Sample records for technology dimensions length

  1. Low dimension structures and devices for new generation photonic technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, D. H.; Tang, D. Y.; Chen, T. P. [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 679798 (Singapore); Mei, T. [Institute of Optoelectronic Materials and Technology, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631 (China); Yuan, X. C. [Institute of Modern Optics, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Low dimensional structures and devices are the key technological building blocks for new generation of electronic and photonic technology. Such structures and devices show novel properties and can be integrated into systems for wide applications in many areas, including medical, biological and military and advancement of science. In this invited talk, I will present the main results achieved in our competitive research program which aims to explore the application of the mesoscopic structures in light source, manipulation and imaging and integrate them into advanced systems. In the light source aspect, we have for the first time developed graphene mode-locked lasers which are in the process of commercialization. Nanocrystal Si embedded in dielectrics was formed by ion implantation and subsequent annealing. Si light emitting devices with external quantum efficiency of about 2.9×10{sup ?3}% for visible emission were demonstrated at room temperature and the color of emitted light can be tuned electrically from violet to white by varying the injected current. In light manipulation, loss compensation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) using quantum well (QW) gain media was studied theoretically and demonstrated experimentally. The SPP propagation length was effectively elongated several times through electrical pumping. One and two microring resonators based on silicon on insulator and III-V semiconductors technologies have been successfully fabricated and they can be used as filter and switch in the photonic circuit. In imaging, both SPP and low dimension structures are investigated and resolution far beyond diffraction limit in visible range has been realized. The integration of the components in the three aspects into complicated systems is on the way.

  2. Technology development for gene discovery and full-length sequencing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marcelo Bento Soares

    2004-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In previous years, with support from the U.S. Department of Energy, we developed methods for construction of normalized and subtracted cDNA libraries, and constructed hundreds of high-quality libraries for production of Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs). Our clones were made widely available to the scientific community through the IMAGE Consortium, and millions of ESTs were produced from our libraries either by collaborators or by our own sequencing laboratory at the University of Iowa. During this grant period, we focused on (1) the development of a method for preferential cloning of tissue-specific and/or rare transcripts, (2) its utilization to expedite EST-based gene discovery for the NIH Mouse Brain Molecular Anatomy Project, (3) further development and optimization of a method for construction of full-length-enriched cDNA libraries, and (4) modification of a plasmid vector to maximize efficiency of full-length cDNA sequencing by the transposon-mediated approach. It is noteworthy that the technology developed for preferential cloning of rare mRNAs enabled identification of over 2,000 mouse transcripts differentially expressed in the hippocampus. In addition, the method that we optimized for construction of full-length-enriched cDNA libraries was successfully utilized for the production of approximately fifty libraries from the developing mouse nervous system, from which over 2,500 full-ORF-containing cDNAs have been identified and accurately sequenced in their entirety either by our group or by the NIH-Mammalian Gene Collection Program Sequencing Team.

  3. A tale of two houses: the human dimension of demand response enabling technology from a case study of an adaptive wireless thermostat.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peffer, Therese; Arens, Edward A; Chen, Xue; Jang, Jaehwi; Auslander, David M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Ed Arens. 2008. Demand Response-Enabled ResidentialEfficiency and Demand Response Programs for 2005/2006.The Human Dimension of Demand Response Enabling Technology

  4. The Human Dimension in Chinese Defense Science, Technology, and Innovation: An Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHEUNG, Tai Ming

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    STUDY OF INNOVATION AND TECHNOLOGY IN CHINA RESEARCH BRIEFSTI. The Study of Innovation and Technology in China (SITC)in Science and Technology Innovation that was established in

  5. Technology for the Twenty-First Century Classroom Computer and information technologies have transformed nearly every dimension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loudon, Catherine

    transformed nearly every dimension of society, including business, government, science, and engineering (Drucker, 1959; Bereiter & Scardamalia, 1996). Yet in spite of such twenty-first century movements from core subjects. They really have changed little so far" (p. 3). The conservatism observed

  6. Splitting of 3d quaternion dimensions into 2d-sells and a "world screen technology"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander P. Yefremov

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A set of basic vectors locally describing metric properties of an arbitrary 2-dimensional (2D) surface is used for construction of fundamental algebraic objects having nilpotent and idempotent properties. It is shown that all possible linear combinations of the objects when multiplied behave as a set of hypercomples (in particular, quaternion) units; thus interior structure of the 3D space dimensions pointed by the vector units is exposed. Geometric representations of elementary surfaces (2D-sells) structuring the dimensions are studied in detail. Established mathematical link between a vector quaternion triad treated as a frame in 3D space and elementary 2D-sells prompts to raise an idea of "world screen" having 1/2 of a space dimension but adequately reflecting kinematical properties of an ensemble of 3D frames.

  7. Editorial: Redefining Length

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sprouse, Gene D. [American Physical Society (United States)

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Technological changes have moved publishing to electronic-first publication where the print version has been relegated to simply another display mode. Distribution in HTML and EPUB formats, for example, changes the reading environment and reduces the need for strict pagination. Therefore, in an effort to streamline the calculation of length, the APS journals will no longer use the printed page as the determining factor for length. Instead the journals will now use word counts (or word equivalents for tables, figures, and equations) to establish length; for details please see http://publish.aps.org/authors/length-guide. The title, byline, abstract, acknowledgment, and references will not be included in these counts allowing authors the freedom to appropriately credit coworkers, funding sources, and the previous literature, bringing all relevant references to the attention of readers. This new method for determining length will be easier for authors to calculate in advance, and lead to fewer length-associated revisions in proof, yet still retain the quality of concise communication that is a virtue of short papers.

  8. Carbon Nanotubes: Measuring Dispersion and Length

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fagan, Jeffrey A.; Bauer, Barry J.; Hobbie, Erik K.; Becker, Matthew L.; Hight-Walker, Angela; Simpson, Jeffrey R.; Chun, Jaehun; Obrzut, Jan; Bajpai, Vardhan; Phelan, Fred R.; Simien, Daneesh; Yeon Huh, Ji; Migler, Kalman B.

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced technological uses of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) rely on the production of single length and chirality populations that are currently only available through liquid phase post processing. The foundation of all of these processing steps is the attainment of individualized nanotube dispersion in solution; an understanding of the collodial properties of the dispersed SWCNTs can then be used to designed appropriate conditions for separations. In many instances nanotube size, particularly length, is especially active in determining the achievable properties from a given population, and thus there is a critical need for measurement technologies for both length distribution and effective separation techniques. In this Progress Report, we document the current state of the art for measuring dispersion and length populations, including separations, and use examples to demonstrate the desirability of addressing these parameters.

  9. Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesis of 2D AlloysTrails NewsTechnologyTechnology A

  10. Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesis of 2D AlloysTrails NewsTechnologyTechnology

  11. Similarity Dimension of a Glaciated Terrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Daniel R.

    rate of movement. #12;Data Acquisition · The topography of a formerly glaciated surface the proportionality constant b from the previous equation. #12;Application to Topography · The topography of a region, it becomes possible to evaluate the length and similarity dimension of topography as Richardson

  12. Universal Extra Dimension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anirban Kundu

    2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a brief discussion of the following features of the Universal Extra Dimension (UED) model: (i) Formulation, (ii) Indirect bounds, (iii) Collider search and the Inverse Problem, (iv) Astrophysical bounds, and (v) UED with two extra dimensions.

  13. III-V Multigate Non-Planar Channel Transistor Simulations and Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shih, Kun-Huan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    model. Table 3.1 Spacer and underlap dimensions of source/length. TABLE 3.1 SPACER AND UNDERLAP DIMENSIONS OF SOURCE/= 2 mA/ µ m (c) Spacer or underlap dimension (nm) Figure 3.3

  14. Static Length Scales of N=6 Chern-Simons Plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dongsu Bak; Kazem Bitaghsir Fadafan; Hyunsoo Min

    2010-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Using gravity description, we compute various static length scales of N=6 Chern Simons plasma in a strongly coupled regime. For this, we consider the CP3 compactification of the type IIA supergravity down to four dimensions, and identify all the low-lying bosonic modes up to masses corresponding to the operator dimension 3 together with all the remaining CP3 invariant modes. We find the true mass gap, the Debye screening mass and the corresponding dual operators to be probed in the field theory side.

  15. Gravity, Dimension, Equilibrium, & Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jerome Perez

    2006-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Is it actually possible to interpret gravitation as space's property in a pure classical way. Then, we note that extended self-gravitating system equilibrium depends directly on the number of dimension of the space in which it evolves. Given those precisions, we review the principal thermodynamical knowledge in the context of classical gravity with arbitrary dimension of space. Stability analyses for bounded 3D systems, namely the Antonov instability paradigm, are then rapproched to some amazing properties of globular clusters and galaxies.

  16. Congestion pricing : policy dimensions, public rejection and impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chingcuanco, Franco (Franco Felipe)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis makes three related contributions to the broad literature on congestion pricing. First, it examines three policy dimensions that underlie pricing: the economic arguments that motivate it, the technological ...

  17. Big Mysteries: Extra Dimensions

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lincoln, Don

    2014-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The weakness of gravity compared to the other subatomic forces is a real mystery. While nobody knows the answer, one credible solution is that gravity has access to more spatial dimensions than the other three known forces. In this video, Fermilab's Dr. Don Lincoln describes this idea, with the help of some very urbane characters.

  18. Web Style Guide Fixed Dimension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Web Style Guide KEY: Fixed Dimension: Variable Dimension: V1.1, SEPTEMBER 2010 #12;Page 2 Table PAGE NEWS & EVENTS PAGE Fonts & Colors FONTS COLORS Web Writing Guidelines WEB WRITING GUIDELINES Web

  19. Continuously variable focal length lens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adams, Bernhard W; Chollet, Matthieu C

    2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A material preferably in crystal form having a low atomic number such as beryllium (Z=4) provides for the focusing of x-rays in a continuously variable manner. The material is provided with plural spaced curvilinear, optically matched slots and/or recesses through which an x-ray beam is directed. The focal length of the material may be decreased or increased by increasing or decreasing, respectively, the number of slots (or recesses) through which the x-ray beam is directed, while fine tuning of the focal length is accomplished by rotation of the material so as to change the path length of the x-ray beam through the aligned cylindrical slows. X-ray analysis of a fixed point in a solid material may be performed by scanning the energy of the x-ray beam while rotating the material to maintain the beam's focal point at a fixed point in the specimen undergoing analysis.

  20. Continuous lengths of oxide superconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kroeger, Donald M. (Knoxville, TN); List, III, Frederick A. (Andersonville, TN)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A layered oxide superconductor prepared by depositing a superconductor precursor powder on a continuous length of a first substrate ribbon. A continuous length of a second substrate ribbon is overlaid on the first substrate ribbon. Sufficient pressure is applied to form a bound layered superconductor precursor powder between the first substrate ribbon and the second substrate ribbon. The layered superconductor precursor is then heat treated to establish the oxide superconducting phase. The layered oxide superconductor has a smooth interface between the substrate and the oxide superconductor.

  1. Motivation and definitions Dimension theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climenhaga, Vaughn

    Motivation and definitions Dimension theory Results: old and new Multifractal analysis of Birkhoff averages #12;Motivation and definitions Dimension theory Results: old and new Outline 1 Motivation and definitions A multifractal decomposition Example 2 Dimension theory Quantifying level sets A dynamically

  2. Running couplings in extra dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jisuke Kubo; Haruhiko Terao; George Zoupanos

    2000-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The regularization scheme dependence of running couplings in extra compactified dimensions is discussed. We examine several regularization schemes explicitly in order to analyze the scheme dependence of the Kaluza-Klein threshold effects, which cause the power law running, in the case of the scalar theory in five dimensions with one dimension compactified. It is found that in 1-loop order, the net difference in the running of the coupling among the different schemes is reduced to be rather small after finite renormalization. An additional comment concerns the running couplings in the warped extra dimensions which are found to be regularization dependent above TeV scale.

  3. Reduced-dimension transistors: Reduced-dimension transistors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pulfrey, David L.

    1 Reduced-dimension transistors: the HEMT LECTURE 20 · Reduced-dimension transistors · HEMT · 2-D;8 For a finite well · Wavefunction not completely confined · Use undoped spacer #12;9 Employment of a spacer scattering (µ ). · Electrons and donors separated no I I scattering, i.e., µ · Undoped spacer also helps

  4. Stable heteronuclear few-atom bound states in mixed dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin Tao; Zhang Peng; Zhang Wei [Department of Physics, Renmin University of China, Beijing 100872 (China)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study few-body problems in mixed dimensions where two or three heavy atoms are trapped individually in parallel one-dimensional tubes or two-dimensional disks and a single light atom travels freely in three dimensions. Using the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, we find three- and four-body bound states for a broad parameter region. Specifically, the existence of trimer and tetramer states persists to the negative scattering length regime, where no two-body bound state is present. As pointed out by Y. Nishida in an earlier work [Phys. Rev. A 82, 011605(R) (2010)], these few-body bound states are stable against three-body recombination due to geometric separation. In addition, we find that the binding energy of the ground trimer and tetramer state reaches its maximum value when the scattering lengths are comparable to the separation between the low-dimensional traps.

  5. The BCS - BEC Crossover In Arbitrary Dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zohar Nussinov; Shmuel Nussinov

    2005-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Cold atom traps and certain neutron star layers may contain fermions with separation much larger than the range of pair-wise potentials yet much shorter than the scattering length. Such systems can display {\\em universal} characteristics independent of the details of the short range interactions. In particular, the energy per particle is a fraction $\\xi$ of the Fermi energy of the free Fermion system. Our main result is that for space dimensions D smaller than two and larger than four a specific extension of this problem readily yields $\\xi=1$ for all $D \\le 2$ whereas $\\xi$ is rigorously non-positive (and potentially vanishing) for all $ D \\ge 4$. We discuss the D=3 case. A particular unjustified recipe suggests $\\xi=1/2$ in D=3.

  6. Constraints on extra dimensions from precision molecular spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salumbides, E J; Gato-Rivera, B; Ubachs, W

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate investigations of quantum level energies in molecular systems are shown to provide a test ground to constrain the size of compactified extra dimensions. This is made possible by the recent progress in precision metrology with ultrastable lasers on energy levels in neutral molecular hydrogen (H$_2$, HD and D$_2$) and the molecular hydrogen ions (H$_2^+$, HD$^+$ and D$_2^+$). Comparisons between experiment and quantum electrodynamics calculations for these molecular systems can be interpreted in terms of probing large extra dimensions, under which conditions gravity will become much stronger. Molecules are a probe of space-time geometry at typical distances where chemical bonds are effective, i.e. at length scales of an \\AA. Constraints on compactification radii for extra dimensions are derived within the Arkani-Hamed-Dimopoulos-Dvali framework, while constraints for curvature or brane separation are derived within the Randall-Sundrum framework. Based on the molecular spectroscopy of D$_2$ molecules an...

  7. String universality in ten dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allan Adams; Oliver DeWolfe; Washington Taylor

    2014-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the ${\\cal N}=1$ supergravity theories in ten dimensions with gauge groups $U(1)^{496}$ and $E_8 \\times U(1)^{248}$ are not consistent quantum theories. Cancellation of anomalies cannot be made compatible with supersymmetry and abelian gauge invariance. Thus, in ten dimensions all supersymmetric theories of gravity without known inconsistencies are realized in string theory.

  8. Length Based Attack and Braid Groups: Cryptanalysis of Anshel-Anshel-Goldfeld Key

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myasnikov, Aleksey

    Length Based Attack and Braid Groups: Cryptanalysis of Anshel-Anshel-Goldfeld Key Exchange Protocol of Technology, Hoboken, New Jersey, USA, 07030 {amyasnik,aushakov}@stevens.edu Abstract. The length based attack and Tannenbaum in [9]. Several attempts have been made to implement the attack [6], but none of them had produced

  9. Formulas & definitions to know Formulas & definitions that will be provided if Distance formula in 3 dimensions compab = ab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lozano-Robledo, Alvaro

    Formulas & definitions to know Formulas & definitions that will be provided if needed Distance formula in 3 dimensions compab = a·b |a| Equation of a sphere W = F · D (work, force, distance) Vector of differentiability for a function of two variables arc length formula, arc length function the graph of a function

  10. Boom and Bust Inflation: A Graceful Exit via Compact Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Adam R. [Physics Department, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)

    2008-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A model of inflation is proposed in which compact extra dimensions allow a graceful exit without recourse to flat potentials or super-Planckian field values. Though bubbles of true vacuum are too sparse to uniformly reheat the Universe by colliding with each other, a compact dimension enables a single bubble to uniformly reheat by colliding with itself. This mechanism, which generates an approximately scale invariant perturbation spectrum, requires that inflation be driven by a bulk field, that vacuum decay be slow, and that the extra dimension be at least a hundred times larger than the false vacuum Hubble length.

  11. Twist operators in higher dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ling-Yan Hung; Robert C. Myers; Michael Smolkin

    2014-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We study twist operators in higher dimensional CFT's. In particular, we express their conformal dimension in terms of the energy density for the CFT in a particular thermal ensemble. We construct an expansion of the conformal dimension in power series around n=1, with n being replica parameter. We show that the coefficients in this expansion are determined by higher point correlations of the energy-momentum tensor. In particular, the first and second terms, i.e. the first and second derivatives of the scaling dimension, have a simple universal form. We test these results using holography and free field theory computations, finding agreement in both cases. We also consider the `operator product expansion' of spherical twist operators and finally, we examine the behaviour of correlators of twist operators with other operators in the limit n ->1.

  12. Low-Income Weatherization: The Human Dimension

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation focuses on how the human dimension saves energy within low-income weatherization programs.

  13. TASI Lectures on Supergravity and String Vacua in Various Dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington Taylor

    2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    These lectures aim to provide a global picture of the spaces of consistent quantum supergravity theories and string vacua in higher dimensions. The lectures focus on theories in the even dimensions 10, 8, and 6. Supersymmetry, along with with anomaly cancellation and other quantum constraints, places strong limitations on the set of physical theories which can be consistently coupled to gravity in higher-dimensional space-times. As the dimensionality of space-time decreases, the range of possible supergravity theories and the set of known string vacuum constructions expand. These lectures develop the basic technology for describing a variety of string vacua, including heterotic, intersecting brane, and F-theory compactifications. In particular, a systematic presentation is given of the basic elements of F-theory. In each dimension, we summarize the current state of knowledge regarding the extent to which supergravity theories not realized in string theory can be shown to be inconsistent.

  14. Tests of the Gravitational Inverse-Square Law below the Dark-Energy Length Scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. J. Kapner; T. S. Cook; E. G. Adelberger; J. H. Gundlach; B. R. Heckel; C. D. Hoyle; H. E. Swanson

    2006-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We conducted three torsion-balance experiments to test the gravitational inverse-square law at separations between 9.53 mm and 55 micrometers, probing distances less than the dark-energy length scale $\\lambda_{\\rm d}=\\sqrt[4]{\\hbar c/\\rho_{\\rm d}}\\approx 85 \\mu$m. We find with 95% confidence that the inverse-square law holds ($|\\alpha| \\leq 1$) down to a length scale $\\lambda = 56 \\mu$m and that an extra dimension must have a size $R \\leq 44 \\mu$m.

  15. ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY Engineering Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY Engineering Technology Program The Bachelor of Science in Engineering Technology (BSET) is a hands-on program based upon engineering technology fundamentals, engineering for employment or further education. The focus is on current engineering technology issues and applications used

  16. Environmental Stresses Disrupt Telomere Length Homeostasis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shamir, Ron

    Environmental Stresses Disrupt Telomere Length Homeostasis Gal Hagit Romano1,2,3. , Yaniv Harari1 and Biotechnology, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel, 2 Blavatnik School of Computer Science, Tel Aviv response to environmental signals. These results demonstrate that telomere length can be manipulated

  17. Variable Length Path Coupling Thomas P. Hayes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayes, Thomas

    length path coupling theorem, we im- prove the upper bound on the mixing time of the Glauber dynamics . By a "coupling" for this chain, we will mean a joint stochastic process (Xt, Yt) on × such that eachVariable Length Path Coupling Thomas P. Hayes Eric Vigoda July 17, 2006 Abstract We present a new

  18. Deconstructing unparticles in higher dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Jong-Phil [Korea Institute for Advanced Study, Seoul 130-722 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Unparticles are realized by deconstruction in higher extra dimensions. It is shown that in this framework when the scale invariance is broken, the corresponding spectral function of the unparticle is shifted by an amount of the breaking scale. The result strongly supports the conventional ansatz for the spectral function of the unparticle in the literature.

  19. crystal nickel a hree dimension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braun, Paul

    Zhenting 1 Department 2 Departmen ABSTRACT This pape crystal nickel a hree dimension photonic cryst polystyrene op silicon chips, volume fraction can be controlle nickel structure hen sacrificed volume fraction reports microm crystal structur or alumina she nickel microca microstructure further electrop volume

  20. Octupolar order in two dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Epifanio G. Virga

    2015-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Octupolar order is described in two space dimensions in terms of the maxima (and conjugated minima) of the probability density associated with a third-rank, fully symmetric and traceless tensor. Such a representation is shown to be equivalent to diagonalizing the relevant third-rank tensor, an equivalence which however is only valid in the two-dimensional case.

  1. Resource dimensioning through buffer sampling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boucherie, Richard J.

    , theoretical dimensioning formulae that estimate the required capacity C as a function of the input traffic the buffer content, estimates the buffer content distribution, and `inverts' this to the variance. We of capacity that should be added, advanced modeling and performance techniques are required. These predictions

  2. Random fractal strings: their zeta functions, complex dimensions and spectral asymptotics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jordan, Jonathan

    Random fractal strings: their zeta functions, complex dimensions and spectral asymptotics B-increasing real numbers which sums to one. For our purposes a fractal string is a string formed from the lengths versions of fractal strings. We show that using a random re- cursive self-similar construction

  3. Nanotube Formation: Researchers Learn To Control The Dimensions Of Metal Oxide Nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nair, Sankar

    made from metal oxides -- work that could lead to a technique for precisely conNanotube Formation: Researchers Learn To Control The Dimensions Of Metal Oxide Nanotubes Science their diameter and length. Based on metal oxides in combination with silicon and germanium, such single

  4. Assessment of Possible Cycle Lengths for Fully-Ceramic Micro-Encapsulated Fuel-Based Light Water Reactor Concepts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Sonat Sen; Michael A. Pope; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Kemal O. Pasamehmetoglu

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The tri-isotropic (TRISO) fuel developed for High Temperature reactors is known for its extraordinary fission product retention capabilities [1]. Recently, the possibility of extending the use of TRISO particle fuel to Light Water Reactor (LWR) technology, and perhaps other reactor concepts, has received significant attention [2]. The Deep Burn project [3] currently focuses on once-through burning of transuranic fissile and fissionable isotopes (TRU) in LWRs. The fuel form for this purpose is called Fully-Ceramic Micro-encapsulated (FCM) fuel, a concept that borrows the TRISO fuel particle design from high temperature reactor technology, but uses SiC as a matrix material rather than graphite. In addition, FCM fuel may also use a cladding made of a variety of possible material, again including SiC as an admissible choice. The FCM fuel used in the Deep Burn (DB) project showed promising results in terms of fission product retention at high burnup values and during high-temperature transients. In the case of DB applications, the fuel loading within a TRISO particle is constituted entirely of fissile or fissionable isotopes. Consequently, the fuel was shown to be capable of achieving reasonable burnup levels and cycle lengths, especially in the case of mixed cores (with coexisting DB and regular LWR UO2 fuels). In contrast, as shown below, the use of UO2-only FCM fuel in a LWR results in considerably shorter cycle length when compared to current-generation ordinary LWR designs. Indeed, the constraint of limited space availability for heavy metal loading within the TRISO particles of FCM fuel and the constraint of low (i.e., below 20 w/0) 235U enrichment combine to result in shorter cycle lengths compared to ordinary LWRs if typical LWR power densities are also assumed and if typical TRISO particle dimensions and UO2 kernels are specified. The primary focus of this summary is on using TRISO particles with up to 20 w/0 enriched uranium kernels loaded in Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) assemblies. In addition to consideration of this 'naive' use of TRISO fuel in LWRs, several refined options are briefly examined and others are identified for further consideration including the use of advanced, high density fuel forms and larger kernel diameters and TRISO packing fractions. The combination of 800 {micro}m diameter kernels of 20% enriched UN and 50% TRISO packing fraction yielded reactivity sufficient to achieve comparable burnup to present-day PWR fuel.

  5. Bioinformatics challenges of new sequencing technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfrender, Michael

    Bioinformatics challenges of new sequencing technology Mihai Pop and Steven L. Salzberg Center for Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, University of Maryland, MD 20742, USA New DNA sequencing technologies a range of species using the new technologies. However, these new technologies produce read lengths

  6. Effect of Minimal lengths on Electron Magnetism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khireddine Nouicer

    2007-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the magnetic properties of electron in a constant magnetic field and confined by a isotropic two dimensional harmonic oscillator on a space where the coordinates and momenta operators obey generalized commutation relations leading to the appearance of a minimal length. Using the momentum space representation we determine exactly the energy eigenvalues and eigenfunctions. We prove that the usual degeneracy of Landau levels is removed by the presence of the minimal length in the limits of weak and strong magnetic field.The thermodynamical properties of the system, at high temperature, are also investigated showing a new magnetic behavior in terms of the minimal length.

  7. Critical Gravity in Four Dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lue, H. [China Economics and Management Academy, Central University of Finance and Economics, Beijing 100081 (China); Institute for Advanced Study, Shenzhen University, Nanhai Avenue 3688, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Pope, C. N. [George P. and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); DAMTP, Centre for Mathematical Sciences, Cambridge University, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 OWA (United Kingdom)

    2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We study four-dimensional gravity theories that are rendered renormalizable by the inclusion of curvature-squared terms to the usual Einstein action with a cosmological constant. By choosing the parameters appropriately, the massive scalar mode can be eliminated and the massive spin-2 mode can become massless. This ''critical'' theory may be viewed as a four-dimensional analogue of chiral topologically massive gravity, or of critical 'new massive gravity' with a cosmological constant, in three dimensions. We find that the on-shell energy for the remaining massless gravitons vanishes. There are also logarithmic spin-2 modes, which have positive energy. The mass and entropy of standard Schwarzschild-type black holes vanish. The critical theory might provide a consistent toy model for quantum gravity in four dimensions.

  8. Dark Energy From Fifth Dimension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Alavirad; N. Riazi

    2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Observational evidence for the existence of dark energy is strong. Here we suggest a model which is based on a modified gravitational theory in 5D and interpret the 5th dimension as a manifestation of dark energy in the 4D observable universe. We also obtain an equation of state parameter which varies with time. Finally, we match our model with observations by choosing the free parameters of the model.

  9. Inheritance of Cotton Fiber Length and Strength

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joy, Kolbyn Seth

    2014-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    hybrids. General combining ability (GCA) and specific combining ability (SCA) were estimated according to Griffing’s diallel Model I, Method 4 for lint percent, high volume instrument (HVI) upper half mean length (UHML), fiber bundle strength (Str...

  10. A length operator for canonical quantum gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Thiemann

    1996-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct an operator that measures the length of a curve in four-dimensional Lorentzian vacuum quantum gravity. We work in a representation in which a $SU(2)$ connection is diagonal and it is therefore surprising that the operator obtained after regularization is densely defined, does not suffer from factor ordering singularities and does not require any renormalization. We show that the length operator admits self-adjoint extensions and compute part of its spectrum which like its companions, the volume and area operators already constructed in the literature, is purely discrete and roughly is quantized in units of the Planck length. The length operator contains full and direct information about all the components of the metric tensor which faciliates the construction of a new type of weave states which approximate a given classical 3-geometry.

  11. Human Dimensions of Wildlife Research Norman Dandy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Human Dimensions of Wildlife Research Norman Dandy Social & Economic Research Group #12;Wildlife) · Human-dimensions of species management (HDSM) Research Projects #12;Collaborative Frameworks for Land of woodland landscapes ­ discussion groups, · Choice experiments, · Fellowships / Placements, · Newsletters

  12. (Co)dimension (co)Heyting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darnière, Luck

    (Co)dimension dans les alg`ebres (co)Heyting Luck Darni`ere, Markus Junker (Co)dimension Compl´etion Pr´ecompacit´e Densit´e et scission Mod`ele compl´etion S´eminaire DDG, Paris 7 (Co)dimension dans les alg`ebres (co)Heyting Luck Darni`ere Markus Junker 10 novembre 2009 #12;(Co)dimension dans les alg

  13. DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN DIMENSIONS OF NATURAL RESOURCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CODE DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN DIMENSIONS OF NATURAL RESOURCES College of Natural Resources Colorado;3 DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL HUMAN DIMENSIONS OF NATURAL RESOURCES CODE ARTICLE I. GOAL AND OBJECTIVES A. DEPARTMENT MISSION The mission of the Department of Human Dimensions of Natural Resources is to contribute

  14. Sighting optics including an optical element having a first focal length and a second focal length

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crandall, David Lynn (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One embodiment of sighting optics according to the teachings provided herein may include a front sight and a rear sight positioned in spaced-apart relation. The rear sight includes an optical element having a first focal length and a second focal length. The first focal length is selected so that it is about equal to a distance separating the optical element and the front sight and the second focal length is selected so that it is about equal to a target distance. The optical element thus brings into simultaneous focus, for a user, images of the front sight and the target.

  15. Absorption Lengths in the Holographic Plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irene Amado; Carlos Hoyos; Karl Landsteiner; Sergio Montero

    2007-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the effect of a periodic perturbation with frequency $\\omega$ on the holographic N=4 plasma represented by the planar AdS black hole. The response of the system is given by exponentially decaying waves. The corresponding complex wave numbers can be found by solving wave equations in the AdS black hole background with infalling boundary conditions on the horizon in an analogous way as in the calculation of quasinormal modes. The complex momentum eigenvalues have an interpretation as poles of the retarded Green's functions, where the inverse of the imaginary part gives an absorption length $\\lambda$. At zero frequency we obtain the screening length for a static field. These are directly related to the glueball masses in the dimensionally reduced theory. We also point out that the longest screening length corresponds to an operator with non-vanishing R-charge and thus does not have an interpretation as a QCD3 glueball.

  16. Crystal diffraction lens with variable focal length

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smither, R.K.

    1991-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for altering the focal length of a focusing element of one of a plurality of pre-determined focal lengths by changing heat transfer within selected portions of the element by controlled quantities is disclosed. Control over heat transfer is accomplished by manipulating one or more of a number of variables, including: the amount of heat or cold applied to surfaces; type of fluids pumped through channels for heating and cooling; temperatures, directions of flow and rates of flow of fluids; and placement of channels. 19 figures.

  17. Apparatus for fabricating continuous lengths of superconductor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kroeger, Donald M. (Knoxville, TN); List, III, Frederick A. (Andersonville, TN)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process and apparatus for manufacturing a superconductor. The process is accomplished by depositing a superconductor precursor powder on a continuous length of a first substrate ribbon, overlaying a continuous length of a second substrate ribbon on said first substrate ribbon, and applying sufficient pressure to form a bound layered superconductor comprising a layer of said superconducting precursor powder between said first substrate ribbon and said second substrates ribbon. The layered superconductor is then heat treated to establish the superconducting phase of said superconductor precursor powder.

  18. Apparatus for fabricating continuous lengths of superconductor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kroeger, Donald M. (Knoxville, TN); List, III, Frederick A. (Andersonville, TN)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process and apparatus for manufacturing a superconductor. The process is accomplished by depositing a superconductor precursor powder on a continuous length of a first substrate ribbon, overlaying a continuous length of a second substrate ribbon on said first substrate ribbon, and applying sufficient pressure to form a bound layered superconductor comprising a layer of said superconducting precursor powder between said first substrate ribbon and said second substrates ribbon. The layered superconductor is then heat treated to establish the superconducting phase of said superconductor precursor powder.

  19. Statics and Dynamics of Spin and Electric Dipoles in 3-Dimension, 4-Dimension, and Other Dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SASLOW, WM; Fulling, Stephen A.; Hu, Chia-Ren.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -dimensional spaces where polar vec- tors have n components, spin has n (n ?1)/2 components. Moreover, although a rotation can make an arbitrary polar vector have only one noniero component, the same is not true for spin (and mag- netic field). In particular, for n... com- ponent we have derived the equation of motion for spin in n dimensions, and for n =4 we apply it to free Larmor precession, where we find two modes [at y(H~2+H34)]. Simple ferromagnets and spin glasses are also discussed for n=4. Since no true...

  20. EA Systems Examples Induction and Recursion Length Measuring the Universe Analysis Number systems of different lengths,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forster, T.E.

    EA Systems Examples Induction and Recursion Length Measuring the Universe Analysis Number systems of Mathematics University of Bristol April 21, 2008 Richard.Pettigrew@bris.ac.uk Natural number systems and infinitesimal analysis #12;EA Systems Examples Induction and Recursion Length Measuring the Universe Analysis

  1. Photoelectron track length distributions measured in a negative ion time projection chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prieskorn, Z R; Kaaret, P E; Black, J K

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report photoelectron track length distributions between 3 and 8 keV in gas mixtures of Ne+CO2+CH3NO2 (260:80:10 Torr) and CO2+CH3NO2 (197.5: 15 Torr). The measurements were made using a negative ion time projection chamber (NITPC) at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). We report the first quantitative analysis of photoelectron track length distributions in a gas. The distribution of track lengths at a given energy is best fit by a lognormal distribution. A powerlaw distribution of the form, f(E)=a(E/Eo)n, is found to fit the relationship between mean track length and energy. We find n=1.29 +/- 0.07 for Ne+CO2+CH3NO2 and n=1.20 +/- 0.09 for CO2+CH3NO2. Understanding the distribution of photoelectron track lengths in proportional counter gases is important for optimizing the pixel size and the dimensions of the active region in electron-drift time projection chambers (TPCs) and NITPC X-ray polarimeters.

  2. Nuclear Proliferation Technology Trends Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zentner, Michael D.; Coles, Garill A.; Talbert, Robert J.

    2005-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is underway to develop mature, integrated methodologies to address nonproliferation issues. A variety of methodologies (both qualitative and quantitative) are being considered. All have one thing in common, a need for a consistent set of proliferation related data that can be used as a basis for application. One approach to providing a basis for predicting and evaluating future proliferation events is to understand past proliferation events, that is, the different paths that have actually been taken to acquire or attempt to acquire special nuclear material. In order to provide this information, this report describing previous material acquisition activities (obtained from open source material) has been prepared. This report describes how, based on an evaluation of historical trends in nuclear technology development, conclusions can be reached concerning: (1) The length of time it takes to acquire a technology; (2) The length of time it takes for production of special nuclear material to begin; and (3) The type of approaches taken for acquiring the technology. In addition to examining time constants, the report is intended to provide information that could be used to support the use of the different non-proliferation analysis methodologies. Accordingly, each section includes: (1) Technology description; (2) Technology origin; (3) Basic theory; (4) Important components/materials; (5) Technology development; (6) Technological difficulties involved in use; (7) Changes/improvements in technology; (8) Countries that have used/attempted to use the technology; (9) Technology Information; (10) Acquisition approaches; (11) Time constants for technology development; and (12) Required Concurrent Technologies.

  3. PastForward New Dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahabi, Cyrus

    Founding Executive Directors June Beallor James Moll Founding Advisory Committee Karen Kushell Branko Sam Gustman Chief Technology Officer Karen Jungblut Director of Research and Documentation Steven on Location By Scott Lindenbaum 11 SPACE AND TIME Geo-Immersive Learning By Cyrus Shahabi, Ali Khodaei

  4. Pauling bond strength, bond length and electron density distribution...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pauling bond strength, bond length and electron density distribution. Pauling bond strength, bond length and electron density distribution. Abstract: A power law regression...

  5. The Deng algorithm in higher dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Nyonyi; S. D. Maharaj; K. S. Govinder

    2014-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We extend an algorithm of Deng in spherically symmetric spacetimes to higher dimensions. We show that it is possible to integrate the generalised condition of pressure isotropy and generate exact solutions to the Einstein field equations for a shear-free cosmological model with heat flow in higher dimensions. Three new metrics are identified which contain results of four dimensions as special cases. We show graphically that the matter variables are well behaved and the speed of sound is causal.

  6. New hydrocracking catalysts increase throughput, run length

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huizinga, T. [Shell Internationale Petroleum Mij., The Hague (Netherlands); Theunissen, J.M.H. [Rayong Refinery Co. Ltd., Rayong (Thailand); Minderhoud, H.; Veen, R. van [Koninklijke/Shell-Lab., Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1995-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved, second-stage hydrocracking catalyst has been developed by combining stabilized Y zeolites with amorphous silica alumina cracking components. A commercial application of this catalyst, along with a new, first-stage zeolitic hydrocracking catalyst, resulted in increased unit throughput and cycle length. The paper discusses the hydrocracking process, first-stage catalysts, second-stage catalysts, hydrogenation process, commercial results, and product properties.

  7. Faience Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholson, Paul

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by Joanne Hodges. Faience Technology, Nicholson, UEE 2009Egyptian materials and technology, ed. Paul T. Nicholson,Nicholson, 2009, Faience Technology. UEE. Full Citation:

  8. Black holes in extra dimensions can decay on the bulk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. K. Chaudhuri

    2003-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In the extra dimensional theories, with TeV scale Plank constant, black holes may be produced in the Large Hadron Collider experiments. We have argued that in the d-dimensional black hole, the intrinsically 4-dimensional brane fields do not see the same geometry at the horizon, as in a 4-dimensional space-time. Kaluza-Klein modes invades the brane and surroundings and the brane fields can be considered as a thermal system at the temperature of the black hole. From energy and entropy consideration, we show that whether or not a six-dimensional black hole will decay by emitting Kaluza-Klein modes or the standard model particles, will depend on the length scale of the extra dimensions as well as on the mass of the black hole. For higher dimensional black holes, Kaluza-Klein modes will dominate the decay.

  9. String Universality in Six Dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vijay Kumar; Washington Taylor

    2009-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In six dimensions, cancellation of gauge, gravitational, and mixed anomalies strongly constrains the set of quantum field theories which can be coupled consistently to gravity. We show that for some classes of six-dimensional supersymmetric gauge theories coupled to gravity, the anomaly cancellation conditions are equivalent to tadpole cancellation and other constraints on the matter content of heterotic/type I compactifications on K3. In these cases, all consistent 6D supergravity theories have a realization in string theory. We find one example which may arise from a novel string compactification, and we identify a new infinite family of models satisfying anomaly factorization. We find, however, that this infinite family of models, as well as other infinite families of models previously identified by Schwarz are pathological. We suggest that it may be feasible to demonstrate that there is a string theoretic realization of all consistent six-dimensional supergravity theories which have Lagrangian descriptions with arbitrary gauge and matter content. We attempt to frame this hypothesis of string universality as a concrete conjecture.

  10. Length and Energy of Quadratic Bezier Curves and Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffmann, Christoph M.

    Length and Energy of Quadratic B´ezier Curves and Applications Young Joon Ahn a , Christoph for the arc length and the bending energy of quadratic B´ezier curves. The formulae are in terms control point is analyzed for curves of fixed arc length or bending energy. In the case of arc length

  11. Constructive Dimension and Turing Degrees Laurent Bienvenu #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephan, Frank

    S with constructive Hausdor# dimension dimH (S) and constructive packing dimension dimP (S) is Turing equivalent to a sequence R with dimH (R) # (dim H (S)/dim P (S)) - #, for arbitrary # > 0. Furthermore, if dimP (S) > 0, then dimP (R) # 1 - #. The reduction thus serves as a randomness extractor that increases the algorithmic

  12. Combinatorial Dimension in Fractional Cartesian Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Frank

    Combinatorial Dimension in Fractional Cartesian Products Ron Blei,1 Fuchang Gao2 1 Department of Mathematics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06268; e-mail: blei@math.uconn.edu 2 Department? Correspondence to: R. Blei © 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. 146 #12;COMBINATORIAL DIMENSION IN FRACTIONAL CARTESIAN

  13. Deconstructing Dimensions Adventures in Theory Space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nima Arkani-Hamed

    2009-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Theories of gravity and gauge forces in more than four dimensions offer a new paradigm for physics beyond the standard model. We present some of the most interesting recent ideas, and explain how signals for extra dimensions could appear in experiments at a linear e+e- collider.

  14. TREKisM At Length Issue 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multiple Contributors

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . "Triskelian Fledgeling" — by Vel Jaeger "Kelvan Exile" — by Vel Jaeger 111. Romulan Astronomy — by Robert S. Sayes 113c Trek-M's Speak their Minds on ST:TMP 121. A Glance Backwards - reactions to TaL I (first issue of TREKisM at Length) 122. Trivia Quizes #3...\\un Speck run. "fynjrur^run. -Storu Ipu1- 'The^dds" UYena T^fc* Ink.nc l'*- bjj rafrick La\\fena ^aq Kidd LuckICKU ©/980' -14- 0N CONVENTIONAL OCCASIONS The following Is a conglomeration of reports, Interviews, and reminiscences from TREKisM members...

  15. TREKiSM At Length Issue 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multiple Contributors

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Trek IV! SHALOM PAX PEACE to us all in 1986 Table of Contents TITLE AUTHOR ARTIST PAGE I. DATA ENTRIES FROST ON THE TYPEWRITER V.L. Thorn LaVena Kay Kldd 2 "Trek Omen" V.L. Thorn 6 (originally appeared In TREKisM #26) JAMES T. KIRK vs THE COMPUTER... appeared in TREKisM at Length III) TALES FROM THE VULCAN HEARTH Karen C. Hunter 53 HOW THE VULCANS LOST THEIR WINGS 54 THE SKY GOD'S DAUGHTER 56 THE GIFT OF THE GODS LaVena Kay Kldd 57 "Sul Generis" V.L. Thorn 58 "Cat-Kin" Emily Ross 60 (originally appeared...

  16. Property:Length (m) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkins County, Nebraska:PrecourtOid JumpEligSysSize JumpTechDsc JumpAlpha3 JumpLabLength (m)

  17. Dimensions of Usability: Cougaar, Aglets and Adaptive Agent Architecture (AAA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haack, Jereme N.; Cowell, Andrew J.; Gorton, Ian

    2004-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Research and development organizations are constantly evaluating new technologies in order to implement the next generation of advanced applications. At Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, agent technologies are perceived as an approach that can provide a competitive advantage in the construction of highly sophisticated software systems in a range of application areas. An important factor in selecting a successful agent architecture is the level of support it provides the developer in respect to developer support, examples of use, integration into current workflow and community support. Without such assistance, the developer must invest more effort into learning instead of applying the technology. Like many other applied research organizations, our staff are not dedicated to a single project and must acquire new skills as required, underlining the importance of being able to quickly become proficient. A project was instigated to evaluate three candidate agent toolkits across the dimensions of support they provide. This paper reports on the outcomes of this evaluation and provides insights into the agent technologies evaluated.

  18. Solar energy generation in three dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernardi, Marco

    We formulate, solve computationally and study experimentally the problem of collecting solar energy in three dimensions. We demonstrate that absorbers and reflectors can be combined in the absence of sun tracking to build ...

  19. Dark Energy, Inflation and Extra Dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul J. Steinhardt; Daniel Wesley

    2008-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider how accelerated expansion, whether due to inflation or dark energy, imposes strong constraints on fundamental theories obtained by compactification from higher dimensions. For theories that obey the null energy condition (NEC), we find that inflationary cosmology is impossible for a wide range of compactifications; and a dark energy phase consistent with observations is only possible if both Newton's gravitational constant and the dark energy equation-of-state vary with time. If the theory violates the NEC, inflation and dark energy are only possible if the NEC-violating elements are inhomogeneously distributed in thecompact dimensions and vary with time in precise synchrony with the matter and energy density in the non-compact dimensions. Although our proofs are derived assuming general relativity applies in both four and higher dimensions and certain forms of metrics, we argue that similar constraints must apply for more general compactifications.

  20. On c-theorems in arbitrary dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arpan Bhattacharyya; Ling-Yan Hung; Kallol Sen; Aninda Sinha

    2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The dilaton action in 3+1 dimensions plays a crucial role in the proof of the a-theorem. This action arises using Wess-Zumino consistency conditions and crucially relies on the existence of the trace anomaly. Since there are no anomalies in odd dimensions, it is interesting to ask how such an action could arise otherwise. Motivated by this we use the AdS/CFT correspondence to examine both even and odd dimensional CFTs. We find that in even dimensions, by promoting the cut-off to a field, one can get an action for this field which coincides with the WZ action in flat space. In three dimensions, we observe that by finding an exact Hamilton-Jacobi counterterm, one can find a non-polynomial action which is invariant under global Weyl rescalings. We comment on how this finding is tied up with the F-theorem conjectures.

  1. Secrecy coverage in two dimensions Amites Sarkar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarkar, Amites

    Secrecy coverage in two dimensions Amites Sarkar Department of Mathematics Western Washington University Bellingham, WA 98225, USA Email: amites.sarkar@wwu.edu Abstract--Imagine a sensor network

  2. Secrecy coverage in two dimensions Amites Sarkar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarkar, Amites

    Secrecy coverage in two dimensions Amites Sarkar November 15, 2014 Abstract Working in the infinite, Bellingham, WA 98225, USA. Email: amites.sarkar@wwu.edu 1 #12;Svante Janson proved in 1986 [7] that coverage

  3. Secrecy coverage in two dimensions Amites Sarkar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarkar, Amites

    Secrecy coverage in two dimensions Amites Sarkar October 29, 2013 Abstract Working in the infinite, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225, USA. Email: amites.sarkar@wwu.edu 1 #12;Svante Janson

  4. Stellar mixing length theory with entropy rain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandenburg, Axel

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stellar mixing length theory is modified to include the effects of a nongradient term that originates from the motion of convective elements with entropy perturbations of either sign. It is argued that such a term, first studied by Deardorff in the meteorological context, represents the effects of thin intense downdrafts caused by the rapid cooling in the granulation layer at the top of the convection zone. They transport heat nonlocally, as originally anticipated by Spruit in the 1990s, who describes the convection in the strongly stratified simulations of Stein & Nordlund as entropy rain. Although our model has ill-determined free parameters, it demonstrates that solutions can be found that look similar to the original ones, except that the deeper layers are now Schwarzschild stable, so no giant cells are produced and the typical convective scale is that of granules even at larger depth. Consequences for modeling solar differential, the global dynamo, and sunspots are briefly discussed.

  5. PERSPECTIVES AND USAGE OF TECHNOLOGY OF ARABIC LANGUAGE TEACHERS IN THE UNITED ARAB EMIRATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ALhumaid, Khadija Farhan

    2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract This study examined the perspectives and usage of technology by Arabic language teachers' in various schools all across The United Arab Emirates. Barriers to integrating technology were closely examined. Dimensions investigated included...

  6. Constructive Dimension and Turing Degrees Laurent Bienvenu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doty, David

    sequence S with constructive Hausdorff dimension dimH(S) and constructive packing dimension dimP(S, if dimP(S) > 0, then dimP(R) 1 - . The reduction thus serves as a randomness extractor that increases sequence S (that is, dimH(S) = dimP(S)) such that dimH(S) > 0, the Turing degree of S has constructive

  7. Breaking Parity Symmetry Using Extra Dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. N. Mohapatra; A. Pérez-Lorenzana

    1999-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new way to break parity symmetry in left-right symmetric models using boundary conditions on the fields residing in the fifth dimension. We also discuss the connection between the limits on the size of extra dimensions and the scale of right handed symmetry breaking obtained from the analysis of neutrinoless double beta decay in the case where the righthanded gauge symmetry is in the bulk.

  8. Determination of critical length scales for corrosion processes using microelectroanalytical techniques.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zavadil, Kevin Robert; Wall, Frederick Douglas

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A key factor in our ability to produce and predict the stability of metal-based macro- to nano-scale structures and devices is a fundamental understanding of the localized nature of corrosion. Corrosion processes where physical dimensions become critical in the degradation process include localized corrosion initiation in passivated metals, microgalvanic interactions in metal alloys, and localized corrosion in structurally complex materials like nanocrystalline metal films under atmospheric and inundated conditions. This project focuses on two areas of corrosion science where a fundamental understanding of processes occurring at critical dimensions is not currently available. Sandia will study the critical length scales necessary for passive film breakdown in the inundated aluminum (Al) system and the chemical processes and transport in ultra-thin water films relevant to the atmospheric corrosion of nanocrystalline tungsten (W) films. Techniques are required that provide spatial information without significantly perturbing or masking the underlying relationships. Al passive film breakdown is governed by the relationship between area of the film sampled and its defect structure. We will combine low current measurements with microelectrodes to study the size scale required to observe a single initiation event and record electrochemical breakdown events. The resulting quantitative measure of stability will be correlated with metal grain size, secondary phase size and distribution to understand which metal properties control stability at the macro- and nano-scale. Mechanisms of atmospheric corrosion on W are dependent on the physical dimensions and continuity of adsorbed water layers as well as the chemical reactions that take place in this layer. We will combine electrochemical and scanning probe microscopic techniques to monitor the chemistry and resulting material transport in these thin surface layers. A description of the length scales responsible for driving the corrosion of the nanocrystalline metal films will be developed. The techniques developed and information derived from this work will be used to understand and predict degradation processes in microelectronic and microsystem devices critical to Sandia's mission.

  9. Geometric Solutions for the Neutrino Oscillation Length Resonance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jason Pruet; George M. Fuller

    1999-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We give a geometric interpretation of the neutrino 'oscillation length resonance' recently discovered by Petcov. We use this picture to identify two new solutions for oscillation length resonances in a 3-layer earth model.

  10. Low-coherent WDM reflectometry for accurate fiber length monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hui, Rongqing; Thomas, J.; Allen, Christopher Thomas; Fu, B.; Gao, S.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber-optic low-coherent reflectometer was developed to accurately monitor fiber length variation. A large length-coverage range was obtained by using a fiber Bragg grating array in a wavelength-division-multiplexing ...

  11. Large-dimension, high-ZT Thermoelectric Nanocomposites for High...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Large-dimension, high-ZT Thermoelectric Nanocomposites for High-Power High-efficiency Waste Heat Recovery for Electricity Generation Large-dimension, high-ZT Thermoelectric...

  12. White Paper Societal Dimensions of Earth System Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on Societal Dimensions of Earth System Modeling July 5, 2011 #12; 2 Executive Summary · A Societal Dimensions of Earth System Modeling workshop was held

  13. Dictionaries Using Variable-Length Keys and Data, with Applications *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blelloch, Guy E.

    (Isil- logn, 1) + Itil) and Isil is the length of bit string si. We assume a word length w > log m. We present string Isil > 1, Itil > 1 for all bit-strings si and ti. Fox' fixed-length keys the dictionary problem

  14. 1 Industrial Electron Accelerators type ILU for Industrial Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    equipment - in not protected premises. The dimensions of main units of the various ILU machines are shown the beam extraction device, air pipes of ventillation system and technological equipment are placed

  15. Compact noninvasive electron bunch-length monitor

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Roberts, B.; Mammei, R. R.; Poelker, M.; McCarter, J. L.

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact rf cavity was constructed that simultaneously resonates at many harmonic modes when excited by a repetitive bunched electron beam passing through its bore. The excitation of these modes provides a Fourier description of the temporal characteristics of the bunch train. The cavity was used to noninvasively characterize electron bunches produced from thin and thick GaAs photocathodes inside a DC high voltage photogun illuminated with 37 ps (full width half maximum, FWHM) laser pulses at repetition rates near 1500 MHz, at average beam current from 5 to 500????A , and at beam energy from 75 to 195 keV. The cavity bunch-length monitor could detect electron bunches as short as 57 ps (FWHM) when connected directly to a sampling oscilloscope, and could clearly distinguish bunches with varying degrees of space-charge induced growth and with different tail signatures. Efforts are under way to detect shorter bunches by designing cavities with increased bandwidth. This demonstration lends credibility to the idea that these cavities could also be used for other applications, including bunching and shaping, when driven with external rf.

  16. Core length testable reactor concept neutronic analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanan, N.A.; Bhattacharyya, S.K.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Development work on thermionic reactor systems has been ongoing in the US since the early 1950s. While significant successes were achieved, progress has been hampered by frequent changes in direction and funding instabilities (as has been true for many high technology initiatives). The recent Air Force thermionics initiative (1991) represents the latest in thermionics reactor development in the US. This Air Force initiative called for the development of thermionics reactors with the output power of about 40 kWe, and which incorporated the features of testability, fabricability, low development cost, high level of safety and reliability, and survivability. Several concepts were analyzed to define a design that would meet all the requirements set forth by the Air Force. This report describes the methodology used, the different designs analyzed and reasons for the evolution of the design, and presents the results for the different concepts.

  17. Fractal Dimension Computation From Equal Mass Partitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shiozawa, Yui; Rouet, Jean-Louis

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While the numerical methods which utilizes partitions of equal-size, including the box-counting method, remain the most popular choice for computing the generalized dimension of multifractal sets, two mass- oriented methods are investigated by applying them to the one-dimensional generalized Cantor set. We show that both mass-oriented methods generate relatively good results for generalized dimensions for important cases where the box-counting method is known to fail. Both the strengths and limitations of the methods are also discussed.

  18. Radiation in (2+1)-dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauricio Cataldo; Alberto A. García

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we discuss the radiation equation of state $p=\\rho/2$ in (2+1)-dimensions. In (3+1)-dimensions the equation of state $p=\\rho/3$ may be used to describe either actual electromagnetic radiation (photons) as well as a gas of massless particles in a thermodynamic equilibrium (for example neutrinos). In this work it is shown that in the framework of (2+1)-dimensional Maxwell electrodynamics the radiation law $p=\\rho/2$ takes place only for plane waves, i.e. for $E = B$. Instead of the linear Maxwell electrodynamics, to derive the (2+1)-radiation law for more general cases with $E \

  19. TECHNOLOGY AND DEMOCRACY GEOG 804 (002) Wednesday 6-8:30 pm Saunders 219*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doyle, Martin

    Syllabus: TECHNOLOGY AND DEMOCRACY GEOG 804 (002) Wednesday 6-8:30 pm Saunders 219* Instructor://blackboard.unc.edu Overview Are society's technological choices open to democratic participation? The graduate seminar and research workshop in TECHNOLOGY AND DEMOCRACY explores political dimensions of technological change

  20. The communication dimension of wind energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    The communication dimension of wind energy: Challenges and opportunities #12;OPPORTUNITIES #12;Pew;1. Emergent anti-wind energy advocacy groups #12;2. A multi-faceted technical issue that is difficult to explain Wind energy Policy Science Engineering Ethics Public relations Others #12;3. Different audience

  1. Large-N droplets in two dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean Lee

    2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Using lattice effective field theory, we study the ground state binding energy of N distinct particles in two dimensions with equal mass interacting weakly via an attractive SU(N)-symmetric short range potential. We find that in the limit of zero range and large N, the ratio of binding energies B_{N}/B_{N-1} approaches the value 8.3(6).

  2. Cosmological model with movement in fifth dimension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. B. Belayev

    2001-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Presented cosmological model is 3D brane world sheet moved in extra dimension with variable scale factor. Analysis of the geodesic motion of the test particle gives settle explanation of the Pioneer effect. It is found that for considered metric the solution of the semi-classical Einstein equations with various parameters conforms to isotropic expanded and anisotropic stationary universe.

  3. The Environmental Justice Dimensions of Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Environmental Justice Dimensions of Climate Change Marie Lynn Miranda, Douglas A. Hastings to mitigate the severe impacts of climate change predicted to occur in the twenty-first century. Many with climate change. This study investigates the varying degrees to which developing and developed nations

  4. DIMENSIONS of DISCOVERY Sponsored Program Awards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    DIMENSIONS of DISCOVERY Sponsored Program Awards May 2013 Office of the Vice President for ResearchFunds." Abu-Omar, Mahdi M; chemistry, from U.S. DepartmentofEnergy,$165,000,"OxoCata- lysts for the Conversion pathobiology, from PHS-NIH National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, $2,963, "Animal-Assisted

  5. Structuring Materials on Multiple Length Scales for Energy Application...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structuring Materials on Multiple Length Scales for Energy Applications October 25, 2012 at 3pm36-428 Adreas Stein Department of Chemistry, University of Minnesota astein...

  6. Ultra-low-loss tapered optical fibers with minimal lengths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryutaro Nagai; Takao Aoki

    2014-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We design and fabricate ultra-low-loss tapered optical fibers (TOFs) with minimal lengths. We first optimize variations of the torch scan length using the flame-brush method for fabricating TOFs with taper angles that satisfy the adiabaticity criteria. We accordingly fabricate TOFs with optimal shapes and compare their transmission to TOFs with a constant taper angle and TOFs with an exponential shape. The highest transmission measured for TOFs with an optimal shape is in excess of 99.7 % with a total TOF length of only 23 mm, whereas TOFs with a constant taper angle of 2 mrad reach 99.6 % transmission for a 63 mm TOF length.

  7. Miniaturized Mid-Infrared Sensor Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, S; Young, C; Mizaikoff, B

    2007-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Fundamental vibrational and rotational modes associated with most inorganic and organic molecules are spectroscopically accessible within the mid-infrared (MIR; 3-20 {micro}m) regime of the electromagnetic spectrum. The interaction between MIR photons and organic molecules provides particularly sharp transitions, which - despite the wide variety of organic molecules - provide unique MIR absorption spectra reflecting the molecularly characteristic arrangement of chemical bonds within the probed molecules via the frequency position of the associated vibrational and rotational transitions. Given the inherent molecular selectivity and achievable sensitivity, MIR spectroscopy provides an ideal platform for optical sensing applications. Despite this potential, early MIR sensing applications were limited to localized applications due to the size of the involved instrumentation, and limited availability of appropriately compact MIR optical components including light sources, detectors, waveguides, and spectrometers. During the last decades, engineering advances in photonics and optical engineering have facilitated the translation of benchtop-style MIR spectroscopy into miniaturized optical sensing schemes providing a footprint compatible with portable instrumentation requirements for field deployable analytical tools. In this trend article, we will discuss recent advances and future strategies for miniaturizing MIR sensor technology. The Beer-Lambert law implies that achievable limit of detection (LOD) for any optical sensor system improves by increasing the interaction length between photons and target analyte species such as e.g., folding the optical path multiple times as in multi-pass gas phase sensing; however, this governing paradigm naturally leads to an increase in system dimensions. Hence, miniaturization of optical sensing system requires scaling down of each optical component, yet improving the performance of each optical element within a smaller form factor for overall at least maintaining, or ideally improving the achievable sensitivity.

  8. Modified Newton's Law of Gravitation Due to Minimal Length in Quantum Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmed Farag Ali; A. Tawfik

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A recent theory about the origin of the gravity suggests that the gravity is originally an entropic force. In this work, we discuss the effects of generalized uncertainty principle (GUP) which is proposed by some approaches to quantum gravity such as string theory, black hole physics and doubly special relativity theories (DSR), on the area law of the entropy. This leads to a $\\sqrt{Area}$-type correction to the area law of entropy which imply that the number of bits $N$ is modified. Therefore, we obtain a modified Newton's law of gravitation. Surprisingly, this modification agrees with different sign with the prediction of Randall-Sundrum II model which contains one uncompactified extra dimension. Furthermore, such modification may have observable consequences at length scales much larger than the Planck scale.

  9. Influence of an anomalous dimension effect on thermal instability in amorphous-InGaZnO thin-film transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Kuan-Hsien; Chou, Wu-Ching, E-mail: tcchang3708@gmail.com, E-mail: wuchingchou@mail.nctu.edu.tw [Department of Electrophysics, National Chiao Tung University, Hsin-chu 300, Taiwan (China); Chang, Ting-Chang, E-mail: tcchang3708@gmail.com, E-mail: wuchingchou@mail.nctu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 804, Taiwan (China); Advanced Optoelectronics Technology Center, National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan (China); Chen, Hua-Mao; Tai, Ya-Hsiang [Department of Photonics and Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsin-chu 300, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Ming-Yen; Hung, Pei-Hua; Chu, Ann-Kuo [Department of Photonics, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 804, Taiwan (China); Wu, Ming-Siou; Hung, Yi-Syuan [Department of Electronics Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsin-Chu 300, Taiwan (China); Hsieh, Tien-Yu [Department of Physics, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 804, Taiwan (China); Yeh, Bo-Liang [Advanced Display Technology Research Center, AU Optronics, No.1, Li-Hsin Rd. 2, Hsinchu Science Park, Hsin-Chu 30078, Taiwan (China)

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper investigates abnormal dimension-dependent thermal instability in amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistors. Device dimension should theoretically have no effects on threshold voltage, except for in short channel devices. Unlike short channel drain-induced source barrier lowering effect, threshold voltage increases with increasing drain voltage. Furthermore, for devices with either a relatively large channel width or a short channel length, the output drain current decreases instead of saturating with an increase in drain voltage. Moreover, the wider the channel and the shorter the channel length, the larger the threshold voltage and output on-state current degradation that is observed. Because of the surrounding oxide and other thermal insulating material and the low thermal conductivity of the IGZO layer, the self-heating effect will be pronounced in wider/shorter channel length devices and those with a larger operating drain bias. To further clarify the physical mechanism, fast I{sub D}-V{sub G} and modulated peak/base pulse time I{sub D}-V{sub D} measurements are utilized to demonstrate the self-heating induced anomalous dimension-dependent threshold voltage variation and on-state current degradation.

  10. Sighting optics including an optical element having a first focal length and a second focal length and methods for sighting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crandall, David Lynn

    2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Sighting optics include a front sight and a rear sight positioned in a spaced-apart relation. The rear sight includes an optical element having a first focal length and a second focal length. The first focal length is selected so that it is about equal to a distance separating the optical element and the front sight and the second focal length is selected so that it is about equal to a target distance. The optical element thus brings into simultaneous focus for a user images of the front sight and the target.

  11. Department of Engineering Technology Technology Education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bieber, Michael

    Department of Engineering Technology Technology Education A Teacher Education Program New Jersey Institute of Technology #12;WHAT WILL YOU LEARN? Technology teachers teach problem-based learning utilizing math, science and technology principles. Technological studies involve students: · Designing

  12. A Study of Query Length Avi Arampatzis1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arampatzis, Avi

    length, and fit power-law and Poisson distribu- tions to four different query sets. We provide and a power-law distribution for longer queries, that better fits real query length distributions than earlier proposals. Categories and Subject Descriptors: H.3 [Information Storage and Re- trieval]: H.3.3 Information

  13. On Termination and Derivation Lengths for Ground Rewrite Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giesl, Juergen

    On Termination and Derivation Lengths for Ground Rewrite Systems Dieter Hofbauer 1 Universit¨at GH@theory.informatik.uni­kassel.de Abstract. It is shown that for terminating ground term rewrite systems the length of derivations a suitable interpretation into the natural numbers. Terminating ground systems are not necessarily

  14. Scaling Behavior and Equilibrium Lengths of Knotted Polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bigelow, Stephen

    Scaling Behavior and Equilibrium Lengths of Knotted Polymers Eric Rawdon Akos Dobay John C. Kern numerical simulations to investigate how the chain length and topology of freely fluctuating knotted polymer of a characteristic changes with the chain size and how this change depends on the topology of the modeled polymers

  15. Distributed Energy Technology Characterization (Desiccant Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Characterization (Desiccant Technologies), January 2004 Distributed Energy Technology Characterization (Desiccant Technologies), January 2004 The purpose of this report is to...

  16. Geometrically induced magnetic catalysis and critical dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonino Flachi; Kenji Fukushima; Vincenzo Vitagliano

    2015-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the combined effect of magnetic fields and geometry in interacting fermionic systems. At leading order in the heat-kernel expansion, the infrared singularity (that in flat space leads to the magnetic catalysis) is regulated by the chiral gap effect and the catalysis is deactivated by effect of the curvature. We discover that an infrared singularity may reappear from higher-order terms in the heat kernel expansion leading to a novel form of geometrically induced magnetic catalysis (absent in flat space). The dynamical mass squared is then modified not only due to the chiral gap effect by an amount proportional to the curvature, but also by a magnetic shift $\\propto (4-D)eB$ where $D$ represents the number of space-time dimensions. We argue that $D=4$ is a critical dimension across which the behaviour of the magnetic shift changes qualitatively.

  17. Geometrically induced magnetic catalysis and critical dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flachi, Antonino; Vitagliano, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the combined effect of magnetic fields and geometry in interacting fermionic systems. At leading order in the heat-kernel expansion, the infrared singularity (that in flat space leads to the magnetic catalysis) is regulated by the chiral gap effect and the catalysis is deactivated by effect of the curvature. We discover that an infrared singularity may reappear from higher-order terms in the heat kernel expansion leading to a novel form of geometrically induced magnetic catalysis (absent in flat space). The dynamical mass squared is then modified not only due to the chiral gap effect by an amount proportional to the curvature, but also by a magnetic shift $\\propto (4-D)eB$ where $D$ represents the number of space-time dimensions. We argue that $D=4$ is a critical dimension across which the behaviour of the magnetic shift changes qualitatively.

  18. Geometrically induced magnetic catalysis and critical dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonino Flachi; Kenji Fukushima; Vincenzo Vitagliano

    2015-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the combined effect of magnetic fields and geometry in interacting fermionic systems. At leading order in the heat-kernel expansion, the infrared singularity (that in flat space leads to the magnetic catalysis) is regulated by the chiral gap effect, and the catalysis is deactivated by the effect of the scalar curvature. We discover that an infrared singularity is found in higher-order terms that mix the magnetic field with curvature, and these lead to a novel form of geometrically induced magnetic catalysis. The dynamical mass squared is then modified not only due to the chiral gap effect by an amount proportional to the curvature, but also by a magnetic shift $\\propto (4-D)eB$, where $D$ represents the number of space-time dimensions. We argue that $D=4$ is a critical dimension across which the behavior of the magnetic shift changes qualitatively.

  19. M(atrix)-Theory in Various Dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Berenstein; Richard Corrado

    1997-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate the precise numerical correspondence between long range scattering of supergravitons and membranes in supergravity in the infinite momentum frame and in M(atrix)-Theory, both in 11 dimensions and for toroidal compactifications. We also identify wrapped membranes in terms of topological invariants of the vector bundles associated to the field theory description of compactified M(atrix)-Theory. We use these results to check the realization of T-duality in M(atrix)-Theory.

  20. Codes and Supersymmetry in One Dimension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. F. Doran; M. G. Faux; S. J. Gates Jr.; T. Hübsch; K. M. Iga; G. D. Landweber; R. L. Miller

    2011-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Adinkras are diagrams that describe many useful supermultiplets in D=1 dimensions. We show that the topology of the Adinkra is uniquely determined by a doubly even code. Conversely, every doubly even code produces a possible topology of an Adinkra. A computation of doubly even codes results in an enumeration of these Adinkra topologies up to N=28, and for minimal supermultiplets, up to N=32.

  1. Effective Fractal Dimension in Computational Complexity and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    have: ­ computable by a finite automata dimFS ­ computable in polynomial time dimp ­ computable? E= DTIME(2n) DENSE= { L | n |Ln|>2n } dimp(E)=1 #12;Density of hard sets The p-dimension of sets-Hitchcock 2011] #12;Density of hard sets 1. Abundance result (dimp(E)=1) Most sets in E do not reduce to nondense

  2. PACKING DIMENSIONS, TRANSVERSAL MAPPINGS AND GEODESIC FLOWS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jyväskylä, University of

    result for the packing dimension, dimp, of projected measures. They showed that if µ is a finite Borel measure on Rn , then (1.1) dimp PV µ = dimm µ for almost all V G(n, m), where dimm µ is a packing is the same for almost all projections, but it may happen that dimm µ dimp µ. The above results are "almost

  3. Dimensional reduction without continuous extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chamseddine, Ali H. [American University of Beirut, Physics Department, Beirut, Lebanon and I.H.E.S. F-91440 Bures-sur-Yvette (France)] [American University of Beirut, Physics Department, Beirut, Lebanon and I.H.E.S. F-91440 Bures-sur-Yvette (France); Froehlich, J.; Schubnel, B. [ETHZ, Mathematics and Physics Departments, Zuerich (Switzerland)] [ETHZ, Mathematics and Physics Departments, Zuerich (Switzerland); Wyler, D. [Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of Zuerich (Switzerland)] [Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a novel approach to dimensional reduction in classical field theory. Inspired by ideas from noncommutative geometry, we introduce extended algebras of differential forms over space-time, generalized exterior derivatives, and generalized connections associated with the 'geometry' of space-times with discrete extra dimensions. We apply our formalism to theories of gauge- and gravitational fields and find natural geometrical origins for an axion- and a dilaton field, as well as a Higgs field.

  4. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2014 Electric Drive Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electric Drive Technologies Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2014 Electric Drive Technologies Annual Progress Report The Electric Drive Technologies research and...

  5. EINDHOVEN UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY Department of Mathematics and Computer Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

    EINDHOVEN UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY Department of Mathematics and Computer Science CASA-Report 14 and Applications Department of Mathematics and Computer Science Eindhoven University of Technology P.O. Box 513 5600 MB Eindhoven, The Netherlands ISSN: 0926-4507 #12;#12;HOMOGENIZATION AND DIMENSION REDUCTION

  6. Noncommutative Inspired Black Holes in Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rizzo, Thomas G.

    2006-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In a recent string theory motivated paper, Nicolini, Smailagic and Spallucci (NSS) presented an interesting model for a noncommutative inspired, Schwarzschild-like black hole solution in 4-dimensions. The essential effect of having noncommutative co-ordinates in this approach is to smear out matter distributions on a scale associated with the turn-on of noncommutativity which was taken to be near the 4-d Planck mass. In particular, NSS assumed that this smearing was essentially Gaussian. This energy scale is sufficiently large that in 4-d such effects may remain invisible indefinitely. Extra dimensional models which attempt to address the gauge hierarchy problem, however, allow for the possibility that the effective fundamental scale may not be far from {approx} 1 TeV, an energy regime that will soon be probed by experiments at both the LHC and ILC. In this paper we generalize the NSS model to the case where flat, toroidally compactified extra dimensions are accessible at the TeV-scale and examine the resulting modifications in black hole properties due to the existence of noncommutativity. We show that while many of the noncommutativity-induced black hole features found in 4-d by NSS persist, in some cases there can be significant modifications due the presence of extra dimensions. We also demonstrate that the essential features of this approach are not particularly sensitive to the Gaussian nature of the smearing assumed by NSS.

  7. Why we live in 3 Dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlos Castro; Alex Granik; M. S. El Naschie

    2000-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A Cantorian fractal spacetime, a family member of von Neumann's noncommutative geometry is introduced as a geometry underlying a new relativity theory which is similar to the relation between general relativity and Riemannian geometry. Based on this model and the new relativity theory an ensemble distribution of all the dimensions of quantum spacetime is derived with the help of Fermat grand theorem. The calculated average dimension is very close to the value of $4+\\phi^3 $ (where $\\phi$ is the golden mean) obtained by El Naschie on the basis of a different approach. It is shown that within the framework of the new relativity the cosmological constant problem is nonexistent, since the Universe self-organizes and self-tunes according to the renormalization group (RG) flow with respect to a local scaling microscopic arrow of time. This implies that the world emerged as a result of a non-equilibrium process of self-organized critical phenomena launched by vacuum fluctuations in Cantorian fractal spacetime $\\cal E^{\\infty}$. It is shown that we are living in a metastable vacuum and are moving towards a fixed point ($ D$ = 4+$\\phi^3$) of the RG. After reaching this point, a new phase transition will drive the universe to a quasi-crystal phase of the lower average dimension of $\\phi^3$.

  8. Portable 543 nm length standard and magnetic-induced zero-crossing shift on length standard transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shy,Jow-Tsong

    a convenient and objective length standard for use in both academic and industrial applications. Ever since the ve- locity of light in a vacuum was defined as 299 792 458 m/s in 1983,1 atom or molecule of the primary length-standard lasers,16 and some inter- comparisons were held thereafter.11,14 Therefore

  9. DEFORMATION-BASED NONLINEAR DIMENSION REDUCTION: APPLICATIONS TO NUCLEAR MORPHOMETRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon, Geoffrey J.

    DEFORMATION-BASED NONLINEAR DIMENSION REDUCTION: APPLICATIONS TO NUCLEAR MORPHOMETRY Gustavo K, contrary to common intuition, the most likely nuclear shape configuration is not symmetric. Index Terms-- Nuclear shape analysis, nonlinear, dimension reduction, image registration. 1. INTRODUCTION Under

  10. Adena Rissman Assistant Professor, Human Dimensions of Ecosystem Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Adena Rissman Assistant Professor, Human Dimensions of Ecosystem Management Department of Forest Professor: 2009-present Human Dimensions of Ecosystem Management Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology, Integrative Graduate Education and Research Training (IGERT). "Novel ecosystems, rapid change, and no

  11. Technology '90

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories have a long history of excellence in performing research and development in a number of areas, including the basic sciences, applied-energy technology, and weapons-related technology. Although technology transfer has always been an element of DOE and laboratory activities, it has received increasing emphasis in recent years as US industrial competitiveness has eroded and efforts have increased to better utilize the research and development resources the laboratories provide. This document, Technology '90, is the latest in a series that is intended to communicate some of the many opportunities available for US industry and universities to work with the DOE and its laboratories in the vital activity of improving technology transfer to meet national needs. Technology '90 is divided into three sections: Overview, Technologies, and Laboratories. The Overview section describes the activities and accomplishments of the DOE research and development program offices. The Technologies section provides descriptions of new technologies developed at the DOE laboratories. The Laboratories section presents information on the missions, programs, and facilities of each laboratory, along with a name and telephone number of a technology transfer contact for additional information. Separate papers were prepared for appropriate sections of this report.

  12. Splitting a Complex of Convex Polytopes In Any Dimension*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    ]. The main contributions of this approach atw (i) it c,an be applied to polyhedral complexes of any dimension

  13. Dimension two vacuum condensates in gauge-invariant theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. V. Bykov; A. A. Slavnov

    2005-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Gauge dependence of the dimension two condensate in Abelian and non-Abelian Yang-Mills theory is investigated.

  14. FRACTAL DIMENSION ESTIMATION: EMPIRICAL MODE DECOMPOSITION VERSUS WAVELETS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonçalves, Paulo

    FRACTAL DIMENSION ESTIMATION: EMPIRICAL MODE DECOMPOSITION VERSUS WAVELETS Paulo Gonc¸alves INRIA, France. {firstname.lastname}@ens-lyon.fr ABSTRACT We address the problem of fractal dimension estimation motions. Index Terms-- fractal dimension, regularity exponents, wavelet transform, EMD 1. MOTIVATION

  15. On the fractal dimension of the Duffing attractor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mariusz Tarnopolski

    2014-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The box counting dimension $d_C$ and the correlation dimension $d_G$ change with the number of numerically generated points forming the attractor. At a sufficiently large number of points the fractal dimension tends to a finite value. The obtained values are $d_C\\approx 1.43$ and $d_G\\approx 1.38$.

  16. Generalized dimensions of images of measures under Gaussian processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falconer, Kenneth

    ). The corresponding question for packing dimension dimP, where dimensions of images of sets can behave in a more Brownian motion, dimP X(E) = dimd P E a.s., where dims P E is the `packing dimension profile' of E

  17. Exploiting Universality in Atoms with Large Scattering Lengths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braaten, Eric

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this research project was atoms with scattering lengths that are large compared to the range of their interactions and which therefore exhibit universal behavior at sufficiently low energies. Recent dramatic advances in cooling atoms and in manipulating their scattering lengths have made this phenomenon of practical importance for controlling ultracold atoms and molecules. This research project was aimed at developing a systematically improvable method for calculating few-body observables for atoms with large scattering lengths starting from the universal results as a first approximation. Significant progress towards this goal was made during the five years of the project.

  18. Hydrogen atom in momentum space with a minimal length

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Djamil Bouaziz; Nourredine Ferkous

    2010-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A momentum representation treatment of the hydrogen atom problem with a generalized uncertainty relation,which leads to a minimal length ({\\Delta}X_{i})_{min}= \\hbar \\sqrt(3{\\beta}+{\\beta}'), is presented. We show that the distance squared operator can be factorized in the case {\\beta}'=2{\\beta}. We analytically solve the s-wave bound-state equation. The leading correction to the energy spectrum caused by the minimal length depends on \\sqrt{\\beta}. An upper bound for the minimal length is found to be about 10^{-9} fm.

  19. Inflationary universe in the presence of a minimal measurable length

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Mohammadi; Ahmed Farag Ali; T. Golanbari; A. Aghamohammadi; Kh. Saaidi; Mir Faizal

    2015-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we will study the effect of having a minimum measurable length on inflationary cosmology. We will analyse the inflationary cosmology in the Jacobson approach. In this approach, gravity is viewed as an emergent thermodynamical phenomena. We will demonstrate that the existence of a minimum measurable length will modify the Friedmann equations in the Jacobson approach. We will use this modified Friedmann equation to analyse the effect of minimum measurable length scale on inflationary cosmology. This analysis will be performed using the Hamiltonian-Jacobi approach. We compare our results to recent data, and find that our model may agree with the recent data.

  20. Inflationary universe in the presence of a minimal measurable length

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohammadi, A; Golanbari, T; Aghamohammadi, A; Saaidi, Kh; Faizal, Mir

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we will study the effect of having a minimum measurable length on inflationary cosmology. We will analyse the inflationary cosmology in the Jacobson approach. In this approach, gravity is viewed as an emergent thermodynamical phenomena. We will demonstrate that the existence of a minimum measurable length will modify the Friedmann equations in the Jacobson approach. We will use this modified Friedmann equation to analyse the effect of minimum measurable length scale on inflationary cosmology. This analysis will be performed using the Hamiltonian-Jacobi approach. We compare our results to recent data, and find that our model may agree with the recent data.

  1. A coarse entropy-rigidity theorem and discrete length-volume inequalities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinneberg, Kyle Edward

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A discrete length-volume inequality . . . . . . . .v 3 Length-volume inequalities revisitedlength-volume inequality for cubes . . . . . . . . . . . .

  2. Laying technological groundwork for Templated Assembly by Selective Removal (TASR) at biological length scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agarwal, Gunjan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work presents the size-selective sorting of biological cells using the assembly process known as Templated Assembly by Selective Removal (TASR). This research has demonstrated experimentally, for the first time, the ...

  3. FEL GAIN LENGTH AND TAPER MEASUREMENTS AT LCLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ratner, D.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    taper mea- surements from LCLS. We ?nd gain lengths of ? 2.9AND TAPER MEASUREMENTS AT LCLS ? D. Ratner † , A. Brachmann,et al. , First Results of the LCLS Laser-Heater Sys- tem,

  4. amyloid fibril length: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Intrinsic Linear Heterogeneity of Amyloid Beta Protein Fibrils Revealed by Higher Resolution Mass-per-length Determinations* Chemistry...

  5. Formation lengths of hadrons in lepto-production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levon Grigoryan

    2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The average formation lengths of the hadrons produced during the deep inelastic scattering (DIS) of leptons on protons are studied in the framework of the symmetric Lund model. It is shown that these formation lengths essentially depend on the electric charges of the hadron. For electro-production and charged current (CC) neutrino-production, the average formation lengths of positively charged particles are larger than those of negatively charged antiparticles. This situation is reversed for CC antineutrino-production. In all the mentioned cases, the main mechanism is the direct production of hadrons. The additional mechanism of hadron production, through the decay of resonances, is essential only for pions and leads to a decrease in the average formation lengths.

  6. Applying Vocal Tract Length Normalization to Meeting Recordings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garau, Giulia; Renals, Steve; Hain, Thomas

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vocal Tract Length Normalisation (VTLN) is a commonly used technique to normalise for inter-speaker variability. It is based on the speaker-specific warping of the frequency axis, parameterised by a scalar warp factor. ...

  7. Inferring the Rate-Length Law of Protein Folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lane, Thomas J

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the rate-length scaling law of protein folding, a key undetermined scaling law in the analytical theory of protein folding. We demonstrate that chain length is a dominant factor determining folding times, and that the unambiguous determination of the way chain length corre- lates with folding times could provide key mechanistic insight into the folding process. Four specific proposed laws (power law, exponential, and two stretched exponentials) are tested against one an- other, and it is found that the power law best explains the data. At the same time, the fit power law results in rates that are very fast, nearly unreasonably so in a biological context. We show that any of the proposed forms are viable, conclude that more data is necessary to unequivocally infer the rate-length law, and that such data could be obtained through a small number of protein folding experiments on large protein domains.

  8. FEL GAIN LENGTH AND TAPER MEASUREMENTS AT LCLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ratner, D.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    more than double the coherent, FEL power over the satura-FEL GAIN LENGTH AND TAPER MEASUREMENTS AT LCLS ? D.Figure 11: Post-saturation FEL pulse energy for a taper with

  9. atomic scattering length: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Atomic-Molecular Condensates with Large Positive Scattering Length Nuclear Theory (arXiv) Summary: We show that...

  10. Fractal Dimension for Fractal Structures: A Hausdorff Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. A. Sánchez-Granero; Manuel Fernández-Martínez

    2010-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides a new model to compute the fractal dimension of a subset on a generalized-fractal space. Recall that fractal structures are a perfect place where a new definition of fractal dimension can be given, so we perform a suitable discretization of the Hausdorff theory of fractal dimension. We also find some connections between our definition and the classical ones and also with fractal dimensions I & II (see http://arxiv.org/submit/0080421/pdf). Therefore, we generalize them and obtain an easy method in order to calculate the fractal dimension of strict self-similar sets which are not required to verify the open set condition.

  11. NONLINEAR MODELS IN 2 +{epsilon} DIMENSIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedan, D.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A generalization of the nonlinear ~ model is considered. The field takes values in a compact manifold M and the coupling is determined by a Riemannian metric on H. The model is renormalizable in 2 + ~ dimensions, the renormalization group acting on the infinite dimensional space of Riemannian metrics. Topological properties of the p-function and solutions of the fixed point equation R{sub ij}-?g{sub ij}=?{sub i}v{sub j}+?{sub j}v{sub i}, ?=±1 or 0, are discussed.

  12. Interacting spin-2 fields in three dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Afshar, Hamid R; Merbis, Wout

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the frame formulation of multi-gravity in three dimensions, we show that demanding the presence of secondary constraints which remove the Boulware-Deser ghosts restricts the possible interaction terms of the theory and identifies invertible frame field combinations whose effective metric may consistently couple to matter. The resulting ghost-free theories can be represented by theory graphs which are trees. In the case of three frame fields, we explicitly show that the requirement of positive masses and energies for the bulk spin-2 modes in AdS$_3$ is consistent with a positive central charge for the putative dual CFT$_2$.

  13. Interacting spin-2 fields in three dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamid R. Afshar; Eric A. Bergshoeff; Wout Merbis

    2015-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the frame formulation of multi-gravity in three dimensions, we show that demanding the presence of secondary constraints which remove the Boulware-Deser ghosts restricts the possible interaction terms of the theory and identifies invertible frame field combinations whose effective metric may consistently couple to matter. The resulting ghost-free theories can be represented by theory graphs which are trees. In the case of three frame fields, we explicitly show that the requirement of positive masses and energies for the bulk spin-2 modes in AdS$_3$ is consistent with a positive central charge for the putative dual CFT$_2$.

  14. DIMENSIONS of DISCOVERY Sponsored Program Awards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    construction & management technology, from Mezzetta Construction Services, $634,287, "IHCDA Home Energy of Egypt,$10,000,"09/10 Em- bassy ofArab Republic of Egypt Government." Borch, Richard F; medicinal

  15. Hydrogen-atom spectrum under a minimal-length hypothesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandor Benczik; Lay Nam Chang; Djordje Minic; Tatsu Takeuchi

    2005-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy spectrum of the Coulomb potential with minimal length commutation relations $[X_i, P_j] = i\\hbar\\{\\delta_{ij}(1+\\beta P^2) + \\beta'P_iP_j\\}$ is determined both numerically and perturbatively for arbitrary values of $\\beta'/\\beta$ and angular momenta $\\ell$. The constraint on the minimal length scale from precision hydrogen spectroscopy data is of order of a few GeV$\

  16. Antenna mechanism of length control of actin cables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lishibanya Mohapatra; Bruce L. Goode; Jane Kondev

    2015-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Actin cables are linear cytoskeletal structures that serve as tracks for myosin-based intracellular transport of vesicles and organelles in both yeast and mammalian cells. In a yeast cell undergoing budding, cables are in constant dynamic turnover yet some cables grow from the bud neck toward the back of the mother cell until their length roughly equals the diameter of the mother cell. This raises the question: how is the length of these cables controlled? Here we describe a novel molecular mechanism for cable length control inspired by recent experimental observations in cells. This antenna mechanism involves three key proteins: formins, which polymerize actin, Smy1 proteins, which bind formins and inhibit actin polymerization, and myosin motors, which deliver Smy1 to formins, leading to a length-dependent actin polymerization rate. We compute the probability distribution of cable lengths as a function of several experimentally tuneable parameters such as the formin-binding affinity of Smy1 and the concentration of myosin motors delivering Smy1. These results provide testable predictions of the antenna mechanism of actin-cable length control.

  17. ECH Technology Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Temkin, Richard [MIT

    2014-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH) is needed for plasma heating, current drive, plasma stability control, and other applications in fusion energy sciences research. The program of fusion energy sciences supported by U. S. DOE, Office of Science, Fusion Energy Sciences relies on the development of ECH technology to meet the needs of several plasma devices working at the frontier of fusion energy sciences research. The largest operating ECH system in the world is at DIII-D, consisting of six 1 MW, 110 GHz gyrotrons capable of ten second pulsed operation, plus two newer gyrotrons. The ECH Technology Development research program investigated the options for upgrading the DIII-D 110 GHz ECH system. Options included extending present-day 1 MW technology to 1.3 – 1.5 MW power levels or developing an entirely new approach to achieve up to 2 MW of power per gyrotron. The research consisted of theoretical research and designs conducted by Communication and Power Industries of Palo Alto, CA working with MIT. Results of the study would be validated in a later phase by research on short pulse length gyrotrons at MIT and long pulse / cw gyrotrons in industry. This research follows a highly successful program of development that has led to the highly reliable, six megawatt ECH system at the DIII-D tokamak. Eventually, gyrotrons at the 1.5 megawatt to multi-megawatt power level will be needed for heating and current drive in large scale plasmas including ITER and DEMO.

  18. The Local Dimension: a method to quantify the Cosmic Web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prakash Sarkar; Somnath Bharadwaj

    2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    It is now well accepted that the galaxies are distributed in filaments, sheets and clusters all of which form an interconnected network known as the Cosmic Web. It is a big challenge to quantify the shapes of the interconnected structural elements that form this network. Tools like the Minkowski functionals which use global properties, though well suited for an isolated object like a single sheet or filament, are not suited for an interconnected network of such objects. We consider the Local Dimension $D$, defined through $N(R)=A R^D$, where $N(R)$ is the galaxy number count within a sphere of comoving radius $R$ centered on a particular galaxy, as a tool to locally quantify the shape in the neigbourhood of different galaxies along the Cosmic Web. We expect $D \\sim 1,2$ and 3 for a galaxy located in a filament, sheet and cluster respectively. Using LCDM N-body simulations we find that it is possible to determine $D$ through a power law fit to $N(R)$ across the length-scales 2 to $10 {\\rm Mpc}$ for $\\sim 33 %$ of the galaxies. We have visually identified the filaments and sheets corresponding to many of the galaxies with $D \\sim 1$ and 2 respectively. In several other situations the structure responsible for the $D$ value could not be visually identified, either due to its being tenuous or due to other dominating structures in the vicinity. We also show that the global distribution of the $D$ values can be used to visualize and interpret how the different structural elements are woven into the Cosmic Web.

  19. Shape Dynamics in 2+1 Dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timothy Budd; Tim Koslowski

    2011-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Shape Dynamics is a formulation of General Relativity where refoliation invariance is traded for local spatial conformal invariance. In this paper we explicitly construct Shape Dynamics for a torus universe in 2+1 dimensions through a linking gauge theory that ensures dynamical equivalence with General Relativity. The Hamiltonian we obtain is formally a reduced phase space Hamiltonian. The construction of the Shape Dynamics Hamiltonian on higher genus surfaces is not explicitly possible, but we give an explicit expansion of the Shape Dynamics Hamiltonian for large CMC volume. The fact that all local constraints are linear in momenta allows us to quantize these explicitly, and the quantization problem for Shape Dynamics turns out to be equivalent to reduced phase space quantization. We consider the large CMC-volume asymptotics of conformal transformations of the wave function. We then use the similarity of Shape Dynamics on the 2-torus with the explicitly constructible strong gravity (BKL) Shape Dynamics Hamiltonian in higher dimensions to suggest a quantization strategy for Shape Dynamics.

  20. Physical Vacuum Properties and Internal Space Dimension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. V. Gorbatenko; A. V. Pushkin

    2004-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper addresses matrix spaces, whose properties and dynamics are determined by Dirac matrices in Riemannian spaces of different dimension and signature. Among all Dirac matrix systems there are such ones, which nontrivial scalar, vector or other tensors cannot be made up from. These Dirac matrix systems are associated with the vacuum state of the matrix space. The simplest vacuum system realization can be ensured using the orthonormal basis in the internal matrix space. This vacuum system realization is not however unique. The case of 7-dimensional Riemannian space of signature 7(-) is considered in detail. In this case two basically different vacuum system realizations are possible: (1) with using the orthonormal basis; (2) with using the oblique-angled basis, whose base vectors coincide with the simple roots of algebra E_{8}. Considerations are presented, from which it follows that the least-dimension space bearing on physics is the Riemannian 11-dimensional space of signature 1(-)& 10(+). The considerations consist in the condition of maximum vacuum energy density and vacuum fluctuation energy density.

  1. Quantum critical metals in $4-?$ dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalo Torroba; Huajia Wang

    2014-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the quantum theory of a Fermi surface coupled to a gapless boson scalar in $D=4-\\epsilon$ spacetime dimensions as a simple model for non-Fermi liquids (NFL) near a quantum phase transition. Our analysis takes into account the full backreaction from Landau damping of the boson, and obtains an RG flow that proceeds through three distinct stages. Above the scale of Landau damping the Fermi velocity flows to zero, while the coupling evolves according to its classical dimension. Once damping becomes important, its backreaction leads to a crossover regime where dynamic and static damping effects compete and the fermion self-energy does not respect scaling. Below this crossover and having tuned the boson to criticality, the theory flows to a $z=3$ scalar interacting with a NFL. By increasing the number of bosonic flavors, the phase diagram near the quantum critical point interpolates between a superconducting dome fully covering the NFL behavior, and a phase where NFL effects become important first, before the onset of superconductivity. A generic prediction of the theory is that the Fermi velocity and quasiparticle residue vanish with a power-law $\\omega^\\epsilon$ as the fixed point is approached. These features may be useful for understanding some of the phenomenology of high $T_c$ materials in a systematic $\\epsilon$--expansion.

  2. FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and fuel cells offer great promise for our energy future. Fuel cell vehicles are not yet commercially, such as a hydrogen fueling station or hydrogen fuel cell vehicle. Technology validation does not certify, and the Federal Government to evaluate hydrogen fuel cell vehicle and infrastructure technologies together in real

  3. LPCVD SILICON NITRIDE-ON-SILICON SPACER TECHNOLOGY H. W. van Zeijl, L.K. Nanver

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technische Universiteit Delft

    of obtaining self-aligned sub- lithographic dimensions. In many processes were spacers are applied to separate-etching affects the dimensions of the spacer which could lead to a lack of control over the spacer-related deviceLPCVD SILICON NITRIDE-ON-SILICON SPACER TECHNOLOGY H. W. van Zeijl, L.K. Nanver DIMES Delft

  4. Energy and Technology Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quirk, W.J. [ed.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was established in 1952 to do research on nuclear weapons and magnetic fusion energy. Since then, we other major programs have been added including laser fusion, and laser isotope separation, biomedical and environmental science, strategic defense and applied energy technology. These programs, in turn, require research in basic scientific disciplines, including chemistry and materials science, computer science and technology, engineering and physics. In this issue, Herald Brown, the Laboratory`s third director and now counselor at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, reminisces about his years at Livermore and comments about the Laboratory`s role in the future. Also an article on visualizing dynamic systems in three dimensions is presented. Researchers can use our interactive algorithms to translate massive quantities of numerical data into visual form and can assign the visual markers of their choice to represent three- dimensional phenomena in a two-dimensional setting, such as a monitor screen. Major work has been done in the visualization of climate modeling, but the algorithms can be used for visualizing virtually any phenomena.

  5. Feedback Mechanism for Microtubule Length Regulation by Stathmin Gradients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maria Zeitz; Jan Kierfeld

    2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We formulate and analyze a theoretical model for the regulation of microtubule (MT) polymerization dynamics by the signaling proteins Rac1 and stathmin. In cells, the MT growth rate is inhibited by cytosolic stathmin, which, in turn, is inactivated by Rac1. Growing MTs activate Rac1 at the cell edge, which closes a positive feedback loop. We investigate both tubulin sequestering and catastrophe promotion as mechanisms for MT growth inhibition by stathmin. For a homogeneous stathmin concentration in the absence of Rac1, we find a switch-like regulation of the MT mean length by stathmin. For constitutively active Rac1 at the cell edge, stathmin is deactivated locally, which establishes a spatial gradient of active stathmin. In this gradient, we find a stationary bimodal MT length distributions for both mechanisms of MT growth inhibition by stathmin. One subpopulation of the bimodal length distribution can be identified with fast growing and long pioneering MTs in the region near the cell edge, which have been observed experimentally. The feedback loop is closed through Rac1 activation by MTs. For tubulin sequestering by stathmin, this establishes a bistable switch with two stable states: one stable state corresponds to upregulated MT mean length and bimodal MT length distributions, i.e., pioneering MTs; the other stable state corresponds to an interrupted feedback with short MTs. Stochastic effects as well as external perturbations can trigger switching events. For catastrophe promoting stathmin we do not find bistability.

  6. Extra dimensions, orthopositronium decay, and stellar cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Friedland; Maurizio Giannotti

    2007-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In a class of extra dimensional models with a warped metric and a single brane the photon can be localized on the brane by gravity only. An intriguing feature of these models is the possibility of the photon escaping into the extra dimensions. The search for this effect has motivated the present round of precision orthopositronium decay experiments. We point out that in this framework a photon in plasma should be metastable. We consider the astrophysical consequences of this observation, in particular, what it implies for the plasmon decay rate in globular cluster stars and for the core-collapse supernova cooling rate. The resulting bounds on the model parameter exceed the possible reach of orthopositronium experiments by many orders of magnitude.

  7. Solar Energy Generation in Three Dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernardi, Marco; Wan, Jin H; Villalon, Rachelle; Grossman, Jeffrey C

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optimizing the conversion of solar energy to electricity is central to the World's future energy economy. Flat photovoltaic panels are commonly deployed in residential and commercial rooftop installations without sun tracking systems and using simple installation guidelines to optimize solar energy collection. Large-scale solar energy generation plants use bulky and expensive sun trackers to avoid cosine losses from photovoltaic panels or to concentrate sunlight with mirrors onto heating fluids.[1,2] However, none of these systems take advantage of the three-dimensional nature of our biosphere, so that solar energy collection largely occurs on flat structures in contrast with what is commonly observed in Nature.[3,4] Here we formulate, solve computationally and study experimentally the problem of collecting solar energy in three-dimensions.[5] We demonstrate that absorbers and reflectors can be combined in the absence of sun tracking to build three-dimensional photovoltaic (3DPV) structures that can generate ...

  8. Improved Bounds on Universal Extra Dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Flacke

    2006-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on recent constraints on models with a flat ``universal'' extra dimension in which all Standard Model fields propagate in the bulk. A significantly improved constraint on the compactification scale is obtained from the extended set of electroweak precision observables accurately measured at LEP1 and LEP2. We find a lower bound of 1/R > 700 (800) GeV at the 99% (95%) confidence level. Comparison of this constraint with the relic density of Kaluza-Klein dark matter for the Minimal UED model points towards the necessity of including non-minimal boundary terms which motivates studying alternative Kaluza-Klein dark matter candidates. Results for the one-loop induced magnetic dipole moment for Kaluza-Klein neutrino dark matter are presented. This talk is based on Phys.Rev.D73:095002,2006 and hep-ph/0601161.

  9. Self-consistent bounces in two dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baacke, Juergen; Kevlishvili, Nina [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Dortmund, D-44221 Dortmund (Germany)

    2005-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute bounce solutions describing false vacuum decay in a {phi}{sup 4} model in two dimensions in the Hartree approximation, thus going beyond the usual one-loop corrections to the decay rate. We use zero energy mode functions of the fluctuation operator for the numerical computation of the functional determinant and the Green's function. We thus avoid the necessity of discretizing the spectrum, as it is necessary when one uses numerical techniques based on eigenfunctions. Regularization is performed in analogy of standard perturbation theory; the renormalization of the Hartree approximation is based on the two-particle point-irreducible scheme. The iteration towards the self-consistent solution is found to converge for some range of the parameters. Within this range we find the corrections to the leading one-loop approximation to be relatively small, not exceeding 1 order of magnitude in the total transition rate.

  10. Kaonic hydrogen atom and kaon-proton scattering length

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Yan

    2009-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Kaonic hydrogen is studied with various realistic potentials in an accurate numerical approach based on Sturmian functions. The kaon-proton scattering length extracted from the 1s energy shift of the kaonic hydrogen by applying the Deser-Trueman formula is severely inconsistent with the one derived by directly solving the scattering Schoedinger equation. We pay special attention to the recent measurement of the energy shift and decay width of the 1s kaonic hydrogen state by the DEAR Collaboration. After taking into account the large discrepancy between the extracted and directly-evaluated scattering lengths, we found theoretical predictions of most chiral SU(3) based models for the kaonic hydrogen decay width are consistent with the DEAR data. We warn the SIDDHARTA collaboration that it may not be reasonable to extract kaon-nucleon scattering lengths, by using the Coulomb-interaction corrected Deser-Truemab formula, from the planned measurement of kaonic hydrogen.

  11. Critical Waves and the Length Problem of Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, R B

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is pointed out that the mystery of how biological systems measure their lengths vanishes away if one premises that they have discovered a way to generate linear waves analogous to compressional sound. These can be used to detect length at either large or small scales using echo timing and fringe counting. It is shown that suitable linear chemical potential waves can, in fact, be manufactured by tuning to criticality conventional reaction-diffusion with a small number substances. Min oscillations in E. coli are cited as precedent resonant length measurement using chemical potential waves analogous to laser detection. Mitotic structures in eucaryotes are identified as candidates for such an effect at higher frequency. The engineering principle is shown to be very general and functionally the same as that used by hearing organs. PNAS Significance Statement: This paper invokes physical principles to address the question of how living things might use reaction-diffusion to measure out and regulate the many thou...

  12. Pumping current of a Luttinger liquid with finite length

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sebastián Franchino Vińas; Pablo Pisani; Mariano Salvay

    2012-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We study transport properties in a Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid in the presence of two time-dependent point like weak impurities, taking into account finite-length effects. By employing analytical methods and performing a perturbation theory, we compute the backscattering pumping current (I_bs) in different regimes which can be established in relation to the oscillatory frequency of the impurities and to the frequency related to the length and the renormalized velocity (by the electron-electron interactions) of the charge density modes. We investigate the role played by the spatial position of the impurity potentials. We also show how the previous infinite length results for I_bs are modified by the finite size of the system.

  13. DIMENSIONS of DISCOVERY Sponsored Program Awards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    ., $18,750, "2014 Plant Population Response of Corn Hybrids." Anderson, William E; aeronautical Millisecond Technologies, Corp, $10,000, "Food Microbiology Research." Barrick, Debra K; cooperative education-Sponsored Account (Purdue Center for Regional Development (PCRD)." Beckerman,JannaL; botany & plant pathol- ogy

  14. DIMENSIONS of DISCOVERY Sponsored Program Awards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    of Numerical Models for the Near- Field Physics of Diesel Sprays with Specific Focus on Flame Lift and Technology) Robotics Program Support Huntington County." Alexeenko, Alina and Topp, Elizabeth M; aeronautical-Abbott Collaboration on Pharmaceutical Freeze- Drying." Anan,MuhammadT; electrical & computer engineering -- Calumet

  15. Constructive Dimension and Weak Truth-Table Degrees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doty, David

    dimension dimH(S) and constructive packing dimension dimP(S) is weak truth-table equivalent to a sequence R with dimH(R) dimH(S)/dimP(S) - , for arbitrary > 0. Furthermore, if dimP(S) > 0, then dimP(R) 1H(S) = dimP(S)) such that dimH(S) > 0, the wtt degree of S has constructive Hausdorff and packing dimension

  16. FEL GAIN LENGTH AND TAPER MEASUREMENTS AT LCLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratner, D.; Fawley, W. M.; Brachmann, A.; Decker, F.J.; Ding, Y.; Dowell, D.; Emma, P.; Frisch, J.; Gilevich, S.; Hays, G.; Hering, P.; Huang, Z.; Loos, H.; Miahnahri, A.; Nuhn, H.D.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; White, W.; Wu, J.; Xiang, D.; Yocky, G.; Fawley, W. M.

    2009-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We present experimental studies of the gain length and saturation power level from 1.5 nm to 1.5 Angstroms at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). By disrupting theFEL process with an orbit kick, we are able to measure the X-ray intensity as a function of undulator length. This kick method is cross-checked with the method of removing undulator sections. We also study the FEL-induced electron energy loss after saturation to determine the optimal taper of the undulator K values. The experimental results are compared to theory and simulations.

  17. Einstein's Dream of Unified Forces - extra dimensions | U.S....

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    hidden? What are the new particles associated with extra dimensions? Through the production of new particles that move in the extra space, the LHC experiments will have direct...

  18. Gauge and Higgs Boson Masses from an Extra Dimension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham Moir; Peter Dziennik; Nikos Irges; Francesco Knechtli; Kyoko Yoneyama

    2014-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We present novel calculations of the mass hierarchy of the $SU(2)$ pure gauge theory on a space-time lattice with an orbifolded fifth dimension. This theory has three parameters; the gauge coupling $\\beta$, the anisotropy $\\gamma$, which is a measure of the ratio of the lattice spacing in the four dimensions to that in the fifth dimension, and the extent of the extra dimension $N_{5}$. Using a large basis of scalar and vector operators we explore in detail the spectrum along the $\\gamma = 1$ line, and for the first time we investigate the spectrum for $\\gamma \

  19. Generalized Klein-Gordon equations in d dimensions from supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bollini, C.G.; Giambiagi, J.J.

    1985-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Wess-Zumino model is extended to higher dimensions, leading to a generalized Klein-Gordon equation whose propagator is computed in configuration space.

  20. K-theoretic rigidity and slow dimension growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Oct 28, 2009 ... In fact, there are no simple separable nuclear stably finite C. ? ... fine locally finite nuclear dimension here; it is enough for us that separable.

  1. Technology Application Centers: Facilitating Technology Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuhel, G. J.

    's approach to technology deployment seeks to blend an industrial customer's priorities with the utility's marketing and customer service objectives. A&C Enercom sees technology deployment as the sum of an equation: technology deployment equals technology...

  2. Proton radius puzzle and large extra dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li-Bang Wang; Wei-Tou Ni

    2013-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a theoretical scenario to solve the proton radius puzzle which recently arises from the muonic hydrogen experiment. In this framework, 4 + n dimensional theory is incorporated with modified gravity. The extra gravitational interaction between the proton and muon at very short range provides an energy shift which accounts for the discrepancy between spectroscopic results from muonic and electronic hydrogen experiments. Assuming the modified gravity is a small perturbation to the existing electromagnetic interaction, we find the puzzle can be solved with stringent constraint on the range of the new force. Our result not only provides a possible solution to the proton radius puzzle but also suggest a direction to test new physics at very small length scale.

  3. FEMP/NTDP Technology Focus New Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FEMP/NTDP Technology Focus New Technology Demonstration Program Technology Focus FEMPFederal Energy Management Program Trends in Energy Management Technology: BCS Integration Technologies ­ Open Communications into a complete EMCIS. The first article [1] covered enabling technologies for emerging energy management systems

  4. Length control of microtubules by depolymerizing motor proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bindu S. Govindan; Manoj Gopalakrishnan; Debashish Chowdhury

    2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In many intracellular processes, the length distribution of microtubules is controlled by depolymerizing motor proteins. Experiments have shown that, following non-specific binding to the surface of a microtubule, depolymerizers are transported to the microtubule tip(s) by diffusion or directed walk and, then, depolymerize the microtubule from the tip(s) after accumulating there. We develop a quantitative model to study the depolymerizing action of such a generic motor protein, and its possible effects on the length distribution of microtubules. We show that, when the motor protein concentration in solution exceeds a critical value, a steady state is reached where the length distribution is, in general, non-monotonic with a single peak. However, for highly processive motors and large motor densities, this distribution effectively becomes an exponential decay. Our findings suggest that such motor proteins may be selectively used by the cell to ensure precise control of MT lengths. The model is also used to analyze experimental observations of motor-induced depolymerization.

  5. Performing local similarity searches with variable length seeds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Csürös, Miklós

    Performing local similarity searches with variable length seeds Mikl´os Csur¨os D´epartement d manner. The algorithm uses a single parameter to control the speed of the similarity search there are many inventions that improve the speed of a full sensitivity search (e.g., [3]), a full-scale search

  6. Reinforcement Learning for Active Length Control of Shape Memory Alloys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valasek, John

    Reinforcement Learning for Active Length Control of Shape Memory Alloys Kenton Kirkpatrick John Valasek Aerospace Engineering Department Texas A&M University AIAA GNC Conference 21 August 2008 Honolulu;Kirkpatrick & Valasek - 5 Shape Memory Alloys (SMA) Metallic Alloys used as actuators Shape Memory Effect

  7. Multi-length Scale Modeling of CVD of Diamond Films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grujicic, Mica

    ) of single-- crystalline and polycrystalline diamond films in acrystalline and polycrystalline diamond filmsMulti-length Scale Modeling of CVD of Diamond Films M. Grujicic and S. G. LaiM. Grujicic and S. G-scale Modeling of CVD Deposition of Diamond Films RotatingRotating--disk Hotdisk Hot--filament CVD

  8. On Postnikov's Hook Length Formula for Binary Trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Bill

    note that Seo [7] also found combinatorial proof of the identity (1). Further studies related to Postnikov's hook length formula (1) have been carried out by Du and Liu [1], Gessel and Seo [2], Liu [4., 28 (2007), 1312-1321. [2] I. M. Gessel and S. Seo, A refinement of Cayley's formula for trees

  9. Long-length contaminated equipment burial containers fabrication process procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCormick, W.A., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    These special process procedures cover the detailed step-by-step procedures required by the supplier who will manufacture the Long-Length Contaminated Equipment (LLCE) Burial Container design. Also included are detailed step-by-step procedures required by the disposal process for completion of the LLCE Burial Containers at Hanford.

  10. Evaluation of the relationship between fracture conductivity, fracture fluid production, and effective fracture length

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lolon, Elyezer P.

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Low-permeability gas wells often produce less than predicted after a fracture treatment. One of the reasons for this is that fracture lengths calculated after stimulation are often less than designed lengths. While actual fracture lengths may...

  11. Evaluation of the relationship between fracture conductivity, fracture fluid production, and effective fracture length 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lolon, Elyezer P.

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Low-permeability gas wells often produce less than predicted after a fracture treatment. One of the reasons for this is that fracture lengths calculated after stimulation are often less than designed lengths. While actual fracture lengths may...

  12. Association of length-slow silica with evaporites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heaney, P.J. (Princeton Univ., Princeton, NJ (United States). Dept. of Geology); Sheppard, R.A. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States). Denver Federal Center); Post, J.E. (Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC (United States). Dept. of Mineral Sciences)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1971, Folk and Pittman described the common occurrence of length-slow quartz (or lutecite) with evaporitic minerals, and they suggested that lutecite might be a useful indicator for vanished evaporites. However, the subsequent discoveries of length-slow silica in carbonate turbidites and in abyssal Pacific cherts revealed that lutecite is not restricted to near-surface deposits. Moreover, Kastner found that length-slow quartz could be crystallized in slightly alkaline solutions enriched in Mg[sup 2+], Na[sup +], and SO[sub 4][sup [minus]2]. Following these studies, researchers have cited the presence of lutecite in rock samples as suggestive but not compelling evidence for an evaporitic origin, and the precise nature of this form of silica has remained somewhat enigmatic. Investigations of chert nodules from evaporitic and non-evaporitic regimes support an identification of length-slow quartz'' with the mineral moganite, a polymorph of silica that is fibrous and optically length slow. Results are based upon X-ray powder diffraction of the chert, followed by Rietveld refinement of the X-ray patterns to quantify the weight fraction of quartz and moganite in each specimen. Most non-evaporitic chert appears to contain between 5 and 15 wt. % moganite, but evaporitic cherts often contain more than 20 wt. %. Cherts that have transformed from precursor magadiite can be particularly rich in moganite; samples from Lake Magadi, Kenya and from Harney Lake, Oregon revealed about equal parts moganite and quartz. However, the observation of decreasing abundances of moganite in rocks of increasing age indicates that moganite is metastable relative to quartz.

  13. Cosmology in one dimension: Symmetry role in dynamics, mass oriented approaches to fractal analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Bruce N; Shiozawa, Yui

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The distribution of visible matter in the universe, such as galaxies and galaxy clusters, has its origin in the week fluctuations of density that existed at the epoch of recombination. The hierarchical distribution of the universe, with its galaxies, clusters and super-clusters of galaxies indicates the absence of a natural length scale. In the Newtonian formulation, numerical simulations of a one-dimensional system permit us to precisely follow the evolution of an ensemble of particles starting with an initial perturbation in the Hubble flow. The limitation of the investigation to one dimension removes the necessity to make approximations in calculating the gravitational field and, on the whole, the system dynamics. It is then possible to accurately follow the trajectories of particles for a long time. The simulations show the emergence of a self-similar hierarchical structure in both the phase space and the configuration space and invites the implementation of a multifractal analysis. Here, after showing th...

  14. Anomalous dimensions determine the power counting -- Wilsonian RG analysis of nuclear EFT --

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koji Harada; Hirofumi Kubo

    2006-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Legendre flow equation, a version of exact Wilsonian renormalization group (WRG) equation, is employed to consider the power counting issues in Nuclear Effective Field Theory. A WRG approach is an ideal framework because it is nonperturbative and does not require any prescribed power counting rule. The power counting is determined systematically from the scaling dimensions of the operators at the nontrivial fixed point. The phase structure is emphasized and the inverse of the scattering length, which is identified as a relevant coupling, is shown to play a role of the order parameter. The relations to the work done by Birse, McGovern, and Richardson and to the Kaplan-Savage-Wise scheme are explained.

  15. Guiding center plasma models in three dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sugiyama, Linda E. [Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139-4307 (United States)

    2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Guiding center plasma models describe the fast charged particle gyration around magnetic field lines by an angle coordinate, defined relative to local orthogonal coordinate axes (e{sub 1},e{sub 2},b=B/B) at each guiding center location. In three dimensions (3D), unlike uniform straight two-dimensional (2D) fields, geometrical effects make the small gyroradius expansion nonuniform in velocity phase space in first order O({rho}{sub i}/L). At second order, Hamiltonian and Lagrangian solutions may be undefined even when good magnetic flux surfaces exist; existence requires the magnetic field torsion {tau}=b{center_dot}{nabla}xb=0 and {tau}{sub g}{identical_to}b{center_dot}({nabla}e{sub 1}){center_dot}e{sub 2}=0, unless the magnetic field has a 2D symmetry, such as toroidal axisymmetry. Keeping complete 3D geometrical effects also requires the magnetic vector potential term to appear in the electric field at the same order as the electrostatic potential. These problems express properties of magnetic vector potentials, Lagrangians, and the curvature of manifolds, and have analogies to attempts to connect small scale Lagrangian theories to higher dimensional, large scale ones in the grand unification theories of physics.

  16. Accelerating Universe from Extra Spatial Dimension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Chatterjee; A. Banerjee; Y. Z. Zhang

    2005-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a simple higher dimensional FRW type of model where the acceleration is apparently caused by the presence of the extra dimensions. Assuming an ansatz in the form of the deceleration parameter we get a class of solutions some of which shows the desirable feature of dimensional reduction as well as reasonably good physical properties of matter. Interestingly we do not have to invoke an extraneous scalar field or a cosmological constant to account for this acceleration. One argues that the terms containing the higher dimensional metric coefficients produces an extra negative pressure that apparently drives the inflation of the 4D space with an accelerating phase. It is further found that in line with the physical requirements our model admits of a decelerating phase in the early era along with an accelerating phase at present.Further the models asymptotically mimic a steady state type of universe although it starts from a big type of singularity. Correspondence to Wesson's induced matter theory is also briefly discussed and in line with it it is argued that the terms containing the higher dimensional metric coefficients apparently creates a negative pressure which drives the inflation of the 3-space with an accelerating phase.

  17. Holographic c-theorems in arbitrary dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert C. Myers; Aninda Sinha

    2011-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We re-examine holographic versions of the c-theorem and entanglement entropy in the context of higher curvature gravity and the AdS/CFT correspondence. We select the gravity theories by tuning the gravitational couplings to eliminate non-unitary operators in the boundary theory and demonstrate that all of these theories obey a holographic c-theorem. In cases where the dual CFT is even-dimensional, we show that the quantity that flows is the central charge associated with the A-type trace anomaly. Here, unlike in conventional holographic constructions with Einstein gravity, we are able to distinguish this quantity from other central charges or the leading coefficient in the entropy density of a thermal bath. In general, we are also able to identify this quantity with the coefficient of a universal contribution to the entanglement entropy in a particular construction. Our results suggest that these coefficients appearing in entanglement entropy play the role of central charges in odd-dimensional CFT's. We conjecture a new c-theorem on the space of odd-dimensional field theories, which extends Cardy's proposal for even dimensions. Beyond holography, we were able to show that for any even-dimensional CFT, the universal coefficient appearing the entanglement entropy which we calculate is precisely the A-type central charge.

  18. (Environmental technology)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boston, H.L.

    1990-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The traveler participated in a conference on environmental technology in Paris, sponsored by the US Embassy-Paris, US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the French Environmental Ministry, and others. The traveler sat on a panel for environmental aspects of energy technology and made a presentation on the potential contributions of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to a planned French-American Environmental Technologies Institute in Chattanooga, Tennessee, and Evry, France. This institute would provide opportunities for international cooperation on environmental issues and technology transfer related to environmental protection, monitoring, and restoration at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The traveler also attended the Fourth International Conference on Environmental Contamination in Barcelona. Conference topics included environmental chemistry, land disposal of wastes, treatment of toxic wastes, micropollutants, trace organics, artificial radionuclides in the environment, and the use biomonitoring and biosystems for environmental assessment. The traveler presented a paper on The Fate of Radionuclides in Sewage Sludge Applied to Land.'' Those findings corresponded well with results from studies addressing the fate of fallout radionuclides from the Chernobyl nuclear accident. There was an exchange of new information on a number of topics of interest to DOE waste management and environmental restoration needs.

  19. Fractal dimension in dissipative chaotic scattering Jess M. Seoane,1,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rey Juan Carlos, Universidad

    Fractal dimension in dissipative chaotic scattering Jesús M. Seoane,1, * Miguel A. F. Sanjuán,1 on chaotic scattering is relevant to situations of physical interest. We inves- tigate how the fractal is thus the fractal dimension of the set of singularities. For nonhyperbolic scattering, it has been known

  20. The Wavelet Dimension Function for Real Dilations and Dilations Admitting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bownik, Marcin

    The Wavelet Dimension Function for Real Dilations and Dilations Admitting non-MSF Wavelets Marcin Bownik and Darrin Speegle Abstract. The wavelet dimension function for arbitrary real dila- tions is defined and used to address several questions involving the existence of MRA wavelets and well

  1. Interactive Dimensions in the Construction of Mental Representations for Text

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patel, Aniruddh D.

    Interactive Dimensions in the Construction of Mental Representations for Text David N. Rapp be as critical to the construction of complex mental models as the discrete dimensions themselves. In the present a bead on Specify again. Incredibly, the horse was still rolling along. A pang of fear went through Woolf

  2. SELECTING INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SECURITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    April 2004 SELECTING INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SECURITY PRODUCTS Shirley Radack, Editor Computer Security Division Information Technology Laboratory National Institute of Standards and Technology Information technology security prod ucts are essential to better secure infor mation technology (IT) systems

  3. Effects of Ultramicroelectrode Dimensions on the Electropolymerization of Polypyrrole

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fletcher, Benjamin L [ORNL; Fern, Jared T. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Rhodes, Kevin [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); McKnight, Timothy E [ORNL; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson [ORNL; Retterer, Scott T [ORNL; Keffer, David J. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Simpson, Michael L [ORNL; Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Anode geometry can significantly affect the electrochemical synthesis of conductive polymers. Here, the effects of anode dimensions on the electropolymerization of pyrrole are investigated. Band microelectrodes were prepared with widths ranging from 2 to 500 {micro}m. The anode dimension has a significant effect on the resulting thickness of polymer film. The electropolymerization process deviates significantly from that predicted by simple mass transfer considerations when electrode dimensions are less than {approx}20 {micro}m. Polymer film thickness is thinner than expected when electrode dimensions become less than {approx}10 {micro}m. A simple mathematical model was derived to explain the observed effects of anode dimensions on the polymerization process. Simulation results confirm that diffusive loss of reaction intermediates accounts for the observed experimental trends. The described simulation facilitates understanding of the electropolymerization processes and approaches to the controlled deposition of polypyrrole, particularly at the submicron scale, for microelectromechanical systems and biomedical applications.

  4. Tri-Cities Index of Innovation and Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, Richard A.; Scott, Michael J.; Butner, Ryan S.

    2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2001 and 2004, the Economic Development Office of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory published companion reports to the Washington Technology Center Index studies that provided additional information on the Tri-Cities (Kennewick-Richland-Pasco) area of the state, its technology businesses, and important advantages that the Tri-Cities have as places to live and do business. These reports also compared the Tri-Cities area to other technology-based metropolitan areas in the Pacific Northwest and nation along critical dimensions known to be important to technology firms. This report updates the material in these earlier reports, and highlights a growing Tri-Cities metropolitan area.

  5. LEXSEE 16 BERKELEY TECH L J 1 Copyright (c) 2001 Berkeley Technology Law Journal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Page 1 LEXSEE 16 BERKELEY TECH L J 1 Copyright (c) 2001 Berkeley Technology Law Journal Berkeley Technology Law Journal 2001 16 Berkeley Tech. L.J. 1 LENGTH: 3937 words ANNUAL REVIEW OF LAW AND TECHNOLOGY Law Journal; J.D. candidate, 2001, Boalt Hall School of Law, University of California, Berkeley; Ph

  6. Estimate of the allowable dimensions of diagnosed defects in category III and IV welded pipeline joints{sup 1}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grin', E. A.; Bochkarev, V. I. [JSC 'All-Russia Thermal Engineering Institute' (JSC 'VTI') (Russian Federation)] [JSC 'All-Russia Thermal Engineering Institute' (JSC 'VTI') (Russian Federation)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An approach for estimating the permissible dimensions of technological defects in butt welded joints in category III and IV pipelines is described. The allowable size of a welding defect is determined from the condition of compliance with the specifications on strength for a reference cross section (damaged joint) of the pipeline taking into account its weakening by a given defect.With regard to the fairly widespread discovery of technological defects in butt welded joints during diagnostics of auxiliary pipelines for thermal electric power plants, the proposed approach can be used in practice by repair and consulting organizations.

  7. ILD SiW ECAL and sDHCAL dimension-performance optimisation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tran, Trong Hieu

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ILD, International Large Detector, is one of the detector concepts for a future linear collider. Its performance is investigated using Monte-Carlo full simulation and PandoraPFA. Among several options, a combination of the silicon-tungsten electromagnetic calorimeter (SiW ECAL) and the semi-digital hadronic calorimeter (sDHCAL) presenting the highest granularity calorimeters, is here investigated. It is shown that by reducing the radius and length of the entire detector by a factor of $\\sim1.3$ with respect to the baseline dimensions, the jet energy resolution is degraded by 8 to 19% in the range of 45 and 250 GeV. The price of ILD which scales roughly quadratically with the ILD dimensions may be reduced by a factor of nearly two. A similar study made with the SiW ECAL and the analog hadronic calorimeter (AHCAL) shows that for an inner radius of ECAL of about~1.4 m, the performance is comparable between sDHCAL and AHCAL.

  8. Reduced buckling in one dimension versus two dimensions of a compressively strained film on a compliant substrate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is that the islands tend to buckle during anneal- ing to relieve stress, in addition to their lateral expansion Fig. 1Reduced buckling in one dimension versus two dimensions of a compressively strained film may permit undesirable roughening buckling of a compressively strained film. In this work, we

  9. Dissipative hydrodynamics in 2+1 dimension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. K. Chaudhuri

    2006-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2+1 dimension, we have simulated the hydrodynamic evolution of QGP fluid with dissipation due to shear viscosity. Comparison of evolution of ideal and viscous fluid, both initialised under the same conditions e.g. same equilibration time, energy density and velocity profile, reveal that the dissipative fluid evolves slowly, cooling at a slower rate. Cooling get still slower for higher viscosity. The fluid velocities on the otherhand evolve faster in a dissipative fluid than in an ideal fluid. The transverse expansion is also enhanced in dissipative evolution. For the same decoupling temperature, freeze-out surface for a dissipative fluid is more extended than an ideal fluid. Dissipation produces entropy as a result of which particle production is increased. Particle production is increased due to (i) extension of the freeze-out surface and (ii) change of the equilibrium distribution function to a non-equilibrium one, the last effect being prominent at large transverse momentum. Compared to ideal fluid, transverse momentum distribution of pion production is considerably enhanced. Enhancement is more at high $p_T$ than at low $p_T$. Pion production also increases with viscosity, larger the viscosity, more is the pion production. Dissipation also modifies the elliptic flow. Elliptic flow is reduced in viscous dynamics. Also, contrary to ideal dynamics where elliptic flow continues to increase with transverse momentum, in viscous dynamics, elliptic flow tends to saturate at large transverse momentum. The analysis suggest that initial conditions of the hot, dense matter produced in Au+Au collisions at RHIC, as extracted from ideal fluid analysis can be changed significantly if the QGP fluid is viscous.

  10. Predicting Pattern Tooling and Casting Dimensions for Investment Casting - Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabau, Adrian S [ORNL

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The investment casting process allows the production of complex-shape parts and close dimensional tolerances. One of the most important phases in the investment casting process is the design of the pattern die. Pattern dies are used to create wax patterns by injecting wax into dies. The wax patterns are used to create a ceramic shell by the application of a series of ceramic coatings, and the alloy is cast into the dewaxed shell mold (Fig. 1.1). However, the complexity of shape and the close dimensional tolerances required in the final casting make it difficult to determine tooling dimensions. The final linear dimension of the casting depends on the cumulative effects of the linear expansions or contractions in each step of the investment casting process (Fig. 1.2). In most cases, the mold geometry or cores restrict the shrinkage of the pattern or the cast part, and the final casting dimensions may be affected by time-dependent processes such as viscoelastic deformation of the wax, and viscoplastic creep and plastic deformations of the shell and alloy. The pattern die is often reworked several times to produce castings whose dimensions are within acceptable tolerances. To date, investment casting technology has been based on hands-on training and experience. Technical literature is limited to experimental, phenomenological studies aimed at obtaining empirical correlations for quick and easy application in industry. The goal of this project was to predict casting dimensions for investment castings in order to meet blueprint nominal during the first casting run. Several interactions have to be considered in a coupled manner to determine the shrinkage factors: these are the die-wax, wax-shell, and shell-alloy interactions (as illustrated in Fig. 1.3). In this work, the deformations of the die-wax and shell-alloy systems were considered in a coupled manner, while the coupled deformation of the wax-shell system was not considered. Future work is needed in order to deliver to industry a computer program in which all three systems are coupled for determining the dimensions of the wax pattern, the shell mold, and casting in a sequential but coupled manner.

  11. Dangerous implications of a minimum length in quantum gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cosimo Bambi; Katherine Freese

    2008-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The existence of a minimum length and a generalization of the Heisenberg uncertainty principle seem to be two fundamental ingredients required in any consistent theory of quantum gravity. In this letter we show that they would predict dangerous processes which are phenomenologically unacceptable. For example, long--lived virtual super--Planck mass black holes may lead to rapid proton decay. Possible solutions of this puzzle are briefly discussed.

  12. Critical Waves and the Length Problem of Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. B. Laughlin

    2015-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    It is pointed out that the mystery of how biological systems measure their lengths vanishes away if one premises that they have discovered a way to generate linear waves analogous to compressional sound. These can be used to detect length at either large or small scales using echo timing and fringe counting. It is shown that suitable linear chemical potential waves can, in fact, be manufactured by tuning to criticality conventional reaction-diffusion with a small number substances. Min oscillations in E. coli are cited as precedent resonant length measurement using chemical potential waves analogous to laser detection. Mitotic structures in eucaryotes are identified as candidates for such an effect at higher frequency. The engineering principle is shown to be very general and functionally the same as that used by hearing organs. PNAS Significance Statement: This paper invokes physical principles to address the question of how living things might use reaction-diffusion to measure out and regulate the many thousands of lengths required to make their body parts and internal organs. It argues that two ideas have been missing. One is that oscillation is necessary to achieve the necessary design stability and plasticity. The other is that the system must be tuned to criticality to stabilize the propagation velocity, thus enabling clocks to function as meter sticks. The broader significance is twofold: First, a fundamental piece of the machinery of life is probably invisible to present-day biochemical methods because they are too slow. Second, the simplicity of growth and form identified a century ago by D'Arcy Thompson is probably a symptom of biological engineering strategies, not primitive law.

  13. Multi-length Scale Modeling of Titanium Nitride Coatings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grujicic, Mica

    Multi-length Scale Modeling of Titanium Nitride Coatings M. Grujicic and S. G. LaiM. Grujicic and S Conservation Circumferential Momentum Conservation Thermal Energy Balance Species Continuity Dependent of Titanium Nitride Surface Species TiCl4(S): NH2(S): TiCl2(S): NH(S): TiCl(S): N(S): Ti (S): N*(S): Ti*(S): N

  14. Magnetic field-line lengths inside interplanetary magnetic flux ropes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Qiang; Krucker, Sam

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the detailed and systematic study of field-line twist and length distributions within magnetic flux ropes embedded in Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs). The Grad-Shafranov reconstruction method is utilized together with a constant-twist nonlinear force-free (Gold-Hoyle) flux rope model to reveal the close relation between the field-line twist and length in cylindrical flux ropes, based on in-situ Wind spacecraft measurements. We show that the field-line twist distributions within interplanetary flux ropes are inconsistent with the Lundquist model. In particular we utilize the unique measurements of magnetic field-line lengths within selected ICME events as provided by Kahler et al. (2011) based on energetic electron burst observations at 1 AU and the associated type III radio emissions detected by the Wind spacecraft. These direct measurements are compared with our model calculations to help assess the flux-rope interpretation of the embedded magnetic structures. By using the differen...

  15. Technology disrupted

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Papatheodorou, Y. [CH2M Hill (United States)

    2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Three years ago, the author presented a report on power generation technologies which in summary said 'no technology available today has the potential of becoming transformational or disruptive in the next five to ten years'. In 2006 the company completed another strategic view research report covering the electric power, oil, gas and unconventional energy industries and manufacturing industry. This article summarises the strategic view findings and then revisits some of the scenarios presented in 2003. The cost per megawatt-hour of the alternatives is given for plants ordered in 2005 and then in 2025. The issue of greenhouse gas regulation is dealt with through carbon sequestration and carbon allowances or an equivalent carbon tax. Results reveal substantial variability through nuclear power, hydro, wind, geothermal and biomass remain competitive through every scenario. Greenhouse gas scenario analysis shows coal still be viable, albeit less competitive against nuclear and renewable technologies. A carbon tax or allowance at $24 per metric ton has the same effect on IGCC cost as a sequestration mandate. However, the latter would hurt gas plants much more than a tax or allowance. Sequestering CO{sub 2} from a gas plant is almost as costly per megawatt-hour as for coal. 5 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. Emerging technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Shin-yee

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mission of the Emerging Technologies thrust area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is to help individuals establish technology areas that have national and commercial impact, and are outside the scope of the existing thrust areas. We continue to encourage innovative ideas that bring quality results to existing programs. We also take as our mission the encouragement of investment in new technology areas that are important to the economic competitiveness of this nation. In fiscal year 1992, we have focused on nine projects, summarized in this report: (1) Tire, Accident, Handling, and Roadway Safety; (2) EXTRANSYT: An Expert System for Advanced Traffic Management; (3) Odin: A High-Power, Underwater, Acoustic Transmitter for Surveillance Applications; (4) Passive Seismic Reservoir Monitoring: Signal Processing Innovations; (5) Paste Extrudable Explosive Aft Charge for Multi-Stage Munitions; (6) A Continuum Model for Reinforced Concrete at High Pressures and Strain Rates: Interim Report; (7) Benchmarking of the Criticality Evaluation Code COG; (8) Fast Algorithm for Large-Scale Consensus DNA Sequence Assembly; and (9) Using Electrical Heating to Enhance the Extraction of Volatile Organic Compounds from Soil.

  17. Venus Technology Plan Venus Technology Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Venus Technology Plan May 2014 #12; ii Venus Technology Plan At the Venus Exploration Survey priorities, and (3) develop a Technology Plan for future Venus missions (after a Technology Forum at VEXAG Meeting 11 in November 2013). Here, we present the 2014 Venus Technology Plan

  18. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Science and Technology Policy Fellowship...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cell Technologies Office Science and Technology Policy Fellowship Opportunities Available Fuel Cell Technologies Office Science and Technology Policy Fellowship Opportunities...

  19. Implementing Sustainability: The Behavioral-Institutional Dimension

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malone, Elizabeth [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Diamond, Richard C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Wolfe, Amy K [ORNL; Sanquist, Tom [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Payne, Christopher [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Dion, Jerry [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Organizations, both public and private sector, are increasingly pursuing strategies to reduce their energy use and increase sustainability. Whether these efforts are based on economic rationale, community spirit, environmental ethics, federal mandates, or other reasons, they predominantly feature strategies that rely on new technologies. If there is any focus on behavior change, it is typically addressed to changing individual behavior. While we recognize the importance and limitations of the role of individual behavior in promoting sustainability goals, we are more interested in the role of institutional behavior. We have reviewed the small but growing literature on institutional behavior change, and have identified eight evidence-based principles as a guide for federal agencies to take action. This article presents the principles and illustrates them with examples to suggest ways that they can serve as models for others.

  20. The fractal dimension of the spectrum of quasiperiodical schrodinger operators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laurent Marin

    2012-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the fractal dimension of the spectrum of a quasiperiodical Schrodinger operator associated to a sturmian potential. We consider potential defined with irrationnal number verifying a generic diophantine condition. We recall how shape and box dimension of the spectrum is linked to the irrational number properties. In the first place, we give general lower bound of the box dimension of the spectrum, true for all irrational numbers. In the second place, we improve this lower bound for almost all irrational numbers. We finally recall dynamical implication of the first bound.

  1. Physical Interpretation of the 26 Dimensions of Bosonic String Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank D. Smith Jr

    2002-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The 26 dimensions of Closed Unoriented Bosonic String Theory are interpreted as the 26 dimensions of the traceless Jordan algebra J3(O)o of 3x3 Octonionic matrices, with each of the 3 Octonionic dimenisons of J3(O)o having the following physical interpretation: 4-dimensional physical spacetime plus 4-dimensional internal symmetry space; 8 first-generation fermion particles; 8 first-generation fermion anti-particles. This interpretation is consistent with interpreting the strings as World Lines of the Worlds of Many-Worlds Quantum Theory and the 26 dimensions as the degrees of freedom of the Worlds of the Many-Worlds.

  2. THE GEOGRAPHY OF INNOVATION : CHALLENGES TO TECHNOLOGY POLICY WITHIN REGIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 THE GEOGRAPHY OF INNOVATION : CHALLENGES TO TECHNOLOGY POLICY WITHIN REGIONS MURIEL FADAIRO, to access knowledge, to use knowledge." (P. Maskell, 2001) The "Geography of Innovation"1 is based of the innovation activities. It focuses on an attempt to measure the spatial dimension of knowledge externalities

  3. Technology and the Box

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maitland, Padma

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    its explorations of technology in partnership with radicalPadma Maitland Technology and the Box The room is thedisciplines. The theme of “Technology and the Box” emerged

  4. Hydrogen Technologies Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hydrogen Technologies Group at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory advances the Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center's mission by researching a variety of hydrogen technologies.

  5. Innovation and Transportation's Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garrison, William L.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    decision making. Innovation and technology lock-in hasStage 1 imagine the innovation and technology developmentof emphasizing innovation and technology development. Pull

  6. TECHNOLOGY FORUM

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic| Department of Energy 51:Cross-Site66 -Topic Groups TECHNOLOGY

  7. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2009 Advanced Vehicle Technology...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Well-to-Wheels Analysis of Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Advanced Vehicle Technology Analysis...

  8. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Advanced Vehicle Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicle Technology Analysis and Evaluation Activities and Heavy Vehicle Systems Optimization Program Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Advanced Vehicle...

  9. The Human Dimension in Chinese Defense Science, Technology, and Innovation: An Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHEUNG, Tai Ming

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cutting-edge research to leaders intervening to support the development of favored projects, the human factor

  10. Wave propagation in periodic lattices with defects of smaller dimension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Kutsenko

    2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The procedure of evaluating of the spectrum for discrete periodic operators perturbed by operators of smaller dimensions is obtained. This result allows to obtain propagative, guided, localised spectra for different kind of physical operators on graphs with defects.

  11. The Size of Compact Extra Dimensions from Blackbody Radiation Laws

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramaton Ramos; Henrique Boschi-Filho

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we generalize the Stefan-Boltzmann and Wien's displacement laws for a $D$-dimensional manifold composed by 4 non-compact dimensions and $D-4$ compact dimensions, $ R^{1,3}$ x $T^{D-4} $. The electromagnetic field is assumed to pervade all compact and non-compact dimensions. In particular, the total radiated power becomes $ R(T) = \\sigma_B T^4 + \\sigma_D (a) \\, T^D $, where $a$ is the size of the compact extra dimensions. For $D=10$, predicted from String Theory, and $D=11$, from M-Theory, the outcomes agree with available experimental data for $a$ as high as 2 x $10^{-7}$m.

  12. STABILITY OF EQUILIBRIA IN ONE DIMENSION FOR DIBLOCK COPOLYMER EQUATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sander, Evelyn

    STABILITY OF EQUILIBRIA IN ONE DIMENSION FOR DIBLOCK COPOLYMER EQUATION Olga Stulov Department for numerically. The various sets of the solutions of the linearized model were found by means of software AUTO

  13. The Higgs boson as a gauge field in extra dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco Serone

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    I review, at a general non-technical level, the main properties of models in extra dimensions where the Higgs field is identified with some internal component of a gauge field.

  14. The N = 8 superconformal bootstrap in three dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chester, Shai M.

    We analyze the constraints imposed by unitarity and crossing symmetry on the four-point function of the stress-tensor multiplet of N=8 superconformal field theories in three dimensions. We first derive the superconformal ...

  15. Growth and Technological Leadership in US Industries: A Spatial Econometric Analysis at the State Level, 19631997

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Growth and Technological Leadership in US Industries: A Spatial Econometric Analysis at the State, industry level, technological leadership, spatial econometrics JEL codes: C21, I23, O33, R12 Copyright 2007 spatial econometric techniques, and focus on capturing the geographical dimension of growth

  16. Dezincing Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudek, F.J.; Daniels, E.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Service Div.; Morgan, W.A. [Metal Recovery Technologies, Inc., East Chicago, IN (United States)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Half of the steel produced in the US is derived from scrap. With zinc-coated prompt scrap increasing fivefold since 1980, steel-makers are feeling the effect of increased contaminant loads on their operations. The greatest concern is the cost of treatment before disposal of waste dusts and water that arise from remelting zinc-coated scrap. An economic process is needed to strip and recover the zinc from scrap to provide a low residual scrap for steel- and iron-making. Metal Recovery Technologies, Inc., with the assistance of Argonne National Laboratory, have been developing a caustic leach dezincing process for upgrading galvanized stamping plant scrap into clean scrap with recovery of the zinc. With further development the technology could also process galvanized scrap from obsolete automobiles. This paper will review: (1) the status of recent pilot plant operations and plans for a commercial demonstration facility with a dezincing capacity of up to 250,000 tons/year, (2) the economics of caustic dezincing, and (3) benefits of decreased cost of environmental compliance, raw material savings, and improved operations with use of dezinced scrap.

  17. Dynamics and length distribution of microtubules under force and confinement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Björn Zelinski; Nina Müller; Jan Kierfeld

    2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the microtubule polymerization dynamics with catastrophe and rescue events for three different confinement scenarios, which mimic typical cellular environments: (i) The microtubule is confined by rigid and fixed walls, (ii) it grows under constant force, and (iii) it grows against an elastic obstacle with a linearly increasing force. We use realistic catastrophe models and analyze the microtubule dynamics, the resulting microtubule length distributions, and force generation by stochastic and mean field calculations; in addition, we perform stochastic simulations. We also investigate the force dynamics if growth parameters are perturbed in dilution experiments. Finally, we show the robustness of our results against changes of catastrophe models and load distribution factors.

  18. Optical Scattering Lengths in Large Liquid-Scintillator Neutrino Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Wurm; Franz von Feilitzsch; Marianne Goeger-Neff; Martin Hofmann; Tobias Lachenmaier; Timo Lewke; Teresa Marrodan Undagoitita; Quirin Meindl; Randoplh Moellenberg; Lothar Oberauer; Walter Potzel; Marc Tippmann; Sebastian Todor; Christoph Traunsteiner; Juergen Winter

    2010-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    For liquid-scintillator neutrino detectors of kiloton scale, the transparency of the organic solvent is of central importance. The present paper reports on laboratory measurements of the optical scattering lengths of the organic solvents PXE, LAB, and Dodecane which are under discussion for next-generation experiments like SNO+, Hanohano, or LENA. Results comprise the wavelength range from 415 to 440nm. The contributions from Rayleigh and Mie scattering as well as from absorption/re-emission processes are discussed. Based on the present results, LAB seems to be the preferred solvent for a large-volume detector.

  19. Varying properties along lengths of temperature limited heaters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Xie, Xueying (Houston, TX); Miller, David Scott (Katy, TX); Ginestra, Jean Charles (Richmond, TX)

    2011-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for heating a subsurface formation is described. The system includes an elongated heater in an opening in the formation. The elongated heater includes two or more portions along the length of the heater that have different power outputs. At least one portion of the elongated heater includes at least one temperature limited portion with at least one selected temperature at which the portion provides a reduced heat output. The heater is configured to provide heat to the formation with the different power outputs. The heater is configured so that the heater heats one or more portions of the formation at one or more selected heating rates.

  20. The K+ K+ scattering length from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silas Beane; Thomas Luu; Konstantinos Orginos; Assumpta Parreno; Martin Savage; Aaron Torok; Andre Walker-Loud

    2007-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The K+K+ scattering length is calculated in fully-dynamical lattice QCD with domain-wall valence quarks on the MILC asqtad-improved gauge configurations with fourth-rooted staggered sea quarks. Three-flavor mixed-action chiral perturbation theory at next-to-leading order, which includes the leading effects of the finite lattice spacing, is used to extrapolate the results of the lattice calculation to the physical value of mK + /fK + . We find mK^+ aK^+ K^+ = â~0.352 ± 0.016, where the statistical and systematic errors have been combined in quadrature.

  1. Self-aligned submicron gate length gallium arsenide MESFET 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Hsien-Ching

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    38 21. Proximity cap annealing . 22. Temperature profile of post implant anneal 46 47 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. "Pits" or holes in GaAs post implant anneal without sacrificial cap Silicon monoxide source (bafile box) used.... 16(b)). The bottom resist layer is then further etched in the oxygen plasma to produce undercutting for the desire gate structure. The amount of undercut is determined by the desired length of the gate and is the width of the remaining resist...

  2. Pauling bond strength, bond length and electron density distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibbs, Gerald V.; Ross, Nancy L.; Cox, David F.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Iversen, Bo B.; Spackman, M. A.

    2014-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A power law regression equation, = 1.46(/r)-0.19, connecting the average experimental bond lengths, , with the average accumulation of the electron density at the bond critical point, , between bonded metal M and oxygen atoms, determined at ambient conditions for oxide crystals, where r is the row number of the M atom, is similar to the regression equation R(M-O) = 1.39(?(rc)/r)-0.21 determined for three perovskite crystals for pressures as high as 80 GPa. The two equations are also comparable with those, = 1.43(/r)-0.21, determined for a large number of oxide crystals at ambient conditions and = 1.39(/r)-0.22, determined for geometry optimized hydroxyacid molecules, that connect the bond lengths to the average Pauling electrostatic bond strength, , for the M-O bonded interactions. On the basis of the correspondence between the two sets of equations connecting ?(rc) and the Pauling bond strength s with bond length, it appears that Pauling’s simple definition of bond strength closely mimics the accumulation of the electron density between bonded pairs of atoms. The similarity of the expressions for the crystals and molecules is compelling evidence that the M-O bonded interactions for the crystals and molecules 2 containing the same bonded interactions are comparable. Similar expressions, connecting bond lengths and bond strength, have also been found to hold for fluoride, nitride and sulfide molecules and crystals. The Brown-Shannon bond valence, ?, power law expression ? = [R1/(R(M-O)]N that has found wide use in crystal chemistry, is shown to be connected to a more universal expression determined for oxides and the perovskites, = r[(1.41)/]4.76, demonstrating that the bond valence for a bonded interaction is likewise closely connected to the accumulation of the electron density between the bonded atoms. Unlike the Brown-Shannon expression, it is universal in that it holds for the M-O bonded interactions for a relatively wide range of M atoms of the periodic table. The power law equation determined for the oxide crystals at ambient conditions is similar to the power law expression = r[1.46/]5.26 determined for the perovskites at pressures as high as 80 GPa, indicating that the intrinsic connection between R(M-O) and ?(rc) that holds at ambient conditions also holds, to a first approximation, at high pressures.

  3. Constructive Dimension and Weak Truth-Table Degrees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    infinite sequence S with construc- tive Hausdorff dimension dimH(S) and constructive packing dimension dimP(S. Furthermore, if dimP(S) > 0, then dimP(R) 1 - . The reduc- tion thus serves as a randomness extractor. It is also shown that, for any regular sequence S (that is, dimH(S) = dimP(S)) such that dimH(S) > 0, the wtt

  4. Multipole moments for black objects in five dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kentaro Tanabe; Seiju Ohashi; Tetsuya Shiromizu

    2010-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In higher dimensions than four, conventional uniqueness theorem in asymptotically flat space-times does not hold, i.e., black objects can not be classified only by the mass, angular momentum and charge. In this paper, we define multipole moments for black objects and show that Myers-Perry black hole and black ring can be distinguished by quadrupole moments. This consideration gives us a new insight for the uniqueness theorem for black objects in higher dimensions.

  5. Mass Generation and Related Issues from Exotic Higher Dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Rojas; M. A. De Andrade; L. P. Colatto; J. L. Matheus-Valle; L. P. G. De Assis; J. A. Helayel-Neto

    2011-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The main purpose of this work is to show that massless Dirac equation formulated for non-interacting Majorana-Weyl spinors in higher dimensions, particularly in D=1+9 and D=5+5, can lead to an interpretation of massive Majorana and Dirac spinors in D=1+3. By adopting suitable representations of the Dirac matrices in higher dimensions, we pursue the investigation of which higher dimensional space-times and which mass-shell relation concerning massless Dirac equations in higher dimensions may induce massive spinors in D=1+3. The mixing of the chiral fermions in higher dimensions may induce a mechanism such that four massive Majorana fermions may show up and, at an appropriate limit an almost zero and a huge mass show up with corresponding left-handed and right-handed eigenstates. This mechanism, in a peculiar way, could reassess the See-Saw scheme associated to neutrino with Majorana-type masses. Remarkably the masses of the particles are fixed by the dimension decoupling/reduction scheme based on the mass Lorentz invariant term, where one set of the decoupled dimensions are the "target" coordinates frame and the other set of coordinates is the composing block of the mass term in lower dimensions. This proposal should allow us to understand the generation of hierarchies, such as the fourth generation, for the fermionic masses in D=1+3, or in lower dimensions in general, starting from the constraints between the energy and the momentum in D=n+n. For the initial D=5+5 Majorana-Weyl spinors framework using the Weyl representation to the Dirac matrices we observe an intriguing decomposition of space-time that result in two very equivalent D=1+4 massive spinors which mass term, in D=1+3 included, is originated from the remained/decoupled component and that could induce a Brane-World mechanism.

  6. Cosmologically safe QCD axion as a present from extra dimension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kawasaki, Masahiro; Yanagida, Tsutomu T

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a QCD axion model where the origin of PQ symmetry and suppression of axion isocurvature perturbations are explained by introducing an extra dimension. Each extra quark-antiquark pair lives on branes separately to suppress PQ breaking operators. The size of the extra dimension changes after inflation due to an interaction between inflaton and a bulk scalar field, which implies that the PQ symmetry can be drastically broken during inflation to suppress undesirable axion isocurvature fluctuations.

  7. Domain with Noncompactified Extra Dimensions in Multidimensional Universe with Compactified Extra Dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. D. Dzhunushaliev

    1997-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    It is supposed that in our Universe with compactified extra dimensions (ED) the domains exist with noncompactified ED. Such domain can be a wormhole-like solution in multidimensional gravity (MD), located between two null surfaces. With the availability of compactification mechanism this MD domain can be joined on null surfaces with two black holes filled by gauge field. Solution of this kind in MD gravity on the principal bundle with structural group SU(3) is obtained. This solution is wormhole-like object located between two null surfaces $ds^2=0$. In some sense these solutions are dual to black holes: they are statical spherically symmetric solutions under null surfaces whereas black holes are statical spherically symmetric solutions outside of event horizon.

  8. General com Technology community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrara, Katherine W.

    Campus IT General com m unity Technology community ITsystem owners Campus Council for Information Technology (CCFIT) · ~30 members · Advisory evaluation and review role · Input from faculty, staff, students formal representation on steering team and subcommittees Technology Support Program · Technology support

  9. CSIR TECHNOLOGY AWARDS -2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jayaram, Bhyravabotla

    CSIR TECHNOLOGY AWARDS - 2013 GUIDELINES & PROFORMAE FOR NOMINATIONS Planning and Performance 2013 #12;CSIR TECHNOLOGY AWARDS BRIEF DETAILS ,,CSIR Technology Awards were instituted in 1990 to encourage multi-disciplinary in- house team efforts and external interaction for technology development

  10. Northwest Regional Technology Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northwest Regional Technology Center for Homeland Security The Northwest Regional Technology Center and deployment of technologies that are effective homeland security solutions for the region, and accelerate technology transfer to the national user community. Foster a collaborative spirit across agencies

  11. Fractal dimension of interstellar clouds: opacity and noise effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nestor Sanchez; Emilio J. Alfaro; Enrique Perez

    2006-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    There exists observational evidence that the interstellar medium has a fractal structure in a wide range of spatial scales. The measurement of the fractal dimension (Df) of interstellar clouds is a simple way to characterize this fractal structure, but several factors, both intrinsic to the clouds and to the observations, may contribute to affect the values obtained. In this work we study the effects that opacity and noise have on the determination of Df. We focus on two different fractal dimension estimators: the perimeter-area based dimension (Dper) and the mass-size dimension (Dm). We first use simulated fractal clouds to show that opacity does not affect the estimation of Dper. However, Dm tends to increase as opacity increases and this estimator fails when applied to optically thick regions. In addition, very noisy maps can seriously affect the estimation of both Dper and Dm, decreasing the final estimation of Df. We apply these methods to emission maps of Ophiuchus, Perseus and Orion molecular clouds in different molecular lines and we obtain that the fractal dimension is always in the range 2.6 2.3) average fractal dimension for the interstellar medium, as traced by different chemical species.

  12. Dimension of physical systems, information processing, and thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolas Brunner; Marc Kaplan; Anthony Leverrier; Paul Skrzypczyk

    2014-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We ask how quantum theory compares to more general physical theories from the point of view of dimension. To do so, we first give two model independent definition of the dimension of physical systems, based on measurements and on the capacity of storing information. While both definitions are equivalent in classical and quantum mechanics, they are in general different in generalized probabilistic theories. We discuss in detail the case of a theory known as 'boxworld', and show that such a theory features systems with a dimension mismatch. This dimension mismatch can be made arbitrarily large by using an amplification procedure. Furthermore, we show that the dimension mismatch of boxworld has strong consequences on its power for performing information-theoretic tasks, leading to the collapse of communication complexity and to the violation of information causality. Finally, we discuss the consequences of a dimension mismatch from the perspective of thermodynamics, and ask whether this effect could break Landauer's erasure principle and thus the second law.

  13. Probing the Conformational Distributions of Sub-Persistence Length DNA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mastroianni, Alexander; Sivak, David; Geissler, Phillip; Alivisatos, Paul

    2009-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We have measured the bending elasticity of short double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) chains through small-angle X-ray scattering from solutions of dsDNA-linked dimers of gold nanoparticles. This method, which does not require exertion of external forces or binding to a substrate, reports on the equilibrium distribution of bending fluctuations, not just an average value (as in ensemble FRET) or an extreme value (as in cyclization), and in principle provides a more robust data set for assessing the suitability of theoretical models. Our experimental results for dsDNA comprising 42-94 basepairs (bp) are consistent with a simple worm-like chain model of dsDNA elasticity, whose behavior we have determined from Monte Carlo simulations that explicitly represent nanoparticles and their alkane tethers. A persistence length of 50 nm (150 bp) gave a favorable comparison, consistent with the results of single-molecule force-extension experiments on much longer dsDNA chains, but in contrast to recent suggestions of enhanced flexibility at these length scales.

  14. The bound coherent neutron scattering length of the oxygen isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, Henry E [Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL); Simonson, J Michael {Mike} [ORNL; Neuefeind, Joerg C [ORNL; Lemmel, Hartmut [Technical University Vienna; Rauch, Helmut [E141 Atominstitut der Österreichischen Universitäten,; Zeidler, Anita [University of Bath; Salmon, Phil [University of Bath

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technique of neutron interferometry was used to measure the bound coherent neutron scattering length bcoh of the oxygen isotopes 17O and 18O. From the measured difference in optical path between two water samples, either H2 17O or H2 18O versus H2 natO, where nat denotes the natural isotopic composition, we obtain bcoh , 17O = 5.867(4) fm and bcoh , 18O = 6.009(5) fm, based on the accurately known value of bcoh , natO = 5.805(4) fm which is equal to bcoh , 16O within the experimental uncertainty. Our results for bcoh , 17O and bcoh , 18O differ appreciably from the standard tabulated values of 5.6(5) fm and 5.84(7) fm, respectively. In particular, our measured scattering length contrast of 0.204(3) fm between 18O and natO is nearly a factor of 6 greater than the tabulated value, which renders feasible neutron diffraction experiments using 18O isotope substitution and thereby offers new possibilites for measuring the partial structure factors of oxygen-containing compounds, such as water.

  15. Beyond Mixing-length Theory: a step toward 321D

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnett, W David; Viallet, Maxime; Campbell, Simon W; Lattanzio, John; Mo?ak, Miroslav

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a physical basis for algorithms to replace mixing-length theory (MLT) in stellar evolutionary computations. The 321D procedure is based on three-dimensional (3D) time-dependent solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations, including the Kolmogorov cascade as a sub-grid model of dissipation (implicit large eddy simulations; ILES). We use Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) averaging to make 3D simulation data concise, and use 3D simulations to give RANS closure. We sketch a simple algorithm, which is non-local and time-dependent, with both MLT and the Lorenz convective roll as particular subsets of solutions. The damping length is determined from a balance between the large-scale driving and damping at the Kolmogorov scale. We find that (1) braking regions (boundary layers in which mixing occurs) automatically appear {\\it beyond} the edges of convection as defined by the Schwarzschild criterion, (2) dynamic (non-local) terms imply a non-zero turbulent kinetic energy flux (unlike MLT), (3) the effects...

  16. Cooling Configuration Design Considerations for Long-Length HTS Cables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demko, Jonathan A [ORNL; Duckworth, Robert C [ORNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent successes in demonstrating high temperature superconducting (HTS) cable systems hundreds of meters in length have inspired even longer length projects. A compact and energy efficient cooling configuration can be achieved using a counterflow-cooling arrangement. This is particularly attractive when all three phases are contained in a single cryostat because of the elimination of the space and thermal requirements of a separate liquid nitrogen return line. Future cable projects will utilize second generation (2G) wire which is expected to become lower in cost but may have different thermal requirements than first generation (1G) BSCCO wire due to the lower critical temperature and to a lesser extent, the lower thermal conductivity of the wire. HTS cable configurations will be studied with a numerical model to assess thermal hydraulic performance with AC and thermal losses; a summary of the results from the analysis will be presented. An analysis of the cable thermal- hydraulic response to over-current faults will be presented.

  17. The Chain-Length Distribution in Subcritical Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven Douglas Nolen

    2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The individual fission chains that appear in any neutron multiplying system provide a means, via neutron noise analysis, to unlock a wealth of information regarding the nature of the system. This work begins by determining the probability density distributions for fission chain lengths in zero-dimensional systems over a range of prompt neutron multiplication constant (K) values. This section is followed by showing how the integral representation of the chain-length distribution can be used to obtain an estimate of the system's subcritical prompt multiplication (MP). The lifetime of the chains is then used to provide a basis for determining whether a neutron noise analysis will be successful in assessing the neutron multiplication constant, k, of the system in the presence of a strong intrinsic source. A Monte Carlo transport code, MC++, is used to model the evolution of the individual fission chains and to determine how they are influenced by spatial effects. The dissertation concludes by demonstrating how experimental validation of certain global system parameters by neutron noise analysis may be precluded in situations in which the system K is relatively low and in which realistic detector efficiencies are simulated.

  18. HAUSDORFF DIMENSION, ANALYTIC SETS AND TRANSCENDENCE G. A. EDGAR AND CHRIS MILLER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edgar, Gerald

    HAUSDORFF DIMENSION, ANALYTIC SETS AND TRANSCENDENCE G. A. EDGAR any of* * Edgar [5], Falconer [7], Mattila [9] or [11] for details). From now on, "dimension

  19. TIME DOMAIN VOCAL TRACT LENGTH NORMALIZATION David Sundermann, Antonio Bonafonte

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suendermann, David

    Science Department Ahornstr. 55, 52056 Aachen, Germany ney@cs.rwth-aachen.de Harald H¨oge Siemens AG Corporate Technology Otto-Hahn-Ring 6, 81739 Munich, Germany harald.hoege@siemens.com ABSTRACT Recently (mapping of several speakers to a certain individual) but the other direction (transforming a standard

  20. Simulations of The Dalles Dam Proposed Full Length Spillwall

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Perkins, William A.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.

    2008-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents results of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling study to evaluatethe impacts of a full-length spillwall at The Dalles Dam. The full-length spillwall is being designed and evaluated as a structural means to improve tailrace egress and thus survival of juvenile fish passing through the spillway. During the course of this study, a full-length spillwall at Bays 6/7 and 8/9 were considered. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) has proposed extending the spillwall constructed in the stilling basin between spillway Bays 6 and 7 about 590 ft farther downstream. It is believed that the extension of the spillwall will improve egress conditions for downstream juvenile salmonids by moving them more rapidly into the thalweg of the river hence reducing their exposure to predators. A numerical model was created, validated, and applied the The Dalles Dam tailrace. The models were designed to assess impacts to flow, tailrace egress, navigation, and adult salmon passage of a proposed spill wall extension. The more extensive model validation undertaken in this study greatly improved our confidence in the numerical model to represent the flow conditions in The Dalles tailrace. This study used these validated CFD models to simulate the potential impacts of a spillwall extension for The Dalles Dam tailrace for two locations. We determined the following: (1)The construction of an extended wall (between Bays 6/7) will not adversely impact entering or exiting the navigation lock. Impact should be less if a wall were constructed between Bays 8/9. (2)The construction of a wall between Bays 6/7 will increase the water surface elevation between the wall and the Washington shore. Although the increased water surface elevation would be beneficial to adult upstream migrants in that it decreases velocities on the approach to the adult ladder, the increased flow depth would enhance dissolved gas production, impacting potential operations of the project because of water quality. A wall between Bays 8/9 should have a lesser impact as the confined spill would be across more bays and the relative flow constriction less. (3) The 405 kcfs case was used for the rapid assessment of flow conditions and hydraulic mechanisms that might be responsible for the unexpected erosion at the end of the shelf downstream of Bay 7.

  1. Long-length contaminated equipment disposal process path document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCormick, W.A.

    1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The first objective of the LLCE Process Path Document is to guide future users of this system on how to accomplish the cradle-to-grave process for the disposal of long-length equipment. Information will be provided describing the function and approach to each step in the process. Pertinent documentation, prerequisites, drawings, procedures, hardware, software, and key interfacing organizations will be identified. The second objective is related to the decision to lay up the program until funding is made available to complete it or until a need arises due to failure of an important component in a waste tank. To this end, the document will identify work remaining to be completed for each step of the process and open items or issues that remain to be resolved.

  2. Light absorption cell combining variable path and length pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prather, William S. (2419 Dickey Rd., Augusta, GA 30906)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for use in making spectrophotometric measurements of fluid samples. In particular, the device is a measurement cell containing a movable and a fixed lens with a sample of the fluid therebetween and through which light shines. The cell is connected to a source of light and a spectrophotometer via optic fibers. Movement of the lens varies the path length and also pumps the fluid into and out of the cell. Unidirectional inlet and exit valves cooperate with the movable lens to assure a one-way flow of fluid through the cell. A linear stepper motor controls the movement of the lens and cycles it from a first position closer to the fixed lens and a second position farther from the fixed lens, preferably at least 10 times per minute for a nearly continuous stream of absorption spectrum data.

  3. Analyzing gigahertz bunch length instabilities with a digital signal processor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stege, R.E. Jr.; Krejcik, P.; Minty, M.G.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A bunch length instability, nicknamed the ``sawtooth``, because of its transient behavior, has been observed at high current running in the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) electron damping ring. The incompatibility of this instability with successful SLC naming prompted its study using a high bandwidth real-time spectrum analyzer, the Tektronix 3052 digital signal processor (DSP) system. This device has been used to study energy ramping in storage rings but this is the first time it has been used to study transient instability phenomena. It is a particularly valuable tool for use in understanding non-linear, multiple frequency phenomena. The frequency range of this device has been extended through the use of radio frequency (RF) down converters. This paper describes the measurement setup and presents some of the results.

  4. Analyzing gigahertz bunch length instabilities with a digital signal processor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stege, R.E. Jr.; Krejcik, P.; Minty, M.G.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A bunch length instability, nicknamed the sawtooth'', because of its transient behavior, has been observed at high current running in the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) electron damping ring. The incompatibility of this instability with successful SLC naming prompted its study using a high bandwidth real-time spectrum analyzer, the Tektronix 3052 digital signal processor (DSP) system. This device has been used to study energy ramping in storage rings but this is the first time it has been used to study transient instability phenomena. It is a particularly valuable tool for use in understanding non-linear, multiple frequency phenomena. The frequency range of this device has been extended through the use of radio frequency (RF) down converters. This paper describes the measurement setup and presents some of the results.

  5. Light absorption cell combining variable path and length pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prather, W.S.

    1993-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A device is described for use in making spectrophotometric measurements of fluid samples. In particular, the device is a measurement cell containing a movable and a fixed lens with a sample of the fluid there between and through which light shines. The cell is connected to a source of light and a spectrophotometer via optic fibers. Movement of the lens varies the path length and also pumps the fluid into and out of the cell. Unidirectional inlet and exit valves cooperate with the movable lens to assure a one-way flow of fluid through the cell. A linear stepper motor controls the movement of the lens and cycles it from a first position closer to the fixed lens and a second position farther from the fixed lens, preferably at least 10 times per minute for a nearly continuous stream of absorption spectrum data. 2 figures.

  6. DHS Internship Summary-Crystal Assembly at Different Length Scales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishchenko, L

    2009-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    I was part of a project in which in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to monitor growth and dissolution of atomic and colloidal crystals. At both length scales, the chemical environment of the system greatly altered crystal growth and dissolution. Calcium phosphate was used as a model system for atomic crystals. A dissolution-reprecipitation reaction was observed in this first system, involving the conversion of brushite (DCPD) to octacalcium phosphate (OCP). In the second system, polymeric colloidal crystals were dissolved in an ionic solvent, revealing the underlying structure of the crystal. The dissolved crystal was then regrown through an evaporative step method. Recently, we have also found that colloids can be reversibly deposited in situ onto an ITO (indium tin oxide) substrate via an electrochemistry setup. The overall goal of this project was to develop an understanding of the mechanisms that control crystallization and order, so that these might be controlled during material synthesis. Controlled assembly of materials over a range of length scales from molecules to nanoparticles to colloids is critical for designing new materials. In particular, developing materials for sensor applications with tailorable properties and long range order is important. In this work, we examine two of these length scales: small molecule crystallization of calcium phosphate (whose crystal phases include DCPD, OCP, and HAP) and colloidal crystallization of Poly(methyl methacrylate) beads. Atomic Force Microscopy is ideal for this line of work because it allows for the possibility of observing non-conducting samples in fluid during growth with high resolution ({approx} 10 nm). In fact, during atomic crystal growth one can observe changes in atomic steps, and with colloidal crystals, one can monitor the individual building blocks of the crystal. Colloids and atoms crystallize under the influence of different forces acting at different length scales as seen in Table 1. In particular, molecular crystals, which are typically dominated by ionic and covalent bonding, are an order of magnitude more strongly bonded than colloidal crystals. In molecular crystals, ordering is driven by the interaction potentials between molecules. By contrast, colloidal assembly is a competition between the repulsive electrostatic forces that prevent aggregation in solution (due to surface charge), and short-range van der Waals and entropic forces that leads to ordering. Understanding atomic crystallization is fundamentally important for fabrication of tailorable crystalline materials, for example for biological or chemical sensors. The transformation of brushite to OCP not only serves as a model system for atomic crystal growth (applicable to many other crystal growth processes), but is also important in bone cements. Colloidal crystals have unique optical properties which respond to chemical and mechanical stimuli, making them very important for sensing applications. The mechanism of colloidal crystal assembly is thus fundamentally important. Our in situ dissolution and regrowth experiments are one good method of analyzing how these crystals pack under different conditions and how defect sites are formed and filled. In these experiments, a silica additive was used to strengthen the colloidal crystal during initial assembly (ex situ) and to increase domain size and long range order. Reversible electrodeposition of colloids onto a conductive substrate (ITO in our case) is another system which can further our knowledge of colloidal assembly. This experiment holds promise of allowing in situ observation of colloidal crystal growth and the influence of certain additives on crystal order. The ultimate goal would be to achieve long range order in these crystals by changing the surface charge or the growth environment.

  7. Query-Efficient Locally Decodable Codes of Subexponential Length

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chee, Yeow Meng; Ling, San; Wang, Huaxiong; Zhang, Liang Feng

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop the algebraic theory behind the constructions of Yekhanin (2008) and Efremenko (2009), in an attempt to understand the ``algebraic niceness'' phenomenon in $\\mathbb{Z}_m$. We show that every integer $m = pq = 2^t -1$, where $p$, $q$ and $t$ are prime, possesses the same good algebraic property as $m=511$ that allows savings in query complexity. We identify 50 numbers of this form by computer search, which together with 511, are then applied to gain improvements on query complexity via Itoh and Suzuki's composition method. More precisely, we construct a $3^{\\lceil r/2\\rceil}$-query LDC for every positive integer $rLDC for every integer $r\\geq 104$, both of length $N_{r}$, improving the $2^r$ queries used by Efremenko (2009) and $3\\cdot 2^{r-2}$ queries used by Itoh and Suzuki (2010). We also obtain new efficient private information retrieval (PIR) schemes from the new query-efficient LDCs.

  8. Analysis and Optimization of "Full-Length" Diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schock, Alfred

    2012-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of analyzing the axial variation of the heat generation rate, temperature, voltage, current density and emitter heat flux in a thermionic converter is described. The method is particularly useful for the case of "long" diodes, each extending over the full length of the reactor core. For a given diode geometry and fuel distribution, the analysis combines a nuclear solution of the axial fission density profile with the iterative solution of four differential equations representing the thermal, electrical, and thermionic interactions within the diode. The digital computer program developed to solve these equations can also perform a design optimization with respect to lead resistance, load voltage, and emitter thickness, for a specified maximum emitter temperature. Typical results are presented, and the use of this analysis for predicting the diode operating characteristics is illustrated.

  9. Characteristic length of an AdS/CFT superconductor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kengo Maeda; Takashi Okamura

    2008-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate in more detail the holographic model of a superconductor recently found by Hartnoll, Herzog, and Horowitz [Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 031601], which is constructed from a condensate of a charged scalar field in AdS_4-Schwarzschild background. By analytically studying the perturbation of the gravitational system near the critical temperature T_c, we obtain the superconducting coherence length proportional to 1/\\sqrt{1-T/T_c} via AdS/CFT correspondence. By adding a small external homogeneous magnetic field to the system, we find that a stationary diamagnetic current proportional to the square of the order parameter is induced by the magnetic field. These results agree with Ginzburg-Landau theory and strongly support the idea that a superconductor can be described by a charged scalar field on a black hole via AdS/CFT duality.

  10. Multi-element probabilistic collocation method in high dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foo, Jasmine [Division of Applied Mathematics, Brown University, 182 George St., Box F, Providence, RI 02912 (United States); Karniadakis, George Em [Division of Applied Mathematics, Brown University, 182 George St., Box F, Providence, RI 02912 (United States)], E-mail: gk@dam.brown.edu

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We combine multi-element polynomial chaos with analysis of variance (ANOVA) functional decomposition to enhance the convergence rate of polynomial chaos in high dimensions and in problems with low stochastic regularity. Specifically, we employ the multi-element probabilistic collocation method MEPCM and so we refer to the new method as MEPCM-A. We investigate the dependence of the convergence of MEPCM-A on two decomposition parameters, the polynomial order {mu} and the effective dimension {nu}, with {nu}<dimension. Numerical tests for multi-dimensional integration and for stochastic elliptic problems suggest that {nu}{>=}{mu} for monotonic convergence of the method. We also employ MEPCM-A to obtain error bars for the piezometric head at the Hanford nuclear waste site under stochastic hydraulic conductivity conditions. Finally, we compare the cost of MEPCM-A against Monte Carlo in several hundred dimensions, and we find MEPCM-A to be more efficient for up to 600 dimensions for a specific multi-dimensional integration problem involving a discontinuous function.

  11. Mass Generation and Related Issues from Exotic Higher Dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rojas, M; Colatto, L P; Matheus-Valle, J L; De Assis, L P G; Helayel-Neto, J A

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main purpose of this work is to show that massless Dirac equation formulated for non-interacting Majorana-Weyl spinors in higher dimensions, particularly in D=1+9 and D=5+5, can lead to an interpretation of massive Majorana and Dirac spinors in D=1+3. By adopting suitable representations of the Dirac matrices in higher dimensions, we pursue the investigation of which higher dimensional space-times and which mass-shell relation concerning massless Dirac equations in higher dimensions may induce massive spinors in D=1+3. The mixing of the chiral fermions in higher dimensions may induce a mechanism such that four massive Majorana fermions may show up and, at an appropriate limit an almost zero and a huge mass show up with corresponding left-handed and right-handed eigenstates. This mechanism, in a peculiar way, could reassess the See-Saw scheme associated to neutrino with Majorana-type masses. Remarkably the masses of the particles are fixed by the dimension decoupling/reduction scheme based on the mass Lore...

  12. CMM Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, Robert C.

    2008-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This project addressed coordinate measuring machine (CMM) technology and model-based engineering. CMM data analysis and delivery were enhanced through the addition of several machine types to the inspection summary program. CMM hardware and software improvements were made with the purchases of calibration and setup equipment and new model-based software for the creation of inspection programs. Kansas City Plant (KCP) personnel contributed to and influenced the development of dimensional metrology standards. Model-based engineering capabilities were expanded through the development of software for the tolerance analysis of piece parts and for the creation of model-based CMM inspection programs and inspection plans and through the purchase of off-the-shelf software for the tolerance analysis of mechanical assemblies. An obsolete database application used to track jobs in Precision Measurement was replaced by a web-based application with improved query and reporting capabilities. A potential project to address the transformation of the dimensional metrology enterprise at the Kansas City Plant was identified.

  13. Sewing on the Frame: Medieval Iberian Frametale Collections as Book-length Narratives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nielsen, Karla Ann Merino

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Novella: The European Tale Collection from Boccaccio andIberian Frametale Collections as Book-length Narratives byIberian Frametale Collections as Book-length Narratives by

  14. Lambda-Neutron Scattering Lengths from Radiative K-minus Capture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. R. Gibbs; S. A. Coon; H. K. Han; B. F. Gibson

    2000-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiative capture of the K-minus by the deuteron as a reaction for measurement of the Lambda-neutron scattering lengths. The use of spin information to separate the singlet and triplet scattering lengths is treated.

  15. E-Print Network 3.0 - active recombinant full-length Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the locus of integration... ), recombination between the 5 eyfp cassette and this down- stream 3 eyfp fragment cannot give rise to full-length... by restoration of full-length...

  16. Fuzzy Partitioning Using Real Coded Variable Length Genetic Algorithm for Pixel Classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandyopadhyay, Sanghamitra

    , fuzzy clustering, pattern recognition, remote sensing imagery, Department of Computer Science, KalyaniFuzzy Partitioning Using Real Coded Variable Length Genetic Algorithm for Pixel Classification space. Real-coded variable string length genetic fuzzy clustering with automatic evolution of clusters

  17. On the selection of dimension reduction techniques for scientific applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan, Y J; Kamath, C

    2012-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Many dimension reduction methods have been proposed to discover the intrinsic, lower dimensional structure of a high-dimensional dataset. However, determining critical features in datasets that consist of a large number of features is still a challenge. In this paper, through a series of carefully designed experiments on real-world datasets, we investigate the performance of different dimension reduction techniques, ranging from feature subset selection to methods that transform the features into a lower dimensional space. We also discuss methods that calculate the intrinsic dimensionality of a dataset in order to understand the reduced dimension. Using several evaluation strategies, we show how these different methods can provide useful insights into the data. These comparisons enable us to provide guidance to a user on the selection of a technique for their dataset.

  18. Fermions in odd space-time dimensions: back to basics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bashir, A; Galicia, Ma. de Jesus Anguiano

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is a well known feature of odd space-time dimensions $d$ that there exist two inequivalent fundamental representations $A$ and $B$ of the Dirac gamma matrices. Moreover, the parity transformation swaps the fermion fields living in $A$ and $B$. As a consequence, a parity invariant Lagrangian can only be constructed by incorporating both the representations. Based upon these ideas and contrary to long held belief, we show that in addition to a discrete exchange symmetry for the massless case, we can also define chiral symmetry provided the Lagrangian contains fields corresponding to both the inequivalent representations. We also study the transformation properties of the corresponding chiral currents under parity and charge conjugation operations. We work explicitly in 2+1 dimensions and later show how some of these ideas generalize to an arbitrary number of odd dimensions.

  19. Fermions in odd space-time dimensions: back to basics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Bashir; Ma. de Jesus Anguiano Galicia

    2005-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    It is a well known feature of odd space-time dimensions $d$ that there exist two inequivalent fundamental representations $A$ and $B$ of the Dirac gamma matrices. Moreover, the parity transformation swaps the fermion fields living in $A$ and $B$. As a consequence, a parity invariant Lagrangian can only be constructed by incorporating both the representations. Based upon these ideas and contrary to long held belief, we show that in addition to a discrete exchange symmetry for the massless case, we can also define chiral symmetry provided the Lagrangian contains fields corresponding to both the inequivalent representations. We also study the transformation properties of the corresponding chiral currents under parity and charge conjugation operations. We work explicitly in 2+1 dimensions and later show how some of these ideas generalize to an arbitrary number of odd dimensions.

  20. Probing Large Extra Dimensions With IceCube

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arman Esmaili; O. L. G. Peres; Zahra Tabrizi

    2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    In models with Large Extra Dimensions the smallness of neutrino masses can be naturally explained by introducing gauge singlet fermions which propagate in the bulk. The Kaluza-Klein modes of these fermions appear as towers of sterile neutrino states on the brane. We study the phenomenological consequences of this picture for the high energy atmospheric neutrinos. For this purpose we construct a detailed equivalence between a model with large extra dimensions and a (3 + n) scenario consisting of three active and n extra sterile neutrino states, which provides a clear intuitive understanding of Kaluza-Klein modes. Finally, we analyze the collected data of high energy atmospheric neutrinos by IceCube experiment and obtain bounds on the radius of extra dimensions.

  1. Dark Energy from Casimir Energy on Noncommutative Extra Dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Fabi; B. Harms; G. Karatheodoris

    2006-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the possibility that dark energy is a manifestation of the Casimir energy on extra dimensions with the topology of $S^2$. We consider our universe to be $M^4 \\times S^2$ and modify the geometry by introducing noncommutativity on the extra dimensions only, i.e. replacing $S^2$ with the fuzzy version $S_{F}^2$. We find the energy density as a function of the size of the representation $M+1$ of the algebra of $S_{F}^2$, and we calculate its value for the $M+1=2$ case. The value of the energy density turns out to be positive, i.e. provides dark energy, and the size of the extra dimensions agrees with the experimental limit. We also recover the correct commutative limit as the noncommutative parameter goes to zero.

  2. An electrical resistance method for determining the fiber length distribution of cotton lint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartstack, Albert W

    1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . . ~. . . o ~ o . i e ~ e Specimen Clamp Vise ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Page ~ ~ ~ 14 5 16 Instrumentation for %ms u'ing and Recotrd&g the Length of Cotton Fibers. . . . ~ IB 5. Ezpcrimsntal Setup for Nsasuring the Length Distribution... the difference 'n fiber length was cl earil reer, o?sibbs for inferior processing arid yarn quality, Abided et al (5) nake this statement conci ming length: A review of the previous work done on the relationship between the fiber-properties and the spinrdng...

  3. RECURRENCE, DIMENSION AND ENTROPY AI-HUA FAN, DE-JUN FENG AND JUN WU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Ai-Hua

    about the Hausdorff dimension dimH , the packing dimension dimP and the upper box dimension dimB (see [8 setting, topological entropy is related to dimension by 1 log m htop (E()) l dimH (E()) l dimP (E

  4. Plasma technology directory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, P.P.; Dybwad, G.L.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Plasma Technology Directory has two main goals: (1) promote, coordinate, and share plasma technology experience and equipment within the Department of Energy; and (2) facilitate technology transfer to the commercial sector where appropriate. Personnel are averaged first by Laboratory and next by technology area. The technology areas are accelerators, cleaning and etching deposition, diagnostics, and modeling.

  5. Software-only Multiple Variable Length Decoding for Real-Time Video on MDSP*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhary, Vipin

    3.44 Software-only Multiple Variable Length Decoding for Real- Time Video on MDSP* Ganesh Yadav', R Inc. Abstract-We present the multiple variable length decode algorithm implemented in most video mechanism. I. INTRODUCTION Variable Length Decoding (VLD) is the most important part of the video standards

  6. QueueTrak: Automated Line Length Detection using a Wireless Sensor Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitehouse, Kamin

    , it uses a series of custom active infrared sensors to detect the length of a line in a store or restaurant the design, implementation, and evaluation of QueueTrak, a sensor network that measures the length of linesQueueTrak: Automated Line Length Detection using a Wireless Sensor Network Jared Alexander, Matthew

  7. A New Technique To Determine The Upper Threshold for Finite Length Turbo Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaturvedi, A K

    A New Technique To Determine The Upper Threshold for Finite Length Turbo Codes A.Rajeshand A in finite frame length turbo codes. These thresholds depend on the component encoder as well as the frame to indecisive and unequivocal fixed points respectively, for finiteframe length turbo codes. Concurrently, Gamal

  8. A Critical "Dimension" in a Shell Model for Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paolo Giuliani; Mogens H. Jensen; Victor Yakhot

    2001-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the GOY shell model within the scenario of a critical dimension in fully developed turbulence. By changing the conserved quantities, one can continuously vary an ``effective dimension'' between $d=2$ and $d=3$. We identify a critical point between these two situations where the flux of energy changes sign and the helicity flux diverges. Close to the critical point the energy spectrum exhibits a turbulent scaling regime followed by a plateau of thermal equilibrium. We identify scaling laws and perform a rescaling argument to derive a relation between the critical exponents. We further discuss the distribution function of the energy flux.

  9. Bulk torsion fields in theories with large extra dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biswarup Mukhopadhyaya; Somasri Sen; Soumitra SenGupta

    2002-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the consequences of spacetime torsion coexisting with gravity in the bulk in scenarios with large extra dimensions. Having linked torsion with the Kalb-Ramond antisymmetric tensor field arising in string theories, we examine its artifacts on the visible 3-brane when the extra dimensions are compactified. It is found that while torsion would have led to parity violation in a 4-dimensional framework, all parity violating effects disappear on the visible brane when the torsion originates in the bulk. However, such a scenario is found to have characteristics of its own, some of which can be phenomenologically significant.

  10. Fractal dimension analysis in a highly granular calorimeter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruan, M; Brient, J.C; Jeans, D; Videau, H

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The concept of “particle flow” has been developed to optimise the jet energy resolution by distinguishing the different jet components. A highly granular calorimeter designed for the particle flow algorithm provides an unprecedented level of detail for the reconstruction of calorimeter showers and enables new approaches to shower analysis. In this paper the measurement and use of the fractal dimension of showers is described. The fractal dimension is a characteristic number that measures the global compactness of the shower. It is highly dependent on the primary particle type and energy. Its application in identifying particles and estimating their energy is described in the context of a calorimeter designed for the International Linear Collider.

  11. Fujita LaboratoryTokyo Instituteof Technology Tokyo Instituteof Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fujita LaboratoryTokyo Instituteof Technology Tokyo Instituteof Technology Fujita LaboratoryTokyo Institute of Technology Tokyo Institute of Technology 231 #12;Fujita LaboratoryTokyo Instituteof Technology Tokyo Instituteof Technology 2 IT #12;Fujita LaboratoryTokyo Instituteof

  12. PAVEMENT TECHNOLOGY UPDATE This Technology Transfer Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    PAVEMENT TECHNOLOGY UPDATE This Technology Transfer Program publication is funded by the Division by the University of California Pavement Research Center. The University of California Pavement Research Center Using innovative research and sound engineering principles to improve pavement structures, materials

  13. Northwestern University Information Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shull, Kenneth R.

    ... Integrated Technology Classrooms Online Lectures Collaborative Course Management Tools ...in any teaching environment Classroom Laptop Mobile Device www.it.northwestern.edu NUITAcademic&ResearchTechnologiesNorthwestern University Information Technology (NUIT) is committed to supporting faculty research

  14. Age-related changes in the plasticity and toughness of human cortical bone at multiple length-scales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zimmermann, Elizabeth A.; Schaible, Eric; Bale, Hrishikesh; Barth, Holly D.; Tang, Simon Y.; Reichert, Peter; Busse, Bjoern; Alliston, Tamara; Ager III, Joel W.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The structure of human cortical bone evolves over multiple length-scales from its basic constituents of collagen and hydroxyapatite at the nanoscale to osteonal structures at nearmillimeter dimensions, which all provide the basis for its mechanical properties. To resist fracture, bone’s toughness is derived intrinsically through plasticity (e.g., fibrillar sliding) at structural-scales typically below a micron and extrinsically (i.e., during crack growth) through mechanisms (e.g., crack deflection/bridging) generated at larger structural-scales. Biological factors such as aging lead to a markedly increased fracture risk, which is often associated with an age-related loss in bone mass (bone quantity). However, we find that age-related structural changes can significantly degrade the fracture resistance (bone quality) over multiple lengthscales. Using in situ small-/wide-angle x-ray scattering/diffraction to characterize sub-micron structural changes and synchrotron x-ray computed tomography and in situ fracture-toughness measurements in the scanning electron microscope to characterize effects at micron-scales, we show how these age-related structural changes at differing size-scales degrade both the intrinsic and extrinsic toughness of bone. Specifically, we attribute the loss in toughness to increased non-enzymatic collagen cross-linking which suppresses plasticity at nanoscale dimensions and to an increased osteonal density which limits the potency of crack-bridging mechanisms at micron-scales. The link between these processes is that the increased stiffness of the cross-linked collagen requires energy to be absorbed by “plastic” deformation at higher structural levels, which occurs by the process of microcracking.

  15. 2010 DOE EERE Vehicle Technologies Program Merit Review ? Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology Integration 2010 DOE EERE Vehicle Technologies Program Merit Review Technology Integration Technology integration merit review results 2010amr08.pdf More...

  16. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2010 Fuel Technologies R&D Annual...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Technologies R&D Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2010 Fuel Technologies R&D Annual Progress Report The Fuels Technologies subprogram supports fuels and...

  17. On the Lengths, Colours and Ages of Bars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Combes; J. Palous; Dimitri A. Gadotti; Ronaldo E. De Souza

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract. In an effort to obtain further observational evidences for secular evolution processes in galaxies, as well as observational constraints to current theoretical models of secular evolution, we have used BVRI and Ks images of a sample of 18 barred galaxies to measure the lengths and colours of bars, create colour maps and estimate global colour gradients. In addition, applying a method we developed in a previous article, we could distinguish for 7 galaxies in our sample those whose bars have been recently formed from the ones with already evolved bars. We estimated an average difference in the optical colours between young and evolved bars that may be translated to an age difference of the order of 10 Gyr, meaning that bars may be long standing structures. Moreover, our results show that, on average, evolved bars are longer than young bars. This seems to indicate that, during its evolution, a bar grows longer by capturing stars from the disk, in agreement with recent numerical and analytical results.

  18. Thermal management of long-length HTS cable systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demko, Jonathan A [ORNL; Hassenzahl, William V [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Projections of electric power production suggest a major shift to renewables, such as wind and solar, which will be in remote locations where massive quantities of power are available. One solution for transmitting this power over long distances to load centers is direct current (dc), high temperature superconducting (HTS) cables. Electric transmission via dc cables promises to be effective because of the low-loss, highcurrent- carrying capability of HTS wire at cryogenic temperatures. However, the thermal management system for the cable must be carefully designed to achieve reliable and energyefficient operation. Here we extend the analysis of a superconducting dc cable concept proposed by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), which has one stream of liquid nitrogen flowing in a cryogenic enclosure that includes the power cable, and a separate return tube for the nitrogen. Refrigeration stations positioned every 10 to 20 km cool both nitrogen streams. Both go and return lines are contained in a single vacuum/cryogenic envelope. Other coolants, including gaseous helium and gaseous hydrogen, could provide potential advantages, though they bring some technical challenges to the operation of long-length HTS dc cable systems. A discussion of the heat produced in superconducting cables and a system to remove the heat are discussed. Also, an analysis of the use of various cryogenic fluids in long-distance HTS power cables is presented.

  19. Vehicle Technologies Office: News

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    EERE intends to issue, on behalf of its Fuel Cell Technologies Office, a Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) entitled "Fuel Cell Technologies Incubator: Innovations in Fuel Cell and Hydrogen...

  20. Storage and IO Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Burst Buffer User Defined Images Archive Home R & D Storage and IO Technologies Storage and IO Technologies Burst Buffer NVRAM and Burst Buffer Use Cases In collaboration...

  1. Technology Integration Overview

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Technology Integration Overview Dennis A. Smith - Clean Cities Deployment Connie Bezanson - Vehicle Education June 17, 2014 VEHICLE TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE This presentation does not...

  2. Integrated Technology Deployment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Integrated technology deployment is a comprehensive approach to implementing solutions that increase the use of energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. Federal, state, and local...

  3. Technology Transfer Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) Oil & Gas Technology Transfer Initiatives USEFUL LINKS Association of University Technology Managers (AUTM) Federal Laboratory...

  4. Green Purchasing & Green Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Purchasing & Technology Goals 6 & 7: Green Purchasing & Green Technology Our goal is to purchase and use environmentally sustainable products whenever possible and to implement...

  5. Geothermal Technologies Program Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Jay Nathwani Acting Program Manager Geothermal Technologies Program Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy The Geothermal Technologies Program Overview May 18 2010 Energy...

  6. States & Emerging Energy Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    operations and maintenance, and occupant impact, so not only trying to quantify building energy or technology energy performance, but also the impacts of that technology on users....

  7. Carbon Fiber Technology Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The Carbon Fiber Technology Facility is relevant in proving the scale- up of low-cost carbon fiber precursor materials and advanced manufacturing technologies * Significant...

  8. Fuel & Lubricant Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    May 15, 2012 Kevin Stork, Team Lead VTP Annual Merit Review VTP Fuel & Lubricant Technologies eere.energy.gov 2 | Vehicle Technologies Program Mission Enable advanced combustion...

  9. Yang-Mills like instantons in eight and seven dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. K. Loginov; E. D. Loginova

    2014-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a gauge theory in which a nonassociative Moufang loop takes the place of a structure group. We construct Belavin-Polyakov-Schwartz-Tyupkin (BPST) and t'Hooft like instanton solutions of the gauge theory in seven and eight dimensions.

  10. Fractal dimension and turbulence in Giant HII Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caicedo-Ortiz, H E; López-Bonilla, J; Castańeda, H O

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have measured the fractal dimensions of the Giant HII Regions Hubble X and Hubble V in NGC6822 using images obtained with the Hubble's Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2). These measures are associated with the turbulence observed in these regions, which is quantified through the velocity dispersion of emission lines in the visible. Our results suggest low turbulence behaviour.

  11. Power: The New Dimension of Test Patrick GIRARD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Power: The New Dimension of Test Patrick GIRARD WRTLT 2008WRTLT 2008 ­­ SapporoSapporo -- Japan;2 1. Relevance of power during test 2. Main test power issues 3. Reducing test power by dedicated techniques 4. Low Power Design and its implications on test 5. One step to the future Outline lirmm-00820640

  12. The Post Anachronism: The Temporal Dimension of Facebook Privacy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiter, Michael

    The Post Anachronism: The Temporal Dimension of Facebook Privacy Lujo Bauer , Lorrie Faith Cranor the audience and emphasis of Facebook posts change over time. In a 63-participant longitudinal study, par- ticipants gave their audience and emphasis preferences for up to ten of their Facebook posts in the week

  13. Independent Control of Multiple Magnetic Microrobots in Three Dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sitti, Metin

    Independent Control of Multiple Magnetic Microrobots in Three Dimensions Eric Diller, Joshua method to independently control multiple sub-mm microrobots in three dimen- sions (3D) using magnetic of geometrically or magnetically distinct microrobots which assume different magnetization directions in a rotating

  14. The Equivalence Principle as a Probe for Higher Dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul S. Wesson

    2006-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Higher-dimensional theories of the kind which may unify gravitation with particle physics can lead to significant modifications of general relativity. In five dimensions, the vacuum becomes non-standard, and the Weak Equivalence Principle becomes a geometrical symmetry which can be broken, perhaps at a level detectable by new tests in space.

  15. Looking into Higher Dimensions: Research with Joseph McMoneagle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan, Ronald

    by nuclear reactors can travel as far as 25 light- years in solid lead before being deflected. Another at nuclear distances, and see into higher dimensions. To "calibrate" McMoneagle, I asked him three things (in, if not the best: Joseph McMoneagle. [Joe has published four interesting and informative books on remote viewing

  16. PACKING DIMENSION RESULTS FOR ANISOTROPIC GAUSSIAN RANDOM FIELDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Yimin

    and GrX [0, 1]N are determined by the lower index of . Namely, dimP X [0, 1]N = min d, N , a.s. (1.5) and dimP GrX [0, 1]N = min N , N + (1 - )d , a.s., (1.6) where dimP E denotes the packing dimension of E

  17. PACKING DIMENSION RESULTS FOR ANISOTROPIC GAUSSIAN RANDOM FIELDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    by the lower index of . Namely, dimP X [0, 1]N = min d, N , a.s. (1.5) and dimP GrX [0, 1]N = min N , N + (1 - )d , a.s., (1.6) where dimP E denotes the packing dimension o

  18. Dimensioning hospital wards using the Erlang loss model Corresponding author

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -2006. Finally, we demonstrate the efficiency of merging departments. Keywords: hospital resource allocationDimensioning hospital wards using the Erlang loss model Corresponding author: A.M. de Bruin (MSc of Sciences Department of Mathematics Assistant professor Optimization of Business Processes L. van Zanten

  19. Upper bounds for multiphase composites in any dimension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luis Silvestre

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We prove a rigorous upper bound for the effective conductivity of an isotropic composite made of several isotropic components in any dimension. This upper bound coincides with the Hashin Shtrikman bound when the volume ratio of all phases but any two vanish.

  20. Top-kkk Preferences in High Dimensions Duke University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agarwal, Pankaj K.

    Top-kkk Preferences in High Dimensions Albert Yu Duke University syu@cs.duke.edu Pankaj K. Agarwal applications, users are interested only in a small num- ber (say, k) of "top" objects from a large set on preference top-k queries [9, 12, 13, 23, 38]. Motivated by applications in business analysis, Vlachou et al

  1. Favors from Facebook Friends: Unpacking Dimensions of Social Capital

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michigan, University of

    capital [5, 14, 19]. Social capital is a conceptual framework that considers the resources held by thoseFavors from Facebook Friends: Unpacking Dimensions of Social Capital Yumi Jung, Rebecca Gray]@umich.edu ABSTRACT Past research has demonstrated a link between perceptions of social capital and use of the popular

  2. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON IMAGE PROCESSING 1 Determining the Intrinsic Dimension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Damelin, Steven

    chemical unmixing [1], extracting speech signals in a noisy line [2], unmixing minerals [3] and unmixingIEEEProof IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON IMAGE PROCESSING 1 Determining the Intrinsic Dimension is an important step in the spectral unmixing process and under- or overestimation of this number may lead

  3. The 5th Dimension: Building Blocks for Smart Infrastructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    artifact. Obviously, since the books only pass the energy field of the reader for a few seconds, any formThe 5th Dimension: Building Blocks for Smart Infrastructures Marc Langheinrich ETH Zurich Institute example of such an interaction in 5D would be the following scenario: two "smart" (i.e., tagged) books

  4. Biocompatible Force Sensor with Optical Readout and Dimensions of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Straight, Aaron

    Biocompatible Force Sensor with Optical Readout and Dimensions of 6 nm3 Hari Shroff,,§ Bjo1rn M Received June 6, 2005 ABSTRACT We have developed a nanoscopic force sensor with optical readout. The sensor energy transfer. The sensor was calibrated between 0 and 20 pN using a combined magnetic tweezers

  5. Singularity free stars in (2+1) dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farook Rahaman; Ayan Banerjee; Irina Radinschi; Sumita Banerjee; Soumendranath Ruz

    2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We present some new types of non-singular model for anisotropic stars with constant $\\Lambda $ and variable $\\Lambda$ based on the Krori and Barua (KB) metric in $(2+1)$ dimensions. The solutions obtained here satisfy all the regularity conditions and its simple analytical form helps us to study the various physical properties of the configuration.

  6. PRIMITIVE ALGEBRAS WITH ARBITRARY GELFAND-KIRILLOV DIMENSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vishne, Uzi

    (1), (1999), 151-158 1. Preliminaries Let A be an affine k-algebra. The Gelfand-Kirillov dimension [6 A is finite dimensional. Otherwise GKdim(A) 1, and by Bergman's gap theorem [3], ei- ther GKdim(A) = 1 (in

  7. A procedure to Estimate the Fractal Dimension of Waveforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlos Sevcik

    2010-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for calculating the approximate fractal dimension from a set of N values y sampled from a waveform between time zero and t. The waveform was subjected to a double linear transformation that maps it into a unit square.

  8. Running Scaling Dimensions in Holographic Renormalization Group Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfgang Mueck

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Holographic renormalization group flows can be interpreted in terms of effective field theory. Based on such an interpretation, a formula for the running scaling dimensions of gauge-invariant operators along such flows is proposed. The formula is checked for some simple examples from the AdS/CFT correspondence, but can be applied also in non-AdS/non-CFT cases.

  9. Quantum Gravity in Three Dimensions from Higher-Spin Holography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, Hai Siong

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Higher Spin Anti-de Sitter Gravity,” JHEP 1012, 007 (2010)gravity in three dimensions from the per- spective of higher-spin holography in anti-gravity in three dimen- sions in the framework of higher-spin holography in anti-

  10. DIMENSIONS OF DISTRIBUTED LEADERSHIP IN THE SME CONTEXT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mottram, Nigel

    1 DIMENSIONS OF DISTRIBUTED LEADERSHIP IN THE SME CONTEXT Steve Kempster*, Jason Cope** and Ken IN THE SME CONTEXT Abstract. Entrepreneurial ventures are led as effectively by small teams as by individuals individual leadership within the SME context. The overlap between heroic individual leadership

  11. MODELLING THE ONSET OF DYNAMIC Importance of the Vertical Dimension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansen, Tom Henning

    ­block models of an elastic slider under dry friction. I apply Amontons­Coulomb friction at the block levelMODELLING THE ONSET OF DYNAMIC FRICTION Importance of the Vertical Dimension by JŘRGEN TRŘMBORG of the onset of dynamic friction. Optical methods give access to the sliding interface before and during

  12. Sliced Coordinate Analysis for Effective Dimension Reduction and Nonlinear Extensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwok, James Tin-Yau

    regression; Re- producing kernels. 1. INTRODUCTION The notion of effective dimension reduction (EDR, Li 1991 for estimating the EDR space. Unlike principal component regression, which first applies principal component of an input vector by regressing the input vector against the corresponding output to form an EDR space

  13. DISORDERED BOSE EINSTEIN CONDENSATES WITH INTERACTION IN ONE DIMENSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    DISORDERED BOSE EINSTEIN CONDENSATES WITH INTERACTION IN ONE DIMENSION ROBERT SEIRINGER, JAKOB- Pitaevskii regime. We prove that Bose Einstein condensation survives even a strong random potential with a high density of scatterers. The character of the wave func- tion of the condensate, however, depends

  14. Liquid pair correlations in four spatial dimensions: Theory versus simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Heinen; J. Horbach; H. Löwen

    2014-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Using liquid integral equation theory, we calculate the pair correlations of particles that interact via a smooth repulsive pair potential in d = 4 spatial dimensions. We discuss the performance of different closures for the Ornstein-Zernike equation, by comparing the results to computer simulation data. Our results are of relevance to understand crystal and glass formation in high-dimensional systems.

  15. Method for compression of data using single pass LZSS and run-length encoding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berlin, G.J.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method used preferably with LZSS-based compression methods for compressing a stream of digital data. The method uses a run-length encoding scheme especially suited for data strings of identical data bytes having large run-lengths, such as data representing scanned images. The method reads an input data stream to determine the length of the data strings. Longer data strings are then encoded in one of two ways depending on the length of the string. For data strings having run-lengths less than 18 bytes, a cleared offset and the actual run-length are written to an output buffer and then a run byte is written to the output buffer. For data strings of 18 bytes or longer, a set offset and an encoded run-length are written to the output buffer and then a run byte is written to the output buffer. The encoded run-length is written in two parts obtained by dividing the run length by a factor of 255. The first of two parts of the encoded run-length is the quotient; the second part is the remainder. Data bytes that are not part of data strings of sufficient length are written directly to the output buffer.

  16. Morgantown Energy Technology Center, technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document has been prepared by the DOE Environmental Management (EM) Office of Technology Development (OTD) to highlight its research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation activities funded through the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). Technologies and processes described have the potential to enhance DOE`s cleanup and waste management efforts, as well as improve US industry`s competitiveness in global environmental markets. METC`s R&D programs are focused on commercialization of technologies that will be carried out in the private sector. META has solicited two PRDAs for EM. The first, in the area of groundwater and soil technologies, resulted in twenty-one contact awards to private sector and university technology developers. The second PRDA solicited novel decontamination and decommissioning technologies and resulted in eighteen contract awards. In addition to the PRDAs, METC solicited the first EM ROA in 1993. The ROA solicited research in a broad range of EM-related topics including in situ remediation, characterization, sensors, and monitoring technologies, efficient separation technologies, mixed waste treatment technologies, and robotics. This document describes these technology development activities.

  17. Technology Deployment List | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Technologies Technology Deployment Technology Deployment List Technology Deployment List The Federal Energy Management Program's (FEMP) Technology Deployment List features...

  18. Technology transfer | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology transfer Technology Development and Commercialization at Argonne Read more about Technology Development and Commercialization at Argonne New Director to lead Technology...

  19. Department of Information Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flener, Pierre

    Department of Information Technology Human-Computer Interaction http://www.it.uu.se/research/hci #12;InformationTechnology-HCI Department of Information Technology | www.it.uu.se Today's menu Who we and collaboration Teaching KoF 2007, effects? Vision and plans Challenges #12;InformationTechnology

  20. The Technology & Innovation Centre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mottram, Nigel

    The Technology & Innovation Centre #12;The Technology and Innovation Centre revolutionises the way in Scotland and further afield ­ including power and energy, renewable technologies, photonics and sensors, for industry, the Technology and Innovation Centre has already attracted major partners including Scottish

  1. Predictive Maintenance Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Several diagnostic technologies and best practices are available to assist Federal agencies with predictive maintenance programs.

  2. Bridging the Technology Innovation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Bridging the Technology Innovation Gap Dr Ceri Williams Director of Medical Technologies Innovation Technologies #12;Distinctive Approach to Translating ResearchWe support innovation to reach TRL 5 enable real and Knowledge Centre #12;What is the Medical Technologies IKC? · All activities centre on research translation

  3. Soil washing technology evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suer, A.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental Restoration Engineering (ERE) continues to review innovative, efficient, and cost effective technologies for SRS soil and/or groundwater remediation. As part of this effort, this technical evaluation provides review and the latest information on the technology for SRS soil remediation. Additional technology evaluation reports will be issued periodically to update these reports. The purpose of this report is to review the soil washing technology and its potential application to SRS soil remediation. To assess whether the Soil Washing technology is a viable option for SRS soil remediation, it is necessary to review the technology/process, technology advantages/limitations, performance, applications, and cost analysis.

  4. Technology in water conservation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finch, Dr. Calvin

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2 tx H2O Summer 2013 Column by Dr. Calvin Finch, Water Conservation and Technology Center director WAT E R CONSERVATION & TECHNOLOGY CENTER Securing Our Water Future It is not unusual for individuals to describe water conservation as a... conservation, however, is just as dependent on technological factors. #27;e technology does not have to be complex to be important #20; consider high e#23;ciency toilets and showerheads. #27;ese everyday appliances largely rely on simple technologies...

  5. Technology in water conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finch, Dr. Calvin

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2 tx H2O Summer 2013 Column by Dr. Calvin Finch, Water Conservation and Technology Center director WAT E R CONSERVATION & TECHNOLOGY CENTER Securing Our Water Future It is not unusual for individuals to describe water conservation as a... conservation, however, is just as dependent on technological factors. #27;e technology does not have to be complex to be important #20; consider high e#23;ciency toilets and showerheads. #27;ese everyday appliances largely rely on simple technologies...

  6. Technology Overview Using Case Studies of Alternative Landfill Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    Technology Overview Using Case Studies of Alternative Landfill Technologies and Associated Regulatory Topics Prepared by Interstate Technology & Regulatory Council Alternative Landfill Technologies of Alternative Landfill Technologies and Associated Regulatory Topics March 2003 Prepared by Interstate

  7. Technology adaptation and boundary management in bona fide virtual groups.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Huiyan

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    specific tactics of media use that the groups studied used (such as leaving a daily voicemail to the senior management of other related groups, keeping two separate email lists, one for internal communication, the other one also included the members... aspects of medium, symmetry of initiation and response, etc. They differentiated media on these dimensions for the purpose of illustrating the complexity of media use. For example, email systems, which are often treated as one technology, may differ...

  8. Building Technologies Office Window and Envelope Technologies...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    by 2000 (10.7 billion in current dollars) Source: American Energy Innovation Council Case Studies on the Government's Role in Energy Technology Innovation "Low-Emissivity...

  9. NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY Technology Transfer Novel...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for "Outstanding Commercialization Success" from the Federal Laboratory Consortium for Technology Transfer. On October 4, 2012, the NETL team who developed this alloy received...

  10. Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Centers of Excellence to provide future generations of engineers and scientists with knowledge and skills in advanced automotive technologies. By funding curriculum...

  11. Vehicle Technologies Office: Electric Drive Technologies | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Electronics and Electric Motor R&D North American Power Electronics Supply Chain Analysis Benchmarking EV and HEV Technology View all presentations from the 2014 Merit Review....

  12. Plasma ion sources and ion beam technology inmicrofabrications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ji, Lili

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For over decades, focused ion beam (FIB) has been playing a very important role in microscale technology and research, among which, semiconductor microfabrication is one of its biggest application area. As the dimensions of IC devices are scaled down, it has shown the need for new ion beam tools and new approaches to the fabrication of small-scale devices. In the meanwhile, nanotechnology has also deeply involved in material science research and bioresearch in recent years. The conventional FIB systems which utilize liquid gallium ion sources to achieve nanometer scale resolution can no longer meet the various requirements raised from such a wide application area such as low contamination, high throughput and so on. The drive towards controlling materials properties at nanometer length scales relies on the availability of efficient tools. In this thesis, three novel ion beam tools have been developed and investigated as the alternatives for the conventional FIB systems in some particular applications. An integrated focused ion beam (FIB) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) system has been developed for direct doping or surface modification. This new instrument employs a mini-RF driven plasma source to generate focused ion beam with various ion species, a FEI two-lens electron (2LE) column for SEM imaging, and a five-axis manipulator system for sample positioning. An all-electrostatic two-lens column has been designed to focus the ion beam extracted from the source. Based on the Munro ion optics simulation, beam spot sizes as small as 100 nm can be achieved at beam energies between 5 to 35 keV if a 5 {micro}m-diameter extraction aperture is used. Smaller beam spot sizes can be obtained with smaller apertures at sacrifice of some beam current. The FEI 2LE column, which utilizes Schottky emission, electrostatic focusing optics, and stacked-disk column construction, can provide high-resolution (as small as 20 nm) imaging capability, with fairly long working distance (25 mm) at 25 keV beam voltage. Such an integrated FIB/SEM dual-beam system will not only improve the accuracy and reproducibility when performing ion beam sculpting and direct implantation processes, but will also enable researchers to perform cross-sectioning, imaging, and analysis with the same tool. A major advantage of this approach is the ability to produce a wide variety of ion species tailored to the application.

  13. Magnetic and Electric Black Holes in Arbitrary Dimension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adil Belhaj; Pablo Diaz; Antonio segui

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we compare two different objects: electric black holes and magnetic black holes in arbitrary dimension. The comparison is made in terms of the corresponding moduli space and their extremal geometries. We treat parallelly the magnetic and the electric cases. Specifically, we discuss the gravitational solution of these spherically symmetric objects in the presence of a positive cosmological constant. Then, we find the bounded region of the moduli space allowing the existence of black holes. After identifying it in both the electric and the magnetic case, we calculate the geometry that comes out between the horizons at the coalescence points. Although the electric and magnetic cases are both very different (only dual in four dimensions), gravity solutions seem to clear up most of the differences and lead to very similar geometries.

  14. Efficient Cluster Algorithm for Spin Glasses in Any Space Dimension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng Zhu; Andrew J. Ochoa; Helmut G. Katzgraber

    2015-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Spin systems with frustration and disorder are notoriously difficult to study both analytically and numerically. While the simulation of ferromagnetic statistical mechanical models benefits greatly from cluster algorithms, these accelerated dynamics methods remain elusive for generic spin-glass-like systems. Here we present a cluster algorithm for Ising spin glasses that works in any space dimension and speeds up thermalization by several orders of magnitude at temperatures where thermalization is typically difficult. Our isoenergetic cluster moves are based on the Houdayer cluster algorithm for two-dimensional spin glasses and lead to a speedup over conventional state-of-the-art methods that increases with the system size. We illustrate the benefits of the isoenergetic cluster moves in two and three space dimensions, as well as the nonplanar Chimera topology found in the D-Wave quantum annealing machine.

  15. Perturbative c-theorem in d-dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazuya Yonekura

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study perturbative behavior of free energies on a d-dimensional sphere S^d for theories with marginal interactions. The free energies are interpreted as the "dilaton effective action" with the dilaton having a nontrivial background vacuum expectation value. We compute the dependence of the free energies on the radius of the sphere by using dimensional regularization. It is shown that the first (second) derivative of the free energies in odd (even) dimensions with respect to the radius of the sphere are proportional to the square of the beta functions of coupling constants. The result is consistent with the c, F and a-theorems in two, three, four and six dimensions. The result is also used to rule out a large class of scale invariant theories which are not conformally invariant.

  16. Borromean ground state of fermions in two dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. G. Volosniev; D. V. Fedorov; A. S. Jensen; N. T. Zinner

    2014-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of quantum mechanical bound states is as old as quantum theory itself. Yet, it took many years to realize that three-body borromean systems that are bound when any two-body subsystem is unbound are abundant in nature. Here we demonstrate the existence of borromean systems of spin-polarized (spinless) identical fermions in two spatial dimensions. The ground state with zero orbital (planar) angular momentum exists in a borromean window between critical two- and three-body strengths. The doubly degenerate first excited states of angular momentum one appears only very close to the two-body threshold. They are the lowest in a possible sequence of so-called super-Efimov states. While the observation of the super-Efimov scaling could be very difficult, the borromean ground state should be observable in cold atomic gases and could be the basis for producing a quantum gas of three-body states in two dimensions.

  17. Global symmetries of Yang-Mills squared in various dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anastasiou, A; Hughes, M J; Nagy, S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tensoring two on-shell super Yang-Mills multiplets in dimensions $D\\leq 10$ yields an on-shell supergravity multiplet, possibly with additional matter multiplets. Associating a (direct sum of) division algebra(s) $\\mathbb{D}$ with each dimension $3\\leq D\\leq 10$ we obtain formulae for the algebras $\\mathfrak{g}$ and $\\mathfrak{h}$ of the U-duality group $G$ and its maximal compact subgroup $H$, respectively, in terms of the internal global symmetry algebras of each super Yang-Mills theory. We extend our analysis to include supergravities coupled to an arbitrary number of matter multiplets by allowing for non-supersymmetric multiplets in the tensor product.

  18. The Fractal Dimension of the Spectrum of the Fibonacci Hamiltonian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Damanik; Mark Embree; Anton Gorodetski; Serguei Tcheremchantsev

    2007-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the spectrum of the Fibonacci Hamiltonian and prove upper and lower bounds for its fractal dimension in the large coupling regime. These bounds show that as $\\lambda \\to \\infty$, $\\dim (\\sigma(H_\\lambda)) \\cdot \\log \\lambda$ converges to an explicit constant ($\\approx 0.88137$). We also discuss consequences of these results for the rate of propagation of a wavepacket that evolves according to Schr\\"odinger dynamics generated by the Fibonacci Hamiltonian.

  19. Fractal Zeta Functions and Complex Dimensions of Relative Fractal Drums

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michel L. Lapidus; Goran Radunovi?; Darko Žubrini?

    2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The theory of 'zeta functions of fractal strings' has been initiated by the first author in the early 1990s, and developed jointly with his collaborators during almost two decades of intensive research in numerous articles and several monographs. In 2009, the same author introduced a new class of zeta functions, called `distance zeta functions', which since then, has enabled us to extend the existing theory of zeta functions of fractal strings and sprays to arbitrary bounded (fractal) sets in Euclidean spaces of any dimension. A natural and closely related tool for the study of distance zeta functions is the class of 'tube zeta functions', defined using the tube function of a fractal set. These three classes of zeta functions, under the name of 'fractal zeta functions', exhibit deep connections with Minkowski contents and upper box dimensions, as well as, more generally, with the complex dimensions of fractal sets. Further extensions include zeta functions of relative fractal drums, the box dimension of which can assume negative values, including minus infinity. We also survey some results concerning the existence of the meromorphic extensions of the spectral zeta functions of fractal drums, based in an essential way on earlier results of the first author on the spectral (or eigenvalue) asymptotics of fractal drums. It follows from these results that the associated spectral zeta function has a (nontrivial) meromorphic extension, and we use some of our results about fractal zeta functions to show the new fact according to which the upper bound obtained for the corresponding abscissa of meromorphic convergence is optimal. Finally, we conclude this survey article by proposing several open problems and directions for future research in this area.

  20. PACKING-DIMENSION PROFILES AND FRACTIONAL BROWNIAN MOTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khoshnevisan, Davar

    analytic set E RN and every integer 1 m N, (1.1) dimP (PV E) = DimmE for n,m-almost all V Gn,m, Date is the packing dimension dimP E. The principle aim of this note is to prove that (1.2) holds for all real numbers, 1985, Chapter 18). Xiao (1997) proved that for every analytic set E RN , (1.3) dimP X(E) = 1 H Dim

  1. Auto-Concealment of Supersymmetry in Extra Dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savas Dimopoulos; Kiel Howe; John March-Russell; James Scoville

    2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    In supersymmetric (SUSY) theories with extra dimensions the visible energy in sparticle decays can be significantly reduced and its energy distribution broadened, thus significantly weakening the present collider limits on SUSY. The mechanism applies when the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP) is a bulk state-- e.g. a bulk modulino, axino, or gravitino-- the size of the extra dimensions larger than ~$10^{-14}$ cm, and for a broad variety of visible sparticle spectra. In such cases the lightest ordinary supersymmetric particle (LOSP), necessarily a brane-localised state, decays to the Kaluza-Klein (KK) discretuum of the LSP. This dynamically realises the compression mechanism for hiding SUSY as decays into the more numerous heavier KK LSP states are favored. We find LHC limits on right-handed slepton LOSPs evaporate, while LHC limits on stop LOSPs weaken to ~350-410 GeV compared to ~700 GeV for a stop decaying to a massless LSP. Similarly, for the searches we consider, present limits on direct production of degenerate first and second generation squarks drop to ~450 GeV compared to ~800 GeV for a squark decaying to a massless LSP. Auto-concealment typically works for a fundamental gravitational scale of $M_*$~10-100 TeV, a scale sufficiently high that traditional searches for signatures of extra dimensions are mostly avoided. If superpartners are discovered, their prompt, displaced, or stopped decays can also provide new search opportunities for extra dimensions with the potential to reach $M_*$~$10^9$ GeV. This mechanism applies more generally than just SUSY theories, pertaining to any theory where there is a discrete quantum number shared by both brane and bulk sectors.

  2. Team Massachusetts Brings a Fourth Dimension to the Solar Decathlon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Team Massachusetts is bringing a unique perspective to the Solar Decathlon this fall. You might say it is a fourth dimension because of the team’s newly constructed 4D Home. But it could also be argued that it is because the Massachusetts College of Art and Design and University of Massachusetts Lowell are collaborating for the team’s first entry into the biannual competition, and they’re both public institutions.

  3. Zero point energy on extra dimension: Noncommutative Torus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Fabi; B. Harms; G. Karatheodoris

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we calculate the zero point energy density experienced by observers on M^4 due to a massless scalar field defined throughout M^4 x T^2_F, where T^2_F are fuzzy extra dimensions. Using the Green's function approach we calculate the energy density for the commutative torus and the fuzzy torus. We calculate then the energy density for the fuzzy torus using the Hamiltonian approach. Agreement is shown between Green's function and Hamiltonian approaches.

  4. Bosonization in higher dimensions via noncommutative field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexios P. Polychronakos

    2006-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose the bosonization of a many-body fermion theory in D spatial dimensions through a noncommutative field theory on a (2D-1)-dimensional space. This theory leads to a chiral current algebra over the noncommutative space and reproduces the correct perturbative Hilbert space and excitation energies for the fermions. The validity of the method is demonstrated by bosonizing a two-dimensional gas of fermions in a harmonic trap.

  5. Bosonization in Higher Dimensions via Noncommutative Field Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polychronakos, Alexios P. [Physics Department, City College of the CUNY, New York, New York 10031 (United States)

    2006-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose the bosonization of a many-body fermion theory in D spatial dimensions through a noncommutative field theory on a (2D-1)-dimensional space. This theory leads to a chiral current algebra over the noncommutative space and reproduces the correct perturbative Hilbert space and excitation energies for the fermions. The validity of the method is demonstrated by bosonizing a two-dimensional gas of fermions in a harmonic trap.

  6. Persistence-Length Renormalization of Polymers in a Crowded Environment of Hard Disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sebastian Schöbl; Sebastian Sturm; Wolfhard Janke; Klaus Kroy

    2014-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The most conspicuous property of a semiflexible polymer is its persistence length, defined as the decay length of tangent correlations along its contour. Using an efficient stochastic growth algorithm to sample polymers embedded in a quenched two-dimensional hard-disk fluid, we find apparent wormlike chain statistics with a renormalized persistence length. We identify a universal form of the disorder renormalization that suggests itself as a quantitative measure of molecular crowding.

  7. Perturbation hydrogen-atom spectrum in deformed space with minimal length

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. M. Stetsko; V. M. Tkachuk

    2006-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We study energy spectrum for hydrogen atom with deformed Heisenberg algebra leading to minimal length. We develop correct perturbation theory free of divergences. It gives a possibility to calculate analytically in the 3D case the corrections to $s$-levels of hydrogen atom caused by the minimal length. Comparing our result with experimental data from precision hydrogen spectroscopy an upper bound for the minimal length is obtained.

  8. Fractal dimensions of the galaxy distribution varying by steps?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marie-Noelle Celerier; Reuben Thieberger

    2005-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The structure of the large scale distribution of the galaxies have been widely studied since the publication of the first catalogs. Since large redshift samples are available, their analyses seem to show fractal correlations up to the observational limits. The value of the fractal dimension(s) calculated by different authors have become the object of a large debate, as have been the value of the expected transition from fractality to a possible large scale homogeneity. Moreover, some authors have proposed that different scaling regimes might be discerned at different lenght scales. To go further on into this issue, we have applied the correlation integral method to the wider sample currently available. We therefore obtain a fractal dimension of the galaxy distribution which seems to vary by steps whose width might be related to the organization hierarchy observed for the galaxies. This result could explain some of the previous results obtained by other authors from the analyses of less complete catalogs and maybe reconcile their apparent discrepancy. However, the method applied here needs to be further checked, since it produces odd fluctuations at each transition scale, which need to be thoroughly explained.

  9. Dark energy and extending the geodesic equations of motion: connecting the galactic and cosmological length scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Speliotopoulos, A. D.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    z RESEARCH ARTICLE Dark energy and extending the geodesicof motion using the Dark Energy length scale was proposed.observations. Keywords Dark energy · Galactic density pro?le

  10. Time and length scales within a fire and implications for numerical simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TIESZEN,SHELDON R.

    2000-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A partial non-dimensionalization of the Navier-Stokes equations is used to obtain order of magnitude estimates of the rate-controlling transport processes in the reacting portion of a fire plume as a function of length scale. Over continuum length scales, buoyant times scales vary as the square root of the length scale; advection time scales vary as the length scale, and diffusion time scales vary as the square of the length scale. Due to the variation with length scale, each process is dominant over a given range. The relationship of buoyancy and baroclinc vorticity generation is highlighted. For numerical simulation, first principles solution for fire problems is not possible with foreseeable computational hardware in the near future. Filtered transport equations with subgrid modeling will be required as two to three decades of length scale are captured by solution of discretized conservation equations. By whatever filtering process one employs, one must have humble expectations for the accuracy obtainable by numerical simulation for practical fire problems that contain important multi-physics/multi-length-scale coupling with up to 10 orders of magnitude in length scale.

  11. amplified-fragment length polymorphism: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NOTE Shannon L. Datwyler,1,2 Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: in Hemp and Marijuana (Cannabis sativa L.) According to Amplified Fragment Length...

  12. SHARED TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GRIFFIN, JOHN M. HAUT, RICHARD C.

    2008-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The program established a collaborative process with domestic industries for the purpose of sharing Navy-developed technology. Private sector businesses were educated so as to increase their awareness of the vast amount of technologies that are available, with an initial focus on technology applications that are related to the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies (Hydrogen) Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. Specifically, the project worked to increase industry awareness of the vast technology resources available to them that have been developed with taxpayer funding. NAVSEA-Carderock and the Houston Advanced Research Center teamed with Nicholls State University to catalog NAVSEA-Carderock unclassified technologies, rated the level of readiness of the technologies and established a web based catalog of the technologies. In particular, the catalog contains technology descriptions, including testing summaries and overviews of related presentations.

  13. HAUSDORFF DIMENSION, ANALYTIC SETS AND TRANSCENDENCE G. A. EDGAR AND CHRIS MILLER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edgar, Gerald

    HAUSDORFF DIMENSION, ANALYTIC SETS AND TRANSCENDENCE G. A. EDGAR AND CHRIS MILLER Abstract. Every of Edgar [5], Falconer [7], Mattila [9] or [11] for details). From now on, "dimension" means "Hausdorff

  14. Science & Technology - 2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    System Manager Jay Ayers mount the Kirkpatrick-Baez optic (KBO) telescoping snout on its carriage rails. This will allow it to extend to its full length when installed in a...

  15. Training & Technology Solutions Queens College ~ Office of Converging Technologies ~ Training & Technology Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson Jr.,, Ray

    Training & Technology Solutions Queens College ~ Office of Converging Technologies ~ Training & Technology Solutions 718-997-4875 ~ training@qc.cuny.edu ~ I-Bldg 214 Advisor Center Navigation: Login #12;Training & Technology Solutions Queens College ~ Office of Converging Technologies ~ Training

  16. Burrow fractal dimension and foraging success in subterranean rodents: a simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burrow fractal dimension and foraging success in subterranean rodents: a simulation S. C. Le Comber. Fractal dimension, which describes how a burrow explores the surrounding area in a way that is independent assumed that burrows of high fractal dimension will be associated with greater foraging success, this has

  17. Fractal dimension unscreened angles measured for radial viscous fingering Olivier Praud Harry Swinney

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin. University of

    Fractal dimension unscreened angles measured for radial viscous fingering Olivier Praud Harry, USA #Received November 2004; published July 2005# have examined fractal patterns formed injection experiments. fractal dimension D 0 of pattern large r / 1.70±0.02. Further, generalized dimensions D pattern

  18. Co-dimension-two Grazing Bifurcations in Single-degree-of-freedom Impact Oscillators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Xiaopeng

    Co-dimension-two Grazing Bifurcations in Single-degree-of-freedom Impact Oscillators Phanikrishna paper, the transition be- tween two characteristically different co-dimension-one grazing bifurcation scenarios is found to be associated with the presence of certain co-dimension-two graz- ing bifurcation

  19. DETERMINING THE FRACTAL DIMENSION OF A TIME SERIES WITH A NEURAL NET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    DETERMINING THE FRACTAL DIMENSION OF A TIME SERIES WITH A NEURAL NET MARK J. EMBRECHTS AND YARON and require expert interaction for interpreting the calculated fractal dimension. Artificial neural nets (ANN) offer a fast and elegant way to estimate the fractal dimension of a time series. A backpropagation net

  20. Utilities Inspection Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Messock, R. K.

    Preventive and predictive maintenance programs are enhanced by using various inspection technologies to detect problems and potential failures before catastrophic failure. This paper discusses successful inspection technologies that have been...

  1. Technology Readiness Assessment Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Guide assists individuals and teams involved in conducting Technology Readiness Assessments (TRAs) and developing Technology Maturation Plans (TMPs) for the DOE capital asset projects subject to DOE O 413.3B. Cancels DOE G 413.3-4.

  2. UNIVERSITY of STRATHCLYDE TECHNOLOGY &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mottram, Nigel

    electricity networks and distribution systems, through to using smart grid technologies for more effective of dynamic collaborations delivering productive outcomes. #12;#12;LOW CARBON POWER AND ENERGY FUTURE CITIES Advanced Manufacturing Future Cities Health Technologies Working collaboratively, programmes within

  3. A Statistical Study of the Relationship between the Solar Cycle Length and TreeRing Index

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Statistical Study of the Relationship between the Solar Cycle Length and Tree­Ring Index Values, 450052, China 2 Armagh Observatory, College Hill, Armagh BT61 9DG, N. Ireland Abstract We have determined of the solar cycle length on climate with a reasonable degree of confidence. We find that the data confirm

  4. EFFECTS OF SAMPLE SIZE ON CHARACTERIZATION OF WOOD-PARTICLE LENGTH DISTRIBUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EFFECTS OF SAMPLE SIZE ON CHARACTERIZATION OF WOOD-PARTICLE LENGTH DISTRIBUTION Quang V. Cao of sample size on fitting length distribution of wood particles used for manufacturing wood-based composites moments and the ability of the sample distributions to characterize the population represented

  5. On Loewy lengths of blocks (joint work with S. Koshitani and B. Klshammer)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    On Loewy lengths of blocks (joint work with S. Koshitani and B. Külshammer) Benjamin Sambale, FSU Jena March 26, 2013 Benjamin Sambale On Loewy lengths of blocks #12;Notation G ­ finite group p ­ prime number F ­ algebraically closed field of characteristic p B ­ block of FG J(B) ­ Jacobson radical of B

  6. Evaluation of Largemouth Bass Slot Length Limits in South Dakota Waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IY5~p: SOUTH DAKOTA ----.--) o o ~o Evaluation of Largemouth Bass Slot Length Limits in South Dakota Waters Department of Game, Fish and Parks Wildlife Division Foss Building Pierre. South Dakota 67601.3182 Completion Report No. 93-13 #12;Evaluation of Largemouth Bass Slot Length Limits in South

  7. Variable length pattern coding for power reduction in off-chip data buses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venkitasubramanian Iyer, Jayakrishnan

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    indicating the index of the match is sent. If a variable length pattern match occurs then the code and unmatched portion of data is sent. We implemented our scheme, Variable Length Pattern Coding (VLPC) for various integer and floating point benchmarks...

  8. Impact of Interconnect Length on BTI and HCI Induced Frequency Degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Chris H.

    Impact of Interconnect Length on BTI and HCI Induced Frequency Degradation Xiaofei Wang Pulkit Jain Instability (BTI) and Hot Carrier Injection (HCI) induced frequency degradation on interconnect length has degradation due to BTI decreases monotonically with longer wires because of the shorter effective stress time

  9. VALVE: Variable Length Value Encoder for Off-Chip Data Buses. Dinesh C. Suresh, Banit Agrawal*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najjar, Walid A.

    VALVE: Variable Length Value Encoder for Off-Chip Data Buses. Dinesh C. Suresh, Banit Agrawal (VALVE) technique to reduce the power consumption in the off-chip data buses. While past research has proposed scheme is capable of detecting and encoding variable length bit patterns in the data values. VALVE

  10. Surface Free Energies, Interfacial Tensions and Correlation Lengths of the ABF Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pearce, Paul A.

    Surface Free Energies, Interfacial Tensions and Correlation Lengths of the ABF Models David L. O. Abstract The surface free energies, interfacial tensions and correlation lengths of the Andrews been established there are various quan- tities of physical interest, such as the surface free energies

  11. SPIN-DEPENDENT SCATTERING LENGTHS OF SLOW NEUTRONS WITH NUCLEI BY PSEUDOMAGNETIC MEASUREMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    L-263 SPIN-DEPENDENT SCATTERING LENGTHS OF SLOW NEUTRONS WITH NUCLEI BY PSEUDOMAGNETIC MEASUREMENTS vu par les noyaux. Abstract. - The spin-dependent scattering length of slow neutrons by the nuclei 23 can be of practical importance in many thermal neutron scattering experiments. A new method, called

  12. Scanning microscopy using a short-focal-length Fresnel zone plate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scanning microscopy using a short-focal-length Fresnel zone plate Ethan Schonbrun,* Winnie N. Ye demonstrate a form of scanning microscopy using a short-focal-length Fresnel zone plate and a low-NA relay. In this scheme, parallel scanning microscopy using a Fresnel zone-plate array would require only a single spatial

  13. The Distribution of Loop Lengths in Graphical Models for Turbo Decoding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smyth, Padhraic

    1 The Distribution of Loop Lengths in Graphical Models for Turbo Decoding Xianping Ge, David model for a K = 6, N = 12, rate 1=2 turbo code. Abstract| This paper analyzes the distribution of loop lengths in graphical models for turbo decoding. The prop- erties of such loops are of signi#12;cant

  14. TESLA-FEL 2004-01 Silica Aerogel Radiators for Bunch Length

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TESLA-FEL 2004-01 Silica Aerogel Radiators for Bunch Length Measurements J. B¨ahr a , V. Djordjadze aerogel are used to measure the electron bunch length at the photo injector test facility at DESY Zeuthen by the usage of aerogel is calculated analytically and Monte Carlo simulations are performed. It is shown

  15. Video Description Length Guided Constant Quality Video Coding with Bitrate Constraint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomkins, Andrew

    Video Description Length Guided Constant Quality Video Coding with Bitrate Constraint Lei Yang propose a new video encoding strategy -- Video description length guided Constant Quality video coding with Bitrate Constraint (V-CQBC), for large scale video transcoding systems of video charing websites

  16. 2014 Annual Merit Review, Vehicle Technologies Office - 08 Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    -1 8. Technology Integration The Technology Integration subprogram accelerates the adoption and use of alternative fuel and advanced technology vehicles to help meet national...

  17. DOE Vehicle Technologies Program 2009 Merit Review Report - Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Integration and Education DOE Vehicle Technologies Program 2009 Merit Review Report - Technology Integration and Education Merit review of DOE Vehicle Technologies Program research...

  18. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2013 Fuel and Lubricant Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel and Lubricant Technologies R&D Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2013 Fuel and Lubricant Technologies R&D Annual Progress Report This report describes the...

  19. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Oak Ridge Transportation Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Oak Ridge Transportation Technology Program Annual Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Oak Ridge Transportation Technology Program Annual Report ornlttpreportfy08.pdf More...

  20. Does Doctrine Drive Technology or Does Technology Drive Doctrine?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blasko, Dennis

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Brief No. 4 September 2010 Does Doctrine Drive Technology orDoes Technology Drive Doctrine? Dennis Blasko Summary Wthat emphasizes strategy over technology and may hold some

  1. Technology Innovations and Experience Curves for Nitrogen Oxides Control Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeh, Sonia; Rubin, Edward S.; Taylor, Margaret R.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    including issues of technology and cost un- certainties, areon NO x Control Technologies and Cost Effectiveness forand other factors on technology cost trends (hence, the

  2. Technology Integration Overview

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Identify chronic vehicle or infrastructure field problems * Incident investigations (technology failures) * Capture lessons learned and develop best practices Technical & Problem...

  3. States & Emerging Energy Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation, given through the DOE's Technical Assitance Program (TAP), provides information on States & Emerging Energy Technologies.

  4. Deployment of Emerging Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers the FUPWG Deployment of Emerging Technologies. Presented by Brad Gustafson, Department of Energy, held on November 1, 2006.

  5. Photovoltaic Technology Incubator Awards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This factsheet gives an overview of the Photovoltaic (PV) Technology Incubator Awards and the Solar America Initiative (SAI).

  6. Assessing Fatigue and Ultimate Load Uncertainty in Floating Offshore Wind Turbines Due to Varying Simulation Length

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, G.; Lackner, M.; Haid, L.; Matha, D.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the push towards siting wind turbines farther offshore due to higher wind quality and less visibility, floating offshore wind turbines, which can be located in deep water, are becoming an economically attractive option. The International Electrotechnical Commission's (IEC) 61400-3 design standard covers fixed-bottom offshore wind turbines, but there are a number of new research questions that need to be answered to modify these standards so that they are applicable to floating wind turbines. One issue is the appropriate simulation length needed for floating turbines. This paper will discuss the results from a study assessing the impact of simulation length on the ultimate and fatigue loads of the structure, and will address uncertainties associated with changing the simulation length for the analyzed floating platform. Recommendations of required simulation length based on load uncertainty will be made and compared to current simulation length requirements.

  7. Web Technology (elective package)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franssen, Michael

    Web Technology (elective package) Offered by: Department of Mathematics and Computer Science? Computer Science-based approaches and enabling technologies for the web. Course descriptions Human and efficient. Web Technology The web has become the major source of information retrieval and is playing

  8. SPACE TECHNOLOGY Actual Estimate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SPACE TECHNOLOGY TECH-1 Actual Estimate Budget Authority (in $ millions) FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013 FY.7 247.0 Exploration Technology Development 144.6 189.9 202.0 215.5 215.7 214.5 216.5 Notional SPACE TECHNOLOGY OVERVIEW .............................. TECH- 2 SBIR AND STTR

  9. Department of Science, Technology, &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    Developing Leaders of Innovation Department of Science, Technology, & Society #12;Understanding the relationship between technology and society is crucial to becoming a successful leader in any field. #12;Our Students The University of Virginia Department of Science, Technology, and Society offers a comprehensive

  10. Technology Forecasting Scenario Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technology Forecasting and Scenario Development Newsletter No. 2 October 1998 Systems Analysis was initiated on the establishment of a new research programme entitled Technology Forecasting and Scenario and commercial applica- tion of new technology. An international Scientific Advisory Panel has been set up

  11. New Technology Demonstration Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Technology Demonstration Program Technical Brief FEMPFederal Energy Management Program Tom for saving energy in refrigerated walk-in coolers, and to evaluate the potential for this technology in Federal facilities. The focus of this study was on a single manufacturer of the technology, Nevada Energy

  12. Technology Advertising Contact Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Richard

    Overview #12;Technology Advertising Contact Information Alex Sheath 8596 4063 asheath Overview Our online Technology section is geared towards an IT professional environment, reaching a range of technology enthusiasts from every day gadget consumers to business decision makers where enterprise solutions

  13. Science, technology and innovation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussex, University of

    Science, technology and innovation Taught degrees MSc in Innovation and Sustainability for International Development 1 year full time/2 years part time Technological innovation lies at the heart in the academic and political circles related to the impact of science, technology and innovation in the context

  14. University Libraries Technology Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Paul A.

    Libraries Bowling Green State University #12;Table of Contents Introduction ..................................................................19 Page 2 of 19 Technology Plan, 2003-2005 University Libraries Bowling Green State University #12University Libraries Technology Plan 2003-2005 Page 1 of 19 Technology Plan, 2003-2005 University

  15. Microsoft Technology Centers Novosibirsk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasayya, Vivek

    -depth knowledge of Microsoft products and technologies ensure that you benefit from development best practices discovery, tailored product and technology drill-downs, and expert presentations. It culminates practices, and risk analysis to chief technology officers, architects, and senior members of your

  16. Microsoft Technology Centers Philadelphia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasayya, Vivek

    -depth knowledge of Microsoft products and technologies ensure that you benefit from development best practices discovery, tailored product and technology drill-downs, and expert presentations. It culminates practices, and risk analysis to chief technology officers, architects, and senior members of your

  17. Microsoft Technology Centers Minneapolis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, Galen

    -depth knowledge of Microsoft products and technologies ensure that you benefit from development best practices discovery, tailored product and technology drill-downs, and expert presentations. It culminates practices, and risk analysis to chief technology officers, architects, and senior members of your

  18. Cosmology in One Dimension: Fractal Geometry, Power Spectra and Correlation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruce N. Miller; Jean-Louis Rouet

    2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Concentrations of matter, such as galaxies and galactic clusters, originated as very small density fluctuations in the early universe. The existence of galaxy clusters and super-clusters suggests that a natural scale for the matter distribution may not exist. A point of controversy is whether the distribution is fractal and, if so, over what range of scales. One-dimensional models demonstrate that the important dynamics for cluster formation occur in the position-velocity plane. Here the development of scaling behavior and multifractal geometry is investigated for a family of one-dimensional models for three different, scale-free, initial conditions. The methodology employed includes: 1) The derivation of explicit solutions for the gravitational potential and field for a one-dimensional system with periodic boundary conditions (Ewald sums for one dimension); 2) The development of a procedure for obtaining scale-free initial conditions for the growing mode in phase space for an arbitrary power-law index; 3) The evaluation of power spectra, correlation functions, and generalized fractal dimensions at different stages of the system evolution. It is shown that a simple analytic representation of the power spectra captures the main features of the evolution, including the correct time dependence of the crossover from the linear to nonlinear regime and the transition from regular to fractal geometry. A possible physical mechanism for understanding the self-similar evolution is introduced. It is shown that hierarchical cluster formation depends both on the model and the initial power spectrum. Under special circumstances a simple relation between the power spectrum, correlation function, and correlation dimension in the highly nonlinear regime is confirmed.

  19. Enabling technologies and constraints for software sharing in large astronomy projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liske, Jochen

    deliverables of a software development lifecycle: requirements, specifications and design, software componentsEnabling technologies and constraints for software sharing in large astronomy projects Gianluca dimensions that might be involved in sharing and re-using observatory software (e.g. components, design

  20. Science, technology and innovation in a 21st century John H. Marburger III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    the marketplace. The innovators who built the World Wide Web on the foundation of the Internet were particle of markets and an essential dimension of innovation. And as the example of the World Wide Web shows, need for this special issue. It is published posthumously. Linking the words ``science,'' ``technology

  1. Base-contact proximity effects in bipolar transistors with nitride-spacer technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technische Universiteit Delft

    -lithographic dimensions. For example, in the double polysilicon bipolar transistor, spacers are used to separate the baseBase-contact proximity effects in bipolar transistors with nitride-spacer technology Henk van Zeijl-BJT's with spacer separated Al/Si emitter and base contacts are fabricated and characterized. Due to the proximity

  2. Method of forming cavitated objects of controlled dimension

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, P.R.; Miller, W.J.

    1981-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed of controllably varying the dimensions of cavitated objects such as hollow spherical shells wherein a precursor shell is heated to a temperature above the shell softening temperature in an ambient atmosphere wherein the ratio of gases which are permeable through the shell wall at that temperature to gases which are impermeable through the shell wall is substantially greater than the corresponding ratio for gases contained within the precursor shell. As the shell expands, the partial pressures of permeable gases internally and externally of the shell approach and achieve equilibrium, so that the final shell size depends solely upon the difference in impermeable gas partial pressures and shell surface tension.

  3. Fractal Dimensions for Continuous Time Random Walk Limits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark M. Meerschaert; Erkan Nane; Yimin Xiao

    2011-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In a continuous time random walk (CTRW), each random jump follows a random waiting time. CTRW scaling limits are time-changed processes that model anomalous diffusion. The outer process describes particle jumps, and the non-Markovian inner process (or time change) accounts for waiting times between jumps. This paper studies fractal properties of the sample functions of a time-changed process, and establishes some general results on the Hausdorff and packing dimensions of its range and graph. Then those results are applied to CTRW scaling limits.

  4. Model Independence in Two Dimensions and Polarized Cold Dipolar Molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volosniev, A. G.; Fedorov, D. V.; Jensen, A. S.; Zinner, N. T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)

    2011-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the energy and wave functions of two particles confined to two spatial dimensions interacting via arbitrary anisotropic potentials with negative or zero net volume. The general rigorous analytic expressions are given in the weak coupling limit where universality or model independence are approached. The monopole part of anisotropic potentials is crucial in the universal limit. We illustrate the universality with a system of two arbitrarily polarized cold dipolar molecules in a bilayer. We discuss the transition to universality as a function of polarization and binding energy and compare analytic and numerical results obtained by the stochastic variational method. The universal limit is essentially reached for experimentally accessible strengths.

  5. Compton Scattering at the NLC and Large Extra Dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hooman Davoudiasl

    1999-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We study Compton scattering, gamma e -> gamma e, in the context of the recent proposal for Weak Scale Quantum Gravity (WSQG) with large extra dimensions. It is shown that, with an ultraviolet cutoff $M_S \\sim 1$ TeV for the effective gravity theory, the cross section for this process at the Next Linear Collider (NLC) deviates from the prediction of the Standard Model significantly. Our results suggest that, for typical proposed NLC energies and luminosities, WSQG can be tested in the range 4 TeV$\\lsim M_S \\lsim$ 16 TeV, making gamma e -> gamma e an important test channel.

  6. Radion stabilization from the vacuum on flat extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santos, Eli [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Apartado Postal 55-534, C. P. 09340 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Secretaria Academica de Fisica y Matematicas, Fac. de Ingenieria, Universidad Autonoma de Chiapas, Calle 4a. Oriente, Norte 1428, 29000 Tuxtla Gutierrez, Chiapas (Mexico); Perez-Lorenzana, A. [Departamento de Fisica, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del I.P.N., Apartado Postal 14-740, 07000, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Pimentel, Luis O. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Apartado Postal 55-534, C. P. 09340 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume stabilization in models with flat extra dimensions could follow from vacuum energy residing in the bulk when translational invariance is spontaneously broken. We study a simple toy model that exemplifies this mechanism which considers a massive scalar field with nontrivial boundary conditions at the end points of the compact space, and includes contributions from brane and bulk cosmological constants. We perform our analysis in the conformal frame where the radion field, associated with volume variations, is defined, and present a general strategy for building stabilization potentials out of those ingredients. We also provide working examples for the interval and the T{sup n}/Z{sub 2} orbifold configuration.

  7. Statistical Mechanics of Kinks in (1+1)-Dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francis J. Alexander; Salman Habib

    1992-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the thermal equilibrium properties of kinks in a classical $\\phi^4$ field theory in $1+1$ dimensions. The distribution function, kink density, and correlation function are determined from large scale simulations. A dilute gas description of kinks is shown to be valid below a characteristic temperature. A double Gaussian approximation to evaluate the eigenvalues of the transfer operator enables us to extend the theoretical analysis to higher temperatures where the dilute gas approximation fails. This approach accurately predicts the temperature at which the kink description breaks down.

  8. Search for universal extra dimensions in ppbar collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; /Dubna, JINR; Abbott, Braden Keim; /Oklahoma U.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; /Tata Inst.; Adams, Mark Raymond; /Illinois U., Chicago; Adams, Todd; /Florida State U.; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; /Dubna, JINR; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; /St. Petersburg, INP; Alton, Andrew K.; /Michigan U. /Augustana Coll., Sioux Falls; Alverson, George O.; /Northeastern U.; Aoki, Masato; /Fermilab; Askew, Andrew Warren; /Florida State U. /Stockholm U.

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a search for Kaluza-Klein (KK) particles predicted by models with universal extra dimensions (UED) using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 7.3 fb{sup -1}, collected by the D0 detector at a p{bar p} center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The decay chain of KK particles can lead to a final state with two muons of the same charge. This signature is used to set a lower limit on the compactification scale of R{sup -1} > 260 GeV in a minimal UED model.

  9. Zero point energy on extra dimensions: Noncommutative torus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fabi, S.; Harms, B.; Karatheodoris, G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Alabama, Box 870324, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487-0324 (United States)

    2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we calculate the zero point energy density experienced by observers on M{sup 4} due to a massless scalar field defined throughout M{sup 4}xT{sub F}{sup 2}, where T{sub F}{sup 2} are fuzzy extra dimensions. Using the Green's function approach we calculate the energy density for the commutative torus and the fuzzy torus. We also calculate the energy density for the fuzzy torus using the Hamiltonian approach. Agreement is shown between the Green's function and Hamiltonian approaches.

  10. The Running coupling BFKL anomalous dimensions and splitting functions.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thorne, Robert S

    2 2 + 30.72?Ż50? ) . (2.36) 14 This contribution to the splitting function for t = 6 and is shown in fig. 6.a. Note that because of the truncation of GE(N, t), beyond 6th order the expression for PLOgg (?, ?s(Q2)) is not what one would really get... .K. Abstract I explicitly calculate the anomalous dimensions and splitting functions governing the Q2 evolu- tion of the parton densities and structure functions which result from the running coupling BFKL equation at LO, i.e. I perform a resummation in powers...

  11. Near field optical probe for critical dimension measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stallard, B.R.; Kaushik, S.

    1999-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A resonant planar optical waveguide probe for measuring critical dimensions on an object in the range of 100 nm and below is disclosed. The optical waveguide includes a central resonant cavity flanked by Bragg reflector layers with input and output means at either end. Light is supplied by a narrow bandwidth laser source. Light resonating in the cavity creates an evanescent electrical field. The object with the structures to be measured is translated past the resonant cavity. The refractive index contrasts presented by the structures perturb the field and cause variations in the intensity of the light in the cavity. The topography of the structures is determined from these variations. 8 figs.

  12. Method of forming cavitated objects of controlled dimension

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Paul R. (Toledo, OH); Miller, Wayne J. (Ann Arbor, MI)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of controllably varying the dimensions of cavitated objects such as hollow spherical shells wherein a precursor shell is heated to a temperature above the shell softening temperature in an ambient atmosphere wherein the ratio of gases which are permeable through the shell wall at that temperature to gases which are impermeable through the shell wall is substantially greater than the corresponding ratio for gases contained within the precursor shell. As the shell expands, the partial pressures of permeable gases internally and externally of the shell approach and achieve equilibrium, so that the final shell size depends solely upon the difference in impermeable gas partial pressures and shell surface tension.

  13. Technology Innovation Program | Partnerships | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Innovation Program SHARE Technology Innovation Program The Technology Innovation Program (TIP) is a 1-year program designed to accelerate selected technologies to commercial...

  14. Sandia National Laboratories: Vehicle Technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EfficiencyVehicle Technologies Vehicle Technologies Combustion Research Facility (CRF) Vehicle Technology programs at Sandia share a common goal: reducing dependence on...

  15. Chevron, GE form Technology Alliance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    form Technology Alliance February 3, 2014 HOUSTON, TX, Feb. 3, 2014-Chevron Energy Technology Company and GE Oil & Gas announced today the creation of the Chevron GE Technology...

  16. Renewable Energy Technologies | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Technologies Renewable Energy Technologies Renewable Energy Technologies State, local, and tribal governments can harness renewable energy technologies from natural sources-...

  17. Environmental Technology Verification of Mobile Sources Control...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environmental Technology Verification of Mobile Sources Control Technologies Environmental Technology Verification of Mobile Sources Control Technologies 2005 Diesel Engine...

  18. Technology reviews: Glazing systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuman, J.; Rubinstein, F.; Papamichael, K.; Beltran, L.; Lee, E.S.; Selkowitz, S.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a representative review of existing, emerging, and future technology options in each of five hardware and systems areas in envelope and lighting technologies: lighting systems, glazing systems, shading systems, daylighting optical systems, and dynamic curtain wall systems. The term technology is used here to describe any design choice for energy efficiency, ranging from individual components to more complex systems to general design strategies. The purpose of this task is to characterize the state of the art in envelope and lighting technologies in order to identify those with promise for advanced integrated systems, with an emphasis on California commercial buildings. For each technology category, the following activities have been attempted to the extent possible: Identify key performance characteristics and criteria for each technology; determine the performance range of available technologies; identify the most promising technologies and promising trends in technology advances; examine market forces and market trends; and develop a continuously growing in-house database to be used throughout the project. A variety of information sources have been used in these technology characterizations, including miscellaneous periodicals, manufacturer catalogs and cut sheets, other research documents, and data from previous computer simulations. We include these different sources in order to best show the type and variety of data available, however publication here does not imply our guarantee of these data. Within each category, several broad classes are identified, and within each class we examine the generic individual technologies that fag into that class.

  19. Technology reviews: Shading systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuman, J.; Rubinstein, F.; Papamichael, K.; Beltran, L.; Lee, E.S.; Selkowitz, S.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a representative review of existing, emerging, and future technology options in each of five hardware and systems areas in envelope and lighting technologies: lighting systems, glazing systems, shading systems, daylighting optical systems, and dynamic curtain wall systems. The term technology is used here to describe any design choice for energy efficiency, ranging from individual components to more complex systems to general design strategies. The purpose of this task is to characterize the state of the art in envelope and lighting technologies in order to identify those with promise for advanced integrated systems, with an emphasis on California commercial buildings. For each technology category, the following activities have been attempted to the extent possible: Identify key performance characteristics and criteria for each technology. Determine the performance range of available technologies. Identify the most promising technologies and promising trends in technology advances. Examine market forces and market trends. Develop a continuously growing in-house database to be used throughout the project. A variety of information sources have been used in these technology characterizations, including miscellaneous periodicals, manufacturer catalogs and cut sheets, other research documents, and data from previous computer simulations. We include these different sources in order to best show the type and variety of data available, however publication here does not imply our guarantee of these data. Within each category, several broad classes are identified, and within each class we examine the generic individual technologies that fall into that class.

  20. Scaling study for SP-100 reactor technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, A.C.; McKissock, B. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA); National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH (USA). Lewis Research Center)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, we explored several ways of extending SP-100 reactor technology to higher power levels. One approach was to use the reference SP-100 pin design and increase the fuel pin length and the number of fuel pins as needed to provide higher capability. The impact on scaling of a modified and advanced SP-100 reactor technology was also explored. Finally, the effect of using alternative power conversion subsystems, with SP-100 reactor technology was investigated. One of the principal concerns for any space-based system is mass; consequently, this study focused on estimating reactor, shield, and total system mass. The RSMASS code (Marshall 1986) was used to estimate reactor and shield mass. Simple algorithms developed at NASA Lewis Research Center were used to estimate the balance of system mass. Power ranges from 100 kWe to 10 MWe were explored assuming both one year and seven years of operation. Thermoelectric, Stirling, Rankine, and Brayton power conversion systems were investigated. The impact on safety, reliability, and other system attributes, caused by extending the technology to higher power levels, was also investigated. 6 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Development of Reconstitution Technology for Surveillance Specimens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yasushi Atago; Shunichi Hatano; Eiichiro Otsuka [Japan Power Engineering and Inspection Corporation, KDX Shibadaimon Bldg. 3FL., 10-12, 2-chome Shiba-daimon, Minato-ku, Tokyo, 105-0012 (Japan)

    2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Japan Power Engineering and Inspection Corporation (JAPEIC) has been carrying out the project titled 'Nuclear Power Plant Integrated Management Technology (PLIM)' consigned by Japanese Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) since 1996FY as a 10-years project. As one of the project themes, development of reconstitution technology for reactor pressure vessel (RPV/RV) surveillance specimens, which are installed in RPVs to monitor the neutron irradiation embrittlement on RPV/RV materials, is now on being carried out to deal with the long-term operation of nuclear power plants. The target of this theme is to establish the technical standard for applicability of reconstituted surveillance specimens including the reconstitution of the Charpy specimens and Compact Tension (CT) specimens. With the Charpy specimen reconstitution, application of 10 mm length inserts is used, which enables the conversion of tests from the LT-direction to the TL-direction. This paper presents the basic data from Charpy and CT specimens of RPV materials using the surveillance specimens obtained for un-irradiated materials including the following. 1) Reconstitution Technology of Charpy Specimens. a) The interaction between plastic zone and Heat Affected Zone (HAZ). b) The effects of the possible deviations from the standard specimens for the reconstituted specimens. 2) Reconstitution Technology of CT specimens. a) The correlation between fracture toughness and plastic zone width. Because the project is now in progress, this paper describes the outline of the results obtained as of the end of 2000 FY. (authors)

  2. Explicit Supersymmetry Breaking on Boundaries of Warped Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Lawrence J.; Nomura, Yasunori; Okui, Takemichi; Oliver, Steven J.

    2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Explicit supersymmetry breaking is studied in higher dimensional theories by having boundaries respect only a subgroup of the bulk symmetry. If the boundary symmetry is the maximal subgroup allowed by the boundary conditions imposed on the fields, then the symmetry can be consistently gauged; otherwise gauging leads to an inconsistent theory. In a warped fifth dimension, an explicit breaking of all bulk supersymmetries by the boundaries is found to be inconsistent with gauging; unlike the case of flat 5D, complete supersymmetry breaking by boundary conditions is not consistent with supergravity. Despite this result, the low energy effective theory resulting from boundary supersymmetry breaking becomes consistent in the limit where gravity decouples, and such models are explored in the hope that some way of successfully incorporating gravity can be found. A warped constrained standard model leads to a theory with one Higgs boson with mass expected close to the experimental limit. A unified theory in a warped fifth dimension is studied with boundary breaking of both SU(5) gauge symmetry and supersymmetry. The usual supersymmetric predictionfor gauge coupling unification holds even though the TeV spectrum is quite unlike the MSSM. Such a theory may unify matter and Higgs in the same SU(5) hypermultiplet.

  3. Black holes with gravitational hair in higher dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anabalon, Andres [Departamento de Ciencias Facultad de Artes Liberales, Facultad de Ingenieria y Ciencias, Universidad Adolfo Ibanez, Vina Del Mar (Chile); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Albert-Einstein-Institut, Am Muehlenberg 1 D-14476 Golm (Germany); Canfora, Fabrizio [Centro de Estudios Cientificos (CECS), Casilla 1469 Valdivia (Chile); Giacomini, Alex; Oliva, Julio [Instituto de Ciencias Fisicas y Matematicas, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia (Chile)

    2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new class of vacuum black holes for the most general gravity theory leading to second order field equations in the metric in even dimensions is presented. These space-times are locally anti-de Sitter in the asymptotic region, and are characterized by a continuous parameter that does not enter in the conserve charges, nor it can be reabsorbed by a coordinate transformation: it is therefore a purely gravitational hair. The black holes are constructed as a warped product of a two-dimensional space-time, which resembles the r-t plane of the Banados-Teitelboim-Zanelli black hole, times a warp factor multiplying the metric of a D-2-dimensional Euclidean base manifold, which is restricted by a scalar equation. It is shown that all the Noether charges vanish. Furthermore, this is consistent with the Euclidean action approach: even though the black hole has a finite temperature, both the entropy and the mass vanish. Interesting examples of base manifolds are given in eight dimensions which are products of Thurston geometries, giving then a nontrivial topology to the black hole horizon. The possibility of introducing a torsional hair for these solutions is also discussed.

  4. FEASIBILITY STUDY OF PRESSURE PULSING PIPELINE UNPLUGGING TECHNOLOGIES FOR HANFORD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Servin, M. A. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Richland, WA (United States); Garfield, J. S. [AEM Consulting, LLC (United States); Golcar, G. R. [AEM Consulting, LLC (United States)

    2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to unplug key waste transfer routes is generally essential for successful tank farms operations. All transfer lines run the risk of plugging but the cross site transfer line poses increased risk due to its longer length. The loss of a transfer route needed to support the waste feed delivery mission impacts the cost and schedule of the Hanford clean up mission. This report addresses the engineering feasibility for two pressure pulse technologies, which are similar in concept, for pipeline unplugging.

  5. Strategic Technology JET PROPULSION LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waliser, Duane E.

    Strategic Technology Directions JET PROPULSION LABORATORY National Aeronautics and Space Administration 2 0 0 9 #12;© 2009 California Institute of Technology. Government sponsorship acknowledged. #12;Strategic Technology Directions 2009 offers a distillation of technologies, their links to space missions

  6. IIT SCHOOL OF APPLIED TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT IIT SCHOOL OF APPLIED TECHNOLOGY PREPARING SKILLED INDIVIDUALS, INDUSTRIAL FACILITIES, SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT, SUSTAINABILITY AND MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY. #12;BE ONE to assess, implement, and utilize current technologies, and to learn how to manage industrial operations

  7. Solar Energy Resources and Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Solar energy provides electricity, heating, and cooling for Federal facilities through four primary technology types. The four technologies are broken into two categories; technologies for electricity production and thermal energy technologies.

  8. Microscopic calculation of the spin-dependent neutron scattering lengths on 3He

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. M. Hofmann; G. M. Hale

    2003-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the spin.dependent neutron scattering length on 3He from a microscopic calculation of p-3H, n-3He, and d-2H scattering employing the Argonne v18 nucleon-nucleon potential with and without additional three-nucleon force. The results and that of a comprehensive R-matrix analysis are compared to a recent measurement. The overall agreement for the scattering lengths is quite good. The imaginary parts of the scattering lengths are very sensitive to the inclusion of three-nucleon forces, whereas the real parts are almost insensitive.

  9. A Bunch Length Monitor for JLab 12 GeV Upgrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmad, Mahmoud Mohamad Ali [ODU; Freyberger, Arne P. [JLAB; Gubeli, Joseph F. [JLAB; Krafft, Geoffrey A. [JLAB

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A continuous non-invasive bunch length monitor for the 12 GeV upgrade of Jefferson Lab will be used to determine the bunch length of the beam. The measurement will be done at the fourth dipole of the injector chicane at 123 MeV using the coherent synchrotron light emitted from the dipole. The estimated bunch length is 333 fs. A vacuum chamber will be fabricated and a Radiabeam real time interferometer will be used. In this paper, background, the estimated calculations and the construction of the chamber will be discussed.

  10. The effect of stride length alterations on running efficiency in beginning runners 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James, Jerry Lynn

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    summary table for caloric cost 2 Descriptive statistics for caloric cost 3 Duncan's New Nultiple Range Test for Stride Length 18 20 LIST OF FIGURES F1gure Page l The eff1cient range of a runner 2 The relat1ve roles of Stride Rate and Stride... Length in velocity changes 3 A two-by-three (sex-by-stride length) repeated measures design 4 A bar chart of the caloric cost means of SL-A, SL-B, and SL-C w1thout distinction between sexes l7 22 5 A bar chart of the caloric cost means of each...

  11. Technology transfer 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document, Technology Transfer 94, is intended to communicate that there are many opportunities available to US industry and academic institutions to work with DOE and its laboratories and facilities in the vital activity of improving technology transfer to meet national needs. It has seven major sections: Introduction, Technology Transfer Activities, Access to Laboratories and Facilities, Laboratories and Facilities, DOE Office, Technologies, and an Index. Technology Transfer Activities highlights DOE`s recent developments in technology transfer and describes plans for the future. Access to Laboratories and Facilities describes the many avenues for cooperative interaction between DOE laboratories or facilities and industry, academia, and other government agencies. Laboratories and Facilities profiles the DOE laboratories and facilities involved in technology transfer and presents information on their missions, programs, expertise, facilities, and equipment, along with data on whom to contact for additional information on technology transfer. DOE Offices summarizes the major research and development programs within DOE. It also contains information on how to access DOE scientific and technical information. Technologies provides descriptions of some of the new technologies developed at DOE laboratories and facilities.

  12. Analysis to determine the maximum dimensions of flexible apertures in sensored security netting products.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murton, Mark; Bouchier, Francis A.; vanDongen, Dale T.; Mack, Thomas Kimball; Cutler, Robert Paul; Ross, Michael P.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although technological advances provide new capabilities to increase the robustness of security systems, they also potentially introduce new vulnerabilities. New capability sometimes requires new performance requirements. This paper outlines an approach to establishing a key performance requirement for an emerging intrusion detection sensor: the sensored net. Throughout the security industry, the commonly adopted standard for maximum opening size through barriers is a requirement based on square inches-typically 96 square inches. Unlike standard rigid opening, the dimensions of a flexible aperture are not fixed, but variable and conformable. It is demonstrably simple for a human intruder to move through a 96-square-inch opening that is conformable to the human body. The longstanding 96-square-inch requirement itself, though firmly embedded in policy and best practice, lacks a documented empirical basis. This analysis concluded that the traditional 96-square-inch standard for openings is insufficient for flexible openings that are conformable to the human body. Instead, a circumference standard is recommended for these newer types of sensored barriers. The recommended maximum circumference for a flexible opening should be no more than 26 inches, as measured on the inside of the netting material.

  13. First working group meeting on the minority carrier diffusion length/lifetime measurement: Results of the round robin lifetime/diffusion length tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cudzinovic, M.; Sopori, B. [comp.] [comp.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As was noted in the cover letter that accompanied the samples, the eleven bare silicon samples were from various manufacturers. Table I lists the codes for the samples and the manufacturer of each sample. It also notes if the sample was single or poly-crystalline. The samples had been polished on one side before being sent out for measurements, but no further processing was done. The participants of the study were asked to measure either the lifetime or diffusion length of each of the samples using their standard procedure. Table II shows the experimental conditions used by the groups who measured diffusion length. All the diffusion length measurements were performed using the Surface Photovoltage method (SPV). Table M shows the experimental conditions for the lifetime measurements. All the lifetime measurements were made using the Photoconductance Decay method (PCD) under low level injection. These tables show the diameter of the spot size used during the measurement (the effective sampling area), the locations where measurements were taken, and the number of measurements taken at each location. Table N shows the results of the measurements. The table is divided into diffusion length and lifetime measurements for each sample. The values listed are the average values reported by each group. One of the immediate artifacts seen in the data is the large variation in the lifetime measurements. The values from MIT and Mobil are generally close. However, the measurements from NCSU are typically an order of magnitude lower.

  14. ADVANCED RECIPROCATING COMPRESSION TECHNOLOGY (ARCT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danny M. Deffenbaugh; Klaus Brun; Ralph E. Harris; J. Pete Harrell; Robert J. Mckee; J. Jeffrey Moore; Steven J. Svedeman; Anthony J. Smalley; Eugene L. Broerman; Robert A Hart; Marybeth G. Nored; Ryan S. Gernentz; Shane P. Siebenaler

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. natural gas pipeline industry is facing the twin challenges of increased flexibility and capacity expansion. To meet these challenges, the industry requires improved choices in gas compression to address new construction and enhancement of the currently installed infrastructure. The current fleet of installed reciprocating compression is primarily slow-speed integral machines. Most new reciprocating compression is and will be large, high-speed separable units. The major challenges with the fleet of slow-speed integral machines are: limited flexibility and a large range in performance. In an attempt to increase flexibility, many operators are choosing to single-act cylinders, which are causing reduced reliability and integrity. While the best performing units in the fleet exhibit thermal efficiencies between 90% and 92%, the low performers are running down to 50% with the mean at about 80%. The major cause for this large disparity is due to installation losses in the pulsation control system. In the better performers, the losses are about evenly split between installation losses and valve losses. The major challenges for high-speed machines are: cylinder nozzle pulsations, mechanical vibrations due to cylinder stretch, short valve life, and low thermal performance. To shift nozzle pulsation to higher orders, nozzles are shortened, and to dampen the amplitudes, orifices are added. The shortened nozzles result in mechanical coupling with the cylinder, thereby, causing increased vibration due to the cylinder stretch mode. Valve life is even shorter than for slow speeds and can be on the order of a few months. The thermal efficiency is 10% to 15% lower than slow-speed equipment with the best performance in the 75% to 80% range. The goal of this advanced reciprocating compression program is to develop the technology for both high speed and low speed compression that will expand unit flexibility, increase thermal efficiency, and increase reliability and integrity. Retrofit technologies that address the challenges of slow-speed integral compression are: (1) optimum turndown using a combination of speed and clearance with single-acting operation as a last resort; (2) if single-acting is required, implement infinite length nozzles to address nozzle pulsation and tunable side branch absorbers for 1x lateral pulsations; and (3) advanced valves, either the semi-active plate valve or the passive rotary valve, to extend valve life to three years with half the pressure drop. This next generation of slow-speed compression should attain 95% efficiency, a three-year valve life, and expanded turndown. New equipment technologies that address the challenges of large-horsepower, high-speed compression are: (1) optimum turndown with unit speed; (2) tapered nozzles to effectively reduce nozzle pulsation with half the pressure drop and minimization of mechanical cylinder stretch induced vibrations; (3) tunable side branch absorber or higher-order filter bottle to address lateral piping pulsations over the entire extended speed range with minimal pressure drop; and (4) semi-active plate valves or passive rotary valves to extend valve life with half the pressure drop. This next generation of large-horsepower, high-speed compression should attain 90% efficiency, a two-year valve life, 50% turndown, and less than 0.75 IPS vibration. This program has generated proof-of-concept technologies with the potential to meet these ambitious goals. Full development of these identified technologies is underway. The GMRC has committed to pursue the most promising enabling technologies for their industry.

  15. Geothermal innovative technologies catalog

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenkeremath, D. (ed.)

    1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technology items in this report were selected on the basis of technological readiness and applicability to current technology transfer thrusts. The items include technologies that are considered to be within 2 to 3 years of being transferred. While the catalog does not profess to be entirely complete, it does represent an initial attempt at archiving innovative geothermal technologies with ample room for additions as they occur. The catalog itself is divided into five major functional areas: Exploration; Drilling, Well Completion, and Reservoir Production; Materials and Brine Chemistry; Direct Use; and Economics. Within these major divisions are sub-categories identifying specific types of technological advances: Hardware; Software; Data Base; Process/Procedure; Test Facility; and Handbook.

  16. Fabrication and Testing of Full-Length Single-Cell Externally Fueled Converters for Thermionic Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schock, Alfred

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Paper presented at the 29th IECEC in Monterey, CA in August 1994. The present paper describes the fabrication and testing of full-length prototypcial converters, both unfueled and fueled, and presents parametric results of electrically heated tests.

  17. Korean ESL learners' pragmatic competence: motivation, amount of contact, and length of residence 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahn, Soo Jin

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examined the motivation for learning English, the amount of contact with English, and length of residence in the target language area that affects Korean graduate students’ English pragmatic skills studying at Texas A&M University...

  18. Length regulation of microtubules by molecular motors: Exact solution and density profiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arita, Chikashi; Santen, Ludger

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we study a microtubule (MT) model , whose length is regulated by the action of processive kinesin motors. We treat the case of infinite processivity, i.e. particle exchange in the bulk is neglected. The exact results can be obtained for model parameters which correspond to a finite length of the MT. In contrast to the model with particle exchange we find that the lengths of the MT are exponentially distributed in this parameter regime. The remaining parameter space of the model, which corresponds to diverging MT lengths, is analyzed by means of extensive Monte-Carlo simulations and a macroscopic approach. For divergent MTs we find a complex structure of the phase diagram in terms of shapes of the density profile.

  19. Reinforcement Learning for Active Length Control and Hysteresis Characterization of Shape Memory Alloys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirkpatrick, Kenton C.

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Shape Memory Alloy actuators can be used for morphing, or shape change, by controlling their temperature, which is effectively done by applying a voltage difference across their length. Control of these actuators requires determination...

  20. An evaluation of inductance loop detector lead length and optimal speed trap distance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamm, Robert Alan

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Lead lengths were evaluated with five different design vehicles (large and small passenger cars, a pickup truck, a motorcycle, and a high profile truck) with several detector units. Both passenger cars and the pickup truck were always detected with 4000...

  1. FAIR MATCHING ALGORITHM: FIXED-LENGTH FRAME SCHEDULING IN ALL-PHOTONIC NETWORKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FAIR MATCHING ALGORITHM: FIXED-LENGTH FRAME SCHEDULING IN ALL-PHOTONIC NETWORKS Nahid Saberi email:nahid.saberi@mail.mcgill.ca, coates@ece.mcgill.ca Abstract Internal switches in all

  2. Impact of carbon nanotube length on electron transport in aligned carbon nanotube networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jeonyoon

    Here, we quantify the electron transport properties of aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) networks as a function of the CNT length, where the electrical conductivities may be tuned by up to 10× with anisotropies exceeding 40%. ...

  3. Fresnel zone effects in the scattering of sound by cylinders of various lengths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanton, Tim

    Fresnel zone effects in the scattering of sound by cylinders of various lengths DanielT. Di-source/point-receivercombination.Numerically evaluatingthisexpressionshowedthescatteringcharacteristicstobedominatedbyFresnel zoneeffects·scillationsin thebackscatterversuslengthcurvecausedbyconstructiveand

  4. Telomere Length in Circulating Leukocytes Is Associated with Lung Function and Disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nyholt, Dale R.

    Telomere Length in Circulating Leukocytes Is Associated with Lung Function and Disease Eva Albrecht. Comprehensive Pneumology Center Munich (CPC-M), Member of the German Center for Lung Research, Munich, Germany

  5. Digital Sensor Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ted Quinn; Jerry Mauck; Richard Bockhorst; Ken Thomas

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nuclear industry has been slow to incorporate digital sensor technology into nuclear plant designs due to concerns with digital qualification issues. However, the benefits of digital sensor technology for nuclear plant instrumentation are substantial in terms of accuracy, reliability, availability, and maintainability. This report demonstrates these benefits in direct comparisons of digital and analog sensor applications. It also addresses the qualification issues that must be addressed in the application of digital sensor technology.

  6. Technology Innovation Program 2010ANNUAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technology Innovation Program 2010ANNUAL REPORT 2010ANNUAL REPORT Technology Innovation ProgramTechnology Innovation ProgramTechnology Innovation ProgramTechnology Innovation ProgramTechnology Innovation ProgramTechnology Innovation ProgramTechnology Innovation ProgramTechnology Innovation ProgramTechnology Innovation ProgramTechnology

  7. Viscosity of plant oils as a function of temperature, fatty acid chain length, and unsaturation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neo, Tong Heng

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1988 Major Subject: Agricultural Engineering VISCOSITY OF PLANT OILS AS A FUNCTION OF TEMPERATURE, FATTY ACID CHAIN LENGTH, AND UNSATURATION A Thesis by TONG HENG NEO Approved as to style and content by...: Vincent E. Sweat (Chairman of Committee) Ron L. Richter (Member) R. Engler (Member) Edward A. Hiler (Head of the Department) December 1988 ABSTRACT Viscosity of Plant Oils as a Function of Temperature, Fatty Acid Chain Length, and Unsaturation...

  8. Hook Length Formulas for Trees by Han's Expansion William Y.C. Chen1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Bill

    to unifications of the hook length formulas due to Du and Liu, Han, Gessel and Seo, and Postnikov. Keywords: hook as unifications of the formulas due to Du and Liu [3], Han [6, 7, 8], Gessel and Seo [5]. Let us give a quick given by Chen and Yang [2], and Seo [13]. Hook length formulas have been found for k-ary trees, plane

  9. Bunch length measurement at the Fermilab A0 photoinjector using a Martin-Puplett interferometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thurman-Keup, Randy; Fliller, Raymond Patrick; Kazakevich, Grigory; /Fermilab

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present preliminary measurements of the electron bunch lengths at the Fermilab A0 Photoinjector using a Martin-Puplett interferometer on loan from DESY. The photoinjector provides a relatively wide range of bunch lengths through laser pulse width adjustment and compression of the beam using a magnetic chicane. We present comparisons of data with simulations that account for diffraction distortions in the signal and discuss future plans for improving the measurement.

  10. Can one extract the pi-neutron scattering length from pi-deuteron scattering?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Nogga; C. Hanhart

    2005-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We give a prove of evidence that the original power counting by Weinberg can be applied to estimate the contributions of the operators contributing to the pi-deuteron scattering length. As a consequence, pi-deuteron observables can be used to extract neutron amplitudes--in case of pi-deuteron scattering this means that the pi-neutron scattering length can be extracted with high accuracy. This result is at variance with recent claims. We discuss the origin of this difference.

  11. Additive Manufacturing Technology Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    market by industrial companies, 58 including the Electro Optical Systems (EOS) in Germany, Arcam in Sweden, MCP Tooling Technologies in 59 the UK, and Stratasys, 3D Systems,...

  12. States & Emerging Energy Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    States & Emerging Energy Technologies August 15, 2013 DOE's State and Local Technical Assistance Program 2 DOE's Technical Assistance Program * Strategic Energy Planning * Program...

  13. 2015 Technology Innovation Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for RTU and Lighting Retrofits Energy Efficiency TIP 140: Energy Efficiency Emerging Technology Assessment and Demonstration Projects TIP 261: Determining and Improving the...

  14. Geothermal Resources and Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides a brief overview of geothermal energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply geothermal systems within the Federal sector.

  15. Lighting Technology Panel

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers the Lighting Technology Panel for the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting, held on November 18-19, 2009. 

  16. Climate Vision: Technology Pathways

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Cement Chemical Manufacturing Electric Power Forest Products Iron and Steel Mining Oil and Gas Technology Pathways The DOE's Industries of the Future process helps...

  17. Technology Integration Overview

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    -Technology Integration Overview - Dennis A. Smith Connie Bezanson U. S. Department of Energy Headquarters Office - Washington, D.C. May 2013 Project ID: TI000 2013 Department of...

  18. Flexible Assembly Solar Technology

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy, Inc. All rights reserved. 3 About BrightSource Energy We develop and build solar thermal projects using our own central tower technology Headquartered in...

  19. Science, Technology & Engineering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to lead LANL Science, Technology & Engineering directorate August 17, 2012 LOS ALAMOS, NEW MEXICO, August 17, 2012-Los Alamos National Laboratory Director Charles McMillan...

  20. Genome Science/Technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    McDonald Bioscience Communications Email State-of-the art technology and extensive genomics expertise Protein research Read caption + Los Alamos National Laboratory graduate...

  1. Solar Energy Technologies Office

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2011, the Energy Department's Solar Energy Technologies Office (SETO) became the SunShot Initiative, a collaborative national effort that aggressively drives innovation to make solar energy...

  2. Director, Geothermal Technologies Office

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The mission of the Geothermal Technologies Office (GTO) is to accelerate the development and deployment of clean, domestic geothermal resources that will promote a stronger, more productive economy...

  3. Flexible Assembly Solar Technology

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    field and secured on steel pylons. PROJECT DESCRIPTION The research team is applying automation processes to the design of a Flexible Assembly Solar Technology (FAST). FAST is an...

  4. Carbon Fiber Technology Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    conventional and alternative precursors to carbon fiber Advance high-volume composite design and manufacturing capabilities Transition technology to industry partners...

  5. Upgrading through Preprocessing Technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Upgrading through Preprocessing Technologies The challenges of efficiently converting raw biomass into usable, affordable, customized bioenergy feedstdocks are many. The bioenergy...

  6. Arc Position Sensing Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    arc remelting (VAR) furnaces for industries that use specialty metals such as nickel, titanium, and zirconium. The technology could be used to help produce materials with stronger...

  7. Mobile Technology Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2013-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The directive will ensure that federal organizations and employees within the Department can use mobile technology to support mission requirements in a safe and secure manner.

  8. Advanced Propulsion Technology Strategy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Alternative Sources) Hydrogen Time ADVANCED PROPULSION TECHNOLOGY STRATEGY DOWNSIZED TURBO GAS ENGINE CHEVROLET CRUZE 1.4L TURBO ECOTEC Downsized SIDI Turbo Boosting HCCI -...

  9. Technology Demonstration Partnership Policy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This City Council memorandum establishes a framework for engaging in and evaluating demonstration partnerships with the goal of developing, testing, and demonstrating emerging technologies, product, and service innovations.

  10. Navy Technology Evaluation Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers the Navy Technology Evaluation update at the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting, held on November 18-19, 2009.

  11. HVAC Maintenance and Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers the HVAC maintenance and technologies, and is given at the Spring 2010 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting in Providence, Rhode Island.

  12. Photovoltaic Resources and Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides a brief overview of photovoltaic (PV) technologies supplemented by specific information to apply PV within the Federal sector.

  13. ENERGY EFFICIENCY TECHNOLOGY ROADMAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to involve more explicit alignment with BPA's newest demand-side roadmap resource, the Demand Response Technology Roadmap. 1 Roadmap chapters have been arranged in stand-alone...

  14. Deformations of infrared-conformal theories in two dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oscar Akerlund; Philippe de Forcrand

    2014-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We study two exactly solvable two-dimensional conformal models, the critical Ising model and the Sommerfield model, on the lattice. We show that finite-size effects are important and depend on the aspect ratio of the lattice. In particular, we demonstrate how to obtain the correct massless behavior from an infinite tower of finite-size-induced masses and show that it is necessary to first take the cylindrical geometry limit in order to get correct results. In the Sommerfield model we also introduce a mass deformation to measure the mass anomalous dimension, $\\gamma_m$. We find that the explicit scale breaking of the lattice setup induces corrections which must be taken into account in order to reproduce $\\gamma_m$ at the infrared fixed point. These results can be used to improve the methodology in the search for the conformal window in QCD-like theories with many flavors.

  15. Brane solutions of a spherical sigma model in six dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hyun Min Lee; Antonios Papazoglou

    2004-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore solutions of six dimensional gravity coupled to a non-linear sigma model, in the presence of co-dimension two branes. We investigate the compactifications induced by a spherical scalar manifold and analyze the conditions under which they are of finite volume and singularity free. We discuss the issue of single-valuedness of the scalar fields and provide some special embedding of the scalar manifold to the internal space which solves this problem. These brane solutions furnish some self-tuning features, however they do not provide a satisfactory explanation of the vanishing of the effective four dimensional cosmological constant. We discuss the properties of this model in relation with the self-tuning example based on a hyperbolic sigma model.

  16. Decay of Graviton Condensates and their Generalizations in Arbitrary Dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florian Kuhnel; Bo Sundborg

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Classicalons are self-bound classical field configurations, which include black holes in General Relativity. In quantum theory, they are described by condensates of many soft quanta. In this work, their decay properties are studied in arbitrary dimensions. It is found that generically the decays of other classicalons are enhanced compared to pure graviton condensates, ie. black holes. The evaporation of higher dimensional graviton condensates turns out to match Hawking radiation solely due to non-linearites captured by the classicalon picture. Although less stable than black holes, all self-bound condensates are shown to be stable in the limit of large mass. Like for black holes, the effective coupling always scales as the inverse of the number of constituents, indicating that these systems are at critical points of quantum phase transitions. Consequences for cosmology, astro- and collider physics are briefly discussed.

  17. Inhomogeneous Cooling of the Rough Granular Gas in Two Dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudhir N. Pathak; Dibyendu Das; R. Rajesh

    2014-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the inhomogeneous clustered regime of a freely cooling granular gas of rough particles in two dimensions using large-scale event driven simulations and scaling arguments. During collisions, rough particles dissipate energy in both the normal and tangential directions of collision. In the inhomogeneous regime, translational kinetic energy and the rotational energy decay with time $t$ as power-laws $t^{-\\theta_T}$ and $t^{-\\theta_R}$. We numerically determine $\\theta_T \\approx 1$ and $\\theta_R \\approx 1.6$, independent of the coefficients of restitution. The inhomogeneous regime of the granular gas has been argued to be describable by the ballistic aggregation problem, where particles coalesce on contact. Using scaling arguments, we predict $\\theta_T=1$ and $\\theta_R=1$ for ballistic aggregation, $\\theta_R$ being different from that obtained for the rough granular gas. Simulations of ballistic aggregation with rotational degrees of freedom are consistent with these exponents.

  18. Accident at Three Mile Island: the human dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sills, D.L.; Wolf, C.P.; Shelanski, V.B. (eds.)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 19 chapters, divided according to the following Parts: (1) Public Perceptions of Nuclear Energy; (2) Local Responses to Nuclear Plants; (3) Institutional Responsibilities for Nuclear Energy; (4) The Interaction of Social and Technical Systems; and (5) Implications for Public Policy. All of the abstracts will appear in Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA); three will appear in Energy Research Abstracts (ERA). At the request of the President's Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island (the Kemeny Commission), the Social Science Research Council commissioned social scientists to write a series of papers on the human dimensions of the event. This volume includes those papers, in revised and expanded form, and a comprehensive bibliography of published and unpublished social science research on the accident and its aftermath.

  19. Conserved Quasilocal Quantities and General Covariant Theories in Two Dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Kummer; P. Widerin

    1995-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    General matterless--theories in 1+1 dimensions include dilaton gravity, Yang--Mills theory as well as non--Einsteinian gravity with dynamical torsion and higher power gravity, and even models of spherically symmetric d = 4 General Relativity. Their recent identification as special cases of 'Poisson--sigma--models' with simple general solution in an arbitrary gauge, allows a comprehensive discussion of the relation between the known absolutely conserved quantities in all those cases and Noether charges, resp. notions of quasilocal 'energy--momentum'. In contrast to Noether like quantities, quasilocal energy definitions require some sort of 'asymptotics' to allow an interpretation as a (gauge--independent) observable. Dilaton gravitation, although a little different in detail, shares this property with the other cases. We also present a simple generalization of the absolute conservation law for the case of interactions with matter of any type.

  20. Massive "spin-2" theories in arbitrary $D \\ge 3$ dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Dalmazi; A. L. R. dos Santos; E. L. Mendonça

    2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Here we show that in arbitrary dimensions $D\\ge 3$ there are two families of second order Lagrangians describing massive "spin-2" particles via a nonsymmetric rank-2 tensor. They differ from the usual Fierz-Pauli theory in general. At zero mass one of the families is Weyl invariant. Such massless theory has no particle content in $D=3$ and gives rise, via master action, to a dual higher order (in derivatives) description of massive spin-2 particles in $D=3$ where both the second and the fourth order terms are Weyl invariant, contrary to the linearized New Massive Gravity. However, only the fourth order term is invariant under arbitrary antisymmetric shifts. Consequently, the antisymmetric part of the tensor $e_{[\\mu\