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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology product type" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Hydrology Group - Technologies & Products  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies & Products Systems & Sensors Water Fluxmeter Software & Models Fish Individual-based Numerical Simulator (FINS ) FRAMES 1.x ReActive Flow and Transport of Groundwater...

2

Technology's Impact on Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of a cooperative agreement with the United States Department of Energy (DOE) ?? entitled Technologys Impact on Production: Developing Environmental Solutions at the State and National Level ? ? the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) has been tasked with assisting state governments in the effective, efficient, and environmentally sound regulation of the exploration and production of natural gas and crude oil, specifically in relation to orphaned and abandoned wells and wells nearing the end of productive life. Project goals include: Developing (a) a model framework for prioritization and ranking of orphaned or abandoned well sites; (b) a model framework for disbursement of Energy Policy Act of 2005 funding; and (c) a research study regarding the current status of orphaned wells in the nation. Researching the impact of new technologies on environmental protection from a regulatory perspective. Research will identify and document (a) state reactions to changing technology and knowledge; (b) how those reactions support state environmental conservation and public health; and (c) the impact of those reactions on oil and natural gas production. Assessing emergent technology issues associated with wells nearing the end of productive life. Including: (a) location of orphaned and abandoned well sites; (b) well site remediation; (c) plugging materials; (d) plug placement; (e) the current regulatory environment; and (f) the identification of emergent technologies affecting end of life wells. New Energy Technologies ??Regulating Change, is the result of research performed for Tasks 2 and 3.

Amann, Rachel; Deweese, Ellis; Shipman, Deborah

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

3

FCT Hydrogen Production: Current Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Current Technology to Current Technology to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Production: Current Technology on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Production: Current Technology on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Production: Current Technology on Google Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Production: Current Technology on Delicious Rank FCT Hydrogen Production: Current Technology on Digg Find More places to share FCT Hydrogen Production: Current Technology on AddThis.com... Home Basics Current Technology Thermal Processes Electrolytic Processes Photolytic Processes R&D Activities Quick Links Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards Education Systems Analysis Contacts Current Technology The development of clean, sustainable, and cost-competitive hydrogen

4

Technology's Impact on Production  

SciTech Connect

As part of a cooperative agreement with the United States Department of Energy (DOE) - entitled Technology's Impact on Production: Developing Environmental Solutions at the State and National Level - the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) has been tasked with assisting state governments in the effective, efficient, and environmentally sound regulation of the exploration and production of natural gas and crude oil, specifically in relation to orphaned and abandoned wells and wells nearing the end of productive life. Project goals include: (1) Developing (a) a model framework for prioritization and ranking of orphaned or abandoned well sites; (b) a model framework for disbursement of Energy Policy Act of 2005 funding; and (c) a research study regarding the current status of orphaned wells in the nation. (2) Researching the impact of new technologies on environmental protection from a regulatory perspective. Research will identify and document (a) state reactions to changing technology and knowledge; (b) how those reactions support state environmental conservation and public health; and (c) the impact of those reactions on oil and natural gas production. (3) Assessing emergent technology issues associated with wells nearing the end of productive life. Including: (a) location of orphaned and abandoned well sites; (b) well site remediation; (c) plugging materials; (d) plug placement; (e) the current regulatory environment; and (f) the identification of emergent technologies affecting end of life wells. New Energy Technologies - Regulating Change, is the result of research performed for Tasks 2 and 3.

Rachel Amann; Ellis Deweese; Deborah Shipman

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

5

Electrode Technology for Aluminium Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Symposium. Meeting, 2011 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium, Electrode Technology for Aluminium Production. Sponsorship, The...

6

Available Technologies: Ligninolytic Enzyme Production  

The estimated production cost of laccase using this technology is about 10-60% of current commercial prices. The efficient bioconversion of plant ...

7

Productive commercialization of university technology.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Productive commercialization of university technology is a concern for the many stakeholders of the commercialization system. Do more total university research expenditures and more university (more)

Winder, Charles

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Hydrogen Production: Overview of Technology Options  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Table of Contents Producing Hydrogen...1 Hydrogen Production Technologies ...3 Challenges and Research Needs...4 Technology...

9

Property:Technology Type | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technology Type Technology Type Property Type Text Pages using the property "Technology Type" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) M MHK Technologies/14 MW OTECPOWER + OTEC - Closed Cycle MHK Technologies/Aegir Dynamo + Point Absorber - Floating MHK Technologies/Anaconda bulge tube drives turbine + Oscillating Wave Surge Converter MHK Technologies/AquaBuoy + Point Absorber MHK Technologies/Aquanator + Cross Flow Turbine MHK Technologies/Aquantis + Axial Flow Turbine MHK Technologies/Archimedes Wave Swing + Point Absorber MHK Technologies/Atlantis AN 150 + Axial Flow Turbine MHK Technologies/Atlantis AR 1000 + Axial Flow Turbine MHK Technologies/Atlantis AS 400 + Axial Flow Turbine MHK Technologies/Atlantisstrom + Cross Flow Turbine MHK Technologies/BOLT Lifesaver + Oscillating Wave Surge Converter

10

Production Technology | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Production Technology | National Nuclear Security Administration Production Technology | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Production Technology Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Future Science & Technology Programs > Production Technology Production Technology NNSA continues to assure the safety, security, and reliability of the

11

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Production  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

nuclear; biomass; and other renewable energy technologies, such as wind, solar, geothermal, and hydro-electric power. The overall challenge to hydrogen production is cost...

12

Available Technologies: Biological Production of Alpha Olefins ...  

APPLICATIONS OF TECHNOLOGY: Production of the following from sugar or starch: alpha olefins including 1-hexene, 1-decene, deca-1,5-diene, aromatic ...

13

emerging technologies for metals production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Economics of Production of Primary Titanium by Electrolytic Winning [pp. 13-41] ... A Process for Continuous Titanium Production from Titanium Oxide [pp. 79-88

14

Available Technologies: Production of Bacterial ...  

IB-2013-014. APPLICATIONS OF TECHNOLOGY: Fig. 1: Illustration of a BMC with protein (green and yellow) sequestered within. Biotechnology ; Carbon capture and ...

15

Electrode Technology for Aluminum Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Loss in Cathode Life Resulting from the Shutdown and Restart of Potlines at Aluminum Smelters Lower Aluminium Production Cost through Refractory Material...

16

Technology Innovation in Aluminum Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Today's U.S. aluminum production includes roughly 5.6 million tonnes of .... to help make the cost of aluminum competitive with steel.12 Aluminum pull tabs were...

17

Novel membrane technology for green ethylene production.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ethylene is currently produced by pyrolysis of ethane in the presence of steam. This reaction requires substantial energy input, and the equilibrium conversion is thermodynamically limited. The reaction also produces significant amounts of greenhouse gases (CO and CO{sub 2}) because of the direct contact between carbon and steam. Argonne has demonstrated a new way to make ethylene via ethane dehydrogenation using a dense hydrogen transport membrane (HTM) to drive the unfavorable equilibrium conversion. Preliminary experiments show that the new approach can produce ethylene yields well above existing pyrolysis technology and also significantly above the thermodynamic equilibrium limit, while completely eliminating the production of greenhouse gases. With Argonne's approach, a disk-type dense ceramic/metal composite (cermet) membrane is used to produce ethylene by dehydrogenation of ethane at 850 C. The gas-transport membrane reactor combines a reversible chemical reaction with selective separation of one product species and leads to increased reactant conversion to the desired product. In an experiment ethane was passed over one side of the HTM membrane and air over the other side. The hydrogen produced by the dehydrogenation of ethane was removed and transported through the HTM to the air side. The air provided the driving force required for the transport of hydrogen through the HTM. The reaction between transported hydrogen and oxygen in air can provide the energy needed for the dehydrogenation reaction. At 850 C and 1-atm pressure, equilibrium conversion of ethane normally limits the ethylene yield to 64%, but Argonne has shown that an ethylene yield of 69% with a selectivity of 88% can be obtained under the same conditions. Coking was not a problem in runs extending over several weeks. Further improved HTM materials will lower the temperature required for high conversion at a reasonable residence time, while the lower temperature will suppress unwanted side reactions and prolong membrane life. With the Argonne approach, oxygen does not contact the ethane/ethylene stream, so oxidation products are not formed. Consequently, higher selectivity to ethylene and fewer by-products can be achieved. Some benefits are: (1) Simplifies overall product purification and processing schemes; (2) Results in greater energy efficiency; (3) Completely eliminates greenhouse gases from the reactor section; and (4) Lowers the cost of the 'back end' purification train, which accounts for about 70% of the capital cost of a conventional ethylene production unit.

Balachandran, U.; Lee, T. H.; Dorris, S. E.; Udovich, C. A.; Scouten, C. G.; Marshall, C. L. (Energy Systems); ( CSE)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Fuel Cell Technologies Program: Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production Production Hydrogen is an energy carrier, not an energy source-hydrogen stores and delivers energy in a usable form, but it must be produced from hydrogen containing compounds. Hydrogen can be produced using diverse, domestic resources including fossil fuels, such as coal (preferentially with carbon sequestration), natural gas, and biomass or using nuclear energy and renewable energy sources, such as wind, solar, geothermal, and hydroelectric power to split water. This great potential for diversity of supply is an important reason why hydrogen is such a promising energy carrier. Hydrogen can be produced at large central plants, semi-centrally, or in small distributed units located at or very near the point of use, such as at refueling stations or stationary power

19

Technology diffusion of energy-related products in residential markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Acceptance of energy-related technologies by end residential consumers, manufacturers of energy-related products, and other influential intermediate markets such as builders will influence the potential for market penetration of innovative energy-related technologies developed by the Department of Energy, Office of Building and Community Systems (OBCS). In this report, Pacific Northwest Laboratory reviewed the available information on technology adoption, diffusion, and decision-making processes to provide OBCS with a background and understanding of the type of research that has previously been conducted on this topic. Insight was gained as to the potential decision-making criteria and motivating factors that influence the decision-maker(s) selection of new technologies, and some of the barriers to technology adoption faced by potential markets for OBCS technologies.

Davis, L.J.; Bruneau, C.L.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production Production Photo of hydrogen researcher. Hydrogen can be produced using diverse, domestic resources including fossil fuels, such as natural gas and coal (with carbon sequestration); nuclear; biomass; and other renewable energy technologies, such as wind, solar, geothermal, and hydro-electric power. The overall challenge to hydrogen production is cost reduction. For cost-competitive transportation, a key driver for energy independence, hydrogen must be comparable to conventional fuels and technologies on a per-mile basis in order to succeed in the commercial marketplace. Learn more about DOE's hydrogen cost goal and the analysis used in projecting the future cost of hydrogen. The U.S. Department of Energy supports the research and development of a wide range of technologies to produce hydrogen economically and in environmentally friendly ways.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology product type" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Biodiesel Production Technology: August 2002--January 2004  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* NREL/SR-510-36244 * NREL/SR-510-36244 J. Van Gerpen, B. Shanks, and R. Pruszko Iowa State University D. Clements Renewable Products Development Laboratory G. Knothe USDA/NCAUR Biodiesel Production Technology August 2002-January 2004 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 July 2004 * NREL/SR-510-36244 Biodiesel Production Technology August 2002-January 2004 J. Van Gerpen, B.Shanks, and R. Pruszko Iowa State University D. Clements Renewable Products Development Laboratory G. Knothe USDA/NCAUR NREL Technical Monitor: K. Shaine Tyson

22

Hydrogen Production: Overview of Technology Options, January 2009  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

Overview of technology options for hydrogen production, its challenges and reserach needs and next steps

23

Systematic Discrimination of Advanced Hydrogen Production Technologies  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy, in concert with industry, is developing a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to demonstrate high temperature heat applications to produce hydrogen and electricity or to support other industrial applications. A key part of this program is the production of hydrogen from water that would significantly reduce carbon emissions compared to current production using natural gas. In 2009 the INL led the methodical evaluation of promising advanced hydrogen production technologies in order to focus future resources on the most viable processes. This paper describes how the evaluation process was systematically planned and executed. As a result, High-Temperature Steam Electrolysis was selected as the most viable near-term technology to deploy as a part of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project.

Charles V. Park; Michael W. Patterson

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #306: February 9, 2004 Vehicle Type  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6: February 9, 6: February 9, 2004 Vehicle Type Differences on Vehicle Miles Traveled to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #306: February 9, 2004 Vehicle Type Differences on Vehicle Miles Traveled on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #306: February 9, 2004 Vehicle Type Differences on Vehicle Miles Traveled on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #306: February 9, 2004 Vehicle Type Differences on Vehicle Miles Traveled on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #306: February 9, 2004 Vehicle Type Differences on Vehicle Miles Traveled on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #306: February 9, 2004 Vehicle Type Differences on Vehicle Miles Traveled on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #306:

25

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biological Hydrogen Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter Program Presentations Multimedia Conferences & Meetings

26

Technology Transfer and the Product Development Process  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is my pleasure this morning to address a topic that is much talked about in passing but rarely examined from a first person point of view. That topic is Technology Transfer. Over the next 30 minutes I'd like to approach Technology Transfer within the context of the Product Development Process looking at it from the perspectives of the federal government researcher and the industry manufacturer/user. Fist let us recognize that we are living in an ''Information Age'', where global economic and military competition is determined as much by technology as it is by natural resource assets. It is estimated that technical/scientific information is presently growing at a rate of l3 percent per year; this is expected to increase to 30 percent per year by the turn of the century. In fact, something like 90 percent of all scientific knowledge has been generated in the last 30 years; this pool will double again in the next 10-15 years (Exhibit 1). Of all the scientists and engineers throughout history, 90% live and work in the present time. Successfully managing this technical information/knowledge--i.e., transforming the results of R&D to practical applications--will be an important measure of national strength. A little over a dozen years ago, the United States with only 5 percent of the world's population was generating approximately 75 percent of the world's technology. The US. share is now 50 percent and may decline to 30 percent by the turn of the century. This decline won't be because of downturn in U.S. technological advances but because the other 95 percent of the world's population will be increasing its contribution. Economic and military strength then, will be determined by how quickly and successfully companies, industries, and nations can apply new technological information to practical applications--i.e., how they manage technology transfer within the context of the product development process. Much discussion and pronouncements are ongoing in public forums today over the apparent decline in global competitiveness of U.S. industry. The question is why does U.S. industry not succeed in the development and marketing of competitive products when they lead in the generation of new technology.

Mock, John E.

1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

27

Compatibility of Admix and Synthetic Liner Materials With Clean Coal Technology By-Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When designing effective liner systems for clean coal technology by-products, utilities need information on the liner materials most suitable for each type of waste by-product. This study has developed data on twenty admix and synthetic liner types for seven different by-product combinations.

1991-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

28

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrolysis Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower Workshop Proceedings to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower Workshop Proceedings on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower Workshop Proceedings on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower Workshop Proceedings on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower Workshop Proceedings on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower Workshop Proceedings on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office:

29

The specification and estimation of technological change in electricity production  

SciTech Connect

This study focuses on the rate of technological change in electricity production. The dominant role of fossil fuel-fired electricity production in the industry, coupled with the direct association with the emission of greenhouse gases, makes technology parameters particularly significant for several reasons. First, very long-run simulations of energy-economic paths at a global level require that technical progress occupy a place in the methodology for sound formulations that are vital in global emissions/energy policy analysis. Second, given the outlook for electricity generation being predominately coal-based, especially in developing economies around the world, the specification and measurement of technical change is essential for developing realistic long-run technology forecasts. Finally, industry or sector growth in productivity hinges partly on technical progress, and updated analysis will always be necessary to stay abreast of developments on this front, as well as for economic growth considerations in general. This study is based on empirical economic research on production functions in the electric utility industry. However, it advances a seldom used approach, called the {open_quotes}engineering-production function{close_quotes}, in contrast to the more common neoclassical approach used by economists. Combined with this approach is a major departure from the type of data used to conduct econometric estimations of production parameters. This research draws upon a consistent set of ex ante or {open_quotes}blueprint{close_quotes} data that better reflects planned, technical performance and cost data elements, in contrast to the more customary, expect type of data from actual firm/plant operations. The results from the examination of coal-fired technologies indicate the presence of technical change. Using data for the period from 1979 to 1989, we find technical change to be capital-augmenting at the rate of 1.8 percent per year.

Kavanaugh, D.C.; Ashton, W.B.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Solar and Wind Technologies for Hydrogen Production Report to Congress  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

DOE's Solar and Wind Technologies for Hydrogen Production Report to Congress summarizes the technology roadmaps for solar- and wind-based hydrogen production. Published in December 2005, it fulfills t

31

MHK Technologies/Floating Duck Type Device | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Type Device Type Device < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Floating Duck Type Device.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Guangzhou Institute of Energy Conversion Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4 Proof of Concept Technology Description Guangzhou Institute of Energy Conversion GIEC of Chinese Academy of Sciences CAS plans to build an isolated power system with renewable energy on Dawanshan Island Guangdong Province before August 2012 with total installed capacity of 500kW including 300kW from wave energy device and 200kW from wind turbine The design of 100kW floating duck type device charging process and special transporting boat has been completed and the scale prototype is testing Technology Dimensions

32

Hydrogen Production Roadmap: Technology Pathways to the Future, January 2009  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

Roadmap to identify key challenges and priority R&D needs associated with various hydrogen fuel production technologies.

33

Janata biogas technology and fodder production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An effective bio-gas program leads to efficient use of cow dung for gas recovery and partial supplement to plant nutrient requirements. Bio-gas program leads to improvement in rural living including rural sanitation. The Janata biogas plant designed by the State Planning Institute, Lucknow, based on biogas technology, has proved to be efficient and economical. This book contains the various papers presented at the seminar held to review this technology. The various topics covered are: Status of Biogas Program in India; Role of Extension Agencies in Developing Program of Energy Utilization; Introduction to Drumless Biogas Plant; Principles and Application of Anaerobic Fermentation and Biogas Production, Operational System of Gobar Gas in Rural India; Complete Recycling of Cattle Shed Wastes through Biogas Plant; Chemical Composition of Cattle Excreta and Its Manurial Value; Profitability of Biogas Plant; Biogas Production from Various Organic Wastes; Performance of Janata Biogas Plant and Biogas Utilization in Appliances; Utilization of Solar Energy for Domestic Purposes; and Conservation of Forages. Plant requirements and cost estimates have been given for several units.

Neelakantan, S.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Frying Technology and PracticesChapter 9 Technology of Coating and Frying Food Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Frying Technology and Practices Chapter 9 Technology of Coating and Frying Food Products Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadab

35

Light-Duty Vehicle Energy Consumption by Technology Type from...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Light-Duty Vehicle Energy Consumption by Technology Type from EIA AEO 2011 Early Release Supplemental Table 47 of EIA AEO 2011 Early Release
2011-02-23T15:57:46Z...

36

A research analysis on the concept of converging technology and converging types of information technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The future technological revolution is expected to be led by converging technologies, having enormous effects on economic and industrial environments in the future. But there have been few attempts to make empirical approach to the concept of converging ... Keywords: converging technology roadmap, converging theory, converging type

K. H. Choi

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Impact of Technological Change and Productivity on the Coal Market  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This paper examines the components of past gains in productivity, including regional shifts, the exit of less productive producers, and technological progress Future prospects for continuing productivity gains at sustained, but lower, rates of improvement are discussed.

Information Center

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #471: May 28, 2007 Biodiesel Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1: May 28, 2007 1: May 28, 2007 Biodiesel Production Facilities to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #471: May 28, 2007 Biodiesel Production Facilities on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #471: May 28, 2007 Biodiesel Production Facilities on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #471: May 28, 2007 Biodiesel Production Facilities on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #471: May 28, 2007 Biodiesel Production Facilities on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #471: May 28, 2007 Biodiesel Production Facilities on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #471: May 28, 2007 Biodiesel Production Facilities on AddThis.com... Fact #471: May 28, 2007 Biodiesel Production Facilities

39

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #264: April 21, 2003 Production of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4: April 21, 4: April 21, 2003 Production of Ethanol and MTBE to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #264: April 21, 2003 Production of Ethanol and MTBE on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #264: April 21, 2003 Production of Ethanol and MTBE on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #264: April 21, 2003 Production of Ethanol and MTBE on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #264: April 21, 2003 Production of Ethanol and MTBE on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #264: April 21, 2003 Production of Ethanol and MTBE on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #264: April 21, 2003 Production of Ethanol and MTBE on AddThis.com... Fact #264: April 21, 2003 Production of Ethanol and MTBE

40

New Oxygen-Production Technology Proving Successful | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oxygen-Production Technology Proving Successful Oxygen-Production Technology Proving Successful New Oxygen-Production Technology Proving Successful April 22, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC -- The Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has partnered with Air Products and Chemicals Inc. of Allentown, Penn. to develop the Ion Transport Membrane (ITM) Oxygen, a revolutionary new oxygen-production technology that requires less energy and offers lower capital costs than conventional technologies. ITM Oxygen will enhance the performance of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants, as well as other gasification-based processes. The technology will also enhance the economics of oxy-fired combustion technologies, making it an attractive option for the capture of carbon

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology product type" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basics Current Technology R&D Activities Quick Links Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards Education Systems...

42

Oil & Natural Gas Projects Exploration and Production Technologies | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oil & Natural Gas Projects Exploration and Production Technologies Oil & Natural Gas Projects Exploration and Production Technologies Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Oil & Natural Gas Projects Exploration and Production Technologies Author U.S. Department of Energy Published Publisher Not Provided, Date Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Oil & Natural Gas Projects Exploration and Production Technologies Citation U.S. Department of Energy. Oil & Natural Gas Projects Exploration and Production Technologies [Internet]. [cited 2013/10/15]. Available from: http://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil-gas/Petroleum/projects/EP/Explor_Tech/P225.htm Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Oil_%26_Natural_Gas_Projects_Exploration_and_Production_Technologies&oldid=688583

43

Engineering analysis of biomass gasifier product gas cleaning technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For biomass gasification to make a significant contribution to the energy picture in the next decade, emphasis must be placed on the generation of clean, pollutant-free gas products. This reports attempts to quantify levels of particulated, tars, oils, and various other pollutants generated by biomass gasifiers of all types. End uses for biomass gases and appropriate gas cleaning technologies are examined. Complete systems analysis is used to predit the performance of various gasifier/gas cleanup/end use combinations. Further research needs are identified. 128 refs., 20 figs., 19 tabs.

Baker, E.G.; Brown, M.D.; Moore, R.H.; Mudge, L.K.; Elliott, D.C.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #256: February 24, 2003 Petroleum Product  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6: February 24, 6: February 24, 2003 Petroleum Product Prices Rise to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #256: February 24, 2003 Petroleum Product Prices Rise on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #256: February 24, 2003 Petroleum Product Prices Rise on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #256: February 24, 2003 Petroleum Product Prices Rise on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #256: February 24, 2003 Petroleum Product Prices Rise on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #256: February 24, 2003 Petroleum Product Prices Rise on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #256: February 24, 2003 Petroleum Product Prices Rise on AddThis.com... Fact #256: February 24, 2003

45

Managing the integration of technology into the product development pipeline  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Managing the integration of technology is a complex task in any industry, but especially so in the highly competitive automotive industry. Automakers seek to develop plans to integrate technology into their products such ...

Barretto, Eduardo F., 1971-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Available Technologies: Novel Biosynthetic Pathway for Production ...  

See More Biofuels Technologies. Contact Us. Receive Customized Tech Alerts. Tech Transfer Site Map. Last updated: 02/03/2012.

47

Innovative Technologies for Disruptive Products Advanced ...  

Low-cost carbon fiber from renewable sources for vehicle weight reduction Safer, higher power density battery technologies

48

DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 12002: H2 Production...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record Record : 12002 Date: February 22, 2012 Title: H2 Production Status & Threshold Costs Plot 2006-2011 Originator: Eric Miller and Sarah...

49

TRACER DETECTION TECHNOLOGY CORP. PRODUCTS AND SERVICES FOR CORPORATE...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TRACER DETECTION TECHNOLOGY CORP. PRODUCTS AND SERVICES FOR CORPORATE AND GOVERNMENT SECURITY 3463 MAGIC DRIVE, SUITE T-19 SAN ANTONIO, TX 78229 March 29, 2009 Office of the...

50

MBD Driven Digital Product Collaborative Definition Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recording and exchanging the collaborative product definition information is an important aspect of digital product collaborative development process. To resolve the problem of records the product collaborative definition information, promote the implementation ... Keywords: digital product definition, MBD, collaboration, product manufacturing information, integrated model

QiuZhong Zhou; QingChun Fan

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Program  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report identifies the commercial and near-commercial (emerging) hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and products that resulted from Department of Energy support through the Fuel Cell Technologies

52

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) held a Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop on September 24-25, 2013, in Golden, Colorado. The workshop featured 29 participants representing academia, government, and national laboratories with expertise in the relevant fields. The objective of the Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop was to share information and identify issues, barriers, and research and development needs for biological hydrogen production to enable hydrogen production that meets cost goals. Proceedings 2013 Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop Final Report Presentations Introductory Session Fuel Cell Technologies Office Overview, Sara Dillich, DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office

53

Sestar Technologies, LLC Revolutionar y Solar Energy Products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sestar Technologies, LLC Revolutionar y Solar Energy Products Sestar Technologies, LLC (SESTAR) is developing revolutionary solar energy products that will be integral components in the ultimate solution to the world's current and future energy pro- grams. It will lead to paradigm shifts in a number of solar

Choate, Paul M.

54

NETL: News Release - New Oxygen-Production Technology Proving Successful  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

22, 2009 22, 2009 New Oxygen-Production Technology Proving Successful Ceramic Membrane Enables Efficient, Cost-Effective Co-Production of Power and Oxygen Washington, D.C. -The Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has partnered with Air Products and Chemicals Inc. of Allentown, Penn. to develop the Ion Transport Membrane (ITM) Oxygen, a revolutionary new oxygen-production technology that requires less energy and offers lower capital costs than conventional technologies. ITM Oxygen will enhance the performance of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants, as well as other gasification-based processes. The technology will also enhance the economics of oxy-fired combustion technologies, making it an attractive option for the capture of carbon dioxide from existing coal-fired power plants.

55

Clean Energy Manufacturing Resources - Technology Full-Scale Production |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Full-Scale Production Full-Scale Production Clean Energy Manufacturing Resources - Technology Full-Scale Production Clean Energy Manufacturing Resources - Technology Full-Scale Production Find resources to help you design a production and manufacturing process for a new clean energy technology or product. For full-scale production, other areas to consider include workforce development; R&D funding; and regional, state, and local resources. For more resources, see the Clean Energy Manufacturing Federal Resource Guide. Design Production and Manufacturing Process Advanced Research Projects Agency: Tech-to-Market Resources - general tech-to-market (T2M) resources. DOE Advanced Manufacturing Office: Manufacturing Demonstration Facility - a collaborative manufacturing community that works to provide real data to

56

Energy Efficient New Metal Production Technology - Programmaster ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 28, 2011... for Steel Production: Molten Oxide Electrolysis: Antoine Allanore1; Luis ... Intrinsic Hydrogen Reduction Kinetics of Magnetite Concentrate...

57

Available Technologies: Production of 1-deoxyxylulose-5 ...  

The JBEI process results in the conservation of 17% of carbon being converted to terpenoid products. Conserving metabolic materials (carbon) ...

58

Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Program August 2010 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program iii Table of Contents Summary ...............................................................................................................................................................................v 1.0 Introduction ............................................................................................................................................................... 1-1 1.1 Organization of the FCT Program ..................................................................................................................

59

Available Technologies: Enhancing Fatty Acid Production by ...  

Synthetic biology has opened the door to fatty acid production from simple carbon sources through engineering microbes such as E. coil or yeast.

60

Available Technologies: Biological Production of Cinnamoyl ...  

The JBEI method opens the door for eco-friendly, inexpensive production of a group of chemicals useful in medical therapy and life sciences research.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology product type" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Technology Assessment of Interconnection Products for Distributed Resources: 2001 Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This interim technology assessment for distributed resources (DR), including generation and storage, is intended to assist system engineers in understanding the availability and application of interconnection products. The report provides a frame of reference to assess these products by defining a set of interconnection functions, descriptive elements, and applications and documenting the state of the art of interconnection products.

2001-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

62

Green Technology Foresight about environmentally friendly products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Environmental governance 9 B. Guiding research and research policy: 11 C. Support for eco-innovation 12 D Foundation 227 6.5.3 EU's Environmental Technologies Action Plan (ETAP) 228 6.6 GUIDING RESEARCH AND RESEARCH- AND NANOTECHNOLOGY 237 6.9.1 Introduction 237 6.9.2 Environmental governance 238 6.9.3 Guiding research and research

Mosegaard, Klaus

63

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Forest Products: Technology  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Technology Pathways Technology Pathways AF&PA estimates that the forest products industry will reduce its greenhouse gas emissions intensity by 12% by 2012 relative to 2000 numbers. One of the main ways AF&PA anticipates that the industry will reduce its greenhouse gas emissions intensity is through implementation of new technologies from research and development programs. AF&PA has been participating in DOE's Industries of the Future program, a collaborative research and development partnership between DOE and the forest products industry. Through this program, AF&PA has participated in the development of a number of technologies aimed at cutting energy use, minimizing environmental impacts, and improving productivity in industry. If fully commercialized, these technologies could make the U.S. forest

64

Methane Hydrate Production Technologies to be Tested on Alaska's North  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Methane Hydrate Production Technologies to be Tested on Alaska's Methane Hydrate Production Technologies to be Tested on Alaska's North Slope Methane Hydrate Production Technologies to be Tested on Alaska's North Slope October 24, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy, the Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corporation, and ConocoPhillips will work together to test innovative technologies for producing methane gas from hydrate deposits on the Alaska North Slope. The collaborative testing will take place under the auspices of a Statement of Intent for Cooperation in Methane Hydrates signed in 2008 and extended in 2011 by DOE and Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade, and Industry. The production tests are the next step in both U.S. and Japanese national efforts to evaluate the response of gas hydrate reservoirs to alternative

65

A Realistic Technology and Engineering Assessment of Algae Biofuel Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

microalgae biofuel technologies for both oil and biogas production, provides an initial assessment of the US or wastewater treatment, (2) biofuel outputs--either biogas only or biogas plus oil, and (3) farm size

Quinn, Nigel

66

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #194: December 10, 2001 Production...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4: December 10, 2001 Production and ImportsExports for Top 10 Oil-Producing Countries to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact 194: December 10, 2001...

67

Essays on information, technology and information worker productivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I examine how information technology (IT) skills and use, communication network structures, and the distribution and flow of information in organizations impact individual information worker productivity. The work is divided ...

Aral, Sinan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Information Technology Spillover and Productivity: The Role of Information Technology Intensity and Competition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study interindustry information technology (IT) spillover wherein IT investments made by supplier industries increase the productivity of downstream industries. Using data from U.S. manufacturing industries, we find that industries receive significant ... Keywords: Competition, Industry Analysis, Industry Characteristics, It Effects, It Intensity, It Spillover, Productivity, Total Factor Productivity

Kunsoo Han; Young Chang; Jungpil Hahn

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Total Stocks Stocks by Type  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Stock Type: Download Series History: Definitions, Sources & Notes: Show Data By: Product: Stock Type: Area: 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History; U.S. 1,665,345 ...

70

Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Program - 2012  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This FY 2012 report updates the results of an effort to identify and characterize commercial and near-commercial (emerging) technologies and products that benefited from the support of the Fuel Cell T

71

Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Program - 2011  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This FY 2011 report updates the results of an effort to identify and characterize commercial and near-commercial (emerging) technologies and products that benefited from the support of the Fuel Cell

72

2001 TMS Annual Meeting: Exhibitors Product and Technology Mini ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Topic: CASTING & PRIMARY PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGY ... dross cooling the inert gas dross coolerand following through to the extraction of aluminium from ... These oils oxydize, polymerise and form vanishs on the mold. .... Dean E. Venturin, Unifrax Corporation USA in association with Rex Roto Corporation USA

73

Review: Sensing technologies for precision specialty crop production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the advances in electronic and information technologies, various sensing systems have been developed for specialty crop production around the world. Accurate information concerning the spatial variability within fields is very important for precision ... Keywords: Precision agriculture, Review, Sensing, Specialty crop

W. S. Lee; V. Alchanatis; C. Yang; M. Hirafuji; D. Moshou; C. Li

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Assessment of the magnesium primary production technology. Final report  

SciTech Connect

At current production levels, direct energy savings achievable in primary magnesium production are 1.2 milliquads of energy per annum. Were magnesium to penetrate the automotive market to an average level of 50 pounds per vehicle, the resultant energy savings at the production stage would be somewhat larger, but the resulting savings in gasoline would conserve an estimated 325 milliquads of energy per year. The principal barrier to more widespread use of magnesium in the immediate future is its price. A price reduction of magnesium of 10% would lead to widespread conversion of aluminum die and permanent mold castings to magnesium. This report addresses the technology of electrolytic and thermic magnesium production and the economics of expanded magnesium production and use.

Flemings, M.C.; Kenney, G.B.; Sadoway, D.R.; Clark, J.P.; Szekely, J.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Western oil-shale development: a technology assessment. Volume 2: technology characterization and production scenarios  

SciTech Connect

A technology characterization of processes that may be used in the oil shale industry is presented. The six processes investigated are TOSCO II, Paraho Direct, Union B, Superior, Occidental MIS, and Lurgi-Ruhrgas. A scanario of shale oil production to the 300,000 BPD level by 1990 is developed. (ACR)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Market enhancement of shale oil: The native products extraction technology  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this work was to assess the feasibility of enhancing shale oil commercialization through SO/NPX technology. Specific objectives were: (1) To determine the properties and characteristics of fractions isolable from shale oil utilizing separation sequences which are based on thermodynamic considerations; (2) To identify product streams of market value for promising technology development; (3)To conduct technology development studies leading to a shale oil extraction and processing sequence which promises economic enhancement of shale oil commercialization; (4) To develop an analytical methodology and model for obtaining engineering design data required for process development; (5) To estimate the economics of SO/NPX including the potential for enhancing the profitability of a commercial-scale shale oil MIS retort.

Bunger, J.W. (Bunger (James W.) and Associates, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT (United States)); DuBow, J.B. (Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (United States))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

APPLICATION OF HIGH TECHNOLOGY POLYMERS FOR THE IMMOBILIZATION AND SOLIDIFICATION OF COMPLEX LIQUID RADWASTE TYPES  

SciTech Connect

The Cold War era created a massive build-up of nuclear weapon stockpiles in the former Soviet Union and the United States. The primary objective during this period was the development of nuclear technologies for weapons, space and power with lack of attention to the impact of radioactive and hazardous waste products on the environment. Effective technologies for radioactive and hazardous waste treatment and disposal were not well investigated or promoted during the arms build-up; and consequently, environmental contamination has become a major problem. These problems in Russia and the United States are well documented. Significant amounts of liquid radwaste have existed since the 1950's. The current government of the Russian Federation is addressing the issues of land remediation and permanent storage of radwaste resulting from internal and external pressures for safe cleanup and storage. The Russian government seeks new technologies from internal sources and from the West that will provide high performance, long term stability, safe for transport and for long-term storage of liquid radwaste at a reasonable economic cost. With the great diversity of liquid chemical compositions and activity levels, it is important to note that these waste products cannot be processed with commonly used methods. Different techniques and materials can be used for this problem resolution including the use of polymer materials that are capable of forming chemically stable, solidified waste products. In 2001, the V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute (St. Petersburg, Russia) and Pacific World Trade (Indianapolis, Indiana) began an extensive research and test program to determine the effectiveness and performance of high technology polymers for the immobilization and solidification of complex liquid radwaste types generated by the Ministry of Atomic Energy (Minatom), Russia, organization. The high tech polymers used in the tests were provided by Nochar, Inc. (Indianapolis, Indiana).

Kelley, Dennis; Brunkow, Ward; Pokhitonov, Yuri; Starchenko, Vadim

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

78

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower Workshop Proceedings Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower Workshop Proceedings Wind and hydropower are currently being evaluated in the U.S. and abroad as electricity sources that could enable large volume production of renewable hydrogen for use in transportation and distributed power applications. To further explore this prospect the Fuel Cell Technologies Office, and the Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program at the Department of Energy held a workshop to bring together stakeholders from wind, hydropower, and the electrolysis industries on September 9-10, 2003. The main objectives of the workshop were to: 1) discuss with stakeholders their current activities related to hydrogen, 2) explore with industry opportunities for low-cost hydrogen production through integration between wind and hydropower, water electrolysis and the electricity grid, and 3) review and provide feedback on a current Department of Energy/National Renewable Energy Laboratory analysis efforts to study opportunities for wind electrolysis and other renewable electricity sources.

79

Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Office  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OFFICE OFFICE Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Office September 2013 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Office Notice This report is being disseminated by the Department of Energy. As such, this document was prepared in compliance with Section 515 of the Treasury and General Government Appropriations Act for Fiscal Year 2001(Public Law 106-554) and information quality guidelines issued by the Department of Energy. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness

80

Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Program  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the project described in this report is to identify and document the commercial and emerging (projected to be commercialized within the next 3 years) hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and products that resulted from Department of Energy support through the Fuel Cell Technologies (FCT) Program in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). To do this, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) undertook two efforts simultaneously to accomplish this project. The first effort was a patent search and analysis to identify hydrogen- and fuel-cell-related patents that are associated with FCT-funded projects (or projects conducted by DOE-EERE predecessor programs) and to ascertain the patents current status, as well as any commercial products that may have used the technology documented in the patent. The second effort was a series of interviews with current and past FCT personnel, a review of relevant program annual reports, and an examination of hydrogen- and fuel-cell-related grants made under the Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer Programs, and within the FCT portfolio.

Weakley, Steven A.; Brown, Scott A.

2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology product type" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of the project described in this report is to identify and document the commercial and emerging (projected to be commercialized within the next 3 years) hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and products that resulted from Department of Energy support through the Fuel Cell Technologies (FCT) Program in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) undertook two efforts simultaneously to accomplish this project. The first effort was a patent search and analysis to identify patents related to hydrogen and fuel cells that are associated with FCT-funded projects (or projects conducted by DOE-EERE predecessor programs) and to ascertain the patents current status, as well as any commercial products that may have used the technology documented in the patent. The second effort was a series of interviews with current and past FCT personnel, a review of relevant program annual reports, and an examination of grants made under the Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer Programs that are related to hydrogen and fuel cells.

Weakley, Steven A.

2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

82

Aspects of the Kalina technology applied to geothermal power production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report contains the results of studies conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) concerning the applicability of the Kalina technology to geothermal (hydrothermal) power production. This report represents a correction and addition to that report. The Heat Cycle Research Program (HCRP) has as its primary goal the cost-effective production of electric power from moderate temperature hydrothermal resources. Recent work has included the study of supercritical cycles with counterflow condensation which utilize mixtures as working fluids. These advanced concepts are projected to give a 20 to 30% improvement in power produced per unit geofluid flow rate (geofluid effectiveness, w hr/lb). The original Kalina cycle is a system which is similar to the cycles being studied in the Heat Cycle Research program and it was felt that this new cycle should be studied in the geothermal context. 15 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

Bliem, C.J.

1989-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

83

Table 23. Coal Mining Productivity by State, Mine Type, and Mine Production Range, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mining Productivity by State, Mine Type, and Mine Production Range, 2012 Mining Productivity by State, Mine Type, and Mine Production Range, 2012 (short tons produced per employee hour) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 23. Coal Mining Productivity by State, Mine Type, and Mine Production Range, 2012 (short tons produced per employee hour) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Mine Production Range (thousand short tons) Coal-Producing State, Region 1 and Mine Type Above 1,000 Above 500 to 1,000 Above 200 to 500 Above 100 to 200 Above 50 to 100 Above 10 to 50 10 or Under Total 2 Alabama 1.69 2.50 1.95 1.72 1.83 0.69 0.55 1.68 Underground 1.73 - - - 1.08 0.31 - 1.64 Surface 1.36 2.50 1.95 1.72 2.11 1.19 0.55 1.75 Alaska 5.98 - - - - - - 5.98 Surface 5.98 - - - - - - 5.98 Arizona 7.38 - - - - - - 7.38 Surface

84

Available Technologies: Low Resistance, p-Type Ohmic Contacts ...  

Novel Structured LED and OLED Devices, IB-2230. Co-implantation of Group VI Elements and Nitrogen for the Formation of Non-Alloyed Ohmic Contacts for n-type GaAs, IB ...

85

Estimating Hydrogen Production Potential in Biorefineries Using Microbial Electrolysis Cell Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) are devices that use a hybrid biocatalysis-electrolysis process for production of hydrogen from organic matter. Future biofuel and bioproducts industries are expected to generate significant volumes of waste streams containing easily degradable organic matter. The emerging MEC technology has potential to derive added- value from these waste streams via production of hydrogen. Biorefinery process streams, particularly the stillage or distillation bottoms contain underutilized sugars as well as fermentation and pretreatment byproducts. In a lignocellulosic biorefinery designed for producing 70 million gallons of ethanol per year, up to 7200 m3/hr of hydrogen can be generated. The hydrogen can either be used as an energy source or a chemical reagent for upgrading and other reactions. The energy content of the hydrogen generated is sufficient to meet 57% of the distillation energy needs. We also report on the potential for hydrogen production in existing corn mills and sugar-based biorefineries. Removal of the organics from stillage has potential to facilitate water recycle. Pretreatment and fermentation byproducts generated in lignocellulosic biorefinery processes can accumulate to highly inhibitory levels in the process streams, if water is recycled. The byproducts of concern including sugar- and lignin- degradation products such as furans and phenolics can also be converted to hydrogen in MECs. We evaluate hydrogen production from various inhibitory byproducts generated during pretreatment of various types of biomass. Finally, the research needs for development of the MEC technology and aspects particularly relevant to the biorefineries are discussed.

Borole, Abhijeet P [ORNL; Mielenz, Jonathan R [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Production Analysis Using the H2A  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production Production Analysis Using the H2A v3 Model (Text Version) to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Production Analysis Using the H2A v3 Model (Text Version) on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Production Analysis Using the H2A v3 Model (Text Version) on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Production Analysis Using the H2A v3 Model (Text Version) on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Production Analysis Using the H2A v3 Model (Text Version) on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Production Analysis Using the H2A v3 Model (Text Version) on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Production Analysis Using the H2A v3 Model (Text Version) on AddThis.com...

87

Hydrogen energy for tomorrow: Advanced hydrogen production technologies  

SciTech Connect

The future vision for hydrogen is that it will be cost-effectively produced from renewable energy sources and made available for widespread use as an energy carrier and a fuel. Hydrogen can be produced from water and when burned as a fuel, or converted to electricity, joins with oxygen to again form water. It is a clean, sustainable resource with many potential applications, including generating electricity, heating homes and offices, and fueling surface and air transportation. To achieve this vision, researchers must develop advanced technologies to produce hydrogen at costs competitive with fossil fuels, using sustainable sources. Hydrogen is now produced primarily by steam reforming of natural gas. For applications requiring extremely pure hydrogen, production is done by electrolysis. This is a relatively expensive process that uses electric current to dissociate, or split, water into its hydrogen and oxygen components. Technologies with the best potential for producing hydrogen to meet future demand fall into three general process categories: photobiological, photoelectrochemical, and thermochemical. Photobiological and photoelectrochemical processes generally use sunlight to split water into hydrogen and oxygen. Thermochemical processes, including gasification and pyrolysis systems, use heat to produce hydrogen from sources such as biomass and solid waste.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Service and Product Provider Success Story - Emerging Technologies...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in partnership with Emerging Technologies Associates, Inc., achieves a 9% reduction in energy use intensity. Project Scope Emerging Technologies Associates, Inc. (ETA) worked...

89

Hydrogen Production Roadmap: Technology Pathways to the Future  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

technology without additional DOE resources. This technology may be applicable to LNG with minimal additional development. Barriers discussed herein remain for industry to...

90

Abstract„Production of two types of superconducting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

68271-AB 68271-AB Abstract submitted to the 17 th International Conf. on Magnet Technology, Geneva, Sept. 24-28, 2001 Test Results for Prototypes of the Twin Aperture Dipoles for the LHC Insertion Region* J. Muratore, M. Anerella, J. Cozzolino, G. Ganetis, A. Ghosh, R. Gupta, M. Harrison, A. Jain, A. Marone, S. Plate, J. Schmalzle, R. Thomas, P. Wanderer, E. Willen and K.C. Wu Brookhaven National Laboratory, P.O. Box 5000, Upton, NY 11973-5000 Abstract-The Superconducting Magnet Division at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is building 26 insertion region dipoles of various types for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. These 9.45 m-long, 8 cm aperture magnets use the same coil design as the arc dipoles for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL. The

91

The IT productivity paradox revisited: technological determinism masked by management method?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The productivity paradox in information technology is that investment in IT does not seem to be reflected in increased productivity. There is a host of possible explanations, but little consensus on which are responsible, or even on whether the paradox ... Keywords: information technology, management method, productivity paradox

Stuart Macdonald

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Organizing for Product Development Across Technological Environments: Performance Trade-offs and Priorities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines how designing for product development influences project performance in distinct technological environments. Drawing on a series of computational experiments and paired-case comparisons of six product development projects, we specifically ... Keywords: innovation, new product development, organizational design, qualitative research, research triangulation, simulation, technological environments

Laura B. Cardinal; Scott F. Turner; Michael J. Fern; Richard M. Burton

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report documents the results of an effort to identify and characterize commercial and near-commercial (emerging) technologies and products that benefited from the support of the Hydrogen, Fuel Ce

94

Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Total Stocks Stocks by Type  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil All Oils (Excluding Crude Oil) Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Butylene Other Hydrocarbons Oxygenates (excluding Fuel Ethanol) MTBE Other Oxygenates Renewables (including Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Unfinished Oils Unfinished Oils, Naphthas & Lighter Unfinished Oils, Kerosene & Light Gas Unfinished Oils, Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Motor Gasoline Blending Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB w/ Alcohol MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB w/ Ether MGBC - Reformulated, GTAB MGBC - Conventional MGBC - Conventional, CBOB MGBC - Conventional, GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Aviation Gasoline Blending Comp. Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated Gasoline, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Sulfur Distillate F.O., Greater 500 ppm Sulfur Residual Fuel Oil Residual F.O., than 1.00% Sulfur Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petro. Feedstock Use Other Oils for Petro. Feedstock Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels

95

Soap Manufacturing TechnologyChapter 9 Semi-Boiled Soap Production Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soap Manufacturing Technology Chapter 9 Semi-Boiled Soap Production Systems Surfactants and Detergents eChapters Surfactants - Detergents Press Downloadable pdf of\tChapter 9 Semi-Boiled Soap Production Systems fr

96

Long Tails vs. Superstars: The Effect of Information Technology on Product Variety and Sales Concentration Patterns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Internet and related information technologies are transforming the distribution of product sales across products, and these effects are likely to grow in coming years. Both the Long Tail and the Superstar effect are ...

Brynjolfsson, Erik

97

Environmental benefits of advanced oil and gas exploration and production technology  

SciTech Connect

THROUGHOUT THE OIL AND GAS LIFE CYCLE, THE INDUSTRY HAS APPLIED AN ARRAY OF ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES TO IMPROVE EFFICIENCY, PRODUCTIVITY, AND ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE. THIS REPORT FOCUSES SPECIFICALLY ON ADVANCES IN EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION (E&P) OPERATIONS.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Development of Technology for the Production of HIC Resistant ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A New Technology of Shot Blasting and Pickling in S31803 Duplex Stainless Steel Plate and GR2 Titanium Plate Analysis of Scale Deformation and Fracture in...

99

Hydrogen Technology Analysis: H2A Production Model Update (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation by Todd Ramsden at the 2007 DOE Hydrogen Program Annual Merit Review Meeting provides information about NREL's hydrogen technology analysis activities.

Ramsden, T.

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

100

Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and The Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production  

SciTech Connect

Performance and produced polymer evaluation of four alkaline-surfactant-polymer projects concluded that only one of the projects could have benefited from combining the alkaline-surfactant-polymer and gelation technologies. Cambridge, the 1993 Daqing, Mellott Ranch, and the Wardlaw alkaline-surfacant-polymer floods were studied. An initial gel treatment followed by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood in the Wardlaw field would have been a benefit due to reduction of fracture flow. Numerical simulation demonstrated that reducing the permeability of a high permeability zone of a reservoir with gel improved both waterflood and alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery. A Minnelusa reservoir with both A and B sand production was simulated. A and B sands are separated by a shale layer. A sand and B sand waterflood oil recovery was improved by 196,000 bbls or 3.3% OOIP when a gel was placed in the B sand. Alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery improvement over a waterflood was 392,000 bbls or 6.5% OOIP. Placing a gel into the B sand prior to an alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood resulted in 989,000 bbl or 16.4% OOIP more oil than only water injection. A sand and B sand alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery was improved by 596,000 bbls or 9.9% OOIP when a gel was placed in the B sand.

Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology product type" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

GIS-technologies for integrated assessment of the productive mining areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper describes the bases of a new application of GIS-technologies for integrated assessment and comparison of the productive mining areas, involving a wide range of mining and technological factors, considering mineral properties, mineral occurrence conditions and geographical advantages of a mineral deposit location. The model capabilities are exemplified by a comparison of technological characteristics of coals, transportation and power supply infrastructure of the productive mining areas at the Kuznetsk Coal Basin.

Zamaraev, R.Y.; Oparin, V.N.; Popov, S.E.; Potapov, V.P.; Pyastunovich,O.L. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kemerovo (Russian Federation)

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

102

Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and The Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production  

SciTech Connect

Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or more efficient areal sweep efficiency for those with high permeability contrast ''thief zones''. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or those with thief zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. A prior fluid-fluid report discussed interaction of different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses. Aluminum-polyacrylamide, flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid flowing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetate-xanthan gum rigid gels are not stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. When evaluated in a dual core configuration, injected fluid flows into the core with the greatest effective permeability to the injected fluid. The same gel stability trends to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer injected solution were observed. Aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and the silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems did not produce significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels and the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gel system produced incremental oil with the rigid flowing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differential pressures across cores. None of the gels tested appeared to alter alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution oil recovery. Total waterflood plus chemical flood oil recovery sequence recoveries were all similar. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gel used to seal fractured core maintain fracture closure if followed by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetate gels that were stable to injection of alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at 72 F were stable to injection of alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at 125 F and 175 F in linear corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained diversion capability after injection of an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution in stacked; radial coreflood with a common well bore. Xanthan gum-chromium acetate gels maintained gel integrity in linear corefloods after injection of an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution at 125 F. At 175 F, Xanthan gum-chromium acetate gels were not stable either with or without subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Numerical simulation demonstrated that reducing the permeability of a high permeability zone of a reservoir with gel improved both waterflood and alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery. A Minnelusa reservoir with both A and B sand production was simulated. A and B sands are separated by a shale layer. A sand and B sand waterflood oil recovery was improved by 196,000 bbls when a gel was placed in the B sand. A sand and B sand alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery was improved by 596,000 bbls when a gel was placed in the B sand. Alkaline-surfactant-pol

Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; David Stewart; Bill Jones

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Buildings R&D Breakthroughs: Technologies and Products Supported by the Building Technologies Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Buildings R&D Breakthroughs: Technologies and Products Supported by the Building Technologies Program April 2012 Table of Contents Executive Summary ����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� v 1.0 Introduction���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 1-1

104

Grain & Wood Based Technologies for Production of Ethanol  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Outline Sources of Ethanol Grain Based Dry Mill Process Cellulosic Based Processes Costs Conclusions The Production of Ethanol Bioethanol ...

105

Technology drives natural gas production growth from shale ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, ... Rapid increases in natural gas production from shale gas formations resulted from widespread application ...

106

Smelting Technology and Final Product Quality of Steel Rails Used ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Baotou Steel (Group) Corp. is one of the important production bases for steel rails in China. In order to meet the development of railway transportation, steel rails...

107

Forest products industry of the future: Building a sustainable technology advantage for America`s forest products industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US forest, wood, and paper industry ranks as one of the most competitive forest products industries in the world. With annual shipments valued at nearly $267 billion, it employs over 1.3 million people and is currently among the top 10 manufacturing employers in 46 out of 50 states. Retaining this leadership position will depend largely on the industry`s success in developing and using advanced technologies. These technologies will enable manufacturing plants and forestry enterprises to maximize energy and materials efficiency and reduce waste and emissions, while producing high-quality, competitively priced wood and paper products. In a unique partnership, leaders in the forest products industry have teamed with the US Department of Energy`s Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) to encourage cooperative research efforts that will help position the US forest products industry for continuing prosperity while advancing national energy efficiency and environmental goals.

NONE

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Production Technology of Cored Wire Used For Liquid Metal ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DRI Carburization in the Reduction and Transition Zones of a Shaft Furnace MIDREX Type Effect of Casting Speed on Temperature Difference between...

109

Biofuels Fuels Technology Pathway Options for Advanced Drop-in Biofuels Production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Advanced drop-in hydrocarbon biofuels require biofuel alternatives for refinery products other than gasoline. Candidate biofuels must have performance characteristics equivalent to conventional petroleum-based fuels. The technology pathways for biofuel alternatives also must be plausible, sustainable (e.g., positive energy balance, environmentally benign, etc.), and demonstrate a reasonable pathway to economic viability and end-user affordability. Viable biofuels technology pathways must address feedstock production and environmental issues through to the fuel or chemical end products. Potential end products include compatible replacement fuel products (e.g., gasoline, diesel, and JP8 and JP5 jet fuel) and other petroleum products or chemicals typically produced from a barrel of crude. Considering the complexity and technology diversity of a complete biofuels supply chain, no single entity or technology provider is capable of addressing in depth all aspects of any given pathway; however, all the necessary expert entities exist. As such, we propose the assembly of a team capable of conducting an in-depth technology pathway options analysis (including sustainability indicators and complete LCA) to identify and define the domestic biofuel pathways for a Green Fleet. This team is not only capable of conducting in-depth analyses on technology pathways, but collectively they are able to trouble shoot and/or engineer solutions that would give industrial technology providers the highest potential for success. Such a team would provide the greatest possible down-side protection for high-risk advanced drop-in biofuels procurement(s).

Kevin L Kenney

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Technoeconomic Evaluation of Large-Scale Electrolytic Hydrogen Production Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large-scale production of electrolytic hydrogen and oxygen could increase use of baseload and off-peak surplus power. To be competitive, however, water electrolysis will require low-cost electricity.

1985-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

111

Transitioning technology from R&D to production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Corporate research and development (R&D) drives progress in the high-tech industries. Companies that advance the state-of-the-art in product performance enjoy significant advantages over the competition. However, although ...

Pulitzer, Seward Webb, 1974-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

EA-1929: NorthStar Medical Technologies LLC, Commercial Domestic Production  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9: NorthStar Medical Technologies LLC, Commercial Domestic 9: NorthStar Medical Technologies LLC, Commercial Domestic Production of the Medical Isotope Molybdenum-99 EA-1929: NorthStar Medical Technologies LLC, Commercial Domestic Production of the Medical Isotope Molybdenum-99 SUMMARY This EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to use federal funds to support and accelerate Northstar Medical Radioisotopes' project to develop domestic, commercial production capability for the medical isotope Molybdenum-99 without the use of highly enriched uranium. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD August 24, 2012 EA-1929: Finding of No Significant Impact NorthStar Medical Technologies LLC, Commercial Domestic Production of the Medical Isotope Molybdenum-99

113

EA-1929: NorthStar Medical Technologies LLC, Commercial Domestic Production  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

29: NorthStar Medical Technologies LLC, Commercial Domestic 29: NorthStar Medical Technologies LLC, Commercial Domestic Production of the Medical Isotope Molybdenum-99 EA-1929: NorthStar Medical Technologies LLC, Commercial Domestic Production of the Medical Isotope Molybdenum-99 SUMMARY This EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to use federal funds to support and accelerate Northstar Medical Radioisotopes' project to develop domestic, commercial production capability for the medical isotope Molybdenum-99 without the use of highly enriched uranium. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD August 24, 2012 EA-1929: Finding of No Significant Impact NorthStar Medical Technologies LLC, Commercial Domestic Production of the Medical Isotope Molybdenum-99

114

Promise or Threat? : The Co-production of Technology and Politics in Uranium Enrichment in Iran.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The thesis point of departure is to recapture the co-production idiom within the field of Science and Technology Studies (STS) when analyzing Irans nuclear energy (more)

Moezzi, Maryam

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Large-Scale Pyrolysis Oil Production: A Technology Assessment and Economic Analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A broad perspective of pyrolysis technology as it relates to converting biomass substrates to a liquid bio-oil product and a detailed technical and economic assessment of a fast pyrolysis plant.

Ringer, M.; Putsche, V.; Scahill, J.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Technology strategy of competing with industrial design in markets of high-tech consumer products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis explores the role of industrial design in the formulation of technology strategy for certain firms that compete in markets of high-tech consumer products. The initial intuition is that the role of industrial ...

Mak, Arthur T

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Modelling and Experimental Study of Methane Catalytic Cracking as a Hydrogen Production Technology.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Production of hydrogen is primarily achieved via catalytic steam reforming, partial oxidation,and auto-thermal reforming of natural gas. Although these processes are mature technologies, they are (more)

Amin, Ashraf Mukhtar Lotfi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control Technologies - On-Site Production of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

On-Site Production of Mercury Sorbent with Low Concrete Impact On-Site Production of Mercury Sorbent with Low Concrete Impact The detrimental health effects of mercury are well documented. Furthermore, it has been reported that U.S. coal-fired plants emit approximately 48 tons of mercury a year. To remedy this, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released the Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) on March 15, 2005. A promising method to achieve the mandated mercury reductions is activated carbon injection (ACI). While promising, the current cost of ACI for mercury capture is expensive, and ACI adversely impacts the use of the by-product fly-ash for concrete. Published prices for activated carbon are generally 0.5-1 $/lb and capital costs estimates are 2-55 $/KW. Because of the high costs of ACI, Praxair started feasibility studies on an alternative process to reduce the cost of mercury capture. The proposed process is composed of three steps. First, a hot oxidant mixture is created by using a proprietary Praxair burner. Next, the hot oxidant is allowed to react with pulverized coal and additives. The resulting sorbent product is separated from the resulting syngas. In a commercial installation, the resulting sorbent product would be injected between the air-preheater and the particulate control device.

119

Solder technology in the manufacturing of electronic products  

SciTech Connect

The electronics industry has relied heavily upon the use of soldering for both package construction and circuit assembly. The solder attachment of devices onto printed circuit boards and ceramic microcircuits has supported the high volume manufacturing processes responsible for low cost, high quality consumer products and military hardware. Defects incurred during the manufacturing process are minimized by the proper selection of solder alloys, substrate materials and process parameters. Prototyping efforts are then used to evaluate the manufacturability of the chosen material systems. Once manufacturing feasibility has been established, service reliability of the final product is evaluated through accelerated testing procedures.

Vianco, P.T.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Visions on Energy Production Technologies for Finland up to 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.1% 14% 16% 28% 1.2-1.5 CHP products District heat Back pressure turbine Combined cycle plants Micro-plants (microturbine, fuel cell,..) Heat storage Cold storage Hydrogen storage Clean water District cooling Hydrogen The share of district heating CHP electricity in Finland The share of total CHP electricity in Finland

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology product type" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

United Nations Conference on Trade and Development Biofuel production technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of different biofuels can be produced, including Fisher-Tropsch liquids (FTL), dimethyl ether (DME that would be used for biofuel production. These fuels include Fischer-Tropsch liquids (FTL), methanol such as dimethyl ether (DME) or Fischer-Tropsch liquids (FTL) made from lignocellulosic biomass. A relatively

122

Low-Cost NIALMS Technology: Market Issues & Product Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Non-Intrusive Appliance Load Monitoring System (NIALMS) provides the ability to submeter residential loads from the meter, without intruding into the home. It utilizes a meter recorder installed between the meter socket and a meter, eliminating the need for additional sensors and dataloggers. NIALMS is now a commercially available product, used primarily for load research by utilities. The issues surrounding the proliferation of NIALMS in the meter industry have always involved cost and functionality. Bu...

1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

123

Technology assessment of laser-fusion power production  

SciTech Connect

The inherent features of laser-induced fusion, some laser-fusion reactor concepts, and attendant means of utilizing the thermonuclear energy for commercial electric power generation are discussed. Theoretical fusion-pellet microexplosion energy release characteristics are described and the effects of pellet design options on pellet-microexplosion characteristics are discussed. The results of analyses to assess the engineering feasibility of reactor cavities for which protection of cavity components is provided either by suitable ablative materials or by diversion of plasmas by magnetic fields are presented. Two conceptual laser-fusion electric generating stations, based on different laser-fusion reactor concepts, are described. Technology developments for ultimate commercial application are outlined.

Booth, L.A.; Frank, T.G.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

COUPLING THE ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER TECHNOLOGY AND THE GELATION TECHNOLOGY TO MAXIMIZE OIL PRODUCTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or more efficient areal sweep efficiency for those with high permeability contrast ''thief zones''. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or those with thief zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. A prior fluid-fluid report discussed interaction of different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses. Aluminum-polyacrylamide, flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid flowing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Neither aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide nor silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems produced significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels produced incremental oil with the rigid flowing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differential pressures across cores. None of the gels tested appeared to alter alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution oil recovery. Total waterflood plus chemical flood oil recovery sequence recoveries were all similar.

Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Toward Production From Gas Hydrates: Current Status, Assessment of Resources, and Simulation-Based Evaluationof Technology and Potential  

SciTech Connect

Gas hydrates are a vast energy resource with global distribution in the permafrost and in the oceans. Even if conservative estimates are considered and only a small fraction is recoverable, the sheer size of the resource is so large that it demands evaluation as a potential energy source. In this review paper, we discuss the distribution of natural gas hydrate accumulations, the status of the primary international R&D programs, and the remaining science and technological challenges facing commercialization of production. After a brief examination of gas hydrate accumulations that are well characterized and appear to be models for future development and gas production, we analyze the role of numerical simulation in the assessment of the hydrate production potential, identify the data needs for reliable predictions, evaluate the status of knowledge with regard to these needs, discuss knowledge gaps and their impact, and reach the conclusion that the numerical simulation capabilities are quite advanced and that the related gaps are either not significant or are being addressed. We review the current body of literature relevant to potential productivity from different types of gas hydrate deposits, and determine that there are consistent indications of a large production potential at high rates over long periods from a wide variety of hydrate deposits. Finally, we identify (a) features, conditions, geology and techniques that are desirable in potential production targets, (b) methods to maximize production, and (c) some of the conditions and characteristics that render certain gas hydrate deposits undesirable for production.

Reagan, Matthew; Moridis, George J.; Collett, Timothy; Boswell, Ray; Kurihara, M.; Reagan, Matthew T.; Koh, Carolyn; Sloan, E. Dendy

2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

126

Fractionation of reformate: A new variant of gasoline production technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Novo-Ufa Petroleum Refinery is the largest domestic producer of the unique high-octane unleaded automotive gasolines AI-93 and AI-95 and the aviation gasolines B-91/115 and B-92. The base component for these gasolines is obtained by catalytic reforming of wide-cut naphtha; this basic component is usually blended with certain other components that are expensive and in short supply: toluene, xylenes, and alkylate. For example, the unleaded gasoline AI-93 has been prepared by blending reformate, alkylate, and toluene in a 65:20:15 weight ratio; AI-95 gasoline by blending alkylate and xylenes in an 80:20 weight ratio; and B-91/115 gasoline by compounding a reformate obtained with light straight-run feed, plus alkylate and toluene, in a 55:35:10 weight ratio. Toluene and xylenes have been obtained by process schemes that include the following consecutive processes: redistillation of straight-run naphtha cuts to segregate the required narrow fraction; catalytic reforming (Platforming) of the narrow toluene-xylene straight-run fraction; azeotropic distillation of the reformate to recover toluene and xylenes. A new technology based on the use of reformate fractions is proposed.

Karakuts, V.N.; Tanatarov, M.A.; Telyashev, G.G. [and others

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

COUPLING THE ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER TECHNOLOGY AND THE GELATION TECHNOLOGY TO MAXIMIZE OIL PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or more efficient areal sweep efficiency for those with high permeability contrast ''thief zones''. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or those with thief zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. A prior fluid-fluid report discussed interaction of different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses. Aluminum-polyacrylamide, flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid flowing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetate-xanthan gum rigid gels are not stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. When evaluated in a dual core configuration, injected fluid flows into the core with the greatest effective permeability to the injected fluid. The same gel stability trends to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer injected solution were observed. Aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and the silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems did not produce significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels and the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gel system produced incremental oil with the rigid flowing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differential pressures across cores. None of the gels tested appeared to alter alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution oil recovery. Total waterflood plus chemical flood oil recovery sequence recoveries were all similar.

Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; David Stewart; Bill Jones

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Review: A meta-analysis of e-learning technology acceptance: The role of user types and e-learning technology types  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Existing literature in the field of e-learning technology acceptance reflects a significant number of independent studies that primarily investigate the causal relationships proposed by technology acceptance theory, such as the technology acceptance ... Keywords: Acceptance, E-learning, Meta-analysis, Moderator analysis

BoTjan Umak; Marjan Heri?Ko; Maja PuNik

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Multi-Seam Well Completion Technology: Implications for Powder River Basin Coalbed Methane Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seam Well Completion Seam Well Completion Technology: Implications for Powder River Basin Coalbed Methane Production U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy and National Energy Technology Laboratory Strategic Center for Natural Gas September 2003 DOE/NETL-2003/1193 Multi-Seam Well Completion Technology: Implications for Powder River Basin Coalbed Methane Production U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) (Strategic Center for Natural Gas) DOE/NETL-2003/1193 September 2003 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal

130

Sample Contract Language for Information Technology Using Energy-Efficient Products  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY USING ENERGY- INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY USING ENERGY- EFFICIENT PRODUCTS Section C - Performance Work Statement/Descriptions, Specifications The Contractor shall comply with Sections 524 and Sections 525 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007; Section 104 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005; Executive Order 13514, "Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance," dated October 5, 2009; Executive Order 13423, "Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management," dated

131

Sample Contract Language for Information Technology Using Energy-Efficient Products  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY USING ENERGY- INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY USING ENERGY- EFFICIENT PRODUCTS Section C - Performance Work Statement/Descriptions, Specifications The Contractor shall comply with Sections 524 and Sections 525 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007; Section 104 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005; Executive Order 13514, "Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance," dated October 5, 2009; Executive Order 13423, "Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management," dated

132

DOE Selects Projects to Advance Technologies for the Co-Production of Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advance Technologies for the Co-Production Advance Technologies for the Co-Production of Power and Hydrogen, Fuels or Chemicals from Coal-Biomass Feedstocks DOE Selects Projects to Advance Technologies for the Co-Production of Power and Hydrogen, Fuels or Chemicals from Coal-Biomass Feedstocks August 18, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Eight projects that will focus on gasification of coal/biomass to produce synthetic gas (syngas) have been selected for further development by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The total value of the projects is approximately $8.2 million, with $6.4 million of DOE funding and $1.8 million of non-Federal cost sharing. Syngas is a mixture of predominantly carbon monoxide and hydrogen which can subsequently be converted either to power, fuels, or chemicals. The

133

WABASH RIVER INTEGRATED METHANOL AND POWER PRODUCTION FROM CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGIES (IMPPCCT)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Wabash River Integrated Methanol and Power Production from Clean Coal Technologies (IMPPCCT) project is evaluating integrated electrical power generation and methanol production through clean coal technologies. The project is conducted by a multi-industry team lead by Gasification Engineering Corporation (GEC), a company of Global Energy Inc., and supported by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Dow Chemical Company, Dow Corning Corporation, Methanex Corporation, and Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation. Three project phases are planned for execution over several years, including: (1) Feasibility study and conceptual design for an integrated demonstration facility, and for fence-line commercial embodiment plants (CEP) operated at Dow Chemical or Dow Corning chemical plant locations (2) Research, development, and testing to define any technology gaps or critical design and integration issues (3) Engineering design and financing plan to install an integrated commercial demonstration facility at the existing Wabash River Energy Limited (WREL) plant in West Terre Haute, Indiana.

Albert Tsang

2003-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

134

TRACER DETECTION TECHNOLOGY CORP. PRODUCTS AND SERVICES FOR CORPORATE AND GOVERNMENT SECURITY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TRACER DETECTION TECHNOLOGY CORP. TRACER DETECTION TECHNOLOGY CORP. PRODUCTS AND SERVICES FOR CORPORATE AND GOVERNMENT SECURITY 3463 MAGIC DRIVE, SUITE T-19 SAN ANTONIO, TX 78229 March 29, 2009 Office of the Assistant General Counsel for Technology Transfer and Intellectual Property U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW. Washington, DC 20585. GC-62@hq.doe.gov ATTN: TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER QUESTIONS. Response to Request for Information - Federal Register "The Costs and Benefits of Dealing with Federal Laboratories" This "white paper" is intended to deal constructively with issues relating to technology transfer and interaction of small businesses with federal laboratories, and should be considered a response to #6 (other). As a small businessman and entrepreneur engaged in the

135

TRACER DETECTION TECHNOLOGY CORP. PRODUCTS AND SERVICES FOR CORPORATE AND GOVERNMENT SECURITY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TRACER DETECTION TECHNOLOGY CORP. TRACER DETECTION TECHNOLOGY CORP. PRODUCTS AND SERVICES FOR CORPORATE AND GOVERNMENT SECURITY 3463 MAGIC DRIVE, SUITE T-19 SAN ANTONIO, TX 78229 March 29, 2009 Office of the Assistant General Counsel for Technology Transfer and Intellectual Property U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW. Washington, DC 20585. GC-62@hq.doe.gov ATTN: TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER QUESTIONS. Response to Request for Information - Federal Register "The Costs and Benefits of Dealing with Federal Laboratories" This "white paper" is intended to deal constructively with issues relating to technology transfer and interaction of small businesses with federal laboratories, and should be considered a response to #6 (other). As a small businessman and entrepreneur engaged in the

136

New techniques and products solve industry problems. [New technology available for the natural gas pipeline industry  

SciTech Connect

Recently introduced technology advances in data handling, manipulation and delivery; new gas and storage marketing products; a nonintrusive pipe-crack arrester; and responsive pipe-coating mill construction show promise for cutting industry costs by increasing efficiency in pipe line construction, repair, rehabilitation, and operations. The products, services and methods described in this new technology survey include: a PC-compatible dataserver that requires no user programming; flexible, responsive gas transportation scheme; evaluation of possible further uses on brittle transmission lines for fiberglass-reinforced resin composite; new multilayer epoxy PE coating mill in Corinth, Greece, near areas where large pipe line construction and rehabilitation projects are contemplated.

Bullion, L.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and CharacterizationChapter 12 Palm Oil and Palm Kernel Oil Refining and Fractionation Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and Characterization Chapter 12 Palm Oil and Palm Kernel Oil Refining and Fractionation Technology Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing eChapters Food Science & Technology Health

138

An Assessment of Reactor Types for Thermochemical Hydrogen Production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nuclear energy has been proposed as a heat source for producing hydrogen from water using a sulfur-iodine thermochemical cycle. This document presents an assessment of the suitability of various reactor types for this application. The basic requirement for the reactor is the delivery of 900 C heat to a process interface heat exchanger. Ideally, the reactor heat source should not in itself present any significant design, safety, operational, or economic issues. This study found that Pressurized and Boiling Water Reactors, Organic-Cooled Reactors, and Gas-Core Reactors were unsuitable for the intended application. Although Alkali Metal-Cooled and Liquid-Core Reactors are possible candidates, they present significant development risks for the required conditions. Heavy Metal-Cooled Reactors and Molten Salt-Cooled Reactors have the potential to meet requirements, however, the cost and time required for their development may be appreciable. Gas-Cooled Reactors (GCRs) have been successfully operated in the required 900 C coolant temperature range, and do not present any obvious design, safety, operational, or economic issues. Altogether, the GCRs approach appears to be very well suited as a heat source for the intended application, and no major development work is identified. This study recommends using the Gas-Cooled Reactor as the baseline reactor concept for a sulfur-iodine cycle for hydrogen generation.

MARSHALL, ALBERT C.

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and the Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production  

SciTech Connect

Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or reservoirs with different sand lenses with high permeability contrast. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more crude oil than waterflooding froin swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or reservoirs with high permeability contrast zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. Fluid-fluid interaction with different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9 have been tested. Aluminum-polyacrylamide gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at any pH. Chromium-polyacrylamide gels with polymer to chromium ion ratios of 25 or greater were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions if solution pH was 10.6 or less. When the polymer to chromium ion was 15 or less, chromium-polyacrylamide gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values up to 12.9. Chromium-xanthan gum gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 12.9 at the polymer to chromium ion ratios tested. Silicate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and sulfomethylated resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were also stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Iron-polyacrylamide gels were immediately destroyed when contacted with any of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses with the exception of the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gels. Aluminum-polyacrylamide flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9, either in linear corefloods or in dual separate radial core, common manifold corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid tonguing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid tonguing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Chromium acetate gels were stable to injection of alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at 72 F, 125 F and 175 F in linear corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained diversion capability after injection of an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution in stacked; radial coreflood with a common well bore. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gel used to seal fractured core maintain fracture closure if followed by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetate-xanthan gum rigid gels are not stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection at 72, 125, and 175 F. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. When evaluated in a dual core configuration, injected fluid flows into the core with the greatest effective permeability to the injected fluid. The same gel stability trends to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer injected solution were observed. Aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and the silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems did not produce significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid tonguing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels and the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gel system produced incremental oil with the rigid tonguing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differentia

Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and The Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production  

SciTech Connect

Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or reservoirs with different sand lenses with high permeability contrast. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more crude oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or reservoirs with high permeability contrast zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. Fluid-fluid interaction with different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9 have been tested. Aluminum-polyacrylamide gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at any pH. Chromium-polyacrylamide gels with polymer to chromium ion ratios of 25 or greater were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions if solution pH was 10.6 or less. When the polymer to chromium ion was 15 or less, chromium-polyacrylamide gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values up to 12.9. Chromium-xanthan gum gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 12.9 at the polymer to chromium ion ratios tested. Silicate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and sulfomethylated resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were also stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Iron-polyacrylamide gels were immediately destroyed when contacted with any of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses with the exception of the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gels. Aluminum-polyacrylamide flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9, either in linear corefloods or in dual separate radial core, common manifold corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid tonguing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid tonguing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Chromium acetate gels were stable to injection of alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at 72 F, 125 F and 175 F in linear corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained diversion capability after injection of an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution in stacked; radial coreflood with a common well bore. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gel used to seal fractured core maintain fracture closure if followed by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetatexanthan gum rigid gels are not stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection at 72, 125, and 175 F. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. When evaluated in a dual core configuration, injected fluid flows into the core with the greatest effective permeability to the injected fluid. The same gel stability trends to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer injected solution were observed. Aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and the silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems did not produce significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid tonguing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels and the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gel system produced incremental oil with the rigid tonguing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differential

Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

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141

Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and The Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or reservoirs with different sand lenses with high permeability contrast. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more crude oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or reservoirs with high permeability contrast zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. Fluid-fluid interaction with different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9 have been tested. Aluminum-polyacrylamide gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at any pH. Chromium-polyacrylamide gels with polymer to chromium ion ratios of 25 or greater were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions if solution pH was 10.6 or less. When the polymer to chromium ion was 15 or less, chromium-polyacrylamide gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values up to 12.9. Chromium-xanthan gum gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 12.9 at the polymer to chromium ion ratios tested. Silicate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and sulfomethylated resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were also stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Iron-polyacrylamide gels were immediately destroyed when contacted with any of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses with the exception of the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gels. Aluminum-polyacrylamide flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9, either in linear corefloods or in dual separate radial core, common manifold corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid tonguing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid tonguing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Chromium acetate gels were stable to injection of alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at 72 F, 125 F and 175 F in linear corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained diversion capability after injection of an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution in stacked; radial coreflood with a common well bore. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gel used to seal fractured core maintain fracture closure if followed by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetatexanthan gum rigid gels are not stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection at 72, 125, and 175 F. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. When evaluated in a dual core configuration, injected fluid flows into the core with the greatest effective permeability to the injected fluid. The same gel stability trends to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer injected solution were observed. Aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and the silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems did not produce significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid tonguing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels and the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gel system produced incremental oil with the rigid tonguing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differential

Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

High Temperature Electrolysis for Hydrogen Production from Nuclear Energy TechnologySummary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, has requested that a Hydrogen Technology Down-Selection be performed to identify the hydrogen production technology that has the best potential for timely commercial demonstration and for ultimate deployment with the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). An Independent Review Team has been assembled to execute the down-selection. This report has been prepared to provide the members of the Independent Review Team with detailed background information on the High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) process, hardware, and state of the art. The Idaho National Laboratory has been serving as the lead lab for HTE research and development under the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. The INL HTE program has included small-scale experiments, detailed computational modeling, system modeling, and technology demonstration. Aspects of all of these activities are included in this report. In terms of technology demonstration, the INL successfully completed a 1000-hour test of the HTE Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) technology demonstration experiment during the fall of 2008. The HTE ILS achieved a hydrogen production rate in excess of 5.7 Nm3/hr, with a power consumption of 18 kW. This hydrogen production rate is far larger than has been demonstrated by any of the thermochemical or hybrid processes to date.

J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; J. S. Herring; M. G. McKellar; E. A. Harvego; M. S. Sohal; K. G. Condie

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program iii Table of Contents Summary ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� v 1.0 Introduction ����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������

144

2011 Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program iii Table of Contents Summary ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� v 1.0 Introduction ����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������

145

Production of CO2 from Fossil Fuel Burning by Fuel Type, 1860...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions Historical Global Estimates Production of CO2 from Fossil Fuel Burning by Fuel Type, 1860-1982 (NDP-006) DOI: 10.3334CDIACffe.ndp006 image Data image...

146

U.S. Product Supplied of Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel (Thousand Barrels)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Product Supplied of Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel (Thousand Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1980's: 295,460 ...

147

Multiple-part-type systems in high volume manufacturing : Kanban System design for automatic production scheduling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Kanban Production System is designed to help a factory line meet fluctuating demands for multiple part types. Based on the parameter settings of the Control-Point Policy, the optimum Kanban levels are obtained. The ...

Lee, Kaizhao

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

WABASH RIVER INTEGRATED METHANOL AND POWER PRODUCTION FROM CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGIES (IMPPCCT)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Wabash River Integrated Methanol and Power Production from Clean Coal Technologies (IMPPCCT) project is evaluating integrated electrical power generation and methanol production through clean coal technologies. The project is conducted by a multi-industry team lead previously by Gasification Engineering Corporation (GEC). The project is now under the leadership of ConocoPhillips Company (COP) after it acquired GEC and the E-Gas{trademark} gasification technology from Global Energy in July 2003. The Phase I of this project was supported by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Dow Chemical Company, Dow Corning Corporation, Methanex Corporation, and Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation, while the Phase II is supported by Gas Technology Institute, TDA Research, Inc., and Nucon International, Inc. The two project phases planned for execution include: (1) Feasibility study and conceptual design for an integrated demonstration facility at Global Energy's existing Wabash River Energy Limited (WREL) plant in West Terre Haute, Indiana, and for a fence-line commercial embodiment plants (CEP) operated at Dow Chemical or Dow Corning chemical plant locations (2) Research, development, and testing (RD&T) to define any technology gaps or critical design and integration issues. The WREL facility was designed, constructed, and operated under a project selected and co-funded under the Round IV of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE's) Clean Coal Technology Program. In this project, coal and/or other solid fuel feedstocks are gasified in an oxygen-blown, entrained-flow gasifier with continuous slag removal and a dry particulate removal system. The resulting product synthesis gas is used to fuel a combustion turbine generator whose exhaust is integrated with a heat recovery steam generator to drive a refurbished steam turbine generator. The gasifier uses technology initially developed by The Dow Chemical Company (the Destec Gasification Process), and now acquired and offered commercially by COP as the E-GAS{trademark} technology. In a joint effort with the DOE, a Cooperative Agreement was awarded under the Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) solicitation. GEC, and now COP and the industrial partners are investigating the use of synthesis gas produced by the E-GAS{trademark} technology in a coproduction environment to enhance the efficiency and productivity of solid fuel gasification combined cycle power plants. The objectives of this effort are to determine the feasibility of an EECP located at a specific site which produces some combination of electric power (or heat), fuels, and/or chemicals from synthesis gas derived from coal, or, coal in combination with some other carbonaceous feedstock. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information that will be needed to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation by industry.

Thomas Lynch

2004-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

149

Program on Technology Innovation: Assessment of Fusion Energy Options for Commercial Electricity Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fusion energy options were reviewed to assess technical readiness levels for commercial electricity production for the power industry. Magnetic and inertial confinement systems, in addition to nontraditional fusion concepts, were reviewed by a technical panel of experts, based on workshop presentations by the proponents of each technology. The results are summarized in this ...

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

150

Alternative and Renewable fuels and Vehicle Technology Program Subject Area: Biofuels production Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alternative and Renewable fuels and Vehicle Technology Program Subject Area: Biofuels production: Commercial Facilities · Applicant's Legal Name: Yokayo Biofuels, Inc. · Name of project: A Catalyst for Success · Project Description: Yokayo Biofuels, an industry veteran with over 10 years experience

151

Reciprocating Engines for Stationary Power Generation: Technology, Products, Players, and Business Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reciprocating engines (REs) have long played an important role in the distributed resources market and should, in the future, continue to provide end-use customers and energy companies benefits in both onsite and grid-connected power generation service. This report presents a comprehensive worldwide overview of RE technology and the business climate for these products.

2000-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

152

Hydrogen and electricity production using microbial fuel cell-based technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­ Anaerobic digesters · Electrogenesis ­ Generation of electricity ­ Exoelectrogens ­ Microbial fuel cells1 Hydrogen and electricity production using microbial fuel cell-based technologies Bruce E. Logan · US electricity generation: 13 quad ·Electricity needed for H2 transportation: · Via water

Lee, Dongwon

153

Hydrogen Storage Technologies: Long-Term Commercialization Approach with First Products First  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies Technologies Long-term commercialization approach with first products first Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Manufacturing R&D Workshop Washington, DC Glenn Rambach August 11, 2011 Potential market area for fuel cells (or other power plants). Defined by peak power vs. cost per unit power capacity (W vs. $/kW) for typical applications currently satisfied by legacy technologies. Auto Transit bus 2-cycle scooter Portable generator Wheelchair Fork lift Telecom backup Strategic portable Educational device Retail A Less difficult Less difficult (smaller units) (cost tolerant market) Auto Transit bus 2-cycle scooter Portable generator Wheelchair Fork lift Telecom backup Strategic portable Educational device Retail A Range of application size and specific cost that all can be commercially satisfied

154

Approaches for identifying consumer preferences for the design of technology products : a case study of residential solar panels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis investigates ways to obtain consumer preferences for technology products to help designers identify the key attributes that contribute to a product's market success. A case study of residential solar PV panels ...

Chen, Heidi Qianyi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

WABASH RIVER INTEGRATED METHANOL AND POWER PRODUCTION FROM CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGIES (IMPPCCT)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Wabash River Integrated Methanol and Power Production from Clean Coal Technologies (IMPPCCT) project is evaluating integrated electrical power generation and methanol production through clean coal technologies. The project is conducted by a multi-industry team lead by Gasification Engineering Corporation (GEC), a company of Global Energy Inc., and supported by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Dow Chemical Company, Dow Corning Corporation, Methanex Corporation, and Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation. Three project phases are planned for execution over a three year period, including: (1) Feasibility study and conceptual design for an integrated demonstration facility, and for fence-line commercial embodiment plants (CEP) operated at Dow Chemical or Dow Corning chemical plant locations (2) Research, development, and testing to define any technology gaps or critical design and integration issues (3) Engineering design and financing plan to install an integrated commercial demonstration facility at the existing Wabash River Energy Limited (WREL) plant in West Terre Haute, Indiana. The WREL facility is a project selected and co-funded under the Round IV of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Clean Coal Technology Program. In this project, coal and/or other solid fuel feedstocks are gasified in an oxygen-blown, entrained-flow gasifier with continuous slag removal and a dry particulate removal system. The resulting product synthesis gas is used to fuel a combustion turbine generator whose exhaust is integrated with a heat recovery steam generator to drive a refurbished steam turbine generator. The gasifier uses technology initially developed by The Dow Chemical Company (the Destec Gasification Process), and now offered commercially by Global Energy, Inc., as the E-GAS{trademark} technology. In a joint effort with the DOE, a Cooperative Agreement was awarded under the Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) solicitation. GEC and an Industrial Consortium are investigating the use of synthesis gas produced by the E-GAS{trademark} technology in a coproduction environment to enhance the efficiency and productivity of solid fuel gasification combined cycle power plants. During the reporting period, various methods to remove low-level contaminants for the synthesis gas were reviewed. In addition, there was a transition of the project personnel for GEC which has slowed the production of the outstanding project reports.

Gary Harmond; Albert Tsang

2003-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

156

Large-scale production, harvest and logistics of switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) - current technology and envisioning a mature technology  

SciTech Connect

Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) is a promising cellulosic biomass feedstock for biorefineries and biofuel production. This paper reviews current and future potential technologies for production, harvest, storage, and transportation of switchgrass. Our analysis indicates that for a yield of 10 Mg ha 1, the current cost of producing switchgrass (after establishment) is about $41.50 Mg 1. The costs may be reduced to about half this if the yield is increased to 30 Mg ha 1 through genetic improvement, intensive crop management, and/or optimized inputs. At a yield of 10 Mg ha 1, we estimate that harvesting costs range from $23.72 Mg 1 for current baling technology to less than $16 Mg 1 when using a loafing collection system. At yields of 20 and 30 Mg ha 1 with an improved loafing system, harvesting costs are even lower at $12.75 Mg 1 and $9.59 Mg 1, respectively. Transport costs vary depending upon yield and fraction of land under switchgrass, bulk density of biomass, and total annual demand of a biorefinery. For a 2000 Mg d 1 plant and an annual yield of 10 Mg ha 1, the transport cost is an estimated $15.42 Mg 1, assuming 25% of the land is under switchgrass production. Total delivered cost of switchgrass using current baling technology is $80.64 Mg 1, requiring an energy input of 8.5% of the feedstock higher heating value (HHV). With mature technology, for example, a large, loaf collection system, the total delivered cost is reduced to about $71.16 Mg 1 with 7.8% of the feedstock HHV required as input. Further cost reduction can be achieved by combining mature technology with increased crop productivity. Delivered cost and energy input do not vary significantly as biorefinery capacity increases from 2000 Mg d 1 to 5000 Mg d 1 because the cost of increased distance to access a larger volume feedstock offsets the gains in increased biorefinery capacity. This paper outlines possible scenarios for the expansion of switchgrass handling to 30 Tg (million Mg) in 2015 and 100 Tg in 2030 based on predicted growth of the biorefinery industry in the USA. The value of switchgrass collection operations is estimated at more than $0.6 billion in 2015 and more than $2.1 billion in 2030. The estimated value of post harvest operations is $0.6 $2.0 billion in 2015, and $2.0 $6.5 billion in 2030, depending on the degree of preprocessing. The need for power equipment (tractors) will increase from 100 MW in 2015 to 666 MW in 2030, with corresponding annual values of $150 and $520 million, respectively. 2009 Society of Chemical Industry and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd

Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Turhollow, Jr., Anthony [ORNL; Mani, Sudhagar [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Kumar, Amit [University of Alberta; Bransby, David [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama; Lynd, L. [Dartmouth College; Laser, Mark [Dartmouth College

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

TREATMENT OF METAL-LADEN HAZARDOUS WASTES WITH ADVANCED CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY BY-PRODUCTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This sixteenth quarterly report describes work done during the sixteenth three-month period of the University of Pittsburgh's project on the ''Treatment of Metal-Laden Hazardous Wastes with Advanced Clean Coal Technology By-Products.'' This report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focused upon new laboratory evaluation of samples from Phase 1, discussions with MAX Environmental Technologies, Inc., on the field work of Phase 2, giving a presentation, and making and responding to several outside contacts.

James T. Cobb, Jr.; Ronald D. Neufeld; Jana Agostini

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Treatment of metal-laden hazardous wastes with advanced Clean Coal Technology by-products  

SciTech Connect

This eleventh quarterly report describes work done during the eleventh three-month period of the University of Pittsburgh's project on the ``Treatment of Metal-Laden Hazardous Wastes with Advanced Clean Coal Technology By-Products.'' This report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focused upon new laboratory evaluation of samples from Phase 1, discussions with MAX Environmental Technologies, Inc., on the field work of Phase 2, preparing and giving presentations, and making and responding to two outside contacts.

James T. Cobb, Jr.; Ronald D. Neufeld; Jana Agostini; Wiles Elder

1999-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

159

TREATMENT OF METAL-LADEN HAZARDOUS WASTES WITH ADVANCED CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY BY-PRODUCTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This seventeenth quarterly report describes work done during the seventeenth three-month period of the University of Pittsburgh's project on the ''Treatment of Metal-Laden Hazardous Wastes with Advanced Clean Coal Technology By-Products.'' This report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focused upon new laboratory evaluation of samples from Phase 1, discussions with MAX Environmental Technologies, Inc., on the field work of Phase 2, giving a presentation, submitting a manuscript and making and responding to one outside contact.

James T. Cobb, Jr.; Ronald D. Neufeld; Jana Agostini

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Research Note---Does Technological Progress Alter the Nature of Information Technology as a Production Input? New Evidence and New Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prior research at the firm level finds information technology (IT) to be a net substitute for both labor and non-IT capital inputs. However, it is unclear whether these results hold, given recent IT innovations and continued price declines. In this study ... Keywords: IT business value, capital services, complement, hedonic, organizational decentralization, price index, productivity, rental price, substitute, technological change

Paul Chwelos; Ronald Ramirez; Kenneth L. Kraemer; Nigel P. Melville

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology product type" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Appendix B: CArBon dioxide CApture teChnology SheetS Oxygen PrOductiOn  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxygen PrOductiOn B-500 Oxygen PrOductiOn u.S. dePartment Of energy advanced carbOn diOxide caPture r&d PrOgram: technOlOgy uPdate, may 2013 itm Oxygen technOlOgy fOr integratiOn...

162

Wabash River Integrated Methanol and Power Production from Clean Coal Technologies (IMPPCCT)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Wabash River Integrated Methanol and Power Production from Clean Coal Technologies (IMPPCCT) project was established to evaluate integrated electrical power generation and methanol production through clean coal technologies. The project was under the leadership of ConocoPhillips Company (COP), after it acquired Gasification Engineering Corporation (GEC) and the E-Gas gasification technology from Global Energy Inc. in July 2003. The project has completed both Phase 1 and Phase 2 of development. The two project phases include the following: (1) Feasibility study and conceptual design for an integrated demonstration facility at SG Solutions LLC (SGS), previously the Wabash River Energy Limited, Gasification Facility located in West Terre Haute, Indiana, and for a fence-line commercial embodiment plant (CEP) operated at the Dow Chemical Company or Dow Corning Corporation chemical plant locations. (2) Research, development, and testing (RD&T) to define any technology gaps or critical design and integration issues. Phase 1 of this project was supported by a multi-industry team consisting of Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., The Dow Chemical Company, Dow Corning Corporation, Methanex Corporation, and Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation, while Phase 2 was supported by Gas Technology Institute, TDA Research Inc., and Nucon International, Inc. The SGS integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) facility was designed, constructed, and operated under a project selected and co-funded under the Round IV of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE's) Clean Coal Technology Program. In this project, coal and/or other carbonaceous fuel feedstocks are gasified in an oxygen-blown, entrained-flow gasifier with continuous slag removal and a dry particulate removal system. The resulting product synthesis gas (syngas) is used to fuel a combustion turbine generator whose exhaust is integrated with a heat recovery steam generator to drive a refurbished steam turbine generator. The gasifier uses technology initially developed by The Dow Chemical Company (the Destec Gasification Process), and now acquired and offered commercially by COP as the E-Gas technology. In a joint effort with the DOE, a Cooperative Agreement was awarded under the Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) solicitation. GEC, and later COP and the industrial partners investigated the use of syngas produced by the E-Gas technology in a coproduction environment to enhance the efficiency and productivity of solid fuel gasification combined cycle power plants. The objectives of this effort were to determine the feasibility of an EECP located at a specific site which produces some combination of electric power (or heat), fuels, and/or chemicals from syngas derived from coal, or, coal in combination with some other carbonaceous feedstock. The intended result of the project was to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information that would be needed to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation by industry. The EECP study conducted in Phase 1 of the IMPPCCT Project confirmed that the concept for the integration of gasification-based (E-Gas) electricity generation from coal and/or petroleum coke and methanol production (Liquid Phase Methanol or LPMEOH{trademark}) processes was feasible for the coproduction of power and chemicals. The results indicated that while there were minimal integration issues that impact the deployment of an IMPPCCT CEP, the major concern was the removal of sulfur and other trace contaminants, which are known methanol catalyst poisons, from the syngas. However, economic concerns in the domestic methanol market which is driven by periodic low natural gas prices and cheap offshore supplies limit the commercial viability of this more capital intensive concept. The objective of Phase 2 was to conduct RD&T as outlined in the Phase 1 RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. Studies were designed to address the technical concerns that would mak

Conocophillips

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

163

Technologies  

Technologies Materials. Aggregate Spray for Air Particulate; Actuators Made From Nanoporous Materials; Ceramic Filters; Energy Absorbing Material; Diode Arrays for ...

164

Technologies  

Science & Technology. Weapons & Complex Integration. News Center. News Center. Around the Lab. Contacts. For Reporters. Livermore Lab Report. ...

165

Technologies  

Technologies Energy. Advanced Carbon Aerogels for Energy Applications; Distributed Automated Demand Response; Electrostatic Generator/Motor; Modular Electromechanical ...

166

Technologies  

Technologies Energy, Utilities, & Power Systems. Advanced Carbon Aerogels for Energy Applications; Distributed Automated Demand Response; Electrostatic Generator/Motor

167

Technologies  

Technologies Research Tools. Cell-Free Assembly of NanoLipoprotein Particles; Chemical Prism; Lawrence Livermore Microbial Detection Array (LLMDA) ...

168

The type of calligraphy : writing, print, and technologies of the Arabic alphabet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Press. Hudson, James. 2002. Unicode, From Text to Type. In Language, Culture, Type:International Type Design in the Age of Unicode, edited by

Osborn, J. R. (Wayne)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

WABASH RIVER INTEGRATED METHANOL AND POWER PRODUCTION FROM CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGIES (IMPPCCT)  

SciTech Connect

The Wabash River Integrated Methanol and Power Production from Clean Coal Technologies (IMPPCCT) project is evaluating integrated electrical power generation and methanol production through clean coal technologies. The project is conducted by a multi-industry team lead by Gasification Engineering Corporation (GEC), and supported by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Dow Chemical Company, Dow Corning Corporation, Methanex Corporation, and Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation. Three project phases are planned for execution, including: (1) Feasibility study and conceptual design for an integrated demonstration facility, and for fence-line commercial embodiment plants (CEP) operated at Dow Chemical or Dow Corning chemical plant locations (2) Research, development, and testing (RD&T) to define any technology gaps or critical design and integration issues (3) Engineering design and financing plan to install an integrated commercial demonstration facility at the existing Wabash River Energy Limited (WREL) plant in West Terre Haute, Indiana. The WREL facility is a project selected and co-funded under the Round IV of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE's) Clean Coal Technology Program. In this project, coal and/or other solid fuel feedstocks are gasified in an oxygen-blown, entrained-flow gasifier with continuous slag removal and a dry particulate removal system. The resulting product synthesis gas is used to fuel a combustion turbine generator whose exhaust is integrated with a heat recovery steam generator to drive a refurbished steam turbine generator. The gasifier uses technology initially developed by The Dow Chemical Company (the Destec Gasification Process), and now offered commercially by Global Energy, Inc., parent company of GEC and WREL, as the E-GAS{trademark} technology. In a joint effort with the DOE, a Cooperative Agreement was awarded under the Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) solicitation. GEC and an Industrial Consortium are investigating the use of synthesis gas produced by the E-GAS{trademark} technology in a coproduction environment to enhance the efficiency and productivity of solid fuel gasification combined cycle power plants. The objectives of this effort are to determine the feasibility of an EECP located at a specific site which produces some combination of electric power (or heat), fuels, and/or chemicals from synthesis gas derived from coal, or, coal in combination with some other carbonaceous feedstock. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information that will be needed to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation by industry. During the reporting period, effort continues on identifying potential technologies for removing contaminants from synthesis gas to the level required by methanol synthesis. A liquid phase Claus process and a direct sulfur oxidation process were evaluated. Preliminary discussion was held with interested parties on cooperating on RD&T in Phase II of the project. Also, significant progress was made during the period in the submission of project deliverables. A meeting was held at DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory in Morgantown between GEC and the DOE IMPPCCT Project Manager on the status of the project, and reached an agreement on the best way to wrap up Phase I and transition into the Phase II RD&T. Potential projects for the Phase II, cost, and fund availability were also discussed.

Albert Tsang

2003-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

170

WABASH RIVER INTEGRATED METHANOL AND POWER PRODUCTION FROM CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGIES (IMPPCCT)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Wabash River Integrated Methanol and Power Production from Clean Coal Technologies (IMPPCCT) project is evaluating integrated electrical power generation and methanol production through clean coal technologies. The project is conducted by a multi-industry team lead by Gasification Engineering Corporation (GEC), and supported by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Dow Chemical Company, Dow Corning Corporation, Methanex Corporation, and Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation. Three project phases are planned for execution, including: (1) Feasibility study and conceptual design for an integrated demonstration facility, and for fence-line commercial embodiment plants (CEP) operated at Dow Chemical or Dow Corning chemical plant locations (2) Research, development, and testing (RD&T) to define any technology gaps or critical design and integration issues (3) Engineering design and financing plan to install an integrated commercial demonstration facility at the existing Wabash River Energy Limited (WREL) plant in West Terre Haute, Indiana. The WREL facility is a project selected and co-funded under the Round IV of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE's) Clean Coal Technology Program. In this project, coal and/or other solid fuel feedstocks are gasified in an oxygen-blown, entrained-flow gasifier with continuous slag removal and a dry particulate removal system. The resulting product synthesis gas is used to fuel a combustion turbine generator whose exhaust is integrated with a heat recovery steam generator to drive a refurbished steam turbine generator. The gasifier uses technology initially developed by The Dow Chemical Company (the Destec Gasification Process), and now offered commercially by Global Energy, Inc., parent company of GEC and WREL, as the E-GAS{trademark} technology. In a joint effort with the DOE, a Cooperative Agreement was awarded under the Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) solicitation. GEC and an Industrial Consortium are investigating the use of synthesis gas produced by the E-GAS{trademark} technology in a coproduction environment to enhance the efficiency and productivity of solid fuel gasification combined cycle power plants. The objectives of this effort are to determine the feasibility of an EECP located at a specific site which produces some combination of electric power (or heat), fuels, and/or chemicals from synthesis gas derived from coal, or, coal in combination with some other carbonaceous feedstock. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information that will be needed to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation by industry. During the reporting period, effort continues on identifying potential technologies for removing contaminants from synthesis gas to the level required by methanol synthesis. A liquid phase Claus process and a direct sulfur oxidation process were evaluated. Preliminary discussion was held with interested parties on cooperating on RD&T in Phase II of the project. Also, significant progress was made during the period in the submission of project deliverables. A meeting was held at DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory in Morgantown between GEC and the DOE IMPPCCT Project Manager on the status of the project, and reached an agreement on the best way to wrap up Phase I and transition into the Phase II RD&T. Potential projects for the Phase II, cost, and fund availability were also discussed.

Albert Tsang

2003-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

171

Technologies  

High Performance Computing (HPC) Technologies; Industrial Partnerships Office P.O. Box 808, L-795 Livermore, CA 94551 Phone: (925) 422-6416 Fax: (925) ...

172

WABASH RIVER INTEGRATED METHANOL AND POWER PRODUCTION FROM CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGIES (IMPPCCT)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Wabash River Integrated Methanol and Power Production from Clean Coal Technologies (IMPPCCT) project is evaluating integrated electrical power generation and methanol production through clean coal technologies. The project is conducted by a multi-industry team lead by Gasification Engineering Corporation (GEC), and supported by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Dow Chemical Company, Dow Corning Corporation, Methanex Corporation, and Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation. Two project phases are planned for execution, including: (1) Feasibility study and conceptual design for an integrated demonstration facility at the existing Wabash River Energy Limited (WREL) plant in West Terre Haute, Indiana, and for a fence-line commercial embodiment plants (CEP) operated at Dow Chemical or Dow Corning chemical plant locations (2) Research, development, and testing (RD&T) to define any technology gaps or critical design and integration issues. The WREL facility is a project selected and co-funded under the Round IV of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE's) Clean Coal Technology Program. In this project, coal and/or other solid fuel feedstocks are gasified in an oxygen-blown, entrained-flow gasifier with continuous slag removal and a dry particulate removal system. The resulting product synthesis gas is used to fuel a combustion turbine generator whose exhaust is integrated with a heat recovery steam generator to drive a refurbished steam turbine generator. The gasifier uses technology initially developed by The Dow Chemical Company (the Destec Gasification Process), and now offered commercially by Global Energy, Inc., parent company of GEC and WREL, as the E-GAS{trademark} technology. In a joint effort with the DOE, a Cooperative Agreement was awarded under the Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) solicitation. GEC and an Industrial Consortium are investigating the use of synthesis gas produced by the E-GAS{trademark} technology in a coproduction environment to enhance the efficiency and productivity of solid fuel gasification combined cycle power plants. The objectives of this effort are to determine the feasibility of an EECP located at a specific site which produces some combination of electric power (or heat), fuels, and/or chemicals from synthesis gas derived from coal, or, coal in combination with some other carbonaceous feedstock. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information that will be needed to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation by industry. During the reporting period, DOE approved the RD&T Plan submitted in the previous quarter. The RD&T Plan forms the basis for the Continuation Application to initiate the transition of the project from Phase I to Phase II. Potential technologies for removing contaminants from synthesis gas to the level required by methanol synthesis will be tested in slipstream units at the WREL facility during Phase II. A supplemental information package consisting of a revised Work Breakdown Structure and Budget Plan for Phase II and other necessary forms was also submitted. Agreement is being reached with DOE's patent attorney on the scope of the limited rights data to be provided under the Cooperative Agreement. Preparation of a comprehensive Final Report for Phase I of the project, which will consolidate the remaining deliverables including the Initial Feasibility Report, Concept Report, Site Analysis Report, Economic Analysis, and Preliminary Project Financing Plan, continued during the reporting period. Significant progress was made in the Subsystem Design Specification section of the report.

Albert Tsang

2003-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

173

AISI/DOE Technology Roadmap Program: A Technology of Low Coal Rate and High Productivity of RHF Ironmaking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An economical and environment-friendly ironmaking process based on heating the chemiexecy self-sufficient green balls of iron ore and coal in a hearth furnace is being developed with financial support from AISI members and DOE. DRI, which is hot (1400 C), dense (3.2 g/cm) and of high degree of metallization (95%), has been produced in laboratory and in a pilot plant in Genoa, Italy. Products of such quality have been made from American and Brazilian ores, BOF sludge, EAF dust/BOF sludge mixtures and millscale. The removal of zinc and lead from green balls by this process is essentially complete. In comparison with typical blast furnace operation, the new technology with a melter would have a lower total coal rate by 200kg.THM. The elimination of cokemaking and high temperature agglomeration steps, and a simpler gas handling system would lead to lower capital and operating costs. In comparison with commercial RHF practice it is different in atmosphere (fully oxidized at 1600 to 1650 C), in bed height (120 mm instead of 20-25 mm) and in pellet composition (much less coal but of higher VM). The combined effect leads to three times higher furnace productivity, lower coal consumption and superior DRI quality. The risk of re-oxidation (slag formation) and dusty operation are practiexecy eliminated. The process is stable, tolerant and independent of the size, shape and movement of the hearth. However, materials handling (e.g., discharge of hot DRI) and the exact energy savings have to be established in a larger furnace, straight or rotary, and in a continuous mode of operation.

Wei-Kao Lu

2002-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

174

WABASH RIVER INTEGRATED METHANOL AND POWER PRODUCTION FROM CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGIES (IMPPCCT)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Wabash River Integrated Methanol and Power Production from Clean Coal Technologies (IMPPCCT) project is evaluating integrated electrical power generation and methanol production through clean coal technologies. The project is conducted by a multi-industry team lead by Gasification Engineering Corporation (GEC), and supported by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Dow Chemical Company, Dow Corning Corporation, Methanex Corporation, and Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation. Three project phases are planned for execution over a three year period, including: (1) Feasibility study and conceptual design for an integrated demonstration facility, and for fence-line commercial plants operated at Dow Chemical or Dow Corning chemical plant locations; (2) Research, development, and testing to define any technology gaps or critical design and integration issues; and (3) Engineering design and financing plan to install an integrated commercial demonstration facility at the existing Wabash River Energy Limited (WREL) plant in West Terre Haute, Indiana. This report describes management planning, work breakdown structure development, and feasibility study activities by the IMPPCCT consortium in support of the first project phase. Project planning activities have been completed, and a project timeline and task list has been generated. Requirements for an economic model to evaluate the West Terre Haute implementation and for other commercial implementations are being defined. Specifications for methanol product and availability of local feedstocks for potential commercial embodiment plant sites have been defined. The WREL facility is a project selected and co-funded under the fifth phase solicitation of the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology Program. In this project, coal and/or other solid fuel feedstocks are gasified in an oxygen-blown, entrained-flow gasifier with continuous slag removal and a dry particulate removal system. The resulting product synthesis gas is used to fuel a combustion turbine generator whose exhaust is integrated with a heat recovery steam generator to drive a refurbished steam turbine generator. The gasifier uses technology initially developed by The Dow Chemical Company (the Destec Gasification Process), and now offered commercially by Global Energy, Inc., as the E-GAS{trademark} technology. In a joint effort with the U.S. Department of Energy, working under a Cooperative Agreement Award from the ''Early Entrance Coproduction Plant'' (EECP) initiative, the GEC and an Industrial Consortia are investigating the application of synthesis gas from the E-GAS{trademark} technology to a coproduction environment to enhance the efficiency and productivity of solid fuel gasification combined cycle power plants. The objectives of this effort are to determine the feasibility of an EECP located at a specific site which produces some combination of electric power (or heat), fuels, and/or chemicals from synthesis gas derived from coal, or, coal in combination with some other carbonaceous feedstock. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information that will be needed to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation by industry.

Doug Strickland; Albert Tsang

2002-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

175

AEO2011: Coal Production by Region and Type | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

by Region and Type by Region and Type Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is Table 140, and contains only the reference case. The unit of measurement in this dataset is million short tons. The data is broken down into northern Appalachia, central Appalachia, southern Appalachia, eastern interior, western interior, gulf, Dakota medium, western montana, Wyoming, Rocky Mountain, Arizona/New Mexico and Washington/Alaska. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO Coal Production EIA Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AE2011: Coal Production by Region and Type- Reference Case (xls, 122.3 KiB)

176

Long-Term Column Leaching of Phase II Mercury Control Technology By-Products  

SciTech Connect

An NETL research, development and demonstration program under DOE/Fossil Energy Innovations for Existing Plants is directed toward the improvement of the performance and economics of mercury control from coal-fired plants. The current Phase II of the RD&D program emphasizes the evaluation of performance and cost of control technologies through slip-stream and full scale field testing while continuing the development of novel concepts. One of the concerns of the NETL program is the fate of the captured flue gas mercury which is transferred to the condensed phase by-product stream. The stability of mercury and any co-captured elements in the by-products could have a large economic impact if it reduced by-product sales or increasing their disposal costs. As part of a greater characterization effort of Phase II facility baseline and control technology sample pairs, NETL in-house laboratories have performed continuous leaching of a select subset of the available sample pairs using four leachants: water (pH=5.7), dilute sulfuric acid (pH=1.2), dilute acetic acid (pH=2.9), and sodium carbonate (pH=11.1). This report describes results obtained for mercury, arsenic, and selenium during the 5-month leaching experiments.

Schroeder, K.T.; Cardone, C.R.; White, Fredrick; Rohar, P.C.; Kim, A.G

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Enhanced product realization techniques using as-built and model reconstruction technologies  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Center for Advanced Engineering Technology has developed a product realization process designed to enhance the complexity and comprehensiveness of the information fed back to the designer after the analytical and manufacturing operations have been completed. This process uses principles of As-Built Engineering and Model Reconstruction in a Models Based Engineering environment, allowing optimization in the manufacturing and assembly operations and providing information as to the As-Built configuration to engineering and physics designers for evaluation. As-Built Engineers is a product realization methodology founded on the notion that life-cycle engineering should be based on what is actually produced and not on what is nominally designed. It enables customization in mass production environments and questions nominal based methods of engineering. Model Reconstruction provides the capability of subjecting a design to adverse conditions within the computer aided environment and building a stereolithography model and simulated radiograph from the analytical finite element information of the simulated damaged part. Models Based Engineering is an information management tool and a key driver toward the development of adaptive product realization infrastructures. It encompasses the breadth of engineering information, from concept through design to product application.

Dolin, R.M.; Hefele, J.; Tsai, C.S.; Maes, G.J.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Empirical support for global integrated assessment modeling: Productivity trends and technological change in developing countries' agriculture and electric power sectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Council on Energy and Environment, for Mexico, the NationalMexico, Brazil, and Indonesia), examining long-run trends in productivity, technological change, energy andenergy-intensive manufacturing sectors of five developing countries, India, Brazil, Mexico,

Sathaye, Jayant A.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Technolog  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research in Research in Science and Technolog y Sandia pushes frontiers of knowledge to meet the nation's needs, today and tomorrow Sandia National Laboratories' fundamental science and technology research leads to greater understanding of how and why things work and is intrinsic to technological advances. Basic research that challenges scientific assumptions enables the nation to push scientific boundaries. Innovations and breakthroughs produced at Sandia allow it to tackle critical issues, from maintaining the safety, security and effectiveness of the nation's nuclear weapons and preventing domestic and interna- tional terrorism to finding innovative clean energy solutions, develop- ing cutting-edge nanotechnology and moving the latest advances to the marketplace. Sandia's expertise includes:

180

Hydrogen Gas Production from Nuclear Power Plant in Relation to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Technologies Nowadays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, world has been confused by issues of energy resourcing, including fossil fuel use, global warming, and sustainable energy generation. Hydrogen may become the choice for future fuel of combustion engine. Hydrogen is an environmentally clean source of energy to end-users, particularly in transportation applications because without release of pollutants at the point of end use. Hydrogen may be produced from water using the process of electrolysis. One of the GEN-IV reactors nuclear projects (HTGRs, HTR, VHTR) is also can produce hydrogen from the process. In the present study, hydrogen gas production from nuclear power plant is reviewed in relation to commercialization of hydrogen fuel cell technologies nowadays.

Yusibani, Elin [Research Center for Hydrogen Industrial Use and Storage, AIST (Japan); Department of Physics, Universitas Syiah Kuala (Indonesia); Kamil, Insan; Suud, Zaki [Department of Physics, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia)

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology product type" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies, Class III  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. It was hoped that the successful application of these technologies would result in their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, will be extended to increase the recoverable oil reserves in other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs.

City of Long Beach; Tidelands Oil Production Company; University of Southern California; David K. Davies and Associates

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

182

Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies, Class III  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The successful application of these technologies would result in expanding their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, to other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs.

City of Long Beach; Tidelands Oil Production Company; University of Southern California; David K. Davies and Associates

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

183

DOE/Fossil Energy`s drilling, completion, and stimulation RD&D: A technologies/products overview  

SciTech Connect

An overview of natural gas drilling, completion, and stimulation RD&D sponsored by the US Department of Energy is reported in this paper. Development of high rate-of-penetration drilling systems and underbalanced drilling technologies are detailed among other RD&D activities. The overview serves as a technology transfer medium and is intended to accelerate the deployment of the products and technologies described.

Duda, J.R.; Yost, A.B. II

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

184

Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Computers and the internet play an increasingly larger role in the lives of students. In this activity, students must use various web sites to locate specific pieces of...

185

FutureGen Technologies for Carbon Capture and Storage and Hydrogen and Electricity Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FutureGen FutureGen Technologies for Carbon Capture and Storage and Hydrogen and Electricity Production Office of Fossil Energy U. S. Department of Energy Washington, DC June 2, 2003 Lowell Miller, Director, Office of Coal & Power Systems 24-Jun-03 Slide 2 Office of Fossil Energy Presentation Agenda * FE Hydrogen Program * FutureGen * Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum (CSLF) 24-Jun-03 Slide 3 Office of Fossil Energy Key Drivers * Decreasing domestic supply will lead to increased imports from less stable regions * Conventional petroleum is finite; production will peak and irreversibly decline due to continually increasing demand * Improving environmental quality - Meeting air emission regulations - Greenhouse gas emissions 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005

186

Effective Transfer of Waste Heat Recovery Technology: A Case Study of GTE Products Corporation's Experience  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GTE Products Corporation recently completed a cost sharing technology acceleration program with the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Programs (Contract No. DE-FC01-80CS40330). The cost shared program called for the installation of 175 ceramic recuperators on 38 different furnace that operate with clean exhaust between 1600 F and 2500 F. The engineering team approach utilized by GTE for the system design, installation, and start-up-shakedown support is considered the major reason for the reported success of the GTE program. Savings attributable to recuperation averaged 38% based on energy audits by Battelle Columbus Laboratories. Battelle was contracted to monitor the furnaces before and after the retrofit by the D.O.E. and condense report and compare the data in terms of specific energy consumption vs. product throughout. Economic analysis shows that payback periods generally range from 1 - 2.5 years.

Gonzalez, J. M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ETV Joint Verification Statement TECHNOLOGY TYPE: Continuous Emission Monitor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Program to facilitate the deployment of innovative or improved environmental technologies through performance verification and dissemination of information. The goal of the ETV Program is to further environmental protection by substantially accelerating the acceptance and use of improved and cost-effective technologies. ETV seeks to achieve this goal by providing high-quality, peer-reviewed data on technology performance to those involved in the design, distribution, financing, permitting, purchase, and use of environmental technologies. ETV works in partnership with recognized standards and testing organizations; with stakeholder groups that consist of buyers, vendor organizations, and permitters; and with the full participation of individual technology developers. The program evaluates the performance of innovative technologies by developing test plans that are responsive to the needs of stakeholders, conducting field or laboratory tests (as appropriate), collecting and analyzing data, and preparing peer-reviewed reports. All evaluations are conducted in accordance with rigorous quality assurance protocols to ensure that data of known and adequate quality are generated and that the results are defensible. The Advanced Monitoring Systems (AMS) Center, one of six technology centers under ETV, is operated by Battelle in cooperation with EPAs National Exposure Research Laboratory. The AMS Center has recently evaluated the performance of continuous emission monitors used to measure mercury in flue gases. This

unknown authors

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ETV Joint Verification Statement TECHNOLOGY TYPE: Continuous Emission Monitor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Program to facilitate the deployment of innovative or improved environmental technologies through performance verification and dissemination of information. The goal of the ETV Program is to further environmental protection by substantially accelerating the acceptance and use of improved and cost-effective technologies. ETV seeks to achieve this goal by providing high-quality, peer-reviewed data on technology performance to those involved in the design, distribution, financing, permitting, purchase, and use of environmental technologies. ETV works in partnership with recognized standards and testing organizations; with stakeholder groups that consist of buyers, vendor organizations, and permitters; and with the full participation of individual technology developers. The program evaluates the performance of innovative technologies by developing test plans that are responsive to the needs of stakeholders, conducting field or laboratory tests (as appropriate), collecting and analyzing data, and preparing peer-reviewed reports. All evaluations are conducted in accordance with rigorous quality assurance protocols to ensure that data of known and adequate quality are generated and that the results are defensible. The Advanced Monitoring Systems (AMS) Center, one of six technology centers under ETV, is operated by Battelle in cooperation with EPAs National Exposure Research Laboratory. The AMS Center has recently evaluated the performance of continuous emission monitors used to measure mercury in flue gases. This verification

unknown authors

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Novel Fast Pyrolysis/Catalytic Technology for the Production of Stable Upgraded Liquids  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the proposed research is the demonstration and development of a novel biomass pyrolysis technology for the production of a stable bio-oil. The approach is to carry out catalytic hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) and upgrading together with pyrolysis in a single fluidized bed reactor with a unique two-level design that permits the physical separation of the two processes. The hydrogen required for the HDO will be generated in the catalytic section by the water-gas shift reaction employing recycled CO produced from the pyrolysis reaction itself. Thus, the use of a reactive recycle stream is another innovation in this technology. The catalysts will be designed in collaboration with BASF Catalysts LLC (formerly Engelhard Corporation), a leader in the manufacture of attrition-resistant cracking catalysts. The proposed work will include reactor modeling with state-of-the-art computational fluid dynamics in a supercomputer, and advanced kinetic analysis for optimization of bio-oil production. The stability of the bio-oil will be determined by viscosity, oxygen content, and acidity determinations in real and accelerated measurements. A multi-faceted team has been assembled to handle laboratory demonstration studies and computational analysis for optimization and scaleup.

Ted Oyama, Foster Agblevor, Francine Battaglia, Michael Klein

2013-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

190

WABASH RIVER IMPPCCT, INTEGRATED METHANOL AND POWER PRODUCTION FROM CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGIES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In a joint effort with the U.S. Department of Energy, working under a Cooperative Agreement Award from the ''Early Entrance Coproduction Plant'' (EECP) initiative, the Gasification Engineering Corporation and an Industrial Consortium are investigating the application of synthesis gas from the E-GAS{trademark} technology to a coproduction environment to enhance the efficiency and productivity of solid fuel gasification combined cycle power plants. The objectives of this effort are to determine the feasibility of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant located at a specific site which produces some combination of electric power (or heat), fuels, and/or chemicals from synthesis gas derived from coal, or, coal in combination with some other carbonaceous feedstock. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, financial, and environmental information that will be needed to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation by industry. The Wabash River Integrated Methanol and Power Production from Clean Coal Technologies (IMPPCCT) project is evaluating integrated electrical power generation and methanol production through clean coal technologies. The project is conducted by a multi-industry team lead by Gasification Engineering Corporation (GEC), and supported by Air Products and Chemicals Inc., The Dow Chemical Company, Dow Corning Corporation, Methanex Corporation, and Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation. Three project phases are planned for execution, including: (1) Feasibility Study and conceptual design for an integrated demonstration facility and for fence-line commercial plants operated at The Dow Chemical Company or Dow Corning Corporation chemical plant locations (i.e. the Commercial Embodiment Plant or CEP) (2) Research, development, and testing to address any technology gaps or critical design and integration issues (3) Engineering design and financing plan to install an integrated commercial demonstration facility at the existing Wabash River Energy Ltd., plant in West Terre Haute, Indiana. During the reporting period work was furthered to support the development of capital and operating cost estimates associated with the installation of liquid or gas phase methanol synthesis technology in a Commercial Embodiment Plant (CEP) utilizing the six cases previously defined. In addition, continued development of the plant economic model was accomplished by providing combined cycle performance data. Performance and emission estimates for gas turbine combined cycles was based on revised methanol purge gas information. The economic model was used to evaluate project returns with various market conditions and plant configurations and was refined to correct earlier flaws. Updated power price projections were obtained and incorporated in the model. Sensitivity studies show that break-even methanol prices which provide a 12% return are 47-54 cents/gallon for plant scenarios using $1.25/MM Btu coal, and about 40 cents/gallon for most of the scenarios with $0.50/MM Btu petroleum coke as the fuel source. One exception is a high power price and production case which could be economically attractive at 30 cents/gallon methanol. This case was explored in more detail, but includes power costs predicated on natural gas prices at the 95th percentile of expected price distributions. In this case, the breakeven methanol price is highly sensitive to the required project return rate, payback period, and plant on-line time. These sensitivities result mainly from the high capital investment required for the CEP facility ({approx}$500MM for a single train IGCC-methanol synthesis plant). Finally, during the reporting period the Defense Contractor Audit Agency successfully executed an accounting audit of Global Energy Inc. for data accumulated over the first year of the IMPPCCT project under the Cooperative Agreement.

Doug Strickland

2001-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

191

,"Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Total Stocks Stocks by Type"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Stocks Stocks by Type" Total Stocks Stocks by Type" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Total Stocks Stocks by Type",6,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1956" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_stoc_typ_a_ep00_sae_mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_stoc_typ_a_ep00_sae_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

192

Appendix B: CArBon dioxide CApture teChnology SheetS Oxygen PrOductiOn  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxygen PrOductiOn Oxygen PrOductiOn B-500 Oxygen PrOductiOn u.S. dePartment Of energy advanced carbOn diOxide caPture r&d PrOgram: technOlOgy uPdate, may 2013 itm Oxygen technOlOgy fOr integratiOn in igcc and Other advanced POwer generatiOn SyStemS primary project goals Air Products and Chemicals set out to design and develop an ion transport membrane (ITM) based on ceramics that selectively transport oxygen (O 2 ) ions when operated at high temperature. This high-temperature process may be integrated with advanced power genera- tion processes that require O 2 as a feedstock, such as integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and other clean energy and industrial applications. technical goals * Design, construct, and operate a 0.1-ton/day (TPD) technology development unit

193

Technology Transfer: Available Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ion Sources and Beam Technologies Ion Sources and Beam Technologies GENERATORS AND DETECTORS Compact, Safe and Energy Efficient Neutron Generator Fast Pulsed Neutron Generator High Energy Gamma Generator Lithium-Drifted Silicon Detector with Segmented Contacts Low Power, High Energy Gamma Ray Detector Calibration Device Nested Type Coaxial Neutron Generator Neutron and Proton Generators: Cylindrical Neutron Generator with Nested Option, IB-1764 Neutron-based System for Nondestructive Imaging, IB-1794 Mini Neutron Tube, IB-1793a Ultra-short Ion and Neutron Pulse Production, IB-1707 Mini Neutron Generator, IB-1793b Compact Spherical Neutron Generator, IB-1675 Plasma-Driven Neutron/Gamma Generators Portable, Low-cost Gamma Source for Active Interrogation ION SOURCES WITH ANTENNAS External Antenna for Ion Sources

194

CO-PRODUCTION OF HYDROGEN AND ELECTRICITY USING PRESSURIZED CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED GASIFICATION TECHNOLOGY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Foster Wheeler has completed work under a U.S. Department of Energy cooperative agreement to develop a gasification equipment module that can serve as a building block for a variety of advanced, coal-fueled plants. When linked with other equipment blocks also under development, studies have shown that Foster Wheeler's gasification module can enable an electric generating plant to operate with an efficiency exceeding 60 percent (coal higher heating value basis) while producing near zero emissions of traditional stack gas pollutants. The heart of the equipment module is a pressurized circulating fluidized bed (PCFB) that is used to gasify the coal; it can operate with either air or oxygen and produces a coal-derived syngas without the formation of corrosive slag or sticky ash that can reduce plant availabilities. Rather than fuel a gas turbine for combined cycle power generation, the syngas can alternatively be processed to produce clean fuels and or chemicals. As a result, the study described herein was conducted to determine the performance and economics of using the syngas to produce hydrogen for sale to a nearby refinery in a hydrogen-electricity co-production plant setting. The plant is fueled with Pittsburgh No. 8 coal, produces 99.95 percent pure hydrogen at a rate of 260 tons per day and generates 255 MWe of power for sale. Based on an electricity sell price of $45/MWhr, the hydrogen has a 10-year levelized production cost of $6.75 per million Btu; this price is competitive with hydrogen produced by steam methane reforming at a natural gas price of $4/MMBtu. Hence, coal-fueled, PCFB gasifier-based plants appear to be a viable means for either high efficiency power generation or co-production of hydrogen and electricity. This report describes the PCFB gasifier-based plant, presents its performance and economics, and compares it to other coal-based and natural gas based hydrogen production technologies.

Zhen Fan

2006-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

195

Investigating late stage biopharmaceutical product loss using novel analytical and process technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The biopharmaceutical industry uses recombinant protein technologies to provide novel therapeutics to patients around the world. These technologies have presented exciting opportunities for breakthrough medical treatments ...

Hunnicutt, Leigh Anne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Savings estimates for the United States Environmental Protection Agency?s ENERGY STAR voluntary product labeling program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy performance including new technologies and market trends,the ENERGY STAR brand; BAU technology trends and/or marketenergy performance of individual product types, continuing to aggressively target new product technologies and consumer usage/market trends

Sanchez, Marla Christine

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Long-term affected energy production of waste to energy technologies identified by use of energy system analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Affected energy production is often decisive for the outcome of consequential life-cycle assessments when comparing the potential environmental impact of products or services. Affected energy production is however difficult to determine. In this article the future long-term affected energy production is identified by use of energy system analysis. The focus is on different uses of waste for energy production. The Waste-to-Energy technologies analysed include co-combustion of coal and waste, anaerobic digestion and thermal gasification. The analysis is based on optimization of both investments and production of electricity, district heating and bio-fuel in a future possible energy system in 2025 in the countries of the Northern European electricity market (Denmark, Norway, Sweden, Finland and Germany). Scenarios with different CO{sub 2} quota costs are analysed. It is demonstrated that the waste incineration continues to treat the largest amount of waste. Investments in new waste incineration capacity may, however, be superseded by investments in new Waste-to-Energy technologies, particularly those utilising sorted fractions such as organic waste and refuse derived fuel. The changed use of waste proves to always affect a combination of technologies. What is affected varies among the different Waste-to-Energy technologies and is furthermore dependent on the CO{sub 2} quota costs and on the geographical scope. The necessity for investments in flexibility measures varies with the different technologies such as storage of heat and waste as well as expansion of district heating networks. Finally, inflexible technologies such as nuclear power plants are shown to be affected.

Muenster, M., E-mail: maem@risoe.dtu.d [Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, Frederiksborgvej 399, 4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Meibom, P. [Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, Frederiksborgvej 399, 4000 Roskilde (Denmark)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

198

A novel framework for information technology based agricultural information dissemination system to improve crop productivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Indian farming community is facing a multitude of problems to maximize crop productivity. In spite of successful research on new agricultural practices concerning crop cultivation, the majority of farmers is not getting upper-bound yield due to several reasons. One of the reasons is that expert/scientific advice regarding crop cultivation is not reaching farming community in a timely manner. It is true that India possesses a valuable agricultural knowledge and expertise. However, a wide information gap exists between the research level and practice. Indian farmers need timely expert advice to make them more productive and competitive. In this paper, we made an effort to present a solution to bridge the information gap by exploiting advances in Information Technology (IT). We propose a framework of a cost-effective agricultural information dissemination system (AgrIDS) to disseminate expert agriculture knowledge to the farming community to improve the crop productivity. Some of the crucial benefits of AgrIDS are as follows. It is a scalable system which can be incrementally developed and extended to cover all the farmers (crops) of India in a cost effective manner. It enables the farmer to cultivate a crop with expertise, as that of an agricultural expert, by disseminating both crop and location specific expert advice in a personalized and timely manner. With AgrIDS, the lag period between research effort to practice can be reduced significantly. Finally, the proposed system assumes a great importance due to the trend of globalization, as it aims to provide expert advice which is crucial to for the Indian farmer to harvest different kinds of crop varieties based on the demand in the world market. 1

P. Krishna Reddy

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Molecular Typing and Antimicrobial Resistance of Campylobacter Isolated During Commercial Broiler Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Campylobacter jejuni is a commensal microorganism of the poultry gastrointestinal tract. Broilers, layers, ducks, turkeys, and quails can be colonized by Campylobacter without illness occurring. The vast majority of human Campylobacter infections are recognized as being foodborne. For 2008, preliminary FoodNet data showed that the Campylobacter incidence of infection, 12.68 per 100,000 of the U.S. population, is the second highest, only behind Salmonella at 16.20 per 100,000. To further understand Campylobacters role as a foodborne pathogen, analysis at the molecular level is needed. Microbial molecular typing allows for identification and differentiation of bacterial strains beneath the species level. In this study, the gold standard method for molecular subtyping, Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE), along with Diversilab repetitive element Polymerase Chain Reaction (rep-PCR) and 16S-23S Internal Spacer Region Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (ISR DGGE) were used for the molecular typing of Campylobacter jejuni isolates obtained during different stages of commercial broiler production and processing. In addition, the C. jejuni isolates were tested for resistance to antimicrobials commonly used in both veterinary and human medicine. Antimicrobial resistance testing was carried out using a broth dilution system. The majority of recovered isolates came from post-harvest carcass rinsates. Carcass rinses were obtained at post-evisceration, post-chill stages. All isolates (n = 46) were identified by the Polymerase Chain Reaction as Campylobacter jejuni. Three genotypes (n = 44, n = 1, n = 1) were identified by PFGE. The 46 rep-PCR products grouped into seven clusters and two outliers. Clustering of rep-PCR products by sample source was not observed. No relatedness trends were observed for isolates recovered from the same source. The combination of PFGE and Diversilab rep-PCR methods provides highly discriminatory molecular typing results. These results provide practical epidemiological information that shows postevisceration and post-chill stages are still important targets for intervention studies. The very high occurrence of C. jejuni isolates exhibiting genotype A suggests it may differentially express certain gene(s) that enable this strain to more favorably survive under the different harsh environmental conditions encountered during production and processing. In addition, phenotypic testing revealed all of the isolates were not resistant to the antimicrobials azithromycin, ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, gentamycin, tetracycline, florfenicol, nalidixic acid, telithromycin, and clindamycin at any of the concentrations tested. All the C. jejuni isolates exhibited an indistinguishable two-band 16S-23S ISR DGGE profile. Overall, these C. jejuni commercial broiler pre- and post-harvest isolates exhibited an extremely low degree of molecular and phenotypic variability.

Hernandez, Charles Andrew

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO2 Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Oil Shale Minerals within the Production of Cement andin clinker production. If oil shale is burned separately,in cement production. Assuming that oil shale replaces 8

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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201

U.S. Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Stocks by Type  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil All Oils (Excluding Crude Oil) Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Ethylene Propane/Propylene Propylene (Nonfuel Use) Normal Butane/Butylene Refinery Grade Butane Isobutane/Butylene Other Hydrocarbons Oxygenates (excluding Fuel Ethanol) MTBE Other Oxygenates Renewables (including Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Unfinished Oils Unfinished Oils, Naphthas & Lighter Unfinished Oils, Kerosene & Light Gas Unfinished Oils, Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Motor Gasoline Blending Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB w/ Alcohol MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB w/ Ether MGBC - Reformulated, GTAB MGBC - Conventional MGBC - Conventional, CBOB MGBC - Conventional, GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Aviation Gasoline Blending Comp. Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated Gasoline, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Sulfur Distillate F.O., Greater 500 ppm Sulfur Residual Fuel Oil Residual F.O., than 1.00% Sulfur Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petro. Feedstock Use Other Oils for Petro. Feedstock Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products

202

Development of an In Situ Biosurfactant Production Technology for Enhanced Oil Recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The long-term economic potential for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) is large with more than 300 billion barrels of oil remaining in domestic reservoirs after conventional technologies reach their economic limit. Actual EOR production in the United States has never been very large, less than 10% of the total U. S. production even though a number of economic incentives have been used to stimulate the development and application of EOR processes. The U.S. DOE Reservoir Data Base contains more than 600 reservoirs with over 12 billion barrels of unrecoverable oil that are potential targets for microbially enhanced oil recovery (MEOR). If MEOR could be successfully applied to reduce the residual oil saturation by 10% in a quarter of these reservoirs, more than 300 million barrels of oil could be added to the U.S. oil reserve. This would stimulate oil production from domestic reservoirs and reduce our nation's dependence on foreign imports. Laboratory studies have shown that detergent-like molecules called biosurfactants, which are produced by microorganisms, are very effective in mobilizing entrapped oil from model test systems. The biosurfactants are effective at very low concentrations. Given the promising laboratory results, it is important to determine the efficacy of using biosurfactants in actual field applications. The goal of this project is to move biosurfactant-mediated oil recovery from laboratory investigations to actual field applications. In order to meet this goal, several important questions must be answered. First, it is critical to know whether biosurfactant-producing microbes are present in oil formations. If they are present, then it will be important to know whether a nutrient regime can be devised to stimulate their growth and activity in the reservoir. If biosurfactant producers are not present, then a suitable strain must be obtained that can be injected into oil reservoirs. We were successful in answering all three questions. The specific objectives of the project were (1) to determine the prevalence of biosurfactant producers in oil reservoirs, and (2) to develop a nutrient regime that would stimulate biosurfactant production in the oil reservoir.

M.J. McInerney; R.M. Knapp; Kathleen Duncan; D.R. Simpson; N. Youssef; N. Ravi; M.J. Folmsbee; T.Fincher; S. Maudgalya; Jim Davis; Sandra Weiland

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

203

DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 13010: Onboard Type IV Compressed Hydrogen Storage Systems - Current Performance and Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record Record #: 13010 Date: June 11, 2013 Title: Onboard Type IV Compressed Hydrogen Storage Systems - Current Performance and Cost Originators: Scott McWhorter and Grace Ordaz Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: July 17, 2013 Item: This record summarizes the current status of the projected capacities and manufacturing costs of Type IV, 350- and 700-bar compressed hydrogen storage systems, storing 5.6 kg of usable hydrogen, for onboard light-duty automotive applications when manufactured at a volume of 500,000 units per year. The current projected performance and cost of these systems are presented in Table 1 against the DOE Hydrogen Storage System targets. These analyses were performed in support of the Hydrogen Storage

204

Enabling technologies: Supporting the development and use of innovative, energy-efficient, and environmentally friendly products and processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This pamphlet describes the Office of Industrial Technologies cooperative efforts to address industry needs for advanced materials, sensors and controls, process energy and energy efficiency. US industry needs enabling materials that are stronger and lighter, with resistance to high-temperature fatigue and improved resistance to corrosion and wear. New industrial materials such as intermetallic alloys and advanced ceramics have the potential to meet the challenges of the Industries of the Future. The manufacturing industries obtain over 85% of their energy from the on-site combustion of fuels. Enhancements to burners, boilers, and process heating systems can lower energy costs, reduce emissions, enhance fuel options, and increase safety and reliability. Robust, integrated measurement devices linked to intelligent control systems will enable US industry to use resources more efficiently and improve product quality. Through constant process monitoring and adjustment of parameters, these systems can reduce energy use and labor, minimize waste and pollution, and boost productivity. The Enabling Technologies Program is designed to address the cross-cutting needs of the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT). OIT partners with industry to promote the development and use of energy-efficient, pollution-preventing technologies. The Nation`s environment benefits from greater use of these technologies, and industries benefit from cost savings, improved productivity, and increased competitiveness.

NONE

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Characterization of carbon-based electrochemical capacitor technology from Maxwell Energy Products, Inc.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The electrochemical capacitor devices described in this report were deliverables from the US Department of Energy--Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) Contract No. DE-AC07-92ID13404 as part of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) High Power Energy Storage Program. The Idaho national Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) has responsibility for technical management, testing, and evaluation of high-power batteries and electrochemical capacitors under this Program. The DOE has developed various electrochemical capacitors as candidate power assist devices for the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV) fast response engine requirement. This contract with Maxwell Energy Products, Inc. (Maxwell) was intended to develop a high-energy-density, high-power-density ultracapacitor that is capable of load leveling batteries in electric vehicles. The performance criteria for this device are delivery of 5 W {center_dot} h/kg of useful energy that can be used by the vehicle at an average power rating of 600 W/kg. The capacitor must also have an overall charge/discharge efficiency of 90%, and a useful life of more than 100,000 discharge cycles. The deliverables reported on here are those prepared by Maxwell Energy Products, Inc. at various stages of their developmental program. Deliverables were sent to the INEEL`s Energy Storage Technologies (EST) Laboratory for independent testing and evaluation. This report describes performance testing on three sets of capacitors delivered over a two year period. Additional testing has been done on Set {number_sign}2 described herein, as well as on an additional deliverable from Maxwell. These tests results will be documented in a follow-up report.

Wright, R.B.; Murphy, T.C.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

TREATMENT OF METAL-LADEN HAZARDOUS WASTES WITH ADVANCED CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY BY-PRODUCTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metal-laden wastes can be stabilized and solidified using advanced clean coal technology by-products (CCTBs)--fluid bed combustor ash and spray drier solids. These utility-generated treatment chemicals are available for purchase through brokers, and commercial applications of this process are being practiced by treaters of metal-laden hazardous waste. A complex of regulations governs this industry, and sensitivities to this complex has discouraged public documentation of treatment of metal-laden hazardous wastes with CCTBs. This report provides a comprehensive public documentation of laboratory studies that show the efficacy of the stabilization and solidification of metal-laden hazardous wastes--such as lead-contaminated soils and sandblast residues--through treatment with CCTBs. It then describes the extensive efforts that were made to obtain the permits allowing a commercial hazardous waste treater to utilize CCTBs as treatment chemicals and to install the equipment required to do so. It concludes with the effect of this lengthy process on the ability of the treatment company to realize the practical, physical outcome of this effort, leading to premature termination of the project.

James T. Cobb, Jr.

2003-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

207

EERE Publication and Product Library  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Browse By Topic Browse By Topic Browse the Products and Publications by expanding/selecting from the topic tree below. Make selection(s) in the 'Information For' box to filter your results by audience type. Similarly, use the 'Information Type' box to filter your results by the type of information presented. Topics Bioenergy Technologies Office Building Technologies Office Federal Energy Management Program Geothermal Technologies Office Fuel Cell Technologies Office Advanced Manufacturing Office Solar Energy Technologies Program Vehicle Technologies Office Wind Program Weatherization & Intergovernmental Program General Topics Energy Savers Water Power Program Energy Analysis State and Local Energy Efficiency Action Network (SEE Action) Office of EERE Select Clear Topic Skip Navigation Links.

208

Federal Energy Management Program: Solar Energy Resources and Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solar Energy Resources and Technologies Solar Energy Resources and Technologies Photo of a square, tracking, standalone photovoltaic array stands in front of a tree and body of water. The Environmental Protection Agency uses this photovoltaic array as part of its Manchester Laboratory Solar Project. Solar energy provides electricity, heating, and cooling for Federal facilities through four primary technology types. The four technologies are broken into two categories; technologies for electricity production and thermal energy technologies. The following pages provide a brief overview of each solar energy technology supplemented by specific information to apply solar energy within the Federal sector. Technologies for electricity production include: Photovoltaics Concentrating Solar Power Thermal energy technologies include:

209

Maintaining a Technology-Neutral Approach to Hydrogen Production Process Development through Conceptual Design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project was authorized in the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct), tasking the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) with demonstrating High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) technology. The demonstration is to include the technical, licensing, operational, and commercial viability of HTGR technology for the production of electricity and hydrogen. The Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI), a component of the DOE Hydrogen Program managed by the Office of Nuclear Energy, is also investigating multiple approaches to cost effective hydrogen production from nuclear energy. The objective of NHI is development of the technology and information basis for a future decision on commercial viability. The initiatives are clearly intertwined. While the objectives of NGNP and NHI are generally consistent, NGNP has progressed to the project definition phase and the project plan has matured. Multiple process applications for the NGNP require process heat, electricity and hydrogen in varied combinations and sizes. Coupling these processes to the reactor in multiple configurations adds complexity to the design, licensing and demonstration of both the reactor and the hydrogen production process. Commercial viability of hydrogen production may depend on the specific application and heat transport configuration. A component test facility (CTF) is planned by the NGNP to support testing and demonstration of NGNP systems, including those for hydrogen production, in multiple configurations. Engineering-scale demonstrations in the CTF are expected to start in 2012 to support scheduled design and licensing activities leading to subsequent construction and operation. Engineering-scale demonstrations planned by NHI are expected to start at least two years later. Reconciliation of these schedules is recommended to successfully complete both initiatives. Hence, closer and earlier integration of hydrogen process development and heat transport systems is sensible. For integration purposes, an analysis comparing the design, cost and schedule impact of maintaining a technology neutral approach through conceptual design or making an early hydrogen process technology selection was performed. Early selection does not specifically eliminate a technology, but rather selects the first hydrogen technology for demonstration. A systems-engineering approach was taken to define decision-making criteria for selecting a hydrogen technology. The relative technical, cost and schedule risks of each approach were analyzed and risk mitigation strategies were recommended, including provisions to maintain close collaboration with the NHI. The results of these analyses are presented here.

Michael W. Patterson

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Blue Spark Technologies formerly Thin Battery Technologies Inc | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Spark Technologies formerly Thin Battery Technologies Inc Spark Technologies formerly Thin Battery Technologies Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Blue Spark Technologies (formerly Thin Battery Technologies Inc.) Place Westlake, Ohio Zip 44130 Sector Carbon Product Developer and licensor of carbon-zinc battery technology. Coordinates 32.980007°, -97.168831° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.980007,"lon":-97.168831,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

211

DOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Integrated Hydrogen Production, Purification and Compression System  

SciTech Connect

The project was started in April 2005 with the objective to meet the DOE target of delivered hydrogen of <$1.50/gge, which was later revised by DOE to $2-$3/gge range for hydrogen to be competitive with gasoline as a fuel for vehicles. For small, on-site hydrogen plants being evaluated at the time for refueling stations (the 'forecourt'), it was determined that capital cost is the main contributor to the high cost of delivered hydrogen. The concept of this project was to reduce the cost by combining unit operations for the entire generation, purification, and compression system (refer to Figure 1). To accomplish this, the Fluid Bed Membrane Reactor (FBMR) developed by MRT was used. The FBMR has hydrogen selective, palladium-alloy membrane modules immersed in the reformer vessel, thereby directly producing high purity hydrogen in a single step. The continuous removal of pure hydrogen from the reformer pushes the equilibrium 'forward', thereby maximizing the productivity with an associated reduction in the cost of product hydrogen. Additional gains were envisaged by the integration of the novel Metal Hydride Hydrogen Compressor (MHC) developed by Ergenics, which compresses hydrogen from 0.5 bar (7 psia) to 350 bar (5,076 psia) or higher in a single unit using thermal energy. Excess energy from the reformer provides up to 25% of the power used for driving the hydride compressor so that system integration improved efficiency. Hydrogen from the membrane reformer is of very high, fuel cell vehicle (FCV) quality (purity over 99.99%), eliminating the need for a separate purification step. The hydride compressor maintains hydrogen purity because it does not have dynamic seals or lubricating oil. The project team set out to integrate the membrane reformer developed by MRT and the hydride compression system developed by Ergenics in a single package. This was expected to result in lower cost and higher efficiency compared to conventional hydrogen production technologies. The overall objective was to develop an integrated system to directly produce high pressure, high-purity hydrogen from a single unit, which can meet the DOE cost H2 cost target of $2 - $3/gge when mass produced. The project was divided into two phases with the following tasks and corresponding milestones, targets and decision points. Phase 1 - Task 1 - Verify feasibility of the concept, perform a detailed techno-economic analysis, and develop a test plan; and Task 2: Build and experimentally test a Proof of Concept (POC) integrated membrane reformer/metal hydride compressor system. Phase 2 - Task 3: Build an Advanced Prototype (AP) system with modifications based on POC learning and demonstrate at a commercial site; and Task 4: Complete final product design for mass manufacturing units capable of achieving DOE 2010 H2 cost and performance targets.

Tamhankar, Satish; Gulamhusein, Ali; Boyd, Tony; DaCosta, David; Golben, Mark

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

212

Research guidance studies to assess gasoline from coal by methanol-to-gasoline and Sasol-type Fischer--Tropsch technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary purpose of this study is to provide a technical and economic comparison between the commercial Fischer-Tropsch technology and the new Mobil methanol-to-gasoline technology for the production of motor gasoline. Several technical sensitivity cases are also part of the study and will be included in the final report. Two conceptual plant complexes - Base Case I: Mobil Technology and Base Case II: Fischer-Tropsch Technology--have been developed. They are self-supporting, grass roots facilities assumed to be located in a Wyoming coal field. Plant size is equivalent to the proposed large commercial SNG plants. Except for the Mobil methanol conversion technology, all processes used are commercial. Co-production of all products has been assumed. Products have been upgraded to meet U.S. market specifications. A summary comparison of the two base cases shows that the Mobil technology is somewhat more efficient and more effective in producing gasoline. Moreover, the number of processing steps required is considerably fewer. All products meet the target specifications.

Schreiner, M.

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Technology Regimes and Productivity Growth in Europe and the United States: A Comparative and Historical Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity diffusion The next technological paradigm produced much faster rates of adoption and higher rates of growth, especially in the United States.

van Ark, Bart; Smits, Jan Pieter

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Technology and social process : oscillations in Iron Age copper production and power in Southern Jordan.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Records of technological practice provide an important lens for studying societies and cultures across time and space. This dissertation takes a diachronic view of the (more)

Ben-Yosef, Erez

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Premium Fuel Production From Mining and Timber Waste Using Advanced Separation and Pelletizing Technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Commonwealth of Kentucky is one of the leading states in the production of both coal and timber. As a result of mining and processing coal, an estimated 3 million tons of fine coal are disposed annually to waste-slurry impoundments with an additional 500 million tons stored at a number of disposal sites around the state due to past practices. Likewise, the Kentucky timber industry discards nearly 35,000 tons of sawdust on the production site due to unfavorable economics of transporting the material to industrial boilers for use as a fuel. With an average heating value of 6,700 Btu/lb, the monetary value of the energy disposed in the form of sawdust is approximately $490,000 annually. Since the two industries are typically in close proximity, one promising avenue is to selectively recover and dewater the fine-coal particles and then briquette them with sawdust to produce a high-value fuel. The benefits are i) a premium fuel product that is low in moisture and can be handled, transported, and utilized in existing infrastructure, thereby avoiding significant additional capital investment and ii) a reduction in the amount of fine-waste material produced by the two industries that must now be disposed at a significant financial and environmental price. As such, the goal of this project was to evaluate the feasibility of producing a premium fuel with a heating value greater than 10,000 Btu/lb from waste materials generated by the coal and timber industries. Laboratory and pilot-scale testing of the briquetting process indicated that the goal was successfully achieved. Low-ash briquettes containing 5% to 10% sawdust were produced with energy values that were well in excess of 12,000 Btu/lb. A major economic hurdle associated with commercially briquetting coal is binder cost. Approximately fifty binder formulations, both with and without lime, were subjected to an extensive laboratory evaluation to assess their relative technical and economical effectiveness as binding agents for the briquetting of 90% coal and 10% sawdust blends. Guar gum, wheat starch, and a multi-component formulation were identified as most cost-effective for the production of briquettes targeted for the pulverized-coal market with costs being around $8 per ton of the coal-sawdust blend. REAX/lime and a second multi-component formulation were identified as the most cost-effective for the production of briquettes targeted for the stoker-coal market. Various sources of sawdust generated from different wood types were also investigated to determine their chemical properties and to evaluate their relative performance when briquetted with clean coal to form a premium fuel. The highest heating values, approaching 7,000 Btu/lb, were obtained from oak. Sawdusts from higher-density, red oak, white oak, hickory, and beech trees provided higher quality briquettes relative to their lower-density counterparts. In addition to sawdust type, a number of other parameters were evaluated to characterize their impact on briquette properties. The parameters that exhibited the greatest impact on briquette performance were binder concentration; sawdust concentration and particle size; cure temperature; and ash content. Parameters that had the least impact on briquette properties, at least over the ranges studied, were moisture content, briquetting force, and briquetting dwell time. The continuous production of briquettes from a blend of coal and sawdust was evaluated using a 200 lbs/hr Komarek Model B-100 briquetter. The heating values of briquettes produced by the unit exceeded the goal of the project by a large margin. A significant observation was the role of feed moisture on the stability of the mass flow rate through the briquetter and on briquette strength. Excessive feed moisture levels caused inconsistent or stoppage of material flow through the feed hopper and resulted in the production of variable-quality briquettes. Obviously, the limit on feed moisture content has a significant impact on the economics of coal-sawdust briquetting since it will ultimately dictate dew

Honaker, R. Q.; Taulbee, D.; Parekh, B. K.; Tao, D.

2005-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

216

Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO{sub 2} Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Globally, the cement industry accounts for approximately 5 percent of current anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions. World cement demand and production are increasing significantly, leading to an increase in this industry's absolute energy use and CO{sub 2} emissions. Development of new energy-efficiency and CO{sub 2} emission-reduction technologies and their deployment in the market will be key for the cement industry's mid- and long-term climate change mitigation strategies. This report is an initial effort to compile available information on process description, energy savings, environmental and other benefits, costs, commercialization status, and references for emerging technologies to reduce the cement industry's energy use and CO{sub 2} emissions. Although studies from around the world identify a variety of sector-specific and cross-cutting energy-efficiency technologies for the cement industry that have already been commercialized, information is scarce and/or scattered regarding emerging or advanced energy-efficiency and low-carbon technologies that are not yet commercialized. This report consolidates available information on nineteen emerging technologies for the cement industry, with the goal of providing engineers, researchers, investors, cement companies, policy makers, and other interested parties with easy access to a well-structured database of information on these technologies.

Hasanbeigi, Ali; Price, Lynn; Lin, Elina

2012-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

217

Advanced Production Surface Preparation Technology Development for Ultra-High Pressure Diesel Injection  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2007, An Ultra High Injection Pressure (UHIP) fueling method has been demonstrated by Caterpillar Fuel Systems - Product Development, demonstrating ability to deliver U.S. Environment Protection Agency (EPA) Tier 4 Final diesel engine emission performance with greatly reduced emissions handling components on the engine, such as without NOx reduction after-treatment and with only a through-flow 50% effective diesel particulate trap (DPT). They have shown this capability using multiple multi-cylinder engine tests of an Ultra High Pressure Common Rail (UHPCR) fuel system with higher than traditional levels of CEGR and an advanced injector nozzle design. The system delivered better atomization of the fuel, for more complete burn, to greatly reduce diesel particulates, while CEGR or high efficiency NOx reduction after-treatment handles the NOx. With the reduced back pressure of a traditional DPT, and with the more complete fuel burn, the system reduced levels of fuel consumption by 2.4% for similar delivery of torque and horsepower over the best Tier 4 Interim levels of fuel consumption in the diesel power industry. The challenge is to manufacture the components in high-volume production that can withstand the required higher pressure injection. Production processes must be developed to increase the toughness of the injector steel to withstand the UHIP pulsations and generate near perfect form and finish in the sub-millimeter size geometries within the injector. This project resulted in two developments in 2011. The first development was a process and a machine specification by which a high target of compressive residual stress (CRS) can be consistently imparted to key surfaces of the fuel system to increase the toughness of the steel, and a demonstration of the feasibility of further refinement of the process for use in volume production. The second development was the demonstration of the feasibility of a process for imparting near perfect, durable geometry to these same feature surfaces to withstand the pulsating UHIP diesel injection without fatigue failure, through the expected life of the fuel system's components (10,000 hours for the pump and common rail, 5000 hours for the injector). The potential to Caterpillar of this fueling approach and the overall emissions reduction system is the cost savings of the fuel, the cost savings of not requiring a full emissions module and other emissions hardware, and the enabling of the use of biodiesel fuel due to the reduced dependency on after-treatment. A proprietary production CRS generating process was developed to treat the interior of the sac-type injector nozzle tip region (particularly for the sac region). Ninety-five tips passed ultra high pulsed pressure fatigue testing with no failures assignable to treated surfaces or materials. It was determined that the CRS impartation method does not weaken the tip internal seat area. Caterpillar Fuel Systems - Product Development accepts that the CRS method initial production technical readiness level has been established. A method to gage CRS levels in production was not yet accomplished, but it is believed that monitoring process parameters call be used to guarantee quality. A precision profiling process for injector seat and sac regions has been shown to be promising but not yet fully confirmed. It was demonstrated that this precision profiling process can achieve form and geometry to well under an aggressively small micron peak-to-valley and that there are no surface flaws that approach an even tighter micron peak-to-valley tolerance. It is planned to purchase machines to further develop and move the process towards production. The system is targeted towards the high-power diesel electric power generators and high-power diesel marine power generators, with displacement from 20 liters to 80 liters and with power from 800 brake horsepower (BHP) to 3200BHP (0.6 megawatts to 2.4 megawatts). However, with market adoption, this system has the potential to meet EPA exhaust standards for all diesel engines nine liters and up, or 300B

Grant, Marion B.

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

218

Overview of U. S. activities in IEA Hydrogen Technology. Annex IV. Electrolytic hydrogen production  

SciTech Connect

Technical contributions are described for R and D efforts into: Anode Depolarization; High Temperature Electrolysis Static Feedwater Electrolysis; and the implementing of plans for an Integrated Test Bed for Advanced H/sub 2/ Technology. The US rationale is presented for placing programmatic emphasis on base technology development applicable to the far term.

Mezzina, A.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

TYPE CURVES FOR PRODUCTION TRANSIENT ANALYSIS OFMULTILATERAL WELLS IN NATURALLY FRACTURED SHALE GASRESERVOIRS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Growing demand for oil and natural gas and depletion of conventional reserves has led tothe advancement of technology to economically produce oil and natural gas (more)

Saxena, Aditya

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Production of High Purity Hydrogen from Domestic Coal: Assessing the Techno-Economic Impact of Emerging Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production of High Purity Production of High Purity Hydrogen from Domestic Coal: Assessing the Techno-Economic Impact of Emerging Technologies August 30, 2010 DOE/NETL-2010/1432 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States (U.S.) government. Neither the U.S., nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, nor any of their contractors, subcontractors, or their employees makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology product type" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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221

Requirement for vasoactive amines for production of delayed-type hypersensitivity skin reactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Injection of antigen into the dermis of the flank of an appropriately immunized rat, guinea pig, monkey, or man results, 24-48 h later, in the formation of an erythematous, indurated lesion. Similar skin testing of immunized mice generally fails to produce such lesions (1-3). The explanation for this particular difference between mice and men is unknown but there is reason to believe that it may not stem from differences in immunologically competent cells. Two observations support this view. (a) Appropriately immunized mice exhibit antigen-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) ' reactions when the site of elicitation is the foot pad (4) or the ear (5). (b) Mice exhibit most other manifestations of cell-mediated immunity, in a normal fashion, despite their failure to produce DTH reactions in the flank skin. Thus, mice must have appropriately reactive T cells but there may be some difficulty in delivering the cells required for the production of DTH reactions to the flank skin. In support of this notion, it has been shown that ifperitoneal exudate cells are added to the eliciting dose of antigen placed in the flank skin the lesions that result are morphologically

K. Gershon; Philip W. Askenase; Michael; D. Gershon

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Research guidance studies to assess gasoline from coal by methanol-to-gasoline and sasol-type Fischer--Tropsch technologies. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study provides a technical and economic comparison between the new Mobil methanol-to-gasoline technology under development and the commercially available Fischer--Tropsch technology for the production of motor gasoline meeting U.S. quality standards. Conceptual plant complexes, sited in Wyoming, are complete grass-roots facilities. The Lurgi dry-ash, pressure technology is used to gasify sub-bituminous strip coal. Except for the Mobil process, processes used are commercially available. Coproduction of products, namely SNG, LPG and gasoline, is practiced. Four sensitivity cases have also been developed in less detail from the two base cases. In all areas, the Mobil technology is superior to Fischer--Tropsch: process complexity, energy usage, thermal efficiency, gasoline selectivity, gasoline quality, investment and gasoline selectivity, gasoline quality, investment and gasoline cost. Principal advantages of the Mobil process are its selective yield of excellent quality gasoline with minimum ancillary processing. Fischer--Tropsch not only yields a spectrum of products, but the production of a gasoline meeting U.S. specifications is difficult and complex. This superiority results in about a 25% reduction in the gasoline cost. Sensitivity study conclusions include: (1) the conversion of methanol into gasoline over the Mobil catalyst is highly efficient, (2) if SNG is a valuable product, increased gasoline yield via the reforming of SNG is uneconomical, and (3) fluid-bed operation is somewhat superior to fixed-bed operation for the Mobil methanol conversion technology.

Schreiner, M.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The successful application of these technologies will result in expanding their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, to other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block II-A (Tar II-A) has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs: inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil and non-uniform distribution of the remaining oil. This has resulted in poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. A suite of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies are being applied during the project to improve oil recovery and reduce operating costs.

Scott Hara

2001-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

224

Innovation in Nuclear Technology for the Least Product Price and Cost  

SciTech Connect

In energy markets, costs dominate for all new technology introductions (pressure valves, gas turbines, reactors) both now and far into the future. Technology improves, and costs are reduced as markets are penetrated with the trend following a learning/experience curve (MCE) based on classic economic forces. The curve followed is governed by development costs and market targets, and nuclear systems follow such a curve in order to compete with other technologies and projected future cost for alternate energy initiatives. Funding impacts directly on market penetration and on the ''learning rate.'' The CANDU/AECL development path (experience curve) is a chosen balance between evolution and revolution for a competitive advantage.

Duffey, Romney

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO2 Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shale Energy and Oil Shale Minerals within the Production ofproduction use of carbide slag Cement with low lime saturation factor Calcareous oil shaleoil shale can be used as an alternative feedstock and partial fuel substitute in clinker production.

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Quarterly Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Program tasks for January 2000 through March 2000  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems (OSDPS) of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides radioisotope Power Systems (BPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of .I 997 to study the planet Saturn. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. For the Cassini Mission, for example, ORNL was involved in the production of carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVSs) and weld shields (WSs). This quarterly report has been divided into three sections to reflect program guidance from OSDPS for fiscal year (FY) 2000. The first section deals primarily with maintenance of the capability to produce flight quality carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, clad vent sets (CVSs), and weld shields (WSs). In all three cases, production maintenance is assured by the manufacture of limited quantities of flight quality (FQ) components. The second section deals with several technology activities to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop technologies for two new RPS. The last section is dedicated to studies of the potential for the production of 238Pu at OBNL.

Moore, J.P.

2000-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

227

Quarterly Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Program tasks for April 2000 through June 2000  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems (OSDPS) of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. For the Cassini Mission, for example, ORNL was involved in the production of carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVSs) and weld shields (WSs). This quarterly report has been divided into three sections to reflect program guidance from OSDPS for fiscal year (FY) 2000. The first section deals primarily with maintenance of the capability to produce flight quality carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, clad vent sets (CVSs), and weld shields (WSs). In all three cases, production maintenance is assured by the manufacture of limited quantities of flight quality (FQ) components. The second section deals with several technology activities to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop technologies for two new RPS. The last section is dedicated to studies of the potential for the production of 238Pu at ORNL.

Moore, J.P.

2000-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

228

Interactive visualisation of products in online configurators: a case study for variability modelling technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerous companies develop interactive environments to assist users in customising sales products through the selection of configuration options. A visual representation of these products is an important factor in terms of user experience. However, an ... Keywords: configurator, software product line, user interface, variability modelling

Marianela Ciolfi Felice, Joao Bosco Ferreira Filho, Mathieu Acher, Arnaud Blouin, Olivier Barais

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Creating ladders out of chains : China's technological development in a world of global production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the advent of economic globalization, the terms of debate over the political and social conditions necessary to foster development in the Global South have shifted. Examining technological development, one important ...

Fuller, Douglas Brian

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Automobiles on steroids: Product attribute trade-offs and technological progress in the automobile sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper estimates the technological progress that has occurred since 1980 in the automobile industry and the trade-offs faced when choosing between fuel economy, weight, and engine power characteristics. The results ...

Knittel, Christopher Roland

231

Who decides the shape of product markets? The knowledge institutions that name and categorise new technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider naming and categorization practises within the information technology (IT) arena. In particular, with how certain terminologies are able to colonise wide areas of activity and endure for relatively long periods of time, despite the diversity ...

Neil Pollock; Robin Williams

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Huazhong Science Technology University Yongtai Science Technology Co Ltd |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Huazhong Science Technology University Yongtai Science Technology Co Ltd Huazhong Science Technology University Yongtai Science Technology Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Huazhong Science & Technology University Yongtai Science & Technology Co Ltd Place Wuhan, Hubei Province, China Zip 430074 Sector Solar Product Makes solar passive water heaters. Coordinates 30.572399°, 114.279121° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.572399,"lon":114.279121,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

233

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California, through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The hope is that successful application of these technologies will result in their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, will be extended to increase the recoverable oil reserves in other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block II-A (Tar II-A) has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs: inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil and non-uniform distribution of the remaining oil. This has resulted in poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. A suite of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies are being applied during the project to improve oil recovery and reduce operating costs, including: (1) Development of three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic reservoir simulation models--thermal or otherwise--to aid in reservoir management of the steamflood and post-steamflood phases and subsequent development work. (2) Development of computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid reservoir surveillance and operations. (3) Perform detailed studies of the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (4) Testing and proposed application of a novel alkaline-steam well completion technique for the containment of the unconsolidated formation sands and control of fluid entry and injection profiles. (5) Installation of a 2100 ft, 14 inch insulated, steam line beneath a harbor channel to supply steam to an island location. (6) Testing and proposed application of thermal recovery technologies to increase oil production and reserves: (a) Performing pilot tests of cyclic steam injection and production on new horizontal wells. (b) Performing pilot tests of hot water-alternating-steam (WAS) drive in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Perform a pilot steamflood with the four horizontal injectors and producers using a pseudo steam-assisted gravity-drainage (SAGD) process. (8) Advanced reservoir management, through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring and evaluation.

Unknown

2001-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

234

Federal Energy Management Program: Lighting Control Types  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lighting Control Lighting Control Types to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Lighting Control Types on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Lighting Control Types on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Lighting Control Types on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Lighting Control Types on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Lighting Control Types on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Lighting Control Types on AddThis.com... Energy-Efficient Products Federal Requirements Covered Product Categories Product Designation Process Low Standby Power Energy & Cost Savings Calculators Model Acquisitions Language Working Group Resources Technology Deployment Renewable Energy

235

Hydrogen Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Production DELIVERY FUEL CELLS STORAGE PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGY VALIDATION CODES & STANDARDS SYSTEMS INTEGRATION ANALYSES SAFETY EDUCATION RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT Economy...

236

Multi-Seam Well Completion Technology: Implications for Powder River Basin Coalbed Methane Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the potential benefits of applying multiseam [well] completion (MSC) technology to the massive stack of low-rank coals in the Powder River Basin. As part of this, the study objectives are: Estimate how much additional CBM resource would become accessible and technically recoverable--compared to the current practice of drilling one well to drain a single coal seam; Determine whether there are economic benefits associated with MSC technology utilization (assuming its widespread, successful application) and if so, quantify the gains; Briefly examine why past attempts by Powder River Basin CBM operators to use MSC technology have been relatively unsuccessful; Provide the underpinnings to a decision whether a MSC technology development and/or demonstration effort is warranted by DOE. To a great extent, this assessment builds on the previously published study (DOE, 2002), which contains many of the key references that underlie this analysis. It is available on the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy technology Laboratory, Strategic Center for Natural Gas website (www.netl.doe.gov/scng). It is suggested that readers obtain a copy of the original study to complement the current report.

Office of Fossil Energy; National Energy Technology Laboratory

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Geothermal innovative technologies catalog  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The technology items in this report were selected on the basis of technological readiness and applicability to current technology transfer thrusts. The items include technologies that are considered to be within 2 to 3 years of being transferred. While the catalog does not profess to be entirely complete, it does represent an initial attempt at archiving innovative geothermal technologies with ample room for additions as they occur. The catalog itself is divided into five major functional areas: Exploration; Drilling, Well Completion, and Reservoir Production; Materials and Brine Chemistry; Direct Use; and Economics. Within these major divisions are sub-categories identifying specific types of technological advances: Hardware; Software; Data Base; Process/Procedure; Test Facility; and Handbook.

Kenkeremath, D. (ed.)

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Empirical support for global integrated assessment modeling: Productivity trends and technological change in developing countries' agriculture and electric power sectors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Integrated assessment (IA) modeling of climate policy is increasingly global in nature, with models incorporating regional disaggregation. The existing empirical basis for IA modeling, however, largely arises from research on industrialized economies. Given the growing importance of developing countries in determining long-term global energy and carbon emissions trends, filling this gap with improved statistical information on developing countries' energy and carbon-emissions characteristics is an important priority for enhancing IA modeling. Earlier research at LBNL on this topic has focused on assembling and analyzing statistical data on productivity trends and technological change in the energy-intensive manufacturing sectors of five developing countries, India, Brazil, Mexico, Indonesia, and South Korea. The proposed work will extend this analysis to the agriculture and electric power sectors in India, South Korea, and two other developing countries. They will also examine the impact of alternative model specifications on estimates of productivity growth and technological change for each of the three sectors, and estimate the contribution of various capital inputs--imported vs. indigenous, rigid vs. malleable-- in contributing to productivity growth and technological change. The project has already produced a data resource on the manufacturing sector which is being shared with IA modelers. This will be extended to the agriculture and electric power sectors, which would also be made accessible to IA modeling groups seeking to enhance the empirical descriptions of developing country characteristics. The project will entail basic statistical and econometric analysis of productivity and energy trends in these developing country sectors, with parameter estimates also made available to modeling groups. The parameter estimates will be developed using alternative model specifications that could be directly utilized by the existing IAMs for the manufacturing, agriculture, and electric power sectors.

Sathaye, Jayant A.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Chemical Emissions of Residential Materials and Products: Review of Available Information Environmental Energy Technologies Division  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical Emissions of Residential Materials and Products: Review of Available Information Contract 500-08-06. Chemical Emissions of Residential Materials and Products: Review of Available Information Henry Willem and Brett C. Singer LBNL-3938E #12;Chemical Emissions of Residential Materials

240

Overview of US contributions to IEA hydrogen technology Task IV electrolytic hydrogen production  

SciTech Connect

US contributions derive largely from the US Department of Energy Chemical/Hydrogen Energy Storage Systems Program. The programmatic rationale, goals and focus, which reflect current US R and D policy and perceptions, are discussed as they influence the substance and pace of the R and D program in Hydrogen Technology. Contributions and future prospects are discussed briefly.

Mezzina, A.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology product type" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Design manual for management of solid by-products from advanced coal technologies  

SciTech Connect

Developing coal conversion technologies face major obstacles in byproduct management. This project has developed several management strategies based on field trials of small-scale landfills in an earlier phase of the project, as well as on published/unpublished sources detailing regulatory issues, current industry practice, and reuse opportunities. Field testing, which forms the basis for several of the disposal alternatives presented in this design manual, was limited to byproducts from Ca-based dry SO{sub 2} control technologies, circulating fluidized bed combustion ash, and bubbling bed fluidized bed combustion ash. Data on byproducts from other advanced coal technologies and on reuse opportunities are drawn from other sources (citations following Chapter 3). Field results from the 5 test cases examined under this project, together with results from other ongoing research, provide a basis for predictive modeling of long-term performance of some advanced coal byproducts on exposure to ambient environment. This manual is intended to provide a reference database and development plan for designing, permitting, and operating facilities where advanced coal technology byproducts are managed.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Development of gas production type curves for horizontal wells in coalbed methane reservoirs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Coalbed methane is an unconventional gas resource that consists of methane production from coal seams .The unique difference between CBM and conventional gas reservoirs is (more)

Nfonsam, Allen Ekahnzok.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Fuel-Flexible Gasification-Combustion Technology for Production of Hydrogen and Sequestration-Ready Carbon Dioxide  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Electricity produced from hydrogen in fuel cells can be highly efficient relative to competing technologies and has the potential to be virtually pollution free. Thus, fuel cells may become an ideal solution to this nation's energy needs if one has a satisfactory process for producing hydrogen from available energy resources such as coal, and low-cost alternative feedstocks such as biomass. GE EER is developing an innovative fuel-flexible advanced gasification-combustion (AGC) technology for production of hydrogen for fuel cells or combustion turbines, and a separate stream of sequestration-ready CO2. The AGC module can be integrated into a number of Vision- 21 power systems. It offers increased energy efficiency relative to conventional gasification and combustion systems and near-zero pollution. The R&D on the AGC technology is being conducted under a Vision-21 award from the U.S. DOE NETL with co-funding from GE EER, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIU-C), and the California Energy Commission (CEC). The AGC technology converts coal and air into three separate streams of pure hydrogen, sequestration-ready CO2, and high temperature/pressure oxygen-depleted air to produce electricity in a gas turbine. The three-year program integrates lab-, bench- and pilot-scale studies to demonstrate the AGC concept. Process and kinetic modeling studies as well as an economic assessment will also be performed. This paper provides an overview of the program and its objectives, and discusses first-year R&D activities, including design of experimental facilities and results from initial tests and modeling studies. In particular, the paper describes the design of the bench-scale facility and initial process modeling data. In addition, a process flow diagram is shown for a complete plant incorporating the AGC module with other Vision-21 plant components to maximize hydrogen production and process efficiency.

Rizeq, George; West, Janice; Frydman, Arnaldo; Subia, Raul; Kumar, Ravi; Zamansky, Vladimir (GE Energy and Environmental Research Corporation); Das, Kamalendu (U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory)

2001-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

244

Lean effectiveness model for products and services : servicing existing systems in aerospace and technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Enterprises undergo transformation for more efficient and effective performance and growth. The Lean Enterprise Self Assessment Tool (LESAT) is a product of the Lean Advancement Initiative (LAI) and the Massachusetts ...

Srivastava, Tina Prabha

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO2 Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3473. Hilger, J. 2003. Combined Utilization of Oil ShaleEnergy and Oil Shale Minerals within the Production ofand Other Hydraulic Minerals. Oil Shale, Vol. 20, No. 3, pp.

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO2 Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hilger, J. 2003. Combined Utilization of Oil Shale Energyand Oil Shale Minerals within the Production of Cement andOther Hydraulic Minerals. Oil Shale, Vol. 20, No. 3, pp.

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO2 Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hilger, J. 2003. Combined Utilization of Oil Shale Energyand Oil Shale Minerals within the Production of Cement andHydraulic Minerals. Oil Shale, Vol. 20, No. 3, pp. 347-355.

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Cocoa Butter and Related CompoundsChapter 17 Methods and Technologies Related to Shea Butter Chemophysical Properties and to the Delivery of Bioactives in Chocolate and Related Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cocoa Butter and Related Compounds Chapter 17 Methods and Technologies Related to Shea Butter Chemophysical Properties and to the Delivery of Bioactives in Chocolate and Related Products Food Science Health Nutrition eChapters Food Science

249

Single Cell Oils: Microbial and Algal Oils, 2nd EditionChapter 4 Development of a Docosahexaenoic Acid Production Technology Using Schizochytrium: Historical Perspective and Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Single Cell Oils: Microbial and Algal Oils, 2nd Edition Chapter 4 Development of a Docosahexaenoic Acid Production Technology Using Schizochytrium: Historical Perspective and Update Biofuels and Bioproducts and Biodiesel Biofuels - Bioprodu

250

Technology Assessment of Interconnection Products for Distributed Resources: Research and Development Recommendations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A compatible and economical connection with the resident electrical power system is a key to realizing the full value of distributed generation and storage. This technology assessment looks at the status of interconnection equipment used for interconnecting distributed generation and storage with electric power systems. The assessment is intended to identify business opportunities and to provide specific research and development recommendations based on a manufacturer survey and technical assessment desc...

2000-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

251

Increasing Heavy Oil in the Wilmington Oil Fiel Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies. Annual Report, March 30, 1995--March 31, 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to increase heavy oil reserves in a portion of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California, by implementing advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. Based on the knowledge and experience gained with this project, these technologies are intended to be extended to other sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, and, through technology transfer, will be available to increase heavy oil reserves in other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs.

Allison, Edith

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

NETL: Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

projects are designed to: enhance domestic oil and natural gas supplies through advanced exploration and production technology; examine water related concerns; investigate...

253

Comparison of Energy Production and Performance from Flat-Plate Photovoltaic Module Technologies Deployed at Fixed Tilt: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This conference paper describes the performance data for 14 photovoltaic modules deployed at fixed-latitude tilt in the field are presented and compared. Module performance is monitored continuously for optimum power characteristics. Flat-plate module technologies representative of crystalline, amorphous, and polycrystalline silicon, and cadmium telluride and copper indium diselenide, are scrutinized for energy production, effective efficiency and performance ratio-ratio of effective to reference efficiency. Most performance ratios exhibit seasonal fluctuations largely correlated to air or module temperatures, varying between 80% and 100%. These ratios tend toward larger values during winter and vise versa, except for amorphous silicon and cadmium telluride modules. In a-Si cases, the situation appears reversed: better performance ratios are exhibited during late summer. The effective efficiency and average daily and yearly energy production are analyzed and quantified.

del Cueto, J. A.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

FUEL-FLEXIBLE GASIFICATION-COMBUSTION TECHNOLOGY FOR PRODUCTION OF H2 AND SEQUESTRATION-READY CO2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is expected that in the 21st century the Nation will continue to rely on fossil fuels for electricity, transportation, and chemicals. It will be necessary to improve both the process efficiency and environmental impact performance of fossil fuel utilization. GE Global Research has developed an innovative fuel-flexible Unmixed Fuel Processor (UFP) technology to produce H{sub 2}, power, and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} from coal and other solid fuels. The UFP module offers the potential for reduced cost, increased process efficiency relative to conventional gasification and combustion systems, and near-zero pollutant emissions including NO{sub x}. GE Global Research (prime contractor) was awarded a contract from U.S. DOE NETL to develop the UFP technology. Work on this Phase I program started on October 1, 2000. The project team includes GE Global Research, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIU-C), California Energy Commission (CEC), and T. R. Miles, Technical Consultants, Inc. In the UFP technology, coal and air are simultaneously converted into separate streams of (1) high-purity hydrogen that can be utilized in fuel cells or turbines, (2) sequestration-ready CO{sub 2}, and (3) high temperature/pressure vitiated air to produce electricity in a gas turbine. The process produces near-zero emissions and, based on ASPEN Plus process modeling, has an estimated process efficiency of 6 percentage points higher than IGCC with conventional CO{sub 2} separation. The current R&D program has determined the feasibility of the integrated UFP technology through pilot-scale testing, and investigated operating conditions that maximize separation of CO{sub 2} and pollutants from the vent gas, while simultaneously maximizing coal conversion efficiency and hydrogen production. The program integrated experimental testing, modeling and economic studies to demonstrate the UFP technology. This is the fifteenth quarterly technical progress report for the UFP program, which is supported by U.S. DOE NETL (Contract No. DE-FC26-00FT40974) and GE. This report summarizes program accomplishments for the period starting April 1, 2004 and ending June 30, 2004. The report includes an introduction summarizing the UFP technology, main program tasks, and program objectives; it also provides a summary of program activities and accomplishments covering progress in tasks including lab-scale experimental testing, pilot-scale testing, kinetic modeling, program management and technology transfer.

George Rizeq; Janice West; Arnaldo Frydman; Raul Subia; Vladimir Zamansky; K. Mondal; L. Stonawski; Krzysztof Piotrowski; T. Szymanski; Tomasz Wiltowski; Edwin Hippo

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

FUEL-FLEXIBLE GASIFICATION-COMBUSTION TECHNOLOGY FOR PRODUCTION OF H2 AND SEQUESTRATION-READY CO2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is expected that in the 21st century the Nation will continue to rely on fossil fuels for electricity, transportation, and chemicals. It will be necessary to improve both the process efficiency and environmental impact performance of fossil fuel utilization. GE Global Research has developed an innovative fuel-flexible Unmixed Fuel Processor (UFP) technology to produce H{sub 2}, power, and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} from coal and other solid fuels. The UFP module offers the potential for reduced cost, increased process efficiency relative to conventional gasification and combustion systems, and near-zero pollutant emissions including NO{sub x}. GE Global Research (prime contractor) was awarded a contract from U.S. DOE NETL to develop the UFP technology. Work on this Phase I program started on October 1, 2000. The project team includes GE Global Research, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIU-C), California Energy Commission (CEC), and T. R. Miles, Technical Consultants, Inc. In the UFP technology, coal and air are simultaneously converted into separate streams of (1) high-purity hydrogen that can be utilized in fuel cells or turbines, (2) sequestration-ready CO{sub 2}, and (3) high temperature/pressure vitiated air to produce electricity in a gas turbine. The process produces near-zero emissions and, based on ASPEN Plus process modeling, has an estimated process efficiency of 6 percentage points higher than IGCC with conventional CO{sub 2} separation. The current R&D program will determine the feasibility of the integrated UFP technology through pilot-scale testing, and will investigate operating conditions that maximize separation of CO{sub 2} and pollutants from the vent gas, while simultaneously maximizing coal conversion efficiency and hydrogen production. The program integrates experimental testing, modeling and economic studies to demonstrate the UFP technology. This is the fourteenth quarterly technical progress report for the UFP program, which is supported by U.S. DOE NETL (Contract No. DE-FC26-00FT40974) and GE. This report summarizes program accomplishments for the period starting January 1, 2004 and ending March 31, 2004. The report includes an introduction summarizing the UFP technology, main program tasks, and program objectives; it also provides a summary of program activities and accomplishments covering progress in tasks including lab-scale experimental testing, pilot-scale shakedown and performance testing, program management and technology transfer.

George Rizeq; Janice West; Arnaldo Frydman; Raul Subia; Vladimir Zamansky; Hana Loreth; Krzysztof Piotrowski; Tomasz Wiltowski; Edwin Hippo

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

FUEL-FLEXIBLE GASIFICATION-COMBUSTION TECHNOLOGY FOR PRODUCTION OF H2 AND SEQUESTRATION-READY CO2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is expected that in the 21st century the Nation will continue to rely on fossil fuels for electricity, transportation, and chemicals. It will be necessary to improve both the process efficiency and environmental impact performance of fossil fuel utilization. GE Global Research has developed an innovative fuel-flexible Unmixed Fuel Processor (UFP) technology to produce H{sub 2}, power, and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} from coal and other solid fuels. The UFP module offers the potential for reduced cost, increased process efficiency relative to conventional gasification and combustion systems, and near-zero pollutant emissions including NO{sub x}. GE Global Research (prime contractor) was awarded a contract from U.S. DOE NETL to develop the UFP technology. Work on this Phase I program started on October 1, 2000. The project team includes GE Global Research, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIU-C), California Energy Commission (CEC), and T. R. Miles, Technical Consultants, Inc. In the UFP technology, coal and air are simultaneously converted into separate streams of (1) high-purity hydrogen that can be utilized in fuel cells or turbines, (2) sequestration-ready CO{sub 2}, and (3) high temperature/pressure vitiated air to produce electricity in a gas turbine. The process produces near-zero emissions and, based on ASPEN Plus process modeling, has an estimated process efficiency of 6% higher than IGCC with conventional CO{sub 2} separation. The current R&D program will determine the feasibility of the integrated UFP technology through pilot-scale testing, and will investigate operating conditions that maximize separation of CO{sub 2} and pollutants from the vent gas, while simultaneously maximizing coal conversion efficiency and hydrogen production. The program integrates experimental testing, modeling and economic studies to demonstrate the UFP technology. This is the thirteenth quarterly technical progress report for the UFP program, which is supported by U.S. DOE NETL under Contract No. DE-FC26-00FT40974. This report summarizes program accomplishments for the period starting October 1, 2003 and ending December 31, 2003. The report includes an introduction summarizing the UFP technology, main program tasks, and program objectives; it also provides a summary of program activities and accomplishments covering progress in tasks including lab-scale experimental testing, pilot-scale assembly, pilot-scale demonstration and program management and technology transfer.

George Rizeq; Janice West; Arnaldo Frydman; Raul Subia; Vladimir Zamansky; Hana Loreth; Krzysztof Piotrowski; Tomasz Wiltowski; Edwin Hippo

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Sibolu Technology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sibolu Technology Sibolu Technology Jump to: navigation, search Name Sibolu Technology Place Suzhou, Jiangsu Province, China Sector Solar Product A Chinese technical service and solution provider for a-Si thin-film solar cell production and monosilicon solar cell production. Coordinates 31.3092°, 120.613121° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.3092,"lon":120.613121,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

258

Alpha Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technologies Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name Alpha Technologies Place Bellingham, Washington State Zip 98226 Sector Services, Solar Product Bellingham (WA)-based firm offering, among other products, power conversion products designed specifically for the PV market, plus installation services for solar systems. Coordinates 48.75235°, -122.471219° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.75235,"lon":-122.471219,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

259

AEO2011: Coal Production by Region and Type This dataset comes...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

by Region and Type This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is Table 140,...

260

Technology Search Results | Brookhaven Technology ...  

BSA 11-30: Enhanced Alkane production by Aldehyde Decarbonylase Fusion Constructs; BSA 12-36: Oil Accumulation in Plant Leaves; Find a Technology.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology product type" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Science and Technology Development to Integrate Energy Production and Greenhouse Gas Management  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews the carbon cycle from the point of view of past and present human influence. Potential future human input to the cycle through science and technology to manage atmospheric greenhouse gas are considered. The review suggests that humans will need to ingeniously exploit even more energy to integrate its use with control of atmospheric greenhouse gases. Continuing development and application of energy is essential if the development of human society is to be sustained through the coming centuries. The continuing development of nuclear energy seems an essential energy supply component.

Pendergast, D.

2004-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

262

Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California. This is realized through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. It is hoped that the successful application of these technologies will result in their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and through technology transfer, will be extended to increase the recoverable oil reserves in other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block (FB) II-A has been relatively insufficient because of several producability problems which are common in SBC reservoir; inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil and non-uniform distribution of the remaining oil. This has resulted in poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves.

City of Long Beach; David K.Davies and Associates; Tidelands Oil Production Company; University of Southern California

1999-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

263

Ubiquitous Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ubiquitous Technologies Ubiquitous Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name Ubiquitous Technologies Place Victoria, Texas Zip 77903 Sector Solar Product Ubiquitous Technologies is a nano technology solar energy R&D and commercialization company. Coordinates 48.428315°, -123.364514° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.428315,"lon":-123.364514,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

264

1366 Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technologies Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Logo: 1366 Technologies Name 1366 Technologies Address 45 Hartwell Avenue Place North Lexington, Massachusetts Zip 02421 Sector Solar Product Developer of technologies for enhancing PV efficiency, including new cell wiring and wafer packaging systems. Website http://www.1366tech.com/ Coordinates 42.472405°, -71.257792° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.472405,"lon":-71.257792,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

265

Mears Technology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mears Technology Mears Technology Jump to: navigation, search Name Mears Technology Place Waltham, Massachusetts Zip 2451 Sector Solar Product Waltham-based developer of manufacturing technology for semiconductor chip producers. The firm's MEARS Silicon Technology can be used in solar applicaiton. Coordinates 44.126439°, -73.213733° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.126439,"lon":-73.213733,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

266

TECHNOLOGY TYPE: ENVIRONMENTAL DECISION SUPPORT SOFTWARE APPLICATION: VISUALIZATION, SAMPLE OPTIMIZATION, AND COST- BENEFIT ANALYSIS OF ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SETS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Program (ETV) to facilitate the deployment of innovative or improved environmental technologies through performance verification and dissemination of information. The goal of the ETV Program is to further environmental protection by substantially accelerating the acceptance and use of improved and cost-effective technologies. ETV seeks to achieve this goal by providing high-quality, peer-reviewed data on technology performance to those involved in the design, distribution, financing, permitting, purchase, and use of environmental technologies. ETV works in partnership with recognized standards and testing organizations and stakeholder groups consisting of regulators, buyers, and vendor organizations, with the full participation of individual technology developers. The program evaluates the performance of innovative technologies by developing test plans that are responsive to the needs of stakeholders, conducting field or laboratory tests (as appropriate), collecting and analyzing data, and preparing peer-reviewed reports. All evaluations are conducted in accordance with rigorous quality assurance protocols to ensure that data of known and adequate quality are generated and that the results are defensible. The Site Characterization and Monitoring Technologies Pilot (SCMT), one of 12 technology areas under ETV, is administered by EPAs National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL). With the support of the U.S.

unknown authors

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Genetically enhanced cellulase production in Pseudomonas cellulosa using recombinant DNA technology  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An enhanced strain of Pseudomonas celllulosa was obtained by introducing a recombinant genetic construct comprising a heterologous cellulase gene operably connected to a promoter into ATCC 55702, mutagenizing the transformants by treatment with MNNG, and selecting a high cellulase producing transformant. The transformant, designated Pseudomonas cellulosa ATCC XXXX, exhibits enhanced levels of cellulase production relative to the untransformed Pseudomonas cellulosa strain #142 ATCC 55702.

Dees, H. Craig (Knoxville, TN)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Agent Technologies for Virtual Enterprises in the One-of-a-Kind-Production Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One-of-a-kind-products (OKP) virtual enterprises are highly individualized and perform unique projects. Structural and behavioral modeling are important aspects of the use of agents to support their information systems. This paper discusses business ... Keywords: Software Agent Provider, Virtual Enterprises

Jeroen W.J. Gijsen; Nicholas B. Szirbik; Gerd Wagner

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

DOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Integrated Hydrogen Production, Purification and Compression System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project was started in April 2005 with the objective to meet the DOE target of delivered hydrogen of learning and demonstrate at a commercial site; and Task 4: Complete final product design for mass manufacturing units capable of achieving DOE 2010 H2 cost and performance targets.

Tamhankar, Satish; Gulamhusein, Ali; Boyd, Tony; DaCosta, David; Golben, Mark

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

270

Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies FY 2002 Progress Report Section II. Hydrogen Production and Delivery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy products is thermochemical gasification. The focus here is on gas de- rived from biomass via applications. Many biomass gasifier designs exist, but the most promising today for village-scale trigeneration) in a central- ized village gasifier. Some of the gas so generated would be distributed via PVC pipes

271

Supplying the nuclear arsenal: Production reactor technology, management, and policy, 1942--1992  

SciTech Connect

This book focuses on the lineage of America`s production reactors, those three at Hanford and their descendants, the reactors behind America`s nuclear weapons. The work will take only occasional sideways glances at the collateral lines of descent, the reactor cousins designed for experimental purposes, ship propulsion, and electric power generation. Over the decades from 1942 through 1992, fourteen American production reactors made enough plutonium to fuel a formidable arsenal of more than twenty thousand weapons. In the last years of that period, planners, nuclear engineers, and managers struggled over designs for the next generation of production reactors. The story of fourteen individual machines and of the planning effort to replace them might appear relatively narrow. Yet these machines lay at the heart of the nation`s nuclear weapons complex. The story of these machines is the story of arming the winning weapon, supplying the nuclear arms race. This book is intended to capture the history of the first fourteen production reactors, and associated design work, in the face of the end of the Cold War.

Carlisle, R.P.; Zenzen, J.M.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Cryogenic Technologies Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... processes and products involving cryogenic technologies. ... Develop mathematical models for cryogenic ... Assist in development of bibliographic ...

2013-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

273

NETL: Technology Transfer - History of Technology Transfer  

History of Technology Transfer Technology transfer differs from providing services or products (e.g., acquisition) and financial assistance (e.g., ...

274

FUEL-FLEXIBLE GASIFICATION-COMBUSTION TECHNOLOGY FOR PRODUCTION OF H2 AND SEQUESTRATION-READY CO2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is expected that in the 21st century the Nation will continue to rely on fossil fuels for electricity, transportation, and chemicals. It will be necessary to improve both the process efficiency and environmental impact performance of fossil fuel utilization. GE Global Research (GEGR) has developed an innovative fuel-flexible Unmixed Fuel Processor (UFP) technology to produce H{sub 2}, power, and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} from coal and other solid fuels. The UFP module offers the potential for reduced cost, increased process efficiency relative to conventional gasification and combustion systems, and near-zero pollutant emissions including NO{sub x}. GEGR (prime contractor) was awarded a contract from U.S. DOE NETL to develop the UFP technology. Work on this Phase I program started on October 1, 2000. The project team includes GEGR, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIU-C), California Energy Commission (CEC), and T. R. Miles, Technical Consultants, Inc. In the UFP technology, coal and air are simultaneously converted into separate streams of (1) high-purity hydrogen that can be utilized in fuel cells or turbines, (2) sequestration-ready CO{sub 2}, and (3) high temperature/pressure vitiated air to produce electricity in a gas turbine. The process produces near-zero emissions and, based on Aspen Plus process modeling, has an estimated process efficiency of 6% higher than IGCC with conventional CO{sub 2} separation. The current R&D program will determine the feasibility of the integrated UFP technology through pilot-scale testing, and will investigate operating conditions that maximize separation of CO{sub 2} and pollutants from the vent gas, while simultaneously maximizing coal conversion efficiency and hydrogen production. The program integrates experimental testing, modeling and economic studies to demonstrate the UFP technology. This is the third annual technical progress report for the UFP program supported by U.S. DOE NETL (Contract No. DE-FC26-00FT40974). This report summarizes program accomplishments for the period starting October 1, 2002 and ending September 30, 2003. The report includes an introduction summarizing the UFP technology, main program tasks, and program objectives; it also provides a summary of program activities and accomplishments covering progress in tasks including lab-scale experimental testing, bench-scale experimental testing, process modeling, pilot-scale system design and assembly, and program management.

George Rizeq; Janice West; Arnaldo Frydman; Raul Subia; Vladimir Zamansky; Hana Loreth; Lubor Stonawski; Tomasz Wiltowski; Edwin Hippo; Shashi Lalvani

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Quarterly Report: Microchannel-Assisted Nanomaterial Deposition Technology for Photovoltaic Material Production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Quarterly report to ITP for Nanomanufacturing program. Report covers FY11 Q2. The primary objective of this project is to develop a nanomanufacturing process which will reduce the manufacturing energy, environmental discharge, and production cost associated with current nano-scale thin-film photovoltaic (PV) manufacturing approaches. The secondary objective is to use a derivative of this nanomanufacturing process to enable greener, more efficient manufacturing of higher efficiency quantum dot-based photovoltaic cells now under development. The work is to develop and demonstrate a scalable (pilot) microreactor-assisted nanomaterial processing platform for the production, purification, functionalization, and solution deposition of nanomaterials for photovoltaic applications. The high level task duration is shown. Phase I consists of a pilot platform for Gen II PV films along with parallel efforts aimed at Gen III PV quantum dot materials. Status of each task is described.

Palo, Daniel R.

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

276

Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies  

SciTech Connect

The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block (FB) II-A has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing a 2100 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

Scott Hara

1998-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

277

Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies  

SciTech Connect

The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block (FB) II-A has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing a 2100 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation. Summary of Technical Progress

Scott Hara

1997-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

278

Increasing Heavy Oil Reservers in the Wilmington Oil field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies  

SciTech Connect

The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block (FB) 11-A has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing a 2100 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

Hara, Scott [Tidelands Oil Production Co., Long Beach, CA (United States)

1997-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

279

Development of single type copper alumina catalysts for hydrogen production from dimethyl ether (DME)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dimethyl ether (DME) is expected as one of clean fuels. We have been studying on DME steam reforming for hydrogen production. Copper alumina catalysts prepared by the sol-gel method produced large quantities of H2 with DME steam reforming. Aiming at ... Keywords: DME, alumina, catalyst, clean fuel, copper, dimethyl ether, hydrogen, sol-gel method, steam reforming

Kaoru Takeishi; Atsushi Ban

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Fuel-Flexible Gasification-Combustion Technology for Production of H2 and Sequestration-Ready CO2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is expected that in the 21st century the Nation will continue to rely on fossil fuels for electricity, transportation, and chemicals. It will be necessary to improve both the process efficiency and environmental impact performance of fossil fuel utilization. GE Global Research is developing an innovative fuel-flexible Unmixed Fuel Processor (UFP) technology to produce H{sub 2}, power, and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} from coal and other solid fuels. The UFP module offers the potential for reduced cost, increased process efficiency relative to conventional gasification and combustion systems, and near-zero pollutant emissions including NO{sub x}. GE was awarded a contract from U.S. DOE NETL to develop the UFP technology. Work on the Phase I program started in October 2000, and work on the Phase II effort started in April 2005. In the UFP technology, coal and air are simultaneously converted into separate streams of (1) high-purity hydrogen that can be utilized in fuel cells or turbines, (2) sequestration-ready CO{sub 2}, and (3) high temperature/pressure vitiated air to produce electricity in a gas turbine. The process produces near-zero emissions with an estimated efficiency higher than IGCC with conventional CO2 separation. The Phase I R&D program established the feasibility of the integrated UFP technology through lab-, bench- and pilot-scale testing and investigated operating conditions that maximize separation of CO{sub 2} and pollutants from the vent gas, while simultaneously maximizing coal conversion efficiency and hydrogen production. The Phase I effort integrated experimental testing, modeling and preliminary economic studies to demonstrate the UFP technology. The Phase II effort will focus on three high-risk areas: economics, sorbent attrition and lifetime, and product gas quality for turbines. The economic analysis will include estimating the capital cost as well as the costs of hydrogen and electricity for a full-scale UFP plant. These costs will be benchmarked with IGCC polygen costs for plants of similar size. Sorbent attrition and lifetime will be addressed via bench-scale experiments that monitor sorbent performance over time and by assessing materials interactions at operating conditions. The product gas from the third reactor (high-temperature vitiated air) will be evaluated to assess the concentration of particulates, pollutants and other impurities relative to the specifications required for gas turbine feed streams. This is the eighteenth quarterly technical progress report for the UFP program, which is supported by U.S. DOE NETL (Contract No. DE-FC26-00FT40974) and GE. This report summarizes program accomplishments for the Phase II period starting July 01, 2005 and ending September 30, 2005. The report includes an introduction summarizing the UFP technology, main program tasks, and program objectives; it also provides a summary of program activities and accomplishments covering progress in tasks including process modeling, scale-up and economic analysis.

George Rizeq; Parag Kulkarni; Wei Wei; Arnaldo Frydman; Thomas McNulty; Roger Shisler

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

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281

Technology transfer | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology transfer Technology transfer Technology available for licensing: CURLSNovember 21, 2013 Containment Unidirectional Resource Loading System expands flexibility of glove boxes and other containment systems. Read more about Technology available for licensing: CURLS Rhodobacter System for the Expression of Membrane Proteins Using photosynthetic bacteria (Rhodobacter) for the expression of heterologous membrane proteins Read more about Rhodobacter System for the Expression of Membrane Proteins Synthesizing Membrane Proteins Using In Vitro Methodology This in vitro, cell-free expression system caters to the production of protein types that are challenging to study: membrane proteins, membrane-associated proteins, and soluble proteins that require complex redox cofactors.

282

U.S. Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Stocks by Type  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Stock Type: Area: Feb-13 Mar-13 Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 View History; Total Stocks: 1,790,732: 1,793,174: 1,806,501: 1,817,459: 1,817,679: 1,817,508: 1956-2013 ...

283

Affine Type A Crystal Structure on Tensor Products of Rectangles, Demazure Characters, and Nilpotent Varieties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Answering a question of Kuniba, Misra, Okado, Takagi, and Uchiyama, it is shown that certain higher level Demazure characters of affine type A, coincide with the graded characters of coordinate rings of closures of conjugacy classes of nilpotent matrices. Keywords: Kostka polynomial, Littlewood-Richardson coefficient, crystal graph, tableau

Mark Shimozono

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Fuel-Flexible Gasification-Combustion Technology for Production of H2 and Sequestration-Ready CO2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the near future, the nation will continue to rely on fossil fuels for electricity, transportation, and chemicals. It is necessary to improve both the process efficiency and environmental impact of fossil fuel utilization including greenhouse gas management. GE Global Research (GEGR) investigated an innovative fuel-flexible Unmixed Fuel Processor (UFP) technology with potential to produce H{sub 2}, power, and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} from coal and other solid fuels. The UFP technology offers the long-term potential for reduced cost, increased process efficiency relative to conventional gasification and combustion systems, and near-zero pollutant emissions. GE was awarded a contract from U.S. DOE NETL to investigate and develop the UFP technology. Work started on the Phase I program in October 2000 and on the Phase II effort in April 2005. In the UFP technology, coal, water and air are simultaneously converted into (1) hydrogen rich stream that can be utilized in fuel cells or turbines, (2) CO{sub 2} rich stream for sequestration, and (3) high temperature/pressure vitiated air stream to produce electricity in a gas turbine expander. The process produces near-zero emissions with an estimated efficiency higher than Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) process with conventional CO{sub 2} separation. The Phase I R&D program established the chemical feasibility of the major reactions of the integrated UFP technology through lab-, bench- and pilot-scale testing. A risk analysis session was carried out at the end of Phase I effort to identify the major risks in the UFP technology and a plan was developed to mitigate these risks in the Phase II of the program. The Phase II effort focused on three high-risk areas: economics, lifetime of solids used in the UFP process, and product gas quality for turbines (or the impact of impurities in the coal on the overall system). The economic analysis included estimating the capital cost as well as the costs of hydrogen and electricity for a full-scale UFP plant. These costs were benchmarked with IGCC polygen plants with similar level of CO{sub 2} capture. Based on the promising economic analysis comparison results (performed with the help from Worley Parsons), GE recommended a 'Go' decision in April 2006 to continue the experimental investigation of the UFP technology to address the remaining risks i.e. solids lifetime and the impact of impurities in the coal on overall system. Solids attrition and lifetime risk was addressed via bench-scale experiments that monitor solids performance over time and by assessing materials interactions at operating conditions. The product gas under the third reactor (high-temperature vitiated air) operating conditions was evaluated to assess the concentration of particulates, pollutants and other impurities relative to the specifications required for gas turbine feed streams. During this investigation, agglomeration of solids used in the UFP process was identified as a serious risk that impacts the lifetime of the solids and in turn feasibility of the UFP technology. The main causes of the solids agglomeration were the combination of oxygen transfer material (OTM) reduction at temperatures {approx}1000 C and interaction between OTM and CO{sub 2} absorbing material (CAM) at high operating temperatures (>1200 C). At the end of phase II, in March 2008, GEGR recommended a 'No-go' decision for taking the UFP technology to the next level of development, i.e. development of a 3-5 MW prototype system, at this time. GEGR further recommended focused materials development research programs on improving the performance and lifetime of solids materials used in UFP or chemical looping technologies. The scale-up activities would be recommended only after mitigating the risks involved with the agglomeration and overall lifetime of the solids. This is the final report for the phase II of the DOE-funded Vision 21 program entitled 'Fuel-Flexible Gasification-Combustion Technology for Production of H{sub 2} and Sequestration-Ready CO{sub 2}' (DOE Award No.

Parag Kulkarni; Jie Guan; Raul Subia; Zhe Cui; Jeff Manke; Arnaldo Frydman; Wei Wei; Roger Shisler; Raul Ayala; om McNulty; George Rizeq; Vladimir Zamansky; Kelly Fletcher

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

285

Fuel-Flexible Gasification-Combustion Technology for Production of H2 and Sequestration-Ready CO2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the near future, the nation will continue to rely on fossil fuels for electricity, transportation, and chemicals. It is necessary to improve both the process efficiency and environmental impact of fossil fuel utilization including greenhouse gas management. GE Global Research (GEGR) investigated an innovative fuel-flexible Unmixed Fuel Processor (UFP) technology with potential to produce H{sub 2}, power, and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} from coal and other solid fuels. The UFP technology offers the long-term potential for reduced cost, increased process efficiency relative to conventional gasification and combustion systems, and near-zero pollutant emissions. GE was awarded a contract from U.S. DOE NETL to investigate and develop the UFP technology. Work started on the Phase I program in October 2000 and on the Phase II effort in April 2005. In the UFP technology, coal, water and air are simultaneously converted into (1) hydrogen rich stream that can be utilized in fuel cells or turbines, (2) CO{sub 2} rich stream for sequestration, and (3) high temperature/pressure vitiated air stream to produce electricity in a gas turbine expander. The process produces near-zero emissions with an estimated efficiency higher than Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) process with conventional CO{sub 2} separation. The Phase I R&D program established the chemical feasibility of the major reactions of the integrated UFP technology through lab-, bench- and pilot-scale testing. A risk analysis session was carried out at the end of Phase I effort to identify the major risks in the UFP technology and a plan was developed to mitigate these risks in the Phase II of the program. The Phase II effort focused on three high-risk areas: economics, lifetime of solids used in the UFP process, and product gas quality for turbines (or the impact of impurities in the coal on the overall system). The economic analysis included estimating the capital cost as well as the costs of hydrogen and electricity for a full-scale UFP plant. These costs were benchmarked with IGCC polygen plants with similar level of CO{sub 2} capture. Based on the promising economic analysis comparison results (performed with the help from Worley Parsons), GE recommended a 'Go' decision in April 2006 to continue the experimental investigation of the UFP technology to address the remaining risks i.e. solids lifetime and the impact of impurities in the coal on overall system. Solids attrition and lifetime risk was addressed via bench-scale experiments that monitor solids performance over time and by assessing materials interactions at operating conditions. The product gas under the third reactor (high-temperature vitiated air) operating conditions was evaluated to assess the concentration of particulates, pollutants and other impurities relative to the specifications required for gas turbine feed streams. During this investigation, agglomeration of solids used in the UFP process was identified as a serious risk that impacts the lifetime of the solids and in turn feasibility of the UFP technology. The main causes of the solids agglomeration were the combination of oxygen transfer material (OTM) reduction at temperatures {approx}1000 C and interaction between OTM and CO{sub 2} absorbing material (CAM) at high operating temperatures (>1200 C). At the end of phase II, in March 2008, GEGR recommended a 'No-go' decision for taking the UFP technology to the next level of development, i.e. development of a 3-5 MW prototype system, at this time. GEGR further recommended focused materials development research programs on improving the performance and lifetime of solids materials used in UFP or chemical looping technologies. The scale-up activities would be recommended only after mitigating the risks involved with the agglomeration and overall lifetime of the solids. This is the final report for the phase II of the DOE-funded Vision 21 program entitled 'Fuel-Flexible Gasification-Combustion Technology for Production of H{sub 2} and Sequestration-Ready CO{sub 2}' (DOE Award No.

Parag Kulkarni; Jie Guan; Raul Subia; Zhe Cui; Jeff Manke; Arnaldo Frydman; Wei Wei; Roger Shisler; Raul Ayala; om McNulty; George Rizeq; Vladimir Zamansky; Kelly Fletcher

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

286

Continuing investigations for technology assessment of /sup 99/Mo production from LEU (low enriched Uranium) targets  

SciTech Connect

Currently much of the world's supply of /sup 99m/Tc for medical purposes is produced from /sup 99/Mo derived from the fissioning of high enriched uranium (HEU). The need for /sup 99m/Tc is continuing to grow, especially in developing countries, where needs and national priorities call for internal production of /sup 99/Mo. This paper presents the results of our continuing studies on the effects of substituting low enriched Uranium (LEU) for HEU in targets for the production of fission product /sup 99/Mo. Improvements in the electrodeposition of thin films of uranium metal are reported. These improvements continue to increase the appeal for the substitution of LEU metal for HEU oxide films in cylindrical targets. The process is effective for targets fabricated from stainless steel or hastaloy. A cost estimate for setting up the necessary equipment to electrodeposit uranium metal on cylindrical targets is reported. Further investigations on the effect of LEU substitution on processing of these targets are also reported. Substitution of uranium silicides for the uranium-aluminum alloy or uranium aluminide dispersed fuel used in other current target designs will allow the substitution of LEU for HEU in these targets with equivalent /sup 99/Mo-yield per target and no change in target geometries. However, this substitution will require modifications in current processing steps due to (1) the insolubility of uranium silicides in alkaline solutions and (2) the presence of significant quantities of silicate in solution. Results to date suggest that both concerns can be handled and that substitution of LEU for HEU can be achieved.

Vandergrift, G.F.; Kwok, J.D.; Marshall, S.L.; Vissers, D.R.; Matos, J.E.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Program on Technology Innovation: Sonoluminescing Bubbles and the Synthesis of Nanocatalysts for Hydrogen Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sonoluminescence (SL) is the light emission associated with the catastrophic collapse of microbubbles oscillating under ultrasound. One application of SL is the synthesis of nanoparticles using the sonochemical method at the multibubble sonoluminescence (MBSL) condition. Supported Ni catalysts in various metal oxides with core/shell structures such as Ni/Al2O3, Ni/MgO-Al2O3, Ni/CeO2, Ni/Ce0.75Zr0.25O2 Ni/MgO, and Ni/ZrO-Al2O3 were synthesized at MBSL conditions. Mass production of these catalysts was con...

2012-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

288

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective is to transfer technology which can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The thermal recovery operations in the Tar II-A and Tar V have been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing an 2400 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

Scott Hara

2003-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

289

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective is to transfer technology which can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The thermal recovery operations in the Tar II-A and Tar V have been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing an 2400 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

Scott Hara

2003-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

290

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective is to transfer technology which can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The thermal recovery operations in the Tar II-A and Tar V have been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing an 2400 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

Scott Hara

2004-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

291

Partnering Today: Technology Transfer Highlights Reactive ...  

THE LLNL TECHNOLOGY COMPANY PRODUCT Partnering Today: Technology Transfer Highlights Reactive NanoTechnologies Inc.: Temperature-controlled Precision Bonding

292

Production of ethanol from refinery waste gases. Phase 2, technology development, annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Oil refineries discharge large volumes of H{sub 2}, CO, and CO{sub 2} from cracking, coking, and hydrotreating operations. This program seeks to develop a biological process for converting these waste gases into ethanol, which can be blended with gasoline to reduce emissions. Production of ethanol from all 194 US refineries would save 450 billion BTU annually, would reduce crude oil imports by 110 million barrels/year and emissions by 19 million tons/year. Phase II efforts has yielded at least 3 cultures (Clostridium ljungdahlii, Isolate O-52, Isolate C-01) which are able to produce commercially viable concentrations of ethanol from CO, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2} in petroleum waste gas. Single continuous stirred tank reactor studies have shown that 15-20 g/L of ethanol can be produced, with less than 5 g/L acetic acid byproduct. Culture and reactor optimization in Phase III should yield even higher ethanol concentrations and minimal acetic acid. Product recovery studies showed that ethanol is best recovered in a multi-step process involving solvent extraction/distillation to azeotrope/azeotropic distillation or pervaporation, or direct distillation to the azeotrope/azeotropic distillation or pervaporation. Projections show that the ethanol facility for a typical refinery would require an investment of about $30 million, which would be returned in less than 2 years.

Arora, D.; Basu, R.; Phillips, J.R.; Wikstrom, C.V.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

FUEL-FLEXIBLE GASIFICATION-COMBUSTION TECHNOLOGY FOR PRODUCTION OF H2 AND SEQUESTRATION-READY CO2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is expected that in the 21st century the Nation will continue to rely on fossil fuels for electricity, transportation, and chemicals. It will be necessary to improve both the process efficiency and environmental impact performance of fossil fuel utilization. GE Global Research (GEGR) has developed an innovative fuel-flexible Unmixed Fuel Processor (UFP) technology to produce H{sub 2}, power, and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} from coal and other solid fuels. The UFP module offers the potential for reduced cost, increased process efficiency relative to conventional gasification and combustion systems, and near-zero pollutant emissions including NO{sub x}. GEGR (prime contractor) was awarded a Vision 21 program from U.S. DOE NETL to develop the UFP technology. Work on this Phase I program started on October 1, 2000. The project team includes GEGR, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIU-C), California Energy Commission (CEC), and T. R. Miles, Technical Consultants, Inc. In the UFP technology, coal/opportunity fuels and air are simultaneously converted into separate streams of (1) pure hydrogen that can be utilized in fuel cells, (2) sequestration-ready CO{sub 2}, and (3) high temperature/pressure oxygen-depleted air to produce electricity in a gas turbine. The process produces near-zero emissions and, based on process modeling with best-case scenario assumptions, has an estimated process efficiency of 68%, based on electrical and H{sub 2} energy outputs relative to the higher heating value of coal, and an estimated equivalent electrical efficiency of 60%. The Phase I R&D program will determine the operating conditions that maximize separation of CO{sub 2} and pollutants from the vent gas, while simultaneously maximizing coal conversion efficiency and hydrogen production. The program integrates lab-, bench- and pilot-scale studies to demonstrate the UFP technology. This is the eleventh quarterly technical progress report for the Vision 21 UFP program supported by U.S. DOE NETL (Contract No. DE-FC26-00FT40974). This report summarizes program accomplishments for the period starting April 1, 2003 and ending June 30, 2003. The report includes an introduction summarizing the UFP technology, main program tasks, and program objectives; it also provides a summary of program activities and accomplishments covering progress in tasks including lab-scale experimental testing, pilot-scale assembly, and program management.

George Rizeq; Janice West; Arnaldo Frydman; Raul Subia; Vladimir Zamansky; Hana Loreth; Lubor Stonawski; Tomasz Wiltowski; Edwin Hippo; Shashi Lalvani

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

FUEL-FLEXIBLE GASIFICATION-COMBUSTION TECHNOLOGY FOR PRODUCTION OF H2 AND SEQUESTRATION-READY CO2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is expected that in the 21st century the Nation will continue to rely on fossil fuels for electricity, transportation, and chemicals. It will be necessary to improve both the process efficiency and environmental impact performance of fossil fuel utilization. GE Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (GE EER) has developed an innovative fuel-flexible Unmixed Fuel Processor (UFP) technology to produce H{sub 2}, power, and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} from coal and other solid fuels. The UFP module offers the potential for reduced cost, increased process efficiency relative to conventional gasification and combustion systems, and near-zero pollutant emissions including NO{sub x}. GE EER was awarded a Vision 21 program from U.S. DOE NETL to develop the UFP technology. Work on this Phase I program started on October 1, 2000. The project team includes GE EER, California Energy Commission, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, and T. R. Miles, Technical Consultants, Inc. In the UFP technology, coal/opportunity fuels and air are simultaneously converted into separate streams of (1) pure hydrogen that can be utilized in fuel cells, (2) sequestration-ready CO{sub 2}, and (3) high temperature/pressure oxygen-depleted air to produce electricity in a gas turbine. The process produces near-zero emissions and, based on process modeling work, has an estimated process efficiency of 68%, based on electrical and H{sub 2} energy outputs relative to the higher heating value of coal, and an estimated equivalent electrical efficiency of 60%. The Phase I R&D program will determine the operating conditions that maximize separation of CO{sub 2} and pollutants from the vent gas, while simultaneously maximizing coal conversion efficiency and hydrogen production. The program integrates lab-, bench- and pilot-scale studies to demonstrate the UFP technology. This is the ninth quarterly technical progress report for the Vision 21 UFP program supported by U.S. DOE NETL (Contract No. DE-FC26-00FT40974). This report summarizes program accomplishments for the period starting October 1, 2002 and ending December 31, 2002. The report includes an introduction summarizing the UFP technology, main program tasks, and program objectives; it also provides a summary of program activities and accomplishments covering progress in tasks including lab- and bench-scale experimental testing, pilot-scale design and assembly, and program management.

George Rizeq; Janice West; Arnaldo Frydman; Raul Subia; Vladimir Zamansky; Hana Loreth; Lubor Stonawski; Tomasz Wiltowski; Edwin Hippo; Shashi Lalvani

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Materials technology assessment of high-temperature solar receivers for fuels and chemicals production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Current interest in using solar thermal energy to produce fuels and chemicals has prompted an assessment of materials technology for five proposed designs of solar receivers. The principal process of interest is water splitting. Reaction schemes considered involve the high-temperature decomposition of sulfuric acid, and silicon carbide is the structural ceramic material usually considered most resistant to the conditions of this reaction. Hence we have assessed the fabricability of the designs from SiC for that reaction system, even though most designs envision use with air, helium, or nitrogen as a heat transfer medium. Honeycomb and hemispherical dome receivers have been fabricated from SiC. A receiver using planar coiled tubes has been fabricated from cordierite but not from SiC. Fabrication has not been demonstrated for helical coil and long tube designs. The last three of these should be fabricable with up to two years development. All lack the ultimate test: operational experience. The need for relable seals is common to all designs. Metallic gaskets are subject to corrosion, and ceramic and mechanical seals have not been demonstrated for the anticipated thermal cycling.

Tiegs, T.N.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Final technical report: Commercialization of the Biofine technology for levulinic acid production from paper sludge  

SciTech Connect

This project involved a three-year program managed by BioMetics, Inc. (Waltham, MA) to demonstrate the commercial feasibility of Biofine thermochemical process technology for conversion of cellulose-containing wastes or renewable materials into levulinic acid, a versatile platform chemical. The program, commencing in October 1995, involved the design, procurement, construction and operation of a plant utilizing the Biofine process to convert 1 dry ton per day of paper sludge waste. The plant was successfully designed, constructed, and commissioned in 1997. It was operated for a period of one year on paper sludge from a variety of source paper mills to collect data to verify the design for a commercial scale plant. Operational results were obtained for four different feedstock varieties. Stable, continuous operation was achieved for two of the feedstocks. Continuous operation of the plant at demonstration scale provided the opportunity for process optimization, development of operational protocols, operator training and identification of suitable materials of construction for scale up to commercial operation . Separated fiber from municipal waster was also successfully processed. The project team consisted of BioMetics Inc., Great Lakes Chemical Corporation (West Lafayette, IN), and New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (Albany, NY).

Fitzpatrick, Stephen W.

2002-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

297

Formation-evaluation technology for production enhancement. Annual technical report, October 1990-October 1991  

SciTech Connect

Major advances have been made in the area of formation evaluation in the shales of the Appalachian Basin. This technology can be transferred to the shales of other basins with only minor modifications. A project was initiated to determine reservoir permeability and natural fractures in shale in detail. The plan consists of evaluating three wells in Pike County, Kentucky. The log analysis results and the plan for determining reservoir permeability from core analysis and well tests are presented. The objective is to develop a log based method for determining shale permeability. Electrical properties of the rock are extremely important in formation evaluation. Laboratory techniques and results of determination of these properties from shale core samples in four comprehensive study wells (CSW) are discussed. Geochemical information obtained on shale core samples has been invaluable in development of the shale specific log model. Properties such as total organic carbon (TOC) and pyrolysis S1 are used in the determination of kerogen content. Contour maps of these properties, as well as other geochemical properties, were developed for the Lower Huron and Rhinestreet shale members to permit use in log analysis in the entire Appalachian Basin. Shale permeability can be changed with the addition of a clay-flocculating solute to the aqueous permeant. These properties, as well as specific surface area, adsorption isotherms, water holding capacity, and other fundamental properties are being studied by Purdue Research Foundation.

Luffel, D.L.; Lorenzen, J.; Curtis, J.B.; Low, P.F.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Toward Production From Gas Hydrates: Current Status, Assessment of Resources, and Simulation-Based Evaluation of Technology and Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil-gas/publications/Hydrates/Exploration priorities for marine gas hydrates, Fire In Thewww.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil-gas/publications/Hydrates/

Moridis, George J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

FEMP/NTDP Technology Focus New Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FEMP/NTDP Technology Focus New Technology Demonstration Program Technology Focus FEMPFederal Energy their decision making process relative to energy management systems design, specification, procurement. Future topics will concentrate on more practical aspects including applications software, product

300

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. Through September 2001, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar Zone (Tar II-A). Work is continuing on research to understand the geochemistry and process regarding the sand consolidation well completion technique, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post-steamflood projects. The project team spent the Fourth Quarter 2001 performing routine well work and reservoir surveillance on the Tar II-A post-steamflood and Tar V pilot steamflood projects. The Tar II-A post-steamflood operation started in February 1999 and steam chest fillup occurred in September-October 1999. The targeted reservoir pressures in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands are maintained at 90 {+-} 5% hydrostatic levels by controlling water injection and gross fluid production and through the bimonthly pressure monitoring program enacted at the start of the post-steamflood phase. The project team ramped up well work activity from October 2000 through November 2001 to increase production and injection. In December, water injection well FW-88 was plug and abandoned and replaced by new well FW-295 into the ''D'' sands to accommodate the Port of Long Beach at their expense. Well workovers are planned for 2002 as described in the Operational Management section. Expanding thermal recovery operations to other sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, including the Tar V horizontal well pilot steamflood project, is a critical part of the City of Long Beach and Tidelands Oil Production Company's development strategy for the field. The steamflood operation in the Tar V pilot project is mature and profitable. Recent production performance is below projections because of wellbore mechanical limitations that were being addressed in 2001. As the fluid production is hot, the pilot steamflood was converted to a hot waterflood project in June 2001.

Scott Hara

2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

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301

EPIR Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EPIR Technologies EPIR Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name EPIR Technologies Place Bolingbrook, Illinois Zip 6044 Sector Solar Product EPIR develops a line of products targeted toward the infrared sensor, biosensor and solar photovoltaic industries. Coordinates 41.698175°, -88.081199° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.698175,"lon":-88.081199,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

302

Acrion Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Acrion Technologies Acrion Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name Acrion Technologies Place Cleveland, Ohio Zip 44125 Product Acrion Technologies focuses on landfill gas clean up and clean landfill gas use. The company developed the CO2 Wash Techology that cleans landfill gas. Coordinates 41.504365°, -81.690459° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.504365,"lon":-81.690459,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

303

Greenward Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenward Technologies Greenward Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name Greenward Technologies Address PO Box 203814 Place Austin, Texas Zip 78720 Sector Wind energy Product Developing a prototype energy-generating windmill design using 4 counter-rotating turbines Website http://www.greenward-technolog Coordinates 30.2669°, -97.7428° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.2669,"lon":-97.7428,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

304

Albeo Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Albeo Technologies Albeo Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Albeo Technologies Name Albeo Technologies Address 3125 Sterling Circle Place Boulder, Colorado Zip 80301 Sector Efficiency Product LED lighting Website http://www.albeotech.com/ Coordinates 40.031501°, -105.228587° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.031501,"lon":-105.228587,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

305

Shorepower Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Shorepower Technologies Shorepower Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Shorepower Technologies Name Shorepower Technologies Address 2351 NW York St. Place Portland, Oregon Zip 97210 Sector Services Product Transportation Electrification Infrastructure Year founded 2005 Number of employees 1-10 Phone number 5038927345 Website http://www.shorepower.com/ Coordinates 45.539256°, -122.700291° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.539256,"lon":-122.700291,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

306

Greenwood Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenwood Technologies Greenwood Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name Greenwood Technologies Place Bellevue, Washington State Zip 98005 Sector Efficiency Product Greenwood Technologies sells high efficiency wood burning stoves Coordinates 47.61002°, -122.187549° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.61002,"lon":-122.187549,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

307

Wakonda Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wakonda Technologies Wakonda Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Wakonda Technologies Name Wakonda Technologies Address 2A Gill Street Place Woburn, Massachusetts Zip 01801 Sector Solar Product High efficiency solar panels Year founded 2005 Number of employees 1-10 Website http://wakondatech.com/ Coordinates 42.5108195°, -71.1478095° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.5108195,"lon":-71.1478095,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

308

Pavilion Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pavilion Technologies Pavilion Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name Pavilion Technologies Place Austin, Texas Zip TX 78759 Product Pavilion Technologies is a designer of model-based software to automate manufacturing processes. Coordinates 30.267605°, -97.742984° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.267605,"lon":-97.742984,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

309

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. Through December 2001, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar Zone (Tar II-A). Work is continuing on research to understand the geochemistry and process regarding the sand consolidation well completion technique, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post-steamflood projects. During the First Quarter 2002, the project team developed an accelerated oil recovery and reservoir cooling plan for the Tar II-A post-steamflood project and began implementing the associated well work in March. The Tar V pilot steamflood project will be converted to post-steamflood cold water injection in April 2002. The Tar II-A post-steamflood operation started in February 1999 and steam chest fillup occurred in September-October 1999. The targeted reservoir pressures in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands are maintained at 90 {+-} 5% hydrostatic levels by controlling water injection and gross fluid production and through the bimonthly pressure monitoring program enacted at the start of the post-steamflood phase. Most of the 2001 well work resulted in maintaining oil and gross fluid production and water injection rates. Reservoir pressures in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands are at 88% and 91% hydrostatic levels, respectively. Well work during the first quarter and plans for 2002 are described in the Reservoir Management section. The steamflood operation in the Tar V pilot project is mature and profitable. Recent production performance has been below projections because of wellbore mechanical limitations that have been addressed during this quarter. As the fluid production temperatures were beginning to exceed 350 F, our self-imposed temperature limit, the pilot steamflood was converted to a hot waterflood project in June 2001 and will be converted to cold water injection next quarter.

Scott Hara

2002-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

310

Hydrogen Production and Purification from Coal and Other Heavy Feedstocks Year 6 - Activity 1.4 - Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology  

SciTech Connect

Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., is developing the sour pressure swing adsorption (PSA) technology which can be used to reject acid gas components (hydrogen sulfide [H{sub 2}S] and carbon dioxide [CO{sub 2}]) from sour syngas streams such as coal gasification syngas. In the current work, tests were conducted to investigate the impact of continuous exposure of real sour syngas and dilute levels of hydrochloric acid (HCl) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}) on the preferred adsorbent of that process. The results show a modest (~10%15%) decrease in CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity after sour syngas exposure, as well as deposition of metals from carbonyl decomposition. Continuous exposure to HCl and NH{sub 3} yield a higher degree of CO{sub 2} capacity degradation (up to 25%). These tests represent worst-case approaches since the exposure is continuous and the HCl and NH{sub 3} levels are relatively high compare to an industrial sour syngas stream. Long-term PSA tests are needed to unequivocally evaluate the impact of cyclic exposure to these types of streams.

Dunham, Grant

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

311

Briza Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Briza Technologies Place Hillsborough, New Jersey Zip 8844 Sector Wind energy Product Developing wind turbine technology. References Briza Technologies1 LinkedIn Connections...

312

JSA Technology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

JSA Technology Jump to: navigation, search Name JSA Technology Place Baie Mahault, France Zip 92122 Sector Solar Product JSA Technology specializes in the design, execution, and...

313

PCN Technology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PCN Technology Jump to: navigation, search Name PCN Technology Place San Diego, California Zip CA 92127 Product California-based smart grid technology developer. References PCN...

314

Rubicon Technology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rubicon Technology Jump to: navigation, search Name Rubicon Technology Place Franklin Park, Illinois Zip 60131 Product Rubicon Technology makes a sapphire substrates for use in...

315

Nuclear Proliferation Technology Trends Analysis  

SciTech Connect

A process is underway to develop mature, integrated methodologies to address nonproliferation issues. A variety of methodologies (both qualitative and quantitative) are being considered. All have one thing in common, a need for a consistent set of proliferation related data that can be used as a basis for application. One approach to providing a basis for predicting and evaluating future proliferation events is to understand past proliferation events, that is, the different paths that have actually been taken to acquire or attempt to acquire special nuclear material. In order to provide this information, this report describing previous material acquisition activities (obtained from open source material) has been prepared. This report describes how, based on an evaluation of historical trends in nuclear technology development, conclusions can be reached concerning: (1) The length of time it takes to acquire a technology; (2) The length of time it takes for production of special nuclear material to begin; and (3) The type of approaches taken for acquiring the technology. In addition to examining time constants, the report is intended to provide information that could be used to support the use of the different non-proliferation analysis methodologies. Accordingly, each section includes: (1) Technology description; (2) Technology origin; (3) Basic theory; (4) Important components/materials; (5) Technology development; (6) Technological difficulties involved in use; (7) Changes/improvements in technology; (8) Countries that have used/attempted to use the technology; (9) Technology Information; (10) Acquisition approaches; (11) Time constants for technology development; and (12) Required Concurrent Technologies.

Zentner, Michael D.; Coles, Garill A.; Talbert, Robert J.

2005-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

316

Green Purchasing & Green Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Purchasing & Technology Goals 6 & 7: Green Purchasing & Green Technology Our goal is to purchase and use environmentally sustainable products whenever possible and to implement...

317

Technology Development Loans (Wisconsin)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Technology Development Loans help innovative companies with promising economic futures clear the hurdles associated with bringing new technologies, products, and concepts to market. Loan funds...

318

Toward Production From Gas Hydrates: Current Status, Assessment of Resources, and Simulation-Based Evaluation of Technology and Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mallik Gas Hydrate Production Research Program, Northwestof Depressurization for Gas Production from Gas Hydrate5L-38 Gas Hydrate Thermal Production Test Through Numerical

Moridis, George J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Automated construction technologies : analyses and future development strategies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Substandard productivity and the lack of skilled workers in the construction industry have led major corporations all over the world aiming to produce various types of automated construction technologies. During the process, ...

Hoang, Han (Han Mai)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. Through June 2001, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar Zone (Tar II-A). Work is continuing on research to understand the geochemistry and process regarding the sand consolidation well completion technique, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post-steamflood projects. The project team spent the Third Quarter 2001 performing well work and reservoir surveillance on the Tar II-A post-steamflood project. The Tar II-A post-steamflood operation started in February 1999 and steam chest fillup occurred in September-October 1999. The targeted reservoir pressures in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands are maintained at 90 {+-} 5% hydrostatic levels by controlling water injection and gross fluid production and through the bimonthly pressure monitoring program enacted at the start of the post-steamflood phase. The project team ramped up well work activity from October 2000 to September 2001 to increase production and injection. This work will continue through 2001 as described in the Operational Management section. Expanding thermal recovery operations to other sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, including the Tar V horizontal well pilot steamflood project, is a critical part of the City of Long Beach and Tidelands Oil Production Company's development strategy for the field. The current steamflood operations in the Tar V pilot are economical, but recent performance is below projections because of wellbore mechanical limitations that are being addressed in 2001.

Scott Hara

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology product type" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

FUEL-FLEXIBLE GASIFICATION-COMBUSTION TECHNOLOGY FOR PRODUCTION OF H2 AND SEQUESTRATION-READY CO2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is expected that in the 21st century the Nation will continue to rely on fossil fuels for electricity, transportation, and chemicals. It will be necessary to improve both the thermodynamic efficiency and environmental impact performance of fossil fuel utilization. General Electric Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (GE-EER) has developed an innovative fuel-flexible Advanced Gasification-Combustion (AGC) concept to produce H{sub 2} and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} from solid fuels. The AGC module offers potential for reduced cost and increased energy efficiency relative to conventional gasification and combustion systems. GE-EER was awarded a Vision-21 program from U.S. DOE NETL to develop the AGC technology. Work on this three-year program started on October 1, 2000. The project team includes GE-EER, California Energy Commission, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, and T. R. Miles, Technical Consultants, Inc. In the AGC technology, coal/opportunity fuels and air are simultaneously converted into separate streams of (1) pure hydrogen that can be utilized in fuel cells, (2) sequestration-ready CO{sub 2}, and (3) high temperature/pressure oxygen depleted air to produce electricity in a gas turbine. The process produces near-zero emissions and, based on preliminary modeling work in the first quarter of this program, has an estimated process efficiency of approximately 67% based on electrical and H{sub 2} energy outputs relative to the higher heating value of coal. The three-year R and D program will determine the operating conditions that maximize separation of CO{sub 2} and pollutants from the vent gas, while simultaneously maximizing coal conversion efficiency and hydrogen production. The program integrates lab-, bench- and pilot-scale studies to demonstrate the AGC concept. This is the 1st quarterly progress report for the Vision-21 AGC program supported by U.S. DOE NETL (Contract: DE-FC26-00FT40974). This report summarizes program accomplishments for the period starting October 1, 2000 and ending December 31, 2000. The report includes an introduction summarizing the AGC concept, main program tasks, objectives of this program, and provides a summary of initial program activities covering program management and preliminary progress in first year tasks including lab- and bench-scale design, facilities preparation, and process/kinetic modeling. More over, the report presents and discusses preliminary results particularly form the bench-scale design and process modeling efforts including a process flow diagram that incorporates the AGC module with other vision-21 plant components with the objective of maximizing H{sub 2} production and process efficiency.

George Rizeq; Ravi Kumar; Janice West; Vitali Lissianski; Neil Widmer; Vladimir Zamansky

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Technology Transfer: Available Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Software and Information Technologies Software and Information Technologies Algorithm for Correcting Detector Nonlinearites Chatelet: More Accurate Modeling for Oil, Gas or Geothermal Well Production Collective Memory Transfers for Multi-Core Processors Energy Efficiency Software EnergyPlus:Energy Simulation Software for Buildings Tools, Guides and Software to Support the Design and Operation of Energy Efficient Buildings Flexible Bandwidth Reservations for Data Transfer Genomic and Proteomic Software LABELIT - Software for Macromolecular Diffraction Data Processing PHENIX - Software for Computational Crystallography Vista/AVID: Visualization and Allignment Software for Comparative Genomics Geophysical Software Accurate Identification, Imaging, and Monitoring of Fluid Saturated Underground Reservoirs

323

Innovation and the state : development strategies for high technology industries in a world of fragmented production : Israel, Ireland, and Taiwan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the most unexpected changes of the 1990s is that firms in a number of emerging economies not previously known for their high-technology industries have leapfrogged to the forefront in new Information Technologies ...

Breznitz, Dan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Final Report - Development of New Pressure Swing Adsorption (PSA) Technology to Recover High Valued Products from Chemical Plant and Refinery Waste Systems  

SciTech Connect

Project Objective was to extend pressure swing adsorption (PSA) technology into previously under-exploited applications such as polyolefin production vent gas recovery and H2 recovery from refinery waste gases containing significant amounts of heavy hydrocarbons, aromatics, or H2S.

Keith Ludwig

2004-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

325

Treatment of metal-laden hazardous wastes with advanced clean coal technology by-products. Quarterly report, March 30, 1996--June 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect

Progress is described on the use of by-products form clean coal technologies for the treatment of hazardous wastes. During the third quarter of Phase 2, work continued on evaluating Phase 1 samples (including evaluation of a seventh waste), conducting scholarly work, preparing for field work, preparing and delivering presentations, and making additional outside contacts.

Cobb, J.T. Jr.; Neufeld, R.D.; Blachere, J.R. [and others

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Available Technologies: Enhanced Ionic Liquid Biomass ...  

APPLICATIONS OF TECHNOLOGY: Lignocellulosic biofuel production; Biomass pretreatment; Sugar production; Materials and processes using recovered lignin

327

Biogas Production Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agricultural Engineering University of California, Davis Email: rhzhang@ucdavis.edu Biogas and Fuel Cell Workshop National Renewable Energy Laboratory June 12, 2012 Presentation...

328

Powder Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Title, Author, Publisher, Product Type, In Stock, Date Published. Add to Cart, Image, Click on Title to view details, Member (Student) Price, Non-member Price.

329

ENDF/B-VII.1 Nuclear Data for Science and Technology: Cross Sections, Covariances, Fission Product Yields and Decay Data  

SciTech Connect

The ENDF/B-VII.1 library is our latest recommended evaluated nuclear data file for use in nuclear science and technology applications, and incorporates advances made in the five years since the release of ENDF/B-VII.0. These advances focus on neutron cross sections, covariances, fission product yields and decay data, and represent work by the US Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) in nuclear data evaluation that utilizes developments in nuclear theory, modeling, simulation, and experiment. The principal advances in the new library are: (1) An increase in the breadth of neutron reaction cross section coverage, extending from 393 nuclides to 418 nuclides; (2) Covariance uncertainty data for 185 of the most important nuclides, as documented in companion papers in this edition; (3) R-matrix analyses of neutron reactions on light nuclei, including isotopes of He, Li, and Be; (4) Resonance parameter analyses at lower energies and statistical high energy reactions at higher energies for isotopes of F, Cl, K, Ti, V, Mn, Cr, Ni, Zr and W; (5) Modifications to thermal neutron reactions on fission products (isotopes of Mo, Tc, Rh, Ag, Cs, Nd, Sm, Eu) and neutron absorber materials (Cd, Gd); (6) Improved minor actinide evaluations for isotopes of U, Np, Pu, and Am (we are not making changes to the major actinides 235,238U and 239Pu at this point, except for delayed neutron data, and instead we intend to update them after a further period of research in experiment and theory), and our adoption of JENDL-4.0 evaluations for isotopes of Cm, Bk, Cf, Es, Fm, and some other minor actinides; (7) Fission energy release evaluations; (8) Fission product yield advances for fission-spectrum neutrons and 14 MeV neutrons incident on 239Pu; and (9) A new Decay Data sublibrary. Integral validation testing of the ENDF/B-VII.1 library is provided for a variety of quantities: For nuclear criticality, the VII.1 library maintains the generally-good performance seen for VII.0 for a wide range of MCNP simulations of criticality benchmarks, with improved performance coming from new structural material evaluations, especially for Ti, Mn, Cr, Zr and W. For Be we see some improvements although the fast assembly data appear to be mutually inconsistent. Actinide cross section updates are also assessed through comparisons of fission and capture reaction rate measurements in critical assemblies and fast reactors. We describe the cross section evaluations that have been updated for ENDF/B-VII.1 and the measured data and calculations that motivated the changes, and therefore this paper augments the ENDF/B-VII.0 publication [1].

G. Palmiotti

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

The purpose of this chapter is to illustrate the types of guns and other products that are available at gun shows. Details on the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4 What's for Sale The purpose of this chapter is to illustrate the types of guns and other products have specific types of firearms for sale at gun shows in California and in Arizona, Nevada, Texas that are available at gun shows. Details on the properties, use in crime, and lethality of particular firearms

Leistikow, Bruce N.

331

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., CA. Through June 2002, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar Zone (Tar II-A). Work is continuing on research to understand the geochemistry and process regarding the sand consolidation well completion technique, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V post-steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post-steamflood projects. During the Third Quarter 2002, the project team essentially completed implementing the accelerated oil recovery and reservoir cooling plan for the Tar II-A post-steamflood project developed in March 2002 and is proceeding with additional related work. The project team has completed developing laboratory research procedures to analyze the sand consolidation well completion technique and will initiate work in the fourth quarter. The Tar V pilot steamflood project terminated hot water injection and converted to post-steamflood cold water injection on April 19, 2002. Proposals have been approved to repair two sand consolidated horizontal wells that sanded up, Tar II-A well UP-955 and Tar V well J-205, with gravel-packed inner liner jobs to be performed next quarter. Other well work to be performed next quarter is to convert well L-337 to a Tar V water injector and to recomplete vertical well A-194 as a Tar V interior steamflood pattern producer. Plans have been approved to drill and complete well A-605 in Tar V in the first quarter 2003. Plans have been approved to update the Tar II-A 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and run sensitivity cases to evaluate the accelerated oil recovery and reservoir cooling plan. The Tar II-A post-steamflood operation started in February 1999 and steam chest fillup occurred in September-October 1999. The targeted reservoir pressures in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands are maintained at 90 {+-} 5% hydrostatic levels by controlling water injection and gross fluid production and through the bimonthly pressure monitoring program enacted at the start of the post-steamflood phase. Well work related to the Tar II-A accelerated oil recovery and reservoir cooling plan began in March 2002 with oil production increasing from 1009 BOPD in the first quarter to 1145 BOPD in the third quarter. Reservoir pressures have been increased during the quarter from 88% to 91% hydrostatic levels in the ''T'' sands and from 91% to 94% hydrostatic levels in the ''D'' sands. Well work during the quarter is described in the Reservoir Management section. The post-steamflood production performance in the Tar V pilot project has been below projections because of wellbore mechanical limitations and the loss of a horizontal producer a second time to sand inflow that are being addressed in the fourth quarter. As the fluid production temperatures exceeded 350 F, our self-imposed temperature limit, the pilot steamflood was converted to a hot waterflood project in June 2001 and converted to cold water injection on April 19, 2002.

Scott Hara

2002-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

332

Juice Technologies LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Juice Technologies LLC Juice Technologies LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Juice Technologies LLC Place Columbus, Ohio Zip 43212 Sector Vehicles Product Ohio-based provider of products and technologies in electric plug in hybrid vehicles. Coordinates 39.96196°, -83.002984° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.96196,"lon":-83.002984,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

333

Clean Diesel Technologies Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Diesel Technologies Inc Diesel Technologies Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Clean Diesel Technologies Inc Place Stamford, Connecticut Zip 6901 Product Clean Diesel Technologies Inc is a specialty chemical company with patented products that reduce emissions from diesel engines while simultaneously improving fuel economy and power. Coordinates 42.75294°, -73.068531° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.75294,"lon":-73.068531,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

334

Triton Technologies Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technologies Inc Technologies Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Triton Technologies Inc Place Reston, Virginia Zip 20191 Sector Hydro, Solar Product Technology firm with activities in hydro microturbines and ethanol production. Merged with Solar Night Industries in March 2006. Coordinates 38.959374°, -77.354571° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.959374,"lon":-77.354571,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

335

FUEL-FLEXIBLE GASIFICATION-COMBUSTION TECHNOLOGY FOR PRODUCTION OF H2 AND SEQUESTRATION-READY CO2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is expected that in the 21st century the Nation will continue to rely on fossil fuels for electricity, transportation, and chemicals. It will be necessary to improve both the thermodynamic efficiency and environmental impact performance of fossil fuel utilization. General Electric Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (GE EER) has developed an innovative fuel-flexible Advanced Gasification-Combustion (AGC) concept to produce H{sub 2} and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} from solid fuels. The AGC module offers potential for reduced cost and increased energy efficiency relative to conventional gasification and combustion systems. GE EER was awarded a Vision-21 program from U.S. DOE NETL to develop the AGC technology. Work on this three-year program started on October 1, 2000. The project team includes GE EER, California Energy Commission, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, and T. R. Miles, Technical Consultants, Inc. In the AGC technology, coal/opportunity fuels and air are simultaneously converted into separate streams of (1) pure hydrogen that can be utilized in fuel cells, (2) sequestration-ready CO{sub 2}, and (3) high temperature/pressure oxygen-depleted air to produce electricity in a gas turbine. The process produces near-zero emissions and, based on preliminary modeling work in the first quarter of this program, has an estimated process efficiency of approximately 67% based on electrical and H{sub 2} energy outputs relative to the higher heating value of coal. The three-year R&D program will determine the operating conditions that maximize separation of CO{sub 2} and pollutants from the vent gas, while simultaneously maximizing coal conversion efficiency and hydrogen production. The program integrates lab-, bench- and pilot-scale studies to demonstrate the AGC concept. This is the third quarterly technical progress report for the Vision-21 AGC program supported by U.S. DOE NETL (Contract: DE-FC26-00FT40974). This report summarizes program accomplishments for the period starting April 1, 2001 and ending June 30, 2001. The report includes an introduction summarizing the AGC concept, main program tasks, objectives of this program, and provides a summary of program activities covering program management and progress in first year tasks including lab- and bench-scale design, facilities preparation, and engineering studies.

George Rizeq; Janice West; Arnaldo Frydman; Vladimir Zamansky; Linda Denton; Hana Loreth; Tomasz Wiltowski

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

FUEL-FLEXIBLE GASIFICATION-COMBUSTION TECHNOLOGY FOR PRODUCTION OF H2 AND SEQUESTRATION-READY CO2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is expected that in the 21st century the Nation will continue to rely on fossil fuels for electricity, transportation, and chemicals. It will be necessary to improve both the thermodynamic efficiency and environmental impact performance of fossil fuel utilization. GE Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (GE EER) has developed an innovative fuel-flexible Advanced Gasification-Combustion (AGC) concept to produce H{sub 2} and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} from solid fuels. The AGC module offers potential for reduced cost and increased energy efficiency relative to conventional gasification and combustion systems. GE EER was awarded a Vision 21 program from U.S. DOE NETL to develop the AGC technology. Work on this three-year program started on October 1, 2000. The project team includes GE EER, California Energy Commission, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, and T. R. Miles, Technical Consultants, Inc. In the AGC technology, coal/opportunity fuels and air are simultaneously converted into separate streams of (1) pure hydrogen that can be utilized in fuel cells, (2) sequestration-ready CO{sub 2}, and (3) high temperature/pressure oxygen-depleted air to produce electricity in a gas turbine. The process produces near-zero emissions and, based on preliminary modeling work, has an estimated process efficiency of approximately 67% based on electrical and H{sub 2} energy outputs relative to the higher heating value of coal. The three-year R&D program will determine the operating conditions that maximize separation of CO{sub 2} and pollutants from the vent gas, while simultaneously maximizing coal conversion efficiency and hydrogen production. The program integrates lab-, bench- and pilot-scale studies to demonstrate the AGC concept. This is the second annual technical progress report for the Vision 21 AGC program supported by U.S. DOE NETL (Contract No. DE-FC26-00FT40974). This report summarizes program accomplishments for the period starting October 1, 2001 and ending September 30, 2002. The report includes an introduction summarizing the AGC concept, main program tasks, and program objectives; it also provides a summary of program activities and accomplishments covering progress in tasks including lab- and bench-scale experimental testing, pilot-scale design and assembly, and program management.

George Rizeq; Janice West; Arnaldo Frydman; Raul Subia; Vladimir Zamansky; Hana Loreth; Lubor Stonawski; Tomasz Wiltowski; Edwin Hippo; Shashi Lalvani

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

FUEL-FLEXIBLE GASIFICATION-COMBUSTION TECHNOLOGY FOR PRODUCTION OF H2 AND SEQUESTRATION-READY CO2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is expected that in the 21st century the Nation will continue to rely on fossil fuels for electricity, transportation, and chemicals. It will be necessary to improve both the thermodynamic efficiency and environmental impact performance of fossil fuel utilization. General Electric Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (GE EER) has developed an innovative fuel-flexible Advanced Gasification-Combustion (AGC) concept to produce H{sub 2} and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} from solid fuels. The AGC module offers potential for reduced cost and increased energy efficiency relative to conventional gasification and combustion systems. GE EER was awarded a Vision-21 program from U.S. DOE NETL to develop the AGC technology. Work on this three-year program started on October 1, 2000. The project team includes GE EER, California Energy Commission, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, and T. R. Miles, Technical Consultants, Inc. In the AGC technology, coal/opportunity fuels and air are simultaneously converted into separate streams of (1) pure hydrogen that can be utilized in fuel cells, (2) sequestration-ready CO{sub 2}, and (3) high temperature/pressure oxygen-depleted air to produce electricity in a gas turbine. The process produces near-zero emissions and, based on preliminary modeling work in the first quarter of this program, has an estimated process efficiency of approximately 67% based on electrical and H{sub 2} energy outputs relative to the higher heating value of coal. The three-year R&D program will determine the operating conditions that maximize separation of CO{sub 2} and pollutants from the vent gas, while simultaneously maximizing coal conversion efficiency and hydrogen production. The program integrates lab-, bench- and pilot-scale studies to demonstrate the AGC concept. This is the seventh quarterly technical progress report for the Vision-21 AGC program supported by U.S. DOE NETL (Contract: DE-FC26-00FT40974). This report summarizes program accomplishments for the period starting April 1, 2002 and ending June 30, 2002. The report includes an introduction summarizing the AGC concept, main program tasks, and program objectives; it also provides a summary of program activities covering program management and progress in tasks including lab-/bench-scale experimental testing and pilot-scale design.

George Rizeq; Janice West; Arnaldo Frydman; Raul Subia; Vladimir Zamansky; Hana Loreth; Edwin Hippo; Tomasz Wiltowski

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

FUEL-FLEXIBLE GASIFICATION-COMBUSTION TECHNOLOGY FOR PRODUCTION OF H2 AND SEQUESTRATION-READY CO2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is expected that in the 21st century the Nation will continue to rely on fossil fuels for electricity, transportation, and chemicals. It will be necessary to improve both the thermodynamic efficiency and environmental impact performance of fossil fuel utilization. General Electric Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (GE EER) has developed an innovative fuel-flexible Advanced Gasification-Combustion (AGC) concept to produce H{sub 2} and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} from solid fuels. The AGC module offers potential for reduced cost and increased energy efficiency relative to conventional gasification and combustion systems. GE EER was awarded a Vision-21 program from U.S. DOE NETL to develop the AGC technology. Work on this three-year program started on October 1, 2000. The project team includes GE EER, California Energy Commission, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, and T. R. Miles, Technical Consultants, Inc. In the AGC technology, coal/opportunity fuels and air are simultaneously converted into separate streams of (1) pure hydrogen that can be utilized in fuel cells, (2) sequestration-ready CO{sub 2}, and (3) high temperature/pressure oxygen-depleted air to produce electricity in a gas turbine. The process produces near-zero emissions and, based on preliminary modeling work in the first quarter of this program, has an estimated process efficiency of approximately 67% based on electrical and H{sub 2} energy outputs relative to the higher heating value of coal. The three-year R&D program will determine the operating conditions that maximize separation of CO{sub 2} and pollutants from the vent gas, while simultaneously maximizing coal conversion efficiency and hydrogen production. The program integrates lab-, bench- and pilot-scale studies to demonstrate the AGC concept. This is the fifth quarterly technical progress report for the Vision-21 AGC program supported by U.S. DOE NETL (Contract: DE-FC26-00FT40974). This report summarizes program accomplishments for the period starting October 1, 2001 and ending December 31, 2001. The report includes an introduction summarizing the AGC concept, main program tasks, and program objectives; it also provides a summary of program activities covering program management and progress in tasks including lab- and bench-scale experimental testing, pilot-scale design, and economic studies.

George Rizeq; Janice West; Arnaldo Frydman; Raul Subia; Vladimir Zamansky; Tomasz Wiltowski; Tom Miles; Bruce Springsteen

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Solar Energy Resources and Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar Energy Resources and Technologies Solar Energy Resources and Technologies Solar Energy Resources and Technologies October 7, 2013 - 9:21am Addthis Photo of a square, tracking, standalone photovoltaic array stands in front of a tree and body of water. The Environmental Protection Agency uses this photovoltaic array as part of its Manchester Laboratory Solar Project. Solar energy provides electricity, heating, and cooling for Federal facilities through four primary technology types. The four technologies are broken into two categories; technologies for electricity production and thermal energy technologies. The following pages provide a brief overview of each solar energy technology supplemented by specific information to apply solar energy within the Federal sector. Technologies for electricity production include:

340

Materials Technology @ TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 28, 2012 ... Administrative & Policy Manual .... Materials and Society: Energy Technology, Policy, and Education; Materials Processing and Production; and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology product type" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

HEALTHCARE INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY TESTING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... test reports created for validation purposes and submitted to the certification body, the ... CHP Certified Health Information Technology Products List ...

2013-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

342

Current Technologies LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technologies LLC Technologies LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Current Technologies LLC Place Germantown, Maryland Zip 20874 Product Current Technologies develop smart grid technology for delivering intelligent and distribution over power lines. These developments are also designed to increase the safety of the energy supply. Coordinates 43.220985°, -88.118584° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.220985,"lon":-88.118584,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

343

Hydrocarbon Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrocarbon Technologies Hydrocarbon Technologies Place Lawrenceville, New Jersey Zip 8648 Sector Efficiency Product String representation "Technology-base ... onmental risks." is too long. Coordinates 36.761678°, -77.845048° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.761678,"lon":-77.845048,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

344

Noveda Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Noveda Technologies Noveda Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name Noveda Technologies Address 31 Tannery Road Place Branchburg, NJ Zip 08876 Sector Services Product Real Time Data Monitoring system Year founded 2007 Number of employees 11-50 Phone number 908 534 8855 Website http://www.noveda.com Coordinates 40.607325°, -74.726874° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.607325,"lon":-74.726874,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

345

Cogeneration Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technologies Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name Cogeneration Technologies Place Houston, Texas Zip 77070 Sector Biomass, Solar Product Provides efficient systems in the fields of demand management, biofuel, biomass and solar CHP systems. Coordinates 29.76045°, -95.369784° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.76045,"lon":-95.369784,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

346

Coulomb Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coulomb Technologies Coulomb Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name Coulomb Technologies Address 1692 Dell Ave. Place Campbell, California Zip 95008 Sector Efficiency Product Networked charging stations for PHEV's Website http://www.coulombtech.com/ Coordinates 37.261444°, -121.957627° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.261444,"lon":-121.957627,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

347

Unimicron Technology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Unimicron Technology Unimicron Technology Jump to: navigation, search Name Unimicron Technology Place Taoyuan, Taiwan Sector Solar Product Unimicron established solar venture jointly with United Microelectronic called NexPower that focuses on the development of thin-film PV. Coordinates 25.001909°, 121.304977° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":25.001909,"lon":121.304977,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

348

Maxwell Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Maxwell Technologies Maxwell Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name Maxwell Technologies Address 9244 Balboa Avenue Place San Diego, California Zip 92123 Sector Efficiency Product Manufacturer of ultracapacitors, energy storage devices designed for use in power-generating windmills Website http://www.maxwell.com/ Coordinates 32.823193°, -117.13126° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.823193,"lon":-117.13126,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

349

MAK Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MAK Technologies MAK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name MAK Technologies Place Lebanon, New Jersey Zip 8833 Sector Solar Product Designs and installs solar electric and solar thermal systems Coordinates 33.872452°, 35.876549° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.872452,"lon":35.876549,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

350

Electrogen Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electrogen Technologies Electrogen Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name Electrogen Technologies Place Nairobi, Kenya Sector Solar Product A Kenyan firm who sets up a solar panel joint venture with a Chinese firm in Kenya. Coordinates -1.277298°, 36.806261° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-1.277298,"lon":36.806261,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

351

SVTC Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SVTC Technologies SVTC Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name SVTC Technologies Address 3901 North First Street Place San Jose, California Zip 95134 Sector Solar Product Provides emiconductor process tools for new silicon developers Website http://www.svtc.com/ Coordinates 37.411854°, -121.950581° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.411854,"lon":-121.950581,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

352

LFG Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LFG Technologies LFG Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name LFG Technologies Place Fairport, New York Zip 14450 Product New York-based developer and provider of landfill gas and anaerobic digestion equipment and turnkey solutions. Coordinates 43.10106°, -77.441914° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.10106,"lon":-77.441914,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

353

Fossil energy waste management. Technology status report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the current status and recent accomplishments of the Fossil Energy Waste Management (FE WM) projects sponsored by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The primary goal of the Waste Management Program is to identify and develop optimal strategies to manage solid by-products from advanced coal technologies for the purpose of ensuring the competitiveness of advanced coal technologies as a future energy source. The projects in the Fossil Energy Waste Management Program are divided into three types of activities: Waste Characterization, Disposal Technologies, and Utilization Technologies. This technology status report includes a discussion on barriers to increased use of coal by-products. Also, the major technical and nontechnical challenges currently being addressed by the FE WM program are discussed. A bibliography of 96 citations and a list of project contacts is included if the reader is interested in obtaining additional information about the FE WM program.

Bossart, S.J.; Newman, D.A.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

MHK Technologies/TREK | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TREK TREK < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage TREK.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Renewable Energy Research Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 7 8 Open Water System Testing Demonstration and Operation Technology Description Each TREK turbine has a nameplate capacity of 250 kW However TREK is capable of outputting 333 kW Its benefits are many Requires no dam land conservation for wildlife agriculture and recreation Easily installed requiring minimal civil works structures Operates in many climate and river types Flexible Functions independently or can be connected to an isolated and or interconnected power grid Scalable more turbines can be added should demands increase helping communities with sustainable development Competitive electricity cost is on par with other renewable energy power production options

355

UWM-CBU Concrete Materials Technology Series Program No. 71 Workshop on GREEN CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS USING COAL-COMBUSTION PRODUCTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MATERIALS USING COAL-COMBUSTION PRODUCTS Center for By-Products Utilization NONPROFIT ORGANIZATION 3200 MATERIALS USING COAL-COMBUSTION PRODUCTS Sponsored By UWM Center for By-Products Utilization, Milwaukee, WI We Energies, Milwaukee, WI Co-Sponsored By American Coal Ash Association Educational Foundation

Saldin, Dilano

356

MHK Technologies/Finavera Buoy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Finavera Buoy Finavera Buoy < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Finavera Buoy.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Oregon Iron Works Inc Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber - Floating Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description MARINE DIVISION Oregon Iron Works Inc OIW has a globally recognized Marine Division with a wide range of advanced accomplishments from custom design prototype development Fabricate OPT Power Take Off 2007 Design Build Finavera Buoy 2007 Fabricate OPT Next Generation Buoy 2008 2009 large scale production outfitting electrical mechanical hydraulic pneumatic

357

ENDF/B-VII.1 Nuclear Data for Science and Technology: Cross Sections, Covariances, Fission Product Yields and Decay Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ENDF/B-VII.1 library is our latest recommended evaluated nuclear data file for use in nuclear science and technology applications, and incorporates advances made in the five years since the release of ENDF/B-VII.0. These advances focus on neutron cross sections, covariances, fission product yields and decay data, and represent work by the US Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) in nuclear data evaluation that utilizes developments in nuclear theory, modeling, simulation, and experiment. The principal advances in the new library are: (1) An increase in the breadth of neutron reaction cross section coverage, extending from 393 nuclides to 423 nuclides; (2) Covariance uncertainty data for 190 of the most important nuclides, as documented in companion papers in this edition; (3) R-matrix analyses of neutron reactions on light nuclei, including isotopes of He; Li, and Be; (4) Resonance parameter analyses at lower energies and statistical high energy reactions for isotopes of Cl; K; Ti, V, Mn, Cr, Ni, Zr and W; (5) Modifications to thermal neutron reactions on fission products (isotopes of Mo, Tc, Rh, Ag, Cs, Nd, Sm, Eu) and neutron absorber materials (Cd, Gd); (6) Improved minor actinide evaluations for isotopes of U, Np, Pu, and Am (we are not making changes to the major actinides (235,238)U and (239)Pu at this point, except for delayed neutron data and covariances, and instead we intend to update them after a further period of research in experiment and theory), and our adoption of JENDL-4.0 evaluations for isotopes of Cm, Bk, Cf, Es; Fm; and some other minor actinides; (7) Fission energy release evaluations; (8) Fission product yield advances for fission-spectrum neutrons and 14 MeV neutrons incident on (239)Pu; and (9) A new decay data sublibrary. Integral validation testing of the ENDF/B-VII.1 library is provided for a variety of quantities: For nuclear criticality, the VII.1 library maintains the generally-good performance seen for VII.0 for a wide range of MCNP simulations of criticality benchmarks, with improved performance coming from new structural material evaluations, especially for Ti, Mn, Cr, Zr and W. For Be we see some improvements although the fast assembly data appear to be mutually inconsistent. Actinide cross section updates are also assessed through comparisons of fission and capture reaction rate measurements in critical assemblies and fast reactors, and improvements are evident. Maxwellian-averaged capture cross sections at 30 keV are also provided for astrophysics applications. We describe the cross section evaluations that have been updated for ENDF/B-VII.1 and the measured data and calculations that motivated the changes, and therefore this paper augments the ENDF/B-VII.0 publication [H.

Chadwick, M. B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Herman, Micheal W [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Oblozinsky, Pavel [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Dunn, Michael E [ORNL; Danon, Y. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI); Kahler, A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Smith, Donald L. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Pritychenko, B [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Arbanas, Goran [ORNL; Arcilla, r [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Brewer, R [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Brown, D A [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Capote, R. [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Carlson, A. D. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); Cho, Y S [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute; Derrien, Herve [ORNL; Guber, Klaus H [ORNL; Hale, G. M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Hoblit, S [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Holloway, Shannon T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Johnson, T D [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Kawano, T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Kiedrowski, B C [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Kim, H [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute; Kunieda, S [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Larson, Nancy M [ORNL; Leal, Luiz C [ORNL; Lestone, J P [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Little, R C [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Mccutchan, E A [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Macfarlane, R E [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); MacInnes, M [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Matton, C M [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Mcknight, R D [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Mughabghab, S F [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Nobre, G P [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Palmiotti, G [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Palumbo, A [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Pigni, Marco T [ORNL; Pronyaev, V. G. [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE), Obninsk, Russia; Sayer, Royce O [ORNL; Sonzogni, A A [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Summers, N C [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Talou, P [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Thompson, I J [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Trkov, A. [Jozef Stefan Institute, Slovenia; Vogt, R L [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Van der Marck, S S [Nucl Res & Consultancy Grp, Petten, Netherlands; Wallner, A [University of Vienna, Austria; White, M C [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Wiarda, Dorothea [ORNL; Young, P C [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Hanford stakeholder participation in evaluating innovative technologies: VOC product line, Passive soil vapor extraction using borehole flux tunable hybrid plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A three-phased stakeholder participation program was conducted to support the Volatile Organic Compounds Arid Site Integrated Demonstration (VOC-Arid ID). The US DOE`s Office of Technology Development (OTD) sponsored and directed the VOC-Arid ID. Its purpose was to develop and demonstrate new technologies for remediating VOC contamination in soil and ground water. The integrated demonstration, hosted by the Hanford site in Washington State, is being transitioned into the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Plume Focus Area. The Plume Focus Area has the same basic objectives as the ID, but is broader in scope and is a team effort with technology developers and technology users. The objective is to demonstrate a promising technology once, and if results warrant deploy it broadly across the DOE complex and in private sector applications.

Peterson, T.; McCabe, G.; Niesen, K.; Serie, P.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Global Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies Tasks 3 & 4 Report Economic, Energy, and Environmental Analysis of Hydrogen Production and Delivery Options in Select Alabama Markets: Preliminary Case Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents a set of case studies developed to estimate the cost of producing, storing, delivering, and dispensing hydrogen for light-duty vehicles for several scenarios involving metropolitan areas in Alabama. While the majority of the scenarios focused on centralized hydrogen production and pipeline delivery, alternative delivery modes were also examined. Although Alabama was used as the case study for this analysis, the results provide insights into the unique requirements for deploying hydrogen infrastructure in smaller urban and rural environments that lie outside the DOEs high priority hydrogen deployment regions. Hydrogen production costs were estimated for three technologies steam-methane reforming (SMR), coal gasification, and thermochemical water-splitting using advanced nuclear reactors. In all cases examined, SMR has the lowest production cost for the demands associated with metropolitan areas in Alabama. Although other production options may be less costly for larger hydrogen markets, these were not examined within the context of the case studies.

Fouad, Fouad H.; Peters, Robert W.; Sisiopiku, Virginia P.; Sullivan Andrew J.; Gillette, Jerry; Elgowainy, Amgad; Mintz, Marianne

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

AVAILABLE TECHNOLOGIES | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with information about ARS technologies relating to biobased products, biotechnology, crop production, food safety & nutrition, natural resources, and animal production. Tags...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology product type" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Hydrogen Pathways: Cost, Well-to-Wheels Energy Use, and Emissions for the Current Technology Status of Seven Hydrogen Production, Delivery, and Distribution Scenarios  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Pathways: Cost, Hydrogen Pathways: Cost, Well-to-Wheels Energy Use, and Emissions for the Current Technology Status of Seven Hydrogen Production, Delivery, and Distribution Scenarios Mark Ruth National Renewable Energy Laboratory Melissa Laffen and Thomas A. Timbario Alliance Technical Services, Inc. Technical Report NREL/TP-6A1-46612 September 2009 Technical Report Hydrogen Pathways: Cost, NREL/TP-6A1-46612 Well-to-Wheels Energy Use, September 2009 and Emissions for the Current Technology Status of Seven Hydrogen Production, Delivery, and Distribution Scenarios Mark Ruth National Renewable Energy Laboratory Melissa Laffen and Thomas A. Timbario Alliance Technical Services, Inc. Prepared under Task No. HS07.1002 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393

362

Comparison of entropy production rates in two different types of self-organized flows: Benard convection and zonal flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two different types of self-organizing and sustaining ordered motion in fluids or plasmas--one is a Benard convection (or streamer) and the other is a zonal flow--have been compared by introducing a thermodynamic phenomenological model and evaluating the corresponding entropy production rates (EP). These two systems have different topologies in their equivalent circuits: the Benard convection is modeled by parallel connection of linear and nonlinear conductances, while the zonal flow is modeled by series connection. The ''power supply'' that drives the systems is also a determinant of operating modes. When the energy flux is a control parameter (as in usual plasma experiments), the driver is modeled by a constant-current power supply, and when the temperature difference between two separate boundaries is controlled (as in usual computational studies), the driver is modeled by a constant-voltage power supply. The parallel (series)-connection system tends to minimize (maximize) the total EP when a constant-current power supply drives the system. This minimum/maximum relation flips when a constant-voltage power supply is connected.

Kawazura, Y.; Yoshida, Z. [Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

363

Increasing heavy oil reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field through advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. Annual report, March 30, 1995--March 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to increase heavy oil reserves in a portion of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California, by implementing advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. Based on the knowledge and experience gained with this project, these technologies are intended to be extended to other sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, and, through technology transfer, will be available to increase heavy oil reserves in other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs. The project involves implementing thermal recovery in the southern half of the Fault Block II-A Tar zone. The existing steamflood in Fault Block II-A has been relatively inefficient due to several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. A suite of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies are being applied during the project to improve oil recovery efficiency and reduce operating costs.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Technology Transfer: Success Stories: Licensed Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Licensed Technologies Licensed Technologies Here are some of our licensees and the technologies they are commercializing; see our Start-Up Company page for more of our technology licenses. Company (Licensee) Technology Life Technologies Corp. Cell lines for breast cancer research Bristol Myers Squibb; Novartis; Plexxikon Inc.; Wyeth Research; GlaxoSmithKline; Johnson & Johnson; Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc.; Genzyme Software for automated macromolecular crystallography Shell International Exploration and Production; ConnocoPhillips Company; StatOil ASA; Schlumburger Technology Corportation; BHP Billiton Ltd.; Chevron Energy Technology Company; EniTecnologie S.p.A. Geo-Hydrophysical modeling software Microsoft Home Energy Saver software distribution Kalinex Colorimetric bioassay

365

Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technologies Technologies Technologies October 7, 2013 - 10:20am Addthis The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) offers information about energy-efficient and renewable energy technologies through the following areas. Energy-Efficient Product Procurement: Find energy-efficient product requirements and technology, purchasing specifications, energy cost savings calculators, model contract language, and resources. Technology Deployment: Look up information about developing, measuring, and implementing new and underutilized technologies for energy management in the Federal Government. Renewable Energy: Read about renewable energy requirements, resources and technologies, project planning, purchasing renewable power, and more. See FEMP's other program areas. Addthis FEMP Home

366

Semi-Annual Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Program Tasks for October 1, 2001 Through March 31, 2002  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. For the Cassini Mission, for example, ORNL was involved in the production of carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS). This report has been divided into three sections to reflect program guidance from the Office of Space and Defense Power Systems for fiscal year (FY) 2002. The first section deals primarily with maintenance of the capability to produce flight quality (FQ) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and CVS. In all three cases, production maintenance is assured by the manufacture of limited quantities of FQ components. The second section deals with several technology activities to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop technologies for new radioisotope power systems. The last section is dedicated to studies related to the production of {sup 238}Pu.

J. P. Moore, JPM

2002-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

367

Semi-Annual Technical Progress Report of the Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Program Tasks for September 2000 through March 2001  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. For the Cassini Mission, for example, ORNL was involved in the production of carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS) and weld shields (WS). This report has been divided into three sections to reflect program guidance from the Office of Space and Defense Power Systems for fiscal year (FY) 2001. The first section deals primarily with maintenance of the capability to produce flight quality (FQ) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, CVS, and WS. In all three cases, production maintenance is assured by the manufacture of limited quantities of FQ components. The second section deals with several technology activities to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials. or to develop technologies for new radioisotope power systems. The last section is dedicated to studies related to the production of {sup 238}Pu.

Moore, J.P.

2001-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

368

Semi-Annual Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Program Tasks for April 1, 2002 Through September 20, 2002  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. For the Cassini Mission, for example, ORNL was involved in the production of carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS). This report has been divided into three sections to reflect program guidance from the Office of Space and Defense Power Systems for fiscal year (FY) 2002. The first section deals primarily with maintenance of the capability to produce flight quality (FQ) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and CVS. In all three cases, production maintenance is assured by the manufacture of limited quantities of FQ components. The second section deals with several technology activities to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop technologies for new radioisotope power systems. The last section is dedicated to studies related to the production of {sup 238}Pu.

Moore, J.P.

2002-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

369

Annual Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Program Tasks for October 1, 2002 Through September 30, 2003  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. For the Cassini Mission, for example, ORNL was involved in the production of carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS). This report has been divided into three sections to reflect program guidance from the Office of Space and Defense Power Systems for fiscal year (FY) 2003. The first section deals primarily with maintenance of the capability to produce flight quality (FQ) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and CVS. In all three cases, production maintenance is assured by the manufacture of limited quantities of FQ components. The second section deals with several technology activities to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop technologies for new radioisotope power systems. The last section is dedicated to studies related to the production of {sup 238}Pu.

King, J.F.

2004-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

370

Quantum Fuel Systems Technologies Worldwide Inc Quantum Technologies | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fuel Systems Technologies Worldwide Inc Quantum Technologies Fuel Systems Technologies Worldwide Inc Quantum Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name Quantum Fuel Systems Technologies Worldwide Inc (Quantum Technologies) Place Irvine, California Zip CA 92614 Sector Hydro, Hydrogen, Solar, Vehicles, Wind energy Product A California-based company with new energy activities in powertrains for hybrid vehicles, gas and hydrogen storage equipment manufacturing, and wind and solar energy. Coordinates 41.837752°, -79.268594° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.837752,"lon":-79.268594,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

371

GT Solar Technologies formerly GT Equipment Technologies | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GT Solar Technologies formerly GT Equipment Technologies GT Solar Technologies formerly GT Equipment Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name GT Solar Technologies (formerly GT Equipment Technologies) Place Merrimack, New Hampshire Zip 3054 Product US-based manufacturer of turnkey multicrystalline PV wafer, cell, and module fabrication lines; also offers EFG and dentritic growth furnaces. Coordinates 42.872517°, -71.490603° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.872517,"lon":-71.490603,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

372

A Review of Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO2 Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Globally, the cement industry accounts for approximately 5 percent of current man-made carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. Development of new energy-efficiency and CO2 emission-reduction technologies and their deployment in the market will be key for the cement industry's mid- and long-term climate change mitigation strategies. This paper is an initial effort to compile the available information on process description, energy savings, environmental and other benefits, costs, commercialization status, and references for emerging technologies to reduce the cement industry's energy use and CO2 emissions. This paper consolidates available information on eighteen emerging technologies for the cement industry, with the goal of providing engineers, researchers, investors, cement companies, policy makers, and other interested parties with easy access to a well-structured database of information on these technologies.

Hasanbeigi, A.; Price, L.; Lin, E.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

The critical role of manufacturing-process innovation on product development excellence in high-technology companies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Few managers of high-technology companies view manufacturing-process development as primary source of competitive advantage. For the last two decades trends have shown an increasing number of high-tech industries outsourcing ...

Duarte, Carlos E. A., 1962-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Three New NIST Economics Briefs Explore Technology Topics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... term growth, the development of new technologies drives both new products and services and overall productivity, technology-based industries ...

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

375

Productization and Manufacturing Scaling of High-Efficiency Solar Cell and Module Products Based on a Disruptive Low-Cost, Mono-Crystalline Technology: Final Technical Progress Report, April 1, 2009 - December 30, 2010  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Final report for PV incubator subcontract with Solexel, Inc. The purpose of this project was to develop Solexel's Unique IP, productize it, and transfer it to manufacturing. Silicon constitutes a significant fraction of the total solar cell cost, resulting in an industry-wide drive to lower silicon usage. Solexel's disruptive Solar cell structure got around these challenges and promised superior light trapping, efficiency and mechanical strength, despite being significantly thinner than commercially available cells. Solexel's successful participation in this incubator project became evident as the company is now moving into commercial production and position itself to be competitive for the next Technology Pathway Partnerships (TPP) funding opportunity.

Fatemi, H.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Amulaire Thermal Technology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Amulaire Thermal Technology Amulaire Thermal Technology Jump to: navigation, search Name Amulaire Thermal Technology Address 11555 Sorrento Valley Road Place San Diego, California Zip 92121 Sector Efficiency Product Makes heat-dissipation products used in liquid cooling systems Website http://www.amulaire.com/ Coordinates 32.912393°, -117.231201° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.912393,"lon":-117.231201,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

377

Sustainable Green Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Green Technologies Green Technologies Place Escondido, California Zip 92025 Sector Biofuels Product Creating technology to use hydrogen as an alternative fuel, bio-hydrogen and algal oil production Website http://sgth2.com/ Coordinates 33.0864488°, -117.0441009° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.0864488,"lon":-117.0441009,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

378

Micron Technology Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Micron Technology Inc Micron Technology Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Micron Technology Inc Place Boise, Idaho Zip 83707-0006 Sector Solar Product Solid state flash memory and CMOS maker exploring LED lighting production and rumoured to be mulling solar manufacturing. Coordinates 43.60698°, -116.193409° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.60698,"lon":-116.193409,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

379

Metering Technology Corporation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technology Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name Metering Technology Corporation Place Scotts Valley, California Product Engineering related to communicating meters....

380

Universal Lighting Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Product Universal Lighting Technologies develops, manufactures and markets energy efficient lighting technologies including HID, CFLs and ballasts. References Universal...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology product type" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Property:NrelPartnerType | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NrelPartnerType NrelPartnerType Jump to: navigation, search Property Name NrelPartnerType Property Type String Description Partnership Type. Pages using the property "NrelPartnerType" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1366 Technologies + Incubator + 3 3M + CRADA + A A.O. Smith + Test & Evaluation Partner + A123Systems + CRADA + AAON + Test & Evaluation Partner + AQUA Products + Test & Evaluation Partner + AVL Powertrain Engineering + Licensing Agreement + AWS Truewind + Test & Evaluation Partner + Abengoa Solar + CRADA + Abound Solar + Other Relationship + Advanced Energy Products + Test & Evaluation Partner + Affiliated International Management (AIM) + Test & Evaluation Partner + Affordable Comfort + Test & Evaluation Partner +

382

Preliminary investigations for technology assessment of /sup 99/Mo production from LEU (low enriched uranium) targets. [For production of /sup 99m/Tc; by different methods  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the results of preliminary studies on the effects of substituting low enriched uranium (LEU) for highly enriched uranium (HEU) in targets for the production of fission product /sup 99/Mo. Issues that were addressed are: (1) purity and yield of the /sup 99/Mo//sup 99m/Tc product, (2) fabrication of LEU targets and related concerns, and (3) radioactive waste. Laboratory experimentation was part of the efforts for issues (1) and (2); thus far, radioactive waste disposal has only been addressed in a paper study. Although the reported results are still preliminary, there is reason to be optimistic about the feasibility of utilizing LEU targets for /sup 99/Mo production. 37 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

Vandegrift, G.F.; Chaiko, D.J.; Heinrich, R.R.; Kucera, E.T.; Jensen, K.J.; Poa, D.S.; Varma, R.; Vissers, D.R.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Partnering Institution Name Partnering Institution Name Place Type  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Partnering Institution Name Partnering Institution Name Place Type Partnering Institution Name Partnering Institution Name Place Type of Partnership Partner Center Partner Year Partner Description Link Technologies Technologies North Lexington Massachusetts Incubator National Center for Photovoltaics M M St Paul Minnesota CRADA http www nrel gov pv pv manufacturing html A O Smith A O Smith Milwaukee Wisconsin Test Evaluation Partner Electricity Resources Building Systems Integration A123Systems A123Systems Watertown Massachusetts CRADA Transportation Technologies and Systems http www nrel gov news press html AAON AAON Tulsa Oklahoma Test Evaluation Partner Electricity Resources Building Systems Integration AQUA Products AQUA Products Prosperity South Carolina Test Evaluation Partner Electricity Resources Building Systems Integration

384

Technology Transfer: Available Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Biofuels Biofuels Biotechnology and Medecine Biotechnology & Medicine Chemistry Developing World Energy Efficient Technologies Energy Environmental Technologies...

385

Leadis Technology Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Leadis Technology Inc Leadis Technology Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Leadis Technology Inc. Place Sunnyvale, California Zip 94086-4834 Product Leadis Technology is a semiconductor company engaged in LED and OLED drivers. Coordinates 32.780338°, -96.547405° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.780338,"lon":-96.547405,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

386

Allied Sun Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sun Technologies Sun Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Allied Sun Technologies Name Allied Sun Technologies Address 6881 Alvarado Road, Suite 4 Place San Diego, California Zip 92120 Sector Solar Product solar power systems Phone number (888-765-2740) Website http://www.alliedsun.com Coordinates 32.775565°, -117.051215° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.775565,"lon":-117.051215,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

387

Alternative Concepts and Technology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Technology and Technology Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Alternative Concepts and Technology Name Alternative Concepts and Technology Place Orlando, Florida Sector Solar Product solar power, water catchments, organic gardening Year founded 2007 Website http://www.alternativeconcepts Coordinates 28.5383355°, -81.3792365° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":28.5383355,"lon":-81.3792365,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

388

Leading Edge Technologies Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Leading Edge Technologies Inc Leading Edge Technologies Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Leading Edge Technologies Inc Place Lakeland, Florida Product Profitable manufacturer of lithium ion batteries for consumer electronics makers that merged with Skylab Technologies Group Inc in September 2001 to form Solicore. Coordinates 35.264796°, -89.724114° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.264796,"lon":-89.724114,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

389

KLD Energy Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

KLD Energy Technologies KLD Energy Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name KLD Energy Technologies Place Austin, Texas Zip 78746 Sector Efficiency, Vehicles Product Austin, Texas-based KLD Energy Technologies designs and licenses a high-frequency, low RPM, transmissionless motor system that increases the speed and efficiency of electric vehicles. Coordinates 30.267605°, -97.742984° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.267605,"lon":-97.742984,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

390

Collier Technologies Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technologies Inc Technologies Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Collier Technologies Inc Place Reno, Nevada Zip NV 89502 Sector Hydro, Hydrogen Product Collier is a low emissions technology development and licensing company, specializing in patented hydrogen and mixed gas applications for internal combustion engines. Coordinates 32.944065°, -97.578279° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.944065,"lon":-97.578279,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

391

Mechanical Technologies Inc MTI | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technologies Inc MTI Technologies Inc MTI Jump to: navigation, search Name Mechanical Technologies Inc (MTI) Place Albany, New York Zip 12205 Product The company is dedicated to developing and commercializing new technologies. Coordinates 42.707237°, -89.436378° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.707237,"lon":-89.436378,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

392

Rive Technology Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rive Technology Inc Rive Technology Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Rive Technology Inc Address One Canal Park Place Cambridge, Massachusetts Zip 02141 Sector Biofuels Product Catalyst technology for petroleum refining to dramatically increase the yield of transportation fuels Website http://www.rivetechnology.com/ Coordinates 42.369496°, -71.07676° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.369496,"lon":-71.07676,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

393

United Technologies Corp | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technologies Corp Technologies Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name United Technologies Corp Place Hartford, Connecticut Zip CT 06101 Sector Hydro, Hydrogen Product UTC is a global technology corporation with activities in aerospace, aviation, helicopter design, climate control, elevator design and hydrogen fuel cells. Coordinates 41.763325°, -72.674069° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.763325,"lon":-72.674069,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

394

TRC Advanced Technologies Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TRC Advanced Technologies Inc TRC Advanced Technologies Inc Jump to: navigation, search Logo: TRC Advanced Technologies Inc Name TRC Advanced Technologies Inc Address 8700 Commerce Park Place Houston, Texas Zip 77036 Sector Solar Product Remote power PV systems Website http://www.trcat.com/ Coordinates 29.685775°, -95.535791° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.685775,"lon":-95.535791,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

395

Premier Solar Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technologies Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Premier Solar Technologies Name Premier Solar Technologies Place Dubai, United Arab Emirates Sector Renewable Energy Product Integrated Storage Collector Website http://premiersolartechnologie Coordinates 24.985960773822°, 55.194025039673° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":24.985960773822,"lon":55.194025039673,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

396

Power Tagging Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tagging Technologies Tagging Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name Power Tagging Technologies Place Superior, Colorado Zip 80027 Product Colorado-based developer of advanced digital signal processing technologies that enable real-time "power tagging" on the grid. Coordinates 41.761495°, -108.967894° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.761495,"lon":-108.967894,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

397

Efun Technology Co Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Efun Technology Co Ltd Efun Technology Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Efun Technology Co Ltd. Place Tainan, Taiwan Zip 70955 Sector Solar Product Efun Technology principally engaged in the manufacture of optical film and is diversifying into the thin film solar sector. Coordinates 22.99721°, 120.180862° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":22.99721,"lon":120.180862,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

398

LUCA Technologies Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LUCA Technologies Inc LUCA Technologies Inc Jump to: navigation, search Logo: LUCA Technologies Inc Name LUCA Technologies Inc Address 500 Corporate Circle, Suite C Place Golden, Colorado Zip 80401 Sector Biofuels Product Biofuels developer Website http://www.lucatechnologies.co Coordinates 39.720088°, -105.192312° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.720088,"lon":-105.192312,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

399

Porous Power Technologies LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Porous Power Technologies LLC Porous Power Technologies LLC Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Porous Power Technologies LLC Name Porous Power Technologies LLC Address 2765 Dagny Way, Suite 200 Place Lafayette, Colorado Zip 80026 Sector Efficiency Product Laminable, porous, absorbent Li-ion batteries Website http://www.porouspower.com/ Coordinates 40.0130129°, -105.1327972° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.0130129,"lon":-105.1327972,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

400

Protium Energy Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Protium Energy Technologies Protium Energy Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name Protium Energy Technologies Place Emmaus, Pennsylvania Zip 18049 Sector Hydro, Hydrogen Product A business, and technology consultancy service in the field of hydrogen, fuel cells and alternative energy. Coordinates 40.534985°, -75.491144° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.534985,"lon":-75.491144,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology product type" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Office, finds DOE funding has led to more than 360 hydrogen and fuel cell patents, 36 commercial...

402

NREL: Technology Transfer - Technology Partnership Agreements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Partnership Agreements Technology Partnership Agreements Through technology partnership agreements, NREL provides partners with technical support to help commercialize and deploy energy technologies and products. We do not fund any projects under a technology partnership agreement. The partner provides the necessary resources and covers our costs of providing technical services. NREL does provide funding opportunities through competitively placed contracts. For more information, see our business opportunities. Process The technology partnership agreement process basically includes 11 steps. See the NREL Technology Partnership Agreement Process flowchart. We are committed to working through these steps in a timely manner. Experience suggests that the fastest means to reach an agreement is through

403

Nano Tune Technologies Corp | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nano Tune Technologies Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name Nano Tune Technologies Corp. Place Mountain View, California Product Nano Tune use sol-gel processing technology to...

404

Axeon Technology Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technology Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Axeon Technology Ltd Place United Kingdom Product Owns the Vindax technology, which controls batteries for more efficient...

405

Ryle Technology Ltd UK | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ryle Technology Ltd UK Jump to: navigation, search Name Ryle Technology Ltd UK Place United Kingdom Sector Wind energy Product Focused on wind blade technology development....

406

Petroleum and geothermal production technology in Russia: Summary of information obtained during informational meetings with several Russian Institutes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Russian scientists and engineers have drilled the deepest holes in the world. It is recognized that this experience has given them an expertise in drilling superdeep holes, as well as other aspects of drilling, completions, and geophysics. More and more US oil and gas companies are vigorously expanding their exploration and development into Russia. It is important for them to identify and use Russian technology in drilling, completion, logging, and reservoir characterization to the extent possible, in order to both reduce drilling costs and help support the Russian economy. While these US companies are interested in becoming involved in and/or sponsoring research in Russia, they have been unsure as to which scientists and institutes are working on problems of interest. It was also important to determine in which areas Russian technology is farther advanced than in the West. Such technology could then be commercialized as part of the Industrial Partnering Program. In order to develop a clear understanding of these issues, two Sandia engineers with drilling and completions expertise and a geophysicist with expertise in reservoir analysis traveled to Russia to meet with Russian scientists and engineers to discuss their technologies and areas of interest. This report contains a summary of the information obtained during the visit.

Schafer, D.M.; Glowka, D.A.; Teufel, L.W.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Siluria Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name Siluria Technologies Place Mountain View, California Zip 94043 Sector Solar Product California-based stealth-mode company engaged in...

408

Ardica Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name Ardica Technologies Place San Francisco, California Zip 94107 Product Micro fuel cell company focused on customer-centric applications of fuel cell technologies. References...

409

Technology Partners | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Partners Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Technology Partners Name Technology Partners Address 550 University Avenue Place Palo Alto, California Zip 94301 Region Bay Area Product...

410

Federal Energy Management Program: Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

resources. The FEMP Low Standby Product List is also available. Technology Deployment: Developing, measuring, and implementing new and underutilized technologies for energy...

411

Evince Technology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Evince Technology Jump to: navigation, search Name Evince Technology Place United Kingdom Sector Efficiency, Wind energy Product String representation "Evince has pion ... ing...

412

Clearpower Technology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Clearpower Technology Jump to: navigation, search Name Clearpower Technology Place Belfast, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom Zip BT3 9DT Sector Wind energy Product Clearpower...

413

Solar Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name Solar Technologies Place Dubai, United Arab Emirates Sector Solar Product Dubai-based solar photovoltaic module manufacturing company....

414

Reactor Technology | Nuclear Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Areas Fuel Cycle Science & Technology Fusion Nuclear Science Isotope Development and Production Nuclear Security Science & Technology Nuclear Systems Modeling, Simulation...

415

Partnering Today: Technology Transfer Highlights  

THE LLNL TECHNOLOGY COMPANY PRODUCTS Partnering Today: Technology Transfer Highlights 10 Ametek-Ortec: High-precision Radiation Detectors ORTEC, a unit of AMETEK, is ...

416

National Center for Hydrogen Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

required to develop advanced hydrogen production and delivery technologies from fossil fuels. The EERC works with industry partners on the development of technology to improve the...

417

Supan Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Supan Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name Supan Technologies Place Ontario, Canada Zip K1C 2W6 Product Manufactures chemical etching stations, wafer transfer equipment...

418

A New Type Curve Analysis for Shale Gas/Oil Reservoir Production Performance with Dual Porosity Linear System.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??With increase of interest in exploiting shale gas/oil reservoirs with multiple stage fractured horizontal wells, complexity of production analysis and reservoir description have also increased. (more)

Abdulal, Haider Jaffar

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Technology Roadmap - Biofuels for Transport | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technology Roadmap - Biofuels for Transport Technology Roadmap - Biofuels for Transport Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Technology Roadmap - Biofuels for Transport Agency/Company /Organization: International Energy Agency Focus Area: Fuels & Efficiency Topics: Potentials & Scenarios Resource Type: Reports, Journal Articles, & Tools Website: www.iea.org/papers/2011/EV_PHEV_Roadmap.pdf This roadmap identifies technology goals and defines key actions that stakeholders must undertake to expand biofuel production and use sustainably. It provides additional focus and urgency to international discussions about the importance of biofuels to a low CO2 future. References Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Technology_Roadmap_-_Biofuels_for_Transport&oldid=515032"

420

2012 Wind Technologies Market Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2012 Wind Technologies Market Report Title 2012 Wind Technologies Market Report Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-6356E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Wiser, Ryan...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "technology product type" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


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