WEB-MC to connect to a cellular network ('Long-Haul Communications') to transfer data to and from the NorthWrite Network Operations Center (NOC). A third 'all-in-one' hardware solution was created after the project was extended (Phase 2) and additional resources were provided. The project team leveraged a project funded by the State of Washington to develop a hardware solution that integrated the functionality of the original two devices. The primary reason for this approach was to eliminate the mesh network technical difficulties that severely limited the functionality of the original hardware approach. There were five separate software developments required to deliver the functionality needed for this project. These include the Data Server (or Network Operations Center), Web Application, Diagnostic Software, WEB-MC Embedded Software, Mote Embedded Software. Each of these developments was necessarily dependent on the others. This resulted in a challenging management task - requiring high bandwidth communications among

Patrick O'Neill

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

367

System Demonstration Multilingual Weather Forecast Generation System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

System Demonstration Multilingual Weather Forecast Generation System Tianfang Yao DongmoZhang Qian (Multilingual Weather Forecasts Assistant) system will be demonstrated. It is developed to generate the multilingual text of the weather forecasts automatically. The raw data from the weather observation can be used

368

Energy Systems Integration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Systems Integration Systems Integration Ben Kroposki, PhD, PE Director, Energy Systems Integration National Renewable Energy Laboratory 2 Reducing investment risk and optimizing systems in a rapidly changing energy world * Increasing penetration of variable RE in grid * Increasing ultra high energy efficiency buildings and controllable loads * New data, information, communications and controls * Electrification of transportation and alternative fuels * Integrating energy storage (stationary and mobile) and thermal storage * Interactions between electricity/thermal/fuels/data pathways * Increasing system flexibility and intelligence Current Energy Systems Future Energy Systems Why Energy Systems Integration? 3 Energy Systems Integration Continuum Scale Appliance (Plug)

369

Systems Analysis Workshop Purpose  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Renewable Energy Laboratory National Renewable Energy Laboratory DOE Hydrogen Program DOE Hydrogen Program Systems Analysis Workshop Systems Analysis Workshop Systems Integration Production Delivery Conversion Application Education Codes & Standards Safety Tech Validation Storage Systems Integration Production Delivery Conversion Application Education Codes & Standards Safety Tech Validation Storage Washington D.C. 28-29 Jul 04 Dale Gardner Systems Integration Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle 2 Systems Analysis Workshop Topics * Meeting Goals * Systems Integration * Roles/Responsibilities of Analysis Participants * Systems Analysis * From this Workshop * Capability Presentations 3 Systems Analysis Workshop Meeting Goals 1) Understand the roles and activities of the DOE Technology Analyst,

370

Learning classifier systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This tutorial gives an introduction to Learning Classifier Systems focusing on the Michigan-Style type and XCS in particular. The objective is to introduce (1) where LCSs come from, (2) how LCSs generally work, (3) which different systems exist, (4) ... Keywords: adaptive systems, cognitive systems, datamining, function approximation, genetic algorithms, learning classifier systems, machine learning, regression, reinforcement learning

Martin V. Butz

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Evaluation of systems usability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Motivation -- Development of complex system interfaces can benefit, in addition to the traditional safety focused evaluation, also from a usability approach to evaluation of system performance. But as the users, the information system, and the ... Keywords: activity theory, complex systems, joint cognitive systems, usability evaluation

Paula Savioja; Leena Norros; Leena Salo

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Lossy compression and real-time geovisualization for ultra-low bandwidth telemetry from untethered underwater vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oceanographic applications of robotics are as varied as the undersea environment itself. As underwater robotics moves toward the study of dynamic processes with multiple vehicles, there is an increasing need to distill ...

Murphy, Christopher Alden

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Lighting system with thermal management system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Lighting systems having unique configurations are provided. For instance, the lighting system may include a light source, a thermal management system and driver electronics, each contained within a housing structure. The light source is configured to provide illumination visible through an opening in the housing structure. The thermal management system is configured to provide an air flow, such as a unidirectional air flow, through the housing structure in order to cool the light source. The driver electronics are configured to provide power to each of the light source and the thermal management system.

Arik, Mehmet; Weaver, Stanton; Stecher, Thomas; Seeley, Charles; Kuenzler, Glenn; Wolfe, Jr., Charles; Utturkar, Yogen; Sharma, Rajdeep; Prabhakaran, Satish; Icoz, Tunc

2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

374

Concentrator Photovoltaic Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Concentrator photovoltaic (PV) systems use less solar cell material than other PV systems. PV cells are the most expensive components of a PV system, on a per-area basis. A concentrator makes use...

375

Steam System Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most plant steam systems are complex systems. Usually the fuel required to produce the steam represents a major expense for manufacturing facilities. By properly operating and maintaining the steam system and making minor improvements, significant savings can be realized.

Aegerter, R. A.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Hybrid Systems Diagnosis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on an on-going project to investigate techniques to diagnose complex dynamical systems that are modeled as hybrid systems. In particular, we examine continuous systems with embedded supervisory controllers that experience abrupt, partial ...

Sheila A. McIlraith; Gautam Biswas; Dan Clancy; Vineet Gupta

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Geologic and hydrologic research on the Moana geothermal system, Washoe County, Nevada. Final report October 1, 1982-December 31, 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Combined geologic, geophysical, geochemical, and drilling exploration surveys were used to assess the Moana geothermal resource in Washoe County, Nevada, and to determine its relationship with nearby Steamboat Hot Springs. Moana is the largest single moderate-temperature resource in Nevada that supports geothermal space heating applications. Results show that the general geology and structure for the two systems is similar, but important differences exist with respect to reservoir rocks. Gravity data delineated the contact between important volcanic and sedimentary rocks in Moana, but contour trends did not correlate well with mapped faults. Fluid geochemistry data show major differences in bulk chemical composition, stable-light isotope ratios, and radiocarbon ages for Moana and Steamboat geothermal waters. Water level measurements in observation wells in Moana show simultaneous increasing and decreasing values in different sections of the geothermal area. Temperature-depth profiles changed little during the six-month monitoring period. Direct use of the resource is increasing and longer-lasting, more efficient down-hole heat exchangers are replacing previous equipment that was prone to scaling and corrosion. A computer program that calculates heat output for state-of-the-art heat exchangers is described. Recommendations for continued monitoring, heat exchanger design, and fluid reinjection studies are included. Data are available to government agencies responsible for regulation as well as local residents and potential developers to ensure prudent resource utilization.

Flynn, T.; Ghusn, G. Jr.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Mantle helium and carbon isotopes in Separation Creek Geothermal Springs, Three Sisters area, Central Oregon: Evidence for renewed volcanic activity or a long term steady state system?  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cold bubbling springs in the Separation Creek area, the locus of current uplift at South Sister volcano show strong mantle signatures in helium and carbon isotopes and CO{sub 2}/{sup 3}He. This suggests the presence of fresh basaltic magma in the volcanic plumbing system. Currently there is no evidence to link this system directly to the uplift, which started in 1998. To the contrary, all geochemical evidence suggests that there is a long-lived geothermal system in the Separation Creek area, which has not significantly changed since the early 1990s. There was no archived helium and carbon data, so a definite conclusion regarding the strong mantle signature observed in these tracers cannot yet be drawn. There is a distinct discrepancy between the yearly magma supply required to explain the current uplift (0.006 km{sup 3}/yr) and that required to explain the discharge of CO{sub 2} from the system (0.0005 km{sup 3}/yr). This discrepancy may imply that the chemical signal associated with the increase in magma supply has not reached the surface yet. With respect to this the small changes observed at upper Mesa Creek require further attention, due to the recent volcanic vent in that area it may be the location were the chemical signal related to the uplift can most quickly reach the surface. Occurrence of such strong mantle signals in cold/diffuse geothermal systems suggests that these systems should not be ignored during volcano monitoring or geothermal evaluation studies. Although the surface-expression of these springs in terms of heat is minimal, the chemistry carries important information concerning the size and nature of the underlying high-temperature system and any changes taking place in it.

van Soest, M.C.; Kennedy, B.M.; Evans, W.C.; Mariner, R.H.

2002-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

379

Data & File Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data Management Policies NERSC File Systems HPSS Data Archive Optimizing IO performance on the Lustre file system IO Formats Sharing Data Transferring Data Unix Groups at NERSC...

380

Manufacturing Skills Certification System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... system to their business so that they utilize the skills certification system ... provide input to The Manufacturing Institute about aggregate skill needs of ...

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "telemetry systems geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Sustainable Energy Systems Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sustainable Energy Systems Group The Sustainable Energy Systems Group studies the impacts of energy generation and use, manufacturing, and other activities on the environment, the...

382

Usability for Biometric Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... to improve the usability of biometric systems, it is ... users will have with a system, including the hardware, software and instructional design of a ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

383

Jobstream Separator System Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... any unprivileged PDP-11/45 machine instruction or invoke ... are not an inherent part of the JSS system. ... Four of the six systems are }~C, SAC, NORAD ...

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

384

Umbra's system representation.  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the Umbra System representation. Umbra System representation, initially developed in the spring of 2003, is implemented in Incr/Tcl using concepts borrowed from Carnegie Mellon University's Architecture Description Language (ADL) called Acme. In the spring of 2004 through January 2005, System was converted to Umbra 4, extended slightly, and adopted as the underlying software system for a variety of Umbra applications that support Complex Systems Engineering (CSE) and Complex Adaptive Systems Engineering (CASE). System is now a standard part Of Umbra 4. While Umbra 4 also includes an XML parser for System, the XML parser and Schema are not described in this document.

McDonald, Michael James

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Control system design method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A control system design method and concomitant control system comprising representing a physical apparatus to be controlled as a Hamiltonian system, determining elements of the Hamiltonian system representation which are power generators, power dissipators, and power storage devices, analyzing stability and performance of the Hamiltonian system based on the results of the determining step and determining necessary and sufficient conditions for stability of the Hamiltonian system, creating a stable control system based on the results of the analyzing step, and employing the resulting control system to control the physical apparatus.

Wilson, David G. (Tijeras, NM); Robinett, III, Rush D. (Tijeras, NM)

2012-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

386

Euclid File Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Request Form Euclid File Systems Euclid has 3 kinds of file systems available to users: home directories, scratch directories and project directories, all provided by the NERSC...

387

Underwater Glider System Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Leonard, N. E. , “ONR Underwater Glider Systems Study GliderDavis. The Autonomous Underwater Glider Spray. IEEE Journalto the ONR Committee for Underwater Glider Systems Study,

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Training Management System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beam Time ESAF Contacts Calendars User Community Scientific Access Site AccessVisit Training Training Management System Argonne system used to track training requirements and...

389

Comparative assessment of five potential sites for hydrothermal magma systems: geochemistry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A brief discussion is given of the geochemical objectives and questions that must be addressed in such an evaluation. A summary of the currently published literature that is pertinent in answering these questions is presented for each of the five areas: The Geysers-Clear Lake region, Long Valley, Rio Grand Rift, Roosevelt Hot Springs, and the Salton Trough. The major geochemical processes associated with proposed hydrothermal sites are categorized into three groups for presentation: geochemistry of magma and associated volcanic rocks, geochemistry of hydrothermal solutions, and geochemistry of hydrothermal alteration. (MHR)

White, A.F.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

NERSC File Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Systems Systems NERSC File Systems Overview NERSC file systems can be divided into two categories: local and global. Local file systems are only accessible on a single platform, providing best performance; global file systems are accessible on multiple platforms, simplifying data sharing between platforms. File systems are configured for different purposes. On each machine you have access to at least three different file system Home: Permanent, relatively small storage for data like source code, shell scripts, etc. that you want to keep. This file system is not tuned for high performance from parallel jobs. Referenced by the environment variable $HOME. Scratch: Large, high-performance file system. Place your large data files in this file system for capacity and capability computing. Data is

391

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

61 - 4870 of 26,777 results. 61 - 4870 of 26,777 results. Article Innovative Telemetry System Will Help Tap Hard-to-Reach Natural Gas Resources The commercialization of an innovative telemetry communications system developed through a U.S. Department of Energy research program will help U.S. producers tap previously hard-to-reach natural gas resources deep underground, resulting in access to additional supplies that will help enhance national energy security. http://energy.gov/fe/articles/innovative-telemetry-system-will-help-tap-hard-reach-natural Article Celebrating The Next Generation of Energy Entrepreneurs Recognizing innovative, bold-thinking student entrepreneurs who are working to advance clean energy technologies. http://energy.gov/articles/celebrating-next-generation-energy-entrepreneurs

392

NETL: NEPA Categorical Exclusions - April 2012 to June 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 to June 2012 2 to June 2012 Archive (November 2009 - March 2012) ARRA Date Title Recipient Name Location DOE/NETL Sponsors N 6/28/2012 B7-8 Roof Replacements & B14-16 Demolitions NETL Albany Albany, OR FE/SOD/NETL/Albany N 6/27/2012 2009 National Biodiesel Foundation Biodiesel Infrastructure Project Prime: National Biodiesel Foundation Sub: Harms Oil Company Sioux Falls, SD EE/PMC/PVTD N 6/27/2012 Intelligent Casing - Intelligent Formations Telemetry (ICIFT) System Prime: RPSEA Sub: DrillRight Oklahoma City, OK FE/SCNGO N 6/27/2012 Intelligent Casing - Intelligent Formations Telemetry (ICIFT) System Prime: RPSEA Sub: University of Oklahoma, Main Campus Norman, OK FE/SCNGO N 6/27/2012 Intelligent Casing - Intelligent Formations Telemetry (ICIFT) System Prime: RPSEA

393

NREL: Energy Systems Integration - Energy Systems Integration...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and concentrating solar systems are tested. There is an emphasis on measurement of parabolic trough mirror panels. For detailed laboratory specifications, download the Optical...

394

Near-Surface CO2 Monitoring And Analysis To Detect Hidden Geothermal Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

''Hidden'' geothermal systems are systems devoid of obvious surface hydrothermal manifestations. Emissions of moderate-to-low solubility gases may be one of the primary near-surface signals from these systems. We investigate the potential for CO2 detection and monitoring below and above ground in the near-surface environment as an approach to exploration targeting hidden geothermal systems. We focus on CO2 because it is the dominant noncondensible gas species in most geothermal systems and has moderate solubility in water. We carried out numerical simulations of a CO2 migration scenario to calculate the magnitude of expected fluxes and concentrations. Our results show that CO2 concentrations can reach high levels in the shallow subsurface even for relatively low geothermal source CO2 fluxes. However, once CO2 seeps out of the ground into the atmospheric surface layer, winds are effective at dispersing CO2 seepage. In natural ecological systems in the absence of geothermal gas emissions, near-surface CO2 fluxes and concentrations are predominantly controlled by CO2 uptake by photosynthesis, production by root respiration, microbial decomposition of soil/subsoil organic matter, groundwater degassing, and exchange with the atmosphere. Available technologies for monitoring CO2 in the near-surface environment include the infrared gas analyzer, the accumulation chamber method, the eddy covariance method, hyperspectral imaging, and light detection and ranging. To meet the challenge of detecting potentially small-magnitude geothermal CO2 emissions within the natural background variability of CO2, we propose an approach that integrates available detection and monitoring techniques with statistical analysis and modeling strategies. The proposed monitoring plan initially focuses on rapid, economical, reliable measurements of CO2 subsurface concentrations and surface fluxes and statistical analysis of the collected data. Based on this analysis, are as with a high probability of containing geothermal CO2 anomalies can be further sampled and analyzed using more expensive chemical and isotopic methods. Integrated analysis of all measurements will determine definitively if CO2 derived from a deep geothermal source is present, and if so, the spatial extent of the anomaly. The suitability of further geophysical measurements, installation of deep wells, and geochemical analyses of deep fluids can then be determined based on the results of the near surface CO2 monitoring program.

Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2005-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

395

PERFORMANCEMETRICS INTELLIGENT SYSTEMS ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. PERMIS-2007 FOREWORD SPONSORS PerMIS 2008 PERFORMANCEMETRICS FOR INTELLIGENT SYSTEMS (PERMIS) ...

2010-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

396

PHOTOVOLTAIC SOLAR ELECTRIC SYSTEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Buying a PHOTOVOLTAIC SOLAR ELECTRIC SYSTEM A Consumer Guide 2003 System: A Consumer Guide i Buying a Photovoltaic Solar Electric System A Consumer Guide California Energy water system that uses the sun's energy to heat water, solar electric or photovoltaic technology uses

Krothapalli, Anjaneyulu

397

Quality System Documentation Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quality System Documentation Management. ... Minutes, summaries, or notes from Management Meetings of significance are archived here. ...

2012-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

398

Laboratory Management (Quality) Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laboratory Management (Quality) Systems. NISTIR 7028 Type Evaluation Quality Manual Template. This NISTIR has been ...

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

399

Medical imaging systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A medical imaging system provides simultaneous rendering of visible light and diagnostic or functional images. The system may be portable, and may include adapters for connecting various light sources and cameras in open surgical environments or laparascopic or endoscopic environments. A user interface provides control over the functionality of the integrated imaging system. In one embodiment, the system provides a tool for surgical pathology.

Frangioni, John V

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

400

Petascale system management experiences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Petascale HPC systems are among the largest systems in the world. Intrepid, one such system, is a 40,000 node, 556 teraflop Blue Gene/P system that has been deployed at Argonne National Laboratory. In this paper, we provide some background about the ...

Narayan Desai; Rick Bradshaw; Cory Lueninghoener; Andrew Cherry; Susan Coghlan; William Scullin

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "telemetry systems geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Space System Architecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Final Report of SSPARC: the Space Systems, Policy, and Architecture Research Consortium (Thrust II and III)

McManus, Dr. Hugh

402

Building the Senceive System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The conception and development of pervasive systems, i.e, the systems which will be used in pervasive computing environments, involve interdisciplinary team work. Apparently, the team consists of people with a diverse research background and expertise. ... Keywords: activity recognition, building a sensing system, complex system design, network configuration, project work, wireless sensor networks

Waltenegus Dargie; Alexander Schill

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Performance of Integrated Systems of Automated Roller Shade Systems...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

032011 Keywords automated roller shade systems, daylight responsive dimming systems, daylighting, Integrated systems, photoelectric controls Abstract Daylight responsive...

404

Renovating Residential HVAC Systems HVAC Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- 1 - LBNL 57406 Renovating Residential HVAC Systems HVAC Systems J.A. McWilliams and I.S. Walker and Air Conditioning), and Stacy Hunt and Ananda Harzell (IBACOS). #12;- 3 - Renovating Residential HVAC Guideline for Residential HVAC Retrofits (http

405

Photovoltaic systems and applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Abstracts are given of presentations given at a project review meeting held at Albuquerque, NM. The proceedings cover the past accomplishments and current activities of the Photovoltaic Systems Research, Balance-of-System Technology Development and System Application Experiments Projects at Sandia National Laboratories. The status of intermediate system application experiments and residential system analysis is emphasized. Some discussion of the future of the Photovoltaic Program in general, and the Sandia projects in particular is also presented.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Lighting Control Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The demand for lighting control systems in residential, commercial, and industrial facilities is on the rise with the demand for increased energy savings. With lighting accounting for almost 23% of grid load, there is significant opportunity to reduce lighting load while improving the quality of light for customers. Lighting control systems are becoming more intelligent as the need for them to interface with building control systems and demand response systems also increases. Lighting control systems use...

2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

407

The Napier Type System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Persistent programming is concerned with the construction of large and long lived systems of data. In designing and building persistent object systems, we are attempting to regularise the activities that are performed on data by programming languages, operating systems, database management systems and file systems. We have identified the following areas of research which we are investigating in the context of persistent systems. They are: controlling complexity, protection of data, orthogonal persistence, controlled system evolution and concurrent computation. In this paper, we describe the data modelling facilities of the Napier type system. We also demonstrate the flexible and incremental nature of the type checking mechanism that is required for persistent programming. The type system is central to the nature of the Napier language and we will demonstrate how it has been designed to solve problems in the five areas identified above.

R. Morrison; A.L. Brown; R. Carrick; R.C.H. Connor; A. Dearle; M.P. Atkinson

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

AUTONOMOUS ROBOTIC INSPECTION EXPERIMENTAL SYSTEM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document contains appendices on these topics: COMPUTERS AND CONTROLS; COMPUTER VISION SYSTEM; ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS; MECHANICAL SYSTEMS; ROBOTIC VEHICLE SYSTEMS; FIELD TRIALS.

David N. Rocheleau, Senior Investigator; Edward A. Hamilton, Associate Director, SCUREF; Jerry L. Hudgins, Senior Investigator; Paul McCarty, Graduate Research Assistant; Robert J. Schalkoff, Senior Investigator; Robert O. Pettus, Project Manager & Principal Investigator

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Modeling Power Systems as Complex Adaptive Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Physical analogs have shown considerable promise for understanding the behavior of complex adaptive systems, including macroeconomics, biological systems, social networks, and electric power markets. Many of today's most challenging technical and policy questions can be reduced to a distributed economic control problem. Indeed, economically based control of large-scale systems is founded on the conjecture that the price-based regulation (e.g., auctions, markets) results in an optimal allocation of resources and emergent optimal system control. This report explores the state-of-the-art physical analogs for understanding the behavior of some econophysical systems and deriving stable and robust control strategies for using them. We review and discuss applications of some analytic methods based on a thermodynamic metaphor, according to which the interplay between system entropy and conservation laws gives rise to intuitive and governing global properties of complex systems that cannot be otherwise understood. We apply these methods to the question of how power markets can be expected to behave under a variety of conditions.

Chassin, David P.; Malard, Joel M.; Posse, Christian; Gangopadhyaya, Asim; Lu, Ning; Katipamula, Srinivas; Mallow, J V.

2004-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

410

Survival and Passage of Juvenile Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Passing Through Bonneville Dam, 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and subcontractors conducted an acoustic-telemetry study of juvenile salmonid fish passage and survival at Bonneville Dam in 2010. The study was conducted to assess the readiness of the monitoring system for official compliance studies under the 2008 Biological Opinion and Fish Accords and to assess performance measures including route-specific fish passage proportions, travel times, and survival based upon a single-release model. This also was the last year of evaluation of effects of a behavioral guidance device installed in the Powerhouse 2 forebay. The study relied on releases of live Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System tagged smolts in the Columbia River and used acoustic telemetry to evaluate the approach, passage, and survival of passing juvenile salmon. This study supports the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers continual effort to improve conditions for juvenile anadromous fish passing through Columbia River dams.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Kim, Jin A.; Royer, Ida M.; Batten, George W.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Carpenter, Scott M.; Etherington, D. J.; Faber, Derrek M.; Fischer, Eric S.; Fu, Tao; Hennen, Matthew J.; Mitchell, T. D.; Monter, Tyrell J.; Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Zimmerman, Shon A.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Survival and Passage of Juvenile Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Passing through Bonneville Dam, 2010  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and subcontractors conducted an acoustic-telemetry study of juvenile salmonid fish passage and survival at Bonneville Dam in 2010. The study was conducted to assess the readiness of the monitoring system for official compliance studies under the 2008 Biological Opinion and Fish Accords and to assess performance measures including route-specific fish passage proportions, travel times, and survival based upon a single-release model. This also was the last year of evaluation of effects of a behavioral guidance device installed in the Powerhouse 2 forebay. The study relied on releases of live Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System tagged smolts in the Columbia River and used acoustic telemetry to evaluate the approach, passage, and survival of passing juvenile salmon. This study supports the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers continual effort to improve conditions for juvenile anadromous fish passing through Columbia River dams.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Kim, Jin A.; Royer, Ida M.; Batten, George W.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Carpenter, Scott M.; Etherington, D. J.; Faber, Derrek M.; Fischer, Eric S.; Fu, Tao; Hennen, Matthew J.; Mitchell, Tyler; Monter, Tyrell J.; Skalski, John R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Zimmerman, Shon A.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

An Evaluation of Long-Term Performance of Liner Systems for Low-Level Waste Disposal Facilities  

SciTech Connect

Traditional liner systems consisting of a geosynthetic membrane underlying a waste disposal facility coupled with a leachate collection system have been proposed as a means of containing releases of low-level radioactive waste within the confines of the disposal facility and thereby eliminating migration of radionuclides into the vadose zone and groundwater. However, this type of hydraulic containment liner system is only effective as long as the leachate collection system remains functional or an overlying cover limits the total infiltration to the volumetric pore space of the disposal system. If either the leachate collection system fails, or the overlying cover becomes less effective during the 1,000’s of years of facility lifetime, the liner may fill with water and release contaminated water in a preferential or focused manner. If the height of the liner extends above the waste, the waste will become submerged which could increase the release rate and concentration of the leachate. If the liner extends near land surface, there is the potential for contamination reaching land surface creating a direct exposure pathway. Alternative protective liner systems can be engineered that eliminate radionuclide releases to the vadose zone during operations and minimizing long term migration of radionuclides from the disposal facility into the vadose zone and aquifer. Non-traditional systems include waste containerization in steel or composite materials. This type of system would promote drainage of clean infiltrating water through the facility without contacting the waste. Other alternatives include geochemical barriers designed to transmit water while adsorbing radionuclides beneath the facility. Facility performance for a hypothetical disposal facility has been compared for the hydraulic and steel containerization liner alternatives. Results were compared in terms of meeting the DOE Order 435.1 low-level waste performance objective of 25 mrem/yr all-pathways dose during the 1) institutional control period (0-100 years), compliance period (0-1000 years) and post-compliance period (>1000 years). Evaluation of the all pathway dose included the dose from ingestion and irrigation of contaminated groundwater extracted from a well 100 meters downgradient, in addition to the dose received from direct contact of radionuclides deposited near the surface resulting from facility overflow. Depending on the disposal facility radionuclide inventory, facility design, cover performance, and the location and environment where the facility is situated, the dose from exposure via direct contact of near surface deposited radionuclides can be much greater than the dose received via transport to the groundwater and subsequent ingestion.

Arthur S. Rood; Annette L. Schafer; A. Jeffrey Sondrup

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Environmental Management System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Management System Management System Environmental Management System An Environmental Management System is a systematic method for assessing mission activities, determining the environmental impacts of those activities, prioritizing improvements, and measuring results. May 30, 2012 The continuous improvement cycle Our Environmental Management System encourages continuous improvement of our environmental performance. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Managing our effects on the environment We are committed to protecting the environment while conducting our national security and energy-related missions. Laboratory Environmental Governing Policy What is the Environmental Management System? It covers every program in the Laboratory

414

Verification of Adaptive Systems  

SciTech Connect

Adaptive systems are critical for future space and other unmanned and intelligent systems. Verification of these systems is also critical for their use in systems with potential harm to human life or with large financial investments. Due to their nondeterministic nature and extremely large state space, current methods for verification of software systems are not adequate to provide a high level of assurance for them. The combination of stabilization science, high performance computing simulations, compositional verification and traditional verification techniques, plus operational monitors, provides a complete approach to verification and deployment of adaptive systems that has not been used before. This paper gives an overview of this approach.

Pullum, Laura L [ORNL; Cui, Xiaohui [New York Institute of Technology (NYIT); Vassev, Emil [Lero – The Irish Software Engineering Research Centre; Hinchey, Mike [Lero – The Irish Software Engineering Research Centre; Rouff, Christopher [Lockheed Martin Corporation; Buskens, Richard [Lockheed Martin Corporation

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SAM III PROJECT SAM III PROJECT Sandia National laboratories Prepared for: Project File Documentation Prepared by: MICHAEL J. TAYLOR Project Manager March 31, 1998 JO 850200 : FC 970009 ABSTRACT The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) conducted a demonstration of the Surface Area Modulation Downhole Telemetry System (SAM 111) at the Department of Energy's Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3), in partnership with Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The project encompassed the testing of a real-time wireless telemetry system in a simulated Measurement-While-Drilling (MWD) environment. A Surface Area Modulation (SAM) technique demonstrated data transmission rates greater than present techniques, in a deployment mode which requires

416

Static Temperature Survey At Long Valley Caldera Area (Farrar...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

On The Hydrothermal System Beneath The Resurgent Dome In Long Valley Caldera, East-Central California, Usa, From Recent Pumping Tests And Geochemical Sampling Retrieved from...

417

An Improved Equilibrium-Kinetics Speciation Algorithm For Redox...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flow Systems Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Reactive chemical transport occurs in a variety of geochemical environments, and over a broad range of...

418

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects - GAS HYDRATE DYNAMICS...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the first systematic geochemical and microbiological data to constrain subseafloor methane sinks and the spatio-temporal changes in the nature of microbial systems and pore...

419

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Yellowstone Region (Hurwitz...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hurwitz, Jacob B. Lowenstern, Henry Heasler (2007) Spatial And Temporal Geochemical Trends In The Hydrothermal System Of Yellowstone National Park- Inferences From River Solute...

420

SUBSURFACE EMPLACEMENT TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this analysis is to identify issues and criteria that apply to the design of the Subsurface Emplacement Transportation System (SET). The SET consists of the track used by the waste package handling equipment, the conductors and related equipment used to supply electrical power to that equipment, and the instrumentation and controls used to monitor and operate those track and power supply systems. Major considerations of this analysis include: (1) Operational life of the SET; (2) Geometric constraints on the track layout; (3) Operating loads on the track; (4) Environmentally induced loads on the track; (5) Power supply (electrification) requirements; and (6) Instrumentation and control requirements. This analysis will provide the basis for development of the system description document (SDD) for the SET. This analysis also defines the interfaces that need to be considered in the design of the SET. These interfaces include, but are not limited to, the following: (1) Waste handling building; (2) Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) surface site layout; (3) Waste Emplacement System (WES); (4) Waste Retrieval System (WRS); (5) Ground Control System (GCS); (6) Ex-Container System (XCS); (7) Subsurface Electrical Distribution System (SED); (8) MGR Operations Monitoring and Control System (OMC); (9) Subsurface Facility System (SFS); (10) Subsurface Fire Protection System (SFR); (11) Performance Confirmation Emplacement Drift Monitoring System (PCM); and (12) Backfill Emplacement System (BES).

T. Wilson; R. Novotny

1999-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "telemetry systems geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Business System Planning Project System Requirements Specification  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Business Systems Planning Project System Requirements Specification (SRS) is to provide the outline and contents of the requirements for the CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) integrated business and technical information systems. The SRS will translate proposed objectives into the statement of the functions that are to be performed and data and information flows that they require. The requirements gathering methodology will use (1) facilitated group requirement sessions; (2) individual interviews; (3) surveys; and (4) document reviews. The requirements will be verified and validated through coordination of the technical requirement team and CHG Managers. The SRS document used the content and format specified in Lockheed Martin Services, Inc. Organization Standard Software Practices in conjunction with the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Standard 8340-1984 for Systems Requirements Documents.

NELSON, R.E.

2000-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

422

EPICS system: system structure and user interface  

SciTech Connect

This paper present the user's view of and the general organization of the EPICS control system at Fermilab. Various subsystems of the EPICS control system are discussed. These include the user command language, software protection, the device database, remote computer interfaces, and several application utilities. This paper is related to two other papers on EPICS: an overview paper and a detailed implementation paper.

West, R.E.; Bartlett, J.F.; Bobbitt, J.S.; Lahey, T.E.; Kramper, B.J.; MacKinnon, B.A.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

System Compatibility of Modern Lighting Control Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The state of the energy industry combined with growing economic pressures will drive accelerated use of energy-efficient dimmable lighting devices and control systems. While penetration and application will be different across customer sectors, the goal is to dynamically reduce lighting load without compromising productivity and the quality of light and life in a timely manner. Continual improvement of dimmable devices and controls is paramount to achieving that goal. EPRI research concepts in system com...

2011-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

424

Standard-C hydrogen monitoring system, system design description  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Standard-C cabinet arrangement system design description for the Standard Hydrogen Monitoring System.

Schneider, T.C., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

425

Photovoltaic System Performance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Photovoltaic (PV) systems are usually composed of numerous solar arrays, which in turn, are composed of numerous PV cells. The performance of the system is therefore dependent on the performance of...

426

Stepping Motor Control System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes a hardware system designed to facilitate position and velocity control of a group of eight stepping motors using a PDP-11. The system includes motor driver cards and other interface cards in addition ...

Larson, Noble G.

427

Electricity Distribution System Workshop  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Discussion Summary Discussion Summary Electricity Transmission System Workshop 1 Grid Tech Team Discussion Summary Electricity Transmission System Workshop 2 Table of Contents INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................................. 3 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY .................................................................................................................................. 4 Process ...................................................................................................................................................... 4 Synthesized Challenges ............................................................................................................................. 5

428

Residential Geothermal Systems Credit  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A resident individual taxpayer of Montana who installs a geothermal heating or cooling system in their principal dwelling can claim a tax credit based on the installation costs of the system, not...

429

Crowd-powered systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Crowd-powered systems combine computation with human intelligence, drawn from large groups of people connecting and coordinating online. These hybrid systems enable applications and experiences that neither crowds nor ...

Bernstein, Michael Scott

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Urban organizational systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

General systems theory provides a conceptual framework for the integration of knowledge from a wide variety of specialized fields. Systems theory serves to synthesize, reconcile, and integrate knowledge making it possible ...

Morog, Joseph V

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Hybrid Systems Architectures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ion suppression of lower-level information not relevant for the current task Encapsulation (information hiding) implementation details are hidden, only interface information is visible F. Kurfeß Hybrid System Architectures ASHS '96 37 Inheritance common characteristics are derived from ancestors Polymorphism appropriate instances of classes and operators can be selected at runtime Advantages ffl very flexible ffl suitable for large systems ffl support reuse Problems ffl handling of new and atypical situations ffl quite complex ffl formal verification F. Kurfeß Hybrid System Architectures ASHS '96 38 Expert System What is an Expert System? Basic concepts ffl designer / user supplies facts and information ffl user asks queries and receives expert advice ffl limited to a problem domain (knowledge domain) Components ffl user interface ffl knowledge base ffl inference mechanism Synonyms: knowledge-based system, knowledge-based expert system F. Kurfeß Hybrid System Archi...

Franz J. Kurfeß

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Double Degenerate Binary Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, angular momentum loss via gravitational radiation in double degenerate binary (DDB)systems (NS + NS, NS + WD, WD + WD, and AM CVn) is studied. Energy loss by gravitational waves has been estimated for each type of systems.

Yakut, K. [University of Ege, Department of Astronomy and Space Sciences, 35100-Izmir (Turkey)

2011-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

433

Transport in granular systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are many situations in which a continuum view of granular systems does not fully capture the relevant mechanics. In order for engineers to be able to design systems for transporting granular materials, there needs ...

Wendell, Dawn M. (Dawn Marie), 1983-

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Regimes in Simple Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dynamical systems possessing regimes are identified with those where the state space possesses two or more regions such that transitions of the state from either region to the other are rare. Systems with regimes are compared to those where ...

Edward N. Lorenz

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

IBM POWER7 systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the system architectures and designs of the IBM POWER7® servers. From the smallest single-processor socket blade to the largest 32-processor-socket 256-core enterprise rack server, each system is designed to fully ...

R. X. Arroyo; R. J. Harrington; S. P. Hartman; T. Nguyen

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Absorption heat pump system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

Grossman, Gershon (Oak Ridge, TN)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Absorption heat pump system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

Grossman, G.

1982-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

438

Routing Policy System Replication  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The RIPE database specifications and RPSL define languages used as the basis for representing information in a routing policy system. A repository for routing policy system information is known as a routing registry. A routing registry provides a means ...

C. Villamizar; C. Alaettinoglu; R. Govindan; D. Meyer

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Energy Basics: Photovoltaic Systems  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

an entire PV system. This system is usually everything needed to meet a particular energy demand, such as powering a water pump, the appliances and lights in a home, or-if the...

440

Hanford System Overview  

CHG0612-16.0 CH2M-32399-VA Hanford System Overview Hanford System Overview January 23-24, 2007 Paul Certa Tom Crawford Aluminum and Chromium Leaching for

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441

Small Modular Biomass Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fact sheet that provides an introduction to small modular biomass systems. These systems can help supply electricity to rural areas, businesses, and people without power. They use locally available biomass fuels such as wood, crop waste, and animal manures.

Not Available

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

442